Science.gov

Sample records for wavelength dispersive x-ray

  1. A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Nordlund, Dennis; Tran, Rosalie; Montanez, Paul; Delor, James; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive hard x-ray spectrometer with high-energy resolution and large solid angle collection is described. The instrument is specifically designed for time-resolved applications of x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and x-ray Raman scattering (XRS) at X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL) and synchrotron radiation facilities. It also simplifies resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) studies of the whole 2d RIXS plane. The spectrometer is based on the Von Hamos geometry. This dispersive setup enables an XES or XRS spectrum to be measured in a single-shot mode, overcoming the scanning needs of the Rowland circle spectrometers. In conjunction with the XFEL temporal profile and high-flux, it is a powerful tool for studying the dynamics of time-dependent systems. Photo-induced processes and fast catalytic reaction kinetics, ranging from femtoseconds to milliseconds, will be resolvable in a wide array of systems circumventing radiation damage. PMID:22852678

  2. 12.141 Electron Microprobe Analysis by Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry, January (IAP) 2006

    E-print Network

    Chatterjee, Nilanjan

    Introduction to the theory of x-ray microanalysis through the electron microprobe including ZAF matrix corrections. Techniques to be discussed are wavelength and energy dispersive spectrometry, scanning backscattered ...

  3. Detection limits for actinides in a monochromatic, wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Michael L; Havrilla, George J

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments in x-ray optics have made it possible to examine the L x-rays of actinides using doubly-curved crystals in a bench-top device. A doubly-curved crystal (DCC) acts as a focusing monochromatic filter for polychromatic x-rays. A Monochromatic, Wavelength-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (MWDXRF) instrument that uses DCCs to measure Cm and Pu in reprocessing plant liquors was proposed in 2007 by the authors at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A prototype design of this MWDXRF instrument was developed in collaboration with X-ray Optical Systems Inc. (XOS), of East Greenbush, New York. In the MWDXRF instrument, x-rays from a Rhodium-anode x-ray tube are passed through a primary DCC to produce a monochromatic beam of 20.2-keV photons. This beam is focused on a specimen that may contain actinides. The 20.2-keV interrogating beam is just above the L3 edge of Californium; each actinide (with Z = 90 to 98) present in the specimen emits characteristic L x-rays as the result of L3-shell vacancies. In the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRf, these x-rays enter a secondary DCC optic that preferentially passes 14.961-keV photons, corresponding to the L-alpha-1 x-ray peak of Curium. In the present stage of experimentation, Curium-bearing specimens have not been analyzed with the prototype MWDXRF instrument. Surrogate materials for Curium include Rubidium, which has a K-beta-l x-ray at 14.961 keV, and Yttrium, which has a K-alpha-1 x-ray at 14.958 keV. In this paper, the lower limit of detection for Curium in the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRF instrument is estimated. The basis for this estimate is described, including a description of computational models and benchmarking techniques used. Detection limits for other actinides are considered, as well as future safeguards applications for MWDXRF instrumentation.

  4. High gain, Fast Scan, Broad Spectrum Parallel Beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for SEM

    SciTech Connect

    OHara, David

    2009-05-08

    During contract # DE-FG02-ER83545, Parallax Research, Inc. developed a High gain, Fast Scan Broad Spectrum Parallel beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for use on Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEM). This new spectrometer allows very fast high resolution elemental analysis of samples in an electron microscope. By comparison to previous WDS spectrometers, it can change from one energy position to another very quickly and has an extended range compared to some similar products.

  5. Wavelength dispersing devices for soft and ultrasoft x-ray spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Tomoya; Ryon, R.W.; Shoji, Takashi

    1984-01-01

    Monochromatization combining total reflection by a selected mirror and an appropriate filter offered an alternative approach in order to increase measurable intensity with reasonable spectral resolution. Recently, the use of synthetic multilayers, which are prepared by sputter/evaporation techniques, has been introduced for the detection of soft and ultrasoft x-rays. Studies on the use of these new wavelength dispersing devices have been conducted and it has been found that the reflectivity of these devices is very high compared with single crystals and soap multilayers and that their resolving power is fairly good. This report makes comparisons regarding efficiency of reflection, resolving power and x-ray analytical problems for practical applications among long spacing single crystals, soap multilayers, total reflection combined with a selected mirror and filtering and synthetic multilayers. The x-ray analytical capablities are shown based upon a standard x-ray fluorescence spectrometer equipped with a sealed-off x-ray tube and a gas flow proportional counter with thin film detector window.

  6. A controlled dispersion parallel wavelength x ray spectrometer for electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiori, C. E.; Wight, S. A.; Romig, A. D., Jr.

    1991-04-01

    A new technique is described for the detection of x rays in electron column instruments used in microanalysis. In electron column instruments, the point source of x rays is produced by the interaction of a focused electron beam with the sample. Neither of the conventional methods, wavelength dispersive (WDS) nor energy dispersive (EDS) based spectrometry, is optimized for low Z element quantitative analysis. In WDS applications, where the analyte elements are Be through P, chemical effects complicate the x ray measurement process. Peak positions and shapes are altered, sometimes very strongly, by the electron configurations of the analyte atoms and neighboring atoms. In these cases, the ideal spectrometer would profile the peak and some small amount of continuum on either side of the peak such that an accurate peak area could be calculated. Present WDS spectrometers are serial in nature and cannot directly measure peak areas, often causing errors in the determination of light element concentrations. Bastin and co-workers have developed an elegant method to provide accurate area determinations, using the serial spectrometer, by a three point procedure. The parallel wavelength dispersive spectrometer (PWDS) proposed here is ideally suited for those applications.

  7. Evaluation on the stability of Hg in ABS disk CRM during measurements by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ohata, Masaki; Kidokoro, Toshihiro; Hioki, Akiharu

    2012-01-01

    The stability of Hg in an acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene disk certified reference material (ABS disk CRM, NMIJ CRM 8116-a) during measurements by wavelength dispersion X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF) analysis was evaluated in this study. The XRF intensities of Hg (L(?)) and Pb (L(?)) as well as the XRF intensity ratios of Hg (L(?))/Pb (L(?)) observed under different X-ray tube current conditions as well as their irradiation time were examined to evaluate the stability of Hg in the ABS disk CRM. The observed XRF intensities and the XRF intensity ratios for up to 32 h of measurements under 80 mA of X-ray tube current condition were constant, even though the surface of the ABS disk CRM was charred by the X-ray irradiation with high current for a long time. Moreover, the measurements on Hg and Pb in the charred disks by an energy dispersive XRF (ED-XRF) spectrometer showed constant XRF intensity ratios of Hg (L(?))/Pb (L(?)). From these results, Hg in the ABS disk CRM was evaluated to be sufficiently stable for XRF analysis. PMID:23149612

  8. 12.141 Electron Microprobe Analysis by Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry, January IAP 2010

    E-print Network

    Chatterjee, Nilanjan

    2010-01-01

    This lab-oriented course introduces the student to the subject of X-ray spectrometry and micro-scale chemical quantitative analysis of solid samples through an intensive series of hands-on laboratory exercises that use the ...

  9. High Gain, Fast Scan, Broad Spectrum, Parallel Beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for SEM

    SciTech Connect

    David OHara; Dr. Eric Lochmer

    2003-09-12

    Parallax Research, Inc. proposes to produce a new type of x-ray spectrometer for use with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) that would have the energy resolution of WDS and the ease of use of EDS with sufficient gain for lower energies that it can be used at low beam currents as is EDS. Parallax proposes to do this by development of new multiple reflection x-ray collimation optics, new diffractor technology, new detector technology and new scan algorithms.

  10. Wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis using fundamental parameter approach of Catha edulis and other related plant samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaltout, Abdallah A.; Moharram, Mohammed A.; Mostafa, Nasser Y.

    2012-01-01

    This work is the first attempt to quantify trace elements in the Catha edulis plant (Khat) with a fundamental parameter approach. C. edulis is a famous drug plant in east Africa and Arabian Peninsula. We have previously confirmed that hydroxyapatite represents one of the main inorganic compounds in the leaves and stalks of C. edulis. Comparable plant leaves from basil, mint and green tea were included in the present investigation as well as trifolium leaves were included as a non-related plant. The elemental analyses of the plants were done by Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (WDXRF) spectroscopy. Standard-less quantitative WDXRF analysis was carried out based on the fundamental parameter approaches. According to the standard-less analysis algorithms, there is an essential need for an accurate determination of the amount of organic material in the sample. A new approach, based on the differential thermal analysis, was successfully used for the organic material determination. The obtained results based on this approach were in a good agreement with the commonly used methods. Depending on the developed method, quantitative analysis results of eighteen elements including; Al, Br, Ca, Cl, Cu, Fe, K, Na, Ni, Mg, Mn, P, Rb, S, Si, Sr, Ti and Zn were obtained for each plant. The results of the certified reference materials of green tea (NCSZC73014, China National Analysis Center for Iron and Steel, Beijing, China) confirmed the validity of the proposed method.

  11. Effectiveness of activated carbon disk for the analysis of iodine in water samples using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junseok; An, Jinsung; Kim, Joo-Ae; Yoon, Hye-On

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometry combined with an activated carbon (AC) disk was developed for the determination of total iodine concentrations in water samples. Dissolved iodine species (i.e., I(-) and IO3(-)) in water samples were preconcentrated on the AC disk and directly analyzed by WDXRF spectrometry. The adsorption behavior of I(-) and IO3(-) on the AC disk was assessed at varying pH levels (4, 6, and 8). The AC disks completely retained the I(-) and IO3(-) for all the pH levels tested. The calibration curve obtained from the iodine concentrations (i.e., 0, 20, 200, and 400?g) of AC disks and the measured X-ray intensity from the WDXRF analysis showed a good linearity (R(2)=0.9960), with a relatively low limit of detection (0.575?g). The durability of the AC disk for repeatable measurements was also assessed to validate the sustainability of the proposed method and consequently the measured X-ray intensity for the AC disks was constant until 8d of analysis time. The accuracy of the proposed AC-WDXRF method was confirmed by measuring iodine concentration spiked in drinking water using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The proposed method is simple, rapid, efficient, and environmental friendly for iodine analysis in water samples. As a precursor of disinfection by products (DBPs), it is important to determine the total iodine concentrations in raw water. PMID:26117241

  12. Fabrication of high-throughput critical-angle X-ray transmission gratings for wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Bruccoleri, Alexander Robert

    2013-01-01

    The development of the critical-angle transmission (CAT) grating seeks both an order of magnitude improvement in the effective area, and a factor of three increase in the resolving power of future space-based, soft x-ray ...

  13. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, Peter A. (Arvada, CO)

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focussing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points.

  14. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focusing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points. 3 figs.

  15. Simultaneous detection of electronic structure changes from two elements of a bifunctional catalyst using wavelength-dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy and in situ electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Gul, Sheraz; Ng, Jia Wei Desmond; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Anzenberg, Eitan; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Gorlin, Yelena; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zwart, Petrus H; Zhang, Jin Z; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal K; Jaramillo, Thomas F; Yano, Junko

    2015-04-14

    Multielectron catalytic reactions, such as water oxidation, nitrogen reduction, or hydrogen production in enzymes and inorganic catalysts often involve multimetallic clusters. In these systems, the reaction takes place between metals or metals and ligands to facilitate charge transfer, bond formation/breaking, substrate binding, and release of products. In this study, we present a method to detect X-ray emission signals from multiple elements simultaneously, which allows for the study of charge transfer and the sequential chemistry occurring between elements. K? X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) probes charge and spin states of metals as well as their ligand environment. A wavelength-dispersive spectrometer based on the von Hamos geometry was used to disperse K? signals of multiple elements onto a position detector, enabling an XES spectrum to be measured in a single-shot mode. This overcomes the scanning needs of the scanning spectrometers, providing data free from temporal and normalization errors and therefore ideal to follow sequential chemistry at multiple sites. We have applied this method to study MnOx-based bifunctional electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In particular, we investigated the effects of adding a secondary element, Ni, to form MnNiOx and its impact on the chemical states and catalytic activity, by tracking the redox characteristics of each element upon sweeping the electrode potential. The detection scheme we describe here is general and can be applied to time-resolved studies of materials consisting of multiple elements, to follow the dynamics of catalytic and electron transfer reactions. PMID:25747045

  16. Speciation of inorganic arsenic in drinking water by wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry after in situ preconcentration with miniature solid-phase extraction disks.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Kenta; Inui, Tetsuo; Koike, Yuya; Aizawa, Mamoru; Nakamura, Toshihiro

    2015-03-01

    A rapid and simple method using wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometry after in situ solid-phase extraction (SPE) was developed for the speciation and evaluation of the concentration of inorganic arsenic (As) in drinking water. The method involves the simultaneous collection of As(III) and As(V) using 13 mm ? SPE miniature disks. The removal of Pb(2+) from the sample water was first conducted to avoid the overlapping PbL? and AsK? spectra on the XRF spectrum. To this end, a 50 mL aqueous sample (pH 5-9) was passed through an iminodiacetate chelating disk. The filtrate was adjusted to pH 2-3 with HCl, and then ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate solution was added. The solution was passed through a hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene filter placed on a Zr and Ca loaded cation-exchange disk at a flow rate of 12.5 mL min(-1) to separate As(III)-pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate complex and As(V). Each SPE disk was affixed to an acrylic plate using adhesive cellophane tape, and then examined by WDXRF spectrometry. The detection limits of As(III) and As(V) were 0.8 and 0.6 ?g L(-1), respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to screening for As speciation and concentration evaluation in spring water and well water. PMID:25618730

  17. Determination of divalent iron content in igneous rocks of ultrabasic, basic and intermediate compositions by a wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometric method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubarov, Victor M.; Finkelshtein, Alexandr L.

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes the quantitative wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique of divalent iron content determination in igneous rocks and reports specifics of this technique in terms of classifying rocks into ultrabasic, basic, intermediate and acid ones. Unlike the widely used technique of titration, the proposed XRF technique does not require a labor-consuming procedure for sample preparation. In the fields of FeK?5 line, and FeK?? and FeK?? satellites relative intensities of XRF emission spectrum lines are dependent on the valence state of iron in minerals. The ratio FeK?5/FeK?1,3 is preferred as the analytical parameter. The XRF method allows divalent iron content (expressed as FeO oxide) over 1.5% to be measured in igneous rocks of ultrabasic and basic compositions by the common calibration equation with the error below 10 rel. %, that is comparable with the error of titrimetric analysis. The samples of igneous rocks of intermediate composition and granodiorites should be analyzed using calibration equations obtained with certified reference materials corresponding in composition to the study samples. For the samples of alkaline rocks the errors of FeO content determination might be in excess of 50 rel. %.

  18. Analysis of medieval Serbian silver coins from XIV and XV century by means of wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gržeti?, Ivan; Orli?, Jovana; Radi?, Vesna; Radi?, Milica; Ilijevi?, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry is known as excellent nondestructive technique for analysis of artifacts, in our case, medieval numismatic coins. Collections of 30 silver coins, owned by National Museum in Belgrade, were investigated during our research. Coins from the historical period from 1389 to 1458 belong to the reign of two Serbian rulers, Stefan Lazarevi? and ?ur?e Brankovi?. The aim of this study was to determine elemental composition of silver coins and to characterize alloys from which the coins were minted. The dominant elements detected in all coins were Ag, Cu, Zn and Pb. In some coins Fe, Si and S were detected as well. Results from quantitative analysis shows that the content of Ag in all investigated silver coins exceed 90%, except in two coins that were assumed to be forged. The concentration of Cu ranged from 3% to 5%, and the contents of Zn and Pb varied around 1%. Characterization of coins provided us information about raw materials and employed metallurgical processes.

  19. Theory of angular dispersive imaging hard x-ray spectrographs

    E-print Network

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    A spectrograph is an optical instrument that disperses photons of different energies into distinct directions and space locations, and images photon spectra on a position-sensitive detector. Spectrographs consist of collimating, angular dispersive, and focusing optical elements. Bragg reflecting crystals arranged in an asymmetric scattering geometry are used as the dispersing elements. A ray-transfer matrix technique is applied to propagate x-rays through the optical elements. Several optical designs of hard x-ray spectrographs are proposed and their performance is analyzed. Spectrographs with an energy resolution of 0.1 meV and a spectral window of imaging up to a few tens of meVs are shown to be feasible for inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) spectroscopy applications. In another example, a spectrograph with a 1-meV spectral resolution and 85-meV spectral window of imaging is considered for Cu K-edge resonant IXS (RIXS).

  20. Analysis of nuclear materials by energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence and spectral effects of alpha decay

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, Christopher G

    2009-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectra collected from alpha emitters are complicated by artifacts inherent to the alpha decay process, particularly when using portable instruments. For example, {sup 239}Pu EDXRF spectra exhibit a prominent uranium L X-ray emission peak series due to sample alpha decay rather than source-induced X-ray fluorescence. A portable EDXRF instrument was used to collect spectra from plutonium, americium, and a Pu-contaminated steel sample. The plutonium sample was also analyzed by wavelength dispersive XRF to demonstrate spectral differences observed when using these very different instruments.

  1. A dual-channel, focusing x-ray spectrograph with uniform dispersion for Z pinch plasmas measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Qingguo; Li Zeren; Chen Guanhua; Ye Yan; Huang Xianbin; Cai Hongchun; Li Jing; Xiao Shali

    2012-01-15

    A dual-channel, focusing x-ray spectrograph with uniform dispersion (i.e., the linear dispersion of this spectrograph is a constant) is described for measuring the x-ray spectra emission from the hot, dense Al Z pinch plasmas. The spectrograph uses double uniform-dispersed crystals (e.g., a Quartz 1010 crystal and a Mica 002 crystal) as dispersion elements and a double-film box as detector to achieve the simultaneous recording of the time integrated spectrum covering a wide spectral range of {approx}5-9 A. Since this spectrograph disperse the x-rays on the detector plane with uniform spacing for every wavelength, it needs not the calibration of the wavelength with spatial coordinate, thereby own the advantages of easiness and veracity for spectra identification. The design of this spectrograph and the example of experiment on the ''Yang'' accelerator are presented.

  2. A dual-channel, focusing x-ray spectrograph with uniform dispersion for Z pinch plasmas measurement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingguo; Li, Zeren; Chen, Guanhua; Ye, Yan; Huang, Xianbin; Cai, Hongchun; Li, Jing; Xiao, Shali

    2012-01-01

    A dual-channel, focusing x-ray spectrograph with uniform dispersion (i.e., the linear dispersion of this spectrograph is a constant) is described for measuring the x-ray spectra emission from the hot, dense Al Z pinch plasmas. The spectrograph uses double uniform-dispersed crystals (e.g., a Quartz 1010 crystal and a Mica 002 crystal) as dispersion elements and a double-film box as detector to achieve the simultaneous recording of the time integrated spectrum covering a wide spectral range of ~5-9 A?. Since this spectrograph disperse the x-rays on the detector plane with uniform spacing for every wavelength, it needs not the calibration of the wavelength with spatial coordinate, thereby own the advantages of easiness and veracity for spectra identification. The design of this spectrograph and the example of experiment on the "Yang" accelerator are presented. PMID:22299928

  3. Ultra-short wavelength x-ray system

    DOEpatents

    Umstadter, Donald (Ann Arbor, MI); He, Fei (Ann Arbor, MI); Lau, Yue-Ying (Potomac, MD)

    2008-01-22

    A method and apparatus to generate a beam of coherent light including x-rays or XUV by colliding a high-intensity laser pulse with an electron beam that is accelerated by a synchronized laser pulse. Applications include x-ray and EUV lithography, protein structural analysis, plasma diagnostics, x-ray diffraction, crack analysis, non-destructive testing, surface science and ultrafast science.

  4. Method and apparatus for molecular imaging using X-rays at resonance wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Chapline, Jr., George F. (Alamo, CA)

    1985-01-01

    Holographic X-ray images are produced representing the molecular structure of a microscopic object, such as a living cell, by directing a beam of coherent X-rays upon the object to produce scattering of the X-rays by the object, producing interference on a recording medium between the scattered X-rays from the object and unscattered coherent X-rays and thereby producing holograms on the recording surface, and establishing the wavelength of the coherent X-rays to correspond with a molecular resonance of a constituent of such object and thereby greatly improving the contrast, sensitivity and resolution of the holograms as representations of molecular structures involving such constituent. For example, the coherent X-rays may be adjusted to the molecular resonant absorption line of nitrogen at about 401.3 eV to produce holographic images featuring molecular structures involving nitrogen.

  5. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical…

  6. High Resolution, Non-Dispersive X-Ray Calorimeter Spectrometers on EBITs and Orbiting Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Frederick S.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopy is the primary tool for performing atomic physics with Electron beam ion trap (EBITs). X-ray instruments have generally fallen into two general categories, 1) dispersive instruments with very high spectral resolving powers but limited spectral range, limited count rates, and require an entrance slit, generally, for EBITs, defined by the electron beam itself, and 2) non-dispersive solid-state detectors with much lower spectral resolving powers but that have a broad dynamic range, high count rate ability and do not require a slit. Both of these approaches have compromises that limit the type and efficiency of measurements that can be performed. In 1984 NASA initiated a program to produce a non-dispersive instrument with high spectral resolving power for x-ray astrophysics based on the cryogenic x-ray calorimeter. This program produced the XRS non-dispersive spectrometers on the Astro-E, Astro-E2 (Suzaku) orbiting observatories, the SXS instrument on the Astro-H observatory, and the planned XMS instrument on the International X-ray Observatory. Complimenting these spaceflight programs, a permanent high-resolution x-ray calorimeter spectrometer, the XRS/EBIT, was installed on the LLNL EBIT in 2000. This unique instrument was upgraded to a spectral resolving power of 1000 at 6 keV in 2003 and replaced by a nearly autonomous production-class spectrometer, the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS), in 2007. The ECS spectrometer has a simultaneous bandpass from 0.07 to over 100 keV with a spectral resolving power of 1300 at 6 keV with unit quantum efficiency, and 1900 at 60 keV with a quantum efficiency of 30%. X-ray calorimeters are event based, single photon spectrometers with event time tagging to better than 10 us. We are currently developing a follow-on instrument based on a newer generation of x-ray calorimeters with a spectral resolving power of 3000 at 6 keV, and improved timing and measurement cadence. The unique capabilities of the x-ray calorimeter spectrometer, coupled with higher spectral resolution dispersive spectrometers to resolve line blends, has enabled many science investigations, to date mostly in our x-ray laboratory astrophysics program. These include measurements of absolute cross sections for Land K shell emission from Fe and Ni, charge exchange measurements in many astrophysically abundant elements, lifetime measurements, line ratios, and wavelength measurements. In addition, we have performed many additional measurements in nuclear physics, and in support of diagnostics for laser fusion, for example. In this presentation we will give a detailed overview of x-ray calorimeter instruments in general and in our EBIT laboratory astrophysics program in particular. We will also discuss the science yield of our measurements at EBIT over the last decade) prospects for future science enabled by the current generation of spectrometers and that will be expanded in the near future by the next generation of spectrometers starting in 2611.

  7. Two (and more) sharp X-ray wavelengths in one beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrdý, J.; Hrdá, J.; Oberta, P.; Pacherová, O.

    2016-01-01

    It is proposed how to create and merge two parallel X-ray beams with different wavelengths. The proposed method is based on simultaneous diffraction on two or more different crystallographic planes of perfect single crystals. Possible applications are discussed.

  8. Wavelength dispersive ?PIXE setup for the ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazini?, S.; Boži?evi? Mihali?, I.; Tadi?, T.; Cosic, D.; Jakši?, M.; Mudronja, D.

    2015-11-01

    We have developed a small wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometer to explore the possibility of performing chemical speciation on microscopic samples utilizing focused ion beams available at the Rudjer Boskovic Institute ion microprobe. Although PIXE spectra are in principle chemically invariant, small influence of chemical effects could be observed even with Si(Li) or SDD detectors. Such chemical effects can be clearly seen with high resolution crystal X-ray spectrometers having energy resolution of several eV. A dedicated vacuum chamber, housing the diffraction crystal, sample holder and CCD X-ray detector, was constructed and positioned behind the main ion microprobe vacuum chamber. Here we will briefly describe the spectrometer, and illustrate its capabilities on measured K X-ray spectra of selected sulfur compounds. We will also demonstrate its abilities to resolve K and M X-ray lines irresolvable by solid state ED detectors usually used in PIXE.

  9. Variable magnification variable dispersion glancing incidence imaging x ray spectroscopic telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard (inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A variable magnification variable dispersion glancing incidence x ray spectroscopic telescope capable of multiple high spatial revolution imaging at precise spectral lines of solar and stellar x ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation sources includes a primary optical system which focuses the incoming radiation to a primary focus. Two or more rotatable carriers each providing a different magnification are positioned behind the primary focus at an inclination to the optical axis, each carrier carrying a series of ellipsoidal diffraction grating mirrors each having a concave surface on which the gratings are ruled and coated with a multilayer coating to reflect by diffraction a different desired wavelength. The diffraction grating mirrors of both carriers are segments of ellipsoids having a common first focus coincident with the primary focus. A contoured detector such as an x ray sensitive photographic film is positioned at the second respective focus of each diffraction grating so that each grating may reflect the image at the first focus to the detector at the second focus. The carriers are selectively rotated to position a selected mirror for receiving radiation from the primary optical system, and at least the first carrier may be withdrawn from the path of the radiation to permit a selected grating on the second carrier to receive radiation.

  10. Variable magnification variable dispersion glancing incidence imaging x-ray spectroscopic telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A variable magnification variable dispersion glancing incidence x-ray spectroscopic telescope capable of multiple high spatial revolution imaging at precise spectral lines of solar and stellar x-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation sources includes a pirmary optical system which focuses the incoming radiation to a primary focus. Two or more rotatable carries each providing a different magnification are positioned behind the primary focus at an inclination to the optical axis, each carrier carrying a series of ellipsoidal diffraction grating mirrors each having a concave surface on which the gratings are ruled and coated with a mutlilayer coating to reflect by diffraction a different desired wavelength. The diffraction grating mirrors of both carriers are segments of ellipsoids having a common first focus coincident with the primary focus. A contoured detector such as an x-ray sensitive photogrpahic film is positioned at the second respective focus of each diffraction grating so that each grating may reflect the image at the first focus to the detector at the second focus. The carriers are selectively rotated to position a selected mirror for receiving radiation from the primary optical system, and at least the first carrier may be withdrawn from the path of the radiation to permit a selected grating on the second carrier to receive radiation.

  11. Expanded potential of seleno-carbohydrates as a molecular tool for X-ray structural determination of a carbohydrate-protein complex with single/multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tatsuya; Makyio, Hisayoshi; Ando, Hiromune; Komura, Naoko; Menjo, Masanori; Yamada, Yusuke; Imamura, Akihiro; Ishida, Hideharu; Wakatsuki, Soichi; Kato, Ryuichi; Kiso, Makoto

    2014-04-01

    Seleno-lactoses have been successfully synthesized as candidates for mimicking carbohydrate ligands for human galectin-9 N-terminal carbohydrate recognition domain (NCRD). Selenium was introduced into the mono- or di-saccharides using p-methylselenobenzoic anhydride (Tol2Se) as a novel selenating reagent. The TolSe-substituted monosaccharides were converted into selenoglycosyl donors or acceptors, which were reacted with coupling partners to afford seleno-lactoses. The seleno-lactoses were converted to the target compounds. The structure of human galectin-9 NCRD co-crystallized with 6-MeSe-lactose was determined with single/multi-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD/MAD) phasing and was similar to that of the co-crystal with natural lactose. PMID:24631362

  12. TRANSIT OBSERVATIONS OF THE HOT JUPITER HD 189733b AT X-RAY WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Poppenhaeger, K.; Wolk, S. J.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2013-08-10

    We present new X-ray observations obtained with Chandra ACIS-S of the HD 189733 system, consisting of a K-type star orbited by a transiting Hot Jupiter and an M-type stellar companion. We report a detection of the planetary transit in soft X-rays with a significantly deeper transit depth than observed in the optical. The X-ray data favor a transit depth of 6%-8%, versus a broadband optical transit depth of 2.41%. While we are able to exclude several possible stellar origins for this deep transit, additional observations will be necessary to fully exclude the possibility that coronal inhomogeneities influence the result. From the available data, we interpret the deep X-ray transit to be caused by a thin outer planetary atmosphere which is transparent at optical wavelengths, but dense enough to be opaque to X-rays. The X-ray radius appears to be larger than the radius observed at far-UV wavelengths, most likely due to high temperatures in the outer atmosphere at which hydrogen is mostly ionized. We furthermore detect the stellar companion HD 189733B in X-rays for the first time with an X-ray luminosity of log L{sub X} = 26.67 erg s{sup -1}. We show that the magnetic activity level of the companion is at odds with the activity level observed for the planet-hosting primary. The discrepancy may be caused by tidal interaction between the Hot Jupiter and its host star.

  13. Accounting for the dispersion in the x ray properties of early-type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Raymond E., III; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1990-01-01

    The x ray luminosities of early-type galaxies are correlated with their optical (e.g., blue) luminosities (L sub X approx. L sub B exp 1.6), but the x ray luminosities exhibit considerable scatter for a given optical luminosity L sub B. This dispersion in x ray luminosity is much greater than the dispersion of other properties of early-type galaxies (for a given L sub B), such as luminosity scale-length, velocity dispersion, color, and metallicity. Here, researchers consider several possible sources for the dispersion in x ray luminosity. Some of the scatter in x ray luminosity may result from stellar population variations between galaxies with similar L sub B. Since the x ray emitting gas is from accumulated stellar mass loss, the L sub X dispersion may be due to variations in integrated stellar mass loss rates. Another possible cause of the L sub X dispersion may be variations in the amount of cool material in the galaxies; cool gas may act as an energy sink for the hot gas. Infrared emission may be used to trace such cool material, so researchers look for a correlation between the infrared emission and the x ray emission of early-type galaxies at fixed L sub B. Velocity dispersion variations between galaxies of similar L sub B may also contribute to the L sub X dispersion. The most likely a priori source of the dispersion in L sub X is probably the varying amount of ram-pressure stripping in a range of galaxy environments. The hot gaseous halos of early-type galaxies can be stripped in encounters with other galaxies or with ambient cluster gas if the intracluster gas is sufficiently dense. Researchers find that the most likely cause of dispersion in the x ray properties of early type galaxies is probably the ram-pressure stripping of gaseous halos from galaxies. For a sample of 81 early-type galaxies with x ray luminosities or upper limits derived from Einstein Observatory observations (CFT) researchers calculated the cumulative distribution of angular distances between the x ray sample members and bright galaxies from the Revised Shapley - Ames catalog. Collectively, galaxies with low x ray luminosities (for a given L sub B) tend to be in denser environments than galaxies with higher x ray luminosities.

  14. Wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, W.; Chen, Z. Y. Jin, W.; Huang, D. W.; Ding, Y. H.; Li, J. C.; Zhang, X. Q.; Zhuang, G.; Lee, S. G.; Shi, Y. J.

    2014-11-15

    The wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer is a key issue for the measurements of plasma rotation. For the lack of available standard radiation source near 3.95 Å and there is no other diagnostics to measure the core rotation for inter-calibration, an indirect method by using tokamak plasma itself has been applied on joint Texas experimental tokamak. It is found that the core toroidal rotation velocity is not zero during locked mode phase. This is consistent with the observation of small oscillations on soft x-ray signals and electron cyclotron emission during locked-mode phase.

  15. Rest-wavelength Fiducials for the ITER Core Imaging X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Graf, A. T.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Leutenegger, M. A.; Porter, F. S.

    2012-01-01

    Absolute wavelength references are needed to derive the plasma velocities from the Doppler shift of a given line emitted by a moving plasma. We show that such reference standards exist for the strongest x-ray line in neonlike W64+, which has become the line of choice for the ITER (Latin the way) core imaging x-ray spectrometer. Close-by standards are the Hf L3 line and the Ir L2 line, which bracket the W64+ line by 30 eV; other standards are given by the Ir L1 and L2 lines and the Hf L1 and L2 lines, which bracket the W64+ line by 40 and 160 eV, respectively. The reference standards can be produced by an x-ray tube built into the ITER spectrometer. We present spectra of the reference lines obtained with an x-ray microcalorimeter and compare them to spectra of the W64+ line obtained both with an x-ray microcalorimeter and a crystal spectrometer

  16. Prospect of space-based interferometry at EUV and soft X-ray wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welsh, Barry Y.; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    1992-01-01

    We review the current capabilities of high-resolution, spectroscopic, space-borne instrumentation available for both solar and stellar observations in the EUV and soft X-ray wavelength regimes, and describe the basic design of a compact, all-reflection interferometer based on the spatial heterodyne technique; this is capable of producing a resolving power (lambda/Delta-lambda) of about 20,000 in the 100-200 A region using presently available multilayer optical components. Such an instrument can be readily constructed with existing technology. Due to its small size and lack of moving parts, it is ideally suited to spaceborne applications. Based on best estimates of the efficiency of this instrument at soft X-ray wavelengths, we review the possible use of this high-resolution interferometer in obtaining high-resolution full-disk spectroscopy of the sun. We also discuss its possible use for observations of diffuse sources such as the EUV interstellar background radiation.

  17. X-ray reflectivity measurements of surface roughness using energy dispersive detection

    SciTech Connect

    Chason, E.; Warwick, D.T.

    1990-01-01

    We describe a new technique for measuring x-ray reflectivity using energy dispersive x-ray detection. The benefits of this method are the use of a fixed scattering angle and parallel detection of all energies simultaneously. These advantages make the technique more readily useable with laboratory x-ray sources and more compatible with growth chambers. We find excellent agreement between the calculated Fresnel reflectivity and the reflectivity obtained from a smooth Ge (001) surface. Reflectivities obtained during 500 eV Xe ion bombardment of Ge surfaces demonstrate the sensitivity of the technique to be better than 1 {angstrom}. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis on an absolute scale in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; D'Alfonso, A J; Weyland, M; Taplin, D J; Allen, L J; Findlay, S D

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate absolute scale agreement between the number of X-ray counts in energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy using an atomic-scale coherent electron probe and first-principles simulations. Scan-averaged spectra were collected across a range of thicknesses with precisely determined and controlled microscope parameters. Ionization cross-sections were calculated using the quantum excitation of phonons model, incorporating dynamical (multiple) electron scattering, which is seen to be important even for very thin specimens. PMID:26004522

  19. The development of new radiation protocols for insect sterilization using long wavelength x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquidi, Jacob; Brar, Ramaninder K.; Rodriguez, Stacy; Hansen, Immo

    2015-07-01

    Control of insect species for the protection of crops, livestock, and prevention of disease such as dengue fever and malaria is a high priority in today's global economy. Traditional methods such as pesticides have fallen out of favor because its effects are indiscriminate as well as adverse and unpredictable impacts on the environment. Modern novel techniques such as genetic modification have had trouble gaining traction due to ethics concerns and the potential for unforeseen side effects. One approach that has gained traction and has proven its efficacy is the use of ionizing radiation to affect sterility in insect species in order to scale back their population. Known as Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), it has proven very effective in eradicating certain dipteran insect populations. However, when standard sterilization methods developed for dipertans are applied to mosquito populations significant complications arise, such as an inability to compete with non-irradiated males and high mortality rates. We have investigated the effect of treatment with x-rays of different wavelengths on x-ray sterilized mosquito males. Our results have demonstrated that longer wavelength x-rays have a significant effect on the outcome of the sterile males' longevity as well as an increase on the efficacy of sterilization while employing a substantially lower dose.

  20. Phase Determination by Multiple-Wavelength X-ray Diffraction: Crystal Structure of a Basic ``Blue'' Copper Protein from Cucumbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guss, J. Mitchell; Merritt, Ethan A.; Phizackerley, R. Paul; Hedman, Britt; Murata, Mitsuo; Hodgson, Keith O.; Freeman, Hans C.

    1988-08-01

    A novel x-ray diffraction technique, multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing, has been applied to the de novo determination of an unknown protein structure, that of the ``blue'' copper protein isolated from cucumber seedlings. This method makes use of crystallographic phases determined from measurements made at several wavelengths and has recently been made technically feasible through the use of intense, polychromatic synchrotron radiation together with accurate data collection from multiwire electronic area detectors. In contrast with all of the conventional methods of solving protein structures, which require either multiple isomorphous derivatives or coordinates of a similar structure for molecular replacement, this technique allows direct solution of the classical ``phase problem'' in x-ray crystallography. MAD phase assignment should be particularly useful for determining structures of small to medium-sized metalloproteins for which isomorphous derivatives are difficult or impossible to make. The structure of this particular protein provides new insights into the spectroscopic and redox properties of blue copper proteins, an important class of metalloproteins widely distributed in nature.

  1. Microbial Origin of Desert Varnish Abstract. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analyse,

    E-print Network

    Dorn, Ron

    Reports Microbial Origin of Desert Varnish Abstract. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analyse, desert varnish reveal that microorganisms concentrate ambient manganese I becomes greatly enhanced in brown to black varnish. Specific characteristic. desert varnish and of varnish

  2. Analysis of tincal ore waste by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalfa, Orhan Murat; Üstünda?, Zafer; Özk?r?m, Ilknur; Kagan Kad?o?lu, Yusuf

    2007-01-01

    Etibank Borax Plant is located in K?rka-Eski?ehir, Turkey. The borax waste from this plant was analyzed by means of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The standard addition method was used for the determination of the concentration of Al, Fe, Zn, Sn, and Ba. The results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  3. Analysis of titanium and zirconium in red mud with energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kobya, M.; Ertugrul, M.; Dogan, O.; Simsek, O.

    1996-11-01

    An energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence technique was used for the determination of Titanium (Ti) and Zirconium (Zr) in red mud by using a standard addition method. An annular {sup 241}Am source is employed for excitation of K shells of elements. 13 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry: A Long Overdue Addition to the Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Peter T.

    2011-01-01

    Portable Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyzers have undergone significant improvements over the past decade. Salient advantages of XRF for elemental analysis include minimal sample preparation, multielement analysis capabilities, detection limits in the low parts per million (ppm) range, and analysis times on the order of 1 min.…

  5. Development of at-wavelength metrology for x-ray optics at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Yuan, Sheng; Celestre, Richard; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Gregory; Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard A.

    2010-07-09

    The comprehensive realization of the exciting advantages of new third- and forth-generation synchrotron radiation light sources requires concomitant development of reflecting and diffractive x-ray optics capable of micro- and nano-focusing, brightness preservation, and super high resolution. The fabrication, tuning, and alignment of the optics are impossible without adequate metrology instrumentation, methods, and techniques. While the accuracy of ex situ optical metrology at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) has reached a state-of-the-art level, wavefront control on beamlines is often limited by environmental and systematic alignment factors, and inadequate in situ feedback. At ALS beamline 5.3.1, we are developing broadly applicable, high-accuracy, in situ, at-wavelength wavefront measurement techniques to surpass 100-nrad slope measurement accuracy for Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors. The at-wavelength methodology we are developing relies on a series of tests with increasing accuracy and sensitivity. Geometric Hartmann tests, performed with a scanning illuminated sub-aperture determine the wavefront slope across the full mirror aperture. Shearing interferometry techniques use coherent illumination and provide higher sensitivity wavefront measurements. Combining these techniques with high precision optical metrology and experimental methods will enable us to provide in situ setting and alignment of bendable x-ray optics to realize diffraction-limited, sub 50 nm focusing at beamlines. We describe here details of the metrology beamline endstation, the x-ray beam diagnostic system, and original experimental techniques that have already allowed us to precisely set a bendable KB mirror to achieve a focused spot size of 150 nm.

  6. High-pressure structural studies of dysprosium using angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yongrong; Kumar, Ravhi S.; Cornelius, Andrew L.; Nicol, Malcolm F.

    2007-02-01

    We present structural results under pressure for elemental dysprosium (Dy) up to 87 GPa using in situ angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements with synchrotron x rays and a diamond-anvil cell. Dy exhibits the structural transition sequence, hP2{yields}hR9{yields}hP4{yields}distorted cF4, from Rietveld full-profile refinements. Clear evidence is documented for the high-pressure distorted cF4 phase observed above 45 GPa to be an orthorhombic oS8 (Cmmm) structure for Dy in the lanthanide phase diagram.

  7. Development of an x-ray detector based on polymer- dispersed liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, K.; Hong, J.; Kim, G.; Park, S.; Min, B.; Yang, J.; Nam, S.

    2015-02-01

    The applications of active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) in large-area x-ray imaging systems have increased over time but are still severely limited owing to its pixel resolution, complex fabrication processes, and high cost. As a solution, x-ray light valve (XLV) technology was introduced and expected to have a better resolution and contrast ratio than those of AMFPI, owing to its micrometer level of the LC cells and signal amplification by an external light source. The twisting angle of the LC cells was changed by charge carrier signals created in a photoconductor layer against x-rays, and the diagnostic images from XLV were acquired from the transmittance of the external light source. However, there was a possibility that the photoconductor layer may be crystallized or degenerated due to the application of high temperatures for sealing the LC layer during the fabrication process. To solve such problems, polymer-dispersed liquid crystals (PDLCs), which do not need high temperature for the sealing process of the LC layer, are used in this study instead of typical LC cells. A photoconductor and PDLC are combined to develop an x-ray detector. An external light source and optical sensor are used to investigate the light transmission of the PDLC . The PDLCs used in this paper do not need polarizers and are self-adhesive. Hence, the transmittance is very high in the transparent state, which allows for a linear x-ray response and sufficient dynamic range in digital radiography.

  8. Closing the gap to the diffraction limit: Near wavelength limited tabletop soft x-ray coherent diffractive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, Richard Lunt

    Light microscopy has greatly advanced our understanding of nature. The achievable resolution, however, is limited by optical wavelengths to around 200 nm. Using novel imaging and labeling technologies, resolutions beyond the diffraction limit can be achieved for specialized specimens using techniques such as near-field scanning optical microscopy, stimulated emission depletion microscopy and structured illumination microscopy [1--3]. This dissertation presents a versatile soft x-ray diffraction microscope with 50 nm resolution using tabletop coherent soft x-ray sources. This work represents the first high resolution demonstrations of coherent diffractive or lensless imaging using tabletop extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray sources [4, 5]. This dissertation also presents the first use of field curvature correction in x-ray coherent imaging which allows high numerical aperture imaging and near-diffraction-limited resolution of 1.5lambda. The relevant theory behind high harmonic generation, the primary tabletop source used in this work, will be discussed as well as the theory behind coherent diffractive imaging. Additionally, the first demonstration of tabletop soft x-ray Fourier Transform holography is shown with important applications to shorter wavelength imaging with high harmonic generation with limited flux. A tabletop soft x-ray diffraction microscope should find broad applications in biology, nanoscience, and materials science due to its simple optical design, high resolution, large depth of field, 3D imaging capability, scalability to shorter wavelengths, and ultrafast temporal resolution.

  9. Tunable coherent radiation at soft X-ray wavelengths: Generation and interferometric applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rosfjord, Kristine Marie

    2004-07-01

    The availability of high power, spectrally and spatially coherent soft x-rays (SXR) would facilitate a wide variety of experiments as this energy region covers the primary resonances of many magnetic and biological materials. Specifically, there are the carbon and oxygen K-edges that are critical for biological imaging in the water window and the L-edges of iron, nickel, and cobalt for which imaging and scattering studies can be performed. A new coherent soft X-ray branchline at the Advanced Light Source has begun operation (beamline 12.0.2). Using the third harmonic from an 8 cm period undulator, this branch delivers coherent soft x-rays with photon energies ranging from 200eV to 1keV. This branchline is composed of two sub-branches one at 14X demagnification and the other 8X demagnification. The former is optimized for use at 500eV and the latter at 800eV. Here the expected power from the third harmonic of this undulator and the beamline design and characterization is presented. The characterization includes measurements on available photon flux as well as a series of double pinhole experiments to determine the coherence factor with respect to transverse distance. The first high quality Airy patterns at SXR wavelengths are created with this new beamline. The operation of this new beamline allows for interferometry to be performed in the SXR region. Here an interferometric experiment designed to directly determine the index of refraction of a material under test is performed. Measurements are first made in the EUV region using an established beamline (beamline12.0.1) to measure silicon, ruthenium and tantalum silicon nitride. This work is then extended to the SXR region using beamline 12.0.2 to test chromium and vanadium.

  10. X-ray photo-emission and energy dispersive spectroscopy of HA coated titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.L.; Steinberg, A.D.; Krauss, A.R.

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the chemical composition changes of hydroxyapatite (HA) coated titanium using surface analysis (x-ray photo-emission) and bulk analysis (energy dispersive spectroscopy). The specimens examined were controls, 30 minutes and 3 hours aged specimens in distilled water or 0.2M sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) at room temperature. Each x-ray photo-emission cycle consisted of 3 scans followed by argon sputtering for 10 minutes for a total of usually 20 cycles, corresponding to a sampling depth of {approximately} 1500 {angstrom}. The energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis was on a 110 by 90 {mu}m area for 500 sec. Scanning electron microscopy examination showed crystal formation (3P{sub 2}O{sub 5}*2CAO*?H{sub 2}O by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis) on the HA coating for the specimens aged in sodium phosphate buffer. The x-ray photo-emission results indicated the oxidation effect of water on the titanium (as TiO{sub 2}) and the effect of the buffer to increase the surface concentration of phosphorous. No differences in the chemical composition were observed by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. The crystal growth was only observed for the sodium phosphate buffer specimens and only on the HA surface.

  11. A Soft X-ray Spectrometer using a Highly Dispersive Multilayer Grating

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard; Voronov, Dmitriy; Yashchuk, Valeriy

    2010-06-23

    There is a need for higher resolution spectrometers as a tool for inelastic x-ray scattering. Currently, resolving power around R = 10,000 is advertised. Measured RIXS spectra are often limited by this instrumental resolution and higher resolution spectrometers using conventional gratings would be prohibitively large. We are engaged in a development program to build blazed multilayer grating structures for diffracting soft x-rays in high order. This leads to spectrometers with dispersion much higher than is possible using metal coated-gratings. The higher dispersion then provides higher resolution and the multilayer gratings are capable of operating away from grazing incidence as required. A spectrometer design is presented with a total length 3.8 m and capable of 10{sup 5} resolving power.

  12. A Soft X-ray Spectrometer using a Highly Dispersive Multilayer Grating

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard; Voronov, Dmitriy; Yashchuk, Valeriy

    2010-01-31

    There is a need for higher resolution spectrometers as a tool for inelastic x-ray scattering. Currently, resolving power around R = 10,000 is advertised. Measured RIXS spectra are often limited by this instrumental resolution and higher resolution spectrometers using conventional gratings would be prohibitively large. We are engaged in a development program to build blazed multilayer grating structures for diffracting soft x-rays in high order. This leads to spectrometers with dispersion much higher than is possible using metal coated-gratings. The higher dispersion then provides higher resolution and the multilayer gratings are capable of operating away from grazing incidence as required. A spectrometer design is presented with a total length 3.8m and capable of 10{sup 5} resolving power.

  13. Spatial high resolution energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy on thin lamellas.

    PubMed

    Notthoff, Christian; Winterer, Markus; Beckel, Andreas; Geller, Martin; Heindl, Jürgen

    2013-06-01

    For conventional samples and measurement geometries the spatial resolution of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy is limited by a tear drop shaped emission volume to about 1 ?m. This restriction can be substantially improved using thin samples and high acceleration voltage. In this contribution the spatial resolution of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in a scanning electron microscope using thin lamella samples is investigated. At an acceleration voltage of 30 kV, an edge resolution down to ?dedge = 40 ± 10 nm is observed performing linescans across an interface, using an 80 nm thin sample prepared from a GaAs/AlAs-heterostructure. Furthermore, Monte-Carlo simulations of pure elements ranging from sodium to mercury are performed for different sample thicknesses. From the simulations we can derive a simple empirical formula to predict the spatial resolution as a function of sample thickness. PMID:23545434

  14. Dispersion and monochromatization of x-rays using a beryllium prism.

    PubMed

    Burza, M; Enquist, H; Jurgilaitis, A; Nygaard, J; Larsson, J

    2015-01-26

    We demonstrate experimentally and numerically that an x-ray prism made of beryllium can be used to disperse and monochromatize x-rays. A polished beryllium cuboid was employed as refractive and dispersive optics. The results of a proof-of-principle experiment and methods of performance optimization are presented. The spatial separation of undulator harmonics and their subsequent selection using a slit are described. A numerical study, assuming realistic beam and beamline parameters, suggests that undulator harmonics can be spatially separated in the range from 3 keV to beyond 20 keV, while maintaining throughput above 50%. Refractive optics is particularly suitable for low-repetition-rate sources such as free-electron lasers and other LINAC-based short-pulse sources. PMID:25835820

  15. Scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive x ray analysis of impact residues in LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhard, Ronald P.; Durin, Christian; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1993-01-01

    Detailed optical scanning of tray clamps is being conducted in the Facility for the Optical Inspection of Large Surfaces at JSC to locate and document impacts as small as 40 microns in diameter. Residues from selected impacts are then being characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis at CNES. Results from this analysis will be the initial step to classifying projectile residues into specific sources.

  16. Soft x-ray laser holography with wavelength P. W. Wachulak, M. C. Marconi,* R. A. Bartels, C. S. Menoni, and J. J. Rocca

    E-print Network

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    Soft x-ray laser holography with wavelength resolution P. W. Wachulak, M. C. Marconi,* R. A the tabletop acquisition of soft x-ray holographic images of nanostructures with a spatial resolution of 46 using a compact, tabletop capillary-discharge soft x-ray laser emitting at 46.9 nm in a high

  17. The ChIcAGO Survey: Multi-wavelength Identification of Galactic Plane X-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Gemma; Gaensler, Bryan M.; Slane, Patrick O.; Kaplan, David L.A.; Posselt, Bettina

    2014-08-01

    I present the Chasing the Identification of ASCA Galactic Objects (ChIcAGO) survey, which is designed to identify the unknown X-ray sources discovered during the ASCA Galactic Plane Survey (AGPS). Little is known about most of the AGPS sources, especially those that emit primarily in hard X-rays (2-10 keV) within the F_ 10^-13 to 10^-11 erg cm^-2s^-1 X-ray flux range. In ChIcAGO, the subarcsecond localization capabilities of Chandra have been combined with a multi-wavelength follow-up program, with the ultimate goal of classifying the unidentified sources in the AGPS. Overall to date, 93 unidentified AGPS sources have been observed with Chandra as part of the ChIcAGO survey. A total of 253 X-ray point sources have been detected in these Chandra observations within 3' of the original ASCA positions, the majority of which have optical and infrared counterparts. Using these multi-wavelength follow-up results I have developed a new statistical diagnostic for identifying likely populations of X-ray emitting sources. These studies have revealed that the primary populations of Galactic plane X-ray sources that emit in the F_ 10^-13 to 10^-11 erg cm^-2s^-1 flux range are active stellar coronae, massive stars that are possibly in colliding-wind binaries, X-ray binaries, and magnetars. There is also another primary population that is still unidentified but, on the basis of its X-ray and infrared properties, likely comprise partly of Galactic sources and partly AGN.

  18. High Performance Non-Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometers for Charge Exchange Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter Frederick; Adams, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Karkatoua, D.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Lautenagger, M.

    2010-01-01

    Currently, the only measurements of cosmological charge exchange have been made using low resolution, non-dispersive spectrometers like the PSPC on ROSAT and the CCD instruments on Chandra and XMM/Newton. However, upcoming cryogenic spectrometers on Astro-H and IXO will add vast new capabilities to investigate charge exchange in local objects such as comets and planetary atmospheres. They may also allow us to observe charge exchange in extra-solar objects such as galactic supernova remnants. With low spectral resolution instruments such as CCDs, x-ray emission due to charge exchange recombination really only provides information on the acceptor species, such as the solar wind. With the new breed of x-ray calorimeter instruments, emission from charge exchange becomes highly diagnostic allowing one to uniquely determine the acceptor species, ionization state, donor species and ionization state, and the relative velocity of the interaction. We will describe x-ray calorimeter instrumentation and its potential for charge exchange measurements in the near term. We will also touch on the instrumentation behind a decade of high resolution measurements of charge exchange using an x-ray calorimeter at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  19. THE CORRELATION BETWEEN DISPERSION MEASURE AND X-RAY COLUMN DENSITY FROM RADIO PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    He, C.; Ng, C.-Y.; Kaspi, V. M.

    2013-05-01

    Pulsars are remarkable objects that emit across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, providing a powerful probe of the interstellar medium. In this study, we investigate the relation between dispersion measure (DM) and X-ray absorption column density N{sub H} using 68 radio pulsars detected at X-ray energies with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory or XMM-Newton. We find a best-fit empirical linear relation of N{sub H} (10{sup 20} cm{sup -2})= 0.30{sup +0.13}{sub -0.09} DM (pc cm{sup -3}), which corresponds to an average ionization of 10{sup +4}{sub -3}%, confirming the ratio of one free electron per 10 neutral hydrogen atoms commonly assumed in the literature. We also compare different N{sub H} estimates and note that some N{sub H} values obtained from X-ray observations are higher than the total Galactic H I column density along the same line of sight, while the optical extinction generally gives the best N{sub H} predictions.

  20. Reflection thermal diffuse x-ray scattering for quantitative determination of phonon dispersion relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, A. B.; Hellman, O.; Schlepütz, C. M.; Rockett, A.; Chiang, T.-C.; Hultman, L.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.

    2015-11-01

    Synchrotron reflection x-ray thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) measurements, rather than previously reported transmission TDS, are carried out at room temperature and analyzed using a formalism based upon second-order interatomic force constants and long-range Coulomb interactions to obtain quantitative determinations of MgO phonon dispersion relations ? ?j (q), phonon densities of states g (? ? ), and isochoric temperature-dependent vibrational heat capacities cv(T ) . We use MgO as a model system for investigating reflection TDS due to its harmonic behavior as well as its mechanical and dynamic stability. Resulting phonon dispersion relations and densities of states are found to be in good agreement with independent reports from inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering experiments. Temperature-dependent isochoric heat capacities cv(T ) , computed within the harmonic approximation from ? ?j (q) values, increase with temperature from 0.4 ×10-4eV /atom K at 100 K to 1.4 ×10-4eV /atom K at 200 K and 1.9 ×10-4eV /atom K at 300 K, in excellent agreement with isobaric heat capacity values cp(T ) between 4 and 300 K. We anticipate that the experimental approach developed here will be valuable for determining vibrational properties of heteroepitaxial thin films since the use of grazing-incidence (? ??c , where ?c is the density-dependent critical angle) allows selective tuning of x-ray penetration depths to ?10 nm .

  1. Quantitative energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction for identification of counterfeit medicines: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, Chiaki C. E.; O'Flynn, Daniel; Sidebottom, Aiden; Speller, Robert D.

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of counterfeit and substandard medicines has been growing rapidly over the past decade, and fast, nondestructive techniques for their detection are urgently needed to counter this trend. In this study, energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) combined with chemometrics was assessed for its effectiveness in quantitative analysis of compressed powder mixtures. Although EDXRD produces lower-resolution diffraction patterns than angular-dispersive X-ray diffraction (ADXRD), it is of interest for this application as it carries the advantage of allowing the analysis of tablets within their packaging, due to the higher energy X-rays used. A series of caffeine, paracetamol and microcrystalline cellulose mixtures were prepared with compositions between 0 - 100 weight% in 20 weight% steps (22 samples in total, including a centroid mixture), and were pressed into tablets. EDXRD spectra were collected in triplicate, and a principal component analysis (PCA) separated these into their correct positions in the ternary mixture design. A partial least-squares (PLS) regression model calibrated using this training set was validated using both segmented cross-validation, and with a test set of six samples (mixtures in 8:1:1 and 5?:2?:2? ratios) - the latter giving a root-mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 1.30, 2.25 and 2.03 weight% for caffeine, paracetamol and cellulose respectively. These initial results are promising, with RMSEP values on a par with those reported in the ADXRD literature.

  2. Energy-dispersive wide angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) measurements applied to polymer characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrissin-Fabert, I.; Peix, G.; Babot, D.

    2004-05-01

    A prototype x-ray equipment, initially designed and constructed in our laboratory for thickness measurement of thin silicon carbide coatings (<200 µm), is used for the characterization of epoxy polymers. The spectra delivered by wide angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) experiments allow, for instance, several kinds of characterization: (i) distinction between polymers of different chemical formulae, (ii) distinction between tightly and loosely packed networks and (iii) real-time follow-up of a curing process. Our equipment, flexible and robust, uses an energy-dispersive HpGe detector. Spectra are obtained for a constant scattering angle, i.e. without any rotation of the detector, which allows great mechanical simplicity and gain in terms of measurement time. The device can easily be set on an assembly line for the purpose of automatic non-destructive evaluation of some factory output. Alternatively, it can be set on a robot for the purpose of local inspection of a big structure.

  3. Twenty-Five Millisecond Resolution Time-Resolved X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy in Dispersive Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Tadashi; Oyanagi, Hiroyuki; Saigo, Satoshi; Kaminaga, Ukyo; Hashimoto, Hideki; Kihara, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Noboru; Fujimoto, Masatoshi

    1986-07-01

    The capability of an energy dispersive X-ray absorption spectrometer for time-resolved experiment was demonstrated by measuring X-ray absorption spectra with a time-resolution of 25 ms from two reacting solutions (0.3 M ferric nitrate (Fe(NO3)3) and 0.3 M hydroquinone (C6H4(OH)2)) mixed by the stopped-flow method. A real time observation of the energy shift of the Fe K-absorption edge was successfully made after mixing the two solutions. The result suggests that the method is most suitable for the study of irreversible structural and chemical changes in various kinds of materials.

  4. A Dispersive Method of Measuring Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminaga, Ukyo; Matsushita, Tadashi; Kohra, Kazutake

    1981-05-01

    A novel method of EXAFS measurement has been developed, in which all the data points of a spectrum are collected simultaneously. A convergent X-ray beam, whose energy varies with beam direction, is realized with a transmission-type (Laue-case diffraction) crystal disperser. By measuring the spatial intensity distribution across the beam path behind the focus at which the specimen was placed, an EXAFS spectrum of an iron metal foil is measured in about 15 hr with a statistical accuracy better than 0.16% using a sealed-off X-ray tube operated at 15 keV and 35 mA. Some measures to shorten the measuring time to the order of minutes are discussed.

  5. At-wavelength characterization of refractive x-ray lenses using a two-dimensional grating interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Rutishauser, Simon; David, Christian; Zanette, Irene; Weitkamp, Timm; Donath, Tilman

    2011-11-28

    We report on the application of a two-dimensional hard x-ray grating interferometer to x-ray optics metrology. The interferometer is sensitive to refraction angles in two perpendicular directions with a precision of 10 nrad. It is used to observe the wavefront changes induced by a single parabolic beryllium focusing lens of large radius of curvature. The lens shape is reconstructed and its residual aberrations are analyzed. Its profile differs from an ideal parabolic shape by less than 2 {mu}m or {lambda}/50 at {lambda} = 0.54 A wavelength.

