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Sample records for wavelength dispersive x-ray

  1. A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Nordlund, Dennis; Tran, Rosalie; Montanez, Paul; Delor, James; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive hard x-ray spectrometer with high-energy resolution and large solid angle collection is described. The instrument is specifically designed for time-resolved applications of x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and x-ray Raman scattering (XRS) at X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL) and synchrotron radiation facilities. It also simplifies resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) studies of the whole 2d RIXS plane. The spectrometer is based on the Von Hamos geometry. This dispersive setup enables an XES or XRS spectrum to be measured in a single-shot mode, overcoming the scanning needs of the Rowland circle spectrometers. In conjunction with the XFEL temporal profile and high-flux, it is a powerful tool for studying the dynamics of time-dependent systems. Photo-induced processes and fast catalytic reaction kinetics, ranging from femtoseconds to milliseconds, will be resolvable in a wide array of systems circumventing radiation damage. PMID:22852678

  2. Wavelength dispersive analysis with the synchrotron x ray fluorescence microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, M. L.; Thorn, K. S.; Sutton, S. R.; Jones, K. W.; Bajt, S.

    1993-01-01

    A wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) was tested on the synchrotron x ray fluorescence microprobe at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Compared to WDS spectra using an electron microprobe, the synchrotron WDS spectra have much better sensitivity and, due to the absence of bremsstrahlung radiation, lower backgrounds. The WDS spectrometer was successfully used to resolve REE L fluorescence spectra from standard glasses and transition metal K fluorescence spectra from kamacite.

  3. Decomposition of Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Rémond, Guy; Myklebust, Robert; Fialin, Michel; Nockolds, Clive; Phillips, Matthew; Roques-Carmes, Claude

    2002-01-01

    Line shapes of atomic lines and soft x-ray emission bands measured with a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) with the Electron Probe Micro Analyzer (EPMA) are reviewed. Least square fitting to pseudo-Voigt profiles of the digitally measured spectra are used to account for the presence of non-diagram features (high and low energy satellites) and instrumental induced distortions. The effect of line width and relative intensities on the quality of fits is illustrated. Spectral distortions resulting from the presence of absorption edges within the analyzed wavelength region are illustrated for the case of FeLα,β emission bands for pure Fe and iron oxides. For quantitative analysis, an analytical approach is presented where the measured soft x-ray emission bands are corrected for self absorption before extracting the intensities from the experimental data. PMID:27446750

  4. Optimization of Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometry Analysis Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Stephen J. B.

    2002-01-01

    In setting up the conditions for quantitative wavelength-dispersive electron microprobe analysis a number of parameters have to be defined for each element, namely accelerating voltage, beam current, and (for each element) x-ray line, spectrometer crystal, pulse-height analyser settings, background offsets, and counting times for peak and background. The choices made affect both the reliability of the results and the time taken to obtain a complete analysis. It is difficult for even an experienced user to arrive at the optimum set of conditions for any particular application, in view of the large number of interacting factors involved. Furthermore, optimum choices of some parameters are dependent not only on the concentration of the element concerned (for example, counting times) but also the concentrations of other elements which may have peaks that interfere with peak and/or background measurements, requiring alternative selections of x-ray line or spectrometer crystal. The various factors involved in arriving at an optimum routine and practical possibilities for computer-aided optimization are discussed here.

  5. Detection limits for actinides in a monochromatic, wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Michael L; Havrilla, George J

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments in x-ray optics have made it possible to examine the L x-rays of actinides using doubly-curved crystals in a bench-top device. A doubly-curved crystal (DCC) acts as a focusing monochromatic filter for polychromatic x-rays. A Monochromatic, Wavelength-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (MWDXRF) instrument that uses DCCs to measure Cm and Pu in reprocessing plant liquors was proposed in 2007 by the authors at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A prototype design of this MWDXRF instrument was developed in collaboration with X-ray Optical Systems Inc. (XOS), of East Greenbush, New York. In the MWDXRF instrument, x-rays from a Rhodium-anode x-ray tube are passed through a primary DCC to produce a monochromatic beam of 20.2-keV photons. This beam is focused on a specimen that may contain actinides. The 20.2-keV interrogating beam is just above the L3 edge of Californium; each actinide (with Z = 90 to 98) present in the specimen emits characteristic L x-rays as the result of L3-shell vacancies. In the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRf, these x-rays enter a secondary DCC optic that preferentially passes 14.961-keV photons, corresponding to the L-alpha-1 x-ray peak of Curium. In the present stage of experimentation, Curium-bearing specimens have not been analyzed with the prototype MWDXRF instrument. Surrogate materials for Curium include Rubidium, which has a K-beta-l x-ray at 14.961 keV, and Yttrium, which has a K-alpha-1 x-ray at 14.958 keV. In this paper, the lower limit of detection for Curium in the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRF instrument is estimated. The basis for this estimate is described, including a description of computational models and benchmarking techniques used. Detection limits for other actinides are considered, as well as future safeguards applications for MWDXRF instrumentation.

  6. High gain, Fast Scan, Broad Spectrum Parallel Beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for SEM

    SciTech Connect

    OHara, David

    2009-05-08

    During contract # DE-FG02-ER83545, Parallax Research, Inc. developed a High gain, Fast Scan Broad Spectrum Parallel beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for use on Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEM). This new spectrometer allows very fast high resolution elemental analysis of samples in an electron microscope. By comparison to previous WDS spectrometers, it can change from one energy position to another very quickly and has an extended range compared to some similar products.

  7. Wavelength dispersing devices for soft and ultrasoft x-ray spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Tomoya; Ryon, R.W.; Shoji, Takashi

    1984-01-01

    Monochromatization combining total reflection by a selected mirror and an appropriate filter offered an alternative approach in order to increase measurable intensity with reasonable spectral resolution. Recently, the use of synthetic multilayers, which are prepared by sputter/evaporation techniques, has been introduced for the detection of soft and ultrasoft x-rays. Studies on the use of these new wavelength dispersing devices have been conducted and it has been found that the reflectivity of these devices is very high compared with single crystals and soap multilayers and that their resolving power is fairly good. This report makes comparisons regarding efficiency of reflection, resolving power and x-ray analytical problems for practical applications among long spacing single crystals, soap multilayers, total reflection combined with a selected mirror and filtering and synthetic multilayers. The x-ray analytical capablities are shown based upon a standard x-ray fluorescence spectrometer equipped with a sealed-off x-ray tube and a gas flow proportional counter with thin film detector window.

  8. Monochromatic wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence providing sensitive and selective detection of uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Havrilla, George J; Collins, Michael L; Montoya, Velma M; Chen, Zewu; Wei, Fuzhong

    2010-01-01

    Monochromatic wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (MWDXRF) is a sensitive and selective method for elemental compositional analyses. The basis for this instrumental advance is the doubly curved crystal (DCC) optic. Previous work has demonstrated the feasibility of sensitive trace element detection for yttrium as a surrogate for curium in aqueous solutions. Additional measurements have demonstrated similar sensitivity in several different matrix environments which attests to the selectivity of the DCC optic as well as the capabilities of the MWDXRF concept. The objective of this effort is to develop an improved Pu characterization method for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The MWDXRF prototype instrument is the second step in a multi-year effort to achieve an improved Pu assay. This work will describe a prototype MWDXRF instrument designed for uranium detection and characterization. The prototype consists of an X-ray tube with a rhodium anode and a DCC excitation optic incorporated into the source. The DCC optic passes the RhK{alpha} line at 20.214 keV for monochromatic excitation of the sample. The source is capable of 50 W power at 50 kV and 1.0 mA operation. The x-ray emission from the sample is collected by a DCC optic set at the UL{alpha} line of 13.613 keV. The collection optic transmits the UL{alpha} x-rays to the silicon drift detector. The x-ray source, sample, collection optic and detector are all mounted on motion controlled stages for the critical alignment of these components. The sensitivity and selectivity of the instrument is obtained through the monochromatic excitation and the monochromatic detection. The prototype instrument performance has a demonstrated for sensitivity for uranium detection of around 2 ppm at the current state of development. Further improvement in sensitivity is expected with more detailed alignment.

  9. Toward chromium speciation in solids using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry Cr Kβ lines.

    PubMed

    Malherbe, J; Claverie, F

    2013-04-22

    The determination of chromium speciation in solid samples is critical for environmental and industrial purposes. Several analytical methods exist to perform such a determination either directly in solid state or liquid state after an extraction step, each of them having some limitations. In this study, the use of a high-resolution wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer to determine and quantify chromium species is investigated by looking at the differences in the Kβ transition profiles between Cr(0), Cr(III) and Cr(VI) compounds. Three different approaches were tested and compared to determine the Cr(VI) fraction of known mixtures: relative height and peak fitting using calibration mixtures, partial least square regression (PLS) of pure compounds, and principal component regression (PCR) of pure compounds. The accuracy of these methods was found to be about the same with an average relative error in the range of 15%. However, PLS and PCR can be easily implemented in an automated way contrary to peak fitting which can be sometimes perceived as analyst-dependant. Another advantage of using PLS and PCR is that information concerning the other oxidation states present in the sample can be retrieved. Finally, PLS and the peak height approach can be used up to 0.5% total chromium which make the XRF an alternative technique to X-ray induced photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for chromium speciation in solid state. PMID:23561904

  10. High Gain, Fast Scan, Broad Spectrum, Parallel Beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for SEM

    SciTech Connect

    David OHara; Dr. Eric Lochmer

    2003-09-12

    Parallax Research, Inc. proposes to produce a new type of x-ray spectrometer for use with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) that would have the energy resolution of WDS and the ease of use of EDS with sufficient gain for lower energies that it can be used at low beam currents as is EDS. Parallax proposes to do this by development of new multiple reflection x-ray collimation optics, new diffractor technology, new detector technology and new scan algorithms.

  11. Multielemental fast analysis of vegetation samples by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry: Possibilities and drawbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marguí, E.; Hidalgo, M.; Queralt, I.

    2005-10-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) is universally recognized as a non-destructive method for rapid and sequential, or simultaneous analysis of elemental composition of a material. The use of this technique for the direct determination of chemical elements in plant matrices has increased over the last few years. In the present study, a wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) method for the quantitative analysis of some major elements (Na, Mg, Al, P, S, K, Ca), trace elements (Mn, Fe, Co, Zn, As) and non-essential elements (Sr, Pb) in vegetation specimens has been developed. The method uses a quick and easy sample preparation procedure since only drying, pulverizing and pressing of the samples are necessary. The calibration procedure was established by employing four plant reference materials and several synthetic cellulose calibrators spiked with appropriate amounts of analytes. Matrix effects were corrected employing the method of the influence coefficients on the basis of the computerized routine program linked to the equipment. Trueness of the experimental procedure was checked by using the standard reference material GBW07602 "Bush branches and leaves". In general, good agreement was achieved between certified values and the measured ones with recoveries ranging from 94% to 107%. Moreover, quality parameters, including repeatability and reproducibility of the developed method, were also evaluated. On the whole, from results obtained, WDXRF method proposed prove to be good and effective tool for environmental investigation and quality control processes in vegetation specimens.

  12. Online analysis of sulfur in diesel line by a monochromatic wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Careta, Eduardo; López-Ramírez, Juan Antonio; Reynoso-Whitaker, Gilberto; Sánchez-Mondragon, Javier; Torres-Cisneros, Miguel

    2009-09-01

    This paper proposes the application of a monochromatic wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (MWDXRF) technique developed in the X-ray Optical Systems laboratory Inc. The technique measures low-level sulfur (uls) in fuel. Data for ultra low sulfur in diesel were collected and analyzed using the combination of the mentioned technique and the usage of engineering tools as a fastloop array and a measurement technique. This provides a qualitative method for Diesel sulfur analysis of the Refinery Ing. Antonio M Amor (RIAMA) in Salamanca, Guanajuato. The pooled limit of quantification (PLOQ) for ultra-low-sulfur diesel was found to be less than 1.5 ppm in this study. The reproducibility of 15-ppm sulfur diesel fuel was determined to be better than 3 ppm (95 % confident level). This work shows the performance of the production of Diesel with less than 15-ppm in sulfur lines in the Hydrodesulfurizer Unit of Diesel (HDD) of the refinery. Results and conclusions discusses the better and cheaper method for the production of ultra low sulfur Diesel in the refinery.

  13. Wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis using fundamental parameter approach of Catha edulis and other related plant samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaltout, Abdallah A.; Moharram, Mohammed A.; Mostafa, Nasser Y.

    2012-01-01

    This work is the first attempt to quantify trace elements in the Catha edulis plant (Khat) with a fundamental parameter approach. C. edulis is a famous drug plant in east Africa and Arabian Peninsula. We have previously confirmed that hydroxyapatite represents one of the main inorganic compounds in the leaves and stalks of C. edulis. Comparable plant leaves from basil, mint and green tea were included in the present investigation as well as trifolium leaves were included as a non-related plant. The elemental analyses of the plants were done by Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (WDXRF) spectroscopy. Standard-less quantitative WDXRF analysis was carried out based on the fundamental parameter approaches. According to the standard-less analysis algorithms, there is an essential need for an accurate determination of the amount of organic material in the sample. A new approach, based on the differential thermal analysis, was successfully used for the organic material determination. The obtained results based on this approach were in a good agreement with the commonly used methods. Depending on the developed method, quantitative analysis results of eighteen elements including; Al, Br, Ca, Cl, Cu, Fe, K, Na, Ni, Mg, Mn, P, Rb, S, Si, Sr, Ti and Zn were obtained for each plant. The results of the certified reference materials of green tea (NCSZC73014, China National Analysis Center for Iron and Steel, Beijing, China) confirmed the validity of the proposed method.

  14. Multielemental analysis of dried residue from metal-bearing waters by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, Oscar; Margui, Eva; Queralt, Ignacio

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this work was evaluation of instrumental sensitivity and detection limits for determination of elemental composition (20 different elements ranging from Na to Pb) of liquid mining samples by using conventional Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (WDXRF) instrumentation. Preconcentration of elements from liquid samples was performed by means of a simple dried residue process, and spectral evaluation was carried out by integration of the peak area (using WinQXAS/AXIL package software, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)) instead of the common net peak line intensity traditionally used in conventional WDXRF systems. With the proposed methodology, the calculated detection limits were in the µg L - 1 range (from 0.005 to 0.1 mg L - 1 level depending on the element) in all cases, which is suitable for element determination in most liquid samples involved in environmental studies such as metal mining liquid effluents. The detection limits are also below the established limits of the TCLP 1311 (United States Environmental Protection Agency (US-EPA)) and DIN 38414-S4 (German Standard legislation) procedures, which are commonly used to evaluate the leaching of metals from landfill disposal. Accuracy of the procedure was confirmed by analysis, based on the German Standard Method DIN 3814-S4, of water lixiviates from three overbank sediment samples collected in two abandoned mining areas. The attained results were compared with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) techniques, and acceptable agreement for elements with Z > 20 was found. This study highlights the possibility of using a simple methodology for analysis of liquid mining samples using the WDXRF technique, commonly employed for geochemical exploration of solid samples in environmental studies.

  15. Wavelength-dispersive total-reflection X-ray fluorescence with an efficient Johansson spectrometer and an undulator X-ray source: detection of 10-16 g-level trace metals.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Kenji; Eba, Hiromi; Inoue, Katsuaki; Yagi, Naoto

    2002-09-01

    The present paper reports significant enhancement of the detection power for total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF). The employment of an efficient wavelength-dispersive spectrometer rather than a conventional Si(Li) detector, as well as the use of a quasi-monochromatic undulator X-ray source, completely changed the quality of X-ray florescence spectra. The energy resolution is 20 times better, which effectively contributes to reducing the low-energy tail of the scattering background and to separating neighboring X-ray florescence peaks. Another advantage is its capability with respect to high-counting-rate measurements, which ensure the detection of weak signals from trace materials. The absolute and relative detection limit for nickel are 3.1 x 10(-16) g and 3.1 ppt (pg/g) for a 0.1-microL droplet of pure water, respectively, which is nearly 50 times better than the current best data achieved by conventional energy-dispersive TXRF using a Si(Li) detector system. PMID:12236366

  16. Development of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray emission spectrometers for transmission electron microscopes--an introduction of valence electron spectroscopy for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Masami; Koike, Masato; Fukushima, Kurio; Kimura, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Two types of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray spectrometers, a high-dispersion type and a conventional one, for transmission electron microscopes were constructed. Those spectrometers were used to study the electronic states of valence electrons (bonding electrons). Both spectrometers extended the acceptable energy regions to higher than 2000 eV. The best energy resolution of 0.08 eV was obtained for an Al L-emission spectrum by using the high-dispersion type spectrometer. By using the spectrometer, C K-emission of carbon allotropes, Cu L-emission of Cu(1-x)Zn(x) alloys and Pt M-emission spectra were presented. The FWHM value of 12 eV was obtained for the Pt Malpha-emission peak. The performance of the conventional one was also presented for ZnS and a section specimen of a multilayer device. W-M and Si-K emissions were clearly resolved. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has an advantage for obtaining spectra from a single crystalline specimen with a defined crystal setting. As an example of anisotropic soft X-ray emission, C K-emission spectra of single crystalline graphite with different crystal settings were presented. From the spectra, density of states of pi- and sigma-bondings were separately derived. These results demonstrated a method to analyse the electronic states of valence electrons of materials in the nanometre scale based on TEM. PMID:20371492

  17. Improved instrumental sensitivity for Cd determination in aqueous solutions using Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry, Rh-target tube instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marguí, Eva; Fontàs, Clàudia; Hidalgo, Manuela; Queralt, Ignacio

    2008-11-01

    This work was aimed at improving the instrumental sensitivity and detection limits for Cd determination in liquid samples by using conventional Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (WDXRF) instrumentation equipped with Rh-anode X-ray sources. The fact that the background is drastically reduced when using activated membranes as a preconcentration tool to collect Cd from liquid samples permits an improvement of the sensitivity compared with the direct analysis of liquid samples. Instrumental WDXRF parameters, as well as the study of Cd-K and Cd-L series spectral lines, were evaluated to select the best conditions for Cd quantitation. The Cd-L α spectral line was found to be the best choice in terms of sensitivity and repeatability. The calculated detection limit when this spectral line was used to carry out the measurements was 0.17 mg L - 1 Cd, which is suitable for Cd determination in most liquid samples involved in environmental studies.

  18. Quantification of Site-Specific Cation Exchange in Metal-Organic Frameworks Using Multi-Wavelength Anomalous X-ray Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Brozek, Carl K.; Cozzolino, Anthony F.; Teat, Simon J.; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Dinc,; #259; Mircea,

    2013-09-23

    We employed multiwavelength anomalous X-ray dispersion to determine the relative cation occupation at two crystallographically distinct metal sites in Fe2+-, Cu2+-, and Zn2+-exchanged versions of the microporous metal–organic framework (MOF) known as MnMnBTT (BTT = 1,3,5-benzenetristetrazolate). By exploiting the dispersive differences between Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn, the extent and location of cation exchange were determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data sets collected near the K edges of Mn2+ and of the substituting metal, and at a wavelength remote from either edge as a reference. Comparing the anomalous dispersion between these measurements indicated that the extent of Mn2+ replacement depends on the identity of the substituting metal. We contrasted two unique methods to analyze this data with a conventional approach and evaluated their limitations with emphasis on the general application of this method to other heterometallic MOFs, where site-specific metal identification is fundamental to tuning catalytic and physical properties.

  19. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, Peter A.

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focussing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points.

  20. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focusing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points. 3 figs.

  1. A simple method for detection of gunshot residue particles from hands, hair, face, and clothing using scanning electron microscopy/wavelength dispersive X-ray (SEM/WDX).

    PubMed

    Kage, S; Kudo, K; Kaizoji, A; Ryumoto, J; Ikeda, H; Ikeda, N

    2001-07-01

    We devised a simple and rapid method for detection of gunshot residue (GSR) particles, using scanning electron microscopy/wavelength dispersive X-ray (SEM/WDX) analysis. Experiments were done on samples containing GSR particles obtained from hands, hair, face, and clothing, using double-sided adhesive coated aluminum stubs (tape-lift method). SEM/WDX analyses for GSR were carried out in three steps: the first step was map analysis for barium (Ba) to search for GSR particles from lead styphnate primed ammunition, or tin (Sn) to search for GSR particles from mercury fulminate primed ammunition. The second step was determination of the location of GSR particles by X-ray imaging of Ba or Sn at a magnification of x 1000-2000 in the SEM, using data of map analysis, and the third step was identification of GSR particles, using WDX spectrometers. Analysis of samples from each primer of a stub took about 3 h. Practical applications were shown for utility of this method. PMID:11451063

  2. Phosphorus determination in borophosphosilicate or phosphosilicate glass films on a Si wafer by wavelength dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, H.S.; Higgins, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    In this report, peak shift effects in the SiO{sub 2}/Si(100) system due to chemical bonding are demonstrated. The detailed development of the equations appears in a paper submitted for publication in the Journal of X-ray Spectroscopy. These equations are for the spectral line intensity of Si and P from BPSG films and from the Si in the Si(100) substrate. They are subsequently integrated into two simultaneous equations that can be solved for the phosphorus content and the surface density by a computer program using iterative methods. The general expressions for the BPSG films and the computer program are also applicable to PSG films by setting the boron content to zero. The new procedure was then tested by analysis of a well-defined and carefully prepared set of PSG wafer samples. Preliminary analyses were also made on BPSG wafers. 3 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Simultaneous detection of electronic structure changes from two elements of a bifunctional catalyst using wavelength-dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy and in situ electrochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Gul, Sheraz; Ng, Jia Wei Desmond; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Anzenberg, Eitan; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Gorlin, Yelena; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zwart, Petrus H.; Zhang, Jin Z.; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Jaramillo, Thomas F.; Yano, Junko

    2015-02-25

    Multielectron catalytic reactions, such as water oxidation, nitrogen reduction, or hydrogen production in enzymes and inorganic catalysts often involve multimetallic clusters. In these systems, the reaction takes place between metals or metals and ligands to facilitate charge transfer, bond formation/breaking, substrate binding, and release of products. In this study, we present a method to detect X-ray emission signals from multiple elements simultaneously, which allows for the study of charge transfer and the sequential chemistry occurring between elements. Kβ X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) probes charge and spin states of metals as well as their ligand environment. A wavelength-dispersive spectrometer based on the von Hamos geometry was used to disperse Kβ signals of multiple elements onto a position detector, enabling an XES spectrum to be measured in a single-shot mode. This overcomes the scanning needs of the scanning spectrometers, providing data free from temporal and normalization errors and therefore ideal to follow sequential chemistry at multiple sites. We have applied this method to study MnOx-based bifunctional electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In particular, we investigated the effects of adding a secondary element, Ni, to form MnNiOx and its impact on the chemical states and catalytic activity, by tracking the redox characteristics of each element upon sweeping the electrode potential. In conclusion, the detection scheme we describe here is general and can be applied to time-resolved studies of materials consisting of multiple elements, to follow the dynamics of catalytic and electron transfer reactions.

  4. Simultaneous Detection of Electronic Structure Changes from Two Elements of a Bifunctional Catalyst Using Wavelength-Dispersive X-ray Emission Spectroscopy and in situ Electrochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Sheraz; Desmond Ng, Jia Wei; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Anzenberg, Eitan; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Gorlin, Yelena; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zwart, Petrus H.; Zhang, Jin Z.; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Jaramillo, Thomas F.; Yano, Junko

    2015-01-01

    Multielectron catalytic reactions, such as water oxidation, nitrogen reduction, or hydrogen production in enzymes and inorganic catalysts often involve multimetallic clusters. In these systems, the reaction takes place between metals or metals and ligands to facilitate charge transfer, bond formation/breaking, substrate binding, and release of products. In this study, we present a method to detect X-ray emission signals from multiple elements simultaneously, which allows for the study of charge transfer and the sequential chemistry occurring between elements. Kβ X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) probes charge and spin states of metals as well as their ligand environment. A wavelength-dispersive spectrometer based on the von Hamos geometry was used to disperse Kβ signals of multiple elements onto a position detector, enabling an XES spectrum to be measured in a single-shot mode. This overcomes the scanning needs of the scanning spectrometers, providing data free from temporal and normalization errors and therefore ideal to follow sequential chemistry at multiple sites. We have applied this method to study MnOx-based bifunctional electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In particular, we investigated the effects of adding a secondary element, Ni, to form MnNiOx and its impact on the chemical states and catalytic activity, by tracking the redox characteristics of each element upon sweeping the electrode potential. The detection scheme we describe here is general and can be applied to time-resolved studies of materials consisting of multiple elements, to follow the dynamics of catalytic and electron transfer reactions. PMID:25747045

  5. Simultaneous detection of electronic structure changes from two elements of a bifunctional catalyst using wavelength-dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy and in situ electrochemistry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gul, Sheraz; Ng, Jia Wei Desmond; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Anzenberg, Eitan; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Gorlin, Yelena; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zwart, Petrus H.; et al

    2015-02-25

    Multielectron catalytic reactions, such as water oxidation, nitrogen reduction, or hydrogen production in enzymes and inorganic catalysts often involve multimetallic clusters. In these systems, the reaction takes place between metals or metals and ligands to facilitate charge transfer, bond formation/breaking, substrate binding, and release of products. In this study, we present a method to detect X-ray emission signals from multiple elements simultaneously, which allows for the study of charge transfer and the sequential chemistry occurring between elements. Kβ X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) probes charge and spin states of metals as well as their ligand environment. A wavelength-dispersive spectrometer based onmore » the von Hamos geometry was used to disperse Kβ signals of multiple elements onto a position detector, enabling an XES spectrum to be measured in a single-shot mode. This overcomes the scanning needs of the scanning spectrometers, providing data free from temporal and normalization errors and therefore ideal to follow sequential chemistry at multiple sites. We have applied this method to study MnOx-based bifunctional electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In particular, we investigated the effects of adding a secondary element, Ni, to form MnNiOx and its impact on the chemical states and catalytic activity, by tracking the redox characteristics of each element upon sweeping the electrode potential. In conclusion, the detection scheme we describe here is general and can be applied to time-resolved studies of materials consisting of multiple elements, to follow the dynamics of catalytic and electron transfer reactions.« less

  6. Rapid quantitative determination of major and trace elements in silicate rocks and soils employing fused glass discs using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, A. Keshav; Khanna, Tarun C.; Mohan, K. Rama

    2016-08-01

    This paper introduces a calibration procedure and provides the data achieved for accuracy, precision, reproducibility and the detection limits for major (Si, Al, Fe, Mn, Mg, Ca, Na, K, Ti, P) and trace (Ba, Cr, Cu, Hf, La, Nb, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sr, Ta, Th, U, Y, Zn, Zr) elements in the routine analysis of geological and environmental samples. Forty-two rock and soil reference materials were used to calibrate and evaluate the analytical method using a sequential wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Samples were prepared as fused glass discs and analysis performed with a total measuring time of thirty-one minutes. Another set of twelve independent reference materials were analyzed for the evaluation of accuracy. The detection limits and accuracy obtained for the trace elements (1-2 mg/kg) are adequate both for geochemical exploration and environmental studies. The fitness for purpose of the results was also evaluated by the quality criteria test proposed by the International Global Geochemical Mapping Program (IGCP) from which it can be deduced that the method is adequate considering geochemical mapping application and accuracy obtained is within the expected interval of certified values in most cases.

  7. Determination of water-soluble hexavalent chromium in clinker samples by wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry after concentration in activated layers.

    PubMed

    Marguí, Eva; Fontàs, Claudia; Toribio, Marta; Guillem, Manel; Hidalgo, Manuela; Queralt, Ignacio

    2010-05-01

    The determination of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in cement-related material extracts is frequently monitored in cement industries to comply with the European Directive (2003/53/EC) that limits the use of cements containing more than 2 mg kg(-1) of water-soluble Cr(VI). In the present work, a rapid and simple method for the determination of water-soluble Cr(VI) in clinker samples has been developed. The analytical methodology is based on the combined use of a low cost Cr(VI) isolation procedure using activated layers followed by their analysis using wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometry. WDXRF instrumentation is a common tool used for determining the chemical composition of all materials involved in cement production and also for the quality control of the products produced in cement and concrete factories. Therefore, the presented methodology does not imply the use of additional instrumentation in cement-industries laboratories and can be used as a comparative method to the spectrophotometric reference (EN 196-10:2006). The analytical parameters evaluated (selectivity, limit of detection, linearity, and precision) prove to be suitable for the intended purpose, and the methodology has successfully been applied to determine water-soluble Cr(VI) in several clinker samples. PMID:20482975

  8. Speciation of inorganic arsenic in drinking water by wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry after in situ preconcentration with miniature solid-phase extraction disks.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Kenta; Inui, Tetsuo; Koike, Yuya; Aizawa, Mamoru; Nakamura, Toshihiro

    2015-03-01

    A rapid and simple method using wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometry after in situ solid-phase extraction (SPE) was developed for the speciation and evaluation of the concentration of inorganic arsenic (As) in drinking water. The method involves the simultaneous collection of As(III) and As(V) using 13 mm ϕ SPE miniature disks. The removal of Pb(2+) from the sample water was first conducted to avoid the overlapping PbLα and AsKα spectra on the XRF spectrum. To this end, a 50 mL aqueous sample (pH 5-9) was passed through an iminodiacetate chelating disk. The filtrate was adjusted to pH 2-3 with HCl, and then ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate solution was added. The solution was passed through a hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene filter placed on a Zr and Ca loaded cation-exchange disk at a flow rate of 12.5 mL min(-1) to separate As(III)-pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate complex and As(V). Each SPE disk was affixed to an acrylic plate using adhesive cellophane tape, and then examined by WDXRF spectrometry. The detection limits of As(III) and As(V) were 0.8 and 0.6 μg L(-1), respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to screening for As speciation and concentration evaluation in spring water and well water. PMID:25618730

  9. Analysis of heterogeneous gallstones using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF).

    PubMed

    Jaswal, Brij Bir S; Kumar, Vinay; Sharma, Jitendra; Rai, Pradeep K; Gondal, Mohammed A; Gondal, Bilal; Singh, Vivek K

    2016-04-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an emerging analytical technique with numerous advantages such as rapidity, multi-elemental analysis, no specific sample preparation requirements, non-destructiveness, and versatility. It has been proven to be a robust elemental analysis tool attracting interest because of being applied to a wide range of materials including biomaterials. In this paper, we have performed spectroscopic studies on gallstones which are heterogeneous in nature using LIBS and wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF) techniques. It has been observed that the presence and relative concentrations of trace elements in different kind of gallstones (cholesterol and pigment gallstones) can easily be determined using LIBS technique. From the experiments carried out on gallstones for trace elemental mapping and detection, it was found that LIBS is a robust tool for such biomedical applications. The stone samples studied in the present paper were classified using the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. WD-XRF spectroscopy has been applied for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of major and trace elements present in the gallstone which was compared with the LIBS data. The results obtained in the present paper show interesting prospects for LIBS and WD-XRF to study cholelithiasis better. PMID:26886588

  10. Determination of rare earth elements in combustion ashes from selected Polish coal mines by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoliński, Adam; Stempin, Marek; Howaniec, Natalia

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the experimental works presented in this paper was to develop a method using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (WDXRF) in order to determine the content of 16 rare earth elements (REEs) and the concentration of the said elements in 169 samples of combustion ash of coals coming from ten Polish coal mines, as well as to validate the method. It was found out that there is a clear diversity in the levels and ranges of the variability of REEs occurrence in coal ashes. The average content of cerium, lanthanum, and scandium amounts to 198.8 μg • g- 1, 76.5 μg • g- 1, and 52.4 μg • g- 1 respectively, whereas for such metals as europium, holmium, lutetium, terbium, and thulium, the average content does not exceed the level of 5 μg • g- 1 (the average content for these metals amounts to 1.2 μg • g- 1, 1.4 μg • g- 1, 0.3 μg • g- 1, 1.3 μg • g- 1, and 0.6 μg • g- 1, respectively). In addition, this paper presents an analysis of data obtained by means of hierarchical clustering analysis. Simultaneous interpretation of the dendrogram of objects (coal ash samples) and the color map of the experimental data allowed a more in-depth analysis of the relationships between the clustered coal ash samples from different coal mines and the content of the rare earth elements.

