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Sample records for wavelength dispersive x-ray

  1. A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Nordlund, Dennis; Tran, Rosalie; Montanez, Paul; Delor, James; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe

    2012-07-01

    A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive hard x-ray spectrometer with high-energy resolution and large solid angle collection is described. The instrument is specifically designed for time-resolved applications of x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and x-ray Raman scattering (XRS) at X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL) and synchrotron radiation facilities. It also simplifies resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) studies of the whole 2d RIXS plane. The spectrometer is based on the Von Hamos geometry. This dispersive setup enables an XES or XRS spectrum to be measured in a single-shot mode, overcoming the scanning needs of the Rowland circle spectrometers. In conjunction with the XFEL temporal profile and high-flux, it is a powerful tool for studying the dynamics of time-dependent systems. Photo-induced processes and fast catalytic reaction kinetics, ranging from femtoseconds to milliseconds, will be resolvable in a wide array of systems circumventing radiation damage.

  2. A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Nordlund, Dennis; Tran, Rosalie; Montanez, Paul; Delor, James; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive hard x-ray spectrometer with high-energy resolution and large solid angle collection is described. The instrument is specifically designed for time-resolved applications of x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and x-ray Raman scattering (XRS) at X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL) and synchrotron radiation facilities. It also simplifies resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) studies of the whole 2d RIXS plane. The spectrometer is based on the Von Hamos geometry. This dispersive setup enables an XES or XRS spectrum to be measured in a single-shot mode, overcoming the scanning needs of the Rowland circle spectrometers. In conjunction with the XFEL temporal profile and high-flux, it is a powerful tool for studying the dynamics of time-dependent systems. Photo-induced processes and fast catalytic reaction kinetics, ranging from femtoseconds to milliseconds, will be resolvable in a wide array of systems circumventing radiation damage. PMID:22852678

  3. Wavelength dispersive analysis with the synchrotron x ray fluorescence microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, M. L.; Thorn, K. S.; Sutton, S. R.; Jones, K. W.; Bajt, S.

    1993-01-01

    A wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) was tested on the synchrotron x ray fluorescence microprobe at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Compared to WDS spectra using an electron microprobe, the synchrotron WDS spectra have much better sensitivity and, due to the absence of bremsstrahlung radiation, lower backgrounds. The WDS spectrometer was successfully used to resolve REE L fluorescence spectra from standard glasses and transition metal K fluorescence spectra from kamacite.

  4. Detection limits for actinides in a monochromatic, wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Michael L; Havrilla, George J

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments in x-ray optics have made it possible to examine the L x-rays of actinides using doubly-curved crystals in a bench-top device. A doubly-curved crystal (DCC) acts as a focusing monochromatic filter for polychromatic x-rays. A Monochromatic, Wavelength-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (MWDXRF) instrument that uses DCCs to measure Cm and Pu in reprocessing plant liquors was proposed in 2007 by the authors at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A prototype design of this MWDXRF instrument was developed in collaboration with X-ray Optical Systems Inc. (XOS), of East Greenbush, New York. In the MWDXRF instrument, x-rays from a Rhodium-anode x-ray tube are passed through a primary DCC to produce a monochromatic beam of 20.2-keV photons. This beam is focused on a specimen that may contain actinides. The 20.2-keV interrogating beam is just above the L3 edge of Californium; each actinide (with Z = 90 to 98) present in the specimen emits characteristic L x-rays as the result of L3-shell vacancies. In the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRf, these x-rays enter a secondary DCC optic that preferentially passes 14.961-keV photons, corresponding to the L-alpha-1 x-ray peak of Curium. In the present stage of experimentation, Curium-bearing specimens have not been analyzed with the prototype MWDXRF instrument. Surrogate materials for Curium include Rubidium, which has a K-beta-l x-ray at 14.961 keV, and Yttrium, which has a K-alpha-1 x-ray at 14.958 keV. In this paper, the lower limit of detection for Curium in the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRF instrument is estimated. The basis for this estimate is described, including a description of computational models and benchmarking techniques used. Detection limits for other actinides are considered, as well as future safeguards applications for MWDXRF instrumentation.

  5. High gain, Fast Scan, Broad Spectrum Parallel Beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for SEM

    SciTech Connect

    OHara, David

    2009-05-08

    During contract # DE-FG02-ER83545, Parallax Research, Inc. developed a High gain, Fast Scan Broad Spectrum Parallel beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for use on Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEM). This new spectrometer allows very fast high resolution elemental analysis of samples in an electron microscope. By comparison to previous WDS spectrometers, it can change from one energy position to another very quickly and has an extended range compared to some similar products.

  6. Wavelength dispersing devices for soft and ultrasoft x-ray spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Tomoya; Ryon, R.W.; Shoji, Takashi

    1984-01-01

    Monochromatization combining total reflection by a selected mirror and an appropriate filter offered an alternative approach in order to increase measurable intensity with reasonable spectral resolution. Recently, the use of synthetic multilayers, which are prepared by sputter/evaporation techniques, has been introduced for the detection of soft and ultrasoft x-rays. Studies on the use of these new wavelength dispersing devices have been conducted and it has been found that the reflectivity of these devices is very high compared with single crystals and soap multilayers and that their resolving power is fairly good. This report makes comparisons regarding efficiency of reflection, resolving power and x-ray analytical problems for practical applications among long spacing single crystals, soap multilayers, total reflection combined with a selected mirror and filtering and synthetic multilayers. The x-ray analytical capablities are shown based upon a standard x-ray fluorescence spectrometer equipped with a sealed-off x-ray tube and a gas flow proportional counter with thin film detector window.

  7. Interpretation system for automated wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Arnold, T; Otto, M; Wegscheider, W

    1994-07-01

    A prototype expert system for automated interpretation of wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectra is described. The system consists of two main components: a pre-processor (PREXRF) written in BASIC and a knowledge handling part (INFERXRF) that contains the knowledge base and the inference engine implemented in PROLOG. Both systems rely heavily on the theory of fuzzy sets in an attempt to deal with incomplete and uncertain information. The performance of the interpretation system for automated analysis of simulated and measured samples is demonstrated. PMID:18966054

  8. Monochromatic wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence providing sensitive and selective detection of uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Havrilla, George J; Collins, Michael L; Montoya, Velma M; Chen, Zewu; Wei, Fuzhong

    2010-01-01

    Monochromatic wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (MWDXRF) is a sensitive and selective method for elemental compositional analyses. The basis for this instrumental advance is the doubly curved crystal (DCC) optic. Previous work has demonstrated the feasibility of sensitive trace element detection for yttrium as a surrogate for curium in aqueous solutions. Additional measurements have demonstrated similar sensitivity in several different matrix environments which attests to the selectivity of the DCC optic as well as the capabilities of the MWDXRF concept. The objective of this effort is to develop an improved Pu characterization method for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The MWDXRF prototype instrument is the second step in a multi-year effort to achieve an improved Pu assay. This work will describe a prototype MWDXRF instrument designed for uranium detection and characterization. The prototype consists of an X-ray tube with a rhodium anode and a DCC excitation optic incorporated into the source. The DCC optic passes the RhK{alpha} line at 20.214 keV for monochromatic excitation of the sample. The source is capable of 50 W power at 50 kV and 1.0 mA operation. The x-ray emission from the sample is collected by a DCC optic set at the UL{alpha} line of 13.613 keV. The collection optic transmits the UL{alpha} x-rays to the silicon drift detector. The x-ray source, sample, collection optic and detector are all mounted on motion controlled stages for the critical alignment of these components. The sensitivity and selectivity of the instrument is obtained through the monochromatic excitation and the monochromatic detection. The prototype instrument performance has a demonstrated for sensitivity for uranium detection of around 2 ppm at the current state of development. Further improvement in sensitivity is expected with more detailed alignment.

  9. Concentration depth distribution of grain boundary segregation measured by wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wuqiang; Xu, Min; Bai, Huanhuan; Meng, Ye; Wang, Litao; Shi, Lifa; Pei, Yinghao; Zhang, Jian; Zheng, Lei

    2015-12-01

    A method using wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDS) is applied to the measurement of grain boundary segregation of Sn in silicon steel. The quantification of monolayer concentration of Sn is acquired, which demonstrates an obvious segregation of Sn at grain boundaries. In consideration of the fact that segregated impurities (Sn or other species) distribute in multilayer and not just monolayer segregation can be characterized by WDS, the Gaussian distribution is applied to formulate the multilayer concentration depth distribution according to the measured total concentration. A correction factor is then put forward to improve the quantification. Based on the measured segregation of Sn and the derived formula of multilayer concentration depth distribution, the grain boundary concentrations of Sn are calculated for different thicknesses of segregated layer. From the experimental measurement, theoretical analyses and calculated results, an effective approach for the research of grain boundary segregation is provided. PMID:25791794

  10. Toward chromium speciation in solids using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry Cr Kβ lines.

    PubMed

    Malherbe, J; Claverie, F

    2013-04-22

    The determination of chromium speciation in solid samples is critical for environmental and industrial purposes. Several analytical methods exist to perform such a determination either directly in solid state or liquid state after an extraction step, each of them having some limitations. In this study, the use of a high-resolution wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer to determine and quantify chromium species is investigated by looking at the differences in the Kβ transition profiles between Cr(0), Cr(III) and Cr(VI) compounds. Three different approaches were tested and compared to determine the Cr(VI) fraction of known mixtures: relative height and peak fitting using calibration mixtures, partial least square regression (PLS) of pure compounds, and principal component regression (PCR) of pure compounds. The accuracy of these methods was found to be about the same with an average relative error in the range of 15%. However, PLS and PCR can be easily implemented in an automated way contrary to peak fitting which can be sometimes perceived as analyst-dependant. Another advantage of using PLS and PCR is that information concerning the other oxidation states present in the sample can be retrieved. Finally, PLS and the peak height approach can be used up to 0.5% total chromium which make the XRF an alternative technique to X-ray induced photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for chromium speciation in solid state. PMID:23561904

  11. High Gain, Fast Scan, Broad Spectrum, Parallel Beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for SEM

    SciTech Connect

    David OHara; Dr. Eric Lochmer

    2003-09-12

    Parallax Research, Inc. proposes to produce a new type of x-ray spectrometer for use with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) that would have the energy resolution of WDS and the ease of use of EDS with sufficient gain for lower energies that it can be used at low beam currents as is EDS. Parallax proposes to do this by development of new multiple reflection x-ray collimation optics, new diffractor technology, new detector technology and new scan algorithms.

  12. Online analysis of sulfur in diesel line by a monochromatic wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Careta, Eduardo; López-Ramírez, Juan Antonio; Reynoso-Whitaker, Gilberto; Sánchez-Mondragon, Javier; Torres-Cisneros, Miguel

    2009-09-01

    This paper proposes the application of a monochromatic wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (MWDXRF) technique developed in the X-ray Optical Systems laboratory Inc. The technique measures low-level sulfur (uls) in fuel. Data for ultra low sulfur in diesel were collected and analyzed using the combination of the mentioned technique and the usage of engineering tools as a fastloop array and a measurement technique. This provides a qualitative method for Diesel sulfur analysis of the Refinery Ing. Antonio M Amor (RIAMA) in Salamanca, Guanajuato. The pooled limit of quantification (PLOQ) for ultra-low-sulfur diesel was found to be less than 1.5 ppm in this study. The reproducibility of 15-ppm sulfur diesel fuel was determined to be better than 3 ppm (95 % confident level). This work shows the performance of the production of Diesel with less than 15-ppm in sulfur lines in the Hydrodesulfurizer Unit of Diesel (HDD) of the refinery. Results and conclusions discusses the better and cheaper method for the production of ultra low sulfur Diesel in the refinery.

  13. Determination of chemical composition of siderite in concretions by wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometry following selective dissolution.

    PubMed

    Sitko, Rafa?; Zawisza, Beata; Krzykawski, Tomasz; Malicka, Ewa

    2009-01-15

    Determination of chemical composition of siderite (Fe, Me)CO(3) (where Me=Mg, Ca, Mn) present in siderite concretion is developed. An accurate and precise determination of Mg, Ca, Mn and Fe in siderite required complete separation of this mineral from other materials, e.g. calcite, quartz. For this purpose, selective dissolution in acetic acid (HAc) was applied. HAc concentration from 0.1 to 1 mol L(-1) and extraction time from 0.5 to 8h were investigated. In each step of investigation of selective dissolution, the X-ray diffraction measurements (XRD) of the residues was performed and also calcium (complexometric titration) and iron (XRF) in solution were determined. HAc of concentration 0.25 mol L(-1) and extraction time of 2h was adopted for siderite separation because in these conditions the siderite was not dissolved and, simultaneously, calcite was completely dissolved. In the next step, the nondissolved sample was digested in hydrochloric acid. The solution of the separated siderite was pipetted onto membrane filter and Mg, Ca, Mn and Fe were determined by wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometry. The calibration was performed using 11 certified reference materials of iron ores. Matrix effects were corrected using empirical coefficient model for intermediate-thickness samples. PMID:19064098

  14. Wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis using fundamental parameter approach of Catha edulis and other related plant samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaltout, Abdallah A.; Moharram, Mohammed A.; Mostafa, Nasser Y.

    2012-01-01

    This work is the first attempt to quantify trace elements in the Catha edulis plant (Khat) with a fundamental parameter approach. C. edulis is a famous drug plant in east Africa and Arabian Peninsula. We have previously confirmed that hydroxyapatite represents one of the main inorganic compounds in the leaves and stalks of C. edulis. Comparable plant leaves from basil, mint and green tea were included in the present investigation as well as trifolium leaves were included as a non-related plant. The elemental analyses of the plants were done by Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (WDXRF) spectroscopy. Standard-less quantitative WDXRF analysis was carried out based on the fundamental parameter approaches. According to the standard-less analysis algorithms, there is an essential need for an accurate determination of the amount of organic material in the sample. A new approach, based on the differential thermal analysis, was successfully used for the organic material determination. The obtained results based on this approach were in a good agreement with the commonly used methods. Depending on the developed method, quantitative analysis results of eighteen elements including; Al, Br, Ca, Cl, Cu, Fe, K, Na, Ni, Mg, Mn, P, Rb, S, Si, Sr, Ti and Zn were obtained for each plant. The results of the certified reference materials of green tea (NCSZC73014, China National Analysis Center for Iron and Steel, Beijing, China) confirmed the validity of the proposed method.

  15. Wavelength-dispersive x-ray microanalysis as a novel method for studying magnesium doping in gallium nitride epitaxial films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deatcher, C. J.; Bejtka, K.; Martin, R. W.; Romani, S.; Kheyrandish, H.; Smith, L. M.; Rushworth, S. A.; Liu, C.; Cheong, M. G.; Watson, I. M.

    2006-09-01

    Magnesium doping is critically important in GaN device technology, since it provides the only viable method of producing layers with p-type conductivity. Electron probe microanalysis with wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometry (WDX-EPMA) was used to measure magnesium atom concentrations in doped GaN films grown by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). Our study compared the behaviour of a widely used magnesium source in MOVPE, bis(cyclopentadienyl) magnesium, when vaporized as a solid and as a proprietary two-phase source, Solution Cp2Mg™. The WDX-EPMA technique was capable of measuring [Mg] values in GaN layers at practically useful concentrations of 1019 cm-3 upwards. Excellent agreement in [Mg] values was obtained between [Mg] values measured by WDX-EPMA and the more widely used technique of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). A set of 12 GaN:Mg samples was studied by WDX-EPMA to investigate the dependence of [Mg] on the flow rate of the magnesium source into the MOVPE reactor, with other conditions held constant, including a growth set-point temperature of 1130 °C. These measurements suggested a solid solubility limit at ~1020 cm-3, consistent with previous studies. Up to a value of about half the saturation limit, [Mg] values were proportional to the magnesium source flow, and indicated magnesium atom incorporation from the gas phase with ~11% of the efficiency of gallium atoms. No systematic differences were seen between the behaviour of solid magnesocene and Solution Cp2Mg™. A more limited study of the temperature dependence of magnesium incorporation showed a reduction in incorporation of ~40% as the growth temperature was reduced from 1130 to 1090 °C, consistent with kinetic control. Selected GaN:Mg samples were studied by Hall measurements and high-resolution x-ray diffraction. This work showed no systematic structural degradation of GaN:Mg close to the magnesium solubility limit. Our most conductive sample had a hole concentration of 4.4 × 1017 cm-3, consistent with the expected generation of acceptors from only a small fraction of the magnesium atoms. We also discuss the relative capabilities of SIMS and WDX-EPMA in the context of analysing GaN:Mg samples. SIMS offers superior depth profiling capability and detection limits, whilst WDX-EPMA offers superior spatial resolution, non-destructive analysis, plus simultaneous imaging and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy.

  16. Development of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray emission spectrometers for transmission electron microscopes--an introduction of valence electron spectroscopy for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Masami; Koike, Masato; Fukushima, Kurio; Kimura, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Two types of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray spectrometers, a high-dispersion type and a conventional one, for transmission electron microscopes were constructed. Those spectrometers were used to study the electronic states of valence electrons (bonding electrons). Both spectrometers extended the acceptable energy regions to higher than 2000 eV. The best energy resolution of 0.08 eV was obtained for an Al L-emission spectrum by using the high-dispersion type spectrometer. By using the spectrometer, C K-emission of carbon allotropes, Cu L-emission of Cu(1-x)Zn(x) alloys and Pt M-emission spectra were presented. The FWHM value of 12 eV was obtained for the Pt Malpha-emission peak. The performance of the conventional one was also presented for ZnS and a section specimen of a multilayer device. W-M and Si-K emissions were clearly resolved. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has an advantage for obtaining spectra from a single crystalline specimen with a defined crystal setting. As an example of anisotropic soft X-ray emission, C K-emission spectra of single crystalline graphite with different crystal settings were presented. From the spectra, density of states of pi- and sigma-bondings were separately derived. These results demonstrated a method to analyse the electronic states of valence electrons of materials in the nanometre scale based on TEM. PMID:20371492

  17. A rapid method for the determination of chlorine, phosphorus, and sulfur in flours of grains and legumes using wavelength dispersive x-ray flourescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Prez Ruiz, T; Hernndez Crdoba, M; Gonzlez, R

    1991-01-01

    A rapid method for the determination of chlorine, phosphorus, and sulfur in commercial flours of wheat, barley, maize, rice, field bean, and soybean by wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry has been developed. The flours are strained through a 425 microns sieve, then pelletized and measured. The total analysis time for the quantitation of chlorine, phosphorus, and sulfur is less than 20 min per sample. Calibration is carried out using a standard additions method with mixed standards. The method is accurate and precise, and appears to be adequate for routine analyses. PMID:1917809

  18. Effectiveness of activated carbon disk for the analysis of iodine in water samples using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junseok; An, Jinsung; Kim, Joo-Ae; Yoon, Hye-On

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometry combined with an activated carbon (AC) disk was developed for the determination of total iodine concentrations in water samples. Dissolved iodine species (i.e., I(-) and IO3(-)) in water samples were preconcentrated on the AC disk and directly analyzed by WDXRF spectrometry. The adsorption behavior of I(-) and IO3(-) on the AC disk was assessed at varying pH levels (4, 6, and 8). The AC disks completely retained the I(-) and IO3(-) for all the pH levels tested. The calibration curve obtained from the iodine concentrations (i.e., 0, 20, 200, and 400 ?g) of AC disks and the measured X-ray intensity from the WDXRF analysis showed a good linearity (R(2)=0.9960), with a relatively low limit of detection (0.575 ?g). The durability of the AC disk for repeatable measurements was also assessed to validate the sustainability of the proposed method and consequently the measured X-ray intensity for the AC disks was constant until 8d of analysis time. The accuracy of the proposed AC-WDXRF method was confirmed by measuring iodine concentration spiked in drinking water using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The proposed method is simple, rapid, efficient, and environmental friendly for iodine analysis in water samples. As a precursor of disinfection by products (DBPs), it is important to determine the total iodine concentrations in raw water. PMID:26117241

  19. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, Peter A. (Arvada, CO)

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focussing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points.

  20. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOEpatents

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focusing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points. 3 figs.

  1. Application of a wavelength-dispersive particle-induced X-ray emission system to chemical speciation of phosphorus and sulfur in lake sediment samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tada, Tsutomu; Fukuda, Hitoshi; Hasegawa, Jun; Oguri, Yoshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    The chemical speciation of phosphorus and sulfur in lake sediment was performed by analyzing K? X-ray spectra recorded with a high-resolution wavelength-dispersive particle-induced X-ray emission (WD-PIXE) system. The concentrations of phosphorus and sulfur in the sediment were 2500 and 7000 ppm, respectively. To measure both minor elements in a reasonable measurement time, a 2-MeV proton beam with a high current density (6 nA/mm 2) was used for the chemical speciation. The possible chemical state change caused by the proton irradiation was studied in order to determine the maximal irradiation time without significant change. We found that the chemical states of phosphorus and sulfur were stable under a beam current density of 6 nA/mm 2 and a measurement time of 60 min (phosphorus) and 90 min (sulfur). The chemical states of phosphorus and sulfur were determined to be P 5+ and a mixture of S 2- and S 6+, respectively.

  2. Simultaneous detection of electronic structure changes from two elements of a bifunctional catalyst using wavelength-dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy and in situ electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Gul, Sheraz; Ng, Jia Wei Desmond; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Kern, Jan; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Anzenberg, Eitan; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Gorlin, Yelena; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zwart, Petrus H; Zhang, Jin Z; Bergmann, Uwe; Yachandra, Vittal K; Jaramillo, Thomas F; Yano, Junko

    2015-04-14

    Multielectron catalytic reactions, such as water oxidation, nitrogen reduction, or hydrogen production in enzymes and inorganic catalysts often involve multimetallic clusters. In these systems, the reaction takes place between metals or metals and ligands to facilitate charge transfer, bond formation/breaking, substrate binding, and release of products. In this study, we present a method to detect X-ray emission signals from multiple elements simultaneously, which allows for the study of charge transfer and the sequential chemistry occurring between elements. K? X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) probes charge and spin states of metals as well as their ligand environment. A wavelength-dispersive spectrometer based on the von Hamos geometry was used to disperse K? signals of multiple elements onto a position detector, enabling an XES spectrum to be measured in a single-shot mode. This overcomes the scanning needs of the scanning spectrometers, providing data free from temporal and normalization errors and therefore ideal to follow sequential chemistry at multiple sites. We have applied this method to study MnOx-based bifunctional electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In particular, we investigated the effects of adding a secondary element, Ni, to form MnNiOx and its impact on the chemical states and catalytic activity, by tracking the redox characteristics of each element upon sweeping the electrode potential. The detection scheme we describe here is general and can be applied to time-resolved studies of materials consisting of multiple elements, to follow the dynamics of catalytic and electron transfer reactions. PMID:25747045

  3. Analysis of heterogeneous gallstones using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF).

    PubMed

    Jaswal, Brij Bir S; Kumar, Vinay; Sharma, Jitendra; Rai, Pradeep K; Gondal, Mohammed A; Gondal, Bilal; Singh, Vivek K

    2016-04-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an emerging analytical technique with numerous advantages such as rapidity, multi-elemental analysis, no specific sample preparation requirements, non-destructiveness, and versatility. It has been proven to be a robust elemental analysis tool attracting interest because of being applied to a wide range of materials including biomaterials. In this paper, we have performed spectroscopic studies on gallstones which are heterogeneous in nature using LIBS and wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF) techniques. It has been observed that the presence and relative concentrations of trace elements in different kind of gallstones (cholesterol and pigment gallstones) can easily be determined using LIBS technique. From the experiments carried out on gallstones for trace elemental mapping and detection, it was found that LIBS is a robust tool for such biomedical applications. The stone samples studied in the present paper were classified using the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. WD-XRF spectroscopy has been applied for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of major and trace elements present in the gallstone which was compared with the LIBS data. The results obtained in the present paper show interesting prospects for LIBS and WD-XRF to study cholelithiasis better. PMID:26886588

  4. Speciation of inorganic arsenic in drinking water by wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry after in situ preconcentration with miniature solid-phase extraction disks.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Kenta; Inui, Tetsuo; Koike, Yuya; Aizawa, Mamoru; Nakamura, Toshihiro

    2015-03-01

    A rapid and simple method using wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometry after in situ solid-phase extraction (SPE) was developed for the speciation and evaluation of the concentration of inorganic arsenic (As) in drinking water. The method involves the simultaneous collection of As(III) and As(V) using 13 mm ? SPE miniature disks. The removal of Pb(2+) from the sample water was first conducted to avoid the overlapping PbL? and AsK? spectra on the XRF spectrum. To this end, a 50 mL aqueous sample (pH 5-9) was passed through an iminodiacetate chelating disk. The filtrate was adjusted to pH 2-3 with HCl, and then ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate solution was added. The solution was passed through a hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene filter placed on a Zr and Ca loaded cation-exchange disk at a flow rate of 12.5 mL min(-1) to separate As(III)-pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate complex and As(V). Each SPE disk was affixed to an acrylic plate using adhesive cellophane tape, and then examined by WDXRF spectrometry. The detection limits of As(III) and As(V) were 0.8 and 0.6 ?g L(-1), respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to screening for As speciation and concentration evaluation in spring water and well water. PMID:25618730

  5. Determination of divalent iron content in igneous rocks of ultrabasic, basic and intermediate compositions by a wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometric method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubarov, Victor M.; Finkelshtein, Alexandr L.

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes the quantitative wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique of divalent iron content determination in igneous rocks and reports specifics of this technique in terms of classifying rocks into ultrabasic, basic, intermediate and acid ones. Unlike the widely used technique of titration, the proposed XRF technique does not require a labor-consuming procedure for sample preparation. In the fields of FeKβ5 line, and FeKβ‧ and FeKβ″ satellites relative intensities of XRF emission spectrum lines are dependent on the valence state of iron in minerals. The ratio FeKβ5/FeKβ1,3 is preferred as the analytical parameter. The XRF method allows divalent iron content (expressed as FeO oxide) over 1.5% to be measured in igneous rocks of ultrabasic and basic compositions by the common calibration equation with the error below 10 rel. %, that is comparable with the error of titrimetric analysis. The samples of igneous rocks of intermediate composition and granodiorites should be analyzed using calibration equations obtained with certified reference materials corresponding in composition to the study samples. For the samples of alkaline rocks the errors of FeO content determination might be in excess of 50 rel. %.

  6. Dispersion properties of x-ray waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Pelliccia, D.; Bukreeva, I.; Cedola, A.; Lagomarsino, S

    2006-04-20

    We study the propagation of ultrashort pulses in x-ray waveguides (WGs) by addressing the problem of the temporal dispersion. Starting from basic equations, by means of numerical calculation we demonstrate that far from the absorption edges of the WGs the cladding's material dispersion is negligible. However, close to the absorption edge significant dispersion can take place. This behavior could in principle be exploited to manipulate incoming chirped beams. Moreover, using the two coherent beams produced by the WG in the second (and higher) order of resonance suggests the use of the WC as a dispersion-free beam splitter, which can facilitate x-ray pump-probe experiments in the femtosecond temporal range without the need for external sources.

  7. Determination of rare earth elements in combustion ashes from selected Polish coal mines by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoliński, Adam; Stempin, Marek; Howaniec, Natalia

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the experimental works presented in this paper was to develop a method using wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (WDXRF) in order to determine the content of 16 rare earth elements (REEs) and the concentration of the said elements in 169 samples of combustion ash of coals coming from ten Polish coal mines, as well as to validate the method. It was found out that there is a clear diversity in the levels and ranges of the variability of REEs occurrence in coal ashes. The average content of cerium, lanthanum, and scandium amounts to 198.8 μg • g- 1, 76.5 μg • g- 1, and 52.4 μg • g- 1 respectively, whereas for such metals as europium, holmium, lutetium, terbium, and thulium, the average content does not exceed the level of 5 μg • g- 1 (the average content for these metals amounts to 1.2 μg • g- 1, 1.4 μg • g- 1, 0.3 μg • g- 1, 1.3 μg • g- 1, and 0.6 μg • g- 1, respectively). In addition, this paper presents an analysis of data obtained by means of hierarchical clustering analysis. Simultaneous interpretation of the dendrogram of objects (coal ash samples) and the color map of the experimental data allowed a more in-depth analysis of the relationships between the clustered coal ash samples from different coal mines and the content of the rare earth elements.

  8. Feasibility of wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for the determination of metal impurities in pharmaceutical products and dietary supplements in view of regulatory guidelines.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Alexandra; Fernandes, Tânia; Costa, Isabel Margarida; Gonçalves, Luísa; Brito, José

    2016-04-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometry for the measurement of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ir, Mn, Mo, Ni, Os, Pb, Pd, Pt, Rh, Ru and V impurities in pharmaceuticals and dietary supplements, in view of the requirements by EMA and USP for the measurement of elemental impurities in drug products and according to the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH guidelines). For that purpose, a 4kW WDXRF spectrometer (S4 Pioneer, Bruker AXS) was used after system calibration. The linearity of the method was demonstrated by correlation coefficients in excess of 0.9 and by appropriate test of lack of fit, except for Cd, Hg, Pd, V and As, which were excluded from analysis. The calculated limits of detection and quantification were in the ranges 0.6-5.4μg/g and 1.7-16.4μg/g meeting defined acceptance criteria, except for Pb. The accuracy of the method, determined by the percent recovery (R) of known amounts of each element added to a selected drug, at 3 different concentration levels, was in the acceptance range 70-150% except for Os and Pt, in which case R was marginally outside that range. The repeatability of the method, assessed as the % residual standard deviation (%RSD) of 3 replicate measurements at 3 concentration levels, produced %RSD values lower than 20%, as required. These results show that the WDXRF method complies with the validation requirements defined by the European Pharmacopeia for Cu, Cr, Ir, Mn, Mo, Ni, Os, and Pt, and by the United States Pharmacopeia for Ir, Ni, Os and Pt. Therefore, it may be an alternative to the compendial analytical procedures recommended for such elements. The novelty of the present work is the application of WDXRF to final medicines and not only to active pharmaceutical ingredients and/or excipients. PMID:26845202

  9. Soft x-ray laser holography with wavelength resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Wachulak, P. W.; Marconi, M. C.; Bartels, R. A.; Menoni, C. S.; Rocca, J. J.

    2008-11-15

    We report the tabletop acquisition of soft x-ray holographic images of nanostructures with a spatial resolution of 46{+-}2 nm, nearly equal to the wavelength of the illumination. Holograms of carbon nanotubes were recorded using a compact, tabletop capillary-discharge soft x-ray laser emitting at 46.9 nm in a high-numerical-aperture Gabor configuration.

  10. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy with microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollerith, C.; Wernicke, D.; Bühler, M.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Huber, M.; Höhne, J.; Hertrich, T.; Jochum, J.; Phelan, K.; Stark, M.; Simmnacher, B.; Weiland, W.; Westphal, W.

    2004-03-01

    Shrinking feature sizes in semiconductor device production as well as the use of new materials demand innovation in device technology and material analysis. X-ray spectrometers based on superconducting sensor technology are currently closing the gap between fast energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and high-resolution wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). This work reports on the successful integration of iridium/gold transition edge sensors in the first industrially used microcalorimeter EDS. The POLARIS microcalorimeter system is installed at the failure analysis lab FA5 at Infineon Technologies AG in Neuperlach (Munich) and is used in routine analysis.

  11. Dispersive XAFS Image Radiograph by Parametric X-ray Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Akira; Kobayashi, Koji; Ohshima, Hisashi; Hayakawa, Yasushi; Sato, Isamu; Tanaka, Toshinari; Hayakawa, Ken; Kuwada, Takao

    2007-01-19

    The parametric X-ray (PXR) generator system at Laboratory for Electron Beam Research and Application (LEBRA) in Nihon University is a variable-wavelength and quasi-monochromatic X-ray source, which was developed as one of the advance applications of the 125-MeV electron linear accelerator. Since the first observation of the X-rays generated by the system in April 2004, application studies have been performed using the PXR beam in the region from 6.0 to 20keV. The PXR beam extracted from the fixed output port of the generator has characteristic energy dispersion. The theoretical energy spread at the output port with an inner diameter of 98mm changes approximately from 300eV to 2keV depending on central X-ray energy from 7keV and 20keV. The dispersion occurs linearly only in horizontal direction, with a high energy resolution. The characteristics of the PXR beam from the generator suggest a possibility of for the kind of energy dispersive X-ray absorption fine structure (DXAFS) measurement using density distribution in the radiographs of materials. Using the uniform film of the sample materials, DXAFS can be deduced from the measurement of the horizontal density distribution in the radiograph due to the characteristics of the PXR beam. Since the PXR generator system is based on the S-band liner accelerator, it has the potential for the time-resolved XAFS measurement with several ten pico-second resolutions.

  12. Large area quantitative X-ray mapping of (U,Pu)O 2 nuclear fuel pellets using wavelength dispersive electron probe microanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brmier, S.; Haas, D.; Somers, J.; Walker, C. T.

    2003-04-01

    The work presented is an example of how large area compositional mapping (?1 mm 2) can be used to provide quantitative information on element distribution and specimen homogeneity. High-resolution was accomplished by producing a collage of X-ray maps acquired using classical conditions; magnification 400, spatial resolution 256256 pixels. The individual images, each measuring roughly 250250 ?m, were converted to quantitative maps using the HIMAX software package and the XMAS matrix correction from SAMx. The quantitative gray-level large area X-ray picture was pieced together using the 'Multiple Image Alignment' function of the ANALYSIS image processing software. This software was also used to convert the gray-level pictures to false color images. The specimens investigated were transverse sections of MOX fuel pellets. Results are presented for the distribution of Pu by area fraction and cumulative area fraction, the size distribution of regions of high Pu concentration and average separation of these regions.

  13. Determination of bromine in selected polymer materials by a wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometric method - Critical thickness problem and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorewoda, Tadeusz; Mzyk, Zofia; Anyszkiewicz, Jacek; Charasi?ska, Jadwiga

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an accurate method for the determination of bromine in polymer materials using X-ray fluorescence spectrometry when the thickness of the sample is less than the bromine critical thickness (tc) value. This is particularly important for analyzing compliance with the Restriction of Hazardous Substances Directive. Mathematically and experimentally estimated tc values in polyethylene and cellulose matrixes were up to several millimeters. Four methods were developed to obtain an accurate result. These methods include the addition of an element with a high mass absorption coefficient, the measurement of the total bromine contained in a defined volume of the sample, the exploitation of tube-Rayleigh line intensities and using the Br-L? line.

  14. Analysis of medieval Serbian silver coins from XIV and XV century by means of wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gržetić, Ivan; Orlić, Jovana; Radić, Vesna; Radić, Milica; Ilijević, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry is known as excellent nondestructive technique for analysis of artifacts, in our case, medieval numismatic coins. Collections of 30 silver coins, owned by National Museum in Belgrade, were investigated during our research. Coins from the historical period from 1389 to 1458 belong to the reign of two Serbian rulers, Stefan Lazarević and Đurđe Branković. The aim of this study was to determine elemental composition of silver coins and to characterize alloys from which the coins were minted. The dominant elements detected in all coins were Ag, Cu, Zn and Pb. In some coins Fe, Si and S were detected as well. Results from quantitative analysis shows that the content of Ag in all investigated silver coins exceed 90%, except in two coins that were assumed to be forged. The concentration of Cu ranged from 3% to 5%, and the contents of Zn and Pb varied around 1%. Characterization of coins provided us information about raw materials and employed metallurgical processes.

  15. Ultra-short wavelength x-ray system

    DOEpatents

    Umstadter, Donald; He, Fei; Lau, Yue-Ying

    2008-01-22

    A method and apparatus to generate a beam of coherent light including x-rays or XUV by colliding a high-intensity laser pulse with an electron beam that is accelerated by a synchronized laser pulse. Applications include x-ray and EUV lithography, protein structural analysis, plasma diagnostics, x-ray diffraction, crack analysis, non-destructive testing, surface science and ultrafast science.

  16. Energy dispersive x-ray detection of thorium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Bowen, J H; Woodward, B H; Mossler, J A; Ingram, P; Shelburne, J D

    1980-09-01

    Since the recognition of the development of certain malignant neoplasms in association with thorium dioxide (Thorotrast), its presence has been documented by light microscopic appearance and time-consuming autoradiography. Energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis can be used in the rapid documentation of thorium in paraffin-embedded tissues and it is confirmed that thorium is the principal component of the granular deposits described by light microscopy. PMID:6932191

  17. Detection of faint X-ray spectral features using wavelength, energy, and spatial discrimination techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, L. T.; Gillaspy, J. D.; Pomeroy, J. M.; Szabo, C. I.; Tan, J. N.; Radics, B.; Takacs, E.; Chantler, C. T.; Kimpton, J. A.; Kinnane, M. N.; Smale, L. F.

    2007-09-01

    We report here our methods and results of measurements of very low-signal X-ray spectra produced by highly charged ions in an electron beam ion trap (EBIT). A megapixel Si charge-coupled device (CCD) camera was used in a direct-detection, single-photon-counting mode to image spectra with a cylindrically bent Ge(2 2 0) crystal spectrometer. The resulting wavelength-dispersed spectra were then processed using several intrinsic features of CCD images and image-analysis techniques. We demonstrate the ability to clearly detect very faint spectral features that are on the order of the noise due to cosmic-ray background signatures in our images. These techniques remove extraneous signal due to muon tracks and other sources, and are coupled with the spectrometer wavelength dispersion and atomic-structure calculations of hydrogen-like Ti to identify the energy of a faint line that was not in evidence before applying the methods outlined here.

  18. Analysis of nuclear materials by energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence and spectral effects of alpha decay

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, Christopher G

    2009-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectra collected from alpha emitters are complicated by artifacts inherent to the alpha decay process, particularly when using portable instruments. For example, {sup 239}Pu EDXRF spectra exhibit a prominent uranium L X-ray emission peak series due to sample alpha decay rather than source-induced X-ray fluorescence. A portable EDXRF instrument was used to collect spectra from plutonium, americium, and a Pu-contaminated steel sample. The plutonium sample was also analyzed by wavelength dispersive XRF to demonstrate spectral differences observed when using these very different instruments.

  19. Searching for plasmas with anomalous dispersion in the soft X-ray regime

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, J; Johnson, W R; Cheng, K T

    2007-08-24

    Over the last decade the electron density of plasmas has been measured using X-ray laser interferometers in the 14 to 47 nm wavelength regime. With the same formula used in decades of experiments with optical interferometers, the data analysis assumes the index of refraction is due only to the free electrons, which makes the index less than one. Over the last several years, interferometer experiments in C, Al, Ag, and Sn plasmas have observed plasmas with index of refraction greater than one at 14 or 47 nm and demonstrated unequivocally that the usual formula for calculating the index of refraction is not always valid as the contribution from bound electrons can dominate the free electrons in certain cases. In this paper we search for other materials with strong anomalous dispersion that could be used in X-ray laser interferometer experiments to help understand this phenomena. An average atom code is used to calculate the plasma properties. This paper discusses the calculations of anomalous dispersion in Ne and Na plasmas near 47 nm and Xe plasmas near 14 nm. With the advent of the FLASH X-ray free electron laser in Germany and the LCLS X-FEL coming online at Stanford in 2 years the average atom code will be an invaluable tool to explore plasmas at higher X-ray energy to identify potential experiments for the future. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other X-ray sources will be used to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  20. Advances in understanding the anomalous dispersion of plasmas in the X-ray regime

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, J; Cheng, K T; Johnson, W R

    2008-09-24

    Over the last several years we have predicted and observed plasmas with an index of refraction greater than one in the soft X-ray regime. These plasmas are usually a few times ionized and have ranged from low-Z carbon plasmas to mid-Z tin plasmas. Our main computational tool has been the average atom code AVATOMKG that enables us to calculate the index of refraction for any plasma at any wavelength. In the last year we have improved this code to take into account many-atomic collisions. This allows the code to converge better at low frequencies. In this paper we present our search for plasmas with strong anomalous dispersion that could be used in X-ray laser interferometer experiments to help understand this phenomena. We discuss the calculations of anomalous dispersion in Na vapor and Ne plasmas near 47 nm where we predict large effects. We also discuss higher Z plasmas such as Ce and Yb plasmas that look very interesting near 47 nm. With the advent of the FLASH X-ray free electron laser in Germany and the LCLS X-FEL coming online at Stanford in another year we use the average atom code to explore plasmas at higher X-ray energy to identify potential experiments for the future. In particular we look near the K shell lines of near solid carbon plasmas and predict strong effects. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other X-ray sources will be available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  1. A dual-channel, focusing x-ray spectrograph with uniform dispersion for Z pinch plasmas measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Qingguo; Li Zeren; Chen Guanhua; Ye Yan; Huang Xianbin; Cai Hongchun; Li Jing; Xiao Shali

    2012-01-15

    A dual-channel, focusing x-ray spectrograph with uniform dispersion (i.e., the linear dispersion of this spectrograph is a constant) is described for measuring the x-ray spectra emission from the hot, dense Al Z pinch plasmas. The spectrograph uses double uniform-dispersed crystals (e.g., a Quartz 1010 crystal and a Mica 002 crystal) as dispersion elements and a double-film box as detector to achieve the simultaneous recording of the time integrated spectrum covering a wide spectral range of {approx}5-9 A. Since this spectrograph disperse the x-rays on the detector plane with uniform spacing for every wavelength, it needs not the calibration of the wavelength with spatial coordinate, thereby own the advantages of easiness and veracity for spectra identification. The design of this spectrograph and the example of experiment on the ''Yang'' accelerator are presented.

  2. A dual-channel, focusing x-ray spectrograph with uniform dispersion for Z pinch plasmas measurement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingguo; Li, Zeren; Chen, Guanhua; Ye, Yan; Huang, Xianbin; Cai, Hongchun; Li, Jing; Xiao, Shali

    2012-01-01

    A dual-channel, focusing x-ray spectrograph with uniform dispersion (i.e., the linear dispersion of this spectrograph is a constant) is described for measuring the x-ray spectra emission from the hot, dense Al Z pinch plasmas. The spectrograph uses double uniform-dispersed crystals (e.g., a Quartz 1010 crystal and a Mica 002 crystal) as dispersion elements and a double-film box as detector to achieve the simultaneous recording of the time integrated spectrum covering a wide spectral range of ~5-9 A?. Since this spectrograph disperse the x-rays on the detector plane with uniform spacing for every wavelength, it needs not the calibration of the wavelength with spatial coordinate, thereby own the advantages of easiness and veracity for spectra identification. The design of this spectrograph and the example of experiment on the "Yang" accelerator are presented. PMID:22299928

  3. Focal construct geometry for high intensity energy dispersive x-ray diffraction based on x-ray capillary optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi; Jiang, Bowen; Zhu, Yu

    2016-03-01

    We presented a focal construct geometry (FCG) method for high intensity energy dispersive X-ray diffraction by utilizing a home-made ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL). The ESBC was employed to focus the X-rays from a conventional laboratory source into a small focal spot and to produce an annular X-ray beam in the far-field. Additionally, diffracted polychromatic X-rays were confocally collected by the PPXRL attached to a stationary energy-resolved detector. Our FCG method based on ESBC and PPXRL had achieved relatively high intensity diffraction peaks and effectively narrowed the diffraction peak width which was helpful in improving the potential d-spacing resolution for material phase analysis.

  4. Method and apparatus for molecular imaging using X-rays at resonance wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Chapline, Jr., George F. (Alamo, CA)

    1985-01-01

    Holographic X-ray images are produced representing the molecular structure of a microscopic object, such as a living cell, by directing a beam of coherent X-rays upon the object to produce scattering of the X-rays by the object, producing interference on a recording medium between the scattered X-rays from the object and unscattered coherent X-rays and thereby producing holograms on the recording surface, and establishing the wavelength of the coherent X-rays to correspond with a molecular resonance of a constituent of such object and thereby greatly improving the contrast, sensitivity and resolution of the holograms as representations of molecular structures involving such constituent. For example, the coherent X-rays may be adjusted to the molecular resonant absorption line of nitrogen at about 401.3 eV to produce holographic images featuring molecular structures involving nitrogen.

  5. Two (and more) sharp X-ray wavelengths in one beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrd, J.; Hrd, J.; Oberta, P.; Pacherov, O.

    2016-01-01

    It is proposed how to create and merge two parallel X-ray beams with different wavelengths. The proposed method is based on simultaneous diffraction on two or more different crystallographic planes of perfect single crystals. Possible applications are discussed.

  6. High Resolution, Non-Dispersive X-Ray Calorimeter Spectrometers on EBITs and Orbiting Observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, Frederick S.

    2010-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopy is the primary tool for performing atomic physics with Electron beam ion trap (EBITs). X-ray instruments have generally fallen into two general categories, 1) dispersive instruments with very high spectral resolving powers but limited spectral range, limited count rates, and require an entrance slit, generally, for EBITs, defined by the electron beam itself, and 2) non-dispersive solid-state detectors with much lower spectral resolving powers but that have a broad dynamic range, high count rate ability and do not require a slit. Both of these approaches have compromises that limit the type and efficiency of measurements that can be performed. In 1984 NASA initiated a program to produce a non-dispersive instrument with high spectral resolving power for x-ray astrophysics based on the cryogenic x-ray calorimeter. This program produced the XRS non-dispersive spectrometers on the Astro-E, Astro-E2 (Suzaku) orbiting observatories, the SXS instrument on the Astro-H observatory, and the planned XMS instrument on the International X-ray Observatory. Complimenting these spaceflight programs, a permanent high-resolution x-ray calorimeter spectrometer, the XRS/EBIT, was installed on the LLNL EBIT in 2000. This unique instrument was upgraded to a spectral resolving power of 1000 at 6 keV in 2003 and replaced by a nearly autonomous production-class spectrometer, the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS), in 2007. The ECS spectrometer has a simultaneous bandpass from 0.07 to over 100 keV with a spectral resolving power of 1300 at 6 keV with unit quantum efficiency, and 1900 at 60 keV with a quantum efficiency of 30%. X-ray calorimeters are event based, single photon spectrometers with event time tagging to better than 10 us. We are currently developing a follow-on instrument based on a newer generation of x-ray calorimeters with a spectral resolving power of 3000 at 6 keV, and improved timing and measurement cadence. The unique capabilities of the x-ray calorimeter spectrometer, coupled with higher spectral resolution dispersive spectrometers to resolve line blends, has enabled many science investigations, to date mostly in our x-ray laboratory astrophysics program. These include measurements of absolute cross sections for Land K shell emission from Fe and Ni, charge exchange measurements in many astrophysically abundant elements, lifetime measurements, line ratios, and wavelength measurements. In addition, we have performed many additional measurements in nuclear physics, and in support of diagnostics for laser fusion, for example. In this presentation we will give a detailed overview of x-ray calorimeter instruments in general and in our EBIT laboratory astrophysics program in particular. We will also discuss the science yield of our measurements at EBIT over the last decade) prospects for future science enabled by the current generation of spectrometers and that will be expanded in the near future by the next generation of spectrometers starting in 2611.

  7. X-ray Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowicz, Andrzej A.; Van Grieken, Rene E.

    1984-01-01

    Provided is a selective literature survey of X-ray spectrometry from late 1981 to late 1983. Literature examined focuses on: excitation (photon and electron excitation and particle-induced X-ray emission; detection (wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive spectrometry); instrumentation and techniques; and on such quantitative analytical

  8. Development of high throughput X-ray telescopes for X-ray imaging and dispersive spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.

    1986-01-01

    During the past year the technical approach to the realization of a high throughput Kirkpatrick-Baez X-ray mirror became better defined in terms of construction methodology and factors which affect maximum size. More progress was made than anticipated in the area of automatic figure formation. However, effort to improve the resolution of float glass by simple techniques were not successful. Mirror development, spectroscopy, all sky telescope, and explorer concept studies are discussed.

  9. Development of in situ, at-wavelength metrology for soft x-ray nano-focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Sheng Sam; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Celestre, Richard; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard A.

    2010-09-19

    At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), we are developing broadly applicable, high-accuracy, in situ, at-wavelength wavefront slope measurement techniques for Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirror nano-focusing. We describe here details of the metrology beamline endstation, the at-wavelength tests, and an original alignment method that have already allowed us to precisely set a bendable KB mirror to achieve a FWHM focused spot size of ~;;120 nm, at 1-nm soft x-ray wavelength.

  10. Variable magnification variable dispersion glancing incidence imaging x-ray spectroscopic telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A variable magnification variable dispersion glancing incidence x-ray spectroscopic telescope capable of multiple high spatial revolution imaging at precise spectral lines of solar and stellar x-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation sources includes a pirmary optical system which focuses the incoming radiation to a primary focus. Two or more rotatable carries each providing a different magnification are positioned behind the primary focus at an inclination to the optical axis, each carrier carrying a series of ellipsoidal diffraction grating mirrors each having a concave surface on which the gratings are ruled and coated with a mutlilayer coating to reflect by diffraction a different desired wavelength. The diffraction grating mirrors of both carriers are segments of ellipsoids having a common first focus coincident with the primary focus. A contoured detector such as an x-ray sensitive photogrpahic film is positioned at the second respective focus of each diffraction grating so that each grating may reflect the image at the first focus to the detector at the second focus. The carriers are selectively rotated to position a selected mirror for receiving radiation from the primary optical system, and at least the first carrier may be withdrawn from the path of the radiation to permit a selected grating on the second carrier to receive radiation.

  11. Variable magnification variable dispersion glancing incidence imaging x ray spectroscopic telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A variable magnification variable dispersion glancing incidence x ray spectroscopic telescope capable of multiple high spatial revolution imaging at precise spectral lines of solar and stellar x ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation sources includes a primary optical system which focuses the incoming radiation to a primary focus. Two or more rotatable carriers each providing a different magnification are positioned behind the primary focus at an inclination to the optical axis, each carrier carrying a series of ellipsoidal diffraction grating mirrors each having a concave surface on which the gratings are ruled and coated with a multilayer coating to reflect by diffraction a different desired wavelength. The diffraction grating mirrors of both carriers are segments of ellipsoids having a common first focus coincident with the primary focus. A contoured detector such as an x ray sensitive photographic film is positioned at the second respective focus of each diffraction grating so that each grating may reflect the image at the first focus to the detector at the second focus. The carriers are selectively rotated to position a selected mirror for receiving radiation from the primary optical system, and at least the first carrier may be withdrawn from the path of the radiation to permit a selected grating on the second carrier to receive radiation.

  12. TRANSIT OBSERVATIONS OF THE HOT JUPITER HD 189733b AT X-RAY WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Poppenhaeger, K.; Wolk, S. J.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2013-08-10

    We present new X-ray observations obtained with Chandra ACIS-S of the HD 189733 system, consisting of a K-type star orbited by a transiting Hot Jupiter and an M-type stellar companion. We report a detection of the planetary transit in soft X-rays with a significantly deeper transit depth than observed in the optical. The X-ray data favor a transit depth of 6%-8%, versus a broadband optical transit depth of 2.41%. While we are able to exclude several possible stellar origins for this deep transit, additional observations will be necessary to fully exclude the possibility that coronal inhomogeneities influence the result. From the available data, we interpret the deep X-ray transit to be caused by a thin outer planetary atmosphere which is transparent at optical wavelengths, but dense enough to be opaque to X-rays. The X-ray radius appears to be larger than the radius observed at far-UV wavelengths, most likely due to high temperatures in the outer atmosphere at which hydrogen is mostly ionized. We furthermore detect the stellar companion HD 189733B in X-rays for the first time with an X-ray luminosity of log L{sub X} = 26.67 erg s{sup -1}. We show that the magnetic activity level of the companion is at odds with the activity level observed for the planet-hosting primary. The discrepancy may be caused by tidal interaction between the Hot Jupiter and its host star.

  13. Wavelength dispersive ?PIXE setup for the ion microprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazini?, S.; Boi?evi? Mihali?, I.; Tadi?, T.; Cosic, D.; Jaki?, M.; Mudronja, D.

    2015-11-01

    We have developed a small wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometer to explore the possibility of performing chemical speciation on microscopic samples utilizing focused ion beams available at the Rudjer Boskovic Institute ion microprobe. Although PIXE spectra are in principle chemically invariant, small influence of chemical effects could be observed even with Si(Li) or SDD detectors. Such chemical effects can be clearly seen with high resolution crystal X-ray spectrometers having energy resolution of several eV. A dedicated vacuum chamber, housing the diffraction crystal, sample holder and CCD X-ray detector, was constructed and positioned behind the main ion microprobe vacuum chamber. Here we will briefly describe the spectrometer, and illustrate its capabilities on measured K X-ray spectra of selected sulfur compounds. We will also demonstrate its abilities to resolve K and M X-ray lines irresolvable by solid state ED detectors usually used in PIXE.

  14. Wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, W.; Chen, Z. Y. Jin, W.; Huang, D. W.; Ding, Y. H.; Li, J. C.; Zhang, X. Q.; Zhuang, G.; Lee, S. G.; Shi, Y. J.

    2014-11-15

    The wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer is a key issue for the measurements of plasma rotation. For the lack of available standard radiation source near 3.95 and there is no other diagnostics to measure the core rotation for inter-calibration, an indirect method by using tokamak plasma itself has been applied on joint Texas experimental tokamak. It is found that the core toroidal rotation velocity is not zero during locked mode phase. This is consistent with the observation of small oscillations on soft x-ray signals and electron cyclotron emission during locked-mode phase.

  15. Accounting for the dispersion in the x ray properties of early-type galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Raymond E., III; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1990-01-01

    The x ray luminosities of early-type galaxies are correlated with their optical (e.g., blue) luminosities (L sub X approx. L sub B exp 1.6), but the x ray luminosities exhibit considerable scatter for a given optical luminosity L sub B. This dispersion in x ray luminosity is much greater than the dispersion of other properties of early-type galaxies (for a given L sub B), such as luminosity scale-length, velocity dispersion, color, and metallicity. Here, researchers consider several possible sources for the dispersion in x ray luminosity. Some of the scatter in x ray luminosity may result from stellar population variations between galaxies with similar L sub B. Since the x ray emitting gas is from accumulated stellar mass loss, the L sub X dispersion may be due to variations in integrated stellar mass loss rates. Another possible cause of the L sub X dispersion may be variations in the amount of cool material in the galaxies; cool gas may act as an energy sink for the hot gas. Infrared emission may be used to trace such cool material, so researchers look for a correlation between the infrared emission and the x ray emission of early-type galaxies at fixed L sub B. Velocity dispersion variations between galaxies of similar L sub B may also contribute to the L sub X dispersion. The most likely a priori source of the dispersion in L sub X is probably the varying amount of ram-pressure stripping in a range of galaxy environments. The hot gaseous halos of early-type galaxies can be stripped in encounters with other galaxies or with ambient cluster gas if the intracluster gas is sufficiently dense. Researchers find that the most likely cause of dispersion in the x ray properties of early type galaxies is probably the ram-pressure stripping of gaseous halos from galaxies. For a sample of 81 early-type galaxies with x ray luminosities or upper limits derived from Einstein Observatory observations (CFT) researchers calculated the cumulative distribution of angular distances between the x ray sample members and bright galaxies from the Revised Shapley - Ames catalog. Collectively, galaxies with low x ray luminosities (for a given L sub B) tend to be in denser environments than galaxies with higher x ray luminosities.

  16. The coolest DA white dwarfs detected at soft X-ray wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidder, K. M.; Holberg, J. B.; Barstow, M. A.; Tweedy, R. W.; Wesemael, F.

    1992-01-01

    New soft X-ray/EUV photometric observations of the DA white dwarfs KPD 0631 + 1043 = WD 0631 + 107 and PG 1113 + 413 = WD 1113 + 413 are analyzed. Previously reported soft X-ray detections of three other DAs and the failure to detect a fourth DA in deep Exosat observations are investigated. New ground-based spectra are presented for all of the objects, with IUE Ly-alpha spectra for some. These data are used to constrain the effective temperatures and surface gravities. The improved estimates of these parameters are employed to refer a photospheric He abundance for the hotter objects and to elucidate an effective observational low-temperature threshold for the detection of pure hydrogen DA white dwarfs at soft X-ray wavelengths.

  17. Single photon energy dispersive x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Higginbotham, Andrew; Patel, Shamim; Ciricosta, Orlando; Suggit, Matthew J.; Wark, Justin S.; Hawreliak, James A.; Collins, Gilbert W.; Coppari, Federica; Eggert, Jon H.; Tang, Henry

    2014-03-15

    With the pressure range accessible to laser driven compression experiments on solid material rising rapidly, new challenges in the diagnosis of samples in harsh laser environments are emerging. When driving to TPa pressures (conditions highly relevant to planetary interiors), traditional x-ray diffraction techniques are plagued by increased sources of background and noise, as well as a potential reduction in signal. In this paper we present a new diffraction diagnostic designed to record x-ray diffraction in low signal-to-noise environments. By utilising single photon counting techniques we demonstrate the ability to record diffraction patterns on nanosecond timescales, and subsequently separate, photon-by-photon, signal from background. In doing this, we mitigate many of the issues surrounding the use of high intensity lasers to drive samples to extremes of pressure, allowing for structural information to be obtained in a regime which is currently largely unexplored.

  18. Illicit drug detection using energy dispersive x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, E. J.; Griffiths, J. A.; Koutalonis, M.; Gent, C.; Pani, S.; Horrocks, J. A.; George, L.; Hardwick, S.; Speller, R.

    2009-05-01

    Illicit drugs are imported into countries in myriad ways, including via the postal system and courier services. An automated system is required to detect drugs in parcels for which X-ray diffraction is a suitable technique as it is non-destructive, material specific and uses X-rays of sufficiently high energy to penetrate parcels containing a range of attenuating materials. A database has been constructed containing the measured powder diffraction profiles of several thousand materials likely to be found in parcels. These include drugs, cutting agents, packaging and other innocuous materials. A software model has been developed using these data to predict the diffraction profiles which would be obtained by X-ray diffraction systems with a range of suggested detector (high purity germanium, CZT and scintillation), source and collimation options. The aim of the model was to identify the most promising system geometries, which was done with the aid of multivariate analysis (MVA). The most promising systems were constructed and tested. The diffraction profiles of a range of materials have been measured and used to both validate the model and to identify the presence of drugs in sample packages.

  19. Rest-wavelength Fiducials for the ITER Core Imaging X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Graf, A. T.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Leutenegger, M. A.; Porter, F. S.

    2012-01-01

    Absolute wavelength references are needed to derive the plasma velocities from the Doppler shift of a given line emitted by a moving plasma. We show that such reference standards exist for the strongest x-ray line in neonlike W64+, which has become the line of choice for the ITER (Latin the way) core imaging x-ray spectrometer. Close-by standards are the Hf L3 line and the Ir L2 line, which bracket the W64+ line by 30 eV; other standards are given by the Ir L1 and L2 lines and the Hf L1 and L2 lines, which bracket the W64+ line by 40 and 160 eV, respectively. The reference standards can be produced by an x-ray tube built into the ITER spectrometer. We present spectra of the reference lines obtained with an x-ray microcalorimeter and compare them to spectra of the W64+ line obtained both with an x-ray microcalorimeter and a crystal spectrometer

  20. Feasibility and review of anomalous X-ray diffraction at long wavelengths in materials research and protein crystallography.

    PubMed

    Kahn, R; Carpentier, P; Berthet-Colominas, C; Capitan, M; Chesne, M L; Fanchon, E; Lequien, S; Thiaudire, D; Vicat, J; Zielinski, P; Stuhrmann, H

    2000-05-01

    The feasibility and a review of progress in the long-wavelengths anomalous dispersion technique is given in the context of the development of beamline ID1 of the ESRF for such studies. First experiments on this beamline and their analyses are described. The first study reports on the use of uranium which exhibits an unusually strong anomalous dispersion at its M(V) absorption edge (lambda(M(V)) = 3.5 A). The anomalous scattering amplitude of uranium with 110 anomalous electrons exceeds the resonance scattering of other strong anomalous scatterers like that of the rare earth ions by a factor of four. The resulting exceptional phasing power of uranium is most attractive in protein crystallography using the MAD method. The anomalous dispersion of a uranium derivative of asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (hexagonal, a = 124.4 A, c = 123.4 A) has been measured at three wavelengths near the M(V) edge using beamline ID1 of the ESRF. The present set-up allowed the measurement of 10% of the possible reflections at a resolution of 8 A. This is mainly due to the low sensitivity of the CCD camera. The second study, involving DAFS experiments at wavelengths near the K-absorption edge of chlorine (lambda(K) = 4.4 A), reports the use of salt crystals which give rise to much stronger intensities of diffraction peaks than those of protein crystals. In the case of a crystal of pentamethylammonium undecachlorodibismuthate (PMACB, orthorhombic, a = 13.00 A, b = 14.038 A, c = 15.45 A), all reflections within the resolution range from 6.4 A to 3.5 A and the total scan width of 24 degrees were collected. The crystalline structure of PMACB implies two chemically distinct states of the Cl atom. Consequently, different dispersions near the K-edge of chlorine are expected. The dispersion of the intensity of five Bragg peaks of the PMACB crystal has been measured at 30 wavelengths. The relative success of these preliminary experiments with X-rays of long wavelength shows that the measurement of anomalous X-ray diffraction at wavelengths beyond 3 A is feasible. Starting from the experience gained in these experiments, an increased efficiency of the instrument ID1 by two to three orders of magnitude will be achieved in this wavelength range. A comparison with different techniques of anomalous diffraction which rely on the use of argon/ethane-filled multiwire chambers and image plates as detectors for wavelengths near the K-edge of sulfur and phosphorus is also given. PMID:16609186

  1. Prospect of space-based interferometry at EUV and soft X-ray wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welsh, Barry Y.; Chakrabarti, Supriya

    1992-01-01

    We review the current capabilities of high-resolution, spectroscopic, space-borne instrumentation available for both solar and stellar observations in the EUV and soft X-ray wavelength regimes, and describe the basic design of a compact, all-reflection interferometer based on the spatial heterodyne technique; this is capable of producing a resolving power (lambda/Delta-lambda) of about 20,000 in the 100-200 A region using presently available multilayer optical components. Such an instrument can be readily constructed with existing technology. Due to its small size and lack of moving parts, it is ideally suited to spaceborne applications. Based on best estimates of the efficiency of this instrument at soft X-ray wavelengths, we review the possible use of this high-resolution interferometer in obtaining high-resolution full-disk spectroscopy of the sun. We also discuss its possible use for observations of diffuse sources such as the EUV interstellar background radiation.

  2. Determination of plutonium in nitric acid solutions using energy dispersive L X-ray fluorescence with a low power X-ray generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Py, J.; Groetz, J.-E.; Hubinois, J.-C.; Cardona, D.

    2015-04-01

    This work presents the development of an in-line energy dispersive L X-ray fluorescence spectrometer set-up, with a low power X-ray generator and a secondary target, for the determination of plutonium concentration in nitric acid solutions. The intensity of the L X-rays from the internal conversion and gamma rays emitted by the daughter nuclei from plutonium is minimized and corrected, in order to eliminate the interferences with the L X-ray fluorescence spectrum. The matrix effects are then corrected by the Compton peak method. A calibration plot for plutonium solutions within the range 0.1-20 g L-1 is given.

  3. Performance of X-ray Beam lines at Superconducting Wavelength Shifter

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Y. F.; Chang, C. H.; Liu, C. Y.; Chang, S. H.; Jeng, U.; Lai, Y. H.; Liu, D. G.; Yin, G. C.; Lee, J. F.; Sheu, H. S.; Chung, S. C.; Tsang, K. L.; Liang, K. S.; Hwu, Y.