  6. Effect of x-ray energy dispersion in digital subtraction imaging at the iodine K-edge--A Monte Carlo study

    E-print Network

    Ramello, Luciano

    Effect of x-ray energy dispersion in digital subtraction imaging at the iodine K-edge--A Monte; published 11 December 2007 The effect of the energy dispersion of a quasi-monochromatic x-ray beam on the performance of a dual-energy x-ray imaging system is studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations using MCNPX

  7. Influence of wavelength and pulse duration on single-shot x-ray diffraction patterns from nonspherical nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, Katharina; Peltz, Christian; Varin, Charles; Scheel, Stefan; Brabec, Thomas; Fennel, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a complex scaling discrete dipole approximation (CSDDA) method and study single-shot x-ray diffraction patterns from non-spherical, absorbing nanotargets in the limit of linear response. The convergence of the employed Born series-based iterative solution of the discrete dipole approximation problem via optimal complex mixing turns out to be substantially faster than the original approach with real-valued mixing coefficients, without additional numerical effort per iteration. The CSDDA method is employed to calculate soft x-ray diffraction patterns from large icosahedral silver nanoparticles with diameters up to about 250 {nm}. Our analysis confirms the requirement of relatively long wavelengths to map truly 3D structure information to the experimentally accessible regions of 2D scattering images. On the other hand, we show that short wavelengths are preferable to retain visibility of fine structures such as interference fringes in the scattering patterns when using ultrashort x-ray pulses in the attosecond domain. A simple model is presented to estimate the minimal pulse duration below which the fringe contrast vanishes. Knowledge of the impact of the bandwidth of short pulses on the diffraction images is important to extract information on ultrafast dynamical processes from time-resolved x-ray diffractive imaging experiments on free nanoparticles, in particular at long wavelengths.

  8. The X-ray Luminosity - Velocity Dispersion relation in the REFLEX Cluster Survey

    E-print Network

    A. Ortiz-Gil; L. Guzzo; P. Schuecker; H. Boehringer; C. A. Collins

    2003-11-05

    We present an estimate of the bolometric X-ray luminosity - velocity dispersion L_x - sigma_v relation measured from a new, large and homogeneous sample of 171 low redshift, X-ray selected galaxy clusters. The linear fitting of log(L_x) - log(sigma_v) gives L_x = 10^{32.72 \\pm 0.08} sigma^{4.1 \\pm 0.3}_v erg s^{-1} h^{-2}_{50}. Furthermore, a study of 54 clusters, for which the X-ray temperature of the intracluster medium T is available, allows us to explore two other scaling relations, L_x -T and sigma_v -T. From this sample we obtain L_x \\propto T^{3.1 \\pm 0.2} and sigma_v \\propto T^{1.00 \\pm 0.16}, which are fully consistent with the above result for the L_x-sigma_v. The slopes of L_x -T and sigma_v -T are incompatible with the values predicted by self-similarity (L_x \\propto T^{2} \\propto \\sigma_v^4), thus suggesting the presence of non-gravitational energy sources heating up the intracluster medium, in addition to the gravitational collapse, in the early stages of cluster formation. On the other hand, the result on log(L_x) - log(sigma_v) supports the self-similar model.

  9. Extreme ultraviolet and x-ray transition wavelengths in Rb XXIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indu, Khatri; Arun, Goyal; Sunny, Aggarwal; K. Singh, A.; Man, Mohan

    2015-10-01

    Energy levels, radiative rates, oscillator strengths and line strengths are reported for transitions among the lowest 97 levels of the (1s22s22p6) 3s23p2, 3s23p3d, 3s3p3, 3p4, 3s3p23d, and 3s23d2 configurations of Rb XXIV. A multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method is adopted for the calculations. Radiative rates, oscillator strengths, and line strengths are provided for all electric dipole (E1), magnetic dipole (M1), electric quadrupole (E2), and magnetic quadrupole (M2) transitions from the ground level to all 97 levels, although calculations are performed for a much larger number of levels. To achieve the accuracy of the data, comparisons are provided with similar data obtained from the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC) and also with the available theoretical and experimental results. Our energy levels are found to be accurate to better than 1.2%. Wavelengths calculated are found to lie in EUV (extreme ultraviolet) and x-ray regions. Additionally, lifetimes for all 97 levels are obtained for the first time. The authors, Indu Khatri and Arun Goyal, were supported by the U. G. C., India for their Junior Research Fellowship and Man Mohan by the U.G.C. for Basic Science Research Fellowship.

  10. WAVELENGTH MEASUREMENTS OF K TRANSITIONS OF OXYGEN, NEON, AND MAGNESIUM WITH X-RAY ABSORPTION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Jinyuan; Zhang Shuangnan; Yao Yangsen

    2013-09-10

    Accurate atomic transition data are important in many astronomical research areas, especially for studies of line spectroscopy. Whereas transition data of He-like and H-like ions (i.e., ions in high-charge states) have been accurately calculated, the corresponding data of K transitions of neutral or low-ionized metal elements are still very uncertain. Spectroscopy of absorption lines produced in the interstellar medium (ISM) has been proven to be an effective way to measure the central wavelengths of these atomic transitions. In this work, we analyze 36 Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating observations to search for and measure the ISM absorption lines along sight lines to 11 low-mass X-ray binaries. We correct the Galactic rotation velocity to the rest frame for every observation and then use two different methods to merge all the corrected spectra to a co-added spectrum. However, the co-added spectra obtained by this method exhibit biases, toward to either observations with high counts or lines with high signal-to-noise ratios. We do a Bayesian analysis of several significantly detected lines to obtain the systematic uncertainty and the bias correction for other lines. Compared to previous studies, our results improve the wavelength accuracy by a factor of two to five and significantly reduce the systematic uncertainties and biases. Several weak transitions (e.g., 1s-2p of Mg IV and Mg V; 1s-3p of Mg III and Mg V) are also detected for the first time, albeit with low significance; future observations with improved accuracy are required to confirm these detections.

  11. Determination of carrier yields for neutron activation analysis using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, R.G.; Wandless, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    A new method is described for determining carrier yield in the radiochemical neutron activation analysis of rare-earth elements in silicate rocks by group separation. The method involves the determination of the rare-earth elements present in the carrier by means of energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis, eliminating the need to re-irradiate samples in a nuclear reactor after the gamma ray analysis is complete. Results from the analysis of USGS standards AGV-1 and BCR-1 compare favorably with those obtained using the conventional method. ?? 1984 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  12. Commissioning of Angle Dispersive X-ray Diffraction Beamline on Indus-2

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, A. K.; Sagdeo, Archna; Gupta, Pooja; Kumar, Ashok; Singh, M. N.; Gupta, R. K.; Kane, S. R.; Deb, S. K.

    2011-07-15

    An Angle dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD) beamline on bending magnet source of Indus-2 synchrotron (2.5 GeV, 300 mA) has been commissioned, for the study of single and polycrystalline samples. The beamline optics is based on vertically focusing Pt-coated pre and post mirrors and sagittal focusing Si (311) based double crystal monochromator. Experimental station consists of a six circle diffractometer equipped with scintillation detector and an image plate area detector for powder diffraction. XRD experiments have been performed to study single crystal and polycrystalline samples.

  13. Characterization of Japanese color sticks by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manso, M.; Valadas, S.; Pessanha, S.; Guilherme, A.; Queralt, I.; Candeias, A. E.; Carvalho, M. L.

    2010-04-01

    This work comprises the use of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) techniques for the study of the composition of twentieth century traditional Japanese color sticks. By using the combination of analytical techniques it was possible to obtain information on inorganic and organic pigments, binders and fillers present in the sticks. The colorant materials identified in the sticks were zinc and titanium white, chrome yellow, yellow and red ochre, vermillion, alizarin, indigo, Prussian and synthetic ultramarine blue. The results also showed that calcite and barite were used as inorganic mineral fillers while Arabic gum was the medium used. EDXRF offered great potential for such investigations since it allowed the identification of the elements present in the sample preserving its integrity. However, this information alone was not enough to clearly identify some of the materials in study and therefore it was necessary to use XRD and FTIR techniques.

  14. X-ray coherent scattering form factors of tissues, water and plastics using energy dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, B. W.; Landheer, K. A.; Johns, P. C.

    2011-07-01

    A key requirement for the development of the field of medical x-ray scatter imaging is accurate characterization of the differential scattering cross sections of tissues and phantom materials. The coherent x-ray scattering form factors of five tissues (fat, muscle, liver, kidney, and bone) obtained from butcher shops, four plastics (polyethylene, polystyrene, lexan (polycarbonate), nylon), and water have been measured using an energy-dispersive technique. The energy-dispersive technique has several improvements over traditional diffractometer measurements. Most notably, the form factor is measured on an absolute scale with no need for scaling factors. Form factors are reported in terms of the quantity x = ?-1sin (?/2) over the range 0.363-9.25 nm-1. The coherent form factors of muscle, liver, and kidney resemble those of water, while fat has a narrower peak at lower x, and bone is more structured. The linear attenuation coefficients of the ten materials have also been measured over the range 30-110 keV and parameterized using the dual-material approach with the basis functions being the linear attenuation coefficients of polymethylmethacrylate and aluminum.

  15. Practical applications of energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis in diagnostic oral pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, T.D.; Gibson, D. )

    1990-03-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis is a powerful tool that can reveal the presence and relative quantities of elements in minute particles in biologic materials. Although this technique has been used in some aspects of dental research, it has rarely been applied to diagnostic oral pathology. The purpose of this paper is to inform practicing dentists and oral specialists about the diagnostic potential of this procedure by presenting three case reports. The first case involved the identification of flakes of a metallic material claimed by a 14-year-old girl to appear periodically between her mandibular molars. In the second case, a periodontist was spared a lawsuit when a freely mobile mass in the antrum of his patient was found to be a calcium-phosphorus compound not related to the periodontal packing that had been used. The third case involved the differential diagnosis of amalgam tattoo and graphite tattoo in a pigmented lesion of the hard palate mucosa. The results of the analyses were significant and indicate a role for this technique in the assessment of selected cases. Potential for wider use of energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis in diagnostic oral pathology exists as research progresses.

  16. X-ray coherent scattering form factors of tissues, water and plastics using energy dispersion.

    PubMed

    King, B W; Landheer, K A; Johns, P C

    2011-07-21

    A key requirement for the development of the field of medical x-ray scatter imaging is accurate characterization of the differential scattering cross sections of tissues and phantom materials. The coherent x-ray scattering form factors of five tissues (fat, muscle, liver, kidney, and bone) obtained from butcher shops, four plastics (polyethylene, polystyrene, lexan (polycarbonate), nylon), and water have been measured using an energy-dispersive technique. The energy-dispersive technique has several improvements over traditional diffractometer measurements. Most notably, the form factor is measured on an absolute scale with no need for scaling factors. Form factors are reported in terms of the quantity x = ?(-1)sin?(?/2) over the range 0.363-9.25 nm(-1). The coherent form factors of muscle, liver, and kidney resemble those of water, while fat has a narrower peak at lower x, and bone is more structured. The linear attenuation coefficients of the ten materials have also been measured over the range 30-110 keV and parameterized using the dual-material approach with the basis functions being the linear attenuation coefficients of polymethylmethacrylate and aluminum. PMID:21709341

  17. Inelastic X-ray Scattering Study on Plasmon Dispersion in Liquid Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Koji; Matsuda, Kazuhiro; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Kajihara, Yukio; Miyatake, Tetsu; Ishiguro, Yotaro; Hagiya, Toru; Inui, Masanori; Yao, Makoto

    2015-08-01

    We study the plasmon dispersion of liquid Cs using inelastic X-ray scattering techniques in the range of momentum transfer, 0.32 ? q ? 0.55 Å-1. While the previous electron energy loss spectroscopy experiments reported that the plasmon energy in solid Cs decreases with increasing q below q = 0.5 Å-1, we find that the plasmon energy in liquid Cs tends to increase with q in the range 0.32 ? q ? 0.55 Å-1. We determine the slope of the dispersion normalized by the plasmon energy at q = 0, by fitting the linear function around this q range. The slope for liquid Cs is 0.10 ± 0.12 Å, whereas that for solid Cs is -0.11 ± 0.07 Å. We qualitatively interpret that the observed variation in the dispersion relation upon melting is attributable to the reduction of the band structure effect (the effect of the s-d transitions). In addition, the plasmon dispersion of Cs is compared with that of Rb for both the solid and the liquid state. Although the dispersion curves of Rb and Cs are in appearance qualitatively different from each other, common characteristics are seen for these elements when we take difference between the experimental results and the electron gas prediction. We interpret that this behavior reflects the s-d transitions, which have been theoretically shown to cause the deviation of the plasmon dispersions from the electron gas prediction commonly in Rb and Cs.

  18. Multi-wavelength diagnostics of accretion in an X-ray selected sample of CTTSs

    E-print Network

    Curran, R L; Sacco, G G; Orlando, S; Peres, G; Reale, F; Maggio, A; .,

    2010-01-01

    High resolution X-ray spectroscopy has revealed soft X-rays from high density plasma in Classical T-Tauri stars (CTTSs), probably arising from the accretion shock region. However, the mass accretion rates derived from the X-ray observations are consistently lower than those derived from UV/optical/NIR studies. We aim to test the hypothesis that the high density soft X-ray emission is from accretion by analysing optical accretion tracers from an X-ray selected sample of CTTSs in a homogeneous manner. We analyse optical spectra of a sample of CTTSs and calculate the accretion rates based on measuring optical emission lines. These are then compared to the accretion rates derived from the X-ray spectroscopy. We find that, for each CTTS in our sample, the different optical tracers predict mass accretion rates that agree within the errors, albeit with a spread of ~1 order of magnitude. Typically, mass accretion rates derived from Halpha and HeI 5876 Ang are larger than those derived from Hbeta, Hgamma and OI. When ...

  19. A Multi-wavelength study of the Pulsar PSR B1929+10 and its X-ray trail

    E-print Network

    Werner Becker; Michael Kramer; Axel Jessner; Ronald E. Taam; Jian J. Jia; Kwong S. Cheng; Roberto Mignani; Alberto Pellizzoni; Andrea de Luca; Agnieszka Slowikowska; Patrizia Caraveo

    2006-03-16

    We report on the emission properties of PSR B1929+10 and its putative X-ray trail from a multi-wavelength study performed with XMM-Newton, the ESO NTT, the HST, the Effelsberg 100m Radio Telescope and the Jodrell Bank Radio Observatory. The XMM-Newton observations confirm the existence of the diffuse emission with a trail morphology lying in a direction opposite to the transverse motion of the pulsar. The trail has a length of ~15 arcmin. Its spectrum is non-thermal and produced by electron-synchrotron emission in the shock between the pulsar wind and the surrounding medium. Assuming that the electron lifetime against synchrotron cooling is comparable to the source transit time over the X-ray trail length, the magnetic field strength in the trail emitting region is inferred to be ~5 uG. Inspecting data from the Effelsberg 11cm radio continuum survey of the Galactic plane we discovered an elongated feature apparently coincident with the X-ray trail. The emission properties observed from PSR 1929+10 are found to finally challenge the picture of the emission properties of old non-recycled rotation powered pulsars. Both, the temporal and spectral X-ray emission properties of PSR 1929+10 are in excellent agreement with a non-thermal and, thus, magnetospheric radiation dominated emission scenario. A flux contribution from the thermal emission of heated polar caps of ~7% is inferred from a best fitting composite Planckian and power law spectral model. The X-ray pulse profile is found to be markedly different from the broad sinusoidal pulse profile seen in the low statistic ROSAT data. Simulations in the framework of an outer-gap emission model are able to reproduce the observed X-ray pulse profile and its phase relation relative to the radio pulse.

  20. Atomic inner-shell laser at 1.5-ångström wavelength pumped by an X-ray free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Hitoki; Inubushi, Yuichi; Nagamine, Kazunori; Michine, Yurina; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Mimura, Hidekazu; Kitamura, Hikaru; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yabashi, Makina

    2015-08-01

    Since the invention of the first lasers in the visible-light region, research has aimed to produce short-wavelength lasers that generate coherent X-rays; the shorter the wavelength, the better the imaging resolution of the laser and the shorter the pulse duration, leading to better temporal resolution in probe measurements. Recently, free-electron lasers based on self-amplified spontaneous emission have made it possible to generate a hard-X-ray laser (that is, the photon energy is of the order of ten kiloelectronvolts) in an ångström-wavelength regime, enabling advances in fields from ultrafast X-ray spectrosopy to X-ray quantum optics. An atomic laser based on neon atoms and pumped by a soft-X-ray (that is, a photon energy of less than one kiloelectronvolt) free-electron laser has been achieved at a wavelength of 14 nanometres. Here, we use a copper target and report a hard-X-ray inner-shell atomic laser operating at a wavelength of 1.5 ångströms. X-ray free-electron laser pulses with an intensity of about 1019 watts per square centimetre tuned to the copper K-absorption edge produced sufficient population inversion to generate strong amplified spontaneous emission on the copper K? lines. Furthermore, we operated the X-ray free-electron laser source in a two-colour mode, with one colour tuned for pumping and the other for the seed (starting) light for the laser.

  1. Micro energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis of polychrome lead-glazed Portuguese faiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilherme, A.; Pessanha, S.; Carvalho, M. L.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Coroado, J.

    2010-04-01

    Several glazed ceramic pieces, originally produced in Coimbra (Portugal), were submitted to elemental analysis, having as premise the pigment manufacture production recognition. Although having been produced in Coimbra, their location changed as time passed due to historical reasons. A recent exhibition in Coimbra brought together a great number of these pieces and in situ micro Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (µ-EDXRF) analyses were performed in order to achieve some chemical and physical data on the manufacture of faiences in Coimbra. A non-commercial µ-EDXRF equipment for in situ analysis was employed in this work, carrying some important improvements when compared to the conventional ones, namely, analyzing spot sizes of about 100 µm diameter. The combination of a capillary X-ray lens with a new generation of low power microfocus X-ray tube and a drift chamber detector enabled a portable unit for micro-XRF with a few tens of µm lateral resolution. The advantages in using a portable system emphasized with polycapillary optics enabled to distinguish proximal different pigmented areas, as well as the glaze itself. These first scientific results on the pigment analysis of the collection of faiences seem to point to a unique production center with own techniques and raw materials. This conclusion arose with identification of the blue pigments having in its constitution Mn, Fe Co and As and the yellows as a result of the combination between Pb and Sb. A statistical treatment was used to reveal groups of similarities on the pigments elemental profile.

  2. THE CHANDRA MULTI-WAVELENGTH PROJECT: OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY AND THE BROADBAND SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF X-RAY-SELECTED AGNs

    SciTech Connect

    Trichas, Markos; Green, Paul J.; Aldcroft, Tom; Kim, Dong-Woo; Mossman, Amy; Silverman, John D.; Barkhouse, Wayne; Cameron, Robert A.; Constantin, Anca; Ellison, Sara L.; Foltz, Craig; Haggard, Daryl; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Marshall, Herman L.; Perez, Laura M.; Romero-Colmenero, Encarni; Ruiz, Angel; Smith, Malcolm G.; and others

    2012-06-01

    From optical spectroscopy of X-ray sources observed as part of the Chandra Multi-wavelength Project (ChaMP), we present redshifts and classifications for a total of 1569 Chandra sources from our targeted spectroscopic follow-up using the FLWO/1.5 m, SAAO/1.9 m, WIYN 3.5 m, CTIO/4 m, KPNO/4 m, Magellan/6.5 m, MMT/6.5 m, and Gemini/8 m telescopes, and from archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopy. We classify the optical counterparts as 50% broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 16% emission line galaxies, 14% absorption line galaxies, and 20% stars. We detect QSOs out to z {approx} 5.5 and galaxies out to z {approx} 3. We have compiled extensive photometry, including X-ray (ChaMP), ultraviolet (GALEX), optical (SDSS and ChaMP-NOAO/MOSAIC follow-up), near-infrared (UKIDSS, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and ChaMP-CTIO/ISPI follow-up), mid-infrared (WISE), and radio (FIRST and NVSS) bands. Together with our spectroscopic information, this enables us to derive detailed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for our extragalactic sources. We fit a variety of template SEDs to determine bolometric luminosities, and to constrain AGNs and starburst components where both are present. While {approx}58% of X-ray Seyferts (10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} < L{sub 2-10keV} <10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) require a starburst event (>5% starburst contribution to bolometric luminosity) to fit observed photometry only 26% of the X-ray QSO (L{sub 2-10keV} >10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) population appear to have some kind of star formation contribution. This is significantly lower than for the Seyferts, especially if we take into account torus contamination at z > 1 where the majority of our X-ray QSOs lie. In addition, we observe a rapid drop of the percentage of starburst contribution as X-ray luminosity increases. This is consistent with the quenching of star formation by powerful QSOs, as predicted by the merger model, or with a time lag between the peak of star formation and QSO activity. We have tested the hypothesis that there should be a strong connection between X-ray obscuration and star formation but we do not find any association between X-ray column density and star formation rate both in the general population or the star-forming X-ray Seyferts. Our large compilation also allows us to report here the identification of 81 X-ray Bright Optically inactive Galaxies, 78 z > 3 X-ray sources, and eight Type-2 QSO candidates. Also, we have identified the highest redshift (z = 5.4135) X-ray-selected QSO with optical spectroscopy.

  3. High-average-power, 100-Hz-repetition-rate, tabletop soft-x-ray lasers at sub-15-nm wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Reagan, Brendon; Berrill, Mark A; Wernsing, Keith; Baumgarten, Cory; Woolston, Mark; Rocca, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Efficient excitation of dense plasma columns at 100-Hz repetition rate using a tailored pump pulse profile produced a tabletop soft-x-ray laser average power of 0.1 mW at = 13.9 nm and 20 W at = 11.9 nm from transitions of Ni-like Ag and Ni-like Sn, respectively. Lasing on several other transitions with wavelengths between 10.9 and 14.7 nm was also obtained using 0.9-J pump pulses of 5-ps duration from a compact diode-pumped chirped pulse amplification Yb:YAG laser. Hydrodynamic and atomic plasma simulations show that the pump pulse profile, consisting of a nanosecond ramp followed by two peaks of picosecond duration, creates a plasma with an increased density of Ni-like ions at the time of peak temperature that results in a larger gain coefficient over a temporally and spatially enlarged space leading to a threefold increase in the soft-x-ray laser output pulse energy. The high average power of these compact soft-x-ray lasers will enable applications requiring high photon flux. These results open the path to milliwatt-average-power tabletop soft-x-ray lasers.

  4. Development of a prototype pipework scanning system based upon energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrity, D. J.; De Rosa, A. J.; Bradley, D. A.; Jarman, S. E.; Jenneson, P. M.; Vincent, S. M.

    2010-07-01

    A prototype pipework scanning system based upon energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) has been produced, for which system development and preliminary results are presented here. This apparatus has been developed from experience with 2D and 3D bench-top EDXRD systems and comprises a conventional industrial X-ray tube coupled to a bespoke design of tungsten collimators and compact CdTe detector. It is designed as a robust system, rather than delicate lab-based system, to investigate sections of stainless steel pipework for structural changes induced through quenching the steel in liquid nitrogen, and damaging effects such as chloride-induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Given the properties of tungsten, namely its brittle nature, a complex programme of electro-discharge machining (EDM) has been devised to precisely manufacture the collimators from a series of sintered tungsten blocks. Preliminary measurements have focused on calibrating the system using the extreme ferrite and austenite phases, meeting a pre-requisite benchmark for attempting more challenging measurements such as the austenite to martensite transformation and investigations of SCC in these sections of pipework.

  5. Biomedical and agricultural applications of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, El?bieta; Suski, Szymon; Miller, Karolina; Bartosiewicz, Rafa?

    2015-09-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in electron microscopy has been widely used in many research areas since it provides precise information on the chemical composition of subcellular structures that may be correlated with their high resolution images. In EDS the characteristic X-rays typical of each element are analyzed and the new detectors - an example of which we describe - allow for setting precisely the area of measurements and acquiring signals as a point analysis, as a linescan or in the image format of the desired area. Mapping of the elements requires stringent methods of sample preparation to prevent redistribution/loss of the elements as well as elimination of the risk of overlapping spectra. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses may be performed at a low probe current suitable for thin biological samples. Descriptions of preparation techniques, drawbacks and precautions necessary to obtain reliable results are provided, including data on standards, effects of specimen roughness and quantification. Data on EPMA application in different fields of biomedical and agricultural studies are reviewed. In this review we refer to recent EDS/EPMA applications in medical diagnostics, studies on air pollution and agrochemicals as well as on plant models used to monitor the environment. PMID:26208393

  6. Evaluation on determination of iodine in coal by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, B.; Jackson, J.C.; Palmer, C.; Zheng, B.; Finkelman, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    A quick and inexpensive method of relative high iodine determination from coal samples was evaluated. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) provided a detection limit of about 14 ppm (3 times of standard deviations of the blank sample), without any complex sample preparation. An analytical relative standard deviation of 16% was readily attainable for coal samples. Under optimum conditions, coal samples with iodine concentrations higher than 5 ppm can be determined using this EDXRF method. For the time being, due to the general iodine concentrations of coal samples lower than 5 ppm, except for some high iodine content coal, this method can not effectively been used for iodine determination. More work needed to meet the requirement of determination of iodine from coal samples for this method. Copyright ?? 2005 by The Geochemical Society of Japan.

  7. Studying Dark Energy, Black Holes and Cosmic Feedback at X-ray Wavelengths: NASA's Constellation-X Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornschemeier, A.

    2005-01-01

    Among the most important topics in modern astrophysics are the nature of the dark energy equation of state, the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes in concert with galaxy bulges, and the self-regulating symmetry imposed by both stellar and AGN feedback. All of these topics are readily addressed with observations at X-ray wavelengths. For instance, theoretical models predict that the majority (98%) of the energy and metal content in starburst superwinds exists in the hot million-degree gas. The Constellation-X observatory is being developed to perform spatially resolved high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy so that we may directly measure the absolute element abundances and velocities of this hot gas. This talk focuses on the driving science behind this mission, which is one of two flagship missions in NASA's Beyond Einstein program. A general overview of the observatory's capabilities and basic technology will also be given.

  8. Scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive x ray analysis of impact residues on LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhard, Ronald P.; Durin, Christian; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    To better understand the nature of particulates in low-Earth orbit (LEO), and their effects on spacecraft hardware, we are analyzing residues found in impacts on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) tray clamps. LDEF experiment trays were held in place by 6 to 8 chromic-anodized aluminum (6061-T6) clamps that were fastened to the spacecraft frame using three stainless steel hex bolts. Each clamp exposed an area of approximately 58 sq cm (4.8 cm x 12.7 cm x .45 cm, minus the bolt coverage). Some 337 out of 774 LDEF tray clamps were archived at JSC and are available through the Meteoroid & Debris Special Investigation Group (M&D SIG). Optical scanning of clamps, starting with Bay/Row A01 and working toward H25, is being conducted at JSC to locate and document impacts as small as 40 microns. These impacts are then inspected by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (SEM/EDXA) to select those features which contain appreciable impact residue material. Based upon the composition of projectile remnants, and using criteria developed at JSC, we have made a preliminary discrimination between micrometeoroid and space debris residue-containing impact features. Presently, 13 impacts containing significant amounts of unmelted and semi-melted micrometeoritic residues were forwarded to Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) in France. At the CNES facilities, the upgraded impacts were analyzed using a JEOL T330A SEM equipped with a NORAN Instruments, Voyager X-ray Analyzer. All residues were quantitatively characterized by composition (including oxygen and carbon) to help understand interplanetary dust as possibly being derived from comets and asteroids.

  9. Analysis of energy dispersive x-ray diffraction profiles for material identification, imaging and system control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Emily Jane

    2008-12-01

    This thesis presents the analysis of low angle X-ray scatter measurements taken with an energy dispersive system for substance identification, imaging and system control. Diffraction measurements were made on illicit drugs, which have pseudo- crystalline structures and thus produce diffraction patterns comprising a se ries of sharp peaks. Though the diffraction profiles of each drug are visually characteristic, automated detection systems require a substance identification algorithm, and multivariate analysis was selected as suitable. The software was trained with measured diffraction data from 60 samples covering 7 illicit drugs and 5 common cutting agents, collected with a range of statistical qual ities and used to predict the content of 7 unknown samples. In all cases the constituents were identified correctly and the contents predicted to within 15%. Soft tissues exhibit broad peaks in their diffraction patterns. Diffraction data were collected from formalin fixed breast tissue samples and used to gen erate images. Maximum contrast between healthy and suspicious regions was achieved using momentum transfer windows 1.04-1.10 and 1.84-1.90 nm_1. The resulting images had an average contrast of 24.6% and 38.9% compared to the corresponding transmission X-ray images (18.3%). The data was used to simulate the feedback for an adaptive imaging system and the ratio of the aforementioned momentum transfer regions found to be an excellent pa rameter. Investigation into the effects of formalin fixation on human breast tissue and animal tissue equivalents indicated that fixation in standard 10% buffered formalin does not alter the diffraction profiles of tissue in the mo mentum transfer regions examined, though 100% unbuffered formalin affects the profile of porcine muscle tissue (a substitute for glandular and tumourous tissue), though fat is unaffected.

  10. Soft X-ray emissions, meter-wavelength radio bursts, and particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Reames, D. V.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed study of the relationship between metric radio bursts and soft X-ray flares has been made using an extensive data set covering 15 yr. It is found that type IV emission is mainly associated with long-duration 1-8 A events that are known to be well associated with coronal mass ejections. In contrast, type II and type III bursts originate primarily in impulsive soft X-ray events that are not necessarily accompanied by mass ejection. Strong type III bursts, in particular, appear to occur only in association with relatively impulsive flares. It is suggested that coronal shocks responsible for type II bursts are blast waves generated in impulsive energy releases.

  11. X-ray Scattering Measurements of Particle Orientation in a Sheared Polymer/Clay Dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Pujari, Saswati; Dougherty, Leah; Mobuchon, Christoph; Carreau, Pierre J.; Heuzey, Marie-Claude; Burghardt, Wesley R.

    2012-01-20

    We report steady and transient measurements of particle orientation in a clay dispersion subjected to shear flow. An organically modified clay is dispersed in a Newtonian polymer matrix at a volume fraction of 0.02, using methods previously reported by Mobuchon et al. (Rheol Acta 46: 1045, 2007). In accord with prior studies, mechanical rheometry shows yield stress-like behavior in steady shear, while time dependent growth of modulus is observed following flow cessation. Measurements of flow-induced orientation in the flow-gradient plane of simple shear flow using small-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and WAXS) are reported. Both SAXS and WAXS reveal increasing particle orientation as shear rate is increased. Partial relaxation of nanoparticle orientation upon flow cessation is well correlated with time-dependent changes in complex modulus. SAXS and WAXS data provide qualitatively similar results; however, some quantitative differences are attributed to differences in the length scales probed by these techniques.

  12. Sulfur speciation in hydrous experimental glasses of varying oxidation state - Results from measured wavelength shifts of sulfur X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Michael R.; Rutherford, Malcolm J.

    1988-01-01

    The focusing geometry of an electron microprobe has been used to measure the wavelength shifts of sulfur X-rays from hydrous experimental melts synthesized at oxygen fugacities that range from near the iron-wustite buffer to the magnetite-hermatite buffer. It is found that the proportion of dissolved sulfur which is present as sulfate increases with increasing oxygen fugacity. It is noted that in natural melts that have equilibrated at or below fayalite-magnetite-quartz values of +1, sulfur is probably present mainly as S(2-).

  13. A new approach for the study of cationic lipid DNA complexes by energy dispersive X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracciolo, G.; Caminiti, R.; Natali, F.; Congiu Castellano, A.

    2002-12-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies on the cationic liposomes (CL)-DNA complexes currently used in gene delivery have provided detailed structural informations on these compact, ordered self-assemblies sheding light on the poorly understood structure-activity relationship. Among these, the experiments carried out by using a synchrotron radiation source have showed an experimental resolution remarkably better than that achieved one by traditional in house apparatuses. Here we show a new experimental approach for the study of CL-DNA complexes, based on the employment of silicon wafers as substrates, which allows to obtain high-resolution structural informations by energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXD).

  14. Flat Quartz-Crystal X-ray Spectrometer for Nuclear Forensics Applications 

    E-print Network

    Goodsell, Alison

    2012-10-19

    . To reduce the debilitating effects of the Compton background, a crystal x-ray spectrometer system was designed. This wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy technique isolated the Pu and U x rays according to Bragg's law by x-ray diffraction through a crystal...

  15. ENERGY-DISPERSIVE, X-RAY REFLECTIVITY DENSITY MEASUREMENTS OF POROUS SIO2 XEROGELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    X-ray reflectivity has been used to nondestructively measure the density of thin, porous, SiO2-based xerogels. Critical angle, defined by total external reflection, was measured for multiple x-ray energies to correct for sample misalignment error in me determination of the densit...

  16. Atomic inner-shell laser at 1.5-ångström wavelength pumped by an X-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Hitoki; Inubushi, Yuichi; Nagamine, Kazunori; Michine, Yurina; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Mimura, Hidekazu; Kitamura, Hikaru; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yabashi, Makina

    2015-08-27

    Since the invention of the first lasers in the visible-light region, research has aimed to produce short-wavelength lasers that generate coherent X-rays; the shorter the wavelength, the better the imaging resolution of the laser and the shorter the pulse duration, leading to better temporal resolution in probe measurements. Recently, free-electron lasers based on self-amplified spontaneous emission have made it possible to generate a hard-X-ray laser (that is, the photon energy is of the order of ten kiloelectronvolts) in an ångström-wavelength regime, enabling advances in fields from ultrafast X-ray spectrosopy to X-ray quantum optics. An atomic laser based on neon atoms and pumped by a soft-X-ray (that is, a photon energy of less than one kiloelectronvolt) free-electron laser has been achieved at a wavelength of 14 nanometres. Here, we use a copper target and report a hard-X-ray inner-shell atomic laser operating at a wavelength of 1.5 ångströms. X-ray free-electron laser pulses with an intensity of about 10(19) watts per square centimetre tuned to the copper K-absorption edge produced sufficient population inversion to generate strong amplified spontaneous emission on the copper K? lines. Furthermore, we operated the X-ray free-electron laser source in a two-colour mode, with one colour tuned for pumping and the other for the seed (starting) light for the laser. PMID:26310765

  17. Micro energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry study of dentin coating with nanobiomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Luís. Eduardo Silva; Nahorny, Sídnei; Marciano, Fernanda Roberta; Zanin, Hudson; Lobo, Anderson de Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    New biomaterials such as multi-walled carbon nanotubes oxide/graphene oxide (MWCNTO/GO), nanohydroxyapatite (nHAp) and combination of them together or not to acidulated phosphate fluoride gel (F) have been tested as protective coating before root dentin erosion. Fourteen bovine teeth were cleaned, polished, divided into two parts (n=28) and assigned to seven groups: (Control) - without previous surface treatment; F treatment; nHAp; MWCNTO/GO; F+nHAp; F+MWCNTO/GO and F+MWCNTO/GO/nHAp composites. Each sample had two sites of pre-treatments: acid etched area and an area without treatment. After the biomaterials application, the samples were submitted to six cycles (demineralization: orange juice, 10 min; remineralization: artificial saliva, 1 h). Micro energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (?-EDXRF) mapping area analyses were performed after erosive cycling on both sites (n=84). ?-EDXRF mappings showed that artificial saliva and MWCNTO/GO/nHAp/F composite treatments produced lower dentin demineralization than in the other groups. Exposed dentin tubules allowed better interaction of nanobiomaterials than in smear layer covered dentin. Association of fluoride with other biomaterials had a positive influence on acid etched dentin. MWCNTO/GO/nHAp/F composite treatment resulted in levels of demineralization similar to the control group.

  18. XSPEK — A new program for the evaluation of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, W.; Ketelsen, P.; Knöchel, A.

    1986-05-01

    The computer program XSPEK for fitting spectra obtained in energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis (EDS-XFA) is described. The code is designed around a linear least-squares routine which fits Gaussian peak shapes. With the well known peak position and the constant ratio of the line intensities of a certain element the number of fitting parameters is reduced to one for each element. This leads to an increase in accuracy and a decrease of computation time compared with programs using a nonlinear fitting routine. The program is very flexible to different conditions of excitation and includes an automatic correction for pileup and escape peaks. A spectrum with about 1000 channels and containing up to 15 elements is fitted in 3-4 min on a PDP 11/34 computer and RSX11M system and 2-3 min on a VAX-750 computer (VMS system). A special version works fully automatic after interactive input of the element list and the background shape function. The result is comparable to that obtained with a commercially available computer program with a nonlinear fit for which the CPU time, however, is two to three times longer than for XSPEK

  19. The classification and discrimination of glass fragments using non destructive energy dispersive X-ray microfluorescence.

    PubMed

    Hicks, T; Monard Sermier, F; Goldmann, T; Brunelle, A; Champod, C; Margot, P

    2003-11-26

    Frequency of analytical characteristics is best estimated on glass recovered at random. However, as such data were not available to us, we decided to use control windows for this estimation. In order to use such a database, one has to establish that the recovered fragment comes from a window. Therefore, elemental analysis was used both for classification and discrimination of glass fragments. Several articles have been published on the subject, but most methods alter the glass sample. The use of non destructive energy dispersive X-ray microfluorescence (microXRF) for the analysis of small glass fragments has been evaluated in this context. The refractive index (RI) has also been measured in order to evaluate the complementarity of techniques. Classification of fragments has been achieved using Fisher's linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and neural networks (NN). Discrimination was based on Hotelling's T2 test. Only pairs that were not differentiated by RI followed by the Welch test were studied. The results show that neural network and linear discriminant analysis using qualitative and semi-quantitative data establishes a classification of glass specimens with a high degree of reliability. For discrimination, 119 windows collected from crime scene were compared: using RI it was possible to distinguish 6892 pairs. Out of 129 remaining pairs, 112 were distinguished by microXRF. PMID:14609645

  20. An energy dispersive x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics study of liquid dimethyl carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gontrani, Lorenzo; Russina, Olga; Marincola, Flaminia Cesare; Caminiti, Ruggero

    2009-12-01

    In this work, we report on the first x-ray diffraction study on liquid dimethyl carbonate. Diffraction spectra were collected with an energy-dispersive instrument, whose wide Q-range allows the structure determination of weakly ordered systems (such as liquids). The structural correlation in this liquid ranges up to about 20 Å. The observed patterns are interpreted with a structural model derived from classical molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations were run using OPLS force field, only slightly modified to restrain bond distances to the experimental values. The model structure function and radial distribution functions, averaged among the productive trajectory frames, are in very good agreement with the corresponding experimental ones. Molecular dynamics results show that the deviations from C2v cis-cis structure, predicted by ab initio calculations and observed by electron diffraction in the gas phase, are small. By analyzing the intra- and intermolecular pair distribution functions, it was possible to assign the peaks of the experimental radial distribution function to specific structural correlations, and to compute the different average intermolecular coordination numbers. The intermolecular methyl-carbonyl oxygen distance is thoroughly discussed to assess the presence of weak C-H⋯?O hydrogen bonds.

  1. Microcalorimeter-type energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer for a transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Hara, Toru; Tanaka, Keiichi; Maehata, Keisuke; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Yamasaki, Noriko Y; Ohsaki, Mitsuaki; Watanabe, Katsuaki; Yu, Xiuzhen; Ito, Takuji; Yamanaka, Yoshihiro

    2010-01-01

    A new energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) with a microcalorimeter detector equipped with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) has been developed for high- accuracy compositional analysis in the nanoscale. A superconducting transition-edge-sensor-type microcalorimeter is applied as the detector. A cryogen-free cooling system, which consists of a mechanical and a dilution refrigerator, is selected to achieve long-term temperature stability. In order to mount these detector and refrigerators on a TEM, the cooling system is specially designed such that these two refrigerators are separated. Also, the detector position and arrangement are carefully designed to avoid adverse affects between the superconductor detector and the TEM lens system. Using the developed EDS system, at present, an energy resolution of 21.92 eV full-width-at-half maximum has been achieved at the Cr K alpha line. This value is about seven times better than that of the current typical commercial Si(Li) detector, which is usually around 140 eV. The developed microcalorimeter EDS system can measure a wide energy range, 1-20 keV, at one time with this high energy resolution that can resolve peaks from most of the elements. Although several further developments will be needed to enable practical use, highly accurate compositional analysis with high energy resolution will be realized by this microcalorimeter EDS system. PMID:19717388

  2. The Subaru-XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) VIII.: Multi-wavelength Identification, Optical/NIR Spectroscopic Properties, and Photometric Redshifts of X-ray Sources

    E-print Network

    Akiyama, Masayuki; Watson, Mike G; Furusawa, Hisanori; Takata, Tadafumi; Simpson, Chris; Morokuma, Tomoki; Yamada, Toru; Ohta, Kouji; Iwamuro, Fumihide; Yabe, Kiyoto; Tamura, Naoyuki; Moritani, Yuuki; Takato, Naruhisa; Kimura, Masahiko; Maihara, Toshinori; Dalton, Gavin; Lewis, Ian; Lee, Hanshin; Lake, Emma Curtis; Macaulay, Edward; Clarke, Frazer; Silverman, John D; Croom, Scott; Ouchi, Masami; Hanami, Hitoshi; Tello, J Diaz; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Fujishiro, Naofumi; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    We report the multi-wavelength identification of the X-ray sources found in the Subaru-XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) using deep imaging data covering the wavelength range between the far-UV to the mid-IR. We select a primary counterpart of each X-ray source by applying the likelihood ratio method to R-band, 3.6micron, near-UV, and 24micron source catalogs as well as matching catalogs of AGN candidates selected in 1.4GHz radio and i'-band variability surveys. Once candidates of Galactic stars, ultra-luminous X-ray sources in a nearby galaxy, and clusters of galaxies are removed there are 896 AGN candidates in the sample. We conduct spectroscopic observations of the primary counterparts with multi-object spectrographs in the optical and NIR; 65\\% of the X-ray AGN candidates are spectroscopically-identified. For the remaining X-ray AGN candidates, we evaluate their photometric redshift with photometric data in 15 bands. Utilising the multi-wavelength photometric data of the large sample of X-ray selected AGNs, w...

  3. Application of the focusing x-ray spectrograph with crossed dispersion to investigations of X pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pikuz, S.A.; Song, B.M.; Shelkovenko, T.A.; Chandler, K.M.; Mitchell, M.D.; Hammer, D.A.

    2004-10-01

    A new focusing spectrograph configuration with crossed dispersion (FSCD) has been developed for use in X pinch experiments. This device solves the problem in a crystal spectrograph of the overlapping of reflected radiation in many orders. The x-ray radiation from a small source is dispersed by a transmission grating before it reaches the Bragg reflector (mica crystal). A large aperture (10 mmx10 mm), 0.5 {mu}m period gold transmission grating was made on a 0.5 {mu}m thick Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrate and combined with spherically bent mica crystals with radii of curvature of 100 mm or 186 mm. Results of FSCD application to plasma experiments with X pinch x-ray sources is presented.

  4. The Subaru-XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS). VIII. Multi-wavelength identification, optical/NIR spectroscopic properties, and photometric redshifts of X-ray sources†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Masayuki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Watson, Mike G.; Furusawa, Hisanori; Takata, Tadafumi; Simpson, Chris; Morokuma, Tomoki; Yamada, Toru; Ohta, Kouji; Iwamuro, Fumihide; Yabe, Kiyoto; Tamura, Naoyuki; Moritani, Yuuki; Takato, Naruhisa; Kimura, Masahiko; Maihara, Toshinori; Dalton, Gavin; Lewis, Ian; Lee, Hanshin; Curtis-Lake, Emma; Macaulay, Edward; Clarke, Frazer; Silverman, John D.; Croom, Scott; Ouchi, Masami; Hanami, Hitoshi; Díaz Tello, Jorge; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Fujishiro, Naofumi; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiro

    2015-10-01

    We report on the multi-wavelength identification of the X-ray sources found in the Subaru-XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) using deep imaging data covering the wavelength range between the far-UV and mid-IR (MIR). We select a primary counterpart of each X-ray source by applying the likelihood ratio method to R-band, 3.6 ?m, near-UV, and 24 ?m source catalogs as well as matching catalogs of active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates selected in 1.4 GHz radio and i '-band variability surveys. Once candidates for Galactic stars, ultra-luminous X-ray sources in a nearby galaxy, and clusters of galaxies are removed there are 896 AGN candidates in the sample. We conduct spectroscopic observations of the primary counterparts with multi-object spectrographs in the optical and NIR; 65% of the X-ray AGN candidates are spectroscopically identified. For the remaining X-ray AGN candidates, we evaluate their photometric redshift with photometric data in 15 bands. Utilizing the multi-wavelength photometric data of the large sample of X-ray-selected AGNs, we evaluate the stellar masses, M*, of the host galaxies of the narrow-line AGNs. The distribution of the stellar mass is remarkably constant from z = 0.1 to 4.0. The relation between M* and 2-10 keV luminosity can be explained with strong cosmological evolution of the relationship between the black hole mass and M*. We also evaluate the scatter of the UV-MIR spectral energy distribution (SED) of the X-ray AGNs as a function of X-ray luminosity and absorption by the nucleus. The scatter is compared with galaxies which have redshift and stellar mass distribution matched with the X-ray AGN. The UV-NIR (near-IR) SEDs of obscured X-ray AGNs are similar to those of the galaxies in the matched sample. In the NIR-MIR range, the median SEDs of X-ray AGNs are redder, but the scatter of the SEDs of the X-ray AGN broadly overlaps that of the galaxies in the matched sample.

  5. The Chandra Multi-wavelength Plane Survey (ChaMPlane) is designed to identify the point X-ray sources discovered by the Chandra X-ray Observatory along the Galactic Plane and in the Galactic Center region (GCR) [1]. Based on a multiwavelength dataset [2,3

    E-print Network

    The Chandra Multi-wavelength Plane Survey (ChaMPlane) is designed to identify the point X-ray sources discovered by the Chandra X-ray Observatory along the Galactic Plane and in the Galactic Center + spectroscopy of selected sources) [3]. The hard X-ray sources have absorption and spectral index inconsistent

  6. Mass absorption coefficients of Parylene N at soft X-ray and vacuum-ultraviolet wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, R.; Paresce, F.

    1975-01-01

    Parylene N was selected as a bandpass filter for the extreme-ultraviolet telescope, flown on the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project in July 1975. The telescope measures stellar and diffuse cosmic radiation in the wavelength region from 45 to 170 A. In connection with this application, a systematic study was conducted of the mass absorption coefficient of the Parylene N. The results of the study for the wavelength region from 44 to 2536 A are reported.

  7. Near-surface density profiling of Fe ion irradiated Si (100) using extremely asymmetric x-ray diffraction by variation of the wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Khanbabaee, B. Pietsch, U.; Facsko, S.; Doyle, S.

    2014-10-20

    In this work, we report on correlations between surface density variations and ion parameters during ion beam-induced surface patterning process. The near-surface density variations of irradiated Si(100) surfaces were investigated after off-normal irradiation with 5 keV Fe ions at different fluences. In order to reduce the x-ray probing depth to a thickness below 5?nm, the extremely asymmetrical x-ray diffraction by variation of wavelength was applied, exploiting x-ray refraction at the air-sample interface. Depth profiling was achieved by measuring x-ray rocking curves as function of varying wavelengths providing incidence angles down to 0°. The density variation was extracted from the deviations from kinematical Bragg angle at grazing incidence angles due to refraction of the x-ray beam at the air-sample interface. The simulations based on the dynamical theory of x-ray diffraction revealed that while a net near-surface density decreases with increasing ion fluence which is accompanied by surface patterning, there is a certain threshold of ion fluence to surface density modulation. Our finding suggests that the surface density variation can be relevant with the mechanism of pattern formation.

  8. Low energy X-ray spectra measured with a mercuric iodide energy dispersive spectrometer in a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Huth, G. C.; Bradley, J. G.; Conley, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A mercuric iodide energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, with Peltier cooling provided for the detector and input field effect transistor, has been developed and tested in a scanning electron microscope. X-ray spectra were obtained with the 15 keV electron beam. An energy resolution of 225 eV (FWHM) for Mn-K(alpha) at 5.9 keV and 195 eV (FWHM) for the Mg-K line at 1.25 keV has been measured. Overall system noise level was 175 eV (FWHM). The detector system characterization with a carbon target demonstrated good energy sensitivity at low energies and lack of significant spectral artifacts at higher energies.

  9. EVOLUTION OF X-RAY AND FAR-ULTRAVIOLET DISK-DISPERSING RADIATION FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Ingleby, Laura; Calvet, Nuria; Miller, Jon; Bergin, Edwin; Hartmann, Lee; Hernandez, Jesus; Briceno, Cesar; Espaillat, Catherine E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu E-mail: ebergin@umich.edu E-mail: jesush@cida.ve E-mail: cespaillat@cfa.harvard.edu

    2011-04-15

    We present new X-ray and far-ultraviolet (FUV) observations of T Tauri stars covering the age range 1-10 Myr. Our goals are to observationally constrain the intensity of radiation fields responsible for evaporating gas from the circumstellar disk and to assess the feasibility of current photoevaporation models, focusing on X-ray and UV radiation. We greatly increase the number of 7-10 Myr old T Tauri stars observed in X-rays by including observations of the well-populated 25 Ori aggregate in the Orion OB1a subassociation. With these new 7-10 Myr objects, we confirm that X-ray emission remains constant from 1 to 10 Myr. We also show, for the first time, observational evidence for the evolution of FUV radiation fields with a sample of 56 accreting and non-accreting young stars spanning 1 Myr to 1 Gyr. We find that the FUV emission decreases on timescales consistent with the decline of accretion in classical T Tauri stars until reaching the chromospheric level in weak T Tauri stars and debris disks. Overall, we find that the observed strength of high-energy radiation is consistent with that required by photoevaporation models to dissipate the disks in timescales of approximately 10 Myr. Finally, we find that the high-energy fields that affect gas evolution are not similarly affecting dust evolution; in particular, we find that disks with inner clearings, transitional disks, have similar levels of FUV emission as full disks.

  10. High-Dispersion Spectroscopy of the X-Ray Transient RXTE J0421+560 (= CI Cam) during Outburst

    E-print Network

    Edward L. Robinson; Inese I. Ivans; William F. Welsh

    2001-10-04

    We obtained high dispersion spectra of CI Cam, the optical counterpart of XTE J0421+560, two weeks after the peak of its short outburst in 1998 April. The optical counterpart is a supergiant B[e] star emitting a two-component wind. The cool wind (the source of narrow emission lines of neutral and ionized metals) has a velocity of 32 km/s and a temperature near 8000 K. Dense and roughly spherical, it fills the space around the sgB[e] star, and, based on the size of an infrared-emitting dust shell around the system, extends to a radius between 13 - 50 AU. It carries away mass at a high rate, Mdot > 10^(-6) solar masses per year. The hot wind has a velocity in excess of 2500 km/s and a temperature of 1.7 +/-0.3 x 10^4 K. From UV spectra of CI Cam obtained in 2000 March with Hubble Space Telescope, we derive a differential extinction E(B-V) = 0.85 +/- 0.05. We derive a distance to CI Cam > 5 kpc. Based on this revised distance, the X-ray luminosity at the peak of the outburst was L(2-25 keV) > 3.0 x 10^38 erg/s, making CI Cam one of the most luminous X-ray transients. The ratio of quiescent to peak luminosity in the 2 - 25 keV band is < 1.7 x 10^(-6). The compact star in CI Cam is immersed in the dense circumstellar wind from the sgB[e] star and burrows through the wind producing little X-ray emission except for rare transient outbursts. This picture (a compact star traveling in a wide orbit through the dense circumstellar envelope of a sgB[e] star, occasionally producing transient X-ray outbursts) makes CI Cam unique among the known X-ray binaries. Strong circumstantial evidence suggests that the compact object is a black hole, not a neutron star. We speculate that the X-ray outburst was short because the accretion disk around the compact star is fed from a stellar wind and is smaller than disks fed by Roche-lobe overflow.

  11. Texture analysis of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe alloys by X-ray and neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béchade, J. L.; Mathon, M. H.; Branger, V.; Réglé, H.; Alamo, A.

    2002-07-01

    The ferritic ODS alloys studied were obtained by mechanical alloying. This strengthening method is very attractive, in particular for nuclear applications. In order to ensure the alloy a good compromise between mechanical resistance and ductility at high temperatures, it is necessary to control the microstructure and in particular the evolution during the recrystallization. First, a preliminary study, performed by X ray diffraction and optical microscopy, shows several grain growth mechanisms ; in particular, the “abnormal” grain growth mechanism which conducts to a large grain size [1], [2]. After annealing (3600s at 1470^{circ}C), the 30% cold-worked (swaging) alloys exhibit an heterogeneous microstructure with a large grains size ( 200 to 500 ?m) in the heart and near the surface of the material when the intermediate zone is inhabited by small grains ( 1 ?m). Fora higher cold-work level (60%), large size grains are only present in the periphery of the material. On account of the large grain size and strong heterogeneity of the microstructure, texture analysis using laboratory x-ray beam in not well adapted and so we have decided to use neutron beam. The neutron diffraction texture analysis has been performed at the Laboratoire Léon Brillouin on the 6T1 diffractometer on 2 different rods of the alloy (corresponding to the reduction ratios of 30% and 60%). Specific samples have been machined to characterise separately the zones with a different microstructure. After deformation, the alloys exhibit a typical ?-fibre texture \\{ hkl \\} <1l0> whatever the area of the sample and the reduction ratio. After recrystallization, a very inhomogeneous texture is evidenced through the thickness of the sample, in particular for the rod deformed with a reduction ratio of 30% : in the heart and in the periphery of the rod, a “single-crystal” type texture is observed; the a fibre remains for the intermediate diameter of the rod. For the rod cold rolled with a reduction ratio of 60%, the ?-fibre keeps on the heart of the material and as in the precedent case, a “single-crystal” type texture is observed near the surface of the sample. EBSD measurements have been performed to explicit at a local scale this behaviour and in order to furnish some input data for the simulation of static recrystallization. Les aciers ferritiques avec dispersion d'oxydes étudiés sont obtenus par métallurgie des poudres, ce qui leur confère une résistance mécanique accrue à haute température notamment pour des applications nucléaires. La difficulté pour l'utilisation de tels alliages réside dans la maîtrise de leur microstructure au cours de l'élaboration en particulier durant la recristallisation. Une première étude en diffraction des rayons-x et en métallographie optique a permis de révéler différents mécanismes de croissance du grain lors de la recristallisation, notamment une croissance “anormale” conduisant à une taille de grain très importante [t], [2]. Après recuit (3600s à 1470^{circ}C), précédé par un écrouissage de 30% sur des barres (par martelage) on voit apparaître une microstructure hétérogène à gros grains ( 200 à 500 ?m) au coeur et en surface externe de la barre alors que la zone intermédiaire est peuplée de grains fins (sim 1 ?m). Pour un écrouissage plus élevé (60%), après le même recuit, on ne voit apparaître des gros grains qu'en périphérie de la barre. Pour ce type de microstructure fortement hétérogène et à gros grains, la diffraction des rayons-x pour l'analyse de texture est mal adaptée, ce qui nous a conduit à utiliser la diffraction des neutrons sur le diffractomètre 6TI du Laboratoire Léon Brillouin. Les deux matériaux, écrouis de 30% et 60%, ont été analysés en réalisant des échantillons particuliers permettant d'étudier séparément le coeur et la périphérie. Après déformation, les deux échantillons présentent une texture de fibre ? \\{ hkl \\} <1l0> en tout point de la barre. Après recristallisation, on retrouve une texture trè

  12. Multi-wavelength coverage of state transitions in the new black hole X-ray binary swift J1910.2-0546

    SciTech Connect

    Degenaar, N.; Maitra, D.; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M.; Reis, R. C.; King, A. L.; Gültekin, K.; Cackett, E. M.; Bailyn, C. D.; Buxton, M. M.; MacDonald, R. K. D.; Fabian, A. C.; Fox, D. B.; Rykoff, E. S.

    2014-04-01

    Understanding how black holes accrete and supply feedback to their environment is one of the outstanding challenges of modern astrophysics. Swift J1910.2-0546 is a candidate black hole low-mass X-ray binary that was discovered in 2012 when it entered an accretion outburst. To investigate the binary configuration and the accretion morphology, we monitored the evolution of the outburst for ?3 months at X-ray, UV, optical (B, V, R, I), and near-infrared (J, H, K) wavelengths using Swift and SMARTS. The source evolved from a hard to a soft X-ray spectral state with a relatively cold accretion disk that peaked at ?0.5 keV. A Chandra/HETG spectrum obtained during this soft state did not reveal signatures of an ionized disk wind. Both the low disk temperature and the absence of a detectable wind could indicate that the system is viewed at relatively low inclination. The multi-wavelength light curves revealed two notable features that appear to be related to X-ray state changes. First, a prominent flux decrease was observed in all wavebands ? 1-2 weeks before the source entered the soft state. This dip occurred in (0.6-10 keV) X-rays ? 6 days later than at longer wavelengths, which could possibly reflect the viscous timescale of the disk. Second, about two weeks after the source transitioned back into the hard state, the UV emission significantly increased while the X-rays steadily decayed. We discuss how these observations may reflect changes in the accretion morphology, perhaps related to the quenching/launch of a jet or the collapse/recovery of a hot flow.

  13. An energy-dispersive technique to measure x-ray coherent scattering form factors of amorphous materials.

    PubMed

    King, B W; Johns, P C

    2010-02-01

    The material-dependent x-ray scattering properties of amorphous substances such as tissues and phantom materials used in imaging are determined by their scattering form factors, measured as a function of the momentum transfer argument, x. Incoherent scattering form factors, F(inc), are calculable for all values of x while coherent scattering form factors, F(coh), cannot be calculated except at large x because of their dependence on long-range order. As a result, measuring F(coh) is very important to the developing field of x-ray scatter imaging. Previous measurements of F(coh), based on crystallographic techniques, have shown significant variability, as these techniques are not optimal for amorphous materials. We have developed an energy-dispersive technique that uses a polychromatic x-ray beam and an energy-sensitive detector. We show that F(coh) can be measured directly, with no scaling parameters, by computing the ratio of two spectra: the first, measured at a given scattering angle and the second, the direct transmission spectrum with no scattering. Experiments have been constructed on this principle and used to measure F(coh) for water and polyethylene to explore the reliability of the technique. A 121 kVp x-ray spectrum and seven different scattering angles between 1.67 and 15.09 degrees were used, resulting in a measurable range of x between 0.5 and 9.5 nm(-1). These are the first measurements of F(coh) made without the need for a scaling factor. Resolution in x varies between 10% for small scattering angles and 2% for large scattering angles. Accuracy in F(coh) is shown to be strongly dependent on the precision of the experimental geometry and varies between 5% and 15%. Comparison with previous published measurements for water shows values of the average absolute relative difference between 8% and 14%. PMID:20071771

  14. Enhanced quantification for 3D energy dispersive spectrometry: going beyond the limitation of large volume of X-ray emission.