  11. Feasibility of wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for the determination of metal impurities in pharmaceutical products and dietary supplements in view of regulatory guidelines.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Alexandra; Fernandes, Tânia; Costa, Isabel Margarida; Gonçalves, Luísa; Brito, José

    2016-04-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometry for the measurement of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ir, Mn, Mo, Ni, Os, Pb, Pd, Pt, Rh, Ru and V impurities in pharmaceuticals and dietary supplements, in view of the requirements by EMA and USP for the measurement of elemental impurities in drug products and according to the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH guidelines). For that purpose, a 4 kW WDXRF spectrometer (S4 Pioneer, Bruker AXS) was used after system calibration. The linearity of the method was demonstrated by correlation coefficients in excess of 0.9 and by appropriate test of lack of fit, except for Cd, Hg, Pd, V and As, which were excluded from analysis. The calculated limits of detection and quantification were in the ranges 0.6-5.4 μg/g and 1.7-16.4 μg/g meeting defined acceptance criteria, except for Pb. The accuracy of the method, determined by the percent recovery (R) of known amounts of each element added to a selected drug, at 3 different concentration levels, was in the acceptance range 70-150% except for Os and Pt, in which case R was marginally outside that range. The repeatability of the method, assessed as the % residual standard deviation (%RSD) of 3 replicate measurements at 3 concentration levels, produced %RSD values lower than 20%, as required. These results show that the WDXRF method complies with the validation requirements defined by the European Pharmacopeia for Cu, Cr, Ir, Mn, Mo, Ni, Os, and Pt, and by the United States Pharmacopeia for Ir, Ni, Os and Pt. Therefore, it may be an alternative to the compendial analytical procedures recommended for such elements. The novelty of the present work is the application of WDXRF to final medicines and not only to active pharmaceutical ingredients and/or excipients. PMID:26845202

  12. Spatiotemporal focusing dynamics in plasmas at X-ray wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; Tibai, Z.; Hebling, J.; Mishra, S. K.

    2014-03-01

    Using a finite curvature beam, we investigate here the spatiotemporal focusing dynamics of a laser pulse in plasmas at X-ray wavelength. We trace the dependence of curvature parameter on the focusing of laser pulse and recognize that the self-focusing in plasma is more intense for the X-ray laser pulse with curved wavefront than with flat wavefront. The simulation results demonstrate that spatiotemporal focusing dynamics in plasmas can be controlled with the appropriate choice of beam-plasma parameters to explore the high intensity effects in X-ray regime.

  13. Spatiotemporal focusing dynamics in plasmas at X-ray wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, A. Tibai, Z.; Hebling, J.; Mishra, S. K.

    2014-03-15

    Using a finite curvature beam, we investigate here the spatiotemporal focusing dynamics of a laser pulse in plasmas at X-ray wavelength. We trace the dependence of curvature parameter on the focusing of laser pulse and recognize that the self-focusing in plasma is more intense for the X-ray laser pulse with curved wavefront than with flat wavefront. The simulation results demonstrate that spatiotemporal focusing dynamics in plasmas can be controlled with the appropriate choice of beam-plasma parameters to explore the high intensity effects in X-ray regime.

  14. X-ray Emission Wavelengths of Argon, Krypton, Xenon, and Curium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleykamp, H.

    1992-03-01

    The wavelengths of the L series of argon, krypton and xenon, the K series of argon, and the M series of curium were measured by means of wavelength dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The specimens for the investigations were TiC layers which had been HF sputtered under reduced argon pressure by the PVD method, krypton and xenon implanted zeolites, and a curium doped borosilicate glass. The obtained relative intensities of the X-ray emission lines were normalized to the maximum intensity of the line of the respective series

  15. Determination of major elements by wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and trace elements by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry in igneous rocks from the same fused sample (110 mg)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amosova, Alena A.; Panteeva, Svetlana V.; Chubarov, Victor M.; Finkelshtein, Alexandr L.

    2016-08-01

    The fusion technique is proposed for simultaneous determination of 35 elements from the same sample. Only 110 mg of rock sample was used to obtain fused glasses for quantitative determination of 10 major elements by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis, 16 rare earth elements and some other trace elements by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis. Fusion was performed with 1.1 g of lithium metaborate and LiBr solution as the releasing agent in platinum crucible in electric furnace at 1100 °C. The certified reference materials of ultramafic, mafic, intermediate and felsic igneous rocks have been applied to obtain the calibration curves for rock-forming oxides (Na2O, MgO, Al2O3, SiO2, P2O5, K2O, CaO, TiO2, MnO, Fe2O3) and some trace elements (Ba, Sr, Zr) determination by X-ray fluorescence analysis. The repeatability does not exceed the allowable standard deviation for a wide range of concentrations. In the most cases the relative standard deviation was less than 5%. Obtained glasses were utilized for the further determination of rare earth (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) and some other (Ba, Sr, Zr, Rb, Cs, Y, Nb, Hf, Ta, Th and U) trace elements by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis with the same certified reference materials employed. The results could mostly be accepted as satisfactory. The proposed procedure essentially reduces the expenses in comparison with separate sample preparation for inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and X-ray fluorescence analysis.

  16. Large area quantitative X-ray mapping of (U,Pu)O 2 nuclear fuel pellets using wavelength dispersive electron probe microanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brémier, S.; Haas, D.; Somers, J.; Walker, C. T.

    2003-04-01

    The work presented is an example of how large area compositional mapping (≥1 mm 2) can be used to provide quantitative information on element distribution and specimen homogeneity. High-resolution was accomplished by producing a collage of X-ray maps acquired using classical conditions; magnification ×400, spatial resolution 256×256 pixels. The individual images, each measuring roughly 250×250 μm, were converted to quantitative maps using the HIMAX® software package and the XMAS® matrix correction from SAMx. The quantitative gray-level large area X-ray picture was pieced together using the 'Multiple Image Alignment' function of the ANALYSIS® image processing software. This software was also used to convert the gray-level pictures to false color images. The specimens investigated were transverse sections of MOX fuel pellets. Results are presented for the distribution of Pu by area fraction and cumulative area fraction, the size distribution of regions of high Pu concentration and average separation of these regions.

  17. Site-specific Incorporation of 3-Iodo-L-tyrosine into Proteins and Single-wavelength Anomalous Dispersion Phasing with Soft X-ray in Protein Crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, Kazutaka; Sakamoto, Kensaku

    Iodine is a good anomalous scatter for radiations from in-house X-ray generators (Cu/CrKα). Non-natural amino acid, 3-iodo-L-tyrosine, is able to be site-specifically incorporated into proteins with amber suppresser tRNA and mutated TyrRS from M. jannaschii in the E. coli expression system. To determine the crystal structure of acetyl transferase from T. thermophilus, iodotyrosine-containing proteins were prepared and crystallized. Structure determination was successfully conducted with the protein variant with iodotyrosine at position 111. Anomalous signals from iodotyrosine with Cu/CrKα radiations were both sufficient to calculate clear electron density map. In the crystal structure, iodotyrosine did not significantly disturb the native structure.

  18. Analysis of medieval Serbian silver coins from XIV and XV century by means of wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gržetić, Ivan; Orlić, Jovana; Radić, Vesna; Radić, Milica; Ilijević, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry is known as excellent nondestructive technique for analysis of artifacts, in our case, medieval numismatic coins. Collections of 30 silver coins, owned by National Museum in Belgrade, were investigated during our research. Coins from the historical period from 1389 to 1458 belong to the reign of two Serbian rulers, Stefan Lazarević and Đurđe Branković. The aim of this study was to determine elemental composition of silver coins and to characterize alloys from which the coins were minted. The dominant elements detected in all coins were Ag, Cu, Zn and Pb. In some coins Fe, Si and S were detected as well. Results from quantitative analysis shows that the content of Ag in all investigated silver coins exceed 90%, except in two coins that were assumed to be forged. The concentration of Cu ranged from 3% to 5%, and the contents of Zn and Pb varied around 1%. Characterization of coins provided us information about raw materials and employed metallurgical processes.

  19. The use of wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence and discriminant analysis in the identification of the elemental composition of cumin samples and the determination of the country of origin.

    PubMed

    Hondrogiannis, E; Peterson, K; Zapf, C M; Roy, W; Blackney, B; Dailey, K

    2012-12-15

    Sixteen elements found in 33 cumin spice samples from China, India, Syria, and Turkey were analysed by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectroscopy using the commercially available Bruker - AXS S4 Explorer for the purpose of using the elements to discriminate among country of origin. Pellets were prepared of the samples and elemental concentrations calculated from calibration curves constructed using four National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) standards. A separate NIST tomato standard (1573a) was used as a validation check, while the WDXRF data for six of the cumin samples was further validated using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The elements measured included Ca, Mg, K, P, S, Al, Ba, Br, Cl, Fe, Na, Mn, Rb, Sr, Cu, and Zn and were detected in the range from an average mean of 4.3 mg kg(-1) for Ba up to 19223.8 mg kg(-1) for K. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine which elemental concentrations were statistically different from one another, and discriminant analysis was used to classify the cumin samples by country of origin. Using only eight elements (Ca, Mg, K, Fe, Na, Mn, Sr, and Zn) we were able to differentiate among cumin samples from four different geographic origins. Validation of the model with the validation set yielded 87.50% accuracy. Successful discrimination with just eight elements will allow for higher throughput in the screening of cumin samples using WDXRF for origin verification in less time. PMID:22980878

  20. Single atom identification by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lovejoy, T. C.; Dellby, N.; Krivanek, O. L.; Ramasse, Q. M.; Falke, M.; Kaeppel, A.; Terborg, R.; Zan, R.

    2012-04-09

    Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, single, isolated impurity atoms of silicon and platinum in monolayer and multilayer graphene are identified. Simultaneously acquired electron energy loss spectra confirm the elemental identification. Contamination difficulties are overcome by employing near-UHV sample conditions. Signal intensities agree within a factor of two with standardless estimates.

  1. Point diffraction interferometry at soft x-ray wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Sommargren, G.E.; Hostetler, R.

    1993-07-01

    To achieve the image performance necessary for soft x-ray projection lithography, interferometric testing at the design wavelength is required to accurately characterize the wavefront of the imaging system. The wavefront depends not only on the surface figure of the individual optics and on their relative alignment, but also on aperture dependent phase shifts induced by the resonant multilayer coatings on the optical surfaces. This paper describes the design and lithographic fabrication of an array of point diffraction interferometers on a silicon nitride membrane that has been over-coated with a spatially graded partially transmitting film to provide fringe contrast control. Experimental results using a visible light analogue (larger pinholes and different transmission gradient) will be shown.

  2. Ultra-short wavelength x-ray system

    DOEpatents

    Umstadter, Donald; He, Fei; Lau, Yue-Ying

    2008-01-22

    A method and apparatus to generate a beam of coherent light including x-rays or XUV by colliding a high-intensity laser pulse with an electron beam that is accelerated by a synchronized laser pulse. Applications include x-ray and EUV lithography, protein structural analysis, plasma diagnostics, x-ray diffraction, crack analysis, non-destructive testing, surface science and ultrafast science.

  3. Phase dispersion X-ray imaging of murine soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingal, V. N.; Ingal, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    The generation of phase-contrast (PC) images in the phase-dispersion introscopy (PDI) technique is the subject of this paper. Conditions for extreme sensitivity to murine soft-tissue anatomy are discussed. The unique information content and good contrast of the minutest details of anatomy, together with the high brilliance of X-ray optics, give the authors confidence that the PDI method can be successfully applied for medical diagnostics.

  4. Portable energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and X-ray diffraction and radiography system for archaeometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza Cuevas, Ariadna; Perez Gravie, Homero

    2011-03-01

    Starting on a laboratory developed portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) spectrometer; three different analytical results can be performed: analysis of chemical elements, analysis of major chemical crystalline phase and structural analysis, which represents a contribution to a new, low cost development of portable X-ray analyzer; since these results are respectively obtained with independent equipments for X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction and radiography. Detection limits of PXRF were characterized using standard reference materials for ceramics, glass, bronze and bones, which are the main materials requiring quantitative analysis in art and archeological objects. A setup for simultaneous energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and diffraction (ED (XRF-XRD)) in the reflection mode has been tested for in situ and non-destructive analysis according to the requirements of art objects inspection. The system uses a single low power X-ray tube and an X-ray energy dispersive detector to measure X-ray diffraction spectrum at a fixed angle. Application to the identification of jadeite-jade mineral in archeological objects by XRD is presented. A local high resolution radiography image obtained with the same low power X-ray tube allows for studies in painting and archeological bones.

  5. Analysis of nuclear materials by energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence and spectral effects of alpha decay

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, Christopher G

    2009-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectra collected from alpha emitters are complicated by artifacts inherent to the alpha decay process, particularly when using portable instruments. For example, {sup 239}Pu EDXRF spectra exhibit a prominent uranium L X-ray emission peak series due to sample alpha decay rather than source-induced X-ray fluorescence. A portable EDXRF instrument was used to collect spectra from plutonium, americium, and a Pu-contaminated steel sample. The plutonium sample was also analyzed by wavelength dispersive XRF to demonstrate spectral differences observed when using these very different instruments.

  6. Searching for plasmas with anomalous dispersion in the soft X-ray regime

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, J; Johnson, W R; Cheng, K T

    2007-08-24

    Over the last decade the electron density of plasmas has been measured using X-ray laser interferometers in the 14 to 47 nm wavelength regime. With the same formula used in decades of experiments with optical interferometers, the data analysis assumes the index of refraction is due only to the free electrons, which makes the index less than one. Over the last several years, interferometer experiments in C, Al, Ag, and Sn plasmas have observed plasmas with index of refraction greater than one at 14 or 47 nm and demonstrated unequivocally that the usual formula for calculating the index of refraction is not always valid as the contribution from bound electrons can dominate the free electrons in certain cases. In this paper we search for other materials with strong anomalous dispersion that could be used in X-ray laser interferometer experiments to help understand this phenomena. An average atom code is used to calculate the plasma properties. This paper discusses the calculations of anomalous dispersion in Ne and Na plasmas near 47 nm and Xe plasmas near 14 nm. With the advent of the FLASH X-ray free electron laser in Germany and the LCLS X-FEL coming online at Stanford in 2 years the average atom code will be an invaluable tool to explore plasmas at higher X-ray energy to identify potential experiments for the future. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other X-ray sources will be used to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  7. A dual-channel, focusing x-ray spectrograph with uniform dispersion for Z pinch plasmas measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Qingguo; Li Zeren; Chen Guanhua; Ye Yan; Huang Xianbin; Cai Hongchun; Li Jing; Xiao Shali

    2012-01-15

    A dual-channel, focusing x-ray spectrograph with uniform dispersion (i.e., the linear dispersion of this spectrograph is a constant) is described for measuring the x-ray spectra emission from the hot, dense Al Z pinch plasmas. The spectrograph uses double uniform-dispersed crystals (e.g., a Quartz 1010 crystal and a Mica 002 crystal) as dispersion elements and a double-film box as detector to achieve the simultaneous recording of the time integrated spectrum covering a wide spectral range of {approx}5-9 A. Since this spectrograph disperse the x-rays on the detector plane with uniform spacing for every wavelength, it needs not the calibration of the wavelength with spatial coordinate, thereby own the advantages of easiness and veracity for spectra identification. The design of this spectrograph and the example of experiment on the ''Yang'' accelerator are presented.

  8. Focal construct geometry for high intensity energy dispersive x-ray diffraction based on x-ray capillary optics.

    PubMed

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi; Jiang, Bowen; Zhu, Yu

    2016-03-14

    We presented a focal construct geometry (FCG) method for high intensity energy dispersive X-ray diffraction by utilizing a home-made ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL). The ESBC was employed to focus the X-rays from a conventional laboratory source into a small focal spot and to produce an annular X-ray beam in the far-field. Additionally, diffracted polychromatic X-rays were confocally collected by the PPXRL attached to a stationary energy-resolved detector. Our FCG method based on ESBC and PPXRL had achieved relatively high intensity diffraction peaks and effectively narrowed the diffraction peak width which was helpful in improving the potential d-spacing resolution for material phase analysis. PMID:26979685

  9. Focal construct geometry for high intensity energy dispersive x-ray diffraction based on x-ray capillary optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi; Jiang, Bowen; Zhu, Yu

    2016-03-01

    We presented a focal construct geometry (FCG) method for high intensity energy dispersive X-ray diffraction by utilizing a home-made ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL). The ESBC was employed to focus the X-rays from a conventional laboratory source into a small focal spot and to produce an annular X-ray beam in the far-field. Additionally, diffracted polychromatic X-rays were confocally collected by the PPXRL attached to a stationary energy-resolved detector. Our FCG method based on ESBC and PPXRL had achieved relatively high intensity diffraction peaks and effectively narrowed the diffraction peak width which was helpful in improving the potential d-spacing resolution for material phase analysis.

  10. Method and apparatus for molecular imaging using x-rays at resonance wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Chapline, G.F. Jr.

    Holographic x-ray images are produced representing the molecular structure of a microscopic object, such as a living cell, by directing a beam of coherent x-rays upon the object to produce scattering of the x-rays by the object, producing interference on a recording medium between the scattered x-rays from the object and unscattered coherent x-rays and thereby producing holograms on the recording surface, and establishing the wavelength of the coherent x-rays to correspond with a molecular resonance of a constituent of such object and thereby greatly improving the contrast, sensitivity and resolution of the holograms as representations of molecular structures involving such constituent. For example, the coherent x-rays may be adjusted to the molecular resonant absorption line of nitrogen at about 401.3 eV to produce holographic images featuring molecular structures involving nitrogen.

  11. Method and apparatus for molecular imaging using X-rays at resonance wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Chapline, Jr., George F.

    1985-01-01

    Holographic X-ray images are produced representing the molecular structure of a microscopic object, such as a living cell, by directing a beam of coherent X-rays upon the object to produce scattering of the X-rays by the object, producing interference on a recording medium between the scattered X-rays from the object and unscattered coherent X-rays and thereby producing holograms on the recording surface, and establishing the wavelength of the coherent X-rays to correspond with a molecular resonance of a constituent of such object and thereby greatly improving the contrast, sensitivity and resolution of the holograms as representations of molecular structures involving such constituent. For example, the coherent X-rays may be adjusted to the molecular resonant absorption line of nitrogen at about 401.3 eV to produce holographic images featuring molecular structures involving nitrogen.

  12. Measuring Performance of Energy-Dispersive X-ray Systems.

    PubMed

    Statham

    1998-11-01

    : As Si(Li) detector technology has matured, many of the fundamental problems have been addressed in the competition among manufacturers and there is now an expectation, implied by many textbooks, that all energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) detectors are made and will perform in the same way. Although there has been some convergence in Si(Li) systems and these are still the most common, manufacturing recipes still differ and there are many alternative EDX devices, such as microcalorimeters and room temperature detectors, that have both advantages and disadvantages over Si(Li). Rather than emphasizing differences in technologies, performance measures should reveal benefits relevant to the intended application. The instrument is inevitably going to be a "black box" of integrated components; this article reviews some of the methods that have been applied and introduces some new techniques that can be used to assess performance without resorting to complex software or sophisticated mathematical algorithms. Sensitivity, resolution, artefacts, and stability are discussed with particular application to compositional analysis using electron beam excitation of X-rays in the 100-eV to 10-keV energy region. PMID:10087283

  13. High Resolution, Non-Dispersive X-Ray Calorimeter Spectrometers on EBITs and Orbiting Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Frederick S.

    2010-01-01

    calorimeter spectrometer, coupled with higher spectral resolution dispersive spectrometers to resolve line blends, has enabled many science investigations, to date mostly in our x-ray laboratory astrophysics program. These include measurements of absolute cross sections for Land K shell emission from Fe and Ni, charge exchange measurements in many astrophysically abundant elements, lifetime measurements, line ratios, and wavelength measurements. In addition, we have performed many additional measurements in nuclear physics, and in support of diagnostics for laser fusion, for example. In this presentation we will give a detailed overview of x-ray calorimeter instruments in general and in our EBIT laboratory astrophysics program in particular. We will also discuss the science yield of our measurements at EBIT over the last decade) prospects for future science enabled by the current generation of spectrometers and that will be expanded in the near future by the next generation of spectrometers starting in 2611.

  14. Two (and more) sharp X-ray wavelengths in one beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrdý, J.; Hrdá, J.; Oberta, P.; Pacherová, O.

    2016-01-01

    It is proposed how to create and merge two parallel X-ray beams with different wavelengths. The proposed method is based on simultaneous diffraction on two or more different crystallographic planes of perfect single crystals. Possible applications are discussed.

  15. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical…

  16. Energy-dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy using an X-ray free-electron laser in a shot-by-shot mode

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Gildea, Richard J.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Laksmono, Hartawan; Hellmich, Julia; Glöckner, Carina; Echols, Nathaniel; Sierra, Raymond G.; Schafer, Donald W.; Sellberg, Jonas; Kenney, Christopher; Herbst, Ryan; Pines, Jack; Hart, Philip; Herrmann, Sven; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Latimer, Matthew J.; Fry, Alan R.; Messerschmidt, Marc M.; Miahnahri, Alan; Seibert, M. Marvin; Zwart, Petrus H.; White, William E.; Adams, Paul D.; Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Zouni, Athina; Messinger, Johannes; Glatzel, Pieter; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    The ultrabright femtosecond X-ray pulses provided by X-ray free-electron lasers open capabilities for studying the structure and dynamics of a wide variety of systems beyond what is possible with synchrotron sources. Recently, this “probe-before-destroy” approach has been demonstrated for atomic structure determination by serial X-ray diffraction of microcrystals. There has been the question whether a similar approach can be extended to probe the local electronic structure by X-ray spectroscopy. To address this, we have carried out femtosecond X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) at the Linac Coherent Light Source using redox-active Mn complexes. XES probes the charge and spin states as well as the ligand environment, critical for understanding the functional role of redox-active metal sites. Kβ1,3 XES spectra of MnII and Mn2III,IV complexes at room temperature were collected using a wavelength dispersive spectrometer and femtosecond X-ray pulses with an individual dose of up to >100 MGy. The spectra were found in agreement with undamaged spectra collected at low dose using synchrotron radiation. Our results demonstrate that the intact electronic structure of redox active transition metal compounds in different oxidation states can be characterized with this shot-by-shot method. This opens the door for studying the chemical dynamics of metal catalytic sites by following reactions under functional conditions. The technique can be combined with X-ray diffraction to simultaneously obtain the geometric structure of the overall protein and the local chemistry of active metal sites and is expected to prove valuable for understanding the mechanism of important metalloproteins, such as photosystem II. PMID:23129631

  17. The evolution of AGN's at x ray wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maccacaro, Tommaso; Dellaceca, R.; Gioia, I. M.; Stocke, J. T.; Wolter, A.

    1992-01-01

    The cosmological evolution and the Luminosity Function (LF) of x-ray selected Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) are discussed. The sample used is extracted from the Einstein Observatory Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey (EMSS) and consists of more than 420 objects. Preliminary results from the Rosat all sky survey data confirm the correctness of the optical identification of the EMSS sources, thus giving confidence to the results obtained from the analysis of the AGN sample. The XLF observed at different redshifts gives direct evidence of cosmological evolution. Data were analyzed within the framework of luminosity evolution models and the two most common evolutionary forms were considered. Luminosity dependent evolution is required if the evolution function has the exponential form, whereas the simpler pure luminosity evolution model is still acceptable if the evolution function has the power law form. Using the whole sample of objects the number counts and the devolved XLF were derived. A comparison of the EMSS Data with preliminary Rosat results indicates an overall agreement.

  18. Development of high throughput X-ray telescopes for X-ray imaging and dispersive spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.

    1986-01-01

    During the past year the technical approach to the realization of a high throughput Kirkpatrick-Baez X-ray mirror became better defined in terms of construction methodology and factors which affect maximum size. More progress was made than anticipated in the area of automatic figure formation. However, effort to improve the resolution of float glass by simple techniques were not successful. Mirror development, spectroscopy, all sky telescope, and explorer concept studies are discussed.

  19. Variable magnification variable dispersion glancing incidence imaging x ray spectroscopic telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A variable magnification variable dispersion glancing incidence x ray spectroscopic telescope capable of multiple high spatial revolution imaging at precise spectral lines of solar and stellar x ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation sources includes a primary optical system which focuses the incoming radiation to a primary focus. Two or more rotatable carriers each providing a different magnification are positioned behind the primary focus at an inclination to the optical axis, each carrier carrying a series of ellipsoidal diffraction grating mirrors each having a concave surface on which the gratings are ruled and coated with a multilayer coating to reflect by diffraction a different desired wavelength. The diffraction grating mirrors of both carriers are segments of ellipsoids having a common first focus coincident with the primary focus. A contoured detector such as an x ray sensitive photographic film is positioned at the second respective focus of each diffraction grating so that each grating may reflect the image at the first focus to the detector at the second focus. The carriers are selectively rotated to position a selected mirror for receiving radiation from the primary optical system, and at least the first carrier may be withdrawn from the path of the radiation to permit a selected grating on the second carrier to receive radiation.

  20. Variable magnification variable dispersion glancing incidence imaging x-ray spectroscopic telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A variable magnification variable dispersion glancing incidence x-ray spectroscopic telescope capable of multiple high spatial revolution imaging at precise spectral lines of solar and stellar x-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation sources includes a pirmary optical system which focuses the incoming radiation to a primary focus. Two or more rotatable carries each providing a different magnification are positioned behind the primary focus at an inclination to the optical axis, each carrier carrying a series of ellipsoidal diffraction grating mirrors each having a concave surface on which the gratings are ruled and coated with a mutlilayer coating to reflect by diffraction a different desired wavelength. The diffraction grating mirrors of both carriers are segments of ellipsoids having a common first focus coincident with the primary focus. A contoured detector such as an x-ray sensitive photogrpahic film is positioned at the second respective focus of each diffraction grating so that each grating may reflect the image at the first focus to the detector at the second focus. The carriers are selectively rotated to position a selected mirror for receiving radiation from the primary optical system, and at least the first carrier may be withdrawn from the path of the radiation to permit a selected grating on the second carrier to receive radiation.

  1. Development of in situ, at-wavelength metrology for soft x-ray nano-focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Sheng Sam; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Celestre, Richard; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard A.

    2010-09-19

    At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), we are developing broadly applicable, high-accuracy, in situ, at-wavelength wavefront slope measurement techniques for Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirror nano-focusing. We describe here details of the metrology beamline endstation, the at-wavelength tests, and an original alignment method that have already allowed us to precisely set a bendable KB mirror to achieve a FWHM focused spot size of ~;;120 nm, at 1-nm soft x-ray wavelength.

  2. Optimization of reflectivity of periodic and quasiperiodic multilayer films at soft X-ray wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, E.; Marr, G. V.; Player, M. A.

    1990-06-01

    The reflectivity of multilayer films consisting of alternating layers of high and low refractive index is investigated. It is found that the thickness of periods affects the optimized reflectivity, and that a quasi-periodic structure with fixed thickness of periods but changing thicknesses of the layers can form two reflecting peaks at different wavelength positions. The result can be used to increase the bandwidth and to change the shape of reflectivity curves in the soft X-ray region. Since nonabsorbing material does not exist in the soft X-ray region, the thickness of each layer should be optimized separately in order to obtain maximum reflectivity at a single wavelength.

  3. TRANSIT OBSERVATIONS OF THE HOT JUPITER HD 189733b AT X-RAY WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Poppenhaeger, K.; Wolk, S. J.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2013-08-10

    We present new X-ray observations obtained with Chandra ACIS-S of the HD 189733 system, consisting of a K-type star orbited by a transiting Hot Jupiter and an M-type stellar companion. We report a detection of the planetary transit in soft X-rays with a significantly deeper transit depth than observed in the optical. The X-ray data favor a transit depth of 6%-8%, versus a broadband optical transit depth of 2.41%. While we are able to exclude several possible stellar origins for this deep transit, additional observations will be necessary to fully exclude the possibility that coronal inhomogeneities influence the result. From the available data, we interpret the deep X-ray transit to be caused by a thin outer planetary atmosphere which is transparent at optical wavelengths, but dense enough to be opaque to X-rays. The X-ray radius appears to be larger than the radius observed at far-UV wavelengths, most likely due to high temperatures in the outer atmosphere at which hydrogen is mostly ionized. We furthermore detect the stellar companion HD 189733B in X-rays for the first time with an X-ray luminosity of log L{sub X} = 26.67 erg s{sup -1}. We show that the magnetic activity level of the companion is at odds with the activity level observed for the planet-hosting primary. The discrepancy may be caused by tidal interaction between the Hot Jupiter and its host star.

  4. Transit Observations of the Hot Jupiter HD 189733b at X-Ray Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppenhaeger, K.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Wolk, S. J.

    2013-08-01

    We present new X-ray observations obtained with Chandra ACIS-S of the HD 189733 system, consisting of a K-type star orbited by a transiting Hot Jupiter and an M-type stellar companion. We report a detection of the planetary transit in soft X-rays with a significantly deeper transit depth than observed in the optical. The X-ray data favor a transit depth of 6%-8%, versus a broadband optical transit depth of 2.41%. While we are able to exclude several possible stellar origins for this deep transit, additional observations will be necessary to fully exclude the possibility that coronal inhomogeneities influence the result. From the available data, we interpret the deep X-ray transit to be caused by a thin outer planetary atmosphere which is transparent at optical wavelengths, but dense enough to be opaque to X-rays. The X-ray radius appears to be larger than the radius observed at far-UV wavelengths, most likely due to high temperatures in the outer atmosphere at which hydrogen is mostly ionized. We furthermore detect the stellar companion HD 189733B in X-rays for the first time with an X-ray luminosity of log LX = 26.67 erg s-1. We show that the magnetic activity level of the companion is at odds with the activity level observed for the planet-hosting primary. The discrepancy may be caused by tidal interaction between the Hot Jupiter and its host star.

  5. Simultaneous observations of coronal bright points in X-ray and radio wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitta, Nariaki; Bastian, Timothy S.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Harvey, Karen L.; Strong, Keith T.

    1992-01-01

    We present a first explicit comparison of coronal bright points in soft X-ray and radio wavelengths, using the Soft X-ray Telescope aboard the Yohkoh spacecraft and the Very Large Array. About half of the 33 compact sources identified in a 20-cm full-disk map appear as X-ray bright points in the X-ray data. The other half apparently corresponds to unipolar regions with enhanced magnetic fields. Thus, the identification of radio bright points alone cannot reliably serve as a proxy for X-ray bright points. A preliminary analysis reveals that bright points commonly observed at 20 cm and in X-rays have temperatures of (1.4-2.9) x 10 exp 6 K and emission measures of (0.4-2.5) x 10 exp 45/cu cm. The observed brightness temperatures at 20 cm (1-2.5) x 10 exp 5 K can be explained in terms of optically thin free-free emission from a plasma with these parameters.

  6. Accounting for the dispersion in the x ray properties of early-type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Raymond E., III; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1990-01-01

    The x ray luminosities of early-type galaxies are correlated with their optical (e.g., blue) luminosities (L sub X approx. L sub B exp 1.6), but the x ray luminosities exhibit considerable scatter for a given optical luminosity L sub B. This dispersion in x ray luminosity is much greater than the dispersion of other properties of early-type galaxies (for a given L sub B), such as luminosity scale-length, velocity dispersion, color, and metallicity. Here, researchers consider several possible sources for the dispersion in x ray luminosity. Some of the scatter in x ray luminosity may result from stellar population variations between galaxies with similar L sub B. Since the x ray emitting gas is from accumulated stellar mass loss, the L sub X dispersion may be due to variations in integrated stellar mass loss rates. Another possible cause of the L sub X dispersion may be variations in the amount of cool material in the galaxies; cool gas may act as an energy sink for the hot gas. Infrared emission may be used to trace such cool material, so researchers look for a correlation between the infrared emission and the x ray emission of early-type galaxies at fixed L sub B. Velocity dispersion variations between galaxies of similar L sub B may also contribute to the L sub X dispersion. The most likely a priori source of the dispersion in L sub X is probably the varying amount of ram-pressure stripping in a range of galaxy environments. The hot gaseous halos of early-type galaxies can be stripped in encounters with other galaxies or with ambient cluster gas if the intracluster gas is sufficiently dense. Researchers find that the most likely cause of dispersion in the x ray properties of early type galaxies is probably the ram-pressure stripping of gaseous halos from galaxies. For a sample of 81 early-type galaxies with x ray luminosities or upper limits derived from Einstein Observatory observations (CFT) researchers calculated the cumulative distribution of angular distances

  7. Wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, W.; Chen, Z. Y. Jin, W.; Huang, D. W.; Ding, Y. H.; Li, J. C.; Zhang, X. Q.; Zhuang, G.; Lee, S. G.; Shi, Y. J.