    2007-01-19

    To fully utilize a hard X-ray source generated by a 5-Tesla superconducting wavelength shifter (SWLS) that shifts the critical energy of synchrotron spectrum from 2.1 to 7.5 keV, we have designed and constructed three hard X-ray beamlines, BL01A, BL01B, and BL0IC. BL01A is a white light beamline for phase-contrast X-ray image applications. The spatial resolution of phase-contrast X-ray image is 1 {mu}m. The photon flux can saturate a camera of 700-microns field-of-view within 10 ms. BL01B equipped with a double crystal monochromator (DCM) and a toroidal focusing mirror, which provides photon beams with energies from 5 to 20 keV, is adequate for scattering related experiments and hard X-ray microscopy. The energy-resolution {delta}E/E is 1 x 10-3. The photon flux is optimized to be 4.5 x 1011 photons s-1 with 200 mA ring current, which outcasts the flux of the wiggler beamline BL17B by 110 times at 15 keV. BL01C equipped with a DCM and both collimating and focusing mirrors, covering photon energies from 6 to 33 keV, is ideal for EXAFS and X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments. The average photon flux is 3 x 1010 photons s-1 with 200 mA ring current. The energy-resolution is between 1.7 x 10-4 and 3.0 x 10-4. In this article, we will present the measured performance of these beamlines.

  4. Standardless energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis using primary radiation monochromatized with LiF(200) crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitko, Rafa?; Zawisza, Beata; Malicka, Ewa

    2008-11-01

    Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (EDXRF) with primary radiation monochromatized by LiF(200) crystal was developed. In the constructed spectrometer, the radiation from the Ag target X-ray tube operated at 50 kV and 40 mA excites the secondary target (Cu, Se, Zr or Mo). The characteristic radiation (Cu K ?, Se K ?, Zr K ? or Mo K ?) of the target is monochromatized with LiF(200) crystal and excites elements in the analyzed sample. The X-ray spectra are collected by thermoelectrically cooled Si-PIN detector with resolution of 145 eV at 5.9 keV. The pinhole collimator placed in front of the X-ray detector allows reducing size of the analyzed area. Quantitative analysis is performed using standardless fundamental parameters (FP) method. Because sample is excited using highly monochromatized radiation, the calculations are much simpler and analysis error resulting from uncertainty of X-ray tube spectral distribution is completely eliminated. Moreover, EDXRF system allows obtaining very low background and appropriate secondary target can be selected for the best excitation of the determined elements and to avoid overlapping of the analyte peaks with characteristic radiation originating from the secondary target. The FP calculations were verified using several certified reference materials of stainless steel. The spectrometer was used for nondestructive analysis of mono- and polycrystals of selenide spinels of general formula M xN yCr zSe 4 (where M, N are Cu 2+, Zn 2+, Cd 2+, Mn 2+, Ge 2+, Ni 2+, V 3+, Sb 3+, Ga 3+). The results from EDXRF were compared with those obtained by means of the wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (WDXRF).

  5. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis on an absolute scale in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; D'Alfonso, A J; Weyland, M; Taplin, D J; Allen, L J; Findlay, S D

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate absolute scale agreement between the number of X-ray counts in energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy using an atomic-scale coherent electron probe and first-principles simulations. Scan-averaged spectra were collected across a range of thicknesses with precisely determined and controlled microscope parameters. Ionization cross-sections were calculated using the quantum excitation of phonons model, incorporating dynamical (multiple) electron scattering, which is seen to be important even for very thin specimens. PMID:26004522

  6. The development of new radiation protocols for insect sterilization using long wavelength x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquidi, Jacob; Brar, Ramaninder K.; Rodriguez, Stacy; Hansen, Immo

    2015-07-01

    Control of insect species for the protection of crops, livestock, and prevention of disease such as dengue fever and malaria is a high priority in today's global economy. Traditional methods such as pesticides have fallen out of favor because its effects are indiscriminate as well as adverse and unpredictable impacts on the environment. Modern novel techniques such as genetic modification have had trouble gaining traction due to ethics concerns and the potential for unforeseen side effects. One approach that has gained traction and has proven its efficacy is the use of ionizing radiation to affect sterility in insect species in order to scale back their population. Known as Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), it has proven very effective in eradicating certain dipteran insect populations. However, when standard sterilization methods developed for dipertans are applied to mosquito populations significant complications arise, such as an inability to compete with non-irradiated males and high mortality rates. We have investigated the effect of treatment with x-rays of different wavelengths on x-ray sterilized mosquito males. Our results have demonstrated that longer wavelength x-rays have a significant effect on the outcome of the sterile males' longevity as well as an increase on the efficacy of sterilization while employing a substantially lower dose.

  7. Comptonization of X-rays by low-temperature electrons. [photon wavelength redistribution in cosmic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Illarionov, A.; Kallman, T.; Mccray, R.; Ross, R.

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for calculating the spectrum that results from the Compton scattering of a monochromatic source of X-rays by low-temperature electrons, both for initial-value relaxation problems and for steady-state spatial diffusion problems. The method gives an exact solution of the inital-value problem for evolution of the spectrum in an infinite homogeneous medium if Klein-Nishina corrections to the Thomson cross section are neglected. This, together with approximate solutions for problems in which Klein-Nishina corrections are significant and/or spatial diffusion occurs, shows spectral structure near the original photon wavelength that may be used to infer physical conditions in cosmic X-ray sources. Explicit results, shown for examples of time relaxation in an infinite medium and spatial diffusion through a uniform sphere, are compared with results obtained by Monte Carlo calculations and by solving the appropriate Fokker-Planck equation.

  8. Phase Determination by Multiple-Wavelength X-ray Diffraction: Crystal Structure of a Basic ``Blue'' Copper Protein from Cucumbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guss, J. Mitchell; Merritt, Ethan A.; Phizackerley, R. Paul; Hedman, Britt; Murata, Mitsuo; Hodgson, Keith O.; Freeman, Hans C.

    1988-08-01

    A novel x-ray diffraction technique, multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing, has been applied to the de novo determination of an unknown protein structure, that of the ``blue'' copper protein isolated from cucumber seedlings. This method makes use of crystallographic phases determined from measurements made at several wavelengths and has recently been made technically feasible through the use of intense, polychromatic synchrotron radiation together with accurate data collection from multiwire electronic area detectors. In contrast with all of the conventional methods of solving protein structures, which require either multiple isomorphous derivatives or coordinates of a similar structure for molecular replacement, this technique allows direct solution of the classical ``phase problem'' in x-ray crystallography. MAD phase assignment should be particularly useful for determining structures of small to medium-sized metalloproteins for which isomorphous derivatives are difficult or impossible to make. The structure of this particular protein provides new insights into the spectroscopic and redox properties of blue copper proteins, an important class of metalloproteins widely distributed in nature.

  9. X-ray photoemission and energy dispersive spectroscopy of hydroxyapatite-coated titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.L.; Steinberg, A.D.; Krauss, A.R.

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the chemical composition changes of hydroxyapatite (HA) coated titanium using surface analysis (X-ray photoemission) and bulk analysis (energy dispersive spectroscopy). The specimens examined were controls and specimens aged 30 min and 3 h at room temperature in distilled water and 0.2M sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.2). Each X-ray photoemission cycle consisted of three scans followed by argon sputtering for 10 min for usually 20 cycles, corresponding to a sampling depth of {approximately}1,500 {angstrom}. The energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis was on a 110 by 90 {micro}m area for 500 s. The X-ray photoemission results indicated the oxidation effect of water on the titanium (as TiO{sub 2}) and the effect of the buffer to increase the surface concentration of phosphorus. No differences in the chemical composition were observed by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis.

  10. Development of at-wavelength metrology for x-ray optics at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Yuan, Sheng; Celestre, Richard; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Gregory; Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard A.

    2010-07-09

    The comprehensive realization of the exciting advantages of new third- and forth-generation synchrotron radiation light sources requires concomitant development of reflecting and diffractive x-ray optics capable of micro- and nano-focusing, brightness preservation, and super high resolution. The fabrication, tuning, and alignment of the optics are impossible without adequate metrology instrumentation, methods, and techniques. While the accuracy of ex situ optical metrology at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) has reached a state-of-the-art level, wavefront control on beamlines is often limited by environmental and systematic alignment factors, and inadequate in situ feedback. At ALS beamline 5.3.1, we are developing broadly applicable, high-accuracy, in situ, at-wavelength wavefront measurement techniques to surpass 100-nrad slope measurement accuracy for Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors. The at-wavelength methodology we are developing relies on a series of tests with increasing accuracy and sensitivity. Geometric Hartmann tests, performed with a scanning illuminated sub-aperture determine the wavefront slope across the full mirror aperture. Shearing interferometry techniques use coherent illumination and provide higher sensitivity wavefront measurements. Combining these techniques with high precision optical metrology and experimental methods will enable us to provide in situ setting and alignment of bendable x-ray optics to realize diffraction-limited, sub 50 nm focusing at beamlines. We describe here details of the metrology beamline endstation, the x-ray beam diagnostic system, and original experimental techniques that have already allowed us to precisely set a bendable KB mirror to achieve a focused spot size of 150 nm.

  11. Atomic-resolution chemical mapping using energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alfonso, A. J.; Freitag, B.; Klenov, D.; Allen, L. J.

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate atomic-resolution chemical mapping using energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy. Theoretical simulations of the imaging process demonstrate that these images are directly interpretable. This is due to the fact that the effective ionization interaction is local and this is an incoherent mode of imaging.

  12. Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry: A Long Overdue Addition to the Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Peter T.

    2011-01-01

    Portable Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyzers have undergone significant improvements over the past decade. Salient advantages of XRF for elemental analysis include minimal sample preparation, multielement analysis capabilities, detection limits in the low parts per million (ppm) range, and analysis times on the order of 1 min.…

  13. Analysis of tincal ore waste by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalfa, Orhan Murat; stnda?, Zafer; zk?r?m, Ilknur; Kagan Kad?o?lu, Yusuf

    2007-01-01

    Etibank Borax Plant is located in K?rka-Eski?ehir, Turkey. The borax waste from this plant was analyzed by means of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The standard addition method was used for the determination of the concentration of Al, Fe, Zn, Sn, and Ba. The results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  14. Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry: A Long Overdue Addition to the Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Peter T.

    2011-01-01

    Portable Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analyzers have undergone significant improvements over the past decade. Salient advantages of XRF for elemental analysis include minimal sample preparation, multielement analysis capabilities, detection limits in the low parts per million (ppm) range, and analysis times on the order of 1 min.

  15. 20 element HgI{sub 2} energy dispersive x-ray array detector system

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.A.; Dorri, N.; Wang, M.; Szczebiot, R.W.; Dabrowski, A.J.; Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O.; Patt, B.E.

    1991-12-31

    This paper describes recent progress in the development of HgI{sub 2} energy dispersive x-ray detector arrays and associated miniaturized processing electronics for synchrotron radiation research applications. The experimental results with a 20 element array detector were obtained under realistic synchrotron beam conditions at SSRL. An energy resolution of 250 eV (FWHM) at 5.9 keV (Mn-K{sub a}) was achieved. Energy resolution and throughput measurements versus input count rate and energy of incoming radiation have been measured. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectra were taken from diluted samples simulating proteins with nickel.

  16. 20 element HgI sub 2 energy dispersive x-ray array detector system

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.A.; Dorri, N.; Wang, M.; Szczebiot, R.W.; Dabrowski, A.J. ); Hedman, B.; Hodgson, K.O. . Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Patt, B.E. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes recent progress in the development of HgI{sub 2} energy dispersive x-ray detector arrays and associated miniaturized processing electronics for synchrotron radiation research applications. The experimental results with a 20 element array detector were obtained under realistic synchrotron beam conditions at SSRL. An energy resolution of 250 eV (FWHM) at 5.9 keV (Mn-K{sub a}) was achieved. Energy resolution and throughput measurements versus input count rate and energy of incoming radiation have been measured. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectra were taken from diluted samples simulating proteins with nickel.

  17. Interfacial energy-dispersive spectroscopy profile X-ray resolution measurements in variable pressure SEM.

    PubMed

    Zoukel, Abdelhalim; Khouchaf, Lahcen; Di Martino, Jean; Ruch, David

    2014-10-01

    A procedure has been developed to follow degradation of energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) X-ray lateral resolution in a variable pressure scanning electron microscope. This procedure is based on evaluation of the EDS profile shape change for different experimental conditions. Some parameters affecting the X-ray resolution in high-vacuum mode have been taken into account. Good agreement between the simulated and experimental EDS profiles shows the reliability of the proposed procedure. A significant improvement in measurement of the EDS profile interfacial distance (DINT) has been achieved. PMID:24960537

  18. High-pressure structural studies of dysprosium using angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yongrong; Kumar, Ravhi S.; Cornelius, Andrew L.; Nicol, Malcolm F.

    2007-02-01

    We present structural results under pressure for elemental dysprosium (Dy) up to 87 GPa using in situ angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements with synchrotron x rays and a diamond-anvil cell. Dy exhibits the structural transition sequence, hP2{yields}hR9{yields}hP4{yields}distorted cF4, from Rietveld full-profile refinements. Clear evidence is documented for the high-pressure distorted cF4 phase observed above 45 GPa to be an orthorhombic oS8 (Cmmm) structure for Dy in the lanthanide phase diagram.

  19. A new X-ray pinhole camera for energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence imaging with high-energy and high-spatial resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, F. P.; Altana, C.; Cosentino, L.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Mascali, D.; Pappalardo, L.; Rizzo, F.

    2013-08-01

    A new X-ray pinhole camera for the Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (ED-XRF) imaging of materials with high-energy and high-spatial resolution, was designed and developed. It consists of a back-illuminated and deep depleted CCD detector (composed of 1024 1024 pixels with a lateral size of 13 ?m) coupled to a 70 ?m laser-drilled pinhole-collimator, positioned between the sample under analysis and the CCD. The X-ray pinhole camera works in a coaxial geometry allowing a wide range of magnification values. The characteristic X-ray fluorescence is induced on the samples by irradiation with an external X-ray tube working at a maximum power of 100 W (50 kV and 2 mA operating conditions). The spectroscopic capabilities of the X-ray pinhole camera were accurately investigated. Energy response and energy calibration of the CCD detector were determined by irradiating pure target-materials emitting characteristic X-rays in the energy working-domain of the system (between 3 keV and 30 keV). Measurements were performed by using a multi-frame acquisition in single-photon counting. The characteristic X-ray spectra were obtained by an automated processing of the acquired images. The energy resolution measured at the Fe-K? line is 157 eV. The use of the X-ray pinhole camera for the 2D resolved elemental analysis was investigated by using reference-patterns of different materials and geometries. The possibility of the elemental mapping of samples up to an area of 3 3 cm2 was demonstrated. Finally, the spatial resolution of the pinhole camera was measured by analyzing the profile function of a sharp-edge. The spatial resolution determined at the magnification values of 3.2 and 0.8 (used as testing values) is about 90 ?m and 190 ?m respectively.

  20. Tunable coherent radiation at soft X-ray wavelengths: Generation and interferometric applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rosfjord, Kristine Marie

    2004-07-01

    The availability of high power, spectrally and spatially coherent soft x-rays (SXR) would facilitate a wide variety of experiments as this energy region covers the primary resonances of many magnetic and biological materials. Specifically, there are the carbon and oxygen K-edges that are critical for biological imaging in the water window and the L-edges of iron, nickel, and cobalt for which imaging and scattering studies can be performed. A new coherent soft X-ray branchline at the Advanced Light Source has begun operation (beamline 12.0.2). Using the third harmonic from an 8 cm period undulator, this branch delivers coherent soft x-rays with photon energies ranging from 200eV to 1keV. This branchline is composed of two sub-branches one at 14X demagnification and the other 8X demagnification. The former is optimized for use at 500eV and the latter at 800eV. Here the expected power from the third harmonic of this undulator and the beamline design and characterization is presented. The characterization includes measurements on available photon flux as well as a series of double pinhole experiments to determine the coherence factor with respect to transverse distance. The first high quality Airy patterns at SXR wavelengths are created with this new beamline. The operation of this new beamline allows for interferometry to be performed in the SXR region. Here an interferometric experiment designed to directly determine the index of refraction of a material under test is performed. Measurements are first made in the EUV region using an established beamline (beamline12.0.1) to measure silicon, ruthenium and tantalum silicon nitride. This work is then extended to the SXR region using beamline 12.0.2 to test chromium and vanadium.

  1. Theory of angular-dispersive, imaging hard-x-ray spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2015-05-01

    A spectrograph is an optical instrument that disperses photons of different energies into distinct directions and space locations and that images photon spectra on a position-sensitive detector. Spectrographs consist of collimating, angular dispersive, and focusing optical elements. Bragg reflecting crystals arranged in an asymmetric scattering geometry can be used as the dispersing elements in the hard-x-ray regime. A ray-transfer matrix technique is applied to propagate x-rays through the optical elements. Several optical designs of hard-x-ray spectrographs are proposed and their performance is analyzed. Spectrographs with an energy resolution of 0.1 meV and a spectral window of imaging up to a few tens of meVs are shown to be feasible for inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) spectroscopy applications. In another example, a spectrograph with a 1-meV spectral resolution and 85-meV spectral window of imaging is considered for Cu K -edge resonant IXS.

  2. Development of an x-ray detector based on polymer- dispersed liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, K.; Hong, J.; Kim, G.; Park, S.; Min, B.; Yang, J.; Nam, S.

    2015-02-01

    The applications of active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) in large-area x-ray imaging systems have increased over time but are still severely limited owing to its pixel resolution, complex fabrication processes, and high cost. As a solution, x-ray light valve (XLV) technology was introduced and expected to have a better resolution and contrast ratio than those of AMFPI, owing to its micrometer level of the LC cells and signal amplification by an external light source. The twisting angle of the LC cells was changed by charge carrier signals created in a photoconductor layer against x-rays, and the diagnostic images from XLV were acquired from the transmittance of the external light source. However, there was a possibility that the photoconductor layer may be crystallized or degenerated due to the application of high temperatures for sealing the LC layer during the fabrication process. To solve such problems, polymer-dispersed liquid crystals (PDLCs), which do not need high temperature for the sealing process of the LC layer, are used in this study instead of typical LC cells. A photoconductor and PDLC are combined to develop an x-ray detector. An external light source and optical sensor are used to investigate the light transmission of the PDLC . The PDLCs used in this paper do not need polarizers and are self-adhesive. Hence, the transmittance is very high in the transparent state, which allows for a linear x-ray response and sufficient dynamic range in digital radiography.

  3. Closing the gap to the diffraction limit: Near wavelength limited tabletop soft x-ray coherent diffractive imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, Richard Lunt

    Light microscopy has greatly advanced our understanding of nature. The achievable resolution, however, is limited by optical wavelengths to around 200 nm. Using novel imaging and labeling technologies, resolutions beyond the diffraction limit can be achieved for specialized specimens using techniques such as near-field scanning optical microscopy, stimulated emission depletion microscopy and structured illumination microscopy [1--3]. This dissertation presents a versatile soft x-ray diffraction microscope with 50 nm resolution using tabletop coherent soft x-ray sources. This work represents the first high resolution demonstrations of coherent diffractive or lensless imaging using tabletop extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray sources [4, 5]. This dissertation also presents the first use of field curvature correction in x-ray coherent imaging which allows high numerical aperture imaging and near-diffraction-limited resolution of 1.5lambda. The relevant theory behind high harmonic generation, the primary tabletop source used in this work, will be discussed as well as the theory behind coherent diffractive imaging. Additionally, the first demonstration of tabletop soft x-ray Fourier Transform holography is shown with important applications to shorter wavelength imaging with high harmonic generation with limited flux. A tabletop soft x-ray diffraction microscope should find broad applications in biology, nanoscience, and materials science due to its simple optical design, high resolution, large depth of field, 3D imaging capability, scalability to shorter wavelengths, and ultrafast temporal resolution.

  4. High-resolution detectors for imaging and spectroscopy at ultraviolet and soft X-ray wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.; Morgan, J. S.; Slater, D. C.

    1988-01-01

    The Multi-Anode Microchannel Arrays (MAMAs) are a family of pulse-counting imaging array detectors designed specifically for astrophysical investigations in space. The MAMAs have a number of unique performance characteristics which make them particularly suitable for imaging and spectroscopy at ultraviolet and soft X-ray wavelengths. First, they employ 'solar blind' photocathodes eliminating the 'red leak' problem associated with solid state arrays such as the CCDs. Second, they operate with zero readout noise, yielding photon-statistics limited signals. Third, they utilize a random readout technique and can determine both the location of a detected photon and also its arrival time to an accuracy of the order of 100 ns. This paper gives an overview of the construction, mode of operation, and performance characteristics of the MAMA detectors and describes the current status of the development program.

  5. X-ray photo-emission and energy dispersive spectroscopy of HA coated titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.L.; Steinberg, A.D.; Krauss, A.R.

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the chemical composition changes of hydroxyapatite (HA) coated titanium using surface analysis (x-ray photo-emission) and bulk analysis (energy dispersive spectroscopy). The specimens examined were controls, 30 minutes and 3 hours aged specimens in distilled water or 0.2M sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) at room temperature. Each x-ray photo-emission cycle consisted of 3 scans followed by argon sputtering for 10 minutes for a total of usually 20 cycles, corresponding to a sampling depth of {approximately} 1500 {angstrom}. The energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis was on a 110 by 90 {mu}m area for 500 sec. Scanning electron microscopy examination showed crystal formation (3P{sub 2}O{sub 5}*2CAO*?H{sub 2}O by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis) on the HA coating for the specimens aged in sodium phosphate buffer. The x-ray photo-emission results indicated the oxidation effect of water on the titanium (as TiO{sub 2}) and the effect of the buffer to increase the surface concentration of phosphorous. No differences in the chemical composition were observed by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. The crystal growth was only observed for the sodium phosphate buffer specimens and only on the HA surface.

  6. Dispersion and monochromatization of x-rays using a beryllium prism.

    PubMed

    Burza, M; Enquist, H; Jurgilaitis, A; Nygaard, J; Larsson, J

    2015-01-26

    We demonstrate experimentally and numerically that an x-ray prism made of beryllium can be used to disperse and monochromatize x-rays. A polished beryllium cuboid was employed as refractive and dispersive optics. The results of a proof-of-principle experiment and methods of performance optimization are presented. The spatial separation of undulator harmonics and their subsequent selection using a slit are described. A numerical study, assuming realistic beam and beamline parameters, suggests that undulator harmonics can be spatially separated in the range from 3 keV to beyond 20 keV, while maintaining throughput above 50%. Refractive optics is particularly suitable for low-repetition-rate sources such as free-electron lasers and other LINAC-based short-pulse sources. PMID:25835820

  7. A Soft X-ray Spectrometer using a Highly Dispersive Multilayer Grating

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard; Voronov, Dmitriy; Yashchuk, Valeriy

    2010-01-31

    There is a need for higher resolution spectrometers as a tool for inelastic x-ray scattering. Currently, resolving power around R = 10,000 is advertised. Measured RIXS spectra are often limited by this instrumental resolution and higher resolution spectrometers using conventional gratings would be prohibitively large. We are engaged in a development program to build blazed multilayer grating structures for diffracting soft x-rays in high order. This leads to spectrometers with dispersion much higher than is possible using metal coated-gratings. The higher dispersion then provides higher resolution and the multilayer gratings are capable of operating away from grazing incidence as required. A spectrometer design is presented with a total length 3.8m and capable of 10{sup 5} resolving power.

  8. A Soft X-ray Spectrometer using a Highly Dispersive Multilayer Grating

    SciTech Connect

    Warwick, Tony; Padmore, Howard; Voronov, Dmitriy; Yashchuk, Valeriy

    2010-06-23

    There is a need for higher resolution spectrometers as a tool for inelastic x-ray scattering. Currently, resolving power around R = 10,000 is advertised. Measured RIXS spectra are often limited by this instrumental resolution and higher resolution spectrometers using conventional gratings would be prohibitively large. We are engaged in a development program to build blazed multilayer grating structures for diffracting soft x-rays in high order. This leads to spectrometers with dispersion much higher than is possible using metal coated-gratings. The higher dispersion then provides higher resolution and the multilayer gratings are capable of operating away from grazing incidence as required. A spectrometer design is presented with a total length 3.8 m and capable of 10{sup 5} resolving power.

  9. Spatial high resolution energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy on thin lamellas.

    PubMed

    Notthoff, Christian; Winterer, Markus; Beckel, Andreas; Geller, Martin; Heindl, Jrgen

    2013-06-01

    For conventional samples and measurement geometries the spatial resolution of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy is limited by a tear drop shaped emission volume to about 1 ?m. This restriction can be substantially improved using thin samples and high acceleration voltage. In this contribution the spatial resolution of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in a scanning electron microscope using thin lamella samples is investigated. At an acceleration voltage of 30 kV, an edge resolution down to ?dedge = 40 10 nm is observed performing linescans across an interface, using an 80 nm thin sample prepared from a GaAs/AlAs-heterostructure. Furthermore, Monte-Carlo simulations of pure elements ranging from sodium to mercury are performed for different sample thicknesses. From the simulations we can derive a simple empirical formula to predict the spatial resolution as a function of sample thickness. PMID:23545434

  10. Hydration kinetics of oriented lipid membranes investigated by energy dispersive x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracciolo, Giulio; Sadun, Claudia; Caminiti, Ruggero

    2004-08-01

    Energy dispersive x-ray diffraction was applied to investigate the hydration kinetics of highly aligned 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane membrane system. First, the adsorption of water into the lipid film results in a continous gain of interbilayer spatial coherence until a maximum is reached. Further, adsorbed water molecules behave as bulk water promoting loss of spatial coherence and leading to a progressive lowering and broadening of diffraction peaks. The possible molecular origin of this phenomenon is discussed.

  11. Scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive x ray analysis of impact residues in LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhard, Ronald P.; Durin, Christian; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1993-01-01

    Detailed optical scanning of tray clamps is being conducted in the Facility for the Optical Inspection of Large Surfaces at JSC to locate and document impacts as small as 40 microns in diameter. Residues from selected impacts are then being characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis at CNES. Results from this analysis will be the initial step to classifying projectile residues into specific sources.

  12. Repair of fractured framework: scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maalhagh-Fard, Ahmad; Wagner, Warren C

    2004-09-01

    Fractured metal prostheses can be analyzed for possible causes of failure using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In this study, fractography is used to determine the cause of the failure and whether repair is practical. Energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) is used to determine composition of the fractured prosthesis so that a repair process can be recommended. The technique is presented for the repair of a titanium framework for an implant-supported overdenture based on the analysis data. PMID:15359153

  13. LOCALIZING INTEGRAL SOURCES WITH CHANDRA: X-RAY AND MULTI-WAVELENGTH IDENTIFICATIONS AND ENERGY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Tomsick, John A.; Bodaghee, Arash; Chaty, Sylvain; Rodriguez, Jerome; Halpern, Jules; Kalemci, Emrah; Oezbey Arabaci, Mehtap

    2012-08-01

    We report on Chandra observations of 18 hard X-ray (>20 keV) sources discovered with the INTEGRAL satellite near the Galactic plane. For 14 of the INTEGRAL sources, we have uncovered one or two potential Chandra counterparts per source. These provide soft X-ray (0.3-10 keV) spectra and subarcsecond localizations, which we use to identify counterparts at other wavelengths, providing information about the nature of each source. Despite the fact that all of the sources are within 5 Degree-Sign of the plane, four of the IGR sources are active galactic nuclei (AGNs; IGR J01545+6437, IGR J15391-5307, IGR J15415-5029, and IGR J21565+5948) and four others are likely AGNs (IGR J03103+5706, IGR J09189-4418, IGR J16413-4046, and IGR J16560-4958) based on each of them having a strong IR excess and/or extended optical or near-IR emission. We compare the X-ray and near-IR fluxes of this group of sources to those of AGNs selected by their 2-10 keV emission in previous studies and find that these IGR AGNs are in the range of typical values. There is evidence in favor of four of the sources being Galactic (IGR J12489-6243, IGR J15293-5609, IGR J16173-5023, and IGR J16206-5253), but only IGR J15293-5609 is confirmed as a Galactic source as it has a unique Chandra counterpart and a parallax measurement from previous optical observations that puts its distance at 1.56 {+-} 0.12 kpc. The 0.3-10 keV luminosity for this source is (1.4{sup +1.0}{sub -0.4}) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 32} erg s{sup -1}, and its optical/IR spectral energy distribution is well described by a blackbody with a temperature of 4200-7000 K and a radius of 12.0-16.4 R{sub Sun }. These values suggest that IGR J15293-5609 is a symbiotic binary with an early K-type giant and a white dwarf accretor. We also obtained likely Chandra identifications for IGR J13402-6428 and IGR J15368-5102, but follow-up observations are required to constrain their source types.

  14. CUBIC - A non-dispersive Diffuse X-ray Background spectrometer. [Cosmic Unresolved X-ray Background Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, David N.; Skinner, Mark A.; Antunes, Alexander J. D.; Catalano, Mark A.; Cocklin, Eric J.; Engel, Leland G.; Entingh, Timothy J.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Green, Roland; Kelly, Douglas A.

    1992-01-01

    The Cosmic Unresolved X-ray Background Instrument using CCDs (CUBIC) is designed to obtain spectral observations of the Diffuse X-ray Background (DXRB) with moderate spectral resolution over the energy range 0.2-10 keV, using mechanically-collimated CCDs. At this time, it is the only planned satellite payload devoted to the study of the spectrum of the DXRB. Over the anticipated 3 year lifetime of the satellite, CUBIC will be able to study up to 50 percent of the sky with 5 x 5 deg spatial resolution for the subkilovolt Galactic diffuse background, and with 10 x 10 deg spatial resolution for the extragalactic diffuse background above 2 keV. CUBIC will obtain high quality nondispersive spectra of soft X-ray emission from the interstellar medium, supernova remnants, and some bright sources, and will make a sensitive seach for line emission or other features in the extragalactic cosmic X-ray background from 2-10 keV.

  15. The ChIcAGO Survey: Multi-wavelength Identification of Galactic Plane X-ray Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Gemma; Gaensler, Bryan M.; Slane, Patrick O.; Kaplan, David L.A.; Posselt, Bettina

    2014-08-01

    I present the Chasing the Identification of ASCA Galactic Objects (ChIcAGO) survey, which is designed to identify the unknown X-ray sources discovered during the ASCA Galactic Plane Survey (AGPS). Little is known about most of the AGPS sources, especially those that emit primarily in hard X-rays (2-10 keV) within the F_ 10^-13 to 10^-11 erg cm^-2s^-1 X-ray flux range. In ChIcAGO, the subarcsecond localization capabilities of Chandra have been combined with a multi-wavelength follow-up program, with the ultimate goal of classifying the unidentified sources in the AGPS. Overall to date, 93 unidentified AGPS sources have been observed with Chandra as part of the ChIcAGO survey. A total of 253 X-ray point sources have been detected in these Chandra observations within 3' of the original ASCA positions, the majority of which have optical and infrared counterparts. Using these multi-wavelength follow-up results I have developed a new statistical diagnostic for identifying likely populations of X-ray emitting sources. These studies have revealed that the primary populations of Galactic plane X-ray sources that emit in the F_ 10^-13 to 10^-11 erg cm^-2s^-1 flux range are active stellar coronae, massive stars that are possibly in colliding-wind binaries, X-ray binaries, and magnetars. There is also another primary population that is still unidentified but, on the basis of its X-ray and infrared properties, likely comprise partly of Galactic sources and partly AGN.

  16. THE CORRELATION BETWEEN DISPERSION MEASURE AND X-RAY COLUMN DENSITY FROM RADIO PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    He, C.; Ng, C.-Y.; Kaspi, V. M.

    2013-05-01

    Pulsars are remarkable objects that emit across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, providing a powerful probe of the interstellar medium. In this study, we investigate the relation between dispersion measure (DM) and X-ray absorption column density N{sub H} using 68 radio pulsars detected at X-ray energies with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory or XMM-Newton. We find a best-fit empirical linear relation of N{sub H} (10{sup 20} cm{sup -2})= 0.30{sup +0.13}{sub -0.09} DM (pc cm{sup -3}), which corresponds to an average ionization of 10{sup +4}{sub -3}%, confirming the ratio of one free electron per 10 neutral hydrogen atoms commonly assumed in the literature. We also compare different N{sub H} estimates and note that some N{sub H} values obtained from X-ray observations are higher than the total Galactic H I column density along the same line of sight, while the optical extinction generally gives the best N{sub H} predictions.

  17. High Performance Non-Dispersive X-Ray Spectrometers for Charge Exchange Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter Frederick; Adams, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Karkatoua, D.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Lautenagger, M.

    2010-01-01

    Currently, the only measurements of cosmological charge exchange have been made using low resolution, non-dispersive spectrometers like the PSPC on ROSAT and the CCD instruments on Chandra and XMM/Newton. However, upcoming cryogenic spectrometers on Astro-H and IXO will add vast new capabilities to investigate charge exchange in local objects such as comets and planetary atmospheres. They may also allow us to observe charge exchange in extra-solar objects such as galactic supernova remnants. With low spectral resolution instruments such as CCDs, x-ray emission due to charge exchange recombination really only provides information on the acceptor species, such as the solar wind. With the new breed of x-ray calorimeter instruments, emission from charge exchange becomes highly diagnostic allowing one to uniquely determine the acceptor species, ionization state, donor species and ionization state, and the relative velocity of the interaction. We will describe x-ray calorimeter instrumentation and its potential for charge exchange measurements in the near term. We will also touch on the instrumentation behind a decade of high resolution measurements of charge exchange using an x-ray calorimeter at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  18. Quantitative energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction for identification of counterfeit medicines: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, Chiaki C. E.; O'Flynn, Daniel; Sidebottom, Aiden; Speller, Robert D.

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of counterfeit and substandard medicines has been growing rapidly over the past decade, and fast, nondestructive techniques for their detection are urgently needed to counter this trend. In this study, energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) combined with chemometrics was assessed for its effectiveness in quantitative analysis of compressed powder mixtures. Although EDXRD produces lower-resolution diffraction patterns than angular-dispersive X-ray diffraction (ADXRD), it is of interest for this application as it carries the advantage of allowing the analysis of tablets within their packaging, due to the higher energy X-rays used. A series of caffeine, paracetamol and microcrystalline cellulose mixtures were prepared with compositions between 0 - 100 weight% in 20 weight% steps (22 samples in total, including a centroid mixture), and were pressed into tablets. EDXRD spectra were collected in triplicate, and a principal component analysis (PCA) separated these into their correct positions in the ternary mixture design. A partial least-squares (PLS) regression model calibrated using this training set was validated using both segmented cross-validation, and with a test set of six samples (mixtures in 8:1:1 and 5⅓:2⅓:2⅓ ratios) - the latter giving a root-mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 1.30, 2.25 and 2.03 weight% for caffeine, paracetamol and cellulose respectively. These initial results are promising, with RMSEP values on a par with those reported in the ADXRD literature.

  19. Reflection thermal diffuse x-ray scattering for quantitative determination of phonon dispersion relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, A. B.; Hellman, O.; Schleptz, C. M.; Rockett, A.; Chiang, T.-C.; Hultman, L.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.

    2015-11-01

    Synchrotron reflection x-ray thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) measurements, rather than previously reported transmission TDS, are carried out at room temperature and analyzed using a formalism based upon second-order interatomic force constants and long-range Coulomb interactions to obtain quantitative determinations of MgO phonon dispersion relations ? ?j (q), phonon densities of states g (? ? ), and isochoric temperature-dependent vibrational heat capacities cv(T ) . We use MgO as a model system for investigating reflection TDS due to its harmonic behavior as well as its mechanical and dynamic stability. Resulting phonon dispersion relations and densities of states are found to be in good agreement with independent reports from inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering experiments. Temperature-dependent isochoric heat capacities cv(T ) , computed within the harmonic approximation from ? ?j (q) values, increase with temperature from 0.4 10-4eV /atom K at 100 K to 1.4 10-4eV /atom K at 200 K and 1.9 10-4eV /atom K at 300 K, in excellent agreement with isobaric heat capacity values cp(T ) between 4 and 300 K. We anticipate that the experimental approach developed here will be valuable for determining vibrational properties of heteroepitaxial thin films since the use of grazing-incidence (? ??c , where ?c is the density-dependent critical angle) allows selective tuning of x-ray penetration depths to ?10 nm .

  20. At-wavelength and optical metrology of bendable x-ray optics for nanofocusing at the ALS

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2009-06-11

    We report on a new research and development program at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab directed to establish both at-wavelength and conventional optical metrology techniques suitable to characterize the surface profile of super-high-quality x-ray optics with sub-microradian precision.

  1. New software to model energy dispersive X-ray diffraction in polycrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghammraoui, B.; Tabary, J.; Pouget, S.; Paulus, C.; Moulin, V.; Verger, L.; Duvauchelle, Ph.

    2012-02-01

    Detection of illicit materials, such as explosives or drugs, within mixed samples is a major issue, both for general security and as part of forensic analyses. In this paper, we describe a new code simulating energy dispersive X-ray diffraction patterns in polycrystalline materials. This program, SinFullscat, models diffraction of any object in any diffractometer system taking all physical phenomena, including amorphous background, into account. Many system parameters can be tuned: geometry, collimators (slit and cylindrical), sample properties, X-ray source and detector energy resolution. Good agreement between simulations and experimental data was obtained. Simulations using explosive materials indicated that parameters such as the diffraction angle or the energy resolution of the detector have a significant impact on the diffraction signature of the material inspected. This software will be a convenient tool to test many diffractometer configurations, providing information on the one that best restores the spectral diffraction signature of the materials of interest.

  2. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF SOLAR FLARES WITH A CONSTRAINED PEAK X-RAY FLUX

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, Trevor A.; Testa, Paola; Reeves, Katharine K.

    2013-06-20

    We present an analysis of soft X-ray (SXR) and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) observations of solar flares with an approximate C8 Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) class. Our constraint on peak GOES SXR flux allows for the investigation of correlations between various flare parameters. We show that the duration of the decay phase of a flare is proportional to the duration of its rise phase. Additionally, we show significant correlations between the radiation emitted in the flare rise and decay phases. These results suggest that the total radiated energy of a given flare is proportional to the energy radiated during the rise phase alone. This partitioning of radiated energy between the rise and decay phases is observed in both SXR and EUV wavelengths. Though observations from the EUV Variability Experiment show significant variation in the behavior of individual EUV spectral lines during different C8 events, this work suggests that broadband EUV emission is well constrained. Furthermore, GOES and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly data allow us to determine several thermal parameters (e.g., temperature, volume, density, and emission measure) for the flares within our sample. Analysis of these parameters demonstrate that, within this constrained GOES class, the longer duration solar flares are cooler events with larger volumes capable of emitting vast amounts of radiation. The shortest C8 flares are typically the hottest events, smaller in physical size, and have lower associated total energies. These relationships are directly comparable with several scaling laws and flare loop models.

  3. Extreme ultraviolet and x-ray transition wavelengths in Rb XXIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indu, Khatri; Arun, Goyal; Sunny, Aggarwal; K. Singh, A.; Man, Mohan

    2015-10-01

    Energy levels, radiative rates, oscillator strengths and line strengths are reported for transitions among the lowest 97 levels of the (1s22s22p6) 3s23p2, 3s23p3d, 3s3p3, 3p4, 3s3p23d, and 3s23d2 configurations of Rb XXIV. A multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method is adopted for the calculations. Radiative rates, oscillator strengths, and line strengths are provided for all electric dipole (E1), magnetic dipole (M1), electric quadrupole (E2), and magnetic quadrupole (M2) transitions from the ground level to all 97 levels, although calculations are performed for a much larger number of levels. To achieve the accuracy of the data, comparisons are provided with similar data obtained from the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC) and also with the available theoretical and experimental results. Our energy levels are found to be accurate to better than 1.2%. Wavelengths calculated are found to lie in EUV (extreme ultraviolet) and x-ray regions. Additionally, lifetimes for all 97 levels are obtained for the first time. The authors, Indu Khatri and Arun Goyal, were supported by the U. G. C., India for their Junior Research Fellowship and Man Mohan by the U.G.C. for Basic Science Research Fellowship.

  4. WAVELENGTH MEASUREMENTS OF K TRANSITIONS OF OXYGEN, NEON, AND MAGNESIUM WITH X-RAY ABSORPTION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Jinyuan; Zhang Shuangnan; Yao Yangsen

    2013-09-10

    Accurate atomic transition data are important in many astronomical research areas, especially for studies of line spectroscopy. Whereas transition data of He-like and H-like ions (i.e., ions in high-charge states) have been accurately calculated, the corresponding data of K transitions of neutral or low-ionized metal elements are still very uncertain. Spectroscopy of absorption lines produced in the interstellar medium (ISM) has been proven to be an effective way to measure the central wavelengths of these atomic transitions. In this work, we analyze 36 Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating observations to search for and measure the ISM absorption lines along sight lines to 11 low-mass X-ray binaries. We correct the Galactic rotation velocity to the rest frame for every observation and then use two different methods to merge all the corrected spectra to a co-added spectrum. However, the co-added spectra obtained by this method exhibit biases, toward to either observations with high counts or lines with high signal-to-noise ratios. We do a Bayesian analysis of several significantly detected lines to obtain the systematic uncertainty and the bias correction for other lines. Compared to previous studies, our results improve the wavelength accuracy by a factor of two to five and significantly reduce the systematic uncertainties and biases. Several weak transitions (e.g., 1s-2p of Mg IV and Mg V; 1s-3p of Mg III and Mg V) are also detected for the first time, albeit with low significance; future observations with improved accuracy are required to confirm these detections.

  5. Energy Dispersive Spectrometry and Quantitative Analysis Short Course. Introduction to X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectrometry and Quantitative Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Paul; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This course will cover practical applications of the energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) to x-ray microanalysis. Topics covered will include detector technology, advances in pulse processing, resolution and performance monitoring, detector modeling, peak deconvolution and fitting, qualitative and quantitative analysis, compositional mapping, and standards. An emphasis will be placed on use of the EDS for quantitative analysis, with discussion of typical problems encountered in the analysis of a wide range of materials and sample geometries.

  6. Influence of wavelength and pulse duration on single-shot x-ray diffraction patterns from nonspherical nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, Katharina; Peltz, Christian; Varin, Charles; Scheel, Stefan; Brabec, Thomas; Fennel, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a complex scaling discrete dipole approximation (CSDDA) method and study single-shot x-ray diffraction patterns from non-spherical, absorbing nanotargets in the limit of linear response. The convergence of the employed Born series-based iterative solution of the discrete dipole approximation problem via optimal complex mixing turns out to be substantially faster than the original approach with real-valued mixing coefficients, without additional numerical effort per iteration. The CSDDA method is employed to calculate soft x-ray diffraction patterns from large icosahedral silver nanoparticles with diameters up to about 250 {nm}. Our analysis confirms the requirement of relatively long wavelengths to map truly 3D structure information to the experimentally accessible regions of 2D scattering images. On the other hand, we show that short wavelengths are preferable to retain visibility of fine structures such as interference fringes in the scattering patterns when using ultrashort x-ray pulses in the attosecond domain. A simple model is presented to estimate the minimal pulse duration below which the fringe contrast vanishes. Knowledge of the impact of the bandwidth of short pulses on the diffraction images is important to extract information on ultrafast dynamical processes from time-resolved x-ray diffractive imaging experiments on free nanoparticles, in particular at long wavelengths.

  7. A complete inverse Monte Carlo model for energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickael, M. W.

    1991-03-01

    A complete model for energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence based on the Inverse Monte Carlo (IMC) method is obtained. The model accounts for primary, secondary, and tertiary X-rays excited by unscattered, single, and double scattered source photons. The elemental X-ray intensities are derived as functions of the difference in the elemental weight fractions between the unknown sample and a given reference sample to form a set of nonlinear equations. The coefficients of these equations are obtained from a Monte Carlo simulation in the reference sample and the system of equations is numerically solved for the unknown sample composition. The IMC model has been investigated for a radioisotope source excited EDXRF system consisting of a 109Cd source and a Si(Li) detector for a Cu?Ni alloy sample (CDA Alloy 715) and a stainless steel sample (304 Stainless Steel) in addition to several other simulated cases. The results show that the IMC model is valid, accurate, and computationally efficient. The accuracy of the solution is found to be directly related to the accuracy with which the elemental intensities are known. On the average, the model takes about 5 min on a high speed personal computer to yield a relative error in the elemental weight fractions of about 3%.

  8. [Application of in situ micro energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis in mineralogy].

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai; Ge, Liang-Quan; Gu, Yi; Zhang, Qing-Xian; Xiong, Sheng-Qing

    2013-11-01

    Thirteen rock samples were collected for studying the variation of element content in the mineral during the alteration process from Xinjiang, China. The IED-6000 in situ micro energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence developed by CDUT was applied to get chemical and physical data from minerals. The non-destructive spectrometer is based on a low-power Mo-anode X-ray tube and a Si-PIN peltier cooled X-ray detector. The unique design of the tube's probe allows very close coupling of polycapillary and makes the use of micro-area measurement feasible and efficient. The spectrometer can be integrated into any microscope for analysis. The long axis diameter of beam spot is about 110 microm. According to micro-EDXRF measurement, the tetrahedrite was corrected to pyrite, improving the efficiency and accuracy of the mineral identification. The feldspar of mineralized rock sample is rich in Cu and Zn which can be used as prospecting indicator elements. Element content of Cr, Mn and Co shows negative correlation with the degree of mineralization. PMID:24555398

  9. Differential phase contrast in scanning x-ray microscopy with half-wavelength phase shifter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoshio; Takeuchi, Akihisa

    2016-01-01

    A method for differential-phase-contrast imaging in scanning x-ray microscopy is proposed. The microfocus beam is produced with an x-ray focusing optics, and a half of the optical aperture is masked with a ?/2 phase shifter. This generates a pair of focused beam at the focal plane, with ? phase difference. Combining with a diaphragm in front of the transmission beam detector, differential phase contrast (contrast proportional to the phase-difference between two foci) can be obtained. Preliminary results with a Fresnel zone plate focusing optics at 12.4 keV x-ray energy are shown.

  10. Three-dimensional chemical analysis of tungsten probes by energy dispersive x-ray nanotomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saghi, Z.; Xu, X.; Peng, Y.; Inkson, B.; Mbus, G.

    2007-12-01

    The chemical distribution of oxide layers around functional tungsten nanotips is studied using electron tomography. Three-dimensional element distribution functions are derived for such tips, giving insight into the subsurface chemistry. Energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy is coupled to computed tomography to reconstruct slices across the tip. It is finally shown how the surface reconstruction by geometric tomography from annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images can be combined with EDX tomography reconstructions to reduce backprojection artefacts and improve the sharpness of the surface contours.

  11. Quantitative analysis of annealed scanning probe tips using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cobley, R. J.; Brown, R. A.; Barnett, C. J.; Maffeis, T. G. G.; Penny, M. W.

    2013-01-14

    A quantitative method to measure the reduction in oxide species on the surface of electrochemically etched tungsten tips during direct current annealing is developed using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Oxide species are found to decrease with annealing current, with the trend repeatable over many tips and along the length of the tip apex. A linear resistivity approximation finds significant oxide sublimation occurs at 1714 K, but surface melting and tip broadening at 2215 K. This method can be applied to calibrate any similar annealing stage, and to identify the tradeoff regime between required morphological and chemical properties.

  12. Determination of carrier yields for neutron activation analysis using energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, R.G.; Wandless, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    A new method is described for determining carrier yield in the radiochemical neutron activation analysis of rare-earth elements in silicate rocks by group separation. The method involves the determination of the rare-earth elements present in the carrier by means of energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis, eliminating the need to re-irradiate samples in a nuclear reactor after the gamma ray analysis is complete. Results from the analysis of USGS standards AGV-1 and BCR-1 compare favorably with those obtained using the conventional method. ?? 1984 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  13. Commissioning of Angle Dispersive X-ray Diffraction Beamline on Indus-2

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, A. K.; Sagdeo, Archna; Gupta, Pooja; Kumar, Ashok; Singh, M. N.; Gupta, R. K.; Kane, S. R.; Deb, S. K.

    2011-07-15

    An Angle dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD) beamline on bending magnet source of Indus-2 synchrotron (2.5 GeV, 300 mA) has been commissioned, for the study of single and polycrystalline samples. The beamline optics is based on vertically focusing Pt-coated pre and post mirrors and sagittal focusing Si (311) based double crystal monochromator. Experimental station consists of a six circle diffractometer equipped with scintillation detector and an image plate area detector for powder diffraction. XRD experiments have been performed to study single crystal and polycrystalline samples.

  14. A Multi-Wavelength Study of the X-Ray Sources in the NGC 5018

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Kajal K.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Wu, Kinwah; Saripalli, Lakshmi

    2004-01-01

    The E3 giant elliptical galaxy NGC-5018 was observed with the cxo X-ray Observatory's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer for 30-h on 14 April 2001. Results of analysis of these X-ray data as well as of complementary optical, infrared, and radio data are reported. Seven X-ray point sources, including the nucleus, were detected. If they are intrinsic to NGC-5018, then all six non-nuclear sources have luminosities exceeding 10(exp 39)-ergl in the 0.5-8.0-keV energy band; placing them in the class of Ultra- luminous X-ray sources. Comparison of X-ray source positions to archival Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (hst/WFPC2) images reveal four of the six non-nuclear sources are spatially--coincident with bright, M$(sub V)LA -8.6 mag, objects. These four objects have optical magnitudes and (V-I) colors consistent with globular clusters in NGC-5018. However, one of these objects was observed to vary by siml mag in both V and I between observations taken 28 July 1997 and 04 Feb 1999 indicating this source is a background active galactic nucleus (AGN). The nature of the other three optically-bright objects cannot be determined from the available optical data but all have X-ray-to-optical flux ratios consistent with background AGNs. Strong, unpolarized, radio emission has been detected from another of the optically-bright counterparts. It displays an inverted radio spectrum and is the most absorbed of the seven sources in the X-ray band. It, too, is most readily explained as a background AGN, though alternative explanations cannot be ruled out. Extended X-ray emission is detected within a siml5 arcsec radius of the galaxy center at a luminosity of sim lO(exp 40)-ergl in the X-ray band. Its thermal X-ray spectrum (kT sim0.4-keV) and its spatial coincidence with strong H(alpha) emission are consistent with a hot gas origin. The nucleus itself is a weak X-ray source, LA-5 times 10(exp 39)-ergl, but displays a radio spectrum typical of AGN.

  15. Characterization of Japanese color sticks by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manso, M.; Valadas, S.; Pessanha, S.; Guilherme, A.; Queralt, I.; Candeias, A. E.; Carvalho, M. L.

    2010-04-01

    This work comprises the use of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) techniques for the study of the composition of twentieth century traditional Japanese color sticks. By using the combination of analytical techniques it was possible to obtain information on inorganic and organic pigments, binders and fillers present in the sticks. The colorant materials identified in the sticks were zinc and titanium white, chrome yellow, yellow and red ochre, vermillion, alizarin, indigo, Prussian and synthetic ultramarine blue. The results also showed that calcite and barite were used as inorganic mineral fillers while Arabic gum was the medium used. EDXRF offered great potential for such investigations since it allowed the identification of the elements present in the sample preserving its integrity. However, this information alone was not enough to clearly identify some of the materials in study and therefore it was necessary to use XRD and FTIR techniques.

  16. Determination of selenium in biological samples with an energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoli; Yu, Zhaoshui

    2016-05-01

    Selenium is both a nutrient and a toxin. Selenium-especially organic selenium-is a core component of human nutrition. Thus, it is very important to measure selenium in biological samples. The limited sensitivity of conventional XRF hampers its widespread use in biological samples. Here, we describe the use of high-energy (100kV, 600W) linearly polarized beam energy-dispersive X-Ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF) in tandem with a three-dimensional optics design to determine 0.1-5.1μgg(-1) levels of selenium in biological samples. The effects of various experimental parameters such as applied voltage, acquisition time, secondary target and various filters were thoroughly investigated. The detection limit of selenium in biological samples via high-energy (100kV, 600W) linearly polarized beam energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy was decreased by one order of magnitude versus conventional XRF (Paltridge et al., 2012) and found to be 0.1μg/g. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to describe EDXRF measurements of Se in biological samples with important implications for the nutrition and analytical chemistry communities. PMID:26922394

  17. Practical applications of energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis in diagnostic oral pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, T.D.; Gibson, D. )

    1990-03-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis is a powerful tool that can reveal the presence and relative quantities of elements in minute particles in biologic materials. Although this technique has been used in some aspects of dental research, it has rarely been applied to diagnostic oral pathology. The purpose of this paper is to inform practicing dentists and oral specialists about the diagnostic potential of this procedure by presenting three case reports. The first case involved the identification of flakes of a metallic material claimed by a 14-year-old girl to appear periodically between her mandibular molars. In the second case, a periodontist was spared a lawsuit when a freely mobile mass in the antrum of his patient was found to be a calcium-phosphorus compound not related to the periodontal packing that had been used. The third case involved the differential diagnosis of amalgam tattoo and graphite tattoo in a pigmented lesion of the hard palate mucosa. The results of the analyses were significant and indicate a role for this technique in the assessment of selected cases. Potential for wider use of energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis in diagnostic oral pathology exists as research progresses.

  18. X-ray coherent scattering form factors of tissues, water and plastics using energy dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, B. W.; Landheer, K. A.; Johns, P. C.

    2011-07-01

    A key requirement for the development of the field of medical x-ray scatter imaging is accurate characterization of the differential scattering cross sections of tissues and phantom materials. The coherent x-ray scattering form factors of five tissues (fat, muscle, liver, kidney, and bone) obtained from butcher shops, four plastics (polyethylene, polystyrene, lexan (polycarbonate), nylon), and water have been measured using an energy-dispersive technique. The energy-dispersive technique has several improvements over traditional diffractometer measurements. Most notably, the form factor is measured on an absolute scale with no need for scaling factors. Form factors are reported in terms of the quantity x = ?-1sin (?/2) over the range 0.363-9.25 nm-1. The coherent form factors of muscle, liver, and kidney resemble those of water, while fat has a narrower peak at lower x, and bone is more structured. The linear attenuation coefficients of the ten materials have also been measured over the range 30-110 keV and parameterized using the dual-material approach with the basis functions being the linear attenuation coefficients of polymethylmethacrylate and aluminum.

  19. Inelastic X-ray Scattering Study on Plasmon Dispersion in Liquid Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Koji; Matsuda, Kazuhiro; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Kajihara, Yukio; Miyatake, Tetsu; Ishiguro, Yotaro; Hagiya, Toru; Inui, Masanori; Yao, Makoto

    2015-08-01

    We study the plasmon dispersion of liquid Cs using inelastic X-ray scattering techniques in the range of momentum transfer, 0.32 ? q ? 0.55 -1. While the previous electron energy loss spectroscopy experiments reported that the plasmon energy in solid Cs decreases with increasing q below q = 0.5 -1, we find that the plasmon energy in liquid Cs tends to increase with q in the range 0.32 ? q ? 0.55 -1. We determine the slope of the dispersion normalized by the plasmon energy at q = 0, by fitting the linear function around this q range. The slope for liquid Cs is 0.10 0.12 , whereas that for solid Cs is -0.11 0.07 . We qualitatively interpret that the observed variation in the dispersion relation upon melting is attributable to the reduction of the band structure effect (the effect of the s-d transitions). In addition, the plasmon dispersion of Cs is compared with that of Rb for both the solid and the liquid state. Although the dispersion curves of Rb and Cs are in appearance qualitatively different from each other, common characteristics are seen for these elements when we take difference between the experimental results and the electron gas prediction. We interpret that this behavior reflects the s-d transitions, which have been theoretically shown to cause the deviation of the plasmon dispersions from the electron gas prediction commonly in Rb and Cs.

  20. Towards hybrid pixel detectors for energy-dispersive or soft X-ray photon science.

    PubMed

    Jungmann-Smith, J H; Bergamaschi, A; Brückner, M; Cartier, S; Dinapoli, R; Greiffenberg, D; Huthwelker, T; Maliakal, D; Mayilyan, D; Medjoubi, K; Mezza, D; Mozzanica, A; Ramilli, M; Ruder, Ch; Schädler, L; Schmitt, B; Shi, X; Tinti, G

    2016-03-01

    JUNGFRAU (adJUstiNg Gain detector FoR the Aramis User station) is a two-dimensional hybrid pixel detector for photon science applications at free-electron lasers and synchrotron light sources. The JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype presented here is specifically geared towards low-noise performance and hence soft X-ray detection. The design, geometry and readout architecture of JUNGFRAU 0.4 correspond to those of other JUNGFRAU pixel detectors, which are charge-integrating detectors with 75 µm × 75 µm pixels. Main characteristics of JUNGFRAU 0.4 are its fixed gain and r.m.s. noise of as low as 27 e(-) electronic noise charge (<100 eV) with no active cooling. The 48 × 48 pixels JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype can be combined with a charge-sharing suppression mask directly placed on the sensor, which keeps photons from hitting the charge-sharing regions of the pixels. The mask consists of a 150 µm tungsten sheet, in which 28 µm-diameter holes are laser-drilled. The mask is aligned with the pixels. The noise and gain characterization, and single-photon detection as low as 1.2 keV are shown. The performance of JUNGFRAU 0.4 without the mask and also in the charge-sharing suppression configuration (with the mask, with a `software mask' or a `cluster finding' algorithm) is tested, compared and evaluated, in particular with respect to the removal of the charge-sharing contribution in the spectra, the detection efficiency and the photon rate capability. Energy-dispersive and imaging experiments with fluorescence X-ray irradiation from an X-ray tube and a synchrotron light source are successfully demonstrated with an r.m.s. energy resolution of 20% (no mask) and 14% (with the mask) at 1.2 keV and of 5% at 13.3 keV. The performance evaluation of the JUNGFRAU 0.4 prototype suggests that this detection system could be the starting point for a future detector development effort for either applications in the soft X-ray energy regime or for an energy-dispersive detection system. PMID:26917124

  1. Micro energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis of polychrome lead-glazed Portuguese faiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilherme, A.; Pessanha, S.; Carvalho, M. L.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Coroado, J.

    2010-04-01

    Several glazed ceramic pieces, originally produced in Coimbra (Portugal), were submitted to elemental analysis, having as premise the pigment manufacture production recognition. Although having been produced in Coimbra, their location changed as time passed due to historical reasons. A recent exhibition in Coimbra brought together a great number of these pieces and in situ micro Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (-EDXRF) analyses were performed in order to achieve some chemical and physical data on the manufacture of faiences in Coimbra. A non-commercial -EDXRF equipment for in situ analysis was employed in this work, carrying some important improvements when compared to the conventional ones, namely, analyzing spot sizes of about 100 m diameter. The combination of a capillary X-ray lens with a new generation of low power microfocus X-ray tube and a drift chamber detector enabled a portable unit for micro-XRF with a few tens of m lateral resolution. The advantages in using a portable system emphasized with polycapillary optics enabled to distinguish proximal different pigmented areas, as well as the glaze itself. These first scientific results on the pigment analysis of the collection of faiences seem to point to a unique production center with own techniques and raw materials. This conclusion arose with identification of the blue pigments having in its constitution Mn, Fe Co and As and the yellows as a result of the combination between Pb and Sb. A statistical treatment was used to reveal groups of similarities on the pigments elemental profile.

  2. THE CHANDRA MULTI-WAVELENGTH PROJECT: OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY AND THE BROADBAND SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF X-RAY-SELECTED AGNs

    SciTech Connect

    Trichas, Markos; Green, Paul J.; Aldcroft, Tom; Kim, Dong-Woo; Mossman, Amy; Silverman, John D.; Barkhouse, Wayne; Cameron, Robert A.; Constantin, Anca; Ellison, Sara L.; Foltz, Craig; Haggard, Daryl; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Marshall, Herman L.; Perez, Laura M.; Romero-Colmenero, Encarni; Ruiz, Angel; Smith, Malcolm G.; and others

    2012-06-01

    From optical spectroscopy of X-ray sources observed as part of the Chandra Multi-wavelength Project (ChaMP), we present redshifts and classifications for a total of 1569 Chandra sources from our targeted spectroscopic follow-up using the FLWO/1.5 m, SAAO/1.9 m, WIYN 3.5 m, CTIO/4 m, KPNO/4 m, Magellan/6.5 m, MMT/6.5 m, and Gemini/8 m telescopes, and from archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopy. We classify the optical counterparts as 50% broad-line active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 16% emission line galaxies, 14% absorption line galaxies, and 20% stars. We detect QSOs out to z {approx} 5.5 and galaxies out to z {approx} 3. We have compiled extensive photometry, including X-ray (ChaMP), ultraviolet (GALEX), optical (SDSS and ChaMP-NOAO/MOSAIC follow-up), near-infrared (UKIDSS, Two Micron All Sky Survey, and ChaMP-CTIO/ISPI follow-up), mid-infrared (WISE), and radio (FIRST and NVSS) bands. Together with our spectroscopic information, this enables us to derive detailed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for our extragalactic sources. We fit a variety of template SEDs to determine bolometric luminosities, and to constrain AGNs and starburst components where both are present. While {approx}58% of X-ray Seyferts (10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} < L{sub 2-10keV} <10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) require a starburst event (>5% starburst contribution to bolometric luminosity) to fit observed photometry only 26% of the X-ray QSO (L{sub 2-10keV} >10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) population appear to have some kind of star formation contribution. This is significantly lower than for the Seyferts, especially if we take into account torus contamination at z > 1 where the majority of our X-ray QSOs lie. In addition, we observe a rapid drop of the percentage of starburst contribution as X-ray luminosity increases. This is consistent with the quenching of star formation by powerful QSOs, as predicted by the merger model, or with a time lag between the peak of star formation and QSO activity. We have tested the hypothesis that there should be a strong connection between X-ray obscuration and star formation but we do not find any association between X-ray column density and star formation rate both in the general population or the star-forming X-ray Seyferts. Our large compilation also allows us to report here the identification of 81 X-ray Bright Optically inactive Galaxies, 78 z > 3 X-ray sources, and eight Type-2 QSO candidates. Also, we have identified the highest redshift (z = 5.4135) X-ray-selected QSO with optical spectroscopy.

  3. High-average-power, 100-Hz-repetition-rate, tabletop soft-x-ray lasers at sub-15-nm wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Reagan, Brendon; Berrill, Mark A; Wernsing, Keith; Baumgarten, Cory; Woolston, Mark; Rocca, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Efficient excitation of dense plasma columns at 100-Hz repetition rate using a tailored pump pulse profile produced a tabletop soft-x-ray laser average power of 0.1 mW at = 13.9 nm and 20 W at = 11.9 nm from transitions of Ni-like Ag and Ni-like Sn, respectively. Lasing on several other transitions with wavelengths between 10.9 and 14.7 nm was also obtained using 0.9-J pump pulses of 5-ps duration from a compact diode-pumped chirped pulse amplification Yb:YAG laser. Hydrodynamic and atomic plasma simulations show that the pump pulse profile, consisting of a nanosecond ramp followed by two peaks of picosecond duration, creates a plasma with an increased density of Ni-like ions at the time of peak temperature that results in a larger gain coefficient over a temporally and spatially enlarged space leading to a threefold increase in the soft-x-ray laser output pulse energy. The high average power of these compact soft-x-ray lasers will enable applications requiring high photon flux. These results open the path to milliwatt-average-power tabletop soft-x-ray lasers.

  4. Development of a prototype pipework scanning system based upon energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrity, D. J.; De Rosa, A. J.; Bradley, D. A.; Jarman, S. E.; Jenneson, P. M.; Vincent, S. M.

    2010-07-01

    A prototype pipework scanning system based upon energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) has been produced, for which system development and preliminary results are presented here. This apparatus has been developed from experience with 2D and 3D bench-top EDXRD systems and comprises a conventional industrial X-ray tube coupled to a bespoke design of tungsten collimators and compact CdTe detector. It is designed as a robust system, rather than delicate lab-based system, to investigate sections of stainless steel pipework for structural changes induced through quenching the steel in liquid nitrogen, and damaging effects such as chloride-induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Given the properties of tungsten, namely its brittle nature, a complex programme of electro-discharge machining (EDM) has been devised to precisely manufacture the collimators from a series of sintered tungsten blocks. Preliminary measurements have focused on calibrating the system using the extreme ferrite and austenite phases, meeting a pre-requisite benchmark for attempting more challenging measurements such as the austenite to martensite transformation and investigations of SCC in these sections of pipework.