    PubMed

    Burdet, Pierre; Hébert, Cécile; Cantoni, Marco

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a method developed to quantify three-dimensional energy dispersive spectrometry (3D EDS) data with voxel size smaller than the volume from which X-rays are emitted. The influence of the neighboring voxels is corrected by applying recursively a complex quantification, improving thereby the accuracy of the quantification of critically small features. The enhanced quantification method is applied to simulated and measured data. A systematic improvement is obtained compared with classical quantification, proving the concept and the prospect of this method. PMID:24960631

  15. Evaluating the presence of titanium in XIX-century Brazilian steels by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neiva, Augusto Camara; Pinto, Herbert Prince Favero; Landgraf, Fernando José Gomes

    2014-02-01

    Ores, pig iron and steel pieces from the XIX Century ironworks Royal St. John of Ipanema Iron Foundry (Real Fábrica de Ferro São João do Ipanema), in Iperó, Brazil, were analyzed by Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) spectroscopy, with the aim of investigating the presence of deleterious elements as Ti and P in the minerals and in the resulting products. Analytical modifications made in order to improve the detection limits for Ti and P are discussed. Both elements were found in the raw material and in the products, but large differences in chemical composition were found in different samples or regions of samples.

  16. In-situ study of the growth of CuO nanowires by energy dispersive X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Himanshu; Ganguli, Tapas; Deb, S. K.; Sant, Tushar; Poswal, Himanshu; Sharma, S. M.

    2013-02-05

    Growth of CuO nanowires by annealing method has been studied in-situ by grazing incidence Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction (EDXRD) technique on Indus-2. It was observed that Cu slowly oxidized to Cu{sub 2}O and finally to CuO. The data was taken as a function of time at two annealing temperatures 500 Degree-Sign C where nanowires form and 300 Degree-Sign C where nanowires don't form. We found that the strain in the CuO layer may be a principal factor for the spontaneous growth of nanowires in annealing method.

  17. Dispersion of magnetic excitations in the cuprate La2CuO4 and CaCuO2 compounds measured using resonant x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Braicovich, L; Ament, L J P; Bisogni, V; Forte, F; Aruta, C; Balestrino, G; Brookes, N B; De Luca, G M; Medaglia, P G; Granozio, F Miletto; Radovic, M; Salluzzo, M; van den Brink, J; Ghiringhelli, G

    2009-04-24

    By resonant inelastic x-ray scattering in the soft x-ray regime we probe the dynamical multiple-spin correlations in the antiferromagnetic cuprates La2CuO4 and CaCuO2. High resolution measurements at the copper L3 edge allow the clear observation of dispersing bimagnon excitations. Theory based on the ultrashort core-hole lifetime expansion fits the data on these coherent spin excitations without free parameters. PMID:19518752

  18. Evidence for core–shell nanoclusters in oxygen dispersion strengthened steels measured using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Odette, G. R.; Segre, C. U.

    2014-02-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) dispersion strengthened by an ultra high density of Y–Ti–O enriched nano-features (NF) exhibit superior creep strength and the potential for high resistance to radiation damage. However, the detailed character of the NF, that precipitate from solid solution during hot consolidation of metallic powders mechanically alloyed with Y?O?, are not well understood. In order to clarify the nature of the NF, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) technique, including X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) were used to characterize the local structure of the Ti and Y atoms in both NFA powders and consolidated alloys. The powders were characterized in the as-received, as-milled and after annealing milled powders at 850, 1000 and 1150 °C. The consolidated alloys included powders hot isostatic pressed (HIPed) at 1150 °C and commercial vendor alloys, MA957 and J12YWT. The NFA XAS data were compared various Ti and Y-oxide standards. The XANES and EXAFS spectra for the annealed and HIPed powders are similar and show high temperature heat treatments shift the Y and Ti to more oxidized states that are consistent with combinations of Y?Ti?O? and, especially, TiO. However, the MA957 and J12YWT and annealed–consolidated powder data differ. The commercial vendor alloys results more closely resemble the as-milled powder data and all show that a significant fraction of substitutional Ti remains dissolved in the (BCC) ferrite matrix.

  19. Determination of trace elements in Syrian medicinal plants and their infusions by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khuder, A.; Sawan, M. Kh.; Karjou, J.; Razouk, A. K.

    2009-07-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) techniques suited well for a multi-element determination of K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb, and Sr in some Syrian medicinal plant species. The accuracy and the precision of both techniques were verified by analyzing the Standard Reference Materials (SRM) peach-1547 and apple leaves-1515. A good agreement between the measured concentrations of the previously mentioned elements and the certified values were obtained with errors less than 10.7% for TXRF and 15.8% for XRF. The determination of Br was acceptable only by XRF with an error less than 24%. Furthermore, the XRF method showed a very good applicability for the determination of K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, and Br in infusions of different Syrian medicinal plant species, namely anise ( Anisum vulgare), licorice root ( Glycyrrhiza glabra), and white wormwood ( Artemisia herba-alba).

  20. Final Report, DOE Award Number DE-FG02-02ER45964, Electromagnetic Properties of Matter at X-ray Wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, David Y.

    2007-02-28

    We report results of a collaborative study of photon and charged-particle interactions with matter between the University of Vermont and Argonne and Brookhaven National Laboratories. A major goal was to extend the study of electromagnetic properties of selected materials to as wide a spectral range as possible. This broad approach discloses systematic trends not apparent in isolated measurements and exploits the power of dispersion analysis and sum-rule constraints. Emphasis was largely on UV and X-ray processes and capitalized on the wide range of photon energies available at NSLS. A key finding is that, under favorable circumstances, dispersion theory relates dispersive processes (e.g. refractive index, dielectric constant) to spectral moments of absorptive processes. This appears to be a new method in optics; it yields significant simplifications and provides a precise, model-independent characterization of optical materials. Problems addressed included a) x-ray magnetooptics; b) UV/soft-x-ray processes in insulators and their contribution to visible dispersion; c) demonstration of moments/dispersion analysis in glasses and applications to fiber-optic systems; d) the optical constants of silicon and their application to the stopping power of silicon for charged-particles. Results include: ? Resolution of a long-standing conflict over the relation between x-ray Faraday rotation and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Specifically, the Kramers-Kronig relations must be generalized to account for the breaking of time-reversal symmetry by magnetic fields. Experimental reports to the contrary were shown to be inconclusive. Reanalysis of x-ray Faraday rotation data supports the generalization. ? Demonstration that the optical properties of dielectrics in their region of transparency are determined by a series expansion in spectral moments of the dielectric’s infrared and ultraviolet absorption spectra. Application of this to silicate glasses clarifies the role of glass modifiers in introducing charge-transfer, intra-ionic and perturbed-exciton transitions that combine to determine visible optical properties. Roughly, the refractive index is determined by the total electronic absorption, while dispersion depends on how the absorption is distributed. Materials characterization using UV/soft-x-ray moments may have application to non-destructive testing of glasses and high-temperature glass melts. ? Application of moments methods to pulse propagation in optical fibers showed that signal distortion is minimized at the carrier-wave frequency for which dispersion in group velocity caused by IR processes just cancels the dispersion caused by UV and soft-x-ray processes. ? Construction of a composite set of optical constants for silicon employing a method of self-consistent dispersion analysis from the extensive measurements available in the literature. This provides a reliable set of optical constants in the IR and visible, and has clarified the issue of scaling relative measurements at the K edge and the accuracy of measurements at the L edge. ? Direct calculation of the stopping power of silicon for charged particles as outlined by Bethe using our composite set of optical constants. This task was not previously feasible for want of accurate dielectric function data over a wide spectral range. This study resolved a long-standing conflict between measured average excitation energy or I values that was an issue for radiation damage and shielding applications.

  1. Study of soil aggregate breakdown dynamics under low dispersive ultrasonic energies with sedimentation and X-ray attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomakers, Jasmin; Zehetner, Franz; Mentler, Axel; Ottner, Franz; Mayer, Herwig

    2015-10-01

    It has been increasingly recognized that soil organic matter stabilization is strongly controlled by physical binding within soil aggregates. It is therefore essential to measure soil aggregate stability reliably over a wide range of disruptive energies and different aggregate sizes. To this end, we tested highaccuracy ultrasonic dispersion in combination with subsequent sedimentation and X-ray attenuation. Three arable topsoils (notillage) from Central Europe were subjected to ultrasound at four different specific energy levels: 0.5, 6.7, 100 and 500 J cm-3, and the resulting suspensions were analyzed for aggregate size distribution by wet sieving (2 000-63 ?m) and sedimentation/X-ray attenuation (63-2 ?m). The combination of wet sieving and sedimentation technique allowed for a continuous analysis, at high resolution, of soil aggregate breakdown dynamics after defined energy inputs. Our results show that aggregate size distribution strongly varied with sonication energy input and soil type. The strongest effects were observed in the range of low specific energies (< 10 J cm-3), which previous studies have largely neglected. This shows that low ultrasonic energies are required to capture the full range of aggregate stability and release of soil organic matter upon aggregate breakdown.

  2. Development of energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence as a mobile analysis method for hazardous metals in transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, S.J.

    1998-09-01

    Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) is a widely applied technique for both laboratory and field-based characterization of metals in complex matrices. Here an EDXRF method is described for analysis of 13 hazardous (RCRA) metals in Portland cement, a typical matrix for transuranic (TRU) waste from US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Samples are analyzed as homogeneous powders prepared by simple drying, mixing, and milling. Analyses are performed using a commercial EDXRF spectrometer equipped with an X-ray tube, a high-resolution Si(Li) detector, and fundamental parameters software for data reduction. The spectrometer is rugged and suitable for use in either mobile or fixed-based laboratories. Standardization is accomplished using fundamental parameters techniques for several prepared standards which bracket the expected range in metal concentrations, and typical standardization uncertainties are < 10%. Detection limits range from 2--20 ppm and meet required action levels with a few exceptions including Be, Hg and V. Accuracy is evaluated from a series of unknown quality control samples and ranges from 85--102%, whereas the total method uncertainty is typically < 10%. Consequently, this simple, rapid, and inexpensive technique can provide quantitative characterization of virtually all of the RCRA metals in TRU waste cement samples.

  3. Determination of selenium at trace levels in geologic materials by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wahlberg, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    Low levels of selenium (0.1-500 ppm) in both organic and inorganic geologic materials can be semiquantitatively measured by isolating Se as a thin film for presentation to an energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Suitably pulverized samples are first digested by fusing with a mixture of Na2CO3 and Na2O2. The fusion cake is dissolved in distilled water, buffered with NH4Cl, and filtered to remove Si and the R2O3 group. A carrier solution of Na2TeO4, plus solid KI, hydrazine sulfate and Na2SO3, is added to the filtrate. The solution is then vacuum-filtered through a 0.45-??m pore-size filter disc. The filter, with the thin film of precipitate, is supported between two sheets of Mylar?? film for analysis. Good agreement is shown between data reported in this study and literature values reported by epithermal neutron-activation analysis and spectrofluorimetry. The method can be made quantitative by utilizing a secondary precipitation to assure complete recovery of the Se. The X-ray method offers fast turn-around time and a reasonably high production rate. ?? 1981.

  4. Effect of x-ray energy dispersion in digital subtraction imaging at the iodine K-edge--A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Prino, F.; Ceballos, C.; Cabal, A.; Sarnelli, A.; Gambaccini, M.; Ramello, L.

    2008-01-15

    The effect of the energy dispersion of a quasi-monochromatic x-ray beam on the performance of a dual-energy x-ray imaging system is studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations using MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) version 2.6.0. In particular, the case of subtraction imaging at the iodine K-edge, suitable for angiographic imaging application, is investigated. The average energies of the two beams bracketing the iodine K-edge are set to the values of 31.2 and 35.6 keV corresponding to the ones obtained with a compact source based on a conventional x-ray tube and a mosaic crystal monochromator. The energy dispersion of the two beams is varied between 0 and 10 keV of full width at half-maximum (FWHM). The signal and signal-to-noise ratio produced in the simulated images by iodine-filled cavities (simulating patient vessels) drilled in a PMMA phantom are studied as a function of the x-ray energy dispersion. The obtained results show that, for the considered energy separation of 4.4 keV, no dramatic deterioration of the image quality is observed with increasing x-ray energy dispersion up to a FWHM of about 2.35 keV. The case of different beam energies is also investigated by means of fast simulations of the phantom absorption.

  5. Evaluation of imaging properties of soft x-ray multilayer mirrors and their application to highly dispersive spectral imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kolachevsky, N. N.; Mitropolsky, M. M.; Ragozin, E. N.; Salashchenko, N. N.; Slemzin, V. A.; Zhitnik, I. A.

    1995-05-01

    A variety of normal-incidence multilayer mirrors (MMs) intended for studies of astrophysical and laboratory soft-x-ray radiation sources have been synthesized on concave (r=1.6-2.0 m) fused silica substrates. The MMs range in resonance wavelength {lambda}0 from 4.5 to 31 nm. Their imaging capability has been evaluated from small-source imaging tests employing to a laser-plasma broadband XUV radiation source and a high-resolution XUV photographic film. The photographs testify to a subarcsecond angular resolution. For 17.5-nm MMs, a resolution of at least {approx_equal}0.32 arcseconds has been demonstrated, which is only 2.4{lambda}0/D for the MMs involved.

  6. Sodium lauryl sulfate enhances nickel penetration through guinea-pig skin. Studies with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, M.; Sagstroem, S.R.; Roomans, G.M.; Forslind, B.

    1989-03-01

    The effect of sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), a common ingredient of detergents, on the penetration of nickel through the stratum corneum in the guinea-pig skin model was studied with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) to evaluate the barrier-damaging properties of this common detergent. The EDX technique allows a simultaneous determination of physiologically important elements, e.g., Na, Mg, P, Cl, K, Ca and S in addition to Ni at each point of measurement in epidermal cell strata. Our results show that SLS reduces the barrier function to Ni-ion penetration of the stratum corneum. In addition we have shown that EDX allows analysis of the influence of different factors involved in nickel penetration through the skin by giving data on the physiological effects on the epidermal cells caused by the applied substances.

  7. Detailed differential coefficients of anomalous dispersion terms to derivatives in least-squares refinement for X-ray crystallography

    PubMed

    Okada; Okada

    2000-03-01

    In X-ray crystallographic analysis, correct trial structures are refined by least-squares method. The detailed differential coefficients for the parameters of the calculated structure factor Fc(h) can not be found in any papers, textbooks, nor user's manual of several crystallographic computer systems. We describe, firstly, the basic expression of the structure factors, Fo(h) and Fc(h), anomalous dispersion terms of the structure factor, and then least-squares refining of magnitude of Fo(h) and Fo(h)2 for use in teaching, education and computer programming. Secondly we derive the differential terms of the structure factors, solve the normal equation by diagonal, block and full-matrix approximations, and apply these to the revised computer program LSBF in DS*SYSTEM. Several practical tests are performed for these differentiations. PMID:10719634

  8. Dendrochemical patterns of calcium, zinc, and potassium related to internal factors detected by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF).

    PubMed

    Smith, Kevin T; Balouet, Jean Christophe; Shortle, Walter C; Chalot, Michel; Beaujard, François; Grudd, Håkan; Vroblesky, Don A; Burken, Joel G

    2014-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) provides highly sensitive and precise spatial resolution of cation content in individual annual growth rings in trees. The sensitivity and precision have prompted successful applications to forensic dendrochemistry and the timing of environmental releases of contaminants. These applications have highlighted the need to distinguish dendrochemical effects of internal processes from environmental contamination. Calcium, potassium, and zinc are three marker cations that illustrate the influence of these processes. We found changes in cation chemistry in tree rings potentially due to biomineralization, development of cracks or checks, heartwood/sapwood differentiation, intra-annual processes, and compartmentalization of infection. Distinguishing internal from external processes that affect dendrochemistry will enhance the value of EDXRF for both physiological and forensic investigations. PMID:24034830

  9. Trace elemental analysis of school chalk using energy dispersive X-ray florescence spectroscopy (ED-XRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruthi, Y. A.; Das, N. Lakshmana; Ramprasad, S.; Ram, S. S.; Sudarshan, M.

    2015-08-01

    The present studies focus the quantitative analysis of elements in school chalk to ensure the safety of its use. The elements like Calcium (Ca), Aluminum (Al), Iron (Fe), Silicon (Si) and Chromium (Cr) were analyzed from settled chalk dust samples collected from five classrooms (CD-1) and also from another set of unused chalk samples collected from local market (CD-2) using Energy Dispersive X-Ray florescence(ED-XRF) spectroscopy. Presence of these elements in significant concentrations in school chalk confirmed that, it is an irritant and occupational hazard. It is suggested to use protective equipments like filtered mask for mouth, nose and chalk holders. This study also suggested using the advanced mode of techniques like Digital boards, marker boards and power point presentations to mitigate the occupational hazard for classroom chalk

  10. Dendrochemical patterns of calcium, zinc, and potassium related to internal factors detected by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kevin T.; Balouet, Jean Christophe; Shortle, Walter C.; Chalot, Michel; Beaujard, François; Grudd, Håkan; Vroblesky, Don A.; Burkem, Joel G.

    2014-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) provides highly sensitive and precise spatial resolution of cation content in individual annual growth rings in trees. The sensitivity and precision have prompted successful applications to forensic dendrochemistry and the timing of environmental releases of contaminants. These applications have highlighted the need to distinguish dendrochemical effects of internal processes from environmental contamination. Calcium, potassium, and zinc are three marker cations that illustrate the influence of these processes. We found changes in cation chemistry in tree rings potentially due to biomineralization, development of cracks or checks, heartwood/sapwood differentiation, intra-annual processes, and compartmentalization of infection. Distinguishing internal from external processes that affect dendrochemistry will enhance the value of EDXRF for both physiological and forensic investigations.

  11. Energy dispersive x-ray analysis of the cornea. Application to paraffin sections of normal and diseased corneas

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, M.R.; Streeten, B.W.

    1984-11-01

    The distribution of chemical elements in the normal human cornea was studied by energy dispersive x-ray analysis and scanning electron microscopy of routinely prepared paraffin sections. Calcium, phosphorus, and sulfur were consistently present in quantities above background and varied in concentration regionally. Analysis of fresh-frozen tissue, an approximation of the in vivo state, gave a similar elemental profile to paraffin sections, except for the loss of diffusable electrolytes in the latter. After fixation, S was the most abundant element and was highest in Descemet's membrane. Corneas with granular, lattice, macular, and Fuchs endothelial dystrophies, band keratopathy, and spheroidal degeneration were also examined. Characteristic patterns of abnormal S and Ca distribution were found in each of the dystrophies. The relative proportions of Ca, P, and S gave diagnostic profiles for distinguishing band keratopathy and spheroidal degeneration.

  12. Inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of phonon dispersion and lifetimes in PbTe1-x Se x alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhiting; Li, Mingda; Ren, Zhensong; Ma, Hao; Alatas, Ahmet; Wilson, Stephen D.; Li, Ju

    2015-09-01

    PbTe1-x Se x alloys are of special interest to thermoelectric applications. Inelastic x-ray scattering determination of phonon dispersion and lifetimes along the high symmetry directions for PbTe1-x Se x alloys are presented. By comparing with calculated results based on the virtual crystal model calculations combined with ab initio density functional theory, the validity of virtual crystal model is evaluated. The results indicate that the virtual crystal model is overall a good assumption for phonon frequencies and group velocities despite the softening of transverse acoustic phonon modes along [1?1?1] direction, while the treatment of lifetimes warrants caution. In addition, phonons remain a good description of vibrational modes in PbTe1-x Se x alloys.

  13. Gold nephropathy. Ultrastructural, fluorescent, and energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Ainsworth, S.K.; Swain, R.P.; Watabe, N.; Brackett, N.C. Jr.; Pilia, P.; Hennigar, G.R.

    1981-07-01

    The nephrotic syndrome developed in a patient receiving therapy with gold for rheumatoid arthritis. The results of a histopathological examination of the renal biopsy specimen were unremarkable. Immunofluorescent studies showed deposits of immunoglobulins and C3 in a granular pattern in the glomerular basement membranes. Ultrastructurally, the discrete osmiophilic immune complexes were epimembranous. By x-ray microanalysis, gold that was complexed with sulfur was present in proximal tubular cytoplasmic vacuoles and nuclei. Gold and sulfur could not be demonstrated in glomerular epimembranous deposits. The results of these studies suggest that immune complex deposition does not involve gold and sulfur acting as haptens. Gold-salt therapy may result in damage to proximal tubules that leak renal tubular antigens, which in turn complex with autoantibody and produce an autoimmune membranous nephropathy. The evidence for this mechanism is not convincing. Although the data indicate an immune-complex cause for gold-salt nephropathy, the incident antigen (or antigens) and mechanism of action remain unidentified.

  14. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Stearns, Daniel S. (Mountain View, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1989-01-01

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

  15. The Chandra Multi-Wavelength Project (ChaMP): A Serendipitous X-Ray Survey Using Chandra Archival Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Belinda; Lavoie, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The launch of the Chandra X-ray Observatory in July 2000 opened a new era in X-ray astronomy. Its unprecedented, < 1" spatial resolution and low background is providing views of the X-ray sky 10-100 times fainter than previously possible. We have begun to carry out a serendipitous survey of the X-ray sky using Chandra archival data to flux limits covering the range between those reached by current satellites and those of the small area Chandra deep surveys. We estimate the survey will cover about 8 sq.deg. per year to X-ray fluxes (2-10 keV) in the range 10(exp -13) - 6(exp -16) erg cm2/s and include about 3000 sources per year, roughly two thirds of which are expected to be active galactic nuclei (AGN). Optical imaging of the ChaMP fields is underway at NOAO and SAO telescopes using g',r',z' colors with which we will be able to classify the X-ray sources into object types and, in some cases, estimate their redshifts. We are also planning to obtain optical spectroscopy of a well-defined subset to allow confirmation of classification and redshift determination. All X-ray and optical results and supporting optical data will be place in the ChaMP archive within a year of the completion of our data analysis. Over the five years of Chandra operations, ChaMP will provide both a major resource for Chandra observers and a key research tool for the study of the cosmic X-ray background and the individual source populations which comprise it. ChaMP promises profoundly new science return on a number of key questions at the current frontier of many areas of astronomy including solving the spectral paradox by resolving the CXRB, locating and studying high redshift clusters and so constraining cosmological parameters, defining the true, possibly absorbed, population of quasars and studying coronal emission from late-type stars as their cores become fully convective. The current status and initial results from the ChaMP will be presented.

  16. Star Formation & the Star Formation History of the Universe: Exploring the X-ray and the Multi-wavelength Point of Views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgarella, Denis; Ciesla, Laure; Boquien, Mederic; Buat, Veronique; Roehlly, Yannick

    2015-09-01

    The star formation rate density traces the formation of stars in the universe. To estimate the star formation rate of galaxies, we can use a wide range of star formation tracers: continuum measurements in most wavelength domains, lines, supernovae and GRBs... All of them have pros and cons. Most of the monochromatic tracers are hampered but the effects of dust. But, before being able to estimate the star formation rate, we first need to obtain a safe estimate to the dust attenuation. The advantage of the X-ray wavelength range is that we can consider it as free from the effect of dust. In this talk, we will estimate how many galaxies we could detect with ATHENA to obtain the star formation density. For this, I will use my recent Herschel paper where the total (UV + IR) star formation rate density was evaluated up to z ~ 4 and provide quantitative figures for what ATHENA will detect as a function of the redshift and the luminosity. ATHENA will need predictions that are in agreement with what we observe in the other wavelength ranges. I will present the code CIGALE (http://cigale.lam.fr). The new and public version of CIGALE (released in April 2015) allows to model the emission of galaxies from the far-ultraviolet to the radio and it can make prediction in any of these wavelength ranges. I will show how galaxy star formation rates can be estimated in a way that combines all the advantages of monochromatic tracers but not the caveats. It should be stressed that we can model the emission of AGNs in the FUV-to-FIR range using several models. Finally, I will explain why we seriously consider to extend CIGALE to the x-ray range to predict the X-ray emission of galaxies including any AGN.

  17. The Wavelength-Dispersive Spectrometer and Its Proposed Use in the Analytical Electron Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Joseph I.; Lyman, Charles E.; Williams, David B.

    1989-01-01

    The Analytical Electron Microscope (AEM) equipped with a wavelength-dispersive spectrometer (WDS) should have the ability to resolve peaks which normally overlap in the spectra from an energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS). With a WDS it should also be possible to measure lower concentrations of elements in thin foils due to the increased peak-to-background ratio compared with EDS. The WDS will measure X-ray from the light elements (4 less than Z less than 1O) more effectively. This paper addresses the possibility of interfacing a compact WDS with a focussing circle of approximately 4 cm to a modem AEM with a high-brightness (field emission) source of electrons.

  18. Effect of hydration on the structure of solid-supported Niosomal membranes investigated by in situ energy dispersive X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracciolo, Giulio; Pozzi, Daniela; Caminiti, Ruggero; Marianecci, Carlotta; Moglioni, Simone; Carafa, Maria; Amenitsch, Heinz

    2008-09-01

    The supramolecular structure of Niosomal vesicles (Niosomes) made of a binary mixture of polysorbate 20 (Tween 20) and Cholesterol in aqueous solution was investigated by means of synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Solid-supported Niosomal membranes at full hydration exhibit the same structural properties, as determined by in situ energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXD), than their counterpart in solution. Both Niosomes and solid-supported Niosomal membranes are made of highly swollen bilayers rich in Tween 20 coexisting with Cholesterol crystallites. EDXD patterns from oriented samples suggest that at least some Cholesterol crystals are aligned along the normal to the solid support.

  19. Mapping the Ionization State of Laser-Irradiated Ar Gas Jets With Multi-Wavelength Monochromatic X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kugland, N L; Doppner, T; Kemp, A; Schaeffer, D; Glenzer, S H; Niemann, C

    2010-04-08

    Two-dimensional monochromatic images of fast-electron stimulated Ar K{alpha} and He-{alpha} x-ray self-emission have recorded a time-integrated map of the extent of Ar{sup {approx}6+} and Ar{sup 16+} ions, respectively, within a high density (10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} atomic density) Ar plasma. This plasma was produced by irradiating a 2 mm wide clustering Ar gas jet with an ultra-high intensity (10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, 200 fs) Ti:Sapphire laser operating at 800 nm. Spherically bent quartz crystals in the 200 (for K{alpha}) and 201 (for He-{alpha}) planes were used as near-normal incidence reflective x-ray optics. We see that a large (830 {micro}m long) region of plasma emits K{alpha} primarily along the laser axis, while the He-{alpha} emission is confined to smaller hot spot (230 {micro}m long) region that likely corresponds to the focal volume of the f/8 laser beam. X-ray spectra from a Bragg spectrometer operating in the von Hamos geometry, which images in one dimension, indicate that the centroids of the K{alpha} and He-{alpha} emission regions are separated by approximately 330 {micro}m along the laser axis.

  20. THIN-FILM DENSITY DETERMINATION OF TANTALUM, TANTALUM OXIDES, AND XEROGELS BY MULTIPLE RADIATION ENERGY DISPERSIVE X-RAY REFLECTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    X-ray reflectivity provides a nondestructive technique for measuring density in thin films. A conventional laboratory, Bragg-Brentano geometry diffractometer was employed to show the generalized feasibility of this technique. X-ray tubes with chromium, copper, and molybdenum targ...

  1. Scanning Electron Microscopy Findings With Energy-Dispersive X-ray Investigations of Cosmetically Tinted Contact Lenses

    PubMed Central

    Hotta, Fumika; Imai, Shoji; Miyamoto, Tatsuro; Mitamura-Aizawa, Sayaka; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the surfaces and principal elements of the colorants of cosmetically tinted contact lenses (Cos-CLs). Methods: We analyzed the surfaces and principal elements of the colorants of five commercially available Cos-CLs using scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray analysis. Results: In two Cos-CLs, the anterior and posterior surfaces were smooth, and colorants were found inside the lens. One lens showed colorants located to a depth of 8 to 14 ?m from the anterior side of the lens. In the other lens, colorants were found in the most superficial layer on the posterior surface, although a coated layer was observed. The colorants in the other three lenses were deposited on either lens surface. Although a print pattern was uniform in embedded type lenses, uneven patterns were apparent in dot-matrix design lenses. Colorants used in all lenses contained chlorine, iron, and titanium. In the magnified scanning electron microscopy images of a certain lens, chlorine is exuded and spread. Conclusions: Cosmetically tinted contact lenses have a wide variety of lens surfaces and colorants. Colorants may be deposited on the lens surface and consist of an element that has tissue toxicity. PMID:25799458

  2. Misfit strain of oxygen precipitates in Czochralski silicon studied with energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Gröschel, A. Will, J.; Bergmann, C.; Magerl, A.

    2014-06-21

    Annealed Czochralski Silicon wafers containing SiO{sub x} precipitates have been studied by high energy X-ray diffraction in a defocused Laue setup using a laboratory tungsten tube. The energy dispersive evaluation of the diffracted Bragg intensity of the 220 reflection within the framework of the statistical dynamical theory yields the static Debye-Waller factor E of the crystal, which gives access to the strain induced by the SiO{sub x} precipitates. The results are correlated with precipitate densities and sizes determined from transmission electron microscopy measurements of equivalent wafers. This allows for the determination of the constrained linear misfit ? between precipitate and crystal lattice. For samples with octahedral precipitates the values ranging from ??=?0.39 (+0.28/?0.12) to ??=?0.48 (+0.34/?0.16) indicate that self-interstitials emitted into the matrix during precipitate growth contribute to the lattice strain. In this case, the expected value calculated from literature values is ??=?0.26?±?0.05. Further, the precise evaluation of Pendellösung oscillations in the diffracted Bragg intensity of as-grown wafers reveals a thermal Debye-Waller parameter for the 220 reflection B{sup 220}(293?K) of 0.5582?±?0.0039 Å{sup 2} for a structure factor based on spherically symmetric scattering contributions.

  3. NASA Li/CF(x) cell problem analysis: Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x ray spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John

    1991-01-01

    An analysis was made of Lithium/carbon fluoride cell parts for possible chloride contamination induced by exposure to thionyl chloride (SOCl2); various samples were submitted for analysis. Only a portion of the analysis which has been conducted is covered, herein, namely analysis by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS). A strip of nickel was exposed to SOCl2 vapors to observe variations in surface concentrations of sulfur and chlorine with time. By detecting chlorine one can not infer contamination by SOCl2 only that contamination is present. Six samples of stainless steel foil were analyzed for chlorine using EDS. Chlorine was not detected on background samples but was detected on the samples which had been handled including those which had been cleaned. Cell covers suspected of being contaminated while in storage and covers which were not exposed to the same storage conditions were analyzed for chlorine. Although no chlorine was found on the covers from cells, it was found on all stored covers. Results are presented with techniques shown for analysis and identification. Relevant photomicrographs are presented.

  4. Assignment of Individual Metal Redox States in a Metalloprotein By Crystallographic Refinement at Multiple X-Ray Wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Einsle, O.; Andrade, S.L.A.; Dobbek, H.; Meyer, J.; Rees, D.C.; /Gottingen U. /Bayreuth U. /DRDC, Grenoble /Caltech

    2007-07-09

    A method is presented to derive anomalous scattering contributions for individual atoms within a protein crystal by collecting several sets of diffraction data at energies spread along an X-ray absorption edge of the element in question. The method has been applied to a [2Fe:2S] ferredoxin model system with localized charges in the reduced state of the iron-sulfur cluster. The analysis shows that upon reduction the electron resides at the iron atom closer to the protein surface. The technique should be sufficiently sensitive for more complex clusters with noninteger redox states and is generally applicable given that crystals are available.

  5. Wavelengths of the 4 d-4 p, 0-1 transitions of X-ray lasers in Ni-like ions with Z ? 79

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, E. P.

    2015-04-01

    X-ray lasers on transitions of Ni-like ions are promising due to their high efficiency and possibility of generating radiation in the "water window" region using compact, laboratory pump sources. The precision wavelength values of laser transitions are necessary to determine the ions in which intense laser radiation in the region of 6.70-6.75 nm is possible, because multilayer mirrors with a high reflection coefficient are designed for this narrow range. In this paper, the energy levels of ions of the Ni-like sequence with the nuclear charge 36 ? Z ? 79 are calculated by the method of relativistic perturbation theory with a zero-approximation model potential. The wavelengths of the two strongest 4 d-4 p, 0-1 transitions of X-ray lasers are presented. It is shown that the 3 d 9 3/24 d 3/2 [ J = 0]-3 d 9 3/24 p 1/2 [ J = 1] laser transition with ? = 67.38 Å is possible in Sm34+ and the 3 d 9 3/24 d 3/2 [ J = 0]-3 d 9 5/24 p 3/2 [ J = 1] transition with ? = 67.48 Å is possible in Gd36+. The calculated results coincide with the known experimental data to within the experimental error.

  6. Proposal for precision wavelength measurement of the Ni-like gadolinium x-ray laser formed during the interaction of a nanostructured target with an ultrashort laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, E. P.

    2015-10-01

    The wavelengths of the 3d 94d [J = 0]-3d 94p [J = 1] transitions of x-ray lasers in Ni-like sequence ions with nucleus charges Z?????79 are refined. The results of calculations are within the experimental error. It was found that the wavelengths of 3d3/294d3/2{} [J = 0]-3d3/29 4p 1/2 [J = 1] and 3d3/29 4d 3/2[J = 0]-3d5/29 4p 3/2[J = 1] transitions in Sm34+ and Gd36+, respectively, are in the range of 6.70-6.75?nm. Exactly for this narrow range, multilayer mirrors with high reflectance are developed. The gain of the x-ray laser with ? = 6.748?nm in Gd36+ is calculated under the assumption that plasma is formed during the interaction of a nanostructured (cluster-like) gadolinium target with high-intensity pump laser radiation. The optimum plasma density, temperature, length, and pump parameters are determined to achieve the highest Gd36+ ion fraction and emission quantum yield of ~1013 photons.

  7. Amalgam tattoo: report of an unusual clinical presentation and the use of energy dispersive X-ray analysis as an aid to diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, J.P. Jr.; Greer, J.L.; Daniels, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    An unusual appearing gingival amalgam pigmentation (amalgam tattoo) that completely surrounded the maxillary right first premolar in a 13-year-old boy is presented. Because of the wide distribution and apparent clinical progression of the discoloration, an excisional biopsy was performed. The histopathologic diagnosis of amalgam pigmentation was confirmed in paraffin sections by energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Silver, tin, and mercury were detected in the specimen.

  8. High-pressure structural transformations of Sn up to 138 GPa: Angle-dispersive synchrotron x-ray diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamat, Ashkan; Briggs, Richard; Bouvier, Pierre; Petitgirard, Sylvain; Dewaele, Agnès; Cutler, Melissa E.; Corà, Furio; Daisenberger, Dominik; Garbarino, Gaston; McMillan, Paul F.

    2013-09-01

    The high-pressure behavior of elemental Sn has been studied by angle-dispersive synchrotron x-ray diffraction up to 138 GPa under quasihydrostatic conditions at room temperature. The data confirm the occurrence of a first-order phase transition at 10.8 GPa between ?-Sn (Sn-II) (I41/amd) and a further body-centered-tetragonal polymorph (?-Sn or Sn-III) (I4/mmm). Above 32 GPa, this phase exhibits a distortion into a new body-centered-orthorhombic (bco) modification (Immm). Beyond 70 GPa, the structure becomes body-centered cubic (bcc) (Im-3m). There is a region of coexistence where the bcc reflections are observed to appear superimposed on the bco pattern above 40 GPa and the two diffraction signatures coexist until 70 GPa. We examined this possible existence of a kinetically hindered first-order phase transition between the two polymorphs by performing density functional theory (DFT) calculations with an emphasis on the potential energy in response to axial (c/a,b/a) distortions at constant volume. The DFT results suggest a slightly different interpretation of the structural transformations. At low pressure, the global minimum energy is always centered around b/a=1, and there is no indication of transformation to a bco structure. However, any small strains in the c/a ratio in the system would provide an orthorhombic distortion of the observed magnitude. Such strains could be induced due to slight deviations from hydrostatic conditions in the experimental study. Concerning the possible bco-bcc phase transitions, the DFT calculations reveal an energy surface with a barrier developed between solutions with different c/a values over the pressure range of interest. Crucially, the calculated barrier heights are low, and they disappear in the region of the observed phase transformation. The DFT results indicate a mechanically softened material that may exhibit localized domain structures in response to even slightly nonhydrostatic stress conditions.

  9. MATHEMATICAL TECHNIQUES FOR X-RAY ANALYZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mathematical techniques and subsequent computer software were developed to process energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectra for elemental analysis of airborne particulate matter collected on filters. The research concerned two areas: (1) determination of characteristic x-ray ...

  10. Broadband Wavelength Spanning Holographic Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Kashma; Shriyan, Sameet; Fontecchio, Adam

    2008-03-01

    Broadened interaction wavelength of holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystals (HPDLCs) have extensive applications in beam steering for instrument clusters, hyperspectral imaging, wavelength filtering and construction of lightweight optics. A novel simultaneous time and spatial multiplexing formation configuration is proposed here, to increase narrow wavelength reflecting notch to broad range wavelength spanning device. HPDLC films have electro-optic controllability by applying field. No moving parts, light weight, small footprint compared to prisms and lenses, high color purity make the broadband wavelength HPDLCs desirable for the above applications. Varying the incident laser beam exposure angles using motorized rotating stage, during formation is the key step here for their formation in a single medium. The fabricated broadband wavelength sensitive HPDLCs are characterized for the uniformity of the reflected peak and electro optic response. Their output wavefront is analyzed using wavefront analysis technique.

  11. A new method for polychromatic X-ray ?Laue diffraction on a Cu pillar using an energy-dispersive pn-junction charge-coupled device.

    PubMed

    Abboud, A; Kirchlechner, C; Send, S; Micha, J S; Ulrich, O; Pashniak, N; Strüder, L; Keckes, J; Pietsch, U

    2014-11-01

    ?Laue diffraction with a polychromatic X-ray beam can be used to measure strain fields and crystal orientations of micro crystals. The hydrostatic strain tensor can be obtained once the energy profile of the reflections is measured. However, this remains a challenge both on the time scale and reproducibility of the beam position on the sample. In this review, we present a new approach to obtain the spatial and energy profiles of Laue spots by using a pn-junction charge-coupled device, an energy-dispersive area detector providing 3D resolution of incident X-rays. The morphology and energetic structure of various Bragg peaks from a single crystalline Cu micro-cantilever used as a test system were simultaneously acquired. The method facilitates the determination of the Laue spots' energy spectra without filtering the white X-ray beam. The synchrotron experiment was performed at the BM32 beamline of ESRF using polychromatic X-rays in the energy range between 5 and 25 keV and a beam size of 0.5 ?m × 0.5 ?m. The feasibility test on the well known system demonstrates the capabilities of the approach and introduces the "3D detector method" as a promising tool for material investigations to separate bending and strain for technical materials. PMID:25430118

  12. A new method for polychromatic X-ray ?Laue diffraction on a Cu pillar using an energy-dispersive pn-junction charge-coupled device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abboud, A.; Kirchlechner, C.; Send, S.; Micha, J. S.; Ulrich, O.; Pashniak, N.; Strüder, L.; Keckes, J.; Pietsch, U.

    2014-11-01

    ?Laue diffraction with a polychromatic X-ray beam can be used to measure strain fields and crystal orientations of micro crystals. The hydrostatic strain tensor can be obtained once the energy profile of the reflections is measured. However, this remains a challenge both on the time scale and reproducibility of the beam position on the sample. In this review, we present a new approach to obtain the spatial and energy profiles of Laue spots by using a pn-junction charge-coupled device, an energy-dispersive area detector providing 3D resolution of incident X-rays. The morphology and energetic structure of various Bragg peaks from a single crystalline Cu micro-cantilever used as a test system were simultaneously acquired. The method facilitates the determination of the Laue spots' energy spectra without filtering the white X-ray beam. The synchrotron experiment was performed at the BM32 beamline of ESRF using polychromatic X-rays in the energy range between 5 and 25 keV and a beam size of 0.5 ?m × 0.5 ?m. The feasibility test on the well known system demonstrates the capabilities of the approach and introduces the "3D detector method" as a promising tool for material investigations to separate bending and strain for technical materials.

  13. A new method for polychromatic X-ray ?Laue diffraction on a Cu pillar using an energy-dispersive pn-junction charge-coupled device

    SciTech Connect

    Abboud, A.; Send, S.; Pashniak, N.; Pietsch, U.; Kirchlechner, C.; Micha, J. S.; Ulrich, O.; Keckes, J.

    2014-11-15

    ?Laue diffraction with a polychromatic X-ray beam can be used to measure strain fields and crystal orientations of micro crystals. The hydrostatic strain tensor can be obtained once the energy profile of the reflections is measured. However, this remains a challenge both on the time scale and reproducibility of the beam position on the sample. In this review, we present a new approach to obtain the spatial and energy profiles of Laue spots by using a pn-junction charge-coupled device, an energy-dispersive area detector providing 3D resolution of incident X-rays. The morphology and energetic structure of various Bragg peaks from a single crystalline Cu micro-cantilever used as a test system were simultaneously acquired. The method facilitates the determination of the Laue spots’ energy spectra without filtering the white X-ray beam. The synchrotron experiment was performed at the BM32 beamline of ESRF using polychromatic X-rays in the energy range between 5 and 25 keV and a beam size of 0.5 ?m × 0.5 ?m. The feasibility test on the well known system demonstrates the capabilities of the approach and introduces the “3D detector method” as a promising tool for material investigations to separate bending and strain for technical materials.

  14. Late time multi wavelength observations of Swift J1644+5734: A luminous optical/IR bump and quiescent X-ray emission

    E-print Network

    Levan, A J; Brown, G C; Metzger, B D; Page, K L; Cenko, S B; O'Brien, P T; Lyman, J D; Wiersema, K; Stanway, E R; Fruchter, A S; Perley, D A; Bloom, J S

    2015-01-01

    We present late-time multi-wavelength observations of Swift J1644+57, suggested to be a relativistic tidal disruption flare (TDF). Our observations extend to >4 years from discovery, and show that 1.4 years after outburst the relativistic jet switched-off on a timescale less than tens of days, corresponding to a power-law decay faster than $t^{-70}$. Beyond this point weak X-rays continue to be detected at an approximately constant luminosity of $L_X \\sim 5 \\times 10^{42}$ erg s$^{-1}$, and are marginally inconsistent with a continuing decay of $t^{-5/3}$, similar to that seen prior to the switch-off. Host photometry enables us to infer a black hole mass of $M_{BH}=3 \\times 10^6$ M$_{\\odot}$, consistent with the late time X-ray luminosity arising from sub-Eddington accretion onto the black hole in the form of either an unusually optically faint AGN or a slowly varying phase of the transient. Optical/IR observations show a clear bump in the light curve at timescales of 30-50 days, with a peak magnitude (correc...

  15. In-situ and operando characterization of batteries with energy-dispersive synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxton, William Arthur

    Batteries play a pivotal role in the low-carbon society that is required to thwart the effects of climate change. Alternative low-carbon energy sources, such as wind and solar, are often intermittent and unreliable. Batteries are able capture their energy and deliver it later when it is needed. The implementation of battery systems in grid-level and transportation sectors is essential for efficient use of alternative energy sources. Scientists and engineers need better tools to analyze and measure the performance characteristics of batteries. One of the main hindrances in the progress of battery research is that the constituent electrode materials are inaccessible once an electrochemical cell is constructed. This leaves the researcher with a limited number of available feedback mechanisms to assess the cell's performance, e.g., current, voltage, and impedance. These data are limited in their ability to reveal the more-localized smaller-scale structural mechanisms on which the batteries' performance is so dependent. Energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXRD) is one of the few techniques that can internally probe a sealed battery. By analyzing the structural behavior of battery electrodes, one is able to gain insight to the physical properties on which the battery's performance is dependent. In this dissertation, EDXRD with ultrahigh energy synchrotron radiation is used to probe the electrodes of manufactured primary and secondary lithium batteries under in-situ and operando conditions. The technique is then applied to solve specific challenges facing lithium ion batteries. Diffraction spectra are collected from within a battery at 40 micrometer resolution. Peak-fitting is used to quantitatively estimate the abundance of lithiated and non-lithiated phases. Through mapping the distribution of phases within, structural changes are linked to the battery's galvanic response. A three-dimensional spatial analysis of lithium iron phosphate batteries suggests that evolution of inhomogeneity is linked to the particle connectivity. Despite a non-linear local response, the average of the measured ensemble behaves linearly. The results suggest that inhomogeneity can be difficult to measure and highlights the power of the EDXRD technique. Additional applications of EDXRD are discussed.

  16. Measurement of the phase transformation in sheet steel from the ferrite to austenite phase using angular dispersive X-ray diffraction in a transmission geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrity, D. J.; Jenneson, P. M.; Luggar, R. D.; Vincent, S. M.

    2006-09-01

    An angular dispersive X-ray diffraction arrangement, utilising an image intensifier and X-ray filtering, has been developed to measure the ferrite to austenite phase transformation in an online steel foundry process line. Given the degradation in resolution associated with transmission measurements, the extreme phases have been used to calibrate the system. The most significant differences between these two phases are found to occur at scattering angles of between 6° and 8°. The results obtained from measurement of the radially integrated profile in this region whilst heating a ferrite-phase sample towards the phase transformation temperature are consistent with the expected trend, demonstrating the requirement for uniform temperature between the ferrite and austenite phase samples in order to observe the phase transformation.

  17. Self-consistent absorption correction for quantitative energy- dispersive X-ray spectroscopy of InGaN layers in analytical transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, T.; Wang, X.

    2015-10-01

    A new method of absorption correction for energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscope is tested on InGaN samples. We simulate the effective k-factor for the In L line with respect to Ga L or Ga K and plot this as a function of the Ga K/L intensity ratio, which can be directly measured from experimental spectra. This basically performs an internal self-consistency check in the quantification using differently absorbed X-ray lines, which is in principle equivalent to an absorption correction as a function of specimen thickness but has the practical advantage that neither specimen thickness nor density or mass-thickness of the specimens need actually be measured.

  18. An analytic model for the response of a CZT detector in diagnostic energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    LeClair, Robert J.; Wang Yinkun; Zhao Peiying; Boileau, Michel; Wang, Lilie; Fleurot, Fabrice

    2006-05-15

    A CdZnTe detector (CZTD) can be very useful for measuring diagnostic x-ray spectra. The semiconductor detector does, however, exhibit poor hole transport properties and fluorescence generation upon atomic de-excitations. This article describes an analytic model to characterize these two phenomena that occur when a CZTD is exposed to diagnostic x rays. The analytical detector response functions compare well with those obtained via Monte Carlo calculations. The response functions were applied to 50, 80, and 110 kV x-ray spectra. Two 50 kV spectra were measured; one with no filtration and the other with 1.35 mm Al filtration. The unfiltered spectrum was numerically filtered with 1.35 mm of Al in order to see whether the recovered spectrum resembled the filtered spectrum actually measured. A deviation curve was obtained by subtracting one curve from the other on an energy bin by bin basis. The deviation pattern fluctuated around the zero line when corrections were applied to both spectra. Significant deviations from zero towards the lower energies were observed when the uncorrected spectra were used. Beside visual observations, the exposure obtained using the numerically attenuated unfiltered beam was compared to the exposure calculated with the actual filtered beam. The percent differences were 0.8% when corrections were applied and 25% for no corrections. The model can be used to correct diagnostic x-ray spectra measured with a CdZnTe detector.

  19. An analytic model for the response of a CZT detector in diagnostic energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    LeClair, Robert J; Wang, Yinkun; Zhao, Peiying; Boileau, Michel; Wang, Lilie; Fleurot, Fabrice

    2006-05-01

    A CdZnTe detector (CZTD) can be very useful for measuring diagnostic x-ray spectra. The semiconductor detector does, however, exhibit poor hole transport properties and fluorescence generation upon atomic de-excitations. This article describes an analytic model to characterize these two phenomena that occur when a CZTD is exposed to diagnostic x rays. The analytical detector response functions compare well with those obtained via Monte Carlo calculations. The response functions were applied to 50, 80, and 110 kV x-ray spectra. Two 50 kV spectra were measured; one with no filtration and the other with 1.35 mm Al filtration. The unfiltered spectrum was numerically filtered with 1.35 mm of Al in order to see whether the recovered spectrum resembled the filtered spectrum actually measured. A deviation curve was obtained by subtracting one curve from the other on an energy bin by bin basis. The deviation pattern fluctuated around the zero line when corrections were applied to both spectra. Significant deviations from zero towards the lower energies were observed when the uncorrected spectra were used. Beside visual observations, the exposure obtained using the numerically attenuated unfiltered beam was compared to the exposure calculated with the actual filtered beam. The percent differences were 0.8% when corrections were applied and 25% for no corrections. The model can be used to correct diagnostic x-ray spectra measured with a CdZnTe detector. PMID:16752568

  20. [Applacation of portable energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer in chemical composition analysis of Chinese ancient glass].

    PubMed

    Liu, Song; Li, Qing-hui; Gan, Fu-xi; Gu, Dong-hong

    2010-09-01

    Chemical composition is one of the most important aspects in the study of Chinese ancient glasses, as it could provide scientific proofs for the technical origin and development of Chinese ancient glasses. It is very necessary to find out some new an alyzing techniques. One of the most remarkable advantages for portable X-ray fluorescence technique is its portability, which allows antiques that can't be allowed to move out of museum to be analyzed. The basic principles, performances and analysis process of the equipment that was improved by OURSTEX company and Center of Sci-tech Archaeology of Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics are presented in detail. Some examples for the application of portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer in chemical composition analysis of Chinese ancient glass samples excavated from Xinjiang province are also given. The results are compared with that determined by the proton induced X-ray fluorescence technique. There is a potential application for portable X-ray fluorescence technique in on site analysis. PMID:21105443

  1. Student X-Ray Fluorescence Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fetzer, Homer D.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes the experimental arrangement for x-ray analysis of samples which involves the following: the radioisotopic x-ray disk source; a student-built fluorescence chamber; the energy dispersive x-ray detector, linear amplifier and bias supply; and a multichannel pulse height analyzer. (GS)

  2. Misidentification of major constituents by automatic qualitative energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis: a problem that threatens the credibility of the analytical community.

    PubMed

    Newbury, Dale E

    2005-12-01

    Automatic qualitative analysis for peak identification is a standard feature of virtually all modern computer-aided analysis software for energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry with electron excitation. Testing of recently installed systems from four different manufacturers has revealed the occasional occurrence of misidentification of peaks of major constituents whose concentrations exceeded 0.1 mass fraction (10 wt%). Test materials where peak identification failures were observed included ZnS, KBr, FeS2, tantalum-niobium alloy, NIST Standard Reference Material 482 (copper-gold alloy), Bi2Te3, uranium-rhodium alloys, platinum-chromium alloy, GaAs, and GaP. These misidentifications of major constituents were exacerbated when the incident beam energy was 10 keV or lower, which restricted or excluded the excitation of the high photon energy K- and L-shell X-rays where multiple peaks, for example, Kalpha (K-L2,3)-Kbeta (K-M2,3); Lalpha (L3-M4,5)-Lbeta (L2-M4)-Lgamma (L2-N4), are well resolved and amenable to identification with high confidence. These misidentifications are so severe as to properly qualify as blunders that present a serious challenge to the credibility of this critical analytical technique. Systematic testing of a peak identification system with a suite of diverse materials can reveal the specific elements and X-ray peaks where failures are likely to occur. PMID:17481333

  3. Chemometric classification of gunshot residues based on energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis and inductively coupled plasma analysis with mass-spectrometric detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, S.; Otto, M.; Niewoehner, L.; Barth, M.; Bro¿?ek-Mucha, Z.; Biegstraaten, J.; Horváth, R.

    2007-09-01

    A gunshot residue sample that was collected from an object or a suspected person is automatically searched for gunshot residue relevant particles. Particle data (such as size, morphology, position on the sample for manual relocation, etc.) as well as the corresponding X-ray spectra and images are stored. According to these data, particles are classified by the analysis-software into different groups: 'gunshot residue characteristic', 'consistent with gunshot residue' and environmental particles, respectively. Potential gunshot residue particles are manually checked and - if necessary - confirmed by the operating forensic scientist. As there are continuing developments on the ammunition market worldwide, it becomes more and more difficult to assign a detected particle to a particular ammunition brand. As well, the differentiation towards environmental particles similar to gunshot residue is getting more complex. To keep external conditions unchanged, gunshot residue particles were collected using a specially designed shooting device for the test shots revealing defined shooting distances between the weapon's muzzle and the target. The data obtained as X-ray spectra of a number of particles (3000 per ammunition brand) were reduced by Fast Fourier Transformation and subjected to a chemometric evaluation by means of regularized discriminant analysis. In addition to the scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis results, isotope ratio measurements based on inductively coupled plasma analysis with mass-spectrometric detection were carried out to provide a supplementary feature for an even lower risk of misclassification.

  4. Theoretical demonstration of how the dispersion of magnetic excitations in cuprate compounds can be determined using resonant inelastic X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Ament, Luuk J P; Ghiringhelli, Giacomo; Sala, Marco Moretti; Braicovich, Lucio; van den Brink, Jeroen

    2009-09-11

    We show that in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the copper L and M edge direct spin-flip scattering is in principle allowed. We demonstrate how this possibility can be exploited to probe the dispersion of magnetic excitations, for instance magnons, of cuprates such as the high T(c) superconductors. We compute the relevant local and momentum dependent magnetic scattering amplitudes, which we compare to the elastic and dd-excitation scattering intensities. For cuprates these theoretical results put RIXS as a technique on the same footing as neutron scattering. PMID:19792395

  5. RF Single Electron Transistor Readout Amplifiers for Superconducting Astronomical Detectors for X-Ray to Sub-mm Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Thomas; Aassime, Abdelhanin; Delsing, Per; Frunzio, Luigi; Li, Li-Qun; Prober, Daniel; Schoelkopf, Robert; Segall, Ken; Wilson, Chris; Stahle, Carl

    2000-01-01

    We report progress on using a new type of amplifier, the Radio-Frequency Single-Electron Transistor (RF-SET), to develop multi-channel sensor readout systems for fast and sensitive readout of high impedance cryogenic photodetectors such as Superconducting Tunnel Junctions and Single Quasiparticle Photon Counters. Although cryogenic, these detectors are desirable because of capabilities not other-wise attainable. However, high impedances and low output levels make low-noise, high-speed readouts challenging, and large format arrays would be facilitated by compact, low-power, on-chip integrated amplifiers. Well-suited for this application are RF-SETs, very high performance electrometers which use an rf readout technique to provide 100 MHz bandwidth. Small size, low power, and cryogenic operation allow direct integration with detectors, and using multiple rf carrier frequencies permits simultaneous readout of 20-50 amplifiers with a common electrical connection. We describe both the first 2-channel demonstration of this wavelength division multiplexing technique for RF-SETs, and Charge-Locked-Loop operation with 100 kHz of closed-loop bandwidth.

  6. Thermoelectrically cooled semiconductor detectors for non-destructive analysis of works of art by means of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesareo, Roberto; Ettore Gigante, Giovanni; Castellano, Alfredo

    1999-06-01

    Thermoelectrically cooled semiconductor detectors, such as Si-PIN, Si-drift, Cd1-xZnxTe and HgI 2, coupled to miniaturized low-power X-ray tubes, are well suited in portable systems for energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), analysis of archaeological samples. The Si-PIN detector is characterized by a thickness of about 300 ?m, an area of about 2×3 mm 2, an energy resolution of about 200-250 eV at 5.9 keV and an entrance window of 25-75 ?m. The Si-drift detector has approximately the same area and thickness, but an energy resolution of 155 eV at 5.9 keV. The efficiency of these detectors is around 100% from 4 to 10 keV, and then decreases versus energy, reaching ˜9% at 30 keV. Coupled to a miniaturized 10 kV, 0.1 mA, Ca-anode or to a miniaturized 30 kV, 0.1 mA, W-anode X-ray tubes, portable systems can be constructed, which are able to analyse K-lines of elements up to about silver, and L-lines of heavy elements. The Cd 1- xZn xTe detector has an area of 4 mm 2 and a thickness of 3 mm. It has an energy resolution of about 300 eV at 5.9 keV, and an efficiency of 100% over the whole range of X-rays. Finally the HgI 2 detector has an efficiency of about 100% in the whole range of X-rays, and an energy resolution of about 200 eV at 5.9 keV. Coupled to a small 50-60 kV, 1 mA, W-anode X-ray tube, portable systems can be constructed, for the analysis of practically all elements. These systems were applied to analysis in the field of archaeometry and in all applications for which portable systems are needed or at least useful (for example X-ray transmission measurements, X-ray microtomography and so on). Results of in-field use of these detectors and a comparison among these room temperature detectors in relation to concrete applications are presented. More specifically, concerning EDXRF analysis, ancient gold samples were analysed in Rome, in Mexico City and in Milan, ancient bronzes in Sassari, in Bologna, in Chieti and in Naples, and sulfur (due to pollution) in an old roman fresco in the church of S. Stefano Rotondo (Rome).

  7. MICROQUASARS AND X-RAY NOVAE

    E-print Network

    Greiner, Jochen

    Part I MICROQUASARS AND X-RAY NOVAE allbook.tex; 15/11/2000; 21:23; p.1 #12; 2 allbook.tex; 15/11/2000; 21:23; p.2 #12; Recent results on X-ray novae and microquasars at radio and infrared wavelengths and infrared wavelengths have provided a sig- ni#12;cant contribution to our knowledge of X-ray novae

  8. Relationship between dislocations and residual stresses in cold-drawn pearlitic steel analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Shigeo; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki; Suzuki, Shigeru; Kumagai, Masayoshi; Imafuku, Muneyuki; Tashiro, Hitoshi; Kajiwara, Kentaro; Shobu, Takahiasa

    2013-09-15

    We analyzed the dislocation distribution of cold-drawn pearlitic-steel wire by using the line-profile analysis based on the energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXD). Although this line-profile analysis requires a high resolution in reciprocal space, the resolution for EDXD is generally poor due to the energy resolution of the detector. Our analysis demonstrated that the resolution in the reciprocal space can be maximized at small scattering angles. Using the line-profile analysis based on the EDXD, the microstructural parameters such as the crystallite size and the dislocation density of the ferrite phase in the pearlitic steel were successfully analyzed. In addition, the distribution of the residual stress of the ferrite phase of a pearlitic steel wire was also analyzed using the EDXD measurement. - Highlights: • Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction is applied to the line-profile analysis. • Distribution of dislocations in ferrite in the pearlitic steel wire is analyzed. • Relationship between dislocations and residual stress is discussed.