    2014-11-15

    The wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer is a key issue for the measurements of plasma rotation. For the lack of available standard radiation source near 3.95 Å and there is no other diagnostics to measure the core rotation for inter-calibration, an indirect method by using tokamak plasma itself has been applied on joint Texas experimental tokamak. It is found that the core toroidal rotation velocity is not zero during locked mode phase. This is consistent with the observation of small oscillations on soft x-ray signals and electron cyclotron emission during locked-mode phase.

  8. Wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Yan, W; Chen, Z Y; Jin, W; Huang, D W; Ding, Y H; Li, J C; Zhang, X Q; Lee, S G; Shi, Y J; Zhuang, G

    2014-11-01

    The wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer is a key issue for the measurements of plasma rotation. For the lack of available standard radiation source near 3.95 Å and there is no other diagnostics to measure the core rotation for inter-calibration, an indirect method by using tokamak plasma itself has been applied on joint Texas experimental tokamak. It is found that the core toroidal rotation velocity is not zero during locked mode phase. This is consistent with the observation of small oscillations on soft x-ray signals and electron cyclotron emission during locked-mode phase. PMID:25430323

  9. Wavelength dispersive μPIXE setup for the ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazinić, S.; Božičević Mihalić, I.; Tadić, T.; Cosic, D.; Jakšić, M.; Mudronja, D.

    2015-11-01

    We have developed a small wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometer to explore the possibility of performing chemical speciation on microscopic samples utilizing focused ion beams available at the Rudjer Boskovic Institute ion microprobe. Although PIXE spectra are in principle chemically invariant, small influence of chemical effects could be observed even with Si(Li) or SDD detectors. Such chemical effects can be clearly seen with high resolution crystal X-ray spectrometers having energy resolution of several eV. A dedicated vacuum chamber, housing the diffraction crystal, sample holder and CCD X-ray detector, was constructed and positioned behind the main ion microprobe vacuum chamber. Here we will briefly describe the spectrometer, and illustrate its capabilities on measured K X-ray spectra of selected sulfur compounds. We will also demonstrate its abilities to resolve K and M X-ray lines irresolvable by solid state ED detectors usually used in PIXE.

  10. Single photon energy dispersive x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Higginbotham, Andrew; Patel, Shamim; Ciricosta, Orlando; Suggit, Matthew J.; Wark, Justin S.; Hawreliak, James A.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Coppari, Federica; Eggert, Jon H.; Tang, Henry

    2014-03-15

    With the pressure range accessible to laser driven compression experiments on solid material rising rapidly, new challenges in the diagnosis of samples in harsh laser environments are emerging. When driving to TPa pressures (conditions highly relevant to planetary interiors), traditional x-ray diffraction techniques are plagued by increased sources of background and noise, as well as a potential reduction in signal. In this paper we present a new diffraction diagnostic designed to record x-ray diffraction in low signal-to-noise environments. By utilising single photon counting techniques we demonstrate the ability to record diffraction patterns on nanosecond timescales, and subsequently separate, photon-by-photon, signal from background. In doing this, we mitigate many of the issues surrounding the use of high intensity lasers to drive samples to extremes of pressure, allowing for structural information to be obtained in a regime which is currently largely unexplored.

  11. The coolest DA white dwarfs detected at soft X-ray wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidder, K. M.; Holberg, J. B.; Barstow, M. A.; Tweedy, R. W.; Wesemael, F.

    1992-01-01

    New soft X-ray/EUV photometric observations of the DA white dwarfs KPD 0631 + 1043 = WD 0631 + 107 and PG 1113 + 413 = WD 1113 + 413 are analyzed. Previously reported soft X-ray detections of three other DAs and the failure to detect a fourth DA in deep Exosat observations are investigated. New ground-based spectra are presented for all of the objects, with IUE Ly-alpha spectra for some. These data are used to constrain the effective temperatures and surface gravities. The improved estimates of these parameters are employed to refer a photospheric He abundance for the hotter objects and to elucidate an effective observational low-temperature threshold for the detection of pure hydrogen DA white dwarfs at soft X-ray wavelengths.

  12. Rest-wavelength Fiducials for the ITER Core Imaging X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Graf, A. T.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Leutenegger, M. A.; Porter, F. S.

    2012-01-01

    Absolute wavelength references are needed to derive the plasma velocities from the Doppler shift of a given line emitted by a moving plasma. We show that such reference standards exist for the strongest x-ray line in neonlike W64+, which has become the line of choice for the ITER (Latin the way) core imaging x-ray spectrometer. Close-by standards are the Hf L3 line and the Ir L2 line, which bracket the W64+ line by 30 eV; other standards are given by the Ir L1 and L2 lines and the Hf L1 and L2 lines, which bracket the W64+ line by 40 and 160 eV, respectively. The reference standards can be produced by an x-ray tube built into the ITER spectrometer. We present spectra of the reference lines obtained with an x-ray microcalorimeter and compare them to spectra of the W64+ line obtained both with an x-ray microcalorimeter and a crystal spectrometer

  13. Rest-wavelength fiducials for the ITER core imaging x-ray spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Graf, A T; Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Leutenegger, M A; Porter, F S

    2012-10-01

    Absolute wavelength references are needed to derive the plasma velocities from the Doppler shift of a given line emitted by a moving plasma. We show that such reference standards exist for the strongest x-ray line in neonlike W(64+), which has become the line of choice for the ITER (Latin "the way") core imaging x-ray spectrometer. Close-by standards are the Hf Lβ(3) line and the Ir Lα(2) line, which bracket the W(64+) line by ±30 eV; other standards are given by the Ir Lα(1) and Lα(2) lines and the Hf Lβ(1) and Lβ(2) lines, which bracket the W(64+) line by ±40 and ±160 eV, respectively. The reference standards can be produced by an x-ray tube built into the ITER spectrometer. We present spectra of the reference lines obtained with an x-ray microcalorimeter and compare them to spectra of the W(64+) line obtained both with an x-ray microcalorimeter and a crystal spectrometer. PMID:23126933

  14. Compositional analysis of Ceramic Glaze by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Energy Dispersive X-Ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khedr, A.; Abdel-kareem, O.; Elnabi, S. H.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied for the analysis of Egyptian Islamic glaze ceramic sample. The sample dating back to Fatimid period (969-1169AD), and collected from Al-Fustat excavation store in Cairo. The analysis of contaminated pottery sample has been performed to draw mapping for the elemental compositions by LIBS technique. LIBS measurements have been done by the fundamental wavelength (1064 nm) of Nd: YAG laser for the elemental analysis and performing the cleaning processes of the pottery sample. In addition, complementary analyses were carried out by scanning electron microscopy linked with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (SEM/EDX) to obtain verification of chemical results. The morphological surfaces before and after cleaning has been done by Optical Microscopy (OM).

  15. Speckle-based at-wavelength metrology of X-ray mirrors with super accuracy.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Yogesh; Wang, Hongchang; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-05-01

    X-ray active mirrors, such as bimorph and mechanically bendable mirrors, are increasingly being used on beamlines at modern synchrotron source facilities to generate either focused or "tophat" beams. As well as optical tests in the metrology lab, it is becoming increasingly important to optimise and characterise active optics under actual beamline operating conditions. Recently developed X-ray speckle-based at-wavelength metrology technique has shown great potential. The technique has been established and further developed at the Diamond Light Source and is increasingly being used to optimise active mirrors. Details of the X-ray speckle-based at-wavelength metrology technique and an example of its applicability in characterising and optimising a micro-focusing bimorph X-ray mirror are presented. Importantly, an unprecedented angular sensitivity in the range of two nanoradians for measuring the slope error of an optical surface has been demonstrated. Such a super precision metrology technique will be beneficial to the manufacturers of polished mirrors and also in optimization of beam shaping during experiments. PMID:27250381

  16. X-ray polaroids based on the total external reflection in anomalous-dispersion regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machavariani, V. Sh

    1996-12-01

    A new method of development of x-ray polaroids is suggested. The idea is based on the effect of total external reflection from an anisotropic crystal in the anomalous-dispersion region. The polarization coefficient for hexagonal BN crystal near the boron K absorption edge is calculated for different glancing angles and thicknesses of sample. It is shown that the method treated provides a simple way of constructing an effective x-ray polaroid.

  17. The development of new radiation protocols for insect sterilization using long wavelength x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Urquidi, Jacob Brar, Ramaninder K.; Rodriguez, Stacy; Hansen, Immo

    2015-07-23

    Control of insect species for the protection of crops, livestock, and prevention of disease such as dengue fever and malaria is a high priority in today’s global economy. Traditional methods such as pesticides have fallen out of favor because its effects are indiscriminate as well as adverse and unpredictable impacts on the environment. Modern novel techniques such as genetic modification have had trouble gaining traction due to ethics concerns and the potential for unforeseen side effects. One approach that has gained traction and has proven its efficacy is the use of ionizing radiation to affect sterility in insect species in order to scale back their population. Known as Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), it has proven very effective in eradicating certain dipteran insect populations. However, when standard sterilization methods developed for dipertans are applied to mosquito populations significant complications arise, such as an inability to compete with non-irradiated males and high mortality rates. We have investigated the effect of treatment with x-rays of different wavelengths on x-ray sterilized mosquito males. Our results have demonstrated that longer wavelength x-rays have a significant effect on the outcome of the sterile males’ longevity as well as an increase on the efficacy of sterilization while employing a substantially lower dose.

  18. The development of new radiation protocols for insect sterilization using long wavelength x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquidi, Jacob; Brar, Ramaninder K.; Rodriguez, Stacy; Hansen, Immo

    2015-07-01

    Control of insect species for the protection of crops, livestock, and prevention of disease such as dengue fever and malaria is a high priority in today's global economy. Traditional methods such as pesticides have fallen out of favor because its effects are indiscriminate as well as adverse and unpredictable impacts on the environment. Modern novel techniques such as genetic modification have had trouble gaining traction due to ethics concerns and the potential for unforeseen side effects. One approach that has gained traction and has proven its efficacy is the use of ionizing radiation to affect sterility in insect species in order to scale back their population. Known as Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), it has proven very effective in eradicating certain dipteran insect populations. However, when standard sterilization methods developed for dipertans are applied to mosquito populations significant complications arise, such as an inability to compete with non-irradiated males and high mortality rates. We have investigated the effect of treatment with x-rays of different wavelengths on x-ray sterilized mosquito males. Our results have demonstrated that longer wavelength x-rays have a significant effect on the outcome of the sterile males' longevity as well as an increase on the efficacy of sterilization while employing a substantially lower dose.

  19. Comptonization of X-rays by low-temperature electrons. [photon wavelength redistribution in cosmic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Illarionov, A.; Kallman, T.; Mccray, R.; Ross, R.

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for calculating the spectrum that results from the Compton scattering of a monochromatic source of X-rays by low-temperature electrons, both for initial-value relaxation problems and for steady-state spatial diffusion problems. The method gives an exact solution of the inital-value problem for evolution of the spectrum in an infinite homogeneous medium if Klein-Nishina corrections to the Thomson cross section are neglected. This, together with approximate solutions for problems in which Klein-Nishina corrections are significant and/or spatial diffusion occurs, shows spectral structure near the original photon wavelength that may be used to infer physical conditions in cosmic X-ray sources. Explicit results, shown for examples of time relaxation in an infinite medium and spatial diffusion through a uniform sphere, are compared with results obtained by Monte Carlo calculations and by solving the appropriate Fokker-Planck equation.

  20. A semianalytic model to extract differential linear scattering coefficients of breast tissue from energy dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements

    SciTech Connect

    LeClair, Robert J.; Boileau, Michel M.; Wang Yinkun

    2006-04-15

    The goal of this work is to develop a technique to measure the x-ray diffraction signals of breast biopsy specimens. A biomedical x-ray diffraction technology capable of measuring such signals may prove to be of diagnostic use to the medical field. Energy dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements coupled with a semianalytical model were used to extract the differential linear scattering coefficients [{mu}{sub s}(x)] of breast tissues on absolute scales. The coefficients describe the probabilities of scatter events occurring per unit length of tissue per unit solid angle of detection. They are a function of the momentum transfer argument, x=sin({theta}/2)/{lambda}, where {theta}=scatter angle and {lambda}=incident wavelength. The technique was validated by using a 3 mm diameter 50 kV polychromatic x-ray beam incident on a 5 mm diameter 5 mm thick sample of water. Water was used because good x-ray diffraction data are available in the literature. The scatter profiles from 6 deg. to 15 deg. in increments of 1 deg. were measured with a 3 mmx3 mmx2 mm thick cadmium zinc telluride detector. A 2 mm diameter Pb aperture was placed on top of the detector. The target to detector distance was 29 cm and the duration of each measurement was 10 min. Ensemble averages of the results compare well with the gold standard data of A. H. Narten [''X-ray diffraction data on liquid water in the temperature range 4 deg. C-200 deg. C, ORNL Report No. 4578 (1970)]. An average 7.68% difference for which most of the discrepancies can be attributed to the background noise at low angles was obtained. The preliminary measurements of breast tissue are also encouraging.

  1. Phase Determination by Multiple-Wavelength X-ray Diffraction: Crystal Structure of a Basic ``Blue'' Copper Protein from Cucumbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guss, J. Mitchell; Merritt, Ethan A.; Phizackerley, R. Paul; Hedman, Britt; Murata, Mitsuo; Hodgson, Keith O.; Freeman, Hans C.

    1988-08-01

    A novel x-ray diffraction technique, multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing, has been applied to the de novo determination of an unknown protein structure, that of the ``blue'' copper protein isolated from cucumber seedlings. This method makes use of crystallographic phases determined from measurements made at several wavelengths and has recently been made technically feasible through the use of intense, polychromatic synchrotron radiation together with accurate data collection from multiwire electronic area detectors. In contrast with all of the conventional methods of solving protein structures, which require either multiple isomorphous derivatives or coordinates of a similar structure for molecular replacement, this technique allows direct solution of the classical ``phase problem'' in x-ray crystallography. MAD phase assignment should be particularly useful for determining structures of small to medium-sized metalloproteins for which isomorphous derivatives are difficult or impossible to make. The structure of this particular protein provides new insights into the spectroscopic and redox properties of blue copper proteins, an important class of metalloproteins widely distributed in nature.

  2. Energy Dispersive X-ray Tomography for 3D Elemental Mapping of Individual Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Slater, Thomas J A; Lewis, Edward A; Haigh, Sarah J

    2016-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy within the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) provides accurate elemental analysis with high spatial resolution, and is even capable of providing atomically resolved elemental maps. In this technique, a highly focused electron beam is incident upon a thin sample and the energy of emitted X-rays is measured in order to determine the atomic species of material within the beam path. This elementally sensitive spectroscopy technique can be extended to three dimensional tomographic imaging by acquiring multiple spectrum images with the sample tilted along an axis perpendicular to the electron beam direction. Elemental distributions within single nanoparticles are often important for determining their optical, catalytic and magnetic properties. Techniques such as X-ray tomography and slice and view energy dispersive X-ray mapping in the scanning electron microscope provide elementally sensitive three dimensional imaging but are typically limited to spatial resolutions of > 20 nm. Atom probe tomography provides near atomic resolution but preparing nanoparticle samples for atom probe analysis is often challenging. Thus, elementally sensitive techniques applied within the scanning transmission electron microscope are uniquely placed to study elemental distributions within nanoparticles of dimensions 10-100 nm. Here, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy within the STEM is applied to investigate the distribution of elements in single AgAu nanoparticles. The surface segregation of both Ag and Au, at different nanoparticle compositions, has been observed. PMID:27403838

  3. Demonstration of guided-wave phenomena at extreme-ultraviolet and soft-x-ray wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Ceglio, N M; Hawryluk, A M; Stearns, D G; Kühne, M; Müller, P

    1988-04-01

    We report an explicit demonstration of classical guided-wave propagation at XUV and soft-x-ray wavelengths. Experiments were performed using narrow-band synchrotron radiation at 5, 20.8, 21, and 30 nm. Free-standing gold transmission gratings served as waveguide structures. These structures had a 300-nm grating period with waveguide channel widths as small as 100 nm and were as thick as 700 nm in the direction of guided-wave transmission. Guided-wave phenomena were manifest in strongly asymmetric diffraction patterns resulting from the angular tilt of the transmission-grating normal from the incident-beam direction. PMID:19745868

  4. Two facets of the x-ray microanalysis at low voltage: The secondary fluorescence x-rays emission and the microcalorimeter energy-dispersive spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demers, Hendrix

    The best spatial resolution, for a microanalysis with a scanning electron microscope (SEND, is achieved by using a low voltage electron beam. But the x-ray microanalysis was developed for high electron beam energy (greater than 10 keV). Also, the specimen will often contain light and medium elements and the analyst will have to use a mixture of K, L, and sometime M x-ray peaks for the x-ray microanalysis. With a mixture of family lines, it will be common to have secondary fluorescence x-rays emission by K--L and L--K interactions. The accuracy of the fluorescence correction models presently used by the analyst are not well known for these interactions. This work shows that the modified secondary fluorescence x-rays emission correction models can improve the accuracy of the microanalysis for K--L and L--K interactions. The general equation derived in this work allows the identification of three factors which influence the secondary fluorescence x-rays emission. The fluorescence production factor epsilonƒ can be used to predict the importance of the secondary fluorescence x-rays emission. A large value of epsilonƒ indicates that a fluorescence correction is needed. Another disadvantage of using a low voltage is that there are more frequent occurrences of x-ray peaks overlap. A new microanalysis instruments that combines the high-spatial resolution and high-energy resolution for x-ray detection is needed. The microcalorimeter energy-dispersive spectrometer (muEDS) should improve the low voltage microanalysis, but the maturity of this technology has to be evaluated first. One of the first commercial muEDS for x-ray microanalysis in a SEM is studied and analyzed in this work. This commercial muEDS has an excellent energy resolution (˜ 15 eV) and can detect x-rays of low energy. This x-ray detector can be used as a high-spatial resolution and high-energy resolution microanalysis instrument. There are still hurdles that this technology must overcome before its

  5. Development of at-wavelength metrology for x-ray optics at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Yuan, Sheng; Celestre, Richard; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Gregory; Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard A.

    2010-07-09

    The comprehensive realization of the exciting advantages of new third- and forth-generation synchrotron radiation light sources requires concomitant development of reflecting and diffractive x-ray optics capable of micro- and nano-focusing, brightness preservation, and super high resolution. The fabrication, tuning, and alignment of the optics are impossible without adequate metrology instrumentation, methods, and techniques. While the accuracy of ex situ optical metrology at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) has reached a state-of-the-art level, wavefront control on beamlines is often limited by environmental and systematic alignment factors, and inadequate in situ feedback. At ALS beamline 5.3.1, we are developing broadly applicable, high-accuracy, in situ, at-wavelength wavefront measurement techniques to surpass 100-nrad slope measurement accuracy for Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors. The at-wavelength methodology we are developing relies on a series of tests with increasing accuracy and sensitivity. Geometric Hartmann tests, performed with a scanning illuminated sub-aperture determine the wavefront slope across the full mirror aperture. Shearing interferometry techniques use coherent illumination and provide higher sensitivity wavefront measurements. Combining these techniques with high precision optical metrology and experimental methods will enable us to provide in situ setting and alignment of bendable x-ray optics to realize diffraction-limited, sub 50 nm focusing at beamlines. We describe here details of the metrology beamline endstation, the x-ray beam diagnostic system, and original experimental techniques that have already allowed us to precisely set a bendable KB mirror to achieve a focused spot size of 150 nm.

  6. Determination of phonon dispersion relations by X-ray thermal diffuse scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, R.; Chiang, T.-C.

    2010-07-20

    Thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) of X-rays from crystals contains information on phonons. This paper reviews the general theory of TDS and some recent experiments aimed at further developing TDS into a useful and efficient method for studying phonon dispersion relations.

  7. Analysis of tincal ore waste by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalfa, Orhan Murat; Üstündağ, Zafer; Özkırım, Ilknur; Kagan Kadıoğlu, Yusuf

    2007-01-01

    Etibank Borax Plant is located in Kırka-Eskişehir, Turkey. The borax waste from this plant was analyzed by means of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The standard addition method was used for the determination of the concentration of Al, Fe, Zn, Sn, and Ba. The results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  8. Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry: A Long Overdue Addition to the Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Peter T.

    2011-01-01

    Portable Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyzers have undergone significant improvements over the past decade. Salient advantages of XRF for elemental analysis include minimal sample preparation, multielement analysis capabilities, detection limits in the low parts per million (ppm) range, and analysis times on the order of 1 min.…

  9. Imaging at soft X-ray wavelengths with high-gain microchannel plate detector systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. Gethyn

    1986-01-01

    Multianode microchannel array (MAMA) detector systems with formats of 256 x 1024 pixels and active areas of 6 x 26 mm are now under evaluation at visible, UV and soft X-ray wavelengths. Very-large-format versions of the MAMA detectors with formats of 2048 x 2048 pixels and active areas of 52 x 52 mm are under development for use in the NASA Goddard Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). Open-structure versions of these detectors with Cs I photocathodes can provide a high-resolution imaging capability at EUV and soft X-ray wavelengths and can deliver a maximum count rate from each array in excess of 10 to the 6th counts/s. In addition, these detector systems have the unique capability to determine the arrival time of a detected photon to an accuracy of 100 ns or better. The construction, mode of operation, and performance characteristics of the MAMA detectors are described, and the program for the development of the very-large-format detectors is outlined.

  10. Detector arrays for photometric measurements at soft X-ray, ultraviolet and visible wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.; Mount, G. H.; Bybee, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The construction and modes of operation of the Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detectors are described, and the designs of spectrometers utilizing them are outlined. MAMA consists of a curved microchannel array plate, an opaque photocathode (peak quantum efficiency of 19% at 1216 A), and a multi-anode (either discrete- or coincidence-anode) readout array. Designed for use in instruments on spaceborne telescopes, MAMA can be operated in a windowless configuration in extreme-ultraviolet and soft X-ray wavelengths, or in a sealed configuration at UV and visible wavelengths. Advantages of MAMA include low applied potential (less than 3.0 kV), high gain (greater than 10 to the 6th electrons/pulse), low sensitivity to high-energy charged particles, and immunity to external magnetic fields of less than 500 Gauss

  11. Phonon dispersion in uranium measured using inelastic x-ray scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, M. E.; Lander, G. H.; Sinn, H.; Alatas, A.; Hults, W. L.; McQueeney, R. J.; Smith, J. L.; Wilt, J.; XFD

    2003-02-01

    Phonon-dispersion curves were obtained from inelastic x-ray scattering measurements on high-purity uranium single crystals at room temperature. Modes displacing atoms along [00{zeta}] and propagating in all three high-symmetry directions were measured. Whereas the acoustic modes agree with the neutron measurements, the longitudinal-optic branch is about 10% higher in energy, but consistent with higher cutoff energies observed in phonon density-of-states measurements on polycrystals. The application of this x-ray technique, which requires only very small samples, opens possibilities in actinide science.

  12. The 20 element HgI2 energy dispersive x ray array detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwanczyk, J. A.; Dorri, N.; Wang, M.; Szczebiot, R. W.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K. O.; Patt, B. E.

    1991-11-01

    This paper describes recent progress in the development of HgI2 energy dispersive x-ray detector arrays and associated miniaturized processing electronics for synchrotron radiation research applications. The experimental results with a 20 element array detector were obtained under realistic synchrotron beam conditions at SSRL. An energy resolution of 250 eV (FWHM) at 5.9 keV (Mn-K(sub a)) was achieved. Energy resolution and throughput measurements versus input count rate and energy of incoming radiation have been measured. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectra were taken from diluted samples simulating proteins with nickel.

  13. Superconducting Detector System for High-Resolution Energy-Dispersive Soft X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Niedermayr, T; Drury, O; Funk, T; Frank, M; Labov, S E; Cramer, S

    2001-02-21

    Synchrotron-based soft x-ray spectroscopy is often limited by detector performance. Grating spectrometers have the resolution, but lack the efficiency for the analysis of dilute samples. Semiconducting Si(Li) or Ge detectors are efficient, but often lack the resolution to separate weak signals from strong nearby lines in multi-element samples. Superconducting tunnel junctions (STJs) operated at temperatures below 1 K can be used as high-resolution high-efficiency x-ray detectors. They combine high energy resolution around 10 eV FWHM with the broad band efficiency of energy-dispersive detectors. We have designed a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to operate STJ detectors in x-ray fluorescence measurements at beam line 4 of the ALS. We demonstrate the capabilities of such a detector system for fluorescence analysis of dilute metal sites in proteins and inorganic model compounds.

  14. Tunable coherent radiation at soft X-ray wavelengths: Generation and interferometric applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rosfjord, Kristine Marie

    2004-07-01

    The availability of high power, spectrally and spatially coherent soft x-rays (SXR) would facilitate a wide variety of experiments as this energy region covers the primary resonances of many magnetic and biological materials. Specifically, there are the carbon and oxygen K-edges that are critical for biological imaging in the water window and the L-edges of iron, nickel, and cobalt for which imaging and scattering studies can be performed. A new coherent soft X-ray branchline at the Advanced Light Source has begun operation (beamline 12.0.2). Using the third harmonic from an 8 cm period undulator, this branch delivers coherent soft x-rays with photon energies ranging from 200eV to 1keV. This branchline is composed of two sub-branches one at 14X demagnification and the other 8X demagnification. The former is optimized for use at 500eV and the latter at 800eV. Here the expected power from the third harmonic of this undulator and the beamline design and characterization is presented. The characterization includes measurements on available photon flux as well as a series of double pinhole experiments to determine the coherence factor with respect to transverse distance. The first high quality Airy patterns at SXR wavelengths are created with this new beamline. The operation of this new beamline allows for interferometry to be performed in the SXR region. Here an interferometric experiment designed to directly determine the index of refraction of a material under test is performed. Measurements are first made in the EUV region using an established beamline (beamline12.0.1) to measure silicon, ruthenium and tantalum silicon nitride. This work is then extended to the SXR region using beamline 12.0.2 to test chromium and vanadium.

  15. Multi-wavelength Observations of Cyg X-3 During a Hard X-ray Flare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Jeremy S.; Matthews, N. K.; VERITAS Collaboration

    2013-04-01

    We present the results of multi-wavelength observations of the microquasar Cygnus X-3 which was detected by the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) onboard the Swift observatory to be in a hard X-ray (10-150 keV) flaring state on March 23, 2012. Since the VERITAS collaboration has initiated a plan to perform follow-up observations of hard X-ray transients detected by the BAT, this event prompted observations with the VERITAS array of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes on the nights of March 24 and 27, 2012. A significant very high energy (VHE; E>100GeV) signal was not seen from the micro quasar. In addition to the BAT and VERITAS observations, we will present the results of an analysis of Fermi LAT data in the 200 - 300,000 MeV band from the flaring period. Although the exact physics are currently unclear, observations over the entire electromagnetic spectrum can provide insight to the physical phenomena producing the flares.

  16. Closing the gap to the diffraction limit: Near wavelength limited tabletop soft x-ray coherent diffractive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, Richard Lunt

    Light microscopy has greatly advanced our understanding of nature. The achievable resolution, however, is limited by optical wavelengths to around 200 nm. Using novel imaging and labeling technologies, resolutions beyond the diffraction limit can be achieved for specialized specimens using techniques such as near-field scanning optical microscopy, stimulated emission depletion microscopy and structured illumination microscopy [1--3]. This dissertation presents a versatile soft x-ray diffraction microscope with 50 nm resolution using tabletop coherent soft x-ray sources. This work represents the first high resolution demonstrations of coherent diffractive or lensless imaging using tabletop extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray sources [4, 5]. This dissertation also presents the first use of field curvature correction in x-ray coherent imaging which allows high numerical aperture imaging and near-diffraction-limited resolution of 1.5lambda. The relevant theory behind high harmonic generation, the primary tabletop source used in this work, will be discussed as well as the theory behind coherent diffractive imaging. Additionally, the first demonstration of tabletop soft x-ray Fourier Transform holography is shown with important applications to shorter wavelength imaging with high harmonic generation with limited flux. A tabletop soft x-ray diffraction microscope should find broad applications in biology, nanoscience, and materials science due to its simple optical design, high resolution, large depth of field, 3D imaging capability, scalability to shorter wavelengths, and ultrafast temporal resolution.

  17. Aliasing in a Hartmann wavefront sensor at x-ray wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poyneer, Lisa A.; Bauman, Brian; Macintosh, Bruce

    2012-10-01

    The Hartmann Sensor is a simple and well-established method to interrogate wavefront quality. Recently the Hartmann sensor has been used at very short wavelengths, including the extreme UV. Here we consider the Hartmann sensor and its ability to measure the wavefront of an x-ray beam. We use both analytic methods and a wave-optics, Fresnel-diffraction simulation. The Hartmann sensor samples the wavefront, which means that it is susceptible to aliasing (the non-linear phenomenon where high-spatial frequency components are incorrectly measured as low-spatial frequency components). Our analysis shows that aliasing is more severe in the Hartmann sensor than in the corresponding (optical) Shack-Hartmann. Aliasing worsens as Hartmann hole size shrinks. The wave-optics simulations show that for reasonable optics-polishing errors and Hartmann mask design, aliasing errors can be of the same magnitude as the phase that is to be measured.

  18. High-resolution detectors for imaging and spectroscopy at ultraviolet and soft X-ray wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.; Morgan, J. S.; Slater, D. C.

    1988-01-01

    The Multi-Anode Microchannel Arrays (MAMAs) are a family of pulse-counting imaging array detectors designed specifically for astrophysical investigations in space. The MAMAs have a number of unique performance characteristics which make them particularly suitable for imaging and spectroscopy at ultraviolet and soft X-ray wavelengths. First, they employ 'solar blind' photocathodes eliminating the 'red leak' problem associated with solid state arrays such as the CCDs. Second, they operate with zero readout noise, yielding photon-statistics limited signals. Third, they utilize a random readout technique and can determine both the location of a detected photon and also its arrival time to an accuracy of the order of 100 ns. This paper gives an overview of the construction, mode of operation, and performance characteristics of the MAMA detectors and describes the current status of the development program.

  19. X-ray photo-emission and energy dispersive spectroscopy of HA coated titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.L.; Steinberg, A.D.; Krauss, A.R.

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the chemical composition changes of hydroxyapatite (HA) coated titanium using surface analysis (x-ray photo-emission) and bulk analysis (energy dispersive spectroscopy). The specimens examined were controls, 30 minutes and 3 hours aged specimens in distilled water or 0.2M sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) at room temperature. Each x-ray photo-emission cycle consisted of 3 scans followed by argon sputtering for 10 minutes for a total of usually 20 cycles, corresponding to a sampling depth of {approximately} 1500 {angstrom}. The energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis was on a 110 by 90 {mu}m area for 500 sec. Scanning electron microscopy examination showed crystal formation (3P{sub 2}O{sub 5}*2CAO*?H{sub 2}O by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis) on the HA coating for the specimens aged in sodium phosphate buffer. The x-ray photo-emission results indicated the oxidation effect of water on the titanium (as TiO{sub 2}) and the effect of the buffer to increase the surface concentration of phosphorous. No differences in the chemical composition were observed by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. The crystal growth was only observed for the sodium phosphate buffer specimens and only on the HA surface.

  20. Approaching soft X-ray wavelengths in nanomagnet-based microwave technology.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haiming; D' Allivy Kelly, O; Cros, V; Bernard, R; Bortolotti, P; Anane, A; Brandl, F; Heimbach, F; Grundler, D

    2016-01-01

    Seven decades after the discovery of collective spin excitations in microwave-irradiated ferromagnets, there has been a rebirth of magnonics. However, magnetic nanodevices will enable smart GHz-to-THz devices at low power consumption only, if such spin waves (magnons) are generated and manipulated on the sub-100 nm scale. Here we show how magnons with a wavelength of a few 10 nm are exploited by combining the functionality of insulating yttrium iron garnet and nanodisks from different ferromagnets. We demonstrate magnonic devices at wavelengths of 88 nm written/read by conventional coplanar waveguides. Our microwave-to-magnon transducers are reconfigurable and thereby provide additional functionalities. The results pave the way for a multi-functional GHz technology with unprecedented miniaturization exploiting nanoscale wavelengths that are otherwise relevant for soft X-rays. Nanomagnonics integrated with broadband microwave circuitry offer applications that are wide ranging, from nanoscale microwave components to nonlinear data processing, image reconstruction and wave-based logic. PMID:27063401

  1. Approaching soft X-ray wavelengths in nanomagnet-based microwave technology

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haiming; d' Allivy Kelly, O.; Cros, V.; Bernard, R.; Bortolotti, P.; Anane, A.; Brandl, F.; Heimbach, F.; Grundler, D.