  5. Atomic inner-shell laser at 1.5-ngstrm wavelength pumped by an X-ray free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Hitoki; Inubushi, Yuichi; Nagamine, Kazunori; Michine, Yurina; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Mimura, Hidekazu; Kitamura, Hikaru; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yabashi, Makina

    2015-08-01

    Since the invention of the first lasers in the visible-light region, research has aimed to produce short-wavelength lasers that generate coherent X-rays; the shorter the wavelength, the better the imaging resolution of the laser and the shorter the pulse duration, leading to better temporal resolution in probe measurements. Recently, free-electron lasers based on self-amplified spontaneous emission have made it possible to generate a hard-X-ray laser (that is, the photon energy is of the order of ten kiloelectronvolts) in an ngstrm-wavelength regime, enabling advances in fields from ultrafast X-ray spectrosopy to X-ray quantum optics. An atomic laser based on neon atoms and pumped by a soft-X-ray (that is, a photon energy of less than one kiloelectronvolt) free-electron laser has been achieved at a wavelength of 14 nanometres. Here, we use a copper target and report a hard-X-ray inner-shell atomic laser operating at a wavelength of 1.5 ngstrms. X-ray free-electron laser pulses with an intensity of about 1019 watts per square centimetre tuned to the copper K-absorption edge produced sufficient population inversion to generate strong amplified spontaneous emission on the copper K? lines. Furthermore, we operated the X-ray free-electron laser source in a two-colour mode, with one colour tuned for pumping and the other for the seed (starting) light for the laser.

  6. Atomic-scale chemical quantification of oxide interfaces using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ping; Xiong, Jie; Van Benthem, Mark; Jia, Quanxi

    2013-04-01

    Atomic-scale quantification of chemical composition across oxide interfaces is important for understanding physical properties of epitaxial oxide nanostructures. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope was used to quantify chemical composition across the interface of ferromagnetic La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 and antiferromagnetic BiFeO3 quantum structure. This research demonstrates that chemical composition at atomic columns can be quantified by Gaussian peak-fitting of EDS compositional profiles across the interface. Cation diffusion was observed at both A- and B-sublattice sites; and asymmetric chemical profiles exist across the interface, consistent with the previous studies.

  7. Soil characterization by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence: sampling strategy for in situ analysis.

    PubMed

    Custo, Graciela; Boeykens, Susana; Dawidowski, L; Fox, L; Gmez, D; Luna, F; Vzquez, Cristina

    2005-07-01

    This work describes a sampling strategy that will allow the use of portable EDXRF (energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence) instruments for "in situ" soil analysis. The methodology covers a general approach to planning field investigations for any type of environmental studies and it was applied for a soil characterization study in the zone of Campana, Argentina, by evaluating data coming from an EDXRF spectrometer with a radioisotope excitation source. Simulating non-treated sampled as "in situ" samples and a soil characterization for Campana area was intended. "In situ" EDXRF methodology is a powerful analytical modality with the advantage of providing data immediately, allowing a fast general screening of the soil composition. PMID:16038489

  8. Energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis of mitochondrial deposits in sideroblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Trump, B F; Berezesky, I K; Jiji, R M; Mergner, W J; Bulger, R E

    1978-10-01

    Energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis was used to analyze mitochondrial and lysosomal iron-containing deposits in sideroblastic anemia. Although it has been previously known that these deposits contain iron by inference from Prussian blue staining, the possible presence of other cations as well as the nature of the anions present has not been identified. The results show that the mitochondrial deposits in erythroid cells have peaks for iron and phosphorus indicating that they do not represent calcifications which commonly occur following injury and that the principal anion may be phosphorus. Studies of hemosiderin and ferritin aggregates in lysosomes of macrophages in the same bone marrow samples again reveal similar peaks for iron and phosphorus. The results also indicate the probable similarity of mitochondrial and macrophage deposists although ferritin itself was never identified in the mitochondrial deposits. The results illustrate the potential of this method for diagnostic and investigative pathology. PMID:703261

  9. Sodium Chloride Diffusion during Muscle Salting Evidenced by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy Imaging.

    PubMed

    Filgueras, Rnata; Peyrin, Frdric; Vnien, Annie; Hnot, Jean Marc; Astruc, Thierry

    2016-01-27

    To better understand the relationship between the muscle structure and NaCl transfers in meat, we used energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) coupled with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to analyze brined and dry-salted rat muscles. The muscles were freeze-dried to avoid the delocalization of soluble ions that happens in regular dehydration through a graded series of ethanol. Na and Cl maps were superimposed on SEM images to combine the muscle structure and NaCl diffusion. Brining causes rapid diffusion of NaCl through the tissue. Most brine diffuses in a linear front from the muscle surface, but a small proportion enters through the perimysium network. The muscle area penetrated by brine shows heterogeneous patterns of NaCl retention, with some connective tissue islets containing more NaCl than other parts of perimysium. NaCl penetration is considerably slower after dry salting than after brining. PMID:26727622

  10. Liquid contrabands classification based on energy dispersive X-ray diffraction and hybrid discriminant analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YangDai, Tianyi; Zhang, Li

    2016-02-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) combined with hybrid discriminant analysis (HDA) has been utilized for classifying the liquid materials for the first time. The XRD spectra of 37 kinds of liquid contrabands and daily supplies were obtained using an EDXRD test bed facility. The unique spectra of different samples reveal XRD's capability to distinguish liquid contrabands from daily supplies. In order to create a system to detect liquid contrabands, the diffraction spectra were subjected to HDA which is the combination of principal components analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Experiments based on the leave-one-out method demonstrate that HDA is a practical method with higher classification accuracy and lower noise sensitivity than the other methods in this application. The study shows the great capability and potential of the combination of XRD and HDA for liquid contrabands classification.

  11. Evaluation on determination of iodine in coal by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, B.; Jackson, J.C.; Palmer, C.; Zheng, B.; Finkelman, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    A quick and inexpensive method of relative high iodine determination from coal samples was evaluated. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) provided a detection limit of about 14 ppm (3 times of standard deviations of the blank sample), without any complex sample preparation. An analytical relative standard deviation of 16% was readily attainable for coal samples. Under optimum conditions, coal samples with iodine concentrations higher than 5 ppm can be determined using this EDXRF method. For the time being, due to the general iodine concentrations of coal samples lower than 5 ppm, except for some high iodine content coal, this method can not effectively been used for iodine determination. More work needed to meet the requirement of determination of iodine from coal samples for this method. Copyright ?? 2005 by The Geochemical Society of Japan.

  12. Conductivity and structure of poly(ethylene glycol) complexes using energy dispersive X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Caminiti, R.; Carbone, M.; Panero, S.; Sadun, C.

    1999-11-25

    Triflate salts of Mg(II), Zn(II), and Cu(II) in liquid, low weight poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether (PEGM-(400)) to determine their conductivity and to ascertain their possible use as electrolyte media, have been studied. Their liquid structures have been studied by energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction. By this technique, the cation geometrical coordination has been determined. Furthermore, the local structure of the bivalent cations has been singled out by application of the difference method to isomorphic solutions. The investigated cations have an octahedral coordination, with the exception of Cu, which displays two apical bonds longer than the planar ones. The authors also found that the polymer chain is coordinated to the cations Mg and Zn through the oxygen atoms of the polymer units 1, 5, and 9.

  13. Studying Dark Energy, Black Holes and Cosmic Feedback at X-ray Wavelengths: NASA's Constellation-X Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornschemeier, A.

    2005-01-01

    Among the most important topics in modern astrophysics are the nature of the dark energy equation of state, the formation and evolution of supermassive black holes in concert with galaxy bulges, and the self-regulating symmetry imposed by both stellar and AGN feedback. All of these topics are readily addressed with observations at X-ray wavelengths. For instance, theoretical models predict that the majority (98%) of the energy and metal content in starburst superwinds exists in the hot million-degree gas. The Constellation-X observatory is being developed to perform spatially resolved high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy so that we may directly measure the absolute element abundances and velocities of this hot gas. This talk focuses on the driving science behind this mission, which is one of two flagship missions in NASA's Beyond Einstein program. A general overview of the observatory's capabilities and basic technology will also be given.

  14. Soft X-ray emissions, meter-wavelength radio bursts, and particle acceleration in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Reames, D. V.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed study of the relationship between metric radio bursts and soft X-ray flares has been made using an extensive data set covering 15 yr. It is found that type IV emission is mainly associated with long-duration 1-8 A events that are known to be well associated with coronal mass ejections. In contrast, type II and type III bursts originate primarily in impulsive soft X-ray events that are not necessarily accompanied by mass ejection. Strong type III bursts, in particular, appear to occur only in association with relatively impulsive flares. It is suggested that coronal shocks responsible for type II bursts are blast waves generated in impulsive energy releases.

  15. Plasma code for astrophysical charge exchange emission at X-ray wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Liyi; Kaastra, Jelle; Raassen, A. J. J.

    2016-04-01

    Charge exchange X-ray emission provides unique insight into the interactions between cold and hot astrophysical plasmas. Besides its own profound science, this emission is also technically crucial to all observations in the X-ray band, since charge exchange with the solar wind often contributes a significant foreground component that contaminates the signal of interest. By approximating the cross sections resolved to n and l atomic subshells and carrying out complete radiative cascade calculation, we have created a new spectral code to evaluate the charge exchange emission in the X-ray band. Compared to collisional thermal emission, charge exchange radiation exhibits enhanced lines from large-n shells to the ground, as well as large forbidden-to-resonance ratios of triplet transitions. Our new model successfully reproduces an observed high-quality spectrum of comet C/2000 WM1 (LINEAR), which emits purely by charge exchange between solar wind ions and cometary neutrals. It demonstrates that a proper charge exchange model will allow us to probe the ion properties remotely, including charge state, dynamics, and composition, at the interface between the cold and hot plasmas.

  16. Analysis of energy dispersive x-ray diffraction profiles for material identification, imaging and system control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Emily Jane

    2008-12-01

    This thesis presents the analysis of low angle X-ray scatter measurements taken with an energy dispersive system for substance identification, imaging and system control. Diffraction measurements were made on illicit drugs, which have pseudo- crystalline structures and thus produce diffraction patterns comprising a se ries of sharp peaks. Though the diffraction profiles of each drug are visually characteristic, automated detection systems require a substance identification algorithm, and multivariate analysis was selected as suitable. The software was trained with measured diffraction data from 60 samples covering 7 illicit drugs and 5 common cutting agents, collected with a range of statistical qual ities and used to predict the content of 7 unknown samples. In all cases the constituents were identified correctly and the contents predicted to within 15%. Soft tissues exhibit broad peaks in their diffraction patterns. Diffraction data were collected from formalin fixed breast tissue samples and used to gen erate images. Maximum contrast between healthy and suspicious regions was achieved using momentum transfer windows 1.04-1.10 and 1.84-1.90 nm_1. The resulting images had an average contrast of 24.6% and 38.9% compared to the corresponding transmission X-ray images (18.3%). The data was used to simulate the feedback for an adaptive imaging system and the ratio of the aforementioned momentum transfer regions found to be an excellent pa rameter. Investigation into the effects of formalin fixation on human breast tissue and animal tissue equivalents indicated that fixation in standard 10% buffered formalin does not alter the diffraction profiles of tissue in the mo mentum transfer regions examined, though 100% unbuffered formalin affects the profile of porcine muscle tissue (a substitute for glandular and tumourous tissue), though fat is unaffected.

  17. Scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive x ray analysis of impact residues on LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhard, Ronald P.; Durin, Christian; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    To better understand the nature of particulates in low-Earth orbit (LEO), and their effects on spacecraft hardware, we are analyzing residues found in impacts on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) tray clamps. LDEF experiment trays were held in place by 6 to 8 chromic-anodized aluminum (6061-T6) clamps that were fastened to the spacecraft frame using three stainless steel hex bolts. Each clamp exposed an area of approximately 58 sq cm (4.8 cm x 12.7 cm x .45 cm, minus the bolt coverage). Some 337 out of 774 LDEF tray clamps were archived at JSC and are available through the Meteoroid & Debris Special Investigation Group (M&D SIG). Optical scanning of clamps, starting with Bay/Row A01 and working toward H25, is being conducted at JSC to locate and document impacts as small as 40 microns. These impacts are then inspected by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (SEM/EDXA) to select those features which contain appreciable impact residue material. Based upon the composition of projectile remnants, and using criteria developed at JSC, we have made a preliminary discrimination between micrometeoroid and space debris residue-containing impact features. Presently, 13 impacts containing significant amounts of unmelted and semi-melted micrometeoritic residues were forwarded to Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) in France. At the CNES facilities, the upgraded impacts were analyzed using a JEOL T330A SEM equipped with a NORAN Instruments, Voyager X-ray Analyzer. All residues were quantitatively characterized by composition (including oxygen and carbon) to help understand interplanetary dust as possibly being derived from comets and asteroids.

  18. Scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X ray analysis of impact residues on LDEF tray clamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, Ronald P.; Durin, Christian; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1992-06-01

    To better understand the nature of particulates in low-Earth orbit (LEO), and their effects on spacecraft hardware, we are analyzing residues found in impacts on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) tray clamps. LDEF experiment trays were held in place by 6 to 8 chromic-anodized aluminum (6061-T6) clamps that were fastened to the spacecraft frame using three stainless steel hex bolts. Each clamp exposed an area of approximately 58 sq cm (4.8 cm x 12.7 cm x .45 cm, minus the bolt coverage). Some 337 out of 774 LDEF tray clamps were archived at JSC and are available through the Meteoroid & Debris Special Investigation Group (M&D SIG). Optical scanning of clamps, starting with Bay/Row A01 and working toward H25, is being conducted at JSC to locate and document impacts as small as 40 microns. These impacts are then inspected by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (SEM/EDXA) to select those features which contain appreciable impact residue material. Based upon the composition of projectile remnants, and using criteria developed at JSC, we have made a preliminary discrimination between micrometeoroid and space debris residue-containing impact features. Presently, 13 impacts containing significant amounts of unmelted and semi-melted micrometeoritic residues were forwarded to Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) in France. At the CNES facilities, the upgraded impacts were analyzed using a JEOL T330A SEM equipped with a NORAN Instruments, Voyager X-ray Analyzer. All residues were quantitatively characterized by composition (including oxygen and carbon) to help understand interplanetary dust as possibly being derived from comets and asteroids.

  19. Hot Electron and X-ray Production from Intense Laser Irradiation of Wavelength-scale Polystyrene Spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditmire, T.; Sumeruk, H. A.; Kneip, S.; Symes, D. R.; Churina, I. V.; Belolipetski, A. V.; Dyer, G.; Bernstein, A.; Donnelly, T. D.

    2008-04-01

    In an attempt to control the electric fields at the surface of a high intensity solid target we have studied hot electron generation and x-ray production from targets coated with microspheres. This work is motivated by the possibility that spheres with size comparable to the wavelength of the incident laser radiation can result in electric field enhancements through well know Mie resonances. This local field enhancement can then lead to more efficient electron generation. We investigated hard x-ray (above 100 keV) generation from copper and fused silica targets coated with a monolayer covering of polystyrene microspheres. We performed the experiment using the 20 TW THOR laser system at the University of Texas. We frequency doubled the laser to improve temporal contrast and irradiated the spheres with 400 nm pulses at an intensity of 2 x 1017 W/cm2. Hard X-ray emission from the plasma was observed using filtered NaI scintillation detectors and K-alpha emission was measured with a Von Hamos spectrometer. We illuminated polystyrene spheres of diameters 0.1 -2.9 microns on a glass substrate, with the 400 nm 100fs pulse, and find that there is a clear Mie enhancement in the field and hot electron generation for a specific range of sphere sizes.

  20. Phase development in the hardening process of two calcium phosphate bone cements: an energy dispersive X-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Generosi, A.; Smirnov, V.V.; Rau, J.V.; Albertini, V. Rossi; Ferro, D.; Barinov, S.M.

    2008-03-04

    This work was aimed at the application of an energy dispersive X-ray diffraction technique to study the kinetics of phase development during the setting and hardening reactions in two calcium phosphate bone cements. The cements under study are based on either tricalcium phosphate or tetracalcium phosphate initial solid phase, and a magnesium carbonate-phosphoric acid liquid phase as the hardening liquid. The application of the energy dispersive X-ray diffraction method allowed to collect the diffraction patterns from the cement pastes in situ starting from 1 min of the setting and hardening process. The only crystallized phase in both cements was apatite-like phase, the primary crystallization process proceeds during a few seconds of the setting reaction. Both the compressive strength and the pH value changes during the hardening period can be attributed to the transformations occurring in the intergranular X-ray amorphous phase.

  1. Clinical applications of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis in dermatology--an up-date

    SciTech Connect

    Forslind, B.

    1988-06-01

    Dermatological papers comprising scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis data published 1983 through 1986 in international journals are reviewed, as an update to our 1984 paper on Clinical applications of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis in dermatology. The present paper not only deals with a review of recent publications in this area but also presents the application of microincineration to hair and cryosectioned freeze-dried skin specimens. Examples of the increased contrast obtained in hair cross sections are presented and a discussion on the feasibility of microincineration at analysis of hair and skin cross sections is given. Particle probe analysis (EDX: energy dispersive X-ray analysis and PMP: proton microprobe analysis) as applied to hair and skin samples are presented with stress put on the proton probe analysis. The complementarity of EDX and PMP is demonstrated and future applications are suggested. 75 references.

  2. Sulfur speciation in hydrous experimental glasses of varying oxidation state - Results from measured wavelength shifts of sulfur X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Michael R.; Rutherford, Malcolm J.

    1988-01-01

    The focusing geometry of an electron microprobe has been used to measure the wavelength shifts of sulfur X-rays from hydrous experimental melts synthesized at oxygen fugacities that range from near the iron-wustite buffer to the magnetite-hermatite buffer. It is found that the proportion of dissolved sulfur which is present as sulfate increases with increasing oxygen fugacity. It is noted that in natural melts that have equilibrated at or below fayalite-magnetite-quartz values of +1, sulfur is probably present mainly as S(2-).

  3. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis of runoff water and vegetation from abandoned mining of Pb Zn ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, A. F.; Queralt, I.; Carvalho, M. L.; Bordalo, M.

    2003-12-01

    The present work reports on the heavy metal content: Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd and Pb in running waters and vegetation around abandoned mining areas. Two species of mosses ( Dicranum sp. and Pleurocarpus sp.) and three different species of wild grass ( Bromus sp., Rumex sp. and Pseudoavena sp.) growing on the surrounding areas of old lead-zinc mines (Aran Valley, Pyrenees, NE Spain) have been analyzed. Both water and vegetation were collected in two different sampling places: (a) near the mine gallery water outlets and (b) on the landfill close to the abandoned mineral concentration factories. For the heavy metal content determination, two different techniques were used: total reflection X-ray fluorescence for water analysis and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence for vegetation study. Surface waters around mine outlets exhibit anomalous content of Co, Ni, Zn, Cd. Stream waters running on mining landfills exhibit higher Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb than those of the waters at the mine gallery outlets. The results allow us to assess the extent of the environmental impact of the mining activities on the water quality. The intake of these elements by vegetation was related with the sampling place, reflecting the metal water content and the substrate chemistry. Accumulation of metals in mosses is higher than those exhibited in wild grasses. Furthermore, different levels of accumulation were found in different wild grass. Rumex sp. presented the lowest metal concentrations, while Pseudoavena sp. reported the highest metal content.

  4. Chandra Multi-wavelength Plane (ChaMPlane) Survey: Initial Results for X-ray Source Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, J.; Grindlay, J. E.; Laycock, S.; Zhao, P.; Kim, D.; Schlegel, E.

    2003-03-01

    We present initial results of X-ray source properties from 60 fields surveyed by Chandra Multi-wavelength Plane (ChaMPlane) project. ChaMPlane is our ongoing deep galactic plane survey with the Chandra X-ray observatory. These 60 Chandra fields are selected for galactic latitude < ˜ 12 deg, exposure > ˜ 20 ksec and lack of bright diffuse or point sources, and 30 of them are in the Galactic Center region reported by Wang et al (2002, Nature, 415, 148). We report the properties of the X-ray sources in these fields and compare them, as well as the logN-logS distributions, with the recent results from our first discussion of ChaMPlane sources (Grindlay et al 2003, AN, in press) and a deep observation of the Galactic center (Muno et al. 2003, ApJ submitted). We processed the data and identified the sources using tools specifically developed for the high latitude ChaMP survey but with modifications to enable processing stacked images from multiple observations of the same field. We access source reliability and positional uncertainty through simulations. The significantly enhanced logN-logS distribution reported for the galactic bulge by Grindlay et al is mapped in finer detail and compared with the sharp central peak at the galactic center. The X-ray color-color analysis suggests that the excess in the galactic bulge is likely due to an enhanced population of CVs and compact binaries. This work was supported in part by NASA/Chandra grants AR1-2001X and AR2-3002A and NSF grant AST-0098683.

  5. A Review of Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) as an Analytical Tool in Numismatic Studies.

    PubMed

    Navas, Mara Jos; Asuero, Agustn Garca; Jimnez, Ana Mara

    2016-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) as an analytical technique in studies of ancient coins is summarized and reviewed. Specific EDXRF applications in historical studies, in studies of the corrosion of coins, and in studies of the optimal working conditions of some laser-based treatment for the cleaning of coins are described. PMID:26767646

  6. Fast GPU-based absolute intensity determination for energy-dispersive X-ray Laue diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alghabi, F.; Send, S.; Schipper, U.; Abboud, A.; Pietsch, U.; Kolb, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for fast determination of absolute intensities in the sites of Laue spots generated by a tetragonal hen egg-white lysozyme crystal after exposure to white synchrotron radiation during an energy-dispersive X-ray Laue diffraction experiment. The Laue spots are taken by means of an energy-dispersive X-ray 2D pnCCD detector. Current pnCCD detectors have a spatial resolution of 384 × 384 pixels of size 75 × 75 μm2 each and operate at a maximum of 400 Hz. Future devices are going to have higher spatial resolution and frame rates. The proposed method runs on a computer equipped with multiple Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) which provide fast and parallel processing capabilities. Accordingly, our GPU-based algorithm exploits these capabilities to further analyse the Laue spots of the sample. The main contribution of the paper is therefore an alternative algorithm for determining absolute intensities of Laue spots which are themselves computed from a sequence of pnCCD frames. Moreover, a new method for integrating spectral peak intensities and improved background correction, a different way of calculating mean count rate of the background signal and also a new method for n-dimensional Poisson fitting are presented.We present a comparison of the quality of results from the GPU-based algorithm with the quality of results from a prior (base) algorithm running on CPU. This comparison shows that our algorithm is able to produce results with at least the same quality as the base algorithm. Furthermore, the GPU-based algorithm is able to speed up one of the most time-consuming parts of the base algorithm, which is n-dimensional Poisson fitting, by a factor of more than 3. Also, the entire procedure of extracting Laue spots' positions, energies and absolute intensities from a raw dataset of pnCCD frames is accelerated by a factor of more than 3.

  7. ENERGY-DISPERSIVE, X-RAY REFLECTIVITY DENSITY MEASUREMENTS OF POROUS SIO2 XEROGELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    X-ray reflectivity has been used to nondestructively measure the density of thin, porous, SiO2-based xerogels. Critical angle, defined by total external reflection, was measured for multiple x-ray energies to correct for sample misalignment error in me determination of the densit...

  8. A new approach for the study of cationic lipid DNA complexes by energy dispersive X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracciolo, G.; Caminiti, R.; Natali, F.; Congiu Castellano, A.

    2002-12-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies on the cationic liposomes (CL)-DNA complexes currently used in gene delivery have provided detailed structural informations on these compact, ordered self-assemblies sheding light on the poorly understood structure-activity relationship. Among these, the experiments carried out by using a synchrotron radiation source have showed an experimental resolution remarkably better than that achieved one by traditional in house apparatuses. Here we show a new experimental approach for the study of CL-DNA complexes, based on the employment of silicon wafers as substrates, which allows to obtain high-resolution structural informations by energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXD).

  9. Micro energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry study of dentin coating with nanobiomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Luís. Eduardo Silva; Nahorny, Sídnei; Marciano, Fernanda Roberta; Zanin, Hudson; Lobo, Anderson de Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    New biomaterials such as multi-walled carbon nanotubes oxide/graphene oxide (MWCNTO/GO), nanohydroxyapatite (nHAp) and combination of them together or not to acidulated phosphate fluoride gel (F) have been tested as protective coating before root dentin erosion. Fourteen bovine teeth were cleaned, polished, divided into two parts (n=28) and assigned to seven groups: (Control) - without previous surface treatment; F treatment; nHAp; MWCNTO/GO; F+nHAp; F+MWCNTO/GO and F+MWCNTO/GO/nHAp composites. Each sample had two sites of pre-treatments: acid etched area and an area without treatment. After the biomaterials application, the samples were submitted to six cycles (demineralization: orange juice, 10 min; remineralization: artificial saliva, 1 h). Micro energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μ-EDXRF) mapping area analyses were performed after erosive cycling on both sites (n=84). μ-EDXRF mappings showed that artificial saliva and MWCNTO/GO/nHAp/F composite treatments produced lower dentin demineralization than in the other groups. Exposed dentin tubules allowed better interaction of nanobiomaterials than in smear layer covered dentin. Association of fluoride with other biomaterials had a positive influence on acid etched dentin. MWCNTO/GO/nHAp/F composite treatment resulted in levels of demineralization similar to the control group.

  10. XSPEK A new program for the evaluation of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, W.; Ketelsen, P.; Knchel, A.

    1986-05-01

    The computer program XSPEK for fitting spectra obtained in energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis (EDS-XFA) is described. The code is designed around a linear least-squares routine which fits Gaussian peak shapes. With the well known peak position and the constant ratio of the line intensities of a certain element the number of fitting parameters is reduced to one for each element. This leads to an increase in accuracy and a decrease of computation time compared with programs using a nonlinear fitting routine. The program is very flexible to different conditions of excitation and includes an automatic correction for pileup and escape peaks. A spectrum with about 1000 channels and containing up to 15 elements is fitted in 3-4 min on a PDP 11/34 computer and RSX11M system and 2-3 min on a VAX-750 computer (VMS system). A special version works fully automatic after interactive input of the element list and the background shape function. The result is comparable to that obtained with a commercially available computer program with a nonlinear fit for which the CPU time, however, is two to three times longer than for XSPEK

  11. Line-coincidence schemes for producing laser action at soft-x-ray wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Chapline, G.F.

    1983-01-12

    Line-coincidence schemes for producing laser action in the wavelength regime 100-30A are reviewed. Schemes involving pumping of 2..-->..4 transitions in neon-like ions are singled out as particularly attractive.

  12. Mass absorption coefficients of Parylene N at soft X-ray and vacuum-ultraviolet wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, R.; Paresce, F.

    1975-01-01

    Parylene N was selected as a bandpass filter for the extreme-ultraviolet telescope, flown on the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project in July 1975. The telescope measures stellar and diffuse cosmic radiation in the wavelength region from 45 to 170 A. In connection with this application, a systematic study was conducted of the mass absorption coefficient of the Parylene N. The results of the study for the wavelength region from 44 to 2536 A are reported.

  13. Atomic inner-shell laser at 1.5-ngstrm wavelength pumped by an X-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Hitoki; Inubushi, Yuichi; Nagamine, Kazunori; Michine, Yurina; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Yumoto, Hirokatsu; Yamauchi, Kazuto; Mimura, Hidekazu; Kitamura, Hikaru; Katayama, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Yabashi, Makina

    2015-08-27

    Since the invention of the first lasers in the visible-light region, research has aimed to produce short-wavelength lasers that generate coherent X-rays; the shorter the wavelength, the better the imaging resolution of the laser and the shorter the pulse duration, leading to better temporal resolution in probe measurements. Recently, free-electron lasers based on self-amplified spontaneous emission have made it possible to generate a hard-X-ray laser (that is, the photon energy is of the order of ten kiloelectronvolts) in an ngstrm-wavelength regime, enabling advances in fields from ultrafast X-ray spectrosopy to X-ray quantum optics. An atomic laser based on neon atoms and pumped by a soft-X-ray (that is, a photon energy of less than one kiloelectronvolt) free-electron laser has been achieved at a wavelength of 14 nanometres. Here, we use a copper target and report a hard-X-ray inner-shell atomic laser operating at a wavelength of 1.5 ngstrms. X-ray free-electron laser pulses with an intensity of about 10(19) watts per square centimetre tuned to the copper K-absorption edge produced sufficient population inversion to generate strong amplified spontaneous emission on the copper K? lines. Furthermore, we operated the X-ray free-electron laser source in a two-colour mode, with one colour tuned for pumping and the other for the seed (starting) light for the laser. PMID:26310765

  14. RF undulator for compact X-ray SASE source of variable wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzikov, S. V.; Hirshfield, J. L.; Jiang, Y.; Marshall, T. C.; Vikharev, A. A.

    2012-12-21

    A room-temperature RF undulator, fed by Ka-band radiation and intended to produce {approx}1 nm wavelength radiation using moderate energy electrons, is considered. The necessary electron bunches with energy 0.2-1 GeV could be produced by petawatt laser pulses injected into plasma bubbles.

  15. THE SAP3 COMPUTER PROGRAM FOR QUANTITATIVE MULTIELEMENT ANALYSIS BY ENERGY DISPERSIVE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Nielson, K. K.; Sanders, R. W.

    1982-04-01

    SAP3 is a dual-function FORTRAN computer program which performs peak analysis of energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectra and then quantitatively interprets the results of the multielement analysis. It was written for mono- or bi-chromatic excitation as from an isotopic or secondary excitation source, and uses the separate incoherent and coherent backscatter intensities to define the bulk sample matrix composition. This composition is used in performing fundamental-parameter matrix corrections for self-absorption, enhancement, and particle-size effects, obviating the need for specific calibrations for a given sample matrix. The generalized calibration is based on a set of thin-film sensitivities, which are stored in a library disk file and used for all sample matrices and thicknesses. Peak overlap factors are also determined from the thin-film standards, and are stored in the library for calculating peak overlap corrections. A detailed description is given of the algorithms and program logic, and the program listing and flow charts are also provided. An auxiliary program, SPCAL, is also given for use in calibrating the backscatter intensities. SAP3 provides numerous analysis options via seventeen control switches which give flexibility in performing the calculations best suited to the sample and the user needs. User input may be limited to the name of the library, the analysis livetime, and the spectrum filename and location. Output includes all peak analysis information, matrix correction factors, and element concentrations, uncertainties and detection limits. Twenty-four elements are typically determined from a 1024-channel spectrum in one-to-two minutes using a PDP-11/34 computer operating under RSX-11M.

  16. High-power-density capillary discharge plasma columns for shorter wavelength discharge-pumped soft-x-ray lasers.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, J J; Frati, M; Rocca, J J; Shlyaptsev, V N; Osterheld, A L

    2002-02-01

    We report the generation of plasma columns in gas-filled capillary channels using discharge excitation powers that exceed those of previous studies by one to two orders of magnitude. Current pulses up to 200 kA and 10-90 % rise time of about 10 ns (current increase rate equivalent to 1.5 x 10(13) A/s) were utilized to excite plasmas in 3.3 and 4 mm diameter channels. Time resolved soft-x-ray spectra and pinhole images of the plasma were obtained. The experimental data and its comparison with model computations suggest that dense argon plasma columns 300 mum in diameter with electron temperatures >250 eV have been obtained. These characteristics make these plasmas of interest for extending discharge-pumped lasers to shorter wavelengths. PMID:11863665

  17. Polarity characterization by anomalous x-ray dispersion of ZnO films and GaN lateral polar structures

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, Christopher T.; Sachet, Edward; Paisley, Elizabeth A.; Hoffmann, Marc P.; Rajan, Joseph; Collazo, Ramón; Sitar, Zlatko; Maria, Jon-Paul

    2014-01-28

    We demonstrate the use of anomalous x-ray scattering of constituent cations at their absorption edge, in a conventional Bragg-Brentano diffractometer, to measure absolutely and quantitatively the polar orientation and polarity fraction of unipolar and mixed polar wurtzitic crystals. In one set of experiments, the gradual transition between c+ and c− polarity of epitaxial ZnO films on sapphire as a function of MgO buffer layer thickness is monitored quantitatively, while in a second experiment, we map the polarity of a lateral polar homojunction in GaN. The dispersion measurements are compared with piezoforce microscopy images, and we demonstrate how x-ray dispersion and scanning probe methods can provide complementary information that can discriminate between polarity fractions at a material surface and polarity fractions averaged over the film bulk.

  18. Application of the focusing x-ray spectrograph with crossed dispersion to investigations of X pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pikuz, S.A.; Song, B.M.; Shelkovenko, T.A.; Chandler, K.M.; Mitchell, M.D.; Hammer, D.A.

    2004-10-01

    A new focusing spectrograph configuration with crossed dispersion (FSCD) has been developed for use in X pinch experiments. This device solves the problem in a crystal spectrograph of the overlapping of reflected radiation in many orders. The x-ray radiation from a small source is dispersed by a transmission grating before it reaches the Bragg reflector (mica crystal). A large aperture (10 mmx10 mm), 0.5 {mu}m period gold transmission grating was made on a 0.5 {mu}m thick Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} substrate and combined with spherically bent mica crystals with radii of curvature of 100 mm or 186 mm. Results of FSCD application to plasma experiments with X pinch x-ray sources is presented.

  19. The application of a microstrip gas counter to energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Veloso, J.F.C.A.; Santos, J.M.F. dos; Conde, C.A.N.; Morgado, R.E.

    1996-07-01

    Performance characteristics of a microstrip gas counter operated as a x-ray fluorescence spectrometer are reported. Gas amplification as a function of microstrip anode-cathode voltage was measured, and the breakdown threshold voltage was determined in pure xenon. The detector temporal stability and the effect of gas purity were assessed. Energy resolution and linearity, detection efficiency, and uniformity of spatial response in the 2- to 60-keV x-ray energy range were determined from the pulse-height distributions of the fluorescence x-ray spectra induced in a variety of single- and multi-element sample materials. Energy resolution similar to conventional proportional counters was achieved at 6 keV.

  20. Near-surface density profiling of Fe ion irradiated Si (100) using extremely asymmetric x-ray diffraction by variation of the wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Khanbabaee, B. Pietsch, U.; Facsko, S.; Doyle, S.

    2014-10-20

    In this work, we report on correlations between surface density variations and ion parameters during ion beam-induced surface patterning process. The near-surface density variations of irradiated Si(100) surfaces were investigated after off-normal irradiation with 5 keV Fe ions at different fluences. In order to reduce the x-ray probing depth to a thickness below 5 nm, the extremely asymmetrical x-ray diffraction by variation of wavelength was applied, exploiting x-ray refraction at the air-sample interface. Depth profiling was achieved by measuring x-ray rocking curves as function of varying wavelengths providing incidence angles down to 0°. The density variation was extracted from the deviations from kinematical Bragg angle at grazing incidence angles due to refraction of the x-ray beam at the air-sample interface. The simulations based on the dynamical theory of x-ray diffraction revealed that while a net near-surface density decreases with increasing ion fluence which is accompanied by surface patterning, there is a certain threshold of ion fluence to surface density modulation. Our finding suggests that the surface density variation can be relevant with the mechanism of pattern formation.

  1. Near-surface density profiling of Fe ion irradiated Si (100) using extremely asymmetric x-ray diffraction by variation of the wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanbabaee, B.; Facsko, S.; Doyle, S.; Pietsch, U.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we report on correlations between surface density variations and ion parameters during ion beam-induced surface patterning process. The near-surface density variations of irradiated Si(100) surfaces were investigated after off-normal irradiation with 5 keV Fe ions at different fluences. In order to reduce the x-ray probing depth to a thickness below 5 nm, the extremely asymmetrical x-ray diffraction by variation of wavelength was applied, exploiting x-ray refraction at the air-sample interface. Depth profiling was achieved by measuring x-ray rocking curves as function of varying wavelengths providing incidence angles down to 0. The density variation was extracted from the deviations from kinematical Bragg angle at grazing incidence angles due to refraction of the x-ray beam at the air-sample interface. The simulations based on the dynamical theory of x-ray diffraction revealed that while a net near-surface density decreases with increasing ion fluence which is accompanied by surface patterning, there is a certain threshold of ion fluence to surface density modulation. Our finding suggests that the surface density variation can be relevant with the mechanism of pattern formation.

  2. Fast elemental screening of soil and sediment profiles using small-spot energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence: application to mining sediments geochemistry.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Fernandez, Oscar; Queralt, Ignacio

    2010-09-01

    Elemental analysis of different sediment cores originating from the Cartagena-La Union mining district in Spain was carried out by means of a programmable small-spot energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer to study the distribution of heavy metals along soil profiles. Cores were obtained from upstream sediments of a mining creek, from the lowland sedimentation plain, and from a mining landfill dump (tailings pile). A programmable two-dimensional (2D) stage and a focal spot resolution of 600 ?m allow us to obtain complete core mapping. Geochemical results were verified using a more powerful wavelength-dispersion X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) technique. The data obtained was processed in order to study the statistical correlations within the elemental compositions. The results obtained allow us to observe the differential in-depth distribution of heavy metals among the sampled zones. Dump site cores exhibit a homogeneous distribution of heavy metals, whereas the alluvial plain core shows accumulation of heavy metals in the upper part. This approach can be useful for the fast screening of heavy metals in depositional environments around mining sites. PMID:20828442

  3. EVOLUTION OF X-RAY AND FAR-ULTRAVIOLET DISK-DISPERSING RADIATION FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Ingleby, Laura; Calvet, Nuria; Miller, Jon; Bergin, Edwin; Hartmann, Lee; Hernandez, Jesus; Briceno, Cesar; Espaillat, Catherine E-mail: ncalvet@umich.edu E-mail: ebergin@umich.edu E-mail: jesush@cida.ve E-mail: cespaillat@cfa.harvard.edu

    2011-04-15

    We present new X-ray and far-ultraviolet (FUV) observations of T Tauri stars covering the age range 1-10 Myr. Our goals are to observationally constrain the intensity of radiation fields responsible for evaporating gas from the circumstellar disk and to assess the feasibility of current photoevaporation models, focusing on X-ray and UV radiation. We greatly increase the number of 7-10 Myr old T Tauri stars observed in X-rays by including observations of the well-populated 25 Ori aggregate in the Orion OB1a subassociation. With these new 7-10 Myr objects, we confirm that X-ray emission remains constant from 1 to 10 Myr. We also show, for the first time, observational evidence for the evolution of FUV radiation fields with a sample of 56 accreting and non-accreting young stars spanning 1 Myr to 1 Gyr. We find that the FUV emission decreases on timescales consistent with the decline of accretion in classical T Tauri stars until reaching the chromospheric level in weak T Tauri stars and debris disks. Overall, we find that the observed strength of high-energy radiation is consistent with that required by photoevaporation models to dissipate the disks in timescales of approximately 10 Myr. Finally, we find that the high-energy fields that affect gas evolution are not similarly affecting dust evolution; in particular, we find that disks with inner clearings, transitional disks, have similar levels of FUV emission as full disks.

  4. Low energy X-ray spectra measured with a mercuric iodide energy dispersive spectrometer in a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Huth, G. C.; Bradley, J. G.; Conley, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A mercuric iodide energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, with Peltier cooling provided for the detector and input field effect transistor, has been developed and tested in a scanning electron microscope. X-ray spectra were obtained with the 15 keV electron beam. An energy resolution of 225 eV (FWHM) for Mn-K(alpha) at 5.9 keV and 195 eV (FWHM) for the Mg-K line at 1.25 keV has been measured. Overall system noise level was 175 eV (FWHM). The detector system characterization with a carbon target demonstrated good energy sensitivity at low energies and lack of significant spectral artifacts at higher energies.

  5. Low energy x-ray spectra measured with a mercuric iodide energy dispersive spectrometer in a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Dabrowski, A.J.; Huth, G.C.; Bradley, J.G.; Conley, J.M.; Albee, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    A mercuric iodide energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer, with Peltier cooling provided for the detector and input field effect transistor, has been developed and tested in a scanning electron microscope. X-ray spectra were obtained with the 15 keV electron beam. An energy resolution of 225 eV (FWHM) for Mn-K/sub ..cap alpha../ at 5.9 keV and 195 eV (FWHM) for Mg-K line at 1.25 keV has been measured. Overall system noise level was 175 eV (FWHM). The detector system characterization with a carbon target demonstrated good energy sensitivity at low energies and lack of significant spectral artifacts at higher energies. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  6. An evaluation of multilayer mirrors for the soft x ray and extreme ultraviolet wavelength range that were irradiated with neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, S. P.; May, M. J.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Finkenthal, M.; Moos, H. W.; Farnum, E. H.; Clinard, F. W., Jr.; Tarrio, C.; Watts, R.

    1997-01-01

    The Plasma Spectroscopy Group at the Johns Hopkins University develops high photon throughput multilayer mirror (MLM) based soft x ray and extreme ultraviolet (XUV 10 Å<λ<304 Å) spectroscopic diagnostics for magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The D-T reactions in large fusion reactor type devices such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor will produce neutrons at a rate as high as 5×1019 n s-1. The MLMs, which are used as dispersive and focusing optics, will not be shielded from these neutrons. In an effort to assess the potential radiation damage, four MLMs (No. 1: Mo/Si, d=87.8 Å, Zerodur substrate with 50 cm concave spherical curvature; No. 2: W/B4C, d=22.75 Å, Si wafer substrate; No. 3: W/C, d=25.3 Å, Si wafer substrate; and No. 4: Mo/Si, d=186.6 Å, Si wafer substrate) were irradiated with fast neutrons at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF). The neutron beam at LASREF has an energy distribution that peaks at 1-2 MeV with a tail that extends out to 100 MeV. The MLMs were irradiated to a fast neutron fluence of 1.1×1019 n cm-2 at 270-300 °C. A comparison between the dispersive and reflective characteristics of the irradiated MLMs and the corresponding qualities of control samples will be given.

  7. Texture analysis of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe alloys by X-ray and neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béchade, J. L.; Mathon, M. H.; Branger, V.; Réglé, H.; Alamo, A.

    2002-07-01

    The ferritic ODS alloys studied were obtained by mechanical alloying. This strengthening method is very attractive, in particular for nuclear applications. In order to ensure the alloy a good compromise between mechanical resistance and ductility at high temperatures, it is necessary to control the microstructure and in particular the evolution during the recrystallization. First, a preliminary study, performed by X ray diffraction and optical microscopy, shows several grain growth mechanisms ; in particular, the “abnormal” grain growth mechanism which conducts to a large grain size [1], [2]. After annealing (3600s at 1470^{circ}C), the 30% cold-worked (swaging) alloys exhibit an heterogeneous microstructure with a large grains size ( 200 to 500 μm) in the heart and near the surface of the material when the intermediate zone is inhabited by small grains ( 1 μm). Fora higher cold-work level (60%), large size grains are only present in the periphery of the material. On account of the large grain size and strong heterogeneity of the microstructure, texture analysis using laboratory x-ray beam in not well adapted and so we have decided to use neutron beam. The neutron diffraction texture analysis has been performed at the Laboratoire Léon Brillouin on the 6T1 diffractometer on 2 different rods of the alloy (corresponding to the reduction ratios of 30% and 60%). Specific samples have been machined to characterise separately the zones with a different microstructure. After deformation, the alloys exhibit a typical α-fibre texture \\{ hkl \\} <1l0> whatever the area of the sample and the reduction ratio. After recrystallization, a very inhomogeneous texture is evidenced through the thickness of the sample, in particular for the rod deformed with a reduction ratio of 30% : in the heart and in the periphery of the rod, a “single-crystal” type texture is observed; the a fibre remains for the intermediate diameter of the rod. For the rod cold rolled with a reduction ratio of 60%, the α-fibre keeps on the heart of the material and as in the precedent case, a “single-crystal” type texture is observed near the surface of the sample. EBSD measurements have been performed to explicit at a local scale this behaviour and in order to furnish some input data for the simulation of static recrystallization. Les aciers ferritiques avec dispersion d'oxydes étudiés sont obtenus par métallurgie des poudres, ce qui leur confère une résistance mécanique accrue à haute température notamment pour des applications nucléaires. La difficulté pour l'utilisation de tels alliages réside dans la maîtrise de leur microstructure au cours de l'élaboration en particulier durant la recristallisation. Une première étude en diffraction des rayons-x et en métallographie optique a permis de révéler différents mécanismes de croissance du grain lors de la recristallisation, notamment une croissance “anormale” conduisant à une taille de grain très importante [t], [2]. Après recuit (3600s à 1470^{circ}C), précédé par un écrouissage de 30% sur des barres (par martelage) on voit apparaître une microstructure hétérogène à gros grains ( 200 à 500 μm) au coeur et en surface externe de la barre alors que la zone intermédiaire est peuplée de grains fins (sim 1 μm). Pour un écrouissage plus élevé (60%), après le même recuit, on ne voit apparaître des gros grains qu'en périphérie de la barre. Pour ce type de microstructure fortement hétérogène et à gros grains, la diffraction des rayons-x pour l'analyse de texture est mal adaptée, ce qui nous a conduit à utiliser la diffraction des neutrons sur le diffractomètre 6TI du Laboratoire Léon Brillouin. Les deux matériaux, écrouis de 30% et 60%, ont été analysés en réalisant des échantillons particuliers permettant d'étudier séparément le coeur et la périphérie. Après déformation, les deux échantillons présentent une texture de fibre α \\{ hkl \\} <1l0> en tout point de la barre. Après recristallisation, on retrouve une texture très hétérogène suivant le rayon de la barre, notamment après 30% : le coeur et la périphérie de la barre présentent une texture de type “mono-cristal”, la zone intermédiaire restant une fibre α. Après écrouissage de 60%, on garde la fibre α au coeur de la barre, la périphérie présentant, comme pour l'écrouissage précédent, une texture de type “mono-cristal”. Des analyses en EBSD ont également été réalisées pour foumir des éléments de compréhension sur les mécanismes locaux de recristallisation afin de simuler la recristallisation statique de ses alliages via une approche numérique.

  8. Residual strain gradient determination in metal matrix composites by synchrotron X-ray energy dispersive diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, Todd A.; Wadley, Haydn N. G.; Black, David R.

    1993-01-01

    An X-ray technique for the measurement of internal residual strain gradients near the continuous reinforcements of metal matrix composites has been investigated. The technique utilizes high intensity white X-ray radiation from a synchrotron radiation source to obtain energy spectra from small (0.001 cu mm) volumes deep within composite samples. The viability of the technique was tested using a model system with 800 micron Al203 fibers and a commercial purity titanium matrix. Good agreement was observed between the measured residual radial and hoop strain gradients and those estimated from a simple elastic concentric cylinders model. The technique was then used to assess the strains near (SCS-6) silicon carbide fibers in a Ti-14Al-21Nb matrix after consolidation processing. Reasonable agreement between measured and calculated strains was seen provided the probe volume was located 50 microns or more from the fiber/matrix interface.

  9. Rapid spectral and flux time variations in a solar burst observed at various dm-mm wavelengths and at hard X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zodivaz, A. M.; Kaufmann, P.; Correia, E.; Costa, J. E. R.; Takakura, T.; Cliver, E. W.; Tapping, K. F.

    1986-01-01

    A solar burst was observed with high sensitivity and time resolution at cm-mm wavelengths by two different radio observatories (Itapetinga and Algonquin), with high spectral time resolution at dm-mm wavelengths by patrol instruments (Sagamore Hill), and at hard X-rays (HXM Hinotori). At the onset of the major burst time structure there was a rapid rise in the spectral turnover frequency (from 5 to 15 GHz), in about 10s, coincident to a reduction of the spectral index in the optically thin part of the spectrum. The burst maxima were not time coincident at the optically thin radio frequencies and at the different hard X-ray energy ranges. The profiles at higher radio frequencies exhibited better time coincidence to the high energy X-rays. The hardest X-ray spectrum (-3) coincided with peak radio emission at the higher frequency (44 GHz). The event appeared to be built up by a first major injection of softer particles followed by other injections of harder particles. Ultrafast time structures were identified as superimposed on the burst emission at the cm-mm high sensitivity data at X-rays, with predominant repetition rates ranging from 2.0 to 3.5 Hz.

  10. Rapid spectral and flux time variations in a solar burst observed at various dm-mm wavelengths and at hard X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zodivaz, A. M.; Kaufmann, P.; Correia, E.; Costa, J. E. R.; Takakura, T.; Cliver, E. W.; Tapping, K. F.

    A solar burst was observed with high sensitivity and time resolution at cm-mm wavelengths by two different radio observatories (Itapetinga and Algonquin), with high spectral time resolution at dm-mm wavelengths by patrol instruments (Sagamore Hill), and at hard X-rays (HXM Hinotori). At the onset of the major burst time structure there was a rapid rise in the spectral turnover frequency (from 5 to 15 GHz), in about 10s, coincident to a reduction of the spectral index in the optically thin part of the spectrum. The burst maxima were not time coincident at the optically thin radio frequencies and at the different hard X-ray energy ranges. The profiles at higher radio frequencies exhibited better time coincidence to the high energy X-rays. The hardest X-ray spectrum (-3) coincided with peak radio emission at the higher frequency (44 GHz). The event appeared to be built up by a first major injection of softer particles followed by other injections of harder particles. Ultrafast time structures were identified as superimposed on the burst emission at the cm-mm high sensitivity data at X-rays, with predominant repetition rates ranging from 2.0 to 3.5 Hz.

  11. X-ray monochromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An x-ray monochromator is described, wherin a housing supports a plurality of mirrors forming a plurality of opposed mirror faces in parallel with each other and having thereon multilayer coatings, with each of said pairs of mirror faces being provided with identical coatings which are different from the coatings on the other pairs of mirror faces such that each pair of mirror faces has a peak x-ray reflection at a different wavelength regime. The housing is moveable to bring into a polychromatic x-ray beam that pair of mirror faces having the best x-ray reflection for the desired wavelength, with the mirrors being pivotable to move the mirror faces to that angle of incidence at which the peak reflectivity of the desired wavelength x-rays occurs.

  12. Design and Performance of a TES X-ray Microcalorimeter Array for Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy on Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Haruka; Nagayoshi, K.; Hayashi, T.; Sakai, K.; Yamamoto, R.; Mitsuda, K.; Yamasaki, N. Y.; Maehata, K.; Hara, T.

    2016-02-01

    We discuss the design and performance of a transition edge sensor (TES) X-ray microcalorimeter array for scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM)-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The TES X-ray microcalorimeter has better energy resolution compared to conventional silicon drift detector and STEM-EDS utilizing a TES detector makes it possible to map the distribution of elements on a specimen in addition to analyze the composition. The requirement for a TES detector is a high counting rate (> 20 kcps), wide energy band (0.5-15 keV) and good energy resolution (< 10 eV) full width at half maximum. The major improvement of this development is to increase the maximum counting rate. In order to accommodate the high counting rate, we adopted an 8 × 8 format, 64-pixel array and common biasing scheme for the readout method. We did all design and fabrication of the device in house. With the device we have fabricated most recently, the pulse decay time is 40 \\upmu s which is expected to achieve 50 kcps. For a single pixel, the measured energy resolution was 7.8 eV at 5.9 keV. This device satisfies the requirements of counting rate and energy resolution, although several issues remain where the performance must be confirmed.

  13. Bulk substrate porosity verification by applying Monte Carlo modeling and Castaing's formula using energy-dispersive x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung, Lai Chin; Fei, Cheong Choke; Mandeep, Jit Singh; Amin, Nowshad; Lai, Khin Wee

    2015-11-01

    The leadframe fabrication process normally involves additional thin-metal layer plating on the bulk copper substrate surface for wire bonding purposes. Silver, tin, and copper flakes are commonly adopted as plating materials. It is critical to assess the density of the plated metal layer, and in particular to look for porosity or voids underneath the layer, which may reduce the reliability during high-temperature stress. A fast, reliable inspection technique is needed to assess the porosity or void weakness. To this end, the characteristics of x-rays generated from bulk samples were examined using an energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) detector to examine the porosity percentage. Monte Carlo modeling was integrated with Castaing's formula to verify the integrity of the experimental data. Samples with different porosity percentages were considered to test the correlation between the intensity of the collected x-ray signal and the material density. To further verify the integrity of the model, conventional cross-sectional samples were also taken to observe the porosity percentage using Image J software measurement. A breakthrough in bulk substrate assessment was achieved by applying EDX for the first time to nonelemental analysis. The experimental data showed that the EDX features were not only useful for elemental analysis, but also applicable to thin-film metal layer thickness measurement and bulk material density determination. A detailed experiment was conducted using EDX to assess the plating metal layer and bulk material porosity.

  14. Multi-wavelength coverage of state transitions in the new black hole X-ray binary swift J1910.2-0546

    SciTech Connect

    Degenaar, N.; Maitra, D.; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M.; Reis, R. C.; King, A. L.; Gltekin, K.; Cackett, E. M.; Bailyn, C. D.; Buxton, M. M.; MacDonald, R. K. D.; Fabian, A. C.; Fox, D. B.; Rykoff, E. S.

    2014-04-01

    Understanding how black holes accrete and supply feedback to their environment is one of the outstanding challenges of modern astrophysics. Swift J1910.2-0546 is a candidate black hole low-mass X-ray binary that was discovered in 2012 when it entered an accretion outburst. To investigate the binary configuration and the accretion morphology, we monitored the evolution of the outburst for ?3 months at X-ray, UV, optical (B, V, R, I), and near-infrared (J, H, K) wavelengths using Swift and SMARTS. The source evolved from a hard to a soft X-ray spectral state with a relatively cold accretion disk that peaked at ?0.5 keV. A Chandra/HETG spectrum obtained during this soft state did not reveal signatures of an ionized disk wind. Both the low disk temperature and the absence of a detectable wind could indicate that the system is viewed at relatively low inclination. The multi-wavelength light curves revealed two notable features that appear to be related to X-ray state changes. First, a prominent flux decrease was observed in all wavebands ? 1-2 weeks before the source entered the soft state. This dip occurred in (0.6-10 keV) X-rays ? 6 days later than at longer wavelengths, which could possibly reflect the viscous timescale of the disk. Second, about two weeks after the source transitioned back into the hard state, the UV emission significantly increased while the X-rays steadily decayed. We discuss how these observations may reflect changes in the accretion morphology, perhaps related to the quenching/launch of a jet or the collapse/recovery of a hot flow.

  15. Multi-wavelength Coverage of State Transitions in the New Black Hole X-Ray Binary Swift J1910.2-0546

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenaar, N.; Maitra, D.; Cackett, E. M.; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M.; Reis, R. C.; King, A. L.; Gültekin, K.; Bailyn, C. D.; Buxton, M. M.; MacDonald, R. K. D.; Fabian, A. C.; Fox, D. B.; Rykoff, E. S.

    2014-04-01

    Understanding how black holes accrete and supply feedback to their environment is one of the outstanding challenges of modern astrophysics. Swift J1910.2-0546 is a candidate black hole low-mass X-ray binary that was discovered in 2012 when it entered an accretion outburst. To investigate the binary configuration and the accretion morphology, we monitored the evolution of the outburst for sime3 months at X-ray, UV, optical (B, V, R, I), and near-infrared (J, H, K) wavelengths using Swift and SMARTS. The source evolved from a hard to a soft X-ray spectral state with a relatively cold accretion disk that peaked at sime0.5 keV. A Chandra/HETG spectrum obtained during this soft state did not reveal signatures of an ionized disk wind. Both the low disk temperature and the absence of a detectable wind could indicate that the system is viewed at relatively low inclination. The multi-wavelength light curves revealed two notable features that appear to be related to X-ray state changes. First, a prominent flux decrease was observed in all wavebands ~= 1-2 weeks before the source entered the soft state. This dip occurred in (0.6-10 keV) X-rays ~= 6 days later than at longer wavelengths, which could possibly reflect the viscous timescale of the disk. Second, about two weeks after the source transitioned back into the hard state, the UV emission significantly increased while the X-rays steadily decayed. We discuss how these observations may reflect changes in the accretion morphology, perhaps related to the quenching/launch of a jet or the collapse/recovery of a hot flow.

  16. A new background subtraction method for energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectra using a cubic spline interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Longtao; Liu, Zhiguo; Wang, Kai; Chen, Man; Peng, Shiqi; Zhao, Weigang; He, Jialin; Zhao, Guangcui

    2015-03-01

    A new method is presented to subtract the background from the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrum using a cubic spline interpolation. To accurately obtain interpolation nodes, a smooth fitting and a set of discriminant formulations were adopted. From these interpolation nodes, the background is estimated by a calculated cubic spline function. The method has been tested on spectra measured from a coin and an oil painting using a confocal MXRF setup. In addition, the method has been tested on an existing sample spectrum. The result confirms that the method can properly subtract the background.

  17. Enhanced quantification for 3D energy dispersive spectrometry: going beyond the limitation of large volume of X-ray emission.

    PubMed

    Burdet, Pierre; Hébert, Cécile; Cantoni, Marco

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a method developed to quantify three-dimensional energy dispersive spectrometry (3D EDS) data with voxel size smaller than the volume from which X-rays are emitted. The influence of the neighboring voxels is corrected by applying recursively a complex quantification, improving thereby the accuracy of the quantification of critically small features. The enhanced quantification method is applied to simulated and measured data. A systematic improvement is obtained compared with classical quantification, proving the concept and the prospect of this method. PMID:24960631

  18. In situ multi-element analyses by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence on varnishes of historical violins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echard, Jean-Philippe

    2004-10-01

    Varnishes of Italian violins and other historical stringed instruments have been analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The instruments whose varnishes were to be analyzed were chosen from the collection kept in Musée de la Musique in Paris. Direct analyses were performed on instrument varnishes, without any sampling and non-destructively, showing inorganic elements such as lead, mercury and iron that could be related to siccatives or pigments. Analytical results and their comparison with old formulae or traditional recipes of violin varnishes, as with the few previous analytical results, will be discussed.

  19. Structural features of a cationic gemini surfactant at full hydration investigated by energy dispersive X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracciolo, Giulio; Mancini, Giovanna; Bombelli, Cecilia; Caminiti, Ruggero

    2004-03-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXD) measurements were conducted on fully hydrated samples of the cationic gemini surfactant (2S,3S)-2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-bis( N-hexadecyl- N, N-dimethylammonium)butane dibromide, SS, as a function of temperature. The surfactant molecules self-assemble into multilamellar vesicles with a well-defined d-spacing which decreases as temperature increases. The derived structural parameters, such as bilayer thickness, size of the water region interbilayer, number of water molecules per surfactant molecule reveal reduced bilayer fluctuations, as a function of increasing temperature, consistent with the observed reduction of the water layer.

  20. An evaluation of multilayer mirrors for the soft x ray and extreme ultraviolet wavelength range that were irradiated with neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, S.P.; May, M.J.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Finkenthal, M.; Moos, H.W.; Farnum, E.H.; Clinard, F.W. Jr.; Tarrio, C.; Watts, R.

    1997-01-01

    The Plasma Spectroscopy Group at the Johns Hopkins University develops high photon throughput multilayer mirror (MLM) based soft x ray and extreme ultraviolet (XUV 10 {Angstrom}{lt}{lambda}{lt}304 {Angstrom}) spectroscopic diagnostics for magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The D-T reactions in large fusion reactor type devices such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor will produce neutrons at a rate as high as 5{times}10{sup 19} ns{sup -1}. The MLMs, which are used as dispersive and focusing optics, will not be shielded from these neutrons. In an effort to assess the potential radiation damage, four MLMs (No. 1: Mo/Si, d=87.8 {Angstrom}, Zerodur substrate with 50 cm concave spherical curvature; No. 2: W/B{sub 4}C, d=22.75 {Angstrom}, Si wafer substrate; No. 3: W/C, d=25.3 {Angstrom}, Si wafer substrate; and No. 4: Mo/Si, d=186.6 {Angstrom}, Si wafer substrate) were irradiated with fast neutrons at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF). The neutron beam at LASREF has an energy distribution that peaks at 1{endash}2 MeV with a tail that extends out to 100 MeV. The MLMs were irradiated to a fast neutron fluence of 1.1{times}10{sup 19} ncm{sup {minus}2} at 270{endash}300{degree}C. A comparison between the dispersive and reflective characteristics of the irradiated MLMs and the corresponding qualities of control samples will be given. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. X-ray spectrometers with cylindrical, spherical and toroidal dispersive elements

    SciTech Connect

    Baronova, E.O.; Lider, V.V.; Stepanenko, M.M.; Vikhrev, V.V.; Pereira, N.R.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes a series of crystal spectrometers for soft x-ray diagnostics of pulsed plasmas. Most use high quality quartz crystals with different orientations of their crystal planes, attached by optical contact to spherical and toroidal substrates. The authors developed special procedures to attach spherical Johansson quartz crystals with optical contact, and to mount Cauchois type (transmission) crystals. Some mica crystals can be connected to the substrate with glue. The spectrometers cover an extended energy range, from the low end (0.7 keV) in reflection with a Johann or Johannson configuration to the high end (200 keV) with the Cauchois crystal. They use film as x-ray detector. They pay special attention to spectral and spatial resolutions. These characteristics are modeled analytically and compared with experimental calibration. Some crystals have spectral resolution better than 9 x 10{sup {minus}5}, and spatial resolution of a few microns. One of these is a uniquely large (100 mm by 40 mm) quartz crystal bent to a 3,770 mm radius. The spectrometer was used on a 500 kA plasma focus, with enough resolution to estimate temperature and density of the argon plasma from the line shapes, and the fraction of current in an electron beam from the line's polarization. Compared to a conventional spectrometer with a cylindrically bent crystal, the spectrometer with a chemically polished spherical crystal has much better resolution of the fine structure.

  2. Crystals for astronomical X-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burek, A.

    1976-01-01

    Crystal spectrometric properties and the factors that affect their measurement are discussed. Theoretical and experimental results on KAP are summarized and theoretical results based on the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction are given for the acid phthalates as well as for the commonly used planes of ADP, PET and EDDT. Anomalous dispersion is found to be important for understanding the details of crystal Bragg reflection properties at long X-ray wavelengths and some important effects are pointed out. The theory of anomalous dispersion is applied to explain the anomalous reflectivity exhibited by KAP at 23.3 A.

  3. Energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction using an annular beam.

    PubMed

    Dicken, A J; Evans, J P O; Rogers, K D; Greenwood, C; Godber, S X; Prokopiou, D; Stone, N; Clement, J G; Lyburn, I; Martin, R M; Zioupos, P

    2015-05-18

    We demonstrate material phase identification by measuring polychromatic diffraction spots from samples at least 20 mm in diameter and up to 10 mm thick with an energy resolving point detector. Within our method an annular X-ray beam in the form of a conical shell is incident with its symmetry axis normal to an extended polycrystalline sample. The detector is configured to receive diffracted flux transmitted through the sample and is positioned on the symmetry axis of the annular beam. We present the experiment data from a range of different materials and demonstrate the acquisition of useful data with sub-second collection times of 0.5 s; equating to 0.15 mAs. Our technique should be highly relevant in fields that demand rapid analytical methods such as medicine, security screening and non-destructive testing. PMID:26074592

  4. Chemical analysis of coal by energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence utilizing artificial standards

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, B.D.

    1982-01-01

    Accurate determinations of the elemental composition of coal by classical methods can be quite difficult and are normally very time consuming. X-ray fluorescence utilizing the powder method, however, has the ability of providing accurate and rapid analyses. Unfortunately, well characterized standards, although available, are not plentiful. In addition, the durability of stability of ground and pelletized coal samples is poor resulting in deterioration with time. As a result, artificial coal standards were prepared from certified geological materials by fusing in lithium tetraborate in percentages approximating expected ash contents and compositions in coal. Since the lithium tetraborate comprises about the same percentage of the standard as does the carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen in coal, the ground and pelletized coal sample can be assayed against the fused calibration curves by compensating for the differences in the mass absorption coefficients of the two matrices. 5 figures, 4 tables.

  5. Determination of trace elements in Syrian medicinal plants and their infusions by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khuder, A.; Sawan, M. Kh.; Karjou, J.; Razouk, A. K.