  9. Elemental analysis of human amniotic fluid and placenta by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence: child weight and maternal age dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, M. L.; Custódio, P. J.; Reus, U.; Prange, A.

    2001-11-01

    This work is an attempt to evaluate the possible influence of the mother's age in trace element concentrations in human amniotic fluid and placenta and whether these concentrations are correlated to the weight of the newborn infants. Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) was used to analyze 16 amniotic fluid samples, and the placenta samples were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The whole samples were collected during delivery from healthy mothers and healthy infants and full-term pregnancies. According to the age of the mother, three different groups were considered: 20-25, 25-30 and 30-40 years old. Only two mothers were aged more than 35 years. The weight of the infants ranged from 2.56 to 4.05 kg and three groups were also considered: 2.5-3, 3-3.5 and 3.5-4 kg. The organic matrix of the amniotic fluid samples was removed by treatment with HNO 3 followed by oxygen plasma ashing. Yttrium was used as the internal standard for TXRF analysis. Placenta samples were lyophilized and analyzed by EDXRF without any chemical treatment. Very low levels of Ni and Sr were found in the amniotic fluid samples, and were independent of the age of the mother and weight of the child. Cr, Mn, Se and Pb were at the level of the detection limit. Zn, considered one of the key elements in neonatal health, was not significantly different in the samples analyzed; however, it was weakly related to birth weigh. The concentrations obtained ranged from 0.11 to 0.92 mg/l and 30 to 65 ?g/g in amniotic fluid and placenta, respectively. The only two elements which seemed to be significantly correlated with mother's age and newborn weight were Ca and Fe for both types of sample: Ca levels were increased in heavier children and older mothers; however, Fe increased with increasing maternal age, but decreased for heavier babies. The same conclusions were obtained for placenta and amniotic fluid samples. Cu is closely associated with Fe in its function in the organism and has a similar behavior to this element, but not as pronounced.

  10. Synchrotron Radiation and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Applications on Elemental Distribution in Human Hair and Bones

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, M.L.; Marques, A.F.; Brito, J.

    2003-01-24

    This work is an application of synchrotron microprobe X- Ray fluorescence in order to study elemental distribution along human hair samples of contemporary citizens. Furthermore, X-Ray fluorescence spectrometry is also used to analyse human bones of different historical periods: Neolithic and contemporary subjects. The elemental content in the bones allowed us to conclude about environmental contamination, dietary habits and health status influence in the corresponding citizens. All samples were collected post-mortem. Quantitative analysis was performed for Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr and Pb. Mn and Fe concentration were much higher in bones from pre-historic periods. On the contrary, Pb bone concentrations of contemporary subjects are much higher than in pre-historical ones, reaching 100 {mu}g g-1, in some cases. Very low concentrations for Co, Ni, Br and Rb were found in all the analysed samples. Cu concentrations, allows to distinguish Chalcolithic bones from the Neolithic ones. The distribution of trace elements along human hair was studied for Pb and the obtained pattern was consistent with the theoretical model, based on the diffusion of this element from the root and along the hair. Therefore, the higher concentrations in hair for Pb of contemporary individuals were also observed in the bones of citizens of the same sampling sites. All samples were analysed directly without any chemical treatment.

  11. X-ray standing wave analysis of nanostructures using partially coherent radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, M. K.; Das, Gangadhar; Bedzyk, M. J.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of longitudinal (or temporal) coherence on total reflection assisted x-ray standing wave (TR-XSW) analysis of nanoscale materials is quantitatively demonstrated by showing how the XSW fringe visibility can be strongly damped by decreasing the spectral resolution of the incident x-ray beam. The correction for nonzero wavelength dispersion (?? ? 0) of the incident x-ray wave field is accounted for in the model computations of TR-XSW assisted angle dependent fluorescence yields of the nanostructure coatings on x-ray mirror surfaces. Given examples include 90 nm diameter Au nanospheres deposited on a Si(100) surface and a 3 nm thick Zn layer trapped on top a 100 nm Langmuir-Blodgett film coating on a Au mirror surface. Present method opens up important applications, such as enabling XSW studies of large dimensioned nanostructures using conventional laboratory based partially coherent x-ray sources.

  12. Probing the Structure and Morphology of X-ray and Gamma-ray Binaries Using a Multi-Wavelength, Multi-MIssion Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, Joel Barry

    2016-01-01

    This thesis focuses on High-Mass X-ray Binaries and their gamma-ray precursors, consisting of a compact object and an optical companion. Matter lost from the companion is accreted by the compact object where the gravitational potential energy is converted into X-ray radiation. The predominant high-energy emissions in gamma-ray binaries are in the MeV to TeV bandpasses. These are attributed to relativistic jets in microquasars or shocks from winds of the donor star and pulsar powered by rapid rotation of the neutron star.I use multi-wavelength observations with RXTE, MAXI, Swift, Suzaku, Fermi and ATCA to provide detailed temporal and spectral information on several X-ray binaries and one gamma-ray binary, 1FGL J1018.6-5856.My survey of the eclipsing HMXBs IGR J16393-4643, IGR J16418-4532, IGR J16479-4514, IGR J18027-2016 and XTE J1855-026 demonstrates that the physical parameters of both stellar components can be constrained. In IGR J16393-4643, spectral types of B0 V or B0-5 III are found to be consistent with the eclipse duration and Roche-lobe size, but the previously proposed spectral types in IGR J16418- 4532 and IGR J16479-4514 were not. Also found to be consistent with the eclipse half-angle and Roche-lobe size were the mass donor spectral types of IGR J18027-2016 and XTE J1855-026.4U 1210-64 was postulated to be an HMXB powered by the Be mechanism. Long-term observations show distinct high and low states and a 6.7101±0.0005 day modulation. A sharp dip interpreted to be an eclipse is found in the folded light curves. The eclipse half-angle is not consistent with the previously proposed spectral type B5 V, pointing to possible spectral types of B0 V or B0-5 III.The gamma-ray binary 1FGL J1018.6-5856, discovered by the Fermi Large Area Telescope, consists of an O6 V((f)) star and a suspected rapidly spinning pulsar. I exploit the 6.5 yr gamma-ray data to search for long-term changes in the properties of the 16.531±0.006 day orbital modulation. The best-fit spectral model consists of a featureless absorbed power law, evidence that 1FGL J1018.6-5856 is a non-accreting system. I find the radio amplitude modulation to decline with increasing frequency, indicating the presence of free-free absorption.

  13. Combination of electron energy-loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to determine indium concentration in InGaN thin film structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Chauvat, M. P.; Ruterana, P.; Walther, T.

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate a method to determine the indium concentration, x, of In x Ga1-x N thin films by combining plasmon excitation studies in electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) with a novel way of quantification of the intensity of x-ray lines in energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS). The plasmon peak in EELS of InGaN is relatively broad. We fitted a Lorentz function to the main plasmon peak to suppress noise and the influence from the neighboring Ga 3d transition in the spectrum, which improves the precision in the evaluation of the plasmon peak position. As the indium concentration of InGaN is difficult to control during high temperature growth due to partial In desorption, the nominal indium concentrations provided by the growers were not considered reliable. The indium concentration obtained from EDXS quantification using Oxford Instrument ISIS 300 x-ray standard quantification software often did not agree with the nominal indium concentration, and quantification using K and L lines was inconsistent. We therefore developed a self-consistent iterative procedure to determine the In content from thickness-dependent k-factors, as described in recent work submitted to Journal of Microscopy. When the plasmon peak position is plotted versus the indium concentration from EDXS we obtain a linear relationship over the whole compositional range, and the standard error from linear least-squares fitting shows that the indium concentration can be determined from the plasmon peak position to within ?x = ± 0.037 standard deviation.

  14. Structure determination by multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) at the Pr?L III edge

    PubMed Central

    Puehringer, Sandra; Hellmig, Michael; Liu, Sunbin; Weiss, Manfred S.; Wahl, Markus C.; Mueller, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    The use of longer X-ray wavelengths in macromolecular crystallography has grown significantly over the past few years. The main reason for this increased use of longer wavelengths has been to utilize the anomalous signal from sulfur, providing a means for the experimental phasing of native proteins. Here, another possible application of longer X-ray wavelengths is presented: MAD at the L III edges of various lanthanide compounds. A first experiment at the L III edge of Pr was conducted on HZB MX beamline BL14.2 and resulted in the successful structure determination of the C-terminal domain of a spliceosomal protein. This experiment demonstrates that L III edges of lanthanides constitute potentially attractive targets for long-wavelength MAD experiments. PMID:22869138

  15. Geographically dispersed parallel sysplex architecture using optical wavelength division multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCusatis, Casimer M.; Hall, W. E.; Janniello, Frank; Petersen, D.

    1998-12-01

    Since its introduction in 1994, the Parallel Sysplex architecture for mainframe computer systems has attracted a great deal of interest because of its high performance, continuous availability, scalability, and lower cost of ownership. Recently, it has become possible to interconnect the building blocks of a Parallel Sysplex (host processor, coupling facility, sysplex timer, and disk storage) at extended distances using fiber optic data links. In particular, optical wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) has been an enabling technology for the extension of this architecture to a geographically dispersed Parallel Sysplex (GDPS). We describe the use of WDM in GDPS configurations, including distance limitations and typical performance considerations. Experimental results of testing a GDPS with WDM channel extensions up to 40 km are presented, and some test results on the IBM 9729 Optical Wavelength Division Multiplexer used in these configurations are also discussed.

  16. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    DOEpatents

    Howells, Malcolm R. (Berkeley, CA); Jacobsen, Chris (Sound Beach, NY)

    1995-01-01

    A non-contact X-ray projection lithography method for producing a desired X-ray image on a selected surface of an X-ray-sensitive material, such as photoresist material on a wafer, the desired X-ray image having image minimum linewidths as small as 0.063 .mu.m, or even smaller. A hologram and its position are determined that will produce the desired image on the selected surface when the hologram is irradiated with X-rays from a suitably monochromatic X-ray source of a selected wavelength .lambda.. On-axis X-ray transmission through, or off-axis X-ray reflection from, a hologram may be used here, with very different requirements for monochromaticity, flux and brightness of the X-ray source. For reasonable penetration of photoresist materials by X-rays produced by the X-ray source, the wavelength X, is preferably chosen to be no more than 13.5 nm in one embodiment and more preferably is chosen in the range 1-5 nm in the other embodiment. A lower limit on linewidth is set by the linewidth of available microstructure writing devices, such as an electron beam.

  17. The classification of secondary colorectal liver cancer in human biopsy samples using angular dispersive x-ray diffraction and multivariate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakou, Chrysoula; Farquharson, Michael J.

    2009-08-01

    The motivation behind this study is to assess whether angular dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD) data, processed using multivariate analysis techniques, can be used for classifying secondary colorectal liver cancer tissue and normal surrounding liver tissue in human liver biopsy samples. The ADXRD profiles from a total of 60 samples of normal liver tissue and colorectal liver metastases were measured using a synchrotron radiation source. The data were analysed for 56 samples using nonlinear peak-fitting software. Four peaks were fitted to all of the ADXRD profiles, and the amplitude, area, amplitude and area ratios for three of the four peaks were calculated and used for the statistical and multivariate analysis. The statistical analysis showed that there are significant differences between all the peak-fitting parameters and ratios between the normal and the diseased tissue groups. The technique of soft independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA) was used to classify normal liver tissue and colorectal liver metastases resulting in 67% of the normal tissue samples and 60% of the secondary colorectal liver tissue samples being classified correctly. This study has shown that the ADXRD data of normal and secondary colorectal liver cancer are statistically different and x-ray diffraction data analysed using multivariate analysis have the potential to be used as a method of tissue classification.

  18. Performance of a gaseous detector based energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence imaging system: Analysis of human teeth treated with dental amalgam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, A. L. M.; Figueroa, R.; Jaramillo, A.; Carvalho, M. L.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2013-08-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) imaging systems are of great interest in many applications of different areas, once they allow us to get images of the spatial elemental distribution in the samples. The detector system used in this study is based on a micro patterned gas detector, named Micro-Hole and Strip Plate. The full field of view system, with an active area of 28 × 28 mm2 presents some important features for EDXRF imaging applications, such as a position resolution below 125 ?m, an intrinsic energy resolution of about 14% full width at half maximum for 5.9 keV X-rays, and a counting rate capability of 0.5 MHz. In this work, analysis of human teeth treated by dental amalgam was performed by using the EDXRF imaging system mentioned above. The goal of the analysis is to evaluate the system capabilities in the biomedical field by measuring the drift of the major constituents of a dental amalgam, Zn and Hg, throughout the tooth structures. The elemental distribution pattern of these elements obtained during the analysis suggests diffusion of these elements from the amalgam to teeth tissues.

  19. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics for the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1990 is presented. Topics studied include: soft x ray background, new sounding rocket payload: x ray calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  20. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics is presented. Topics studied include: the soft x ray background, proportional counter and filter calibrations, the new sounding rocket payload: X Ray Calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  1. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePLUS

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  2. X-Ray Imaging

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Surgery Imaging Clinical Trials Basics Patient Information X-Ray Imaging Print This Page X-ray imaging is perhaps the most familiar type of imaging. Images produced by X-rays are due to the different absorption rates of ...

  3. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Image/Video Gallery Your radiologist explains chest x-ray. Transcript Welcome to Radiology Info dot org! Hello, ... about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed ...

  4. SMM x ray polychromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, J. L. R.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) experiment was to study the physical properties of solar flare plasma and its relation to the parent active region to understand better the flare mechanism and related solar activity. Observations were made to determine the temperature, density, and dynamic structure of the pre-flare and flare plasma as a function of wavelength, space and time, the extent to which the flare plasma departs from thermal equilibrium, and the variation of this departure with time. The experiment also determines the temperature and density structure of active regions and flare-induced changes in the regions.

  5. Single-shot calibration of soft x-ray mirrors using a sinusoidal transmission grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpilman, Z.; Ehrlich, Y.; Maman, S.; Levy, I.; Shussman, T.; Oren, G.; Zakosky Nueberger, I.; Hurvitz, G.

    2014-11-01

    Calibration of soft x-ray diagnostics is a challenge due to the lack of laboratory-size calibrated sources. An in situ calibration method for newly developed x-ray mirrors, is presented. The x-ray source is produced by laser-matter interaction, and twin transmission gratings which create two identical dispersion lines. The gratings have a sinusoidal transmission function, which produces a highly precise high-orders free spectrum. An x-ray mirror interacts with one of the dispersion lines, and the mirror efficiency curve as a function of wavelength is extracted. Mirror efficiency shows good agreement with the literature, and evidence of water layer may justify the need of in situ calibration.

  6. THE STRUCTURE OF THE ACCRETION DISK IN THE ACCRETION DISK CORONA X-RAY BINARY 4U 1822-371 AT OPTICAL AND ULTRAVIOLET WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Bayless, Amanda J.; Robinson, Edward L.; Cornell, Mark E.; Hynes, Robert I.; Ashcraft, Teresa A.

    2010-01-20

    The eclipsing low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1822-371 is the prototypical accretion disk corona (ADC) system. We have obtained new time-resolved UV spectroscopy of 4U 1822-371 with the Advanced Camera for Surveys/Solar Blind Channel on the Hubble Space Telescope and new V- and J-band photometry with the 1.3 m SMARTS telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. We use the new data to construct its UV/optical spectral energy distribution and its orbital light curve in the UV, V, and J bands. We derive an improved ephemeris for the optical eclipses and confirm that the orbital period is changing rapidly, indicating extremely high rates of mass flow in the system, and we show that the accretion disk in the system has a strong wind with projected velocities up to 4000 km s{sup -1}. We show that the disk has a vertically extended, optically thick component at optical wavelengths. This component extends almost to the edge of the disk and has a height equal to approx0.5 of the disk radius. As it has a low brightness temperature, we identify it as the optically thick base of a disk wind, not as the optical counterpart of the ADC. Like previous models of 4U 1822-371, ours needs a tall obscuring wall near the edge of the accretion disk, but we interpret the wall as a layer of cooler material at the base of the disk wind, not as a tall, luminous disk rim.

  7. Structural phase transition of ternary dielectric SmGdO{sub 3}: Evidence from angle dispersive x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Yogesh E-mail: satya504@gmail.com Sahoo, Satyaprakash E-mail: satya504@gmail.com Misra, Pankaj; Pavunny, Shojan P.; Katiyar, Ram S. E-mail: satya504@gmail.com; Mishra, A. K.; Dwivedi, Abhilash; Sharma, S. M.

    2015-03-07

    High-pressure synchrotron based angle dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD) studies were carried out on SmGdO{sub 3} (SGO) up to 25.7?GPa at room temperature. ADXRD results indicated a reversible pressure-induced phase transition from ambient monoclinic to hexagonal phase at ?8.9?GPa. The observed pressure-volume data were fitted with the third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state yielding zero pressure bulk modulus B{sub 0}?=?132(22) and 177(9) GPa for monoclinic (B-type) and hexagonal (A-type) phases, respectively. Pressure dependent micro-Raman spectroscopy further confirmed the monoclinic to hexagonal phase transition at about 5.24?GPa. The mode Grüneisen parameters and pressure coefficients for different Raman modes corresponding to each individual phases of SGO were calculated using pressure dependent Raman mode analysis.

  8. Determination of heavy metals in suspended waste water collected from Oued El Harrach Algiers River by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouziane, S.; Amokrane, A.; Toumert, I.

    2013-12-01

    A preliminary study of the atmospheric pollution in the centre of Algiers is one of the important fields of applications in the environmental science. Nowadays, we need to evaluate the level of the contamination which has an unfavourable effect on physicochemical properties of soils and plants and namely also on human health. In the present work, water samples collected from Oued El-Harrach Algiers River, have been filtered in 0.45 ?m Millipore filters to be analysed by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence technique using 109Cd radioisotope source. Concentrations of the toxic elements like heavy metals are determined and compared with the published ones values by Yoshida [1] and those obtained using PIXE and NAA techniques [6].

  9. On the absence of a positive sound dispersion in the THz dynamics of glycerol: an inelastic x-ray scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Cunsolo, Alessandro

    2012-10-23

    The high frequency transport properties of glycerol are derived from inelastic x-ray scattering spectra measured at different pressures and compared with ultrasound absorption data. As a result, the presence of two distinct relaxation processes is inferred: a slow one, occurring in the GHz window and having an essentially structural character, and a fast one, related instead to microscopic degrees of freedom. While the former originates a neat increase of the apparent, i.e. frequency-dependent, sound velocity, the latter induces no visible dispersive effects on the acoustic propagation. The observed behavior is likely paradigmatic of all glass formers near or below the melting and it is here discussed and explained in some detail.

  10. Statistical assessment of heavy metal pollution in sediments of east coast of Tamilnadu using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (EDXRF).

    PubMed

    Ravisankar, R; Sivakumar, S; Chandrasekaran, A; Kanagasabapathy, K V; Prasad, M V R; Satapathy, K K

    2015-08-01

    The study of heavy metal pollution in coastal sediments assumes importance with respect to environmental ecology in view of the rapid industrialization and increased anthropogenic activities. The concentrations of Mg, Al, K, Ca, Ti, Fe, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni and Zn were measured in twenty sampling sites along the east coast of Tamilnadu, India by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF). Natural background values were used to delineate their origin as geogenic or anthropogenic. To interpret and assess the contamination status for heavy metals in sediments, four metal pollution indices used such as an enrichment factor, a geo-accumulation index, a contamination factor and a pollution load index. Multivariate statistical methods were applied to identify the source of heavy metals. Heavy metal toxicity risk was assessed using sediment quality guidelines. The presented methodology was used to determine the anthropogenic origin of heavy metals in the sediment. PMID:25956221

  11. Spatially resolved energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic method for in-situ evaluation of mechanical properties during the growth of a C - Pt composite nanowire

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Amit; Banerjee, S. S.

    2014-05-15

    A core-shell type C-Pt composite nanowire is fabricated using focused ion and electron beam induced chemical vapor deposition techniques. Using information from spatially resolved energy dispersive x-ray spectra, we detect the resonance vibration in the C-Pt composite nanowire. We use this method to measure the Young's moduli of the constituents (C, Pt) of the composite nanowire and also estimate the density of the FEB CVD grown Pt shell surrounding the C core. By measuring the resonance characteristics of the composite nanowire we estimate a Pt shell growth rate of ?0.9 nms{sup ?1}. The study is analyzed to suggest that the Pt shell growth mechanism is primarily governed by the sticking coefficient of the organometallic vapor on the C nanowire core.

  12. Analysis of Catalonian silver coins from the Spanish War of Independence period (1808-1814) by Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitarch, A.; Queralt, I.; Alvarez-Perez, A.

    2011-02-01

    Between the years 1808 and 1814, the Spanish War of Independence took place. This period, locally known as "Guerra del Francès", generated the need for money and consequently five mints were opened around the Catalan territory. To mark the 200th anniversary of the beginning of the war, an extensive campaign of Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence measurements of some of these "emergency coins" was carried out. Apart from the silver (major constituent of all the studied coins) it has been possible to recognize copper as main metal alloying element. Likewise, the presence of zinc, tin, lead, gold, platinum, antimony, nickel and iron has been also identified. The obtained results have been useful not only for the characterization of the alloys, but also to determine the differences and analogies between the emissions and for historical explanations.

  13. Rod Packing in Chiral Nematic Cellulose Nanocrystal Dispersions Studied by Small-Angle X-ray Scattering and Laser Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Christina; Agthe, Michael; Fall, Andreas B; Gordeyeva, Korneliya; Guccini, Valentina; Salajková, Michaela; Plivelic, Tomás S; Lagerwall, Jan P F; Salazar-Alvarez, German; Bergström, Lennart

    2015-06-16

    The packing of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) in the anisotropic chiral nematic phase has been investigated over a wide concentration range by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and laser diffraction. The average separation distance between the CNCs and the average pitch of the chiral nematic phase have been determined over the entire isotropic-anisotropic biphasic region. The average separation distances range from 51 nm, at the onset of the anisotropic phase formation, to 25 nm above 6 vol % (fully liquid crystalline phase) whereas the average pitch varies from ?15 ?m down to ?2 ?m as ? increases from 2.5 up to 6.5 vol %. Using the cholesteric order, we determine that the twist angle between neighboring CNCs increases from about 1° up to 4° as ? increases from 2.5 up to 6.5 vol %. The dependence of the twisting on the volume fraction was related to the increase in the magnitude of the repulsive interactions between the charged rods as the average separation distance decreases. PMID:26020691

  14. Femtosecond x-ray absorption spectroscopy with hard x-ray free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Tetsuo; Togashi, Tadashi; Tono, Kensuke; Kameshima, Takashi; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Obara, Yuki; Misawa, Kazuhiko; Bhattacharya, Atanu; Kurahashi, Naoya; Ogi, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Toshinori; Molecular Reaction Dynamics Research Team, RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198

    2013-09-23

    We have developed a method of dispersive x-ray absorption spectroscopy with a hard x-ray free electron laser (XFEL), generated by a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mechanism. A transmission grating was utilized for splitting SASE-XFEL light, which has a relatively large bandwidth (?E/E ? 5 × 10{sup ?3}), into several branches. Two primary split beams were introduced into a dispersive spectrometer for measuring signal and reference spectra simultaneously. After normalization, we obtained a Zn K-edge absorption spectrum with a photon-energy range of 210 eV, which is in excellent agreement with that measured by a conventional wavelength-scanning method. From the analysis of the difference spectra, the noise ratio was evaluated to be ?3 × 10{sup ?3}, which is sufficiently small to trace minute changes in transient spectra induced by an ultrafast optical laser. This scheme enables us to perform single-shot, high-accuracy x-ray absorption spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution.

  15. Kinetic modeling of the X-ray-induced damage to a metalloprotein.

    PubMed

    Davis, Katherine M; Kosheleva, Irina; Henning, Robert W; Seidler, Gerald T; Pushkar, Yulia

    2013-08-01

    It is well-known that biological samples undergo X-ray-induced degradation. One of the fastest occurring X-ray-induced processes involves redox modifications (reduction or oxidation) of redox-active cofactors in proteins. Here we analyze room-temperature data on the photoreduction of Mn ions in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II, one of the most radiation damage-sensitive proteins and a key constituent of natural photosynthesis in plants, green algae, and cyanobacteria. Time-resolved X-ray emission spectroscopy with wavelength-dispersive detection was used to collect data on the progression of X-ray-induced damage. A kinetic model was developed to fit experimental results, and the rate constant for the reduction of OEC Mn(III) and Mn(IV) ions by solvated electrons was determined. From this model, the possible kinetics of X-ray-induced damage at a variety of experimental conditions, such as different rates of dose deposition as well as different excitation wavelengths, can be inferred. We observed a trend of increasing dosage threshold prior to the onset of X-ray-induced damage with increasing rates of dose deposition. This trend suggests that experimentation with higher rates of dose deposition is beneficial for measurements of biological samples sensitive to radiation damage, particularly at pink beam and X-ray free electron laser sources. PMID:23815809

  16. Kinetic Modeling of the X-ray-induced Damage to a Metalloprotein

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Katherine M.; Kosheleva, Irina; Henning, Robert W.; Seidler, Gerald T.; Pushkar, Yulia

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that biological samples undergo x-ray-induced degradation. One of the fastest occurring x-ray-induced processes involves redox modifications (reduction or oxidation) of redox-active cofactors in proteins. Here we analyze room temperature data on the photoreduction of Mn ions in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II, one of the most radiation damage sensitive proteins and a key constituent of natural photosynthesis in plants, green algae and cyanobacteria. Time-resolved x-ray emission spectroscopy with wavelength-dispersive detection was used to collect data on the progression of x-ray-induced damage. A kinetic model was developed to fit experimental results, and the rate constant for the reduction of OEC MnIII/IV ions by solvated electrons was determined. From this model, the possible kinetics of x-ray-induced damage at variety of experimental conditions, such as different rates of dose deposition as well as different excitation wavelengths, can be inferred. We observed a trend of increasing dosage threshold prior to the onset of x-ray-induced damage with increasing rates of damage deposition. This trend suggests that experimentation with higher rates of dose deposition is beneficial for measurements of biological samples sensitive to radiation damage, particularly at pink beam and x-ray FEL sources. PMID:23815809

  17. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePLUS

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will first ...

  18. Determination of the phonon dispersion of zinc blende ,,3C... silicon carbide by inelastic x-ray scattering

    E-print Network

    Weinstein, Benard.A.

    Determination of the phonon dispersion of zinc blende ,,3C... silicon carbide by inelastic x-temperature ap- plications. Silicon carbide has generated interest not only because of its large band gap grown with different silicon isotopes. Eigenvectors provide a more exhaustive way of testing lattice

  19. Determination of lanthanides by source excited energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) method after preconcentration with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC).

    PubMed

    Orescanin, Visnja; Mikelic, Luka; Roje, Vibor; Lulic, Stipe

    2006-06-16

    A new analytical procedure for determination of lanthanides in environmental samples after chemical separation from major matrix elements on DOWEX 50W-X8 resin followed by preconcentration with chelating agent ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC) and analyses of thin targets by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) method using 109Cd as the source of excitation was presented. Characteristic Lalpha X-ray lines of the lanthanides were used for calculations of the net peak area and mass concentrations. The influence of pH value of the solution and addition of organic matter on the complexation was investigated. Percentage of recovery of each lanthanide after separation on DOWEX 50W-X8 resin was also determined. Accuracy of the method was tested on standard reference materials and real environmental samples (red mud material). For that purpose samples of standard reference materials and red mud were prepared as thick targets and directly analyzed (without the separation step) by EDXRF method using 241Am as the excitation source. In that case lanthanides concentrations were determined over their characteristic Kalpha X-ray lines and results were compared with those obtained after separation/preconcentration step described above. Results showed that selected lanthanides made stable complexes with APDC in the alkaline medium with the maximum recovery at pH=8. The presence of organic matter slightly modified the complexation by means of somewhat higher recovery percentage at pH lower than 7 and approx. 20% lower recovery at pH higher than 7. Recovery of the elements after separation on DOWEX 50W-X8 resin and preconcentration with APDC at pH=8 varied from 91.4% (Pr) to only 24.9% in the case of Dy. Concentrations of lanthanides measured in standard reference material and environmental samples of red mud after microwave digestion, separation on DOWEX 50W-X8 resin, preconcentration with APDC at pH=8 and recalculation on the percentage of recovery were in good agreement with certified values in the case of SRM as well as with the concentrations obtained by direct determination over Kalpha lines using 241Am excitation source in the case of red mud leading to the conclusion that presented method was applicable for the determination of lanthanides in real environmental samples. PMID:17723409

  20. Determination of inorganic nutrients in wheat flour by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peruchi, Lidiane Cristina; Nunes, Lidiane Cristina; de Carvalho, Gabriel Gustinelli Arantes; Guerra, Marcelo Braga Bueno; de Almeida, Eduardo; Rufini, Iolanda Aparecida; Santos, Dário; Krug, Francisco José

    2014-10-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) were evaluated for the determination of P, K, Ca, Mg, S, Fe, Cu, Mn and Zn in pressed pellets of wheat flours. EDXRF and LIBS calibration models were built with analytes mass fractions determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after microwave-assisted acid digestion in a set of 25 wheat flour laboratory samples. Test samples consisted of pressed pellets prepared from wheat flour mixed with 30% mm- 1 cellulose binder. Experiments were carried out with a LIBS setup consisted of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and a spectrometer with Echelle optics and ICCD, and a benchtop EDXRF system fitted with a Rh target X-ray tube and a Si(Li) semiconductor detector. The correlation coefficients from the linear calibration models of P, K, Ca, Mg, S, Fe, Mn and Zn determined by LIBS and/or EDXRF varied from 0.9705 for Zn to 0.9990 for Mg by LIBS, and from 0.9306 for S to 0.9974 for K by EDXRF. The coefficients of variation of measurements varied from 1.2 to 20% for LIBS, and from 0.3 to 24% for EDXRF. The predictive capabilities based on RMSEP (root mean square error of prediction) values were appropriate for the determination of P, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn and Zn by LIBS, and for P, K, S, Ca, Fe, and Zn by EDXRF. In general, results from the analysis of NIST SRM 1567a Wheat flour by LIBS and EDXRF were in agreement with their certified mass fractions.

  1. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePLUS

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  2. Bone X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Bone What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? ... Bone X-ray (Radiography)? What is Bone X-ray (Radiography)? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  3. Abdomen X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Abdomen Abdominal x-ray uses a very ... an abdominal x-ray? What is abdominal x-ray? An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical ...

  4. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Panoramic Dental X-ray What is Panoramic X-ray? What are some ... of Panoramic X-ray? What is Panoramic X-ray? Panoramic radiography , also called panoramic x-ray , is ...

  5. Portable total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis in the identification of unknown laboratory hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Ying Imashuku, Susumu; Sasaki, Nobuharu; Ze, Long; Kawai, Jun; Takano, Shotaro; Sohrin, Yoshiki; Seki, Hiroko; Miyauchi, Hiroya

    2014-05-15

    In this study, a portable total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometer was used to analyze unknown laboratory hazards that precipitated on exterior surfaces of cooling pipes and fume hood pipes in chemical laboratories. With the aim to examine the accuracy of TXRF analysis for the determination of elemental composition, analytical results were compared with those of wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry, scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry, energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, x-ray diffraction spectrometry (XRD), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Detailed comparison of data confirmed that the TXRF method itself was not sufficient to determine all the elements (Z?>?11) contained in the samples. In addition, results suggest that XRD should be combined with XPS in order to accurately determine compound composition. This study demonstrates that at least two analytical methods should be used in order to analyze the composition of unknown real samples.

  6. SIMULTANEOUS MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF MAGNETIC ACTIVITY IN ULTRACOOL DWARFS. III. X-RAY, RADIO, AND Halpha ACTIVITY TRENDS IN M AND L DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.; Basri, G.; Fleming, T. A.; Liebert, J.; Giampapa, M. S.; Gizis, J. E.; MartIn, E.; Rutledge, R. E.

    2010-01-20

    As part of our on-going investigation into the magnetic field properties of ultracool dwarfs, we present simultaneous radio, X-ray, and Halpha observations of three M9.5-L2.5 dwarfs (BRI 0021-0214, LSR 060230.4+391059, and 2MASS J052338.2-140302). We do not detect X-ray or radio emission from any of the three sources, despite previous detections of radio emission from BRI 0021 and 2M0523-14. Steady and variable Halpha emission are detected from 2M0523-14 and BRI 0021, respectively, while no Halpha emission is detected from LSR 0602+39. Overall, our survey of nine M8-L5 dwarfs doubles the number of ultracool dwarfs observed in X-rays, and triples the number of L dwarfs, providing in addition the deepest limits to date, log(L{sub X}/L{sub bol}) approx< -5. With this larger sample we find the first clear evidence for a substantial reduction in X-ray activity, by about two orders of magnitude, from mid-M to mid-L dwarfs. We find that the decline in Halpha roughly follows L{sub Ha}lpha/L{sub bol} propor to 10{sup -0.4x(SP-6)} for SP >= 6, where SP = 0 for spectral type M0. In the radio band, however, the luminosity remains relatively unchanged from M0 to L4, leading to a substantial increase in L{sub rad}/L{sub bol}. Our survey also provides the first comprehensive set of simultaneous radio/X-ray/Halpha observations of ultracool dwarfs, and reveals a clear breakdown of the radio/X-ray correlation beyond spectral type M7, evolving smoothly from L{sub n}u{sub ,rad}/L{sub X} approx 10{sup -15.5} to approx10{sup -11.5} Hz{sup -1} over the narrow spectral-type range M7-M9. This breakdown reflects the substantial reduction in X-ray activity beyond M7, but its physical origin remains unclear since, as evidenced by the uniform radio emission, there is no drop in the field dissipation and particle acceleration efficiency. Based on the results of our survey, we conclude that a further investigation of magnetic activity in ultracool dwarfs will benefit from a two-pronged approach: multi-rotation observations of nearby known active sources and a snapshot survey of a large sample within approx50 pc to uncover rare flaring objects.

  7. The Need for X-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken

    2011-01-01

    For over four decades, X-ray, EUV, and UV spectral observations have been used to measure physical properties of the solar atmosphere. During this time, there has been substantial improvement in the spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution of the observations for the EUV and UV wavelength ranges. At wavelengths below 100 Angstroms, however, observations of the solar corona with simultaneous spatial and spectral resolution are limited, and not since the late 1970's have spatially resolved solar X-ray spectra been measured. The soft-X-ray wavelength range is dominated by emission lines formed at high temperatures and provides diagnostics unavailable in any other wavelength range. In this presentation, we will discuss the important science questions that can be answered using spatially and spectrally resolved X-ray spectra.

  8. Ultrafast X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2010-04-19

    Since before the scattering of X-rays off of DNA led to the first understanding of the double helix structure, sources of X-rays have been an essential tool for scientists examining the structure and interactions of matter. The resolution of a microscope is proportional to the wavelength of light so x-rays can see much finer structures than visible light, down to single atoms. In addition, the energy of X-rays is resonant with the core atomic levels of atoms so with appropriate wavelengths the placement of specific atoms in a large molecule can be determined. Over 10,000 scientists use synchrotron sources, storage rings of high energy electrons, each year worldwide. As an example of such use, virtually every picture of a protein or drug molecule that one sees in the scientific press is a reconstruction based on X-ray scattering of synchrotron light from the crystallized form of that molecule. Unfortunately those pictures are static and proteins work through configuration (shape) changes in response to energy transfer. To understand how biological systems work requires following the energy flow to these molecules and tracking how shape changes drive their interaction with other molecules. We'd like to be able to freeze the action of these molecules at various steps along the way with an X-ray strobe light. How fast does it have to be? To actually get a picture of a molecule in a fixed configuration requires X-ray pulses as short as 30 femtoseconds (1/30 of a millionth of a millionth of a second). To capture the energy flow through changes in electronic levels requires a faster strobe, less than 1 femtosecond! And to acquire such information in smaller samples with higher accuracy demands brighter and brighter X-rays. Unfortunately modern synchrotrons (dubbed 3rd Generation Light Sources) cannot deliver such short bright pulses of X-rays. An entirely new approach is required, linear-accelerator (linac-)-based light sources termed 4th or Next Generation Light Sources (NGLSs). Although NGLSs will not displace synchrotrons from their role they do offer exciting new capabilities which can be understood from the physics of the light production in each device.

  9. A rapid, dispersion-based wavelength-stepped and wavelength-swept laser for optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Tozburun, Serhat; Siddiqui, Meena; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Optical-domain subsampling enables Fourier-domain OCT imaging at high-speeds and extended depth ranges while limiting the required acquisition bandwidth. To perform optical-domain subsampling, a wavelength-stepped rather than a wavelength-swept source is required. This preliminary study introduces a novel design for a rapid wavelength-stepped laser source that uses dispersive fibers in combination with a fast lithium-niobate modulator to achieve wavelength selection. A laser with 200 GHz wavelength-stepping and a sweep rate of 9 MHz over a 94 nm range at a center wavelength of 1550 nm is demonstrated. A reconfiguration of this source design to a continuous wavelength-swept light for conventional Fourier-domain OCT is also demonstrated. PMID:24663631

  10. X Ray Topography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balchin, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some aspects in X-ray topography, including formation of dislocations, characteristics of stacking faults, x-ray contrast in defect inspection, Berg-Barrett technique, and Lang traversing crystal and Borrmann's methods. (CC)

  11. X-ray (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on ... will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other ...

  12. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePLUS

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some are: Bitewing Periapical Palatal (also called occlusal) ...

  13. X-Ray Lasers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapline, George; Wood, Lowell

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the prospects of generating coherent x rays using high-power lasers and indentifies problem areas in their development. Indicates possible applications for coherent x rays in the fields of chemistry, biology, and crystallography. (GS)

  14. Elemental relationships in rock varnish as seen with SEM/EDX (scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray) elemental line profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Reneau, S.L.; Harrington, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    The heterogeneous nature of rock varnish requires a thorough survey of elemental and mineralogic compositions before relating chemical variability of rock varnish to past geochemical environments. Elemental relationships in rock varnish can be examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with an elemental line profiling routine using semi-quantitative, energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis. Results of SEM/EDX analysis suggest: variations in cation concentrations used in varnish cation ratio dating relate more specifically to variations in detritus within the varnish than to element mobility as defined by weathering indices; Mn concentration rather than Mn:Fe ratios may be a more appropriate indicator of paleoclimatic fluctuations; and the Mn-oxide phase existing in varnish is most likely a Ba-enriched phase rather than birnessite. Element line profiling offers great potential for gaining insights into geochemical processes affecting the deposition and diagenesis of rock varnish and for testing hypotheses relating to its chemical variability. 27 refs., 9 figs.

  15. In-situ energy dispersive x-ray diffraction study of the growth of CuO nanowires by annealing method

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Himanshu; Ganguli, Tapas; Deb, S. K.; Sant, Tushar; Poswal, H. K.; Sharma, Surinder M.

    2013-10-14

    The in-situ growth of CuO nanowires was studied by Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction (EDXRD) to observe the mechanism of growth. The study was carried out for comparison at two temperatures—at 500 °C, the optimum temperature of the nanowires growth, and at 300 °C just below the temperature range of the growth. The in situ observation revealed the successive oxidation of Cu foil to Cu{sub 2}O layer and finally to CuO layer. Further analysis showed the presence of a compressive stress in CuO layer due to interface at CuO and Cu{sub 2}O layers. The compressive stress was found to increase with the growth of the nanowires at 500 °C while it relaxed with the growth of CuO layer at 300 °C. The present results do not support the existing model of stress relaxation induced growth of nanowires. Based on the detailed Transmission Electron Microscope, Scanning Electron Microscope, and EDXRD results, a microstructure based growth model has been suggested.

  16. Post-mortem interval estimation of human skeletal remains by micro-computed tomography, mid-infrared microscopic imaging and energy dispersive X-ray mapping

    PubMed Central

    Hatzer-Grubwieser, P.; Bauer, C.; Parson, W.; Unterberger, S. H.; Kuhn, V.; Pemberger, N.; Pallua, Anton K.; Recheis, W.; Lackner, R.; Stalder, R.; Pallua, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    In this study different state-of-the-art visualization methods such as micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), mid-infrared (MIR) microscopic imaging and energy dispersive X-ray (EDS) mapping were evaluated to study human skeletal remains for the determination of the post-mortem interval (PMI). PMI specific features were identified and visualized by overlaying molecular imaging data and morphological tissue structures generated by radiological techniques and microscopic images gained from confocal microscopy (Infinite Focus (IFM)). In this way, a more distinct picture concerning processes during the PMI as well as a more realistic approximation of the PMI were achieved. It could be demonstrated that the gained result in combination with multivariate data analysis can be used to predict the Ca/C ratio and bone volume (BV) over total volume (TV) for PMI estimation. Statistical limitation of this study is the small sample size, and future work will be based on more specimens to develop a screening tool for PMI based on the outcome of this multidimensional approach. PMID:25878731

  17. Investigation of Sn surface segregation during GeSn epitaxial growth by Auger electron spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukamoto, Takahiro; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Hirose, Nobumitsu; Kasamatsu, Akifumi; Mimura, Takashi; Matsui, Toshiaki

    2015-02-02

    The mechanism of Sn surface segregation during the epitaxial growth of GeSn on Si (001) substrates was investigated by Auger electron spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Sn surface segregation depends on the growth temperature and Sn content of GeSn layers. During Sn surface segregation, Sn-rich nanoparticles form and move on the surface during the deposition, which results in a rough surface owing to facet formation. The Sn-rich nanoparticles moving on the surface during the deposition absorb Sn from the periphery and yield a lower Sn content, not on the surface but within the layer, because the Sn surface segregation and the GeSn deposition occur simultaneously. Sn surface segregation can occur at a lower temperature during the deposition compared with that during postannealing. This suggests that the Sn surface segregation during the deposition is strongly promoted by the migration of deposited Ge and Sn adatoms on the surface originating from the thermal effect of substrate temperature, which also suggests that limiting the migration of deposited Ge and Sn adatoms can reduce the Sn surface segregation and improve the crystallinity of GeSn layers.

  18. Towards Understanding Galaxy Clusters and Their Constituents Projection Effects on Velocity Dispersion, X-Ray Emission Mass Estimates, Gas Fraction and Substructure

    E-print Network

    Cen, R

    1996-01-01

    We study the projection effects on various observables of clusters of galaxies at zero redshift, including cluster richness, velocity dispersion, temperature, X-ray luminosity, three total mass estimates (velocity based, temperature based and gravitational lensing derived), gas mass estimate and substructure, utilizing a simulation of a realistic cosmological model (a cold dark matter model with the following parameters: $H_0=65$km/s/Mpc, various quantites are also examined in detail. It is shown that projection effects are important for some quantities but insignificant for others. In particular, it is shown that, on average, the gas to total mass ratio in clusters appears 30-40\\% higher than the global ratio due to projection, and the observed broad distribution of gas to total mass ratio is adequately accounted for by projection effects, alleviating the need to invoke other physical processes. The lensing deduced mass is, on average, 20-30\\% higher than the velocity or temperature based mass, while a signi...

  19. Winter and summer characteristics of airborne particles inside emperor Qin's Terra-Cotta Museum, China: a study by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tafeng; Cao, Junji; Ho, Kinfai; An, Zhisheng; Lee, Shuncheng; Chow, Judith C; Watson, John G; Li, Hua

    2011-09-01

    Day- and nighttime total suspended particulate matter was collected inside and outside Emperor Qin's Terra-Cotta Museum in winter and summer 2008. The purpose was to characterize the winter and summer differences of indoor airborne particles in two display halls with different architectural and ventilation conditions, namely the Exhibition Hall and Pit No. 1. The morphology and elemental composition of two season samples were investigated using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. It is found that the particle size, particle mass concentration, and particle type were associated with the visitor numbers in the Exhibition Hall and with the natural ventilation in Pit No. 1 in both winter and summer. Evident winter and summer changes in the composition and physicochemical properties of the indoor suspended particulate matters were related to the source emission and the meteorological conditions. Particle mass concentrations in both halls were higher in winter than in summer. In winter, the size of the most abundant particles at the three sites were all between 0.5 and 1.0 microm, whereas in summer the peaks were all located at less than 0.5 microm. The fraction of sulfur-containing particles was 2-7 times higher in winter than in summer. In addition to the potential soiling hazard, the formation and deposition of sulfur-containing particles in winter may lead to the chemical and physical weathering of the surfaces of the terra-cotta statues. PMID:22010376

  20. Sinus x-ray

    MedlinePLUS

    Paranasal sinus radiography; X-ray - sinuses ... sinus x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department. Or the x-ray may be taken ... Anslow P. Ear, nose and throat radiology. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, ... Radiology: A Textbook of Medical Imaging . 5th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  1. Hand x-ray

    MedlinePLUS

    X-ray - hand ... A hand x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department or your health care provider's office by an ... technician. You will be asked to place your hand on the x-ray table, and keep it ...

  2. X-Rays

    MedlinePLUS

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of your ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat and ...

  3. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy/Monte Carlo simulation approach for the non-destructive analysis of corrosion patina-bearing alloys in archaeological bronzes: The case of the bowl from the Fareleira 3 site (Vidigueira, South Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottaini, C.; Mirão, J.; Figuereido, M.; Candeias, A.; Brunetti, A.; Schiavon, N.

    2015-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) is a well-known technique for non-destructive and in situ analysis of archaeological artifacts both in terms of the qualitative and quantitative elemental composition because of its rapidity and non-destructiveness. In this study EDXRF and realistic Monte Carlo simulation using the X-ray Monte Carlo (XRMC) code package have been combined to characterize a Cu-based bowl from the Iron Age burial from Fareleira 3 (Southern Portugal). The artifact displays a multilayered structure made up of three distinct layers: a) alloy substrate; b) green oxidized corrosion patina; and c) brownish carbonate soil-derived crust. To assess the reliability of Monte Carlo simulation in reproducing the composition of the bulk metal of the objects without recurring to potentially damaging patina's and crust's removal, portable EDXRF analysis was performed on cleaned and patina/crust coated areas of the artifact. Patina has been characterized by micro X-ray Diffractometry (?XRD) and Back-Scattered Scanning Electron Microscopy + Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (BSEM + EDS). Results indicate that the EDXRF/Monte Carlo protocol is well suited when a two-layered model is considered, whereas in areas where the patina + crust surface coating is too thick, X-rays from the alloy substrate are not able to exit the sample.

  4. Analysis of eight argonne premium coal samples by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, J.R.; Sellers, G.A.; Johnson, R.G.; Vivit, D.V.; Kent, J.

    1990-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectrometric methods were used in the analysis of eight Argonne Premium Coal Samples. Trace elements (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Ba, La, and Ce) in coal ash were determined by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry; major elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, and Fe) in coal ash and trace elements (Cl and P) in whole coal were determined by wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The results of this study will be used in a geochemical database compiled for these materials from various analytical techniques. The experimental XRF methods and procedures used to determine these major and trace elements are described.

  5. A von Hamos x-ray spectrometer based on a segmented-type diffraction crystal for single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy and time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies

    SciTech Connect

    Szlachetko, J.; Nachtegaal, M.; Boni, E. de; Willimann, M.; Safonova, O.; Sa, J.; Smolentsev, G.; Szlachetko, M.; Bergamaschi, A.; Schmitt, B.; David, C.; Luecke, A.; Bokhoven, J. A. van; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Hoszowska, J.; Kayser, Y.; Jagodzinski, P.

    2012-10-15

    We report on the design and performance of a wavelength-dispersive type spectrometer based on the von Hamos geometry. The spectrometer is equipped with a segmented-type crystal for x-ray diffraction and provides an energy resolution in the order of 0.25 eV and 1 eV over an energy range of 8000 eV-9600 eV. The use of a segmented crystal results in a simple and straightforward crystal preparation that allows to preserve the spectrometer resolution and spectrometer efficiency. Application of the spectrometer for time-resolved resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and single-shot x-ray emission spectroscopy is demonstrated.

  6. High Energy Vision: Processing X-rays

    E-print Network

    DePasquale, Joseph; Edmonds, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Astronomy is by nature a visual science. The high quality imagery produced by the world's observatories can be a key to effectively engaging with the public and helping to inspire the next generation of scientists. Creating compelling astronomical imagery can, however, be particularly challenging in the non-optical wavelength regimes. In the case of X-ray astronomy, where the amount of light available to create an image is severely limited, it is necessary to employ sophisticated image processing algorithms to translate light beyond human vision into imagery that is aesthetically pleasing while still being scientifically accurate. This paper provides a brief overview of the history of X-ray astronomy leading to the deployment of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, followed by an examination of the specific challenges posed by processing X-ray imagery. The authors then explore image processing techniques used to mitigate such processing challenges in order to create effective public imagery for X-ray astronomy. ...

  7. Multi-wavelength study of X-ray luminous clusters at z ~ 0.3 I. Star formation activity of cluster galaxies

    E-print Network

    Braglia, F G; Biviano, A; Böhringer, H

    2009-01-01

    The current paradigm of cosmic formation and evolution of galaxy clusters foresees growth mostly through merging. Galaxies in the infall region or in the core of a cluster undergo transformations owing to different environmental stresses. For two X-ray luminous clusters at redshift z ~ 0.3 with opposite X-ray morphologies, RXCJ0014.3-3022 and RXCJ2308.3-0211, we assess differences in galaxy populations as a function of cluster topography. Cluster large-scale structure and substructure are determined from the combined photometry in the B, V, and R bands, and from multi-object optical spectroscopy at low resolution. A spectral index analysis is performed, based on the [OII] and Hdelta features, and the D4000 break, available for more than 100 member galaxies per cluster. Combination of spectral indices and FUV-optical colours provides a picture of the star formation history in galaxies. In spite of the potential presence of a small fraction of galaxies with obscured star formation activity, the average star-for...

  8. Determination of heavy metals concentrations in airborne particulates matter (APM) from Manjung district, Perak using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad, Nursyairah; Hamzah, Zaini; Wood, Ab. Khalik; Saat, Ahmad; Alias, Masitah

    2015-04-01

    Airborne particulates trace metals are considered as public health concern as it can enter human lungs through respiratory system. Generally, any substance that has been introduced to the atmosphere that can cause severe effects to living things and the environment is considered air pollution. Manjung, Perak is one of the development districts that is active with industrial activities. There are many industrial activities surrounding Manjung District area such as coal fired power plant, quarries and iron smelting which may contribute to the air pollution into the environment. This study was done to measure the concentrations of Hg, U, Th, K, Cu, Fe, Cr, Zn, As, Se, Pb and Cd in the Airborne Particulate Matter (APM) collected at nine locations in Manjung District area within 15 km radius towards three directions (North, North-East and South-East) in 5 km intervals. The samples were collected using mini volume air sampler with cellulose filter through total suspended particulate (TSP). The sampler was set up for eight hours with the flow rate of 5 L/min. The filter was weighed before and after sample collection using microbalance, to get the amount of APM and kept in desiccator before analyzing. The measurement was done using calibrated Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) Spectrometer. The air particulate concentrations were found below the Malaysia Air Quality Guidelines for TSP (260 µg/m3). All of the metals concentrations were also lower than the guidelines set by World Health Organization (WHO), Ontario Ministry of the Environment and Argonne National Laboratory, USA NCRP (1975). From the concentrations, the enrichment factor were calculated.

  9. Measurement of wavelengths and lamb shifts for inner-shell transitions in Fe XVIII-XXIV. [from solar flare X-ray spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seely, J. F.; Feldman, U.; Safronova, U. I.

    1986-01-01

    The wavelengths of inner-shell 1s-2p transitions in the ions Fe XVIII-XXIV have been measured in solar flare spectra recorded by the Naval Research Laboratory crystal spectrometer (SOLFLEX) on the Air Force P78-1 spacecraft. The measurements are compared with previous measurements and with recently calculated wavelengths. It is found that the measured wavelengths are systematically larger than the wavelengths calculated using the Z-expansion method by up to 0.65 mA. For the more highly charged ions, these differences can be attributed to the QED contributions to the transition energies that are not included in the Z-expansion calculations.

  10. Influence by x-ray facula on dimension measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Li, Ye; Duanmu, Qingduo; Zhao, Peng

    2015-03-01

    Based on the imaging features of the original image intensifier of X-ray, the light halo caused by X-ray projective halation is analyzed, the result shows the stray X-ray energy is lower than the direct X-ray energy. The screen brightness generated by the image intensifier of X-ray stimulated by the stray X-ray energy is weaker than that generated by the direct X-ray energy. In addition the projector facula reflected from the direct X-ray is focused on the central region of X-ray image intensifier, therefore a toroidal ring similar to the solar halation is formed around the projector halation. The results of the theoretical analysis and experimental discovery show this phenomenon caused by X-ray tube on X-ray image intensifier can not be eliminated and in the system of X-ray size detection composed of them the X-ray halation will reduce the detection accuracy resulting in measurement results' deviation dispersion under given conditions. This kind of nonlinear system error can not be canceled out by the segmented modification of coefficient compensation but it can be restrained through the adjustment of correction coefficients. After the physical testing and comparison of the physical normal size the accuracy of 0.1mm of the compensated X-ray measurement results after the adjustment of correction coefficient has been reached. The results are highly reproducible and the method of the segmented coefficient compensation has been improved.

  11. X-ray Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Matt, Giorgio; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero

    2010-07-01

    1. X-ray polarimetry: historical remarks and other considerations; Part I. Polarimetry Techniques: 2. Scattering polarimetry in high energy astronomy; 3. Photoelectric polarimeters; 4. Bragg crystal polarimeters; 5. X-ray polarimetry with the photon counting pixel detector timepix; 6. HE polarized photon interactions with matter: simulations with geant4; 7. The GPD as a polarimeter: theory and facts; 8. Ideal gas electron multipliers (GEMs) for x-ray polarimeters; 9. Broad-band soft x-ray polarimetry; 10. Feasibility of x-ray photoelectric polarimeters with large field of view; 11. Angular resolution of a photoelectric polarimeter; 12. Development of a Thomson x-ray polarimeter; 13. Hard x / soft gamma ray polarimetry using a Laue lens; Part II. Polarized Emission in X-ray Sources: 14. Probing strong gravity effects with x-ray polarimetry; 15. X-ray polarization from black holes in the thermal state; 16. Strong-gravity effects acting on polarization from orbiting spots; 17. Polarization of thermal emission from accreting black holes; 18. X-ray polarimetry and radio-quiet AGN; 19. The soft x-ray polarization in obscured AGN; 20. The polarization of complex x-ray sources; 21. Polarization of Compton x-rays from jets in AGN; 22. Polarization of x-ray lines from galaxy clusters and elliptical galaxies; 23. Polarization characteristics of rotation-powered pulsars; 24. Polarized x-rays from magnetized neutron stars; 25. Polarization properties of x-ray millisecond pulsars; 26. X-ray polarization signatures of neutron stars; 27. Polarization from the oscillating magnetized accretion torus; 28. X-ray polarization from accreting white dwarfs and associated systems; 29. Polarization of pulsar wind nebulae; 30. X-ray polarization of gamma-ray bursts; 31. Central engine afterglow from GRBs and the polarization signature; 32. GRB afterglow polarimetry. Past, present and future; 33. Gamma-ray polarimetry with SPI; 34. INTEGRAL/IBIS observations of the Crab Nebula and GRB 041219A; 35. Fermi results on the origin of high energy emission in pulsars; 36. Diagnostics of the evolution of spiral galaxies in a cluster environment; Part III. Future Missions: 37. Gravity and extreme magnetism SMEX (GEMS); 38. Programs of x-ray polarimetry in Italy; 39. A polarimeter for IXO; 40. Polarimetry with ASTRO-H soft gamma-ray detector; 41. EXIST and its polarization sensitivity; 42. PoGOLite: a balloon-borne soft gamma-ray polarimeter; 43. Studies of neutron background rejection in the PoGOLite polarimeter; 44. Observing polarized x-rays with PoGOLite; 45. Pre-flight qualification tests of the PoGOLite detector system; 46. The gamma-ray polarimeter experiment (GRAPE) Balloon Payload; 47. POLAR: an instrument dedicated to GRB polarization measurement; 48. Polarisation detection capability of GRIPS; 49. X-ray and y-ray polarimetry small satellite mission polaris; 50. GAP aboard the solar powered sail mission; 51. Hard x-ray polarimeter for small satellite missions; 52. Performance of hard x-ray polarimeter: PHENEX; 53. GRB polarimetry with POET; Index.

  12. Quantitative Measurements of X-ray Intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J., Schneider, M.

    2011-09-01

    This chapter describes the characterization of several X-ray sources and their use in calibrating different types of X-ray cameras at National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). The cameras are employed in experimental plasma studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), including the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The sources provide X-rays in the energy range from several hundred eV to 110 keV. The key to this effort is measuring the X-ray beam intensity accurately and traceable to international standards. This is accomplished using photodiodes of several types that are calibrated using radioactive sources and a synchrotron source using methods and materials that are traceable to the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The accreditation procedures are described. The chapter begins with an introduction to the fundamental concepts of X-ray physics. The types of X-ray sources that are used for device calibration are described. The next section describes the photodiode types that are used for measuring X-ray intensity: power measuring photodiodes, energy dispersive photodiodes, and cameras comprising photodiodes as pixel elements. Following their description, the methods used to calibrate the primary detectors, the power measuring photodiodes and the energy dispersive photodiodes, as well as the method used to get traceability to international standards are described. The X-ray source beams can then be measured using the primary detectors. The final section then describes the use of the calibrated X-ray beams to calibrate X-ray cameras. Many of the references are web sites that provide databases, explanations of the data and how it was generated, and data calculations for specific cases. Several general reference books related to the major topics are included. Papers expanding some subjects are cited.

  13. X-ray photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, M. J.

    2015-09-01

    I describe a method for synthesizing photometric passbands for use with current and future X-ray instruments. The method permits the standardization of X-ray passbands and thus X-ray photometry between different instruments and missions. The method is illustrated by synthesizing a passband in the XMM-Newton European Photon Imaging Camera pn which is similar to the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter 0.5-2 keV band.

  14. X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Satellite X-ray experiments and ground-based programs aimed at observation of X-ray binaries are discussed. Experiments aboard OAO-3, OSO-8, Ariel 5, Uhuru, and Skylab are included along with rocket and ground-based observations. Major topics covered are: Her X-1, Cyg X-3, Cen X-3, Cyg X-1, the transient source A0620-00, other possible X-ray binaries, and plans and prospects for future observational programs.