    2016-01-01

    Seven decades after the discovery of collective spin excitations in microwave-irradiated ferromagnets, there has been a rebirth of magnonics. However, magnetic nanodevices will enable smart GHz-to-THz devices at low power consumption only, if such spin waves (magnons) are generated and manipulated on the sub-100 nm scale. Here we show how magnons with a wavelength of a few 10 nm are exploited by combining the functionality of insulating yttrium iron garnet and nanodisks from different ferromagnets. We demonstrate magnonic devices at wavelengths of 88 nm written/read by conventional coplanar waveguides. Our microwave-to-magnon transducers are reconfigurable and thereby provide additional functionalities. The results pave the way for a multi-functional GHz technology with unprecedented miniaturization exploiting nanoscale wavelengths that are otherwise relevant for soft X-rays. Nanomagnonics integrated with broadband microwave circuitry offer applications that are wide ranging, from nanoscale microwave components to nonlinear data processing, image reconstruction and wave-based logic. PMID:27063401

  2. Approaching soft X-ray wavelengths in nanomagnet-based microwave technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haiming; D'Allivy Kelly, O.; Cros, V.; Bernard, R.; Bortolotti, P.; Anane, A.; Brandl, F.; Heimbach, F.; Grundler, D.

    2016-04-01

    Seven decades after the discovery of collective spin excitations in microwave-irradiated ferromagnets, there has been a rebirth of magnonics. However, magnetic nanodevices will enable smart GHz-to-THz devices at low power consumption only, if such spin waves (magnons) are generated and manipulated on the sub-100 nm scale. Here we show how magnons with a wavelength of a few 10 nm are exploited by combining the functionality of insulating yttrium iron garnet and nanodisks from different ferromagnets. We demonstrate magnonic devices at wavelengths of 88 nm written/read by conventional coplanar waveguides. Our microwave-to-magnon transducers are reconfigurable and thereby provide additional functionalities. The results pave the way for a multi-functional GHz technology with unprecedented miniaturization exploiting nanoscale wavelengths that are otherwise relevant for soft X-rays. Nanomagnonics integrated with broadband microwave circuitry offer applications that are wide ranging, from nanoscale microwave components to nonlinear data processing, image reconstruction and wave-based logic.

  3. A Soft X-ray Spectrometer using a Highly Dispersive Multilayer Grating

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard; Voronov, Dmitriy; Yashchuk, Valeriy

    2010-01-31

    There is a need for higher resolution spectrometers as a tool for inelastic x-ray scattering. Currently, resolving power around R = 10,000 is advertised. Measured RIXS spectra are often limited by this instrumental resolution and higher resolution spectrometers using conventional gratings would be prohibitively large. We are engaged in a development program to build blazed multilayer grating structures for diffracting soft x-rays in high order. This leads to spectrometers with dispersion much higher than is possible using metal coated-gratings. The higher dispersion then provides higher resolution and the multilayer gratings are capable of operating away from grazing incidence as required. A spectrometer design is presented with a total length 3.8m and capable of 10{sup 5} resolving power.

  4. Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction in the diamond anvil, high-pressure apparatus - Comparison of synchrotron and conventional X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spain, I. L.; Black, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The use of both conventional fixed-anode X-ray sources and synchrotron radiation to carry out energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction experiments at high pressure in a diamond anvil cell, is discussed. The photon flux at the sample and at the detector for the two cases are compared and the results are presented in graphs. It is shown that synchrotron radiation experiments can be performed with nearly two orders of magnitude increase in data rate if superior detectors and detector electronics are available.

  5. Combination of Raman, Infrared, and X-Ray Energy-Dispersion Spectroscopies and X-Ray Diffraction to Study a Fossilization Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sousa Filho, Francisco Eduardo; da Silva, João Hermínio; Feitosa Saraiva, Antônio Álamo; Brito, Deyvid Dennys S.; Viana, Bartolomeu Cruz; de Oliveira Abagaro, Bruno Tavares; de Tarso Cavalcante Freire, Paulo

    2011-12-01

    X-ray diffraction was combined with X-ray energy-dispersion, Fourier-transform infrared, and Raman spectroscopies to study the fossilization of a Cretaceous specimen of the plant Brachyphyllum castilhoi, a fossil from the Ipubi Formation, in the Araripe Sedimentary Basin, Northeastern Brazil. Among the possible fossilization processes, which could involve pyrite, silicon oxide, calcium oxide, or other minerals, we were able to single out pyritization as the central mechanism producing the fossil, more than 100 million years ago. In addition to expanding the knowledge of the Ipubi Formation, this study shows that, when combined with other experimental techniques, Raman spectroscopy is a valuable tool at the paleontologist's disposal.

  6. Scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive x ray analysis of impact residues in LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhard, Ronald P.; Durin, Christian; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1993-01-01

    Detailed optical scanning of tray clamps is being conducted in the Facility for the Optical Inspection of Large Surfaces at JSC to locate and document impacts as small as 40 microns in diameter. Residues from selected impacts are then being characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis at CNES. Results from this analysis will be the initial step to classifying projectile residues into specific sources.

  7. Dispersive x-ray synchrotron studies of Pt-C multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Smither, R.K.; Rodricks, B.; Lamelas, F.; Medjahed, D.; Dos Passos, W.; Clarke, R.; Ziegler, E.; Fontaine, A.

    1989-02-01

    We demonstrate the simultaneous acquisition of high-resolution x-ray absorption spectra and scattering data, using a combination of energy-dispersive optics and a two-dimensional CCD detector. Results are presented on the optical constants of Pt and on the reflectivity of a platinum-carbon multilayer at the L/sub III/ absorption edge of Pt. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  8. The SLcam: a full-field energy dispersive X-ray camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjeoumikhov, A.; Buzanich, G.; Langhoff, N.; Ordavo, I.; Radtke, M.; Reinholz, U.; Riesemeier, H.; Scharf, O.; Soltau, H.; Wedell, R.

    2012-11-01

    The color X-ray camera (SLcam®) is a full-field single photon imager. As stand-alone camera, it is applicable for energy and space-resolved X-ray detection measurements. The exchangeable poly-capillary optics in front of a beryllium entrance window conducts X-ray photons from the probe to distinguished energy dispersive pixels on a pnCCD. The dedicated software enables the acquisition and the online processing of the spectral data for all 69696 pixels, leading to a real-time visualization of the element distribution in a sample. No scanning system is employed. A first elemental composition image of the sample is visible within minutes while statistics is improving in the course of time. Straight poly-capillary optics allows for 1:1 imaging with a space resolution of 50 μm and no limited depth of sharpness, ideal to map uneven objects. Using conically shaped optics, a magnification of 6 times was achieved with a space resolution of 10 μm. We present a measurement with a laboratory source showing the camera capability to perform fast full-field X-ray Fluorescence (FF-XRF) imaging with an easy, portable and modular setup.

  9. High Performance Non-Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometers for Charge Exchange Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter Frederick; Adams, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Karkatoua, D.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Lautenagger, M.

    2010-01-01

    Currently, the only measurements of cosmological charge exchange have been made using low resolution, non-dispersive spectrometers like the PSPC on ROSAT and the CCD instruments on Chandra and XMM/Newton. However, upcoming cryogenic spectrometers on Astro-H and IXO will add vast new capabilities to investigate charge exchange in local objects such as comets and planetary atmospheres. They may also allow us to observe charge exchange in extra-solar objects such as galactic supernova remnants. With low spectral resolution instruments such as CCDs, x-ray emission due to charge exchange recombination really only provides information on the acceptor species, such as the solar wind. With the new breed of x-ray calorimeter instruments, emission from charge exchange becomes highly diagnostic allowing one to uniquely determine the acceptor species, ionization state, donor species and ionization state, and the relative velocity of the interaction. We will describe x-ray calorimeter instrumentation and its potential for charge exchange measurements in the near term. We will also touch on the instrumentation behind a decade of high resolution measurements of charge exchange using an x-ray calorimeter at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  10. LOCALIZING INTEGRAL SOURCES WITH CHANDRA: X-RAY AND MULTI-WAVELENGTH IDENTIFICATIONS AND ENERGY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Tomsick, John A.; Bodaghee, Arash; Chaty, Sylvain; Rodriguez, Jerome; Halpern, Jules; Kalemci, Emrah; Oezbey Arabaci, Mehtap

    2012-08-01

    We report on Chandra observations of 18 hard X-ray (>20 keV) sources discovered with the INTEGRAL satellite near the Galactic plane. For 14 of the INTEGRAL sources, we have uncovered one or two potential Chandra counterparts per source. These provide soft X-ray (0.3-10 keV) spectra and subarcsecond localizations, which we use to identify counterparts at other wavelengths, providing information about the nature of each source. Despite the fact that all of the sources are within 5 Degree-Sign of the plane, four of the IGR sources are active galactic nuclei (AGNs; IGR J01545+6437, IGR J15391-5307, IGR J15415-5029, and IGR J21565+5948) and four others are likely AGNs (IGR J03103+5706, IGR J09189-4418, IGR J16413-4046, and IGR J16560-4958) based on each of them having a strong IR excess and/or extended optical or near-IR emission. We compare the X-ray and near-IR fluxes of this group of sources to those of AGNs selected by their 2-10 keV emission in previous studies and find that these IGR AGNs are in the range of typical values. There is evidence in favor of four of the sources being Galactic (IGR J12489-6243, IGR J15293-5609, IGR J16173-5023, and IGR J16206-5253), but only IGR J15293-5609 is confirmed as a Galactic source as it has a unique Chandra counterpart and a parallax measurement from previous optical observations that puts its distance at 1.56 {+-} 0.12 kpc. The 0.3-10 keV luminosity for this source is (1.4{sup +1.0}{sub -0.4}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 32} erg s{sup -1}, and its optical/IR spectral energy distribution is well described by a blackbody with a temperature of 4200-7000 K and a radius of 12.0-16.4 R{sub Sun }. These values suggest that IGR J15293-5609 is a symbiotic binary with an early K-type giant and a white dwarf accretor. We also obtained likely Chandra identifications for IGR J13402-6428 and IGR J15368-5102, but follow-up observations are required to constrain their source types.

  11. The ChIcAGO Survey: Multi-wavelength Identification of Galactic Plane X-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Gemma; Gaensler, Bryan M.; Slane, Patrick O.; Kaplan, David L.A.; Posselt, Bettina

    2014-08-01

    I present the Chasing the Identification of ASCA Galactic Objects (ChIcAGO) survey, which is designed to identify the unknown X-ray sources discovered during the ASCA Galactic Plane Survey (AGPS). Little is known about most of the AGPS sources, especially those that emit primarily in hard X-rays (2-10 keV) within the F_ 10^-13 to 10^-11 erg cm^-2s^-1 X-ray flux range. In ChIcAGO, the subarcsecond localization capabilities of Chandra have been combined with a multi-wavelength follow-up program, with the ultimate goal of classifying the unidentified sources in the AGPS. Overall to date, 93 unidentified AGPS sources have been observed with Chandra as part of the ChIcAGO survey. A total of 253 X-ray point sources have been detected in these Chandra observations within 3' of the original ASCA positions, the majority of which have optical and infrared counterparts. Using these multi-wavelength follow-up results I have developed a new statistical diagnostic for identifying likely populations of X-ray emitting sources. These studies have revealed that the primary populations of Galactic plane X-ray sources that emit in the F_ 10^-13 to 10^-11 erg cm^-2s^-1 flux range are active stellar coronae, massive stars that are possibly in colliding-wind binaries, X-ray binaries, and magnetars. There is also another primary population that is still unidentified but, on the basis of its X-ray and infrared properties, likely comprise partly of Galactic sources and partly AGN.

  12. Second and third harmonic generation at UV and soft x-ray wavelengths from semiconductor gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenti, M. A.; de Ceglia, D.; Scalora, M.

    2011-10-01

    Extraordinary transmission properties are demonstrated in the UV range for GaAs gratings with sub-wavelength apertures under TM-polarization excitation. The metal-like response below 270nm, typical of several semiconductors such as GaAs or GaP, in fact may be used to excite surface waves that lead to enhance transmission in the linear regime and for novel nonlinear optical phenomena in the UV and soft X-ray ranges. An investigation of the linear transmission as a function of geometrical parameters of the grating reveals the formation of surface waves and relatively high transmission values even in regimes where the nominal absorption is significant. Strong field localization in subwavelength cavities and on the surface of the grating can be achieved under proper excitation conditions leading to the enhancement of harmonic generation. Nonlinear contributions to harmonic generation arise from symmetry breaking, the nonlinear magnetic Lorentz force, and from intrinsic, dipolar volume contributions. Preliminary results show promising nonlinear conversion efficiencies at wavelengths below 100nm, and demonstrate cross-coupling of TE and TM polarizations for pump and harmonic signals. A down-conversion process that can re-generate pump photons of polarization orthogonal compared to the incident pump field is also demonstrated.

  13. Quantitative energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction for identification of counterfeit medicines: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, Chiaki C. E.; O'Flynn, Daniel; Sidebottom, Aiden; Speller, Robert D.

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of counterfeit and substandard medicines has been growing rapidly over the past decade, and fast, nondestructive techniques for their detection are urgently needed to counter this trend. In this study, energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) combined with chemometrics was assessed for its effectiveness in quantitative analysis of compressed powder mixtures. Although EDXRD produces lower-resolution diffraction patterns than angular-dispersive X-ray diffraction (ADXRD), it is of interest for this application as it carries the advantage of allowing the analysis of tablets within their packaging, due to the higher energy X-rays used. A series of caffeine, paracetamol and microcrystalline cellulose mixtures were prepared with compositions between 0 - 100 weight% in 20 weight% steps (22 samples in total, including a centroid mixture), and were pressed into tablets. EDXRD spectra were collected in triplicate, and a principal component analysis (PCA) separated these into their correct positions in the ternary mixture design. A partial least-squares (PLS) regression model calibrated using this training set was validated using both segmented cross-validation, and with a test set of six samples (mixtures in 8:1:1 and 5⅓:2⅓:2⅓ ratios) - the latter giving a root-mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 1.30, 2.25 and 2.03 weight% for caffeine, paracetamol and cellulose respectively. These initial results are promising, with RMSEP values on a par with those reported in the ADXRD literature.

  14. New software to model energy dispersive X-ray diffraction in polycrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghammraoui, B.; Tabary, J.; Pouget, S.; Paulus, C.; Moulin, V.; Verger, L.; Duvauchelle, Ph.

    2012-02-01

    Detection of illicit materials, such as explosives or drugs, within mixed samples is a major issue, both for general security and as part of forensic analyses. In this paper, we describe a new code simulating energy dispersive X-ray diffraction patterns in polycrystalline materials. This program, SinFullscat, models diffraction of any object in any diffractometer system taking all physical phenomena, including amorphous background, into account. Many system parameters can be tuned: geometry, collimators (slit and cylindrical), sample properties, X-ray source and detector energy resolution. Good agreement between simulations and experimental data was obtained. Simulations using explosive materials indicated that parameters such as the diffraction angle or the energy resolution of the detector have a significant impact on the diffraction signature of the material inspected. This software will be a convenient tool to test many diffractometer configurations, providing information on the one that best restores the spectral diffraction signature of the materials of interest.

  15. At-wavelength and optical metrology of bendable x-ray optics for nanofocusing at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2009-06-11

    We report on a new research and development program at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab directed to establish both at-wavelength and conventional optical metrology techniques suitable to characterize the surface profile of super-high-quality x-ray optics with sub-microradian precision.

  16. Visibility of Hinode/XRT X-Ray Jets at AIA/EUV Wavelengths, a Temperature Indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterling, A. C.; Bakucz Canario, D.; Moore, R. L.; Falconer, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    X-ray jets have been observed for years using data from the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) on the Hinode Satellite. Recently with the launch of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) it has been possible to observe solar jets over a range of EUV of wavelengths using the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). In this study, we investigated the appearance of X-ray jets in AIA images at wavelengths of 304, 171, 193, 211, 131, 94, and 335 Å. We selected 20 random X-ray jets from XRT movies of the polar coronal holes and then examined AIA EUV images from the same locations and times to determine the visibility of the jets at the different EUV wavelengths. We found that the jets were almost always visible in the 193 and 211 Å channel images. In the "hottest" EUV channels (94 Å, 335 Å), usually the spire of the jet was not visible, although sometimes a base brightening could be discerned. At other wavelengths (171, 131, and 335), the results were mixed. Based on the response characteristics of AIA (Lemen et al, 2011) to the temperature of the observed radiating solar plasma, our finding that most jets are visible in the 193 and 211 Å channels is consistent with other recent studies that measured jet temperatures of 1.5~2.0 MK (Pucci et al, 2012 & Paraschiv et al, 2015). This work was supported by the NASA LWS and HGI programs.

  17. Energy Dispersive Spectrometry and Quantitative Analysis Short Course. Introduction to X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectrometry and Quantitative Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Paul; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This course will cover practical applications of the energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) to x-ray microanalysis. Topics covered will include detector technology, advances in pulse processing, resolution and performance monitoring, detector modeling, peak deconvolution and fitting, qualitative and quantitative analysis, compositional mapping, and standards. An emphasis will be placed on use of the EDS for quantitative analysis, with discussion of typical problems encountered in the analysis of a wide range of materials and sample geometries.

  18. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF SOLAR FLARES WITH A CONSTRAINED PEAK X-RAY FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, Trevor A.; Testa, Paola; Reeves, Katharine K.

    2013-06-20

    We present an analysis of soft X-ray (SXR) and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) observations of solar flares with an approximate C8 Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) class. Our constraint on peak GOES SXR flux allows for the investigation of correlations between various flare parameters. We show that the duration of the decay phase of a flare is proportional to the duration of its rise phase. Additionally, we show significant correlations between the radiation emitted in the flare rise and decay phases. These results suggest that the total radiated energy of a given flare is proportional to the energy radiated during the rise phase alone. This partitioning of radiated energy between the rise and decay phases is observed in both SXR and EUV wavelengths. Though observations from the EUV Variability Experiment show significant variation in the behavior of individual EUV spectral lines during different C8 events, this work suggests that broadband EUV emission is well constrained. Furthermore, GOES and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data allow us to determine several thermal parameters (e.g., temperature, volume, density, and emission measure) for the flares within our sample. Analysis of these parameters demonstrate that, within this constrained GOES class, the longer duration solar flares are cooler events with larger volumes capable of emitting vast amounts of radiation. The shortest C8 flares are typically the hottest events, smaller in physical size, and have lower associated total energies. These relationships are directly comparable with several scaling laws and flare loop models.

  19. Extreme ultraviolet and x-ray transition wavelengths in Rb XXIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indu, Khatri; Arun, Goyal; Sunny, Aggarwal; K. Singh, A.; Man, Mohan

    2015-10-01

    Energy levels, radiative rates, oscillator strengths and line strengths are reported for transitions among the lowest 97 levels of the (1s22s22p6) 3s23p2, 3s23p3d, 3s3p3, 3p4, 3s3p23d, and 3s23d2 configurations of Rb XXIV. A multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method is adopted for the calculations. Radiative rates, oscillator strengths, and line strengths are provided for all electric dipole (E1), magnetic dipole (M1), electric quadrupole (E2), and magnetic quadrupole (M2) transitions from the ground level to all 97 levels, although calculations are performed for a much larger number of levels. To achieve the accuracy of the data, comparisons are provided with similar data obtained from the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC) and also with the available theoretical and experimental results. Our energy levels are found to be accurate to better than 1.2%. Wavelengths calculated are found to lie in EUV (extreme ultraviolet) and x-ray regions. Additionally, lifetimes for all 97 levels are obtained for the first time. The authors, Indu Khatri and Arun Goyal, were supported by the U. G. C., India for their Junior Research Fellowship and Man Mohan by the U.G.C. for Basic Science Research Fellowship.

  20. WAVELENGTH MEASUREMENTS OF K TRANSITIONS OF OXYGEN, NEON, AND MAGNESIUM WITH X-RAY ABSORPTION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Jinyuan; Zhang Shuangnan; Yao Yangsen

    2013-09-10

    Accurate atomic transition data are important in many astronomical research areas, especially for studies of line spectroscopy. Whereas transition data of He-like and H-like ions (i.e., ions in high-charge states) have been accurately calculated, the corresponding data of K transitions of neutral or low-ionized metal elements are still very uncertain. Spectroscopy of absorption lines produced in the interstellar medium (ISM) has been proven to be an effective way to measure the central wavelengths of these atomic transitions. In this work, we analyze 36 Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating observations to search for and measure the ISM absorption lines along sight lines to 11 low-mass X-ray binaries. We correct the Galactic rotation velocity to the rest frame for every observation and then use two different methods to merge all the corrected spectra to a co-added spectrum. However, the co-added spectra obtained by this method exhibit biases, toward to either observations with high counts or lines with high signal-to-noise ratios. We do a Bayesian analysis of several significantly detected lines to obtain the systematic uncertainty and the bias correction for other lines. Compared to previous studies, our results improve the wavelength accuracy by a factor of two to five and significantly reduce the systematic uncertainties and biases. Several weak transitions (e.g., 1s-2p of Mg IV and Mg V; 1s-3p of Mg III and Mg V) are also detected for the first time, albeit with low significance; future observations with improved accuracy are required to confirm these detections.

  1. At-wavelength characterization of refractive x-ray lenses using a two-dimensional grating interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Rutishauser, Simon; David, Christian; Zanette, Irene; Weitkamp, Timm; Donath, Tilman

    2011-11-28

    We report on the application of a two-dimensional hard x-ray grating interferometer to x-ray optics metrology. The interferometer is sensitive to refraction angles in two perpendicular directions with a precision of 10 nrad. It is used to observe the wavefront changes induced by a single parabolic beryllium focusing lens of large radius of curvature. The lens shape is reconstructed and its residual aberrations are analyzed. Its profile differs from an ideal parabolic shape by less than 2 {mu}m or {lambda}/50 at {lambda} = 0.54 A wavelength.

  2. Influence of wavelength and pulse duration on single-shot x-ray diffraction patterns from nonspherical nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, Katharina; Peltz, Christian; Varin, Charles; Scheel, Stefan; Brabec, Thomas; Fennel, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a complex scaling discrete dipole approximation (CSDDA) method and study single-shot x-ray diffraction patterns from non-spherical, absorbing nanotargets in the limit of linear response. The convergence of the employed Born series-based iterative solution of the discrete dipole approximation problem via optimal complex mixing turns out to be substantially faster than the original approach with real-valued mixing coefficients, without additional numerical effort per iteration. The CSDDA method is employed to calculate soft x-ray diffraction patterns from large icosahedral silver nanoparticles with diameters up to about 250 {nm}. Our analysis confirms the requirement of relatively long wavelengths to map truly 3D structure information to the experimentally accessible regions of 2D scattering images. On the other hand, we show that short wavelengths are preferable to retain visibility of fine structures such as interference fringes in the scattering patterns when using ultrashort x-ray pulses in the attosecond domain. A simple model is presented to estimate the minimal pulse duration below which the fringe contrast vanishes. Knowledge of the impact of the bandwidth of short pulses on the diffraction images is important to extract information on ultrafast dynamical processes from time-resolved x-ray diffractive imaging experiments on free nanoparticles, in particular at long wavelengths.

  3. X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy: A New Probe of Short Wavelength Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierker, S. B.

    1996-03-01

    The new field of x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) offers an unprecedented opportunity to extend the range of length scales over which a material's low frequency dynamics can be studied down to interatomic spacings. The critical development which has now made XPCS a feasible technique is the high brightness of insertion devices at second and third generation synchrotron sources. In this talk, I will describe the principles of the XPCS technique and how it is practiced, as well as its potential use for a variety of important problems in the low frequency dynamics of condensed matter systems, such as complex fluids, glasses, surfaces, and metallic alloys. Illustrations will be drawn from our(Research done in collaboration with R. Pindak, R. M. Fleming, I. K. Robinson, L. Berman, G. Grubel, and D. L. Abernathy. S.B.D. supported by NSF DMR92-17956. I.K.R. supported by NSF MDR 93-15691. The NSLS is supported by DOE DE-AC02-76CH00016.) results(S. B. Dierker, R. Pindak, R. M. Fleming, I. K. Robinson, L. Berman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75), 449 (1995). on using XPCS to study the Brownian motion of a gold colloid. We made small angle x-ray scattering measurements of the static structure factor of an optically opaque gold colloid dispersed in the viscous liquid glycerol. We discovered a novel effect due to photoemission induced charging of the gold colloid which could be suppressed by the addition of salt. We determined the dynamic correlation functions for the Brownian motion of the colloid particles at wavevectors between 10-3 <= q <= 10-2 Åwhich extends well beyond the range of visible light scattering. The resulting diffusion coefficient is very q dependent, scaling approximately as D(q) = D_o/S(q). The results of recent progress in using the Prototype Small Gap Undulator (PSGU) at beam line X13 at the NSLS will also be described. We(Research done in collaboration with L. Berman, Z. Yin, and E. Dufresne.) have achieved a coherent flux of > 10^10 photons/second in a

  4. Determination of carrier yields for neutron activation analysis using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, R.G.; Wandless, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    A new method is described for determining carrier yield in the radiochemical neutron activation analysis of rare-earth elements in silicate rocks by group separation. The method involves the determination of the rare-earth elements present in the carrier by means of energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis, eliminating the need to re-irradiate samples in a nuclear reactor after the gamma ray analysis is complete. Results from the analysis of USGS standards AGV-1 and BCR-1 compare favorably with those obtained using the conventional method. ?? 1984 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  5. Distinction between entrance and exit wounds by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naoko; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Takakura, Ayaka; Jamal, Mostofa; Ito, Asuka; Kumihashi, Mitsuru; Tsutsui, Kunihiko; Kimura, Shoji; Ameno, Kiyoshi

    2016-09-01

    We investigated gunshot wounds in two autopsy cases using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX). Lead and copper were detected in the entrance wound of one case and lead, antimony, and copper were detected in that of the other case. In the exit wounds of both cases, lead, antimony, and copper were below detection limits. These findings indicate that the detection of metallic elements, such as lead, antimony, and copper, which are found in bullets, may be useful for differentiating entrance from exit wounds using EDX. PMID:27591531

  6. Reflection thermal diffuse x-ray scattering for quantitative determination of phonon dispersion relations

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, A. B.; Hellman, O.; Schlepuetz, C. M.; Rockett, A.; Chiang, T. -C.; Hultman, L.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.

    2015-11-03

    Synchrotron reflection x-ray thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) measurements, rather than previously reported transmission TDS, are carried out at room temperature and analyzed using a formalism based upon second-order interatomic force constants and long-range Coulomb interactions to obtain quantitative determinations of MgO phonon dispersion relations (h) over bar omega(j) (q), phonon densities of states g((h) over bar omega), and isochoric temperature-dependent vibrational heat capacities cv (T). We use MgO as a model system for investigating reflection TDS due to its harmonic behavior as well as its mechanical and dynamic stability. Resulting phonon dispersion relations and densities of states are found to be in good agreement with independent reports from inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering experiments. Temperature-dependent isochoric heat capacities cv (T), computed within the harmonic approximation from (h) over bar omega(j) (q) values, increase with temperature from 0.4 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 100 K to 1.4 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 200 K and 1.9 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 300 K, in excellent agreement with isobaric heat capacity values cp (T) between 4 and 300 K. We anticipate that the experimental approach developed here will be valuable for determining vibrational properties of heteroepitaxial thin films since the use of grazing-incidence (θ ≲ θc where θc is the density-dependent critical angle) allows selective tuning of x-ray penetration depths to ≲ 10 nm.

  7. Reflection thermal diffuse x-ray scattering for quantitative determination of phonon dispersion relations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mei, A. B.; Hellman, O.; Schlepuetz, C. M.; Rockett, A.; Chiang, T. -C.; Hultman, L.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.

    2015-11-03

    Synchrotron reflection x-ray thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) measurements, rather than previously reported transmission TDS, are carried out at room temperature and analyzed using a formalism based upon second-order interatomic force constants and long-range Coulomb interactions to obtain quantitative determinations of MgO phonon dispersion relations (h) over bar omega(j) (q), phonon densities of states g((h) over bar omega), and isochoric temperature-dependent vibrational heat capacities cv (T). We use MgO as a model system for investigating reflection TDS due to its harmonic behavior as well as its mechanical and dynamic stability. Resulting phonon dispersion relations and densities of states are found tomore » be in good agreement with independent reports from inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering experiments. Temperature-dependent isochoric heat capacities cv (T), computed within the harmonic approximation from (h) over bar omega(j) (q) values, increase with temperature from 0.4 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 100 K to 1.4 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 200 K and 1.9 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 300 K, in excellent agreement with isobaric heat capacity values cp (T) between 4 and 300 K. We anticipate that the experimental approach developed here will be valuable for determining vibrational properties of heteroepitaxial thin films since the use of grazing-incidence (θ ≲ θc where θc is the density-dependent critical angle) allows selective tuning of x-ray penetration depths to ≲ 10 nm.« less

  8. Reflection thermal diffuse x-ray scattering for quantitative determination of phonon dispersion relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, A. B.; Hellman, O.; Schlepütz, C. M.; Rockett, A.; Chiang, T.-C.; Hultman, L.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.

    2015-11-01

    Synchrotron reflection x-ray thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) measurements, rather than previously reported transmission TDS, are carried out at room temperature and analyzed using a formalism based upon second-order interatomic force constants and long-range Coulomb interactions to obtain quantitative determinations of MgO phonon dispersion relations ℏ ωj (q), phonon densities of states g (ℏ ω ), and isochoric temperature-dependent vibrational heat capacities cv(T ) . We use MgO as a model system for investigating reflection TDS due to its harmonic behavior as well as its mechanical and dynamic stability. Resulting phonon dispersion relations and densities of states are found to be in good agreement with independent reports from inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering experiments. Temperature-dependent isochoric heat capacities cv(T ) , computed within the harmonic approximation from ℏ ωj (q) values, increase with temperature from 0.4 ×10-4eV /atom K at 100 K to 1.4 ×10-4eV /atom K at 200 K and 1.9 ×10-4eV /atom K at 300 K, in excellent agreement with isobaric heat capacity values cp(T ) between 4 and 300 K. We anticipate that the experimental approach developed here will be valuable for determining vibrational properties of heteroepitaxial thin films since the use of grazing-incidence (θ ≲θc , where θc is the density-dependent critical angle) allows selective tuning of x-ray penetration depths to ≲10 nm .

  9. Characterization of Japanese color sticks by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manso, M.; Valadas, S.; Pessanha, S.; Guilherme, A.; Queralt, I.; Candeias, A. E.; Carvalho, M. L.

    2010-04-01

    This work comprises the use of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) techniques for the study of the composition of twentieth century traditional Japanese color sticks. By using the combination of analytical techniques it was possible to obtain information on inorganic and organic pigments, binders and fillers present in the sticks. The colorant materials identified in the sticks were zinc and titanium white, chrome yellow, yellow and red ochre, vermillion, alizarin, indigo, Prussian and synthetic ultramarine blue. The results also showed that calcite and barite were used as inorganic mineral fillers while Arabic gum was the medium used. EDXRF offered great potential for such investigations since it allowed the identification of the elements present in the sample preserving its integrity. However, this information alone was not enough to clearly identify some of the materials in study and therefore it was necessary to use XRD and FTIR techniques.

  10. Multi-wavelength study of X-ray binaries in the Magellanic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajoelimanana, A. F.; Charles, P. A.

    We present the long-term temporal properties of X-rays binaries in the Magellanic Clouds using archival optical (from MACHO and OGLE) and X-ray (XMM-Newton) observations. The SMC has known to have an interesting over-abundant population of Be/X-ray binaries (BeX) as compared to our Galaxy. The majority of these SMC BeX display superorbital variations, many of them quasi-periodic on timescales of 200-3000 days, which are believed to be related to the formation and depletion of the Be star equatorial disk. The MACHO colour of these systems follow a clockwise loop-like structure in the colour-magnitude diagram. We also found a quasi-periodic variations in the prototype LMC supersoft source CAL 83. Its light curve shows dramatic brightness changes of ˜1 mag on timescales of ˜450 days. This supersoft source spends typically ˜200 days in the optical low state. Moreover, we have seen an anticorrelation between their X-ray and optical behaviour in which supersoft X-rays are detected during optical minima and very weak or completely off at optical maxima. Simple backbody fits to both high and low-state X-ray spectra reveals a decrease of blackbody temperature and luminosity when the optical counterpart brightens.