    2009-07-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) techniques suited well for a multi-element determination of K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb, and Sr in some Syrian medicinal plant species. The accuracy and the precision of both techniques were verified by analyzing the Standard Reference Materials (SRM) peach-1547 and apple leaves-1515. A good agreement between the measured concentrations of the previously mentioned elements and the certified values were obtained with errors less than 10.7% for TXRF and 15.8% for XRF. The determination of Br was acceptable only by XRF with an error less than 24%. Furthermore, the XRF method showed a very good applicability for the determination of K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, and Br in infusions of different Syrian medicinal plant species, namely anise ( Anisum vulgare), licorice root ( Glycyrrhiza glabra), and white wormwood ( Artemisia herba-alba).

  6. Evidence for core–shell nanoclusters in oxygen dispersion strengthened steels measured using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Odette, G. R.; Segre, C. U.

    2014-02-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) dispersion strengthened by an ultra high density of Y–Ti–O enriched nano-features (NF) exhibit superior creep strength and the potential for high resistance to radiation damage. However, the detailed character of the NF, that precipitate from solid solution during hot consolidation of metallic powders mechanically alloyed with Y₂O₃, are not well understood. In order to clarify the nature of the NF, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) technique, including X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) were used to characterize the local structure of the Ti and Y atoms in both NFA powders and consolidated alloys. The powders were characterized in the as-received, as-milled and after annealing milled powders at 850, 1000 and 1150 °C. The consolidated alloys included powders hot isostatic pressed (HIPed) at 1150 °C and commercial vendor alloys, MA957 and J12YWT. The NFA XAS data were compared various Ti and Y-oxide standards. The XANES and EXAFS spectra for the annealed and HIPed powders are similar and show high temperature heat treatments shift the Y and Ti to more oxidized states that are consistent with combinations of Y₂Ti₂O₇ and, especially, TiO. However, the MA957 and J12YWT and annealed–consolidated powder data differ. The commercial vendor alloys results more closely resemble the as-milled powder data and all show that a significant fraction of substitutional Ti remains dissolved in the (BCC) ferrite matrix.

  7. Evidence for core-shell nanoclusters in oxygen dispersion strengthened steels measured using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S.; Odette, G. R.; Segre, C. U.

    2014-02-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) dispersion strengthened by an ultra high density of Y-Ti-O enriched nano-features (NF) exhibit superior creep strength and the potential for high resistance to radiation damage. However, the detailed character of the NF, that precipitate from solid solution during hot consolidation of metallic powders mechanically alloyed with Y2O3, are not well understood. In order to clarify the nature of the NF, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) technique, including X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) were used to characterize the local structure of the Ti and Y atoms in both NFA powders and consolidated alloys. The powders were characterized in the as-received, as-milled and after annealing milled powders at 850, 1000 and 1150 °C. The consolidated alloys included powders hot isostatic pressed (HIPed) at 1150 °C and commercial vendor alloys, MA957 and J12YWT. The NFA XAS data were compared various Ti and Y-oxide standards. The XANES and EXAFS spectra for the annealed and HIPed powders are similar and show high temperature heat treatments shift the Y and Ti to more oxidized states that are consistent with combinations of Y2Ti2O7 and, especially, TiO. However, the MA957 and J12YWT and annealed-consolidated powder data differ. The commercial vendor alloys results more closely resemble the as-milled powder data and all show that a significant fraction of substitutional Ti remains dissolved in the (BCC) ferrite matrix.

  8. Hot electron and x-ray production from intense laser irradiation of wavelength-scale polystyrene spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Sumeruk, H. A.; Kneip, S.; Symes, D. R.; Churina, I. V.; Belolipetski, A. V.; Dyer, G.; Landry, J.; Bansal, G.; Bernstein, A.; Donnelly, T. D.; Karmakar, A.; Pukhov, A.; Ditmire, T.

    2007-06-15

    Hot electron and x-ray production from solid targets coated with polystyrene-spheres which are irradiated with high-contrast, 100 fs, 400 nm light pulses at intensity up to 2x10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} have been studied. The peak hard x-ray signal from uncoated fused silica targets is an order of magnitude smaller than the signal from targets coated with submicron sized spheres. The temperature of the x-rays in the case of sphere-coated targets is twice as hot as that of uncoated glass. A sphere-size scan of the x-ray yield and observation of a peak in both the x-ray production and temperature at a sphere diameter of 0.26 {mu}m, indicate that these results are consistent with Mie enhancements of the laser field at the sphere surface and multipass stochastic heating of the hot electrons in the oscillating laser field. These results also match well with particle-in-cell simulations of the interaction.

  9. Structure and dynamics of concentrated dispersions of polystyrene latex spheres in glycerol: Static and dynamic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lumma, D.; Lurio, L. B.; Borthwick, M. A.; Falus, P.; Mochrie, S. G. J.

    2000-12-01

    X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering measurements are applied to characterize the dynamics and structure of concentrated suspensions of charge-stabilized polystyrene latex spheres dispersed in glycerol, for volume fractions between 2.7% and 52%. The static structures of the suspensions show essentially hard-sphere behavior. The short-time dynamics shows good agreement with predictions for the wave-vector-dependent collective diffusion coefficient, which are based on a hard-sphere model [C. W. J. Beenakker and P. Mazur, Physica A 126, 349 (1984)]. However, the intermediate scattering function is found to violate a scaling behavior found previously for a sterically stabilized hard-sphere suspension [P. N. Segre and P. N. Pusey, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 771 (1996)]. Our measurements are parametrized in terms of a viscoelastic model for the intermediate scattering function [W. Hess and R. Klein, Adv. Phys. 32, 173 (1983)]. Within this framework, two relaxation modes are predicted to contribute to the decay of the dynamic structure factor, with mode amplitudes depending on both wave vector and volume fraction. Our measurements indicate that, for particle volume fractions smaller than about 0.30, the intermediate scattering function is well described in terms of single-exponential decays, whereas a double-mode structure becomes apparent for more concentrated systems.

  10. Determination of selenium at trace levels in geologic materials by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wahlberg, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    Low levels of selenium (0.1-500 ppm) in both organic and inorganic geologic materials can be semiquantitatively measured by isolating Se as a thin film for presentation to an energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Suitably pulverized samples are first digested by fusing with a mixture of Na2CO3 and Na2O2. The fusion cake is dissolved in distilled water, buffered with NH4Cl, and filtered to remove Si and the R2O3 group. A carrier solution of Na2TeO4, plus solid KI, hydrazine sulfate and Na2SO3, is added to the filtrate. The solution is then vacuum-filtered through a 0.45-??m pore-size filter disc. The filter, with the thin film of precipitate, is supported between two sheets of Mylar?? film for analysis. Good agreement is shown between data reported in this study and literature values reported by epithermal neutron-activation analysis and spectrofluorimetry. The method can be made quantitative by utilizing a secondary precipitation to assure complete recovery of the Se. The X-ray method offers fast turn-around time and a reasonably high production rate. ?? 1981.

  11. Photometric study of single-shot energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction at a laser plasma facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hoidn, O. R.; Seidler, G. T.

    2014-01-15

    The low repetition rates and possible shot-to-shot variations in laser-plasma studies place a high value on single-shot diagnostics. For example, white-beam scattering methods based on broadband backlighter x-ray sources are used to determine changes in the structure of laser-shocked crystalline materials by the evolution of coincidences of reciprocal lattice vectors and kinematically allowed momentum transfers. Here, we demonstrate that white-beam techniques can be extended to strongly disordered dense plasma and warm dense matter systems where reciprocal space is only weakly structured and spectroscopic detection is consequently needed to determine the static structure factor and thus, the ion-ion radial distribution function. Specifically, we report a photometric study of energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction (ED-XRD) for structural measurement of high energy density systems at large-scale laser facilities such as OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility. We find that structural information can be obtained in single-shot ED-XRD experiments using established backlighter and spectrometer technologies.

  12. Study of soil aggregate breakdown dynamics under low dispersive ultrasonic energies with sedimentation and X-ray attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomakers, Jasmin; Zehetner, Franz; Mentler, Axel; Ottner, Franz; Mayer, Herwig

    2015-10-01

    It has been increasingly recognized that soil organic matter stabilization is strongly controlled by physical binding within soil aggregates. It is therefore essential to measure soil aggregate stability reliably over a wide range of disruptive energies and different aggregate sizes. To this end, we tested highaccuracy ultrasonic dispersion in combination with subsequent sedimentation and X-ray attenuation. Three arable topsoils (notillage) from Central Europe were subjected to ultrasound at four different specific energy levels: 0.5, 6.7, 100 and 500 J cm-3, and the resulting suspensions were analyzed for aggregate size distribution by wet sieving (2 000-63 ?m) and sedimentation/X-ray attenuation (63-2 ?m). The combination of wet sieving and sedimentation technique allowed for a continuous analysis, at high resolution, of soil aggregate breakdown dynamics after defined energy inputs. Our results show that aggregate size distribution strongly varied with sonication energy input and soil type. The strongest effects were observed in the range of low specific energies (< 10 J cm-3), which previous studies have largely neglected. This shows that low ultrasonic energies are required to capture the full range of aggregate stability and release of soil organic matter upon aggregate breakdown.

  13. Development of energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence as a mobile analysis method for hazardous metals in transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, S.J.

    1998-09-01

    Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) is a widely applied technique for both laboratory and field-based characterization of metals in complex matrices. Here an EDXRF method is described for analysis of 13 hazardous (RCRA) metals in Portland cement, a typical matrix for transuranic (TRU) waste from US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Samples are analyzed as homogeneous powders prepared by simple drying, mixing, and milling. Analyses are performed using a commercial EDXRF spectrometer equipped with an X-ray tube, a high-resolution Si(Li) detector, and fundamental parameters software for data reduction. The spectrometer is rugged and suitable for use in either mobile or fixed-based laboratories. Standardization is accomplished using fundamental parameters techniques for several prepared standards which bracket the expected range in metal concentrations, and typical standardization uncertainties are < 10%. Detection limits range from 2--20 ppm and meet required action levels with a few exceptions including Be, Hg and V. Accuracy is evaluated from a series of unknown quality control samples and ranges from 85--102%, whereas the total method uncertainty is typically < 10%. Consequently, this simple, rapid, and inexpensive technique can provide quantitative characterization of virtually all of the RCRA metals in TRU waste cement samples.

  14. Flash X-Ray measurements on the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean P.; Beresh, Steven J.; DeMauro, Edward Paisley; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-11-23

    The interaction of a Mach 1.67 shock wave with a dense particle curtain is quantified using flash radiography. These new data provide a view of particle transport inside a compressible, dense gas–solid flow of high optical opacity. The curtain, composed of 115-µm glass spheres, initially spans 87 % of the test section width and has a streamwise thickness of about 2 mm. Radiograph intensities are converted to particle volume fraction distributions using the Beer–Lambert law. The mass in the particle curtain, as determined from the X-ray data, is in reasonable agreement with that given from a simpler method using a load cell and particle imaging. Following shock impingement, the curtain propagates downstream and the peak volume fraction decreases from about 23 to about 4 % over a time of 340 µs. The propagation occurs asymmetrically, with the downstream side of the particle curtain experiencing a greater volume fraction gradient than the upstream side, attributable to the dependence of particle drag on volume fraction. Bulk particle transport is quantified from the time-dependent center of mass of the curtain. Furthermore, the bulk acceleration of the curtain is shown to be greater than that predicted for a single 115-µm particle in a Mach 1.67 shock-induced flow.

  15. Gold nephropathy. Ultrastructural, fluorescent, and energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Ainsworth, S.K.; Swain, R.P.; Watabe, N.; Brackett, N.C. Jr.; Pilia, P.; Hennigar, G.R.

    1981-07-01

    The nephrotic syndrome developed in a patient receiving therapy with gold for rheumatoid arthritis. The results of a histopathological examination of the renal biopsy specimen were unremarkable. Immunofluorescent studies showed deposits of immunoglobulins and C3 in a granular pattern in the glomerular basement membranes. Ultrastructurally, the discrete osmiophilic immune complexes were epimembranous. By x-ray microanalysis, gold that was complexed with sulfur was present in proximal tubular cytoplasmic vacuoles and nuclei. Gold and sulfur could not be demonstrated in glomerular epimembranous deposits. The results of these studies suggest that immune complex deposition does not involve gold and sulfur acting as haptens. Gold-salt therapy may result in damage to proximal tubules that leak renal tubular antigens, which in turn complex with autoantibody and produce an autoimmune membranous nephropathy. The evidence for this mechanism is not convincing. Although the data indicate an immune-complex cause for gold-salt nephropathy, the incident antigen (or antigens) and mechanism of action remain unidentified.

  16. Flash X-Ray measurements on the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean P.; Beresh, Steven J.; DeMauro, Edward Paisley; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-11-23

    The interaction of a Mach 1.67 shock wave with a dense particle curtain is quantified using flash radiography. These new data provide a view of particle transport inside a compressible, dense gas–solid flow of high optical opacity. The curtain, composed of 115-µm glass spheres, initially spans 87 % of the test section width and has a streamwise thickness of about 2 mm. Radiograph intensities are converted to particle volume fraction distributions using the Beer–Lambert law. The mass in the particle curtain, as determined from the X-ray data, is in reasonable agreement with that given from a simpler method using amore » load cell and particle imaging. Following shock impingement, the curtain propagates downstream and the peak volume fraction decreases from about 23 to about 4 % over a time of 340 µs. The propagation occurs asymmetrically, with the downstream side of the particle curtain experiencing a greater volume fraction gradient than the upstream side, attributable to the dependence of particle drag on volume fraction. Bulk particle transport is quantified from the time-dependent center of mass of the curtain. Furthermore, the bulk acceleration of the curtain is shown to be greater than that predicted for a single 115-µm particle in a Mach 1.67 shock-induced flow.« less

  17. Flash X-ray measurements on the shock-induced dispersal of a dense particle curtain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Justin L.; Kearney, Sean P.; Beresh, Steven J.; DeMauro, Edward P.; Pruett, Brian O.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of a Mach 1.67 shock wave with a dense particle curtain is quantified using flash radiography. These new data provide a view of particle transport inside a compressible, dense gas-solid flow of high optical opacity. The curtain, composed of 115-µm glass spheres, initially spans 87 % of the test section width and has a streamwise thickness of about 2 mm. Radiograph intensities are converted to particle volume fraction distributions using the Beer-Lambert law. The mass in the particle curtain, as determined from the X-ray data, is in reasonable agreement with that given from a simpler method using a load cell and particle imaging. Following shock impingement, the curtain propagates downstream and the peak volume fraction decreases from about 23 to about 4 % over a time of 340 µs. The propagation occurs asymmetrically, with the downstream side of the particle curtain experiencing a greater volume fraction gradient than the upstream side, attributable to the dependence of particle drag on volume fraction. Bulk particle transport is quantified from the time-dependent center of mass of the curtain. The bulk acceleration of the curtain is shown to be greater than that predicted for a single 115-µm particle in a Mach 1.67 shock-induced flow.

  18. Final Report, DOE Award Number DE-FG02-02ER45964, Electromagnetic Properties of Matter at X-ray Wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, David Y.

    2007-02-28

    We report results of a collaborative study of photon and charged-particle interactions with matter between the University of Vermont and Argonne and Brookhaven National Laboratories. A major goal was to extend the study of electromagnetic properties of selected materials to as wide a spectral range as possible. This broad approach discloses systematic trends not apparent in isolated measurements and exploits the power of dispersion analysis and sum-rule constraints. Emphasis was largely on UV and X-ray processes and capitalized on the wide range of photon energies available at NSLS. A key finding is that, under favorable circumstances, dispersion theory relates dispersive processes (e.g. refractive index, dielectric constant) to spectral moments of absorptive processes. This appears to be a new method in optics; it yields significant simplifications and provides a precise, model-independent characterization of optical materials. Problems addressed included a) x-ray magnetooptics; b) UV/soft-x-ray processes in insulators and their contribution to visible dispersion; c) demonstration of moments/dispersion analysis in glasses and applications to fiber-optic systems; d) the optical constants of silicon and their application to the stopping power of silicon for charged-particles. Results include: ? Resolution of a long-standing conflict over the relation between x-ray Faraday rotation and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism. Specifically, the Kramers-Kronig relations must be generalized to account for the breaking of time-reversal symmetry by magnetic fields. Experimental reports to the contrary were shown to be inconclusive. Reanalysis of x-ray Faraday rotation data supports the generalization. ? Demonstration that the optical properties of dielectrics in their region of transparency are determined by a series expansion in spectral moments of the dielectrics infrared and ultraviolet absorption spectra. Application of this to silicate glasses clarifies the role of glass modifiers in introducing charge-transfer, intra-ionic and perturbed-exciton transitions that combine to determine visible optical properties. Roughly, the refractive index is determined by the total electronic absorption, while dispersion depends on how the absorption is distributed. Materials characterization using UV/soft-x-ray moments may have application to non-destructive testing of glasses and high-temperature glass melts. ? Application of moments methods to pulse propagation in optical fibers showed that signal distortion is minimized at the carrier-wave frequency for which dispersion in group velocity caused by IR processes just cancels the dispersion caused by UV and soft-x-ray processes. ? Construction of a composite set of optical constants for silicon employing a method of self-consistent dispersion analysis from the extensive measurements available in the literature. This provides a reliable set of optical constants in the IR and visible, and has clarified the issue of scaling relative measurements at the K edge and the accuracy of measurements at the L edge. ? Direct calculation of the stopping power of silicon for charged particles as outlined by Bethe using our composite set of optical constants. This task was not previously feasible for want of accurate dielectric function data over a wide spectral range. This study resolved a long-standing conflict between measured average excitation energy or I values that was an issue for radiation damage and shielding applications.

  19. Evaluation of imaging properties of soft x-ray multilayer mirrors and their application to highly dispersive spectral imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kolachevsky, N. N.; Mitropolsky, M. M.; Ragozin, E. N.; Salashchenko, N. N.; Slemzin, V. A.; Zhitnik, I. A.

    1995-05-01

    A variety of normal-incidence multilayer mirrors (MMs) intended for studies of astrophysical and laboratory soft-x-ray radiation sources have been synthesized on concave (r=1.6-2.0 m) fused silica substrates. The MMs range in resonance wavelength {lambda}0 from 4.5 to 31 nm. Their imaging capability has been evaluated from small-source imaging tests employing to a laser-plasma broadband XUV radiation source and a high-resolution XUV photographic film. The photographs testify to a subarcsecond angular resolution. For 17.5-nm MMs, a resolution of at least {approx_equal}0.32 arcseconds has been demonstrated, which is only 2.4{lambda}0/D for the MMs involved.

  20. Examination of the Thermal Transformation of Chrysotile by Using Dispersion Staining and Conventional X-ray Diffraction Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crummett, C. D.; Candela, P. A.; Wylie, A. G.; Earnest, D. J.

    2004-12-01

    Chrysotile has been used industrially as a component of refractory products, and in friction products, such as brake linings. Examining the decomposition or transformation of chrysotile as a function of time and temperature will help clarify the characteristics of particulates released during processes such as automotive braking. Previous studies have reported that the thermal treatment of chrysotile alters both its surface and structure, resulting in deviations from its natural properties, possibly reducing its biological activity (Langer, 2003: Reg Tox Pharm, v38, p71). In past studies, the nonequilibrium thermal decomposition of chrysotile has been investigated by using static dehydration, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis. These studies suggest that the thermal transformation of chrysotile follows a two step sequence of dehydroxylation/dehydration and recrystallization where (1) chrysotile yields forsterite + silica + water with (2) forsterite + silica later forming enstatite (Ball and Taylor, 1963: Mineral. Mag. v33, p467, Brindley and Hayami, 1965: Mineral. Mag. v35, p189). In this research the decomposition of chrysotile from Thetford Quebec was studied. Samples were heated isothermally in air at temperatures from 200 C to 1000 C. After heating for up to 24 hours the refractive indices of remaining chrysotile fibers were measured by using dispersion staining. In addition, reaction products were identified by optical methods, electron probe microanalysis, and X-ray diffraction performed after the termination of the experiment. Preliminary results show that there is no change in optical properties of chrysotile heated to 400 C for 24 hours. From 400 C to 575 C for 24 hours, the index of refraction increases parallel to the length of the fiber from 1.552 to 1.560. From 400 C to 575 C for 24 hours, the index of refraction perpendicular to the length of the fiber varies irregularly from 1.538-1.548. The variability of the refractive indices, both parallel and perpendicular, observed in unheated chrysotile reduces from approximately 0.04 to 0.01 when heated to 575 C for 24 hours. Chrysotile heated to 575 C for 24 hours shows an overall loss of X-ray intensity for the main chrysotile peaks and possible growth of forsterite. At 800 C, although the fibrous morphology remains, X-ray diffraction analysis of the run products shows no remaining chrysotile and the index of refraction parallel to the length of the fiber is approximately 1.594. Initial data show that the reaction rates associated with the dehydroxylation/dehydration and recrystallization of chrysotile are dependent upon the texture of individual fibers.

  1. The Chandra Multi-Wavelength Project (ChaMP): A Serendipitous X-Ray Survey Using Chandra Archival Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, Belinda; Lavoie, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The launch of the Chandra X-ray Observatory in July 2000 opened a new era in X-ray astronomy. Its unprecedented, < 1" spatial resolution and low background is providing views of the X-ray sky 10-100 times fainter than previously possible. We have begun to carry out a serendipitous survey of the X-ray sky using Chandra archival data to flux limits covering the range between those reached by current satellites and those of the small area Chandra deep surveys. We estimate the survey will cover about 8 sq.deg. per year to X-ray fluxes (2-10 keV) in the range 10(exp -13) - 6(exp -16) erg cm2/s and include about 3000 sources per year, roughly two thirds of which are expected to be active galactic nuclei (AGN). Optical imaging of the ChaMP fields is underway at NOAO and SAO telescopes using g',r',z' colors with which we will be able to classify the X-ray sources into object types and, in some cases, estimate their redshifts. We are also planning to obtain optical spectroscopy of a well-defined subset to allow confirmation of classification and redshift determination. All X-ray and optical results and supporting optical data will be place in the ChaMP archive within a year of the completion of our data analysis. Over the five years of Chandra operations, ChaMP will provide both a major resource for Chandra observers and a key research tool for the study of the cosmic X-ray background and the individual source populations which comprise it. ChaMP promises profoundly new science return on a number of key questions at the current frontier of many areas of astronomy including solving the spectral paradox by resolving the CXRB, locating and studying high redshift clusters and so constraining cosmological parameters, defining the true, possibly absorbed, population of quasars and studying coronal emission from late-type stars as their cores become fully convective. The current status and initial results from the ChaMP will be presented.

  2. Energy dispersive x-ray analysis of the cornea. Application to paraffin sections of normal and diseased corneas

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, M.R.; Streeten, B.W.

    1984-11-01

    The distribution of chemical elements in the normal human cornea was studied by energy dispersive x-ray analysis and scanning electron microscopy of routinely prepared paraffin sections. Calcium, phosphorus, and sulfur were consistently present in quantities above background and varied in concentration regionally. Analysis of fresh-frozen tissue, an approximation of the in vivo state, gave a similar elemental profile to paraffin sections, except for the loss of diffusable electrolytes in the latter. After fixation, S was the most abundant element and was highest in Descemet's membrane. Corneas with granular, lattice, macular, and Fuchs endothelial dystrophies, band keratopathy, and spheroidal degeneration were also examined. Characteristic patterns of abnormal S and Ca distribution were found in each of the dystrophies. The relative proportions of Ca, P, and S gave diagnostic profiles for distinguishing band keratopathy and spheroidal degeneration.

  3. Findings for current marks: histopathological examination and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy of three cases.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naoko; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Jamal, Mostofa; Kumihashi, Mitsuru; Tsutsui, Kunihiko; Ameno, Kiyoshi

    2013-09-01

    We describe herein three cases of electrocution. As most deaths caused by electricity are due to cardiac arrhythmia or paralysis of the respiratory muscles, autopsy findings in electrocution cases are generally non-specific, with the exception of the presence of current marks. We detected metallization by histological examination and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis in tissues of typical or atypical current marks. In addition, myofiber break-up was observed in one case. One patient was hospitalized before death and revealed patchy contraction band necrosis, along with infiltration of leucocytes and vacuolation in the diaphragm. The presence of current marks is the hallmark for forensic diagnosis of electrocution. Although specific findings are lacking at autopsy in cases of electrocution, detailed histological examination and EDX analysis provide useful information for forensic diagnosis. PMID:23895763

  4. Trace elemental analysis of school chalk using energy dispersive X-ray florescence spectroscopy (ED-XRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruthi, Y. A.; Das, N. Lakshmana; Ramprasad, S.; Ram, S. S.; Sudarshan, M.

    2015-08-01

    The present studies focus the quantitative analysis of elements in school chalk to ensure the safety of its use. The elements like Calcium (Ca), Aluminum (Al), Iron (Fe), Silicon (Si) and Chromium (Cr) were analyzed from settled chalk dust samples collected from five classrooms (CD-1) and also from another set of unused chalk samples collected from local market (CD-2) using Energy Dispersive X-Ray florescence(ED-XRF) spectroscopy. Presence of these elements in significant concentrations in school chalk confirmed that, it is an irritant and occupational hazard. It is suggested to use protective equipments like filtered mask for mouth, nose and chalk holders. This study also suggested using the advanced mode of techniques like Digital boards, marker boards and power point presentations to mitigate the occupational hazard for classroom chalk

  5. Inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of phonon dispersion and lifetimes in PbTe1-x Se x alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhiting; Li, Mingda; Ren, Zhensong; Ma, Hao; Alatas, Ahmet; Wilson, Stephen D.; Li, Ju

    2015-09-01

    PbTe1-x Se x alloys are of special interest to thermoelectric applications. Inelastic x-ray scattering determination of phonon dispersion and lifetimes along the high symmetry directions for PbTe1-x Se x alloys are presented. By comparing with calculated results based on the virtual crystal model calculations combined with ab initio density functional theory, the validity of virtual crystal model is evaluated. The results indicate that the virtual crystal model is overall a good assumption for phonon frequencies and group velocities despite the softening of transverse acoustic phonon modes along [1 1 1] direction, while the treatment of lifetimes warrants caution. In addition, phonons remain a good description of vibrational modes in PbTe1-x Se x alloys.

  6. Sodium lauryl sulfate enhances nickel penetration through guinea-pig skin. Studies with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, M.; Sagstroem, S.R.; Roomans, G.M.; Forslind, B.

    1989-03-01

    The effect of sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), a common ingredient of detergents, on the penetration of nickel through the stratum corneum in the guinea-pig skin model was studied with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) to evaluate the barrier-damaging properties of this common detergent. The EDX technique allows a simultaneous determination of physiologically important elements, e.g., Na, Mg, P, Cl, K, Ca and S in addition to Ni at each point of measurement in epidermal cell strata. Our results show that SLS reduces the barrier function to Ni-ion penetration of the stratum corneum. In addition we have shown that EDX allows analysis of the influence of different factors involved in nickel penetration through the skin by giving data on the physiological effects on the epidermal cells caused by the applied substances.

  7. Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis of moss and soil from abandoned mining of Pb-Zn ores.

    PubMed

    Koz, B

    2014-09-01

    This research investigates heavy metal pollution around one of the most important mining areas in Turkey, the Sebinkarahisar (Giresun) lead-zinc mining, by means of analyzing moss and soil samples collected in the neighborhood of the copper mining at different distances. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (Epsilon 5, PANalytical, Almelo, The Netherlands) is utilized in the experiments. The results have indicated that the both moss and soil samples contain aluminum, vanadium, chromium, manganese, iron, nickel, copper, zinc, arsenic, barium, cerium, tungsten, and lead. The comparison of the heavy metal concentrations with the typical measurements in the world and with the limit values for the human health has revealed the critical heavy metal pollution levels in the region. The possible consequences of these results are briefly discussed from the point of potential hazards to ecology and human health. PMID:24788924

  8. [Line scanning analysis of white porcelain from Gong Kiln in early Tang dynasty by energy disperse X-ray fluorescence].

    PubMed

    Ling, Xue; Mao, Zhen-wei; Feng, Min; Hu, Yao-wu; Wang, Chang-sui; Liu, Hong-miao

    2005-07-01

    Gong kiln, for its long porcelain-firing history, was one of three representative white porcelain kilns in northern China. In order to improve the quality and whiteness of white porcelain, a decorating layer or cosmetic earth was laid on the body surface in Gong kiln during early Tang dynasty, which was able to blot out rough surface and weaken the influence of fuscous body upon surface color. In this paper the main chemical composition of the white porcelain's profile was analyzed by using energy disperse X-Ray fluorescence. The result showed that different materials were used as cosmetic earth during early Tang dynasty, in accordance with the phenomenon under optical microscope. In addition, the glaze belongs to calcium glaze in which plant ash was added. PMID:16241078

  9. Dendrochemical patterns of calcium, zinc, and potassium related to internal factors detected by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kevin T.; Balouet, Jean Christophe; Shortle, Walter C.; Chalot, Michel; Beaujard, François; Grudd, Håkan; Vroblesky, Don A.; Burkem, Joel G.

    2014-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) provides highly sensitive and precise spatial resolution of cation content in individual annual growth rings in trees. The sensitivity and precision have prompted successful applications to forensic dendrochemistry and the timing of environmental releases of contaminants. These applications have highlighted the need to distinguish dendrochemical effects of internal processes from environmental contamination. Calcium, potassium, and zinc are three marker cations that illustrate the influence of these processes. We found changes in cation chemistry in tree rings potentially due to biomineralization, development of cracks or checks, heartwood/sapwood differentiation, intra-annual processes, and compartmentalization of infection. Distinguishing internal from external processes that affect dendrochemistry will enhance the value of EDXRF for both physiological and forensic investigations.

  10. X-ray Photon Counting Using 100 MHz Ready-Made Silicon P-Intrinsic-N X-ray Diode and Its Application to Energy-Dispersive Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Hajime; Watanabe, Manabu; Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Osawa, Akihiro; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Kusachi, Shinya; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira

    2013-07-01

    X-ray photons are directly detected using a 100 MHz ready-made silicon P-intrinsic-N X-ray diode (Si-PIN-XD). The Si-PIN-XD is shielded using an aluminum case with a 25-µm-thick aluminum window and a BNC connector. The photocurrent from the Si-PIN-XD is amplified by charge sensitive and shaping amplifiers, and the event pulses are sent to a multichannel analyzer (MCA) to measure X-ray spectra. At a tube voltage of 90 kV, we observe K-series characteristic X-rays of tungsten. Photon-counting computed tomography (PC-CT) is accomplished by repeated linear scans and rotations of an object, and projection curves of the object are obtained by linear scanning at a tube current of 2.0 mA. The exposure time for obtaining a tomogram is 10 min with scan steps of 0.5 mm and rotation steps of 1.0°. At a tube voltage of 90 kV, the maximum count rate is 150 kcps. We carry out PC-CT using gadolinium media and confirm the energy-dispersive effect with changes in the lower level voltage of the event pulse using a comparator.

  11. X-ray spectroscopy to determine line coincidences

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhalter, P.G.; Charatis, G.; Rockett, P.

    1983-01-31

    X-ray spectroscopy in the 12 to 15 A region of L-shell lines from selected transition elements was performed in a joint Naval Research Laboratory - KMS Fusion, Inc. experiment. The accurate wavelengths determined in this work will be utilized in selecting potential pumping candidates in future x-ray lasing schemes. Specifically, high-resolution x-ray spectra were collected under controlled geometric and target conditions using both red and green light laser excitation in the KMS Chroma laser. Three groups of x-ray spectra were collected with highly-dispersive x-ray crystals at wavelengths centered at 12.543, 13.781 and 14.458 A corresponding to He- and H-like lines from fluorine. Two specially-designed flat crystal spectrographs employing film shutters were used with pairs of beryl and TAP crystals. The spectra from potential lasant and pump candidates could be recorded on the same spectrogram to aid in identifying x-ray line coincidences. In cases where wavelengths were measured in both the red and green laser work, agreement within 1 to 3 mA was obtained for the L-series x-ray lines. Within this accuracy range, five L series x-ray lines, mostly 2p-3d transitions from the metals Cr, Mn, and Ni, had wavelength values coincident to K-series lines in fluorine.

  12. Effect of x-ray energy dispersion in digital subtraction imaging at the iodine K-edge--A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Prino, F.; Ceballos, C.; Cabal, A.; Sarnelli, A.; Gambaccini, M.; Ramello, L.

    2008-01-15

    The effect of the energy dispersion of a quasi-monochromatic x-ray beam on the performance of a dual-energy x-ray imaging system is studied by means of Monte Carlo simulations using MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) version 2.6.0. In particular, the case of subtraction imaging at the iodine K-edge, suitable for angiographic imaging application, is investigated. The average energies of the two beams bracketing the iodine K-edge are set to the values of 31.2 and 35.6 keV corresponding to the ones obtained with a compact source based on a conventional x-ray tube and a mosaic crystal monochromator. The energy dispersion of the two beams is varied between 0 and 10 keV of full width at half-maximum (FWHM). The signal and signal-to-noise ratio produced in the simulated images by iodine-filled cavities (simulating patient vessels) drilled in a PMMA phantom are studied as a function of the x-ray energy dispersion. The obtained results show that, for the considered energy separation of 4.4 keV, no dramatic deterioration of the image quality is observed with increasing x-ray energy dispersion up to a FWHM of about 2.35 keV. The case of different beam energies is also investigated by means of fast simulations of the phantom absorption.

  13. Efficient Excitation of Gain-Saturated Sub-9-nm-Wavelength Tabletop Soft-X-Ray Lasers and Lasing Down to 7.36 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi, David; Wang, Yong; Luther, Brad; Yin, Liang; Martz, Dale; Woolston, Mark; Liu, Yanwei; Berrill, Mark A; Jorge, Rocca

    2011-01-01

    We have demonstrated the efficient generation of sub-9-nm-wavelength picosecond laser pulses of microjoule energy at 1-Hz repetition rate with a tabletop laser. Gain-saturated lasing was obtained at =8.85 nm in nickel-like lanthanum ions excited by collisional electron-impact excitation in a precreated plasma column heated by a picosecond optical laser pulse of 4-J energy. Furthermore, isoelectronic scaling along the lanthanide series resulted in lasing at wavelengths as short as =7.36 nm. Simulations show that the collisionally broadened atomic transitions in these dense plasmas can support the amplification of subpicosecond soft-x-ray laser pulses.

  14. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Stearns, Daniel S. (Mountain View, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA)

    1989-01-01

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5-50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20-250 A. The support membrane is 10-200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window.

  15. X-ray beamsplitter

    DOEpatents

    Ceglio, N.M.; Stearns, D.G.; Hawryluk, A.M.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1987-08-07

    An x-ray beamsplitter which splits an x-ray beam into two coherent parts by reflecting and transmitting some fraction of an incident beam has applications for x-ray interferometry, x-ray holography, x-ray beam manipulation, and x-ray laser cavity output couplers. The beamsplitter is formed of a wavelength selective multilayer thin film supported by a very thin x-ray transparent membrane. The beamsplitter resonantly transmits and reflects x-rays through thin film interference effects. A thin film is formed of 5--50 pairs of alternate Mo/Si layers with a period of 20--250 A. The support membrane is 10--200 nm of silicon nitride or boron nitride. The multilayer/support membrane structure is formed across a window in a substrate by first forming the structure on a solid substrate and then forming a window in the substrate to leave a free-standing structure over the window. 6 figs.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fusheng

    Four key components with regards to Monte Carlo Library Least Squares (MCLLS) have been developed by the author. These include: a comprehensive and accurate Monte Carlo simulation code - CEARXRF5 with Differential Operators (DO) and coincidence sampling, Detector Response Function (DRF), an integrated Monte Carlo - Library Least-Squares (MCLLS) Graphical User Interface (GUI) visualization System (MCLLSPro) and a new reproducible and flexible benchmark experiment setup. All these developments or upgrades enable the MCLLS approach to be a useful and powerful tool for a tremendous variety of elemental analysis applications. CEARXRF, a comprehensive and accurate Monte Carlo code for simulating the total and individual library spectral responses of all elements, has been recently upgraded to version 5 by the author. The new version has several key improvements: input file format fully compatible with MCNP5, a new efficient general geometry tracking code, versatile source definitions, various variance reduction techniques (e.g. weight window mesh and splitting, stratifying sampling, etc.), a new cross section data storage and accessing method which improves the simulation speed by a factor of four and new cross section data, upgraded differential operators (DO) calculation capability, and also an updated coincidence sampling scheme which including K-L and L-L coincidence X-Rays, while keeping all the capabilities of the previous version. The new Differential Operators method is powerful for measurement sensitivity study and system optimization. For our Monte Carlo EDXRF elemental analysis system, it becomes an important technique for quantifying the matrix effect in near real time when combined with the MCLLS approach. An integrated visualization GUI system has been developed by the author to perform elemental analysis using iterated Library Least-Squares method for various samples when an initial guess is provided. This software was built on the Borland C++ Builder platform and has a user-friendly interface to accomplish all qualitative and quantitative tasks easily. That is to say, the software enables users to run the forward Monte Carlo simulation (if necessary) or use previously calculated Monte Carlo library spectra to obtain the sample elemental composition estimation within a minute. The GUI software is easy to use with user-friendly features and has the capability to accomplish all related tasks in a visualization environment. It can be a powerful tool for EDXRF analysts. A reproducible experiment setup has been built and experiments have been performed to benchmark the system. Two types of Standard Reference Materials (SRM), stainless steel samples from National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and aluminum alloy samples from Alcoa Inc., with certified elemental compositions, are tested with this reproducible prototype system using a 109Cd radioisotope source (20mCi) and a liquid nitrogen cooled Si(Li) detector. The results show excellent agreement between the calculated sample compositions and their reference values and the approach is very fast.

  17. Component analyses of urinary nanocrystallites of uric acid stone formers by combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, fast Fourier transformation, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin-Yuan; Xue, Jun-Fa; Xia, Zhi-Yue; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to analyse the components of nanocrystallites in urines of patients with uric acid (UA) stones. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), fast Fourier transformation (FFT) of HRTEM, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were performed to analyse the components of these nanocrystallites. XRD and FFT showed that the main component of urinary nanocrystallites was UA, which contains a small amount of calcium oxalate monohydrate and phosphates. EDS showed the characteristic absorption peaks of C, O, Ca and P. The formation of UA stones was closely related to a large number of UA nanocrystallites in urine. A combination of HRTEM, FFT, EDS and XRD analyses could be performed accurately to analyse the components of urinary nanocrystallites. PMID:26023155

  18. New pathways for improved quantification of energy-dispersive X-ray spectra of semiconductors with multiple X-ray lines from thin foils investigated in transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Parri, M C; Qiu, Y; Walther, T

    2015-12-01

    Theoretical approaches to quantify the chemical composition of bulk and thin-layer specimens using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscope are compared to experiments investigating (In)GaAs and Si(Ge) semiconductors. Absorption correctors can be improved by varying the take-off angle to determine the depth of features within the foil or the samples thickness, or by definition of effective k-factors that can be obtained from plots of k-factors versus foil thickness or, preferably, versus the K/L intensity ratio for a suitable element. The latter procedure yields plots of self-consistent absorption corrections that can be used to determine the chemical composition, iteratively for SiGe using a set of calibration curves or directly from a single calibration curve for InGaAs, for single X-ray spectra without knowledge of sample thickness, density or mass absorption coefficients. PMID:26769195

  19. Star Formation & the Star Formation History of the Universe: Exploring the X-ray and the Multi-wavelength Point of Views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgarella, Denis; Ciesla, Laure; Boquien, Mederic; Buat, Veronique; Roehlly, Yannick

    2015-09-01

    The star formation rate density traces the formation of stars in the universe. To estimate the star formation rate of galaxies, we can use a wide range of star formation tracers: continuum measurements in most wavelength domains, lines, supernovae and GRBs... All of them have pros and cons. Most of the monochromatic tracers are hampered but the effects of dust. But, before being able to estimate the star formation rate, we first need to obtain a safe estimate to the dust attenuation. The advantage of the X-ray wavelength range is that we can consider it as free from the effect of dust. In this talk, we will estimate how many galaxies we could detect with ATHENA to obtain the star formation density. For this, I will use my recent Herschel paper where the total (UV + IR) star formation rate density was evaluated up to z ~ 4 and provide quantitative figures for what ATHENA will detect as a function of the redshift and the luminosity. ATHENA will need predictions that are in agreement with what we observe in the other wavelength ranges. I will present the code CIGALE (http://cigale.lam.fr). The new and public version of CIGALE (released in April 2015) allows to model the emission of galaxies from the far-ultraviolet to the radio and it can make prediction in any of these wavelength ranges. I will show how galaxy star formation rates can be estimated in a way that combines all the advantages of monochromatic tracers but not the caveats. It should be stressed that we can model the emission of AGNs in the FUV-to-FIR range using several models. Finally, I will explain why we seriously consider to extend CIGALE to the x-ray range to predict the X-ray emission of galaxies including any AGN.

  20. Mapping the Ionization State of Laser-Irradiated Ar Gas Jets With Multi-Wavelength Monochromatic X-Ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kugland, N L; Doppner, T; Kemp, A; Schaeffer, D; Glenzer, S H; Niemann, C

    2010-04-08

    Two-dimensional monochromatic images of fast-electron stimulated Ar K{alpha} and He-{alpha} x-ray self-emission have recorded a time-integrated map of the extent of Ar{sup {approx}6+} and Ar{sup 16+} ions, respectively, within a high density (10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} atomic density) Ar plasma. This plasma was produced by irradiating a 2 mm wide clustering Ar gas jet with an ultra-high intensity (10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, 200 fs) Ti:Sapphire laser operating at 800 nm. Spherically bent quartz crystals in the 200 (for K{alpha}) and 201 (for He-{alpha}) planes were used as near-normal incidence reflective x-ray optics. We see that a large (830 {micro}m long) region of plasma emits K{alpha} primarily along the laser axis, while the He-{alpha} emission is confined to smaller hot spot (230 {micro}m long) region that likely corresponds to the focal volume of the f/8 laser beam. X-ray spectra from a Bragg spectrometer operating in the von Hamos geometry, which images in one dimension, indicate that the centroids of the K{alpha} and He-{alpha} emission regions are separated by approximately 330 {micro}m along the laser axis.

  1. MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDIES OF SPECTACULAR RAM PRESSURE STRIPPING OF A GALAXY: DISCOVERY OF AN X-RAY ABSORPTION FEATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Liyi; Makishima, Kazuo; Yagi, Masafumi; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Fujita, Yutaka; Hattori, Takashi; Akahori, Takuya

    2013-11-10

    We report the detection of an X-ray absorption feature near the galaxy M86 in the Virgo cluster. The absorber has a column density of 2-3 10{sup 20} cm{sup 2}, and its position coincides with the peak of an intracluster H I cloud which was removed from the galaxy NGC 4388 presumably by ram pressure. These results indicate that the H I cloud is located in front of M86 along the line-of-sight, and suggest that the stripping was primarily created by an interaction between NGC 4388 and the hot plasmas of the Virgo cluster, not the M86 halo. By calculating an X-ray temperature map, we further detected an X-ray counterpart of the H I cloud up to ?3' south of M86. It has a temperature of 0.89 keV and a mass of ?4.5 10{sup 8} M {sub ?}, exceeding the estimated H I gas mass. The high hot-to-cold gas ratio in the cloud indicates a significant evaporation of the H I gas, probably by thermal conduction from the hotter cluster plasma with a sub-Spitzer rate.

  2. Evaluation of microstructural parameters of oxide dispersion strengthened steels from X-ray diffraction profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasenko, Svetlana; Benediktovitch, Andrei; Ulyanenkova, Tatjana; Uglov, Vladimir; Skuratov, Vladimir; O'Connell, Jacques; Neethling, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    The microstructural parameters of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels from measured diffraction profiles were evaluated using an approach where the complex oxide nanoparticles (Y2Ti2O7 and Y4Al2O9) are modeled as spherical inclusions in the steel matrix with coherent or incoherent boundaries. The proposed method enables processing of diffraction data from materials containing spherical inclusions in addition to straight dislocations, and taking into account broadening due to crystallite size and instrumental effects. The parameters of crystallite size distribution modeled by a lognormal distribution function (the parameters m and σ), the strain anisotropy parameter q, the dislocation density ρ, the dislocation arrangement parameter M, the density of oxide nanoparticles ρnp and the nanoparticle radius r0 were determined for the ODS steel samples. The results obtained are in good agreement with the results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  3. DIBENZYLAMMONIUM AND SODIUM DIBENZYLDITHIOCARBAMATES AS PRECIPITANTS FOR PRECONCENTRATION OF TRACE ELEMENTS IN WATER FOR ANALYSIS BY ENERGY DISPERSIVE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Precipitation with combined dibenzylammonium dibenzyldithiocarbamate and sodium dibenzyldithiocarbamate at pH 5.0 can be used to separate 22 trace elements from water. Membrane filtration on the precipitate yielded a thin sample, suitable for analysis by energy dispersive X-ray f...

  4. Assignment of Individual Metal Redox States in a Metalloprotein By Crystallographic Refinement at Multiple X-Ray Wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Einsle, O.; Andrade, S.L.A.; Dobbek, H.; Meyer, J.; Rees, D.C.; /Gottingen U. /Bayreuth U. /DRDC, Grenoble /Caltech

    2007-07-09

    A method is presented to derive anomalous scattering contributions for individual atoms within a protein crystal by collecting several sets of diffraction data at energies spread along an X-ray absorption edge of the element in question. The method has been applied to a [2Fe:2S] ferredoxin model system with localized charges in the reduced state of the iron-sulfur cluster. The analysis shows that upon reduction the electron resides at the iron atom closer to the protein surface. The technique should be sufficiently sensitive for more complex clusters with noninteger redox states and is generally applicable given that crystals are available.

  5. THIN-FILM DENSITY DETERMINATION OF TANTALUM, TANTALUM OXIDES, AND XEROGELS BY MULTIPLE RADIATION ENERGY DISPERSIVE X-RAY REFLECTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    X-ray reflectivity provides a nondestructive technique for measuring density in thin films. A conventional laboratory, Bragg-Brentano geometry diffractometer was employed to show the generalized feasibility of this technique. X-ray tubes with chromium, copper, and molybdenum targ...

  6. Atomic-scale Chemical Imaging and Quantification of Metallic Alloy Structures by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ping; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, M. J.; Smith, David J.

    2014-02-01

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L21 phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at B?-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at B??-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems.

  7. Scanning Electron Microscopy Findings With Energy-Dispersive X-ray Investigations of Cosmetically Tinted Contact Lenses

    PubMed Central

    Hotta, Fumika; Imai, Shoji; Miyamoto, Tatsuro; Mitamura-Aizawa, Sayaka; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the surfaces and principal elements of the colorants of cosmetically tinted contact lenses (Cos-CLs). Methods: We analyzed the surfaces and principal elements of the colorants of five commercially available Cos-CLs using scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray analysis. Results: In two Cos-CLs, the anterior and posterior surfaces were smooth, and colorants were found inside the lens. One lens showed colorants located to a depth of 8 to 14 μm from the anterior side of the lens. In the other lens, colorants were found in the most superficial layer on the posterior surface, although a coated layer was observed. The colorants in the other three lenses were deposited on either lens surface. Although a print pattern was uniform in embedded type lenses, uneven patterns were apparent in dot-matrix design lenses. Colorants used in all lenses contained chlorine, iron, and titanium. In the magnified scanning electron microscopy images of a certain lens, chlorine is exuded and spread. Conclusions: Cosmetically tinted contact lenses have a wide variety of lens surfaces and colorants. Colorants may be deposited on the lens surface and consist of an element that has tissue toxicity. PMID:25799458

  8. Atomic-Scale Chemical Imaging and Quantification of Metallic Alloy Structures by Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ping; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, Matthew J.; Smith, David J.

    2014-02-04

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L21 phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at B?-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at B??-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems.

  9. Atomic-scale Chemical Imaging and Quantification of Metallic Alloy Structures by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ping; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, M. J.; Smith, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L21 phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at B?-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at B??-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems. PMID:24492747

  10. NASA Li/CF(x) cell problem analysis: Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x ray spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, John

    1991-01-01

    An analysis was made of Lithium/carbon fluoride cell parts for possible chloride contamination induced by exposure to thionyl chloride (SOCl2); various samples were submitted for analysis. Only a portion of the analysis which has been conducted is covered, herein, namely analysis by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS). A strip of nickel was exposed to SOCl2 vapors to observe variations in surface concentrations of sulfur and chlorine with time. By detecting chlorine one can not infer contamination by SOCl2 only that contamination is present. Six samples of stainless steel foil were analyzed for chlorine using EDS. Chlorine was not detected on background samples but was detected on the samples which had been handled including those which had been cleaned. Cell covers suspected of being contaminated while in storage and covers which were not exposed to the same storage conditions were analyzed for chlorine. Although no chlorine was found on the covers from cells, it was found on all stored covers. Results are presented with techniques shown for analysis and identification. Relevant photomicrographs are presented.

  11. Chemometric methods for the quantification of crystalline tacrolimus in solid dispersion by powder X-ray diffractrometry.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Akhtar; Rahman, Ziyaur; Bykadi, Srikant; Khan, Mansoor A

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study was to develop powder X-ray diffraction (XRPD) chemometric model for quantifying crystalline tacrolimus from solid dispersion (SD). Three SDs (amorphous tacrolimus component) with varying drug to excipient ratios (24.4%, 6.7%, and 4.3% drug) were prepared. Placebo SDs were mixed with crystalline tacrolimus to make their composition equivalent to three SD (crystalline tacrolimus component). These two components were mixed to cover 0%-100% of crystalline drug. Uniformity of the sample mixtures was confirmed by near-infrared chemical imaging. XRPD showed three distinct peaks of crystalline drug at 8.5, 10.3, and 11.2 (2?), which were nonoverlapping with the excipients. Principal component regressions (PCR) and partial least square (PLS) regression used in model development showed high R(2) (>0.99) for all the mixtures. Overall, the model showed low root mean square of standard error, standard error, and bias, which was smaller in PLS than PCR-based model. Furthermore, the model performance was evaluated on the formulations with known percentage of crystalline drug. Model-calculated crystalline drug percentage values were close to actual value. Therefore, these studies strongly suggest the application of chemometric-XRPD models as a quality control tool to quantitatively predict the crystalline drug in the formulation. PMID:24585357

  12. Misfit strain of oxygen precipitates in Czochralski silicon studied with energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Grschel, A. Will, J.; Bergmann, C.; Magerl, A.

    2014-06-21

    Annealed Czochralski Silicon wafers containing SiO{sub x} precipitates have been studied by high energy X-ray diffraction in a defocused Laue setup using a laboratory tungsten tube. The energy dispersive evaluation of the diffracted Bragg intensity of the 220 reflection within the framework of the statistical dynamical theory yields the static Debye-Waller factor E of the crystal, which gives access to the strain induced by the SiO{sub x} precipitates. The results are correlated with precipitate densities and sizes determined from transmission electron microscopy measurements of equivalent wafers. This allows for the determination of the constrained linear misfit ? between precipitate and crystal lattice. For samples with octahedral precipitates the values ranging from ??=?0.39 (+0.28/?0.12) to ??=?0.48 (+0.34/?0.16) indicate that self-interstitials emitted into the matrix during precipitate growth contribute to the lattice strain. In this case, the expected value calculated from literature values is ??=?0.26??0.05. Further, the precise evaluation of Pendellsung oscillations in the diffracted Bragg intensity of as-grown wafers reveals a thermal Debye-Waller parameter for the 220 reflection B{sup 220}(293?K) of 0.5582??0.0039 {sup 2} for a structure factor based on spherically symmetric scattering contributions.

  13. Investigation of x-ray photon counting using a silicon-PIN diode and its application to energy-dispersive computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Hajime; Sato, Eiichi; Sagae, Michiaki; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Osawa, Akihiro; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira

    2013-09-01

    X-ray photon counting was performed using a readymade silicon-PIN photodiode (Si-PIN-PD) at tube voltages ranging from 42 to 60 kV, and X-ray photons are directly detected using the 100 MHz Si-PIN-PD without a scintillator. Photocurrent from the diode is amplified using charge-sensitive and shaping amplifiers. Using a multichannel analyzer, X-ray spectra at a tube voltage of 60 kV could easily be measured. The photon-counting computed tomography (PCCT) is accomplished by repeated linear scans and rotations of an object, and projection curves of the object are obtained by the linear scan. In the PC-CT, we confirmed the energy-dispersive effect with changes in lower-level voltage of the event pulse using a comparator.

  14. X-ray microanalysis as applied to fungal tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Thibaut, M.; Ansel, M.; de Azevedo Carneiro, J.

    1977-01-01

    Analytical electron microscopy combines the techniques of high-resolution electron microscopy and high-sensitivity X-ray microanalysis of samples. Spectrometry of the elements (characteristic X-rays produced by a scanning electron microprobe) was employed to detect some elements of Mendeleev's classification in pathogenic fungi for humans. X-ray microanalysis applied in wavelength dispersive spectrometry was used to study Coccidioïdes immitis, Paracoccidioïdes brasiliensis and Trichosporum cutaneum. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:558789

  15. Late Time Multi-wavelength Observations of Swift J1644+5734: A Luminous Optical/IR Bump and Quiescent X-Ray Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Brown, G. C.; Metzger, B. D.; Page, K. L.; Cenko, S. B.; O’Brien, P. T.; Lyman, J. D.; Wiersema, K.; Stanway, E. R.; Fruchter, A. S.; Perley, D. A.; Bloom, J. S.

    2016-03-01

    We present late time multi-wavelength observations of Swift J1644+57, suggested to be a relativistic tidal disruption flare (TDF). Our observations extend to >4 years from discovery and show that 1.4 years after outburst the relativistic jet switched off on a timescale less than tens of days, corresponding to a power-law decay faster than t‑70. Beyond this point weak X-rays continue to be detected at an approximately constant luminosity of LX ∼ 5 × 1042 erg s‑1 and are marginally inconsistent with a continuing decay of t‑5/3, similar to that seen prior to the switch-off. Host photometry enables us to infer a black hole mass of MBH = 3 × 106 M⊙, consistent with the late time X-ray luminosity arising from sub-Eddington accretion onto the black hole in the form of either an unusually optically faint active galactic nucleus or a slowly varying phase of the transient. Optical/IR observations show a clear bump in the light curve at timescales of 30–50 days, with a peak magnitude (corrected for host galaxy extinction) of MR ∼ ‑22 to ‑23. The luminosity of the bump is significantly higher than seen in other, non-relativistic TDFs and does not match any re-brightening seen at X-ray or radio wavelengths. Its luminosity, light curve shape, and spectrum are broadly similar to those seen in superluminous supervnovae, although subject to large uncertainties in the correction of the significant host extinction. We discuss these observations in the context of both TDF and massive star origins for Swift J1644+5734 and other candidate relativistic tidal flares.

  16. A multi-wavelength view of AB Doradus outer atmosphere . Simultaneous X-ray and optical spectroscopy at high cadence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalitha, S.; Fuhrmeister, B.; Wolter, U.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Engels, D.; Wieringa, M. H.

    2013-12-01

    Aims: We study the chromosphere and corona of the ultra-fast rotator AB Dor A at high temporal and spectral resolution using simultaneous observations with XMM-Newton in the X-rays, VLT/UVES in the optical, and the ATCA in the radio. Our optical spectra have a resolving power of ~50 000 with a time cadence of ~1 min. Our observations continuously cover more than one rotational period and include both quiescent periods and three flaring events of different strengths. Methods: From the X-ray observations we investigated the variations in coronal temperature, emission measure, densities, and abundance. We interpreted our data in terms of a loop model. From the optical data we characterised the flaring chromospheric material using numerous emission lines that appear in the course of the flares. A detailed analysis of the line shapes and line centres allowed us to infer physical characteristics of the flaring chromosphere and to coarsely localise the flare event on the star. Results: We specifically used the optical high-cadence spectra to demonstrate that both turbulent and Stark broadening are present during the first ten minutes of the first flare. Also, in the first few minutes of this flare, we find short-lived (one to several minutes) emission subcomponents in the H? and Ca ii K lines, which we interpret as flare-connected shocks owing to their high intrinsic velocities. Combining the space-based data with the results of our optical spectroscopy, we derive flare-filling factors. Finally, comparing X-ray, optical broadband, and line emission, we find a correlation for two of the three flaring events, while there is no clear correlation for one event. Also, we do not find any correlation of the radio data to any other observed data. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile, 383.D-1002A and on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA member states and NASA.Full Table 6 and reduced data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/560/A69

  17. Wavelengths of the 4 d-4 p, 0-1 transitions of X-ray lasers in Ni-like ions with Z ? 79

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, E. P.

    2015-04-01

    X-ray lasers on transitions of Ni-like ions are promising due to their high efficiency and possibility of generating radiation in the "water window" region using compact, laboratory pump sources. The precision wavelength values of laser transitions are necessary to determine the ions in which intense laser radiation in the region of 6.70-6.75 nm is possible, because multilayer mirrors with a high reflection coefficient are designed for this narrow range. In this paper, the energy levels of ions of the Ni-like sequence with the nuclear charge 36 ? Z ? 79 are calculated by the method of relativistic perturbation theory with a zero-approximation model potential. The wavelengths of the two strongest 4 d-4 p, 0-1 transitions of X-ray lasers are presented. It is shown that the 3 d 9 3/24 d 3/2 [ J = 0]-3 d 9 3/24 p 1/2 [ J = 1] laser transition with ? = 67.38 is possible in Sm34+ and the 3 d 9 3/24 d 3/2 [ J = 0]-3 d 9 5/24 p 3/2 [ J = 1] transition with ? = 67.48 is possible in Gd36+. The calculated results coincide with the known experimental data to within the experimental error.

  18. Proposal for precision wavelength measurement of the Ni-like gadolinium x-ray laser formed during the interaction of a nanostructured target with an ultrashort laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, E. P.

    2015-10-01

    The wavelengths of the 3d 94d [J = 0]-3d 94p [J = 1] transitions of x-ray lasers in Ni-like sequence ions with nucleus charges Z  ⩽  79 are refined. The results of calculations are within the experimental error. It was found that the wavelengths of 3d3/294d3/2{} [J = 0]-3d3/29 4p 1/2 [J = 1] and 3d3/29 4d 3/2[J = 0]-3d5/29 4p 3/2[J = 1] transitions in Sm34+ and Gd36+, respectively, are in the range of 6.70-6.75 nm. Exactly for this narrow range, multilayer mirrors with high reflectance are developed. The gain of the x-ray laser with λ = 6.748 nm in Gd36+ is calculated under the assumption that plasma is formed during the interaction of a nanostructured (cluster-like) gadolinium target with high-intensity pump laser radiation. The optimum plasma density, temperature, length, and pump parameters are determined to achieve the highest Gd36+ ion fraction and emission quantum yield of ~1013 photons.

  19. The Wavelength-Dispersive Spectrometer and Its Proposed Use in the Analytical Electron Microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Joseph I.; Lyman, Charles E.; Williams, David B.

    1989-01-01

    The Analytical Electron Microscope (AEM) equipped with a wavelength-dispersive spectrometer (WDS) should have the ability to resolve peaks which normally overlap in the spectra from an energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS). With a WDS it should also be possible to measure lower concentrations of elements in thin foils due to the increased peak-to-background ratio compared with EDS. The WDS will measure X-ray from the light elements (4 less than Z less than 1O) more effectively. This paper addresses the possibility of interfacing a compact WDS with a focussing circle of approximately 4 cm to a modem AEM with a high-brightness (field emission) source of electrons.

  20. High-pressure structural transformations of Sn up to 138 GPa: Angle-dispersive synchrotron x-ray diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamat, Ashkan; Briggs, Richard; Bouvier, Pierre; Petitgirard, Sylvain; Dewaele, Agns; Cutler, Melissa E.; Cor, Furio; Daisenberger, Dominik; Garbarino, Gaston; McMillan, Paul F.

    2013-09-01

    The high-pressure behavior of elemental Sn has been studied by angle-dispersive synchrotron x-ray diffraction up to 138 GPa under quasihydrostatic conditions at room temperature. The data confirm the occurrence of a first-order phase transition at 10.8 GPa between ?-Sn (Sn-II) (I41/amd) and a further body-centered-tetragonal polymorph (?-Sn or Sn-III) (I4/mmm). Above 32 GPa, this phase exhibits a distortion into a new body-centered-orthorhombic (bco) modification (Immm). Beyond 70 GPa, the structure becomes body-centered cubic (bcc) (Im-3m). There is a region of coexistence where the bcc reflections are observed to appear superimposed on the bco pattern above 40 GPa and the two diffraction signatures coexist until 70 GPa. We examined this possible existence of a kinetically hindered first-order phase transition between the two polymorphs by performing density functional theory (DFT) calculations with an emphasis on the potential energy in response to axial (c/a,b/a) distortions at constant volume. The DFT results suggest a slightly different interpretation of the structural transformations. At low pressure, the global minimum energy is always centered around b/a=1, and there is no indication of transformation to a bco structure. However, any small strains in the c/a ratio in the system would provide an orthorhombic distortion of the observed magnitude. Such strains could be induced due to slight deviations from hydrostatic conditions in the experimental study. Concerning the possible bco-bcc phase transitions, the DFT calculations reveal an energy surface with a barrier developed between solutions with different c/a values over the pressure range of interest. Crucially, the calculated barrier heights are low, and they disappear in the region of the observed phase transformation. The DFT results indicate a mechanically softened material that may exhibit localized domain structures in response to even slightly nonhydrostatic stress conditions.

  1. Applicability of the energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis for quantification of irregular calcium deposits on fruit and leaf cuticles.

    PubMed

    Hunsche, M; Noga, G

    2008-12-01

    In our studies, we evaluated the relation between CaCl(2) concentration and the scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis parameters, net intensity, peak/background and standardized percentage of atoms and percentage of weight after application of single microdroplets on enzymatically isolated tomato fruit cuticles and apple seedling leaves. After analysis, the Ca/Cl ratio was calculated and the area ultimately covered with Ca and Cl within the droplet spread area determined. According to our findings, all evaluated parameters were influenced by both droplet volume and calcium chloride concentration, whereas Pearson's analysis revealed a strong correlation between net intensity and area ultimately covered by Ca or Cl, respectively. Simple linear regressions for net intensity, peak/background and Ca/Cl ratio showed variable determination coefficients (R(2)) ranging between 0.49 and 0.79. Multiple regression equations comprising net intensity, Ca/Cl ratio and deposit area were established to estimate the amount of calcium present on the cuticles. Equation slopes depended on droplet volumes, with determination coefficients of 0.89 and 0.81 for 0.5 and 1.0-microL droplets, respectively. The importance of the physicochemical properties of the spray solution was exploited in another study where a hydrophobic or a hydrophilic adjuvant was added to a 10 g L(-1) CaCl(2) solution, which was applied to apple seedling leaves. The addition of adjuvants increased values of net intensity and peak/background, which correlated significantly with the area covered by calcium. The importance of the methodology for studies on the interaction between leaf applied fertilizers (also extended to agrochemicals) and the characteristics of target surfaces is discussed. PMID:19094022

  2. Invited article: The fast readout low noise camera as a versatile x-ray detector for time resolved dispersive extended x-ray absorption fine structure and diffraction studies of dynamic problems in materials science, chemistry, and catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labiche, Jean-Claude; Mathon, Olivier; Pascarelli, Sakura; Newton, Mark A.; Ferre, Gemma Guilera; Curfs, Caroline; Vaughan, Gavin; Homs, Alejandro; Carreiras, David Fernandez

    2007-09-01

    Originally conceived and developed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) as an "area" detector for rapid x-ray imaging studies, the fast readout low noise (FReLoN) detector of the ESRF [J.-C. Labiche, ESRF Newsletter 25, 41 (1996)] has been demonstrated to be a highly versatile and unique detector. Charge coupled device (CCD) cameras at present available on the public market offer either a high dynamic range or a high readout speed. A compromise between signal dynamic range and readout speed is always sought. The parameters of the commercial cameras can sometimes be tuned, in order to better fulfill the needs of specific experiments, but in general these cameras have a poor duty cycle (i.e., the signal integration time is much smaller than the readout time). In order to address scientific problems such as time resolved experiments at the ESRF, a FReLoN camera has been developed by the Instrument Support Group at ESRF. This camera is a low noise CCD camera that combines high dynamic range, high readout speed, accuracy, and improved duty cycle in a single image. In this paper, we show its application in a quasi-one-dimensional sense to dynamic problems in materials science, catalysis, and chemistry that require data acquisition on a time scale of milliseconds or a few tens of milliseconds. It is demonstrated that in this mode the FReLoN can be applied equally to the investigation of rapid changes in long range order (via diffraction) and local order (via energy dispersive extended x-ray absorption fine structure) and in situations of x-ray hardness and flux beyond the capacity of other detectors.