  15. A Multi-Wavelength, Multi-Epoch Study of the Soft X-Ray Transient Prototype, V616 Mon (A0620-00)

    E-print Network

    Dawn M. Gelino; Thomas E. Harrison; Jerome A. Orosz

    2001-08-06

    We have obtained optical and infrared photometry of the soft x-ray transient prototype V616 Mon (A0620-00). From this photometry, we find a spectral type of K4 for the secondary star in the system, which is consistent with spectroscopic observations. We present J-, H-, and K-band light curves modeled with WD98 and ELC. Combining detailed, independently run models for ellipsoidal variations due to a spotted, non-spherical secondary star, and the observed ultraviolet to infrared spectral energy distribution of the system, we show that the most likely value for the orbital inclination is 40.75 +/- 3 deg. This inclination angle implies a primary black hole mass of 11.0 +/- 1.9 solar masses.

  16. The high energy X-ray universe

    PubMed Central

    Giacconi, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    Since its beginning in the early 1960s, the field of X-ray astronomy has exploded, experiencing a ten-billion-fold increase in sensitivity, which brought it on par with the most advanced facilities at all wavelengths. I will briefly describe the revolutionary first discoveries prior to the launch of the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories, present some of the current achievements, and offer some thoughts about the future of this field. PMID:20404148

  17. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F.-J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; Vetter, S.; Maxwell, T.J.; Ding, Y.; Coffee, R.; Wakatsuki, S.; Huang, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitude in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion. PMID:25744344

  18. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F. J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; Vetter, S.; Maxwell, T. J.; Ding, Y.; Coffee, R.; Wakatsuki, S.; Huang, Z.

    2015-03-06

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitude in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.

  19. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F.-J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; Vetter, S.; Maxwell, T. J.; Ding, Y.; Coffee, R.; Wakatsuki, S.; Huang, Z.

    2015-03-01

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitude in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.

  20. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F. J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; et al

    2015-03-06

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitudemore »in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.« less

  1. Chemical Analysis of Reaction Rims on Olivine Crystals in Natural Samples of Black Dacite Using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy, Lassen Peak, CA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    Lassen Volcanic Center is the southernmost volcanic region in the Cascade volcanic arc formed by the Cascadia Subduction Zone. Lassen Peak last erupted in 1915 in an arc related event producing a black dacite material containing xenocrystic olivine grains with apparent orthopyroxene reaction rims. The reaction rims on these olivine grains are believed to have formed by reactions that ensued from a mixing/mingling event that occurred prior to eruption between the admixed mafic andesitic magma and a silicic dacite host material. Natural samples of the 1915 black dacite from Lassen Peak, CA were prepared into 15 polished thin sections and carbon coated for analysis using a FEI Quanta 250 Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) to identify and measure mineral textures and disequilibrium reaction rims. Observed mineralogical textures related to magma mixing include biotite and amphibole grains with apparent dehydration/breakdown rims, pyroxene-rimmed quartz grains, high concentration of microlites in glass matrix, and pyroxene/amphibole reaction rims on olivine grains. Olivine dissolution is evidenced as increased iron concentration toward convolute edges of olivine grains as observed by Backscatter Electron (BSE) imagery and elemental mapping using NSS spectral imaging software. In an attempt to quantify the area of reaction rim growth on olivine grains within these samples, high-resolution BSE images of 30 different olivine grains were collected along with Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) of different phases. Olivine cores and rims were extracted from BSE images using Photoshop and saved as separate image files. ImageJ software was used to calculate the area (?m2) of the core and rim of these grains. Average pyroxene reaction rim width for 30 grains was determined to be 11.68+/-1.65 ?m. Rim widths of all 30 grains were averaged together to produce an overall average rim width for the Lassen Peak black dacite. By quantifying the reaction rims on olivine grains in the natural samples of Lassen Peak dacite as well as the bulk chemistry of the rock, this provides insight into the storage conditions of the magma chamber and the timing necessary for reactions to form these specific volcanic textures which in turn can be used as a basis for better understanding future experimental reconstruction of this magmatic system.

  2. X-ray - skeleton

    MedlinePLUS

    A skeletal x-ray is an imaging test used to look at the bones. It is used to detect fractures , tumors, or ... in the health care provider’s office by an x-ray technologist. You will lie on a table or ...

  3. Extremity x-ray

    MedlinePLUS

    An extremity x-ray is an image of the hands, wrist, feet, ankle, leg, thigh, forearm humerus or upper arm, hip, shoulder ... term "extremity" often refers to a human limb. X-rays are a form of radiation that passes through ...

  4. Detection of x ray sources in PROS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deponte, J.; Primini, F. A.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of detecting discrete sources in x-ray images has much in common with the problem of automatic source detection at other wavelengths. In all cases, one searches for positive brightness enhancements exceeding a certain threshold, which appear consistent with what one expects for a point source, in the presence of a (possibly) spatially variable background. Multidimensional point spread functions (e.g., dependent on detector position and photon energy) are also common. At the same time, the problem in x-ray astronomy has some unique aspects. For example, for typical x-ray exposures in current or recent observatories, the number of available pixels far exceeds the number of actual x-ray events, so Poisson, rather than Gaussian statistics apply. Further, extended cosmic x-ray sources are common, and one often desires to detect point sources in the vicinity or even within bright, diffuse x-ray emission. Finally, support structures in x-ray detectors often cast sharp shadows in x-ray images making it necessary to detect sources in a region of rapidly varying exposure. We have developed a source detection package within the IRAF/PROS environment which attempts to deal with some of the problems of x-ray source detection. We have patterned our package after the successful Einstein Observatory x-ray source detection programs. However, we have attempted to improve the flexibility and accessibility of the functions and to provide a graphical front-end for the user. Our philosophy has been to use standard IRAF tasks whenever possible for image manipulation and to separate general functions from mission-specific ones. We will report on the current status of the package and discuss future developments, including simulation tasks, to allow the user to assess detection efficiency and source significance, tasks to determine source intensity, and alternative detection algorithms.

  5. X-ray laser world wide progress

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, D.L.

    1987-05-12

    This summary describes the x-ray laser, discusses its status of development world wide, and speculates on its future. At this time, vigorous research in the USA, France and Great Britain has not only demonstrated amplification of soft x-rays, but has pushed the observed lasing wavelengths from approx.28 nm to 6.1 nm. Knowledge obtained from this work has led to the design of new schemes likely to reach even shorter wavelengths, perhaps less than the carbon K absorption edge at 4.37 nm. Researchers have also obtained saturated output at a few megawatts of power with a divergence (geometric) of a few mrad at approx.20 nm. If research continues at this pace, the x-ray laser will be available in a few more years with GW power levels, sub 4.4 nm wavelengths and fully-coherent beams.

  6. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    MedlinePLUS

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... The test is done in a hospital x-ray department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to lie on the x-ray table ...

  7. Determination and speciation of trace and ultratrace selenium ions by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry using graphene as solid adsorbent in dispersive micro-solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Kocot, Karina; Leardi, Riccardo; Walczak, Beata; Sitko, Rafal

    2015-03-01

    A dispersive micro-solid phase extraction (DMSPE) with graphene as a solid adsorbent and ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) as a chelating agent was proposed for speciation and detemination of inorganic selenium by the energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF). In developed DMSPE, graphene particles are dispersed throughout the analyzed solution, therefore reaction between Se(IV)-APDC complexes and graphene nanoparticles occurs immediately. The concentration of Se(VI) is calculated as the difference between the concentration of selenite after and before prereduction of selenate. A central composite face-centered design with 3 center points was performed in order to optimize conditions and to study the effect of four variables (pH of the sample, concentration of APDC, concentration of Triton-X-100, and sample volume). The best results were obtained when suspension consisting of 200 µg of graphene nanosheets, 1.2 mg of APDC and 0.06 mg of Triton-X-100 was rapidly injected to the 50 mL of the analyzed solution. Under optimized conditions Se ions can be determined with a very good recovery (97.7±5.0% and 99.2±6.6% for Se(IV) and Se(VI), respectively) and precision (RSD=5.1-6.6%). Proposed DMSPE/EDXRF procedure allowed to obtain low detection limits (0.032 ng mL(-1)) and high enrichment factor (1013±15). The proposed methodology was successfully applied for the determination of Se in mineral, tap, lake and sea water samples as well as in biological materials (Lobster Hepatopancreas and Pig Kidney). PMID:25618680

  8. X-ray crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  9. Laboratory Data for X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Chen, H.; Gu, M.-F.; Kahn, S. M.; Lepson, J. K.; Savin, D. W.; Utter, S. B.

    2000-01-01

    Laboratory facilities have made great strides in producing large sets of reliable data for X-ray astronomy, which include ionization and recombination cross sections needed for charge balance calculations as well as the atomic data needed for interpreting X-ray line formation. We discuss data from the new generation sources and pay special attention to the LLNL electron beam ion trap experiment, which is unique in its ability to provide direct laboratory access to spectral data under precisely controlled conditions that simulate those found in many astrophysical plasmas. Examples of spectral data obtained in the 1-160 A wavelength range are given illustrating the type of laboratory X-ray data produced in support of such missions as Chandra, X-Ray Multi-Mirror telescope (XMM), Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) and Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer Satellite (EUVE).

  10. X-Ray Background Survey Spectrometer (XBSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. T. (Principal Investigator); Paulos, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to perform a spectral survey of the low energy diffuse X-ray background using the X-ray Background Survey Spectrometer (XBSS) on board the Space Station Freedom (SSF). XBSS obtains spectra of the X-ray diffuse background in the 11-24 A and 44-84 A wavelength intervals over the entire sky with 15 deg spatial resolution. These X-rays are almost certainly from a very hot (10(exp 6) K) component of the interstellar medium that is contained in regions occupying a large fraction of the interstellar volume near the Sun. Astrophysical plasmas near 10(exp 6) K are rich in emission lines, and the relative strengths of these lines, besides providing information about the physical conditions of the emitting gas, also provide information about its history and heating mechanisms.

  11. X-ray superbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cash, W.

    Four regions of the galaxy, the Cygnus Superbubble, the Eta Carina complex, the Orion/Eridanus complex, and the Gum Nebula, are discussed as examples of collective effects in the interstellar medium. All four regions share certain features, indicating a common structure. The selection effects which determine the observable X-ray properties of the superbubbles are discussed, and it is demonstrated that only a very few more in our Galaxy can be detected in X rays. X-ray observation of extragalactic superbubbles is shown to be possible but requires the capabilities of a large, high quality, AXAF class observatory.

  12. X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph (Livermore, CA)

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  13. SASE free electron lasers as short wavelength coherent sources. From first results at 100 nm to a 1 Å X-ray laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treusch, R.; Feldhaus, J.

    2003-10-01

    During the last few years free electron lasers (FELs) based on self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) have been demonstrated at wavelengths of 12 ?m [CITE], 830 nm [CITE], 530 nm [CITE] and 385 nm [CITE], and around 100 nm [CITE]. Recently, saturation has been observed in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral region between 82 nm and 125 nm at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY. The radiation pulses have been characterized with respect to pulse energy, statistical fluctuations, angular divergence and spectral distribution, both in the linear gain and in the saturation regime of the FEL [CITE]. The results are in good agreement with theoretical simulations, providing a solid basis for other projects aiming at still shorter wavelengths down to the 0.1 nm range [CITE].

  14. A single-pass free-electron laser for soft x-rays with wavelengths less than or equal to 10 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, J.C.; Wang, T.F.; Newnam, B.E.; McVey, B.D.

    1987-01-01

    We consider a single-pass FEL amplifier, driven by an rf-linac followed by a damping ring for reduced emittance, for use in generating intense coherent light at wavelengths <10 nm. The dependence of the optical gain on electron beam quality, studied with the 3-D FEL simulation code FELEX, is given and related to the expected power of self-amplified spontaneous emission. Design issues for the damping ring to achieve the required electron beam quality are discussed.

  15. High-resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy with transition-edge sensors: present performance and future potential.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, J; Doriese, W B; Fowler, J W; Swetz, D S; Jaye, C; Fischer, D A; Reintsema, C D; Bennett, D A; Vale, L R; Mandal, U; O'Neil, G C; Miaja-Avila, L; Joe, Y I; El Nahhas, A; Fullagar, W; Gustafsson, F Parnefjord; Sundström, V; Kurunthu, D; Hilton, G C; Schmidt, D R; Ullom, J N

    2015-05-01

    X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is a powerful element-selective tool to analyze the oxidation states of atoms in complex compounds, determine their electronic configuration, and identify unknown compounds in challenging environments. Until now the low efficiency of wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometer technology has limited the use of XES, especially in combination with weaker laboratory X-ray sources. More efficient energy-dispersive detectors have either insufficient energy resolution because of the statistical limits described by Fano or too low counting rates to be of practical use. This paper updates an approach to high-resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy that uses a microcalorimeter detector array of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TESs). TES arrays are discussed and compared with conventional methods, and shown under which circumstances they are superior. It is also shown that a TES array can be integrated into a table-top time-resolved X-ray source and a soft X-ray synchrotron beamline to perform emission spectroscopy with good chemical sensitivity over a very wide range of energies. PMID:25931095

  16. 5.8 X-ray Calorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2008-01-01

    X-ray calorimeter instruments for astrophysics have seen rapid development since they were invented in 1984. The prime instrument on all currently planned X-ray spectroscopic observatories is based on calorimeter technology. This relatively simple detection concept that senses the energy of an incident photon by measuring the temperature rise of an absorber material at very low temperatures, can form the basis of a very high performance, non-dispersive spectrometer. State-of-the-art calorimeter instruments have resolving powers of over 3000, large simultaneous band-passes, and near unit efficiency. This coupled with the intrinsic imaging capability of a pixilated x-ray calorimeter array, allows true spectral-spatial instruments to be constructed. In this chapter I briefly review the detection scheme, the state-of-the-art in X-ray calorimeter instruments and the future outlook for this technology.

  17. Spectra of cosmic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.; Mccray, R.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray measurements provide the most direct probes of astrophysical environments with temperatures exceeding one million K. Progress in experimental research utilizing dispersive techniques (e.g., Bragg and grating spectroscopy) is considerably slower than that in areas utilizing photometric techniques, because of the relative inefficiency of the former for the weak X-ray signals from celestial sources. As a result, the term "spectroscopy" as applied to X-ray astronomy has traditionally satisfied a much less restrictive definition (in terms of resolving power) than it has in other wavebands. Until quite recently, resolving powers of order unity were perfectly respectable, and still provide (in most cases) the most useful spectroscopic data. In the broadest sense, X-ray photometric measurements are spectroscopic, insofar as they represent samples of the overall electromagnetic continua of celestial objects.

  18. Characterization of toners and inkjets by laser ablation spectrochemical methods and Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trejos, Tatiana; Corzo, Ruthmara; Subedi, Kiran; Almirall, José

    2014-02-01

    Detection and sourcing of counterfeit currency, examination of counterfeit security documents and determination of authenticity of medical records are examples of common forensic document investigations. In these cases, the physical and chemical composition of the ink entries can provide important information for the assessment of the authenticity of the document or for making inferences about common source. Previous results reported by our group have demonstrated that elemental analysis, using either Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) or Laser Ablation Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), provides an effective, practical and robust technique for the discrimination of document substrates and writing inks with minimal damage to the document. In this study, laser-based methods and Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) methods were developed, optimized and validated for the forensic analysis of more complex inks such as toners and inkjets, to determine if their elemental composition can differentiate documents printed from different sources and to associate documents that originated from the same printing source. Comparison of the performance of each of these methods is presented, including the analytical figures of merit, discrimination capability and error rates. Different calibration strategies resulting in semi-quantitative and qualitative analysis, comparison methods (match criteria) and data analysis and interpretation tools were also developed. A total of 27 black laser toners originating from different manufacturing sources and/or batches were examined to evaluate the discrimination capability of each method. The results suggest that SEM-EDS offers relatively poor discrimination capability for this set (~ 70.7% discrimination of all the possible comparison pairs or a 29.3% type II error rate). Nonetheless, SEM-EDS can still be used as a complementary method of analysis since it has the advantage of being non-destructive to the sample in addition to providing imaging capabilities to further characterize toner samples by their particle morphology. Laser sampling methods resulted in an improvement of the discrimination between different sources with LIBS producing 89% discrimination and LA-ICP-MS resulting in 100% discrimination. In addition, a set of 21 black inkjet samples was examined by each method. The results show that SEM-EDS is not appropriate for inkjet examinations since their elemental composition is typically below the detection capabilities with only sulfur detected in this set, providing only 47.4% discrimination between possible comparison pairs. Laser sampling methods were shown to provide discrimination greater than 94% for this same inkjet set with false exclusion and false inclusion rates lower than 4.1% and 5.7%, for LA-ICP-MS and LIBS respectively. Overall these results confirmed the utility of the examination of printed documents by laser-based micro-spectrochemical methods. SEM-EDS analysis of toners produced a limited utility for discrimination within sources but was not an effective tool for inkjet ink discrimination. Both LA-ICP-MS and LIBS can be used in forensic laboratories to chemically characterize inks on documents and to complement the information obtained by conventional methods and enhance their evidential value.

  19. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1992-01-01

    This final report covers the period 1 January 1985 - 31 March 1992. It is divided into the following sections: the soft x-ray background; proportional counter and filter calibrations; sounding rocket flight preparations; new sounding rocket payload: x-ray calorimeter; and theoretical studies. Staff, publications, conference proceedings, invited talks, contributed talks, colloquia and seminars, public service lectures, and Ph. D. theses are listed.

  20. Principles of X-ray Navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, John Eric; /SLAC

    2006-03-17

    X-ray navigation is a new concept in satellite navigation in which orientation, position and time are measured by observing stellar emissions in x-ray wavelengths. X-ray navigation offers the opportunity for a single instrument to be used to measure these parameters autonomously. Furthermore, this concept is not limited to missions in close proximity to the earth. X-ray navigation can be used on a variety of missions from satellites in low earth orbit to spacecraft on interplanetary missions. In 1997 the Unconventional Stellar Aspect Experiment (USA) will be launched as part of the Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS). USA will provide the first platform for real-time experimentation in the field of x-ray navigation and also serves as an excellent case study for the design and manufacturing of space qualified systems in small, autonomous groups. Current techniques for determining the orientation of a satellite rely on observations of the earth, sun and stars in infrared, visible or ultraviolet wavelengths. It is possible to use x-ray imaging devices to provide arcsecond level measurement of attitude based on star patterns in the x-ray sky. This technique is explored with a simple simulation. Collimated x-ray detectors can be used on spinning satellites to provide a cheap and reliable measure of orientation. This is demonstrated using observations of the Crab Pulsar taken by the high Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO-1) in 1977. A single instrument concept is shown to be effective, but dependent on an a priori estimate of the guide star intensity and thus susceptible to errors in that estimate. A star scanner based on a differential measurement from two x-ray detectors eliminates the need for an a priori estimate of the guide star intensity. A first order model and a second order model of the two star scanner concepts are considered. Many of the stars that emit in the x-ray regime are also x-ray pulsars with frequency stability approaching a part in 10{sup 9}. By observing these pulsations, a satellite can keep accurate time autonomously. They have demonstrated the acquisition and tracking of the Crab nebula pulsar by simulating the operation of a phase-locked loop.

  1. X-ray laser driven gold targets

    SciTech Connect

    Petrova, Tz. B. Whitney, K. G.; Davis, J.

    2014-03-15

    The femtosecond population dynamics of gold irradiated by a coherent high-intensity (>10{sup 17}?W/cm{sup 2}) x-ray laser pulse is investigated theoretically. There are two aspects to the assembled model. One is the construction of a detailed model of platinum-like gold inclusive of all inner-shell states that are created by photoionization of atomic gold and decay either by radiative or Auger processes. Second is the computation of the population dynamics that ensues when an x-ray pulse is absorbed in gold. The hole state generation depends on the intensity and wavelength of the driving x-ray pulse. The excited state populations reached during a few femtosecond timescales are high enough to generate population inversions, whose gain coefficients are calculated. These amplified lines in the emitted x-ray spectrum provide important diagnostics of the radiation dynamics and also suggest a nonlinear way to increase the frequency of the coherent output x-ray pulses relative to the frequency of the driver input x-ray pulse.

  2. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, R.D.; Huang, Z.

    1998-10-20

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source is disclosed for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications. 4 figs.

  3. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  4. Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  5. X-ray modulation transfer functions of photostimulable phosphor image plates and scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Holland, Glenn E.; Hudson, Lawrence T.; Henins, Albert

    2008-11-01

    The modulation transfer functions of two types of photostimulable phosphor image plates were determined in the 10 keV to 50 keV x-ray energy range using a resolution test pattern with up to 10 line pairs per mm (LP/mm) and a wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometer. Techniques were developed for correcting for the partial transmittance of the high energy x rays through the lead bars of the resolution test pattern, and the modulation transfer function (MTF) was determined from the measured change in contrast with LP/mm values. The MTF was convolved with the slit function of the image plate scanner, and the resulting point spread functions (PSFs) were in good agreement with the observed shapes and widths of x-ray spectral lines and with the PSF derived from edge spread functions. The shapes and the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) values of the PSF curves of the Fuji Superior Resolution (SR) and Fuji Maximum Sensitivity (MS) image plate detectors, consisting of the image plate and the scanner, determined by the three methods gave consistent results: The SR PSF is Gaussian with 0.13 mm FWHM, and the MS PSF is Lorentzian with 0.19 mm FWHM. These techniques result in the accurate determination of the spatial resolution achievable using image plate and scanner combinations and enable the optimization of spatial resolution for x-ray spectroscopy and radiography.

  6. Numerical calculation of phase-matching properties in photonic crystal fibers with three and four zero-dispersion wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xingtao; Liu, Xiaoxu; Wang, Shutao; Wang, Wei; Han, Ying; Liu, Zhaolun; Li, Shuguang; Hou, Lantian

    2015-10-19

    Photonic crystal fibers with three and four zero-dispersion wavelengths are presented through special design of the structural parameters, in which the closing to zero and ultra-flattened dispersion can be obtained. The unique phase-matching properties of the fibers with three and four zero-dispersion wavelengths are analyzed. Variation of the phase-matching wavelengths with the pump wavelengths, pump powers, dispersion properties, and fiber structural parameters is analyzed. The presence of three and four zero-dispersion wavelengths can realize wavelength conversion of optical soliton between two anomalous dispersion regions, generate six phase-matching sidebands through four-wave mixing and create more new photon pairs, which can be used for the study of supercontinuum generation, optical switches and quantum optics. PMID:26480448

  7. Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF): An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, M. C.; ODell, S. L.; Elsner, R. F.; VanSpeybroeck, L. P.

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) is the x-ray component of NASA's Great Observatories. To be launched in late 1998, AXAF will provide unprecedented capabilities for high-resolution imaging, spectrometric imaging, and high-resolution disperse spectroscopy, over the x-ray band from about 0.1 keV to 10 keV. With these capabilities, AXAF observations will address many of the outstanding questions in astronomy, astrophysics, and cosmology.

  8. X-RAY GROUPS OF GALAXIES IN THE AEGIS DEEP AND WIDE FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Erfanianfar, G.; Lerchster, M.; Nandra, K.; Connelly, J. L.; Mirkazemi, M.; Finoguenov, A.; Tanaka, M.; Laird, E.; Bielby, R.; Faber, S. M.; Kocevski, D.; Jeltema, T.; Newman, J. A.; Coil, A. L.; Brimioulle, F.; Davis, M.; McCracken, H. J.; Willmer, C.; Gerke, B.; and others

    2013-03-10

    We present the results of a search for extended X-ray sources and their corresponding galaxy groups from 800 ks Chandra coverage of the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS). This yields one of the largest X-ray-selected galaxy group catalogs from a blind survey to date. The red-sequence technique and spectroscopic redshifts allow us to identify 100% of reliable sources, leading to a catalog of 52 galaxy groups. These groups span the redshift range z {approx} 0.066-1.544 and virial mass range M{sub 200} {approx} 1.34 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13}-1.33 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }. For the 49 extended sources that lie within DEEP2 and DEEP3 Galaxy Redshift Survey coverage, we identify spectroscopic counterparts and determine velocity dispersions. We select member galaxies by applying different cuts along the line of sight or in projected spatial coordinates. A constant cut along the line of sight can cause a large scatter in scaling relations in low-mass or high-mass systems depending on the size of the cut. A velocity-dispersion-based virial radius can cause a larger overestimation of velocity dispersion in comparison to an X-ray-based virial radius for low-mass systems. There is no significant difference between these two radial cuts for more massive systems. Independent of radial cut, an overestimation of velocity dispersion can be created in the case of the existence of significant substructure and compactness in X-ray emission, which mostly occur in low-mass systems. We also present a comparison between X-ray galaxy groups and optical galaxy groups detected using the Voronoi-Delaunay method for DEEP2 data in this field.

  9. Dispersion measurement of optical fiber using dual wavelength diffraction phase microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarfard, Mohammad Reza; Tayebi, Behnam; Nasab, Razie Jalai; Kim, Dug Young

    2014-11-01

    Various quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) techniques for noninvasive and quantitative analysis of samples proposed based on imaging interferometry techniques over the last decade [1-4]. A phase image can be obtained with a single set of interference data in some types of phase microscopes such as diffraction phase microscope [5, 6]. They are suitable for studying rapidly varying phenomena with reduced concern for systematic and sample variations that may occur during the acquisition of the raw data. Dispersion measurements of a sample carry more information than refractive index of measurements at a single wavelength [7]. Knowledge of the optical dispersion for phase objects such as optical fibers, biological cells and micro-particles can provide very useful information about their property. In this work, we report on a common-path and dual wavelength quantitative phase microscope that simultaneously acquires two phase images at different wavelengths. The simultaneous dual-wavelength measurement was performed with a diffraction phase microscope based on a transmission grating and a spatial filter that form a common-path imaging interferometer. With a combined laser source that generates two-color light continuously, a different diffraction order of the grating was utilized for each wavelength component so that the dual-wavelength interference pattern could be distinguished by the distinct fringe frequencies. The refractive index profiles of fiber in both wavelengths were measured adequately by our DW-DPM system.

  10. Soft X-Ray Emissions from Planets and Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, A.; Gladstone, G. R.; Elsner, R. F.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Grodent, D.; Lewis, W. S.; Crary, F. J.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Howell, R. R.; Johnson, R. E.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The soft x-ray energy band (less than 4 keV) is an important spectral regime for planetary remote sensing, as a wide variety of solar system objects are now known to shine at these wavelengths. These include Earth, Jupiter, comets, moons, Venus, and the Sun. Earth and Jupiter, as magnetic planets, are observed to emanate strong x-ray emissions from their auroral (polar) regions, thus providing vital information on the nature of precipitating particles and their energization processes in planetary magnetospheres. X rays from low latitudes have also been observed on these planets, resulting largely from atmospheric scattering and fluorescence of solar x-rays. Cometary x-rays are now a well established phenomena, more than a dozen comets have been observed at soft x-ray energies, with the accepted production mechanism being charge-exchange between heavy solar wind ions and cometary neutrals. Also, Lunar x-rays have been observed and are thought to be produced by scattering and fluorescence of solar x-rays from the Moon's surface. With the advent of sophisticated x-ray observatories, e.g., Chandra and XMM-Newton, the field of planetary x-ray astronomy is advancing at a much faster pace. The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) has recently captured soft x-rays from Venus. Venusian x-rays are most likely produced through fluorescence of solar x-rays by C and O atoms in the upper atmosphere. Very recently, using CXO we have discovered soft x-rays from the moons of Jupiter-Io, Europa, and probably Ganymede. The plausible source of the x-rays from the Galilean satellites is bombardment of their surfaces by energetic (greater than 10 KeV) ions from the inner magnetosphere of Jupiter. The Io plasma Torus (IPT) is also discovered by CXO to be a source of soft x-rays by CXO have revealed a mysterious pulsating (period approx. 45 minutes) x-ray hot spot is fixed in magnetic latitude and longitude and is magnetically connected to a region in the outer magnetosphere of Jupiter. These surprising results have called into question our understanding of Jovian auroral x-rays. In this paper, we will present a comparative view of the x-ray observations on planets, comets, and moons, with emphasis on recent results from CXO, and discuss the proposed source mechanisms.

  11. Dispersion of the long-wavelength phonons in Ge, Si, GaAs, quartz, and sapphire

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, H.-Y.; Maris, H. J.

    2001-06-01

    We have used the picosecond ultrasonic technique to measure the dispersion of long-wavelength longitudinal acoustic phonons in Ge, Si, GaAs, z-cut quartz, and sapphire. In these experiments, a subpicosecond light pulse was used to generate a strain pulse at one surface of the sample. After propagation through the sample, the shape of this strain pulse was modified because of the phonon dispersion. From this change in shape, the magnitude of the dispersion could be determined. The results are compared with various lattice dynamical models. We also report on measurements of the temperature dependence of the sound velocity and the acoustic attenuation.

  12. X-ray-induced water vaporization

    SciTech Connect

    Weon, B. M.; Lee, J. S.; Je, J. H.; Fezzaa, K.

    2011-09-15

    We present quantitative evidence for x-ray-induced water vaporization: water is vaporized at a rate of 5.5 pL/s with the 1-A-wavelength x-ray irradiation of {approx}0.1 photons per A{sup 2}; moreover, water vapor is reversibly condensed during pauses in irradiation. This result fundamentally suggests that photoionization induces vaporization. This phenomenon is attributed to surface-tension reduction by ionization and would be universally important in radiological and electrohydrodynamic situations.

  13. X-Ray Transition Energies Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 128 X-Ray Transition Energies Database (Web, free access)   This X-ray transition table provides the energies and wavelengths for the K and L transitions connecting energy levels having principal quantum numbers n = 1, 2, 3, and 4. The elements covered include Z = 10, neon to Z = 100, fermium. There are two unique features of this data base: (1) a serious attempt to have all experimental values on a scale consistent with the International System of measurement (the SI) and (2) inclusion of accurate theoretical estimates for all transitions.

  14. Highly efficient pulsed power supply system with a two-stage LC generator and a step-up transformer for fast capillary discharge soft x-ray laser at shorter wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Yusuke; Takahashi, Shnsuke; Komatsu, Takanori; Song, Inho; Watanabe, Masato; Hotta, Eiki

    2010-01-15

    Highly efficient and compact pulsed power supply system for a capillary discharge soft x-ray laser (SXRL) has been developed. The system consists of a 2.2 {mu}F two-stage LC inversion generator, a 2:54 step-up transformer, a 3 nF water capacitor, and a discharge section with a few tens of centimeter length capillary. Adoption of the pulsed transformer in combination with the LC inversion generator enables us to use only one gap switch in the circuit for charging the water capacitor up to about 0.5 MV. Furthermore, step-up ratio of a water capacitor voltage to a LC inversion generator initial charging voltage is about 40 with energy transfer efficiency of about 50%. It also leads to good reproducibility of a capillary discharge which is necessary for lasing a SXRL stably. For the study of the possibility of lasing a SXRL at shorter wavelength in a small laboratory scale, high-density and high-temperature plasma column suitable for the laser can be generated relatively easily with this system.

  15. X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for extended X-ray sources

    DOEpatents

    Bitter, Manfred L. (Princeton, NJ); Fraenkel, Ben (Jerusalem, IL); Gorman, James L. (Bordentown, NJ); Hill, Kenneth W. (Lawrenceville, NJ); Roquemore, A. Lane (Cranbury, NJ); Stodiek, Wolfgang (Princeton, NJ); von Goeler, Schweickhard E. (Princeton, NJ)

    2001-01-01

    Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokomak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters using the imaging properties for Bragg angles near 45. For a Bragg angle of 45.degree., the spherical crystal focuses a bundle of near parallel X-rays (the cross section of which is determined by the cross section of the crystal) from the plasma to a point on a detector, with parallel rays inclined to the main plain of diffraction focused to different points on the detector. Thus, it is possible to radially image the plasma X-ray emission in different wavelengths simultaneously with a single crystal.

  16. Transient and Capillary Collisional X-ray Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shlyaptsev, V N; Dunn, J; Fournier, K B; Moon, S; Osterheld, A L; Rocca, J J; Detering, F; Rozmus, W; Matte, J P; Fiedorowicz, H; Bartnik, A; Kanouff, M

    2001-12-17

    In this work we report our numerical modeling results of laser-generated transient inversion and capillary discharge X-ray lasers. In the search for more efficient X-ray lasers we look closely at other approaches in conjunction with experiments at LLNL. In the search for improved X-ray lasers we perform modeling and experimental investigations of low density targets including gas puff targets. We have found the importance of plasma kinetics in transient X-ray lasers by expanding the physical model beyond hydrodynamics approach with Particle In Cell (PIC) and Fokker-Planck codes. The evidence of the Langdon effect was inferred from the recent experimental data obtained with the Ni-like Pd X-ray laser. We continue modeling different kinds of capillary discharge plasma configurations directed toward shorter wavelength X-ray lasers, plasma diagnostics and other applications.

  17. Quasi-monochromatic field-emission x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Diop, Babacar; Binh, Vu Thien

    2012-09-15

    By favoring the L-peak emission over the bremsstrahlung part, direct quasi-monochromatic soft x-ray emission has been obtained with a field emission (FE) x-ray source. The electron impact x-ray setup uses an arrayed cathode of carbon nanopearl FE tips as a stable cold electron source within a vacuum of 10{sup -6}-10{sup -7} Torr. The high brightness of the FE e-beam coupled with the array structure of the cold cathode allows a smoother control of the x-ray emission intensity. The wavelength of the x-ray source can be modified by the choice of target materials. Using Mo as the target material, the x-ray emission shows a peak centered at 2.45 keV with a monochromaticity between 75% and 55% and a FWHM in the range of 450 eV.

  18. X-ray emission from active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, R.

    1985-01-01

    It is often held that the X-ray emission from active galactic nuclei (AGN) arises from a region close to the central energy source. Thus X-ray observations may provide the best constraints on the central engine. In particular, the shape of the X-ray continuum gives information about the mechanism for photon generation, X-ray time variability data can constrain the size and mass of the continuum source, and X-ray occultation data give constraints on the relative sizes of the continuum source and the intervening absorbing material (often assumed to be the broad line clouds). In addition, since a fair fraction of the total energy of an AGN is emitted at X-ray wavelengths, direct measurement of the amount and spectral form of this radiation is important for modeling of the optically emitting clouds.

  19. Limitations of ZAF correction factors in the determination of calcium/phosphorus ratios: Important forensic science considerations relevant to the analysis of bone fragments using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, C.M.; Cromey, D.W. )

    1990-05-01

    A series of calcium phosphate standards having calcium/phosphorus (Ca/P) molar ratios of 0.50, 1.00, 1.50, and 1.67, respectively, was prepared for bulk specimen analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDXA). The standards were mounted on carbon planchettes as either pure crystals or crystals embedded in epoxy resin. Ten different samples of each embedded and non-embedded standard were analyzed in a JEOL 100 CX electron microscope interfaced with a Kevex 8000 EDXA system using a lithium-drifted silicon detector and a multichannel analyzer. The Ca/P ratios were determined by calculating both net peak intensities without matrix corrections and atomic kappa-ratios using the MAGIC V computer program with ZAF correction factors for quantitative analysis. There was such extensive absorption of phosphorus X-rays in standards embedded in an epoxy matrix that the observed Ca/P ratios were statistically compatible with four different standards ranging in theoretical Ca/P ratios from 1.0 to 1.67. Although the non-embedded crystals showed a greater separation in the Ca/P ratios, both methods of preparation produced serious flaws in analysis. Direct application of the discovery of this caveat to the identification of suspected bone fragments for forensic science purposes is discussed.

  20. Quantitative Electron-Excited X-Ray Microanalysis of Borides, Carbides, Nitrides, Oxides, and Fluorides with Scanning Electron Microscopy/Silicon Drift Detector Energy-Dispersive Spectrometry (SEM/SDD-EDS) and NIST DTSA-II.

    PubMed

    Newbury, Dale E; Ritchie, Nicholas W M

    2015-10-01

    A scanning electron microscope with a silicon drift detector energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM/SDD-EDS) was used to analyze materials containing the low atomic number elements B, C, N, O, and F achieving a high degree of accuracy. Nearly all results fell well within an uncertainty envelope of ±5% relative (where relative uncertainty (%)=[(measured-ideal)/ideal]×100%). Quantification was performed with the standards-based "k-ratio" method with matrix corrections calculated based on the Pouchou and Pichoir expression for the ionization depth distribution function, as implemented in the NIST DTSA-II EDS software platform. The analytical strategy that was followed involved collection of high count (>2.5 million counts from 100 eV to the incident beam energy) spectra measured with a conservative input count rate that restricted the deadtime to ~10% to minimize coincidence effects. Standards employed included pure elements and simple compounds. A 10 keV beam was employed to excite the K- and L-shell X-rays of intermediate and high atomic number elements with excitation energies above 3 keV, e.g., the Fe K-family, while a 5 keV beam was used for analyses of elements with excitation energies below 3 keV, e.g., the Mo L-family. PMID:26365439

  1. Low Energy X-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, Wayne R.

    1981-10-01

    A subkilovolt spectrometer has been produced to permit high-energy-resolution, time-dependent x-ray intensity measurements. The diffracting element is a curved mica (d=9.95Å) crystal. To preclude higher order (n?1) diffractions, a carbon x-ray mirror that reflects only photons with energies less than ˜1.1 keV is utilized ahead of the diffracting element. The nominal energy range of interest is 800 to 900 eV. The diffracted photons are detected by a gold-surfaced photoelectric diode designed to have a very good frequency response, and whose current is recorded on an oscilloscope. A thin, aluminum light barrier is placed between the diffracting crystal and the photoelectric diode detector to keep any UV generated on or scattered by the crystal from illuminating the detector. High spectral enegy resolution is provided by many photocathodes between 8- and 50-eV wide placed serially along the diffracted x-ray beam at the detector position. The spectrometer was calibrated for energy and energy dispersion using the Ni L?1,2 lines produced in the LLNL IONAC accelerator and in third order using a molybdenum target x-ray tube. For the latter calibration the carbon mirror was replaced by one surfaced with rhodium to raise the cut-off energy to about 3 keV. The carbon mirror reflection dependence on energy was measured using one of our Henke x-ray sources. The curved mica crystal diffraction efficiency was measured on our Low-Energy X-ray (LEX) machine. The spectrometer performs well although some changes in the way the x-ray mirror is held are desirable.

  2. Towards attosecond X-ray pulses from the FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Zholents, Alexander A.; Fawley, William M.

    2004-07-01

    The ability to study ultrafast phenomena has been recently advanced by the demonstrated production and measurement of a single, 650-attosecond (10{sup 18} sec), VUV x-ray pulse[1] and, latter, a 250-attosecond pulse[2]. The next frontier is a production of the x-ray pulses with shorter wavelengths and in a broader spectral range. Several techniques for a generation of an isolated, attosecond duration, short-wavelength x-ray pulse based upon the ponderomotive laser acceleration [3], SASE and harmonic cascade FELs ([4] - [6]) had been already proposed. In this paper we briefly review a technique proposed in [5] and present some new results.

  3. Advanced light element and low energy X-ray line analysis using Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (EDS) with Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salge, T.; Palasse, L.; Berlin, J.; Hansen, B.; Terborg, R.; Falke, M.

    2013-12-01

    Introduction: Characterization at the micro- to nano-scale is crucial for understanding many processes in earth, planetary, material and biological sciences. The composition of thin electron transparent samples can be analyzed in the nm-range using transmission electron microscopes (TEM) or, specific sample holders provided, in the field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). Nevertheless both methods often require complex sample preparation. An alternative method is to analyze bulk samples with a FE-SEM. In order to decrease the excitation volume for generated X-rays, low accelerating voltages (HV<10) are required. Consequently, only low to intermediate energy X-ray lines can be evaluated and many peak overlaps have to be deconvoluted since the high energy range is not available. Methods: A BRUKER Quantax EDS system with an XFlash Silicon Drift Detector acquired EDS spectra in spectrum images. To separate overlapping peaks, an extended atomic database [1] was used. For single channel EDS the electron beam current, solid angle, take-off angle and exposure time can be optimized to investigate the element composition. Multiple SDD setups ensure an even higher efficiency and larger collection angles for the X-ray analysis than single channel detectors. Shadowing effects are minimized in element distribution maps so that samples can be investigated quickly and sometimes in a close to natural state, with little preparation. A new type of EDS detector, the annular four channel SDD (XFlash 5060F), is placed between the pole piece and sample. It covers a very large solid angle (1.1 sr) and allows sufficient data collection at low beam currents on beam sensitive samples with substantial surface topography. Examples of applications: Results demonstrate that SDD-based EDS analysis contributes essential information on the structure at the micro- to nano scale of the investigated sample types. These include stardust analogue impact experiments [2], Chicxulub asteroid impactites [3,4], ore characterization of the Sudbury igneous complex [5], biomineralization in bacteria and insects [6], and characterization of ceramics [7] and ceramic metal joints [8]. We conclude that improvements in SDD and pulse processor technology including multi-detector and multi-segment options provide new insights because a vast amount of detailed information can be collected in a short period of time. Using the XFlash QUAD 5060F, samples can be analyzed rapidly at low beam current without carbon coating. [1] A. Assmann, A. and M. Wendt 2003. Spectrochim. Acta Part B, 58: 711-716. [2] A.T. Kearsley et al. 2013. 44th LPSC, 18-22.03.2013, The Woodlands, USA: #1910. [3] P. Schulte et al. 2010. Science 327: 1214-1218. [4] M. Nelson et al. 2012. GCA 86: 1-20. [5] Salge et al. 2013. LPI Contrib .No. 1737: 89. [6] M. Falke et al. 2013. EURO BioMat. 23-24.04.2013, Weimar, Germany. [7] H. Yurdakul et al. 2013.accepted for MC 2013, 25-30.08.2013, Regensburg, Germany [8] O. Tunckan 2010. PhD thesis. Anadolu University, Eskisehir, Turkey.

  4. X-Ray Exam: Hip

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the pelvis). During the examination, an X-ray machine sends a beam of radiation through the pelvic ... contain a table and a large X-ray machine hanging from the ceiling. Parents usually can accompany ...

  5. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    MedlinePLUS

    ... person's wrist. During the examination, an X-ray machine sends a beam of radiation through the wrist, ... have a table and a large X-ray machine hanging from the ceiling. Parents are usually able ...

  6. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    MedlinePLUS

    ... person's foot. During the examination, an X-ray machine sends a beam of radiation through the foot, ... contain a table and a large X-ray machine hanging from the ceiling. Parents are usually able ...

  7. Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

    2013-01-25

    The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

  8. The identification of the pigments used to paint statues of Feixiange Cliff in China in late 19th century by micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Pu-jun; Huang, Wei; Jianhua-Wang; Zhao, Gang; Wang, Xiao-ling

    2010-11-01

    The application of micro-Raman spectroscopy (?-RS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) to the research of pigments collected from Statues of Feixiange Cliff No. 67 and No. 69 niche of Tang Dynasty in China is reported. Five kinds of pigments were found in the experimental data, including black (carbon), white (gypsum + quartz), blue (lapis lazuli) and green (Paris green + Barium sulphate). After synthesized in 1814, Paris green was reported for a large import as a light and bright green pigment to paint architectures in China from the late 19th century. The analyzed blue pigment demonstrated the similar Raman spectra to the Lâjvardina blue glazed ceramics, which indicated lapis lazuli was an artificial product. This confirmed the painting of Feixiange Cliff in the early Republic of China as the historical record, and also reveals that some pigments were imported from abroad.

  9. In-situ synchrotron energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction study of thin Pd foils with Pd:D and Pd:H concentrations up to 1:1

    SciTech Connect

    Knies, D. L.; Grabowski, K. S.; Dominguez, D. D.; Qadri, S. B.; Hubler, G. K.; Violante, V.; Hu, J. Z.; He, J. H.

    2012-10-15

    Time resolved, in-situ, energy dispersive x-ray diffraction was performed in an electrolysis cell during electrochemical loading of palladium foil cathodes with hydrogen and deuterium. Concentrations of H:Pd (D:Pd) up to 1:1 in 0.1 M LiOH (LiOD) in H{sub 2}O (D{sub 2}O) electrolyte were obtained, as determined by both the Pd lattice parameter and cathode resistivity. In addition, some indications on the kinetics of loading and deloading of hydrogen from the Pd surface were obtained. The alpha-beta phase transformations were clearly delineated but no new phases at high concentration were determined.

  10. Holography at x-ray wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Solem, T.C.; Baldwin, G.C.; Chapline, G.F.

    1981-01-01

    We discuss alternative holographic techniques for imaging microscopic structures with a short-pulse, high intensity, high-quantum-energy laser. We find that Fresnel transform holography using a photoresist for registration of the hologram is most likely to be within the scope of near term technology. Although it has advantages in time gating, using an in-line electron microscope for hologram registration has an unacceptable tradeoff between quantum efficiency and resolution. Fourier transform holography using a reflector to generate the reference beam might be a reasonable alternative using low resolution film, but is necessarily more complicated. We discuss the dependence of the required laser intensity on the resolution sought and on the elastic and absorption cross sections. We conclude that resonant scattering must be used to obtain holograms at reasonable intensities.

  11. Influence of wavelength-dependent-loss on dispersive wave in nonlinear optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Rodrigo Acuna

    2012-11-01

    In this work, we study numerically the influence of wavelength-dependent loss on the generation of dispersive waves (DWs) in nonlinear fiber. This kind of loss can be obtained, for instance, by the acousto-optic effect in fiber optics. We show that this loss lowers DW frequency in an opposite way that the Raman effect does. Also, we see that the Raman effect does not change the DW frequency too much when wavelength-dependent loss is included. Finally, we show that the DW frequency is not practically affected by fiber length. PMID:23128688

  12. Tunable X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Boyce, James R. (Williamsburg, VA)

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  13. X-Ray Exam: Finger

    MedlinePLUS

    ... interpreting X-ray images, will look at your child's X-rays and send a report to your doctor, who ... Helping Your Child You can help your young child prepare for a finger X-ray by explaining the test in simple terms before ...

  14. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    MedlinePLUS

    ... interpreting X-ray images, will look at your child's X-rays and send a report to your doctor, who ... technician. Helping Your Child You can help your child prepare for an ankle X-ray by explaining the test in simple terms before ...

  15. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Edward Snell, a National Research Council research fellow at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), prepares a protein crystal for analysis by x-ray crystallography as part of NASA's structural biology program. The small, individual crystals are bombarded with x-rays to produce diffraction patterns, a map of the intensity of the x-rays as they reflect through the crystal.

  16. Development of the water window imaging X-ray microscope utilizing normal-incidence multilayer optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Shealy, David L.; Brinkley, B. R.; Baker, Phillip C.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A water-window imaging X-ray telescope configured with normal-incidence multilayer X-ray mirrors has been developed to obtain images with unprecedented spatial resolution and contrast of carbon-based microstructures within living cells. The narrow bandpass response inherent in multilayer X-ray optics is accurately tuned to wavelengths within the water window.

  17. Distributed Measurement of the Chromatic Dispersion of an Optical Fiber Using a Wavelength-Tunable OTDR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdoch, Stuart G.; Svendsen, David A.

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, a distributed measurement of the chromatic dispersion (CD) of an optical fiber is presented. The measurement is based on the analysis of a set of bidirectional optical time domain reflectometer traces collected over the wavelength range of interest. To calculate the distributed CD of the fiber, several approximations are required. The validity of these approximations is verified via a numerical simulation for both step-index and dispersion-shifted fibers (DSFs). These simulations allow the placement of an upper bound on the error of the measurement. Experimentally, measurements of both step-index and DSFs are reported.

  18. SOLITONS: Bright and dark pulses in optical fibres in the vicinity of the zero-dispersion wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotkov, I. A.; Bisyarin, M. A.

    2004-02-01

    The influence of the third-order dispersion on the propagation of short pulses in optical fibres is considered. The appearance of coupled nonlinear structures consisting of dark and bright envelope solitons is described. The wavelength range is found in the vicinity of the zero-dispersion wavelength where the effect of the third-order dispersion on the pulse propagation proves to be dominant. It is shown that in this case a nonlinear structure in the form of an embedded soliton appears.

  19. X-ray calibration of the GOES-N/O solar X-ray imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catura, Paul R.; Gantner, Brennan L.; Jurcevich, Bruce K.; Kam, Claude K.; Lemen, James R.; Morrison, Mons D.; Shing, Lawrence; Catura, Richard C.

    2004-02-01

    The X-ray calibration of the GOES Solar X-ray Imagers (SXI) was accomplished at the component level and at the instrument level. The CCD and thin film filters were characterized in the facilities at the Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory. The grazing incidence telescope mirrors and the completed instruments were calibrated at the X-ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) at NASA"s Marshall Space Flight Center. The XRCF consists of an X-ray source at one end of a 518 m long evacuated tube and a large vacuum chamber at the opposite end. The X-ray source has a variety of interchangeable anodes and filters to provide filtered characteristic K- and L-shell line emission in the range from 0.109 to 8.6 keV. The absolute Photometric calibration of the SXI telescopes is very important for analysis and interpretation of their data, and to monitor the long-term solar variations at X-ray wavelengths. This paper describes the results of these calibrations.

  20. New developments of X-ray fluorescence imaging techniques in laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Kouichi; Matsuno, Tsuyoshi; Takimoto, Yuki; Yamanashi, Masaki; Kometani, Noritsugu; Sasaki, Yuji C.; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Kato, Shuichi; Yamada, Takashi; Shoji, Takashi; Kawahara, Naoki

    2015-11-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is a well-established analytical technique with a long research history. Many applications have been reported in various fields, such as in the environmental, archeological, biological, and forensic sciences as well as in industry. This is because XRF has a unique advantage of being a nondestructive analytical tool with good precision for quantitative analysis. Recent advances in XRF analysis have been realized by the development of new x-ray optics and x-ray detectors. Advanced x-ray focusing optics enables the making of a micro x-ray beam, leading to micro-XRF analysis and XRF imaging. A confocal micro-XRF technique has been applied for the visualization of elemental distributions inside the samples. This technique was applied for liquid samples and for monitoring chemical reactions such as the metal corrosion of steel samples in the NaCl solutions. In addition, a principal component analysis was applied for reducing the background intensity in XRF spectra obtained during XRF mapping, leading to improved spatial resolution of confocal micro-XRF images. In parallel, the authors have proposed a wavelength dispersive XRF (WD-XRF) imaging spectrometer for a fast elemental imaging. A new two dimensional x-ray detector, the Pilatus detector was applied for WD-XRF imaging. Fast XRF imaging in 1 s or even less was demonstrated for Euro coins and industrial samples. In this review paper, these recent advances in laboratory-based XRF imaging, especially in a laboratory setting, will be introduced.

  1. X-ray and extreme ultraviolet imaging using layered synthetic microstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, J. H.; Barbee, T. W.; Shealy, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Up to now designers of X-ray optical instruments such as microscopes and telescopes have been compelled to use mirrors operating at small glancing angles. However, using vapor deposition techniques, it is now possible to build multilayered thin film structures in which the individual layers have thicknesses comparable with a wavelength of X-rays. These devices operate in a manner exactly analogous to multilayer dielectric coatings at visible wavelengths and can be used to increase the X-ray and extreme ultraviolet reflectivity of surfaces at large glancing angles. These X-ray mirrors have numerous potential applications in X-ray optics. Attention is given to X-ray images with a normal incidence mirror, and applications of multilayer optics. Single-mirror telescopes for solar/stellar astronomy are discussed, taking into account solar corona and transition region studies, and X-ray and extreme ultraviolet astronomy. Hybrid X-ray telescopes are also considered.

  2. Development of variable-magnification X-ray Bragg optics.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Keiichi; Yamashita, Yoshiki; Takahashi, Yumiko; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2015-07-01

    A novel X-ray Bragg optics is proposed for variable-magnification of an X-ray beam. This X-ray Bragg optics is composed of two magnifiers in a crossed arrangement, and the magnification factor, M, is controlled through the azimuth angle of each magnifier. The basic properties of the X-ray optics such as the magnification factor, image transformation matrix and intrinsic acceptance angle are described based on the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction. The feasibility of the variable-magnification X-ray Bragg optics was verified at the vertical-wiggler beamline BL-14B of the Photon Factory. For X-ray Bragg magnifiers, Si(220) crystals with an asymmetric angle of 14° were used. The magnification factor was calculated to be tunable between 0.1 and 10.0 at a wavelength of 0.112?nm. At various magnification factors (M ? 1.0), X-ray images of a nylon mesh were observed with an air-cooled X-ray CCD camera. Image deformation caused by the optics could be corrected by using a 2 × 2 transformation matrix and bilinear interpolation method. Not only absorption-contrast but also edge-contrast due to Fresnel diffraction was observed in the magnified images. PMID:26134799

  3. Chemical analysis of uranium-niobium alloys by wavelength dispersive spectroscopy at the sigma complex

    SciTech Connect

    Papin, Pallas A.

    2012-06-01

    Uranium-niobium alloys play an important role in the nation's nuclear stockpile. It is possible to chemically quantify this alloy at a micron scale by using a technique know as wavelength dispersive spectroscopy. This report documents how this technique was used and how it is possible to reproduce measurements of this type. Discussion regarding the accuracy and precision of the measurements, the development of standards, and the comparison of different ways to model the matrices are all presented.

  4. Jovian X-ray emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, J. H.; Lewis, W. S.; Gladstone, G. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Brandt, W. N.

    1996-01-01

    The Einstein and Rosat observations of X-ray emissions from Jupiter are summarized. Jupiter's soft X-ray emission is observed to originate from the planet's auroral zones, and specifically, from its equatorial region. The processes responsible for these emissions are not established. The brightness distribution of the Jovian X-rays is characterized by the dependence on central meridian longitude and by north-south and morning-afternoon asymmetries. The X-rays observed during the impact of the comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 are believed to be impact-induced brightenings of the X-ray aurora.

  5. X-ray beam finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, H. W.

    1983-06-01

    An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube was described. The beam finder includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially aligned, parallel opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

  6. Submicrojoule femtosecond erbium-doped fibre laser for the generation of dispersive waves at submicron wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Kotov, L V; Koptev, M Yu; Anashkina, E A; Muravyev, S V; Andrianov, A V; Kim, A V; Bubnov, M M; Likhachev, M E; Ignat'ev, A D; Lipatov, D S; Gur'yanov, A N

    2014-05-30

    We have demonstrated a femtosecond erbium-doped fibre laser system built in the master oscillator/power amplifier (MOPA) approach. The final amplifier stage utilises a specially designed large mode area active fibre cladding-pumped by multimode laser diodes. The system is capable of generating submicrojoule pulses at a wavelength near 1.6 ?m. We have obtained 530-fs pulses with an energy of 400 nJ. The output of the system can be converted to wavelengths shorter than 1 ?m through the generation of dispersive waves in passive nonlinear fibre. We have obtained ultra-short 7-nJ pulses with a spectral width of ?100 nm and a centre wavelength of 0.9 ?m, which can be used as a seed signal in parametric amplifiers in designing petawatt laser systems. (lasers)

  7. Soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, D.L.; Rosen, M.D.

    1988-12-01

    One of the elusive dreams of laser physicists has been the development of an x-ray laser. After 25 years of waiting, the x-ray laser has at last entered the scientific scene, although those now in operation are still laboratory prototypes. They produce soft x rays down to about five nanometers. X-ray lasers retain the usual characteristics of their optical counterparts: a very tight beam, spatial and temporal coherence, and extreme brightness. Present x-ray lasers are nearly 100 times brighter that the next most powerful x-ray source in the world: the electron synchrotron. Although Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is widely known for its hard-x-ray laser program which has potential applications in the Strategic Defense Initiative, the soft x-ray lasers have no direct military applications. These lasers, and the scientific tools that result from their development, may one day have a place in the design and diagnosis of both laser fusion and hard x-ray lasers. The soft x-ray lasers now in operation at the LLNL have shown great promise but are still in the primitive state. Once x-ray lasers become reliable, efficient, and economical, they will have several important applications. Chief among them might be the creation of holograms of microscopic biological structures too small to be investigated with visible light. 5 figs.

  8. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  9. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A. (Woodside, CA); Boyers, David G. (Mountain View, CA); Pincus, Cary (Sunnyvale, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  10. Dual-state dissipative solitons from an all-normal-dispersion erbium-doped fiber laser: continuous wavelength tuning and multi-wavelength emission.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhichao; Fu, Songnian; Chen, Changxiu; Tang, Ming; Shum, Perry; Liu, Deming

    2015-06-15

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate switchable operation of dissipative solitons (DSs) in an erbium-doped fiber laser. By managing normal dispersion of laser cavity, the 3-dB spectral bandwidth up to 8.1 nm can be obtained with the help of a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror. Using an inline polarizer, the fiber laser can be separately operated at either wavelength-tunable or multi-wavelength emission. The central wavelength of DS can be continuously tuned from 1554 to 1561 nm with its spectra maintaining standard rectangular shape. Alternatively, triple-wavelength DSs at 1535, 1544, and 1553 nm can be simultaneously obtained. PMID:26076236

  11. X-ray imaging physics for nuclear medicine technologists. Part 1: Basic principles of x-ray production.

    PubMed

    Seibert, J Anthony

    2004-09-01

    The purpose is to review in a 4-part series: (i) the basic principles of x-ray production, (ii) x-ray interactions and data capture/conversion, (iii) acquisition/creation of the CT image, and (iv) operational details of a modern multislice CT scanner integrated with a PET scanner. Advances in PET technology have lead to widespread applications in diagnostic imaging and oncologic staging of disease. Combined PET/CT scanners provide the high-resolution anatomic imaging capability of CT with the metabolic and physiologic information by PET, to offer a significant increase in information content useful for the diagnostician and radiation oncologist, neurosurgeon, or other physician needing both anatomic detail and knowledge of disease extent. Nuclear medicine technologists at the forefront of PET should therefore have a good understanding of x-ray imaging physics and basic CT scanner operation, as covered by this 4-part series. After reading the first article on x-ray production, the nuclear medicine technologist will be familiar with (a) the physical characteristics of x-rays relative to other electromagnetic radiations, including gamma-rays in terms of energy, wavelength, and frequency; (b) methods of x-ray production and the characteristics of the output x-ray spectrum; (c) components necessary to produce x-rays, including the x-ray tube/x-ray generator and the parameters that control x-ray quality (energy) and quantity; (d) x-ray production limitations caused by heating and the impact on image acquisition and clinical throughput; and (e) a glossary of terms to assist in the understanding of this information. PMID:15347692

  12. Beyond Chandra: the x-ray Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Gaskin, Jessica; Tananbaum, Harvey; Vikhlinin, Alexey

    2015-05-01

    Over the past 16 years, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has provided an unparalleled means for exploring the high energy universe with its half-arcsecond angular resolution. Chandra studies have deepened our understanding of galaxy clusters, active galactic nuclei, galaxies, supernova remnants, planets, and solar system objects addressing most, if not all, areas of current interest in astronomy and astrophysics. As we look beyond Chandra, it is clear that comparable or even better angular resolution with greatly increased photon throughput is essential to address even more demanding science questions, such as the formation and subsequent growth of black hole seeds at very high redshift; the emergence of the first galaxy groups; and details of feedback over a large range of scales from galaxies to galaxy clusters. Recently, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, together with the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, has initiated a concept study for such a mission now named the X-ray Surveyor. This concept study starts with a baseline payload consisting of a high resolution X-ray telescope and an instrument set which may include an X-ray calorimeter, a wide-field imager and a dispersive grating spectrometer and readout. The telescope would consist of highly nested thin shells, for which a number of technical approaches are currently under development, including adjustable X-ray optics, differential deposition, and modern polishing techniques applied to a variety of substrates. In many areas, the mission requirements would be no more stringent than those of Chandra, and the study takes advantage of similar studies for other large area missions carried out over the past two decades. Initial assessments indicate that such an X-ray mission is scientifically compelling, technically feasible, and worthy of a high prioritization by the next American National Academy of Sciences Decadal Survey for Astronomy and Astrophysics.