  11. MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF THE Be/X-RAY BINARY MXB 0656-072

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Jingzhi; Li Hui; Liu Qingzhong; Zurita Heras, Juan Antonio; Chaty, Sylvain E-mail: hli@pmo.ac.cn E-mail: juan-antonio.zurita-heras@cea.fr

    2012-07-01

    We present and analyze the optical photometric and spectroscopic data of the Be/X-ray binary MXB 0656-072 from 2006 to 2009. A 101.2 day orbital period is found, for the first time, from the present public X-ray data (Swift/BAT and RXTE/ASM). The anti-correlation between the H{alpha} emission and the UBV brightness of MXB 0656-072 during our 2007 observations indicates that a mass ejection event took place in the system. After the mass ejection, a low-density region might develop around the Oe star. With the outward motion of the circumstellar disk, the outer part of the disk interacted with the neutron star around its periastron passage and a series of X-ray outbursts were triggered between MJD 54350 and MJD 54850. The Proportional Counter Array-HEXTE spectra during the 2007-2008 X-ray outbursts could be well fitted by a cutoff power law with low-energy absorption, together with an iron line around 6.4 keV, and a broad cyclotron resonance feature around 30 keV. The same variability of the soft and hard X-ray colors in 2.3-21 keV indicated that there were no overall changes in the spectral shape during the X-ray outbursts, which might only be connected with the changes of the mass accretion rate onto the neutron star.

  12. Practical applications of energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis in diagnostic oral pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, T.D.; Gibson, D. )

    1990-03-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis is a powerful tool that can reveal the presence and relative quantities of elements in minute particles in biologic materials. Although this technique has been used in some aspects of dental research, it has rarely been applied to diagnostic oral pathology. The purpose of this paper is to inform practicing dentists and oral specialists about the diagnostic potential of this procedure by presenting three case reports. The first case involved the identification of flakes of a metallic material claimed by a 14-year-old girl to appear periodically between her mandibular molars. In the second case, a periodontist was spared a lawsuit when a freely mobile mass in the antrum of his patient was found to be a calcium-phosphorus compound not related to the periodontal packing that had been used. The third case involved the differential diagnosis of amalgam tattoo and graphite tattoo in a pigmented lesion of the hard palate mucosa. The results of the analyses were significant and indicate a role for this technique in the assessment of selected cases. Potential for wider use of energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis in diagnostic oral pathology exists as research progresses.

  13. X-ray coherent scattering form factors of tissues, water and plastics using energy dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, B. W.; Landheer, K. A.; Johns, P. C.

    2011-07-01

    A key requirement for the development of the field of medical x-ray scatter imaging is accurate characterization of the differential scattering cross sections of tissues and phantom materials. The coherent x-ray scattering form factors of five tissues (fat, muscle, liver, kidney, and bone) obtained from butcher shops, four plastics (polyethylene, polystyrene, lexan (polycarbonate), nylon), and water have been measured using an energy-dispersive technique. The energy-dispersive technique has several improvements over traditional diffractometer measurements. Most notably, the form factor is measured on an absolute scale with no need for scaling factors. Form factors are reported in terms of the quantity x = λ-1sin (θ/2) over the range 0.363-9.25 nm-1. The coherent form factors of muscle, liver, and kidney resemble those of water, while fat has a narrower peak at lower x, and bone is more structured. The linear attenuation coefficients of the ten materials have also been measured over the range 30-110 keV and parameterized using the dual-material approach with the basis functions being the linear attenuation coefficients of polymethylmethacrylate and aluminum.

  14. Determination of selenium in biological samples with an energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoli; Yu, Zhaoshui

    2016-05-01

    Selenium is both a nutrient and a toxin. Selenium-especially organic selenium-is a core component of human nutrition. Thus, it is very important to measure selenium in biological samples. The limited sensitivity of conventional XRF hampers its widespread use in biological samples. Here, we describe the use of high-energy (100kV, 600W) linearly polarized beam energy-dispersive X-Ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF) in tandem with a three-dimensional optics design to determine 0.1-5.1μgg(-1) levels of selenium in biological samples. The effects of various experimental parameters such as applied voltage, acquisition time, secondary target and various filters were thoroughly investigated. The detection limit of selenium in biological samples via high-energy (100kV, 600W) linearly polarized beam energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy was decreased by one order of magnitude versus conventional XRF (Paltridge et al., 2012) and found to be 0.1μg/g. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe EDXRF measurements of Se in biological samples with important implications for the nutrition and analytical chemistry communities. PMID:26922394

  15. Towards hybrid pixel detectors for energy-dispersive or soft X-ray photon science.

    PubMed

    Jungmann-Smith, J H; Bergamaschi, A; Brückner, M; Cartier, S; Dinapoli, R; Greiffenberg, D; Huthwelker, T; Maliakal, D; Mayilyan, D; Medjoubi, K; Mezza, D; Mozzanica, A; Ramilli, M; Ruder, Ch; Schädler, L; Schmitt, B; Shi, X; Tinti, G

    2016-03-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications at free-electron lasers and synchrotron light sources. The JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype presented here is specifically geared towards low-noise performance and hence soft X-ray detection. The design, geometry and readout architecture of JUNGFRAU 0.4 correspond to those of other JUNGFRAU pixel detectors, which are charge-integrating detectors with 75 µm × 75 µm pixels. Main characteristics of JUNGFRAU 0.4 are its fixed gain and r.m.s. noise of as low as 27 e(-) electronic noise charge (<100 eV) with no active cooling. The 48 × 48 pixels JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype can be combined with a charge-sharing suppression mask directly placed on the sensor, which keeps photons from hitting the charge-sharing regions of the pixels. The mask consists of a 150 µm tungsten sheet, in which 28 µm-diameter holes are laser-drilled. The mask is aligned with the pixels. The noise and gain characterization, and single-photon detection as low as 1.2 keV are shown. The performance of JUNGFRAU 0.4 without the mask and also in the charge-sharing suppression configuration (with the mask, with a `software mask' or a `cluster finding' algorithm) is tested, compared and evaluated, in particular with respect to the removal of the charge-sharing contribution in the spectra, the detection efficiency and the photon rate capability. Energy-dispersive and imaging experiments with fluorescence X-ray irradiation from an X-ray tube and a synchrotron light source are successfully demonstrated with an r.m.s. energy resolution of 20% (no mask) and 14% (with the mask) at 1.2 keV and of 5% at 13.3 keV. The performance evaluation of the JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype suggests that this detection system could be the starting point for a future detector development effort for either applications in the soft X-ray energy regime or for an energy-dispersive

  16. Effects of dispersion and absorption in resonant Bragg diffraction of x-rays.

    PubMed

    Lovesey, S W; Scagnoli, V; Dobrynin, A N; Joly, Y; Collins, S P

    2014-03-26

    Resonant diffraction of x-rays by crystals with anisotropic optical properties is investigated theoretically, to assess how the intensity of a Bragg spot is influenced by effects related to dispersion (birefringence) and absorption (dichroism). Starting from an exact but opaque expression, simple analytic results are found to expose how intensity depends on dispersion and absorption in the primary and secondary beams and, also, the azimuthal angle (rotation of the crystal about the Bragg wavevector). If not the full story for a given application, our results are more than adequate to explore consequences of dispersion and absorption in the intensity of a Bragg spot. Results are evaluated for antiferromagnetic copper oxide, and low quartz. For CuO, one of our results reproduces all salient features of a previously published simulation of the azimuthal-angle dependence of a magnetic Bragg peak. It is transparent in our analytic result that dispersion and absorption effects alone cannot reproduce published experimental data. Available data for the azimuthal-angle dependence of space-group forbidden reflections (0,0, l), with l ≠ 3n, of low quartz depart from symmetry imposed by the triad axis of rotation symmetry. The observed asymmetry can be induced by dispersion and absorption even though absorption coefficients are constant, independent of the azimuthal angle, in this class of reflections. PMID:24599265

  17. Spectral and spatial characteristics of x-ray film detectors in the wavelength range 20--150 {angstrom}

    SciTech Connect

    Fedin, D.A.; Fedorchuk, R.V.; Koshevoi, M.O.; Lukjantsev, I.V.; Rupasov, A.A.; Shikanov, A.S.; Gullikson, E.

    1995-12-31

    Investigations of spectral sensitivity, contrast coefficient, and spatial resolution of widely used x-ray films have been undertaken at the P.N. Lebedev Institute. A description of experimental methodologies and results are presented. These studies were carried out using synchrotron radiation in the range of 20--150 {angstrom}. Spectral sensitivity and contrast coefficient dependencies on wavelength for Kodak 10106, DEF, RAR2490, and TPF films and spatial resolution for Kodak 10106 and RAR2490 films are presented and discussed.

  18. Micro energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis of polychrome lead-glazed Portuguese faiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilherme, A.; Pessanha, S.; Carvalho, M. L.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Coroado, J.

    2010-04-01

    Several glazed ceramic pieces, originally produced in Coimbra (Portugal), were submitted to elemental analysis, having as premise the pigment manufacture production recognition. Although having been produced in Coimbra, their location changed as time passed due to historical reasons. A recent exhibition in Coimbra brought together a great number of these pieces and in situ micro Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (µ-EDXRF) analyses were performed in order to achieve some chemical and physical data on the manufacture of faiences in Coimbra. A non-commercial µ-EDXRF equipment for in situ analysis was employed in this work, carrying some important improvements when compared to the conventional ones, namely, analyzing spot sizes of about 100 µm diameter. The combination of a capillary X-ray lens with a new generation of low power microfocus X-ray tube and a drift chamber detector enabled a portable unit for micro-XRF with a few tens of µm lateral resolution. The advantages in using a portable system emphasized with polycapillary optics enabled to distinguish proximal different pigmented areas, as well as the glaze itself. These first scientific results on the pigment analysis of the collection of faiences seem to point to a unique production center with own techniques and raw materials. This conclusion arose with identification of the blue pigments having in its constitution Mn, Fe Co and As and the yellows as a result of the combination between Pb and Sb. A statistical treatment was used to reveal groups of similarities on the pigments elemental profile.

  19. THE CHANDRA MULTI-WAVELENGTH PROJECT: OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY AND THE BROADBAND SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF X-RAY-SELECTED AGNs

    SciTech Connect

    Trichas, Markos; Green, Paul J.; Aldcroft, Tom; Kim, Dong-Woo; Mossman, Amy; Silverman, John D.; Barkhouse, Wayne; Cameron, Robert A.; Constantin, Anca; Ellison, Sara L.; Foltz, Craig; Haggard, Daryl; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Marshall, Herman L.; Perez, Laura M.; Romero-Colmenero, Encarni; Ruiz, Angel; Smith, Malcolm G.; and others

    2012-06-01

    From optical spectroscopy of X-ray sources observed as part of the Chandra Multi-wavelength Project (ChaMP), we present redshifts and classifications for a total of 1569 Chandra sources from our targeted spectroscopic follow-up using the FLWO/1.5 m, SAAO/1.9 m, WIYN 3.5 m, CTIO/4 m, KPNO/4 m, Magellan/6.5 m, MMT/6.5 m, and Gemini/8 m telescopes, and from archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopy. We classify the optical counterparts as 50% broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 16% emission line galaxies, 14% absorption line galaxies, and 20% stars. We detect QSOs out to z {approx} 5.5 and galaxies out to z {approx} 3. We have compiled extensive photometry, including X-ray (ChaMP), ultraviolet (GALEX), optical (SDSS and ChaMP-NOAO/MOSAIC follow-up), near-infrared (UKIDSS, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and ChaMP-CTIO/ISPI follow-up), mid-infrared (WISE), and radio (FIRST and NVSS) bands. Together with our spectroscopic information, this enables us to derive detailed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for our extragalactic sources. We fit a variety of template SEDs to determine bolometric luminosities, and to constrain AGNs and starburst components where both are present. While {approx}58% of X-ray Seyferts (10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} < L{sub 2-10keV} <10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) require a starburst event (>5% starburst contribution to bolometric luminosity) to fit observed photometry only 26% of the X-ray QSO (L{sub 2-10keV} >10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) population appear to have some kind of star formation contribution. This is significantly lower than for the Seyferts, especially if we take into account torus contamination at z > 1 where the majority of our X-ray QSOs lie. In addition, we observe a rapid drop of the percentage of starburst contribution as X-ray luminosity increases. This is consistent with the quenching of star formation by powerful QSOs, as predicted by the merger model, or with a time lag between the peak of star formation and QSO

  20. High-average-power, 100-Hz-repetition-rate, tabletop soft-x-ray lasers at sub-15-nm wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, Brendan A.; Berrill, Mark; Wernsing, Keith A.; Baumgarten, Cory; Woolston, Mark; Rocca, Jorge J.

    2014-05-01

    Efficient excitation of dense plasma columns at 100-Hz repetition rate using a tailored pump pulse profile produced a tabletop soft-x-ray laser average power of 0.1 mW at λ = 13.9 nm and 20 μW at λ = 11.9 nm from transitions of Ni-like Ag and Ni-like Sn, respectively. Lasing on several other transitions with wavelengths between 10.9 and 14.7 nm was also obtained using 0.9-J pump pulses of 5-ps duration from a compact diode-pumped chirped pulse amplification Yb:YAG laser. Hydrodynamic and atomic plasma simulations show that the pump pulse profile, consisting of a nanosecond ramp followed by two peaks of picosecond duration, creates a plasma with an increased density of Ni-like ions at the time of peak temperature that results in a larger gain coefficient over a temporally and spatially enlarged space leading to a threefold increase in the soft-x-ray laser output pulse energy. The high average power of these compact soft-x-ray lasers will enable applications requiring high photon flux. These results open the path to milliwatt-average-power tabletop soft-x-ray lasers.

  1. Energy dispersive x-ray diffraction of charge density waves via chemical filtering

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Yejun; Somayazulu, M. S.; Jaramillo, R.; Rosenbaum, T.F.; Isaacs, E.D.; Hu Jingzhu; Mao Hokwang

    2005-06-15

    Pressure tuning of phase transitions is a powerful tool in condensed matter physics, permitting high-resolution studies while preserving fundamental symmetries. At the highest pressures, energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXD) has been a critical method for geometrically confined diamond anvil cell experiments. We develop a chemical filter technique complementary to EDXD that permits the study of satellite peaks as weak as 10{sup -4} of the crystal Bragg diffraction. In particular, we map out the temperature dependence of the incommensurate charge density wave diffraction from single-crystal, elemental chromium. This technique provides the potential for future GPa pressure studies of many-body effects in a broad range of solid state systems.

  2. In situ energy dispersive x-ray reflectometry measurements on organic solar cells upon working

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paci, B.; Generosi, A.; Albertini, V. Rossi; Perfetti, P.; de Bettignies, R.; Firon, M.; Leroy, J.; Sentein, C.

    2005-11-01

    The change in the morphology of plastic solar cells was studied by means of time-resolved energy dispersive x-ray reflectivity (XRR). This unconventional application of the XRR technique allowed the follow up of in situ morphological evolution of an organic photovoltaic device upon working. The study consisted of three steps: A preliminary set of XRR measurements on various samples representing the intermediate stages of cell construction, which provided accurate data regarding the electronic densities of the different layers; the verification of the morphological stability of the device under ambient condition; a real-time collection of XRR patterns, both in the dark and during 15h in artificial light conditions which allowed the changes in the system morphology at the electrode-active layer interface to be monitored. In this way, a progressive thickening of this interface, responsible for a reduction in the performances of the device, was observed directly.

  3. Energy Dispersive X-Ray and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopies for Performance and Corrosion Analysis of PEMWEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen, S. M., Iii; Zhang, F.-Y.

    2014-11-01

    Proton exchange membrane water electrolyzers (PEMWEs) are a promising energy storage technology due to their high efficiency, compact design, and ability to be used in a renewable energy system. Before they are able to make a large commercial impact, there are several hurdles facing the technology today. Two powerful techniques for both in-situ and ex- situ characterizations to improve upon their performance and better understand their corrosion are electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, respectively. In this paper, the authors use both methods in order to characterize the anode gas diffusion layer (GDL) in a PEMWE cell and better understand the corrosion that occurs in the oxygen electrode during electrolysis.

  4. Soil characterization by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence: sampling strategy for in situ analysis.

    PubMed

    Custo, Graciela; Boeykens, Susana; Dawidowski, L; Fox, L; Gómez, D; Luna, F; Vázquez, Cristina

    2005-07-01

    This work describes a sampling strategy that will allow the use of portable EDXRF (energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence) instruments for "in situ" soil analysis. The methodology covers a general approach to planning field investigations for any type of environmental studies and it was applied for a soil characterization study in the zone of Campana, Argentina, by evaluating data coming from an EDXRF spectrometer with a radioisotope excitation source. Simulating non-treated sampled as "in situ" samples and a soil characterization for Campana area was intended. "In situ" EDXRF methodology is a powerful analytical modality with the advantage of providing data immediately, allowing a fast general screening of the soil composition. PMID:16038489

  5. Evaluation on determination of iodine in coal by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, B.; Jackson, J.C.; Palmer, C.; Zheng, B.; Finkelman, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    A quick and inexpensive method of relative high iodine determination from coal samples was evaluated. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) provided a detection limit of about 14 ppm (3 times of standard deviations of the blank sample), without any complex sample preparation. An analytical relative standard deviation of 16% was readily attainable for coal samples. Under optimum conditions, coal samples with iodine concentrations higher than 5 ppm can be determined using this EDXRF method. For the time being, due to the general iodine concentrations of coal samples lower than 5 ppm, except for some high iodine content coal, this method can not effectively been used for iodine determination. More work needed to meet the requirement of determination of iodine from coal samples for this method. Copyright ?? 2005 by The Geochemical Society of Japan.

  6. Quantitative atomic resolution elemental mapping via absolute-scale energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Weyland, M; Sang, X; Xu, W; Dycus, J H; LeBeau, J M; D'Alfonso, A J; Allen, L J; Findlay, S D

    2016-09-01

    Quantitative agreement on an absolute scale is demonstrated between experiment and simulation for two-dimensional, atomic-resolution elemental mapping via energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. This requires all experimental parameters to be carefully characterized. The agreement is good, but some discrepancies remain. The most likely contributing factors are identified and discussed. Previous predictions that increasing the probe forming aperture helps to suppress the channelling enhancement in the average signal are confirmed experimentally. It is emphasized that simple column-by-column analysis requires a choice of sample thickness that compromises between being thick enough to yield a good signal-to-noise ratio while being thin enough that the overwhelming majority of the EDX signal derives from the column on which the probe is placed, despite strong electron scattering effects. PMID:27258645

  7. Characterization of small noble metal electrodes by voltammetry and energy dispersive x ray analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strein, Timothy G.; Ewing, Andrew G.

    1993-01-01

    Construction and characterization of platinum and gold electrodes with total structural diameters of 1-2 micrometers is described. These small voltammetric probes have been constructed by direct electroreduction of noble metals onto the tips of etched carbon fiber microdisk electrodes. Voltammetry, electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray analysis, and pulsed amperometric detection have been used to characterize these electrodes. Dopamine concentrations have been determined over a range of 10(exp -4) to 10(exp -3) M in the biological buffer system which contains 25 mM glucose, a compound known to adsorb strongly to electrodes. Amperometric monitoring at a constant potential with these small results in signal decay of 20% to 40% in a ten minute experiment. Pulsed amperometric detection minimizes electrode fouling, resulting in 5% or less signal decay over the same ten minute period.

  8. Neighborite Under High Pressure: In Situ Angle Dispersive X-ray Diffraction Study Using Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Chen, J.; Weidner, D.; Hu, J.; Meng, Y.; Mao, H.

    2003-12-01

    The neighborite (NaMgF3) is an ideal analogue model for silicate perovskite (MgSiO3) due to the similarities between their crystal and electronic structures. The advantage of the analogue study is that the weaker bonding feature of neighborite grants us the opportunity to simulate behavior of silicate perovskite at lower mantlei. e.high pressure and high temperature condition, at relatively lower P-T conditions. The previous high pressure studies for neighborite were reported by Zhao et al [1, 2]. Energy dispersive x-ray diffraction data were achieved within 10GPa and 1000oC, while angle dispersive x-ray diffraction data were obtained only at 4.9GPa and room temperature.More information of atomic position change is required to reveal the role of MgF6 octahedral framework tilting during its phase transition process responding to heating andcompressing. Thus the high-resolution monochromatic x-ray powder diffraction studies on NaMgF3 perovskite at high pressure were carried out using diamond anvil cell at X17C of National Synchrotron Light Source (Brookhaven) and HPCAT of Advance Photon Source (Argonne). The orthorhombic structure keeps stable under pressure up to 30 GPa, and the crystal structure is refined using Rietveld method. The result indicates that tilting angle of the MgF6 octahedral framework increases continually while the octahedral Mg-F bond length decreases slightly with increasing pressure.Difference between the tilting angles derived from macro-structure (lattice parameters) and from micro-structure (atomic positions), as well as the trend of change in the tilting angle with temperature and pressureare discussed. [1]. Zhao YS, Weidner DJ, Ko JD, Leinenweber K, Liu X, Li BS, Meng Y,Pacalo REG, Vaughan MT, Wang YB, Yeganehhaeri A,J.Geophys. Res. Solid Earth, 99 (1994) 2871. [2]. Zhao YS, Parise JB, Wang YB, Kusaba K, Vaughan MT, Weidner DJ, Kikegawa T, Chen J, Shimomura O,Am.Miner., 79 (1994) 615.

  9. Pump laser wavelength-dependent control of the efficiency of kilovolt x-ray emission from atomic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, W. Andreas; Omenetto, F. G.; Borisov, A. B.; Longworth, J. W.; McPherson, A.; Jordan, C.; Boyer, K.; Kondo, K.; Rhodes, C. K.

    1998-11-01

    An explanation is presented for the recently reported striking differences in the kilovolt Xe L-shell 0953-4075/31/22/014/img15 x-ray emission from Xe cluster targets excited by comparable terawatt ultraviolet (248 nm) and infrared (800 nm) femtosecond laser pulses under nearly identical experimental conditions (Kondo K et al 1997 J. Phys. B.: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 30 2707-16). A classical analysis of these results, within the framework of the first Born approximation for electron-atom collisions producing inner-shell ionization, strongly suggests that both the 0953-4075/31/22/014/img16 times stronger Xe(L) emission under ultraviolet laser excitation and the observed differences in the x-ray spectra are caused primarily by the different ultraviolet and infrared pump laser wavelengths. The kinematics of photoionized electrons in the intense laser fields (0953-4075/31/22/014/img17-0953-4075/31/22/014/img18) and the Coulomb-driven expansion of the electron distribution photoionized from the atomic cluster both indicate that the strong pump-laser wavelength scaling in the production of kilovolt x-rays from Xe clusters results from the more localized and controlled electron-cluster interactions afforded by a shorter optical period.

  10. Studying Dark Energy, Black Holes and Cosmic Feedback at X-ray Wavelengths: NASA's Constellation-X Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornschemeier, A.

    2005-01-01

    Among the most important topics in modern astrophysics are the nature of the dark energy equation of state, the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes in concert with galaxy bulges, and the self-regulating symmetry imposed by both stellar and AGN feedback. All of these topics are readily addressed with observations at X-ray wavelengths. For instance, theoretical models predict that the majority (98%) of the energy and metal content in starburst superwinds exists in the hot million-degree gas. The Constellation-X observatory is being developed to perform spatially resolved high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy so that we may directly measure the absolute element abundances and velocities of this hot gas. This talk focuses on the driving science behind this mission, which is one of two flagship missions in NASA's Beyond Einstein program. A general overview of the observatory's capabilities and basic technology will also be given.

  11. Modeling of the influence of the driving laser wavelength on the beam quality of transiently pumped X-ray lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pape, S.; Zeitoun, Ph.

    2003-04-01

    A three dimensional ray tracing code (SHADOX) has been developed, as a post-processor of any hydrodynamic/atomic code, to model X-ray laser beam propagation along the amplifying medium and any optical component. In this paper we show a study aimed to investigate the influence of the long driving pulse wavelength on the transiently pumped X-ray laser propagation and amplification. Different pumping configurations have been modeled and their respective influence on the beam quality has been investigated. This work shows that the beam homogeneity is highly sensitive to both the emissive zone dimension and electron density gradient and that pumping by a double pulse in a two-color configuration (2 ω/ ω; Δt=200 ps) is favorable in terms of beam quality.

  12. [Energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry--a forensic chemistry method for determination of shooting distance].

    PubMed

    Havel, J

    2003-10-01

    The article follows up the experiences Energo-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) as the forensic necrochemical method as the tool for detection of metals (gunshot residues--GSR) in connection with gunshot-wounds of persons--authors: dipl. Ing. J. Havel and dipl. Ing. K. Zelenka and Energo-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) as the forensic method as the tool for identification of inlets (gunshot--entries) and outlets (gunshot--exits)--author: dipl. Ing. J. Havel. PMID:14661530

  13. Optical properties of zirconium carbide in 60-200 Å wavelength region using x-ray reflectivity technique.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amol; Modi, Mohammed H; Lodha, G S

    2015-01-10

    Optical constants of zirconium carbide (ZrC) have been determined in the soft x-ray region of 60-200 Å wavelength using angle-dependent x-ray reflectivity measurements. Reflectivity measurements are carried out at the reflectivity beamline of the Indus-1 synchrotron radiation source. Derived optical constants (δ and β) are compared with the tabulated values [At. Data Nucl. Data Tables 54, 181 (1993)]. The optical constants are 15%-35% lower than bulk values in the 60-200 Å wavelength region. Near the Zr M4 edge 187 eV (66.3 Å), the δ values were close to bulk values with a deviation of 5%-10%. A large deviation of ∼20% was found in beta values especially near the Zr M4 edge region, whereas it was in close agreement in the wavelength range away from the edge. To the best of our knowledge, this paper gives the first reported experimental values of optical constants for zirconium carbide in the 60-200 Å wavelength region. PMID:25967623

  14. Extraction of accurate structure-factor amplitudes from Laue data: wavelength normalization with wiggler and undulator X-ray sources.

    PubMed

    Srajer, V; Crosson, S; Schmidt, M; Key, J; Schotte, F; Anderson, S; Perman, B; Ren, Z; Teng, T Y; Bourgeois, D; Wulff, M; Moffat, K

    2000-07-01

    Wavelength normalization is an essential part of processing of Laue X-ray diffraction data and is critically important for deriving accurate structure-factor amplitudes. The results of wavelength normalization for Laue data obtained in nanosecond time-resolved experiments at the ID09 beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, France, are presented. Several wiggler and undulator insertion devices with complex spectra were used. The results show that even in the most challenging cases, such as wiggler/undulator tandems or single-line undulators, accurate wavelength normalization does not require unusually redundant Laue data and can be accomplished using typical Laue data sets. Single-line undulator spectra derived from Laue data compare well with the measured incident X-ray spectra. Successful wavelength normalization of the undulator data was also confirmed by the observed signal in nanosecond time-resolved experiments. Single-line undulators, which are attractive for time-resolved experiments due to their high peak intensity and low polychromatic background, are compared with wigglers, based on data obtained on the same crystal. PMID:16609201

  15. Plasma code for astrophysical charge exchange emission at X-ray wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Liyi; Kaastra, Jelle; Raassen, A. J. J.

    2016-04-01

    Charge exchange X-ray emission provides unique insight into the interactions between cold and hot astrophysical plasmas. Besides its own profound science, this emission is also technically crucial to all observations in the X-ray band, since charge exchange with the solar wind often contributes a significant foreground component that contaminates the signal of interest. By approximating the cross sections resolved to n and l atomic subshells and carrying out complete radiative cascade calculation, we have created a new spectral code to evaluate the charge exchange emission in the X-ray band. Compared to collisional thermal emission, charge exchange radiation exhibits enhanced lines from large-n shells to the ground, as well as large forbidden-to-resonance ratios of triplet transitions. Our new model successfully reproduces an observed high-quality spectrum of comet C/2000 WM1 (LINEAR), which emits purely by charge exchange between solar wind ions and cometary neutrals. It demonstrates that a proper charge exchange model will allow us to probe the ion properties remotely, including charge state, dynamics, and composition, at the interface between the cold and hot plasmas.

  16. Positional characteristics of meter-decameter wavelength bursts associated with hard X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.; Gergely, T. E.; Kane, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    Isolated and grouped type III bursts have been observed in temporal association with impulsive hard X-ray bursts in the 26-154 keV range, down to frequencies as low as 30 MHz and out to a distance of 3.1 solar radii from the disk center. The bursts occurred in regions whose electron density may have been as much as 20 times higher than that of the Newkirk-Saito model. The present observations indicate that electron acceleration/injection occurs over a region covering a wide range of magnetic field lines. It is noted that, of the two gradual hard X-ray bursts observed in association with type IV bursts, one was accompanied by a type II event, while the other was not, although both exhibited the same characteristics. It is suggested that the gradual burst associated with a type IV only involved electrons which are trapped in the plasmoid which produces the meter-decameter emission, while another fraction of the population is trapped in the low-lying loops which produce the hard X-ray and centimeter radiation.

  17. Analysis of energy dispersive x-ray diffraction profiles for material identification, imaging and system control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Emily Jane

    2008-12-01

    This thesis presents the analysis of low angle X-ray scatter measurements taken with an energy dispersive system for substance identification, imaging and system control. Diffraction measurements were made on illicit drugs, which have pseudo- crystalline structures and thus produce diffraction patterns comprising a se ries of sharp peaks. Though the diffraction profiles of each drug are visually characteristic, automated detection systems require a substance identification algorithm, and multivariate analysis was selected as suitable. The software was trained with measured diffraction data from 60 samples covering 7 illicit drugs and 5 common cutting agents, collected with a range of statistical qual ities and used to predict the content of 7 unknown samples. In all cases the constituents were identified correctly and the contents predicted to within 15%. Soft tissues exhibit broad peaks in their diffraction patterns. Diffraction data were collected from formalin fixed breast tissue samples and used to gen erate images. Maximum contrast between healthy and suspicious regions was achieved using momentum transfer windows 1.04-1.10 and 1.84-1.90 nm_1. The resulting images had an average contrast of 24.6% and 38.9% compared to the corresponding transmission X-ray images (18.3%). The data was used to simulate the feedback for an adaptive imaging system and the ratio of the aforementioned momentum transfer regions found to be an excellent pa rameter. Investigation into the effects of formalin fixation on human breast tissue and animal tissue equivalents indicated that fixation in standard 10% buffered formalin does not alter the diffraction profiles of tissue in the mo mentum transfer regions examined, though 100% unbuffered formalin affects the profile of porcine muscle tissue (a substitute for glandular and tumourous tissue), though fat is unaffected.

  18. Scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive x ray analysis of impact residues on LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhard, Ronald P.; Durin, Christian; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    To better understand the nature of particulates in low-Earth orbit (LEO), and their effects on spacecraft hardware, we are analyzing residues found in impacts on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) tray clamps. LDEF experiment trays were held in place by 6 to 8 chromic-anodized aluminum (6061-T6) clamps that were fastened to the spacecraft frame using three stainless steel hex bolts. Each clamp exposed an area of approximately 58 sq cm (4.8 cm x 12.7 cm x .45 cm, minus the bolt coverage). Some 337 out of 774 LDEF tray clamps were archived at JSC and are available through the Meteoroid & Debris Special Investigation Group (M&D SIG). Optical scanning of clamps, starting with Bay/Row A01 and working toward H25, is being conducted at JSC to locate and document impacts as small as 40 microns. These impacts are then inspected by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (SEM/EDXA) to select those features which contain appreciable impact residue material. Based upon the composition of projectile remnants, and using criteria developed at JSC, we have made a preliminary discrimination between micrometeoroid and space debris residue-containing impact features. Presently, 13 impacts containing significant amounts of unmelted and semi-melted micrometeoritic residues were forwarded to Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) in France. At the CNES facilities, the upgraded impacts were analyzed using a JEOL T330A SEM equipped with a NORAN Instruments, Voyager X-ray Analyzer. All residues were quantitatively characterized by composition (including oxygen and carbon) to help understand interplanetary dust as possibly being derived from comets and asteroids.

  19. Clinical applications of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis in dermatology--an up-date

    SciTech Connect

    Forslind, B.

    1988-06-01

    Dermatological papers comprising scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis data published 1983 through 1986 in international journals are reviewed, as an update to our 1984 paper on Clinical applications of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis in dermatology. The present paper not only deals with a review of recent publications in this area but also presents the application of microincineration to hair and cryosectioned freeze-dried skin specimens. Examples of the increased contrast obtained in hair cross sections are presented and a discussion on the feasibility of microincineration at analysis of hair and skin cross sections is given. Particle probe analysis (EDX: energy dispersive X-ray analysis and PMP: proton microprobe analysis) as applied to hair and skin samples are presented with stress put on the proton probe analysis. The complementarity of EDX and PMP is demonstrated and future applications are suggested. 75 references.