  3. NGC 7679: an anomalous, composite Seyfert 1 galaxy whose X-ray luminous AGN vanishes at optical wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buson, L. M.; Cappellari, M.; Corsini, E. M.; Held, E. V.; Lim, J.; Pizzella, A.

    2006-02-01

    Morphological disturbances and gas kinematics of the SB0 galaxy NGC 7679 = Arp 216 are investigated to understand the history of this highly composite object, where AGN and starburst signatures dominate in the X-ray and optical/IR regime, respectively. Perturbations of the ionized gas velocity field appear quite mild within 15'' (~5 kpc) of the center, so it can be straightforwardly modeled as a circularly rotating disk. Outside that radius, significant disturbances are seen. In particular, the eastern distorted arm as well as the huge neutral hydrogen bridge connecting NGC 7679 to the nearby Seyfert spiral NGC 7682 unambiguously represent the vestige of a close encounter of the two objects ~500 Myr ago. The relationship of such a past event with the much more recent, centrally located starburst (not older than 20 Myr) cannot be easily established. Together, the classification of NGC 7679 is less extreme than that proposed in the past, being simply a (disturbed) galaxy where starburst and AGN activity coexist with a starburst dominating the bolometric luminosity.

  4. Quantitative determination on heavy metals in different stages of wine production by Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence and Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence: Comparison on two vineyards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessanha, Sofia; Carvalho, Maria Luisa; Becker, Maria; von Bohlen, Alex

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the elemental content, namely heavy metals, of samples of vine-leaves, grapes must and wine. In order to assess the influence of the vineyard age on the elemental content throughout the several stages of wine production, elemental determinations of trace elements were made on products obtained from two vineyards aged 6 and 14 years from Douro region. The elemental content of vine-leaves and grapes was determined by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF), while analysis of the must and wine was performed by Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF). Almost all elements present in wine and must samples did not exceed the recommended values found in literature for wine. Bromine was present in the 6 years old wine in a concentration 1 order of magnitude greater than what is usually detected. The Cu content in vine-leaves from the older vineyard was found to be extremely high probably due to excessive use of Cu-based fungicides to control vine downy mildew. Higher Cu content was also detected in grapes although not so pronounced. Concerning the wine a slightly higher level was detected on the older vineyard, even so not exceeding the recommended value.

  5. Diffraction efficiency of 200-nm-period critical-angle transmission gratings in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet wavelength bands

    SciTech Connect

    Heilmann, Ralf K.; Ahn, Minseung; Bruccoleri, Alex; Chang, Chih-Hao; Gullikson, Eric M.; Mukherjee, Pran; Schattenburg, Mark L.

    2011-04-01

    We report on measurements of the diffraction efficiency of 200-nm-period freestanding blazed transmission gratings for wavelengths in the 0.96 to 19.4 nm range. These critical-angle transmission (CAT) gratings achieve highly efficient blazing over a broad band via total external reflection off the sidewalls of smooth, tens of nanometer thin ultrahigh aspect-ratio silicon grating bars and thus combine the advantages of blazed x-ray reflection gratings with those of more conventional x-ray transmission gratings. Prototype gratings with maximum depths of 3.2 and 6 {mu}m were investigated at two different blaze angles. In these initial CAT gratings the grating bars are monolithically connected to a cross support mesh that only leaves less than half of the grating area unobstructed. Because of our initial fabrication approach, the support mesh bars feature a strongly trapezoidal cross section that leads to varying CAT grating depths and partial absorption of diffracted orders. While theory predicts broadband absolute diffraction efficiencies as high as 60% for ideal CAT gratings without a support mesh, experimental results show efficiencies in the range of {approx}50-100% of theoretical predictions when taking the effects of the support mesh into account. Future minimization of the support mesh therefore promises broadband CAT grating absolute diffraction efficiencies of 50% or higher.

  6. Diffraction efficiency of 200-nm-period critical-angle transmission gratings in the soft x-ray and extreme ultraviolet wavelength bands.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, Ralf K; Ahn, Minseung; Bruccoleri, Alex; Chang, Chih-Hao; Gullikson, Eric M; Mukherjee, Pran; Schattenburg, Mark L

    2011-04-01

    We report on measurements of the diffraction efficiency of 200-nm-period freestanding blazed transmission gratings for wavelengths in the 0.96 to 19.4 nm range. These critical-angle transmission (CAT) gratings achieve highly efficient blazing over a broad band via total external reflection off the sidewalls of smooth, tens of nanometer thin ultrahigh aspect-ratio silicon grating bars and thus combine the advantages of blazed x-ray reflection gratings with those of more conventional x-ray transmission gratings. Prototype gratings with maximum depths of 3.2 and 6 ?m were investigated at two different blaze angles. In these initial CAT gratings the grating bars are monolithically connected to a cross support mesh that only leaves less than half of the grating area unobstructed. Because of our initial fabrication approach, the support mesh bars feature a strongly trapezoidal cross section that leads to varying CAT grating depths and partial absorption of diffracted orders. While theory predicts broadband absolute diffraction efficiencies as high as 60% for ideal CAT gratings without a support mesh, experimental results show efficiencies in the range of ?50-100% of theoretical predictions when taking the effects of the support mesh into account. Future minimization of the support mesh therefore promises broadband CAT grating absolute diffraction efficiencies of 50% or higher. PMID:21460902

  7. Emergent Chemical Mapping at Atomic-Column Resolution by Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy in an Aberration-Corrected Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, M.-W.; Liou, S. C.; Chang, C.-P.; Choa, F.-S.; Chen, C. H.

    2010-05-01

    Chemical mapping at atomic-column resolution by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy in a spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) has been demonstrated for the 1.47- dumbbell structure in InGaAs. The structural imaging and the chemical information in the two-dimensional map are directly correlated. Comparisons with the other existing mapping techniques of STEM in conjunction with electron energy-loss spectroscopy were discussed from aspects of ionization interactions.

  8. Amalgam tattoo: report of an unusual clinical presentation and the use of energy dispersive X-ray analysis as an aid to diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, J.P. Jr.; Greer, J.L.; Daniels, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    An unusual appearing gingival amalgam pigmentation (amalgam tattoo) that completely surrounded the maxillary right first premolar in a 13-year-old boy is presented. Because of the wide distribution and apparent clinical progression of the discoloration, an excisional biopsy was performed. The histopathologic diagnosis of amalgam pigmentation was confirmed in paraffin sections by energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Silver, tin, and mercury were detected in the specimen.

  9. Defect analysis of a silicon nanowire transistor by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy technique in a STEM: 2D mappings and tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepinay, K.; Lorut, F.; Pofelski, A.; Coquand, R.; Pantel, R.; Epicier, T.

    2013-11-01

    The robust development of exotic devices strongly relies on physical characterization to better understand the stacked layers architecture and the resulting morphology. In such a context, a silicon nanowire, 200nm long and of around 15nm of diameter, encapsulated by a high-k metal gate stack (TiN/HfSiON) of few nanometers per layer, is characterized by 2D and 3D X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy in a STEM to evaluate the process flow methodology.

  10. A new method for polychromatic X-ray ?Laue diffraction on a Cu pillar using an energy-dispersive pn-junction charge-coupled device.

    PubMed

    Abboud, A; Kirchlechner, C; Send, S; Micha, J S; Ulrich, O; Pashniak, N; Strder, L; Keckes, J; Pietsch, U

    2014-11-01

    ?Laue diffraction with a polychromatic X-ray beam can be used to measure strain fields and crystal orientations of micro crystals. The hydrostatic strain tensor can be obtained once the energy profile of the reflections is measured. However, this remains a challenge both on the time scale and reproducibility of the beam position on the sample. In this review, we present a new approach to obtain the spatial and energy profiles of Laue spots by using a pn-junction charge-coupled device, an energy-dispersive area detector providing 3D resolution of incident X-rays. The morphology and energetic structure of various Bragg peaks from a single crystalline Cu micro-cantilever used as a test system were simultaneously acquired. The method facilitates the determination of the Laue spots' energy spectra without filtering the white X-ray beam. The synchrotron experiment was performed at the BM32 beamline of ESRF using polychromatic X-rays in the energy range between 5 and 25 keV and a beam size of 0.5 ?m 0.5 ?m. The feasibility test on the well known system demonstrates the capabilities of the approach and introduces the "3D detector method" as a promising tool for material investigations to separate bending and strain for technical materials. PMID:25430118

  11. A new method for polychromatic X-ray ?Laue diffraction on a Cu pillar using an energy-dispersive pn-junction charge-coupled device

    SciTech Connect

    Abboud, A.; Send, S.; Pashniak, N.; Pietsch, U.; Kirchlechner, C.; Micha, J. S.; Ulrich, O.; Keckes, J.

    2014-11-15

    ?Laue diffraction with a polychromatic X-ray beam can be used to measure strain fields and crystal orientations of micro crystals. The hydrostatic strain tensor can be obtained once the energy profile of the reflections is measured. However, this remains a challenge both on the time scale and reproducibility of the beam position on the sample. In this review, we present a new approach to obtain the spatial and energy profiles of Laue spots by using a pn-junction charge-coupled device, an energy-dispersive area detector providing 3D resolution of incident X-rays. The morphology and energetic structure of various Bragg peaks from a single crystalline Cu micro-cantilever used as a test system were simultaneously acquired. The method facilitates the determination of the Laue spots energy spectra without filtering the white X-ray beam. The synchrotron experiment was performed at the BM32 beamline of ESRF using polychromatic X-rays in the energy range between 5 and 25 keV and a beam size of 0.5 ?m 0.5 ?m. The feasibility test on the well known system demonstrates the capabilities of the approach and introduces the 3D detector method as a promising tool for material investigations to separate bending and strain for technical materials.

  12. A new method for polychromatic X-ray μLaue diffraction on a Cu pillar using an energy-dispersive pn-junction charge-coupled device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abboud, A.; Kirchlechner, C.; Send, S.; Micha, J. S.; Ulrich, O.; Pashniak, N.; Strüder, L.; Keckes, J.; Pietsch, U.

    2014-11-01

    μLaue diffraction with a polychromatic X-ray beam can be used to measure strain fields and crystal orientations of micro crystals. The hydrostatic strain tensor can be obtained once the energy profile of the reflections is measured. However, this remains a challenge both on the time scale and reproducibility of the beam position on the sample. In this review, we present a new approach to obtain the spatial and energy profiles of Laue spots by using a pn-junction charge-coupled device, an energy-dispersive area detector providing 3D resolution of incident X-rays. The morphology and energetic structure of various Bragg peaks from a single crystalline Cu micro-cantilever used as a test system were simultaneously acquired. The method facilitates the determination of the Laue spots' energy spectra without filtering the white X-ray beam. The synchrotron experiment was performed at the BM32 beamline of ESRF using polychromatic X-rays in the energy range between 5 and 25 keV and a beam size of 0.5 μm × 0.5 μm. The feasibility test on the well known system demonstrates the capabilities of the approach and introduces the "3D detector method" as a promising tool for material investigations to separate bending and strain for technical materials.

  13. X-ray imaging and x-ray source development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Trebes, J.; Balhorn, R.; Anderson, E.

    1993-12-01

    The Laser Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has a continuing effort to develop both x-ray sources and x-ray sources and x-ray microscopy. This effort includes the ongoing development of: (1) a wide range of x-ray lasers at the Nova Laser Facility, (2) a zone plate lens--multilayer mirror based x-ray microscope (3) three dimensional, high resolution x-ray microscopy (4) short wavelength, normal incidence multilayer x-ray mirrors, (5) compact, high average power lasers for producing x-ray lasers and laser plasma x-ray sources. We have constructed and operated an x-ray laser based transmission x-ray microscope. The advantage offered by the x-ray laser source is the extreme high brightness allows high resolution images to be made on a timescale faster than that for x-ray damage effects to appear. The microscope, consists of: the x-ray laser, a multilayer coated, near normal incidence spherical mirror used as a condenser, a silicon nitride specimen holder, an x-ray zone plate used as an objective lens, and a microchannel plate x-ray detector. The x-ray laser used is the Ni-like Ta x-ray laser operating with a wavelength of 4.48 nm, a pulselength of 200 spec, a divergence of 10 mrad, and an output energy of 10 microjoules.

  14. In-situ and operando characterization of batteries with energy-dispersive synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxton, William Arthur

    Batteries play a pivotal role in the low-carbon society that is required to thwart the effects of climate change. Alternative low-carbon energy sources, such as wind and solar, are often intermittent and unreliable. Batteries are able capture their energy and deliver it later when it is needed. The implementation of battery systems in grid-level and transportation sectors is essential for efficient use of alternative energy sources. Scientists and engineers need better tools to analyze and measure the performance characteristics of batteries. One of the main hindrances in the progress of battery research is that the constituent electrode materials are inaccessible once an electrochemical cell is constructed. This leaves the researcher with a limited number of available feedback mechanisms to assess the cell's performance, e.g., current, voltage, and impedance. These data are limited in their ability to reveal the more-localized smaller-scale structural mechanisms on which the batteries' performance is so dependent. Energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXRD) is one of the few techniques that can internally probe a sealed battery. By analyzing the structural behavior of battery electrodes, one is able to gain insight to the physical properties on which the battery's performance is dependent. In this dissertation, EDXRD with ultrahigh energy synchrotron radiation is used to probe the electrodes of manufactured primary and secondary lithium batteries under in-situ and operando conditions. The technique is then applied to solve specific challenges facing lithium ion batteries. Diffraction spectra are collected from within a battery at 40 micrometer resolution. Peak-fitting is used to quantitatively estimate the abundance of lithiated and non-lithiated phases. Through mapping the distribution of phases within, structural changes are linked to the battery's galvanic response. A three-dimensional spatial analysis of lithium iron phosphate batteries suggests that evolution of inhomogeneity is linked to the particle connectivity. Despite a non-linear local response, the average of the measured ensemble behaves linearly. The results suggest that inhomogeneity can be difficult to measure and highlights the power of the EDXRD technique. Additional applications of EDXRD are discussed.

  15. MATHEMATICAL TECHNIQUES FOR X-RAY ANALYZERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mathematical techniques and subsequent computer software were developed to process energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectra for elemental analysis of airborne particulate matter collected on filters. The research concerned two areas: (1) determination of characteristic x-ray ...

  16. ENERGY DISPERSIVE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS OF DUST COLLECTED USING A VERTICAL ELUTRIATOR COTTON DUST SAMPLER

    EPA Science Inventory

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy has been used to analyze trace element concentrations in cotton dusts collected on verticle elutriator filter media. Twenty-three samples collected from ten bales of cotton processed in a model card room have been analyzed. The major elements...

  17. [Applacation of portable energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer in chemical composition analysis of Chinese ancient glass].

    PubMed

    Liu, Song; Li, Qing-hui; Gan, Fu-xi; Gu, Dong-hong

    2010-09-01

    Chemical composition is one of the most important aspects in the study of Chinese ancient glasses, as it could provide scientific proofs for the technical origin and development of Chinese ancient glasses. It is very necessary to find out some new an alyzing techniques. One of the most remarkable advantages for portable X-ray fluorescence technique is its portability, which allows antiques that can't be allowed to move out of museum to be analyzed. The basic principles, performances and analysis process of the equipment that was improved by OURSTEX company and Center of Sci-tech Archaeology of Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics are presented in detail. Some examples for the application of portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer in chemical composition analysis of Chinese ancient glass samples excavated from Xinjiang province are also given. The results are compared with that determined by the proton induced X-ray fluorescence technique. There is a potential application for portable X-ray fluorescence technique in on site analysis. PMID:21105443

  18. A study of X-ray emission from galactic and extragalactic sources with emphasis on soft and ultra-soft wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, C. S.; Lampton, M.; Cruddace, R. G.; Paresce, F.

    1974-01-01

    A Black Brant VC rocket was used to scan the Coma and Virgo clusters in order to measure structure in the X-ray sources. The rocket also made measurements of soft X-ray spectra, soft X-ray background flux during a 50 deg scan of the sky, soft X-rays from De Voucoulers 50, set limits to the energy dependence of soft X-ray background spectra, and the flux of solar 584 A radiation resonantly scattered by interstellar He flowing through the solar system.

  19. Broadband Wavelength Spanning Holographic Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Kashma; Shriyan, Sameet; Fontecchio, Adam

    2008-03-01

    Broadened interaction wavelength of holographic polymer dispersed liquid crystals (HPDLCs) have extensive applications in beam steering for instrument clusters, hyperspectral imaging, wavelength filtering and construction of lightweight optics. A novel simultaneous time and spatial multiplexing formation configuration is proposed here, to increase narrow wavelength reflecting notch to broad range wavelength spanning device. HPDLC films have electro-optic controllability by applying field. No moving parts, light weight, small footprint compared to prisms and lenses, high color purity make the broadband wavelength HPDLCs desirable for the above applications. Varying the incident laser beam exposure angles using motorized rotating stage, during formation is the key step here for their formation in a single medium. The fabricated broadband wavelength sensitive HPDLCs are characterized for the uniformity of the reflected peak and electro optic response. Their output wavefront is analyzed using wavefront analysis technique.

  20. Self-consistent absorption correction for quantitative energy- dispersive X-ray spectroscopy of InGaN layers in analytical transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, T.; Wang, X.

    2015-10-01

    A new method of absorption correction for energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscope is tested on InGaN samples. We simulate the effective k-factor for the In L line with respect to Ga L or Ga K and plot this as a function of the Ga K/L intensity ratio, which can be directly measured from experimental spectra. This basically performs an internal self-consistency check in the quantification using differently absorbed X-ray lines, which is in principle equivalent to an absorption correction as a function of specimen thickness but has the practical advantage that neither specimen thickness nor density or mass-thickness of the specimens need actually be measured.

  1. Measurement of the phase transformation in sheet steel from the ferrite to austenite phase using angular dispersive X-ray diffraction in a transmission geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrity, D. J.; Jenneson, P. M.; Luggar, R. D.; Vincent, S. M.

    2006-09-01

    An angular dispersive X-ray diffraction arrangement, utilising an image intensifier and X-ray filtering, has been developed to measure the ferrite to austenite phase transformation in an online steel foundry process line. Given the degradation in resolution associated with transmission measurements, the extreme phases have been used to calibrate the system. The most significant differences between these two phases are found to occur at scattering angles of between 6 and 8. The results obtained from measurement of the radially integrated profile in this region whilst heating a ferrite-phase sample towards the phase transformation temperature are consistent with the expected trend, demonstrating the requirement for uniform temperature between the ferrite and austenite phase samples in order to observe the phase transformation.

  2. RF Single Electron Transistor Readout Amplifiers for Superconducting Astronomical Detectors for X-Ray to Sub-mm Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Thomas; Aassime, Abdelhanin; Delsing, Per; Frunzio, Luigi; Li, Li-Qun; Prober, Daniel; Schoelkopf, Robert; Segall, Ken; Wilson, Chris; Stahle, Carl

    2000-01-01

    We report progress on using a new type of amplifier, the Radio-Frequency Single-Electron Transistor (RF-SET), to develop multi-channel sensor readout systems for fast and sensitive readout of high impedance cryogenic photodetectors such as Superconducting Tunnel Junctions and Single Quasiparticle Photon Counters. Although cryogenic, these detectors are desirable because of capabilities not other-wise attainable. However, high impedances and low output levels make low-noise, high-speed readouts challenging, and large format arrays would be facilitated by compact, low-power, on-chip integrated amplifiers. Well-suited for this application are RF-SETs, very high performance electrometers which use an rf readout technique to provide 100 MHz bandwidth. Small size, low power, and cryogenic operation allow direct integration with detectors, and using multiple rf carrier frequencies permits simultaneous readout of 20-50 amplifiers with a common electrical connection. We describe both the first 2-channel demonstration of this wavelength division multiplexing technique for RF-SETs, and Charge-Locked-Loop operation with 100 kHz of closed-loop bandwidth.

  3. Colorless directional coupler with dispersion engineered sub-wavelength structure.

    PubMed

    Halir, R; Maese-Novo, A; Ortega-Moñux, A; Molina-Fernández, I; Wangüemert-Pérez, J G; Cheben, P; Xu, D-X; Schmid, J H; Janz, S

    2012-06-01

    Directional couplers are extensively used devices in integrated optics, but suffer from limited operational wavelength range. Here we use, for the first time, the dispersive properties of sub-wavelength gratings to achieve a fivefold enhancement in the operation bandwidth of a silicon-on-insulator directional coupler. This approach does not compromise the size or the phase response of the device. The sub-wavelength grating based directional coupler we propose covers a 100 nm bandwidth with an imbalance of ≤ 0.6 dB between its outputs, as supported by full 3D FDTD simulations. PMID:22714374

  4. Center for X-Ray Optics, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    The Center for X-Ray Optics has made substantial progress during the past year on the development of very high resolution x-ray technologies, the generation of coherent radiation at x-ray wavelengths, and, based on these new developments, had embarked on several scientific investigations that would not otherwise have been possible. The investigations covered in this report are topics on x-ray sources, x-ray imaging and applications, soft x-ray spectroscopy, synchrotron radiation, advanced light source and magnet structures for undulators and wigglers. (LSP)

  5. An X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of the inversion degree in zinc ferrite nanocrystals dispersed on a highly porous silica aerogel matrix.

    PubMed

    Carta, D; Marras, C; Loche, D; Mountjoy, G; Ahmed, S I; Corrias, A

    2013-02-01

    The structural properties of zinc ferrite nanoparticles with spinel structure dispersed in a highly porous SiO(2) aerogel matrix were compared with a bulk zinc ferrite sample. In particular, the details of the cation distribution between the octahedral (B) and tetrahedral (A) sites of the spinel structure were determined using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The analysis of both the X-ray absorption near edge structure and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure indicates that the degree of inversion of the zinc ferrite spinel structures varies with particle size. In particular, in the bulk microcrystalline sample, Zn(2+) ions are at the tetrahedral sites and trivalent Fe(3+) ions occupy octahedral sites (normal spinel). When particle size decreases, Zn(2+) ions are transferred to octahedral sites and the degree of inversion is found to increase as the nanoparticle size decreases. This is the first time that a variation of the degree of inversion with particle size is observed in ferrite nanoparticles grown within an aerogel matrix. PMID:23406136

  6. Misidentification of major constituents by automatic qualitative energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis: a problem that threatens the credibility of the analytical community.

    PubMed

    Newbury, Dale E

    2005-12-01

    Automatic qualitative analysis for peak identification is a standard feature of virtually all modern computer-aided analysis software for energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry with electron excitation. Testing of recently installed systems from four different manufacturers has revealed the occasional occurrence of misidentification of peaks of major constituents whose concentrations exceeded 0.1 mass fraction (10 wt%). Test materials where peak identification failures were observed included ZnS, KBr, FeS2, tantalum-niobium alloy, NIST Standard Reference Material 482 (copper-gold alloy), Bi2Te3, uranium-rhodium alloys, platinum-chromium alloy, GaAs, and GaP. These misidentifications of major constituents were exacerbated when the incident beam energy was 10 keV or lower, which restricted or excluded the excitation of the high photon energy K- and L-shell X-rays where multiple peaks, for example, Kalpha (K-L2,3)-Kbeta (K-M2,3); Lalpha (L3-M4,5)-Lbeta (L2-M4)-Lgamma (L2-N4), are well resolved and amenable to identification with high confidence. These misidentifications are so severe as to properly qualify as blunders that present a serious challenge to the credibility of this critical analytical technique. Systematic testing of a peak identification system with a suite of diverse materials can reveal the specific elements and X-ray peaks where failures are likely to occur. PMID:17481333

  7. An X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of the inversion degree in zinc ferrite nanocrystals dispersed on a highly porous silica aerogel matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carta, D.; Marras, C.; Loche, D.; Mountjoy, G.; Ahmed, S. I.; Corrias, A.

    2013-02-01

    The structural properties of zinc ferrite nanoparticles with spinel structure dispersed in a highly porous SiO2 aerogel matrix were compared with a bulk zinc ferrite sample. In particular, the details of the cation distribution between the octahedral (B) and tetrahedral (A) sites of the spinel structure were determined using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The analysis of both the X-ray absorption near edge structure and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure indicates that the degree of inversion of the zinc ferrite spinel structures varies with particle size. In particular, in the bulk microcrystalline sample, Zn2+ ions are at the tetrahedral sites and trivalent Fe3+ ions occupy octahedral sites (normal spinel). When particle size decreases, Zn2+ ions are transferred to octahedral sites and the degree of inversion is found to increase as the nanoparticle size decreases. This is the first time that a variation of the degree of inversion with particle size is observed in ferrite nanoparticles grown within an aerogel matrix.

  8. Pre-Columbian alloys from the royal tombs of Sipn; energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis with a portable equipment.

    PubMed

    Cesareo, R; Calza, C; Dos Anjos, M; Lopes, R T; Bustamante, A; Fabian S, J; Alva, W; Chero Z, L

    2010-01-01

    On the north coast of present-day Peru flourished approximately between 50 and 700 AD, the Moche civilization. It was an advanced culture and the Moche were sophisticated metalsmiths, so that they are considered as the finest producers of jewels and artefacts of the region. The Moche metalworking ability was impressively demonstrated by the objects discovered by Walter Alva and coworkers in 1987, in the excavations of the "Tumbas Reales de Sipn". About 50 metal objects from these excavations, now at the namesake Museum, in Lambayeque, north of Peru, were analyzed with a portable equipment using energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence. This portable equipment is mainly composed of a small size X-ray tube and a thermoelectrically cooled X-ray detector. Standard samples of gold and silver alloys were employed for quantitative analysis. It was determined that the analyzed artefacts from the "Tumbas Reales de Sipn" are mainly composed of gold, silver and copper alloys, of gilded copper and of tumbaga, the last being a poor gold alloy enriched at the surface by depletion gilding, i.e. removing copper from the surface. PMID:19819709

  9. Chemometric classification of gunshot residues based on energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis and inductively coupled plasma analysis with mass-spectrometric detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, S.; Otto, M.; Niewoehner, L.; Barth, M.; Bro?ek-Mucha, Z.; Biegstraaten, J.; Horvth, R.

    2007-09-01

    A gunshot residue sample that was collected from an object or a suspected person is automatically searched for gunshot residue relevant particles. Particle data (such as size, morphology, position on the sample for manual relocation, etc.) as well as the corresponding X-ray spectra and images are stored. According to these data, particles are classified by the analysis-software into different groups: 'gunshot residue characteristic', 'consistent with gunshot residue' and environmental particles, respectively. Potential gunshot residue particles are manually checked and - if necessary - confirmed by the operating forensic scientist. As there are continuing developments on the ammunition market worldwide, it becomes more and more difficult to assign a detected particle to a particular ammunition brand. As well, the differentiation towards environmental particles similar to gunshot residue is getting more complex. To keep external conditions unchanged, gunshot residue particles were collected using a specially designed shooting device for the test shots revealing defined shooting distances between the weapon's muzzle and the target. The data obtained as X-ray spectra of a number of particles (3000 per ammunition brand) were reduced by Fast Fourier Transformation and subjected to a chemometric evaluation by means of regularized discriminant analysis. In addition to the scanning electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis results, isotope ratio measurements based on inductively coupled plasma analysis with mass-spectrometric detection were carried out to provide a supplementary feature for an even lower risk of misclassification.

  10. An energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction study of the nickel-sulfide assisted growth of RuS2 thin films by reactive magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunken, Stephan; Krause, Jonas; Ellmer, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    RuS2 thin films were deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering from a metallic Ru target in an Ar/H2S atmosphere. The influence of Ni sputtering on the crystalline properties of the deposited RuS2 was observed in real-time using in-situ energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) by which it was possible to take an X-ray diffraction and fluorescence pattern every 10 s. Co-sputtering from a Ni target as well as pre-deposition of NiSx leads to an improved growth of the RuS2 crystallites. The size of the RuS2 crystallites increases with additional sputtering of Ni, which was proved by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Above deposition temperatures of about 673 K only the Ru phase grows without Ni assistance. Co-sputtering of Ni leads to the growth of RuS2 even at temperatures of 773 K. Thus using Ni allows higher deposition temperatures, which further improves the crystalline properties of RuS2 films.

  11. A correlative approach to segmenting phases and ferrite morphologies in transformation-induced plasticity steel using electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gazder, Azdiar A; Al-Harbi, Fayez; Spanke, Hendrik Th; Mitchell, David R G; Pereloma, Elena V

    2014-12-01

    Using a combination of electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data, a segmentation procedure was developed to comprehensively distinguish austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite, ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths in a thermo-mechanically processed low-Si, high-Al transformation-induced plasticity steel. The efficacy of the ferrite morphologies segmentation procedure was verified by transmission electron microscopy. The variation in carbon content between the ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths was explained on the basis of carbon partitioning during their growth. PMID:25126753

  12. Effect of hydration on the structure of oriented lipid membranes investigated by in situ time-resolved energy dispersive x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caminiti, Ruggero; Caracciolo, Giulio; Pisani, Michela

    2005-06-01

    In situ time-resolved energy dispersive x-ray diffraction (EDXD) was applied to investigate the effect of hydration on the structure of 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP)-oriented membranes. The measurements allowed a very high density time sampling of the evolution of the structural properties of the DOTAP bilayer such as the lamellar d-spacing, the membrane thickness, and the size of the interbilayer water region. Time-resolved EDXD has been found to provide important information on the role played by free water molecules on the structure and fluidity of lipid bilayer.

  13. Effect of hydration on the long-range order of lipid multilayers investigated by in situ time-resolved energy dispersive X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caminiti, Ruggero; Caracciolo, Giulio; Pisani, Michela; Bruni, Paolo

    2005-06-01

    In situ time-resolved energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXD) was applied to investigate the hydration kinetics of oriented dioleoylphosphocoline (DOPC) and 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) membranes. The long-range order in the investigated lipid multilayers has been found to vary as a function of hydration in a nonmonotic way. In the first stage, water adsorption increased the long-range order along the normal to the lipid bilayer whereas, in the second one, a progressive loss of interbilayer coherence was observed. Possible molecular mechanisms underlying the experimental observations are discussed.

  14. A scanning angle energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction technique for high-pressure structure studies in diamond anvil cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wenge; Shen, Guoyin; Wang, Yanbin; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2008-10-24

    A scanning angle diffraction technique with an energy-dispersive solid-state detector (SSD) and white synchrotron radiation has been developed for high-pressure structure studies in diamond anvil cells (DACs). This technique is similar to the CAESAR technique [Y. Wang, T. Uchida, R. Von Dreele, M.L. Rivers, N. Nishiyama, K. Funakoshi, A. Nozawa, and H. Kaneko, A new technique for angle-dispersive powder diffraction using an energy-dispersive setup and synchrotron radiation, J. Appl. Cryst. 37 (2004), p. 947] developed for large-volume presses, but extended to DAC applications with high spatial resolution. The main feature of the technique is the well-defined collimation in the beam path to the detector, which improves the signal-to-noise ratio significantly, compared to routine monochromatic angle-dispersive powder diffraction with area detectors. This is particularly useful and essential for low-scattering materials and for amorphous and liquid diffraction/scattering studies using DACs. Data collected from crystalline and amorphous samples in DACs show that a coarse 2{theta} scan (0.1--0.2{sup o} for crystals and 0.5{sup o} for amorphous structure) is sufficient to obtain reasonable diffraction resolution. The scanning angle energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction technique provides angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction (ADXD) data in multiple energies. Such multi-energy ADXD data carry much more information than regular single-energy ADXD, which could provide site-specific atomic structure information for full structure refinement.

  15. Student X-Ray Fluorescence Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fetzer, Homer D.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes the experimental arrangement for x-ray analysis of samples which involves the following: the radioisotopic x-ray disk source; a student-built fluorescence chamber; the energy dispersive x-ray detector, linear amplifier and bias supply; and a multichannel pulse height analyzer. (GS)

  16. Thermoelectrically cooled semiconductor detectors for non-destructive analysis of works of art by means of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesareo, Roberto; Ettore Gigante, Giovanni; Castellano, Alfredo

    1999-06-01

    Thermoelectrically cooled semiconductor detectors, such as Si-PIN, Si-drift, Cd1-xZnxTe and HgI 2, coupled to miniaturized low-power X-ray tubes, are well suited in portable systems for energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF), analysis of archaeological samples. The Si-PIN detector is characterized by a thickness of about 300 ?m, an area of about 23 mm 2, an energy resolution of about 200-250 eV at 5.9 keV and an entrance window of 25-75 ?m. The Si-drift detector has approximately the same area and thickness, but an energy resolution of 155 eV at 5.9 keV. The efficiency of these detectors is around 100% from 4 to 10 keV, and then decreases versus energy, reaching 9% at 30 keV. Coupled to a miniaturized 10 kV, 0.1 mA, Ca-anode or to a miniaturized 30 kV, 0.1 mA, W-anode X-ray tubes, portable systems can be constructed, which are able to analyse K-lines of elements up to about silver, and L-lines of heavy elements. The Cd 1- xZn xTe detector has an area of 4 mm 2 and a thickness of 3 mm. It has an energy resolution of about 300 eV at 5.9 keV, and an efficiency of 100% over the whole range of X-rays. Finally the HgI 2 detector has an efficiency of about 100% in the whole range of X-rays, and an energy resolution of about 200 eV at 5.9 keV. Coupled to a small 50-60 kV, 1 mA, W-anode X-ray tube, portable systems can be constructed, for the analysis of practically all elements. These systems were applied to analysis in the field of archaeometry and in all applications for which portable systems are needed or at least useful (for example X-ray transmission measurements, X-ray microtomography and so on). Results of in-field use of these detectors and a comparison among these room temperature detectors in relation to concrete applications are presented. More specifically, concerning EDXRF analysis, ancient gold samples were analysed in Rome, in Mexico City and in Milan, ancient bronzes in Sassari, in Bologna, in Chieti and in Naples, and sulfur (due to pollution) in an old roman fresco in the church of S. Stefano Rotondo (Rome).

  17. Synchrotron Radiation and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Applications on Elemental Distribution in Human Hair and Bones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, M. L.; Marques, A. F.; Brito, J.

    2003-01-01

    This work is an application of synchrotron microprobe X- Ray fluorescence in order to study elemental distribution along human hair samples of contemporary citizens. Furthermore, X-Ray fluorescence spectrometry is also used to analyse human bones of different historical periods: Neolithic and contemporary subjects. The elemental content in the bones allowed us to conclude about environmental contamination, dietary habits and health status influence in the corresponding citizens. All samples were collected post-mortem. Quantitative analysis was performed for Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr and Pb. Mn and Fe concentration were much higher in bones from pre-historic periods. On the contrary, Pb bone concentrations of contemporary subjects are much higher than in pre-historical ones, reaching 100 μg g-1, in some cases. Very low concentrations for Co, Ni, Br and Rb were found in all the analysed samples. Cu concentrations, allows to distinguish Chalcolithic bones from the Neolithic ones. The distribution of trace elements along human hair was studied for Pb and the obtained pattern was consistent with the theoretical model, based on the diffusion of this element from the root and along the hair. Therefore, the higher concentrations in hair for Pb of contemporary individuals were also observed in the bones of citizens of the same sampling sites. All samples were analysed directly without any chemical treatment.

  18. Synchrotron Radiation and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Applications on Elemental Distribution in Human Hair and Bones

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, M.L.; Marques, A.F.; Brito, J.

    2003-01-24

    This work is an application of synchrotron microprobe X- Ray fluorescence in order to study elemental distribution along human hair samples of contemporary citizens. Furthermore, X-Ray fluorescence spectrometry is also used to analyse human bones of different historical periods: Neolithic and contemporary subjects. The elemental content in the bones allowed us to conclude about environmental contamination, dietary habits and health status influence in the corresponding citizens. All samples were collected post-mortem. Quantitative analysis was performed for Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr and Pb. Mn and Fe concentration were much higher in bones from pre-historic periods. On the contrary, Pb bone concentrations of contemporary subjects are much higher than in pre-historical ones, reaching 100 {mu}g g-1, in some cases. Very low concentrations for Co, Ni, Br and Rb were found in all the analysed samples. Cu concentrations, allows to distinguish Chalcolithic bones from the Neolithic ones. The distribution of trace elements along human hair was studied for Pb and the obtained pattern was consistent with the theoretical model, based on the diffusion of this element from the root and along the hair. Therefore, the higher concentrations in hair for Pb of contemporary individuals were also observed in the bones of citizens of the same sampling sites. All samples were analysed directly without any chemical treatment.

  19. Structural characterization of the phospholipid stabilizer layer at the solid-liquid interface of dispersed triglyceride nanocrystals with small-angle x-ray and neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmiele, Martin; Schindler, Torben; Unruh, Tobias; Busch, Sebastian; Morhenn, Humphrey; Westermann, Martin; Steiniger, Frank; Radulescu, Aurel; Lindner, Peter; Schweins, Ralf; Boesecke, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Dispersions of crystalline nanoparticles with at least one sufficiently large unit cell dimension can give rise to Bragg reflections in the small-angle scattering range. If the nanocrystals possess only a small number of unit cells along these particular crystallographic directions, the corresponding Bragg reflections will be broadened. In a previous study of phospholipid stabilized dispersions of β-tripalmitin platelets [Unruh, J. Appl. Crystallogr.JACGAR0021-889810.1107/S0021889807044378 40, 1008 (2007)], the x-ray powder pattern simulation analysis (XPPSA) was developed. The XPPSA method facilitates the interpretation of the rather complicated small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) curves of such dispersions of nanocrystals. The XPPSA method yields the distribution function of the platelet thicknesses and facilitates a structural characterization of the phospholipid stabilizer layer at the solid-liquid interface between the nanocrystals and the dispersion medium from the shape of the broadened 001 Bragg reflection. In this contribution an improved and extended version of the XPPSA method is presented. The SAXS and small-angle neutron scattering patterns of dilute phospholipid stabilized tripalmitin dispersions can be reproduced on the basis of a consistent simulation model for the particles and their phospholipid stabilizer layer on an absolute scale. The results indicate a surprisingly flat arrangement of the phospholipid molecules in the stabilizer layer with a total thickness of only 12 Å. The stabilizer layer can be modeled by an inner shell for the fatty acid chains and an outer shell including the head groups and additional water. The experiments support a dense packing of the phospholipid molecules on the nanocrystal surfaces rather than isolated phospholipid domains.

  20. Elemental analysis of human amniotic fluid and placenta by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence: child weight and maternal age dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, M. L.; Custdio, P. J.; Reus, U.; Prange, A.

    2001-11-01

    This work is an attempt to evaluate the possible influence of the mother's age in trace element concentrations in human amniotic fluid and placenta and whether these concentrations are correlated to the weight of the newborn infants. Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) was used to analyze 16 amniotic fluid samples, and the placenta samples were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The whole samples were collected during delivery from healthy mothers and healthy infants and full-term pregnancies. According to the age of the mother, three different groups were considered: 20-25, 25-30 and 30-40 years old. Only two mothers were aged more than 35 years. The weight of the infants ranged from 2.56 to 4.05 kg and three groups were also considered: 2.5-3, 3-3.5 and 3.5-4 kg. The organic matrix of the amniotic fluid samples was removed by treatment with HNO 3 followed by oxygen plasma ashing. Yttrium was used as the internal standard for TXRF analysis. Placenta samples were lyophilized and analyzed by EDXRF without any chemical treatment. Very low levels of Ni and Sr were found in the amniotic fluid samples, and were independent of the age of the mother and weight of the child. Cr, Mn, Se and Pb were at the level of the detection limit. Zn, considered one of the key elements in neonatal health, was not significantly different in the samples analyzed; however, it was weakly related to birth weigh. The concentrations obtained ranged from 0.11 to 0.92 mg/l and 30 to 65 ?g/g in amniotic fluid and placenta, respectively. The only two elements which seemed to be significantly correlated with mother's age and newborn weight were Ca and Fe for both types of sample: Ca levels were increased in heavier children and older mothers; however, Fe increased with increasing maternal age, but decreased for heavier babies. The same conclusions were obtained for placenta and amniotic fluid samples. Cu is closely associated with Fe in its function in the organism and has a similar behavior to this element, but not as pronounced.

  1. Nondestructive characterization of municipal-solid-waste-contaminated surface soil by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence and low-Z (atomic number) particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Dhrubajyoti; Ghosh, Rita; Mitra, Ajoy K; Roy, Subinit; Sarkar, Manoranjan; Chowdhury, Subhajit; Bhowmik, Asit; Mukhopadhyay, Ujjal; Maskey, Shila; Ro, Chul-Un

    2011-11-01

    The long-term environmental impact of municipal solid waste (MSW) landfilling is still under investigation due to the lack of detailed characterization studies. A MSW landfill site, popularly known as Dhapa, in the eastern fringe of the metropolis of Kolkata, India, is the subject of present study. A vast area of Dhapa, adjoining the current core MSW dump site and evolving from the raw MSW dumping in the past, is presently used for the cultivation of vegetables. The inorganic chemical characteristics of the MSW-contaminated Dhapa surface soil (covering a 2-km stretch of the area) along with a natural composite (geogenic) soil sample (from a small countryside farm), for comparison, were investigated using two complementary nondestructive analytical techniques, energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) for bulk analysis and low-Z (atomic number) particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis (low-Z particle EPMA) for single-particle analysis. The bulk concentrations of K, Rb, and Zr remain almost unchanged in all the soil samples. The Dhapa soil is found to be polluted with heavy metals such as Cu, Zn, and Pb (highly elevated) and Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Sr (moderately elevated), compared to the natural countryside soil. These high bulk concentration levels of heavy metals were compared with the Ecological Soil Screening Levels for these elements (U.S. Environment Protection Agency) to assess the potential risk on the immediate biotic environment. Low-Z particle EPMA results showed that the aluminosilicate-containing particles were the most abundant, followed by SiO2, CaCO3-containing, and carbonaceous particles in the Dhapa samples, whereas in the countryside sample only aluminosilicate-containing and SiO2 particles were observed. The mineral particles encountered in the countryside sample are solely of geogenic origin, whereas those from the Dhapa samples seem to have evolved from a mixture of raw dumped MSW, urban dust, and other contributing factors such as wind, precipitation, weather patterns, farming, and water logging, resulting in their diverse chemical compositions and the abundant observation of carbonaceous species. Particles containing C and P were more abundant in the Dhapa samples than in the countryside soil sample, suggesting that MSW-contaminated soils are more fertile. However, the levels of particles containing potentially toxic heavy metals such as Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, and/or Pb in the Dhapa samples were significant, corroborated by their high bulk concentration levels (EDXRF), causing deep concern for the immediate environment and contamination of the food chain through food crops. PMID:22168094

  2. Relationship between dislocations and residual stresses in cold-drawn pearlitic steel analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Shigeo; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki; Suzuki, Shigeru; Kumagai, Masayoshi; Imafuku, Muneyuki; Tashiro, Hitoshi; Kajiwara, Kentaro; Shobu, Takahiasa

    2013-09-15

    We analyzed the dislocation distribution of cold-drawn pearlitic-steel wire by using the line-profile analysis based on the energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXD). Although this line-profile analysis requires a high resolution in reciprocal space, the resolution for EDXD is generally poor due to the energy resolution of the detector. Our analysis demonstrated that the resolution in the reciprocal space can be maximized at small scattering angles. Using the line-profile analysis based on the EDXD, the microstructural parameters such as the crystallite size and the dislocation density of the ferrite phase in the pearlitic steel were successfully analyzed. In addition, the distribution of the residual stress of the ferrite phase of a pearlitic steel wire was also analyzed using the EDXD measurement. - Highlights: Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction is applied to the line-profile analysis. Distribution of dislocations in ferrite in the pearlitic steel wire is analyzed. Relationship between dislocations and residual stress is discussed.

  3. Probing the Structure and Morphology of X-ray and Gamma-ray Binaries Using a Multi-Wavelength, Multi-MIssion Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, Joel Barry

    2016-01-01

    This thesis focuses on High-Mass X-ray Binaries and their gamma-ray precursors, consisting of a compact object and an optical companion. Matter lost from the companion is accreted by the compact object where the gravitational potential energy is converted into X-ray radiation. The predominant high-energy emissions in gamma-ray binaries are in the MeV to TeV bandpasses. These are attributed to relativistic jets in microquasars or shocks from winds of the donor star and pulsar powered by rapid rotation of the neutron star.I use multi-wavelength observations with RXTE, MAXI, Swift, Suzaku, Fermi and ATCA to provide detailed temporal and spectral information on several X-ray binaries and one gamma-ray binary, 1FGL J1018.6-5856.My survey of the eclipsing HMXBs IGR J16393-4643, IGR J16418-4532, IGR J16479-4514, IGR J18027-2016 and XTE J1855-026 demonstrates that the physical parameters of both stellar components can be constrained. In IGR J16393-4643, spectral types of B0 V or B0-5 III are found to be consistent with the eclipse duration and Roche-lobe size, but the previously proposed spectral types in IGR J16418- 4532 and IGR J16479-4514 were not. Also found to be consistent with the eclipse half-angle and Roche-lobe size were the mass donor spectral types of IGR J18027-2016 and XTE J1855-026.4U 1210-64 was postulated to be an HMXB powered by the Be mechanism. Long-term observations show distinct high and low states and a 6.7101±0.0005 day modulation. A sharp dip interpreted to be an eclipse is found in the folded light curves. The eclipse half-angle is not consistent with the previously proposed spectral type B5 V, pointing to possible spectral types of B0 V or B0-5 III.The gamma-ray binary 1FGL J1018.6-5856, discovered by the Fermi Large Area Telescope, consists of an O6 V((f)) star and a suspected rapidly spinning pulsar. I exploit the 6.5 yr gamma-ray data to search for long-term changes in the properties of the 16.531±0.006 day orbital modulation. The best-fit spectral model consists of a featureless absorbed power law, evidence that 1FGL J1018.6-5856 is a non-accreting system. I find the radio amplitude modulation to decline with increasing frequency, indicating the presence of free-free absorption.

  4. Probing the Structure and Morphology of X-ray and Gamma-ray Binaries Using a Multi-Wavelength, Multi-Mission Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, Joel Barry

    This thesis focuses on High-Mass X-ray Binaries (HMXBs) and their gamma-ray precursors, consisting of a compact object and an optical companion. Matter lost from the companion is accreted by the compact-object where the gravitational potential energy is converted into X-ray radiation. The predominant high-energy emissions in gamma-ray binaries are in the MeV to TeV bandpasses. Often, they are attributed to relativistic jets in microquasars or shocks from winds of the donor star and pulsar powered by rapid rotation of the neutron star. I use multi-wavelength observations with RXTE, MAXI, Swift, Suzaku, Fermi and ATCA to provide detailed temporal and spectral information on several X-ray binaries and one gamma-ray binary, namely 1FGL J1018.6-5856. My survey of the eclipsing HMXBs IGR J16393-4643, IGR J16418-4532, IGR J16479-4514, IGR J18027-2016 and XTE J1855-026 demonstrates that the physical parameters of both stellar components can be constrained. In IGR J16393-4643, spectral types of B0 V or B0-5 III are found to be consistent with the eclipse duration and Roche-lobe size, but the previously proposed spectral types in IGR J16418- 4532 and IGR J16479-4514 were not. Also found to be consistent with the eclipse half-angle and Roche-lobe size were the mass donor spectral types of IGR J18027-2016 and XTE J1855-026. 4U 1210-64 was postulated to be a HMXB powered by the Be mechanism. Long-term observations show distinct high and low states and a 6.7101±0.0005 day modulation. A sharp dip interpreted to be an eclipse is found in the folded light curves. The eclipse half-angle is not consistent with the previously proposed spectral type B5 V, pointing to possible spectral types of B0 V or B0-5 III. The gamma-ray binary 1FGL J1018.6-5856, discovered by the Fermi Large Area Telescope, consists of an O6 V((f)) star and suspected rapidly spinning pulsar. I exploit the ~6.5 yr gamma-ray data to search for long-term changes in the properties of the 16.531±0.006 day orbital modulation. The best-fit spectral model consists of a featureless absorbed power law, evidence that 1FGL J1018.6-5856 is a non-accreting system. I find the radio amplitude modulation to decline with increasing frequency, indicating the presence of free-free absorption.

  5. X-Ray Microdiffraction at Megabar Pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, H.

    2003-12-01

    High-pressure x-ray diffraction (XRD) provides unique, important sources of structural information of minerals in the Earth's deep interior, but encounters major limitations. The restriction to forward diffraction geometry (2θ less than 90° ) severely limits the accuracy. With the 50-5 μ m size x-ray beam typically used to probe samples at 30-200 GPa, the number of crystals covered by the x-ray beam is often too few for good polycrystalline XRD, but too numerous for single-crystal XRD. Single-crystal XRD method with monochromatic x-ray source and 2-d detector works satisfactorily for crystal size larger than 20 μ m, but when the crystal is significantly less than 5 μ m, the sample signals are often overwhelmed by the background. Energy dispersive XRD with polychromatic x-radiation has been used successfully to determine unit-cell parameters of smaller single crystals, but the intensity information is unusable for structural refinement because this method requires rotation of the small crystal relative to the small x-ray beam. Recent integration of panoramic diamond anvil cell1 (PDAC) with synchrotron x-ray microdiffraction2 (XRMD) method has finally overcome these limitations and can potentially revolutionize the high-pressure XRD field. This XRMD method focuses polychromatic x-radiation to submicrometer size to resolve very small single crystals, and collects Laue spots with a 2-d CCD detector. The PDAC allows complete forward, 90° , and back scatterings, while the background signal is minimized by directing the incident x-ray beam through single-crystal diamonds (i.e., avoiding the beryllium seats and gasket). The incident beam can be changed to monochromatic, tuned through the full energy (wavelength) range, and focused to the identical submicrometer spot for d-spacing determination of each Laue spot. All polychromatic Laue spots are collected simultaneously from the same x-ray sampled volume, thus reliable for structure determination. The development provide long-sought solutions to important technical and scientific issues, including the fundamental changes of silicates, oxides, ices, and condensed gases that are the main components of deep planetary interiors. 1 H. K. Mao, J. Xu, V. V. Struzhkin, et al., Science 292, 914 (2001). 2 N. Tamura, R. S. Celestre, A. A. MacDowell, et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 73, 1369 (2002).

  6. X-Ray Imaging

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Surgery Imaging Clinical Trials Basics Patient Information X-Ray Imaging Print This Page X-ray imaging is perhaps the most familiar type of imaging. Images produced by X-rays are due to the different absorption rates of ...

  7. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1990-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics is presented. Topics studied include: the soft x ray background, proportional counter and filter calibrations, the new sounding rocket payload: X Ray Calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  8. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics for the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1990 is presented. Topics studied include: soft x ray background, new sounding rocket payload: x ray calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  9. Joint x-ray

    MedlinePLUS

    X-ray - joint; Arthrography; Arthrogram ... x-ray technologist will help you position the joint to be x-rayed on the table. Once in place, pictures are taken. The joint may be moved into other positions for more ...

  10. Combination of electron energy-loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to determine indium concentration in InGaN thin film structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Chauvat, M. P.; Ruterana, P.; Walther, T.

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate a method to determine the indium concentration, x, of In x Ga1-x N thin films by combining plasmon excitation studies in electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) with a novel way of quantification of the intensity of x-ray lines in energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS). The plasmon peak in EELS of InGaN is relatively broad. We fitted a Lorentz function to the main plasmon peak to suppress noise and the influence from the neighboring Ga 3d transition in the spectrum, which improves the precision in the evaluation of the plasmon peak position. As the indium concentration of InGaN is difficult to control during high temperature growth due to partial In desorption, the nominal indium concentrations provided by the growers were not considered reliable. The indium concentration obtained from EDXS quantification using Oxford Instrument ISIS 300 x-ray standard quantification software often did not agree with the nominal indium concentration, and quantification using K and L lines was inconsistent. We therefore developed a self-consistent iterative procedure to determine the In content from thickness-dependent k-factors, as described in recent work submitted to Journal of Microscopy. When the plasmon peak position is plotted versus the indium concentration from EDXS we obtain a linear relationship over the whole compositional range, and the standard error from linear least-squares fitting shows that the indium concentration can be determined from the plasmon peak position to within Δx = ± 0.037 standard deviation.

  11. SMM x ray polychromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, J. L. R.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the X-ray Polychromator (XRP) experiment was to study the physical properties of solar flare plasma and its relation to the parent active region to understand better the flare mechanism and related solar activity. Observations were made to determine the temperature, density, and dynamic structure of the pre-flare and flare plasma as a function of wavelength, space and time, the extent to which the flare plasma departs from thermal equilibrium, and the variation of this departure with time. The experiment also determines the temperature and density structure of active regions and flare-induced changes in the regions.

  12. THE STRUCTURE OF THE ACCRETION DISK IN THE ACCRETION DISK CORONA X-RAY BINARY 4U 1822-371 AT OPTICAL AND ULTRAVIOLET WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Bayless, Amanda J.; Robinson, Edward L.; Cornell, Mark E.; Hynes, Robert I.; Ashcraft, Teresa A.

    2010-01-20

    The eclipsing low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1822-371 is the prototypical accretion disk corona (ADC) system. We have obtained new time-resolved UV spectroscopy of 4U 1822-371 with the Advanced Camera for Surveys/Solar Blind Channel on the Hubble Space Telescope and new V- and J-band photometry with the 1.3 m SMARTS telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. We use the new data to construct its UV/optical spectral energy distribution and its orbital light curve in the UV, V, and J bands. We derive an improved ephemeris for the optical eclipses and confirm that the orbital period is changing rapidly, indicating extremely high rates of mass flow in the system, and we show that the accretion disk in the system has a strong wind with projected velocities up to 4000 km s{sup -1}. We show that the disk has a vertically extended, optically thick component at optical wavelengths. This component extends almost to the edge of the disk and has a height equal to approx0.5 of the disk radius. As it has a low brightness temperature, we identify it as the optically thick base of a disk wind, not as the optical counterpart of the ADC. Like previous models of 4U 1822-371, ours needs a tall obscuring wall near the edge of the accretion disk, but we interpret the wall as a layer of cooler material at the base of the disk wind, not as a tall, luminous disk rim.

  13. Tokamak x ray diagnostic instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K.W.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bitter, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Von Goeler, S.; Hsuan, H.; Johnson, L.C.; Liew, S.L.; McGuire, K.; Pare, V.

    1987-01-01

    Three classes of x-ray diagnostic instruments enable measurement of a variety of tokamak physics parameters from different features of the x-ray emission spectrum. (1) The soft x-ray (1 to 50 keV) pulse-height-analysis (PHA) diagnostic measures impurity concentrations from characteristic line intensities and the continuum enhancement, and measures the electron temperature from the continuum slope. (2) The Bragg x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) measures the ion temperature and neutral-beam-induced toroidal rotation velocity from the Doppler broadening and wavelength shift, respectively, of spectral lines of medium-Z impurity ions. Impurity charge state distributions, precise wavelengths, and inner-shell excitation and recombination rates can also be studied. X rays are diffracted and focused by a bent crystal onto a position-sensitive detector. The spectral resolving power E/..delta..E is greater than 10/sup 4/ and time resolution is 10 ms. (3) The x-ray imaging system (XIS) measures the spatial structure of rapid fluctuations (0.1 to 100 kHZ) providing information on MHD phenomena, impurity transport rates, toroidal rotation velocity, plasma position, and the electron temperature profile. It uses an array of silicon surface-barrier diodes which view different chords of the plasma through a common slot aperture and operate in current (as opposed to counting) mode. The effectiveness of shields to protect detectors from fusion-neutron radiation effects has been studied both theoretically and experimentally.

  14. Investigation of phase mismatch in microstructure fiber with multiple zero-dispersion wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Xinying; Xing, Jingwei; Yang, Jianju; Han, Ying; Zhou, Guiyao; Zhang, Baojun; Qi, Yuefeng; Wang, Wei

    2015-08-01

    MFs with three zero-dispersion wavelengths are studied and designed by multi-pole method. Phase mismatch of this kind of MFs with d/Λ=0.40, Λ=1.8μm is studied when pump locates at all three zero-dispersion wavelengths and the wavelengths of some commonly used lasers. Numerical results show that broadband phase match can be achieved when the pump varies from the normal dispersion regime around the first zero-dispersion wavelength to the last zero-dispersion wavelength and two sets of phase matched wavelengths exist when the wavelengths of pump are in the anomalous dispersion regime between the first two zero-dispersion wavelengths. Then, a little air-hole is added in the fiber core and the dispersion characteristics of the new MFs are investigated for MFs with four zero-dispersion wavelengths. The phase matching topology of this kind of MFs with d/Λ=0.80, Λ=2.2μm, d0=0.636μm is analyzed when the pump is in the anomalous dispersion regime, zero-dispersion wavelength and normal dispersion regime of the fiber. Two sets of phase matched wavelengths can also be found when the MF is pumped in the anomalous dispersion regime between two neighboring zero-dispersion wavelengths. Interestingly, when the MF is pumped in the normal dispersion regime between the second and third zero-dispersion wavelength, three phase matched wavelengths sets appear. For MFs with multiple zero-dispersion wavelengths mentioned above, in entire phase matching band, there always exists one Stokes wave whose wavelength is longer than the longest zero-dispersion wavelength of the fiber, which will provide more possibilities for frequency conversion in mid-infrared band.

  15. X-ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2004-01-01

    The X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) instrument is a revolutionary non-dispersive spectrometer that will form the basis for the Astro-E2 observatory to be launched in 2005. We have recently installed a flight spare X R S microcalorimeter spectrometer at the EBIT-I facility at LLNL replacing the XRS from the earlier Astro-E mission and providing twice the resolution. The X R S microcalorimeter is an x-ray detector that senses the heat deposited by the incident photon. It achieves a high energy resolution by operating at 0.06K and by carefully controlling the heat capacity and thermal conductance. The XRS/EBIT instrument has 32 pixels in a square geometry and achieves an energy resolution of 6 eV at 6 keV, with a bandpass from 0.1 to 12 keV (or more at higher operating temperature). The instrument allows detailed studies of the x-ray line emission of laboratory plasmas. The XRS/EBIT also provides an extensive calibration "library" for the Astro-E2 observatory.

  16. Possibility of scanning electron microscope observation and energy dispersive X-ray analysis in microscale region of insulating samples using diluted ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Susumu; Kawakami, Tetsuo; Ze, Long; Kawai, Jun

    2012-04-01

    The possibility of scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrometry analysis in microscale regions of insulating samples using diluted ionic liquid was investigated. It is possible to obtain clear secondary electron images of insulating samples such as a rock and mineral at 5,000 times magnification by dropping 10 ?L of 1 wt% of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMI-CH?COO) diluted with ethanol onto the samples. We also obtained EDX spectra of the samples in microscale regions (~5 ?m) without overlapping EDX spectra of other minerals with different composition. It might be possible to perform quantitative analysis of the samples if a method that does not need standard samples is applied or an X-ray detector sensitive for light elements was attached. The method of dropping 1 wt% EMI-CH?COO diluted with ethanol onto insulating samples is useful for SEM observation, EDX analysis in microscale regions, and the preservation of scarce rock and mineral samples because ionic liquid can be easily removed with acetone. PMID:22364683

  17. A standards-based method for compositional analysis by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry using multivariate statistical analysis: application to multicomponent alloys.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Monika; Ahrenkiel, S P; Carapella, J J; Wanlass, M W

    2013-02-01

    Given an unknown multicomponent alloy, and a set of standard compounds or alloys of known composition, can one improve upon popular standards-based methods for energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectrometry to quantify the elemental composition of the unknown specimen? A method is presented here for determining elemental composition of alloys using transmission electron microscopy-based EDX with appropriate standards. The method begins with a discrete set of related reference standards of known composition, applies multivariate statistical analysis to those spectra, and evaluates the compositions with a linear matrix algebra method to relate the spectra to elemental composition. By using associated standards, only limited assumptions about the physical origins of the EDX spectra are needed. Spectral absorption corrections can be performed by providing an estimate of the foil thickness of one or more reference standards. The technique was applied to III-V multicomponent alloy thin films: composition and foil thickness were determined for various III-V alloys. The results were then validated by comparing with X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence analysis, demonstrating accuracy of approximately 1% in atomic fraction. PMID:23298470

  18. Performance of a gaseous detector based energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence imaging system: Analysis of human teeth treated with dental amalgam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, A. L. M.; Figueroa, R.; Jaramillo, A.; Carvalho, M. L.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2013-08-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) imaging systems are of great interest in many applications of different areas, once they allow us to get images of the spatial elemental distribution in the samples. The detector system used in this study is based on a micro patterned gas detector, named Micro-Hole and Strip Plate. The full field of view system, with an active area of 28 × 28 mm2 presents some important features for EDXRF imaging applications, such as a position resolution below 125 μm, an intrinsic energy resolution of about 14% full width at half maximum for 5.9 keV X-rays, and a counting rate capability of 0.5 MHz. In this work, analysis of human teeth treated by dental amalgam was performed by using the EDXRF imaging system mentioned above. The goal of the analysis is to evaluate the system capabilities in the biomedical field by measuring the drift of the major constituents of a dental amalgam, Zn and Hg, throughout the tooth structures. The elemental distribution pattern of these elements obtained during the analysis suggests diffusion of these elements from the amalgam to teeth tissues.

  19. Iron speciation of airborne subway particles by the combined use of energy dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis and Raman microspectrometry.

    PubMed

    Eom, Hyo-Jin; Jung, Hae-Jin; Sobanska, Sophie; Chung, Sang-Gwi; Son, Youn-Suk; Kim, Jo-Chun; Sunwoo, Young; Ro, Chul-Un

    2013-11-01

    Quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA), known as low-Z particle EPMA, and Raman microspectrometry (RMS) were applied in combination for an analysis of the iron species in airborne PM10 particles collected in underground subway tunnels. Iron species have been reported to be a major chemical species in underground subway particles generated mainly from mechanical wear and friction processes. In particular, iron-containing particles in subway tunnels are expected to be generated with minimal outdoor influence on the particle composition. Because iron-containing particles have different toxicity and magnetic properties depending on their oxidation states, it is important to determine the iron species of underground subway particles in the context of both indoor public health and control measures. A recently developed analytical methodology, i.e., the combined use of low-Z particle EPMA and RMS, was used to identify the chemical species of the same individual subway particles on a single particle basis, and the bulk iron compositions of airborne subway particles were also analyzed by X-ray diffraction. The majority of airborne subway particles collected in the underground tunnels were found to be magnetite, hematite, and iron metal. All the particles collected in the tunnels of underground subway stations were attracted to permanent magnets due mainly to the almost ubiquitous ferrimagnetic magnetite, indicating that airborne subway particles can be removed using magnets as a control measure. PMID:24069900

  20. Study of trace element correlations with drought tolerance in different sorghum genotypes using energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence technique.

    PubMed

    Abu, Assar A H; Joseph, Daisy; Suprasanna, P; Choudhury, R K; Saxena, A; Bapat, V A

    2002-03-01

    Drought-tolerant and drought-susceptible genotypes of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Monech) were analyzed by the energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) technique to study the correlation of trace elements with drought-tolerance capacities. Samples prepared from mature seeds, young seedlings, and old plants were analyzed using a 109Cd radioisotope source and a Si(Li) semiconductor detector of resolution 170 eV for 5.9-keV MnKalpha X-rays. Elements such as K, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb and Sr and Y were found to be present in varying concentrations in different samples. The trace element profile studied in the seeds of 11 genotypes and in seedlings (young and old) of 4 sorghum genotypes showed considerable variation. The genotype Arfa Gadamak (AG) showed a distinct presence of a high level of Zn in its young seedling. It was observed that in most of the genotypes (seeds), K and Fe concentrations were more in the tolerant genotype as compared to the susceptible type. The concentration of Fe decreased with maturity in the tolerant group and it increased with maturity in the susceptible group. PMID:11934249

  1. Chain-length dependent growth dynamics of n-alkanes on silica investigated by energy-dispersive x-ray reflectivity in situ and in real-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C.; Frank, C.; Bommel, S.; Rukat, T.; Leitenberger, W.; Schäfer, P.; Schreiber, F.; Kowarik, S.