  13. Beyond Chandra - the X-ray Surveyor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Gaskin, Jessica A.; Tananbaum, Harvey; Vhiklinin, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 16 years, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has provided an unparalleled means for exploring the high energy universe with its half-arcsecond angular resolution. Chandra studies have deepened our understanding of galaxy clusters, active galactic nuclei, galaxies, supernova remnants, planets, and solar system objects addressing most, if not all, areas of current interest in astronomy and astrophysics. As we look beyond Chandra, it is clear that comparable or even better angular resolution with greatly increased photon throughput is essential to address even more demanding science questions, such as the formation and subsequent growth of black hole seeds at very high redshift; the emergence of the first galaxy groups; and details of feedback over a large range of scales from galaxies to galaxy clusters. Recently, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, together with the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, has initiated a concept study for such a mission now named the X-ray Surveyor. This concept study starts with a baseline payload consisting of a high resolution X-ray telescope and an instrument set which may include an X-ray calorimeter, a wide-field imager and a dispersive grating spectrometer and readout. The telescope would consist of highly nested thin shells, for which a number of technical approaches are currently under development, including adjustable X-ray optics, differential deposition, and modern polishing techniques applied to a variety of substrates. In many areas, the mission requirements would be no more stringent than those of Chandra, and the study takes advantage of similar studies for other large area missions carried out over the past two decades. Initial assessments indicate that such an X-ray mission is scientifically compelling, technically feasible, and worthy of a high prioritization by the next American National Academy of Sciences Decadal Survey for Astronomy and Astrophysics.

  14. X-ray satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the second quarter 1985 development of the X-ray satellite project is presented. It is shown that the project is proceeding according to plan and that the projected launch date of September 9, 1987 is on schedule. An overview of the work completed and underway on the systems, subsystems, payload, assembly, ground equipment and interfaces is presented. Problem areas shown include cost increases in the area of focal instrumentation, the star sensor light scattering requirements, and postponements in the data transmission subsystems.

  15. X-Ray Absorption and Scattering by Interstellar Grains

    E-print Network

    Hoffman, John A

    2015-01-01

    Interstellar abundance determinations from fits to X-ray absorption edges often rely on the following false assumptions: (1) the grains are "optically thin" at the observed X-ray wavelengths, and (2) scattering is insignificant and can be ignored. We show instead that scattering contributes significantly to the attenuation of X-rays for realistic dust grain size distributions and substantially modifies the spectrum near absorption edges of elements present in grains. The dust attenuation modules used in major X-ray spectral fitting programs do not take this into account. We show that the consequences of neglecting scattering on the determination of interstellar elemental abundances are modest; however, scattering (along with uncertainties in the grain size distribution) must be taken into account when near-edge extinction fine structure is used to infer dust mineralogy. We advertise the benefits and accuracy of anomalous diffraction theory for both X-ray halo analysis and near edge absorption studies. An open...

  16. X-ray selected high redshift clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gioia, Isabella M.; Maccacaro, T.; Schild, R. E.; Morris, S. L.; Stocke, J. T.

    1987-01-01

    Studies of the evolution of X-ray emission from clusters of galaxies have so far used distant clusters discovered optically and then observed at X-ray wavelengths (Henry et al., 1982; Henry and Lavery, 1984). A different approach to the study of cluster evolution is to use clusters selected directly by their X-ray emission, since X-ray selection is extremely successful at discovering high-redshift clusters (up to z = 0.5). The Extension of the Medium Sensitivity Survey, a study of serendipitous X-ray sources discovered with the Einstein Imaging Proportional Counter, has so far provided a sample of more than 60 clusters with relatively high redshifts. Upon completion of the identification programs the sample will include over 100 clusters. Here the data currently available are presented, and the basic properties of this new sample of clusters of galaxies are discussed. A preliminary number-counts distribution is also derived.

  17. X-ray laser microscopy of rat sperm nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L.B. ); Trebes, J.E.; Balhorn, R.; Mrowka, S.; Barbee, T.W.Jr.; Brase, J.; Corzett, M.; Koch, J.A.; Lee, C.; London, R.A.; MacGowan, B.J.; Matthews, D.L.; Stone, G. ); Anderson, E.; Attwood, D.T. ); Gray, J. ); Kern, D. )

    1992-10-09

    The development of high brightness and short pulse width x-ray lasers now offers biologists the possibility of high-resolution imaging of specimens in an aqueous environment without the blurring effects associated with natural motions and chemical erosion. As a step toward developing the capabilities of this type of x-ray microscopy, a tantalum x-ray laser at 44.83 angstrom wavelength was used together with an x-ray zone plate lens to image both unlabeled and selectively gold-labeled dried rat sperm nuclei. The observed images show {approximately}500 angstrom features, illustrate the importance of x-ray microscopy in determining chemical composition, and provide information about the uniformity of sperm chromatin organization and the extent of sperm chromatin hydration.

  18. Iron redistribution in a zirconium alloy after neutron and proton irradiation studied by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) using an aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, E. M.; Harte, A.; Frankel, P.; Haigh, S. J.; Jädernäs, D.; Romero, J.; Hallstadius, L.; Preuss, M.

    2014-11-01

    Zirconium alloys used as cladding materials in nuclear reactors can exhibit accelerated irradiation induced growth, often termed linear growth, after sustained neutron irradiation. This phenomenon has been linked to the formation of -component dislocation loops and to the concentration of interstitial solute atoms. It is well documented for the Zircaloys that Fe dissolves from second phase particles (SPPs) during irradiation thus increasing the interstitial solute concentration in the matrix. However, no progress has yet been made into understanding whether a similar process occurs for the newer ZIRLO™ alloys. We aim to overcome this shortcoming here by studying compositional changes in second phase particles in Low Tin ZIRLO™ after neutron and proton irradiation using energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Material irradiated to 18 dpa (displacements per atom) using neutrons and to 2.3 and 7 dpa by protons was investigated. The results show that Fe is lost from Zr-Nb-Fe-SPPs during both neutron and proton irradiation. Prior to irradiation, Fe was detected at the interface of ?-Nb-SPPs. This Fe enrichment is also dispersed during irradiation. Qualitatively, excellent agreement was found regarding the elemental redistribution processes observed after proton and neutron irradiation.

  19. X-ray microscopy of human malaria

    SciTech Connect

    Magowan, C.; Brown, J.T.; Mohandas, N.; Meyer-Ilse, W.

    1997-04-01

    Associations between intracellular organisms and host cells are complex and particularly difficult to examine. X-ray microscopy provides transmission images of subcellular structures in intact cells at resolutions superior to available methodologies. The spatial resolution is 50-60nm with a 1 micron depth of focus, superior to anything achievable with light microscopy. Image contrast is generated by differences in photoelectric absorption by the atoms in different areas (i.e. subcellular structures) throughout the full thickness of the sample. Absorption due to carbon dominates among all the elements in the sample at 2.4 nm x-ray wavelength. Thus images show features or structures, in a way not usually seen by other types of microscopy. The authors used soft x-ray microscopy to investigate structural development of Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites in normal and genetically abnormal erythrocytes, and in infected erythrocytes treated with compounds that have anti-malarial effects. X-ray microscopy showed newly elaborated structures in the cytosol of unstained, intact erythrocytes, redistribution of mass (carbon) in infected erythrocytes, and aberrant parasite morphology. Better understanding of the process of intracellular parasite maturation and the interactions between the parasite and its host erythrocyte can help define new approaches to the control of this deadly disease.

  20. X-Ray and Radio Studies of Black Hole X-Ray Transients During Outburst Decay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsick, John A.

    2005-01-01

    Black hole (BH) and black hole candidate (BHC) transients are X-ray binary systems that typically undergo bright outbursts that last a couple months with recurrence times of years to decades. For this ADP project, we are studying BH/BHC systems during the decaying phases of their outbursts using the Rossi X-ray Taming Explorer (RXTE), the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and multi-wavelength facilities. These systems usually undergo state transitions as they decay, and our observations are designed to catch the state transitions. The specific goals of this proposal include: 1. To determine the evolution of the characteristic frequencies present in the power spectrum (such as quasi-periodic oscillations, QPOs) during state transitions in order to place constraints on the accretion geometry; 2. To contemporaneously measure X-ray spectral and timing properties along with flux measurements in the radio band to determine the relationship between the accretion disk and radio jets; 3. To extend our studies of X-ray properties of BHCs to very low accretion rates using RXTE and Chandra. The work performed under this proposal has been highly successful, allowing the PI to lead, direct, or assist in the preparation of 7 related publications in refereed journals and 6 other conference presentations or reports. These items are listed below, and the abstracts for the refereed publications have also been included. Especially notable results include our detailed measurements of the characteristic frequencies and spectral parameters of BH/BHCs after the transition to the hard state (see All A3, and A5) and at low flux levels (see A4). Our measurements provide one of the strongest lines of evidence to date that the inner edge of the optically thick accretion disk gradually recedes from the black hole at low flux levels. In addition, we have succeeded in obtaining excellent multi-wavelength coverage of a BH system as its compact jet turned on (see Al). Our results show, somewhat unexpectedly, that the radio jet does not turn on until the hard X-ray emission is well past its peak hard state level, strongly constraining theoretical models for hard X-ray production and the spectrum emitted by the jet. Finally, the X-ray/radio results in A2 led us to propose a general picture about the relationship between jet production and X-ray spectral states .

  1. Combined energy detector-wavelength dispersive spectrometer electron probe microanalysis of biological soft tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Ingram, F D; Ingram, M J

    1983-01-01

    A Si(Li)energy detector has been coupled with a fully automated, four wavelength dispersive spectrometer electron probe microanalyzer for analysis of freeze-dried, plastic-embedded biological tissue samples. Through the use of a suitable absorber, the unwanted portion of the energy spectrum is suppressed, thus reducing overall counting rate in the energy detector to the point where it is possible to use electron beam currents with high intensities, typical of wavelength dispersive spectrometer operation, while using the configuration of highest energy detector solid angle available in our electron probe microanalyzer. The electron probe automation software has been extended to permit control of the energy detector simultaneously with control of the electron microprobe. A software stopwatch permits accurate compensation for differences between energy detector and wavelength spectrometer dead times. A region of continuum in the energy spectrum is calibrated against background for the spectrometers to provide a different number representing background for each spectrometer. This background information is provided simultaneously with on-peak data collection by treating each region of interest from the Si(Li) energy detector spectrum as an additional data line in the electron probe microanalyzer computer automation package. PMID:6635579

  2. Wavelength dependent measurements of optical fiber transit time, material dispersion, and attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    COCHRANE,KYLE ROBERT; BAILEY,JAMES E.; LAKE,PATRICK WAYNE; CARLSON,ALAN L.

    2000-04-18

    A new method for measuring the wavelength dependence of the transit time, material dispersion, and attenuation of an optical fiber is described. The authors inject light from a 4-ns risetime pulsed broad-band flashlamp into various length fibers and record the transmitted signals with a time-resolved spectrograph. Segments of data spanning an approximately 3,000 {angstrom} range are recorded from a single flashlamp pulse. Comparison of data acquired with short and long fibers enables the determination of the transit time and the material dispersion as functions of wavelength dependence for the entire recorded spectrum simultaneously. The wavelength dependent attenuation is also determined from the signal intensities. The method is demonstrated with experiments using a step index 200-{micro}m-diameter SiO{sub 2} fiber. The results agree with the transit time determined from the bulk glass refractive index to within {+-} 0.035% for the visible (4,000--7,200 {angstrom}) spectrum and 0.12% for the ultraviolet (2,650--4,000 {angstrom}) spectrum, and with the attenuation specified by the fiber manufacturer to within {+-} 10%.

  3. Quantitative cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography/X-ray computed tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping; Chen, Xueli; Chao, Tiantian; Cao, Xu; Zhao, Fengjun; Huang, Liyu; Liang, Jimin

    2014-11-01

    X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) is an imaging technology based on X-ray-excitable materials. The main purpose of this paper is to obtain quantitative luminescence concentration using the structural information of the X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in the hybrid cone beam XLT/XCT system. A multi-wavelength luminescence cone beam XLT method with the structural a priori information is presented to relieve the severe ill-posedness problem in the cone beam XLT. The nanophosphors and phantom experiments were undertaken to access the linear relationship of the system response. Then, an in vivo mouse experiment was conducted. The in vivo experimental results show that the recovered concentration error as low as 6.67% with the location error of 0.85 mm can be achieved. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately recover the nanophosphor inclusion and realize the quantitative imaging.

  4. Quantitative cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography/X-ray computed tomography imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping Chen, Xueli; Chao, Tiantian; Cao, Xu; Zhao, Fengjun; Huang, Liyu; Liang, Jimin

    2014-11-10

    X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) is an imaging technology based on X-ray-excitable materials. The main purpose of this paper is to obtain quantitative luminescence concentration using the structural information of the X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in the hybrid cone beam XLT/XCT system. A multi-wavelength luminescence cone beam XLT method with the structural a priori information is presented to relieve the severe ill-posedness problem in the cone beam XLT. The nanophosphors and phantom experiments were undertaken to access the linear relationship of the system response. Then, an in vivo mouse experiment was conducted. The in vivo experimental results show that the recovered concentration error as low as 6.67% with the location error of 0.85?mm can be achieved. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately recover the nanophosphor inclusion and realize the quantitative imaging.

  5. Bent crystal spectrometer for solar X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapley, C. G.; Culhane, J. L.; Acton, L. W.; Catura, R. C.; Joki, E. G.; Bakke, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A bent crystal spectrometer employs a collimated beam of X-rays incident on the crystal over a range of Bragg angles determined by the orientation and curvature of the crystal surface. It provides continuous and simultaneous coverage of all X-ray wavelengths within its spectral range. In-flight testing for solar X-ray spectroscopy was performed using a small instrument to supplement the wavelength coverage of several scanning spectrometers used to study solar active regions in the 9-24 A range. Later testing included modifications to alleviate problems caused by ultraviolet radiation. Future usage of the device will include studies of time variable emission from solar flares or discrete galactic X-ray sources, and the first major experiment to utilize bent crystal spectrometers will be the Solar Maximum Mission satellite in 1979.

  6. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Stone, Gary F. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA); Chornenky, Victor I. (Minnetonka, MN)

    2002-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  7. Solar X-ray physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bornmann, P.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Research on solar X-ray phenomena performed by American scientists during 1987-1990 is reviewed. Major topics discussed include solar images observed during quiescent times, the processes observed during solar flares, and the coronal, interplanetary, and terrestrial phenomena associated with solar X-ray flares. Particular attention is given to the hard X-ray emission observed at the start of the flare, the energy transfer to the soft X-ray emitting plasma, the late resolution of the flare as observed in soft X-ray, and the rate of occurrence of solar flares as a function of time and latitude. Pertinent aspects of nonflaring, coronal X-ray emission and stellar flares are also discussed. 175 refs.

  8. Conception of broadband stigmatic high-resolution spectrometers for the soft X-ray range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnyakov, E. A.; Shatokhin, A. N.; Ragozin, E. N.

    2015-04-01

    We formulate an approach to the development of stigmatic high-resolution spectral instruments for the soft X-ray range (? <= 300 Å), which is based on the combined operation of normalincidence multilayer mirrors (including broadband aperiodic ones) and grazing-incidence reflection gratings with nonequidistant grooves (so-called VLS gratings). A concave multilayer mirror serves to produce a slightly astigmatic image of the radiation source (for instance, an entrance slit), and the diffraction grating produces a set of its dispersed stigmatic spectral images. The width of the operating spectral region is determined by the aperiodic structure of the multilayer mirror and may range up to an octave in wavelength.

  9. Topological X-Rays Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mark

    2012-01-01

    We continue our study of topological X-rays begun in Lynch ["Topological X-rays and MRI's," iJMEST 33(3) (2002), pp. 389-392]. We modify our definition of a topological magnetic resonance imaging and give an affirmative answer to the question posed there: Can we identify a closed set in a box by defining X-rays to probe the interior and without…

  10. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Soft X-ray Laser Program: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Trebes, J.; Brown, S.; Campbell, E.M.; Ceglio, N.; Eder, D.; Gaines, D.; Hawryluk, A.; Keane, C.; London, R.; MacGowan, B.

    1987-08-01

    Significant progress toward the goal of producing high power, high coherence x-ray lasers has been made. Lasing at wavelengths as low as 66 A has been achieved in a nickel like laser scheme which is scalable to sub-44 A wavelengths. In addition, x-ray laser cavities, x-ray holography, and an applications beamline have been demonstrated. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Filters for soft X-ray solar telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiller, Eberhard; Grebe, Kurt; Golub, Leon

    1990-01-01

    Soft X-ray telescopes require filters that block visible and infrared light and have good soft X-ray transmission. The optical properties of possible materials are discussed, and the fabrication and testing methods for the filters used in a 10-inch normal incidence telescope for 63 A are described. The best performances in the 44-114-A wavelength range are obtained with foils of carbon and rhodium.

  12. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  13. Low Accelerating Voltage, X-ray Microanalysis: Benefits and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mcswiggen, P.; Mori, N.; Takakura, M.; Nielsen, C.

    2011-12-01

    The development of the field emission (FE) electron gun has made it possible to generate extremely high, electron densities and as a result, an electron beam that is one-half to one-tenth the diameter of the conventional thermionic emission electron gun using a W filament or a LaB6 tip. In addition, with a Schottky thermal, field emission (TFE) electron gun, sufficient beam currents can be provided for trace element microanalyses. Now the challenge is to be able to take advantage of this smaller electron beam to provide X-ray analyses of comparable size areas. Using the typical operating conditions for X-ray microanalyses (15-20kV accelerating voltage), the electron beam scattering within the sample results in an analysis that is of a much larger area. However working at a low accelerating voltage, the amount of scatter is greatly reduced, resulting in an analytical area that can be about the size of the electron beam. The optimum accelerating voltage that will produce the smallest analytical volume is typically around 5-7 kV. At lower accelerating voltages, the size of the analytical area is controlled by the size of the electron beam, which increases with decreasing accelerating voltage. At higher accelerating voltages, the analytical area is controlled by the amount of scattering within the sample, which in turn is controlled by the accelerating voltage and the average atomic number of the material. The higher the accelerating voltage, the more scatter. Using a TFE electron gun at low accelerating voltages means it is possible to analyze areas in the range of 0.1 ?m. However, working at low accelerating voltages can produce a new set of challenges when trying to obtain the best quality quantitative analyses. One problem comes from the fact that there are few X-ray lines available when using lower accelerating voltages. This is particularly problematic when using energy dispersive spectrometers (EDS), less so with wavelength dispersive spectrometers (WDS). With EDS analyses, the available X-ray lines are all commonly overlapped at the low energy end of the spectrum. With WDS and its much higher energy resolution, it is possible to resolve lines that would be overlapped on an EDS system. A secondly challenge is that fewer X-rays are produce for a given beam current. In many situations, this can be overcome by simply using a higher beam current. With a TFE electron gun, a higher beam current can be obtained with minimal change in the size of the analytical area. One of the biggest challenges of low voltage analyses is the fact that any surface coating can have a big impact on the analyses. Surface oxide layers, surface contamination and even inconsistencies in the carbon coating can affect the results more significantly when running at low accelerating voltages. Not only does the surface coating reduce the X-ray count rates, they can change the measured element ratios. Low voltage analyses have become the challenge that light element analyses have been in the past.

  14. Fourier transform inelastic x-ray scattering from phonons using Free Electron Laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trigo, Mariano; Henighan, Thomas; Reis, David

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate that ultrafast x-ray scattering at Free Electron Lasers (FELs) provides a new approach for measuring phonon dispersion relations spanning the entire Brillouin zone, without the need for complex monochromators and spectrometers. Our method uses an ultrafast optical laser as pump and the dynamics are probed using femtosecond x-ray pulses from an FEL. We obtain the entire transverse acoustic phonon dispersion in germanium with ~ 0.5 meV energy resolution by a simple Fourier transform of the oscillatory dynamics of the scattered x-ray intensity. Using coherent control with a pair of pump pulses, we show that the femtosecond laser couples to pairs of phonons, analogous to a second order Raman scattering mechanism, which also explains the excitation of large-wavevector phonons by the long wavelength (optical) pump pulse. This shows that the generation mechanism is quite general and thus this ultrafast approach could be applicable as a general spectroscopic tool of phonons near to and far from equilibrium.

  15. The fabrication of wavelength shifting lightguides from clear acrylic sheet by disperse dyeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, J. E.

    2015-06-01

    Wavelength shifting lightguides have found extensive use as a means of collecting scintillation or cherenkov light from large areas onto a smaller area photodetector and for matching the emitted spectrum to the spectral response of the photodetector. Conventionally, such lightguides are fabricated by casting acrylic polymer with the fluorescent dye incorporated in the bulk. A technique has been developed in which plain cast acrylic sheet is disperse dyed in an aqueous bath. The resulting lightguide has the fluorescent dye held in a thin layer at the surface of the material. A number of different fluorescent dyes are demonstrated

  16. High-efficiency x-ray gratings with asymmetric-cut multilayers.

    PubMed

    Bajt, Saša; Chapman, Henry N; Aquila, Andrew; Gullikson, Eric

    2012-03-01

    We present the fabrication and analysis of efficient and highly dispersive gratings for the x-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) regime. We show that an asymmetric-cut multilayer structure can act as a near-perfect blazed grating. The precision and high line density are achieved by layer deposition of materials, which can be controlled to the angstrom level. We demonstrate this in the EUV regime with two structures made by cutting and polishing magnetron-sputtered multilayer mirrors of over 2000 bilayers thick, each with a period of 6.88 nm. These were cut at angles of 2.9° and 7.8° to the surface. Within the 3% bandwidth rocking curve of the multilayer, the angular dispersion of the diffracted wave was in agreement with the grating equation for elements with 7250 and 19,700 line pairs/mm, respectively. The dependence of the measured efficiency was in excellent agreement with a formulation of dynamical diffraction theory for multilayered structures. At a wavelength of 13.2 nm, the efficiency of the first-order diffraction was over 95% of the reflectivity of the uncut multilayer. We predict that such structures should also be effective at shorter x-ray wavelengths. Both the Laue (transmitting) and Bragg (reflecting) geometries are incorporated in our formalism, which is applied to the analysis of multilayer Laue lenses and focusing and dispersing Bragg optics. PMID:22472750

  17. X-ray laser interferometry: A new tool for AGEX

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, A.S.; Moreno, J.C.; Libby, S.B.

    1995-10-01

    Collisionally pumped soft x-ray lasers now operate over a wavelength range extending from 4--40 nm. With the recent advances in the development of multilayer mirrors and beamsplitters in the soft x-ray regime, we can utilize the unique properties of x-ray lasers to study large, rapidly evolving laser-driven plasmas with high electron densities. By employing a shorter wavelength x-ray laser, as compared to using conventional optical laser as the probe source, we can access a much higher density regime while reducing refractive effects which limit the spatial resolution and data interpretation. Using a neon-like yttrium x-ray laser which operates at a wavelength of 15.5 mn, we have performed a series of soft x-ray laser interferometry experiments, operated in the skewed Mach-Zehnder configuration, to characterize plasmas relevant to both weapons and inertial confinement fusion. The two-dimensional density profiles obtained from the interferograms allow us to validate and benchmark our numerical models used to study the physics in the high-energy density regime, relevant to both weapons and inertial confinement fusion.

  18. X-Ray Interactions with Matter from the Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Henke, B. L.; Gullikson, E. M.; Davis, J. C.

    The primary interactions of low-energy x-rays within condensed matter, viz. photoabsorption and coherent scattering, are described for photon energies outside the absorption threshold regions by using atomic scattering factors. The atomic scattering factors may be accurately determined from the atomic photoabsorption cross sections using modified Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations. From a synthesis of the currently available experimental data and recent theoretical calculations for photoabsorption, the angle-independent, forward-scattering components of the atomic scattering factors have been thus semiempirically determined and tabulated here for 92 elements and for the region 50-30,000 eV. Atomic scattering factors for all angles of coherent scattering and at the higher photon energies are obtained from these tabulated forward-scattering values by adding a simple angle-dependent form-factor correction. The incoherent scattering contributions that become significant for the light elements at the higher photon energies are similarly determined. The basic x-ray interaction relations that are used in applied x-ray physics are presented here in terms of the atomic scattering factors. The bulk optical constants are also related to the atomic scattering factors. These atomic and optical relations are applied to the detailed calculation of the reflectivity characteristics of a series of practical x-ray mirror, multilayer, and crystal monochromators. Comparisons of the results of this semiempirical,"atom-like", description of x-ray interactions for the low-energy region with those of experiment and ab initio theory are presented.

  19. X-Ray Spectroscopy Using Low Temperature Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Frederick

    2011-01-01

    After several decades of development, a significant amount of the effort in low temperature detectors (LTDs) is concentrated on deploying real-world experiments. This has resulted from a great deal of basic detector physics performed by several generations of students, post-docs, and researchers. One of the most fruitful applications of LTDs is in non-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. LTD x-ray spectrometers are broadband, efficient, moderately high-resolution, and can handle moderately high count rates. However, they require significantly more power, mass, and infrastructure compared to traditional solid state x-ray spectrometers, and cannot achieve, at least at low energies, the resolving powers achieved with dispersive spectrometers. In several fields, however, LTDs have or will make a significant contribution. In this review, we will discuss x-ray spectroscopy in general, the fields of science where LTDs are making a significant impact, and some of the current and near-term LTD spectrometers.

  20. X-ray diagnostics for TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    von Goeler, S.; Hill, K.W.; Bitter, M.

    1982-12-01

    A short description of the x-ray diagnostic preparation for the TFTR tokamak is given. The x-ray equipment consists of the limiter x-ray monitoring system, the soft x-ray pulse-height-analysis-system, the soft x-ray imaging system and the x-ray crystal spectrometer. Particular attention is given to the radiation protection of the x-ray systems from the neutron environment.

  1. Supercontinuum generation by nanosecond dual-pumping near the two zero-dispersion wavelengths of a photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucon, Anne; Sylvestre, Thibaut; Huy, Kien Phan; Beugnot, Jean-Charles; Mélin, Gilles; Maillotte, Hervé; Dudley, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Supercontinuum generation by dual-wavelength nanosecond pumping in the vicinity of both zero-dispersion wavelengths of a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) is experimentally demonstrated. It is shown in particular that two pumps at 1535 nm and 767 nm simultaneously pumping near the two zero-dispersion wavelengths of a specially designed PCF yields a combined visible and infrared supercontinuum spectrum spanning from 0.55 ?m to 1.9 ?m. We discuss the generation mechanisms underlying the continuum formation in terms of modulation instability and cascaded Raman generation.

  2. Analysis of particles produced during airbag deployment by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and their deposition on surrounding surfaces: a mid-research summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, J. Matney

    2011-06-01

    Airbags can be encountered in forensic work when investigating a car crash and are typically constructed with primerlike material to begin the deployment apparatus. The mechanisms of airbag deployment can produce particles ideal for scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) analysis. A recent study published by Berk studied airbags with vents and showed that it is possible for particles generated from the deployment of these airbags to deposit on surfaces in the vehicle as the airbags deflate.1 Another paper published by Berk reported particles similar in morphology and composition to primer gunshot residue (GSR) are produced by side impact airbags.2 This paper's aim will be to show mid-point results of a study still in progress in which non-vented airbags were analyzed to determine if they exhibited the same particle depositing features as their vented airbag counterparts. Further investigation in this study is being performed to find more airbags which produce primer gunshot residue-like particles containing lead, barium, and antimony from airbag deployment. To date, the study has resulted in (1) non-vented airbags exhibiting deposition of particles suitable for SEM/EDS analysis and (2) no gunshot residue-like particles being detected from the airbag residues studied thus far.

  3. Spatial distribution of physico-chemical properties and function of heavy metals in soils of Yelagiri hills, Tamilnadu by energy dispersive X-ray florescence spectroscopy (EDXRF) with statistical approach.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, A; Ravisankar, R

    2015-11-01

    Soil physico-chemical properties were thought to be important factors in obscuring clear identification of pollutant sources. In the present study physicochemical properties such as, pH, electrical conductivity, bulk density, porosity density, soil texture and color were determined to identify the pollution status using different conventional analytical methods in soils of Yelagiri Hills, Tamilnadu. Soil pH ranges from 5.39 to 8.43 which indicate that the soils are acidic to alkaline in nature. The concentrations of selected heavy metals were determined using energy dispersive X-ray florescence spectroscopy (EDXRF) technique. In all the locations Al is the most abundant metal and Co is the least amount in soil. The relationship between the physico-chemical properties and heavy metals were studied by Pearson correlation. The statistical technique shows that strong significant correlation among the heavy metals. The Chemometric approaches namely: principal component analyses (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), were used for identify the soil pollutant. Spatial distribution of physico-chemical properties of soil such as pH, soil texture (sand, silt, clay) electrical conductivity was studied by geo-statistical methods such as kriging identified areas. The heavy metal mapping also attempted to know the distribution pattern in soils. PMID:26079515

  4. The Time-resolved and Extreme-conditions XAS (TEXAS) facility at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility: the energy-dispersive X-ray absorption spectroscopy beamline ID24.

    PubMed

    Pascarelli, S; Mathon, O; Mairs, T; Kantor, I; Agostini, G; Strohm, C; Pasternak, S; Perrin, F; Berruyer, G; Chappelet, P; Clavel, C; Dominguez, M C

    2016-01-01

    The European Synchrotron Radiation Facility has recently made available to the user community a facility totally dedicated to Time-resolved and Extreme-conditions X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy - TEXAS. Based on an upgrade of the former energy-dispersive XAS beamline ID24, it provides a unique experimental tool combining unprecedented brilliance (up to 10(14)?photons?s(-1) on a 4?µm × 4?µm FWHM spot) and detection speed for a full EXAFS spectrum (100?ps per spectrum). The science mission includes studies of processes down to the nanosecond timescale, and investigations of matter at extreme pressure (500?GPa), temperature (10000?K) and magnetic field (30?T). The core activities of the beamline are centered on new experiments dedicated to the investigation of extreme states of matter that can be maintained only for very short periods of time. Here the infrastructure, optical scheme, detection systems and sample environments used to enable the mission-critical performance are described, and examples of first results on the investigation of the electronic and local structure in melts at pressure and temperature conditions relevant to the Earth's interior and in laser-shocked matter are given. PMID:26698085

  5. Determination of trace amounts of hexavalent chromium in drinking waters by dispersive microsolid-phase extraction using modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes combined with total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadir, Z.; Bulut, V. N.; Hidalgo, M.; Soylak, M.; Marguí, E.

    2015-05-01

    A methodology based on the combination of dispersive microsolid-phase extraction (DMSPE) with total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry is proposed for the determination of hexavalent chromium in drinking waters. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified with the anionic exchanger tricaprylmethylammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) were used as solid sorbents. After the sorption process of Cr(VI) on the modified MWCNTs, the aqueous sample was separated by centrifugation and the loaded MWCNTs were suspended using a small volume of an internal standard solution and analyzed directly by a benchtop TXRF spectrometer, without any elution step. Parameters affecting the extraction process (pH and volume of the aqueous sample, amount of MWCNTs, extraction time) and TXRF analysis (volume of internal standard, volume of deposited suspension on the reflector, drying mode, and instrumental parameters) have been carefully evaluated to test the real capability of the developed methodology for the determination of Cr(VI) at trace levels. Using the best analytical conditions, it was found that the minimum Cr(VI) content that can be detected in an aqueous solution was 3 ?g L- 1. This value is almost 20 times lower than the maximum hexavalent chromium content permissible in drinking waters, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Recoveries for spiked tap and mineral water samples were, in most cases, in the range of 101-108% which demonstrates the suitability of the TXRF methodology for monitoring Cr(VI) at trace levels in drinking water samples.

  6. Cosmic X-ray Sources.

    PubMed

    Bowyer, S; Byram, E T; Chubb, T A; Friedman, H

    1965-01-22

    Eight new sources of cosmic x-rays were detected by two Aerobee surveys in 1964. One source, from Sagittarius, is close to the galactic center, and the other, from Ophiuchus, may coincide with Kepler's 1604 supernova. All the x-ray sources are fairly close to the galactic plane. PMID:17832788

  7. X-ray based extensometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, E. H.; Pease, D. M.

    1988-12-01

    A totally new method of extensometry using an X-ray beam was proposed. The intent of the method is to provide a non-contacting technique that is immune to problems associated with density variations in gaseous environments that plague optical methods. X-rays are virtually unrefractable even by solids. The new method utilizes X-ray induced X-ray fluorescence or X-ray induced optical fluorescence of targets that have melting temperatures of over 3000 F. Many different variations of the basic approaches are possible. In the year completed, preliminary experiments were completed which strongly suggest that the method is feasible. The X-ray induced optical fluorescence method appears to be limited to temperatures below roughly 1600 F because of the overwhelming thermal optical radiation. The X-ray induced X-ray fluorescence scheme appears feasible up to very high temperatures. In this system there will be an unknown tradeoff between frequency response, cost, and accuracy. The exact tradeoff can only be estimated. It appears that for thermomechanical tests with cycle times on the order of minutes a very reasonable system may be feasible. The intended applications involve very high temperatures in both materials testing and monitoring component testing. Gas turbine engines, rocket engines, and hypersonic vehicles (NASP) all involve measurement needs that could partially be met by the proposed technology.

  8. X-ray based extensometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, E. H.; Pease, D. M.

    1988-01-01

    A totally new method of extensometry using an X-ray beam was proposed. The intent of the method is to provide a non-contacting technique that is immune to problems associated with density variations in gaseous environments that plague optical methods. X-rays are virtually unrefractable even by solids. The new method utilizes X-ray induced X-ray fluorescence or X-ray induced optical fluorescence of targets that have melting temperatures of over 3000 F. Many different variations of the basic approaches are possible. In the year completed, preliminary experiments were completed which strongly suggest that the method is feasible. The X-ray induced optical fluorescence method appears to be limited to temperatures below roughly 1600 F because of the overwhelming thermal optical radiation. The X-ray induced X-ray fluorescence scheme appears feasible up to very high temperatures. In this system there will be an unknown tradeoff between frequency response, cost, and accuracy. The exact tradeoff can only be estimated. It appears that for thermomechanical tests with cycle times on the order of minutes a very reasonable system may be feasible. The intended applications involve very high temperatures in both materials testing and monitoring component testing. Gas turbine engines, rocket engines, and hypersonic vehicles (NASP) all involve measurement needs that could partially be met by the proposed technology.

  9. X-Ray Exam: Forearm

    MedlinePLUS

    What It Is A forearm X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses a small amount of radiation to take a picture of a person's forearm ( ... radius, ulna, and elbow). During the examination, an X-ray machine sends a beam of radiation through the ...

  10. X-Ray Exam: Pelvis

    MedlinePLUS

    What It Is A pelvis X-ray is a safe and painless test that uses a small amount of radiation to take a picture of the pelvic bones, ... surround the hip area. During the examination, an X-ray machine sends a beam of radiation through the ...

  11. Numerical analysis for a solid-core photonic crystal fiber with tunable zero dispersion wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrientos-García, A.; Sukoivanov, Igor A.; Andrade-Lucio, J. A.; Guryev, Igor; Shulika, Oleksiy V.; Hernandez-García, J. C.; Ramos-Ortiz, G.

    2014-09-01

    Here we propose a simple design for a solid-core photonic crystal fiber made of silica by keeping the golden ratio (1.618) between pitch and air hole diameter ? /d in a subset of six rings of air-holes with hexagonal arrangement. In the case when we have a pitch equal to one micron (? =1 ?m), we need air-holes diameters d=0.618 ?m in order to obtain the golden ratio parameter (?/d=1.618), and achieve two zero dispersion wavelength (ZDW) points at 725 nm and 1055 nm; this gives us the possibility to use this fiber in supercontinuum generation using a laser emission close to that points. We analyzed a series of fibers using this relation and show the possibilities of tunable ZDW in a wide range of wavelengths from 725 nm to 2000 nm with low losses and small effective area. In agreement with the ZDW point needed, the geometry of the structure can be modified to the point of having only three rings of air holes that surround the solid core with low losses and good confinement mode. The design proposed here is analyzed using the finite element method (FEM) with perfectly matched layers (PML), including the material dispersion directly into the model applying the Sellmeier's equation.

  12. Focusing X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen; Brissenden, Roger; Davis, William; Elsner, Ronald; Elvis, Martin; Freeman, Mark; Gaetz, Terrance; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhall; Jerlus, Diab; Juda, Michael; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey; Murray, Stephen; Petre, Robert; Podgorski, William; Ramsey, Brian; Reid, Paul; Saha, Timo; Wolk, Scott; Troller-McKinstry, Susan; Weisskopf, Martin; Wilke, Rudeger; Zhang, William

    2010-01-01

    During the half-century history of x-ray astronomy, focusing x-ray telescopes, through increased effective area and finer angular resolution, have improved sensitivity by 8 orders of magnitude. Here, we review previous and current x-ray-telescope missions. Next, we describe the planned next-generation x-ray-astronomy facility, the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). We conclude with an overview of a concept for the next next-generation facility, Generation X. Its scientific objectives will require very large areas (about 10,000 sq m) of highly-nested, lightweight grazing-incidence mirrors, with exceptional (about 0.1-arcsec) resolution. Achieving this angular resolution with lightweight mirrors will likely require on-orbit adjustment of alignment and figure.

  13. X-Ray Tomographic Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnie Schmittberger

    2010-08-25

    Tomographic scans have revolutionized imaging techniques used in medical and biological research by resolving individual sample slices instead of several superimposed images that are obtained from regular x-ray scans. X-Ray fluorescence computed tomography, a more specific tomography technique, bombards the sample with synchrotron x-rays and detects the fluorescent photons emitted from the sample. However, since x-rays are attenuated as they pass through the sample, tomographic scans often produce images with erroneous low densities in areas where the x-rays have already passed through most of the sample. To correct for this and correctly reconstruct the data in order to obtain the most accurate images, a program employing iterative methods based on the inverse Radon transform was written. Applying this reconstruction method to a tomographic image recovered some of the lost densities, providing a more accurate image from which element concentrations and internal structure can be determined.

  14. X-Ray Diffraction Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F. (Inventor); Bryson, Charles (Inventor); Freund, Friedmann (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An x-ray diffraction apparatus for use in analyzing the x-ray diffraction pattern of a sample is introduced. The apparatus includes a beam source for generating a collimated x-ray beam having one or more discrete x-ray energies, a holder for holding the sample to be analyzed in the path of the beam, and a charge-coupled device having an array of pixels for detecting, in one or more selected photon energy ranges, x-ray diffraction photons produced by irradiating such a sample with said beam. The CCD is coupled to an output unit which receives input information relating to the energies of photons striking each pixel in the CCD, and constructs the diffraction pattern of photons within a selected energy range striking the CCD.

  15. X-ray shearing interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Koch, Jeffrey A. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-07-08

    An x-ray interferometer for analyzing high density plasmas and optically opaque materials includes a point-like x-ray source for providing a broadband x-ray source. The x-rays are directed through a target material and then are reflected by a high-quality ellipsoidally-bent imaging crystal to a diffraction grating disposed at 1.times. magnification. A spherically-bent imaging crystal is employed when the x-rays that are incident on the crystal surface are normal to that surface. The diffraction grating produces multiple beams which interfere with one another to produce an interference pattern which contains information about the target. A detector is disposed at the position of the image of the target produced by the interfering beams.

  16. Analytical X-ray Safety Refresh Training

    E-print Network

    Analytical X-ray Safety Refresh Training Radiation Safety Officer Department of Environmental Health and Safety #12;TWO TYPES OF X-RAYS Characteristic X-ray · Electrons jump from higher energy orbitals to lower energy orbitals · Extra energy is release as X-rays · This type of X-rays has discrete

  17. Diffraction peaks in x-ray spectroscopy: Friend or foe?

    SciTech Connect

    Tissot, R.G.; Goehner, R.P.

    1992-11-01

    Diffraction peaks can occur as unidentifiable peaks in the energy spectrum of an x-ray spectrometric analysis. Recently, there has been increased interest in oriented polycrystalline films and epitaxial films on single crystal substrates for electronic applications. Since these materials diffract x-rays more efficiently than randomly oriented polycrystalline materials, diffraction peaks are being observed more frequently in x-ray fluorescent spectra. In addition, micro x-ray spectrometric analysis utilizes a small, intense, collimated x-ray beam that can yield well defined diffraction peaks. In some cases these diffraction peaks can occur at the same position as elemental peaks. These diffraction peaks, although a possible problem in qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis, can give very useful information about the crystallographic structure and orientation of the material being analyzed. The observed diffraction peaks are dependent on the geometry of the x-ray spectrometer, the degree of collimation and the distribution of wavelengths (energies) originating from the x-ray tube and striking the sample.

  18. Diffraction peaks in x-ray spectroscopy: Friend or foe

    SciTech Connect

    Tissot, R.G.; Goehner, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Diffraction peaks can occur as unidentifiable peaks in the energy spectrum of an x-ray spectrometric analysis. Recently, there has been increased interest in oriented polycrystalline films and epitaxial films on single crystal substrates for electronic applications. Since these materials diffract x-rays more efficiently than randomly oriented polycrystalline materials, diffraction peaks are being observed more frequently in x-ray fluorescent spectra. In addition, micro x-ray spectrometric analysis utilizes a small, intense, collimated x-ray beam that can yield well defined diffraction peaks. In some cases these diffraction peaks can occur at the same position as elemental peaks. These diffraction peaks, although a possible problem in qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis, can give very useful information about the crystallographic structure and orientation of the material being analyzed. The observed diffraction peaks are dependent on the geometry of the x-ray spectrometer, the degree of collimation and the distribution of wavelengths (energies) originating from the x-ray tube and striking the sample.

  19. Potential for biomolecular imaging with femtosecond X-ray pulses.

    PubMed

    Neutze, R; Wouts, R; van der Spoel, D; Weckert, E; Hajdu, J

    2000-08-17

    Sample damage by X-rays and other radiation limits the resolution of structural studies on non-repetitive and non-reproducible structures such as individual biomolecules or cells. Cooling can slow sample deterioration, but cannot eliminate damage-induced sample movement during the time needed for conventional measurements. Analyses of the dynamics of damage formation suggest that the conventional damage barrier (about 200 X-ray photons per A2 with X-rays of 12 keV energy or 1 A wavelength) may be extended at very high dose rates and very short exposure times. Here we have used computer simulations to investigate the structural information that can be recovered from the scattering of intense femtosecond X-ray pulses by single protein molecules and small assemblies. Estimations of radiation damage as a function of photon energy, pulse length, integrated pulse intensity and sample size show that experiments using very high X-ray dose rates and ultrashort exposures may provide useful structural information before radiation damage destroys the sample. We predict that such ultrashort, high-intensity X-ray pulses from free-electron lasers that are currently under development, in combination with container-free sample handling methods based on spraying techniques, will provide a new approach to structural determinations with X-rays. PMID:10963603

  20. The Distance and Mass of the Galaxy Cluster Abell 1995 Derived From Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect and X-Ray Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Sandeep K.; Joy, Marshall; Carlstrom, John E.; Holder, Gilbert P.; Reese, Erik D.; Gomez, Percy L.; Hughes, John P.; Grego, Laura; Holzapfel, William L.

    2000-01-01

    We present multi-wavelength observations of the Abell 1995 galaxy cluster. From analysis of x-ray spectroscopy and imaging data we derive the electron temperature, cluster core radius, and central electron number density. Using optical spectroscopy of 15 cluster members, we derive an accurate cluster redshift and velocity dispersion. Finally, the interferometric imaging of the SZE toward Abell 1995 at 28.5 GHz provides a measure of the integrated pressure through the cluster.

  1. A Study of Wavelength Calibration of NEWSIPS High-Dispersion Spectra

    E-print Network

    Myron A. Smith

    2001-04-03

    In this study we cross-correlate many IUE echellograms of a variety of stars to evaluate systematic error sources in the wavelength zeropoint of all three cameras. We first evaluated differences between the final archived ("NEWSIPS") and the originally processed ("IUESIPS") spectra. These show a clear time dependence in zeropoint for the SWP camera due to revisions in the IUESIPS wavelength scale. Small IUESIPS - NEWSIPS differences are also found for the LWR camera. We also examined wavelength zeropoint disparities between data obtained both through the small and large entrance apertures and for observations made by different target acquisition modes for faint and bright stars. We found that velocities resulting from these alternative observing modes are nil. For large-aperture observations the dominant error source is the target position placement in the aperture. We searched for spurious trends with time, and found only a suggestion of time trends for faint stars observed with the SWP camera. We also discovered 1-day, +/-3 km/s sinusoidsal patterns in intensive monitoring data which are ascribable to changes in telescope focus resulting from thermal drifts. In the second part of the paper, we measured mean zeropoint errors of NEWSIPS echellogram data against laboratory results by using the GHRS spectral atlas of the 10 Lac. We find that the derived apparent velocity difference for this star is -1 +/-3.5 km/s. Several less precise comparisons lead to similar results. The zeropoints of the NEWSIPS-processed LWP/LWR cameras are evaluated and are also found to be nearly zero (+/-5 km/s) relative to HST atlases of Arcturus and Procyon atlas. These results do not support result by Gonzalez-Riestra et al. that corrections should be introduced to the wavelength scales of various NEWSIPS high-dispersion data products.

  2. High-energy X-ray detection by hafnium-doped organic-inorganic hybrid scintillators prepared by sol-gel method

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yan; Koshimizu, Masanori Yahaba, Natsuna; Asai, Keisuke; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Kishimoto, Shunji; Haruki, Rie

    2014-04-28

    With the aim of enhancing the efficiency with which plastic scintillators detect high-energy X-rays, hafnium-doped organic-inorganic hybrid scintillators were fabricated via a sol-gel method. Transmission electron microscopy of sampled material reveals the presence of Hf{sub x}Si{sub 1?x}O{sub 2} nanoparticles, dispersed in a polymer matrix that constitutes the active material of the X-ray detector. With Hf{sub x}Si{sub 1?x}O{sub 2} nanoparticles incorporated in the polymer matrix, the absorption edge and the luminescence wavelength is shifted, which we attribute to Mie scattering. The detection efficiency for 67.4-keV X-rays in a 0.6-mm-thick piece of this material is two times better than the same thickness of a commercial plastic scintillator-NE142.

  3. Chemical effects correlated to nitrogen content of iron nitride films observed in the Fe L-shell X-rays induced by 5-keV electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, R.; Bertol, A. P. L.; Jacobsen, S. D.; Castellano, G.; Vasconcellos, M. A. Z.

    2014-01-01

    Iron nitride thin films, produced by reactive magnetron sputtering, were characterized with grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, X-ray reflectometry, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy. Their characteristic L-X-rays spectra, obtained with an electron microprobe analyzer equipped with a wavelength dispersive spectrometer, were compared to the spectrum of an iron standard. The spectra from the nitrides presented several chemical effects: change in the relative peak areas and shifts of the positions of the L?1,2 and the L?1 peaks (chemical shift). The change in relative peak areas, namely the ratio between the L?1 and the L?1,2 peaks, correlated well with the nitrogen content measured with RBS.

  4. Normal incidence X-ray mirror for chemical microanalysis

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Martin J. (Tijeras, NM); Romig, Jr., Alton D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01

    A non-planar, focusing mirror, to be utilized in both electron column instruments and micro-x-ray fluorescence instruments for performing chemical microanalysis on a sample, comprises a concave, generally spherical base substrate and a predetermined number of alternating layers of high atomic number material and low atomic number material contiguously formed on the base substrate. The thickness of each layer is an integral multiple of the wavelength being reflected and may vary non-uniformly according to a predetermined design. The chemical analytical instruments in which the mirror is used also include a predetermined energy source for directing energy onto the sample and a detector for receiving and detecting the x-rays emitted from the sample; the non-planar mirror is located between the sample and detector and collects the x-rays emitted from the sample at a large solid angle and focuses the collected x-rays to the sample. For electron column instruments, the wavelengths of interest lie above 1.5 nm, while for x-ray fluorescence instruments, the range of interest is below 0.2 nm. Also, x-ray fluorescence instruments include an additional non-planar focusing mirror, formed in the same manner as the previously described m The invention described herein was made in the performance of work under contract with the Department of Energy, Contract No. DE-AC04-76DP00789, and the United States Government has rights in the invention pursuant to this contract.

  5. The role of EBIT in X-ray laser research

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, J

    2007-01-25

    Back in the early 1980's the X-ray laser program required a new level of understanding and measurements of the atomic physics of highly charged ions. The electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) was developed and built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of the effort to understand and measure the cross sections and wavelengths of highly charged ions. In this paper we will discuss some of the early history of EBIT and how it was used to help in the development of X-ray lasers. EBIT's capability was unique and we will show some of the experimental results obtained over the years that were done related to X-ray lasers. As X-ray lasers have now become a table-top tool we will show some new areas of research that involve understanding the index of refraction in partially ionized plasmas and suggest new areas where EBIT may be able to contribute.

  6. An X-ray-selected white dwarf of intermediate luminosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margon, Bruce; Bolte, Michael; Anderson, Scott F.

    1987-01-01

    Spectrophotometric observations of a previously uncataloged 17th magnitude hot DA white dwarf are reported. Simple models can reproduce the visible spectrum if the star has log g = 8.0 + or - 0.5 and T(eff) = 22,500 + or - 2000 K. The implied distance is about 200 pc. It is plausible that photospheric emission from this star is responsible for the observed X-ray source. Identification of this object with the X-ray source would imply a photosphere free of traces of helium inferred in other X-ray-emitting DAs, and would support previous suggestions that current DA model atmospheres are in need of revision at X-ray wavelengths.

  7. X-Ray spectroscopy of cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestwich, Andrea

    1996-01-01

    Cooling flows in clusters of galaxies occur when the cooling time of the gas is shorter than the age of the cluster; material cools and falls to the center of the cluster potential. Evidence for short X-ray cooling times comes from imaging studies of clusters and X-ray spectroscopy of a few bright clusters. Because the mass accretion rate can be high (a few 100 solar mass units/year) the mass of material accumulated over the lifetime of a cluster can be as high as 10(exp 12) solar mass units. However, there is little evidence for this material at other wavelengths, and the final fate of the accretion material is unknown. X-ray spectra obtained with the Einstein SSS show evidence for absorption; if confirmed this result would imply that the accretion material is in the form of cool dense clouds. However ice on the SSS make these data difficult to interpret. We obtained ASCA spectra of the cooling flow cluster Abell 85. Our primary goals were to search for multi-temperature components that may be indicative of cool gas; search for temperature gradients across the cluster; and look for excess absorption in the cooling region.

  8. Variable magnification glancing incidence x ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard (inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A multispectral glancing incidence x ray telescope is disclosed, which capable of broadband, high resolution imaging of solar and stellar x ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation sources includes a primary optical system which focuses the incoming radiation to a primary focus. Two or more ellipsoidal mirrors are positioned behind the primary focus at an inclination to the optical axis, each mirror having a concave surface coated with a multilayer synthetic microstructure coating to reflect a desired wavelength. The ellipsoidal mirrors are segments of respective ellipsoids having a common first focus coincident with the primary focus. A detector such as an x ray sensitive photographic film is positioned at the second focus of each of the ellipsoids so that each of the ellipsoidal mirrors may reflect the image at the first focus to the detector. In one embodiment the mirrors are inclined at different angles and has its respective second focus at a different location, separate detectors being located at the respective second focus. The mirrors are arranged so that the magnification and field of view differ, and a solenoid activated arm may withdraw at least one mirror from the beam to select the mirror upon which the beam is to impinge so that selected magnifications and fields of view may be detected.

  9. The X Raying of America.

    PubMed

    Villforth, J C

    Up to 30 percent of the 278 million medical and dental diagnostic x rays made yearly really aren't needed, and since any x ray increases a person's risk of getting cancer, these excess radiations are an unnecessary peril to public health. So says FDA's John C. Villforth, director of the Bureau of Radiological Health, who outlines the health problems and excess medical costs that result from ignorance, laxity, and misplaced medical judgments involving x rays and tells what the Agency is doing to reduce the threat. PMID:10309106

  10. X-Ray Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-01-01

    The FluoroScan Imaging System is a high resolution, low radiation device for viewing stationary or moving objects. It resulted from NASA technology developed for x-ray astronomy and Goddard application to a low intensity x-ray imaging scope. FlouroScan Imaging Systems, Inc, (formerly HealthMate, Inc.), a NASA licensee, further refined the FluoroScan System. It is used for examining fractures, placement of catheters, and in veterinary medicine. Its major components include an x-ray generator, scintillator, visible light image intensifier and video display. It is small, light and maneuverable.

  11. X-Rays, Pregnancy and You

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and Procedures Medical Imaging Medical X-ray Imaging X-Rays, Pregnancy and You Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... the decision with your doctor. What Kind of X-Rays Can Affect the Unborn Child? During most x- ...

  12. Why Do I Need X-Rays?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your desktop! more... Why Do I Need X-Rays? Article Chapters Why Do I Need X-Rays? ... tooth decay. Updated: January 2012 Related Articles: X-Rays The Academy of General Dentistry (AGD) Sets the ...

  13. X-RAY MONITORING OF ULTRALUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Kaaret, Philip; Feng Hua

    2009-09-10

    X-ray monitoring observations were performed with the Swift observatory of the ultraluminous X-ray sources Holmberg IX X-1, NGC 5408 X-1, and NGC 4395 X-2 and also of the nuclear X-ray source in NGC 4395. Holmberg IX X-1 remains in the hard X-ray spectral state as its flux varies by a factor of 7 up to a (isotropic) luminosity of 2.8 x 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}. This behavior may suggest an unusually massive compact object. We find excess power at periods near 60 days and 28 days in the X-ray emission from Holmberg IX X-1. Additional monitoring is required to test the significance of these signals. NGC 5408 X-1 and NGC 4395 X-2 appear to remain in the soft spectral state found by Chandra and XMM with little variation in spectral hardness even as the luminosity changes by a factor of 9. We found an outburst from the nuclear source in NGC 4395 reaching an X-ray luminosity of 9 x 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}, several times higher than any previously reported.

  14. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Center for X-Ray Optics; Soft X-Ray Imaging wit Zone Plate Lenses; Biological X-Ray microscopy; Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography for Nanoelectronic Pattern Transfer; Multilayer Reflective Optics; EUV/Soft X-ray Reflectometer; Photoemission Microscopy with Reflective Optics; Spectroscopy with Soft X-Rays; Hard X-Ray Microprobe; Coronary Angiography; and Atomic Scattering Factors.

  15. Solar coronal electron heating by short-wavelength dispersive shear Alfvén waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, R.; Shukla, P. K.; Eliasson, B.; Cairns, A.

    2015-10-01

    The electron heating of the solar coronal plasma has remained one of the most important problems in solar physics. An explanation of the electron heating rests on the identification of the energy source and appropriate physical mechanisms via which the energy can be channelled to the electrons. Our objective here is to present an estimate for the electron heating rate in the presence of finite amplitude short-wavelength (in comparison with the ion gyroradius) dispersive shear Alfvén (SWDSA) waves that propagate obliquely to the ambient magnetic field direction in the solar corona. Specifically, it is demonstrated that SWDSA waves can significantly contribute to the solar coronal electron heating via collisionless heating involving SWDSA wave-electron interactions.

  16. Coherent X-ray Imaging Techniques for Shock Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, David

    2015-06-01

    X-ray radiography has been used for several decades in dynamic experiments to measure material flow in extreme conditions via absorption of x-rays propagating through the materials. Image contrast in traditional radiography is determined by the absorption coefficients and areal densities of the materials at a given x-ray wavelength, and often limits these measurements to materials with sufficiently high atomic numbers and areal density, while low-Z materials and small areal density variations are completely transparent and not visible in the image. Coherent x-ray sources, such as those found at synchrotrons and x-ray free-electron lasers, provide new opportunities for imaging dynamic experiments due to their high spatial and spectral coherence, high brightness and short temporal duration (<100 ps). Phase-sensitive techniques, such as phase contrast imaging (PCI), rely on the overlap and interference of the x-rays due to spatial variations in their transmitted phase, and are enabled primarily by high spatial coherence of the x-ray source. Objects that are otherwise transparent to x-rays can be imaged with PCI, and small variations in areal density become visible that would be not observable with traditional radiography. In this talk an overview of PCI will be given, and current applications of this technique in high-energy density physics, shock physics and material dynamics will be presented. Other future uses of imaging using coherent x-ray sources in dynamic high-pressure experiments will be discussed. Work performed under the auspices of DOE by LANL under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  17. Simultaneous X-ray and optical observations of the flaring X-ray source, Aquila A-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, C. S.; Charles, P. A.

    1979-01-01

    During the summer of 1978 the recurrent transient X-ray source, Aquila X-1, underwent its first major outburst in two years. The results of extensive observations at X-ray and optical wavelengths throughout this event, which lasted for approximately two months are presented. The peak X-ray luminosity was approximately 1.3 times that of the Crab and exhibited spectral dependent flickering on timescales approximately 5 minutes. The observations are interpreted in terms of a standard accretion disk model withparticular emphasis on the similarities to Sco X-1 and other dward X-ray systems, although the transient nature of the system remains unexplained. It was found that Aquila X-1 can be described adequately by the semi-detached Roche lobe model and yields a mass ratio of less than or approximate to 3.5.

  18. Surface-Enhanced X-Ray Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Surface-enhanced x-ray fluorescence (SEn-XRF) spectroscopy is a form of surface- enhanced spectroscopy that was conceived as a means of obtaining greater sensitivity in x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. As such, SEn-XRF spectroscopy joins the ranks of such other, longer-wavelength surface-enhanced spectroscopies as those based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS), and surfaceenhanced infrared Raman absorption (SEIRA), which have been described in previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. XRF spectroscopy has been used in analytical chemistry for determining the elemental compositions of small samples. XRF spectroscopy is rapid and quantitative and has been applied to a variety of metal and mineralogical samples. The main drawback of XRF spectroscopy as practiced heretofore is that sensitivity has not been as high as required for some applications. In SEn-XRF as in the other surface-enhanced spectroscopies, one exploits several interacting near-field phenomena, occurring on nanotextured surfaces, that give rise to local concentrations of incident far-field illumination. In this case, the far-field illumination comes from an x-ray source. Depending on the chemical composition and the geometry of a given nanotextured surface, these phenomena could include the lightning-rod effect (concentration of electric fields at the sharpest points on needlelike surface features), surface plasmon resonances, and grazing incidence geometric effects. In the far field, the observable effect of these phenomena is an increase in the intensity of the spectrum of interest - in this case, the x-ray fluorescence spectrum of chemical elements of interest that may be present within a surface layer at distances no more than a few nanometers from the surface.