  20. Shear Induced Alignment of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Dispersions via Small Angle X-Ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujari, Saswati; Burghardt, Wesley R.; Rahatekar, Sameer S.; Windle, Alan H.; Koziol, Krzysztof K.

    2008-07-01

    We report small-angle x-ray scattering studies of shear-induced alignment of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) dispersions. Uncured epoxy was used as a viscous, Newtonian suspending medium, and samples were prepared from `aligned' MWCNTs using methods previously reported (Rahatekar et al. J Rheol 40:599, 2006); here we emphasize measurements on rather dilute dispersions. Flow-induced alignment was studied in both the flow-gradient (1-2) plane, and the flow-vorticity (1-3) plane using, respectively, annular cone and plate and rotating disk x-ray shear cells. Small-angle x-ray scattering patterns were rendered anisotropic under application of shear flow. Measurements in the 1-2 plane indicate that the average MWCNT orientation direction is intermediate between the flow and gradient directions. Transient measurements of structure evolution enabled by high flux synchrotron radiation allowed study of time-dependent behavior following flow reversal and flow cessation.

  1. X-ray Scattering Measurements of Particle Orientation in a Sheared Polymer/Clay Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Pujari, Saswati; Dougherty, Leah; Mobuchon, Christoph; Carreau, Pierre J.; Heuzey, Marie-Claude; Burghardt, Wesley R.

    2012-01-20

    We report steady and transient measurements of particle orientation in a clay dispersion subjected to shear flow. An organically modified clay is dispersed in a Newtonian polymer matrix at a volume fraction of 0.02, using methods previously reported by Mobuchon et al. (Rheol Acta 46: 1045, 2007). In accord with prior studies, mechanical rheometry shows yield stress-like behavior in steady shear, while time dependent growth of modulus is observed following flow cessation. Measurements of flow-induced orientation in the flow-gradient plane of simple shear flow using small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS) are reported. Both SAXS and WAXS reveal increasing particle orientation as shear rate is increased. Partial relaxation of nanoparticle orientation upon flow cessation is well correlated with time-dependent changes in complex modulus. SAXS and WAXS data provide qualitatively similar results; however, some quantitative differences are attributed to differences in the length scales probed by these techniques.

  2. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis of runoff water and vegetation from abandoned mining of Pb Zn ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, A. F.; Queralt, I.; Carvalho, M. L.; Bordalo, M.

    2003-12-01

    The present work reports on the heavy metal content: Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd and Pb in running waters and vegetation around abandoned mining areas. Two species of mosses ( Dicranum sp. and Pleurocarpus sp.) and three different species of wild grass ( Bromus sp., Rumex sp. and Pseudoavena sp.) growing on the surrounding areas of old lead-zinc mines (Aran Valley, Pyrenees, NE Spain) have been analyzed. Both water and vegetation were collected in two different sampling places: (a) near the mine gallery water outlets and (b) on the landfill close to the abandoned mineral concentration factories. For the heavy metal content determination, two different techniques were used: total reflection X-ray fluorescence for water analysis and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence for vegetation study. Surface waters around mine outlets exhibit anomalous content of Co, Ni, Zn, Cd. Stream waters running on mining landfills exhibit higher Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb than those of the waters at the mine gallery outlets. The results allow us to assess the extent of the environmental impact of the mining activities on the water quality. The intake of these elements by vegetation was related with the sampling place, reflecting the metal water content and the substrate chemistry. Accumulation of metals in mosses is higher than those exhibited in wild grasses. Furthermore, different levels of accumulation were found in different wild grass. Rumex sp. presented the lowest metal concentrations, while Pseudoavena sp. reported the highest metal content.

  3. Hot Electron and X-ray Production from Intense Laser Irradiation of Wavelength-scale Polystyrene Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditmire, T.; Sumeruk, H. A.; Kneip, S.; Symes, D. R.; Churina, I. V.; Belolipetski, A. V.; Dyer, G.; Bernstein, A.; Donnelly, T. D.

    2008-04-01

    In an attempt to control the electric fields at the surface of a high intensity solid target we have studied hot electron generation and x-ray production from targets coated with microspheres. This work is motivated by the possibility that spheres with size comparable to the wavelength of the incident laser radiation can result in electric field enhancements through well know Mie resonances. This local field enhancement can then lead to more efficient electron generation. We investigated hard x-ray (above 100 keV) generation from copper and fused silica targets coated with a monolayer covering of polystyrene microspheres. We performed the experiment using the 20 TW THOR laser system at the University of Texas. We frequency doubled the laser to improve temporal contrast and irradiated the spheres with 400 nm pulses at an intensity of 2 x 1017 W/cm2. Hard X-ray emission from the plasma was observed using filtered NaI scintillation detectors and K-alpha emission was measured with a Von Hamos spectrometer. We illuminated polystyrene spheres of diameters 0.1 -2.9 microns on a glass substrate, with the 400 nm 100fs pulse, and find that there is a clear Mie enhancement in the field and hot electron generation for a specific range of sphere sizes.

  4. Rigorous quantitative elemental microanalysis by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS) with spectrum processing by NIST DTSA-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newbury, Dale E.; Ritchie, Nicholas W. M.

    2014-09-01

    Quantitative electron-excited x-ray microanalysis by scanning electron microscopy/silicon drift detector energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (SEM/SDD-EDS) is capable of achieving high accuracy and high precision equivalent to that of the high spectral resolution wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometer even when severe peak interference occurs. The throughput of the SDD-EDS enables high count spectra to be measured that are stable in calibration and resolution (peak shape) across the full deadtime range. With this high spectral stability, multiple linear least squares peak fitting is successful for separating overlapping peaks and spectral background. Careful specimen preparation is necessary to remove topography on unknowns and standards. The standards-based matrix correction procedure embedded in the NIST DTSA-II software engine returns quantitative results supported by a complete error budget, including estimates of the uncertainties from measurement statistics and from the physical basis of the matrix corrections. NIST DTSA-II is available free for Java-platforms at: http://www.cstl.nist.gov/div837/837.02/epq/dtsa2/index.html).

  5. Fast GPU-based absolute intensity determination for energy-dispersive X-ray Laue diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alghabi, F.; Send, S.; Schipper, U.; Abboud, A.; Pietsch, U.; Kolb, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for fast determination of absolute intensities in the sites of Laue spots generated by a tetragonal hen egg-white lysozyme crystal after exposure to white synchrotron radiation during an energy-dispersive X-ray Laue diffraction experiment. The Laue spots are taken by means of an energy-dispersive X-ray 2D pnCCD detector. Current pnCCD detectors have a spatial resolution of 384 × 384 pixels of size 75 × 75 μm2 each and operate at a maximum of 400 Hz. Future devices are going to have higher spatial resolution and frame rates. The proposed method runs on a computer equipped with multiple Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) which provide fast and parallel processing capabilities. Accordingly, our GPU-based algorithm exploits these capabilities to further analyse the Laue spots of the sample. The main contribution of the paper is therefore an alternative algorithm for determining absolute intensities of Laue spots which are themselves computed from a sequence of pnCCD frames. Moreover, a new method for integrating spectral peak intensities and improved background correction, a different way of calculating mean count rate of the background signal and also a new method for n-dimensional Poisson fitting are presented.We present a comparison of the quality of results from the GPU-based algorithm with the quality of results from a prior (base) algorithm running on CPU. This comparison shows that our algorithm is able to produce results with at least the same quality as the base algorithm. Furthermore, the GPU-based algorithm is able to speed up one of the most time-consuming parts of the base algorithm, which is n-dimensional Poisson fitting, by a factor of more than 3. Also, the entire procedure of extracting Laue spots' positions, energies and absolute intensities from a raw dataset of pnCCD frames is accelerated by a factor of more than 3.

  6. ENERGY-DISPERSIVE, X-RAY REFLECTIVITY DENSITY MEASUREMENTS OF POROUS SIO2 XEROGELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    X-ray reflectivity has been used to nondestructively measure the density of thin, porous, SiO2-based xerogels. Critical angle, defined by total external reflection, was measured for multiple x-ray energies to correct for sample misalignment error in me determination of the densit...

  7. Multi-element analysis of pyrite ores using polarized energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ustündağ, Zafer; Ustündağ, Ilknur; Kağan Kadioğlu, Yusuf

    2007-07-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry is used worldwide in geological material analysis. This study, applies polarized energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (PEDXRF) Spectrometer and compares in the samples of Rize-Cayeli and Mardin pyrite ores. The samples of pyrite ore were collected from the Rize and Mardin in Turkey. The prepared samples were analyzed using a PEDXRF spectrometer. The result of the analysis shows the presence of many elements including rare-earth elements (from Na to Th). The accuracy and precision of the technique for chemical analysis is demonstrated by analyzing USGS standards, GEOL, GBW 7109 and GBW-7309 sediment. PMID:17459714

  8. Multi-wavelength properties of IGR J05007-7047 (LXP 38.55) and identification as a Be X-ray binary pulsar in the LMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilopoulos, G.; Haberl, F.; Delvaux, C.; Sturm, R.; Udalski, A.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the results of a ˜40-d multi-wavelength monitoring of the Be X-ray binary system IGR J05007-7047 (LXP 38.55). During that period the system was monitored in the X-rays using the Swift telescope and in the optical with multiple instruments. When the X-ray luminosity exceeded 1036 erg s-1 we triggered an XMM-Newton ToO observation. Timing analysis of the photon events collected during the XMM-Newton observation reveals coherent X-ray pulsations with a period of 38.551(3) s (1σ), making it the 17th known high-mass X-ray binary pulsar in the LMC. During the outburst, the X-ray spectrum is fitted best with a model composed of an absorbed power law (Γ = 0.63) plus a high-temperature blackbody (kT ˜2 keV) component. By analysing ˜12 yr of available OGLE optical data we derived a 30.776(5) d optical period, confirming the previously reported X-ray period of the system as its orbital period. During our X-ray monitoring the system showed limited optical variability while its IR flux varied in phase with the X-ray luminosity, which implies the presence of a disc-like component adding cooler light to the spectral energy distribution of the system.

  9. High temperature monitoring of silicon carbide ceramics by confocal energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi

    2016-04-01

    In the present work, we presented an alternative method for monitoring of the oxidation situation of silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics at various high temperatures in air by measuring the Compton-to-Rayleigh intensity ratios (ICo/IRa) and effective atomic numbers (Zeff) of SiC ceramics with the confocal energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer. A calibration curve of the relationship between ICo/IRa and Zeff was established by using a set of 8 SiC calibration samples. The sensitivity of this approach is so high that it can be easily distinguished samples of Zeff differing from each other by only 0.01. The linear relationship between the variation of Zeff and the variations of contents of C, Si and O of SiC ceramics were found, and the corresponding calculation model of the relationship between the ΔZ and the ΔCC, ΔCSi, and ΔCO were established. The variation of contents of components of the tested SiC ceramics after oxidation at high temperature was quantitatively calculated based on the model. It was shown that the results of contents of carbon, silicon and oxygen obtained by this method were in good agreement with the results obtained by XPS, giving values of relative deviation less than 1%. It was concluded that the practicality of this proposed method for monitoring of the oxidation situation of SiC ceramics at high temperatures was acceptable.

  10. Elemental analysis of mining wastes by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, O.; Queralt, I.; Carvalho, M. L.; Garcia, G.

    2007-08-01

    An energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) tri-axial geometry experimental spectrometer has been employed to determine the concentrations of 13 different elements (K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr and Pb) in mine wastes from different depths of two mine tailings from the Cartagena-La Union (Spain) mining district. The elements were determined and quantified using the fundamental parameters method. The concentrations of Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb were compared to the values from the European and Spanish legislation to evaluate the environmental risk and to classify the wastes as inert wastes or as wastes that have to be control land-filled. The results obtained demonstrate that these wastes can be considered as inert for the considered elements, apart from the concentration levels of Zn and Pb. Whilst Zn slightly overpasses the regulatory levels, Pb mean value exceeds three to six times the value to be considered as Class I potential land-filling material.

  11. An energy dispersive x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics study of liquid dimethyl carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontrani, Lorenzo; Russina, Olga; Marincola, Flaminia Cesare; Caminiti, Ruggero

    2009-12-01

    In this work, we report on the first x-ray diffraction study on liquid dimethyl carbonate. Diffraction spectra were collected with an energy-dispersive instrument, whose wide Q-range allows the structure determination of weakly ordered systems (such as liquids). The structural correlation in this liquid ranges up to about 20 Å. The observed patterns are interpreted with a structural model derived from classical molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations were run using OPLS force field, only slightly modified to restrain bond distances to the experimental values. The model structure function and radial distribution functions, averaged among the productive trajectory frames, are in very good agreement with the corresponding experimental ones. Molecular dynamics results show that the deviations from C2v cis-cis structure, predicted by ab initio calculations and observed by electron diffraction in the gas phase, are small. By analyzing the intra- and intermolecular pair distribution functions, it was possible to assign the peaks of the experimental radial distribution function to specific structural correlations, and to compute the different average intermolecular coordination numbers. The intermolecular methyl-carbonyl oxygen distance is thoroughly discussed to assess the presence of weak C-H⋯ṡO hydrogen bonds.

  12. Microcalorimeter-type energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer for a transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Hara, Toru; Tanaka, Keiichi; Maehata, Keisuke; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Yamasaki, Noriko Y; Ohsaki, Mitsuaki; Watanabe, Katsuaki; Yu, Xiuzhen; Ito, Takuji; Yamanaka, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    A new energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) with a microcalorimeter detector equipped with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) has been developed for high- accuracy compositional analysis in the nanoscale. A superconducting transition-edge-sensor-type microcalorimeter is applied as the detector. A cryogen-free cooling system, which consists of a mechanical and a dilution refrigerator, is selected to achieve long-term temperature stability. In order to mount these detector and refrigerators on a TEM, the cooling system is specially designed such that these two refrigerators are separated. Also, the detector position and arrangement are carefully designed to avoid adverse affects between the superconductor detector and the TEM lens system. Using the developed EDS system, at present, an energy resolution of 21.92 eV full-width-at-half maximum has been achieved at the Cr K alpha line. This value is about seven times better than that of the current typical commercial Si(Li) detector, which is usually around 140 eV. The developed microcalorimeter EDS system can measure a wide energy range, 1-20 keV, at one time with this high energy resolution that can resolve peaks from most of the elements. Although several further developments will be needed to enable practical use, highly accurate compositional analysis with high energy resolution will be realized by this microcalorimeter EDS system. PMID:19717388

  13. Micro energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry study of dentin coating with nanobiomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Luís. Eduardo Silva; Nahorny, Sídnei; Marciano, Fernanda Roberta; Zanin, Hudson; Lobo, Anderson de Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    New biomaterials such as multi-walled carbon nanotubes oxide/graphene oxide (MWCNTO/GO), nanohydroxyapatite (nHAp) and combination of them together or not to acidulated phosphate fluoride gel (F) have been tested as protective coating before root dentin erosion. Fourteen bovine teeth were cleaned, polished, divided into two parts (n=28) and assigned to seven groups: (Control) - without previous surface treatment; F treatment; nHAp; MWCNTO/GO; F+nHAp; F+MWCNTO/GO and F+MWCNTO/GO/nHAp composites. Each sample had two sites of pre-treatments: acid etched area and an area without treatment. After the biomaterials application, the samples were submitted to six cycles (demineralization: orange juice, 10 min; remineralization: artificial saliva, 1 h). Micro energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μ-EDXRF) mapping area analyses were performed after erosive cycling on both sites (n=84). μ-EDXRF mappings showed that artificial saliva and MWCNTO/GO/nHAp/F composite treatments produced lower dentin demineralization than in the other groups. Exposed dentin tubules allowed better interaction of nanobiomaterials than in smear layer covered dentin. Association of fluoride with other biomaterials had a positive influence on acid etched dentin. MWCNTO/GO/nHAp/F composite treatment resulted in levels of demineralization similar to the control group.

  14. [Influence of the Experiment Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Measurement of Uranium by Different Excitation Source].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Chao; Ge, Liang-quan; Liu, Duan; Zhang, Qing-xian; Gu, Yi; Luo, Yao-yao; Zhao, Jian-kun

    2016-03-01

    Aiming at the self-excitation effect on the interference of measurements which exist in the process of Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence method for uranium measurement. To solve the problem of radioactive isotopes only used as excitation source in determination of uranium. Utilizing the micro X-ray tube to test Self-excitation effect to get a comparison of the results obtained by three different uranium ore samples--109 Cd, 241 Am and Mirco X-ray tube. The results showed that self-excitation effect produced the area measure of characteristic X-ray peak is less than 1% of active condition, also the interference of measurements can be negligible. Photoelectric effect cross-section excited by 109 Cd is higher, corresponding fluorescence yield is higher than excited by 241 Am as well due to characteristics X-ray energy of 109 Cd, 22.11 & 24.95 KeV adjacent to absorption edge energy of L(α), 21.75 KeV, based on the above, excitation efficiency by 109 Cd is higher than 241 Am; The fact that measurement error excited by 241 Am is significantly greater than by 109 Cd is mainly due to peak region overlap between L energy peaks of uranium and Scattering peak of 241 Am, 26.35 keV, These factors above caused the background of measured Spectrum higher; The error between the uranium content in ore samples which the X-ray tube as the excitation source and the chemical analysis results is within 10%. Conclusion: This paper come to the conclusion that the technical quality of uranium measurement used X-ray tube as excitation source is superior to that in radioactive source excitation mode. PMID:27400534

  15. Atomic inner-shell laser at 1.5-ångström wavelength pumped by an X-ray free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Hitoki; Inubushi, Yuichi; Nagamine, Kazunori; Michine, Yurina; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Mimura, Hidekazu; Kitamura, Hikaru; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yabashi, Makina

    2015-08-01

    Since the invention of the first lasers in the visible-light region, research has aimed to produce short-wavelength lasers that generate coherent X-rays; the shorter the wavelength, the better the imaging resolution of the laser and the shorter the pulse duration, leading to better temporal resolution in probe measurements. Recently, free-electron lasers based on self-amplified spontaneous emission have made it possible to generate a hard-X-ray laser (that is, the photon energy is of the order of ten kiloelectronvolts) in an ångström-wavelength regime, enabling advances in fields from ultrafast X-ray spectrosopy to X-ray quantum optics. An atomic laser based on neon atoms and pumped by a soft-X-ray (that is, a photon energy of less than one kiloelectronvolt) free-electron laser has been achieved at a wavelength of 14 nanometres. Here, we use a copper target and report a hard-X-ray inner-shell atomic laser operating at a wavelength of 1.5 ångströms. X-ray free-electron laser pulses with an intensity of about 1019 watts per square centimetre tuned to the copper K-absorption edge produced sufficient population inversion to generate strong amplified spontaneous emission on the copper Kα lines. Furthermore, we operated the X-ray free-electron laser source in a two-colour mode, with one colour tuned for pumping and the other for the seed (starting) light for the laser.

  16. Atomic inner-shell laser at 1.5-ångström wavelength pumped by an X-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Hitoki; Inubushi, Yuichi; Nagamine, Kazunori; Michine, Yurina; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Mimura, Hidekazu; Kitamura, Hikaru; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yabashi, Makina

    2015-08-27

    Since the invention of the first lasers in the visible-light region, research has aimed to produce short-wavelength lasers that generate coherent X-rays; the shorter the wavelength, the better the imaging resolution of the laser and the shorter the pulse duration, leading to better temporal resolution in probe measurements. Recently, free-electron lasers based on self-amplified spontaneous emission have made it possible to generate a hard-X-ray laser (that is, the photon energy is of the order of ten kiloelectronvolts) in an ångström-wavelength regime, enabling advances in fields from ultrafast X-ray spectrosopy to X-ray quantum optics. An atomic laser based on neon atoms and pumped by a soft-X-ray (that is, a photon energy of less than one kiloelectronvolt) free-electron laser has been achieved at a wavelength of 14 nanometres. Here, we use a copper target and report a hard-X-ray inner-shell atomic laser operating at a wavelength of 1.5 ångströms. X-ray free-electron laser pulses with an intensity of about 10(19) watts per square centimetre tuned to the copper K-absorption edge produced sufficient population inversion to generate strong amplified spontaneous emission on the copper Kα lines. Furthermore, we operated the X-ray free-electron laser source in a two-colour mode, with one colour tuned for pumping and the other for the seed (starting) light for the laser. PMID:26310765

  17. Line-coincidence schemes for producing laser action at soft-x-ray wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G.F.

    1983-01-12

    Line-coincidence schemes for producing laser action in the wavelength regime 100-30A are reviewed. Schemes involving pumping of 2..-->..4 transitions in neon-like ions are singled out as particularly attractive.

  18. Observation of a Quasiperiodic Pulsation in Hard X-Ray, Radio, and Extreme-ultraviolet Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Nakariakov, Valery M.; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2016-05-01

    We present a multiwavelength analysis of a quasiperiodic pulsation (QPP) observed in the hard X-ray (HXR), radio, and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) channels during an M1.9 flare that occurred on 2011 September 23-24. The nonthermal HXR emission in 25-50 keV observed by RHESSI shows five distinct impulsive peaks of decaying amplitude with a period of about 3 minutes. A similar QPP was observed in the microwave emission recorded by the Nobeyama Radioheliograph and Polarimeter in the 2, 3.75, 9.4, and 17 GHz channels. Interestingly, the 3-minute QPP was also observed in the metric and decimetric radio frequencies (25-180, 245, 610 MHz) as repetitive type III bursts. Multiwavelength observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Image Assembly, Hinode/SOT, and Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory/SECCHI suggest a fan-spine topology at the eruption site, associated with the formation of a quasi-circular ribbon during the flare. A small filament was observed below the fan loops before the flare onset. The filament rose slowly and interacted with the ambient field. This behavior was followed by an untwisting motion of the filament. Two different structures of the filament showed an approximately 3-minute periodic alternate rotation in the clockwise and counterclockwise directions. The 3-minute QPP was found to highly correlate with 3-minute oscillations in a nearby sunspot. We suggest that the periodic reconnection (modulated either by a sunspot slow-mode wave or by an untwisting filament) at a magnetic null point most likely causes the repetitive particle acceleration, generating the QPP observed in HXR, microwave, and type III radio bursts.

  19. Observation of a Quasiperiodic Pulsation in Hard X-Ray, Radio, and Extreme-ultraviolet Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Nakariakov, Valery M.; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2016-05-01

    We present a multiwavelength analysis of a quasiperiodic pulsation (QPP) observed in the hard X-ray (HXR), radio, and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) channels during an M1.9 flare that occurred on 2011 September 23–24. The nonthermal HXR emission in 25–50 keV observed by RHESSI shows five distinct impulsive peaks of decaying amplitude with a period of about 3 minutes. A similar QPP was observed in the microwave emission recorded by the Nobeyama Radioheliograph and Polarimeter in the 2, 3.75, 9.4, and 17 GHz channels. Interestingly, the 3-minute QPP was also observed in the metric and decimetric radio frequencies (25–180, 245, 610 MHz) as repetitive type III bursts. Multiwavelength observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Image Assembly, Hinode/SOT, and Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory/SECCHI suggest a fan-spine topology at the eruption site, associated with the formation of a quasi-circular ribbon during the flare. A small filament was observed below the fan loops before the flare onset. The filament rose slowly and interacted with the ambient field. This behavior was followed by an untwisting motion of the filament. Two different structures of the filament showed an approximately 3-minute periodic alternate rotation in the clockwise and counterclockwise directions. The 3-minute QPP was found to highly correlate with 3-minute oscillations in a nearby sunspot. We suggest that the periodic reconnection (modulated either by a sunspot slow-mode wave or by an untwisting filament) at a magnetic null point most likely causes the repetitive particle acceleration, generating the QPP observed in HXR, microwave, and type III radio bursts.

  20. Polarity characterization by anomalous x-ray dispersion of ZnO films and GaN lateral polar structures

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, Christopher T.; Sachet, Edward; Paisley, Elizabeth A.; Hoffmann, Marc P.; Rajan, Joseph; Collazo, Ramón; Sitar, Zlatko; Maria, Jon-Paul

    2014-01-28

    We demonstrate the use of anomalous x-ray scattering of constituent cations at their absorption edge, in a conventional Bragg-Brentano diffractometer, to measure absolutely and quantitatively the polar orientation and polarity fraction of unipolar and mixed polar wurtzitic crystals. In one set of experiments, the gradual transition between c+ and c− polarity of epitaxial ZnO films on sapphire as a function of MgO buffer layer thickness is monitored quantitatively, while in a second experiment, we map the polarity of a lateral polar homojunction in GaN. The dispersion measurements are compared with piezoforce microscopy images, and we demonstrate how x-ray dispersion and scanning probe methods can provide complementary information that can discriminate between polarity fractions at a material surface and polarity fractions averaged over the film bulk.

  1. Backscattered electron imaging and windowless energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis: a new technique for gallstone analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, H.S.; Lillemoe, K.D.; Magnuson, T.H.; Frasca, P.; Pitt, H.A. )

    1990-12-01

    Scanning electron microscopy with or without conventional energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis is currently used to identify gallstone microstructure and inorganic composition. Organic calcium salts are among many biliary constituents thought to have a role in gallstone nidation and growth. However, current analytical techniques which identify these salts are destructive and compromise gallstone microstructural data. We have developed a new technique for gallstone analysis which provides simultaneous structural and compositional identification of calcium salts within gallstones. Backscattered electron imaging is used to localize calcium within cholesterol at minimum concentrations of 0.01%. Windowless energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis produces elemental spectra of gallstone calcium salts which are qualitatively and quantitatively different. These combined techniques provide simultaneous structural and compositional information obtained from intact gallstone cross-sections and have been used to identify calcium salts in gallstones obtained at cholecystectomy from 106 patients.

  2. Application of the focusing x-ray spectrograph with crossed dispersion to investigations of X pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pikuz, S.A.; Song, B.M.; Shelkovenko, T.A.; Chandler, K.M.; Mitchell, M.D.; Hammer, D.A.

    2004-10-01

    A new focusing spectrograph configuration with crossed dispersion (FSCD) has been developed for use in X pinch experiments. This device solves the problem in a crystal spectrograph of the overlapping of reflected radiation in many orders. The x-ray radiation from a small source is dispersed by a transmission grating before it reaches the Bragg reflector (mica crystal). A large aperture (10 mmx10 mm), 0.5 {mu}m period gold transmission grating was made on a 0.5 {mu}m thick Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrate and combined with spherically bent mica crystals with radii of curvature of 100 mm or 186 mm. Results of FSCD application to plasma experiments with X pinch x-ray sources is presented.

  3. The Subaru-XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS). VIII. Multi-wavelength identification, optical/NIR spectroscopic properties, and photometric redshifts of X-ray sources†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Masayuki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Watson, Mike G.; Furusawa, Hisanori; Takata, Tadafumi; Simpson, Chris; Morokuma, Tomoki; Yamada, Toru; Ohta, Kouji; Iwamuro, Fumihide; Yabe, Kiyoto; Tamura, Naoyuki; Moritani, Yuuki; Takato, Naruhisa; Kimura, Masahiko; Maihara, Toshinori; Dalton, Gavin; Lewis, Ian; Lee, Hanshin; Curtis-Lake, Emma; Macaulay, Edward; Clarke, Frazer; Silverman, John D.; Croom, Scott; Ouchi, Masami; Hanami, Hitoshi; Díaz Tello, Jorge; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Fujishiro, Naofumi; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiro

    2015-10-01

    We report on the multi-wavelength identification of the X-ray sources found in the Subaru-XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) using deep imaging data covering the wavelength range between the far-UV and mid-IR (MIR). We select a primary counterpart of each X-ray source by applying the likelihood ratio method to R-band, 3.6 μm, near-UV, and 24 μm source catalogs as well as matching catalogs of active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates selected in 1.4 GHz radio and i '-band variability surveys. Once candidates for Galactic stars, ultra-luminous X-ray sources in a nearby galaxy, and clusters of galaxies are removed there are 896 AGN candidates in the sample. We conduct spectroscopic observations of the primary counterparts with multi-object spectrographs in the optical and NIR; 65% of the X-ray AGN candidates are spectroscopically identified. For the remaining X-ray AGN candidates, we evaluate their photometric redshift with photometric data in 15 bands. Utilizing the multi-wavelength photometric data of the large sample of X-ray-selected AGNs, we evaluate the stellar masses, M*, of the host galaxies of the narrow-line AGNs. The distribution of the stellar mass is remarkably constant from z = 0.1 to 4.0. The relation between M* and 2-10 keV luminosity can be explained with strong cosmological evolution of the relationship between the black hole mass and M*. We also evaluate the scatter of the UV-MIR spectral energy distribution (SED) of the X-ray AGNs as a function of X-ray luminosity and absorption by the nucleus. The scatter is compared with galaxies which have redshift and stellar mass distribution matched with the X-ray AGN. The UV-NIR (near-IR) SEDs of obscured X-ray AGNs are similar to those of the galaxies in the matched sample. In the NIR-MIR range, the median SEDs of X-ray AGNs are redder, but the scatter of the SEDs of the X-ray AGN broadly overlaps that of the galaxies in the matched sample.

  4. At-wavelength metrology facility for soft X-ray reflection optics.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, A; Bischoff, P; Eggenstein, F; Erko, A; Gaupp, A; Künstner, S; Mast, M; Schmidt, J-S; Senf, F; Siewert, F; Zeschke, Th; Schäfers, F

    2016-05-01

    A new Optics Beamline coupled to a versatile UHV reflectometer is successfully operating at BESSY-II. It is used to carry out at-wavelength characterization and calibration of in-house produced gratings and novel nano-optical devices as well as mirrors and multilayer systems in the UV and XUV spectral region. This paper presents most recent commissioning data of the beamline and shows their correlation with initial beamline design calculations. Special attention is paid to beamline key parameters which determine the quality of the measurements such as high-order suppression and stray light behavior. The facility is open to user operation. PMID:27250385

  5. Near-surface density profiling of Fe ion irradiated Si (100) using extremely asymmetric x-ray diffraction by variation of the wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Khanbabaee, B. Pietsch, U.; Facsko, S.; Doyle, S.

    2014-10-20

    In this work, we report on correlations between surface density variations and ion parameters during ion beam-induced surface patterning process. The near-surface density variations of irradiated Si(100) surfaces were investigated after off-normal irradiation with 5 keV Fe ions at different fluences. In order to reduce the x-ray probing depth to a thickness below 5 nm, the extremely asymmetrical x-ray diffraction by variation of wavelength was applied, exploiting x-ray refraction at the air-sample interface. Depth profiling was achieved by measuring x-ray rocking curves as function of varying wavelengths providing incidence angles down to 0°. The density variation was extracted from the deviations from kinematical Bragg angle at grazing incidence angles due to refraction of the x-ray beam at the air-sample interface. The simulations based on the dynamical theory of x-ray diffraction revealed that while a net near-surface density decreases with increasing ion fluence which is accompanied by surface patterning, there is a certain threshold of ion fluence to surface density modulation. Our finding suggests that the surface density variation can be relevant with the mechanism of pattern formation.

  6. EVOLUTION OF X-RAY AND FAR-ULTRAVIOLET DISK-DISPERSING RADIATION FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Ingleby, Laura; Calvet, Nuria; Miller, Jon; Bergin, Edwin; Hartmann, Lee; Hernandez, Jesus; Briceno, Cesar; Espaillat, Catherine E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu E-mail: ebergin@umich.edu E-mail: jesush@cida.ve E-mail: cespaillat@cfa.harvard.edu

    2011-04-15

    We present new X-ray and far-ultraviolet (FUV) observations of T Tauri stars covering the age range 1-10 Myr. Our goals are to observationally constrain the intensity of radiation fields responsible for evaporating gas from the circumstellar disk and to assess the feasibility of current photoevaporation models, focusing on X-ray and UV radiation. We greatly increase the number of 7-10 Myr old T Tauri stars observed in X-rays by including observations of the well-populated 25 Ori aggregate in the Orion OB1a subassociation. With these new 7-10 Myr objects, we confirm that X-ray emission remains constant from 1 to 10 Myr. We also show, for the first time, observational evidence for the evolution of FUV radiation fields with a sample of 56 accreting and non-accreting young stars spanning 1 Myr to 1 Gyr. We find that the FUV emission decreases on timescales consistent with the decline of accretion in classical T Tauri stars until reaching the chromospheric level in weak T Tauri stars and debris disks. Overall, we find that the observed strength of high-energy radiation is consistent with that required by photoevaporation models to dissipate the disks in timescales of approximately 10 Myr. Finally, we find that the high-energy fields that affect gas evolution are not similarly affecting dust evolution; in particular, we find that disks with inner clearings, transitional disks, have similar levels of FUV emission as full disks.