    2012-05-01

    We compare the growth dynamics of the three n-alkanes C36H74, C40H82, and C44H90 on SiO2 using real-time and in situ energy-dispersive x-ray reflectivity. All molecules investigated align in an upright-standing orientation on the substrate and exhibit a transition from layer-by-layer growth to island growth after about 4 monolayers under the conditions employed. Simultaneous fits of the reflected intensity at five distinct points in reciprocal space show that films formed by longer n-alkanes roughen faster during growth. This behavior can be explained by a chain-length dependent height of the Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier. Further x-ray diffraction measurements after growth indicate that films consisting of longer n-alkanes also incorporate more lying-down molecules in the top region. While the results reveal behavior typical for chain-like molecules, the findings can also be useful for the optimization of organic field effect transistors where smooth interlayers of n-alkanes without coexistence of two or more molecular orientations are required.

  2. Rod Packing in Chiral Nematic Cellulose Nanocrystal Dispersions Studied by Small-Angle X-ray Scattering and Laser Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Christina; Agthe, Michael; Fall, Andreas B; Gordeyeva, Korneliya; Guccini, Valentina; Salajková, Michaela; Plivelic, Tomás S; Lagerwall, Jan P F; Salazar-Alvarez, German; Bergström, Lennart

    2015-06-16

    The packing of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) in the anisotropic chiral nematic phase has been investigated over a wide concentration range by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and laser diffraction. The average separation distance between the CNCs and the average pitch of the chiral nematic phase have been determined over the entire isotropic-anisotropic biphasic region. The average separation distances range from 51 nm, at the onset of the anisotropic phase formation, to 25 nm above 6 vol % (fully liquid crystalline phase) whereas the average pitch varies from ≈15 μm down to ≈2 μm as ϕ increases from 2.5 up to 6.5 vol %. Using the cholesteric order, we determine that the twist angle between neighboring CNCs increases from about 1° up to 4° as ϕ increases from 2.5 up to 6.5 vol %. The dependence of the twisting on the volume fraction was related to the increase in the magnitude of the repulsive interactions between the charged rods as the average separation distance decreases. PMID:26020691

  3. X-ray lithography using holographic images

    SciTech Connect

    Howells, Malcolm R.; Jacobsen, Chris

    1995-01-01

    A non-contact X-ray projection lithography method for producing a desired X-ray image on a selected surface of an X-ray-sensitive material, such as photoresist material on a wafer, the desired X-ray image having image minimum linewidths as small as 0.063 .mu.m, or even smaller. A hologram and its position are determined that will produce the desired image on the selected surface when the hologram is irradiated with X-rays from a suitably monochromatic X-ray source of a selected wavelength .lambda.. On-axis X-ray transmission through, or off-axis X-ray reflection from, a hologram may be used here, with very different requirements for monochromaticity, flux and brightness of the X-ray source. For reasonable penetration of photoresist materials by X-rays produced by the X-ray source, the wavelength X, is preferably chosen to be no more than 13.5 nm in one embodiment and more preferably is chosen in the range 1-5 nm in the other embodiment. A lower limit on linewidth is set by the linewidth of available microstructure writing devices, such as an electron beam.

  4. The Diffuse X-ray Spectrometer Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. T.; Edgar, R. J.; Juda, M.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Mccammon, D.; Snowden, S. L.; Zhang, J.; Skinner, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    The Diffuse X-ray Spectrometer Experiment, or 'DXS', is designed to measure the spectrum of the low-energy diffuse X-ray background with about 10 eV energy resolution and 15-deg spatial resolution. During a 5-day Space Shuttle mission, DXS is to measure the spectrum of ten 15 x 15 deg regions lying along a single 150-deg-long great circle arc on the sky. DXS carries two large-area X-ray Bragg spectrometers for the 44-84 A wavelength range; these permit measurement of the wavelength spectrum of the cosmic low-energy diffuse X-ray background with good spectral resolution.

  5. Modifications of the X-ray source and monitor at the X-ray Calibration Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newbolt, W. Barlow

    1986-01-01

    In order to test the instruments aboard the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) some modifications will need to be made in the X-ray Calibration Facility at Marshall. Several of these modifications involve the X-ray source and the monitor. The source was redesigned to increase the spectral purity of the beam and decrease its polarization by minimizing the number of bremsstrahlung photons in the beam. This was accomplished by utilizing an annular electron gun which allowed the beam to take off antiparallel to the direction at which electrons are incident on the anode. Two other features of the source are the conical anode which decreases the effective spot size and a rotatable anode and filter wheel which allow the operator to change targets without breaking vacuum. The monitor is an important part of the facility because it is used to determine the X-ray flux at the target. A commercially available solid-state detector, Si(Li), should be used along with appropriate proportional counters for monitoring. This detector will be particularly useful when energy or wavelength dispersive instruments are tested because of its good resolution.

  6. Atomic-Resolution X-ray Energy-Dispersive Spectroscopy Chemical Mapping of Substitutional Dy Atoms in a High-Coercivity Neodymium Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itakura, Masaru; Watanabe, Natsuki; Nishida, Minoru; Daio, Takeshi; Matsumura, Syo

    2013-05-01

    We have investigated local element distributions in a Dy-doped Nd2Fe14B hot-deformed magnet by atomic-column resolution chemical mapping using an X-ray energy-dispersive spectrometer (XEDS) attached to an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (Cs-corrected STEM). The positions of the Nd and Dy atomic columns were visualized in the XEDS maps. The substitution of Dy was limited to a surface layer 2-3 unit cells thick in the Nd2Fe14B grains, and the Dy atoms preferentially occupied the 4f-Nd sites of Nd2Fe14B. These results provide further insights into the principal mechanism governing the coercivity enhancement due to Dy doping.

  7. Iron bacteria in drinking-water distribution systems: elemental analysis of gallionella stalks, using x-ray energy-dispersive microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, H F; Means, E G; Olson, B H

    1981-01-01

    "Iron" bacteria belonging to the genus Gallionella were observed by scanning electron microscopy in water samples and attached to pipe surfaces in a Southern California drinking-water distribution system. The cells were recognized by their characteristic elongated helical stalks composed of numerous intertwined microfibrils. Many of the stalks were partially coated with insoluble ferric salt deposits. Stalks recovered directly from water samples were analyzed for their elemental composition by using X-ray energy-dispersive microanalysis. Silicon, aluminum, calcium, and iron were the predominant elements present in the stalks. Smaller quantities of the elements phosphorous, sulfur, chlorine, copper, and zinc were also detected. Manganese, though present in measurable quantities in the water supply, was not detected in the stalks, suggesting that this organism is unable to utilize this element as an electron donor. This represents the first such analysis of Gallionella stalks recovered from environmental samples without prior subculturing in artificial laboratory media. PMID:16345695

  8. The application of a variable-pressure scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray microanalyser to the diagnosis of electrocution: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Nishiguchi, Minori; Ouchi, Harumi; Minami, Takako; Kubota, Akira; Utsumi, Takao; Sakamoto, Nobuharu; Kashiwagi, Nobuyuki; Shinomiya, Kouji; Tsuboi, Hideki; Hishida, Shigeru

    2004-03-01

    We describe here a case of accidental electrocution. A 48-year-old male was found dead in his room. At autopsy, there was a current mark on the right thumb and big toe. Histological examination revealed that the skin wound had the characteristics of a current mark, including vacuolation and elongation of the cell nuclei. We could also identify titanium metallization on the skin surface of the current mark using a variable-pressure scanning electron microscope (VP-SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray microanalyser (EDX). The autopsy finding and the subsequent investigation support the conclusion that the cause of his death was electrocution. Our result shows that the VP-SEM with EDX is a useful tool for the forensic diagnosis of electrocution. PMID:15177075

  9. Determination of heavy metals in suspended waste water collected from Oued El Harrach Algiers River by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouziane, S.; Amokrane, A.; Toumert, I.

    2013-12-01

    A preliminary study of the atmospheric pollution in the centre of Algiers is one of the important fields of applications in the environmental science. Nowadays, we need to evaluate the level of the contamination which has an unfavourable effect on physicochemical properties of soils and plants and namely also on human health. In the present work, water samples collected from Oued El-Harrach Algiers River, have been filtered in 0.45 μm Millipore filters to be analysed by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence technique using 109Cd radioisotope source. Concentrations of the toxic elements like heavy metals are determined and compared with the published ones values by Yoshida [1] and those obtained using PIXE and NAA techniques [6].

  10. Determination of sulfur and heavy metals in crude oil and petroleum products by energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry and fundamental parameter approach

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, L.H.; Agerbo, A.

    1981-10-01

    The combination of energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence based on the secondary target excitation principle and of a quantification model based on the fundamental parameter approach provides a method for the determination of sulfur and heavy metals in crude oil and petroleum products. Samples are analyzed directly without any kind of sample preparation. For sulfur the analysis is performed under vacuum in an open cell arrangement. Further, a calibration procedure has been developed independent of both the sample matrix and instrument setting. This procedure and the quantification model have been applied to various certified reference materials and the results obtained proved to be accurate to within 2 to 5%. The precision (1 sigma) of the method is, however, better than 1.5% as long as the counting statistics are not the limiting factor.

  11. Dynamic structural change in Pd-perovskite automotive catalyst studied by time-resolved dispersive x-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Daiju; Nishihata, Yasuo; Mizuki, Jun'ichiro; Taniguchi, Masashi; Uenishi, Mari; Tanaka, Hirohisa

    2010-06-01

    Dynamic structural change in Pd-perovskite automotive catalyst, LaFe0.9Pd0.1O3, which has a high catalytic activity during aging, was studied by in situ time-resolved dispersive x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at 200-500 C. An Al2O3-based conventional catalyst was also studied. In a reductive atmosphere, both catalysts showed similar temperature dependences of structural transformation from an oxide to a metal. However, different temperature dependence was observed in an oxidative atmosphere. A faster response in the structural change was observed in the Pd-perovskite catalyst than in the Pd/Al2O3 catalyst. It was revealed that Pd-perovskite shows a considerably fast structural change to the oxidized state via the movement of Pd atoms into the perovskite crystal, in comparison with Pd/Al2O3 showing two-step structural change for making PdO.

  12. Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction study of phase development during hardening of calcium phosphate bone cements with addition of chitosan.

    PubMed

    Rau, J V; Generosi, A; Smirnov, V V; Ferro, D; Rossi Albertini, V; Barinov, S M

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this work was to study the phase transformation during the setting reaction of two calcium phosphate bone cements based on either alpha tricalcium phosphate (alpha-TCP) or tetracalcium phosphate (TetCP) initial solid phase, and a magnesium carbonate-phosphoric acid solution as the hardening liquid. Low molecular weight (38.2 kDa) chitosan was used to retard the cement's setting reaction. To follow the kinetics of the phase development, an energy dispersive X-ray diffraction technique was applied. This technique allowed the collection of diffraction patterns from the cement pastes in situ starting from 1 min of the setting process. In the case of the TetCP-based cement, the appearance and evolution of an intermediate phase was detected. PMID:18308650

  13. Structural phase transition of ternary dielectric SmGdO{sub 3}: Evidence from angle dispersive x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Yogesh E-mail: satya504@gmail.com Sahoo, Satyaprakash E-mail: satya504@gmail.com Misra, Pankaj; Pavunny, Shojan P.; Katiyar, Ram S. E-mail: satya504@gmail.com; Mishra, A. K.; Dwivedi, Abhilash; Sharma, S. M.

    2015-03-07

    High-pressure synchrotron based angle dispersive x-ray diffraction (ADXRD) studies were carried out on SmGdO{sub 3} (SGO) up to 25.7 GPa at room temperature. ADXRD results indicated a reversible pressure-induced phase transition from ambient monoclinic to hexagonal phase at ∼8.9 GPa. The observed pressure-volume data were fitted with the third order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state yielding zero pressure bulk modulus B{sub 0} = 132(22) and 177(9) GPa for monoclinic (B-type) and hexagonal (A-type) phases, respectively. Pressure dependent micro-Raman spectroscopy further confirmed the monoclinic to hexagonal phase transition at about 5.24 GPa. The mode Grüneisen parameters and pressure coefficients for different Raman modes corresponding to each individual phases of SGO were calculated using pressure dependent Raman mode analysis.

  14. Statistical assessment of heavy metal pollution in sediments of east coast of Tamilnadu using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (EDXRF).

    PubMed

    Ravisankar, R; Sivakumar, S; Chandrasekaran, A; Kanagasabapathy, K V; Prasad, M V R; Satapathy, K K

    2015-08-01

    The study of heavy metal pollution in coastal sediments assumes importance with respect to environmental ecology in view of the rapid industrialization and increased anthropogenic activities. The concentrations of Mg, Al, K, Ca, Ti, Fe, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni and Zn were measured in twenty sampling sites along the east coast of Tamilnadu, India by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF). Natural background values were used to delineate their origin as geogenic or anthropogenic. To interpret and assess the contamination status for heavy metals in sediments, four metal pollution indices used such as an enrichment factor, a geo-accumulation index, a contamination factor and a pollution load index. Multivariate statistical methods were applied to identify the source of heavy metals. Heavy metal toxicity risk was assessed using sediment quality guidelines. The presented methodology was used to determine the anthropogenic origin of heavy metals in the sediment. PMID:25956221

  15. Immunocytochemistry, electron tomography, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) on cryosections of human cancer cells doped with stimuli responsive polymeric nanogels loaded with iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Roberto; Falqui, A; Curcio, A; Quarta, A; Pellegrino, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    The cryosectioning technique is an alternative method for preparing biological material for Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). We have applied this technique to study the mechanism of cell internalization of stimuli-responsive polymeric nanogels exploited as cargo nanovectors. With respect to conventional TEM processing, cryosectioning technique better preserves the morphology of solvent-sensitive nanogels and enhances the visibility of membrane-bounded organelles inside the cell cytoplasm. In this chapter we describe the protocols we have established to perform Electron Microscopy (EM)-immunocytochemistry, Electron Tomography (ET), and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDXS) chemical analysis in Scanning TEM (STEM) on cryosections of HeLa cells treated with pH-responsive nanogels hosting short interference RNA (siRNAs) and iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs). PMID:23918338

  16. On the absence of a positive sound dispersion in the THz dynamics of glycerol: an inelastic x-ray scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Cunsolo, Alessandro

    2012-10-23

    The high frequency transport properties of glycerol are derived from inelastic x-ray scattering spectra measured at different pressures and compared with ultrasound absorption data. As a result, the presence of two distinct relaxation processes is inferred: a slow one, occurring in the GHz window and having an essentially structural character, and a fast one, related instead to microscopic degrees of freedom. While the former originates a neat increase of the apparent, i.e. frequency-dependent, sound velocity, the latter induces no visible dispersive effects on the acoustic propagation. The observed behavior is likely paradigmatic of all glass formers near or below the melting and it is here discussed and explained in some detail.

  17. The determination of toxic metals in simulated stomach contents by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis and a fatal case of mercury poisoning.

    PubMed

    Winstanley, R; Patel, I; Fischer, E

    1987-01-01

    Soup is used as a simulated stomach contents matrix to determine the lower level of detection for 16 metals. All of the metals can be detected at the levels which might be expected for acute fatal doses even if the stomach contents are considerably diluted. However where small doses are administered over a prolonged period this method may not be sufficiently sensitive. A case of fatal poisoning by the ingestion of mercuric chloride is described to illustrate the effectiveness of the method. In this case mercury was also detected and determined at highly significant levels in blood and liver by the same technique. This energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) method is easy to use, rapid and non-destructive. PMID:3428801

  18. Spatially resolved energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic method for in-situ evaluation of mechanical properties during the growth of a C - Pt composite nanowire

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Amit; Banerjee, S. S.

    2014-05-15

    A core-shell type C-Pt composite nanowire is fabricated using focused ion and electron beam induced chemical vapor deposition techniques. Using information from spatially resolved energy dispersive x-ray spectra, we detect the resonance vibration in the C-Pt composite nanowire. We use this method to measure the Young's moduli of the constituents (C, Pt) of the composite nanowire and also estimate the density of the FEB CVD grown Pt shell surrounding the C core. By measuring the resonance characteristics of the composite nanowire we estimate a Pt shell growth rate of ?0.9 nms{sup ?1}. The study is analyzed to suggest that the Pt shell growth mechanism is primarily governed by the sticking coefficient of the organometallic vapor on the C nanowire core.

  19. On the authenticity of eight Reales 1730 Mexican silver coins by X-ray diffraction and by energy dispersion spectroscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas-Rodriguez, I.; Herrera, A.; Vzquez-Lpez, C.; Apolo, R.; Gonzlez-Hernndez, J.; Hernndez-Landaverde, M. A.; Rodriguez, M. E.

    2004-02-01

    Ancient silver Mexican coins made during the years 1730-1734, were analyzed non-destructively by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and by optical microscopy. Nine coins of denomination eight Reales were studied. These coins belong to the numismatic private collection in Mexico. Six elements (copper, aluminum, magnesium, silicon, chromium and silver) were determined quantitatively. The coins reveal a uniform Ag concentration. Some of the items are covered with patina. A strong positive correlation between Al and Cu content and also a strong negative correlation between S and Ag were determined. The weight of the coins varied between 26.1344 and 26.9913 g, which is a good indicator of the authenticity of the items. The purpose of this work is to investigate by precise means if some of the coins were falsified or if really all of them are authentic.

  20. A false report of product tampering involving a rodent and soft drink can: light microscopy, image analysis and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analysis.

    PubMed

    Platek, F; Ranieri, N; Wolnik, K A

    1997-11-01

    The "Pepsi Tamperings" of 1993 resulted in a large number of cases involving foreign objects reportedly found inside canned soft drinks. Although the majority of cases involved medical syringes and metallic objects, one case involved the report of a mouse found inside a can of Caffeine-Free Diet Pepsi. Using light and polarized light microscopy and computer-assisted image analysis, trace evidence and tooth structure from the suspect mouse were matched to scratches and indentions on the suspect can. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis were used to compare and match particles of gnawed metal from the lid of the suspect can to other particles recovered from the muzzle and stomach of the suspect mouse. The forensic analyses in this case proved the mouse could not have been canned in the soft drink product and refuted the defendant's sworn statements. PMID:9397564

  1. Analysis of Catalonian silver coins from the Spanish War of Independence period (1808-1814) by Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitarch, A.; Queralt, I.; Alvarez-Perez, A.

    2011-02-01

    Between the years 1808 and 1814, the Spanish War of Independence took place. This period, locally known as "Guerra del Francès", generated the need for money and consequently five mints were opened around the Catalan territory. To mark the 200th anniversary of the beginning of the war, an extensive campaign of Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence measurements of some of these "emergency coins" was carried out. Apart from the silver (major constituent of all the studied coins) it has been possible to recognize copper as main metal alloying element. Likewise, the presence of zinc, tin, lead, gold, platinum, antimony, nickel and iron has been also identified. The obtained results have been useful not only for the characterization of the alloys, but also to determine the differences and analogies between the emissions and for historical explanations.

  2. Chest x-ray

    MedlinePLUS

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... You stand in front of the x-ray machine. You will be told to hold your breath when the x-ray is taken. Two images are usually taken. You will first ...

  3. X-ray fluorescence analysis major elements in silicate minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Hagan, R.C.

    1982-09-01

    An automated wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometer is operational for analysis of major elements in rocks and minerals. Procedures for trace-element analysis are being developed. Sample preparation methods and analytical techniques are similar to those commonly used elsewhere, but data reduction is conducted by the Fundamental Parameters program developed by Criss. Unlike empirically derived calibration curves, this data reduction method considers x-ray absorption and secondary fluorescence, which vary with differences in sample composition. X-ray intensities for each element from several standards are averaged to develop a theoretical standard for comparison with samples of unknown composition. Accurate data for samples with wide compositional ranges result from these data reduction and standardization techniques.

  4. X-ray metrology for advanced microelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyon, C.

    2010-02-01

    The recent development of bright X-ray sources, reliable X-ray focusing optics, large X-ray detectors and X-ray data modelling and processing, have improved X-ray techniques to the point where many are being introduced in MOS transistor manufacturing lines as new metrology methods. The fundamental X-ray physical properties, such as their small wavelength and their weak interaction with solid-state matter satisfy basic in-line metrology requirements: non-destructiveness, speed, accuracy, reliability and long-term stability. The capability of X-ray based metrology methods to monitor critical 65 and 45 nm processes such as ion implant, nitrided SiO2 gate dielectrics, NiSi, Cu/porous low-? interconnects and MIM capacitors is highlighted in this paper.

  5. Femtosecond x-ray absorption spectroscopy with hard x-ray free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Tetsuo; Togashi, Tadashi; Tono, Kensuke; Kameshima, Takashi; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Obara, Yuki; Misawa, Kazuhiko; Bhattacharya, Atanu; Kurahashi, Naoya; Ogi, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Toshinori; Molecular Reaction Dynamics Research Team, RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198

    2013-09-23

    We have developed a method of dispersive x-ray absorption spectroscopy with a hard x-ray free electron laser (XFEL), generated by a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mechanism. A transmission grating was utilized for splitting SASE-XFEL light, which has a relatively large bandwidth (ΔE/E ∼ 5 × 10{sup −3}), into several branches. Two primary split beams were introduced into a dispersive spectrometer for measuring signal and reference spectra simultaneously. After normalization, we obtained a Zn K-edge absorption spectrum with a photon-energy range of 210 eV, which is in excellent agreement with that measured by a conventional wavelength-scanning method. From the analysis of the difference spectra, the noise ratio was evaluated to be ∼3 × 10{sup −3}, which is sufficiently small to trace minute changes in transient spectra induced by an ultrafast optical laser. This scheme enables us to perform single-shot, high-accuracy x-ray absorption spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution.

  6. SIMULTANEOUS MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF MAGNETIC ACTIVITY IN ULTRACOOL DWARFS. III. X-RAY, RADIO, AND Halpha ACTIVITY TRENDS IN M AND L DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.; Basri, G.; Fleming, T. A.; Liebert, J.; Giampapa, M. S.; Gizis, J. E.; MartIn, E.; Rutledge, R. E.

    2010-01-20

    As part of our on-going investigation into the magnetic field properties of ultracool dwarfs, we present simultaneous radio, X-ray, and Halpha observations of three M9.5-L2.5 dwarfs (BRI 0021-0214, LSR 060230.4+391059, and 2MASS J052338.2-140302). We do not detect X-ray or radio emission from any of the three sources, despite previous detections of radio emission from BRI 0021 and 2M0523-14. Steady and variable Halpha emission are detected from 2M0523-14 and BRI 0021, respectively, while no Halpha emission is detected from LSR 0602+39. Overall, our survey of nine M8-L5 dwarfs doubles the number of ultracool dwarfs observed in X-rays, and triples the number of L dwarfs, providing in addition the deepest limits to date, log(L{sub X}/L{sub bol}) approx< -5. With this larger sample we find the first clear evidence for a substantial reduction in X-ray activity, by about two orders of magnitude, from mid-M to mid-L dwarfs. We find that the decline in Halpha roughly follows L{sub Ha}lpha/L{sub bol} propor to 10{sup -0.4x(SP-6)} for SP >= 6, where SP = 0 for spectral type M0. In the radio band, however, the luminosity remains relatively unchanged from M0 to L4, leading to a substantial increase in L{sub rad}/L{sub bol}. Our survey also provides the first comprehensive set of simultaneous radio/X-ray/Halpha observations of ultracool dwarfs, and reveals a clear breakdown of the radio/X-ray correlation beyond spectral type M7, evolving smoothly from L{sub n}u{sub ,rad}/L{sub X} approx 10{sup -15.5} to approx10{sup -11.5} Hz{sup -1} over the narrow spectral-type range M7-M9. This breakdown reflects the substantial reduction in X-ray activity beyond M7, but its physical origin remains unclear since, as evidenced by the uniform radio emission, there is no drop in the field dissipation and particle acceleration efficiency. Based on the results of our survey, we conclude that a further investigation of magnetic activity in ultracool dwarfs will benefit from a two-pronged approach: multi-rotation observations of nearby known active sources and a snapshot survey of a large sample within approx50 pc to uncover rare flaring objects.

  7. Direct rapid analysis of trace bioavailable soil macronutrients by chemometrics-assisted energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and scattering spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kaniu, M I; Angeyo, K H; Mwala, A K; Mangala, M J

    2012-06-01

    Precision agriculture depends on the knowledge and management of soil quality (SQ), which calls for affordable, simple and rapid but accurate analysis of bioavailable soil nutrients. Conventional SQ analysis methods are tedious and expensive. We demonstrate the utility of a new chemometrics-assisted energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and scattering (EDXRFS) spectroscopy method we have developed for direct rapid analysis of trace 'bioavailable' macronutrients (i.e. C, N, Na, Mg, P) in soils. The method exploits, in addition to X-ray fluorescence, the scatter peaks detected from soil pellets to develop a model for SQ analysis. Spectra were acquired from soil samples held in a Teflon holder analyzed using (109)Cd isotope source EDXRF spectrometer for 200 s. Chemometric techniques namely principal component analysis (PCA), partial least squares (PLS) and artificial neural networks (ANNs) were utilized for pattern recognition based on fluorescence and Compton scatter peaks regions, and to develop multivariate quantitative calibration models based on Compton scatter peak respectively. SQ analyses were realized with high CMD (R(2)>0.9) and low SEP (0.01% for N and Na, 0.05% for C, 0.08% for Mg and 1.98 ?g g(-1) for P). Comparison of predicted macronutrients with reference standards using a one-way ANOVA test showed no statistical difference at 95% confidence level. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first time that an XRF method has demonstrated utility in trace analysis of macronutrients in soil or related matrices. PMID:22595429

  8. Integrated sorption-energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence detection for automatic determination of lead and cadmium in low-concentration solutions.

    PubMed

    Prez-Serradilla, J A; Luque de Castro, M D

    2007-11-01

    Sorbent material packed in a PTFE laboratory-made flow cell located in the specimen holder of an energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) detector has been used for in situ solid-phase extraction (SPE) preconcentration-detection of metals. The flow cell was connected to a single-channel flow-injection (FI) manifold (for full automation of the steps and proper development of the method) by two PTFE tubes of 0.5-mm inner diameter introduced into the spectrometer specimen holder by a small orifice without distortion or modification of the instrument. The optical window open in the PTFE flow cell was adjusted to the X-ray irradiation zone of the spectrometer and fixed to it. The approach was tested by using both Pb and Cd aqueous solutions and a Dowex 50 cation-exchange resin as a sorbent, and flushing the sample through the flow cell for EDXRF measurements after removal of the sample matrix. The limits of detection and the limits of quantification (LOQs) thus obtained were 0.15 and 0.5 microg for Pb and 0.3 and 0.8 microg for Cd, respectively, values that allow the approach to be used for the analysis of drinking water by injecting a 100-mL sample into the FI manifold, taking into account the EC drinking water directives. The linear dynamic ranges are between the LOQ and 600 microg for both analytes. The method was validated by the standard addition method using tap-water samples. In addition, the integrated SPE-EDXRF approach enables the study of the variables influencing the sorption step-namely the effects of the volume of sample flushed through the column, concentrations of the analytes in the sample, breakthrough volume of the resin, elution profiles, sample pH and retention and elution flow rates-in an automatic, cheap, fast and precise way. PMID:17846752

  9. Determination of inorganic nutrients in wheat flour by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peruchi, Lidiane Cristina; Nunes, Lidiane Cristina; de Carvalho, Gabriel Gustinelli Arantes; Guerra, Marcelo Braga Bueno; de Almeida, Eduardo; Rufini, Iolanda Aparecida; Santos, Drio; Krug, Francisco Jos

    2014-10-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF) were evaluated for the determination of P, K, Ca, Mg, S, Fe, Cu, Mn and Zn in pressed pellets of wheat flours. EDXRF and LIBS calibration models were built with analytes mass fractions determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after microwave-assisted acid digestion in a set of 25 wheat flour laboratory samples. Test samples consisted of pressed pellets prepared from wheat flour mixed with 30% mm- 1 cellulose binder. Experiments were carried out with a LIBS setup consisted of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and a spectrometer with Echelle optics and ICCD, and a benchtop EDXRF system fitted with a Rh target X-ray tube and a Si(Li) semiconductor detector. The correlation coefficients from the linear calibration models of P, K, Ca, Mg, S, Fe, Mn and Zn determined by LIBS and/or EDXRF varied from 0.9705 for Zn to 0.9990 for Mg by LIBS, and from 0.9306 for S to 0.9974 for K by EDXRF. The coefficients of variation of measurements varied from 1.2 to 20% for LIBS, and from 0.3 to 24% for EDXRF. The predictive capabilities based on RMSEP (root mean square error of prediction) values were appropriate for the determination of P, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn and Zn by LIBS, and for P, K, S, Ca, Fe, and Zn by EDXRF. In general, results from the analysis of NIST SRM 1567a Wheat flour by LIBS and EDXRF were in agreement with their certified mass fractions.

  10. Forensic analysis of soil and sediment traces by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis: an experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Pye, Kenneth; Croft, Debra

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a series of experiments carried out to determine the precision of soil trace comparisons based on elemental peak height ratios determined by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXRA) in a variable pressure scanning electron microscope (VP-SEM). Experiments were conducted on 'bulk' soil aggregates, ground powders prepared from the <150 microm soil fractions and on smears of both the bulk soil and <150 microm material placed on cotton cloth. X-ray count data were obtained using area scans and spot analyses at different magnifications. The effects on elemental peak height ratios of varying the SEM chamber pressure, beam spot size, emission current and accelerating voltage were also examined. The peak height ratios for oxygen, silicon, aluminium, potassium, calcium and iron were found to show little variation as a function of chamber pressure, spot size and emission current over the ranges examined, but a strong dependency on accelerating voltage was observed. Within-sample variation in results, expressed by the percentage coefficient of variation, was found to be lowest for area scan analyses of the ground <150 microm fractions and greatest for the spot analyses of the bulk soil aggregates and the <150 microm fractions. We conclude that comparison of elemental peak height ratios determined by EDXRA can be a useful tool for rapid screening of soil samples, especially when combined with investigation of other attributes of the soil traces such as colour, fabric and the composition, shapes and surface textures of individual particles or aggregates within the soil traces. If sufficient material is available and can be readily separated without contamination or loss, higher resolution and more precise elemental data should be obtained by methods such as inductively coupled plasma atomic-emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) or mass-spectrometry (ICP-MS). PMID:16621381

  11. Single-shot calibration of soft x-ray mirrors using a sinusoidal transmission grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpilman, Z.; Ehrlich, Y.; Maman, S.; Levy, I.; Shussman, T.; Oren, G.; Zakosky Nueberger, I.; Hurvitz, G.

    2014-11-01

    Calibration of soft x-ray diagnostics is a challenge due to the lack of laboratory-size calibrated sources. An in situ calibration method for newly developed x-ray mirrors, is presented. The x-ray source is produced by laser-matter interaction, and twin transmission gratings which create two identical dispersion lines. The gratings have a sinusoidal transmission function, which produces a highly precise high-orders free spectrum. An x-ray mirror interacts with one of the dispersion lines, and the mirror efficiency curve as a function of wavelength is extracted. Mirror efficiency shows good agreement with the literature, and evidence of water layer may justify the need of in situ calibration.

  12. Redox and speciation micromapping using dispersive X-ray absorption spectroscopy: Application to iron in chlorite mineral of a metamorphic rock thin section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MuOz, Manuel; de Andrade, Vincent; Vidal, Olivier; Lewin, Eric; Pascarelli, Sakura; Susini, Jean

    2006-11-01

    The first dispersive ?-XANES mapping is presented here. The experiments have been conducted at the iron K-edge, on the "Dispersive-EXAFS" beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (France). The mapping has been performed on a polished thin section of 30 ?m of a natural metamorphic rock including different types of minerals. Because of the high X-ray absorption due to the thickness of the glass sample holder (1 mm), the data have been collected in the fluorescence mode using the so-called "Turbo-XAFS" design. The effective spot size was approximately 10 10 microns, and an area 390 180 microns in size was mapped. Improvements of the acquisition process allowed collection of each XANES spectrum in 1.5 s and with a step size of 5 microns so that 2808 spectra with full XANES information were collected. Then, automatic procedures for data reduction and mapping reconstruction were developed using Matlab. The results are maps of iron content, oxidation state, and speciation, with a 5 ?m spatial resolution after two-dimensional deconvolution. Subsequent analyses of the reconstructed images provide some quantitative calibrations.

  13. Estimation of Crystallinity of Nifedipine-Polyvinylpyrrolidone Solid Dispersion by Usage of Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy and of X-Ray Powder Diffractometer.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Issei; Shimakura, Kemmaro; Kuroda, Hideki; Nakajima, Takehisa; Goto, Satoru; Makino, Kimiko

    2015-12-01

    Crystalline state of pharmaceutical materials is of great importance in preparation of pharmaceutics, because their physicochemical properties affect bioavailability, quality of products, therapeutic level and manufacturing process. In this study, we have estimated time-dependent changes of nifedipine in nifedipine-polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) solid dispersion by measuring terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and by X-ray powder diffractometry (XRPD), and compared their correlativity. Crystallinity of nifedipine-PVP solid dispersion was changed by storing the amorphous sample at 25C-75C and relative humidity of over 80% for 0.25-24.00 h. To compare the results of two types of measurements, we have used a general method of linear regression analysis. Crystallinities estimated using THz-TDS were plotted on the x-axis and that of XRPD were on the y-axis. From the result of the calculation, the correlativity of them was confirmed. THz-TDS has the capability of becoming the replacement of XRPD. 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 104:4307-4313, 2015. PMID:26461839

  14. Chemical speciation of chlorine in particulate matter by wavelength-dispersive PIXE technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wonglee, Sarinrat; Tada, Tsutomu; Fukuda, Hitoshi; Hasegawa, Jun; Oguri, Yoshiyuki

    2011-12-01

    Chemical speciation of chlorine (Cl) in atmospheric particulate matter (APM) was performed by using a wavelength-dispersive PIXE spectrograph based on high-resolution measurement of Cl-K? emission. Samples of atmospheric particles were size-fractioned and collected by a cascade impactor at an urban area in Tokyo. The target position with respect to the spectrograph was precisely adjusted by a 2D laser displacement sensor to achieve high detection efficiency. The samples were irradiated with 2 MeV protons from a tandem electrostatic accelerator. The beam current was 300-500 nA. During the irradiation, the target was cooled by liquid nitrogen to avoid the evaporation of volatile Cl compounds. The measured spectra for the NaCl standard samples clearly showed the Cl-K? series composed of the K? 1 and the satellite K? x, K? 5 lines. From the measured X-ray yields, it was found that the chemical speciation of samples with Cl concentrations as low as ?1% is possible by this method. The Cl-K? series were also successfully observed in the case of APM samples with particle sizes of 11.0-2.1 ?m. The spectra shapes of the NaCl standard samples and an APM sample were slightly different from each other, because of some possible mixing of non-sea salt component in the APM sample.

  15. Ultra-High-Spectral-Resolution X-Ray/EUV Monochromator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    1991-01-01

    Ultra-high-spectral-resolution X-Ray/EUV monochromator depends on Bragg reflection from multilayer coats and diffraction by mutlilayer-coated grating to select narrow wavelength band from input beam. Its monochromatic output beam of accurately known wavelength very useful in testing and calibration of x-ray telescopes, x-ray microscopes, photographic films, and photodetectors; in research in biological and biomedical disciplines, x-ray crystallography, properties and processing of materials, and x-ray lasers; and in x-ray lithography.

  16. Imaging with x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L.B.; Cauble, B.; Frieders, G.; Koch, J.A.; MacGowan, B.J.; Matthews, D.L.; Mrowka, S.; Ress, D.; Trebes, J.E.; Weiland, T.L.

    1993-11-01

    Collisionally pumped soft x-ray lasers now operate over a wavelength range extending from 35--300 {Angstrom}. These sources have high peak brightness and are now being utilized for x-ray imaging and plasma interferometry. In this paper we will describe our efforts to probe long scalelength plasmas using Moire deflectrometry and soft x-ray imaging. The progress in the development of short pulse x-ray lasers using a double pulse irradiation technique which incorporates a travelling wave pump will also be presented.

  17. Ultrafast X-ray Sources

    SciTech Connect

    George Neil

    2010-04-19

    Since before the scattering of X-rays off of DNA led to the first understanding of the double helix structure, sources of X-rays have been an essential tool for scientists examining the structure and interactions of matter. The resolution of a microscope is proportional to the wavelength of light so x-rays can see much finer structures than visible light, down to single atoms. In addition, the energy of X-rays is resonant with the core atomic levels of atoms so with appropriate wavelengths the placement of specific atoms in a large molecule can be determined. Over 10,000 scientists use synchrotron sources, storage rings of high energy electrons, each year worldwide. As an example of such use, virtually every picture of a protein or drug molecule that one sees in the scientific press is a reconstruction based on X-ray scattering of synchrotron light from the crystallized form of that molecule. Unfortunately those pictures are static and proteins work through configuration (shape) changes in response to energy transfer. To understand how biological systems work requires following the energy flow to these molecules and tracking how shape changes drive their interaction with other molecules. We'd like to be able to freeze the action of these molecules at various steps along the way with an X-ray strobe light. How fast does it have to be? To actually get a picture of a molecule in a fixed configuration requires X-ray pulses as short as 30 femtoseconds (1/30 of a millionth of a millionth of a second). To capture the energy flow through changes in electronic levels requires a faster strobe, less than 1 femtosecond! And to acquire such information in smaller samples with higher accuracy demands brighter and brighter X-rays. Unfortunately modern synchrotrons (dubbed 3rd Generation Light Sources) cannot deliver such short bright pulses of X-rays. An entirely new approach is required, linear-accelerator (linac-)-based light sources termed 4th or Next Generation Light Sources (NGLSs). Although NGLSs will not displace synchrotrons from their role they do offer exciting new capabilities which can be understood from the physics of the light production in each device.

  18. Histopathologic findings and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopic analysis of experimentally induced foreign-body pneumonias in rats.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, R F; Evans, M G; Derksen, F J

    1989-11-01

    To document the diagnostic features of foreign-body pneumonias, four commonly used orally administered medicaments were instilled into the lungs of Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats in each group received a single 0.4 ml dose of either barium sulfate suspension (BaSO4), mineral oil, Pepto-bismol, or Kaopectate inoculated into a lung via a mainstem bronchus. The other lung served as a non-inoculated control. Rats were euthanatized on post-inoculation day 2 or 7 in order to document fully-developed acute pulmonary lesions and developing, chronic pulmonary lesions, respectively. Light microscopic features of BaSO4-inoculated lungs were distinctive from changes in mineral oil-inoculated lungs at both post-inoculation days. On post-inoculation day 2, rats inoculated with BaSO4 had pneumonia characterized by large numbers of alveolar macrophages containing green-to-brown granular material. There was minimal interstitial involvement. On post-inoculation day 2, mineral oil caused pneumonia characterized by giant cells and alveolar macrophages that had cytoplasms distended with variably-sized clear vacuoles. Lungs inoculated with BaSO4 or mineral oil had changed little on post-inoculation day 7 compared to the light microscopic features observed on day 2. On post-inoculation day 2, rats inoculated with either Pepto-bismol or Kaopectate had broncho-interstitial pneumonia with areas of necrosis and hemorrhage. On post-inoculation day 7, lungs inoculated with Pepto-bismol or Kaopectate had extensive fibrosis within alveolar lumens. Energy dispersive spectroscopy performed on sections of lung from rats given BaSO4, Pepto-bismol, and Kaopectate yielded a unique elemental spectrum for each compound in situ on post-inoculation days 2 and 7.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2603329

  19. X-ray (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    X-rays are a form of ionizing radiation that can penetrate the body to form an image on ... will be shades of gray depending on density. X-rays can provide information about obstructions, tumors, and other ...

  20. X Ray Topography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balchin, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some aspects in X-ray topography, including formation of dislocations, characteristics of stacking faults, x-ray contrast in defect inspection, Berg-Barrett technique, and Lang traversing crystal and Borrmann's methods. (CC)

  1. X-Ray Lasers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapline, George; Wood, Lowell

    1975-01-01

    Outlines the prospects of generating coherent x rays using high-power lasers and indentifies problem areas in their development. Indicates possible applications for coherent x rays in the fields of chemistry, biology, and crystallography. (GS)

  2. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePLUS

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film ... the dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some are: Bitewing Periapical Palatal (also called occlusal) ...

  3. Measured conversion efficiencies of P45, paraterphenyl, tetraphenyl butadiene, and sodium salicylate phosphors in the soft-x-ray wavelength range

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, S.P.; Huang, L.K.; May, M.J.; Moos, H.W. ); Stutman, D.; Kovnovich, S.; Finkenthal, M. )

    1994-06-01

    The measured conversion efficiencies at 9.89, 23.6, 44.7, and 160 A of P45 phosphor screens, as well as those of paraterphenyl, tetraphenyl butadiene, and sodium salicylate at 9.89, 44.7, and 67.6 A, are presented. The conversion efficiency is defined as the ratio of photoelectrons ejected from the photocathode of a visible detector, which are excited by the scintillated photons that are emitted from the phosphor in a solid angle of 2[pi], to the number of soft-x-ray photons incident on the phosphor. The effect of the phosphor's thickness on the conversion efficiency was studied. The P45 phosphor converts the soft-x-ray photon (10--200 A) into an order of magnitude more visible photons than the low-[ital Z] phosphors. The P45 phosphor screen used in conjunction with a photomultiplier tube offers a soft-x-ray photodetector with a conversion efficiency that ranges from 0.5 at 160 A to 12 at 9.89 A and a high electronic gain.

  4. Anomalous X-ray diffraction with soft X-ray synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Carpentier, P; Berthet-Colominas, C; Capitan, M; Chesne, M L; Fanchon, E; Lequien, S; Stuhrmann, H; Thiaudire, D; Vicat, J; Zielinski, P; Kahn, R

    2000-07-01

    Anomalous diffraction with soft X-ray synchrotron radiation opens new possibilities in protein crystallography and materials science. Low-Z elements like silicon, phosphorus, sulfur and chlorine become accessible as new labels in structural studies. Some of the heavy elements like uranium exhibit an unusually strong dispersion at their M(V) absorption edge (lambdaMV = 3.497 A, E(MV) = 3545 eV) and so does thorium. Two different test experiments are reported here showing the feasibility of anomalous X-ray diffraction at long wavelengths with a protein containing uranium and with a salt containing chlorine atoms. With 110 electrons the anomalous scattering amplitude of uranium exceeds by a factor of 4 the resonance scattering of other strong anomalous scatterers like that of the lanthanides at their L(III) edge. The resulting exceptional phasing power of uranium is most attractive in protein crystallography using the multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) method. The anomalous dispersion of an uranium derivative of asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (hexagonal unit cell; a = 123.4 A, c = 124.4 A) has been measured for the first time at 4 wavelengths near the M(V) edge using the beamline ID1 of ESRF (Grenoble, France). The present set up allowed to measure only 30% of the possible reflections at a resolution of 4 A, mainly because of the low sensitivity of the CCD detector. In the second experiment, the dispersion of the intensity of 5 X-ray diffraction peaks from pentakismethylammonium undecachlorodibismuthate (PMACB, orthorhombic unit cell; a = 13.003 A, b = 14.038 A, c = 15.450 A) has been measured at 30 wavelengths near the K absorption edge of chlorine (lambdaK = 4.397 A, EK= 2819.6 eV). All reflections within the resolution range from 6.4 A to 3.4 A expected in the 20 degree scan were observed. The chemical state varies between different chlorine atoms of PMACB, and so does the dispersion of different Bragg peaks near the K-edge of chlorine. The results reflect the performance of the beamline ID1 of ESRF at wavelengths beyond 3 A at the end of 1998. A gain by a factor 100 for diffraction experiments with 4.4 A photons was achieved in Autumn 1999 when two focusing mirrors had been added to the X-ray optics. Further progress is expected from area detectors more sensitive to soft X-rays. Both CCD detectors and image plates would provide a gain of two orders of measured intensity. Image plates would have the additional advantage that they can be bent cylindrically and thus cover a larger solid angle in reciprocal space. In many cases, samples need to be cooled: closed and open systems are presented. A comparison with the state of art of soft X-ray diffraction, as it had been reached at HASYLAB (Hamburg, Germany), and as it is developing at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA), is given. PMID:10976874

  5. Kinetic modeling of the X-ray-induced damage to a metalloprotein.

    PubMed

    Davis, Katherine M; Kosheleva, Irina; Henning, Robert W; Seidler, Gerald T; Pushkar, Yulia

    2013-08-01

    It is well-known that biological samples undergo X-ray-induced degradation. One of the fastest occurring X-ray-induced processes involves redox modifications (reduction or oxidation) of redox-active cofactors in proteins. Here we analyze room-temperature data on the photoreduction of Mn ions in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II, one of the most radiation damage-sensitive proteins and a key constituent of natural photosynthesis in plants, green algae, and cyanobacteria. Time-resolved X-ray emission spectroscopy with wavelength-dispersive detection was used to collect data on the progression of X-ray-induced damage. A kinetic model was developed to fit experimental results, and the rate constant for the reduction of OEC Mn(III) and Mn(IV) ions by solvated electrons was determined. From this model, the possible kinetics of X-ray-induced damage at a variety of experimental conditions, such as different rates of dose deposition as well as different excitation wavelengths, can be inferred. We observed a trend of increasing dosage threshold prior to the onset of X-ray-induced damage with increasing rates of dose deposition. This trend suggests that experimentation with higher rates of dose deposition is beneficial for measurements of biological samples sensitive to radiation damage, particularly at pink beam and X-ray free electron laser sources. PMID:23815809

  6. Sinus x-ray

    MedlinePLUS

    Paranasal sinus radiography; X-ray - sinuses ... sinus x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department. Or the x-ray may be taken ... Brown J, Rout J. ENT, neck, and dental radiology. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH Schaefer- ...

  7. X-Rays

    MedlinePLUS

    X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of your ... different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat and ...

  8. X-ray

    MedlinePLUS

    ... still when you are having an x-ray. Motion can cause blurry images. You may be asked to hold your breath or not move for a second or two when the image is being taken. The following are common types of x-rays: Abdominal x-ray Barium x- ...

  9. Hand x-ray

    MedlinePLUS

    X-ray - hand ... A hand x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department or your health care provider's office by an ... technician. You will be asked to place your hand on the x-ray table, and keep it ...

  10. The Need for X-Ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Ken

    2011-01-01

    For over four decades, X-ray, EUV, and UV spectral observations have been used to measure physical properties of the solar atmosphere. During this time, there has been substantial improvement in the spectral, spatial, and temporal resolution of the observations for the EUV and UV wavelength ranges. At wavelengths below 100 Angstroms, however, observations of the solar corona with simultaneous spatial and spectral resolution are limited, and not since the late 1970's have spatially resolved solar X-ray spectra been measured. The soft-X-ray wavelength range is dominated by emission lines formed at high temperatures and provides diagnostics unavailable in any other wavelength range. In this presentation, we will discuss the important science questions that can be answered using spatially and spectrally resolved X-ray spectra.

  11. Morphological and chemical changes in dentin after using endodontic agents: Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and scanning electron microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascon, Fernanda Miori; Kantovitz, Kamila Rosamilia; Soares, Lus Eduardo Silva; Santo, Ana Maria do Esprito; Martin, Airton Abraha~o.; Puppin-Rontani, Regina Maria

    2012-07-01

    We examine the morphological and chemical changes in the pulp chamber dentin after using endodontic agents by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman), and micro energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry (?EDXRF). Thirty teeth were sectioned exposing the pulp chamber and divided by six groups (n=5): NT-no treatment; CHX-2% chlorhexidine; CHXE-2% chlorhexidine+17% EDTA E-17% EDTA; SH5-5.25% NaOCl; SH5E-5.25% NaOCl+17% EDTA. The inorganic and organic content was analyzed by FT-Raman. ?EDXRF examined calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) content as well as Ca/P ratio. Impressions of specimens were evaluated by SEM. Data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests (p<0.05). Differences were observed among groups for the 960 cm-1 peak. Ca and P content differences were significant (SH5>NT=SH5E>CHX>E>CHXE). CHXE and E presented the highest Ca/P ratio values compared to the other groups (p<0.05). The SEM images in the EDTA-treated groups had the highest number of open tubules. Erosion in the tubules was observed in CHX and SH5E groups. Endodontic agents change the inorganic and organic content of pulp chamber dentin. NaOCl used alone, or in association with EDTA, was the most effective agent considering chemical and morphological approaches.

  12. Effect of 10% sodium ascorbate on the calcium: Phosphorus ratio of enamel bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide: An in vitro quantitative energy-dispersive X-ray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Poorni, Saravanan; Kumar, R. Anil; Shankar, P.; Indira, Rajamani; Ramachandran, S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The study assessed quantitatively the calcium and phosphorous loss from the enamel surface following bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide and reversal with 10% sodium ascorbate using energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX). Materials and Methods: Eight non-carious, freshly extracted human permanent maxillary central incisors without any visible defects were used. Each specimen was bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide activated by light and reversed with sodium ascorbate antioxidant gel. The calcium and phosphorous content in weight percent of sound, bleached and reversed enamel was acquired using EDAX. The Ca/P ratio was calculated from the obtained data. One-way ANOVA followed by Post Hoc Tukey test was used for comparing the Ca/P ratio of sound, bleached and reversed enamel. Results: All the samples subjected to bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide showed a statistically significant decrease in the Ca/P ratio as compared with samples in which no bleaching procedure was performed (P-value < 0.01). The striking finding was that there was a significant increase in the Ca/P ratio on application of sodium ascorbate antioxidant gel when compared with the bleached enamel (P-value < 0.01). Conclusion: The authors concluded that 35% hydrogen peroxide causes a significant decrease in the Ca/P ratio. This decrease in the Ca/P ratio can be restored by the application of 10% sodium ascorbate antioxidant gel. PMID:22114425

  13. Investigation of Sn surface segregation during GeSn epitaxial growth by Auger electron spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukamoto, Takahiro; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Hirose, Nobumitsu; Kasamatsu, Akifumi; Mimura, Takashi; Matsui, Toshiaki

    2015-02-02

    The mechanism of Sn surface segregation during the epitaxial growth of GeSn on Si (001) substrates was investigated by Auger electron spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Sn surface segregation depends on the growth temperature and Sn content of GeSn layers. During Sn surface segregation, Sn-rich nanoparticles form and move on the surface during the deposition, which results in a rough surface owing to facet formation. The Sn-rich nanoparticles moving on the surface during the deposition absorb Sn from the periphery and yield a lower Sn content, not on the surface but within the layer, because the Sn surface segregation and the GeSn deposition occur simultaneously. Sn surface segregation can occur at a lower temperature during the deposition compared with that during postannealing. This suggests that the Sn surface segregation during the deposition is strongly promoted by the migration of deposited Ge and Sn adatoms on the surface originating from the thermal effect of substrate temperature, which also suggests that limiting the migration of deposited Ge and Sn adatoms can reduce the Sn surface segregation and improve the crystallinity of GeSn layers.

  14. Role of trace elements (Zn, Sr, Fe) in bone development: energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence study of rat bone and tooth tissue.

    PubMed

    Maciejewska, Karina; Drzazga, Zofia; Kaszuba, Micha?

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the most common debilitating disease around the world and it is more and more established among young people. There are well known recommendations for nutrition of newborns and children concerning adequate calcium and vitamin D intake in order to maintain proper bone density. Nevertheless, important role in structure and function of a healthy bone tissue is played by an integration between all constituents including elements other than Ca, like trace elements, which control vital processes in bone tissue. It is important from scientific point of view as well as prevention of bone diseases, to monitor the mineralization process considering changes of the concentration of minerals during first stage of bone formation. This work presents studies of trace element (zinc, strontium, and iron) concentration in bones and teeth of Wistar rats at the age of 7, 14, and 28 days. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) was used to examine mandibles, skulls, femurs, tibiae, and incisors. The quantitative analysis was performed using fundamental parameters method (FP). Zn and Sr concentrations were highest for the youngest individuals and decreased with age of rats, while Fe content was stable in bone matrix for most studied bones. Our results reveal the necessity of monitoring concentration of not only major, but also minor elements, because the trace elements play special role in the first period of bone development. PMID:24615876

  15. In Vitro assessment of dentin erosion after immersion in acidic beverages: surface profile analysis and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Caneppele, Taciana Marco Ferraz; Jeronymo, Raffaela Di Iorio; Di Nicol, Rebeca; de Arajo, Maria Amlia Mximo; Soares, Lus Eduardo Silva

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of some acidic drinks on dentin erosion, using methods of surface profile (SP) analysis and energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF). One hundred standardized dentin slabs obtained from bovine incisor roots were used. Dentin slabs measuring 5x5 mm were ground flat, polished and half of each specimen surface was protected with nail polish. For 60 min, the dentin surfaces were immersed in 50 mL of 5 different drinks (Gatorade, Del Valle Mais orange juice, Coca-Cola, Red Bull and white wine), 20 blocks in each drink. The pH of each beverage was measured. After the erosive challenge, the nail polish was removed and SP was analyzed. The mineral concentration of dentin surfaces was determined by means of EDXRF. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (?=0.05). SP analysis showed that Red-Bull had the highest erosive potential (p<0.05). EDXRF results exhibited a decrease in phosphate in the groups immersed in Red-Bull, orange juice and white wine (p<0.05), and no significant difference in calcium content between the reference surface and eroded surface. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that all studied beverages promoted erosion on root dentin and Red Bull had the highest erosive potential. There was no correlation between pH of beverages and their erosive potential and only the P content changed after erosive challenge. PMID:23207852

  16. Effects of Er:YAG laser irradiation and manipulation treatments on dentin components, part 2: energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva Soares, Lus Eduardo; Do Esprito Santo, Ana Maria; Brugnera, Aldo; Zanin, Ftima Antnia Aparecida; Martin, Airton Abraha~O.

    2009-03-01

    The effects of laser etching, decontamination, and storage treatments on dentin components were studied by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF). Thirty bovine incisors were prepared to expose the dentin surface and then divided into two main groups based upon the decontamination process and storage procedure: autoclaved (group A, n=15) or stored in aqueous thymol solution (group B, n=15). The surfaces of the dentin slices were schematically divided into four areas, with each one corresponding to a treatment subgroup. The specimens were either etched with phosphoric acid (control subgroup) or irradiated with erbium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser (subgroups: I-80 mJ, II-120 mJ, and III-180 mJ). Samples were analyzed by micro-EDXRF, yielding three spectra for each area (before and after treatment). Surface mappings covering an area of 8060 points with steps of 20 ?m were also performed on selected specimens. The amount of Ca and P in group A specimens decreased significantly (P<0.05) after the acid etching and the Ca/P ratio increased (P<0.001). Er:YAG laser-etching using lower laser energies did not produce significant changes in dentin components. The mapping data support the hypothesis that acid etching on dentin produced a more chemically homogeneous surface and thus a more favorable surface for the diffusion of adhesive monomers.

  17. Scanning transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray/electron energy loss spectroscopy studies on SiC-on-insulator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimaru, Manabu; Dickerson, R.M.; Sickafus, K.E.

    2000-05-01

    Elemental distributions and chemical bonding states of oxygen-ion-implanted SiC have been examined using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX) and an electron energy loss spectrometer (EELS). 6H-SiC single crystals with [0001] orientation were implanted with 180 keV oxygen ions at 650 C to fluences of 0.7 x 10{sup 18} and 1.4 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup 2}. STEM-EDX/EELS measurements show that the low-dose sample possesses a buried amorphous SiC{sub x}O{sub y} layer, and oxygen concentration peaks around the center of the buried amorphous layer. On the other hand, a well-defined SiO{sub 2} layer including self-bonded carbon atoms is formed in the high-dose sample, and this amorphous region has a layered structure due to compositional variations of silicon, carbon, and oxygen. A slight chemical disordering induced by implantation is also confirmed to exist in topmost SiC layer.

  18. Effects of Er:YAG laser irradiation and manipulation treatments on dentin components, part 2: energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry study.

    PubMed

    Soares, Lus Eduardo Silva; do Esprito Santo, Ana Maria; Brugnera, Aldo; Zanin, Ftima Anto Nia Aparecida; Martin, Airton Abraho

    2009-01-01

    The effects of laser etching, decontamination, and storage treatments on dentin components were studied by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF). Thirty bovine incisors were prepared to expose the dentin surface and then divided into two main groups based upon the decontamination process and storage procedure: autoclaved (group A, n=15) or stored in aqueous thymol solution (group B, n=15). The surfaces of the dentin slices were schematically divided into four areas, with each one corresponding to a treatment subgroup. The specimens were either etched with phosphoric acid (control subgroup) or irradiated with erbium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser (subgroups: I-80 mJ, II-120 mJ, and III-180 mJ). Samples were analyzed by micro-EDXRF, yielding three spectra for each area (before and after treatment). Surface mappings covering an area of 80x60 points with steps of 20 mum were also performed on selected specimens. The amount of Ca and P in group A specimens decreased significantly (P<0.05) after the acid etching and the CaP ratio increased (P<0.001). Er:YAG laser-etching using lower laser energies did not produce significant changes in dentin components. The mapping data support the hypothesis that acid etching on dentin produced a more chemically homogeneous surface and thus a more favorable surface for the diffusion of adhesive monomers. PMID:19405732

  19. Scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry for quick detection of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in environmental water samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chengjun; Jiang, Fenghua; Gao, Wei; Li, Xiaoyun; Yu, Yanzhen; Yin, Xiaofei; Wang, Yong; Ding, Haibing

    2016-03-01

    Detection of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria has largely been dependent on targeted gene sequencing technology or traditional cell cultivation, which usually takes from days to months to carry out. This clearly does not meet the requirements of analysis for time-sensitive samples and/or complicated environmental samples. Since energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) can be used to simultaneously detect multiple elements in a sample, including sulfur, with minimal sample treatment, this technology was applied to detect sulfur-oxidizing bacteria using their high sulfur content within the cell. This article describes the application of scanning electron microscopy imaging coupled with EDS mapping for quick detection of sulfur oxidizers in contaminated environmental water samples, with minimal sample handling. Scanning electron microscopy imaging revealed the existence of dense granules within the bacterial cells, while EDS identified large amounts of sulfur within them. EDS mapping localized the sulfur to these granules. Subsequent 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that the bacteria detected in our samples belonged to the genus Chromatium, which are sulfur oxidizers. Thus, EDS mapping made it possible to identify sulfur oxidizers in environmental samples based on localized sulfur within their cells, within a short time (within 24 h of sampling). This technique has wide ranging applications for detection of sulfur bacteria in environmental water samples.

  20. Post-mortem interval estimation of human skeletal remains by micro-computed tomography, mid-infrared microscopic imaging and energy dispersive X-ray mapping

    PubMed Central

    Hatzer-Grubwieser, P.; Bauer, C.; Parson, W.; Unterberger, S. H.; Kuhn, V.; Pemberger, N.; Pallua, Anton K.; Recheis, W.; Lackner, R.; Stalder, R.; Pallua, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    In this study different state-of-the-art visualization methods such as micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), mid-infrared (MIR) microscopic imaging and energy dispersive X-ray (EDS) mapping were evaluated to study human skeletal remains for the determination of the post-mortem interval (PMI). PMI specific features were identified and visualized by overlaying molecular imaging data and morphological tissue structures generated by radiological techniques and microscopic images gained from confocal microscopy (Infinite Focus (IFM)). In this way, a more distinct picture concerning processes during the PMI as well as a more realistic approximation of the PMI were achieved. It could be demonstrated that the gained result in combination with multivariate data analysis can be used to predict the Ca/C ratio and bone volume (BV) over total volume (TV) for PMI estimation. Statistical limitation of this study is the small sample size, and future work will be based on more specimens to develop a screening tool for PMI based on the outcome of this multidimensional approach. PMID:25878731

  1. Application of Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy for Characterization of Detrital Minerals in Karst Cave Speleothems.

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Nina; Miler, Miloš; Šebela, Stanka; Jarc, Simona

    2016-02-01

    Micro-scale observations in karst caves help to identify different processes that shaped local morphology. Scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy inspection of speleothems from two karst caves in Slovenia, Predjama and Črna Jama, confirmed the presence of sub-angular to sub-rounded detrital fragments of clay minerals, feldspars, quartz, Fe-oxides/hydroxides, rutile and Nb-rutile, xenotime, kassite, allanite, fluorapatite, epidote, ilmenite, monazite, sphene, and zircon, between 2 and 50 μm across. These occur in porous layers separating calcite laminae in the clayey coating on the layer below the surface of the speleothems, and are also incorporated within actual crystals. It is likely that they are derived from the weathered rocks of the Eocene flysch. Probably they were first transported into the caves by floodwaters forming cave sediments. Later, depending upon the climate conditions, they were moved by air currents or by water to the surface of active speleothems. They might also be redeposited from overlying soils enriched with wind-transported minerals from the flysch, or from higher passages filled with weathered flysch sediment, by drip water percolating through the fissured limestone. As some of the identified minerals are carriers of rare earth elements, Ti and Zr, their presence could affect any palaeoclimatic interpretations that are based upon the geochemical composition of the speleothems. PMID:26914996

  2. Winter and summer characteristics of airborne particles inside emperor Qin's Terra-Cotta Museum, China: a study by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tafeng; Cao, Junji; Ho, Kinfai; An, Zhisheng; Lee, Shuncheng; Chow, Judith C; Watson, John G; Li, Hua

    2011-09-01

    Day- and nighttime total suspended particulate matter was collected inside and outside Emperor Qin's Terra-Cotta Museum in winter and summer 2008. The purpose was to characterize the winter and summer differences of indoor airborne particles in two display halls with different architectural and ventilation conditions, namely the Exhibition Hall and Pit No. 1. The morphology and elemental composition of two season samples were investigated using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. It is found that the particle size, particle mass concentration, and particle type were associated with the visitor numbers in the Exhibition Hall and with the natural ventilation in Pit No. 1 in both winter and summer. Evident winter and summer changes in the composition and physicochemical properties of the indoor suspended particulate matters were related to the source emission and the meteorological conditions. Particle mass concentrations in both halls were higher in winter than in summer. In winter, the size of the most abundant particles at the three sites were all between 0.5 and 1.0 microm, whereas in summer the peaks were all located at less than 0.5 microm. The fraction of sulfur-containing particles was 2-7 times higher in winter than in summer. In addition to the potential soiling hazard, the formation and deposition of sulfur-containing particles in winter may lead to the chemical and physical weathering of the surfaces of the terra-cotta statues. PMID:22010376

  3. Automatic Peak Identification in Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDS) Microanalysis: Can You Always Trust the Results?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newbury, D.

    2006-05-01

    The degree of sophistication of computer-aided scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS) microanalysis has advanced to the point where it is possible with a single command to automatically perform sequential qualitative analysis (peak identification) and quantitative analysis and then create a report of analysis with full statistical support. Often the actual algorithms employed in commercial software for each stage of the analysis are not provided or tested in sufficient detail nor are any inherent limitations in applying such "black box" software described to enable the analyst to estimate the performance. The identification of the elements responsible for the characteristic peaks in the EDS spectrum is obviously the first critical step in performing a robust analysis. Can the software be trusted to always deliver the correct elemental identification for the easiest possible case: peaks with high intensity and high peak-to-background that arise from major constituents (i.e., concentration, C above 0.1 mass fraction = 10 weight percent) and which do not suffer peak interference from another constituent? Unfortunately, testing of automatic peak identification procedures in a series of commercial systems has revealed that serious mistakes occur approximately 3 to 5 percent of the time for this easiest case [1]. Moreover, these mistakes are not random but occur systematically for certain elements. The situation is even worse when minor (C from 0.01 to 0.1) and trace (C less than 0.01) constituents are of interest or when analysis is performed under "low voltage" conditions (beam energy 5 keV or less). The prudent analyst will always use manual peak identification procedures to provide confirmation of automatic peak identification results before proceeding to quantitative analysis [2]. [1] Newbury, D., Microscopy and Microanalysis, 11 (2005) 545. [2] Goldstein, J., Newbury, D., Joy, D., Lyman, C., Echlin, P., Lifshin, E., Sawyer, L., and Michael, J., Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray Microanalysis, 3rd edition (Kluwer Academic Plenum Press, New York, 2003) 355.

  4. Prediction and observation of tin and silver plasmas with index of refraction greater than one in the soft x-ray range

    SciTech Connect

    Filevich, Jorge; Grava, Jonathan; Purvis, Mike; Marconi, Mario C.; Rocca, Jorge J.; Nilsen, Joseph; Dunn, James; Johnson, Walter R.

    2006-07-15

    We present the calculated prediction and the experimental confirmation that doubly ionized Ag and Sn plasmas can have an index of refraction greater than one for soft x-ray wavelengths. Interferometry experiments conducted using a capillary discharge soft x-ray laser operating at a wavelength of 46.9 nm (26.44 eV) confirm that in few times ionized laser-created plasmas of these elements the anomalous dispersion from bound electrons can dominate the free electron contribution, making the index of refraction greater than one. The results confirm that bound electrons can strongly influence the index of refraction of numerous plasmas over a broad range of soft x-ray wavelengths confirming recent observations. The understanding of index of refraction at short wavelengths will become even more essential during the next decade as x-ray free electron lasers will become available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths.

  5. First hard X-ray observations of the blazar S5 0716+714 with NuSTAR during a multi-wavelength campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierzcholska, A.; Siejkowski, H.

    2016-02-01

    We report the results of a multi-frequency campaign targeting S5 0716+714 in the flaring state of the source observed in January and February 2015. The observations have been performed using the following instruments: Fermi/LAT, NuSTAR, Swift/XRT and Swift/UVOT. The elevated flux level was visible in all frequencies and the outburst consists of five sub-flares. In this paper we focus on the analysis of the X-ray observations both in the soft and hard regimes for data collected with NuSTAR and Swift/XRT. This is the first time, when hard X-ray observations of the source collected with NuSTAR are reported. The studies reveal both low- and high-energy components clearly visible in the energy band, with the break energy of 8 keV, which is the highest break energy ever reported for S5 0716+714. The second part of this work is concentrated on multi-frequency observations collected during the flaring activity period. The variability patterns recorded during the period are characterized using a fractional variability amplitude and description of the flare profiles. The correlation studies reveal strong and significant relation between the optical, ultraviolet and gamma-ray observations, and no time lag is found for any of the studied relations.

  6. X-ray studies of coeval star samples. III. X-ray emission in the Ursa Major stream

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, J.H.M.M.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Vaiana, G.S.; Harnden, F.R., Jr. Osservatorio Astronomico, Palermo Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA )

    1990-03-01

    Results are reported from a comprehensive survey of X-ray emission from stars known or suspected to be members of the UMa cluster and/or stream. Of the 42 UMa member stars surveyed, 18 were detected as X-ray sources, and spectral analysis was performed for 10 stars with sufficient X-ray counts. Consideration is given to relations between X-ray luminosity, color, and kinematics of the sample stars, and the X-ray spectra of the UMa stars are discussed in the context of the general problem of stellar X-ray temperatures. Also confirmed is the lack of X-ray-emitting A dwarfs among UMa members; among stars of later spectra type there is a rather large dispersion in X-ray luminosity. This dispersion cannot readily be explained by contamination with field star interlopers and appears rather to be a property of the UMa X-ray luminosity distribution function. 43 refs.

  7. X-ray studies of coeval star samples. III - X-ray emission in the Ursa Major stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Micela, G.; Sciortino, S.; Vaiana, G. S.; Harnden, F. R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Results are reported from a comprehensive survey of X-ray emission from stars known or suspected to be members of the UMa cluster and/or stream. Of the 42 UMa member stars surveyed, 18 were detected as X-ray sources, and spectral analysis was performed for 10 stars with sufficient X-ray counts. Consideration is given to relations between X-ray luminosity, color, and kinematics of the sample stars, and the X-ray spectra of the UMa stars are discussed in the context of the general problem of stellar X-ray temperatures. Also confirmed is the lack of X-ray-emitting A dwarfs among UMa members; among stars of later spectra type there is a rather large dispersion in X-ray luminosity. This dispersion cannot readily be explained by contamination with field star interlopers and appears rather to be a property of the UMa X-ray luminosity distribution function.

  8. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction using diethyldithiocarbamate as a chelating agent and the dried-spot technique for the determination of Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se and Pb by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocot, Karina; Zawisza, Beata; Sitko, Rafal

    2012-07-01

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) using sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) as a chelating agent was investigated for the simultaneous determination of iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, selenium and lead ions in water samples. The procedure was performed using 5 mL of the sample, 100 μL of a 0.5% solution of DDTC, 30 μL of carbon tetrachloride (extraction phase) and 500 μL of methanol (disperser solvent). The experiments showed that Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb can be simultaneously extracted at a pH of 5 and that Se can be extracted at a pH of 2-3. The results were compared with those obtained using ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate as a chelating agent. For all analytes, a linear range was observed up to 0.4 μg mL- 1. If Fe and Zn are present in concentrations 10 times higher than those of the other analytes, then the linearity is observed up to 0.2 μg mL- 1. In the present study, the organic phase that contained preconcentrated elements was deposited onto a Millipore filter and measured using energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The obtained detection limits were 2.9, 1.5, 2.0, 2.3, 2.5, 2.0 and 3.9 ng mL- 1 for Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se and Pb, respectively. This combination of DLLME and the dried-spot technique is promising for multielement analyses using other spectroscopy techniques, such as laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy or total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

  9. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy/Monte Carlo simulation approach for the non-destructive analysis of corrosion patina-bearing alloys in archaeological bronzes: The case of the bowl from the Fareleira 3 site (Vidigueira, South Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottaini, C.; Mirão, J.; Figuereido, M.; Candeias, A.; Brunetti, A.; Schiavon, N.

    2015-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) is a well-known technique for non-destructive and in situ analysis of archaeological artifacts both in terms of the qualitative and quantitative elemental composition because of its rapidity and non-destructiveness. In this study EDXRF and realistic Monte Carlo simulation using the X-ray Monte Carlo (XRMC) code package have been combined to characterize a Cu-based bowl from the Iron Age burial from Fareleira 3 (Southern Portugal). The artifact displays a multilayered structure made up of three distinct layers: a) alloy substrate; b) green oxidized corrosion patina; and c) brownish carbonate soil-derived crust. To assess the reliability of Monte Carlo simulation in reproducing the composition of the bulk metal of the objects without recurring to potentially damaging patina's and crust's removal, portable EDXRF analysis was performed on cleaned and patina/crust coated areas of the artifact. Patina has been characterized by micro X-ray Diffractometry (μXRD) and Back-Scattered Scanning Electron Microscopy + Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (BSEM + EDS). Results indicate that the EDXRF/Monte Carlo protocol is well suited when a two-layered model is considered, whereas in areas where the patina + crust surface coating is too thick, X-rays from the alloy substrate are not able to exit the sample.

  10. Measurement of wavelengths and lamb shifts for inner-shell transitions in Fe XVIII-XXIV. [from solar flare X-ray spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seely, J. F.; Feldman, U.; Safronova, U. I.

    1986-01-01

    The wavelengths of inner-shell 1s-2p transitions in the ions Fe XVIII-XXIV have been measured in solar flare spectra recorded by the Naval Research Laboratory crystal spectrometer (SOLFLEX) on the Air Force P78-1 spacecraft. The measurements are compared with previous measurements and with recently calculated wavelengths. It is found that the measured wavelengths are systematically larger than the wavelengths calculated using the Z-expansion method by up to 0.65 mA. For the more highly charged ions, these differences can be attributed to the QED contributions to the transition energies that are not included in the Z-expansion calculations.

  11. A rapid, dispersion-based wavelength-stepped and wavelength-swept laser for optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Tozburun, Serhat; Siddiqui, Meena; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Optical-domain subsampling enables Fourier-domain OCT imaging at high-speeds and extended depth ranges while limiting the required acquisition bandwidth. To perform optical-domain subsampling, a wavelength-stepped rather than a wavelength-swept source is required. This preliminary study introduces a novel design for a rapid wavelength-stepped laser source that uses dispersive fibers in combination with a fast lithium-niobate modulator to achieve wavelength selection. A laser with 200 GHz wavelength-stepping and a sweep rate of 9 MHz over a 94 nm range at a center wavelength of 1550 nm is demonstrated. A reconfiguration of this source design to a continuous wavelength-swept light for conventional Fourier-domain OCT is also demonstrated. PMID:24663631

  12. X-ray Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellazzini, Ronaldo; Costa, Enrico; Matt, Giorgio; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero

    2010-07-01

    1. X-ray polarimetry: historical remarks and other considerations; Part I. Polarimetry Techniques: 2. Scattering polarimetry in high energy astronomy; 3. Photoelectric polarimeters; 4. Bragg crystal polarimeters; 5. X-ray polarimetry with the photon counting pixel detector timepix; 6. HE polarized photon interactions with matter: simulations with geant4; 7. The GPD as a polarimeter: theory and facts; 8. Ideal gas electron multipliers (GEMs) for x-ray polarimeters; 9. Broad-band soft x-ray polarimetry; 10. Feasibility of x-ray photoelectric polarimeters with large field of view; 11. Angular resolution of a photoelectric polarimeter; 12. Development of a Thomson x-ray polarimeter; 13. Hard x / soft gamma ray polarimetry using a Laue lens; Part II. Polarized Emission in X-ray Sources: 14. Probing strong gravity effects with x-ray polarimetry; 15. X-ray polarization from black holes in the thermal state; 16. Strong-gravity effects acting on polarization from orbiting spots; 17. Polarization of thermal emission from accreting black holes; 18. X-ray polarimetry and radio-quiet AGN; 19. The soft x-ray polarization in obscured AGN; 20. The polarization of complex x-ray sources; 21. Polarization of Compton x-rays from jets in AGN; 22. Polarization of x-ray lines from galaxy clusters and elliptical galaxies; 23. Polarization characteristics of rotation-powered pulsars; 24. Polarized x-rays from magnetized neutron stars; 25. Polarization properties of x-ray millisecond pulsars; 26. X-ray polarization signatures of neutron stars; 27. Polarization from the oscillating magnetized accretion torus; 28. X-ray polarization from accreting white dwarfs and associated systems; 29. Polarization of pulsar wind nebulae; 30. X-ray polarization of gamma-ray bursts; 31. Central engine afterglow from GRBs and the polarization signature; 32. GRB afterglow polarimetry. Past, present and future; 33. Gamma-ray polarimetry with SPI; 34. INTEGRAL/IBIS observations of the Crab Nebula and GRB 041219A; 35. Fermi results on the origin of high energy emission in pulsars; 36. Diagnostics of the evolution of spiral galaxies in a cluster environment; Part III. Future Missions: 37. Gravity and extreme magnetism SMEX (GEMS); 38. Programs of x-ray polarimetry in Italy; 39. A polarimeter for IXO; 40. Polarimetry with ASTRO-H soft gamma-ray detector; 41. EXIST and its polarization sensitivity; 42. PoGOLite: a balloon-borne soft gamma-ray polarimeter; 43. Studies of neutron background rejection in the PoGOLite polarimeter; 44. Observing polarized x-rays with PoGOLite; 45. Pre-flight qualification tests of the PoGOLite detector system; 46. The gamma-ray polarimeter experiment (GRAPE) Balloon Payload; 47. POLAR: an instrument dedicated to GRB polarization measurement; 48. Polarisation detection capability of GRIPS; 49. X-ray and y-ray polarimetry small satellite mission polaris; 50. GAP aboard the solar powered sail mission; 51. Hard x-ray polarimeter for small satellite missions; 52. Performance of hard x-ray polarimeter: PHENEX; 53. GRB polarimetry with POET; Index.

  13. Electron density distribution and Madelung potential in alpha-spodumene, LiAl(SiO3)2, from two-wavelength high-resolution X-ray diffraction data.

    PubMed

    Kuntzinger; Ghermani

    1999-06-01

    The electron density distribution in alpha-spodumene, LiAl(SiO(3))(2), was derived from high-resolution X-ray diffraction experiments. The results obtained from both Mo Kalpha- and Ag Kalpha-wavelength data sets are reported. The features of the Si-O and Al-O bonds are related to the geometrical parameters of the Si-O-Al and Si-O-Si bridges on the one hand and to the O.Li(+) interaction on the other. Kappa refinements against the two data sets yielded almost the same net charges for the Si (+1.8 e) and O (-1.0 e) atoms in spodumene. However, the Al net charge obtained from the Ag Kalpha data (+1.9 e) is larger than the net charge derived from the Mo Kalpha data (+1.5 e). This difference correlates with a more contracted Al valence shell revealed by the shorter X-ray wavelength (kappa = 1.4 for the Ag Kalpha data set). The derived net charges were used to calculate the Madelung potential at the spodumene atomic sites. The electrostatic energy for the chemical formula LiAl(SiO(3))(2) was -8.60 e(2) (-1) (-123.84 eV) from the net charges derived from the Ag Kalpha data and -6.97 e(2) (-1) (-100.37 eV) from the net charges derived from the Mo Kalpha data. PMID:10927368

  14. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and scattering assessment of soil quality via partial least squares and artificial neural networks analytical modeling approaches.

    PubMed

    Kaniu, M I; Angeyo, K H; Mwala, A K; Mwangi, F K

    2012-08-30

    Soil quality assessment (SQA) calls for rapid, simple and affordable but accurate analysis of soil quality indicators (SQIs). Routine methods of soil analysis are tedious and expensive. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence and scattering (EDXRFS) spectrometry in conjunction with chemometrics is a potentially powerful method for rapid SQA. In this study, a 25 m Ci (109)Cd isotope source XRF spectrometer was used to realize EDXRFS spectrometry of soils. Glycerol (a simulate of "organic" soil solution) and kaolin (a model clay soil) doped with soil micro (Fe, Cu, Zn) and macro (NO(3)(-), SO(4)(2-), H(2)PO(4)(-)) nutrients were used to train multivariate chemometric calibration models for direct (non-invasive) analysis of SQIs based on partial least squares (PLS) and artificial neural networks (ANN). The techniques were compared for each SQI with respect to speed, robustness, correction ability for matrix effects, and resolution of spectral overlap. The method was then applied to perform direct rapid analysis of SQIs in field soils. A one-way ANOVA test showed no statistical difference at 95% confidence interval between PLS and ANN results compared to reference soil nutrients. PLS was more accurate analyzing C, N, Na, P and Zn (R(2)>0.9) and low SEP of (0.05%, 0.01%, 0.01%, and 1.98 ?g g(-1)respectively), while ANN was better suited for analysis of Mg, Cu and Fe (R(2)>0.9 and SEP of 0.08%, 4.02 ?g g(-1), and 0.88 ?g g(-1) respectively). PMID:22939153

  15. Information: Use of the Ex-6500 energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometer in quantitative analysis. Component determination in noble metal alloys

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    In the early 1990s, the BAIRD Co. put new analytical instruments on the world market - EX-series energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometers intended for high-precision determination of macrocomponents in various materials over a wide spectral range with enhanced sensitivity for light elements. The high performance characteristics of these spectrometers has attracted the attention of numerous users in Europe, including Russia. In 1993-1994, several EX-series spectrometers (EX-6500 version) were supplied to a number of metallurgical works in Russia. At present, all these instruments have been put into service and are effectively used in factory laboratories. The statistical evidence available by now enables one to assess the strong and weak points of this instrumentation in solving concrete analytical problems. Data on jewelry alloys of noble metals analyzed by means of an EX-6500 spectrometer are given be- low; in our subsequent communications we intend to present results of analysis for various materials of ferrous metallurgy. The quantitative analysis of noble metals is a complicated analytical task in view of the stringent requirements imposed on the composition of such materials, which necessitates the use of high-precision analytical techniques. According to currently adopted standards in the analysis of noble metal alloys, the absolute tolerated error of parallel determinations for a confidence probability p = 0.95 must not be higher than 0.20% for the mass fraction of a particular component in an alloy up to 99.9%. Such a small error is usually achieved by using gravimetry or titrimetry, which requires time-consuming and laborious preparation of a sample for analysis. Viewed practically, the replacement of these conventional wet chemistry methods by advanced sophisticated instrumentation capable of ensuring the required accuracy of measurement, saving analysis time, and making sample preparation easier is undoubtedly advantageous.

  16. Determination of heavy metals concentrations in airborne particulates matter (APM) from Manjung district, Perak using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad, Nursyairah; Hamzah, Zaini; Wood, Ab. Khalik; Saat, Ahmad; Alias, Masitah

    2015-04-01

    Airborne particulates trace metals are considered as public health concern as it can enter human lungs through respiratory system. Generally, any substance that has been introduced to the atmosphere that can cause severe effects to living things and the environment is considered air pollution. Manjung, Perak is one of the development districts that is active with industrial activities. There are many industrial activities surrounding Manjung District area such as coal fired power plant, quarries and iron smelting which may contribute to the air pollution into the environment. This study was done to measure the concentrations of Hg, U, Th, K, Cu, Fe, Cr, Zn, As, Se, Pb and Cd in the Airborne Particulate Matter (APM) collected at nine locations in Manjung District area within 15 km radius towards three directions (North, North-East and South-East) in 5 km intervals. The samples were collected using mini volume air sampler with cellulose filter through total suspended particulate (TSP). The sampler was set up for eight hours with the flow rate of 5 L/min. The filter was weighed before and after sample collection using microbalance, to get the amount of APM and kept in desiccator before analyzing. The measurement was done using calibrated Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) Spectrometer. The air particulate concentrations were found below the Malaysia Air Quality Guidelines for TSP (260 µg/m3). All of the metals concentrations were also lower than the guidelines set by World Health Organization (WHO), Ontario Ministry of the Environment and Argonne National Laboratory, USA NCRP (1975). From the concentrations, the enrichment factor were calculated.

  17. X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Satellite X-ray experiments and ground-based programs aimed at observation of X-ray binaries are discussed. Experiments aboard OAO-3, OSO-8, Ariel 5, Uhuru, and Skylab are included along with rocket and ground-based observations. Major topics covered are: Her X-1, Cyg X-3, Cen X-3, Cyg X-1, the transient source A0620-00, other possible X-ray binaries, and plans and prospects for future observational programs.

  18. Quick measurement of crystal truncation rod profiles in simultaneous multi-wavelength dispersive mode

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, T.; Tajiri, H.; Takahashi, T.; Shirasawa, T.; Arakawa, E.; Toyokawa, H.

    2011-11-15

    To conduct time-resolved measurements in the wide momentum transfer (q = 4{pi} sin{theta}/{lambda}, {theta}: the glancing angle of the x-ray beam, {lambda}: x-ray wavelength) range of interest, we developed a method that can simultaneously measure the whole profile of x-ray diffraction and crystal truncation rod scattering of interest with no need of rotation of the specimen, detector, and monochromator crystal during the measurement. With a curved crystal polychromator (Si 111 diffraction), a horizontally convergent x-ray beam having a one-to-one correlation between wavelength (energy: 16.24-23.0 keV) and direction is produced. The convergent x-ray beam components of different wavelengths are incident on the specimen in a geometry where {theta} is the same for all the x-ray components and are diffracted within corresponding vertical scattering planes by a specimen ([GaAs(12ML)/AlAs(8 ML)]{sub 50} on GaAs(001) substrate) placed at the focal point. Although {theta} is the same for all the directions, q continuously varies because {lambda} changes as a function of direction. The normalized horizontal intensity distribution across the beam, as measured using a two-dimensional pixel array detector downstream of the specimen, represents the reflectivity curve profile both near to and far from the Bragg point. As for the crystal truncation rod scattering around the 002 reflection, the diffraction profile from the Bragg peak down to reflectivity of 1.0 x 10{sup -9} was measured with a sufficient data collection time (1000-2000 s). With data collection times of 100, 10, 1.0, and 0.1 s, profiles down to a reflectivity of {approx}6 x 10{sup -9}, {approx}2 x 10{sup -8}, {approx}8 x 10{sup -8}, and {approx}8 x 10{sup -7} were measured, respectively. To demonstrate the time-resolving capability of the system, reflectivity curves were measured with time resolutions of 1.0 s while rotating the specimen. We have also measured the diffraction profile around the 113 reflection in the non-specular reflection geometry.

  19. A Synthesis Of Cosmic X-ray And Infrared Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yong; Helou, G.; Armus, L.; Stierwalt, S.

    2012-01-01

    We present a synthesis model of cosmic IR and X-ray background, with the goal to derive a complete census of cosmic evolution of star formation (SF) and black-hole (BH) growth by complementing advantages of X-ray and IR surveys to each other. By assuming that individual galaxies are experiencing both SF and BH accretion, our model decomposes the total IR LF into SF and BH components while taking into account the luminosity-dependent SED and its dispersion of the SF component, and the extinction-dependent SED of the BH component. The best-fit parameters are derived by fitting to the number counts and redshift distributions at X-ray including both hard and soft bands, and mid-IR to submm bands including IRAS, Spitzer, Herschel, SCUBA, Aztec and MAMBO. Based on the fit result, our models provide a series of predictions on galaxy evolution and black-hole growth. For evolution of infrared galaxies, the model predicts that the total infrared luminosity function is best described through evolution in both luminosity and density. For evolution of AGN populations, the model predicts that the evolution of X-ray LF also shows luminosity and density dependent, that the type-1/type-2 AGN fraction is a function of both luminosity and redshift, and that the Compton-thick AGN number density evolves strongly with redshift, contributing about 20% to the total cosmic BH growth. For BH growth in IR galaxies, the model predicts that the majority of BH growth at z>1 occurs in infrared luminous galaxies and the AGN fraction as a function of IR survey is a strong function of the survey depth, ranging from >50% at bright end to below 10% at faint end. We also evaluates various AGN selection techniques at X-ray and IR wavelengths and offer predictions for future missions at X-ray and IR.

  20. White beam x-ray waveguide optics

    SciTech Connect

    Jarre, A.; Salditt, T.; Panzner, T.; Pietsch, U.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2004-07-12

    We report a white beam x-ray waveguide (WG) experiment. A resonant beam coupler x-ray waveguide (RBC) is used simultaneously as a broad bandpass (or multibandpass) monochromator and as a beam compressor. We show that, depending on the geometrical properties of the WG, the exiting beam consists of a defined number of wavelengths which can be shifted by changing the angle of incidence of the white x-ray synchrotron beam. The characteristic far-field pattern is recorded as a function of exit angle and energy. This x-ray optical setup may be used to enhance the intensity of coherent x-ray WG beams since the full energetic acceptance of the WG mode is transmitted.

  1. MASS CALIBRATION AND COSMOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE SPT-SZ GALAXY CLUSTER SAMPLE USING VELOCITY DISPERSION ? {sub v} AND X-RAY Y {sub X} MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Bocquet, S.; Saro, A.; Mohr, J. J.; Bazin, G.; Chiu, I.; Desai, S.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bayliss, M.; Bautz, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Brodwin, M.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; De Haan, T.; and others

    2015-02-01

    We present a velocity-dispersion-based mass calibration of the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect survey (SPT-SZ) galaxy cluster sample. Using a homogeneously selected sample of 100 cluster candidates from 720deg{sup 2} of the survey along with 63 velocity dispersion (? {sub v}) and 16 X-ray Y {sub X} measurements of sample clusters, we simultaneously calibrate the mass-observable relation and constrain cosmological parameters. Our method accounts for cluster selection, cosmological sensitivity, and uncertainties in the mass calibrators. The calibrations using ? {sub v} and Y {sub X} are consistent at the 0.6? level, with the ? {sub v} calibration preferring ?16% higher masses. We use the full SPT{sub CL} data set (SZ clusters+? {sub v}+Y {sub X}) to measure ?{sub 8}(?{sub m}/0.27){sup 0.3} = 0.809 0.036 within a flat ?CDM model. The SPT cluster abundance is lower than preferred by either the WMAP9 or Planck+WMAP9 polarization (WP) data, but assuming that the sum of the neutrino masses is ?m {sub ?} = 0.06 eV, we find the data sets to be consistent at the 1.0? level for WMAP9 and 1.5? for Planck+WP. Allowing for larger ?m {sub ?} further reconciles the results. When we combine the SPT{sub CL} and Planck+WP data sets with information from baryon acoustic oscillations and TypeIa supernovae, the preferred cluster masses are 1.9? higher than the Y {sub X} calibration and 0.8? higher than the ? {sub v} calibration. Given the scale of these shifts (?44% and ?23% in mass, respectively), we execute a goodness-of-fit test; it reveals no tension, indicating that the best-fit model provides an adequate description of the data. Using the multi-probe data set, we measure ?{sub m} = 0.299 0.009 and ?{sub 8} = 0.829 0.011. Within a ?CDM model we find ?m {sub ?} = 0.148 0.081 eV. We present a consistency test of the cosmic growth rate using SPT clusters. Allowing both the growth index ? and the dark energy equation-of-state parameter w to vary, we find ? = 0.73 0.28 and w = 1.007 0.065, demonstrating that the expansion and the growth histories are consistent with a ?CDM universe (? = 0.55; w = 1)

  2. Multi-wavelength study of X-ray luminous clusters at z ~ 0.3. I. Star-formation activity of cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braglia, F. G.; Pierini, D.; Biviano, A.; Bhringer, H.

    2009-06-01

    Context: The current paradigm of cosmic formation and evolution of galaxy clusters foresees growth mostly through merging. Galaxies in the infall region or in the core of a cluster undergo transformations owing to different environmental stresses. Aims: For two X-ray luminous clusters at redshift z 0.3 with opposite X-ray morphologies (i.e., dynamical states), RXCJ 0014.3-3022 and RXCJ 2308.3-0211, we assess differences in galaxy populations as a function of cluster topography. This is a pilot study for the joint X-ray and optical analysis of the REFLEX-DXL cluster sample. Methods: Cluster large-scale structure and substructure are determined from the combined photometry in the B, V, and R bands, and from multi-object optical spectroscopy at low resolution. Photometric redshifts and broad-band optical colours are determined. A spectral index analysis is performed, based on the [O II](??3726, 3728 ) and H?(?4102 ) features, and the D4000 break, which are available for more than 100 member galaxies per cluster. Additional far-ultraviolet (FUV) photometry is retrieved from the GALEX archive. Combination of spectral indices and FUV-optical colours provides a picture of the star-formation history in galaxies. Results: In spite of the potential presence of a small fraction of galaxies with obscured star-formation activity, the average star-formation history of cluster members is found to depend on clustercentric distance and, more interestingly, on cluster substructure. The core regions of both clusters mainly host galaxies dominated by old, passively evolving stellar populations, which define the same red sequence in a (B-R) colour-R magnitude diagram. However, a sharp increase in star-formation activity is found along two clearly evident filamentary structures of the merging cluster RXCJ 0014.3-3022, out to its virial radius and beyond. It is produced by luminous (i.e., LR ? LRstar) and sub-Lstar galaxies. In contrast, the regular cool-core cluster RXCJ 2308.3-0211 mostly hosts galaxies that either populate the red sequence or are becoming more passive. This finding holds out to the cluster virial radius, and also for its immediate large-scale environment. Conclusions: These results suggest the existence of a correspondence between assembly state and overall age of the stellar populations of galaxies inside the virialized region and in the surrounding large-scale structure of massive clusters at z 0.3. Tables 9 and 10 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/500/947

  3. X-ray - skeleton

    MedlinePLUS

    A skeletal x-ray is an imaging test used to look at the bones. It is used to detect fractures , tumors, or conditions ... the health care provider's office by an x-ray technologist. You will lie on a table or ...

  4. Extremity x-ray

    MedlinePLUS

    An extremity x-ray is an image of the hands, wrist, feet, ankle, leg, thigh, forearm humerus or upper arm, hip, shoulder ... term "extremity" often refers to a human limb. X-rays are a form of radiation that passes through ...

  5. Chest X-Ray

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

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  6. Technological challenges to X-ray FELs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter

    2000-05-01

    There is strong interest in the development of X-ray Free Electron Lasers (X-ray FELs). The interest is driven by the scientific opportunities provided by intense, coherent X-rays. An X-ray FEL has all the characteristics of a fourth-generation source: brightness several orders of magnitude greater than presently achieved in third-generation sources, full transverse coherence, and sub-picosecond long pulses. The SLAC and DESY laboratories have presented detailed design studies for X-ray FEL user-facilities around the 0.1 nm wavelength regime (LCLS at SLAC, TESLA X-ray FEL at DESY). Both laboratories are engaged in proof-of-principle experiments at longer wavelengths (TTF FEL Phase I at 71 nm, VISA at 600-800 nm) with results expected in 1999. The technologies needed to achieve the proposed performances are those of bright electron sources, of acceleration systems capable of preserving the brightness of the source, and of undulators capable of meeting the magnetic and mechanical tolerances that are required for operation in the SASE mode. This paper discusses the technological challenges presented by the X-ray FEL projects.

  7. Quantitative Measurements of X-ray Intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Haugh, M. J., Schneider, M.

    2011-09-01

    This chapter describes the characterization of several X-ray sources and their use in calibrating different types of X-ray cameras at National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). The cameras are employed in experimental plasma studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), including the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The sources provide X-rays in the energy range from several hundred eV to 110 keV. The key to this effort is measuring the X-ray beam intensity accurately and traceable to international standards. This is accomplished using photodiodes of several types that are calibrated using radioactive sources and a synchrotron source using methods and materials that are traceable to the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The accreditation procedures are described. The chapter begins with an introduction to the fundamental concepts of X-ray physics. The types of X-ray sources that are used for device calibration are described. The next section describes the photodiode types that are used for measuring X-ray intensity: power measuring photodiodes, energy dispersive photodiodes, and cameras comprising photodiodes as pixel elements. Following their description, the methods used to calibrate the primary detectors, the power measuring photodiodes and the energy dispersive photodiodes, as well as the method used to get traceability to international standards are described. The X-ray source beams can then be measured using the primary detectors. The final section then describes the use of the calibrated X-ray beams to calibrate X-ray cameras. Many of the references are web sites that provide databases, explanations of the data and how it was generated, and data calculations for specific cases. Several general reference books related to the major topics are included. Papers expanding some subjects are cited.

  8. The high energy X-ray universe

    PubMed Central

    Giacconi, Riccardo

    2010-01-01

    Since its beginning in the early 1960s, the field of X-ray astronomy has exploded, experiencing a ten-billion-fold increase in sensitivity, which brought it on par with the most advanced facilities at all wavelengths. I will briefly describe the revolutionary first discoveries prior to the launch of the Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observatories, present some of the current achievements, and offer some thoughts about the future of this field. PMID:20404148

  9. X-ray spectroscopy of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culhane, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    After a brief review of the nature of the solar corona, the X-ray output of solar flares is discussed in some detail with particular reference to emission line excitation mechanisms and to the information that can be obtained about the flare plasma from studies of the intensities, profiles and wavelengths of these lines. The X-ray crystal spectrometers on the NASA Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft are described and the interpretation of the spectra obtained with these instruments is discussed.

  10. Analysis of eight argonne premium coal samples by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, J.R.; Sellers, G.A.; Johnson, R.G.; Vivit, D.V.; Kent, J.

    1990-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectrometric methods were used in the analysis of eight Argonne Premium Coal Samples. Trace elements (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Ba, La, and Ce) in coal ash were determined by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry; major elements (Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, and Fe) in coal ash and trace elements (Cl and P) in whole coal were determined by wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The results of this study will be used in a geochemical database compiled for these materials from various analytical techniques. The experimental XRF methods and procedures used to determine these major and trace elements are described.

  11. High-sensitivity x-ray absorption fine structure investigation of arsenic shallow implant in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, H.; Yoshiki, M.; Takemura, M.; Tomita, M.; Takeno, S.

    2009-08-01

    High-sensitivity fluorescence-yield x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) has been investigated to characterize the local structure around arsenic shallow implant in silicon. Fluorescence-yield XAFS experiments were performed using a high-brilliance synchrotron radiation beam from an in-vacuum-type undulator in a third-generation light source. In addition to investigating the efficiency of high-brilliance undulator x-rays during the fluorescence-yield XAFS measurements, we compared the analytical performance of both the wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) and the energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) based on the silicon drift detector (SDD). It was confirmed that the WDS reduces the influence of scattering background due to the high spectral resolution. Another advantage of the WDS is high counting rate measurements. It was found that fluorescence-yield XAFS using undulator x-rays combined with the WDS permits superior sensitivity measurements.

  12. Chemical Analysis of Reaction Rims on Olivine Crystals in Natural Samples of Black Dacite Using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy, Lassen Peak, CA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    Lassen Volcanic Center is the southernmost volcanic region in the Cascade volcanic arc formed by the Cascadia Subduction Zone. Lassen Peak last erupted in 1915 in an arc related event producing a black dacite material containing xenocrystic olivine grains with apparent orthopyroxene reaction rims. The reaction rims on these olivine grains are believed to have formed by reactions that ensued from a mixing/mingling event that occurred prior to eruption between the admixed mafic andesitic magma and a silicic dacite host material. Natural samples of the 1915 black dacite from Lassen Peak, CA were prepared into 15 polished thin sections and carbon coated for analysis using a FEI Quanta 250 Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) to identify and measure mineral textures and disequilibrium reaction rims. Observed mineralogical textures related to magma mixing include biotite and amphibole grains with apparent dehydration/breakdown rims, pyroxene-rimmed quartz grains, high concentration of microlites in glass matrix, and pyroxene/amphibole reaction rims on olivine grains. Olivine dissolution is evidenced as increased iron concentration toward convolute edges of olivine grains as observed by Backscatter Electron (BSE) imagery and elemental mapping using NSS spectral imaging software. In an attempt to quantify the area of reaction rim growth on olivine grains within these samples, high-resolution BSE images of 30 different olivine grains were collected along with Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) of different phases. Olivine cores and rims were extracted from BSE images using Photoshop and saved as separate image files. ImageJ software was used to calculate the area (μm2) of the core and rim of these grains. Average pyroxene reaction rim width for 30 grains was determined to be 11.68+/-1.65 μm. Rim widths of all 30 grains were averaged together to produce an overall average rim width for the Lassen Peak black dacite. By quantifying the reaction rims on olivine grains in the natural samples of Lassen Peak dacite as well as the bulk chemistry of the rock, this provides insight into the storage conditions of the magma chamber and the timing necessary for reactions to form these specific volcanic textures which in turn can be used as a basis for better understanding future experimental reconstruction of this magmatic system.

  13. Absolute Timing of the Crab Pulsar: X-ray, Radio, and Optical Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, P. S.; Wood, K. S.; Wolff, M. T.; Lovellette, M. N.; Sheikh, S.; Moon, D.-S.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Roberts, M.; Bloom, E. D.; Tournear, D.; Saz Parkinson, P.; Reilly, K.

    2002-12-01

    We report on multiwavelength observations of the Crab Pulsar and compare the pulse arrival time at radio, IR, optical, and X-ray wavelengths. Comparing absolute arrival times at multiple energies can provide clues to the magnetospheric structure and emission region geometry. Absolute time calibration of each observing system is of paramount importance for these observations and we describe how this is done for each system. We directly compare arrival time determinations for 2--10 keV X-ray observations made contemporaneously with the PCA on the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and the USA Experiment on ARGOS. These two X-ray measurements employ very different means of measuring time and satellite position and thus have different systematic error budgets. The comparison with other wavelengths requires additional steps such as dispersion measure corrections and a precise definition of the ``peak'' of the light curve since the light curve shape varies with observing wavelength. We will describe each of these effects and quantify the magnitude of the systematic error that each may contribute. Basic research on X-ray Astronomy at NRL is funded by NRL/ONR.

  14. Influence by x-ray facula on dimension measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xulei; Li, Ye; Duanmu, Qingduo; Zhao, Peng

    2015-03-01

    Based on the imaging features of the original image intensifier of X-ray, the light halo caused by X-ray projective halation is analyzed, the result shows the stray X-ray energy is lower than the direct X-ray energy. The screen brightness generated by the image intensifier of X-ray stimulated by the stray X-ray energy is weaker than that generated by the direct X-ray energy. In addition the projector facula reflected from the direct X-ray is focused on the central region of X-ray image intensifier, therefore a toroidal ring similar to the solar halation is formed around the projector halation. The results of the theoretical analysis and experimental discovery show this phenomenon caused by X-ray tube on X-ray image intensifier can not be eliminated and in the system of X-ray size detection composed of them the X-ray halation will reduce the detection accuracy resulting in measurement results' deviation dispersion under given conditions. This kind of nonlinear system error can not be canceled out by the segmented modification of coefficient compensation but it can be restrained through the adjustment of correction coefficients. After the physical testing and comparison of the physical normal size the accuracy of 0.1mm of the compensated X-ray measurement results after the adjustment of correction coefficient has been reached. The results are highly reproducible and the method of the segmented coefficient compensation has been improved.

  15. X-ray crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    X-rays diffracted from a well-ordered protein crystal create sharp patterns of scattered light on film. A computer can use these patterns to generate a model of a protein molecule. To analyze the selected crystal, an X-ray crystallographer shines X-rays through the crystal. Unlike a single dental X-ray, which produces a shadow image of a tooth, these X-rays have to be taken many times from different angles to produce a pattern from the scattered light, a map of the intensity of the X-rays after they diffract through the crystal. The X-rays bounce off the electron clouds that form the outer structure of each atom. A flawed crystal will yield a blurry pattern; a well-ordered protein crystal yields a series of sharp diffraction patterns. From these patterns, researchers build an electron density map. With powerful computers and a lot of calculations, scientists can use the electron density patterns to determine the structure of the protein and make a computer-generated model of the structure. The models let researchers improve their understanding of how the protein functions. They also allow scientists to look for receptor sites and active areas that control a protein's function and role in the progress of diseases. From there, pharmaceutical researchers can design molecules that fit the active site, much like a key and lock, so that the protein is locked without affecting the rest of the body. This is called structure-based drug design.

  16. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePLUS

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... The test is done in a hospital radiology department or in the health care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  17. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    MedlinePLUS

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... The test is done in a hospital x-ray department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to lie on the x-ray table ...

  18. Panoramic Dental X-Ray

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the limitations of Panoramic X-ray? What is Panoramic X-ray? Panoramic radiography , also called panoramic x-ray , is ... top of page What are the limitations of Panoramic X-ray? A panoramic x-ray does not provide precise ...

  19. X-ray superbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cash, W.

    Four regions of the galaxy, the Cygnus Superbubble, the Eta Carina complex, the Orion/Eridanus complex, and the Gum Nebula, are discussed as examples of collective effects in the interstellar medium. All four regions share certain features, indicating a common structure. The selection effects which determine the observable X-ray properties of the superbubbles are discussed, and it is demonstrated that only a very few more in our Galaxy can be detected in X rays. X-ray observation of extragalactic superbubbles is shown to be possible but requires the capabilities of a large, high quality, AXAF class observatory.

  20. X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph (Livermore, CA)

    1991-01-01

    An X-ray laser (10) that lases between the K edges of carbon and oxygen, i.e. between 44 and 23 Angstroms, is provided. The laser comprises a silicon (12) and dysprosium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like dysprosium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped to their upper X-ray laser state by line emission from hydrogen-like silicon ions (32). The novel X-ray laser should prove especially useful for the microscopy of biological specimens.

  1. SASE free electron lasers as short wavelength coherent sources. From first results at 100 nm to a 1 X-ray laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treusch, R.; Feldhaus, J.

    2003-10-01

    During the last few years free electron lasers (FELs) based on self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) have been demonstrated at wavelengths of 12 ?m [CITE], 830 nm [CITE], 530 nm [CITE] and 385 nm [CITE], and around 100 nm [CITE]. Recently, saturation has been observed in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral region between 82 nm and 125 nm at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY. The radiation pulses have been characterized with respect to pulse energy, statistical fluctuations, angular divergence and spectral distribution, both in the linear gain and in the saturation regime of the FEL [CITE]. The results are in good agreement with theoretical simulations, providing a solid basis for other projects aiming at still shorter wavelengths down to the 0.1 nm range [CITE].

  2. Detection of x ray sources in PROS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deponte, J.; Primini, F. A.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of detecting discrete sources in x-ray images has much in common with the problem of automatic source detection at other wavelengths. In all cases, one searches for positive brightness enhancements exceeding a certain threshold, which appear consistent with what one expects for a point source, in the presence of a (possibly) spatially variable background. Multidimensional point spread functions (e.g., dependent on detector position and photon energy) are also common. At the same time, the problem in x-ray astronomy has some unique aspects. For example, for typical x-ray exposures in current or recent observatories, the number of available pixels far exceeds the number of actual x-ray events, so Poisson, rather than Gaussian statistics apply. Further, extended cosmic x-ray sources are common, and one often desires to detect point sources in the vicinity or even within bright, diffuse x-ray emission. Finally, support structures in x-ray detectors often cast sharp shadows in x-ray images making it necessary to detect sources in a region of rapidly varying exposure. We have developed a source detection package within the IRAF/PROS environment which attempts to deal with some of the problems of x-ray source detection. We have patterned our package after the successful Einstein Observatory x-ray source detection programs. However, we have attempted to improve the flexibility and accessibility of the functions and to provide a graphical front-end for the user. Our philosophy has been to use standard IRAF tasks whenever possible for image manipulation and to separate general functions from mission-specific ones. We will report on the current status of the package and discuss future developments, including simulation tasks, to allow the user to assess detection efficiency and source significance, tasks to determine source intensity, and alternative detection algorithms.

  3. Medical X-Rays

    MedlinePLUS

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  4. X ray fiducial foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alford, C.; Serduke, F.; Makowiecki, D.; Jankowski, A.; Wall, M.

    1991-03-01

    An x-ray spectrum from a laser fusion experiment was passed through an Al, Si, Y multilayer foil. The position of the absorption edges of the Al, Si, and Y was used to calibrate the x-ray energy spectrum recorded on photographic film. The foil consisted of 4000 A of Al, 6000 A of Si, and 4000 A of Y sputter deposited on a 1.5 microns thick Mylar film. It was necessary to layer the structure in order to achieve the required mechanical strength and dimensional stability. The results include analysis of the x-ray energy spectrum and microstructural characterization of the foil using x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy.

  5. X-ray (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the x-ray particles, and will appear white. Metal and contrast media (special dye used to highlight areas of the body) will also appear white. Structures containing air will be black and muscle, fat, and fluid will appear as ...

  6. EBIS-A facility for the studies of X-ray emission from solids bombarded by highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bana?, D.; Jab?o?ski, ?.; Jagodzi?ski, P.; Kubala-Kuku?, A.; Sobota, D.; Pajek, M.

    2015-07-01

    We report here on the progress in the X-ray spectroscopy program at the EBIS-A facility installed recently at the Institute of Physics of Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce. In this facility the beams of low-energy highly charged ions (HCI) produced by the Dresden EBIS-A ion source, after extraction and charge-state separation in the double focusing magnet, are directed to the experimental UHV chamber equipped with a 5-axis universal sample manipulator. The X-rays emitted in interaction of the highly charged ions with solids can be measured by an energy dispersive X-ray silicon drift detector (SDD) and/or a wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (WDS) mounted at the experimental chamber. The surface nanostructures formed by an impact of HCI will be studied by the grazing emission X-ray fluorescence (GEXRF) technique and using a multiprobe surface analysis system based on the X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) coupled to the UHV chamber of the EBIS-A facility. In this paper a brief description of the facility, X-ray instrumentation and the surface analysis system is given and the first results are presented.

  7. Cosmic x ray physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1992-01-01

    This final report covers the period 1 January 1985 - 31 March 1992. It is divided into the following sections: the soft x-ray background; proportional counter and filter calibrations; sounding rocket flight preparations; new sounding rocket payload: x-ray calorimeter; and theoretical studies. Staff, publications, conference proceedings, invited talks, contributed talks, colloquia and seminars, public service lectures, and Ph. D. theses are listed.

  8. Determination and speciation of trace and ultratrace selenium ions by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry using graphene as solid adsorbent in dispersive micro-solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Kocot, Karina; Leardi, Riccardo; Walczak, Beata; Sitko, Rafal

    2015-03-01

    A dispersive micro-solid phase extraction (DMSPE) with graphene as a solid adsorbent and ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) as a chelating agent was proposed for speciation and detemination of inorganic selenium by the energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (EDXRF). In developed DMSPE, graphene particles are dispersed throughout the analyzed solution, therefore reaction between Se(IV)-APDC complexes and graphene nanoparticles occurs immediately. The concentration of Se(VI) is calculated as the difference between the concentration of selenite after and before prereduction of selenate. A central composite face-centered design with 3 center points was performed in order to optimize conditions and to study the effect of four variables (pH of the sample, concentration of APDC, concentration of Triton-X-100, and sample volume). The best results were obtained when suspension consisting of 200 g of graphene nanosheets, 1.2 mg of APDC and 0.06 mg of Triton-X-100 was rapidly injected to the 50 mL of the analyzed solution. Under optimized conditions Se ions can be determined with a very good recovery (97.75.0% and 99.26.6% for Se(IV) and Se(VI), respectively) and precision (RSD=5.1-6.6%). Proposed DMSPE/EDXRF procedure allowed to obtain low detection limits (0.032 ng mL(-1)) and high enrichment factor (101315). The proposed methodology was successfully applied for the determination of Se in mineral, tap, lake and sea water samples as well as in biological materials (Lobster Hepatopancreas and Pig Kidney). PMID:25618680

  9. CW Coherent Soft X-Ray Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niimura, Marvin

    2007-03-01

    CW Soft X-Ray Laser (CW-SXL) lasing at the ``water window" wavelengths (2.3 - 4.4 nm) is indispensable for CW structural (3D) study of biological polymers such as DNA and proteins. Unlike pulsed X-ray (laser) sources, CW-SXLs have a higher beam quality and do not rely on a high power pulsed laser. The electronic structure necessary for lasing soft X-ray lines is obtainable from a CW source of highly charged ions (HCIs). Soft X-ray emission due to the interaction of HCIs with neutral atoms is taking place in the quasar and cometary gases. Solar and (quasar's) stellar winds are naturally occurring CW sources of HCIs, for which a modern electron cyclotron ion source (ECRIS) can be used in laboratory. Appropriate X-ray cavity (equipped with Bragg reflector) and re-circulating neutral gas atoms can achieve the laser action at water window. Population inversion takes place naturally since the electron transfer from neutral gas atom to HCI is readily a Rydberg pumping, no TW pump laser, as used for pulsed X-ray source, is needed. My preliminary calculation has indicated that the achievable gain-length product gL =2.16 -6.48 with the laser output power P > 26.4 kW, exceeding the level of pulsed X-ray source.

  10. Understanding X-ray super-saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Gaitee

    2006-09-01

    X-ray emission is commonly used to measure magnetic activity in cool stars. While X-ray levels and magnetic activity levels rise with stellar rotation rate, X-ray luminosities actually decline or "super-saturate" in the most rapidly rotating stars. Conflicting theories have been used to explain this: e.g., magnetic dynamos are inhibited, surface fields are more confined or their heating is less efficient, or emission is reduced due to centrifugal stripping of the outer corona. We will test different explanations of super-saturation through a multi-wavelength study of the star, AP 139. By comparing rotational modulation in its X-ray lightcurves and temperatures with maps of surface activity we can learn if and how this phenomenon is related to changes in the star's surface fields.

  11. Rosat and the X-ray universe

    SciTech Connect

    Beatty, J.K.

    1990-08-01

    A major new satellite (Rosat) promises to provide astronomers with a map of perhaps 100,000 beacons in the X-ray sky, fresh images of high-energy objects approaching the resolution of visible-light photographs, and a first-ever survey of the sky at extreme-ultraviolet wavelengths. The German and British governments along with NASA are participating in this program. The grazing incidence technique previously used by Einstein and other missions is used to bring the X-rays to a focus and thus to create images. The X-ray telescope is equipped with three instruments, though only one can occupy the focus at any given time. Two are redundant detectors called position-sensitive proportional counters. The whole-sky survey will yield a complete X-ray image of the celestial sphere with 1/2-arc-minute detail of sources large and small, not just crude scans by wide-angle sensors.

  12. X-Ray Background Survey Spectrometer (XBSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, W. T. (Principal Investigator); Paulos, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to perform a spectral survey of the low energy diffuse X-ray background using the X-ray Background Survey Spectrometer (XBSS) on board the Space Station Freedom (SSF). XBSS obtains spectra of the X-ray diffuse background in the 11-24 A and 44-84 A wavelength intervals over the entire sky with 15 deg spatial resolution. These X-rays are almost certainly from a very hot (10(exp 6) K) component of the interstellar medium that is contained in regions occupying a large fraction of the interstellar volume near the Sun. Astrophysical plasmas near 10(exp 6) K are rich in emission lines, and the relative strengths of these lines, besides providing information about the physical conditions of the emitting gas, also provide information about its history and heating mechanisms.

  13. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F.-J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; Vetter, S.; Maxwell, T.J.; Ding, Y.; Coffee, R.; Wakatsuki, S.; Huang, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitude in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion. PMID:25744344

  14. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Marinelli, A; Ratner, D; Lutman, A A; Turner, J; Welch, J; Decker, F-J; Loos, H; Behrens, C; Gilevich, S; Miahnahri, A A; Vetter, S; Maxwell, T J; Ding, Y; Coffee, R; Wakatsuki, S; Huang, Z

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitude in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion. PMID:25744344

  15. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F. J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; et al

    2015-03-06

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitudemore » in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.« less

  16. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F. J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; Vetter, S.; Maxwell, T. J.; Ding, Y.; Coffee, R.; Wakatsuki, S.; Huang, Z.

    2015-03-06

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitude in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.

  17. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F.-J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; Vetter, S.; Maxwell, T. J.; Ding, Y.; Coffee, R.; Wakatsuki, S.; Huang, Z.

    2015-03-01

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitude in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.

  18. Characterization of toners and inkjets by laser ablation spectrochemical methods and Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trejos, Tatiana; Corzo, Ruthmara; Subedi, Kiran; Almirall, José

    2014-02-01

    Detection and sourcing of counterfeit currency, examination of counterfeit security documents and determination of authenticity of medical records are examples of common forensic document investigations. In these cases, the physical and chemical composition of the ink entries can provide important information for the assessment of the authenticity of the document or for making inferences about common source. Previous results reported by our group have demonstrated that elemental analysis, using either Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) or Laser Ablation Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), provides an effective, practical and robust technique for the discrimination of document substrates and writing inks with minimal damage to the document. In this study, laser-based methods and Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) methods were developed, optimized and validated for the forensic analysis of more complex inks such as toners and inkjets, to determine if their elemental composition can differentiate documents printed from different sources and to associate documents that originated from the same printing source. Comparison of the performance of each of these methods is presented, including the analytical figures of merit, discrimination capability and error rates. Different calibration strategies resulting in semi-quantitative and qualitative analysis, comparison methods (match criteria) and data analysis and interpretation tools were also developed. A total of 27 black laser toners originating from different manufacturing sources and/or batches were examined to evaluate the discrimination capability of each method. The results suggest that SEM-EDS offers relatively poor discrimination capability for this set (~ 70.7% discrimination of all the possible comparison pairs or a 29.3% type II error rate). Nonetheless, SEM-EDS can still be used as a complementary method of analysis since it has the advantage of being non-destructive to the sample in addition to providing imaging capabilities to further characterize toner samples by their particle morphology. Laser sampling methods resulted in an improvement of the discrimination between different sources with LIBS producing 89% discrimination and LA-ICP-MS resulting in 100% discrimination. In addition, a set of 21 black inkjet samples was examined by each method. The results show that SEM-EDS is not appropriate for inkjet examinations since their elemental composition is typically below the detection capabilities with only sulfur detected in this set, providing only 47.4% discrimination between possible comparison pairs. Laser sampling methods were shown to provide discrimination greater than 94% for this same inkjet set with false exclusion and false inclusion rates lower than 4.1% and 5.7%, for LA-ICP-MS and LIBS respectively. Overall these results confirmed the utility of the examination of printed documents by laser-based micro-spectrochemical methods. SEM-EDS analysis of toners produced a limited utility for discrimination within sources but was not an effective tool for inkjet ink discrimination. Both LA-ICP-MS and LIBS can be used in forensic laboratories to chemically characterize inks on documents and to complement the information obtained by conventional methods and enhance their evidential value.

  19. Energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis of biological bulk specimens: a review of the method and its application to experimental gerontology and cancer research

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, I.

    1983-01-01

    Biological bulk specimens can be prepared by the freeze-fracture freeze-drying method, which is suitable for quantitative X-ray microanalysis of intracellular components. Although the spatial resolution of this analytic technique does not allow us to analyze smaller cellular compartments than the nucleus and cytoplasm it may deliver useful results for answering questions of experimental biology. Bulk specimens are also suitable for determination of intracellular water and dry mass contents under certain conditions. Applications of the bulk specimen X-ray microanalysis for experimental gerontology revealed an age dependent increase of the intracellular potassium content of the postmitotic cells, a diminution of intracellular water content during aging and delivered indirect proof for the decrease of the passive potassium permeability of the cell membrane in old hepatocytes and giant neurons. The bulk specimen method of X-ray microanalysis has been applied also in cancer research: it proved to be helpful in the determination of intracellular Na+-contents and Na+/K+ ratios in various human and experimental animal tumors as well as in other models of cell proliferation. These data gain a certain weight in light of the recent developments on the regulation of mitogenesis.

  20. Normal incidence x-ray mirror for chemical microanalysis

    DOEpatents

    Carr, M.J.; Romig, A.D. Jr.

    1987-08-05

    An x-ray mirror for both electron column instruments and micro x-ray fluorescence instruments for making chemical, microanalysis comprises a non-planar mirror having, for example, a spherical reflecting surface for x-rays comprised of a predetermined number of alternating layers of high atomic number material and low atomic number material contiguously formed on a substrate and whose layers have a thickness which is a multiple of the wavelength being reflected. For electron column instruments, the wavelengths of interest lie above 1.5nm, while for x-ray fluorescence instruments, the range of interest is below 0.2nm. 4 figs.

  1. Excimer laser technology for soft x-ray generation

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, M.F.; Shields, H.

    1994-12-31

    An angularly-multiplexed XeCl excimer laser system, generating pulses of 4-5 ns duration, has been used to investigate soft x-ray generation from laser-produced plasmas. For applications in x-ray lithography, the spectral regions of 10--15 {angstrom} and around 135 {angstrom} have been studied. A laser to x-ray conversion efficiency of 5.5% and an x-ray power of >1 W into 2{pi} steradians have been demonstrated in the shorter wavelength band. At the longer wavelength, the effects of laser intensity and plasma recombination on conversion efficiency have been studied.

  2. Spectra of cosmic x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, S.S.; Mccray, R.

    1982-02-01

    X-ray measurements provide the most direct probes of astrophysical environments with temperatures exceeding one million K. Progress in experimental research utilizing dispersive techniques (e.g., Bragg and grating spectroscopy) is considerably slower than that in areas utilizing photometric techniques, because of the relative inefficiency of the former for the weak X-ray signals from celestial sources. As a result, the term spectroscopy as applied to X-ray astronomy has traditionally satisfied a much less restrictive definition (in terms of resolving power) than it has in other wavebands. Until quite recently, resolving powers of order unity were perfectly respectable, and still provide (in most cases) the most useful spectroscopic data. In the broadest sense, X-ray photometric measurements are spectroscopic, insofar as they represent samples of the overall electromagnetic continua of celestial objects.

  3. 5.8 X-ray Calorimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, F. Scott

    2008-01-01

    X-ray calorimeter instruments for astrophysics have seen rapid development since they were invented in 1984. The prime instrument on all currently planned X-ray spectroscopic observatories is based on calorimeter technology. This relatively simple detection concept that senses the energy of an incident photon by measuring the temperature rise of an absorber material at very low temperatures, can form the basis of a very high performance, non-dispersive spectrometer. State-of-the-art calorimeter instruments have resolving powers of over 3000, large simultaneous band-passes, and near unit efficiency. This coupled with the intrinsic imaging capability of a pixilated x-ray calorimeter array, allows true spectral-spatial instruments to be constructed. In this chapter I briefly review the detection scheme, the state-of-the-art in X-ray calorimeter instruments and the future outlook for this technology.

  4. Spectra of cosmic X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.; Mccray, R.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray measurements provide the most direct probes of astrophysical environments with temperatures exceeding one million K. Progress in experimental research utilizing dispersive techniques (e.g., Bragg and grating spectroscopy) is considerably slower than that in areas utilizing photometric techniques, because of the relative inefficiency of the former for the weak X-ray signals from celestial sources. As a result, the term "spectroscopy" as applied to X-ray astronomy has traditionally satisfied a much less restrictive definition (in terms of resolving power) than it has in other wavebands. Until quite recently, resolving powers of order unity were perfectly respectable, and still provide (in most cases) the most useful spectroscopic data. In the broadest sense, X-ray photometric measurements are spectroscopic, insofar as they represent samples of the overall electromagnetic continua of celestial objects.

  5. Data collection with a tailored X-ray beam size at 2.69? wavelength (4.6?keV): sulfur SAD phasing of Cdc23(Nterm).

    PubMed

    Cianci, Michele; Groves, Matthew R; Barford, David; Schneider, Thomas R

    2016-03-01

    The capability to reach wavelengths of up to 3.1? at the newly established EMBL P13 beamline at PETRA III, the new third-generation synchrotron at DESY in Hamburg, provides the opportunity to explore very long wavelengths to harness the sulfur anomalous signal for phase determination. Data collection at ? = 2.69? (4.6?keV) allowed the crystal structure determination by sulfur SAD phasing of Cdc23(Nterm), a subunit of the multimeric anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C). At this energy, Cdc23(Nterm) has an expected Bijvoet ratio ?|Fanom|?/?F? of 2.2%, with 282 residues, including six cysteines and five methionine residues, and two molecules in the asymmetric unit (65.4?kDa; 12 Cys and ten Met residues). Selectively illuminating two separate portions of the same crystal with an X-ray beam of 50?m in diameter allowed crystal twinning to be overcome. The crystals diffracted to 3.1? resolution, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 61.2, c=151.5?, and belonged to space group P43. The refined structure to 3.1? resolution has an R factor of 18.7% and an Rfree of 25.9%. This paper reports the structure solution, related methods and a discussion of the instrumentation. PMID:26960127

  6. Characterization of acrylic polyamide plastic embolization particles in vitro and in human tissue sections by light microscopy, infrared microspectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis.

    PubMed

    Murakata, Linda A; Lewin-Smith, Michael R; Specht, Charles S; Kalasinsky, Victor F; McEvoy, Peter L; Vinh, Tuyethoa N; Rabin, Lionel N M I; Mullick, Florabel G

    2006-07-01

    Vascular embolization is a well-established practice for the treatment of tumors and vascular lesions. Rounded beads (microspheres) of various materials (collagen, dextran and trisacryl-polymer-gelatin) were developed to solve problems encountered with earlier versions of embolic material. We performed histochemistry, Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis on two uterine and one hepatic specimen with unidentified intravascular foreign material, and examined a reference embolization product for comparison. The hematoxylin and eosin stained tissue sections showed multiple foci with unidentified intravascular foreign material and fibrous obliteration of vessel lumens. Only one case had a clinical history of previous embolization but without specifying the material used. One case was submitted for identification of a 'parasite'. The material stained positively with Sirius red and mucicarmine, variably with Masson's trichrome stain and Movat pentachrome, and did not stain centrally with periodic acid Schiff with diastase. Infrared spectrophotometric analysis of the material from all three cases demonstrated the spectrum of acrylic polyamide plastic. A control sample of EmboGold exhibited infrared microspectroscopic spectra similar to the three tissue specimens. Analysis by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis demonstrated some differences in elemental composition between the tissue sections and the selected reference material. To our knowledge, this is the first report of infrared spectrophotometric analysis with scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray analysis of an acrylic polyamide plastic embolization product both in vitro and in human histologic tissue sections. In cases lacking appropriate clinical information, identification by these methods and/or a panel of special stains may assist pathologists unfamiliar with this material's light microscopic appearance. PMID:16619001

  7. Optical afterburner for an x-ray free electron laser as a tool for pump-probe experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldin, E. L.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Yurkov, M. V.

    2010-03-01

    We propose a new scheme for two-color operation of an x-ray self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser (SASE FEL). The scheme is based on an intrinsic feature of such a device: chaotic modulations of electron beam energy and energy spread on the scale of FEL coherence length are converted into large density modulations on the same scale with the help of a dispersion section, installed behind the x-ray undulator. Powerful radiation is then generated with the help of a dedicated radiator (like an undulator that selects a narrow spectral line), or one can simply use, for instance, broadband edge radiation. A typical radiation wavelength can be as short as a FEL coherence length, and can be redshifted by increasing the dispersion section strength. In practice it means the wavelength ranges from vacuum ultraviolet to infrared. The long-wavelength radiation pulse is naturally synchronized with the x-ray pulse and can be either directly used in pump-probe experiments or cross correlated with a high-power pulse from a conventional laser system. In this way experimenters overcome jitter problems and can perform pump-probe experiments with femtosecond resolution. Additional possibilities like on-line monitoring of x-ray pulse duration (making “optical replica” of an x-ray pulse) are also discussed in the paper. The proposed scheme is very simple, cheap, and robust, and therefore can be easily realized in facilities like FLASH, European XFEL, LCLS, and SCSS.

  8. X-ray lasing - Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-11-01

    The theoretical basis of lasing at very short wavelengths is discussed, and lasing at soft-X-ray (4-50 nm) wavelengths using the electron-collisional excitation scheme is successfully demonstrated. In research at LLNL, thin foils of selenium and yttrium are irradiated with laser light to generate a roughly cylindrical plasma containing neon-like ions. Excitation of ground state 2p electrons to the 3p state in the lasant medium is followed by very fast radioactive decay out of the 3s state, creating a population inversion between the 3s and 3p states. Stimulated X-ray emission is initiated by slower spontaneous decay from a 3p to 3s state. Design goals are to produce a plasma with a flat electron density of approximately 5 x 10 to the 20th/cu cm, a flat temperature profile, a scale length of at least 100 microns, and a population inversion lasting at least the 100 ps necessary to produce a significant gain. Good correlation is seen between experimental data and LANEX and XRASER theoretical modeling predictions over large variations in intensity, pulse length, and probing times. No explanation is found for the weakness of the J = 0 to J = 1 lasing transition line at 18.3 nm.

  9. In-situ synchrotron energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction study of thin Pd foils with Pd:D and Pd:H concentrations up to 1:1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knies, D. L.; Violante, V.; Grabowski, K. S.; Hu, J. Z.; Dominguez, D. D.; He, J. H.; Qadri, S. B.; Hubler, G. K.

    2012-10-01

    Time resolved, in-situ, energy dispersive x-ray diffraction was performed in an electrolysis cell during electrochemical loading of palladium foil cathodes with hydrogen and deuterium. Concentrations of H:Pd (D:Pd) up to 1:1 in 0.1 M LiOH (LiOD) in H2O (D2O) electrolyte were obtained, as determined by both the Pd lattice parameter and cathode resistivity. In addition, some indications on the kinetics of loading and deloading of hydrogen from the Pd surface were obtained. The alpha-beta phase transformations were clearly delineated but no new phases at high concentration were determined.

  10. Principles of X-ray Navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, John Eric; /SLAC

    2006-03-17

    X-ray navigation is a new concept in satellite navigation in which orientation, position and time are measured by observing stellar emissions in x-ray wavelengths. X-ray navigation offers the opportunity for a single instrument to be used to measure these parameters autonomously. Furthermore, this concept is not limited to missions in close proximity to the earth. X-ray navigation can be used on a variety of missions from satellites in low earth orbit to spacecraft on interplanetary missions. In 1997 the Unconventional Stellar Aspect Experiment (USA) will be launched as part of the Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS). USA will provide the first platform for real-time experimentation in the field of x-ray navigation and also serves as an excellent case study for the design and manufacturing of space qualified systems in small, autonomous groups. Current techniques for determining the orientation of a satellite rely on observations of the earth, sun and stars in infrared, visible or ultraviolet wavelengths. It is possible to use x-ray imaging devices to provide arcsecond level measurement of attitude based on star patterns in the x-ray sky. This technique is explored with a simple simulation. Collimated x-ray detectors can be used on spinning satellites to provide a cheap and reliable measure of orientation. This is demonstrated using observations of the Crab Pulsar taken by the high Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO-1) in 1977. A single instrument concept is shown to be effective, but dependent on an a priori estimate of the guide star intensity and thus susceptible to errors in that estimate. A star scanner based on a differential measurement from two x-ray detectors eliminates the need for an a priori estimate of the guide star intensity. A first order model and a second order model of the two star scanner concepts are considered. Many of the stars that emit in the x-ray regime are also x-ray pulsars with frequency stability approaching a part in 10{sup 9}. By observing these pulsations, a satellite can keep accurate time autonomously. They have demonstrated the acquisition and tracking of the Crab nebula pulsar by simulating the operation of a phase-locked loop.

  11. Determination of plasma bromvalerylurea and its main metabolite by a simple high-performance liquid chromatographic method and quantitation of bromide by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry in carbon tetrachloride-intoxicated rats.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, E; Nakamura, T; Nagashima, A; Yamazaki, K; Ohashi, N; Tsuchihashi, H; Misawa, S

    2001-08-15

    In the present study, small volumes of plasma were used for the measurement of bromvalerylurea (BVU), its metabolite, 3-methylbutyrylurea (MVU), and bromide in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-treated rats by HPLC-UV and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. A liquid-liquid extraction system was also investigated. BVU and MVU were extracted from 100 microl plasma samples in a single-step involving deproteination with 1 M hydrochloric acid using ethenzamide as internal standard. Samples were separated by HPLC in an acetonitrile-8 mM potassium dihydrogenphosphate buffer (35:65, v/v) mobile phase at a flow-rate of 0.4 ml/min on a 15 cm octadecylsilyl column at room temperature. Analytes were detected at a wavelength of 210 nm. The limits of quantitation for BVU, MVU and bromide are 0.1, 0.1 and 50 microg/ml, respectively. The intra-day accuracies over the range of concentrations were 95.8 to 121.1%, 97.2 to 119.7% and 96.2 to 105.8% for BVU, MVU and bromide, respectively. The inter-day accuracies were 97.7 to 115.1%, 98.3 to 111.6% and 98.3 to 102.9% for BVU, MVU and bromide, respectively. The absolute recoveries using tert.-butyl methyl ether are 96-98% for BVU and 95-98% for MVU. The decline in the plasma concentrations of BVU in olive oil-treated rats fitted a one-compartment model and the plasma MVU level reached a peak at around 1.5-2 h and then decreased gradually. The elimination of BVU in CCl4 (1 ml/kg)-treated rats was delayed and MVU production was less than that in the olive oil-treated group. However, there was no difference in the plasma levels of bromide between CCl4-treated rats and control rats. rights reserved. PMID:11499491

  12. X-ray fluorescence experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, I.; Trombka, J. I.; Gerard, J.; Schmadebeck, R.; Lowman, P.; Blodgett, H.; Yin, L.; Eller, E.; Lamothe, R.; Gorenstein, P.

    1972-01-01

    The preliminary results from the Sco X-1 and Cyg X-1 obtained from the Apollo 15 X-ray detector data are presented along with preliminary results of the X-ray fluorescence spectrometric data of the lunar surface composition. The production of the characteristic X-rays following the interaction of solar X-rays with the lunar surface is described along with the X-ray spectrometer. Preliminary analyses of the astronomical X-ray observation and the X-ray fluorescence data are presented.

  13. Study of Phonon Dispersion in Silicon and Germanium at Long Wavelengths Using Picosecond Ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, H.-Y.; Maris, H. J.

    2000-06-12

    We have studied the dispersion of long wavelength longitudinal phonons in silicon and germanium using ultrasonic techniques. For long wavelengths, the acoustic phonon dispersion relation is of the form {omega}(k){approx_equal}ck-{gamma}k{sup 3} , where c is the speed of sound and {gamma} measures the lowest-order phonon dispersion. By sending an ultrasonic pulse of length a few hundred angstroms into a crystal and measuring the change of the pulse shape with propagation distance, we are able to determine the parameter {gamma} . The results are compared with lattice dynamics models. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  14. Micro and imaging x-ray analysis by using polycapillary x-ray optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Kouichi; Nakano, Kazuhiko; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Yonehara, Tasuku

    2008-08-01

    We have studied the micro x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and 2D- or 3D-XRF analysis in the laboratory by using polycapillary optics. A confocal 3D micro-XRF instrument was applied for solid/liquid interface analysis. 2D elemental maps of x-ray fluorescence for the solid surface of an Fe plate after Cu was deposited by chemical plating were obtained. The 2D images could be taken in the solution. This result suggests that this 3D micro-XRF method is useful for in-situ monitoring of chemical reactions on solid-liquid interfaces. Furthermore, we have reported a new application of polycapillary x-ray optics. Two independent straight polycapillary optics were arranged between the sample and an x-ray energy dispersive detector. X-ray fluorescence emitted from the sample was collimated by the first capillary, and then it was introduced into the second capillary. By adjusting the angle between two capillary optics, only the x-rays totally reflected on the inner wall of the second capillary could be detected by the x-ray detector. This result suggests that we can use these polycapillary optics for x-ray energy filtering optics.

  15. X-ray beam finder

    DOEpatents

    Gilbert, H.W.

    1983-06-16

    An X-ray beam finder for locating a focal spot of an X-ray tube includes a mass of X-ray opaque material having first and second axially-aligned, parallel-opposed faces connected by a plurality of substantially identical parallel holes perpendicular to the faces and a film holder for holding X-ray sensitive film tightly against one face while the other face is placed in contact with the window of an X-ray head.

  16. Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  17. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  18. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, R.D.; Huang, Z.

    1998-10-20

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source is disclosed for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications. 4 figs.

  19. X-ray laser driven gold targets

    SciTech Connect

    Petrova, Tz. B. Whitney, K. G.; Davis, J.

    2014-03-15

    The femtosecond population dynamics of gold irradiated by a coherent high-intensity (>10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}) x-ray laser pulse is investigated theoretically. There are two aspects to the assembled model. One is the construction of a detailed model of platinum-like gold inclusive of all inner-shell states that are created by photoionization of atomic gold and decay either by radiative or Auger processes. Second is the computation of the population dynamics that ensues when an x-ray pulse is absorbed in gold. The hole state generation depends on the intensity and wavelength of the driving x-ray pulse. The excited state populations reached during a few femtosecond timescales are high enough to generate population inversions, whose gain coefficients are calculated. These amplified lines in the emitted x-ray spectrum provide important diagnostics of the radiation dynamics and also suggest a nonlinear way to increase the frequency of the coherent output x-ray pulses relative to the frequency of the driver input x-ray pulse.

  20. Hard x ray highlights of AR 5395

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. A.; Dennis, Brian R.

    1989-01-01

    Active Region 5395 produced an exceptional series of hard x ray bursts notable for their frequency, intensity, and impulsivity. Over the two weeks from March 6 to 19, 447 hard x ray flares were observed by the Hard X Ray Burst Spectrometer on Solar Maximum Mission (HXRBS/SMM), a rate of approx. 35 per day which exceeded the previous high by more than 50 percent. During one 5 day stretch, more than 250 flares were detected, also a new high. The three largest GOES X-flares were observed by HXRBS and had hard x ray rates over 100,000 s(exp -1) compared with only ten flares above 100,000(exp -1) during the previous nine years of the mission. An ongoing effort for the HXRBS group has been the correlated analysis of hard x ray data with flare data at other wavelengths with the most recent emphasis on those measurements with spatial information. During a series of bursts from AR 5395 at 1644 to 1648 UT on 12 March 1989, simultaneous observations were made by HXRBS and UVSP (Ultra Violet Spectrometer Polarimeter) on SMM, the two-element Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) interferometric array, and R. Canfield's H-alpha Echelle spectrograph at the National Solar Observatory at Sacramento Peak. The data show strong correlations in the hard x ray, microwave, and UV lightcurves. This event will be the subject of a combined analysis.

  1. Theoretical and Experimental X-Ray Peak/Background Ratios and Implications for Energy-Dispersive Spectrometry in the Next-Generation Analytical Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Zaluzec, Nestor J

    2016-02-01

    Modern analytical electron microscopes equipped with silicon drift detectors now allow for a wide range of geometrical configurations capable of performing quantitative X-ray spectrometry. Recent work has improved the collection solid angles of these detectors, however, the impact of increasing the solid angle on detection sensitivity as measured by the peak/background ratio has not been addressed. This work compares theoretical and experimental peak/background ratios for incident electron energies in the range of 20-200 keV, with X-ray detectors in both conventional orientations (on the electron entrance surface) as well as new geometries (the electron exit surface). The implications of these parameters on detectability limits for the next generations of "Lab-in-the-Gap" analytical microscope are also considered. It was found that theoretical calculations of the angular distribution of bremsstrahlung and their effects on the peak/background ratio match well with experimental measurements, and indicate that new geometries which can result in large solid angles provided an added benefit in addition to increased characteristic signal, namely increased sensitivity for the analyst. PMID:26794345

  2. X-ray spectral line coincidences between fluorine K- and transition-metal L-series lines

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhalter, P.G.; Charatis, G.; Rockett, P.D.

    1983-11-01

    X-ray spectroscopy was performed in the 12--15-A region, recording L-series lines from selected laser-irradiated transition metals. Line coincidences and near coincidences were identified between Cr, Mn, Fe, and Ni L spectra, and F VIII and F IX K-shell lines. Wavelengths were determined to accuracies of 1--3 mA and will be utilized in selecting potential pumping candidates in future x-ray lasing schemes. High-resolution x-ray spectra were collected under controlled illumination and target conditions, using 1.05- and 0.527-..mu..m laser excitation with the KMS CHROMA laser. Laser intensity varied from 1.2--2.5 x 10/sup 14/ W/cm/sup 2/ in 200-ps pulses. Three groups of x-ray spectra were collected with highly dispersive x-ray crystals at wave bands centered at 12.643, 13.781, and 14.458 A, corresponding to H- and He-like lines from fluorine. Two specially designed flat crystal spectrographs employing camera shutters were used with pairs of beryl and thallium acid phthalate (TAP) crystals. The spectra from potential lasant and pump candidates could be recorded on the same spectrogram to aid in identifying x-ray line coincidences. In cases where wavelengths were measured in both the 1.05- and 0.527-..mu..m laser work, agreement within 1--3 mA was obtained for the L-series x-ray lines. Within this accuracy range, some five L-series x-ray lines, mostly 2p-3d transitions from the metals Cr, Mn, and Ni, had wavelength values coincident with K-series lines in fluorine.

  3. Highly efficient pulsed power supply system with a two-stage LC generator and a step-up transformer for fast capillary discharge soft x-ray laser at shorter wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Yusuke; Takahashi, Shnsuke; Komatsu, Takanori; Song, Inho; Watanabe, Masato; Hotta, Eiki

    2010-01-15

    Highly efficient and compact pulsed power supply system for a capillary discharge soft x-ray laser (SXRL) has been developed. The system consists of a 2.2 {mu}F two-stage LC inversion generator, a 2:54 step-up transformer, a 3 nF water capacitor, and a discharge section with a few tens of centimeter length capillary. Adoption of the pulsed transformer in combination with the LC inversion generator enables us to use only one gap switch in the circuit for charging the water capacitor up to about 0.5 MV. Furthermore, step-up ratio of a water capacitor voltage to a LC inversion generator initial charging voltage is about 40 with energy transfer efficiency of about 50%. It also leads to good reproducibility of a capillary discharge which is necessary for lasing a SXRL stably. For the study of the possibility of lasing a SXRL at shorter wavelength in a small laboratory scale, high-density and high-temperature plasma column suitable for the laser can be generated relatively easily with this system.

  4. Highly efficient pulsed power supply system with a two-stage LC generator and a step-up transformer for fast capillary discharge soft x-ray laser at shorter wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yusuke; Takahashi, Shnsuke; Komatsu, Takanori; Song, Inho; Watanabe, Masato; Hotta, Eiki

    2010-01-01

    Highly efficient and compact pulsed power supply system for a capillary discharge soft x-ray laser (SXRL) has been developed. The system consists of a 2.2 ?F two-stage LC inversion generator, a 2:54 step-up transformer, a 3 nF water capacitor, and a discharge section with a few tens of centimeter length capillary. Adoption of the pulsed transformer in combination with the LC inversion generator enables us to use only one gap switch in the circuit for charging the water capacitor up to about 0.5 MV. Furthermore, step-up ratio of a water capacitor voltage to a LC inversion generator initial charging voltage is about 40 with energy transfer efficiency of about 50%. It also leads to good reproducibility of a capillary discharge which is necessary for lasing a SXRL stably. For the study of the possibility of lasing a SXRL at shorter wavelength in a small laboratory scale, high-density and high-temperature plasma column suitable for the laser can be generated relatively easily with this system.

  5. IrO2-based disperse-phase electrocatalysts: a complementary study by means of the cavity-microelectrode and ex-situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Minguzzi, Alessandro; Locatelli, Cristina; Cappelletti, Giuseppe; Scavini, Marco; Vertova, Alberto; Ghigna, Paolo; Rondinini, Sandra

    2012-06-28

    In this work, IrO(2)-based powders are screened by cyclic voltammetry for the determination of the electrochemical active sites and for the qualitative evaluation of the iridium atoms speciation. All results are obtained using a cavity-microelectrode as powder holder, thus exploiting the features of this innovative tool, whose best potentialities have been recently introduced by our group. All the studied materials have been prepared by the sol-gel technique and differ in calcination temperature and method of mixing the metal oxide precursors. The electrochemical results are complemented with the information obtained by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), that give insights on the local structure of each selected sample, confirming the trends found by cyclic voltammetry and give new and unexpected insights on the powder structural features. PMID:22280059

  6. Electron-excited energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry in the variable pressure scanning electron microscope (EDS/VPSEM): it's not microanalysis anymore!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newbury, Dale E.; Ritchie, Nicholas W. M.

    2015-10-01

    X-ray spectra suffer significantly degraded spatial resolution when measured in the variable-pressure scanning electron microscope (VPSEM, chamber pressure 1 Pa to 2500 Pa) as compared to highvacuum SEM (operating pressure < 10 mPa). Depending on the gas path length, electrons that are scattered hundreds of micrometers outside the focused beam can contribute 90% or more of the measured spectrum. Monte Carlo electron trajectory simulation, available in NIST DTSA-II, models the gas scattering and simulates mixed composition targets, e.g., particle on substrate. The impact of gas scattering at the major (C > 0.1 mass fraction), minor (0.01 <= C <= 0.1), and trace (C < 0.01) constituent levels can be estimated. NIST DTSA-II for Java-platforms is available free at: http://www.cstl.nist.gov/div837/837.02/epq/dtsa2/index.html).

  7. X-ray wavelengths and Auger transition energies of 1s 2p4 (2S, 2,4P, 2D) resonances in B-like (Z = 6-18) ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakho, I.; Sow, M.; Wagué, A.

    2015-04-01

    We report Auger energies of the 1s 2p4 (2S, 2,4P, 2D) resonances belonging to the 1s 2p4 (2S, 2,4P, 2D) → 1s2 2p2 (1S, 1P, 1D) and to the 1s 2p4 (2S, 2,4P, 2D) → 1s2 2s2p 1,3P transitions in B-like ions (Z = 6-18). X-ray wavelengths of the 1s2p4 (2S, 2P, 2D) resonances are also reported. The calculations are carried out in the framework of the screening constant by unit nuclear charge (SCUNC) formalism. The present results for the core-excited 1s 2p4 (2S, 2,4P, 2D) resonances in B-like C+, O3+, Ne5+, Mg7+ and Si9+ ions agree well with recent saddle-point variation and saddle-point complex-rotation (SPCR) results (Sun et al 2013 Phys. Rev A 87 032509). The new Auger energies and wavelengths for the 1s 2p4 (2S, 2,4P, 2D) resonances in B-like N2+, F4+, Na6+, Al8+, P10+, S11+, Cl12+ and Ar13+ ions provide benchmarked values for future experimental and theoretical studies on these B-like ions in connection with the diagnostic of astrophysical and laboratory plasma.

  8. Data collection with a tailored X-ray beam size at 2.69 Å wavelength (4.6 keV): sulfur SAD phasing of Cdc23Nterm

    PubMed Central

    Cianci, Michele; Groves, Matthew R.; Barford, David; Schneider, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    The capability to reach wavelengths of up to 3.1 Å at the newly established EMBL P13 beamline at PETRA III, the new third-generation synchrotron at DESY in Hamburg, provides the opportunity to explore very long wavelengths to harness the sulfur anomalous signal for phase determination. Data collection at λ = 2.69 Å (4.6 keV) allowed the crystal structure determination by sulfur SAD phasing of Cdc23Nterm, a subunit of the multimeric anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C). At this energy, Cdc23Nterm has an expected Bijvoet ratio 〈|F anom|〉/〈F〉 of 2.2%, with 282 residues, including six cysteines and five methionine residues, and two molecules in the asymmetric unit (65.4 kDa; 12 Cys and ten Met residues). Selectively illuminating two separate portions of the same crystal with an X-ray beam of 50 µm in diameter allowed crystal twinning to be overcome. The crystals diffracted to 3.1 Å resolution, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 61.2, c = 151.5 Å, and belonged to space group P43. The refined structure to 3.1 Å resolution has an R factor of 18.7% and an R free of 25.9%. This paper reports the structure solution, related methods and a discussion of the instrumentation. PMID:26960127

  9. X-ray focusing scheme with continuously variable lens.

    PubMed

    Adams, Bernhard W; Rose-Petruck, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    A novel hybrid X-ray focusing scheme was developed for operation of the X-ray streak camera at the Advanced Photon Source: an X-ray lens focuses vertically from a long distance of 16 m and produces an extended focus that has a small footprint on an inexpensive sagittal mirror. A patented method is used to continuously adjust the focal length of the lens and compensate for chromatic dispersion in energy scans. PMID:25537583

  10. Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF): An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, M. C.; ODell, S. L.; Elsner, R. F.; VanSpeybroeck, L. P.

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) is the x-ray component of NASA's Great Observatories. To be launched in late 1998, AXAF will provide unprecedented capabilities for high-resolution imaging, spectrometric imaging, and high-resolution disperse spectroscopy, over the x-ray band from about 0.1 keV to 10 keV. With these capabilities, AXAF observations will address many of the outstanding questions in astronomy, astrophysics, and cosmology.

  11. X-ray-induced water vaporization

    SciTech Connect

    Weon, B. M.; Lee, J. S.; Je, J. H.; Fezzaa, K.

    2011-09-15

    We present quantitative evidence for x-ray-induced water vaporization: water is vaporized at a rate of 5.5 pL/s with the 1-A-wavelength x-ray irradiation of {approx}0.1 photons per A{sup 2}; moreover, water vapor is reversibly condensed during pauses in irradiation. This result fundamentally suggests that photoionization induces vaporization. This phenomenon is attributed to surface-tension reduction by ionization and would be universally important in radiological and electrohydrodynamic situations.

  12. X-Ray Transition Energies Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 128 X-Ray Transition Energies Database (Web, free access)   This X-ray transition table provides the energies and wavelengths for the K and L transitions connecting energy levels having principal quantum numbers n = 1, 2, 3, and 4. The elements covered include Z = 10, neon to Z = 100, fermium. There are two unique features of this data base: (1) a serious attempt to have all experimental values on a scale consistent with the International System of measurement (the SI) and (2) inclusion of accurate theoretical estimates for all transitions.

  13. The Beagle 2 X-ray spectrometer for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talboys, Dean Lee

    This thesis is concerned with the Beagle 2 X-ray spectrometer (XRS) for Mars. The scientific goals of the XRS were to perform (i) geochemical analyses of Martian rocks and soils and (ii) in situ 40K >40Ar dating of rocks. The major aims of this study were the development of the XRS to achieve its scientific goals and to inform the design of future versions of the instrument. The XRS is described and compared with the previous X-ray Spectrometers that have been successfully deployed on Mars. A characterisation of the XRS investigated the fundamental behaviour of the instrument in terms of its spectral features (gain, resolution and artefacts), gain variation with temperature of its components, deadtime and quantum efficiency. The XRS was calibrated to convert elemental intensities from its analyses into concentrations. The concentrations of several major and trace elements of interest in reference materials were linearly correlated with the certified concentration. The analytical performance of the XRS was evaluated in comparison with a terrestrial portable X-ray spectrometer (PXRF) and a wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometer (WD XRF). The performance was characterised in terms of accuracy, detection limit and fitting precision. This study showed the importance of energy resolution to the analytical performance of the XRS. The operational performance of the XRS was evaluated. The geochemical composition of several basalts analysed by the XRS agreed with complementary analyses by the PXRF and WD XRF. The 40K >40Ar radiometric ages for two basalts were determined using the K content in the basalts in conjunction with their 40Ar isotope content (analysed by a laboratory version of the Beagle 2 Gas Analysis Package). The 40K 40Ar ages were found to differ to the Ar-Ar ages because of various effects associated with inhomogeneity of the K content in the rock and radiogenic40Ar loss.

  14. Tunable Monochromatic X-ray Source Based on Parametric X-ray Radiation at LEBRA, Nihon University

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, Y.; Sato, I.; Hayakawa, K.; Tanaka, T.; Kuwada, T.; Sakai, T.; Nogami, K.; Nakao, K.; Inagaki, M.; Mori, A.

    2007-01-19

    The monochromatic X-ray source based on parametric X-ray radiation (PXR) was developed by using the electron beam from the 125-MeV linac at Nihon University. The X-ray generating system consists of two silicon perfect-crystal plates to offer a wide tunability. The system has actually been providing the energy dispersive monochromatic X-ray beam in the region of 6 to 20 keV, using Si(111)-plane for the target and the second crystals. Since the X-ray beam from the PXR generator has rather high energy resolution and coherency, X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurement and phase-contrast imaging are possible applications of PXR. Actually, preliminary experiments on energy dispersive XAFS measurement and refraction-contrast imaging have been successfully carried out using the PXR beam.

  15. Holography at x-ray wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Solem, T.C.; Baldwin, G.C.; Chapline, G.F.

    1981-01-01

    We discuss alternative holographic techniques for imaging microscopic structures with a short-pulse, high intensity, high-quantum-energy laser. We find that Fresnel transform holography using a photoresist for registration of the hologram is most likely to be within the scope of near term technology. Although it has advantages in time gating, using an in-line electron microscope for hologram registration has an unacceptable tradeoff between quantum efficiency and resolution. Fourier transform holography using a reflector to generate the reference beam might be a reasonable alternative using low resolution film, but is necessarily more complicated. We discuss the dependence of the required laser intensity on the resolution sought and on the elastic and absorption cross sections. We conclude that resonant scattering must be used to obtain holograms at reasonable intensities.

  16. Soft-X-Ray Prefilter for Hot, Bright Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. M.; Ortendahl, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Prefilters consisting of beryllium foil supported on conductive silver mesh transmit soft x-rays but are nearly opaque to visible and infrared light. New Be/AG filters protect imaging X-ray detectors from damage by visible and longer wavelength radiation when viewing such hot, bright emitters as Sun or possibly certain industrial processes.

  17. Soft X-Ray Emissions from Planets and Moons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhardwaj, A.; Gladstone, G. R.; Elsner, R. F.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Grodent, D.; Lewis, W. S.; Crary, F. J.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Howell, R. R.; Johnson, R. E.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The soft x-ray energy band (less than 4 keV) is an important spectral regime for planetary remote sensing, as a wide variety of solar system objects are now known to shine at these wavelengths. These include Earth, Jupiter, comets, moons, Venus, and the Sun. Earth and Jupiter, as magnetic planets, are observed to emanate strong x-ray emissions from their auroral (polar) regions, thus providing vital information on the nature of precipitating particles and their energization processes in planetary magnetospheres. X rays from low latitudes have also been observed on these planets, resulting largely from atmospheric scattering and fluorescence of solar x-rays. Cometary x-rays are now a well established phenomena, more than a dozen comets have been observed at soft x-ray energies, with the accepted production mechanism being charge-exchange between heavy solar wind ions and cometary neutrals. Also, Lunar x-rays have been observed and are thought to be produced by scattering and fluorescence of solar x-rays from the Moon's surface. With the advent of sophisticated x-ray observatories, e.g., Chandra and XMM-Newton, the field of planetary x-ray astronomy is advancing at a much faster pace. The Chandra X-ray Observatory (CXO) has recently captured soft x-rays from Venus. Venusian x-rays are most likely produced through fluorescence of solar x-rays by C and O atoms in the upper atmosphere. Very recently, using CXO we have discovered soft x-rays from the moons of Jupiter-Io, Europa, and probably Ganymede. The plausible source of the x-rays from the Galilean satellites is bombardment of their surfaces by energetic (greater than 10 KeV) ions from the inner magnetosphere of Jupiter. The Io plasma Torus (IPT) is also discovered by CXO to be a source of soft x-rays by CXO have revealed a mysterious pulsating (period approx. 45 minutes) x-ray hot spot is fixed in magnetic latitude and longitude and is magnetically connected to a region in the outer magnetosphere of Jupiter. These surprising results have called into question our understanding of Jovian auroral x-rays. In this paper, we will present a comparative view of the x-ray observations on planets, comets, and moons, with emphasis on recent results from CXO, and discuss the proposed source mechanisms.

  18. X-ray lithography masking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Henry I. (Inventor); Lim, Michael (Inventor); Carter, James (Inventor); Schattenburg, Mark (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    X-ray masking apparatus includes a frame having a supporting rim surrounding an x-ray transparent region, a thin membrane of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material attached at its periphery to the supporting rim covering the x-ray transparent region and a layer of x-ray opaque material on the thin membrane inside the x-ray transparent region arranged in a pattern to selectively transmit x-ray energy entering the x-ray transparent region through the membrane to a predetermined image plane separated from the layer by the thin membrane. A method of making the masking apparatus includes depositing back and front layers of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material on front and back surfaces of a substrate, depositing back and front layers of reinforcing material on the back and front layers, respectively, of the hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing the material including at least a portion of the substrate and the back layers of an inside region adjacent to the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material, removing a portion of the front layer of reinforcing material opposite the inside region to expose the surface of the front layer of hard inorganic x-ray transparent material separated from the inside region by the latter front layer, and depositing a layer of x-ray opaque material on the surface of the latter front layer adjacent to the inside region.

  19. X-Ray Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Dr. S. N. Zhang has lead a seven member group (Dr. Yuxin Feng, Mr. XuejunSun, Mr. Yongzhong Chen, Mr. Jun Lin, Mr. Yangsen Yao, and Ms. Xiaoling Zhang). This group has carried out the following activities: continued data analysis from space astrophysical missions CGRO, RXTE, ASCA and Chandra. Significant scientific results have been produced as results of their work. They discovered the three-layered accretion disk structure around black holes in X-ray binaries; their paper on this discovery is to appear in the prestigious Science magazine. They have also developed a new method for energy spectral analysis of black hole X-ray binaries; four papers on this topics were presented at the most recent Atlanta AAS meeting. They have also carried Monte-Carlo simulations of X-ray detectors, in support to the hardware development efforts at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). These computation-intensive simulations have been carried out entirely on the computers at UAH. They have also carried out extensive simulations for astrophysical applications, taking advantage of the Monte-Carlo simulation codes developed previously at MSFC and further improved at UAH for detector simulations. One refereed paper and one contribution to conference proceedings have been resulted from this effort.

  20. X-Ray Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, B. D.; Elsner, R. F.; Engelhaupt, D.; Kolodziejczak, J. J.; ODell, S. L.; Speegle, C. O.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    2004-01-01

    We are fabricating optics for the hard-x-ray region using electroless nickel replication. The attraction of this process, which has been widely used elsewhere, is that the resulting full shell optics are inherently stable and thus can have very good angular resolution. The challenge with this process is to develop lightweight optics (nickel has a relatively high density of 8.9 g/cu cm), and to keep down the costs of mandrel fabrication. We accomplished the former through the development of high-strength nickel alloys that permit very thin shells without fabrication- and handling-induced deformations. For the latter, we have utilized inexpensive grinding and diamond turning to figure the mandrels and then purpose-built polishing machines to finish the surface. In-house plating tanks and a simple water-bath separation system complete the process. To date we have built shells ranging in size from 5 cm diameter to 50 cm, and with thickness down to 100 micron. For our HERO balloon program, we are fabricating over 200 iridium-coated shells, 250 microns thick, for hard-x-ray imaging up to 75 keV. Early test results on these have indicated half-power-diameters of 15 arcsec. The status of these and other hard-x-ray optics will be reviewed.

  1. Nonlinear wavelength conversion in photonic crystal fibers with three zero-dispersion points

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, S. P.; Biancalana, F.; Podlipensky, A.; St. J. Russell, P.

    2011-02-15

    In this theoretical study, we show that a simple endlessly single-mode photonic crystal fiber can be designed to yield, not just two, but three zero-dispersion wavelengths. The presence of a third dispersion zero creates a rich phase-matching topology, enabling enhanced control over the spectral locations of the four-wave-mixing and resonant-radiation bands emitted by solitons and short pulses. The greatly enhanced flexibility in the positioning of these bands has applications in wavelength conversion, supercontinuum generation, and pair-photon sources for quantum optics.

  2. X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for extended X-ray sources

    DOEpatents

    Bitter, Manfred L. (Princeton, NJ); Fraenkel, Ben (Jerusalem, IL); Gorman, James L. (Bordentown, NJ); Hill, Kenneth W. (Lawrenceville, NJ); Roquemore, A. Lane (Cranbury, NJ); Stodiek, Wolfgang (Princeton, NJ); von Goeler, Schweickhard E. (Princeton, NJ)

    2001-01-01

    Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokomak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters using the imaging properties for Bragg angles near 45. For a Bragg angle of 45.degree., the spherical crystal focuses a bundle of near parallel X-rays (the cross section of which is determined by the cross section of the crystal) from the plasma to a point on a detector, with parallel rays inclined to the main plain of diffraction focused to different points on the detector. Thus, it is possible to radially image the plasma X-ray emission in different wavelengths simultaneously with a single crystal.

  3. Glass Monocapillary X-ray Optics And Their Applications In X-ray Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, X.; Feser, M.; Huang, E.; Lyon, A.; Yun, W.

    2010-04-06

    Elliptical, parabolic and Wolter type glass monocapillaries were fabricated for use as x-ray condensers in the energy range of 250 eV to 20 keV. On a routine basis a diameter error of +/-0.4 {mu}m and straightness error of 0.8 {mu}m (peak to valley) can be reached. The final test of condensers was performed at-wavelength by imaging the far field x-ray reflection intensity distribution using a laboratory microfocus x-ray source. For medium length condensers with a total length <80 mm, a total slope error of 40 murad rms was obtained. The applications in full-field x-ray microscopes and the future effort in developing capillary Wolter mirrors based on this technology are reported.

  4. X-ray modulation transfer functions of photostimulable phosphor image plates and scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John F.; Holland, Glenn E.; Hudson, Lawrence T.; Henins, Albert

    2008-11-01

    The modulation transfer functions of two types of photostimulable phosphor image plates were determined in the 10 keV to 50 keV x-ray energy range using a resolution test pattern with up to 10 line pairs per mm (LP/mm) and a wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometer. Techniques were developed for correcting for the partial transmittance of the high energy x rays through the lead bars of the resolution test pattern, and the modulation transfer function (MTF) was determined from the measured change in contrast with LP/mm values. The MTF was convolved with the slit function of the image plate scanner, and the resulting point spread functions (PSFs) were in good agreement with the observed shapes and widths of x-ray spectral lines and with the PSF derived from edge spread functions. The shapes and the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) values of the PSF curves of the Fuji Superior Resolution (SR) and Fuji Maximum Sensitivity (MS) image plate detectors, consisting of the image plate and the scanner, determined by the three methods gave consistent results: The SR PSF is Gaussian with 0.13 mm FWHM, and the MS PSF is Lorentzian with 0.19 mm FWHM. These techniques result in the accurate determination of the spatial resolution achievable using image plate and scanner combinations and enable the optimization of spatial resolution for x-ray spectroscopy and radiography.

  5. Advanced light element and low energy X-ray line analysis using Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (EDS) with Silicon Drift Detectors (SDD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salge, T.; Palasse, L.; Berlin, J.; Hansen, B.; Terborg, R.; Falke, M.

    2013-12-01

    Introduction: Characterization at the micro- to nano-scale is crucial for understanding many processes in earth, planetary, material and biological sciences. The composition of thin electron transparent samples can be analyzed in the nm-range using transmission electron microscopes (TEM) or, specific sample holders provided, in the field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). Nevertheless both methods often require complex sample preparation. An alternative method is to analyze bulk samples with a FE-SEM. In order to decrease the excitation volume for generated X-rays, low accelerating voltages (HV<10) are required. Consequently, only low to intermediate energy X-ray lines can be evaluated and many peak overlaps have to be deconvoluted since the high energy range is not available. Methods: A BRUKER Quantax EDS system with an XFlash Silicon Drift Detector acquired EDS spectra in spectrum images. To separate overlapping peaks, an extended atomic database [1] was used. For single channel EDS the electron beam current, solid angle, take-off angle and exposure time can be optimized to investigate the element composition. Multiple SDD setups ensure an even higher efficiency and larger collection angles for the X-ray analysis than single channel detectors. Shadowing effects are minimized in element distribution maps so that samples can be investigated quickly and sometimes in a close to natural state, with little preparation. A new type of EDS detector, the annular four channel SDD (XFlash 5060F), is placed between the pole piece and sample. It covers a very large solid angle (1.1 sr) and allows sufficient data collection at low beam currents on beam sensitive samples with substantial surface topography. Examples of applications: Results demonstrate that SDD-based EDS analysis contributes essential information on the structure at the micro- to nano scale of the investigated sample types. These include stardust analogue impact experiments [2], Chicxulub asteroid impactites [3,4], ore characterization of the Sudbury igneous complex [5], biomineralization in bacteria and insects [6], and characterization of ceramics [7] and ceramic metal joints [8]. We conclude that improvements in SDD and pulse processor technology including multi-detector and multi-segment options provide new insights because a vast amount of detailed information can be collected in a short period of time. Using the XFlash QUAD 5060F, samples can be analyzed rapidly at low beam current without carbon coating. [1] A. Assmann, A. and M. Wendt 2003. Spectrochim. Acta Part B, 58: 711-716. [2] A.T. Kearsley et al. 2013. 44th LPSC, 18-22.03.2013, The Woodlands, USA: #1910. [3] P. Schulte et al. 2010. Science 327: 1214-1218. [4] M. Nelson et al. 2012. GCA 86: 1-20. [5] Salge et al. 2013. LPI Contrib .No. 1737: 89. [6] M. Falke et al. 2013. EURO BioMat. 23-24.04.2013, Weimar, Germany. [7] H. Yurdakul et al. 2013.accepted for MC 2013, 25-30.08.2013, Regensburg, Germany [8] O. Tunckan 2010. PhD thesis. Anadolu University, Eskisehir, Turkey.

  6. X-ray Free-electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Feldhaus, J.; Arthur, J.; Hastings, J.B.; /SLAC

    2007-02-23

    In a free-electron laser (FEL) the lasing medium is a high-energy beam of electrons flying with relativistic speed through a periodic magnetic field. The interaction between the synchrotron radiation that is produced and the electrons in the beam induces a periodic bunching of the electrons, greatly increasing the intensity of radiation produced at a particular wavelength. Depending only on a phase match between the electron energy and the magnetic period, the wavelength of the FEL radiation can be continuously tuned within a wide spectral range. The FEL concept can be adapted to produce radiation wavelengths from millimeters to Angstroms, and can in principle produce hard x-ray beams with unprecedented peak brightness, exceeding that of the brightest synchrotron source by ten orders of magnitude or more. This paper focuses on short-wavelength FELs. It reviews the physics and characteristic properties of single-pass FELs, as well as current technical developments aiming for fully coherent x-ray radiation pulses with pulse durations in the 100 fs to 100 as range. First experimental results at wavelengths around 100 nm and examples of scientific applications planned on the new, emerging x-ray FEL facilities are presented.

  7. Soft X-ray Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, John

    1999-05-20

    The contents of this report cover the following: (1) design of the soft x-ray telescope; (2) fabrication and characterization of the soft x-ray telescope; and (3) experimental implementation at the OMEGA laser facility.

  8. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    MedlinePLUS

    ... person's wrist. During the examination, an X-ray machine sends a beam of radiation through the wrist, ... have a table and a large X-ray machine hanging from the ceiling. Parents are usually able ...

  9. X-Ray Exam: Foot

    MedlinePLUS

    ... person's foot. During the examination, an X-ray machine sends a beam of radiation through the foot, ... contain a table and a large X-ray machine hanging from the ceiling. Parents are usually able ...

  10. Fluctuation X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Saldin, PI: D. K.; Co-I's: J. C. H. Spence and P. Fromme

    2013-01-25

    The work supported by the grant was aimed at developing novel methods of finding the structures of biomolecules using x-rays from novel sources such as the x-ray free electron laser and modern synchrotrons

  11. Numerical calculation of phase-matching properties in photonic crystal fibers with three and four zero-dispersion wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xingtao; Liu, Xiaoxu; Wang, Shutao; Wang, Wei; Han, Ying; Liu, Zhaolun; Li, Shuguang; Hou, Lantian

    2015-10-19

    Photonic crystal fibers with three and four zero-dispersion wavelengths are presented through special design of the structural parameters, in which the closing to zero and ultra-flattened dispersion can be obtained. The unique phase-matching properties of the fibers with three and four zero-dispersion wavelengths are analyzed. Variation of the phase-matching wavelengths with the pump wavelengths, pump powers, dispersion properties, and fiber structural parameters is analyzed. The presence of three and four zero-dispersion wavelengths can realize wavelength conversion of optical soliton between two anomalous dispersion regions, generate six phase-matching sidebands through four-wave mixing and create more new photon pairs, which can be used for the study of supercontinuum generation, optical switches and quantum optics. PMID:26480448

  12. Quantitative Electron-Excited X-Ray Microanalysis of Borides, Carbides, Nitrides, Oxides, and Fluorides with Scanning Electron Microscopy/Silicon Drift Detector Energy-Dispersive Spectrometry (SEM/SDD-EDS) and NIST DTSA-II.

    PubMed

    Newbury, Dale E; Ritchie, Nicholas W M

    2015-10-01

    A scanning electron microscope with a silicon drift detector energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM/SDD-EDS) was used to analyze materials containing the low atomic number elements B, C, N, O, and F achieving a high degree of accuracy. Nearly all results fell well within an uncertainty envelope of 5% relative (where relative uncertainty (%)=[(measured-ideal)/ideal]100%). Quantification was performed with the standards-based "k-ratio" method with matrix corrections calculated based on the Pouchou and Pichoir expression for the ionization depth distribution function, as implemented in the NIST DTSA-II EDS software platform. The analytical strategy that was followed involved collection of high count (>2.5 million counts from 100 eV to the incident beam energy) spectra measured with a conservative input count rate that restricted the deadtime to ~10% to minimize coincidence effects. Standards employed included pure elements and simple compounds. A 10 keV beam was employed to excite the K- and L-shell X-rays of intermediate and high atomic number elements with excitation energies above 3 keV, e.g., the Fe K-family, while a 5 keV beam was used for analyses of elements with excitation energies below 3 keV, e.g., the Mo L-family. PMID:26365439

  13. Dispersion measurement of optical fiber using dual wavelength diffraction phase microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarfard, Mohammad Reza; Tayebi, Behnam; Nasab, Razie Jalai; Kim, Dug Young

    2014-11-01

    Various quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) techniques for noninvasive and quantitative analysis of samples proposed based on imaging interferometry techniques over the last decade [1-4]. A phase image can be obtained with a single set of interference data in some types of phase microscopes such as diffraction phase microscope [5, 6]. They are suitable for studying rapidly varying phenomena with reduced concern for systematic and sample variations that may occur during the acquisition of the raw data. Dispersion measurements of a sample carry more information than refractive index of measurements at a single wavelength [7]. Knowledge of the optical dispersion for phase objects such as optical fibers, biological cells and micro-particles can provide very useful information about their property. In this work, we report on a common-path and dual wavelength quantitative phase microscope that simultaneously acquires two phase images at different wavelengths. The simultaneous dual-wavelength measurement was performed with a diffraction phase microscope based on a transmission grating and a spatial filter that form a common-path imaging interferometer. With a combined laser source that generates two-color light continuously, a different diffraction order of the grating was utilized for each wavelength component so that the dual-wavelength interference pattern could be distinguished by the distinct fringe frequencies. The refractive index profiles of fiber in both wavelengths were measured adequately by our DW-DPM system.

  14. Site Specific X-ray Anomalous Dispersion of the Geometrically Frustrated Kagome Magnet Herbertsmithite ZnCu3(OH)6Cl2

    SciTech Connect

    A Freedman; T Han; A Prodi; P Muller; Q Huang; Y Chen; S Webb; Y Lee; T McQueen; D Nocera

    2011-12-31

    Structural characterization, exploiting X-ray scattering differences at elemental absorption edges, is developed to quantitatively determine crystallographic site-specific metal disorder. We apply this technique to the problem of Zn-Cu chemical disorder in ZnCu{sub 3}(OH){sub 6}Cl{sub 2}. This geometrically frustrated kagome antiferromagnet is one of the best candidates for a spin-liquid ground state, but chemical disorder has been suggested as a mundane explanation for its magnetic properties. Using anomalous scattering at the Zn and Cu edges, we determine that there is no Zn occupation of the intralayer Cu sites within the kagome layer; however there is Cu present on the Zn intersite, leading to a structural formula of (Zn{sub 0.85}Cu{sub 0.15})Cu{sub 3}(OH){sub 6}Cl{sub 2}. The lack of Zn mixing onto the kagome lattice sites lends support to the idea that the electronic ground state in ZnCu{sub 3}(OH){sub 6}Cl{sub 2} and its relatives is nontrivial.

  15. High-pressure structural transformations of PbCrO{sub 4} up to 51.2 GPa: An angle-dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction study

    SciTech Connect

    Errandonea, D.

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • PbCrO{sub 4} was studied under high pressure up to 51 GPa using synchrotron powder XRD. • The occurrence of three phase transitions is reported. • The crystal structures of the high-pressure phases are assigned. • Axial and bulk compressibilities are determined. - Abstract: We report on high-pressure X-ray diffraction measurements up to 51.2 GPa in PbCrO{sub 4} at room temperature. Three high-pressure phases with structures different than the ambient-pressure monazite-type (P2{sub 1}/n) are reported. One phase transition was found at 3.8 GPa to an isomorphic structure to monazite. A second transition occurs at 11.1 GPa. After this transition, the coexistence of tetragonal (I4{sub 1}/a) and monoclinic (P2{sub 1}) structures is detected up to 21.1 GPa. Beyond this pressure and up to 51.2 GPa, only the high-pressure monoclinic phase is observed. Upon decompression all structural changes are reversible. Finally, the axial compressibilities for the different phases have been determined as well as the equations of state.

  16. Extended asymmetric-cut multilayer X-ray gratings.

    PubMed

    Prasciolu, Mauro; Haase, Anton; Scholze, Frank; Chapman, Henry N; Bajt, Saša

    2015-06-15

    The fabrication and characterization of a large-area high-dispersion blazed grating for soft X-rays based on an asymmetric-cut multilayer structure is reported. An asymmetric-cut multilayer structure acts as a perfect blazed grating of high efficiency that exhibits a single diffracted order, as described by dynamical diffraction throughout the depth of the layered structure. The maximum number of grating periods created by cutting a multilayer deposited on a flat substrate is equal to the number of layers deposited, which limits the size of the grating. The size limitation was overcome by depositing the multilayer onto a substrate which itself is a coarse blazed grating and then polish it flat to reveal the uniformly spaced layers of the multilayer. The number of deposited layers required is such that the multilayer thickness exceeds the step height of the substrate structure. The method is demonstrated by fabricating a 27,060 line pairs per mm blazed grating (36.95 nm period) that is repeated every 3,200 periods by the 120-μm period substrate structure. This preparation technique also relaxes the requirements on stress control and interface roughness of the multilayer film. The dispersion and efficiency of the grating is demonstrated for soft X-rays of 13.2 nm wavelength. PMID:26193502

  17. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Child All About Food Allergies X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle Print A A A Text Size What's in ... en español Radiografía: tobillo What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test ...

  18. X-Ray Exam: Ankle

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Palsy: Caring for Your Child X-Ray Exam: Ankle KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Ankle Print A A A Text Size What's in ... en espaol Radiografa: tobillo What It Is An ankle X-ray is a safe and painless test ...

  19. Tunable X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Boyce, James R.

    2011-02-08

    A method for the production of X-ray bunches tunable in both time and energy level by generating multiple photon, X-ray, beams through the use of Thomson scattering. The method of the present invention simultaneously produces two X-ray pulses that are tunable in energy and/or time.

  20. X-RAY GROUPS OF GALAXIES IN THE AEGIS DEEP AND WIDE FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Erfanianfar, G.; Lerchster, M.; Nandra, K.; Connelly, J. L.; Mirkazemi, M.; Finoguenov, A.; Tanaka, M.; Laird, E.; Bielby, R.; Faber, S. M.; Kocevski, D.; Jeltema, T.; Newman, J. A.; Coil, A. L.; Brimioulle, F.; Davis, M.; McCracken, H. J.; Willmer, C.; Gerke, B.; and others

    2013-03-10

    We present the results of a search for extended X-ray sources and their corresponding galaxy groups from 800 ks Chandra coverage of the All-wavelength Extended Groth Strip International Survey (AEGIS). This yields one of the largest X-ray-selected galaxy group catalogs from a blind survey to date. The red-sequence technique and spectroscopic redshifts allow us to identify 100% of reliable sources, leading to a catalog of 52 galaxy groups. These groups span the redshift range z {approx} 0.066-1.544 and virial mass range M{sub 200} {approx} 1.34 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13}-1.33 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }. For the 49 extended sources that lie within DEEP2 and DEEP3 Galaxy Redshift Survey coverage, we identify spectroscopic counterparts and determine velocity dispersions. We select member galaxies by applying different cuts along the line of sight or in projected spatial coordinates. A constant cut along the line of sight can cause a large scatter in scaling relations in low-mass or high-mass systems depending on the size of the cut. A velocity-dispersion-based virial radius can cause a larger overestimation of velocity dispersion in comparison to an X-ray-based virial radius for low-mass systems. There is no significant difference between these two radial cuts for more massive systems. Independent of radial cut, an overestimation of velocity dispersion can be created in the case of the existence of significant substructure and compactness in X-ray emission, which mostly occur in low-mass systems. We also present a comparison between X-ray galaxy groups and optical galaxy groups detected using the Voronoi-Delaunay method for DEEP2 data in this field.

  1. Low Energy X-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, Wayne R.

    1981-10-01

    A subkilovolt spectrometer has been produced to permit high-energy-resolution, time-dependent x-ray intensity measurements. The diffracting element is a curved mica (d=9.95) crystal. To preclude higher order (n?1) diffractions, a carbon x-ray mirror that reflects only photons with energies less than 1.1 keV is utilized ahead of the diffracting element. The nominal energy range of interest is 800 to 900 eV. The diffracted photons are detected by a gold-surfaced photoelectric diode designed to have a very good frequency response, and whose current is recorded on an oscilloscope. A thin, aluminum light barrier is placed between the diffracting crystal and the photoelectric diode detector to keep any UV generated on or scattered by the crystal from illuminating the detector. High spectral enegy resolution is provided by many photocathodes between 8- and 50-eV wide placed serially along the diffracted x-ray beam at the detector position. The spectrometer was calibrated for energy and energy dispersion using the Ni L?1,2 lines produced in the LLNL IONAC accelerator and in third order using a molybdenum target x-ray tube. For the latter calibration the carbon mirror was replaced by one surfaced with rhodium to raise the cut-off energy to about 3 keV. The carbon mirror reflection dependence on energy was measured using one of our Henke x-ray sources. The curved mica crystal diffraction efficiency was measured on our Low-Energy X-ray (LEX) machine. The spectrometer performs well although some changes in the way the x-ray mirror is held are desirable.

  2. Low energy x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, W.R.

    1981-06-05

    A subkilovolt spectrometer has been produced to permit high-energy-resolution, time-dependent x-ray intensity measurements. The diffracting element is a curved mica (d = 9.95A) crystal. To preclude higher order (n > 1) diffractions, a carbon x-ray mirror that reflects only photons with energies less than approx. 1.1 keV is utilized ahead of the diffracting element. The nominal energy range of interest is 800 to 900 eV. The diffracted photons are detected by a gold-surface photoelectric diode designed to have a very good frequency response, and whose current is recorded on an oscilloscope. A thin, aluminium light barrier is placed between the diffracting crystal and the photoelectric diode detector to keep any uv generated on or scattered by the crystal from illuminating the detector. High spectral energy resolution is provided by many photocathodes between 8- and 50-eV wide placed serially along the diffracted x-ray beam at the detector position. The spectrometer was calibrated for energy and energy dispersion using the Ni L..cap alpha../sub 1/ /sub 2/ lines produced in the LLNL IONAC accelerator and in third order using a molybdenum target x-ray tube. For the latter calibration the carbon mirror was replaced by one surfaced with rhodium to raise the cut-off energy to about 3 keV. The carbon mirror reflection dependence on energy was measured using one of our Henke x-ray sources. The curved mica crystal diffraction efficiency was measured on our Low-Energy x-ray (LEX) machine. The spectrometer performs well although some changes in the way the x-ray mirror is held are desirable. 16 figures.

  3. Microchannel detector array for X-rays and UV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. G.; Bybee, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    Device employs sensitive photoelectric electrodes and solid-state memory, can be used at visible UV and X ray wavelengths, includes nonmagnetic proximity focusing, and is immune to high energy charged-particle background.

  4. X-Ray Surveyor Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskin, Jessica

    2015-10-01

    An initial concept study for the X-ray Surveyor mission was carried-out by the Advanced Concept Office at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), with a strawman payload and related requirements that were provided by an Informal Mission Concept Team, comprised of MSFC and Smithsonian Astrophysics Observatory (SAO) scientists plus a diverse cross-section of the X-ray community. The study included a detailed assessment of the requirements, a preliminary design, a mission analysis, and a preliminary cost estimate. The X-ray Surveyor strawman payload is comprised of a high-resolution mirror assembly and an instrument set, which may include an X-ray microcalorimeter, a high-definition imager, and a dispersive grating spectrometer and its readout. The mirror assembly will consist of highly nested, thin, grazing-incidence mirrors, for which a number of technical approaches are currently under development—including adjustable X-ray optics, differential deposition, and new polishing techniques applied to a variety of substrates. This study benefits from previous studies of large missions carried out over the past two decades, such as Con-X, AXSIO and IXO, and in most areas, points to mission requirements no more stringent than those of Chandra.

  5. X-ray satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An overview of the second quarter 1985 development of the X-ray satellite project is presented. It is shown that the project is proceeding according to plan and that the projected launch date of September 9, 1987 is on schedule. An overview of the work completed and underway on the systems, subsystems, payload, assembly, ground equipment and interfaces is presented. Problem areas shown include cost increases in the area of focal instrumentation, the star sensor light scattering requirements, and postponements in the data transmission subsystems.

  6. The identification of the pigments used to paint statues of Feixiange Cliff in China in late 19th century by micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Pu-jun; Huang, Wei; Jianhua-Wang; Zhao, Gang; Wang, Xiao-ling

    2010-11-01

    The application of micro-Raman spectroscopy (μ-RS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS) to the research of pigments collected from Statues of Feixiange Cliff No. 67 and No. 69 niche of Tang Dynasty in China is reported. Five kinds of pigments were found in the experimental data, including black (carbon), white (gypsum + quartz), blue (lapis lazuli) and green (Paris green + Barium sulphate). After synthesized in 1814, Paris green was reported for a large import as a light and bright green pigment to paint architectures in China from the late 19th century. The analyzed blue pigment demonstrated the similar Raman spectra to the Lâjvardina blue glazed ceramics, which indicated lapis lazuli was an artificial product. This confirmed the painting of Feixiange Cliff in the early Republic of China as the historical record, and also reveals that some pigments were imported from abroad.

  7. X-ray fluorescence experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, I.; Trombka, J. I.; Gerard, J.; Lowman, P.; Schmadebeck, R.; Blodget, H. W.; Eller, E.; Yin, L. I.; Lamothe, R.; Osswald, G.

    1972-01-01

    The X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, carried in the scientific instrument module bay of the command and service module, was used for orbital mapping of the lunar surface composition and X-ray galactic observations during transearth coast. The lunar surface measurements involved observations of the intensity and characteristic energy distribution of the secondary or fluorescent X-rays produced by the interaction of solar X-rays with the lunar surface. The astronomical observations consisted of relatively long periods of X-ray measurement of preselected galactic sources such as Cygnus (Cyg X-1) and Scorpius (Sco X-1).

  8. Jovian X-ray emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, J. H.; Lewis, W. S.; Gladstone, G. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Brandt, W. N.

    1996-01-01

    The Einstein and Rosat observations of X-ray emissions from Jupiter are summarized. Jupiter's soft X-ray emission is observed to originate from the planet's auroral zones, and specifically, from its equatorial region. The processes responsible for these emissions are not established. The brightness distribution of the Jovian X-rays is characterized by the dependence on central meridian longitude and by north-south and morning-afternoon asymmetries. The X-rays observed during the impact of the comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 are believed to be impact-induced brightenings of the X-ray aurora.

  9. Application of the X-ray fluorescence analysis and X-ray diffraction in geochemical studies of the Pleistocene tills from Holy Cross Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubala-Kukuś, A.; Ludwikowska-Kȩdzia, M.; Banaś, D.; Braziewicz, J.; Majewska, U.; Pajek, M.; Wudarczyk-Moćko, J.

    2013-12-01

    X-ray fluorescence analysis methods (wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis (WDXRF) and total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF)) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) have been applied in complementary geochemical studies of the Pleistocene till samples. The XRPD technique gave information about the mineral composition of the analyzed samples while the WDXRF and TXRF studies allowed the fast elemental analysis. The till samples were collected from different regions of Holy Cross Mountains (located in central Poland) which are still not unambiguously described in the context of the geochemical studies of the Quaternary sediments. The analysis was concentrated on the geochemical composition of the till samples both for materials occurring on the surface (characterized by continuous weathering processes) and for samples taken from core borehole. The overriding purpose of these studies is determination of the local lithotype of the tills and its lithologic and petrographic diagnostic properties, including the chemical composition of clay and minerals found in the clay. In the presented work the experimental sets up, sample preparation procedure and measurements programme will be discussed in details. Finally, the elemental and mineral compositions will be presented for studied different groups of the samples.

  10. Soft x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, D.L.; Rosen, M.D.

    1988-12-01

    One of the elusive dreams of laser physicists has been the development of an x-ray laser. After 25 years of waiting, the x-ray laser has at last entered the scientific scene, although those now in operation are still laboratory prototypes. They produce soft x rays down to about five nanometers. X-ray lasers retain the usual characteristics of their optical counterparts: a very tight beam, spatial and temporal coherence, and extreme brightness. Present x-ray lasers are nearly 100 times brighter that the next most powerful x-ray source in the world: the electron synchrotron. Although Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is widely known for its hard-x-ray laser program which has potential applications in the Strategic Defense Initiative, the soft x-ray lasers have no direct military applications. These lasers, and the scientific tools that result from their development, may one day have a place in the design and diagnosis of both laser fusion and hard x-ray lasers. The soft x-ray lasers now in operation at the LLNL have shown great promise but are still in the primitive state. Once x-ray lasers become reliable, efficient, and economical, they will have several important applications. Chief among them might be the creation of holograms of microscopic biological structures too small to be investigated with visible light. 5 figs.

  11. Scanning x-ray microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.

    1982-02-23

    A scanning x-ray microscope is described including: an x-ray source capable of emitting a beam of x-rays; a collimator positioned to receive the beam of x-rays and to collimate this beam, a focusing cone means to focus the beam of x-rays, directed by the collimator, onto a focal plane, a specimen mount for supporting a specimen in the focal plane to receive the focused beam of x-rays, and x-ray beam scanning means to relatively move the specimen and the focusing cone means and collimator to scan the focused x-ray beam across the specimen. A detector is disposed adjacent the specimen to detect flourescent photons emitted by the specimen upon exposure to the focused beam of x-rays to provide an electrical output representative of this detection. Means are included for displaying and/or recording the information provided by the output from the detector, as are means for providing information to the recording and/or display means representative of the scan rate and position of the focused x-ray beam relative to the specimen whereby the recording and/or display means can correlate the information received to record and/or display quantitive and distributive information as to the quantity and distribution of elements detected in the specimen. Preferably there is provided an x-ray beam modulation means upstream, relative to the direction of emission of the xray beam, of the focusing cone means.

  12. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.

    1991-12-31

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits is disclosed. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and eliminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an excellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography. 26 figures.

  13. X-ray lithography source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A. (Woodside, CA); Boyers, David G. (Mountain View, CA); Pincus, Cary (Sunnyvale, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive X-ray source for X-ray lithography for the production of integrated circuits. Foil stacks are bombarded with a high-energy electron beam of 25 to 250 MeV to produce a flux of soft X-rays of 500 eV to 3 keV. Methods of increasing the total X-ray power and making the cross section of the X-ray beam uniform are described. Methods of obtaining the desired X-ray-beam field size, optimum frequency spectrum and elminating the neutron flux are all described. A method of obtaining a plurality of station operation is also described which makes the process more efficient and economical. The satisfying of these issues makes transition radiation an exellent moderate-priced X-ray source for lithography.

  14. Towards attosecond X-ray pulses from the FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Zholents, Alexander A.; Fawley, William M.

    2004-07-01

    The ability to study ultrafast phenomena has been recently advanced by the demonstrated production and measurement of a single, 650-attosecond (10{sup 18} sec), VUV x-ray pulse[1] and, latter, a 250-attosecond pulse[2]. The next frontier is a production of the x-ray pulses with shorter wavelengths and in a broader spectral range. Several techniques for a generation of an isolated, attosecond duration, short-wavelength x-ray pulse based upon the ponderomotive laser acceleration [3], SASE and harmonic cascade FELs ([4] - [6]) had been already proposed. In this paper we briefly review a technique proposed in [5] and present some new results.

  15. Chemical dependence of second-order radiative contributions in the K? x-ray spectra of vanadium and its compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazini?, Stjepko; Jaki?, Milko; Mandi?, Luka; Dobrini?, Julijan

    2006-12-01

    K? x-ray spectra of metallic vanadium and its compounds ( V2O3 , VO2 , V2O5 , VC, VN, VCl2 , NH4VO3 , and VOSO45H2O ) induced in thick targets by 3MeV proton beams were measured by using wavelength dispersive (WD) x-ray spectrometer. In addition to the main K?1,3 x-ray line, satellites or second order contributions like K?' , K?? , K?? , and K?2,5 were clearly resolved. Intensities and positions of these lines relative to the K?1,3 x-ray line have been extracted by fitting the spectra and corrected for x-ray sample self-absorption. The influence of the oxidation states and vanadium-ligand bond distances in studied compounds on relative intensities and positions of K?? , K?2,5 , and (K??+K?2,5) x-ray lines (relative to K?1,3+K?' ) has been studied and discussed. The obtained results indicate that the strength of the K?? and K?2,5 transition probability per vanadium-ligand pair decreases exponentially with increasing vanadium-ligand distance, in agreement with the observation reported by Bergman for K?? relative intensity in a number of Mn oxide compounds [U. Bergmann, C. R. Horne, T. J. Collins, J. M. Workman, and S. P. Cramer, Chem. Phys. Letters 302, 119 (1999)].

  16. X-ray calibration of the GOES-N/O solar X-ray imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catura, Paul R.; Gantner, Brennan L.; Jurcevich, Bruce K.; Kam, Claude K.; Lemen, James R.; Morrison, Mons D.; Shing, Lawrence; Catura, Richard C.

    2004-02-01

    The X-ray calibration of the GOES Solar X-ray Imagers (SXI) was accomplished at the component level and at the instrument level. The CCD and thin film filters were characterized in the facilities at the Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory. The grazing incidence telescope mirrors and the completed instruments were calibrated at the X-ray Calibration Facility (XRCF) at NASA"s Marshall Space Flight Center. The XRCF consists of an X-ray source at one end of a 518 m long evacuated tube and a large vacuum chamber at the opposite end. The X-ray source has a variety of interchangeable anodes and filters to provide filtered characteristic K- and L-shell line emission in the range from 0.109 to 8.6 keV. The absolute Photometric calibration of the SXI telescopes is very important for analysis and interpretation of their data, and to monitor the long-term solar variations at X-ray wavelengths. This paper describes the results of these calibrations.

  17. Beyond Chandra - the X-ray Surveyor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Gaskin, Jessica A.; Tananbaum, Harvey; Vhiklinin, Alexey

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 16 years, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has provided an unparalleled means for exploring the high energy universe with its half-arcsecond angular resolution. Chandra studies have deepened our understanding of galaxy clusters, active galactic nuclei, galaxies, supernova remnants, planets, and solar system objects addressing most, if not all, areas of current interest in astronomy and astrophysics. As we look beyond Chandra, it is clear that comparable or even better angular resolution with greatly increased photon throughput is essential to address even more demanding science questions, such as the formation and subsequent growth of black hole seeds at very high redshift; the emergence of the first galaxy groups; and details of feedback over a large range of scales from galaxies to galaxy clusters. Recently, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, together with the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, has initiated a concept study for such a mission now named the X-ray Surveyor. This concept study starts with a baseline payload consisting of a high resolution X-ray telescope and an instrument set which may include an X-ray calorimeter, a wide-field imager and a dispersive grating spectrometer and readout. The telescope would consist of highly nested thin shells, for which a number of technical approaches are currently under development, including adjustable X-ray optics, differential deposition, and modern polishing techniques applied to a variety of substrates. In many areas, the mission requirements would be no more stringent than those of Chandra, and the study takes advantage of similar studies for other large area missions carried out over the past two decades. Initial assessments indicate that such an X-ray mission is scientifically compelling, technically feasible, and worthy of a high prioritization by the next American National Academy of Sciences Decadal Survey for Astronomy and Astrophysics.

  18. Influence of wavelength-dependent-loss on dispersive wave in nonlinear optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Rodrigo Acuna

    2012-11-01

    In this work, we study numerically the influence of wavelength-dependent loss on the generation of dispersive waves (DWs) in nonlinear fiber. This kind of loss can be obtained, for instance, by the acousto-optic effect in fiber optics. We show that this loss lowers DW frequency in an opposite way that the Raman effect does. Also, we see that the Raman effect does not change the DW frequency too much when wavelength-dependent loss is included. Finally, we show that the DW frequency is not practically affected by fiber length. PMID:23128688

  19. Miniature x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Trebes, James E. (Livermore, CA); Stone, Gary F. (Livermore, CA); Bell, Perry M. (Tracy, CA); Robinson, Ronald B. (Modesto, CA); Chornenky, Victor I. (Minnetonka, MN)

    2002-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature x-ray source comprises a compact vacuum tube assembly containing a cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the anode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connection for an initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is highly x-ray transparent and made, for example, from boron nitride. The compact size and potential for remote operation allows the x-ray source, for example, to be placed adjacent to a material sample undergoing analysis or in proximity to the region to be treated for medical applications.

  20. Solar X-ray physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bornmann, P.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Research on solar X-ray phenomena performed by American scientists during 1987-1990 is reviewed. Major topics discussed include solar images observed during quiescent times, the processes observed during solar flares, and the coronal, interplanetary, and terrestrial phenomena associated with solar X-ray flares. Particular attention is given to the hard X-ray emission observed at the start of the flare, the energy transfer to the soft X-ray emitting plasma, the late resolution of the flare as observed in soft X-ray, and the rate of occurrence of solar flares as a function of time and latitude. Pertinent aspects of nonflaring, coronal X-ray emission and stellar flares are also discussed. 175 refs.