  19. Echo Tomography of Reprocessing Sites in X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Joseph; Haswell, Carole

    1998-01-01

    We discovered correlated rapid variability between the optical/UV and X-ray emission for the first time in a soft X-ray transient, GRO J1655-40. Hubble Space Telescope light curves show features similar to those seen by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, but with a mean delay of up to 10 - 20 s. We interpret the correlation as the result of reprocessing of X-rays into optical and UV emission, with a delay owing to finite light travel time; this assumption enables us to perform echo mapping of the system. The time-delay distribution has a mean of 14.6 +/-1.4 s and a dispersion of 10.5+/-1.9 s at binary phase 0.4. This establishes that the reprocessing region is the accretion disk around the compact star, rather than the mass-donating secondary. These results have been published.

  20. Imaging X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, P. A.; Jackson, J. W., Jr.; Alcorn, G. E.; Marshall, F. E. (inventors)

    1984-01-01

    An X-ray spectrometer for providing imaging and energy resolution of an X-ray source is described. This spectrometer is comprised of a thick silicon wafer having an embedded matrix or grid of aluminum completely through the wafer fabricated, for example, by thermal migration. The aluminum matrix defines the walls of a rectangular array of silicon X-ray detector cells or pixels. A thermally diffused aluminum electrode is also formed centrally through each of the silicon cells with biasing means being connected to the aluminum cell walls and causes lateral charge carrier depletion between the cell walls so that incident X-ray energy causes a photoelectric reaction within the silicon producing collectible charge carriers in the form of electrons which are collected and used for imaging.

  1. X-ray microtomographic scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syryamkin, V. I.; Klestov, S. A.

    2015-11-01

    The article studies the operating procedures of an X-ray microtomographic scanner and the module of reconstruction and analysis 3D-image of a test sample in particular. An algorithm for 3D-image reconstruction based on image shadow projections and mathematical methods of the processing are described. Chapter 1 describes the basic principles of X-ray tomography and general procedures of the device developed. Chapters 2 and 3 are devoted to the problem of resources saving by the system during the X-ray tomography procedure, which is achieved by preprocessing of the initial shadow projections. Preprocessing includes background noise removing from the images, which reduces the amount of shadow projections in general and increases the efficiency of the group shadow projections compression. In conclusion, the main applications of X-ray tomography are presented.

  2. X-Ray Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Model 60007A InnerView Real-time X-ray Imaging System, produced by National Imaging Systems, a division of FlouroScan Imaging Systems, Inc. (formerly HealthMate, Inc.), Northbrook, IL, is a third generation spinoff from x-ray astronomy technology. Goddard Space Flight Center developed the original technology into the Lixiscope, a small, portable, minimal radiation x-ray instrument that could be used at the scene of an accident. FlouroScan Imaging Systems, Inc., adapted this technology to develop the FlouroScan, a low-intensity, x-ray system that could be used without the lead aprons, film badges and lead-lined walls that conventional systems require. The InnerView is a spinoff of non-destructive testing and product inspection.

  3. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.

  4. X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-05-01

    The primary advantage of the X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) NDE method is that features are not superposed in the image, thereby rendering them easier to interpret than radiographic projection images. Industrial XRCT systems, unlike medical diagnostic systems, have no size and dosage constraints; they are accordingly used for systems from the scale of gas turbine blades, with hundreds-of-kV energies, to those of the scale of ICBMs, requiring MV-level X-ray energies.

  5. Quantitative X-ray Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takashi

    Full-field soft x-ray microscopes are widely used in many fields of sciences. Advances in nanofabrication technology enabled short wavelength focusing elements with significantly improved spatial resolution. In the soft x-ray spectral region, samples as small as 12 nm can be resolved using micro zone-plates as the objective lens. In addition to conventional x-ray microscopy in which x-ray absorption difference provides the image contrast, phase contrast mechanisms such as differential phase contrast (DIC) and Zernike phase contrast have also been demonstrated These phase contrast imaging mechanisms are especially attractive at the x-ray wavelengths where phase contrast of most materials is typically 10 times stronger than the absorption contrast. With recent progresses in plasma-based x- ray sources and increasing accessibility to synchrotron user facilities, x-ray microscopes are quickly becoming standard measurement equipment in the laboratory. To further the usefulness of x-ray DIC microscopy this thesis explicitly addresses three known issues with this imaging modality by introducing new techniques and devices First, as opposed to its visible-light counterpart, no quantitative phase imaging technique exists for x-ray DIC microscopy. To address this issue, two nanoscale x-ray quantitative phase imaging techniques, using exclusive OR (XOR) patterns and zone-plate doublets, respectively, are proposed. Unlike existing x-ray quantitative phase imaging techniques such as Talbot interferometry and ptychography, no dedicated experimental setups or stringent illumination coherence are needed for quantitative phase retrieval. Second, to the best of our knowledge, no quantitative performance characterization of DIC microscopy exists to date. Therefore the imaging system's response to sample's spatial frequency is not known In order to gain in-depth understanding of this imaging modality, performance of x-ray DIC microscopy is quantified using modulation transfer function. A new illumination apparatus required for the transfer function analysis under partially coherent illumination is also proposed. Such a characterization is essential for a proper selection of DIC optics for various transparent samples under study. Finally, optical elements used for x-ray DIC microscopy are highly absorptive and high brilliance x-ray sources such as synchrotrons are generally needed for image contrast. To extend the use of x-ray DIC microscopy to a wider variety of applications, a high efficiency large numerical aperture optical element consisting of high reflective Bragg reflectors is proposed. Using Bragg reflectors, which have 70% ˜99% reflectivity at extreme ultraviolet and soft x-rays for all angles of glancing incidence, the first order focusing efficiency is expected to increase by ˜ 8 times compared to that of a typical Fresnel zone-plate. This thesis contributes to current nanoscale x-ray phase contrast imaging research and provides new insights for biological, material, and magnetic sciences

  6. Near Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy with X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, D.P.; Acremann, Y.; Scherz, A.; Burkhardt, M.; Stohr, J.; Beye, M.; Schlotter, W.F.; Beeck, T.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Pietzsch, A.; Wurth, W.; Fohlisch, A.; /Hamburg U.

    2009-12-11

    We demonstrate the feasibility of Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy on solids by means of femtosecond soft x-ray pulses from a free-electron laser (FEL). Our experiments, carried out at the Free-Electron Laser at Hamburg (FLASH), used a special sample geometry, spectrographic energy dispersion, single shot position-sensitive detection and a data normalization procedure that eliminates the severe fluctuations of the incident intensity in space and photon energy. As an example we recorded the {sup 3}D{sub 1} N{sub 4,5}-edge absorption resonance of La{sup 3+}-ions in LaMnO{sub 3}. Our study opens the door for x-ray absorption measurements on future x-ray FEL facilities.

  7. X-ray Structure of Snow Flea Antifreeze Protein Determined by Racemic Crystallization of Synthetic Protein Enantiomers

    SciTech Connect

    Pentelute, Brad L.; Gates, Zachary P.; Tereshko, Valentina; Dashnau, Jennifer L.; Vanderkooi, Jane M.; Kossiakoff, Anthony A.; Kent, Stephen B.H.

    2008-08-20

    Chemical protein synthesis and racemic protein crystallization were used to determine the X-ray structure of the snow flea antifreeze protein (sfAFP). Crystal formation from a racemic solution containing equal amounts of the chemically synthesized proteins d-sfAFP and l-sfAFP occurred much more readily than for l-sfAFP alone. More facile crystal formation also occurred from a quasi-racemic mixture of d-sfAFP and l-Se-sfAFP, a chemical protein analogue that contains an additional -SeCH2- moiety at one residue and thus differs slightly from the true enantiomer. Multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing from quasi-racemate crystals was then used to determine the X-ray structure of the sfAFP protein molecule. The resulting model was used to solve by molecular replacement the X-ray structure of l-sfAFP to a resolution of 0.98 {angstrom}. The l-sfAFP molecule is made up of six antiparallel left-handed PPII helixes, stacked in two sets of three, to form a compact brick-like structure with one hydrophilic face and one hydrophobic face. This is a novel experimental protein structure and closely resembles a structural model proposed for sfAFP. These results illustrate the utility of total chemical synthesis combined with racemic crystallization and X-ray crystallography for determining the unknown structure of a protein.

  8. Cosmic X-ray spectroscopy with multilayer optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.; Martinez, Dennis S.; Paris, Elizabeth S.; Hoover, Richard B.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Multilayer optics operated at normal incidence offer a powerful new technology for the study of the solar spectrum in the XUV. The spectra of most cosmic X-ray sources are strongly extinguished at wavelengths above 40 A due to absorption and scattering by interstellar grains. We describe a number of configurations which allow multilayer optics to be used at nonnormal angles of incidence in conjunction with grazing incidence optics to analyze the spectra of cosmic X-ray sources in the wavelength interval between 1.5 and 40 A. These optical configurations utilize both multilayer mirrors and gratings, and permit the efficient observation of extended sources using stigmatic spectrographs. The response of the instruments described to typical cosmic X-ray sources is also discussed.

  9. Multidisciplinary research in the space sciences. Scope B: Experimental X-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novick, R.

    1973-01-01

    A research program to design and develop instruments suitable for rocket-borne X-ray astronomy experiments is discussed. Successful designs that were implemented are summarized. The designs include the following: (1) a large area modular X-ray focusing system, (2) incoherent scattering polarimeters, (3) Bragg crystal spectrometers and polarimeters, and (4) a focusing collector for long wavelength. The applications of these instruments to the observation of X-ray sources in rocket-borne experiments are analyzed.

  10. Special tablets containing cellulose binder and Sr internal standard for simplifying X-ray fluorescence analysis of powder samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mzyk, Zofia; Anyszkiewicz, Jacek; Gorewoda, Tadeusz

    2015-12-01

    The addition of a constant amount of SrCO3 was observed to be the proper internal standard for analysis by wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry to correct the matrix and grain size effects of many constituents. The weighing of constant amounts of SrCO3, binder and sample allowed for the preparation time for analysis to be extended, and special tablets containing binder and SrCO3 were developed. Several substances were tested as binders, among which microcrystalline cellulose was chosen for further study. The prepared tablets were checked for their weight stability and the repeatability of SrCO3 addition. The tablets were then used to prepare pellets from geological samples for X-ray fluorescence analysis. The exemplary application and calibration curves for several analytes confirmed that the prepared tablets could be useful for the pelletizing of such materials to compensate for matrix effects.

  11. Improving the energy resolution of bent crystal X-ray spectrometers with position-sensitive detectors.

    PubMed

    Honkanen, Ari Pekka; Verbeni, Roberto; Simonelli, Laura; Moretti Sala, Marco; Al-Zein, Ali; Krisch, Michael; Monaco, Giulio; Huotari, Simo

    2014-07-01

    Wavelength-dispersive high-resolution X-ray spectrometers often employ elastically bent crystals for the wavelength analysis. In a preceding paper [Honkanen et al. (2014). J. Synchrotron Rad. 21, 104-110] a theory for quantifying the internal stress of a macroscopically large spherically curved analyser crystal was presented. Here the theory is applied to compensate for the corresponding decrease of the energy resolution. The technique is demonstrated with a Johann-type spectrometer using a spherically bent Si(660) analyser in near-backscattering geometry, where an improvement in the energy resolution from 1.0?eV down to 0.5?eV at 9.7?keV incident photon energy was observed. PMID:24971972

  12. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for high throughput analysis of atmospheric aerosol samples: The benefits of synchrotron X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukowiecki, Nicolas; Lienemann, Peter; Zwicky, Christoph N.; Furger, Markus; Richard, Agnes; Falkenberg, Gerald; Rickers, Karen; Grolimund, Daniel; Borca, Camelia; Hill, Matthias; Gehrig, Robert; Baltensperger, Urs

    2008-09-01

    The determination of trace element mass concentrations in ambient air with a time resolution higher than one day represents an urgent need in atmospheric research. It involves the application of a specific technique both for the aerosol sampling and the subsequent analysis of the collected particles. Beside the intrinsic sensitivity of the analytical method, the sampling interval and thus the quantity of collected material that is available for subsequent analysis is a major factor driving the overall trace element detection power. This is demonstrated for synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SR-XRF) of aerosol samples collected with a rotating drum impactor (RDI) in hourly intervals and three particle size ranges. The total aerosol mass on the 1-h samples is in the range of 10 µg. An experimental detection of the nanogram amounts of trace elements with the help of synchrotron X-rays was only achievable by the design of a fit-for-purpose sample holder system, which considered the boundary conditions both from particle sampling and analysis. A 6-µm polypropylene substrate film has evolved as substrate of choice, due to its practical applicability during sampling and its suitable spectroscopic behavior. In contrast to monochromatic excitation conditions, the application of a 'white' beam led to a better spectral signal-to-background ratio. Despite the low sample mass, a counting time of less than 30 s per 1-h aerosol sample led to sufficient counting statistics. Therefore the RDI-SR-XRF method represents a high-throughput analysis procedure without the need for any sample preparation. The analysis of a multielemental mass standard film by SR-XRF, laboratory-based wavelength-dispersive XRF spectrometry and laboratory-based micro XRF spectrometry showed that the laboratory-based methods were no alternatives to the SR-XRF method with respect to sensitivity and efficiency of analysis.

  13. Multiphoton physics with x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrala, G.

    1995-09-01

    With the generation of intense bursts of short wavelength radiation during the interaction of ultra-intense laser beams with solid targets, the possibility of extending the study of the non-linear interactions of radiation with matter to shorter and shorter wavelength radiation becomes possible. One would hope that an extension of the techniques to the x-ray region would lead to new tools that are similar to those used in the visible and that can be widely applied. However, a basic knowledge of the relevant efficiencies of the properties of the materials, under these unusual conditions, is necessary before one can build such sources and devices. In this work the authors discuss the design of the first experiments on non-linear interactions using x-rays in the kilovolt energy range, and present some of the some of the early findings. They concentrate on the possibility of measuring the simplest nonlinear process, two-photon inner-shell ionization of chlorine.

  14. Development of a Planetary X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer and Standard Samples for on-board Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreißigacker, A.; Fabel, O.; Köhler, E.; van Gasselt, S.; Meyer, M.

    2014-04-01

    At the Planetary Sciences and Remote Sensing research group at Freie Universität Berlin an SCDbased X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (XRF-X) is being developed to be employed on planetary orbiters. It performs direct, passive energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence measurements of planetary surfaces by measuring the emitted X-ray fluorescence induced by solar X-rays and high-energy particles.

  15. a Compact Thomson X-Ray Source at Shi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Fumio; Nakajyo, Terunobu; Yanagida, Tatsuya; Ito, Shinji

    A compact, high-brightness x-ray source has been developed through Thomson scattering between photons and relativistic electrons. 33keV energy photons (maximum) were generated in a 165-degree interaction configuration with 38MeV electrons and 800nm-wavelength Ti:sapphire laser light. The number of total photons generated at an interaction point was 106 photons/pulse for a 0.8nC electron bunch charge and 150mJ laser pulse energy. In a 90-degree interaction configuration, 105 photons/pulse total photons were obtained (maximum). Transverse profiles of x-ray intensity and energy were measured by an x-ray CCD camera. These experiment profiles agreed with the analytical results. Imaging using this x-ray source was demonstrated as an application. X-ray images for some objects were taken with various lengths between the objects and the camera. As a result, the refraction contrast images were observed with 17keV x-rays.

  16. Review of soft x-ray lasers and their applications

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, C.H.

    1991-03-01

    The emerging technology of soft x-ray lasers is in a transition phase between the first laboratory demonstrations of gain and the acceptance of soft x-ray lasers as practical tools for novel applications. Current research is focused on several fronts. The operational wavelength range has been extended to the water window'', important for applications in the life sciences. Gain has also been generated with substantially simpler technology (such as a 6J laser) and this augurs well for the commercially availability in the near future of soft x-ray lasers for a variety of applications. Advanced soft x-ray laser concepts are being developed from investigations into ultra-high intensity laser/matter interactions. The first paper a brief historical perspective of x-ray microscopy and holography have begun. In this paper a brief historical perspective of x-ray laser development will be followed by a review of recent advances in recombination, collisional and photo-pumped systems and applications. A summary of current gain-length performance achieved in laboratories worldwide is presented. Near term prospects for applications to novel fields are discussed. 81 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  17. X-ray characterization of solid small molecule organic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Billinge, Simon; Shankland, Kenneth; Shankland, Norman; Florence, Alastair

    2014-06-10

    The present invention provides, inter alia, methods of characterizing a small molecule organic material, e.g., a drug or a drug product. This method includes subjecting the solid small molecule organic material to x-ray total scattering analysis at a short wavelength, collecting data generated thereby, and mathematically transforming the data to provide a refined set of data.

  18. Light collection enhancement of the digital x-ray detector using Gd 2O 2S:Tb and CsI:Tl phosphors in the aspect of nano-scale light dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Taeho; Kim, Taewoo

    2012-01-01

    The nano-scopic light collection is investigated for the Active Matrix Flat-Panel Imagers (AMFPIs). The simulations using two kinds of screens are shown for light collection of x-rays. Enhancement of the light collection is accomplished by the microlens system incorporated with x-ray detector. For digital radiographic and mammographic applications, indirect detection imagers use Gd 2O 2S:Tb or CsI:Tl scintillation screens to convert the x-ray into visible photons. The light collection efficiencies for Gd 2O 2S and CsI are obtained. In Gd 2O 2S, the 27 kVp and 82 ?m are the highest light collection cases in both Lambertian and Isotropic geometries. In CsI, 20 keV and 150 ?m case have the highest light collection efficiency. So, x-ray energy and scintillator thicknesses are considered as the optimized light collection. The optimum thickness and x-ray energy combination are used for the detector of this study. In this paper, it is concluded that the screens between 17 kVp and 25 kVp have higher light collections, which could be considered as the clinical purposes if it is necessary. This energy range is compared with other energy cases, which are examined in the study.

  19. X-ray Emission from Massive Stars

    E-print Network

    Cohen, David

    X-ray Emission from Massive Stars David Cohen Department of Physics and Astronomy Swarthmore #12;What is the mechanism by which massive stars produce x-rays? New results from the Chandra X-ray Observatory ­ high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy: measuring Doppler broadening in emission lines Testing

  20. Imaging X-ray Thomson Scattering Spectrometer Design and Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Gamboa, E.J.; Huntington, C.M.; Trantham, M.R.; Keiter, P.A; Drake, R.P.; Montgomery, David; Benage, John F.; Letzring, Samuel A.

    2012-05-04

    In many laboratory astrophysics experiments, intense laser irradiation creates novel material conditions with large, one-dimensional gradients in the temperature, density, and ionization state. X-ray Thomson scattering is a powerful technique for measuring these plasma parameters. However, the scattered signal has previously been measured with little or no spatial resolution, which limits the ability to diagnose inhomogeneous plasmas. We report on the development of a new imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS) for the Omega laser facility. The diffraction of x-rays from a toroidally-curved crystal creates high-resolution images that are spatially resolved along a one-dimensional profile while spectrally dispersing the radiation. This focusing geometry allows for high brightness while localizing noise sources and improving the linearity of the dispersion. Preliminary results are presented from a scattering experiment that used the IXTS to measure the temperature profile of a shocked carbon foam.

  1. High-intensity laser synchrotron x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1995-10-01

    A laser interacting with a relativistic electron beam behaves like a virtual wiggler of an extremely short period equal to half of the laser wavelength. This approach opens a route to relatively compact, high-brightness x-ray sources alternative or complementary to conventional synchrotron light sources. Although not new, the Laser Synchrotron Light Source (LSLS) concept is still waiting for a convincing demonstration. Available at the BNL`s Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), a high-brightness electron beam and the high-power C0{sub 2} laser may be used as prototype LSLS brick stones. In a feasible demonstration experiment, 10-GW, 100-ps C0{sub 2} laser beam will be brought to a head-on collision with a 10-ps, 0.5-nC, 70 MeV electron bunch. Flashes of well-collimated, up to 9.36-keV ({approximately}{Angstrom}) x-rays of 10-ps pulse duration, with a flux of {approximately}10{sup 19} photons/sec will be produced via linear Compton backscattering. The x-ray spectrum is tunable proportionally to a variable e-beam energy. A natural short-term extension of the proposed experiment would be further enhancement of the x-ray flux to a 10{sup 21}{minus}10{sup 22} photons/sec level, after the ongoing ATF CO{sub 2} laser upgrade to 1 TW peak power and electron bunch shortening to 3 ps. The ATF LSLS x-ray beamline, exceeding by orders of magnitude the peak fluxes attained at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) x-ray storage ring, may become attractive for certain users, e.g., for biological x-ray microscopy. In addition, a terawatt CO{sub 2} laser will enable harmonic multiplication of the x-ray spectrum via nonlinear Compton scattering.

  2. Hard X-ray Microscopy with Multilayer Laue Lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyon Chol

    2011-03-01

    The possibility of imaging at near-atomic resolution using x-rays has been a dream ever since the short-wavelength nature of x-rays was demonstrated by von Laue and coworkers nearly a century ago. Even today the scientific impact of atomic-scale focusing of electromagnetic radiation would be deep and broad, because x-ray microscopy provides capabilities (ability to penetrate, sensitive and accurate elemental and structural information) that are complementary to other high-resolution microscopies. Although hard x-rays can in principle be focused to spot sizes on the order of their wavelength (0.1 nm), this limit has never been approached because of the difficulty in fabricating the optics. Multilayer Laue lens(MLL) is a novel diffractive optic for hard x-ray nano-focusing, which can be fabricated by sputter deposition of zone plate structure on flat substrate. According to the theoretical results, MLL is capable of focusing x-rays to well below 1 nm. We have demonstrated 2-dimensional focusing of hard x-rays with MLLs to a spot size of 25 nm x 27 nm with an efficiency of 2% at a photon energy of 12 keV, while 1-dimensional focus of 16 nm has been achieved. In this talk, we will present an overview of MLL microscopy and recent accomplishments for the determination of chemical composition in nanoscale systems. Lastly, we will give the capabilities of MLL microscopy that have the potential to significantly advance materials science, nanoscience, bio-medical science and environmental science.

  3. Ultraluminous X-ray Sources.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrika, S.; Sholukhova, O.; Abolmasov, P.

    2008-12-01

    We discuss a new type of X-ray sources discovered in galaxies -- ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs). They are of two order of magnitude brighter in X-rays than the brightest Galactic black holes. Two mod- els of ULXs are discussed: "intermediate mass" black holes, 100 - 10000 solar masses, with standard accretion disks, and "stellar mass" black holes with su- percritical accretion disks like that in the Galactic object SS 433. A study of gas nebulae surrounding these objects gives us a new important information on the central sources. The observed X-ray radiation of ULXs is not enough to power their nebulae. To understand both spectra and power of the nebulae one needs a powerful UV source. The ULXs must be such bright in UV range as they are in X-rays. Spectroscopy of gas filaments surrounding SS 433 proves that the intrinsic face-on luminosity of the supercritical accretion disk in the far UV region to be "sim; 10^40 erg/s. We expect that observations of ULXs with the WSO-UV Observatory, measurements their UV fluxes and spectral slopes solve the problem of ULXs between the two known models of these sources.

  4. EUV spectroscopy of high-redshift x-ray objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, M. P.; Wolff, M. T.; Wood, K. S.; Barbee, T. W., Jr.; Barstow, M. A.

    2010-07-01

    As astronomical observations are pushed to cosmological distances (z>3) the spectral energy distributions of X-ray objects, AGN for example, will be redshifted into the EUV waveband. Consequently, a wealth of critical spectral diagnostics, provided by, for example, the Fe L-shell complex and the O VII/VIII lines, will be lost to future planned X-ray missions (e.g., IXO, Gen-X) if operated at traditional X-ray energies. This opens up a critical gap in performance located at short EUV wavelengths, where critical X-ray spectral transitions occur in high-z objects. However, normal-incidence multilayer-grating technology, which performs best precisely at such wavelengths, together with advanced nanolaminate replication techniques have been developed and are now mature to the point where advanced EUV instrument designs with performance complementary to IXO and Gen-X are practical. Such EUV instruments could be flown either independently or as secondary instruments on these X-ray missions. We present here a critical examination of the limits placed on extragalactic EUV measurements by ISM absorption, the range where high-z measurements are practical, and the requirements this imposes on next-generation instrument designs. We conclude with a discussion of a breakthrough technology, nanolaminate replication, which enables such instruments.

  5. Resonant elastic X-ray scattering: Where from? where to?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vettier, C.

    2012-06-01

    The International Conference on Anomalous Scattering held in Malente, Germany, in 1992 examined the broad issue of `dispersion or resonant scattering' for X-rays. The significant aspects discussed at that time included: the evaluation of X-ray scattering factors, the role of local broken symmetries and the application to structure determinations, the impact on magnetic X-ray scattering, but also resonant Raman scattering and nuclear resonant scattering. However, many aspects of resonant elastic X-ray scattering (REXS) were still being revealed and soon it was realised that new productive paths of research would open up. In the last two decades, applications have developed thanks to concurrent developments in X-ray instrumentation and theoretical approaches. Focusing on REXS only, noteworthy fields are: the observation of multiple order parameters, the detection of multipolar moments, but also applications in chemistry and materials sciences, macromolecules and soft matter in the soft X-ray range. REXS has evolved from the exploitation of large resonant signals to a powerful experimental and characterisation method aimed at unravelling new phenomena. The recent technical and theoretical advances have paved the way to further REXS developments in many fields of science.

  6. Characterizing X-ray and Radio emission in the Black Hole X-Ray Binary V404 Cygni during Quiescence

    E-print Network

    Rana, Vikram; Corbel, Stephane; Tomsick, John A; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Walton, Dominic J; Barret, Didier; Boggs, Steven E; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William; Fuerst, Felix; Gandhi, Poshak; Grefenstette, Brian W; Hailey, Charles; Harrison, Fiona A; Madsen, Kristin K; Rahoui, Farid; Stern, Daniel; Tendulkar, Shriharsh; Zhang, William W

    2015-01-01

    We present results from multi-wavelength simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of the black hole X-ray binary V404 Cyg in quiescence. Our coverage with NuSTAR provides the very first opportunity to study the X-ray spectrum of V404 Cyg at energies above 10 keV. The unabsorbed broad-band (0.3-30 keV) quiescent luminosity of the source is 8.9$\\times$10$^{32}$ erg s$^{-1}$ for a distance of 2.4 kpc. The source shows clear variability on short time scales in radio, soft X-ray and hard X-ray bands in the form of multiple flares. The broad-band X-ray spectra obtained from XMM-Newton and NuSTAR can be characterized with a power-law model having photon index {\\Gamma}=2.13$\\pm$0.07 (90% confidence errors); however, residuals at high energies indicate spectral curvature significant at a 3{\\sigma} confidence level with e-folding energy of the cutoff to be 19$^{+19}_{-7}$ keV. Such curvature can be explained using synchrotron emission from the base of a jet outflow. Radio observations using the JVLA reveal that the sp...

  7. Imaging whole Escherichia coli bacteria by using single-particle x-ray diffraction

    E-print Network

    Miao, Jianwei "John"

    Imaging whole Escherichia coli bacteria by using single-particle x-ray diffraction Jianwei Miao Escherichia coli bacteria using coherent x-rays with a wavelength of 2 Å. By using the oversam- pling phasing successful experiment, to our knowledge, of imaging Escherichia coli bacteria at 30-nm resolution by using

  8. Compression of powerful x-ray pulses to attosecond durations by stimulated Raman backscattering in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Malkin, V. M.; Fisch, N. J.; Wurtele, J. S.

    2007-02-15

    Backward Raman amplification (BRA) in plasmas holds the potential for longitudinal compression and focusing of powerful x-ray pulses. In principle, this method is capable of producing pulse intensities close to the vacuum breakdown threshold by manipulating the output of planned x-ray sources. The minimum wavelength limit of BRA applicability to compression of laser pulses in plasmas is found.

  9. Compression of powerful x-ray pulses to attosecond durations by stimulated Raman backscattering in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkin, V. M.; Fisch, N. J.; Wurtele, J. S.

    2007-02-01

    Backward Raman amplification (BRA) in plasmas holds the potential for longitudinal compression and focusing of powerful x-ray pulses. In principle, this method is capable of producing pulse intensities close to the vacuum breakdown threshold by manipulating the output of planned x-ray sources. The minimum wavelength limit of BRA applicability to compression of laser pulses in plasmas is found.

  10. Wavelength dispersion of the local field intensity in silver-gold nanocages.

    PubMed

    Pilot, R; Zoppi, A; Trigari, S; Deepak, F L; Giorgetti, E; Bozio, R

    2015-03-21

    This study provides a combined theoretical and experimental analysis of the far-field (extinction) and of the near-field (SERS enhancement) spectral distribution in hollow nanoparticles, that is, silver-gold nanocages (NCs). Chitosan protected NCs have been synthesized by a galvanic replacement-based procedure: their morphological properties and chemical composition have been characterized by TEM, STEM and ICP. NCs were then functionalized with a thiolated organic dye prior to carrying out SERS measurements. Finite Element Method simulations of a single NC have shown that the field enhancement at the excitation wavelength follows the same spectral dependence as the extinction spectrum and, consequently, the SERS enhancement profile, as a function of the excitation wavelength, peaks at higher energy with respect to extinction. The simulated extinction is remarkably narrower than the experimental spectrum of NCs in solution, indicating that the colloidal sample is substantially polydispersed. However, a simple qualitative model that we have developed would suggest that the SERS enhancement profile is blue-shifted with respect to the extinction in the presence of polydispersivity as well. In addition, NC dimers have been simulated: both their extinction and near field-spectra shift to the red when the size of the gap is reduced analogous to what happens with dimers of filled spherical nanoparticles (NPs). In addition, simulations also revealed that a NC dimer is only slightly more efficient in amplifying the field with respect to the isolated NC, and this behavior is peculiar to NCs. In fact, filled spherical NP dimers exhibit a remarkably stronger field enhancement with respect to the isolated NP. By means of Wavelength Scanned SERS, we measured the spectral distribution of the local field in a dispersion of NCs. We observed experimentally that the local field is distributed in the same spectral region as the extinction and that the absolute value of the SERS enhancement factor maintains a low value throughout the range explored (568-800 nm). We propose that the observed correlation between the SERS profile and the extinction is accidental and originates from the limited increase in amplification provided by NC aggregates with respect to isolated NCs. PMID:25698217

  11. Gated monochromatic x-ray imager

    SciTech Connect

    Oertel, J.A.; Archuleta, T.; Clark, L.

    1995-09-01

    We have recently developed a gated monochromatic x-ray imaging diagnostic for the national Inertial-Confinement Fusion (ICF) program. This new imaging system will be one of the primary diagnostics to be utilized on University of Rochester`s Omega laser fusion facility. The new diagnostic is based upon a Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) microscope dispersed by diffraction crystals, as first described by Marshall and Su. The dispersed images are gated by four individual proximity focused microchannel plates and recorded on film. Spectral coverage is tunable up to 8 keV, spectral resolution has been measured at 20 eV, temporal resolution is 80 ps, and spatial resolution is better than 10 {mu}m.

  12. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    University of Alabama engineer Stacey Giles briefs NASA astronaut Dr. Bornie Dunbar about the design and capabilities of the X-ray Crystallography Facility under development at the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, April 21, 1999. The X-ray Crystallography Facility is designed to speed the collection of protein structure information from crystals grown aboard the International Space Station. By measuring and mapping the protein crystal structure in space, researchers will avoid exposing the delicate crystals to the rigors of space travel and make important research data available to scientists much faster. The X-ray Crystallography facility is being designed and developed by the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, a NASA Commercial Space Center.

  13. X-ray Crystallography Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    University of Alabama engineer Lance Weiss briefs NASA astronaut Dr. Bornie Dunbar about the design and capabilities of the X-ray Crystallography Facility under development at the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, April 21, 1999. The X-ray Crystallography Facility is designed to speed the collection of protein structure information from crystals grown aboard the International Space Station. By measuring and mapping the protein crystal structure in space, researchers will avoid exposing the delicate crystals to the rigors of space travel and make important research data available to scientists much faster. The X-ray Crystallography facility is being designed and developed by the Center for Macromolecular Crystallography of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, a NASA Commercial Space Center.

  14. Wide-band, high-resolution soft x-ray spectrometer for the Electron Beam Ion Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Widmann, K.

    1999-01-01

    We have constructed two wide-band, high-resolution vacuum flat crystal spectrometers and implemented them on the Electron Beam Ion Trap located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Working in unison, these spectrometers can measure an x-ray bandwidth {le}9 {Angstrom} in the soft x-ray region below 21 {Angstrom}. In order to achieve this large bandwidth each spectrometer houses either two 125 mm {times} 13 mm {times} 2 mm RAP (rubidium acid phthalate, 2d=26.121 {Angstrom}), two 114 mm {times} 13 mm {times} 2 mm TlAP (thallium acid phthalate, 2d=25.75 {Angstrom}) crystals, or some combination thereof, for dispersion and two position sensitive proportional counters for detection of x rays. The spectrometers are used to measure wavelengths and relative intensities of the L-shell line emission from FethinspXVII{endash}XXIV for comparison with spectra obtained from astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. The wide wavelength coverage attainable by these spectrometers makes it possible to measure all the L-shell emission from a given iron ion species simultaneously. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Miniaturized, High-Speed, Modulated X-Ray Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gendreau, Keith; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Kenyon, Steve; Spartana, Nick

    2013-01-01

    A low-cost, miniature x-ray source has been developed that can be modulated in intensity from completely off to full intensity on nanosecond timescales. This modulated x-ray source (MXS) has no filaments and is extremely rugged. The energy level of the MXS is adjustable from 0 to more than 100 keV. It can be used as the core of many new devices, providing the first practical, arbitrarily time-variable source of x-rays. The high-speed switching capability and miniature size make possible many new technologies including x-ray-based communication, compact time-resolved x-ray diffraction, novel x-ray fluorescence instruments, and low- and precise-dose medical x-rays. To make x-rays, the usual method is to accelerate electrons into a target material held at a high potential. When the electrons stop in the target, x-rays are produced with a spectrum that is a function of the target material and the energy to which the electrons are accelerated. Most commonly, the electrons come from a hot filament. In the MXS, the electrons start off as optically driven photoelectrons. The modulation of the x-rays is then tied to the modulation of the light that drives the photoelectron source. Much of the recent development has consisted of creating a photoelectrically-driven electron source that is robust, low in cost, and offers high intensity. For robustness, metal photocathodes were adopted, including aluminum and magnesium. Ultraviolet light from 255- to 350-nm LEDs (light emitting diodes) stimulated the photoemissions from these photocathodes with an efficiency that is maximized at the low-wavelength end (255 nm) to a value of roughly 10(exp -4). The MXS units now have much higher brightness, are much smaller, and are made using a number of commercially available components, making them extremely inexpensive. In the latest MXS design, UV efficiency is addressed by using a high-gain electron multiplier. The photocathode is vapor-deposited onto the input cone of a Burle Magnum(TradeMark) multiplier. This system yields an extremely robust photon-driven electron source that can tolerate long, weeks or more, exposure to air with negligible degradation. The package is also small. When combined with the electron target, necessary vacuum fittings, and supporting components (but not including LED electronics or high-voltage sources), the entire modulated x-ray source weighs as little as 158 grams.

  16. Planetary Science Advances with the International X-ray Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, Eric; Elsner, R.; Glassgold, A.; Guedel, M.; Montmerle, T.; Wargelin, B.; Wolk, S.

    2009-01-01

    X-ray studies of planetary systems are beginning to provide important insights inaccessible at other wavelengths. In our Solar System, charge exchange emission from solar particles is faint and variable with complex spectra, a situation well-matched to the planned International X-ray Observatory's high-throughput and high spectral resolution. Solar-type stars universally exhibit enhanced magnetic activity during their youth so that X-ray studies reveal the high-energy inputs to protoplanetary disks and planetary atmospheres. It is possible that X-ray illumination is a critical regulator to the formation of planets. This paper is based on the report of the Con-X ``Solar System, Planet Formation and Evolution'' Science Panel. (1) X-ray irradiation of protoplanetary disks can be probed with the 6.4 keV iron fluorescent line. Seen in a handful of protostars with Chandra and XMM, IXO will survey the line in hundreds of young stellar systems and will quantify the 10-30 keV emission stellar emission that can penetrate deep into the disk. In a few cases, X-ray `superflares' will permit disk reverberation mapping. Combined with infrared and submillimeter studies, IXO will establish the importance of X-ray illumination on protoplanetary disk physics and chemistry. (2) Planetary atmospheres show rapidly varying X-ray components from charge exchange of heavy solar wind ions, electron bremsstrahlung continuum from ion-neutral interactions, and scattering and fluorescence of solar X-ray emission. IXO will produce a movie of these effects in Jupiter as the planet rotates and responds to solar flare/CME events. IXO study of the remarkable Martian X-ray exosphere will constrain the evaporation of planetary atmospheres. Three additional science programs are outlined: study of charge exchange processes in cometary comae; spectroscopy of diffuse heliospheric charge exchange X-rays previously attributed to the hot local interstellar medium; and measurements of flaring in stars hosting extrasolar planets in the Habitable Zone to evaluate atmospheric evaporation.

  17. The SWIRE/Chandra Survey: The X-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Kilgard, Roy; Kim, Dong-Woo; Kim, Minsun; Polletta, Mari; Lonsdale, Carol; Smith, Harding E.; Surace, Jason; Owen, Frazer N.; Franceschini, A.; Siana, Brian; Shupe, David

    2009-12-01

    We report a moderate-depth (70 ks), contiguous 0.7 deg2 Chandra survey in the Lockman Hole Field of the Spitzer/SWIRE Legacy Survey coincident with a completed, ultra-deep VLA survey with deep optical and near-infrared imaging in-hand. The primary motivation is to distinguish starburst galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGNs), including the significant, highly obscured (log N H > 23) subset. Chandra has detected 775 X-ray sources to a limiting broadband (0.3-8 keV) flux ~4 × 10-16 erg cm-2 s-1. We present the X-ray catalog, fluxes, hardness ratios, and multi-wavelength fluxes. The log N versus log S agrees with those of previous surveys covering similar flux ranges. The Chandra and Spitzer flux limits are well matched: 771 (99%) of the X-ray sources have infrared (IR) or optical counterparts, and 333 have MIPS 24 ?m detections. There are four optical-only X-ray sources and four with no visible optical/IR counterpart. The very deep (~2.7 ?Jy rms) VLA data yield 251 (>4?) radio counterparts, 44% of the X-ray sources in the field. We confirm that the tendency for lower X-ray flux sources to be harder is primarily due to absorption. As expected, there is no correlation between observed IR and X-ray fluxes. Optically bright, type 1, and red AGNs lie in distinct regions of the IR versus X-ray flux plots, demonstrating the wide range of spectral energy distributions in this sample and providing the potential for classification/source selection. Many optically bright sources, which lie outside the AGN region in the optical versus X-ray plots (fr /fx >10), lie inside the region predicted for red AGNs in IR versus X-ray plots, consistent with the presence of an active nucleus. More than 40% of the X-ray sources in the VLA field are radio-loud using the classical definition, RL . The majority of these are red and relatively faint in the optical so that the use of RL to select those AGNs with the strongest radio emission becomes questionable. Using the 24 ?m to radio flux ratio (q 24) instead results in 13 of the 147 AGNs with sufficient data being classified as radio-loud, in good agreement with the ~10% expected for broad-lined AGNs based on optical surveys. We conclude that q 24 is a more reliable indicator of radio-loudness. Use of RL should be confined to the optically selected type 1 AGN.

  18. Compact x-ray source and panel

    DOEpatents

    Sampayon, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

    2008-02-12

    A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

  19. Wavelength dependence of reversible photodegradation of disperse orange 11 dye-doped PMMA thin films

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Benjamin R; Kuzyk, Mark G

    2015-01-01

    Using transmittance imaging microscopy we measure the wavelength dependence of reversible photodegradation in disperse orange 11 (DO11) dye-doped (poly)methyl-methacrylate (PMMA). The reversible and irreversible inverse quantum efficiencies (IQEs) are found to be constant over the spectral region investigated, with the average reversible IQE being $\\overline{B}_\\alpha= 8.70 (\\pm 0.38)\\times 10^5$ and the average irreversible IQE being $\\overline{B}_\\epsilon= 1.396 (\\pm 0.031)\\times 10^8$. The large difference between the IQEs is hypothesized to be due to the reversible decay channel being a direct decay mechanism of the dye, while the irreversible decay channel is an indirect mechanism, with the dye first absorbing light, then heating the surrounding environment causing polymer chain scission and cross linking. Additionally, the DO11/PMMA's irreversible IQE is found to be among the largest of those reported for organic dyes, implying that the system is highly photostable. We also find that the recovery rate i...

  20. Cosmic X-ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, D.; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of the beryllium-filtered data from Flight 17.020 was completed. The data base provided by the Wisconsin diffuse X-ray sky survey is being analyzed by correlating the B and C band emission with individual velocity components of neutral hydrogen. Work on a solid state detector to be used in high resolution spectroscopy of diffuse or extend X-ray sources is continuing. A series of 21 cm observations was completed. A paper on the effects of process parameter variation on the reflectivity of sputter-deposited tungsten-carvon multilayers was published.

  1. Portable X-Ray Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Portable x-ray instrument developed by NASA now being produced commercially as an industrial tool may soon find further utility as a medical system. The instrument is Lixiscope - Low Intensity X-Ray Imaging Scope -- a self-contained, battery-powered fluoroscope that produces an instant image through use of a small amount of radioactive isotope. Originally developed by Goddard Space Flight Center, Lixiscope is now being produced by Lixi, Inc. which has an exclusive NASA license for one version of the device.

  2. Copyright The Discussion Group of X-Ray Analysis,

    E-print Network

    Jun, Kawai

    ;37 27 2005 X 6 ED-XAS 7 XRD 8 XANES 9 1 Pigment Identification by Spectroscopic Means: Evidence.Adriaens, 77(17), 5512-5519. 7 Analysis of Time-Resolved Energy-Dispersive X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Data

  3. Si(Li) X-ray astronomical spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.

    1975-01-01

    The general considerations involved in the choice of Si(Li) as a non-dispersive spectrometer for X-ray astronomy are discussed. In particular, its adaptation to HEAO-B is described as an example of the space-borne application of Si(Li) technology.

  4. Development of an x-ray fluorescence microprobe at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory: Early results: Comparison with data from other techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.V.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.; Jones, K.W.; Hanson, A.L.; Gordon, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical predictions for the detection levels in x-ray fluorescence analysis with a synchrotron storage ring are being achieved experimentally at several laboratories. This paper is deliberately restricted to the state of development of the Brookhaven National Laboratory/University of Chicago instruments. Analyses at the parts per million (ppM) level are being made using white light apertured to 20 ..mu..m and an energy dispersive system. This system is particularly useful for elements with Z > 20 in materials dominated by elements with Z < 20. Diffraction causes an interference for crystalline materials. Development of a focusing microprobe for tunable monochromatic x-rays and a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) is delayed by problems in shaping an 8:1 focusing mirror to the required accuracy. Reconnaissance analyses with a wiggler source on the CHESS synchrotron have been made in the K spectrum up to Z = 80.

  5. Hard X-ray Optics Technology Development for Astronomy at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Ramsey, Brian; Kilaru, Kiranmayee

    2009-01-01

    Grazing-incidence telescopes based on Wolter 1 geometry have delivered impressive advances in astrophysics at soft-x-ray wavelengths, while the hard xray region remains relatively unexplored at fine angular resolution and high sensitivities. The ability to perform ground-breaking science in the hard-x-ray energy range had been the motivation for technology developments aimed at fabricating low-cost, light-weight, high-quality x-ray mirrors. Grazing-incidence x-ray optics for high-energy astrophysical applications is being developed at MSFC using the electroform-nickel replication process.

  6. First measurements using the ALS Soft X-ray Fourier Transform spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J.; Duarte, R.M.; Howells, M.R.; Hussain, Z.; Spring, J.

    1997-08-01

    Commissioning of a Fourier Transform Soft X-ray spectrometer (FT-SX) is under way at the Advanced Light Source (ALS), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, as a branch of beamline 9.3.2. The spectrometer is a novel soft x-ray interferometer designed for ultra-high resolution spectroscopy in the photon experimental results which sensitively test models of correlated electron processes in atomic and molecular physics. The design criteria and consequent technical challenges posed by the short wavelengths of x-rays and desired resolving power are discussed. The fundamental and practical aspects of soft x-ray interferometry are also explored.

  7. X-ray Emission from Massive StarsX-ray Emission from Massive Stars David CohenDavid Cohen

    E-print Network

    Cohen, David

    X-ray Emission from Massive StarsX-ray Emission from Massive Stars David CohenDavid CohenOutline BackgroundBackground Massive star X-raysMassive star X-rays vsvs. solar-type X-rays. solar-type X-rays X-ray spectroscopy of massive stars: DataX-ray spectroscopy of massive stars: Data Kinematics

  8. X-Ray Structure determination of the Glycine Cleavage System Protein H of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Using An Inverse Compton Synchrotron X-Ray Source

    PubMed Central

    Abendroth, Jan; McCormick, Michael S.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Staker, Bart; Loewen, Roderick; Gifford, Martin; Rifkin, Jeff; Mayer, Chad; Guo, Wenjin; Zhang, Yang; Myler, Peter; Kelley, Angela; Analau, Erwin; Hewitt, Stephen Nakazawa; Napuli, Alberto J.; Kuhn, Peter; Ruth, Ronald D.; Stewart, Lance J.

    2010-01-01

    Structural genomics discovery projects require ready access to both X-ray and NMR instrumentation which support the collection of experimental data needed to solve large numbers of novel protein structures. The most productive X-ray crystal structure determination laboratories make extensive frequent use of tunable synchrotron X-ray light to solve novel structures by anomalous diffraction methods. This requires that frozen cryo-protected crystals be shipped to large government-run synchrotron facilities for data collection. In an effort to eliminate the need to ship crystals for data collection, we have developed the first laboratory-scale synchrotron light source capable of performing many of the state-of-the-art synchrotron applications in X-ray science. This Compact Light Source is a first-in-class device that uses inverse Compton scattering to generate X-rays of sufficient flux, tunable wavelength and beam size to allow high-resolution X-ray diffraction data collection from protein crystals. We report on benchmarking tests of X-ray diffraction data collection with hen egg white lysozyme, and the successful high-resolution X-ray structure determination of the Glycine cleavage system protein H from Mycobacterium tuberculosis using diffraction data collected with the Compact Light Source X-ray beam. PMID:20364333

  9. Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) science instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dailey, C. C.; Cumings, N. P.; Winkler, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    AXAF is to be equipped with a high performance X-ray telescope for the conduction of detailed astrophysics research. The observatory is to be serviced by the Space Station or the Shuttle, depending on capabilities during the AXAF operational period. The AXAF is to utilize the wavelength band from 1.2 A to 120 A. Attention is given to the AXAF science team, the AXAF observatory characteristics, the AXAF science instrument definition program, the Advanced Charge Coupled Device (CCD) Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), the High Resolution Camera (HRC), the Bragg Crystal Spectrometer (BCS), the X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), the transmission gratings, and the program schedule.

  10. Highly coherent red-shifted dispersive wave generation around 1.3??m for efficient wavelength conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xia; Bi, Wanjun; Chen, Wei; Xue, Tianfeng; Hu, Lili; Liao, Meisong; Gao, Weiqing

    2015-03-14

    This research investigates the mechanism of the optical dispersive wave (DW) and proposes a scheme that can realize an efficient wavelength conversion. In an elaborately designed photonic crystal fiber, a readily available ytterbium laser operating at ?1??m can be transferred to the valuable 1.3??m wavelength range. A low-order soliton is produced to concentrate the energy of the DW into the target wavelength range and improve the degree of coherence. The input chirp is demonstrated to be a factor that enhances the wavelength conversion efficiency. With a positive initial chirp, 76.6% of the pump energy in the fiber can be transferred into a spectral range between 1.24 and 1.4??m. With the use of a grating compressor, it is possible to compress the generated coherent DW of several picoseconds into less than 90?fs.

  11. Optimization of the hard X-ray self-seeding layout of the PAL-XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaeyu; Hyun Shim, Chi; Yoon, Moohyun; Hwang, Ilmoon; Woon Parc, Yong; Wu, Juhao

    2015-10-01

    The Pohang Accelerator Laboratory X-ray free electron laser (PAL-XFEL) will operate a soft X-ray undulator line and a hard X-ray one during the initial operation period. For the hard X-ray line, self-seeding using a diamond crystal is the most promising approach to supply narrow bandwidth radiation to users. This paper presents simulation results for the optimization of the self-seeding layout in the hard X-ray undulator line for PAL-XFEL. The electron energy used in this study for the hard X-ray self-seeding scheme is 8.126 GeV and the central wavelength is 0.15 nm. The photon beam spectral bandwidth will be 0.78 eV by using the self-seeding option.

  12. Soft X-ray microflares

    E-print Network

    Mirzoeva, I K

    2015-01-01

    Soft X-ray solar bursts are studied. Weak bursts with powers up to 10-8 W/m2 were detected. All the events were confirmed by GOES observations. Parameters of these microflares are determined. A physical mechanism for the low-intensity solar events is discussed.

  13. Focused X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A. (Woodside, CA); Boyers, David G. (Mountain View, CA); Pincus, Cary I. (Sunnyvale, CA); Maccagno, Pierre (Stanford, CA)

    1990-01-01

    An intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator.

  14. X-Ray Diffractive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian; Li, Mary; Skinner, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    X-ray optics were fabricated with the capability of imaging solar x-ray sources with better than 0.1 arcsecond angular resolution, over an order of magnitude finer than is currently possible. Such images would provide a new window into the little-understood energy release and particle acceleration regions in solar flares. They constitute one of the most promising ways to probe these regions in the solar atmosphere with the sensitivity and angular resolution needed to better understand the physical processes involved. A circular slit structure with widths as fine as 0.85 micron etched in a silicon wafer 8 microns thick forms a phase zone plate version of a Fresnel lens capable of focusing approx. =.6 keV x-rays. The focal length of the 3-cm diameter lenses is 100 microns, and the angular resolution capability is better than 0.1 arcsecond. Such phase zone plates were fabricated in Goddard fs Detector Development Lab. (DDL) and tested at the Goddard 600-microns x-ray test facility. The test data verified that the desired angular resolution and throughput efficiency were achieved.

  15. Focused X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.I.; Maccagno, P.

    1990-08-21

    Disclosed is an intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator. 8 figs.

  16. Sequential femtosecond X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, C. M.; Pfau, B.; Mitzner, R.; Siemer, B.; Roling, S.; Zacharias, H.; Kutz, O.; Rudolph, I.; Schondelmaier, D.; Treusch, R.; Eisebitt, S.

    2011-02-01

    Recording a `molecular movie' with atomic spatial resolution on the femtosecond timescale set by atomic motion can be considered the ultimate goal of dynamic real-space imaging. Free-electron X-ray lasers, with their (sub)nanometre wavelength, femtosecond pulse duration and high brilliance, fuel the hope that this may ultimately become possible. Single-shot still pictures with sub-100 nm resolution achieved during femtosecond exposures have recently been demonstrated. A femtosecond time-lapse movie requires a sequence of independent images taken with a controllable time delay. As a key step towards achieving a molecular movie, we demonstrate a holographic imaging approach capable of recording two fully independent images with a variable time delay over the entire femtosecond regime. The concept overcomes the fundamental readout time limitations of two-dimensional area detectors, as two subsequent X-ray holograms of a sample can be superimposed within one detector exposure and yet be unambiguously disentangled to reconstruct two independent images.

  17. X-raying the Intergalactic OVI Absorbers

    E-print Network

    Y. Yao; T. M. Tripp; Q. D. Wang; C. W. Danforth; C. R. Canizares; J. M. Shull; H. L. Marshall; L. Song

    2009-03-23

    The observed intergalactic OVI absorbers at z>0 have been regarded as a significant reservoir of the ``missing baryons''. However, to fully understand how these absorbers contribute to the baryon inventory, it is crucial to determine whether the systems are collisionally ionized or photoionized (or both). Using the identified intergalactic OVI absorbers as tracers, we search for the corresponding X-ray absorption lines, which are useful for finding the missing baryons and for revealing the nature of the OVI absorbers. Stacking the Chandra grating spectra along six AGN sight lines, we obtain three spectra with signal-to-noise ratios of 32, 28, and 10 per 12.5 mA spectral bin around the expected OVII Kalpha wavelength. These spectra correspond to OVI absorbers with various dynamic properties. We find no detectable NeIX, OVII, OVIII, NVII, or CVI absorption lines in the spectra, but the high counting statistics allows us to obtain firm upper limits on the corresponding ionic column densities (in particular N(OVII)intergalactic medium and its detection in future X-ray observations.

  18. Tracing Ambient Air Geochemistry using a Modified X-Ray Fluorescence Filter Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, J. C.; Rudolph, E.; Wrice, T.

    2002-12-01

    Modifications of x-ray fluorescence counting procedures enable tracing of aerosol dispersals related to weather fronts and local weather phenomena. Improved X-ray fluorescence methods for bulk aerosols deposited under positive air pressure conditions onto Millipore filters at 80 liters/hour enable the tracing of geological samples in periods down to one hour. Vacuum-plating aliquots of USGS standards onto 0.2 micron polycarbonate and quartz Millipore filters create standards with a shelf life of several months. The analytical system permits detection of light oxides, such as silica to 10 ppm, and heavy elements, such as iron to 0.5 ppm. These collections allow discriminations to be drawn between dominantly geological, silica-enriched air mass and dominantly iron-enriched air of possible industrial origin. These ambient air collections at 120 feet elevation at City College are used to create possible distinctions in air masses related to points of origin. Splits of aerosol examined by neutron activation and coupled plasma emission spectroscopy agree with x-ray fluorescence methods to within analytical error. Aerosol flux conditions are monitored for speciation using direct examination by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analytical capability plus aerosol physical properties by sun photometry. The latter provides bulk optical transmission at six major wavelengths and estimates for bulk aerosol size properties. Preliminary data show positive photometry links with iron-aerosols with a correlation coefficient with southwesterly wind-driven conditions of seventy percent over a four hour monitoring period. Aerosol flux comparisons with heavy metal populations, Ba, Rb, Zr, La show uniform distributions with iron- and silica-enriched populations indicating a pervasive background condition in the ambient air mass over New York City.

  19. Background-reducing X-ray multilayer mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bloch, Jeffrey J. (Los Alamos, NM); Roussel-Dupre', Diane (Los Alamos, NM); Smith, Barham W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1992-01-01

    Background-reducing x-ray multilayer mirror. A multiple-layer "wavetrap" deposited over the surface of a layered, synthetic-microstructure soft x-ray mirror optimized for reflectivity at chosen wavelengths is disclosed for reducing the reflectivity of undesired, longer wavelength incident radiation incident thereon. In three separate mirror designs employing an alternating molybdenum and silicon layered, mirrored structure overlaid by two layers of a molybdenum/silicon pair anti-reflection coating, reflectivities of near normal incidence 133, 171, and 186 .ANG. wavelengths have been optimized, while that at 304 .ANG. has been minimized. The optimization process involves the choice of materials, the composition of the layer/pairs as well as the number thereof, and the distance therebetween for the mirror, and the simultaneous choice of materials, the composition of the layer/pairs, and their number and distance for the "wavetrap."

  20. Overview of the Chandra X-Ray Observatory Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, M. C.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Chandra X-Ray Observatory (originally called the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility - AXAF) is the X-Ray component of NASA's "Great Observatory" Program. Chandra is a NASA facility that provides scientific data to the international astronomical community in response to scientific proposals for its use. The Observatory is the product of the efforts of many organizations in the United States and Europe. The Great Observatories also include the Hubble Space Telescope for space-based observations of astronomical objects primarily in the visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, the now defunct Compton Gamma- Ray Observatory that was designed to observe gamma-ray emission from astronomical objects, and the soon-to-be-launched Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). The Chandra X-Ray Observatory (hereafter CXO) is sensitive to X-rays in the energy range from below 0.1 to above 10.0 keV corresponding to wavelengths from 12 to 0.12 nanometers. The relationship among the various parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, sorted by characteristic temperature and the corresponding wavelength, is illustrated. The German physicist Wilhelm Roentgen discovered what he thought was a new form of radiation in 1895. He called it X-radiation to summarize its properties. The radiation had the ability to pass through many materials that easily absorb visible light and to free electrons from atoms. We now know that X-rays are nothing more than light (electromagnetic radiation) but at high energies. Light has been given many names: radio waves, microwaves, infrared, visible, ultraviolet, X-ray and gamma radiation are all different forms. Radio waves are composed of low energy particles of light (photons). Optical photons - the only photons perceived by the human eye - are a million times more energetic than the typical radio photon, whereas the energies of X-ray photons range from hundreds to thousands of times higher than that of optical photons. Very low temperature systems (hundreds of degrees below zero Celsius) produce low energy radio and microwave photons, whereas cool bodies like our own (about 30 degrees Celsius) produce infrared radiation. Very high temperatures (millions of degrees Celsius) are one way of producing X-rays.

  1. Resolving the Xi Boo Binary in X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Brian

    2010-01-01

    On 2008 May 2, Chandra observed the X-ray spectrum of the Xi Boo binary (G8 V+K4 V) using the LETG grating and HRC-S detector. This is the first time these stars have been resolved at X-ray wavelengths, allowing the study of the coronae of the two stars separately. As expected, the primary dominates the system's emission in X-rays, with the secondary accounting for only 11.5% of the system's total emission. The primary, Xi Boo A, is important because its youthfulness, spectral type, and close proximity (d=6.7 pc) make it an excellent target for studying the coronal spectrum of a young, moderately active, solar-like star. Emission measure distributions and coronal abundance measurements from the spectra will be presented for both stars.

  2. Nonthermal processes in flaring X-ray-bright points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, M. R.; Strong, K. T.; Pick, M.; White, S. M.; Hudson, H. S.; Harvey, K. L.; Kane, S. R.

    1994-01-01

    X-ray-bright point (XBPs) are known to show variability on a number of timescales, including impulsive X-ray brightenings. The relationship between these XBP 'flares' and normal solar flares is poorly known. A fundamental question is whether nonthermal acceleration of particles takes place in XBP flares. We address this issue by searching for nonthermal radio emission at metric wavelengths from flaring XBPs identified in Yohkoh soft x-ray telescope (SXT) data. Unequivocal evidence for type III-like radio bursts, usually attributed to beams of nonthermal electrons on open field lines, is found. This suggests that XBP flares are similar to normal flares and can indeed accelerate nonthermal populations of energetic particles.

  3. Application of a PWFA to an X-ray FEL

    E-print Network

    Israeli, Yasmine; Reiche, Sven; Pedrozzi, Marco; Muggli, Patric

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing demand for X-ray Free-electron lasers (FELs) in various science fields, in particular for those with short pulses, larger photon fluxes and shorter wavelengths. The level of X-ray power and the pulse energy depend on the amount of electron bunch energy. Increasing the latter will increase the power of the radiating X-rays. Using numerical simulations we explore the possibility of using a plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) scheme to increase the electron beam energy of an existing FEL facility without significantly increasing the accelerator length. In this paper we use parameters of the SwissFEL beam. The simulations are carried out in 2D cylindrical symmetry using the code OSIRIS. Initial results show an energy gain of ~2 GeV after propagation of 0.5 m in the plasma with a relative energy spread of ~1%.

  4. X-ray microdiffraction of biominerals.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Nobumichi; Gilbert, Pupa U P A

    2013-01-01

    Biominerals have complex and heterogeneous architectures, hence diffraction experiments with spatial resolutions between 500 nm and 10 ?m are extremely useful to characterize them. X-ray beams in this size range are now routinely produced at many synchrotrons. This chapter provides a review of the different hard X-ray diffraction and scattering techniques, used in conjunction with efficient, state-of-the-art X-ray focusing optics. These include monochromatic X-ray microdiffraction, polychromatic (Laue) X-ray microdiffraction, and microbeam small-angle X-ray scattering. We present some of the most relevant discoveries made in the field of biomineralization using these approaches. PMID:24188780

  5. Characterization of New Hard X-ray Cataclysmic Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernardini, F.; deMartino, D.; Falanga, M.; Mukai, K.; Matt, G.; Bonnet-Bidaud, J.-M.; Masetti, N.; Mouchet, M.

    2012-01-01

    Aims. We aim at characterizing a sample of nine new hard X-ray selected Cataclysmic Variable (CVs), to unambiguously identify them as magnetic systems of the Intermediate Polar (IP) type. Methods. We performed detailed timing and spectral analysis by using X-ray, and simultaneous UV and optical data collected by XMM-Newton, complemented with hard X-ray data provided by INTEGRAL and Swift. The pulse arrival time were used to estimate the orbital periods. The broad band X-ray spectra were fitted using composite models consisting of different absorbing columns and emission components. Results. Strong X-ray pulses at the White Dwarf (WD) spin period are detected and found to decrease with energy. Most sources are spin-dominated systems in the X-rays, though four are beat dominated at optical wavelengths. We estimated the orbital period in all system (except for IGR J16500-3307), providing the first estimate for IGRJ08390-4833, IGRJ18308-1232, and IGR J18173-2509. All X-ray spectra are multi-temperature. V2069 Cyg and RX J0636+3535 poses a soft X-ray optically thick component at kT approx. 80 eV. An intense K (sub alpha) Fe line at 6.4 keV is detected in all sources. An absorption edge at 0.76 keV from OVII is detected in IGR J08390-4833. The WD masses and lower limits to the accretion rates are also estimated. Conclusions. We found all sources to be IPs. IGR J08390-4833, V2069 Cyg, and IGR J16500-3307 are pure disc accretors, while IGR J18308-1232, IGR J1509-6649, IGR J17195-4100, and RX J0636+3535 display a disc-overflow accretion mode. All sources show a temperature gradient in the post-shock regions and a highly absorbed emission from material located in the pre-shock flow which is also responsible for the X-ray pulsations. Reflection at the WD surface is likely the origin of the fluorescent iron line. There is an increasing evidence for the presence of a warm absorber in IPs, a feature that needs future exploration. The addition of two systems to the subgroup of soft X-ray IPs confirms a relatively large ( 30%) incidence.

  6. Characterization of new hard X-ray cataclysmic variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardini, F.; de Martino, D.; Falanga, M.; Mukai, K.; Matt, G.; Bonnet-Bidaud, J.-M.; Masetti, N.; Mouchet, M.

    2012-06-01

    Aims: We aim at characterizing a sample of nine new hard X-ray selected cataclysmic variable (CVs), to unambiguously identify them as magnetic systems of the intermediate polar (IP) type. Methods: We performed detailed timing and spectral analysis by using X-ray, and simultaneous UV and optical data collected by XMM-Newton, complemented with hard X-ray data provided by INTEGRAL and Swift. The pulse arrival time were used to estimate the orbital periods. The broad band X-ray spectra were fitted using composite models consisting of different absorbing columns and emission components. Results: Strong X-ray pulses at the white dwarf (WD) spin period are detected and found to decrease with energy. Most sources are spin-dominated systems in the X-rays, though four are beat dominated at optical wavelengths. We estimated the orbital period in all system (except for IGR J16500-3307), providing the first estimate for IGR J08390-4833, IGR J18308-1232, and IGR J18173-2509. All X-ray spectra are multi-temperature. V2069 Cyg and RX J0636+3535 posses a soft X-ray optically thick component at kT ~ 80 eV. An intense K? Fe line at 6.4 keV is detected in all sources. An absorption edge at 0.76 keV from OVII is detected in IGR J08390-4833. The WD masses and lower limits to the accretion rates are also estimated. Conclusions: We found all sources to be IPs. IGR J08390-4833, V2069 Cyg, and IGR J16500-3307 are pure disc accretors, while IGR J18308-1232, IGR J1509-6649, IGR J17195-4100, and RX J0636+3535 display a disc-overflow accretion mode. All sources show a temperature gradient in the post-shock regions and a highly absorbed emission from material located in the pre-shock flow which is also responsible for the X-ray pulsations. Reflection at the WD surface is likely the origin of the fluorescent iron line. There is an increasing evidence for the presence of a warm absorber in IPs, a feature that needs future exploration. The addition of two systems to the subgroup of soft X-ray IPs confirms a relatively large (~30%) incidence. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton and INTEGRAL, ESA science missions with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States; and Swift, a NASA science mission with Italian participation.

  7. EUV Spectroscopy of High-redshift X-ray Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Michael Paul; Wolff, M. T.; Wood, K. S.; Barbee, T. W., Jr.

    2010-02-01

    As astronomical observations are pushed to cosmological distances (z>3) the spectral energy distributions of X-ray objects, AGNs for example, will have their maxima redshifted into the EUV waveband ( 90-912 Å/0.1-0.01 keV). Consequently, a wealth of spectral diagnostics, provided by, for example, the Fe L-shell complex ( 60-6 Å/0.2-2.0 keV) and the O VII/VIII lines ( 20 Å/0.5 keV), will be lost to X-ray instruments operating at traditional ( 0.5-10 keV) and higher X-ray energies. There are precedents in other wavebands. For example, HST evolutionary studies will become largely the province of JWST. Despite the successes of EUVE, the ROSAT WFC, and the Chandra LETG, the EUV continues to be unappreciated and under-utilized, partly because of a preconception that absorption by neutral galactic Hydrogen in the ISM prevents any useful extragalactic measurements at all EUV wavelengths and, until recently, by a lack of a suitable enabling technology. Thus, if future planned X-ray missions (e.g., IXO, Gen-X) are optimized again for traditional X-ray energies, their performance (effective area, resolving power) will be cut off at ultrasoft X-ray energies or at best be radically reduced in the EUV. This opens up a critical gap in performance located right at short EUV wavelengths, where the critical X-ray spectral transitions occur in high-z objects. However, normal-incidence multilayer-grating technology, which performs best precisely at such wavelengths, together with advanced nano-laminate fabrication techniques have been developed and are now mature to the point where advanced EUV instrument designs with performance complementary to IXO and Gen-X are practical. Such EUV instruments could be flown either independently or as secondary instruments on these X-ray missions. We present here a critical examination of the limits placed on extragalactic EUV measurements by ISM absorption, the range where high-z measurements are practical, and the requirements this imposes on next-generation instrument designs.

  8. Tabletop Ultrabright Kiloelectronvolt X-Ray Sources from Xe and Kr Hollow Atom States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar, Poopalasingam

    Albert Einstein, the father of relativity, once said, "Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better". Today available higher resolution tabletop tool to look deep into matters and living thing is an x-ray source. Although the available tabletop x-rays sources of the 20th century, such as the ones used for medical or dental x-rays are tremendously useful for medical diagnostics and industry, a major disadvantage is that they have low quality skillful brightness, which limits its resolution and accuracy. In the other hand, x-ray free-electrons laser (XFEL) and synchrotron radiation sources provided extreme bright x-rays. However, number of applications of XFEL and synchrotron such as medical and industrials, has been hampered by their size, complexity, and cost. This has set a goal of demonstrating x-ray source with enough brightness for potential applications in an often-called tabletop compact x-ray source that could be operated in university laboratory or hospitals. We have developed two tabletop ultrabright keV x-ray sources, one from a Xe hollow-atom states and the other one from Kr hollow-atom stares with a unique characteristic that makes them complementary to currently-available extreme-light sources; XFEL, and synchrotron x-ray source. Upgraded tabletop ultra-fast KrF* pump-laser interacts with target rare-gas clusters and produces hollow-atom states, which later coherently collapse to the empty inner-shell and thereby generate keV x-ray radiation. The KrF* pump-laser beam is self-focused and forms a self-channel to guide the generated x-ray radiation in the direction of the pump-laser beam to produce directed x-ray beam. Xe (M) x-ray source operates at 1.2-1.6 nm wavelength while the Kr(L) x-ray source operates in 600-800 pm wavelength. System is mounted upon 3 optical-tables (5´x12´) with two KrF amplifiers at a repetition rate of 0.1 Hz. A lower bound for brightness value for both Xe and Kr x-ray sources is 1026 photons s-1mm-2mrad-2 0. This is greater than average brightness (1022 photons s-1mm -2mrad-2 0. 1% BW) of the available x-ray free electron lasers and synchrotron x-ray sources.

  9. Soft X-ray techniques to study mesoscale magnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Kortright, Jeffrey B.

    2003-06-26

    Heterogeneity in magnetization (M) is ubiquitous in modern systems. Even in nominally homogeneous materials, domains or pinning centers typically mediate magnetization reversal. Fundamental lengths determining M structure include the domain wall width and the exchange stiffness length, typically in the 4-400 nm range. Chemical heterogeneity (phase separation, polycrystalline microstructure, lithographic or other patterning, etc.) with length scales from nanometers to microns is often introduced to influence magnetic properties. With 1-2 nm wavelengths {lambda}, soft x-rays in principle can resolve structure down to {lambda}/2, and are well suited to study these mesoscopic length scales [1, 2]. This article highlights recent advances in resonant soft x-ray methods to resolve lateral magnetic structure [3], and discusses some of their relative merits and limitations. Only techniques detecting x-ray photons (rather than photo-electrons) are considered [4], since they are compatible with strong applied fields to probe relatively deeply into samples. The magneto-optical (MO) effects discovered by Faraday and Kerr were observed in the x-ray range over a century later, first at ''hard'' wavelengths in diffraction experiments probing interatomic magnetic structure [5]. In the soft x-ray range, magnetic linear [6] and circular [7] dichroism spectroscopies first developed that average over lateral magnetic structure. These large resonant MO effects enable different approaches to study magnetic structure or heterogeneity that can be categorized as microscopy or scattering [1]. Direct images of magnetic structure result from photo-emission electron microscopes [4, 8] and zone-plate microscopes [9, 10]. Scattering techniques extended into the soft x-ray include familiar specular reflection that laterally averages over structure but can provide depth-resolved information, and diffuse scattering and diffraction that provide direct information about lateral magnetic structure. Scattering techniques are further classified as partially for fully coherent according to the extent of transverse coherence of the incident beam.

  10. Time-resolved near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy on photo-induced phase transitions using a tabletop soft-x-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, P.; Rajkovic, I.; Moré, R.; Norpoth, J.; Techert, S.; Jooss, C.; Mann, Klaus

    2012-05-01

    We present a table-top soft-x-ray spectrometer for the wavelength range ? = 1-5 nm based on a stable laser-driven x-ray source, making use of a gas-puff target. With this setup, optical light-pump/soft-x-ray probe near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) experiments with a temporal resolution of about 230 ps are feasible. Pump-probe NEXAFS measurements were carried out in the "water-window" region (2.28 nm-4.36 nm) on the manganite Pr0.7Ca0.3MnO3, investigating diminutive changes of the oxygen K edge that derive from an optically induced phase transition. The results show the practicability of the table-top soft-x-ray spectrometer on demanding investigations so far exclusively conducted at synchrotron radiation sources.

  11. A novel design for all-solid silica Bragg fiber with zero-dispersion wavelength at 1550 nm.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yi; Jia, Shu; Zhang, Lei; Peng, Jiangde

    2004-09-20

    A novel all-solid Bragg fiber composed entirely of silica material is proposed in this paper. The core of this Bragg fiber is composed of conventional silica, and the cladding is formed by a set of alternating layers of up-doped and down-doped silica. This all-solid silica Bragg fiber is technically feasible and can simplify the fabrication technique. Dispersion properties of this silica Bragg fiber are investigated, and simulations show that zero dispersion wavelength lambda0 near 1.55 m with nonlinear coefficient gamma about 50 W-1km-1 can be obtained in silica Bragg fiber. PMID:19484012

  12. Optics-free x-ray FEL oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Hao, Y.; Kayran, D.; Trbojevic, D.

    2011-03-28

    There is a need for an Optics-Free FEL Oscillators (OFFELO) to further the advantages of free-electron lasers and turning them in fully coherent light sources. While SASE (Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission) FELs demonstrated the capability of providing very high gain and short pulses of radiation and scalability to the X-ray range, the spectra of SASE FELs remains rather wide ({approx}0.5%-1%) compared with typical short wavelengths FEL-oscillators (0.01%-0.0003% in OK-4 FEL). Absence of good optics in VUV and X-ray ranges makes traditional oscillator schemes with very high average and peak spectral brightness either very complex or, strictly speaking, impossible. In this paper, we discuss lattice of the X-ray optics-free FEL oscillator and present results of initial computer simulations of the feedback process and the evolution of FEL spectrum in X-ray OFFELO. We also discuss main limiting factors and feasibility of X-ray OFFELO.

  13. Stellar winds in binary X-ray systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macgregor, K. B.; Vitello, P. A. J.

    1982-01-01

    It is thought that accretion from a strong stellar wind by a compact object may be responsible for the X-ray emission from binary systems containing a massive early-type primary. To investigate the effect of X-ray heating and ionization on the mass transfer process in systems of this type, an idealized model is constructed for the flow of a radiation-driven wind in the presence of an X-ray source of specified luminosity, L sub x. It is noted that for low values of L sub x, X-ray photoionization gives rise to additional ions having spectral lines with wavelengths situated near the peak of the primary continuum flux distribution. As a consequence, the radiation force acting on the gas increases in relation to its value in the absence of X-rays, and the wind is accelerated to higher velocities. As L sub x is increased, the degree of ionization of the wind increases, and the magnitude of the radiation force is diminished in comparison with the case in which L sub x = 0. This reduction leads at first to a decrease in the wind velocity and ultimately (for L sub x sufficiently large) to the termination of radiatively driven mass loss.

  14. The History of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, C.; ,

    2012-06-28

    The successful lasing at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory of the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first X-ray free-electron laser (X-ray FEL), in the wavelength range 1.5 to 15 {angstrom}, pulse duration of 60 to few femtoseconds, number of coherent photons per pulse from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 11}, is a landmark event in the development of coherent electromagnetic radiation sources. Until now electrons traversing an undulator magnet in a synchrotron radiation storage ring provided the best X-ray sources. The LCLS has set a new standard, with a peak X-ray brightness higher by ten orders of magnitudes and pulse duration shorter by three orders of magnitudes. LCLS opens a new window in the exploration of matter at the atomic and molecular scales of length and time. Taking a motion picture of chemical processes in a few femtoseconds or less, unraveling the structure and dynamics of complex molecular systems, like proteins, are some of the exciting experiments made possible by LCLS and the other X-ray FELs now being built in Europe and Asia. In this paper, we describe the history of the many theoretical, experimental and technological discoveries and innovations, starting from the 1960s and 1970s, leading to the development of LCLS.

  15. Telescope for X ray and gamma ray studies in astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, W. D.; Desai, Upendra D.

    1993-10-01

    Imaging of x-rays has been achieved by various methods in astrophysics, nuclear physics, medicine, and material science. A new method for imaging x-ray and gamma-ray sources avoids the limitations of previously used imaging devices. Images are formed in optical wavelengths by using mirrors or lenses to reflect and refract the incoming photons. High energy x-ray and gamma-ray photons cannot be reflected except at grazing angles and pass through lenses without being refracted. Therefore, different methods must be used to image x-ray and gamma-ray sources. Techniques using total absorption, or shadow casting, can provide images in x-rays and gamma-rays. This new method uses a coder made of a pair of Fresnel zone plates and a detector consisting of a matrix of CsI scintillators and photodiodes. The Fresnel zone plates produce Moire patterns when illuminated by an off-axis source. These Moire patterns are deconvolved using a stepped sine wave fitting or an inverse Fourier transform. This type of coder provides the capability of an instantaneous image with sub-arcminute resolution while using a detector with only a coarse position-sensitivity. A matrix of the CsI/photodiode detector elements provides the necessary coarse position-sensitivity. The CsI/photodiode detector also allows good energy resolution. This imaging system provides advantages over previously used imaging devices in both performance and efficiency.

  16. The history of X-ray free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, C.

    2012-10-01

    The successful lasing at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory of the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first X-ray free-electron laser (X-ray FEL), in the wavelength range 1.5 to 15 Å, pulse duration of 60 to few femtoseconds, number of coherent photons per pulse from 1013 to 1011, is a landmark event in the development of coherent electromagnetic radiation sources. Until now electrons traversing an undulator magnet in a synchrotron radiation storage ring provided the best X-ray sources. The LCLS has set a new standard, with a peak X-ray brightness higher by ten orders of magnitudes and pulse duration shorter by three orders of magnitudes. LCLS opens a new window in the exploration of matter at the atomic and molecular scales of length and time. Taking a motion picture of chemical processes in a few femtoseconds or less, unraveling the structure and dynamics of complex molecular systems, like proteins, are some of the exciting experiments made possible by LCLS and the other X-ray FELs now being built in Europe and Asia. In this paper, we describe the history of the many theoretical, experimental and technological discoveries and innovations, starting from the 1960s and 1970s, leading to the development of LCLS.

  17. X-ray laser related experiments and theory at Princeton

    SciTech Connect

    Suckewer, S.

    1989-04-01

    This paper describes a new system for the development of an x-ray laser in the wavelength region from 5 nm to 1 nm utilizing a Powerful Sub-Picosecond Laser (PP-Laser) of expected peak power up to 0.5 TW in a 300 fs pulse. Soft x-ray spectra generated by the interaction of the PP-Laser beam with different targets are presented and compared to the spectra generated by a much less intense laser beam (20--30 GW). A theoretical model for the interaction of atoms with such a strong laser EM field is also briefly discussed. The development of additional amplifiers for the recombining soft x-ray laser and the design of a cavity are presented from the point of view of applications for x-ray microscopy and microlithography. This overview concludes with the presentation of recent results on the quenching of spontaneous emission radiation and its possible effect on the absolute intensity calibration of soft x-ray spectrometers. 26 refs., 18 figs.

  18. Discovery and development of x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Yeuncheol; Yin, Ming; Datta, Timir

    2013-03-01

    In 1912 Max Laue at University of Munich reasoned x-rays to be short wavelength electromagnetic waves and figured interference would occur when scattered off crystals. Arnold Sommerfeld, W. Wien, Ewald and others, raised objections to Laue's idea, but soon Walter Friedrich succeeded in recording x-ray interference patterns off copper sulfate crystals. But the Laue-Ewald's 3-dimensional formula predicted excess spots. Fewer spots were observed. William Lawrence Bragg then 22 year old studying at Cambridge University heard the Munich results from father William Henry Brag, physics professor at Univ of Leeds. Lawrence figured the spots are 2-d interference of x-ray wavelets reflecting off successive atomic planes and derived a simple eponymous equation, the Bragg equation d*sin(theta) = n*lamda. 1913 onward the Braggs dominated the crystallography. Max Laue was awarded the physics Nobel in 1914 and the Braggs shared the same in 1915. Starting with Rontgen's first ever prize in 1901, the importance of x-ray techniques is evident from the four out of a total 16 physics Nobels between 1901-1917. We will outline the historical back ground and importance of x-ray diffraction giving rise to techniques that even in 2013, remain work horses in laboratories all over the globe.

  19. X-ray reflectivity measurements of vacuum deposited thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Chason, M. ); Chason, E. )

    1992-01-01

    X-ray reflectivity using energy dispersive X-ray detection, a nondestructive probe of surface roughness over the region of [approximately] 1--50 [Angstrom], has been used to investigate the characteristicsof vacuum deposited thin films. With a surface roughness sensitivity better than 1 [Angstrom] X-ray reflectivity is sensitive to interfaces between different materials for sample thicknesses up to approximately2000 [Angstrom] (depending on material density). We have investigated discrete Cr/Al deposits on quartz substrates and determined the surface roughness at the interfaces. We have also monitored the evolution ofthe Cr/Al interface following annealing. The experimental data is presented and discussed. The use of the technique for studying thin film deposits is addressed.

  20. X-ray reflectivity measurements of vacuum deposited thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Chason, M.; Chason, E.

    1992-12-31

    X-ray reflectivity using energy dispersive X-ray detection, a nondestructive probe of surface roughness over the region of {approximately} 1--50 {Angstrom}, has been used to investigate the characteristicsof vacuum deposited thin films. With a surface roughness sensitivity better than 1 {Angstrom} X-ray reflectivity is sensitive to interfaces between different materials for sample thicknesses up to approximately2000 {Angstrom} (depending on material density). We have investigated discrete Cr/Al deposits on quartz substrates and determined the surface roughness at the interfaces. We have also monitored the evolution ofthe Cr/Al interface following annealing. The experimental data is presented and discussed. The use of the technique for studying thin film deposits is addressed.

  1. The Secret X-ray Lives of Cepheids: Presenting the First Unambiguous X-ray Detections of Classical Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Scott G.; Guinan, E.; Evans, N.; DePasquale, J.

    2009-01-01

    Chromospheric and transition region emissions have been found in certain Classical Cepheids by previous IUE studies and through our own much more recent FUSE study. However, X-ray emission has long been considered nonexistent in these cool supergiants. Here we report on the surprising discovery of X-ray emissions in three bright, nearby Classical Cepheids recently observed with the XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites - representing the first true detections of this class of variable star at X-ray wavelengths. Polaris (V = +1.98; F7 Ib-II; P = 3.97-d; d 130-pc), ? Dor (V = +3.77; F6 Ia; P = 9.84-d; d 318-pc) and ? Cep (V = +4.07; F5 Iab; P = 5.37-d; d 273-pc) are currently the only three Cepheids to have been observed with modern X-ray satellites. However, only Polaris and ? Dor have been observed with the FUSE satellite, and ? Dor (which has multiple spectra) displays variability in the FUV emission strengths which appears to be correlated to its pulsation period. Unexpectedly, our early analyses of the X-ray data show that these Cepheids, despite their differences in spectral type and pulsation properties, all have log Lx values of 28.8-29 and similarly soft energy distributions. The initial results of our recent X-ray studies are presented along with our FUSE results to bring the high energy activity into better focus. Further FUV/X-ray observations have been proposed with HST/XMM to unambiguously determine the origin and nature of the observed high energy emissions from the targets, possibly arising from warm winds, shocks, or pulsationally induced magnetic activity. We gratefully acknowledge support for this project from NASA grants Chandra-GO6-7011A, 06-FUSE8-099 & XMM-AO7-55241 and NSF grant AST05-07542.

  2. Soft x-ray holography and microscopy of biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianwen; Gao, Hongyi; Xie, Honglan; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2003-10-01

    Some experimental results on soft X-ray microscopy and holography imaging of biological specimens are presented in the paper. As we know, due to diffraction effects, there exists a resolution limit determined by wavelength ? and numerical aperture NA in conventional optical microscopy. In order to improve resolution, the num erical aperture should be made as large as possible and the wavelength as short as possible. Owing to the shorter wavelength, X-rays provide the potential of higher resolution in X-ray microscopy, holography image and allow for exam ination the interior structures of thicker specimens. In the experiments, we used synchrotron radiation source in Hefei as light source. Soft X-rays come from a bending magnet in 800 M eV electron storage ring with characteristic wavelength of 2.4 nm. The continuous X-ray spectrums are monochromatized by a zone-plate and a pinhole with 300 m diameter. The experimental set-up is typical contact microscopic system, its main advantage is simplicity and no special optical element is needed. The specimens used in the experiments of microscopic imaging are the colibacillus, the gingko vascular hundle and the fritillaries ovary karyon. The specimen for holographic imaging is the spider filam ents. The basic structures of plant cells such as the cell walls, the cytoplasm and the karyon especially the joint structures between the cells are observed clearly. An experimental study on a thick biological specimen that is a whole sporule w ith the thickness of about 30 ?m is performed. In the holographic experiments, the experimental setup is typical Gabor in-line holography. The specimen is placed in line with X-ray source, which provides both the reference w aves and specimen illum ination. The specimen is some spider filament, which adhere to a Si3N4 film. The recording medium is PM M A, which is placed at recording distance of about 400 ?m from the specimen. The hologram s were reconstructed by digital method with 300 nm resolutions. A novel method for recording in-line hologram is proposed which is called X-ray in-line holography with zone-plate magnification in this paper. The magnification factor of the micro zone plate imaging is about 103. The transverse resolution can be 48 nm in this method.

  3. A revised partiality model and post-refinement algorithm for X-ray free-electron laser data

    PubMed Central

    Ginn, Helen Mary; Brewster, Aaron S.; Hattne, Johan; Evans, Gwyndaf; Wagner, Armin; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Sutton, Geoff; Stuart, David Ian

    2015-01-01

    Research towards using X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) data to solve structures using experimental phasing methods such as sulfur single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) has been hampered by shortcomings in the diffraction models for X-ray diffraction from FELs. Owing to errors in the orientation matrix and overly simple partiality models, researchers have required large numbers of images to converge to reliable estimates for the structure-factor amplitudes, which may not be feasible for all biological systems. Here, data for cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus type 17 (CPV17) collected at 1.3?Å wavelength at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) are revisited. A previously published definition of a partiality model for reflections illuminated by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) pulses is built upon, which defines a fraction between 0 and 1 based on the intersection of a reflection with a spread of Ewald spheres modelled by a super-Gaussian wavelength distribution in the X-ray beam. A method of post-refinement to refine the parameters of this model is suggested. This has generated a merged data set with an overall discrepancy (by calculating the R split value) of 3.15% to 1.46?Å resolution from a 7225-image data set. The atomic numbers of C, N and O atoms in the structure are distinguishable in the electron-density map. There are 13 S atoms within the 237 residues of CPV17, excluding the initial disordered methionine. These only possess 0.42 anomalous scattering electrons each at 1.3?Å wavelength, but the 12 that have single predominant positions are easily detectable in the anomalous difference Fourier map. It is hoped that these improvements will lead towards XFEL experimental phase determination and structure determination by sulfur SAD and will generally increase the utility of the method for difficult cases. PMID:26057680

  4. A revised partiality model and post-refinement algorithm for X-ray free-electron laser data

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, Helen Mary; Brewster, Aaron S.; Hattne, Johan; Evans, Gwyndaf; Wagner, Armin; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Sutton, Geoff; Stuart, David Ian

    2015-05-23

    Research towards using X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) data to solve structures using experimental phasing methods such as sulfur single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) has been hampered by shortcomings in the diffraction models for X-ray diffraction from FELs. Owing to errors in the orientation matrix and overly simple partiality models, researchers have required large numbers of images to converge to reliable estimates for the structure-factor amplitudes, which may not be feasible for all biological systems. Here, data for cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus type 17 (CPV17) collected at 1.3 Å wavelength at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) are revisited. A previously published definition of a partiality model for reflections illuminated by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) pulses is built upon, which defines a fraction between 0 and 1 based on the intersection of a reflection with a spread of Ewald spheres modelled by a super-Gaussian wavelength distribution in the X-ray beam. A method of post-refinement to refine the parameters of this model is suggested. This has generated a merged data set with an overall discrepancy (by calculating theRsplitvalue) of 3.15% to 1.46 Å resolution from a 7225-image data set. The atomic numbers of C, N and O atoms in the structure are distinguishable in the electron-density map. There are 13 S atoms within the 237 residues of CPV17, excluding the initial disordered methionine. These only possess 0.42 anomalous scattering electrons each at 1.3 Å wavelength, but the 12 that have single predominant positions are easily detectable in the anomalous difference Fourier map. It is hoped that these improvements will lead towards XFEL experimental phase determination and structure determination by sulfur SAD and will generally increase the utility of the method for difficult cases.

  5. A revised partiality model and post-refinement algorithm for X-ray free-electron laser data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ginn, Helen Mary; Brewster, Aaron S.; Hattne, Johan; Evans, Gwyndaf; Wagner, Armin; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Sutton, Geoff; Stuart, David Ian

    2015-05-23

    Research towards using X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) data to solve structures using experimental phasing methods such as sulfur single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) has been hampered by shortcomings in the diffraction models for X-ray diffraction from FELs. Owing to errors in the orientation matrix and overly simple partiality models, researchers have required large numbers of images to converge to reliable estimates for the structure-factor amplitudes, which may not be feasible for all biological systems. Here, data for cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus type 17 (CPV17) collected at 1.3 Å wavelength at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) are revisited. A previously published definitionmore »of a partiality model for reflections illuminated by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) pulses is built upon, which defines a fraction between 0 and 1 based on the intersection of a reflection with a spread of Ewald spheres modelled by a super-Gaussian wavelength distribution in the X-ray beam. A method of post-refinement to refine the parameters of this model is suggested. This has generated a merged data set with an overall discrepancy (by calculating theRsplitvalue) of 3.15% to 1.46 Å resolution from a 7225-image data set. The atomic numbers of C, N and O atoms in the structure are distinguishable in the electron-density map. There are 13 S atoms within the 237 residues of CPV17, excluding the initial disordered methionine. These only possess 0.42 anomalous scattering electrons each at 1.3 Å wavelength, but the 12 that have single predominant positions are easily detectable in the anomalous difference Fourier map. It is hoped that these improvements will lead towards XFEL experimental phase determination and structure determination by sulfur SAD and will generally increase the utility of the method for difficult cases.« less

  6. A revised partiality model and post-refinement algorithm for X-ray free-electron laser data.

    PubMed

    Ginn, Helen Mary; Brewster, Aaron S; Hattne, Johan; Evans, Gwyndaf; Wagner, Armin; Grimes, Jonathan M; Sauter, Nicholas K; Sutton, Geoff; Stuart, David Ian

    2015-06-01

    Research towards using X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) data to solve structures using experimental phasing methods such as sulfur single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) has been hampered by shortcomings in the diffraction models for X-ray diffraction from FELs. Owing to errors in the orientation matrix and overly simple partiality models, researchers have required large numbers of images to converge to reliable estimates for the structure-factor amplitudes, which may not be feasible for all biological systems. Here, data for cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus type 17 (CPV17) collected at 1.3 Å wavelength at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) are revisited. A previously published definition of a partiality model for reflections illuminated by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) pulses is built upon, which defines a fraction between 0 and 1 based on the intersection of a reflection with a spread of Ewald spheres modelled by a super-Gaussian wavelength distribution in the X-ray beam. A method of post-refinement to refine the parameters of this model is suggested. This has generated a merged data set with an overall discrepancy (by calculating the R(split) value) of 3.15% to 1.46 Å resolution from a 7225-image data set. The atomic numbers of C, N and O atoms in the structure are distinguishable in the electron-density map. There are 13 S atoms within the 237 residues of CPV17, excluding the initial disordered methionine. These only possess 0.42 anomalous scattering electrons each at 1.3 Å wavelength, but the 12 that have single predominant positions are easily detectable in the anomalous difference Fourier map. It is hoped that these improvements will lead towards XFEL experimental phase determination and structure determination by sulfur SAD and will generally increase the utility of the method for difficult cases. PMID:26057680

  7. Producing X-rays at the APS

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest X-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those X-rays.

  8. Aspergillosis - chest x-ray (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... usually occurs in immunocompromised individuals. Here, a chest x-ray shows that the fungus has invaded the lung ... are usually seen as black areas on an x-ray. The cloudiness on the left side of this ...

  9. X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Sports: Keeping Kids Safe Concussions: What to Know X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg) KidsHealth > Parents > Doctors & Hospitals > Medical Tests & Exams > X-Ray Exam: Femur (Upper Leg) Print A A A ...

  10. Spectral analysis of X-ray binaries

    E-print Network

    Fridriksson, Joel Karl

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, I present work from three separate research projects associated with observations of X-ray binaries. Two of those revolve around spectral characteristics of neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries (NS-LMXBs), ...

  11. X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cervical vertebrae). During the examination, an X-ray machine sends a beam of radiation through the neck, ... contain a table and a large X-ray machine hanging from the ceiling or wall. Parents are ...

  12. Producing X-rays at the APS

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-04-19

    An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest X-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those X-rays.

  13. Centaurus X-3. [early x-ray binary star spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchings, J. B.; Cowley, A. P.; Crampton, D.; Van Paradus, J.; White, N. E.

    1979-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of Krzeminski's star at dispersions 25-60 A/mm are described. The primary is an evolved star of type O6-O8(f) with peculiarities, some of which are attributable to X-ray heating. Broad emission lines at 4640A (N III), 4686 A(He II) and H-alpha show self-absorption and do not originate entirely from the region near the X-ray star. The primary is not highly luminous (bolometric magnitude about -9) and does not show signs of an abnormally strong stellar wind. The X-ray source was 'on' at the time of optical observations. Orbital parameters are presented for the primary, which yield masses of 17 + or - 2 and 1.0 + or - 3 solar masses for the stars. The optical star is undermassive for its luminosity, as are other OB-star X-ray primaries. The rotation is probably synchronized with the orbital motion. The distance to Cen X-3 is estimated to be 10 + or - 1 kpc. Basic data for 12 early-type X-ray primaries are discussed briefly

  14. ASTRO-H Soft X-Ray Telescope (SXT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soong, Yang; Serlemitsos Peter J.; Okajima, Takashi; Hahne, Devin

    2011-01-01

    ASTRO-H is an astrophysics satellite dedicated for X-ray spectroscopic study non-dispersively and to carry out survey complementally, which will be borne out of US-Japanese collaborative effort. Among the onboard instruments there are four conically approximated Wolter-I X-ray mirrors, among which two of them are soft X-ray mirrors\\ of which the energy range is from a few hundred eV to 15 keY, currently being fabricated in the X-ray Optics Lab at Goddard Space Flight Center. The focal point instruments will be a calorimeter (SXS) and a CCD camera (SXI), respectively. The reflectors of the mirror are made of heat-formed aluminum substrate of the thickness gauged of 152 micron, 229 micron, and 305 micron of the alloy 5052 H-19, followed by epoxy replication on gold-sputtered smooth Pyrex cylindrical mandrels to acquire the X-ray reflective surface. The epoxy layer is 10 micron nominal and surface gold layer of 0.2 micron. Improvements on angular response over the Astro-El/Suzaku mirrors come from error reduction on the figure, the roundness, and the grazing angle/radius mismatching of the reflecting surface, and tighter specs and mechanical strength on supporting structure to reduce the reflector positioning and the assembly errors. In this paper, we report the results of calibration of the engineering model of SXT (EM), and project the quality of the flight mirrors.

  15. Spatial resolution of a hard x-ray CCD detector

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Pereira, Nino R.; Weber, Bruce V.; Schumer, Joseph W.; Apruzese, John P.; Hudson, Lawrence T.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Boyer, Craig N.; Skirlo, Scott

    2010-08-10

    The spatial resolution of an x-ray CCD detector was determined from the widths of the tungsten x-ray lines in the spectrum formed by a crystal spectrometer in the 58 to 70 keV energy range. The detector had 20{mu}m pixel, 1700 by 1200 pixel format, and a CsI x-ray conversion scintillator. The spectral lines from a megavolt x-ray generator were focused on the spectrometer's Rowland circle by a curved transmission crystal. The line shapes were Lorentzian with an average width after removal of the natural and instrumental line widths of 95{mu}m (4.75 pixels). A high spatial frequency background, primarily resulting from scattered gamma rays, was removed from the spectral image by Fourier analysis. The spectral lines, having low spatial frequency in the direction perpendicular to the dispersion, were enhanced by partially removing the Lorentzian line shape and by fitting Lorentzian curves to broad unresolved spectral features. This demonstrates the ability to improve the spectral resolution of hard x-ray spectra that are recorded by a CCD detector with well-characterized intrinsic spatial resolution.

  16. Method for improve x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in nickel-base alloys

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Robert M. (Pittsburgh, PA); Cohen, Isadore (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1990-01-01

    A process for improving the technique of measuring residual stress by x-ray diffraction in pieces of nickel-base alloys which comprises covering part of a predetermined area of the surface of a nickel-base alloy with a dispersion, exposing the covered and uncovered portions of the surface of the alloy to x-rays by way of an x-ray diffractometry apparatus, making x-ray diffraction determinations of the exposed surface, and measuring the residual stress in the alloy based on these determinations. The dispersion is opaque to x-rays and serves a dual purpose since it masks off unsatisfactory signals such that only a small portion of the surface is measured, and it supplies an internal standard by providing diffractogram peaks comparable to the peaks of the nickel alloy so that the alloy peaks can be very accurately located regardless of any sources of error external to the sample.

  17. Method for improving x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in nickel-base alloys

    DOEpatents

    Berman, R.M.; Cohen, I.

    1988-04-26

    A process for improving the technique of measuring residual stress by x-ray diffraction in pieces of nickel-base alloys is discussed. Part of a predetermined area of the surface of a nickel-base alloy is covered with a dispersion. This exposes the covered and uncovered portions of the surface of the alloy to x-rays by way of an x-ray diffractometry apparatus, making x-ray diffraction determinations of the exposed surface, and measuring the residual stress in the alloy based on these determinations. The dispersion is opaque to x-rays and serves a dual purpose, since it masks off unsatisfactory signals such that only a small portion of the surface is measured, and it supplies an internal standard by providing diffractogram peaks comparable to the peaks of the nickel alloy so that the alloy peaks can be very accurately located regardless of any sources of error external to the sample. 2 figs.

  18. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Bionta, R.M.; Ables, E.

    1994-05-03

    An x-ray detector is disclosed which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope. 3 figures.

  19. Microgap x-ray detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R. (Danville, CA); Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA); Ables, Elden (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    An x-ray detector which provides for the conversion of x-ray photons into photoelectrons and subsequent amplification of these photoelectrons through the generation of electron avalanches in a thin gas-filled region subject to a high electric potential. The detector comprises a cathode (photocathode) and an anode separated by the thin, gas-filled region. The cathode may comprise a substrate, such a beryllium, coated with a layer of high atomic number material, such as gold, while the anode can be a single conducting plane of material, such as gold, or a plane of resistive material, such as chromium/silicon monoxide, or multiple areas of conductive or resistive material, mounted on a substrate composed of glass, plastic or ceramic. The charge collected from each electron avalanche by the anode is passed through processing electronics to a point of use, such as an oscilloscope.

  20. Phase-sensitive X-ray imager

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Kevin Louis

    2013-01-08

    X-ray phase sensitive wave-front sensor techniques are detailed that are capable of measuring the entire two-dimensional x-ray electric field, both the amplitude and phase, with a single measurement. These Hartmann sensing and 2-D Shear interferometry wave-front sensors do not require a temporally coherent source and are therefore compatible with x-ray tubes and also with laser-produced or x-pinch x-ray sources.

  1. Advanced x-ray imaging spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callas, John L. (Inventor); Soli, George A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An x-ray spectrometer that also provides images of an x-ray source. Coded aperture imaging techniques are used to provide high resolution images. Imaging position-sensitive x-ray sensors with good energy resolution are utilized to provide excellent spectroscopic performance. The system produces high resolution spectral images of the x-ray source which can be viewed in any one of a number of specific energy bands.

  2. Conversion of electrostatic plasma waves into electromagnetic waves - Numerical calculation of the dispersion relation for all wavelengths.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oya, H.

    1971-01-01

    The dispersion curves have been computed for a wide range of wavelengths from electromagnetic waves to electrostatic waves in a magnetoactive warm plasma with a Maxwellian velocity distribution function. The computation was carried out mainly for the perpendicular propagation mode. The upper hybrid resonance is the connection point of the electrostatic waves and the electromagnetic waves. The electrostatic waves not associated with the upper hybrid resonance are subjected to electron cyclotron damping when the wavelength becomes long. Oblique propagation is allowed for the electrostatic waves in a frequency range from the plasma frequency to the upper hybrid resonance frequency in the long-wavelength region where Landau damping can be neglected and where the electrostatic mode smoothly connects to the electromagnetic X-mode. In a slightly inhomogeneous plasma, the Bernstein-mode electrostatic wave can escape by being converted into the O-mode electromagnetic wave; two reflections take place during this escape process.

  3. Investigation of SL 1115 X-ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froechtenigt, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    A polished Kanigen coated beryllium mirror to be used in a glancing incidence X-ray telescope was evaluated. X-ray photographs of the image of a standard high resolution test target were recorded at 8.34 A and the focal plane of the telescope was determined. Reflection efficiency data was obtained using proportional counters and sources at wavelengths of 8.34, 13.3, and 44 A. These data were compared with similar data taken with another metal mirror. The results of the comparison are that the mirror tested in this program shows better resolution and less scattering than the other mirror previously tested. This mirror was chosen as the flight mirror for the SL 1115 X-Ray Telescope to fly on a Skylark sounding rocket. Also, a position sensitive detector placed in the focal plane of the SL 1115 X-Ray Telescope (flight payload) was successfully calibrated using a 10 arc second point source and at wavelengths of 8.34, 13.3, 27, and 44 A.

  4. X-Ray Microanalysis and Electron Energy Loss Spectrometry in the Analytical Electron Microscope: Review and Future Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, J. I.; Williams, D. B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews and discusses future directions in analytical electron microscopy for microchemical analysis using X-ray and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS). The technique of X-ray microanalysis, using the ratio method and k(sub AB) factors, is outlined. The X-ray absorption correction is the major barrier to the objective of obtaining I% accuracy and precision in analysis. Spatial resolution and Minimum Detectability Limits (MDL) are considered with present limitations of spatial resolution in the 2 to 3 microns range and of MDL in the 0.1 to 0.2 wt. % range when a Field Emission Gun (FEG) system is used. Future directions of X-ray analysis include improvement in X-ray spatial resolution to the I to 2 microns range and MDL as low as 0.01 wt. %. With these improvements the detection of single atoms in the analysis volume will be possible. Other future improvements include the use of clean room techniques for thin specimen preparation, quantification available at the I% accuracy and precision level with light element analysis quantification available at better than the 10% accuracy and precision level, the incorporation of a compact wavelength dispersive spectrometer to improve X-ray spectral resolution, light element analysis and MDL, and instrument improvements including source stability, on-line probe current measurements, stage stability, and computerized stage control. The paper reviews the EELS technique, recognizing that it has been slow to develop and still remains firmly in research laboratories rather than in applications laboratories. Consideration of microanalysis with core-loss edges is given along with a discussion of the limitations such as specimen thickness. Spatial resolution and MDL are considered, recognizing that single atom detection is already possible. Plasmon loss analysis is discussed as well as fine structure analysis. New techniques for energy-loss imaging are also summarized. Future directions in the EELS technique will be the development of new spectrometers and improvements in thin specimen preparation. The microanalysis technique needs to be simplified and software developed so that the EELS technique approaches the relative simplicity of the X-ray technique. Finally, one can expect major improvements in EELS imaging as data storage and processing improvements occur.

  5. Be/X-ray binaries

    E-print Network

    Reig, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to review the observational properties of Be/X-ray binaries. The open questions in Be/X-ray binaries include those related to the Be star companion, that is, the so-called "Be phenomenon", such as, timescales associated to the formation and dissipation of the equatorial disc, mass-ejection mechanisms, V/R variability, and rotation rates; those related to the neutron star, such as, mass determination, accretion physics, and spin period evolution; but also, those that result from the interaction of the two constituents, such as, disc truncation and mass transfer. Until recently, it was thought that the Be stars' disc was not significantly affected by the neutron star. In this review, I present the observational evidence accumulated in recent years on the interaction between the circumstellar disc and the compact companion. The most obvious effect is the tidal truncation of the disc. As a result, the equatorial discs in Be/X-ray binaries are smaller and denser than those around isolat...

  6. X-ray-powered macronovae

    E-print Network

    Kisaka, Shota; Nakar, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    A macronova (or kilonova) was observed as an infrared excess several days after short gamma-ray burst, GRB 130603B. Although the $r$-process radioactivity is widely discussed as an energy source, it requires huge mass of ejecta from a neutron star (NS) binary merger. We propose that the X-ray excess simultaneously observed with the infrared excess can naturally heat the ejecta, leading to the thermal re-emission as observed in infrared. This X-ray-powered model explains both the X-ray and infrared excesses with a single energy source by the central engine like a black hole, and allows for broader parameter region, in particular smaller ejecta mass $\\sim10^{-3}-10^{-2}M_{\\odot}$ with iron mixed as suggested by general relativistic simulations for typical NS-NS mergers, than the previous models. We also discuss the other macronova candidates in GRB 060614 and GRB 080503, and implications for the search of electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational waves.

  7. X-Ray Crystallography Reagent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Microcapsules prepared by encapsulating an aqueous solution of a protein, drug or other bioactive substance inside a semi-permeable membrane by are disclosed. The microcapsules are formed by interfacial coacervation under conditions where the shear forces are limited to 0-100 dynes per square centimeter at the interface. By placing the microcapsules in a high osmotic dewatering solution. the protein solution is gradually made saturated and then supersaturated. and the controlled nucleation and crystallization of the protein is achieved. The crystal-filled microcapsules prepared by this method can be conveniently harvested and stored while keeping the encapsulated crystals in essentially pristine condition due to the rugged. protective membrane. Because the membrane components themselves are x-ray transparent, large crystal-containing microcapsules can be individually selected, mounted in x-ray capillary tubes and subjected to high energy x-ray diffraction studies to determine the 3-D smucture of the protein molecules. Certain embodiments of the microcapsules of the invention have composite polymeric outer membranes which are somewhat elastic, water insoluble, permeable only to water, salts, and low molecular weight molecules and are structurally stable in fluid shear forces typically encountered in the human vascular system.

  8. X-raying clumped stellar winds

    E-print Network

    L. M. Oskinova; W. -R. Hamann; A. Feldmeier

    2008-06-13

    X-ray spectroscopy is a sensitive probe of stellar winds. X-rays originate from optically thin shock-heated plasma deep inside the wind and propagate outwards throughout absorbing cool material. Recent analyses of the line ratios from He-like ions in the X-ray spectra of O-stars highlighted problems with this general paradigm: the measured line ratios of highest ions are consistent with the location of the hottest X-ray emitting plasma very close to the base of the wind, perhaps indicating the presence of a corona, while measurements from lower ions conform with the wind-embedded shock model. Generally, to correctly model the emerging X-ray spectra, a detailed knowledge of the cool wind opacities based on stellar atmosphere models is prerequisite. A nearly grey stellar wind opacity for the X-rays is deduced from the analyses of high-resolution X-ray spectra. This indicates that the stellar winds are strongly clumped. Furthermore, the nearly symmetric shape of X-ray emission line profiles can be explained if the wind clumps are radially compressed. In massive binaries the orbital variations of X-ray emission allow to probe the opacity of the stellar wind; results support the picture of strong wind clumping. In high-mass X-ray binaries, the stochastic X-ray variability and the extend of the stellar-wind part photoionized by X-rays provide further strong evidence that stellar winds consist of dense clumps.

  9. X-Ray Instrumentation Nanoscale Materials

    E-print Network

    Geysen, Mario

    X-Ray Instrumentation Nanoscale Materials Characterization Facilility (NMCF), Department-Crystal Diffractometer The Bruker Kappa Duo diffractometer combines molybdenum and copper X-ray sources with a highly accurate goniometer and one of the most sensitive CCD detectors (Apex II) for X-ray crystallography

  10. Are X-Rays Safe during Pregnancy?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... And most of these deformities are minor, like skin tags or an extra finger or toe. Could I have another test instead of an X-ray? You might be able to have an ultrasound exam instead of an X-ray. Ultrasound, which is also called sonography, is the best alternative to an X-ray. ...

  11. Cryotomography x-ray microscopy state

    DOEpatents

    Le Gros, Mark (Berkeley, CA); Larabell, Carolyn A. (Berkeley, CA)

    2010-10-26

    An x-ray microscope stage enables alignment of a sample about a rotation axis to enable three dimensional tomographic imaging of the sample using an x-ray microscope. A heat exchanger assembly provides cooled gas to a sample during x-ray microscopic imaging.

  12. Reflection zone plate wavelength-dispersive spectrometer for ultra-light elements measurements.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Aljoša; Anklamm, Lars; Firsov, Anatoly; Firsov, Alexander; Löchel, Heike; Sokolov, Andrey; Gubzhokov, Renat; Erko, Alexei

    2015-11-16

    We have developed an electron beam excitation ultra-soft X-ray add-on device for a scanning electron microscope with a reflective zone plate mulichannel spectrometer in order to analyse ultra-light elements such as Li and B. This spectrometer has high (?/??~100) resolving power in the energy range of 45 eV - 1120 eV. Metallic Li samples were examined and fluorescence spectra successfully measured. Energy resolution of 0.49 eV was measured in the ultra-low energy range using the Al L2,3 line at 71 eV. High sensitivity of Boron detection was demonstrated on a B4C sample with layer thicknesses of 1-50 nm, detecting an amount of metallic Boron as small as ~0.57 fg. PMID:26698431

  13. Advanced X-Ray Telescope Mirrors Provide Sharpest Focus Ever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-03-01

    Performing beyond expectations, the high- resolution mirrors for NASA's most powerful orbiting X-ray telescope have successfully completed initial testing at Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray Calibration Facility, Huntsville, AL. "We have the first ground test images ever generated by the telescope's mirror assembly, and they are as good as -- or better than -- expected," said Dr. Martin Weisskopf, Marshall's chief scientist for NASA's Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). The mirror assembly, four pairs of precisely shaped and aligned cylindrical mirrors, will form the heart of NASA's third great observatory. The X-ray telescope produces an image by directing incoming X-rays to detectors at a focal point some 30 feet beyond the telescope's mirrors. The greater the percentage of X-rays brought to focus and the smaller the size of the focal spot, the sharper the image. Tests show that on orbit, the mirror assembly of the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility will be able to focus approximately 70 percent of X-rays from a source to a spot less than one-half arc second in radius. The telescope's resolution is equivalent to being able to read the text of a newspaper from half a mile away. "The telescope's focus is very clear, very sharp," said Weisskopf. "It will be able to show us details of very distant sources that we know are out there, but haven't been able to see clearly." In comparison, previous X-ray telescopes -- Einstein and Rosat -- were only capable of focusing X- rays to five arc seconds. The Advanced X-ray Telescope's resolving power is ten times greater. "Images from the new telescope will allow us to make major advances toward understanding how exploding stars create and disperse many of the elements necessary for new solar systems and for life itself," said Dr. Harvey Tananbaum, director of the Advanced X- ray Astrophysics Facility Science Center at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, in Cambridge, MA -- responsible for the telescope's science mission. "We will observe X-rays generated when stars are torn apart by the incredibly strong gravity around massive black holes in the centers of galaxies," added Tananbaum. On a larger scale, the telescope will play a vital role in answering fundamental questions about the universe. "The superior quality of the mirrors will allow us to see and measure the details of hot gas clouds in clusters of galaxies, giving us a much better idea of the age and size of the universe," said Dr. Leon Van Speybroeck, Telescope Scientist at the Smithsonian Observatory. "These same observations also will measure the amount of dark matter present, providing unique insight into one of nature's great puzzles," said Van Speybroeck. A second phase of testing is now underway at Marshall. Calibration of the observatory's science instruments began in mid-February. "This phase of testing," said Weisskopf, "includes two focal plane instruments and two sets of gratings used to analyze images and energy distributions from cosmic sources seen by the telescope." Working around the clock, test teams are taking measurements and studying results. "It is very exciting," said Weisskopf. "With more than 1,200 measurements taken, there is already a tremendous amount of information for study." The calibration process will end around late April. The mirror assembly then will be shipped to TRW Space and Electronics Group, Redondo Beach, CA -- NASA's prime contractor for the program -- for integration into the spacecraft. The science instruments will remain at Marshall for several more weeks of testing before being shipped to Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation in Boulder, CO, where they will be integrated into the science instrument module before being shipped to TRW. The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility is scheduled for launch in August 1998 and will join NASA's Hubble Space Telescope and Compton Gamma-ray Observatory in exploring the universe. Marshall manages development

  14. Soft x-ray holographic tomography for biological specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hongyi; Chen, Jianwen; Xie, Honglan; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan; Jiang, Shiping; Zhang, Yuxuan

    2003-10-01

    In this paper, we present some experimental results on X -ray holography, holographic tomography, and a new holographic tomography method called pre-amplified holographic tomography is proposed. Due to the shorter wavelength and the larger penetration depths, X-rays provide the potential of higher resolution in imaging techniques, and have the ability to image intact, living, hydrated cells w ithout slicing, dehydration, chemical fixation or stain. Recently, using X-ray source in National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory in Hefei, we have successfully performed some soft X-ray holography experiments on biological specimen. The specimens used in the experiments was the garlic clove epidermis, we got their X-ray hologram, and then reconstructed them by computer programs, the feature of the cell walls, the nuclei and some cytoplasm were clearly resolved. However, there still exist some problems in realization of practical 3D microscopic imaging due to the near-unity refractive index of the matter. There is no X-ray optics having a sufficient high numerical aperture to achieve a depth resolution that is comparable to the transverse resolution. On the other hand, computer tomography needs a record of hundreds of views of the test object at different angles for high resolution. This is because the number of views required for a densely packed object is equal to the object radius divided by the desired depth resolution. Clearly, it is impractical for a radiation-sensitive biological specimen. Moreover, the X-ray diffraction effect makes projection data blur, this badly degrades the resolution of the reconstructed image. In order to observe 3D structure of the biological specimens, McNulty proposed a new method for 3D imaging called "holographic tomography (HT)" in which several holograms of the specimen are recorded from various illumination directions and combined in the reconstruction step. This permits the specimens to be sampled over a wide range of spatial frequencies to improve the depth resolution. In NSRL, we performed soft X-ray holographic tomography experiments. The specimen was the spider filaments and PM M A as recording medium. By 3D CT reconstruction of the projection data, three dimensional density distribution of the specimen was obtained. Also, we developed a new X-ray holographic tomography m ethod called pre-amplified holographic tomography. The method permits a digital real-time 3D reconstruction with high-resolution and a simple and compact experimental setup as well.

  15. [Study on spectrum analysis of X-ray based on rotational mass effect in special relativity].

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Qiang; Xie, Quan; Xiao, Qing-Quan

    2010-04-01

    Based on special relativity, the formation mechanism of characteristic X-ray has been studied, and the influence of rotational mass effect on X-ray spectrum has been given. A calculation formula of the X-ray wavelength based upon special relativity was derived. Error analysis was carried out systematically for the calculation values of characteristic wavelength, and the rules of relative error were obtained. It is shown that the values of the calculation are very close to the experimental values, and the effect of rotational mass effect on the characteristic wavelength becomes more evident as the atomic number increases. The result of the study has some reference meaning for the spectrum analysis of characteristic X-ray in application. PMID:20545180

  16. Ultrafast X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy using Laser-Driven Electron X-ray Sources (LEXS)

    E-print Network

    Guo, Ting

    Ultrafast X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy using Laser-Driven Electron X-ray Sources (LEXS) Guangjun Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 ABSTRACT A laser driven electron x-ray source (LEXS) using a high it more suitable for the generation of hard x-ray pulses. These features include a simplified pumping

  17. X-RAY SPECTROMETRY X-Ray Spectrom. 2007; 36: 336342

    E-print Network

    Limburg, Karin E.

    X-RAY SPECTROMETRY X-Ray Spectrom. 2007; 36: 336­342 Published online in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com) DOI: 10.1002/xrs.980 Fish otolith trace element maps: new approaches with synchrotron microbeam x-ray of elements as they accrete through a fish's life. We apply synchrotron microbeam x-ray fluorescence methods

  18. X-ray Stacking 2008-Apr-22 Astrostats X-ray Stacking

    E-print Network

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    X-ray Stacking 2008-Apr-22 Astrostats X-ray Stacking Tom Aldcroft SAO/CXC #12;X-ray Stacking 2008 to gamma rays Detection efficiency of a source class (e.g. obscured active galactic nuclei) is often best analysis for a sample Stacking ­ mean properties of sample Chandra X-ray data (faint point sources

  19. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of Enpp1

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kazuki; Nishimasu, Hiroshi; Mihara, Emiko; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Takagi, Junichi; Aoki, Junken; Nureki, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Enpp1 is an extracellular membrane-bound glycoprotein that regulates bone mineralization by hydrolyzing ATP to generate pyrophosphate. The extracellular region of mouse Enpp1 was expressed in HEK293S GnT1? cells, purified using the TARGET tag/P20.1-Sepharose system and crystallized. An X-­ray diffraction data set was collected to 3.0?Å resolution. The crystal belonged to space group P31, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 105.3, c = 173.7?Å. A single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) data set was also collected to 2.7?Å resolution using a selenomethionine-labelled crystal. The experimental phases determined by the SAD method produced an interpretable electron-density map. PMID:22750863

  20. Widely tunable dispersive wave generation and soliton self-frequency shift in a tellurite microstructured optical fiber pumped near the zero dispersion wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Tuan, Tong-Hoang; Liu, Lai; Gao, Wei-Qing; Kawamura, Harutaka; Suzuki, Takenobu; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2015-12-01

    Widely tunable dispersive waves (DW) and Raman solitons are generated in a tellurite microstructured optical fiber (TMOF) by pumping in the anomalous dispersion regime, close to the zero dispersion wavelength (ZDW). The DW can be generated from 1518.3 nm to 1315.5 nm, and the soliton can be shifted from the pump wavelength of 1570 nm to 1828.7 nm, by tuning the average pump power from 3 dBm to 17.5 dBm. After the average pump power is increased to 18.8 dBm, two DW peaks (centered at 1323 nm and 1260 nm) and three soliton peaks (centered at 1762 nm, 1825 nm, and 1896 nm) can be observed simultaneously. When the average pump power is greater than 23.4 dBm, a flat and broadband supercontinuum (SC) can be formed by the combined nonlinear effects of soliton self-frequency shift (SSFS), DW generation, and cross phase modulation (XPM).