  7. Fast elemental screening of soil and sediment profiles using small-spot energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence: application to mining sediments geochemistry.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, Oscar; Queralt, Ignacio

    2010-09-01

    Elemental analysis of different sediment cores originating from the Cartagena-La Union mining district in Spain was carried out by means of a programmable small-spot energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer to study the distribution of heavy metals along soil profiles. Cores were obtained from upstream sediments of a mining creek, from the lowland sedimentation plain, and from a mining landfill dump (tailings pile). A programmable two-dimensional (2D) stage and a focal spot resolution of 600 μm allow us to obtain complete core mapping. Geochemical results were verified using a more powerful wavelength-dispersion X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) technique. The data obtained was processed in order to study the statistical correlations within the elemental compositions. The results obtained allow us to observe the differential in-depth distribution of heavy metals among the sampled zones. Dump site cores exhibit a homogeneous distribution of heavy metals, whereas the alluvial plain core shows accumulation of heavy metals in the upper part. This approach can be useful for the fast screening of heavy metals in depositional environments around mining sites. PMID:20828442

  8. Standardless Quantitative Electron-Excited X-ray Microanalysis by Energy-Dispersive Spectrometry: What Is Its Proper Role?

    PubMed

    Newbury

    1998-11-01

    : Electron beam X-ray microanalysis with semiconductor energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) performed with standards and calculated matrix corrections can yield quantitative results with a distribution such that 95% of analyses fall within +/-5% relative for major and minor constituents. Standardless methods substitute calculations for the standard intensities, based either on physical models of X-ray generation and propagation (first principles) or on mathematical fits to remotely measured standards (fitted standards). Error distributions have been measured for three different standardless analysis procedures with a suite of microanalysis standards including metal alloys, glasses, minerals, ceramics, and stoichiometric compounds. For the first-principles standardless procedure, the error distribution placed 95% of analyses within +/-50% relative, whereas for two commercial fitted standards procedures, the error distributions placed 95% of analyses within +/-25% relative. The implication of these error distributions for the accuracy of analytical results is considered, and recommendations for the use of standardless analysis are given. PMID:10087281

  9. Standardless Quantitative Electron-Excited X-ray Microanalysis by Energy-Dispersive Spectrometry: What Is Its Proper Role?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newbury, Dale E.

    1998-11-01

    : Electron beam X-ray microanalysis with semiconductor energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) performed with standards and calculated matrix corrections can yield quantitative results with a distribution such that 95% of analyses fall within ±5% relative for major and minor constituents. Standardless methods substitute calculations for the standard intensities, based either on physical models of X-ray generation and propagation (first principles) or on mathematical fits to remotely measured standards (fitted standards). Error distributions have been measured for three different standardless analysis procedures with a suite of microanalysis standards including metal alloys, glasses, minerals, ceramics, and stoichiometric compounds. For the first-principles standardless procedure, the error distribution placed 95% of analyses within ±50% relative, whereas for two commercial fitted standards procedures, the error distributions placed 95% of analyses within ±25% relative. The implication of these error distributions for the accuracy of analytical results is considered, and recommendations for the use of standardless analysis are given.

  10. Low energy x-ray spectra measured with a mercuric iodide energy dispersive spectrometer in a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Dabrowski, A.J.; Huth, G.C.; Bradley, J.G.; Conley, J.M.; Albee, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    A mercuric iodide energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer, with Peltier cooling provided for the detector and input field effect transistor, has been developed and tested in a scanning electron microscope. X-ray spectra were obtained with the 15 keV electron beam. An energy resolution of 225 eV (FWHM) for Mn-K/sub ..cap alpha../ at 5.9 keV and 195 eV (FWHM) for Mg-K line at 1.25 keV has been measured. Overall system noise level was 175 eV (FWHM). The detector system characterization with a carbon target demonstrated good energy sensitivity at low energies and lack of significant spectral artifacts at higher energies. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Low energy X-ray spectra measured with a mercuric iodide energy dispersive spectrometer in a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Huth, G. C.; Bradley, J. G.; Conley, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A mercuric iodide energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, with Peltier cooling provided for the detector and input field effect transistor, has been developed and tested in a scanning electron microscope. X-ray spectra were obtained with the 15 keV electron beam. An energy resolution of 225 eV (FWHM) for Mn-K(alpha) at 5.9 keV and 195 eV (FWHM) for the Mg-K line at 1.25 keV has been measured. Overall system noise level was 175 eV (FWHM). The detector system characterization with a carbon target demonstrated good energy sensitivity at low energies and lack of significant spectral artifacts at higher energies.

  12. [Energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry--a forensic chemistry method for detection of bullet metal residue in gunshot wounds].

    PubMed

    Havel, J; Zelenka, K

    2003-04-01

    The article describes using of energo-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) as the forensic method as the tool for detection of metals (gunshot residues--GSR) in connection with gunshot-wounds of persons. PMID:12874887

  13. X-ray monochromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An x-ray monochromator is described, wherin a housing supports a plurality of mirrors forming a plurality of opposed mirror faces in parallel with each other and having thereon multilayer coatings, with each of said pairs of mirror faces being provided with identical coatings which are different from the coatings on the other pairs of mirror faces such that each pair of mirror faces has a peak x-ray reflection at a different wavelength regime. The housing is moveable to bring into a polychromatic x-ray beam that pair of mirror faces having the best x-ray reflection for the desired wavelength, with the mirrors being pivotable to move the mirror faces to that angle of incidence at which the peak reflectivity of the desired wavelength x-rays occurs.

  14. High-Dispersion Spectroscopy of the X-Ray Transient RXTE J0421+560 (=CI Camelopardalis) during Outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Edward L.; Ivans, Inese I.; Welsh, William F.

    2002-02-01

    We obtained high-dispersion spectroscopy of CI Cam, the optical counterpart of XTE J0421+560, 2 weeks after the peak of its short outburst in 1998 April. The optical counterpart is a supergiant B[e] star that is emitting a two-component wind, a cool, low-velocity wind and a hot, high-velocity wind. The cool wind, which is the source of narrow emission lines of neutral and ionized metals, has a velocity of 32 km s-1 and a temperature near 8000 K. It is dense, roughly spherical, fills the space around the sgB[e] star, and, based on the size of an infrared-emitting dust shell around the system, extends to a radius between 13 and 50 AU. It carries away mass at a high rate, M>10-6Msolaryr-1. The hot wind has a velocity in excess of 2500 km s-1 and a temperature of 1.7+/-0.3×104 K. From an ultraviolet spectrogram of CI Cam obtained in 2000 March with Hubble Space Telescope, we derive a differential extinction E(B-V)=0.85+/-0.05. We show that the distance to CI Cam is greater than 5 kpc. Based on this revised distance, the X-ray luminosity at the peak of the outburst was L(2-25 keV)>3.0×1038 ergs s-1, making CI Cam one of the most luminous X-ray transients. The ratio of quiescent luminosity to peak luminosity in the 2-25 keV band is Lq/Lp<1.7×10-6. The compact star in CI Cam is immersed in the dense circumstellar wind from the sgB[e] star and burrows through the wind, producing little X-ray emission except for rare transient outbursts. This picture, a compact star traveling in a wide orbit through the dense circumstellar envelope of a sgB[e] star, occasionally producing transient X-ray outbursts, makes CI Cam unique among the known X-ray binaries. There is strong circumstantial evidence that the compact object is a black hole, not a neutron star. We speculate that the X-ray outburst was short because the accretion disk around the compact star is fed from a stellar wind and is smaller than disks fed by Roche lobe overflow. Based on observations made with the NASA

  15. Design and Performance of a TES X-ray Microcalorimeter Array for Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy on Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Haruka; Nagayoshi, K.; Hayashi, T.; Sakai, K.; Yamamoto, R.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Maehata, K.; Hara, T.

    2016-02-01

    We discuss the design and performance of a transition edge sensor (TES) X-ray microcalorimeter array for scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM)-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The TES X-ray microcalorimeter has better energy resolution compared to conventional silicon drift detector and STEM-EDS utilizing a TES detector makes it possible to map the distribution of elements on a specimen in addition to analyze the composition. The requirement for a TES detector is a high counting rate (> 20 kcps), wide energy band (0.5-15 keV) and good energy resolution (< 10 eV) full width at half maximum. The major improvement of this development is to increase the maximum counting rate. In order to accommodate the high counting rate, we adopted an 8 × 8 format, 64-pixel array and common biasing scheme for the readout method. We did all design and fabrication of the device in house. With the device we have fabricated most recently, the pulse decay time is 40 \\upmu s which is expected to achieve 50 kcps. For a single pixel, the measured energy resolution was 7.8 eV at 5.9 keV. This device satisfies the requirements of counting rate and energy resolution, although several issues remain where the performance must be confirmed.

  16. Design and Performance of a TES X-ray Microcalorimeter Array for Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy on Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Haruka; Nagayoshi, K.; Hayashi, T.; Sakai, K.; Yamamoto, R.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Maehata, K.; Hara, T.

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the design and performance of a transition edge sensor (TES) X-ray microcalorimeter array for scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM)-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The TES X-ray microcalorimeter has better energy resolution compared to conventional silicon drift detector and STEM-EDS utilizing a TES detector makes it possible to map the distribution of elements on a specimen in addition to analyze the composition. The requirement for a TES detector is a high counting rate (>20 kcps), wide energy band (0.5-15 keV) and good energy resolution (<10 eV) full width at half maximum. The major improvement of this development is to increase the maximum counting rate. In order to accommodate the high counting rate, we adopted an 8 × 8 format, 64-pixel array and common biasing scheme for the readout method. We did all design and fabrication of the device in house. With the device we have fabricated most recently, the pulse decay time is 40 μs which is expected to achieve 50 kcps. For a single pixel, the measured energy resolution was 7.8 eV at 5.9 keV. This device satisfies the requirements of counting rate and energy resolution, although several issues remain where the performance must be confirmed.

  17. Design and Performance of a TES X-ray Microcalorimeter Array for Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy on Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Haruka; Nagayoshi, K.; Hayashi, T.; Sakai, K.; Yamamoto, R.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Maehata, K.; Hara, T.

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the design and performance of a transition edge sensor (TES) X-ray microcalorimeter array for scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM)-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The TES X-ray microcalorimeter has better energy resolution compared to conventional silicon drift detector and STEM-EDS utilizing a TES detector makes it possible to map the distribution of elements on a specimen in addition to analyze the composition. The requirement for a TES detector is a high counting rate (>20 kcps), wide energy band (0.5-15 keV) and good energy resolution (<10 eV) full width at half maximum. The major improvement of this development is to increase the maximum counting rate. In order to accommodate the high counting rate, we adopted an 8 × 8 format, 64-pixel array and common biasing scheme for the readout method. We did all design and fabrication of the device in house. With the device we have fabricated most recently, the pulse decay time is 40 \\upmu s which is expected to achieve 50 kcps. For a single pixel, the measured energy resolution was 7.8 eV at 5.9 keV. This device satisfies the requirements of counting rate and energy resolution, although several issues remain where the performance must be confirmed.

  18. Bulk substrate porosity verification by applying Monte Carlo modeling and Castaing's formula using energy-dispersive x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung, Lai Chin; Fei, Cheong Choke; Mandeep, Jit Singh; Amin, Nowshad; Lai, Khin Wee

    2015-11-01

    The leadframe fabrication process normally involves additional thin-metal layer plating on the bulk copper substrate surface for wire bonding purposes. Silver, tin, and copper flakes are commonly adopted as plating materials. It is critical to assess the density of the plated metal layer, and in particular to look for porosity or voids underneath the layer, which may reduce the reliability during high-temperature stress. A fast, reliable inspection technique is needed to assess the porosity or void weakness. To this end, the characteristics of x-rays generated from bulk samples were examined using an energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) detector to examine the porosity percentage. Monte Carlo modeling was integrated with Castaing's formula to verify the integrity of the experimental data. Samples with different porosity percentages were considered to test the correlation between the intensity of the collected x-ray signal and the material density. To further verify the integrity of the model, conventional cross-sectional samples were also taken to observe the porosity percentage using Image J software measurement. A breakthrough in bulk substrate assessment was achieved by applying EDX for the first time to nonelemental analysis. The experimental data showed that the EDX features were not only useful for elemental analysis, but also applicable to thin-film metal layer thickness measurement and bulk material density determination. A detailed experiment was conducted using EDX to assess the plating metal layer and bulk material porosity.

  19. Rapid spectral and flux time variations in a solar burst observed at various dm-mm wavelengths and at hard X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zodivaz, A. M.; Kaufmann, P.; Correia, E.; Costa, J. E. R.; Takakura, T.; Cliver, E. W.; Tapping, K. F.

    1986-01-01

    A solar burst was observed with high sensitivity and time resolution at cm-mm wavelengths by two different radio observatories (Itapetinga and Algonquin), with high spectral time resolution at dm-mm wavelengths by patrol instruments (Sagamore Hill), and at hard X-rays (HXM Hinotori). At the onset of the major burst time structure there was a rapid rise in the spectral turnover frequency (from 5 to 15 GHz), in about 10s, coincident to a reduction of the spectral index in the optically thin part of the spectrum. The burst maxima were not time coincident at the optically thin radio frequencies and at the different hard X-ray energy ranges. The profiles at higher radio frequencies exhibited better time coincidence to the high energy X-rays. The hardest X-ray spectrum (-3) coincided with peak radio emission at the higher frequency (44 GHz). The event appeared to be built up by a first major injection of softer particles followed by other injections of harder particles. Ultrafast time structures were identified as superimposed on the burst emission at the cm-mm high sensitivity data at X-rays, with predominant repetition rates ranging from 2.0 to 3.5 Hz.

  20. Simultaneous Multi-Wavelength Observations of the TeV Blazar Mrk 421 during February March, 2003: X-Ray and NIR Correlated Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Alok C.; Acharya, B. S.; Bose, Debanjan; Chitnis, Varsha R.; Fan, Jun-Hui

    2008-08-01

    We report the result of simultaneous multi-wavelength observations of the TeV blazar Mrk 421 during February March 2003. We observed Mrk 421 using the Pachmarhi Array of Cerenkov Telescopes (PACT) of Tata Institute of Fundamental Research at Pachmarhi, India. Other simultaneous data were taken from the literature and public data archives. We have analyzed the high quality X-ray (2 20 keV) observations from the NASA Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). We obtained a possible correlated variability between X-ray and J band (1.25 μ) near infrared (NIR) wavelength. This is the first case of X-ray and NIR correlated variability in Mrk 421 or any high energy peaked (HBL) blazar. The correlated variability reported here indicates a similar origin for the NIR and X-ray emissions. The emission is not affected much by the environment of the surrounding medium of the central engine of Mrk 421. The observations are consistent with the shock-in-jet model for the emissions.

  1. A new background subtraction method for energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectra using a cubic spline interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Longtao; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Kai; Chen, Man; Peng, Shiqi; Zhao, Weigang; He, Jialin; Zhao, Guangcui

    2015-03-01

    A new method is presented to subtract the background from the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrum using a cubic spline interpolation. To accurately obtain interpolation nodes, a smooth fitting and a set of discriminant formulations were adopted. From these interpolation nodes, the background is estimated by a calculated cubic spline function. The method has been tested on spectra measured from a coin and an oil painting using a confocal MXRF setup. In addition, the method has been tested on an existing sample spectrum. The result confirms that the method can properly subtract the background.

  2. Probing Heterogeneous Chemistry of Individual Atmospheric Particles Using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy-Dispersive X-ray Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Krueger, Brenda J.; Grassian, Vicki H.; Iedema, Martin J.; Cowin, James P.; Laskin, Alexander

    2003-10-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of single-particle analysis to investigate the chemistry of isolated, individual particles of atmospheric relevance such as NaCl, sea salt, CaCO3, and SiO2. A variety of state-of-th-art scanning electron microscopy techniques, including environmental scanning electon microscopy and computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, were utilized for monitoring and quantifying phase transitions of individual particles, morphology, and compositional changes of individual particles as they react with nitric acid.

  3. In situ multi-element analyses by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence on varnishes of historical violins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echard, Jean-Philippe

    2004-10-01

    Varnishes of Italian violins and other historical stringed instruments have been analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The instruments whose varnishes were to be analyzed were chosen from the collection kept in Musée de la Musique in Paris. Direct analyses were performed on instrument varnishes, without any sampling and non-destructively, showing inorganic elements such as lead, mercury and iron that could be related to siccatives or pigments. Analytical results and their comparison with old formulae or traditional recipes of violin varnishes, as with the few previous analytical results, will be discussed.

  4. Benzyne-functionalized graphene and graphite characterized by Raman spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Magedov, Igor V.; Frolova, Lilia V.; Ovezmyradov, Mekan; Bethke, Donald; Shaner, Eric A.; Kalugin, Nikolai G.

    2012-01-01

    The benzyne functionalization of chemical vapor deposition grown large area graphene and graphite was performed using a mixture of o-trimethylsilylphenyl triflate and cesium fluoride that react with the carbon surface. The reaction requires at least 2 days of treatment before the appearance of Raman and energy-dispersive X-ray spectral signatures that verify modification. Raman spectra of modified graphene and graphite show a rich structure of lines corresponding to C=C-C, C-H, and low frequency modes of surface-attached benzyne rings. PMID:23505324

  5. Dose-rate controlled energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic mapping of the metallic components in a biohybrid nanosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuanyuan; Munro, Catherine J.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Edwards, Danny J.; Braunschweig, Adam B.; Knecht, Marc R.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we showcase that through precise control of the electron dose rate, state-of-the-art large solid angle energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy mapping in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope is capable of faithful and unambiguous chemical characterization of the Pt and Pd distribution in a peptide-mediated nanosystem. This low-dose-rate recording scheme adds another dimension of flexibility to the design of elemental mapping experiments, and holds significant potential for extending its application to a wide variety of beam sensitive hybrid nanostructures.

  6. Multi-wavelength coverage of state transitions in the new black hole X-ray binary swift J1910.2-0546

    SciTech Connect

    Degenaar, N.; Maitra, D.; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M.; Reis, R. C.; King, A. L.; Gültekin, K.; Cackett, E. M.; Bailyn, C. D.; Buxton, M. M.; MacDonald, R. K. D.; Fabian, A. C.; Fox, D. B.; Rykoff, E. S.

    2014-04-01

    Understanding how black holes accrete and supply feedback to their environment is one of the outstanding challenges of modern astrophysics. Swift J1910.2-0546 is a candidate black hole low-mass X-ray binary that was discovered in 2012 when it entered an accretion outburst. To investigate the binary configuration and the accretion morphology, we monitored the evolution of the outburst for ≅3 months at X-ray, UV, optical (B, V, R, I), and near-infrared (J, H, K) wavelengths using Swift and SMARTS. The source evolved from a hard to a soft X-ray spectral state with a relatively cold accretion disk that peaked at ≅0.5 keV. A Chandra/HETG spectrum obtained during this soft state did not reveal signatures of an ionized disk wind. Both the low disk temperature and the absence of a detectable wind could indicate that the system is viewed at relatively low inclination. The multi-wavelength light curves revealed two notable features that appear to be related to X-ray state changes. First, a prominent flux decrease was observed in all wavebands ≅ 1-2 weeks before the source entered the soft state. This dip occurred in (0.6-10 keV) X-rays ≅ 6 days later than at longer wavelengths, which could possibly reflect the viscous timescale of the disk. Second, about two weeks after the source transitioned back into the hard state, the UV emission significantly increased while the X-rays steadily decayed. We discuss how these observations may reflect changes in the accretion morphology, perhaps related to the quenching/launch of a jet or the collapse/recovery of a hot flow.

  7. Kramers-Kronig analysis of soft x-ray reflectivity data of platinum thin film in 40-200 Å wavelength region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Saurabh; Gupta, R. K.; Sinha, Mangalika; Yadav, P.; Singh, Amol; Modi, Mohammed H.

    2016-05-01

    Reflectivity beamline at Indus-1 synchrotron source is used to determine optical constants of a platinum thin film in the soft x-ray wavelength region of 40-200Å by applying Kramers-Kronig (KK) technique on R vs wavelength data. Upto 150Å wavelength region the results of KK analysis are found in good agreement with the Henke's optical constants and also with those obtained by the angle dependent reflectivity technique. A significant mismatch is observed above 150Å wavelength region which could be due to the presence of higher harmonics in the toroidal grating spectra of the reflectivity beamline.

  8. Detector solid angle formulas for use in x-ray energy dispersive spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Zaluzec, N. J.; Materials Science Division

    2009-01-01

    With the advent of silicon drift X-ray detectors, a range of new geometries has become possible in electron optical columns. Because of their compact size, these detectors can potentially achieve high geometrical collection efficiencies; however, using traditional approximations detector solid angle calculations rapidly break down and at times can yield nonphysical values. In this article we present generalized formulas that can be used to calculate the variation in detection solid angle for contemporary Si(Li) as well as new silicon drift configurations.

  9. Methodology toward 3D micro X-ray fluorescence imaging using an energy dispersive charge-coupled device detector.

    PubMed

    Garrevoet, Jan; Vekemans, Bart; Tack, Pieter; De Samber, Björn; Schmitz, Sylvia; Brenker, Frank E; Falkenberg, Gerald; Vincze, Laszlo

    2014-12-01

    A new three-dimensional (3D) micro X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) methodology based on a novel 2D energy dispersive CCD detector has been developed and evaluated at the P06 beamline of the Petra-III storage ring (DESY) in Hamburg, Germany. This method is based on the illumination of the investigated sample cross-section by a horizontally focused beam (vertical sheet beam) while fluorescent X-rays are detected perpendicularly to the sheet beam by a 2D energy dispersive (ED) CCD detector allowing the collection of 2D cross-sectional elemental images of a certain depth within the sample, limited only by signal self-absorption effects. 3D elemental information is obtained by a linear scan of the sample in the horizontal direction across the vertically oriented sheet beam and combining the detected cross-sectional images into a 3D elemental distribution data set. Results of the 3D μXRF analysis of mineral inclusions in natural deep Earth diamonds are presented to illustrate this new methodology. PMID:25346101

  10. Crystals for astronomical X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burek, A.

    1976-01-01

    Crystal spectrometric properties and the factors that affect their measurement are discussed. Theoretical and experimental results on KAP are summarized and theoretical results based on the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction are given for the acid phthalates as well as for the commonly used planes of ADP, PET and EDDT. Anomalous dispersion is found to be important for understanding the details of crystal Bragg reflection properties at long X-ray wavelengths and some important effects are pointed out. The theory of anomalous dispersion is applied to explain the anomalous reflectivity exhibited by KAP at 23.3 A.

  11. Energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction using an annular beam.

    PubMed

    Dicken, A J; Evans, J P O; Rogers, K D; Greenwood, C; Godber, S X; Prokopiou, D; Stone, N; Clement, J G; Lyburn, I; Martin, R M; Zioupos, P

    2015-05-18

    We demonstrate material phase identification by measuring polychromatic diffraction spots from samples at least 20 mm in diameter and up to 10 mm thick with an energy resolving point detector. Within our method an annular X-ray beam in the form of a conical shell is incident with its symmetry axis normal to an extended polycrystalline sample. The detector is configured to receive diffracted flux transmitted through the sample and is positioned on the symmetry axis of the annular beam. We present the experiment data from a range of different materials and demonstrate the acquisition of useful data with sub-second collection times of 0.5 s; equating to 0.15 mAs. Our technique should be highly relevant in fields that demand rapid analytical methods such as medicine, security screening and non-destructive testing. PMID:26074592

  12. Determination of trace elements in Syrian medicinal plants and their infusions by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khuder, A.; Sawan, M. Kh.; Karjou, J.; Razouk, A. K.

    2009-07-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) techniques suited well for a multi-element determination of K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb, and Sr in some Syrian medicinal plant species. The accuracy and the precision of both techniques were verified by analyzing the Standard Reference Materials (SRM) peach-1547 and apple leaves-1515. A good agreement between the measured concentrations of the previously mentioned elements and the certified values were obtained with errors less than 10.7% for TXRF and 15.8% for XRF. The determination of Br was acceptable only by XRF with an error less than 24%. Furthermore, the XRF method showed a very good applicability for the determination of K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, and Br in infusions of different Syrian medicinal plant species, namely anise ( Anisum vulgare), licorice root ( Glycyrrhiza glabra), and white wormwood ( Artemisia herba-alba).

  13. X-Ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, G. L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews instrumental developments and technique improvements in X-ray spectrometry, grouped into major topic areas of excitation, dispersion and detection, instrumentation and techniques, and quantitative analyses. Cites 162 references. (CS)

  14. Evidence for core–shell nanoclusters in oxygen dispersion strengthened steels measured using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Odette, G. R.; Segre, C. U.

    2014-02-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) dispersion strengthened by an ultra high density of Y–Ti–O enriched nano-features (NF) exhibit superior creep strength and the potential for high resistance to radiation damage. However, the detailed character of the NF, that precipitate from solid solution during hot consolidation of metallic powders mechanically alloyed with Y₂O₃, are not well understood. In order to clarify the nature of the NF, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) technique, including X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) were used to characterize the local structure of the Ti and Y atoms in both NFA powders and consolidated alloys. The powders were characterized in the as-received, as-milled and after annealing milled powders at 850, 1000 and 1150 °C. The consolidated alloys included powders hot isostatic pressed (HIPed) at 1150 °C and commercial vendor alloys, MA957 and J12YWT. The NFA XAS data were compared various Ti and Y-oxide standards. The XANES and EXAFS spectra for the annealed and HIPed powders are similar and show high temperature heat treatments shift the Y and Ti to more oxidized states that are consistent with combinations of Y₂Ti₂O₇ and, especially, TiO. However, the MA957 and J12YWT and annealed–consolidated powder data differ. The commercial vendor alloys results more closely resemble the as-milled powder data and all show that a significant fraction of substitutional Ti remains dissolved in the (BCC) ferrite matrix.

  15. Structure and dynamics of concentrated dispersions of polystyrene latex spheres in glycerol: Static and dynamic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumma, D.; Lurio, L. B.; Borthwick, M. A.; Falus, P.; Mochrie, S. G. J.

    2000-12-01

    X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering measurements are applied to characterize the dynamics and structure of concentrated suspensions of charge-stabilized polystyrene latex spheres dispersed in glycerol, for volume fractions between 2.7% and 52%. The static structures of the suspensions show essentially hard-sphere behavior. The short-time dynamics shows good agreement with predictions for the wave-vector-dependent collective diffusion coefficient, which are based on a hard-sphere model [C. W. J. Beenakker and P. Mazur, Physica A 126, 349 (1984)]. However, the intermediate scattering function is found to violate a scaling behavior found previously for a sterically stabilized hard-sphere suspension [P. N. Segre and P. N. Pusey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 771 (1996)]. Our measurements are parametrized in terms of a viscoelastic model for the intermediate scattering function [W. Hess and R. Klein, Adv. Phys. 32, 173 (1983)]. Within this framework, two relaxation modes are predicted to contribute to the decay of the dynamic structure factor, with mode amplitudes depending on both wave vector and volume fraction. Our measurements indicate that, for particle volume fractions smaller than about 0.30, the intermediate scattering function is well described in terms of single-exponential decays, whereas a double-mode structure becomes apparent for more concentrated systems.

  16. Structure and dynamics of concentrated dispersions of polystyrene latex spheres in glycerol: static and dynamic x-ray scattering

    PubMed

    Lumma; Lurio; Borthwick; Falus; Mochrie

    2000-12-01

    X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering measurements are applied to characterize the dynamics and structure of concentrated suspensions of charge-stabilized polystyrene latex spheres dispersed in glycerol, for volume fractions between 2.7% and 52%. The static structures of the suspensions show essentially hard-sphere behavior. The short-time dynamics shows good agreement with predictions for the wave-vector-dependent collective diffusion coefficient, which are based on a hard-sphere model [C. W. J. Beenakker and P. Mazur, Physica A 126, 349 (1984)]. However, the intermediate scattering function is found to violate a scaling behavior found previously for a sterically stabilized hard-sphere suspension [P. N. Segre and P. N. Pusey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 771 (1996)]. Our measurements are parametrized in terms of a viscoelastic model for the intermediate scattering function [W. Hess and R. Klein, Adv. Phys. 32, 173 (1983)]. Within this framework, two relaxation modes are predicted to contribute to the decay of the dynamic structure factor, with mode amplitudes depending on both wave vector and volume fraction. Our measurements indicate that, for particle volume fractions smaller than about 0.30, the intermediate scattering function is well described in terms of single-exponential decays, whereas a double-mode structure becomes apparent for more concentrated systems. PMID:11138124

  17. Determination of selenium at trace levels in geologic materials by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wahlberg, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    Low levels of selenium (0.1-500 ppm) in both organic and inorganic geologic materials can be semiquantitatively measured by isolating Se as a thin film for presentation to an energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Suitably pulverized samples are first digested by fusing with a mixture of Na2CO3 and Na2O2. The fusion cake is dissolved in distilled water, buffered with NH4Cl, and filtered to remove Si and the R2O3 group. A carrier solution of Na2TeO4, plus solid KI, hydrazine sulfate and Na2SO3, is added to the filtrate. The solution is then vacuum-filtered through a 0.45-??m pore-size filter disc. The filter, with the thin film of precipitate, is supported between two sheets of Mylar?? film for analysis. Good agreement is shown between data reported in this study and literature values reported by epithermal neutron-activation analysis and spectrofluorimetry. The method can be made quantitative by utilizing a secondary precipitation to assure complete recovery of the Se. The X-ray method offers fast turn-around time and a reasonably high production rate. ?? 1981.

  18. Study of soil aggregate breakdown dynamics under low dispersive ultrasonic energies with sedimentation and X-ray attenuation**

    PubMed Central

    Schomakers, Jasmin; Zehetner, Franz; Mentler, Axel; Ottner, Franz; Mayer, Herwig

    2016-01-01

    It has been increasingly recognized that soil organic matter stabilization is strongly controlled by physical binding within soil aggregates. It is therefore essential to measure soil aggregate stability reliably over a wide range of disruptive energies and different aggregate sizes. To this end, we tested high-accuracy ultrasonic dispersion in combination with subsequent sedimentation and X-ray attenuation. Three arable topsoils (notillage) from Central Europe were subjected to ultrasound at four different specific energy levels: 0.5, 6.7, 100 and 500 J cm−3, and the resulting suspensions were analyzed for aggregate size distribution by wet sieving (2 000-63 μm) and sedimentation/X-ray attenuation (63-2 μm). The combination of wet sieving and sedimentation technique allowed for a continuous analysis, at high resolution, of soil aggregate breakdown dynamics after defined energy inputs. Our results show that aggregate size distribution strongly varied with sonication energy input and soil type. The strongest effects were observed in the range of low specific energies (< 10 J cm−3), which previous studies have largely neglected. This shows that low ultrasonic energies are required to capture the full range of aggregate stability and release of soil organic matter upon aggregate breakdown. PMID:27099408

  19. Gold nephropathy. Ultrastructural, fluorescent, and energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Ainsworth, S.K.; Swain, R.P.; Watabe, N.; Brackett, N.C. Jr.; Pilia, P.; Hennigar, G.R.

    1981-07-01

    The nephrotic syndrome developed in a patient receiving therapy with gold for rheumatoid arthritis. The results of a histopathological examination of the renal biopsy specimen were unremarkable. Immunofluorescent studies showed deposits of immunoglobulins and C3 in a granular pattern in the glomerular basement membranes. Ultrastructurally, the discrete osmiophilic immune complexes were epimembranous. By x-ray microanalysis, gold that was complexed with sulfur was present in proximal tubular cytoplasmic vacuoles and nuclei. Gold and sulfur could not be demonstrated in glomerular epimembranous deposits. The results of these studies suggest that immune complex deposition does not involve gold and sulfur acting as haptens. Gold-salt therapy may result in damage to proximal tubules that leak renal tubular antigens, which in turn complex with autoantibody and produce an autoimmune membranous nephropathy. The evidence for this mechanism is not convincing. Although the data indicate an immune-complex cause for gold-salt nephropathy, the incident antigen (or antigens) and mechanism of action remain unidentified.

  20. Flash X-Ray measurements on the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean P.; Beresh, Steven J.; DeMauro, Edward Paisley; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-11-23

    The interaction of a Mach 1.67 shock wave with a dense particle curtain is quantified using flash radiography. These new data provide a view of particle transport inside a compressible, dense gas–solid flow of high optical opacity. The curtain, composed of 115-µm glass spheres, initially spans 87 % of the test section width and has a streamwise thickness of about 2 mm. Radiograph intensities are converted to particle volume fraction distributions using the Beer–Lambert law. The mass in the particle curtain, as determined from the X-ray data, is in reasonable agreement with that given from a simpler method using amore » load cell and particle imaging. Following shock impingement, the curtain propagates downstream and the peak volume fraction decreases from about 23 to about 4 % over a time of 340 µs. The propagation occurs asymmetrically, with the downstream side of the particle curtain experiencing a greater volume fraction gradient than the upstream side, attributable to the dependence of particle drag on volume fraction. Bulk particle transport is quantified from the time-dependent center of mass of the curtain. Furthermore, the bulk acceleration of the curtain is shown to be greater than that predicted for a single 115-µm particle in a Mach 1.67 shock-induced flow.« less

  1. Flash X-Ray measurements on the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean P.; Beresh, Steven J.; DeMauro, Edward Paisley; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-11-23

    The interaction of a Mach 1.67 shock wave with a dense particle curtain is quantified using flash radiography. These new data provide a view of particle transport inside a compressible, dense gas–solid flow of high optical opacity. The curtain, composed of 115-µm glass spheres, initially spans 87 % of the test section width and has a streamwise thickness of about 2 mm. Radiograph intensities are converted to particle volume fraction distributions using the Beer–Lambert law. The mass in the particle curtain, as determined from the X-ray data, is in reasonable agreement with that given from a simpler method using a load cell and particle imaging. Following shock impingement, the curtain propagates downstream and the peak volume fraction decreases from about 23 to about 4 % over a time of 340 µs. The propagation occurs asymmetrically, with the downstream side of the particle curtain experiencing a greater volume fraction gradient than the upstream side, attributable to the dependence of particle drag on volume fraction. Bulk particle transport is quantified from the time-dependent center of mass of the curtain. Furthermore, the bulk acceleration of the curtain is shown to be greater than that predicted for a single 115-µm particle in a Mach 1.67 shock-induced flow.

  2. Flash X-ray measurements on the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean P.; Beresh, Steven J.; DeMauro, Edward P.; Pruett, Brian O.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of a Mach 1.67 shock wave with a dense particle curtain is quantified using flash radiography. These new data provide a view of particle transport inside a compressible, dense gas-solid flow of high optical opacity. The curtain, composed of 115-µm glass spheres, initially spans 87 % of the test section width and has a streamwise thickness of about 2 mm. Radiograph intensities are converted to particle volume fraction distributions using the Beer-Lambert law. The mass in the particle curtain, as determined from the X-ray data, is in reasonable agreement with that given from a simpler method using a load cell and particle imaging. Following shock impingement, the curtain propagates downstream and the peak volume fraction decreases from about 23 to about 4 % over a time of 340 µs. The propagation occurs asymmetrically, with the downstream side of the particle curtain experiencing a greater volume fraction gradient than the upstream side, attributable to the dependence of particle drag on volume fraction. Bulk particle transport is quantified from the time-dependent center of mass of the curtain. The bulk acceleration of the curtain is shown to be greater than that predicted for a single 115-µm particle in a Mach 1.67 shock-induced flow.

  3. Examination of the Thermal Transformation of Chrysotile by Using Dispersion Staining and Conventional X-ray Diffraction Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crummett, C. D.; Candela, P. A.; Wylie, A. G.; Earnest, D. J.

    2004-12-01

    Chrysotile has been used industrially as a component of refractory products, and in friction products, such as brake linings. Examining the decomposition or transformation of chrysotile as a function of time and temperature will help clarify the characteristics of particulates released during processes such as automotive braking. Previous studies have reported that the thermal treatment of chrysotile alters both its surface and structure, resulting in deviations from its natural properties, possibly reducing its biological activity (Langer, 2003: Reg Tox Pharm, v38, p71). In past studies, the nonequilibrium thermal decomposition of chrysotile has been investigated by using static dehydration, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis. These studies suggest that the thermal transformation of chrysotile follows a two step sequence of dehydroxylation/dehydration and recrystallization where (1) chrysotile yields forsterite + silica + water with (2) forsterite + silica later forming enstatite (Ball and Taylor, 1963: Mineral. Mag. v33, p467, Brindley and Hayami, 1965: Mineral. Mag. v35, p189). In this research the decomposition of chrysotile from Thetford Quebec was studied. Samples were heated isothermally in air at temperatures from 200° C to 1000° C. After heating for up to 24 hours the refractive indices of remaining chrysotile fibers were measured by using dispersion staining. In addition, reaction products were identified by optical methods, electron probe microanalysis, and X-ray diffraction performed after the termination of the experiment. Preliminary results show that there is no change in optical properties of chrysotile heated to 400° C for 24 hours. From 400° C to 575° C for 24 hours, the index of refraction increases parallel to the length of the fiber from 1.552 to 1.560. From 400° C to 575° C for 24 hours, the index of refraction perpendicular to the length of the fiber varies irregularly from 1.538-1.548. The

  4. Development of W/C soft x-ray multilayer mirror by ion beam sputtering (IBS) system for below 50A wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, A.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2012-06-25

    A home-made Ion Beam Sputtering (IBS) system has been developed in our laboratory. Using the IBS system single layer W and single layer C film has been deposited at 1000eV Ar ion energy and 10mA ion current. The W-film has been characterized by grazing Incidence X-ray reflectrometry (GIXR) technique and Atomic Force Microscope technique. The single layer C-film has been characterized by Spectroscopic Ellipsometric technique. At the same deposition condition 25-layer W/C multilayer film has been deposited which has been designed for using as mirror at 30 Degree-Sign grazing incidence angle around 50A wavelength. The multilayer sample has been characterized by measuring reflectivity of CuK{alpha} radiation and soft x-ray radiation around 50A wavelength.

  5. Hot electron and x-ray production from intense laser irradiation of wavelength-scale polystyrene spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Sumeruk, H. A.; Kneip, S.; Symes, D. R.; Churina, I. V.; Belolipetski, A. V.; Dyer, G.; Landry, J.; Bansal, G.; Bernstein, A.; Donnelly, T. D.; Karmakar, A.; Pukhov, A.; Ditmire, T.

    2007-06-15

    Hot electron and x-ray production from solid targets coated with polystyrene-spheres which are irradiated with high-contrast, 100 fs, 400 nm light pulses at intensity up to 2x10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} have been studied. The peak hard x-ray signal from uncoated fused silica targets is an order of magnitude smaller than the signal from targets coated with submicron sized spheres. The temperature of the x-rays in the case of sphere-coated targets is twice as hot as that of uncoated glass. A sphere-size scan of the x-ray yield and observation of a peak in both the x-ray production and temperature at a sphere diameter of 0.26 {mu}m, indicate that these results are consistent with Mie enhancements of the laser field at the sphere surface and multipass stochastic heating of the hot electrons in the oscillating laser field. These results also match well with particle-in-cell simulations of the interaction.

  6. Final Report, DOE Award Number DE-FG02-02ER45964, Electromagnetic Properties of Matter at X-ray Wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, David Y

    2007-02-28

    We report results of a collaborative study of photon and charged-particle interactions with matter between the University of Vermont and Argonne and Brookhaven National Laboratories. A major goal was to extend the study of electromagnetic properties of selected materials to as wide a spectral range as possible. This broad approach discloses systematic trends not apparent in isolated measurements and exploits the power of dispersion analysis and sum-rule constraints. Emphasis was largely on UV and X-ray processes and capitalized on the wide range of photon energies available at NSLS. A key finding is that, under favorable circumstances, dispersion theory relates dispersive processes (e.g. refractive index, dielectric constant) to spectral moments of absorptive processes. This appears to be a new method in optics; it yields significant simplifications and provides a precise, model-independent characterization of optical materials. Problems addressed included a) x-ray magnetooptics; b) UV/soft-x-ray processes in insulators and their contribution to visible dispersion; c) demonstration of moments/dispersion analysis in glasses and applications to fiber-optic systems; d) the optical constants of silicon and their application to the stopping power of silicon for charged-particles. Results include; Resolution of a long-standing conflict over the relation between x-ray Faraday rotation and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Specifically, the Kramers-Kronig relations must be generalized to account for the breaking of time-reversal symmetry by magnetic fields. Experimental reports to the contrary were shown to be inconclusive. Reanalysis of x-ray Faraday rotation data supports the generalization; Demonstration that the optical properties of dielectrics in their region of transparency are determined by a series expansion in spectral moments of the dielectric’s infrared and ultraviolet absorption spectra. Application of this to silicate glasses clarifies the role of glass

  7. X-ray Photon Counting Using 100 MHz Ready-Made Silicon P-Intrinsic-N X-ray Diode and Its Application to Energy-Dispersive Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Hajime; Watanabe, Manabu; Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Osawa, Akihiro; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Kusachi, Shinya; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira

    2013-07-01

    X-ray photons are directly detected using a 100 MHz ready-made silicon P-intrinsic-N X-ray diode (Si-PIN-XD). The Si-PIN-XD is shielded using an aluminum case with a 25-µm-thick aluminum window and a BNC connector. The photocurrent from the Si-PIN-XD is amplified by charge sensitive and shaping amplifiers, and the event pulses are sent to a multichannel analyzer (MCA) to measure X-ray spectra. At a tube voltage of 90 kV, we observe K-series characteristic X-rays of tungsten. Photon-counting computed tomography (PC-CT) is accomplished by repeated linear scans and rotations of an object, and projection curves of the object are obtained by linear scanning at a tube current of 2.0 mA. The exposure time for obtaining a tomogram is 10 min with scan steps of 0.5 mm and rotation steps of 1.0°. At a tube voltage of 90 kV, the maximum count rate is 150 kcps. We carry out PC-CT using gadolinium media and confirm the energy-dispersive effect with changes in the lower level voltage of the event pulse using a comparator.

  8. Measurement of Trace Constituents by Electron-Excited X-Ray Microanalysis with Energy-Dispersive Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Newbury, Dale E; Ritchie, Nicholas W M

    2016-06-01

    Electron-excited X-ray microanalysis performed with scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) has been used to measure trace elemental constituents of complex multielement materials, where "trace" refers to constituents present at concentrations below 0.01 (mass fraction). High count spectra measured with silicon drift detector EDS were quantified using the standards/matrix correction protocol embedded in the NIST DTSA-II software engine. Robust quantitative analytical results for trace constituents were obtained from concentrations as low as 0.000500 (mass fraction), even in the presence of significant peak interferences from minor (concentration 0.01≤C≤0.1) and major (C>0.1) constituents. Limits of detection as low as 0.000200 were achieved in the absence of peak interference. PMID:27329308

  9. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis of Si sidewall surface etched by deep-reactive ion etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsutani, Akihiro; Nishioka, Kunio; Sato, Mina

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the composition of a passivation film on a sidewall etched by deep-reactive ion etching (RIE) using SF6/O2 and C4F8 plasma, by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. It was found that the compositions of carbon and fluorine in the passivation film on the etched sidewall depend on the width and depth of the etched trench. It is important to understand both the plasma behavior and the passivation film composition to carry out fabrication by deep-RIE. We consider that these results of the EDX analysis of an etched sidewall will be useful for understanding plasma behavior in order to optimize the process conditions of deep-RIE.

  10. Sodium lauryl sulfate enhances nickel penetration through guinea-pig skin. Studies with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, M.; Sagstroem, S.R.; Roomans, G.M.; Forslind, B.

    1989-03-01

    The effect of sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), a common ingredient of detergents, on the penetration of nickel through the stratum corneum in the guinea-pig skin model was studied with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) to evaluate the barrier-damaging properties of this common detergent. The EDX technique allows a simultaneous determination of physiologically important elements, e.g., Na, Mg, P, Cl, K, Ca and S in addition to Ni at each point of measurement in epidermal cell strata. Our results show that SLS reduces the barrier function to Ni-ion penetration of the stratum corneum. In addition we have shown that EDX allows analysis of the influence of different factors involved in nickel penetration through the skin by giving data on the physiological effects on the epidermal cells caused by the applied substances.

  11. Trace elemental analysis of school chalk using energy dispersive X-ray florescence spectroscopy (ED-XRF)

    SciTech Connect

    Maruthi, Y. A.; Das, N. Lakshmana; Ramprasad, S.; Ram, S. S.; Sudarshan, M.

    2015-08-28

    The present studies focus the quantitative analysis of elements in school chalk to ensure the safety of its use. The elements like Calcium (Ca), Aluminum (Al), Iron (Fe), Silicon (Si) and Chromium (Cr) were analyzed from settled chalk dust samples collected from five classrooms (CD-1) and also from another set of unused chalk samples collected from local market (CD-2) using Energy Dispersive X-Ray florescence(ED-XRF) spectroscopy. Presence of these elements in significant concentrations in school chalk confirmed that, it is an irritant and occupational hazard. It is suggested to use protective equipments like filtered mask for mouth, nose and chalk holders. This study also suggested using the advanced mode of techniques like Digital boards, marker boards and power point presentations to mitigate the occupational hazard for classroom chalk.

  12. Trace elemental analysis of school chalk using energy dispersive X-ray florescence spectroscopy (ED-XRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruthi, Y. A.; Das, N. Lakshmana; Ramprasad, S.; Ram, S. S.; Sudarshan, M.

    2015-08-01

    The present studies focus the quantitative analysis of elements in school chalk to ensure the safety of its use. The elements like Calcium (Ca), Aluminum (Al), Iron (Fe), Silicon (Si) and Chromium (Cr) were analyzed from settled chalk dust samples collected from five classrooms (CD-1) and also from another set of unused chalk samples collected from local market (CD-2) using Energy Dispersive X-Ray florescence(ED-XRF) spectroscopy. Presence of these elements in significant concentrations in school chalk confirmed that, it is an irritant and occupational hazard. It is suggested to use protective equipments like filtered mask for mouth, nose and chalk holders. This study also suggested using the advanced mode of techniques like Digital boards, marker boards and power point presentations to mitigate the occupational hazard for classroom chalk

  13. Dendrochemical patterns of calcium, zinc, and potassium related to internal factors detected by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kevin T.; Balouet, Jean Christophe; Shortle, Walter C.; Chalot, Michel; Beaujard, François; Grudd, Håkan; Vroblesky, Don A.; Burkem, Joel G.

    2014-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) provides highly sensitive and precise spatial resolution of cation content in individual annual growth rings in trees. The sensitivity and precision have prompted successful applications to forensic dendrochemistry and the timing of environmental releases of contaminants. These applications have highlighted the need to distinguish dendrochemical effects of internal processes from environmental contamination. Calcium, potassium, and zinc are three marker cations that illustrate the influence of these processes. We found changes in cation chemistry in tree rings potentially due to biomineralization, development of cracks or checks, heartwood/sapwood differentiation, intra-annual processes, and compartmentalization of infection. Distinguishing internal from external processes that affect dendrochemistry will enhance the value of EDXRF for both physiological and forensic investigations.

  14. Electron probe energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDXA) in the investigation of fossil bone: the case of Java man.

    PubMed

    Bartsiokas, A; Day, M H

    1993-05-22

    Doubts about the attribution of the Trinil femur to Homo erectus on anatomical grounds have a long history. Here, for the first time, published stratigraphic information and chemical evidence based on the Ca/P ratios confirm that the anatomical doubts are justified. The Trinil femur apparently belongs to a more recent stratum above the 'fossil layer' (Hauptknochenschicht, HK) in which the Trinil calotte was found. It is concluded that the Trinil Femur I belongs to Homo sapiens, whereas the Trinil Femora II-V and the calotte belong to H. erectus. The chemical evidence derives from the use of electron probe energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDXA), a technique that can be virtually non-destructive and therefore may be used on scarce fossil evidence. PMID:8391701

  15. Energy dispersive x-ray analysis of the cornea. Application to paraffin sections of normal and diseased corneas

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, M.R.; Streeten, B.W.

    1984-11-01

    The distribution of chemical elements in the normal human cornea was studied by energy dispersive x-ray analysis and scanning electron microscopy of routinely prepared paraffin sections. Calcium, phosphorus, and sulfur were consistently present in quantities above background and varied in concentration regionally. Analysis of fresh-frozen tissue, an approximation of the in vivo state, gave a similar elemental profile to paraffin sections, except for the loss of diffusable electrolytes in the latter. After fixation, S was the most abundant element and was highest in Descemet's membrane. Corneas with granular, lattice, macular, and Fuchs endothelial dystrophies, band keratopathy, and spheroidal degeneration were also examined. Characteristic patterns of abnormal S and Ca distribution were found in each of the dystrophies. The relative proportions of Ca, P, and S gave diagnostic profiles for distinguishing band keratopathy and spheroidal degeneration.

  16. Inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of phonon dispersion and lifetimes in PbTe1-x Se x alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhiting; Li, Mingda; Ren, Zhensong; Ma, Hao; Alatas, Ahmet; Wilson, Stephen D.; Li, Ju

    2015-09-01

    PbTe1-x Se x alloys are of special interest to thermoelectric applications. Inelastic x-ray scattering determination of phonon dispersion and lifetimes along the high symmetry directions for PbTe1-x Se x alloys are presented. By comparing with calculated results based on the virtual crystal model calculations combined with ab initio density functional theory, the validity of virtual crystal model is evaluated. The results indicate that the virtual crystal model is overall a good assumption for phonon frequencies and group velocities despite the softening of transverse acoustic phonon modes along [1 1 1] direction, while the treatment of lifetimes warrants caution. In addition, phonons remain a good description of vibrational modes in PbTe1-x Se x alloys.

  17. Non-destructive analysis of didymium and praseodymium molybdate crystals using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, C. K.; Joseph, Daisy; Pandita, Sanjay; Kotru, P. N.

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of didymium (Di) and praseodymium molybdate crystals were carried out using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The assigned empirical chemical formulae of the composites were tested and verified by the EDXRF technique by estimating experimental major elemental concentration ratios. On the Basis of these ratios, the established formulae for some of the composite materials have been verified and suggestions made for their refinement. Non-destructive technique used in this analysis enables to retain the original crystal samples and makes rapid simultaneous scan of major elements such as La, Pr, Ned and Mo as well as impurities such as Ce. Absence of samarium(Sm) in the spectrum during analysis of didymium molybdate crystals indicated an incomplete growth of mixed rare earth single crystal. These crystals (e.g.,Di) are shown to be of modified stoichiometry with Ce as trace impurity.

  18. Dendrochemical patterns of calcium, zinc, and potassium related to internal factors detected by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF).

    PubMed

    Smith, Kevin T; Balouet, Jean Christophe; Shortle, Walter C; Chalot, Michel; Beaujard, François; Grudd, Håkan; Vroblesky, Don A; Burken, Joel G

    2014-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) provides highly sensitive and precise spatial resolution of cation content in individual annual growth rings in trees. The sensitivity and precision have prompted successful applications to forensic dendrochemistry and the timing of environmental releases of contaminants. These applications have highlighted the need to distinguish dendrochemical effects of internal processes from environmental contamination. Calcium, potassium, and zinc are three marker cations that illustrate the influence of these processes. We found changes in cation chemistry in tree rings potentially due to biomineralization, development of cracks or checks, heartwood/sapwood differentiation, intra-annual processes, and compartmentalization of infection. Distinguishing internal from external processes that affect dendrochemistry will enhance the value of EDXRF for both physiological and forensic investigations. PMID:24034830

  19. Effect of x-ray energy dispersion in digital subtraction imaging at the iodine K-edge--A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Prino, F.; Ceballos, C.; Cabal, A.; Sarnelli, A.; Gambaccini, M.; Ramello, L.

    2008-01-15

    The effect of the energy dispersion of a quasi-monochromatic x-ray beam on the performance of a dual-energy x-ray imaging system is studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations using MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) version 2.6.0. In particular, the case of subtraction imaging at the iodine K-edge, suitable for angiographic imaging application, is investigated. The average energies of the two beams bracketing the iodine K-edge are set to the values of 31.2 and 35.6 keV corresponding to the ones obtained with a compact source based on a conventional x-ray tube and a mosaic crystal monochromator. The energy dispersion of the two beams is varied between 0 and 10 keV of full width at half-maximum (FWHM). The signal and signal-to-noise ratio produced in the simulated images by iodine-filled cavities (simulating patient vessels) drilled in a PMMA phantom are studied as a function of the x-ray energy dispersion. The obtained results show that, for the considered energy separation of 4.4 keV, no dramatic deterioration of the image quality is observed with increasing x-ray energy dispersion up to a FWHM of about 2.35 keV. The case of different beam energies is also investigated by means of fast simulations of the phantom absorption.

  20. Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis, fluoride release, and antimicrobial properties of glass ionomer cements indicated for atraumatic restorative treatment

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Sudhanshu; Tiwari, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare constituents of glass powder, fluoride release, and antimicrobial properties of new atraumatic restorative treatment material with zirconia fillers and conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC) type IX. Materials and Methods: Thisin vitro study comparing Zirconomer and Fuji IX was executed in three parts: (1) energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis of glass powders (2) analysis of fluoride release at 1st, 3rd, 7th, 15th, and 30th day, and (3) antimicrobial activity against Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus casei, and Candida albicans at 48 hours. Data was analyzed using unpaired t-test and two way analysis of variance followed by least significant difference post hoc test. A P value of < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis revealed that, in both Zirconomer and Fuji IX glass powders, mean atomic percentage of oxygen was more than 50%. According to the weight percentage, zirconium in Zirconomer and silica in Fuji IX were the second main elements. Calcium, zinc, and zirconium were observed only in Zirconomer. At all the time intervals, statistically significant higher amount of fluoride release was observed with Zirconomer than Fuji IX. At 48 hours, mean ± standard deviation (SD) of zone of inhibition against Streptococcus mutans was 11.14 ± 0.77 mm and 8.51 ± 0.43 mm for Zirconomer and Fuji IX, respectively. Against Lactobacillus casei, it was 14.06 ± 0.71 mm for Zirconomer and 11.70 ± 0.39 mm for Fuji IX. No antifungal activity was observed against Candida albicans by Zirconomer and Fuji IX. Conclusion: Zirconomer had higher antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus casei, which may be attributed to its composition and higher fluoride release. However, it failed to show antifungal effect againstCandida albicans. PMID:27583226

  1. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis of titanium dioxide nanoparticle distribution after intravenous and subcutaneous injection in mice.

    PubMed

    Patri, Anil; Umbreit, Thomas; Zheng, J; Nagashima, K; Goering, Peter; Francke-Carroll, Sabine; Gordon, Edward; Weaver, James; Miller, Terry; Sadrieh, Nakissa; McNeil, Scott; Stratmeyer, Mel

    2009-11-01

    In an effort to understand the disposition and toxicokinetics of nanoscale materials, we used EDS (energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy) to detect and map the distribution of titanium dioxide (TiO2) in tissue sections from mice following either subcutaneous (s.c.) or intravenous (i.v.) injection. TiO2 nanoparticles were administered at a dose of 560 mg/kg (i.v.) or 5600 mg/kg (s.c.) to Balb/c female mice on two consecutive days. Tissues (liver, kidney, lung, heart, spleen, and brain) were examined by light microscopy, TEM (transmission electron microscopy), SEM (scanning electron microscopy), and EDS following necropsy one day after treatment. Particle agglomerates were detected by light microscopy in all tissues examined, EDS microanalysis was used to confirm that these tissues contained elemental titanium and oxygen. The TEM micrographs and EDS spectra of the aggregates were compared with in vitro measurements of TiO2 nanoparticle injection solution (i.e., in water). The nanoparticles were also characterized using dynamic light scattering in water, 10 mM NaCl, and phosphate buffered saline (PBS). In low ionic strength solvents (water and 10 mM NaCl), the TiO2 particles had average hydrodynamic diameters ranging from 114-122 nm. In PBS, however, the average diameter increases to 1-2 microm, likely due to aggregation analogous to that observed in tissue by TEM and EDS. This investigation demonstrates the suitability of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for detection of nanoparticle aggregates in tissues and shows that disposition of TiO2 nanoparticles depends on the route of administration (i.v. or s.c.). PMID:19626582

  2. The Chandra Multi-Wavelength Project (ChaMP): A Serendipitous X-Ray Survey Using Chandra Archival Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Belinda; Lavoie, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The launch of the Chandra X-ray Observatory in July 2000 opened a new era in X-ray astronomy. Its unprecedented, < 1" spatial resolution and low background is providing views of the X-ray sky 10-100 times fainter than previously possible. We have begun to carry out a serendipitous survey of the X-ray sky using Chandra archival data to flux limits covering the range between those reached by current satellites and those of the small area Chandra deep surveys. We estimate the survey will cover about 8 sq.deg. per year to X-ray fluxes (2-10 keV) in the range 10(exp -13) - 6(exp -16) erg cm2/s and include about 3000 sources per year, roughly two thirds of which are expected to be active galactic nuclei (AGN). Optical imaging of the ChaMP fields is underway at NOAO and SAO telescopes using g',r',z' colors with which we will be able to classify the X-ray sources into object types and, in some cases, estimate their redshifts. We are also planning to obtain optical spectroscopy of a well-defined subset to allow confirmation of classification and redshift determination. All X-ray and optical results and supporting optical data will be place in the ChaMP archive within a year of the completion of our data analysis. Over the five years of Chandra operations, ChaMP will provide both a major resource for Chandra observers and a key research tool for the study of the cosmic X-ray background and the individual source populations which comprise it. ChaMP promises profoundly new science return on a number of key questions at the current frontier of many areas of astronomy including solving the spectral paradox by resolving the CXRB, locating and studying high redshift clusters and so constraining cosmological parameters, defining the true, possibly absorbed, population of quasars and studying coronal emission from late-type stars as their cores become fully convective. The current status and initial results from the ChaMP will be presented.

  3. A Multi-Wavelength Study of Sgr A*: The Correlation of X-ray, Near-IR and Sub-millimeter Emitting Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Bushouse, H.; Dowell, C. D.; Wardle, M.; Roberts, D.; Heinke, C.; Bower, G. C.; Vila Vilaro, B.; Shapiro, S.; Goldwurm, A.; Belanger, G.

    2005-12-01

    I review highlights of the results of two observing campaigns in 2004, designed to investigate the correlation of flare activity from Sgr A* between radio wavelengths and soft gamma-ray energies. We report the detection of a simultaneous X-ray and near-IR flare, as well as a sub-millimeter and near-IR flare using the NICMOS of HST, XMM-Newton and CSO. We explain the X-ray emission as arising from the population of near-IR-synchrotron-emitting relativistic particles, scattering sub-millimeter seed photons within the inner 10 RSch radius of Sgr A* up to X-rays and soft gamma-rays, detected by INTEGRAL. Using the inverse Compton scattering picture, we explain the lack of one-to-one X-ray counterparts to near-IR flares by the variation of the magnetic field and the spectral index distributions of the nonthermal particles. Lastly, we present a composite spectrum of Sgr A* based on these observing campaigns.

  4. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M.; Stearns, Daniel S.; Hawryluk, Andrew M.; Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    1989-01-01

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

  5. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, N.M.; Stearns, D.G.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1987-08-07

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5--50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20--250 A. The support membrane is 10--200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window. 6 figs.

  6. Characterizing dispersion and fragmentation of fractal, pyrogenic silica nanoagglomerates by small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Wengeler, R; Wolf, F; Dingenouts, N; Nirschl, H

    2007-04-10

    Typical characterization of nanoparticle dispersion and compounding processes by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and TEM lack quantitative information on fractal structure, aggregation number, and specific surface area. In this work a synchrotron ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) investigation on diffusion flame and 'Aerosil' silica powders, as well as on their desagglomeration by high-pressure liquid dispersion (200-1400 bar) is presented. Primary particle size, polydispersity, and specific surface area are measured for powders, stirred-in dispersions, and after high-pressure processing with identical results, showing the in-situ applicability of USAXS. These parameters, as well as the hard aggregate mass fractal dimension, with typically Df = 2.15 representing reaction-limited cluster aggregation, are determined by synthesis process conditions. They are unchanged even at the highest hydrodynamic stresses; thus, neither comminution nor agglomerate restructuring nor re-agglomeration occurs. Fragmentation reflects in decreasing radii of gyration, which are compared to mobility equivalent radii from DLS in agreement with theory. PMID:17371058

  7. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometry fixedbeam or overscan x-ray microanalysis of particles can miss the real structure: x-ray spectrum image mapping reveals the true nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newbury, Dale E.; Ritchie, Nicholas W. M.

    2013-05-01

    The typical strategy for analysis of a microscopic particle by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometry x-ray microanalysis (SEM/EDS) is to use a fixed beam placed at the particle center or to continuously overscan to gather an "averaged" x-ray spectrum. While useful, such strategies inevitably concede any possibility of recognizing microstructure within the particle, and such fine scale structure is often critical for understanding the origins, behavior, and fate of particles. Elemental imaging by x-ray mapping has been a mainstay of SEM/EDS analytical practice for many years, but the time penalty associated with mapping with older EDS technology has discouraged its general use and reserved it more for detailed studies that justified the time investment. The emergence of the high throughput, high peak stability silicon drift detector (SDD-EDS) has enabled a more effective particle mapping strategy: "flash" x-ray spectrum image maps can now be recorded in seconds that capture the spatial distribution of major (concentration, C > 0.1 mass fraction) and minor (0.01 <= C <= 0.1) constituents. New SEM/SDD-EDS instrument configurations feature multiple SDDs that view the specimen from widely spaced azimuthal angles. Multiple, simultaneous measurements from different angles enable x-ray spectrometry and mapping that can minimize the strong geometric effects of particles. The NIST DTSA-II software engine is a powerful aid for quantitatively analyzing EDS spectra measured individually as well as for mapping information (available free for Java platforms at: http://www.cstl.nist.gov/div837/837.02/epq/dtsa2/index.html).

  8. New parallel wavelength-dispersive spectrometer based on scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Erko, Alexei; Firsov, Alexander; Gubzhokov, Renat; Bjeoumikhov, Anjuar; Günther, Andreas; Langhoff, Norbert; Bretschneider, Mario; Höhn, Yvonne; Wedell, Reiner

    2014-07-14

    A new wavelength - dispersive X-ray spectrometer for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been developed. This spectrometer can cover an energy range from 50 eV to 1120 eV by using an array made of seventeen reflection zone plates. Soft X-ray emission spectra of simple elements of Li, Be, B, C, N, Ti, V, O, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Ga were measured. The overall energy resolving power on the order of E/ΔE ~80 to 160 has been demonstrated. Spectrometer with 200 reflection zone plates has been used as a multi-channel analyser in the energy range of 100 - 1000 eV for quasi - continuous spectra measurements. The predicted energy-resolving power on the order of E/ΔE = 50 has been achieved in the entire energy range. PMID:25090506

  9. Spatial dispersion and clustering of soil structure through lacunarity of X-ray CT images of soil macropore volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San José Martínez, Fernando; Caniego, Javier; García-Gutiérrez, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    Lacunarity can be seen as a scale dependent measure of heterogeneity or texture ―in terms of image analysis― that was first introduced to quantify different patterns of dispersion and clustering that display geometrical objects with the same fractal dimension. Notwithstanding, lacunarity functions have been revealed as means to measure the deviation of object's geometrical structure from translational invariance beyond self-similarity and fractal geometry. In this work, we will explore how lacunarity quantifies different patterns of dispersion and clustering of different geometrical structures of soil macropore volumes imaged by X-ray computed tomography. Samples extracted from columns were collected at the experimental farm "Finca La Grajera" in La Rioja (Spain), property of La Rioja Regional Government (northern Spain). The vineyard selected was established in 1996. During the 1996 to 2004 period, the soil management was conventional tillage. Before the vineyard was established in 1996, a pasture-legume-cereal rotation was used. In 2004 an experiment was established with different types of soil cover management in between. On December 2010 columns were extracted vertically by percussion drilling between rows of the vineyard.

  10. Evaluation of microstructural parameters of oxide dispersion strengthened steels from X-ray diffraction profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasenko, Svetlana; Benediktovitch, Andrei; Ulyanenkova, Tatjana; Uglov, Vladimir; Skuratov, Vladimir; O'Connell, Jacques; Neethling, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    The microstructural parameters of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels from measured diffraction profiles were evaluated using an approach where the complex oxide nanoparticles (Y2Ti2O7 and Y4Al2O9) are modeled as spherical inclusions in the steel matrix with coherent or incoherent boundaries. The proposed method enables processing of diffraction data from materials containing spherical inclusions in addition to straight dislocations, and taking into account broadening due to crystallite size and instrumental effects. The parameters of crystallite size distribution modeled by a lognormal distribution function (the parameters m and σ), the strain anisotropy parameter q, the dislocation density ρ, the dislocation arrangement parameter M, the density of oxide nanoparticles ρnp and the nanoparticle radius r0 were determined for the ODS steel samples. The results obtained are in good agreement with the results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM).