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1

Weak mutually unbiased bases  

E-print Network

Quantum systems with variables in ${\\mathbb Z}(d)$ are considered. The properties of lines in the ${\\mathbb Z}(d)\\times {\\mathbb Z}(d)$ phase space of these systems, are studied. Weak mutually unbiased bases in these systems are defined as bases for which the overlap of any two vectors in two different bases, is equal to $d^{-1/2}$ or alternatively to one of the $d_i^{-1/2},0$ (where $d_i$ is a divisor of $d$ apart from $d,1$). They are designed for the geometry of the ${\\mathbb Z}(d)\\times {\\mathbb Z}(d)$ phase space, in the sense that there is a duality between the weak mutually unbiased bases and the maximal lines through the origin. In the special case of prime $d$, there are no divisors of $d$ apart from $1,d$ and the weak mutually unbiased bases are mutually unbiased bases.

M. Shalaby; A. Vourdas

2012-03-05

2

Weak evidence of caries reduction using xylitol-based lozenges in two of three selected studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data sourcesThe Medline, PubMed, ISI Web of Science, LILACS, and Cochrane Library databases and articles from the references of identified articles.Study selectionControlled clinical trials and randomised controlled clinical trials (RCTs) of at least one year investigating the link between consuming xylitol-based lozenges; and caries increment; when compared with a control, in any population group.Data extraction and synthesisTwo examiners independently evaluated

Brett G Duane

2012-01-01

3

Evidence of weak conscious experiences in the exclusion task  

PubMed Central

Exclusion tasks have been proposed as objective measures of unconscious perception as they do not depend upon subjective ratings. In exclusion tasks, participants have to complete a task without using a previously presented prime. Use of the prime is taken as evidence for unconscious processing in the absence of awareness, yet it may also simply indicate that participants have weak experiences but fail to realize that these affect the response or fail to counter the effect on the response. Here, we tested this claim by allowing participants to rate their experience of a masked prime on the perceptual awareness scale (PAS) after the exclusion task. Results showed that the prime was used almost as often when participants reported having seen a “weak glimpse” of the prime as when they claimed to have “no experience” of the prime, thus suggesting participants frequently have weak (possibly contentless) experiences of the stimulus when failing to exclude. This indicates that the criteria for report of awareness is lower (i.e., more liberal) than that for exclusion and that failure to exclude should not be taken as evidence of complete absence of awareness. PMID:25295024

Sandberg, Kristian; Del Pin, Simon H.; Bibby, Bo M.; Overgaard, Morten

2014-01-01

4

Investigating Acids and Bases: Strong vs Weak  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity is an extension to standard labs that have students generate a pH curve from strong acid/strong base data. Students are asked to predict and test how the the titration end point will shift when titrating vinegar (a weak acid) with NaOH (a strong base).

5

Evidence-Based Librarianship  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the challenges of finding evidence needed to implement Evidence-Based Librarianship (EBL). Focusing first on database coverage for three health sciences librarianship journals, the article examines the information contents of different databases. Strategies are needed to search for relevant evidence in the library literature via these databases, and the problems associated with searching the grey literature of librarianship.

Jonathan D. Eldredge

2000-01-01

6

Evidence-based dentistry  

Microsoft Academic Search

We live in an age of information, innovation and change. Clinical decision making based on good quality evidence should lead to more effective and efficient treatments. Each practitioner has a role in assesing this information. This paper outlines this role, together with the advantages and problems of introducing an evidence-based approach to dentistry.

D Richards; A Lawrence

1998-01-01

7

Evidence-based practice.  

PubMed

This article provides an insight into the philosophical assumptions underpinning evidence-based practice (EBP). Lois Goding and Keith Edwards believe that EBP has often been adopted within nursing, midwifery and health visiting without careful consideration of the nature of such evidence. This article explores the issues surrounding different research methodologies and methods, in particular the dichotomous relationships between positivism, constructivism and postmodernism. The authors believe that nursing involves complex, intangible human behaviour that demands an interpretative, holistic approach investigating perceptions rather than a reductionist approach. PMID:12149896

Goding, Lois; Edwards, Keith

2002-01-01

8

Evidence-Based Anatomy  

PubMed Central

Anatomy is a descriptive basic medical science that is no longer considered a research-led discipline. Many publications in clinical anatomy are prevalence studies treating clinically relevant anatomical variations and reporting their frequencies and/or associations with variables such as age, sex, side, laterality, and ancestry. This article discusses the need to make sense of the available literature. A new concept, evidence-based anatomy (EBA), is proposed to find, appraise, and synthetize the results reported in such publications. It consists in applying evidence-based principles to the field of epidemiological anatomy research through evidence synthesis using systematic reviews and meta-analyses to generate weighted pooled results. Pooled frequencies and associations based on large pooled sample size are likely to be more accurate and to reflect true population statistics and associations more closely. A checklist of a typical systematic review in anatomy is suggested and the implications of EBA for practice and future research, along with its scope, are discussed. The EBA approach would have positive implications for the future preservation of anatomy as a keystone basic science, for sound knowledge of anatomical variants, and for the safety of medical practice. Clin. Anat. 27:847–852, 2014. PMID:24797314

Yammine, Kaissar

2014-01-01

9

Weak Acid Ionization Constants and the Determination of Weak Acid-Weak Base Reaction Equilibrium Constants in the General Chemistry Laboratory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A laboratory to determine the equilibrium constants of weak acid negative weak base reactions is described. The equilibrium constants of component reactions when multiplied together equal the numerical value of the equilibrium constant of the summative reaction. The component reactions are weak acid ionization reactions, weak base hydrolysis…

Nyasulu, Frazier; McMills, Lauren; Barlag, Rebecca

2013-01-01

10

Quantum Trajectories based on the Weak Value  

E-print Network

The notion of trajectory of an individual particle is strictly inhibited in quantum mechanics because of the uncertainty principle. Nonetheless, the weak value, which has been proposed as a novel and measurable quantity definable to any quantum observable, can offer a possible description of trajectory on account of its statistical nature of the value. In this paper, we explore the physical significance provided by this weak trajectory by considering various situations where interference takes place simultaneously with the observation of particles, that is, in prototypical quantum situations for which no classical treatment is available. These include the double slit experiment and Lloyd's mirror, where in the former case it is argued that the real part of the weak trajectory describes an average over the possible classical trajectories involved in the process, and that the imaginary part is related to the variation of interference. It is shown that this average interpretation of the weak trajectory holds universally under the complex probability defined from the given transition process. These features remain essentially unaltered in the case of Lloyd's mirror where interference occurs with a single slit.

Takuya Mori; Izumi Tsutsui

2015-03-05

11

Experimentally Quantifying the Advantages of Weak-Values-Based Metrology  

E-print Network

We experimentally investigate the relative advantages of implementing weak-values-based metrology versus standard methods. To accomplish this we, measure small optical beam deflections both using a Sagnac interferometer with a monitored dark port (the weak-values-based technique), or by focusing the entire beam to a split detector (the standard technique). By introducing controlled external modulations of the detector, and transverse beam-jitter, we quantify the mitigation of these sources in the weak values-based experiment versus the standard focusing experiment. The experiments are compared using a combination of deterministic and stochastic methods. In all cases, the weak-values technique performs the same or better than the standard technique by up to two orders of magnitude in precision for our parameters. We further measure the statistical efficiency of the weak-values-based technique. By post-selecting on $1\\%$ of the photons, we obtain $99\\%$ of the available Fisher information of the beam deflection parameter.

Gerardo I. Viza; Julián Martínez-Rincón; Gabriel B. Alves; Andrew N. Jordan; John C. Howell

2014-10-31

12

Evidence for Weak-Form Market Efficiency in Hotel Real Estate Markets  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study is to test for evidence of weak-form market efficiency in hotel real estate markets by measuring how rapidly price changes diffuse in geographically proximal areas. Using autocorrelation and cross-correlation analysis, we found that there is little evidence that past hotel prices predict future hotel prices in the same city as well as neigh- boring cities.

Seonghee Oak; William P. Andrew

2003-01-01

13

Linear titration plots for polyfunctional weak acids and bases.  

PubMed

Procedures are derived for obtaining the equivalence volumes in the potentiometric titrations of polyfunctional weak acids and weak bases by a linear titration plot method. The effect of errors in the equilibrium constants on the accuracy is considered. A Fortran program is available to do the calculations. PMID:18961862

Midgley, D; McCallum, C

1976-04-01

14

Evidence-Based Language Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this paper was to examine evidence-based procedures in medicine and to demonstrate that the same protocols can be used in English language instruction. In the evidence-based methodology, studies are divided into those that address specific language problems. Integrated studies are presented as a systematic overview, meta-analysis,…

Pollock, Eric J.

2005-01-01

15

Risk Assessment: Evidence Base  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Human systems PRA (Probabilistic Risk Assessment: a) Provides quantitative measures of probability, consequence, and uncertainty; and b) Communicates risk and informs decision-making. Human health risks rated highest in ISS PRA are based on 1997 assessment of clinical events in analog operational settings. Much work remains to analyze remaining human health risks identified in Bioastronautics Roadmap.

Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.

2007-01-01

16

Module: Evidence Based Practice Module Specification  

E-print Network

Module: Evidence Based Practice Module Specification KEY FACTS Module Code: RCM005 Department: Evidence Based Practice Summary Description Evidence based practice is an approach to clinical problem solving and health care provision based on "good evidence". The purpose of evidence based practice

Weyde, Tillman

17

Weak vs Strong Acids and Bases: The Football Analogy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An important topic in any introductory chemistry course is that of acids and bases. Students generally have no trouble learning the Brønsted-Lowry definition of an acid as a proton donor and a base as a proton acceptor. Problems often arise, however, when chemistry teachers attempt to explain the difference between weak and strong acids, and between weak and strong bases. For acids in aqueous solution, discussing complete in contrast to partial ionization works well for those with a strong grasp of the equilibrium concept, but for many students it does not seem to do the trick. Partial ionization may not evoke much in the mind of a "visual learner". Accordingly, I have developed a football analogy for acids and bases in which acids are compared to quarterbacks, whose job is to get rid of the ball (H+). A strong acid, like an excellent quarterback, delivers the ball effectively; a weak acid, like a poor quarterback, is often left holding the ball. Furthermore, bases may be likened to wide receivers, whose job is to catch and hold onto the ball (H+). A strong base, like an excellent wide receiver, holds onto the ball; a weak base, like a poor receiver, often drops the ball. The concept of throwing and catching a ball is easy to visualize and the analogy to acids and bases can help even students unfamiliar with the mores of the gridiron to comprehend the mores of aqueous protons.

Silverstein, Todd P.

2000-07-01

18

Evidence-Based Management of Anticoagulant Therapy  

PubMed Central

Background: High-quality anticoagulation management is required to keep these narrow therapeutic index medications as effective and safe as possible. This article focuses on the common important management questions for which, at a minimum, low-quality published evidence is available to guide best practices. Methods: The methods of this guideline follow those described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: Most practical clinical questions regarding the management of anticoagulation, both oral and parenteral, have not been adequately addressed by randomized trials. We found sufficient evidence for summaries of recommendations for 23 questions, of which only two are strong rather than weak recommendations. Strong recommendations include targeting an international normalized ratio of 2.0 to 3.0 for patients on vitamin K antagonist therapy (Grade 1B) and not routinely using pharmacogenetic testing for guiding doses of vitamin K antagonist (Grade 1B). Weak recommendations deal with such issues as loading doses, initiation overlap, monitoring frequency, vitamin K supplementation, patient self-management, weight and renal function adjustment of doses, dosing decision support, drug interactions to avoid, and prevention and management of bleeding complications. We also address anticoagulation management services and intensive patient education. Conclusions: We offer guidance for many common anticoagulation-related management problems. Most anticoagulation management questions have not been adequately studied. PMID:22315259

Schulman, Sam; Witt, Daniel M.; Vandvik, Per Olav; Fish, Jason; Kovacs, Michael J.; Svensson, Peter J.; Veenstra, David L.; Crowther, Mark; Guyatt, Gordon H.

2012-01-01

19

From evidence based bioethics to evidence based social policies. [Commentary  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this issue, Norwegian authors demonstrate that causes of early expulsion out the workforce are rooted in childhood. They reconstruct individual biographies in administrative databases linked by an unique national identification number, looking forward 15 years in early adulthood and looking back 20 years till birth with close to negligible loss to follow up. Evidence based bioethics suggest that it

L. G. A. Bonneux

2007-01-01

20

Evidence-Based Chinese Medicine for Hypertension  

PubMed Central

Hypertension is an important worldwide public -health challenge with high mortality and disability. Due to the limitations and concerns with current available hypertension treatments, many hypertensive patients, especially in Asia, have turned to Chinese medicine (CM). Although hypertension is not a CM term, physicians who practice CM in China attempt to treat the disease using CM principles. A variety of approaches for treating hypertension have been taken in CM. For seeking the best evidence of CM in making decisions for hypertensive patients, a number of clinical studies have been conducted in China, which has paved the evidence-based way. After literature searching and analyzing, it appeared that CM was effective for hypertension in clinical use, such as Chinese herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, cupping, qigong, and Tai Chi. However, due to the poor quality of primary studies, clinical evidence is still weak. The potential benefits and safety of CM for hypertension still need to be confirmed in the future with well-designed RCTs of more persuasive primary endpoints and high-quality SRs. Evidence-based Chinese medicine for hypertension still has a long way to go. PMID:23861720

Wang, Jie; Xiong, Xingjiang

2013-01-01

21

From evidence based bioethics to evidence based social policies  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this issue, Norwegian authors demonstrate that causes of early expulsion out the workforce are rooted in childhood. They\\u000a reconstruct individual biographies in administrative databases linked by an unique national identification number, looking\\u000a forward 15 years in early adulthood and looking back 20 years till birth with close to negligible loss to follow up. Evidence\\u000a based bioethics suggest that it is better

Luc Bonneux

2007-01-01

22

Sicily statement on evidence-based practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: A variety of definitions of evidence-based practice (EBP) exist. However, definitions are in themselves insufficient to explain the underlying processes of EBP and to differentiate between an evidence-based process and evidence-based outcome. There is a need for a clear statement of what Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) means, a description of the skills required to practise in an evidence-based manner and

Martin Dawes; William Summerskill; Paul Glasziou; Antonino Cartabellotta; Janet Martin; Kevork Hopayian; Franz Porzsolt; Amanda Burls; James Osborne

2005-01-01

23

Weak Hard X-Ray Emission from Broad Absorption Line Quasars: Evidence for Intrinsic X-Ray Weakness  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report NuSTAR observations of a sample of six X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. These targets, at z = 0.148-1.223, are among the optically brightest and most luminous BAL quasars known at z < 1.3. However, their rest-frame ?2 keV luminosities are 14 to >330 times weaker than expected for typical quasars. Our results from a pilot NuSTAR study of two low-redshift BAL quasars, a Chandra stacking analysis of a sample of high-redshift BAL quasars, and a NuSTAR spectral analysis of the local BAL quasar Mrk 231 have already suggested the existence of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars, i.e., quasars not emitting X-rays at the level expected from their optical/UV emission. The aim of the current program is to extend the search for such extraordinary objects. Three of the six new targets are weakly detected by NuSTAR with <~ 45 counts in the 3-24 keV band, and the other three are not detected. The hard X-ray (8-24 keV) weakness observed by NuSTAR requires Compton-thick absorption if these objects have nominal underlying X-ray emission. However, a soft stacked effective photon index (?eff ? 1.8) for this sample disfavors Compton-thick absorption in general. The uniform hard X-ray weakness observed by NuSTAR for this and the pilot samples selected with <10 keV weakness also suggests that the X-ray weakness is intrinsic in at least some of the targets. We conclude that the NuSTAR observations have likely discovered a significant population (gsim 33%) of intrinsically X-ray weak objects among the BAL quasars with significantly weak <10 keV emission. We suggest that intrinsically X-ray weak quasars might be preferentially observed as BAL quasars.

Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.; Stern, D.; Teng, S. H.; Arévalo, P.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Craig, W. W.; Farrah, D.; Gandhi, P.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Koss, M.; Ogle, P.; Puccetti, S.; Saez, C.; Scott, A. E.; Walton, D. J.; Zhang, W. W.

2014-10-01

24

Evidence-Based Practice and School Nursing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

School nurses need to demonstrate that their practice is based on the best evidence available, which is usually data obtained from research. Evidence-based practice involves combining the best evidence available with nursing expertise and patient and family preferences to determine optimum care. Evidence-based practice guidelines are developed by…

Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

2005-01-01

25

Boosting weak classifiers for visual tracking based on kernel regression  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper proposes an online learning boosting method based on kernel regression for robust visual tracking. Although much progress has been made in using boosting for tracking, it remains a big challenge to get a robust tracker that is insensitive to illumination change, clutter, object deformation, and occlusion. In this paper, we use a nonlinear version of the recursive least square (RLS) algorithm so as to derive weak classifiers for visual tracking, which performs linear regression in a high-dimensional feature space induced by a Mercer kernel. In order to alleviate the computational burden and increase efficiency, we apply online sparsification to filter samples in feature space. In our boosting framework, adaptive linear weak classifiers are performed, the form of which is modified adaptively to cope with scene changes in every frame. Experimental results demonstrate that our proposed method has advantages in dealing with complex background in visual tracking, and often outperforms the state of the art on the popular datasets.

Ma, Bo; Ma, Weizhang

2011-11-01

26

Evidence-Based Practice in Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The evidence-based practice movement has become an important feature of health care systems and health care policy. Within this context, the APA 2005 Presidential Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice defines and discusses evidence-based practice in psychology (EBPP). In an integration of science and practice, the Task Force's report describes…

American Psychologist, 2006

2006-01-01

27

Evidence-Based Practices for Designing Public  

E-print Network

Evidence-Based Practices for Designing Public Engagement in Transportation Kathryn Quick Assistant Questions for Evidence-Based Design 1. What are the purposes of this public engagement effort? 2. Can we for Evidence-Based Design 1. What are the purposes of this public engagement effort? 2. Can we move beyond

Minnesota, University of

28

The need for evidence-based conservation  

E-print Network

to which medical practice was based on research evidence of effectiveness and led to the conclusionThe need for evidence-based conservation William J. Sutherland1 , Andrew S. Pullin2 , Paul M Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK. NR4 7TJ 2 Centre for Evidence-Based Conservation, School

Kark, Salit

29

Translating Research and Building the Evidence Base  

E-print Network

promoting evidence-based, rigorously-tested programs and practices throughout all program areas, including Discovery Practice-based Evidence DIFFUSION #12;What's New About Translational Research? Hasn't CCE beenTranslating Research and Building the Evidence Base John Eckenrode Professor of Human Development

Keinan, Alon

30

An Evidence-Based Systematic Review of  

E-print Network

(Kang et al., 2012). The main objective of this Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) project was to compare and the highest quality of care. Methods Utilizing the Johns Hopkins Nursing Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) modelAn Evidence-Based Systematic Review of Efficacious Interventions for the Management of Delirium

Connor, Ed

31

Evidence-based Science Communication  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This presentation will describe a concrete strategy for bridging the gap between the *science* of science communication and the practice of it. In recent years, social scientists have made substantial progress in identifying the psychological influences that shape public receptivity to scientific information relating to climate change and other public policy issues. That work, however, has consisted nearly entirely of laboratory experiments and public opinion surveys; these methods identify general mechanisms of information processing but do not yield concrete prescriptions for communication in field settings. In order to integrate the findings of the science of science communication with the practice of it, field communication must now be made into a meaningful site of science communication research. "Evidence-based science communication" will involve collaborative work between social scientists and practitioners aimed at formulating and testing scientifically informed communication strategies in real-world contexts.

Kahan, D.

2012-12-01

32

Counterfactual quantum cryptography based on weak coherent states  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the “counterfactual quantum cryptography” scheme [T.-G. Noh, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.230501 103, 230501 (2009)], two legitimate distant peers may share secret-key bits even when the information carriers do not travel in the quantum channel. The security of this protocol with an ideal single-photon source has been proved by Yin [Z.-Q. Yin, H. W. Li, W. Chen, Z. F. Han, and G. C. Guo, Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.82.042335 82, 042335 (2010)]. In this paper, we prove the security of the counterfactual-quantum-cryptography scheme based on a commonly used weak-coherent-laser source by considering a general collective attack. The basic assumption of this proof is that the efficiency and dark-counting rate of a single-photon detector are consistent for any n-photon Fock states. Then through randomizing the phases of the encoding weak coherent states, Eve's ancilla will be transformed into a classical mixture. Finally, the lower bound of the secret-key-bit rate and a performance analysis for the practical implementation are both given.

Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Li, Hong-Wei; Yao, Yao; Zhang, Chun-Mei; Wang, Shuang; Chen, Wei; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu

2012-08-01

33

The Concept of Evidence in Evidence-Based Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There exists a vast literature on evidence-based practice (EBP) in education. The debate branches out in several directions, for example, what EBP entails for the nature of educational practice, what it entails for the teaching profession, what counts as use and abuse of evidence, and what educational research could or should contribute to a what…

Kvernbekk, Tone

2011-01-01

34

DETECTION OF THERMAL EMISSION OF XO-2b: EVIDENCE FOR A WEAK TEMPERATURE INVERSION  

SciTech Connect

We estimate flux ratios of the extrasolar planet XO-2b to its host star XO-2 at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {mu}m with Infrared Array Camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope to be 0.00081 {+-} 0.00017, 0.00098 {+-} 0.00020, 0.00167 {+-} 0.00036, and 0.00133 {+-} 0.00049, respectively. The fluxes provide tentative evidence for a weak temperature inversion in the upper atmosphere, the precise nature of which would need to be confirmed by longer wavelength observations. XO-2b substellar flux of 0.76 x 10{sup 9} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} lies in the predicted transition region between atmospheres with and without upper atmospheric temperature inversion.

Machalek, Pavel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); McCullough, Peter R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Burke, Christopher J.; Hora, Joseph L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Johns-Krull, Christopher M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-108, Houston, TX 77005 (United States)], E-mail: pavel@jhu.edu

2009-08-10

35

Evidence-Based Practices in Secondary Transition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A literature review was conducted to identify evidence-based practices in secondary transition using quality indicator checklists for experimental research. Practices were categorized by the Taxonomy for Transition Programming. Overall, 32 secondary transition evidence-based practices were identified. Two practices had a strong level of evidence,…

Test, David W.; Fowler, Catherine H.; Richter, Sharon M.; White, James; Mazzotti, Valerie; Walker, Allison R.; Kohler, Paula; Kortering, Larry

2009-01-01

36

Voltage Stability and Frequency Synchronization of Weak Power Distribution Networks with Inverter-Based  

E-print Network

Voltage Stability and Frequency Synchronization of Weak Power Distribution Networks with Inverter not apply to truly weak networks. Key words: Weak networks, inverter-based distributed generator, voltage and frequency stability. 1 INTRODUCTION Inverter-based distributed generation (DG) sources are usually a part

Lemmon, Michael

37

Evidence-Based Integrative Dermatology  

PubMed Central

American recognition for medical pluralism arrived in 1991. The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine was established under the National Institutes of Health in 1998. Following this, patients and researchers began exploring use of integrative medicine. Terence Ryan with Gerry Bodeker in Europe, Brian Berman in America, and the Indian council of Medical Research advocated traditional medicine and integrative medicine. The Institute of Applied Dermatology (IAD), Kerala has developed integrated allopathic (biomedical) and ayurvedic therapies to treat Lymphatic Filariasis, Lichen planus, and Vitiligo. Studies conducted at the IAD have created a framework for evidence-based and integrative dermatology (ID). This paper gives an overview of advances in ID with an example of Lichen Planus, which was examined jointly by dermatologists and Ayurveda doctors. The clinical presentation in these patients was listed in a vikruthi table of comparable biomedical terms. A vikruthi table was used for drug selection in ayurvedic dermatology. A total of 19 patients were treated with ayurvedic prescriptions to normalize the vatha-kapha for 3 months. All patients responded and no side effects were recorded. In spite of advancing knowledge on ID, several challenges remain for its use on difficult to treat chronic skin diseases. The formation of new integrative groups and financial support are essential for the growth of ID in India. PMID:23716802

Narahari, Saravu R; Prasanna, Kodimoole S; Sushma, Kandathu V

2013-01-01

38

Evidence-Based Review of Subjective Pediatric Sleep Measures  

PubMed Central

Objective?This manuscript provides an evidence-based psychometric review of parent and child-report pediatric sleep measures using criteria developed by the American Psychological Association (APA) Division 54 Evidence-Based Assessment (EBA) Task Force.?Methods?Twenty-one measures were reviewed: four measures of daytime sleepiness, four measures of sleep habits/hygiene, two measures assessing sleep-related attitudes/cognitions, five measures of sleep initiation/maintenance, and six multidimensional sleep measures.?Results?Six of the 21 measures met “well-established” evidence-based assessment criteria. An additional eight measures were rated as “approaching well-established” and seven were rated as “promising.”?Conclusions?Overall, the multidimensional sleep measures received the highest ratings. Strengths and weaknesses of the measures are described. Recommendations for future pediatric sleep assessment are presented including further validation of measures, use of multiple informants, and stability of sleep measures over time. PMID:21227912

Toliver-Sokol, Marisol; Palermo, Tonya M.

2011-01-01

39

Implementing Evidence-Based Social Work Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recently, social work has been influenced by new forms of practice that hold promise for bringing practice and research together to strengthen the scientific knowledge base supporting social work intervention. The most recent new practice framework is evidence-based practice. However, although evidence-based practice has many qualities that might…

Mullen, Edward J.; Bledsoe, Sarah E.; Bellamy, Jennifer L.

2008-01-01

40

Evidence-Based Practice: Management of Vertigo  

PubMed Central

Synopsis The article focuses on the evidence basis for the management of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), the most common diagnosis of vertigo in both primary care and subspecialty settings. Like all articles in this compilation of evidence-based practice, an overview is presented along with evidence based clinical assessment, diagnosis, and management. Summaries of differential diagnosis of vertigo and outcomes are presented. PMID:22980676

Nguyen-Huynh, Anh T.

2012-01-01

41

Evidence-Based Clearinghouses in Social Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: The purpose of this article is to describe several evidence-based clearinghouses focused on social work and related intervention outcomes, placing them in the context of how such clearinghouses can contribute to research dissemination to foster effective, evidence-based practice. Method: The study employed an analysis of data provided…

Soydan, Haluk; Mullen, Edward J.; Alexandra, Laine; Rehnman, Jenny; Li, You-Ping

2010-01-01

42

Making Evidence-based Practice Educational.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines David Hargreaves' ideas about the nature of evidence-based practice and the future direction for educational research. States that one major theme is that current discourse about evidence-based teaching is uninformed by an articulate educational theory, therefore excluding thoughtful consideration of implications of such a theory for…

Elliott, John

2001-01-01

43

Evidence Based Practice for Library Instruction  

E-print Network

practitioners make more informed decisions about the quality of the research that they may be considering.meganoakleaf.info moakleaf@syr.edu #12;© M. Oakleaf 2011 Definition "Evidence-Based Librarianship (EBL) is an approach Literacy · Evidence Based Library & Information Practice · Journal of Education for Library & Information

Oakleaf, Megan

44

Lysosomal sequestration of hydrophobic weak base chemotherapeutics triggers lysosomal biogenesis and lysosome-dependent cancer multidrug resistance  

PubMed Central

Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a primary hindrance to curative cancer chemotherapy. In this respect, lysosomes were suggested to play a role in intrinsic MDR by sequestering protonated hydrophobic weak base chemotherapeutics away from their intracellular target sites. Here we show that intrinsic resistance to sunitinib, a hydrophobic weak base tyrosine kinase inhibitor known to accumulate in lysosomes, tightly correlates with the number of lysosomes accumulating high levels of sunitinib in multiple human carcinoma cells. Furthermore, exposure of cancer cells to hydrophobic weak base drugs leads to a marked increase in the number of lysosomes per cell. Non-cytotoxic, nanomolar concentrations, of the hydrophobic weak base chemotherapeutics doxorubicin and mitoxantrone triggered rapid lysosomal biogenesis that was associated with nuclear translocation of TFEB, the dominant transcription factor regulating lysosomal biogenesis. This resulted in increased lysosomal gene expression and lysosomal enzyme activity. Thus, treatment of cancer cells with hydrophobic weak base chemotherapeutics and their consequent sequestration in lysosomes triggers lysosomal biogenesis, thereby further enhancing lysosomal drug entrapment and MDR. The current study provides the first evidence that drug-induced TFEB-associated lysosomal biogenesis is an emerging determinant of MDR and suggests that circumvention of lysosomal drug sequestration is a novel strategy to overcome this chemoresistance. PMID:25544758

Zhitomirsky, Benny; Assaraf, Yehuda G.

2015-01-01

45

Evidence-based dentistry: a practitioner's perspective.  

PubMed

Basing practice decisions on evidence is neither contestable nor new. There are some concerns, however, that must be addressed. First, all published "evidence" is not of equal quality. Second, the practical experience of dentists must be recognized as constituting evidence. Additionally, third parties should not be allowed to use evidence if that use interferes with practitioners' judgment. Fourth, the call for more evidence may place a burden on dental schools already struggling to keep up with their demands of teaching basic dental skills. The Dental Practice Parameters developed by the ADA may provide a more realistic alternative because they preserve practitioner discretion. PMID:10344103

Aurbach, F E

1999-01-01

46

Getting Research into Practice: Implementing Evidence-Based Practice in Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article summarizes recent research on the effectiveness of efforts to implement evidence-based health care. The authors conclude that the evidence in support of single interventions being effective in bringing about practitioner change is weak at best. The authors give examples and evaluative comments on more complex organizational and systemic interventions that are aimed at changing clinical practice, and discuss

Mark Halladay; Lisa Bero

2000-01-01

47

Evidence-based management: a literature review.  

PubMed

This paper presents a review of evidence-based management (EBM), exploring whether management activities within healthcare have been, or can be, subject to the same scientific framework as clinical practice. The evidence-based approach was initially examined, noting the hierarchy of evidence ranging from randomized control trials to clinical anecdote. The literature varied in its degree of criticism of this approach; the most common concern referring to the assumed superiority of positivism. However, evidence-based practice was generally accepted as the best way forward. Stewart (1998) offered the only detailed exposition of EBM, outlining a necessary 'attitude of mind' both for EBM and for the creation of a research culture. However, the term 'clinical effectiveness' emerged as a possible replacement buzz-word for EBM (McClarey 1998). The term appears to encompass the sentiments of the evidence-based approach, but with a concomitant concern for economic factors. In this paper the author has examined the divide between those who viewed EBM as an activity for managers to make their own practice accountable and those who believed it to be a facilitative practice to help clinicians with evidence-based practice. Most papers acknowledged the limited research base for management activities within the health service and offered some explanation such as government policy constraints and lack of time. Nevertheless, the overall emphasis is that ideally there should be a management culture firmly based in evidence. PMID:11982781

Young, Sam K

2002-05-01

48

Evidence-based medicine in otolaryngology journals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: We set out to assess, within the context of evidence-based medicine, the levels of supporting evidence for therapeutic recommendations made in leading otolaryngology journals. Design: We used a cross-sectional survey of clinical research articles published in 1999 in 4 high-circulation otolaryngology journals. Outcome Measures: We used study design methodology and level of evidence for clinical research articles with therapeutic

Boris L. Bentsianov; Marina Boruk; Richard M. Rosenfeld

2002-01-01

49

Understanding Evidence-Based Public Health Policy  

PubMed Central

Public health policy has a profound impact on health status. Missing from the literature is a clear articulation of the definition of evidence-based policy and approaches to move the field forward. Policy-relevant evidence includes both quantitative (e.g., epidemiological) and qualitative information (e.g., narrative accounts). We describe 3 key domains of evidence-based policy: (1) process, to understand approaches to enhance the likelihood of policy adoption; (2) content, to identify specific policy elements that are likely to be effective; and (3) outcomes, to document the potential impact of policy. Actions to further evidence-based policy include preparing and communicating data more effectively, using existing analytic tools more effectively, conducting policy surveillance, and tracking outcomes with different types of evidence. PMID:19608941

Chriqui, Jamie F.; Stamatakis, Katherine A.

2009-01-01

50

Evidence-based policymaking: a critique.  

PubMed

The idea that policy should be based on best research evidence might appear to be self-evident. But a closer analysis reveals a number of problems and paradoxes inherent in the concept of "evidence-based policymaking." The current conflict over evidence-based policymaking parallels a long-standing "paradigm war" in social research between positivist, interpretivist, and critical approaches. This article draws from this debate in order to inform the discussions over the appropriateness of evidence- based policymaking and the related question of what is the nature of policymaking. The positivist, empiricist worldview that underpins the theory and practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM) fails to address key elements of the policymaking process. In particular, a narrowly "evidence-based" framing of policymaking is inherently unable to explore the complex, context-dependent, and value-laden way in which competing options are negotiated by individuals and interest groups. Sociolinguistic tools such as argumentation theory offer opportunities for developing richer theories about how policymaking happens. Such tools also have potential practical application in the policymaking process: by enhancing participants' awareness of their own values and those of others, the quality of the collective deliberation that lies at the heart of policymaking may itself improve. PMID:19395827

Greenhalgh, Trisha; Russell, Jill

2009-01-01

51

Practice-Based Evidence: Delivering What Works  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many methods claim to be Evidence-Based Practices. Yet success comes not from a particular practice, but principles that underlie all effective helping. This article uses the principle of consilience to tap knowledge from science, values, and practical experience.

Brendtro, Larry K.; Mitchell, Martin L.

2012-01-01

52

Evidence Based Library & Information Practice by  

Microsoft Academic Search

Program Abstract: Evidence Based Library & Information Practice (EBLIP) is a way of using the best rese arch to solve practical problems in the library. This session will cover the fundamentals of EBLIP, along with possible applications. \\

Rick Wallace; Nakia Carter

53

Evidence-based librarianship: an overview  

PubMed Central

Objective: To demonstrate how the core characteristics of both evidence-based medicine (EBM) and evidence-based health care (EBHC) can be adapted to health sciences librarianship. Method: Narrative review essay involving development of a conceptual framework. The author describes the central features of EBM and EBHC. Following each description of a central feature, the author then suggests ways that this feature applies to health sciences librarianship. Results: First, the decision-making processes of EBM and EBHC are compatible with health sciences librarianship. Second, the EBM and EBHC values of favoring rigorously produced scientific evidence in decision making are congruent with the core values of librarianship. Third, the hierarchical levels of evidence can be applied to librarianship with some modifications. Library researchers currently favor descriptive-survey and case-study methods over systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, or other higher levels of evidence. The library literature nevertheless contains diverse examples of randomized controlled trials, controlled-comparison studies, and cohort studies conducted by health sciences librarians. Conclusions: Health sciences librarians are confronted with making many practical decisions. Evidence-based librarianship offers a decision-making framework, which integrates the best available research evidence. By employing this framework and the higher levels of research evidence it promotes, health sciences librarians can lay the foundation for more collaborative and scientific endeavors. PMID:11055296

Eldredge, Jonathan D.

2000-01-01

54

The Art of Evidence-Based Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this article is to discuss evidence-based practice (EBP) from the perspective of a self-identified evidence-based practitioner. Discussion of EBP includes choosing an initial intervention and evaluation procedures, the iterative process of rechoosing and refining an intervention over the treatment life span, and the importance of evi- dence within the specific clinical situation. Two illustrative case studies are

David E. Pollio

2006-01-01

55

Free Software Development. 3. Numerical Description of Weak Acid with Weak Base Titration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The analytical methods of qualitative and quantitative determination of ions in solutions are very flexible to automation. The present work is focus on modeling the process of titration and presents a numerical simulation of acid-base titration. A PHP program to compute all iterations in titration process that solves a 3 th rank equation to find value of pH for was

Lorentz JÄNTSCHI; Horea Iustin

2002-01-01

56

Evidence-Based Leadership. Essays  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many nations' governments are requiring schools to bring about significant, systematic, and sustained change to improve student outcomes in all settings, and have imposed mandates to ensure that schools are providing quality education and running efficiently and effectively. Consequently, national and state testing programs, standards-based

Lewis, Jenny; Caldwell, Brian J.

2005-01-01

57

Evidence-Based ACL Reconstruction.  

PubMed

There is controversy in the literature regarding a number of topics related to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The purpose of this article is to answer the following questions: 1) Bone-patellar tendon-bone reconstruction (BPTB-R) or hamstrimg reconstruction (H-R); 2) Double bundle or single bundle; 3) Allograft or authograft; 4) Early or late reconstruction; 5) Rate of return to sports after ACL reconstruction; 6) Rate of osteoarthritis after ACL reconstruction. A Cochrane Library and PubMed (MEDLINE) search of systematic reviews and meta-analysis related to ACL reconstruction was performed. The key words were: ACL reconstruction, systematic reviews and meta-analysis. The main criteria for selection were that the articles were systematic reviews and meta-analyses focused on the aforementioned questions. Sixty-nine articles were found, but only 26 were selected and reviewed because they had a high grade (I-II) of evidence. BPTB-R was associated with better postoperative knee stability but with a higher rate of morbidity. However, the results of both procedures in terms of functional outcome in the long-term were similar. The double-bundle ACL reconstruction technique showed better outcomes in rotational laxity, although functional recovery was similar between single-bundle and double-bundle. Autograft yielded better results than allograft. There was no difference between early and delayed reconstruction. 82% of patients were able to return to some kind of sport participation. 28% of patients presented radiological signs of osteoarthritis with a follow-up of minimum 10 years. PMID:25692162

Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos

2015-01-01

58

Evidence-Based ACL Reconstruction  

PubMed Central

There is controversy in the literature regarding a number of topics related to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The purpose of this article is to answer the following questions: 1) Bone-patellar tendon-bone reconstruction (BPTB-R) or hamstrimg reconstruction (H-R); 2) Double bundle or single bundle; 3) Allograft or authograft; 4) Early or late reconstruction; 5) Rate of return to sports after ACL reconstruction; 6) Rate of osteoarthritis after ACL reconstruction. A Cochrane Library and PubMed (MEDLINE) search of systematic reviews and meta-analysis related to ACL reconstruction was performed. The key words were: ACL reconstruction, systematic reviews and meta-analysis. The main criteria for selection were that the articles were systematic reviews and meta-analyses focused on the aforementioned questions. Sixty-nine articles were found, but only 26 were selected and reviewed because they had a high grade (I-II) of evidence. BPTB-R was associated with better postoperative knee stability but with a higher rate of morbidity. However, the results of both procedures in terms of functional outcome in the long-term were similar. The double-bundle ACL reconstruction technique showed better outcomes in rotational laxity, although functional recovery was similar between single-bundle and double-bundle. Autograft yielded better results than allograft. There was no difference between early and delayed reconstruction. 82% of patients were able to return to some kind of sport participation. 28% of patients presented radiological signs of osteoarthritis with a follow-up of minimum 10 years. PMID:25692162

Rodriguez-Merchan, E. Carlos

2015-01-01

59

Lessons to be Learned from Evidence-based Medicine: Practice and Promise of Evidence-based Medicine and Evidence-based Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents statistics of deaths caused by medical errors and argues the effects of misconceptions in diagnosis and treatment. Suggests evidence-based medicine to enhance the quality of practice and minimize error rates. Presents 10 evidence-based lessons and discusses the possible benefits of evidence-based medicine to evidence-based education and…

Wolf, Fredric M.

2000-01-01

60

How Evidence-Based Are the Recommendations in Evidence-Based Guidelines?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundTreatment recommendations for the same condition from different guideline bodies often disagree, even when the same randomized controlled trial (RCT) evidence is cited. Guideline appraisal tools focus on methodology and quality of reporting, but not on the nature of the supporting evidence. This study was done to evaluate the quality of the evidence (based on consideration of its internal validity,

Finlay A. McAlister; Sean van Diepen; Rajdeep S. Padwal; Jeffrey A. Johnson; Sumit R. Majumdar

2007-01-01

61

Evidence-Based Practices and Autism  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interventions for autism are increasing being held to standards such as "evidence-based practice" in psychology and "scientifically-based research" in education. When these concepts emerged in the context of adult psychotherapy and regular education, they caused considerable controversy. Application of the concepts to autism treatments and special…

Mesibov, Gary B.; Shea, Victoria

2011-01-01

62

Evidence-Based Practices and Autism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interventions for autism are increasing being held to standards such as ‘evidence-based practice’ in psychology and ‘scientifically-based research’ in education. When these concepts emerged in the context of adult psychotherapy and regular education, they caused considerable controversy. Application of the concepts to autism treatments and special education has raised additional concerns. An analysis of the benefits and limitations of current

Gary B. Mesibov; Victoria Shea

2011-01-01

63

Viewpoint: Moving beyond evidence-based medicine.  

PubMed

The evidence-based medicine movement has remained both well known and controversial since its inception. The authors reframe the evidence-based medicine debate by pointing out an underappreciated epistemological deficiency: evidence-based medicine as currently conceptualized cannot accommodate concepts that resist quantitative analysis and therefore cannot logically differentiate human beings from complex machines. The authors use Michael Polanyi's philosophy of tacit knowing (which refers to the taken-for-granted knowledge at the periphery of attention that allows persons to understand the world and discern meaning in it) as a starting point for rectifying this deficiency and for working towards an improved, person-centered epistemology of medical practice. The authors demonstrate that not only evidence-based medicine but also most traditional theories of medical practice need a concept such as tacit knowing to account for the kinds of knowledge human beings actually use. Polanyi's philosophy of tacit knowing is defined and briefly explained. A medical epistemology that can account for the tacit dimension of human knowledge and recognize physicians and patients as persons requires a revised conception of medical uncertainty and a recognition that clinician-patient interactions are central to medicine. The authors discuss practical implications of tacit knowing for medical practice, education, research, and health care policy and suggest ways for moving beyond evidence-based medicine towards a comprehensive epistemology of medical practice. PMID:17327722

Henry, Stephen G; Zaner, Richard M; Dittus, Robert S

2007-03-01

64

Evidence-Based Medicine, the Essential Role of Systematic Reviews,  

E-print Network

available, most appropriate evidence in the care of each patient, a practice known as Evidence-based Storage and Retrieval, Text-Mining, Evidence-Based Medicine. 1. Introduction The practice of Evidence-Based of these reviews including the Cochrane Collaboration (e.g., Adams, et al., 2008) and the Evidence-based Practice

Meng, Weiyi

65

eEvidence: Information Seeking Support for Evidence-based Practice: An Implementation Case Study  

E-print Network

eEvidence: Information Seeking Support for Evidence-based Practice: An Implementation Case Study an evidence-based practice resource collection with up-to-date coverage, and then apply automated Evidence-based practice (EBP) is the integration of best research evidence with clinical expertise

Kan, Min-Yen

66

The Evidence-Based Manifesto for School Librarians  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

School Library Journal's 2007 Leadership Summit, "Where's the Evidence? Understanding the Impact of School Libraries," focused on the topic of evidence-based practice. Evidence-based school librarianship is a systematic approach that engages research-derived evidence, school librarian-observed evidence, and user-reported evidence in the processes…

Todd, Ross

2008-01-01

67

Evidence-based radiology: why and how?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  To provide an overview of evidence-based medicine (EBM) in relation to radiology and to define a policy for adoption of this\\u000a principle in the European radiological community.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  Starting from Sackett’s definition of EBM we illustrate the top-down and bottom-up approaches to EBM as well as EBM’s limitations.\\u000a Delayed diffusion and peculiar features of evidence-based radiology (EBR) are defined with emphasis

Francesco Sardanelli; Myriam G. Hunink; Fiona J. Gilbert; Giovanni Di Leo; Gabriel P. Krestin

2010-01-01

68

Evidence-Based Practice: Promoting Evidence-Based Interventions in School Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present an overview of issues related to evidence-based practice and the role that the school psychology profession can play in developing and disseminating evidence-based interventions (EBIs). Historical problems relating to and the recurring debate about the integration of research into practice are presented as a context for the current challenges faced by those engaged in the EBI movement in

Thomas R. Kratochwill; Elisa Steele Shernoff

2003-01-01

69

OPTIMAL CONFIGURATION OF HASH TABLE BASED MULTIMEDIA FINGERPRINT DATABASES USING WEAK BITS  

E-print Network

OPTIMAL CONFIGURATION OF HASH TABLE BASED MULTIMEDIA FINGERPRINT DATABASES USING WEAK BITS Claus fingerprinting has been widely researched and successfully commercialized as a technology to trace and recognize both audio and video content. Most published research on multimedia fingerprinting focuses

Bauer, Claus

70

EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON TRIANGULAR APERTURE GEOGRID-REINFORCED BASES OVER WEAK SUBGRADE UNDER CYCLIC LOADING  

E-print Network

The objective of this study is to investigate the behavior of triangular aperture geogrid-reinforced bases over weak subgrade under cyclic loading through laboratory testing. Behavior of unpaved structures, such as permanent displacement, percentage...

Qian, Yu

2009-12-09

71

Evidence-Based Practice Goes beyond Google  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evidence-based practice (EBP) is applying research to assist in the selection of interventions that result in increased client quality care. Recently the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (2010), a new accreditation body for recreational therapy education, included standards that state students should obtain knowledge…

Klitzing, Sandra

2012-01-01

72

Finding Evidence-Based Practice Information  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Locating sources that are rich in evidence-based practice information can be more difficult for physical as well as occupational therapists in practice settings in which there is not direct access to a health sciences library. In addition, once information has been found, there may not be an easy way to access the data. This commentary will…

Childs, Gary M.

2009-01-01

73

Evidence-Based Practice and Social Work  

Microsoft Academic Search

The essential features of contemporary evidence-based practice (EBP) are outlined, with specific reference to the applications of this model to various areas of social work, micro through macro. EBP is seen as a welcome addition to our field, representing a fuller and more comprehensive development of earlier and related positions such as empirical clinical practice within social work, and the

C. Aaron McNeece; Bruce A. Thyer

2004-01-01

74

Evidence Based Education Request Desk. EBE #555  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Evidence Based Education (EBE) Request seeks to provide an overview of recent research regarding school improvement and reform with special concentration on turning around chronically low-performing schools. The response is divided into four main sections: Research on Effective Methods for Turning Around Low-Performing Schools, Frameworks for…

Regional Educational Laboratory Southeast, 2009

2009-01-01

75

Evidence-based policy Gordon Mackenzie  

E-print Network

Evidence-based policy Gordon Mackenzie #12;How does research contribute to policy? · Traditionally, the link between research findings and policy processes has been viewed as a linear process · A set of research findings is shifted from the 'research sphere' over to the 'policy sphere', and then has some

76

Finding an Evidence-Based Program  

Cancer.gov

Know how to use your needs assessment and program goals and objectives to help you select your program. Be able to find evidence-based program resources. Know how to use search options to narrow your program choices and find out what programs will and will not work with your community.

77

Evidence-based Medicine in Animal Reproduction.  

PubMed

With new knowledge being generated and published daily, the importance of evidence-based approaches in veterinary medicine is obvious. Clinicians must stay current or risk making poor decisions that clients may challenge. Especially in animal reproduction, several new substances and procedures to diagnose or treat reproductive disorders have been introduced in the last years. On the other hand, a closer look at the quality of published literature on animal reproduction reveals major deficits in methodology and reporting of many clinical trials. We strongly recommend systematically assessing the quality of scientific information when reading journal papers before using the given information in practice. The aim of evidence-based medicine (EBM) is to base the decisions in the practice of medicine on valid, clinically relevant research data. Therefore, we suggest that students should become familiar with the concepts of evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM) at the beginning of their veterinary education. Concepts and supporting tools such as checklists for literature assessment have been developed and validated. The purpose of this article is to review and discuss the importance of incorporating EBVM in animal reproduction. The need for further research that produces strong evidence in different fields of animal reproduction and better reporting of relevant study information is obvious. PMID:25220744

Arlt, S P; Heuwieser, W

2014-09-01

78

Evidence Based Education Request Desk. EBE #798  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evidence Based Education (EBE) #555 was in response to the request "Is there any new compelling research for turning around low-performing schools?" The articles included in that document are on target, but include articles through 2009. This EBE Request seeks to provide an updated review of recent research (2009-present) regarding school…

Regional Educational Laboratory Southeast, 2011

2011-01-01

79

Evidence for high accretion-rates in Weak-Line T Tauri stars?  

E-print Network

We have discovered T Tauri stars which show startling spectral variability between observations seperated by 20 years. In spectra published by Bouvier & Appenzeller (1992) these objects showed very weak H-alpha emission, broad CaII absorption and so called ``composite spectra'', where the spectral type inferred from the blue region is earlier than that inferred from the red. We present here new spectroscopy which shows that all four stars now exhibit strong H-alpha emission, narrow CaII emission and a spectral type which is consistent at all wavelengths. We propose a scheme to understand these changes whereby the composite spectra of these stars can be explained by a period of active accretion onto the central, young star. In this scheme the composite spectrum consists of a contribution from the stellar photosphere and a contribution from a hot, optically thick, accretion component. The optically thick nature of the accretion flow explains the weakness of the H-alpha emission during this phase. Within this scheme, the change to a single spectral type at all wavelengths and emergence of strong H-alpha emission are consistent with the accretion columns becoming optically thin, as the accretion rate drops. There is a strong analogy here with the dwarf novae class of interacting binaries, which show similar behaviour during the decline from outbursts of high mass-transfer rate. The most important consequence of this interpretation is that these objects bring into question the association of Weak-Line T Tauri stars (WTTs) with non-accreting or discless objects. In light of this result we consider the justification for this paradigm.

S. P. Littlefair; Tim Naylor; Tim J. Harries; Alon Retter; S. O'Toole

2003-10-07

80

CCO Pulsars as Anti-Magnetars: Evidence of Neutron Stars Weakly Magnetized at Birth  

E-print Network

Our new study of the two central compact object pulsars, PSR J1210-5226 (P = 424 ms) and PSR J1852+0040 (P = 105 ms), leads us to conclude that a weak natal magnetic field shaped their unique observational properties. In the dipole spin-down formalism, the 2-sigma upper limits on their period derivatives, birth equal to their present periods to three significant digits. Their X-ray luminosities exceed their respective spin-down luminosities, implying that their thermal spectra are derived from residual cooling and perhaps partly from accretion of supernova debris. For sufficiently weak magnetic fields an accretion disk can penetrate the light cylinder and interact with the magnetosphere while resulting torques on the neutron star remain within the observed limits. We propose the following as the origin of radio-quiet CCOs: the magnetic field, derived from a turbulent dynamo, is weaker if the NS is formed spinning slowly, which enables it to accrete SN debris. Accretion excludes neutron stars born with both B_s 0.1 s from radio pulsar surveys, where such weak fields are not encountered except among very old (> 40 Myr) or recycled pulsars. We predict that these birth properties are common, and may be attributes of the youngest detected neutron star, the CCO in Cassiopeia A, as well as an undetected infant neutron star in the SN 1987A remnant. In view of the far-infrared light echo discovered around Cas A and attributed to an SGR-like outburst, it is especially important to determine via timing whether Cas A hosts a magnetar or not. If not a magnetar, the Cas A NS may instead have undergone a one-time phase transition (corequake) that powered the light echo.

E. V. Gotthelf; J. P. Halpern

2007-11-10

81

The Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy's aim is to increase government effectiveness by using evidence of what works based on rigorous policy analysis. On the "Mission & Activities" tab near the top of any page, visitors can read of the ineffective policies the Coalition targets. For example, the site details government-funded social programs that have failed to make progress in the areas they are supposed to help, such as "poverty reduction", "K-12 education", and "economic mobility." Further down the page is a list of programs that have been deemed effective by the Coalition - "Nurse-Family Partnership," "Career Academies," and "Success for All in Grades K-2." The "Publications" tab lists the five types of publications of the Coalition, including "Rigorous Evidence," their monthly e-newsletter that can be subscribed to for free for anyone interested in evidence-based policy. Some of the other publications include "Published Op-Eds/Letters to the Editor" and "Coalition Policy Proposals," which have covered, among other things, "Technology Development," "Crime/Substance Abuse," and "Health Care."

82

Evidence-based radiology: review and dissemination.  

PubMed

Evidence-based radiology (EBR) is an important tool for the practice of radiology. The user of the EBR approach identifies evidence in a systematic fashion and then assimilates information through in-depth, explicit critical review of the best-designed and most recent literature on the subject in question. Clinical decision making is then based on the best current evidence, clinical expertise, and patient values. Substantial progress has been made in the review and dissemination of EBR. Dissemination of EBR within radiology has two critical aspects. The first is increased understanding of the methods required for EBR and of the appropriate use of EBR. The second important component is the dissemination of the data and critical literature reviews necessary to allow use of the EBR approach. Resources available for both EBR methods and EBR data in radiology include societies, journals, medical meetings, Web sites, and textbooks. Although radiology has made important progress in this field in recent years, the specialty is still behind other specialties that have been at the forefront of evidence-based medicine in the past decade. PMID:17641360

Medina, L Santiago; Blackmore, C Craig

2007-08-01

83

What Is Evidence-Based Behavior Analysis?  

PubMed Central

Although applied behavior analysts often say they engage in evidence-based practice, they express differing views on what constitutes “evidence” and “practice.” This article describes a practice as a service offered by a provider to help solve a problem presented by a consumer. Solving most problems (e.g., increasing or decreasing a behavior and maintaining this change) requires multiple intervention procedures (i.e., a package). Single-subject studies are invaluable in investigating individual procedures, but researchers still need to integrate the procedures into a package. The package must be standardized enough for independent providers to replicate yet flexible enough to allow individualization; intervention manuals are the primary technology for achieving this balance. To test whether the package is effective in solving consumers' problems, researchers must evaluate outcomes of the package as a whole, usually in group studies such as randomized controlled trials. From this perspective, establishing an evidence-based practice involves more than analyzing the effects of discrete intervention procedures on behavior; it requires synthesizing information so as to offer thorough solutions to problems. Recognizing the need for synthesis offers behavior analysts many promising opportunities to build on their existing research to increase the quality and quantity of evidence-based practices. PMID:25729130

Smith, Tristram

2013-01-01

84

Evidence for the weak steric hindrance scenario in the supercooled-state reorientational dynamics  

E-print Network

We use molecular-dynamics computer simulations to study the translational and reorientational dynamics of a glass-forming liquid of dumbbells. For sufficiently elongated molecules the standard strong steric hindrance scenario for the rotational dynamics is found. However, for small elongations we find a different scenario -- the weak steric hindrance scenario -- caused by a new type of glass transition in which the orientational dynamics of the molecule's axis undergoes a dynamical transition with a continuous increase of the non-ergodicity parameter. These results are in agreement with the theoretical predictions by the mode-coupling theory for the glass transition.

S. -H. Chong; A. J. Moreno; F. Sciortino; W. Kob

2005-04-27

85

From evidence-based practice to practice-based evidence: the idea of situated generalisation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Governments across the world are seeking improvements in school performance. One avenue to improvement that has been widely promulgated is the reform of teaching through the development of evidence-based practice. This paper reports evaluation data from a national programme in England that sought to put teachers at the heart of the search for evidence on which improvements in practice could

Helen Simons; Saville Kushner; Keith Jones; David James

2003-01-01

86

Management of Child and Adolescent Eating Disorders: The Current Evidence Base and Future Directions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although eating disorders in children and adolescents remain a serious cause of morbidity and mortality, the evidence base for effective interventions is surprisingly weak. The adult literature is growing steadily, but this is mainly with regard to psychological therapies for bulimia nervosa and to some extent in the field of pharmacotherapy. This…

Gowers, Simon; Bryant-Waugh, Rachel

2004-01-01

87

The Acid-Base Titration of a Very Weak Acid: Boric Acid  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A laboratory experiment based on the titration of boric acid with strong base in the presence of d-mannitol is described. Boric acid is a very weak acid and direct titration with NaOH is not possible. An auxiliary reagent that contributes to the release of protons in a known stoichiometry facilitates the acid-base titration. Students obtain the…

Celeste, M.; Azevedo, C.; Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.

2012-01-01

88

Evidence-based medical education -quo vadis?  

PubMed

The evidence base for most educational initiatives, at least until very recently, is largely composed of low-level evidence. Four major barriers underlie this historical observation, namely: (1) perceived ethical and acceptability problems arising from the unequal treatment of learners in experimental designs; (2) limited choice of outcome measures and validated instruments; (3) time and resource constraints; and (4) methodological issues concerning contextual confounding and small sample sizes. We advocate the adoption of a 'balanced scorecard' approach in the evaluation of education interventions that brings together a comprehensive panel of outcomes under one framework. We require a diversity of rigorously applied methods to generate these outcomes, drawing from the quantitative and qualitative disciplines of epidemiology, psychology and economics. We further suggest that the research community discuss and agree on a standardized set of common metrics or benchmarks. We conclude with a case study examining whether a hand-held computer clinical decision support tool improves clerkship learning of evidence-based medicine. The era of Brownian motion in health education research is over. What we demand in terms of burden of proof for educational effectiveness should be no less rigorous than our call for an ever escalating threshold concerning evidence of clinical care. PMID:16722922

Leung, Gabriel M; Johnston, Janice M

2006-06-01

89

Evidence-based recommendation on toothpaste use.  

PubMed

Toothpaste can be used as a vehicle for substances to improve the oral health of individuals and populations. Therefore, it should be recommended based on the best scientific evidence available, and not on the opinion of authorities or specialists. Fluoride is the most important therapeutic substance used in toothpastes, adding to the effect of mechanical toothbrushing on dental caries control. The use of fluoride toothpaste to reduce caries in children and adults is strongly based on evidence, and is dependent on the concentration (minimum of 1000 ppm F) and frequency of fluoride toothpaste use (2'/day or higher). The risk of dental fluorosis due to toothpaste ingestion by children has been overestimated, since there is no evidence that: 1) fluoride toothpaste use should be postponed until the age of 3-4 or older, 2) low-fluoride toothpaste avoids fluorosis and 3) fluorosis has a detrimental effect on the quality of life of individuals exposed to fluoridated water and toothpaste. Among other therapeutic substances used in toothpastes, there is evidence that triclosan/copolymer reduce dental biofilm, gingivitis, periodontitis, calculus and halitosis, and that toothpastes containing stannous fluoride reduce biofilm and gingivitis. PMID:24554097

Cury, Jaime Aparecido; Tenuta, Livia Maria Andalo

2014-01-01

90

Speech enhancement based conceptually on auditory evidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new idea, enhancing speech based on auditory evidence, is explored for the problem of enhancing speech degraded by stationary and nonstationary additive white noise. Distinguishing different objectives for heavy and light noise interference, two related algorithms are developed. For speech degraded by heavy noise, the improvement in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is as high as 12 dB; for lightly noisy

Yan Ming Cheng; Douglas O'Shaughnessy

1991-01-01

91

Evidence-based ethics? On evidence-based practice and the "empirical turn" from normative bioethics  

PubMed Central

Background The increase in empirical methods of research in bioethics over the last two decades is typically perceived as a welcomed broadening of the discipline, with increased integration of social and life scientists into the field and ethics consultants into the clinical setting, however it also represents a loss of confidence in the typical normative and analytic methods of bioethics. Discussion The recent incipiency of "Evidence-Based Ethics" attests to this phenomenon and should be rejected as a solution to the current ambivalence toward the normative resolution of moral problems in a pluralistic society. While "evidence-based" is typically read in medicine and other life and social sciences as the empirically-adequate standard of reasonable practice and a means for increasing certainty, I propose that the evidence-based movement in fact gains consensus by displacing normative discourse with aggregate or statistically-derived empirical evidence as the "bottom line". Therefore, along with wavering on the fact/value distinction, evidence-based ethics threatens bioethics' normative mandate. The appeal of the evidence-based approach is that it offers a means of negotiating the demands of moral pluralism. Rather than appealing to explicit values that are likely not shared by all, "the evidence" is proposed to adjudicate between competing claims. Quantified measures are notably more "neutral" and democratic than liberal markers like "species normal functioning". Yet the positivist notion that claims stand or fall in light of the evidence is untenable; furthermore, the legacy of positivism entails the quieting of empirically non-verifiable (or at least non-falsifiable) considerations like moral claims and judgments. As a result, evidence-based ethics proposes to operate with the implicit normativity that accompanies the production and presentation of all biomedical and scientific facts unchecked. Summary The "empirical turn" in bioethics signals a need for reconsideration of the methods used for moral evaluation and resolution, however the options should not include obscuring normative content by seemingly neutral technical measure. PMID:16277663

Goldenberg, Maya J

2005-01-01

92

Evidence Based Psychosocial Interventions in Substance Use  

PubMed Central

In recent years, there has been significant progress and expansion in the development of evidence-based psychosocial treatments for substance abuse and dependence. A literature review was undertaken using the several electronic databases (PubMed, Cochrane Database of systemic reviews and specific journals, which pertain to psychosocial issues in addictive disorders and guidelines on this topic). Overall psychosocial interventions have been found to be effective. Some interventions, such as cognitive behavior therapy, motivational interviewing and relapse prevention, appear to be effective across many drugs of abuse. Psychological treatment is more effective when prescribed with substitute prescribing than when medication or psychological treatment is used alone, particularly for opiate users. The evidence base for psychological treatment needs to be expanded and should also include research on optimal combinations of psychological therapies and any particular matching effects, if any. Psychological interventions are an essential part of the treatment regimen and efforts should be made to integrate evidence-based interventions in all substance use disorder treatment programs. PMID:24860208

Jhanjee, Sonali

2014-01-01

93

Weak Hard X-ray Emission from Broad Absorption Line Quasars Observed with NuSTAR: Evidence for Intrinsic X-ray Weakness  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report NuSTAR observations of a sample of six X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. These targets, at z=0.148-1.223, are among the optically brightest and most luminous BAL quasars known at z<1.3. However, their rest-frame 2 keV luminosities are 14 to >330 times weaker than expected for typical quasars. Our results from a pilot NuSTAR study of two low-redshift BAL quasars, a Chandra stacking analysis of a sample of high-redshift BAL quasars, and a NuSTAR spectral analysis of the local BAL quasar Mrk 231 have already suggested the existence of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars, i.e., quasars not emitting X-rays at the level expected from their optical/UV emission. The aim of the current program is to extend the search for such extraordinary objects. Three of the six new targets are weakly detected by NuSTAR with <45 counts in the 3-24 keV band, and the other three are not detected. The hard X-ray (8-24 keV) weakness observed by NuSTAR requires Compton-thick absorption if these objects have nominal underlying X-ray emission. However, a soft stacked effective photon index (? 1.8) for this sample disfavors Compton-thick absorption in general. The uniform hard X-ray weakness observed by NuSTAR for this and the pilot samples selected with <10 keV weakness also suggests that the X-ray weakness is intrinsic in at least some of the targets. We conclude that the NuSTAR observations have likely discovered a significant population (>33%) of intrinsically X-ray weak objects among the BAL quasars with significantly weak <10 keV emission. We suggest that intrinsically X-ray weak quasars might be preferentially observed as BAL quasars.

Luo, Bin; Brandt, W. Niel; Alexander, David M; Stern, Daniel; Teng, Stacy H.; Arevalo, Patricia; Bauer, Franz E.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn; Comastri, Andrea; Craig, William W.; Farrah, Duncan; Gandhi, Poshak; Hailey, Charles James; Harrison, Fiona; Koss, Michael; Ogle, Patrick M.; Puccetti, Simonetta; Saez, Cristian; Scott, Amy; Walton, Dom; Zhang, William

2014-08-01

94

Evidence-based practice: A challenge for European developmental psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years the evidence-based practice movement has been seeing great gains in impact. Standards for research leading to evidence-based practice have been defined. So far, however, in the area of education standards of evidence are not extensively implemented and in most federal European policies an evidence-based reform has not been attained. The present paper advocates investing effort in evidence-based

Christiane Spiel

2009-01-01

95

Evidence for weak genetic recombination at the PTP2 locus of Nosema ceranae.  

PubMed

The microsporidian Nosema ceranae is an emergent pathogen that threatens the health of honeybees and other pollinators all over the world. Its recent rapid spread across a wide variety of host species and environments demonstrated an enhanced ability of adaptation, which seems to contradict the lack of evidence for genetic recombination and the absence of a sexual stage in its life cycle. Here we retrieved fresh data of the patterns of genetic variation at the PTP2 locus in naturally infected Apis mellifera colonies, by means of single genome amplification. This technique, designed to prevent the formation of chimeric haplotypes during polymerase chain reaction (PCR), provides more reliable estimates of the diversity levels and haplotype structure than standard PCR-cloning methods. Our results are consistent with low but significant rates of recombination in the history of the haplotypes detected: estimates of the population recombination rate are of the order of 30 and support recent evidence for unexpectedly high levels of variation of the parasites within honeybee colonies. These observations suggest the existence of a diploid stage at some point in the life cycle of this parasite and are relevant for our understanding of the dynamics of its expanding population. PMID:25052231

Gómez-Moracho, Tamara; Bartolomé, Carolina; Martín-Hernández, Raquel; Higes, Mariano; Maside, Xulio

2015-04-01

96

How to Practice Evidence-Based Medicine  

PubMed Central

Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is defined as the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence, combined with individual clinical expertise and patient preferences and values, in making decisions about the care of individual patients. In an effort to emphasize the importance of EBM in plastic surgery, ASPS and PRS have launched an initiative to improve the understanding of EBM concepts and provide tools for implementing EBM in practice. Through a series of special articles aimed at educating plastic surgeons, our hope is that readers will be compelled to learn more about EBM and incorporate its principles into their own practices. As the first of the series, this article provides a brief overview of the evolution, current application, and practice of EBM. PMID:20224459

Swanson, Jennifer A.; Schmitz, DeLaine; Chung, Kevin C.

2015-01-01

97

Allelic association but only weak evidence for linkage to the apolipoprotein E locus in late-onset Swedish Alzheimer families  

SciTech Connect

An association between the {epsilon}4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE) and late-onset Alzheimer`s disease (AD) was recently demonstrated. In order to confirm the association and to gauge the ability of standard genetic linkage methods to identify susceptibility genes, we investigated 15 Swedish late-onset AD families. We found an association of familial AD to the APOE {epsilon}4 allele (P = 0.01) but no indication of linkage to the APOE region using 2-point linkage analysis, and only weak evidence using the affected pedigree-member (APM) method. Our results confirm an APOE {epsilon}4 association with late-onset familial AD and indicate that susceptibility genes can easily be missed when using standard lod score and APM genetic linkage analysis. 19 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Liu, L.; Forsell, C.; Lilius, L. [Alzheimer`s Disease Research Centre, Huddinge (Sweden)] [and others] [Alzheimer`s Disease Research Centre, Huddinge (Sweden); and others

1996-05-31

98

Ms Siti ZUBAIDAH, Assistant Director of Nursing (Evidence Based-  

E-print Network

Ms Siti ZUBAIDAH, Assistant Director of Nursing (Evidence Based- Nursing Unit) Dr Emily Ang Deputy Quanzhen, RN Lin Qianqian (Front row) eEvidence: Evidence based care supported by Technology Paula M is determined by the nurses in clinical and community practice · Evidence available immediately at the point

Kan, Min-Yen

99

Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines and School Nursing  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of evidence-based practice (EBP) has become the standard of health care practice. Nurses are expected to use best evidence on a wide range of topics, yet most nurses have limited time, resources, and/or skills to access and evaluate the quality of research and evidence needed to practice evidence-based nursing. EBP guidelines allow nurses…

Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

2007-01-01

100

Disseminating evidence-based care into practice.  

PubMed

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has launched the Partnership for Patients initiative, promising a 20% reduction in readmissions nationally across all payers by December 31, 2013. To address this ambitious goal, CMS has awarded grants to Hospital Engagement Networks, Pioneer Accountable Care Organizations, and the Community-based Care Transitions Program, as well as instituted new penalties for excessive readmission that began in October 2012. National efforts aimed at realizing this goal are predicated, in part, on our effectiveness in disseminating evidence-based care models into practice to improve outcomes and reduce costs. The Care Transitions Intervention (CTI) has been developed, tested, and disseminated to over 750 health care organizations in 40 states nationwide. Four factors promote wide-scale CTI dissemination. The first factor focuses on model fidelity whereby adopters are given insight into which elements of the intervention can be adapted and customized. The second factor concerns the selection of Transitions Coaches and reinforcement of their role through training and participation in a national peer learning network. The third factor relates to model execution with attention to integrating the intervention into existing workflows and fostering relationships with community stakeholders. The fourth factor involves cultivating the support to sustain or expand the intervention through continually making the business case in a changing health care landscape. The lessons learned through the dissemination and implementation of the CTI may be generalizable to the spread of a variety of evidence-based care models. PMID:23537156

Coleman, Eric A; Rosenbek, Susan A; Roman, Sarah P

2013-08-01

101

Hawaii's statewide evidence-based practice program.  

PubMed

Hawaii's innovative statewide evidence-based practice program facilitates practice change across multiple health care systems. The innovation eliminated duplicative efforts and provided resources, was compatible with the values of health care organizations, and had experience with a pilot program. Interpersonal and mass media communication promoted and embedded the practice change. Users included nurse champions with multidisciplinary team members. The rate of adoption varied across projects and, although resources seemed to be a major determinant of successful institutionalization, there does not seem to be a predictable pattern of successful project implementation. PMID:25155528

Mark, Debra D; Latimer, Rene'e W; White, Joan P; Bransford, Deborah; Johnson, Katherine G; Song, Valerie L

2014-09-01

102

Cultural considerations in evidence-based practice.  

PubMed

The role of culture in evidence-based practice (EBP) is examined using the components of the EBP process as a framework for discussion. Issues that are identified include the recruitment and retention of ethnic groups in research; paternalism and institutional racism in regard to those who cannot afford best practice; and cultural differences between health professionals and patients in their understanding of best practice, health, and illness. Strategies that are suggested to reduce cultural incongruence include shared clinical decision making and development of a cultural knowledge system to improve EBP and outcomes on an organizational level. PMID:20527676

Hulme, Polly A

2010-07-01

103

Evidence-based medicine: medical librarians providing evidence at the point of care.  

PubMed

Evidence-based medicine is the conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. .. by best available external clinical evidence we mean clinically relevant research.' Health care reform authorized by the Affordable Care Act is based on the belief that evidence-based practice (EBP) generates cost savings due to the delivery of more effective care.2 Medical librarians, skilled in identifying appropriate resources and working with multiple complex interfaces, can support clinicians' efforts to practice evidence based medicine by providing time and expertise in articulating the clinical question and identifying the best evidence. PMID:25438362

Yaeger, Lauren H; Kelly, Betsy

2014-01-01

104

Evidence-based medicine: medical librarians providing evidence at the point of care.  

PubMed

Evidence-based medicine is the conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. .. by best available external clinical evidence we mean clinically relevant research.' Health care reform authorized by the Affordable Care Act is based on the belief that evidence-based practice (EBP) generates cost savings due to the delivery of more effective care.2 Medical librarians, skilled in identifying appropriate resources and working with multiple complex interfaces, can support clinicians' efforts to practice evidence based medicine by providing time and expertise in articulating the clinical question and identifying the best evidence. PMID:25507879

Yaeger, Lauren H; Kelly, Betsy

2014-01-01

105

Factsheets, Evidence-Based Reviews and Outside Reports  

Cancer.gov

Factsheets, Evidence-Based Reviews & Reports View All  |  Tab View Factsheets Evidence-Based Reviews Reports Please see: NCI Fact Sheets: Diet and Nutrition These documents are issued by the Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine

106

Evidence-based Assessment of Pediatric Pain  

PubMed Central

Objective To conduct an evidence-based review of pediatric pain measures. Methods Seventeen measures were examined, spanning pain intensity self-report, questionnaires and diaries, and behavioral observations. Measures were classified as “Well-established,” “Approaching well-established,” or “Promising” according to established criteria. Information was highlighted to help professionals evaluate the instruments for particular purposes (e.g., research, clinical work). Results Eleven measures met criteria for “Well-established,” six “Approaching well-established,” and zero were classified as “Promising.” Conclusions There are a number of strong measures for assessing children's pain, which allows professionals options to meet their particular needs. Future directions in pain assessment are identified, such as highlighting culture and the impact of pain on functioning. This review examines the research and characteristics of some of the commonly used pain tools in hopes that the reader will be able to use this evidence-based approach and the information in future selection of assessment devices for pediatric pain. PMID:18024983

Lemanek, Kathleen; Blount, Ronald L.; Dahlquist, Lynnda M.; Lim, Crystal S.; Palermo, Tonya M.; McKenna, Kristine D.; Weiss, Karen E.

2008-01-01

107

Evaluating the Quality of Evidence From Correlational Research for Evidence-Based Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Only true experiments offer definitive evidence for causal inferences, but not all educa- tional interventions are readily amenable to experiments. Correlational evidence can at least tenta- tively inform evidence-based practice when sophisticated causal modeling or exclusion methods are employed. Correlational evidence is most informative when exemplary practices are followed as re- gards (a) measurement, (b) quantifying effects, (c) avoiding common

BRUCE THOMPSON

108

Application of Weak Base Anion Exchanger in Sorption of Tartrazine from Aqueous Medium  

Microsoft Academic Search

Decolorization of wastewaters containing dyes is a worldwide problem for which diverse technologies have been applied. In this study, the removal of tartrazine dye from aqueous solutions by the weak base anion exchanger Amberlite FPA51 was investigated as a function of phase contact time, anion exchanger particle size, solution pH, initial dye concentration, and temperature. The amounts of tartrazine adsorbed

Monika Wawrzkiewicz

2010-01-01

109

Weakly Supervised Automatic Transcription of Mouthings for Gloss-Based Sign Language Corpora  

E-print Network

Weakly Supervised Automatic Transcription of Mouthings for Gloss-Based Sign Language Corpora Oscar a method to automatically annotate mouthings in sign language corpora, requiring no more than a simple, research on automatic recognition of sign language has focused on the manual components. However, a full

Magee, Derek

110

Acid-Base Equilibria of Weak Polyelectrolytes in Multilayer Thin Films  

E-print Network

Acid-Base Equilibria of Weak Polyelectrolytes in Multilayer Thin Films Susan E. Burke) incorporated in polyelectrolyte multilayer thin films. We assembled 10 polyelectrolyte layers on colloidal,4 The stratified structure of polyelectrolyte multilayer films has also been combined with small molecules

Barrett, Christopher

111

Using Standards-Based Grading to Address Students' Strengths and Weaknesses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This action research project report uses standard-based grading to address the problem of traditional grades not adequately assessing student content mastery and students' lack of awareness regarding their strengths and weaknesses. Research was conducted by one elementary and two middle school teachers with 158 students between the dates of…

Knaack, Susan; Kreuz, Allie; Zawlocki, Erin

2012-01-01

112

Evidence-Based Medicine in the Education of Psychiatrists  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Evidence-based medicine has an important place in the teaching and practice of psychiatry. Attempts to teach evidence-based medicine skills can be weakened by conceptual confusions feeding a false polarization between traditional clinical skills and evidence-based medicine. Methods: The author develops a broader conception of clinical…

Srihari, Vinod

2008-01-01

113

Clustering of Medical Publications for Evidence Based Medicine Summarisation  

E-print Network

practitioners to improve their effective practice of EBM. 2 Clustering for Evidence Based Medicine The ultimate and evidence- based summaries obtained from the "Clinical Inquiries" section of the Journal of Family PracticeClustering of Medical Publications for Evidence Based Medicine Summarisation Sara Faisal Shash

Aliod, Diego Mollá

114

Evaluation of Evidence-Based Practices in Online Learning  

E-print Network

Evaluation of Evidence-Based Practices in Online Learning A Meta-Analysis and Review of Online Learning Studies #12;#12;Evaluation of Evidence-Based Practices in Online Learning: A Meta.S. Department of Education, Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Policy Development, Evaluation of Evidence-Based

Alpay, S. Pamir

115

The ABCs of Evidence-Based Practice for Teachers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is critical teachers adhere to federal policies regarding evidence-based practices. Quickly identifying and effectively using evidence-based programs and practices is particularly important for special educators, because students in special education often already have academic or behavioral deficits. Using evidence-based practices with…

Kretlow, Allison G.; Blatz, Sharon L.

2011-01-01

116

Evidence-based oral care for oral mucositis.  

PubMed

Nurses must intervene to provide evidence-based supportive care and symptom management for cancer patients. Oral mucositis, a distressing side effect of cancer treatment, is both a research and clinical priority. Nurses can lead improvements with evidence-based oral mucositis interventions. This article describes application of evidence-based clinical recommendations for oral mucositis across diverse patient populations. PMID:24069711

Farrington, Michele; Cullen, Laura; Dawson, Cindy

2013-01-01

117

Weak antilocalization effect in LPE-grown p-Hg0.8Cd0.2Te thin film and the evidence of Te-precipitation  

E-print Network

The weak antilocalization effect is observed in a p-type Hg0.8Cd0.2Te thin film with thickness ~10 micrometers. Based on the analysis of composition, carrier species and excellent fitting of data with a model concerning weak antilocalization effect in Te crystal, the most plausible explanation is that the observed weak antilocalization effect is caused by Te-precipitation.

R. Yang; L. M. Wei; G. L. Yu

2010-06-07

118

Purchasing evidence: the corollary of evidence based purchasing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary The National Health Service (NHS) market led to problems in funding research and development (R&D). The current policy is to resolve these by funding R&D through a national levy on purchasers. The policy does not, however, address the underlying problem that evidence produced by R&D is largely irrelevant to purchasers. The consequences of this policy are likely to be

Selena F. Gray; Gwyn Bevan; Stephen Frankel

2010-01-01

119

Born energy, acid-base equilibrium, structure and interactions of end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work addresses the effect of the Born self-energy contribution in the modeling of the structural and thermodynamical properties of weak polyelectrolytes confined to planar and curved surfaces. The theoretical framework is based on a theory that explicitly includes the conformations, size, shape, and charge distribution of all molecular species and considers the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte. Namely, the degree of charge in the polymers is not imposed but it is a local varying property that results from the minimization of the total free energy. Inclusion of the dielectric properties of the polyelectrolyte is important as the environment of a polymer layer is very different from that in the adjacent aqueous solution. The main effect of the Born energy contribution on the molecular organization of an end-grafted weak polyacid layer is uncharging the weak acid (or basic) groups and consequently decreasing the concentration of mobile ions within the layer. The magnitude of the effect increases with polymer density and, in the case of the average degree of charge, it is qualitatively equivalent to a small shift in the equilibrium constant for the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte monomers. The degree of charge is established by the competition between electrostatic interactions, the polymer conformational entropy, the excluded volume interactions, the translational entropy of the counterions and the acid-base chemical equilibrium. Consideration of the Born energy introduces an additional energetic penalty to the presence of charged groups in the polyelectrolyte layer, whose effect is mitigated by down-regulating the amount of charge, i.e., by shifting the local-acid base equilibrium towards its uncharged state. Shifting of the local acid-base equilibrium and its effect on the properties of the polyelectrolyte layer, without considering the Born energy, have been theoretically predicted previously. Account of the Born energy leads to systematic, but in general small, corrections to earlier theoretical predictions describing the behavior of weak polyelectrolyte layers. However, polyelectrolyte uncharging results in a decrease in the concentration of counterions and inclusion of the Born Energy can result in a substantial decrease of the counterion concentration. The effect of considering the Born energy contribution is explored for end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers by calculating experimental observables which are known to depend on the presence of charges within the polyelectrolyte layer: inclusion of the Born energy contribution leads to a decrease in the capacitance of polyelectrolyte-modified electrodes, a decrease of conductivity of polyelectrolyte-modified nanopores and an increase in the repulsion exerted by a planar polyelectrolyte layer confined by an opposing wall.

Nap, R. J.; Tagliazucchi, M.; Szleifer, I.

2014-01-01

120

Born energy, acid-base equilibrium, structure and interactions of end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers  

SciTech Connect

This work addresses the effect of the Born self-energy contribution in the modeling of the structural and thermodynamical properties of weak polyelectrolytes confined to planar and curved surfaces. The theoretical framework is based on a theory that explicitly includes the conformations, size, shape, and charge distribution of all molecular species and considers the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte. Namely, the degree of charge in the polymers is not imposed but it is a local varying property that results from the minimization of the total free energy. Inclusion of the dielectric properties of the polyelectrolyte is important as the environment of a polymer layer is very different from that in the adjacent aqueous solution. The main effect of the Born energy contribution on the molecular organization of an end-grafted weak polyacid layer is uncharging the weak acid (or basic) groups and consequently decreasing the concentration of mobile ions within the layer. The magnitude of the effect increases with polymer density and, in the case of the average degree of charge, it is qualitatively equivalent to a small shift in the equilibrium constant for the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte monomers. The degree of charge is established by the competition between electrostatic interactions, the polymer conformational entropy, the excluded volume interactions, the translational entropy of the counterions and the acid-base chemical equilibrium. Consideration of the Born energy introduces an additional energetic penalty to the presence of charged groups in the polyelectrolyte layer, whose effect is mitigated by down-regulating the amount of charge, i.e., by shifting the local-acid base equilibrium towards its uncharged state. Shifting of the local acid-base equilibrium and its effect on the properties of the polyelectrolyte layer, without considering the Born energy, have been theoretically predicted previously. Account of the Born energy leads to systematic, but in general small, corrections to earlier theoretical predictions describing the behavior of weak polyelectrolyte layers. However, polyelectrolyte uncharging results in a decrease in the concentration of counterions and inclusion of the Born Energy can result in a substantial decrease of the counterion concentration. The effect of considering the Born energy contribution is explored for end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers by calculating experimental observables which are known to depend on the presence of charges within the polyelectrolyte layer: inclusion of the Born energy contribution leads to a decrease in the capacitance of polyelectrolyte-modified electrodes, a decrease of conductivity of polyelectrolyte-modified nanopores and an increase in the repulsion exerted by a planar polyelectrolyte layer confined by an opposing wall.

Nap, R. J.; Tagliazucchi, M.; Szleifer, I., E-mail: igalsz@northwestern.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Chemistry, and Chemistry of Life Processes Institute, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3100 (United States)

2014-01-14

121

Born energy, acid-base equilibrium, structure and interactions of end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers.  

PubMed

This work addresses the effect of the Born self-energy contribution in the modeling of the structural and thermodynamical properties of weak polyelectrolytes confined to planar and curved surfaces. The theoretical framework is based on a theory that explicitly includes the conformations, size, shape, and charge distribution of all molecular species and considers the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte. Namely, the degree of charge in the polymers is not imposed but it is a local varying property that results from the minimization of the total free energy. Inclusion of the dielectric properties of the polyelectrolyte is important as the environment of a polymer layer is very different from that in the adjacent aqueous solution. The main effect of the Born energy contribution on the molecular organization of an end-grafted weak polyacid layer is uncharging the weak acid (or basic) groups and consequently decreasing the concentration of mobile ions within the layer. The magnitude of the effect increases with polymer density and, in the case of the average degree of charge, it is qualitatively equivalent to a small shift in the equilibrium constant for the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte monomers. The degree of charge is established by the competition between electrostatic interactions, the polymer conformational entropy, the excluded volume interactions, the translational entropy of the counterions and the acid-base chemical equilibrium. Consideration of the Born energy introduces an additional energetic penalty to the presence of charged groups in the polyelectrolyte layer, whose effect is mitigated by down-regulating the amount of charge, i.e., by shifting the local-acid base equilibrium towards its uncharged state. Shifting of the local acid-base equilibrium and its effect on the properties of the polyelectrolyte layer, without considering the Born energy, have been theoretically predicted previously. Account of the Born energy leads to systematic, but in general small, corrections to earlier theoretical predictions describing the behavior of weak polyelectrolyte layers. However, polyelectrolyte uncharging results in a decrease in the concentration of counterions and inclusion of the Born Energy can result in a substantial decrease of the counterion concentration. The effect of considering the Born energy contribution is explored for end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers by calculating experimental observables which are known to depend on the presence of charges within the polyelectrolyte layer: inclusion of the Born energy contribution leads to a decrease in the capacitance of polyelectrolyte-modified electrodes, a decrease of conductivity of polyelectrolyte-modified nanopores and an increase in the repulsion exerted by a planar polyelectrolyte layer confined by an opposing wall. PMID:24437914

Nap, R J; Tagliazucchi, M; Szleifer, I

2014-01-14

122

Parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy and its application to weak signal detection.  

PubMed

The parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy (PSRSE) method is introduced for the detection of a very weak signal in the presence of strong noise. The effect of stochastic resonance on the detection is optimized using parameters obtained in spectral entropy analysis. Upon processing employing the PSRSE method, the amplitude of the weak signal is enhanced and the noise power is reduced, so that the frequency of the signal can be estimated with greater precision through spectral analysis. While the improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio is similar to that obtained using the Duffing oscillator algorithm, the computational cost reduces from O(N(2)) to O(N). The PSRSE approach is applied to the frequency measurement of a weak signal made by a vortex flow meter. The results are compared with those obtained applying the Duffing oscillator algorithm. PMID:25725879

Zhang, Jinjing; Zhang, Tao

2015-02-01

123

Study of weak vibrating signal detection based on chaotic oscillator in MEMS resonant beam sensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, the application of weak signal detection based on chaotic oscillator is studied in a MEMS resonant beam sensor. Chaotic oscillator can detect weak signal which is submerged in the background of large noise. According to the frequency and phase characteristic of the output vibrating signal, reference current signal with fixed frequency difference and same phase to the output signal is set. Frequency and phase of the signal are fixed by detection resistor which works as a multiplier. By calculating the maximum Lyapunov exponent, detection threshold is obtained, and motion change of detection system is monitored. The results of numerical simulation and experiment show that this method can effectively detect the weak resonant signal and find the resonant frequency accurately by setting the threshold of the chaotic oscillator, and it is immune to the noise.

Shi, Huichao; Fan, Shangchun; Xing, Weiwei; Sun, Jinhao

2015-01-01

124

Probing Dark Matter and Dark Energy with Space-Based Weak Lensing  

E-print Network

Weak lensing provides a direct measure of the distribution of mass in the universe, and is therefore a uniquely powerful probe of dark matter. Weak lensing can also be used to measure the twin phenomenon of dark energy, via its effect upon the cosmological growth rate of structures. Essential for this technique are well-resolved images of background galaxies out to large distances. As a concrete example of the surveys that will become available by the end of the decade, we consider the planned Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) space telescope. Detailed simulations of space-based images, manufactured using the shapelets formalism, enable us to quantitatively predict the future sensitivity to weak lensing shear. The high number density of galaxies resolved from space will enable maps of dark matter to be produced in two and three dimensions, with a resolution superior to that from the ground. Such observations will also afford reduced systematics for high-precision measurements of weak lensing statistics. These will be used to set tight constraints on cosmological parameters. In particular, the parameter for equation of state of dark energy, w, will be measured using weak lensing with a precision comparable to and somewhat orthogonal to constraints from other methods.

Richard Massey; Alexandre Refregier; Jason Rhodes

2004-03-10

125

Retrieval-based Face Annotation by Weak Label Regularized Local Coordinate Coding.  

PubMed

Retrieval-based face annotation is a promising paradigm of mining massive web facial images for automated face annotation. This paper addresses a critical problem of such paradigm, i.e., how to effectively perform annotation by exploiting the similar facial images and their weak labels which are often noisy and incomplete. In particular, we propose an effective Weak Label Regularized Local Coordinate Coding (WLRLCC) technique, which exploits the principle of local coordinate coding in learning sparse features, and employs the idea of graph-based weak label regularization to enhance the weak labels of the similar facial images. We present an efficient optimization algorithm to solve the WLRLCC task. We conduct extensive empirical studies on two large-scale web facial image databases: (i) a Western celebrity database with a total of $6,025$ persons and $714,454$ web facial images, and (ii)an Asian celebrity database with $1,200$ persons and $126,070$ web facial images. The encouraging results validate the efficacy of the proposed WLRLCC algorithm. To further improve the efficiency and scalability, we also propose a PCA-based approximation scheme and an offline approximation scheme (AWLRLCC), which generally maintains comparable results but significantly saves much time cost. Finally, we show that WLRLCC can also tackle two existing face annotation tasks with promising performance. PMID:23917420

Wang, Dayong; Hoi, Steven C H; He, Ying; Zhu, Jianke; Mei, Tao; Luo, Jiebo

2013-08-01

126

Performance analysis of weak target detection via ground-based synthetic aperture radar  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Polarimetric Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (Pol-InSAR) is an emerging technique that combines interferometric SAR and polarimetric SAR techniques and has shown its effectiveness in the detection of buried weak targets. The detection performance is affected by the SAR parameters as well as the covering characteristics. In this paper, the effects of covering characteristics on the detection performance were emphasized and experimentally investigated by a ground-based Pol-InSAR system. Firstly, the detection principle for buried weak target by Pol-InSAR technique was presented, which is based on the use of interferometric coherence variation with polarization. Then the ground-based two dimensional rail (TDR) SAR used for investigation was introduced. Furthermore, the experiment target scene was designed and the effects of different covering type, different covering moisture, and different covering depth on the detection performance of weak targets were shown and analyzed. Preliminary results confirmed the effectiveness of Pol-InSAR technique used for weak target detection and it would be helpful for the further investigation of this technique.

Zhou, Yong-sheng; Zhou, Mei; Tang, Ling-li; Li, Chuan-rong

2011-10-01

127

Toward Evidence-Based Transport of Evidence-Based Treatments: MST as an Example  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the journey toward evidence-based transport and implementation in usual care settings of Multisystemic Therapy (MST) for youth with drug abuse and behavioral problems (Henggeler, Schoenwald, Borduin, Rowland, & Cunningham, 1998). Research and experience informing the design of the MST transport strategy, progress in…

Schoenwald, Sonja K.

2008-01-01

128

Home-based telehealth to deliver evidence-based psychotherapy in veterans with PTSD.  

PubMed

Although medical service delivery via home-based telehealth technology (HBT) is gaining wider acceptance in managing chronic illnesses such as diabetes or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, few studies have tested HBT applications of psychotherapy. Clinicians, administrators, and researchers question whether delivering psychotherapeutic services to patients in their homes via video-conferencing technology compromises patient safety, potency of treatment, or data security. Despite these concerns, HBT service delivery may increase access to evidence-based psychotherapies for veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), who may be less willing or less able to receive weekly treatment at a VA medical center or outpatient clinic due to symptom severity or other similar barriers to care. Indeed, although combat-exposed service members endorse high rates of psychiatric disorders, few appear to initiate mental health services or receive an adequate dose of treatment. Thus, using HBT technologies to administer evidence-based therapies remains uncharted territory in both the clinical and research arenas. This manuscript describes an ongoing four year randomized controlled trial comparing in-person Prolonged Exposure (PE) - a specialized evidence-based psychotherapy for PTSD - and PE delivered via HBT, with a particular focus on the selection, application, and strengths/weaknesses of HBT procedures. PMID:22101225

Strachan, Martha; Gros, Daniel F; Yuen, Erica; Ruggiero, Kenneth J; Foa, Edna B; Acierno, Ron

2012-03-01

129

An introduction to evidence-based practice for hand therapists  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a methodologic approach to clinical practice in which evidence is used to reach an informed decision when making a diagnosis, selecting a diagnostic test, picking an intervention, or determining a prognosis. Finding the best evidence through searching and critical appraisal of the methodologic quality of clinical evidence are essential steps. Matching clinical recommendations to the level

Joy C. MacDermid

2004-01-01

130

Case-Based Reasoning in CARE-PARTNER: Gathering Evidence for Evidence-Based Medical Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the CARE-PARTNER system. Functionally, it offers via the WWW knowledge-support assistance to clinicians responsible for the long-term follow-up of stem-cell post-transplant patient care. CARE- PARTNER aims at implementing the concept of evidence-based medical practice, which recommends the practice of medicine based on proven and validated knowledge. From an artificial intelligence viewpoint, it proposes a multimodal reasoning framework

Isabelle Bichindaritz; Emin Kansu; Keith M. Sullivan

1998-01-01

131

Evidence-based assessment of personality disorders.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to provide a foundation for the development of evidence-based guidelines for the assessment of personality disorders, focusing in particular on integrated assessment strategies. The general strategy recommended herein is to first administer a self-report inventory to alert oneself to the potential presence of particular maladaptive personality traits followed by a semistructured interview to verify their presence. This strategy is guided by the existing research that suggests particular strengths of self-report inventories and semistructured interviews relative to unstructured clinical interviews. However, the authors also consider research that suggests that further improvements to the existing instruments can be made. The authors emphasize, in particular, a consideration of age of onset, distortions in self-perception and presentation, gender bias, culture and ethnicity, and personality change. PMID:16262454

Widiger, Thomas A; Samuel, Douglas B

2005-09-01

132

Specialized Community-Based Care: An Evidence-Based Analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Specialized community-based care (SCBC) refers to services that manage chronic illness through formalized links between primary and specialized care. Objectives The objectives of this evidence-based analysis (EBA) were as follows: to summarize the literature on SCBC, also known as intermediate care to synthesize the evidence from previous Medical Advisory Secretariat (now Health Quality Ontario) EBAs on SCBC for heart failure, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and chronic wounds to examine the role of SCBC in family practice Results Part 1: Systematic Review of Intermediate Care Seven systematic reviews on intermediate care since 2008 were identified. The literature base is complex and difficult to define. There is evidence to suggest that intermediate care is effective in improving outcomes; however, the effective interventions are still uncertain. Part 2: Synthesis of Evidence in Intermediate Care Mortality • Heart failure Significant reduction in patients receiving SCBC • COPD Nonsignificant reduction in patients receiving SCBC Hospitalization • Heart failure Nonsignificant reduction in patients receiving SCBC • COPD Significant reduction in patients receiving SCBC Emergency Department Visits • Heart failure Nonsignificant reduction in patients receiving SCBC • COPD Significant reduction in patients receiving SCBC Disease-Specific Patient Outcomes • COPD Nonsignificant improvement in lung function in patients receiving SCBC • Diabetes Significant reduction in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and systolic blood pressure in patients receiving SCBC • Chronic wounds Significant increase in the proportion of healed wounds in patients receiving SCBC Quality of Life • Heart failure Trend toward improvement in patients receiving SCBC • COPD Significant improvement in patients receiving SCBC Part 3: Intermediate Care in Family Practice—Evidence-Based Analysis Five randomized controlled trials were identified comparing SCBC to usual care in family practice. Inclusion criteria were 1) the presence of multiple chronic conditions, and 2) interventions that included 2 or more health care professions. The GRADE quality of the evidence was assessed as low for all outcomes due to the inconsistency and indirectness of the results. Limitations This review did not look at disease-specific studies on intermediate care in family practice. Conclusions Specialized community-based care effectively improves outcomes in patients with heart failure, COPD, and diabetes. The effectiveness of SCBC in family practice is unclear. PMID:23226812

2012-01-01

133

Evidence-Based mini-manual  

E-print Network

--in vitro, animal, etc.) ** Systematic Reviews-­reviews in which rigourous scientific strategies have been's the best evidence for each domain? 1. Therapy/Prevention ** The best evidence for a study of therapy

MacMillan, Andrew

134

Evidence-based gene predictions in plant genomes  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Automated evidence-based gene building is a rapid and cost-effective way to provide reliable gene annotations on newly sequenced genomes. One of the limitations of evidence-based gene builders, however, is their requirement for gene expression evidence—known proteins, full-length cDNAs, or expressed...

135

Evidence-Based Practice in Rehabilitation Counseling: Perceptions and Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study describes certified rehabilitation counselors' attitudes (n=163) about evidence based practice, knowledge and skills related to obtaining and evaluating evidence, use of literature in practice, availability of information, and perceived barriers to evidence-based practice. Responses related to knowledge and skills were mixed with strong…

Bezyak, Jill L.; Kubota, Coleen; Rosenthal, David

2010-01-01

136

Creating Evidence-Based Research in Adapted Physical Activity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Professional practice guided by the best research evidence is a usually referred to as evidence-based practice. The aim of the present paper is to describe five fundamental beliefs of adapted physical activity practices that should be considered in an 8-step research model to create evidence-based research in adapted physical activity. The five…

Reid, Greg; Bouffard, Marcel; MacDonald, Catherine

2012-01-01

137

Evidence for Weak or Linear Conformity but Not for Hyper-Conformity in an Everyday Social Learning Context  

PubMed Central

Conformity is thought to be an important force in cultural evolution because it has the potential to stabilize cooperation in large groups, potentiate group selection and thus explain uniquely human behaviors. However, the effects of such conformity on cultural and biological evolution will depend much on the way individuals are influenced by the frequency of alternative behavioral options witnessed. Theoretical modeling has suggested that only what we refer to as ‘hyper-conformity’, an exaggerated tendency to perform the most frequent behavior witnessed in other individuals, is able to increase within-group homogeneity and between-group diversity, for instance. Empirically however, few experiments have addressed how the frequency of behavior witnessed affects behavior. Accordingly we performed an experiment to test for the presence of conformity in a natural situation with humans. Visitors to a Zoo exhibit were invited to write or draw answers to questions on A5 cards and potentially win a small prize. We manipulated the proportion of existing writings versus drawings visible to visitors and measured the proportion of written cards submitted. We found a strong and significant effect of the proportion of text displayed on the proportion of text in the answers, thus demonstrating social learning. We show that this effect is approximately linear, with potentially a small, weak-conformist component but no hyper-conformist one. The present experiment therefore provides evidence for linear conformity in humans in a very natural context. PMID:22363524

Claidière, Nicolas; Bowler, Mark; Whiten, Andrew

2012-01-01

138

Using Evidence-Based Principles in Clinical Practice  

E-print Network

To help students better understand how to use evidence-based principles in clinical practice, Prof. Storkel is revising her SPLH 880 course so that students can access evidence from clinical research and apply it to specific patients....

Storkel, Holly Lynn

2004-01-01

139

Electrolyte diodes with weak acids and bases. I. Theory and an approximate analytical solution.  

PubMed

Until now acid-base diodes and transistors applied strong mineral acids and bases exclusively. In this work properties of electrolyte diodes with weak electrolytes are studied and compared with those of diodes with strong ones to show the advantages of weak acids and bases in these applications. The theoretical model is a one dimensional piece of gel containing fixed ionizable groups and connecting reservoirs of an acid and a base. The electric current flowing through the gel is measured as a function of the applied voltage. The steady-state current-voltage characteristic (CVC) of such a gel looks like that of a diode under these conditions. Results of our theoretical, numerical, and experimental investigations are reported in two parts. In this first, theoretical part governing equations necessary to calculate the steady-state CVC of a reverse-biased electrolyte diode are presented together with an approximate analytical solution of this reaction-diffusion-ionic migration problem. The applied approximations are quasielectroneutrality and quasiequilibrium. It is shown that the gel can be divided into an alkaline and an acidic zone separated by a middle weakly acidic region. As a further approximation it is assumed that the ionization of the fixed acidic groups is complete in the alkaline zone and that it is completely suppressed in the acidic one. The general solution given here describes the CVC and the potential and ionic concentration profiles of diodes applying either strong or weak electrolytes. It is proven that previous formulas valid for a strong acid-strong base diode can be regarded as a special case of the more general formulas presented here. PMID:16268714

Iván, Kristóf; Simon, Péter L; Wittmann, Mária; Noszticzius, Zoltán

2005-10-22

140

The Recovery of Weak Impulsive Signals Based on Stochastic Resonance and Moving Least Squares Fitting  

PubMed Central

In this paper a stochastic resonance (SR)-based method for recovering weak impulsive signals is developed for quantitative diagnosis of faults in rotating machinery. It was shown in theory that weak impulsive signals follow the mechanism of SR, but the SR produces a nonlinear distortion of the shape of the impulsive signal. To eliminate the distortion a moving least squares fitting method is introduced to reconstruct the signal from the output of the SR process. This proposed method is verified by comparing its detection results with that of a morphological filter based on both simulated and experimental signals. The experimental results show that the background noise is suppressed effectively and the key features of impulsive signals are reconstructed with a good degree of accuracy, which leads to an accurate diagnosis of faults in roller bearings in a run-to failure test. PMID:25076220

Jiang, Kuosheng.; Xu, Guanghua.; Liang, Lin.; Tao, Tangfei.; Gu, Fengshou.

2014-01-01

141

Situation Understanding Based on Heterogeneous Sensor Networks and Human-Inspired Favor Weak Fuzzy Logic System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Humans use multiple sources of sensory information to estimate environmental properties and has innate ability to integrate information from heterogeneous data sources. How the multi-sensory and multimodal information are integrated in human brain? There is consensus that it depends on the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The PFC has top-down control (favor weak) and rule-based mechanisms, and we propose to incorporate the

Qilian Liang

2011-01-01

142

A supercapacitor-based energy storage substation for voltage compensation in weak transportation networks  

Microsoft Academic Search

A supercapacitive-storage-based substation for the compensation of resistive voltage drops in transportation networks is proposed. It allows to feed as a current source in any voltage conditions of the line. The system has been designed as a compensation substation to be placed at weak points like end-of-line stations, instead of additional feeding substations. A dedicated power-electronic converter with an associated

Alfred Rufer; David Hotellier; Philippe Barrade

2004-01-01

143

Separation of Boron from Geothermal Water Using a Boron Selective Macroporous Weak Base Anion Exchange Resin  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, batch and column mode tests were performed to evaluate the efficiency of boron removal from geothermal water containing 10-11 mg B\\/L using Lewatit MK 51 which is a macroporous weak base anion exchange resin with polyhydroxyl groups showing a very high selectivity and capacity for boron. The optimum resin amount for boron removal from geothermal water was determined as

Idil Yilmaz-Ipek; Pelin Koseoglu; Umran Yuksel; Nazl? Yasar; Gözde Yolseven; Mithat Yuksel; Nalan Kabay

2010-01-01

144

A Quantum Proxy Weak Blind Signature Scheme Based on Controlled Quantum Teleportation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Proxy blind signature is applied to the electronic paying system, electronic voting system, mobile agent system, security of internet, etc. A quantum proxy weak blind signature scheme is proposed in this paper. It is based on controlled quantum teleportation. Five-qubit entangled state functions as quantum channel. The scheme uses the physical characteristics of quantum mechanics to implement message blinding, so it could guarantee not only the unconditional security of the scheme but also the anonymity of the messages owner.

Cao, Hai-Jing; Yu, Yao-Feng; Song, Qin; Gao, Lan-Xiang

2014-09-01

145

Evidence-based National Vaccine Policy.  

PubMed

India has over a century old tradition of development and production of vaccines. The Government rightly adopted self-sufficiency in vaccine production and self-reliance in vaccine technology as its policy objectives in 1986. However, in the absence of a full-fledged vaccine policy, there have been concerns related to demand and supply, manufacture vs. import, role of public and private sectors, choice of vaccines, new and combination vaccines, universal vs. selective vaccination, routine immunization vs. special drives, cost-benefit aspects, regulatory issues, logistics etc. The need for a comprehensive and evidence based vaccine policy that enables informed decisions on all these aspects from the public health point of view brought together doctors, scientists, policy analysts, lawyers and civil society representatives to formulate this policy paper for the consideration of the Government. This paper evolved out of the first ever ICMR-NISTADS national brainstorming workshop on vaccine policy held during 4-5 June, 2009 in New Delhi, and subsequent discussions over email for several weeks, before being adopted unanimously in the present form. PMID:20516532

Madhavi, Y; Puliyel, Jacob M; Mathew, Joseph L; Raghuram, N; Phadke, Anant; Shiva, Mira; Srinivasan, S; Paul, Yash; Srivastava, R N; Parthasarathy, A; Gupta, Sunil; Ranga, Udaykumar; Lakshmi, V Vijaya; Joshi, Nayana; Nath, Indira; Gulhati, C M; Chatterjee, Prabir; Jain, Anuradha; Priya, Ritu; Dasgupta, Rajib; Sridhar, S; Dabade, Gopal; Gopakumar, K M; Abrol, Dinesh; Santhosh, M R; Srivastava, Sadhana; Visalakshi, S; Bhargava, Anurag; Sarojini, N B; Sehgal, Devinder; Selvaraj, Sakthivel; Banerji, D

2010-05-01

146

Merging Evidence-Based Psychosocial Interventions in Schizophrenia  

PubMed Central

Psychosocial interventions are an essential part of the treatment for people with severe mental illness such as schizophrenia. The criteria regarding what makes an intervention “evidence-based” along with a current list of evidence-based interventions are presented. Although many evidence-based interventions exist, implementation studies reveal that few, if any, are ever implemented in a given setting. Various theories and approaches have been developed to better understand and overcome implementation obstacles. Among these, merging two evidence-based interventions, or offering an evidence-based intervention within an evidence-based service, are increasingly being reported and studied in the literature. Five such merges are presented, along with their empirical support: cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) with skills training; CBT and family psychoeducation; supported employment (SE) and skills training; SE and cognitive remediation; and SE and CBT. PMID:25431447

Lecomte, Tania; Corbière, Marc; Simard, Stéphanie; Leclerc, Claude

2014-01-01

147

Training Staff and Parents: Evidence-Based Approaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The benefits of relying on evidence-based treatment for people with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have become increasingly\\u000a apparent. Most notably, reliance on treatment approaches with an established evidence base significantly enhances the likelihood\\u000a that treatment will be effective and desired outcomes will result for people with ASD. Although controversy continues over\\u000a what represents a sufficient evidence base in some cases

Dennis H. Reid; Wendy H. Fitch

148

Opening Pandora's Box: Evidence-based practice for educational psychologists  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past few years evidence-based practice has become of central concern to health and social services in this country. The fundamental tenant is that there must be a clear link between professional practice and its research base. This paper outlines the concept of evidence-based practice and how it rests on the concept of good quality research -- defined as

Mark Fox

2003-01-01

149

Evidence-Based Practice: Integrating Classroom Curriculum and Field Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the use of problem-based learning to teach the scope and consequences of evidence-based practices in mental health through an innovative assignment that integrates classroom and field learning. The authors illustrate the planning and implementation of the Evidence-Based Practice: Integrating Classroom Curriculum and Field…

Tuchman, Ellen; Lalane, Monique

2011-01-01

150

Need for evidence-based practice in prosthodontics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Statement Of Problem. Patients, their insurers, the courts, and the scientific community are demanding more evidence to support the effectiveness of health care strategies. Purpose. This article describes evidence-based practice, its origins, and value as a way of addressing the demand for evidence of treatment effectiveness in maxillofacial prosthetics. Material And Methods. A limited review of maxillofacial prosthetics literature was

James D. Anderson

2000-01-01

151

Evidence-Based Practice in the Social Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence-based practice integrates individual practitioner expertise with the best available evidence while also considering the values and expectations of clients. Research can be categorized into two broad areas: primary (experiments, clinical trials, and surveys) and secondary research (overviews of major studies, practice guidelines, and decision and economic analyses). One of the major challenges to incorporating research evidence into organizational life

Michelle Johnson; Michael J. Austin

2008-01-01

152

Triggered single photon emitters based on stimulated parametric scattering in weakly nonlinear systems  

E-print Network

We introduce a scheme of single photon emission based on four-wave mixing in a three mode system with weak Kerr-type nonlinearity. A highly populated lower energy mode results in strong stimulated scattering of particle pairs out of the central mode, which consequently limits the central mode occupation. Thus, the system can be reduced to a $\\chi^{(2)}$ nonlinear medium with greatly enhanced interaction constant. As a model setup we consider dipolaritons in semiconductor microcavities. Using the master equation approach we show strong antibunching under continuous wave pump, which largely exceeds the conventional blockade mechanism. Finally, using a pulsed excitation we demonstrate theoretically a triggered single photon emitter in a weakly nonlinear system with 33% emission probability.

Oleksandr Kyriienko; Timothy C. H. Liew

2014-12-08

153

The Shear TEsting Programme 1: Weak lensing analysis of simulated ground-based observations  

E-print Network

The Shear TEsting Programme, STEP, is a collaborative project to improve the accuracy and reliability of all weak lensing measurements in preparation for the next generation of wide-field surveys. In this first STEP paper we present the results of a blind analysis of simulated ground-based observations of relatively simple galaxy morphologies. The most successful methods are shown to achieve percent level accuracy. From the cosmic shear pipelines that have been used to constrain cosmology, we find weak lensing shear measured to an accuracy that is within the statistical errors of current weak lensing analyses, with shear measurements accurate to better than 7%. The dominant source of measurement error is shown to arise from calibration uncertainties where the measured shear is over or under-estimated by a constant multiplicative factor. This is of concern as calibration errors cannot be detected through standard diagnostic tests. The measured calibration errors appear to result from stellar contamination, false object detection, the shear measurement method itself, selection bias and/or the use of biased weights. Additive systematics (false detections of shear) resulting from residual point-spread function anisotropy are, in most cases, reduced to below an equivalent shear of 0.001, an order of magnitude below cosmic shear distortions on the scales probed by current surveys. Our results provide a snapshot view of the accuracy of current ground-based weak lensing methods and a benchmark upon which we can improve. To this end we provide descriptions of each method tested and include details of the eight different implementations of the commonly used Kaiser, Squires and Broadhurst (1995) method (KSB+) to aid the improvement of future KSB+ analyses.

Catherine Heymans; Ludovic Van Waerbeke; David Bacon; Joel Berge; Gary Bernstein; Emmanuel Bertin; Sarah Bridle; Michael L. Brown; Douglas Clowe; Haakon Dahle; Thomas Erben; Meghan Gray; Marco Hetterscheidt; Henk Hoekstra; Patrick Hudelot; Mike Jarvis; Konrad Kuijken; Vera Margoniner; Richard Massey; Yannick Mellier; Reiko Nakajima; Alexandre Refregier; Jason Rhodes; Tim Schrabback; David Wittman

2006-02-10

154

The Heart of the Matter of Opinion and Evidence: The Value of Evidence-Based Medicine  

PubMed Central

Evidence-based medicine is an important aspect of continuing medical education. This article reviews previous and current examples of conflicting topics that evidence-based medicine has clarified to allow us to provide the best possible patient care. PMID:22438783

Masvidal, Daniel; Lavie, Carl J.

2012-01-01

155

Why the Evidence-Based Paradigm in Early Childhood Education and Care Is Anything but Evident  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Praxeological research is a necessary contribution to the research field in early childhood education and care, which is currently dominated by an evidence-based paradigm that tends to consider the measurement of predefined outcomes as the most valid form of research. We analyse the history of the evidence-based paradigm in the field of medicine…

Vandenbroeck, Michel; Roets, Griet; Roose, Rudi

2012-01-01

156

Toward a Phylogenetic Classification of Primates Based on DNA Evidence Complemented by Fossil Evidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

A highly resolved primate cladogram based on DNA evidence is congruent with extant and fossil osteological evidence. A provisional primate classification based on this cladogram and the time scale provided by fossils and the model of local molecular clocks has all named taxa represent clades and assigns the same taxonomic rank to those clades of roughly equivalent age. Order Primates

Morris Goodman; Calvin A. Porter; John Czelusniak; Scott L. Page; Horacio Schneider; Jeheskel Shoshani; Gregg Gunnell; Colin P. Groves

1998-01-01

157

Evidence-based operations in paediatric surgery  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has been assumed that only 10% of medical interventions are supported by solid scientific evidence. The aim of this study\\u000a was to determine the type of research evidence supporting operations in a tertiary referral paediatric surgical unit. All\\u000a patients admitted over a 4-week period to two surgical firms were enrolled in the study. All major operations carried out\\u000a on

V. Baraldini; L. Spitz; A. Pierro

1998-01-01

158

AVAZ inversion for fracture weakness parameters based on the rock physics model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Subsurface fractures within many carbonates and unconventional resources play an important role in the storage and movement of fluid. The more reliably the detection of fractures could be performed, the more finely the reservoir description could be made. In this paper, we aim to propose a method which uses two important tools, a fractured anisotropic rock physics effective model and AVAZ (amplitude versus incident and azimuthal angle) inversion, to predict fractures from azimuthal seismic data. We assume that the rock, which contains one or more sets of vertical or sub-vertical fractures, shows transverse isotropy with a horizontal axis of symmetry (HTI). Firstly, we develop one improved fractured anisotropic rock physics effective model. Using this model, we estimate P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity and fracture weaknesses from well-logging data. Then the method is proposed to predict fractures from azimuthal seismic data based on AVAZ inversion, and well A is used to verify the reliability of the improved rock physics effective model. Results show that the estimated results are consistent with the real log value, and the variation of fracture weaknesses may detect the locations of fractures. The damped least squares method, which uses the estimated results as initial constraints during the inversion, is more stable. Tests on synthetic data show that fracture weaknesses parameters are still estimated reasonably with moderate noise. A test on real data shows that the estimated results are in good agreement with the drilling.

Chen, Huaizhen; Yin, Xingyao; Qu, Shouli; Zhang, Guangzhi

2014-12-01

159

Integrating evidence-based perfusion into practices: the International Consortium for Evidence-Based Perfusion.  

PubMed

There is surmounting pressure for clinicians domestically and abroad not only to practice evidence-based perfusion, but also to supplement practice with documentation thereof. In this editorial, I shall describe an international initiative aimed at embracing this dictum from patients, regulatory bodies, and payers. "Research is the only hope that the future will be different than the past"- Daniel Mintz, MD "Practical men who believe themselves to be quite exempt from any intellectual influences are usually the slaves of some defunct economist.... It is ideas not vested interests which are dangerous for good or evil."-John Maynard Keynes. PMID:17312899

Likosky, Donald S

2006-12-01

160

Principles of evidence-based dental practice (EBDP).  

PubMed

In an effort to improve patient care, there has been a growing trend across the nation and the world to embed the principles of evidence-based dentistry into mainstream care delivery by private practicing dentists. Evidence-based dentistry is an essential tool that is used to improve the quality of care and to reduce the gap between what we know, what is possible, and what we do. An evidence-based health care practice is one that includes the decision maker's ability to find, assess, and incorporate high-quality, valid information in diagnosis and treatment. The evidence is considered in conjunction with the clinician's experience and judgment, and the patient's preferences, values, and circumstances. This article introduces the basic skills of evidence-based dentistry. Their practice requires a discipline of lifelong learning in which recent and relevant scientific evidence are translated into practical clinical applications. PMID:21473242

Abdellatif, Hoda; Dechow, Paul C; Jones, Daniel L

2011-02-01

161

Clinical Practice Guidelines for Gastric Cancer in Korea: An Evidence-Based Approach  

PubMed Central

Although gastric cancer is quite common in Korea, the treatment outcome is relatively favorable compared to those in western countries. However, there are currently no Korean multidisciplinary guidelines for gastric cancer. Experts from related societies developed guidelines de novo to meet Korean circumstances and requirements, including 23 recommendation statements for diagnosis (n=9) and treatment (n=14) based on relevant key questions. The quality of the evidence was rated according to the GRADE evidence evaluation framework: the evidence levels were based on a systematic review of the literature, and the recommendation grades were classified as either strong or weak. The applicability of the guidelines was considered to meet patients' view and preferences in the context of Korea. The topics of the guidelines cover diagnostic modalities (endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound, and radiologic diagnosis), treatment modalities (surgery, therapeutic endoscopy, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy), and pathologic evaluation. An external review of the guidelines was conducted during the finalization phase. PMID:25061536

Lee, Jun Haeng; Jung, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Jung Hoon; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Jeon, Tae Joo; Kim, Joon Mee; Kim, Young Il; Ryu, Keun Won; Kong, Seong-Ho; Kim, Hyoung-Il; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Kim, Yong Sik; Zang, Dae Young; Cho, Jae Yong; Park, Joon Oh; Lim, Do Hoon; Jung, Eun Sun; Ahn, Hyeong Sik; Kim, Hyun Jung

2014-01-01

162

Clinical practice guidelines for gastric cancer in Korea: an evidence-based approach.  

PubMed

Although gastric cancer is quite common in Korea, the treatment outcome is relatively favorable compared to those in western countries. However, there are currently no Korean multidisciplinary guidelines for gastric cancer. Experts from related societies developed guidelines de novo to meet Korean circumstances and requirements, including 23 recommendation statements for diagnosis (n=9) and treatment (n=14) based on relevant key questions. The quality of the evidence was rated according to the GRADE evidence evaluation framework: the evidence levels were based on a systematic review of the literature, and the recommendation grades were classified as either strong or weak. The applicability of the guidelines was considered to meet patients' view and preferences in the context of Korea. The topics of the guidelines cover diagnostic modalities (endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound, and radiologic diagnosis), treatment modalities (surgery, therapeutic endoscopy, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy), and pathologic evaluation. An external review of the guidelines was conducted during the finalization phase. PMID:25061536

Lee, Jun Haeng; Kim, Jae G; Jung, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Jung Hoon; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Jeon, Tae Joo; Kim, Joon Mee; Kim, Young Il; Ryu, Keun Won; Kong, Seong-Ho; Kim, Hyoung-Il; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Kim, Yong Sik; Zang, Dae Young; Cho, Jae Yong; Park, Joon Oh; Lim, Do Hoon; Jung, Eun Sun; Ahn, Hyeong Sik; Kim, Hyun Jung

2014-06-01

163

Evidence based practice: a survey of physiotherapists' current practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Backgound and Purpose. Evidence-based practice is the explicit use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients and is a concept of growing importance for physiotherapy. The aim of the present study was to investigate Australian physiotherapists' self-reported practice, skills and knowledge of evidence-based practice and to examine differences between recent and experienced grad- uates,

Ross Iles; Megan Davidson

2006-01-01

164

From evidence-based medicine to genomic medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept of ‘evidence-based medicine’ dates back to mid-19th century or even earlier. It remains pivotal in planning, funding\\u000a and in delivering the health care. Clinicians, public health practitioners, health commissioners\\/purchasers, health planners,\\u000a politicians and public seek formal ‘evidence’ in approving any form of health care provision. Essentially ‘evidence-based\\u000a medicine’ aims at the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of the

Dhavendra Kumar

2007-01-01

165

Retrieval-based face annotation by weak label regularized local coordinate coding.  

PubMed

Auto face annotation, which aims to detect human faces from a facial image and assign them proper human names, is a fundamental research problem and beneficial to many real-world applications. In this work, we address this problem by investigating a retrieval-based annotation scheme of mining massive web facial images that are freely available over the Internet. In particular, given a facial image, we first retrieve the top $(n)$ similar instances from a large-scale web facial image database using content-based image retrieval techniques, and then use their labels for auto annotation. Such a scheme has two major challenges: 1) how to retrieve the similar facial images that truly match the query, and 2) how to exploit the noisy labels of the top similar facial images, which may be incorrect or incomplete due to the nature of web images. In this paper, we propose an effective Weak Label Regularized Local Coordinate Coding (WLRLCC) technique, which exploits the principle of local coordinate coding by learning sparse features, and employs the idea of graph-based weak label regularization to enhance the weak labels of the similar facial images. An efficient optimization algorithm is proposed to solve the WLRLCC problem. Moreover, an effective sparse reconstruction scheme is developed to perform the face annotation task. We conduct extensive empirical studies on several web facial image databases to evaluate the proposed WLRLCC algorithm from different aspects. The experimental results validate its efficacy. We share the two constructed databases "WDB" (714,454 images of 6,025 people) and "ADB" (126,070 images of 1,200 people) with the public. To further improve the efficiency and scalability, we also propose an offline approximation scheme (AWLRLCC) which generally maintains comparable results but significantly reduces the annotation time. PMID:24457510

Wang, Dayong; Hoi, Steven C H; He, Ying; Zhu, Jianke; Mei, Tao; Luo, Jiebo

2014-03-01

166

Evidence-Based Practice in Education. Conducting Educational Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The book begins with an explication of evidence-based practice. Some of the ideas of its proponents are discussed, including the Campbell Collaboration, and the application to education of Cochrane-style reviews and meta-analyses. The thinking behind evidence-based practice has been the subject of much criticism, particularly in education, and…

Pring, Richard; Thomas, Gary

2004-01-01

167

Towards an Understanding of Evidence-Based Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The past two decades have seen a rise in the use of the term "evidence-based practice" and a simultaneous increase in the variations in its definition and evaluation. Subsequently, this rise in interest for evidence-based practices has become a double-edged sword for practitioners--that is, while there are a number of interpretations on the…

Digennaro Reed, Florence D.; Reed, Derek D.

2008-01-01

168

Barriers and Enablers to Evidence-Based Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The importance of educational practices based on evidence is well-supported in the literature, however barriers to their implementation in classrooms still exist. This paper examines the phenomenon of evidence-based practice in education highlighting enablers and barriers to their implementation with particular reference to RTLB practice.

Foster, Robyn

2014-01-01

169

Counting what counts: performance measurement and evidence-based practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore conceptual and practical links between performance measurement and evidence-based library and information practice (EBLIP) and to identify lessons to be learned from evidence-based healthcare. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper presents a selective review of key writings in EBLIP for reference to performance measurement. Findings – The paper finds that performance measurement

Andrew Booth

2006-01-01

170

Developing the skills required for evidence-based practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The current health care environment requires practitioners with the skills to find and apply the best currently available evidence for effective health care, to contribute to the development of evidence-based practice protocols, and to evaluate the impact of utilizing validated research findings in practice. Current approaches to teaching research are based mainly on gaining skills by participation in the research

Beverley French

1998-01-01

171

Evidence-based veterinary medicine: new graduates' perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

IN October 2008, Sally Everitt looked at how evidence-based medicine could be integrated into veterinary practice (In Practice, vol 30, pp 526-528). Here, five veterinary graduates who have undertaken an intercalated degree comment on the use of evidence-based medicine in veterinary practice.

Laura Spoor; Simon Priestnall; Jen Claridge; Ben Dustan; Stephanie Reed

2009-01-01

172

Evidence-Based Treatment and Stuttering--Historical Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: To illustrate the way in which both fluency shaping (FS) and stuttering management (SM) treatments for developmental stuttering in adults are evidence based. Method: A brief review of the history and development of FS and SM is provided. It illustrates that both can be justified as evidence-based treatments, each treatment seeking…

Prins, David; Ingham, Roger J.

2009-01-01

173

Evidence-Based Guidelines in Laboratory Medicine: Principles and Methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Guidelines are commonly used tools for supporting medical decisions. Formulating evidence- based recommendations has become a leading principle in guideline development. Aim: This narrative review integrates the most recent methods of evidence-based guideline development and adapts those to the field of laboratory medicine. Summary: We present a 10-step process and a list of criteria for the development of laboratory

Wytze P. Oosterhuis; David E. Bruns; Joseph Watine; Sverre Sandberg; Andrea R. Horvath

2004-01-01

174

General analytical procedure for determination of acidity parameters of weak acids and bases.  

PubMed

The paper presents a new convenient, inexpensive, and reagent-saving general methodology for the determination of pK a values for components of the mixture of diverse chemical classes weak organic acids and bases in water solution, without the need to separate individual analytes. The data obtained from simple pH-metric microtitrations are numerically processed into reliable pK a values for each component of the mixture. Excellent agreement has been obtained between the determined pK a values and the reference literature data for compounds studied. PMID:25692072

Pilarski, Bogus?aw; Kaliszan, Roman; Wyrzykowski, Dariusz; M?odzianowski, Janusz; Bali?ska, Agata

2015-01-01

175

General Analytical Procedure for Determination of Acidity Parameters of Weak Acids and Bases  

PubMed Central

The paper presents a new convenient, inexpensive, and reagent-saving general methodology for the determination of pKa values for components of the mixture of diverse chemical classes weak organic acids and bases in water solution, without the need to separate individual analytes. The data obtained from simple pH-metric microtitrations are numerically processed into reliable pKa values for each component of the mixture. Excellent agreement has been obtained between the determined pKa values and the reference literature data for compounds studied. PMID:25692072

Pilarski, Bogus?aw; Kaliszan, Roman; Wyrzykowski, Dariusz; M?odzianowski, Janusz; Bali?ska, Agata

2015-01-01

176

Growth inhibition of Clostridium thermocellum by carboxylic acids: A mechanism based on uncoupling by weak acids  

Microsoft Academic Search

The inhibition of Clostridium thermocellum strains by acetate and other organic acids (propionate, butyrate) can be explained by a model based on the chemiosmotic theory and uncoupler action. It is proposed that the charged permeant species in the process of anion exclusion is the dimer HA-2. Evidence for this mechanisms is provided by 31P-NMR studies of whole cells and cell

Alejandro A. Herrero; Reinaldo F. Gomez; Brad Snedecor; Cynthia J. Tolman; Mary F. Roberts

1985-01-01

177

Justifying Physical Education Based on Neuroscience Evidence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research has shown that exercise improves cognitive function and psychological traits that influence behavior (e.g., mood, level of motivation). The evidence in the literature also shows that physical education may enhance learning or that academic performance is at least maintained despite a reduction in classroom time in order to increase time…

Berg, Kris

2010-01-01

178

Finding the Common Core: Evidence-Based Practices, Clinically Relevant Evidence, and Core Mechanisms of Change  

Microsoft Academic Search

Improving the quality of children’s mental health care can benefit from the adoption of evidence based and evidence informed\\u000a treatments. However, the promise of moving science into practice is hampered by three core elements that need to be addressed\\u000a in the current conversation among key stakeholders: (1) expanding our understanding of the clinical relevance of different\\u000a types of evidence, (2)

Thomas L. SextonSusan; Susan Douglas Kelley

2010-01-01

179

Strengths and weaknesses of Problem Based Learning from the professional perspective of registered nurses 1  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: to identify competency strengths and weaknesses as perceived by nursing professionals who graduated with a integrated curriculum and competency-based through Problem Based Learning in small groups. METHOD: an intrinsic case study method was used, which analyzes this innovation through former students (from the first class) with three years of professional experience. The data were collected through a questionnaire and discussion groups. RESULTS: the results show that their competency level is valued in a very satisfactory manner. This level paradoxically contrasts with the lack of theoretical knowledge they perceived at the end of their education, when they started working in clinical practice. CONCLUSIONS: the teaching strategy was key to motivate an in-depth study and arouse the desire to know. In addition, Problem Based Learning favors and reinforces the decision to learn, which is that necessary in the course of professional life. PMID:25493666

Cónsul-Giribet, María; Medina-Moya, José Luis

2014-01-01

180

Evidence-based medicine: applications in dietetic practice.  

PubMed

Evidence-based medicine has been defined as "the conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients." Evidence-based practice requires the ability to apply knowledge of medical informatics (eg, efficiently searching the medical literature) and clinical epidemiology (eg, being able to critically appraise the literature) to the treatment of individual patients. Being able to apply the principles of evidence-based medicine in the dietetic practice adds to the credibility and value of dietetics professionals, is consistent with the dietetic code of ethics, and is empowering. This article provides an introduction to the history, philosophy, and methods of evidence-based medicine as applied to the dietetic practice. This article focuses on a 5-step process to finding the best evidence to answer clinical questions: (a) formulate the question, (b) search for answers, (c) appraise the evidence, (d) apply the results, and (e) assess the outcome. We describe the 4S methodology-a systematic approach to efficiently finding the best evidence to answer clinical questions involving the use of systems (comprehensive, evidence-based resources), synopses (compilations of structured abstracts of high-quality studies), syntheses (systematic reviews), and studies (original research articles). Particular emphasis is given to a method for critically appraising papers that emphasizes validity, importance, and clinical applicability. Resources (including Web sites) for further learning are provided. J Am Diet Assoc. 2002;102:1263-1272. PMID:12792624

Gray, Gregory E; Gray, Lorraine K

2002-09-01

181

Extending the evidence hierarchy to enhance evidence-based practice for substance use disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose This paper examines the evidence-based practice (EBP) movement in the context of the developmental status of theory, research and practice on substance use disorders. Scope Hierarchical views that favor randomized con- trolled trials (RCTs) over other forms of evidence are reviewed, and the benefits and limitations of RCTs are considered as they intersect with contemporary issues in the field.

Jalie A. Tucker; David L. Roth

2006-01-01

182

Evidence-based preconceptional lifestyle interventions.  

PubMed

Although the evidence for the associations between preconceptional risk factors and adverse pregnancy outcomes is extensive, the effectiveness of preconceptional interventions to reduce risk factors and to improve pregnancy outcomes remains partly unclear. The objective of this review is to summarize the available effectiveness of lifestyle interventions prior to pregnancy for women in terms of behavior change and pregnancy outcome. A predefined search strategy was applied in electronic databases, and citation tracking was performed. Study selection was performed by 2 independent reviewers according to predefined criteria for eligibility: The intervention was performed preconceptionally on women regarding alcohol use, smoking, weight, diet/nutrition, physical activity, and folic acid status (fortification and supplementation) to achieve behavior change and/or improve pregnancy outcome. Quality and strength of evidence were assessed by 2 independent reviewers. A total of 4,604 potentially relevant records were identified, of which 44 records met the inclusion criteria. Overall, there is a relatively short list of core interventions for which there is substantial evidence of effectiveness when applied in the preconception period. PMID:23985430

Temel, Sevilay; van Voorst, Sabine F; Jack, Brian W; Denkta?, Semiha; Steegers, Eric A P

2014-01-01

183

Narrow Scale Flow and a Weak Field by the Top of Earth's Core: Evidence from Orsted, Magsat and Secular Variation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As Earth's main magnetic field weakens, our magnetic shield against the onslaught of the solar wind thins. And the field strength needed to fend off battering by solar coronal mass ejections is decreasing, just when the delicate complexity of modem, vulnerable, electro-technological systems is increasing at an unprecedented rate. Recently, a working group of distinguished scientist from across the nation has asked NASA's Solid Earth and Natural Hazards program a key question: What are the dynamics of Earth s magnetic field and its interactions with the Earth system? Paleomagnetic studies of crustal rocks magnetized in the geologic past reveal that polarity reversals have occurred many times during Earth s history. Networked super-computer simulations of core field and flow, including effects of gravitational, pressure, rotational Coriolis, magnetic and viscous forces, suggest how this might happen in detail. And space-based measurements of the real, time-varying magnetic field help constrain estimates of the speed and direction of fluid iron flowing near the top of the core and enable tests of some hypotheses about such flow. Now scientists at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center have developed and applied methods to test the hypotheses of narrow scale flow and of a dynamically weak magnetic field near the top of Earth s core. Using two completely different methods, C. V. Voorhies has shown these hypotheses lead to specific theoretical forms for the "spectrum" of Earth s main magnetic field and the spectrum of its rate of change. Much as solar physicists use a prism to separate sunlight into its spectrum, from long wavelength red to short wavelength blue light, geophysicists use a digital prism, spherical harmonic analysis, to separate the measured geomagnetic field into its spectrum, from long to short wavelength fields. They do this for the rate of change of the field as well.

Voorhies, Coerte V.

2004-01-01

184

Patch-based label fusion using local confidence-measures and weak segmentations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A system for the fully automatic segmentation of the liver and spleen is presented. In a multi-atlas based segmentation framework, several existing segmentations are deformed in parallel to image intensity based registrations targeting the unseen patient. A new locally adaptive label fusion method is presented as the core of this paper. In a patch comparison approach, the transformed segmentations are compared to a weak segmentation of the target organ in the unseen patient. The weak segmentation roughly estimates the hidden truth. Traditional fusion approaches just rely on the deformed expert segmentations only. The result of patch comparison is a confidence weight for a neighboring voxel-label in the atlas label images to contribute to the voxel under study. Fusion is finally carried out in a weighted averaging scheme. The new contribution is the incorporation of locally determined confidence features of the unseen patient into the fusion process. For a small experimental set-up consisting of 12 patients, the proposed method performs favorable to standard classifier label fusion methods. In leave-one-out experiments, we obtain a mean Dice ratio of 0.92 for the liver and 0.82 for the spleen.

Mastmeyer, André; Fortmeier, Dirk; Maghsoudi, Ehsan; Simon, Martin; Handels, Heinz

2013-03-01

185

Evidence-based laboratory medicine: is it working in practice?  

PubMed

The principles of Evidence-Based Medicine have been established for about two decades, with the need for evidence-based clinical practice now being accepted in most health systems around the world. These principles can be employed in laboratory medicine. The key steps in evidence-based practice, namely (i) formulating the question; (ii) searching for evidence; (iii) appraising evidence; (iv) applying evidence; and (v) assessing the experience are all accepted but, as yet, translation into daily clinical and laboratory practice has been slow. Furthermore, the demand for evidence-based laboratory medicine (EBLM) has been slow to develop.There are many contrasting observations about laboratory medicine, for example (i) there is too much testing vs insufficient testing; (ii) testing is expensive vs laboratories are expected to generate income; and (iii) test results have little impact on outcomes vs test results are crucial to clinical decision making. However, there is little evidence to support any of these observations. Integrating the principles of EBLM into routine practice will help to resolve some of these issues by identifying (a) where laboratory medicine fits into the care pathway; (b) where testing is appropriate; (c) the nature and quality of evidence required to demonstrate the clinical utility of a test; (d) how the test result impacts on clinical actions; (e) where changes in the care pathway will occur; and (f) where benefit/value can be achieved. These answers will help to establish the culture of EBLM in clinical and laboratory practice. PMID:22363094

Price, Christopher P

2012-02-01

186

Traits-based approaches in bioassessment and ecological risk assessment: strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats.  

PubMed

We discuss the application of traits-based bioassessment approaches in retrospective bioassessment as well as in prospective ecological risk assessments in regulatory frameworks. Both approaches address the interaction between species and stressors and their consequences at different levels of biological organization, but the fact that a specific species may be less abundant in a potentially impacted site compared with a reference site is, regrettably, insufficient to provide diagnostic information. Species traits may, however, overcome the problems associated with taxonomy-based bioassessment. Trait-based approaches could provide signals regarding what environmental factors may be responsible for the impairment and, thereby, provide causal insight into the interaction between species and stressors. For development of traits-based (TBA), traits should correspond to specific types of stressors or suites of stressors. In this paper, a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis of TBA in both applications was used to identify challenges and potentials. This paper is part of a series describing the output of the TERA (Traits-based ecological risk assessment: Realising the potential of ecoinformatics approaches in ecotoxicology) Workshop held between 7 and 11 September, 2009, in Burlington, Ontario, Canada. The recognized strengths were that traits are transferrable across geographies, add mechanistic and diagnostic knowledge, require no new sampling methodology, have an old tradition, and can supplement taxonomic analysis. Weaknesses include autocorrelation, redundancy, and inability to protect biodiversity directly. Automated image analysis, combined with genetic and biotechnology tools and improved data analysis to solve autocorrelation problems were identified as opportunities, whereas low availability of trait data, their transferability, their quantitative interpretation, the risk of developing nonrelevant traits, low quality of historic databases, and their standardization were listed as threats. PMID:20981837

Van den Brink, Paul J; Alexander, Alexa C; Desrosiers, Mélanie; Goedkoop, Willem; Goethals, Peter L M; Liess, Matthias; Dyer, Scott D

2011-04-01

187

Evidence synthesis and its role in evidence-based health care.  

PubMed

The central role of evidence synthesis (or the systematic review of evidence) in evidence-based health care is often poorly understood. There are numerous examples in the literature of poorly conceived and/or executed systematic reviews and of a lack of awareness of the international standards developed by the international leaders in systematic reviews. The Cochrane Collaboration has played a critical global role in developing and refining systematic review methods in relation to evidence of effects and of diagnostic accuracy. PMID:25458130

Pearson, Alan

2014-12-01

188

Mind the Gap: Looking for Evidence-Based Practice of Science Literacy for All in Science Teaching Journals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Science literacy for all is the central goal of science education reforms, and there is a growing importance of the language arts in science. Furthermore, there are strong calls for teacher professionalism and self-directed professional learning that involve evidence-based best practices. This raises questions about whether science teaching journals' recommendations are anchored to high-quality evidence. We found that (a) most National Science Teacher Association journals' science literacy recommendations have weak or no evidence base and (b) those with evidence reference teaching journals, teacher resource books, and literacy education more often than science education research. We concluded that all participants in the knowledge production cycle and transfer process—authors, editors, and reviewers—need to encourage evidence-based practices anchored to ongoing reforms and to literacy and science education research.

Jagger, Susan L.; Yore, Larry D.

2012-10-01

189

Dissemination of Evidence-Based Standards of Care  

PubMed Central

Standards of care pertain to crafting and implementing patient-centered treatment interventions. Standards of care must take into consideration the patient's gender, ethnicity, medical and dental history, insurance coverage (or socioeconomic level, if a private patient), and the timeliness of the targeted scientific evidence. This resolves into a process by which clinical decision-making about the optimal patient-centered treatment relies on the best available research evidence, and all other necessary inputs and factors to provide the best possible treatment. Standards of care must be evidence-based, and not merely based on the evidence – the dichotomy being critical in contemporary health services research and practice. Evidence-based standards of care must rest on the best available evidence that emerges from a concerted hypothesis-driven process of research synthesis and meta-analysis. Health information technology needs to become an every-day reality in health services research and practice to ensure evidence-based standards of care. Current trends indicate that user-friendly methodologies, for the dissemination of evidence-based standards of care, must be developed, tested and distributed. They should include approaches for the quantification and analysis of the textual content of systematic reviews and of their summaries in the form of critical reviews and lay-language summaries. PMID:22355229

Barkhordarian, Andre; Hacker, Brett; Chiappelli, Francesco

2011-01-01

190

Ab initio molecular dynamics study of the mechanism of proton recombination with a weak base.  

PubMed

Despite its fundamental nature, many of the microscopic features of acid–base recombination remain poorly understood. In this work, we use ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to study the recombination of the proton with a weak base, the carbonate ion CO3(2–). Our simulations elucidate the network structure around CO3(2–) that provides a distribution of pathways over which recombination can occur. We observe that the penultimate neutralization step involves a correlated behavior of the transferred protons that is mediated by the water wires decorating the carbonate. These concerted proton transfers are coupled to collective compressions of these water wires. We show further that these processes are dynamically coupled to the reorganization of the water molecules hydrating the CO3(2–) ion. The insights from these simulations help to bridge the structural and dynamical complexity of the microscopic mechanisms with those of phenomenological models invoked by experiments in this field. PMID:25415885

Cuny, Jérôme; Hassanali, Ali A

2014-12-01

191

Towards a spectrum-based bar code for identification of weakly fluorescent microparticles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Spectrally resolved detection of fluorescent probes can be used to identify multiple labeled target molecules in an unknown mixture. We study how the spectral shape, the experimental noise, and the number of spectral detection channels affect the success of identification of weakly fluorescent beads on basis of their emission spectra. The proposed formalism allows to estimate the performance of the spectral identification procedure with a given set of spectral codes on the basis of the reference spectra only. We constructed a simple prism-based setup for spectral detection and demonstrate that seven distinct but overlapping spectral codes realized by combining up to three fluorescent dyes bound to a single bead in a barcode-based manner can be reliably identified. The procedure allows correct identification even in the presence of known autofluorescence background stronger than the actual signal.

Petrášek, Zden?k; Wiedemann, Jens; Schwille, Petra

2014-03-01

192

Some Results of Weak Anticipative Concept Applied in Simulation Based Decision Support in Enterprise  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The simulation models are used as for decision support and learning in enterprises and in schools. Tree cases of successful applications demonstrate usefulness of weak anticipative information. Job shop scheduling production with makespan criterion presents a real case customized flexible furniture production optimization. The genetic algorithm for job shop scheduling optimization is presented. Simulation based inventory control for products with stochastic lead time and demand describes inventory optimization for products with stochastic lead time and demand. Dynamic programming and fuzzy control algorithms reduce the total cost without producing stock-outs in most cases. Values of decision making information based on simulation were discussed too. All two cases will be discussed from optimization, modeling and learning point of view.

Kljaji?, Miroljub; Kofja?, Davorin; Kljaji? Borštnar, Mirjana; Škraba, Andrej

2010-11-01

193

Interpolation of PSF based on compressive sampling and its application in weak lensing survey  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose a new point spread function (PSF) interpolation method based on compressive sampling (CS). Complex-Valued fractional Brownion motion (CV-fBm) field is used as a model of the PSF spatial distribution. The 1/f property of the fBm implies that it is a compressible field; therefore, CS will be able to fully reconstruct the field based on a small number of random samples. Performance evaluation shows the advantages of the proposed method over boxcar filtering, polynomial fitting, inverse distance weighting, and thin-plate methods. Potential applicability of the proposed method in weak gravitational lensing survey, particularly for interpolating fast varying PSF that represent distortion by turbulent field is also discussed.

Suksmono, Andriyan B.

2014-09-01

194

A Third-Generation Evidence Base for Human Spaceflight Risks  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Human Research Program seeks to understand and mitigate risks to crew health and performance in exploration missions center dot HRP's evidence base consists of an Evidence Report for each HRP risk center dot Three generations of Evidence Reports 1) Review articles + Good content - Limited authorship, infrequent updates 2) Wikipedia articles + Viewed often, very open to contributions - Summary of reviews, very few contributions 3) HRP-controlled wiki articles + Incremental additions to review articles with editorial control

Kundrot, Craig E.; Lumpkins, Sarah; Steil, Jennifer; Pellis, Neal; Charles, John

2014-01-01

195

Applying Evidence-Based Medicine Principles to Hip Fracture Management  

PubMed Central

Bone has the capacity to regenerate and not scar after injury – sometimes leaving behind no evidence at all of a prior fracture. As surgeons capable of facilitating such healing, it becomes our responsibility to help choose a treatment that minimizes functional deficits and residual symptoms. And in the case of the geriatric hip fracture, we have seen the accumulation of a vast amount of evidence to help guide us. The best method we currently have for selecting treatment plans is by the practice of evidence-based medicine. According to the now accepted hierarchy, the best is called Level I evidence (e.g., well performed randomized controlled trials) – but this evidence is best only if it is available and appropriate. Lower forms of accepted evidence include cohort studies, case control studies, case series, and case reports, and last, expert opinion – all of which can be potentially instructive. The hallmark of evidence-based treatment is not so much the reliance on evidence in general, but to use the best available evidence relative to the particular patient, the clinical setting and surgeon experience. Correctly applied, varying forms of evidence each have a role in aiding surgeons offer appropriate care for their patients – to help them best fix the fracture. PMID:25593964

Bernstein, Joseph; Morshed, Saam; Helfet, David L.; Bhandari, Mohit; Ahn, Jaimo

2014-01-01

196

Evidence for scene-based motion correspondence.  

PubMed

To maintain stable object representations as our eyes or the objects themselves move, the visual system must determine how newly sampled information relates to existing object representations. To solve this correspondence problem, the visual system uses not only spatiotemporal information (e.g., the spatial and temporal proximity between elements), but also feature information (e.g., the similarity in size or luminance between elements). Here we asked whether motion correspondence relies solely on image-based feature information, or whether it is influenced by scene-based information (e.g., the perceived sizes of surfaces or the perceived illumination conditions). We manipulated scene-based information separately from image-based information in the Ternus display, an ambiguous apparent-motion display, and found that scene-based information influences how motion correspondence is resolved, indicating that theories of motion correspondence that are based on "scene-blind" mechanisms are insufficient. PMID:24452384

Hein, Elisabeth; Moore, Cathleen M

2014-04-01

197

On evidence and evidence-based medicine: lessons from the philosophy of science.  

PubMed

The evidence-based medicine (EBM) movement is touted as a new paradigm in medical education and practice, a description that carries with it an enthusiasm for science that has not been seen since logical positivism flourished (circa 1920-1950). At the same time, the term "evidence-based medicine" has a ring of obviousness to it, as few physicians, one suspects, would claim that they do not attempt to base their clinical decision-making on available evidence. However, the apparent obviousness of EBM can and should be challenged on the grounds of how 'evidence' has been problematised in the philosophy of science. EBM enthusiasm, it follows, ought to be tempered. The post-positivist, feminist, and phenomenological philosophies of science that are examined in this paper contest the seemingly unproblematic nature of evidence that underlies EBM by emphasizing different features of the social nature of science. The appeal to the authority of evidence that characterizes evidence-based practices does not increase objectivity but rather obscures the subjective elements that inescapably enter all forms of human inquiry. The seeming common sense of EBM only occurs because of its assumed removal from the social context of medical practice. In the current age where the institutional power of medicine is suspect, a model that represents biomedicine as politically disinterested or merely scientific should give pause. PMID:16384628

Goldenberg, Maya J

2006-06-01

198

What Is "Evidence-Based Practice" in Geography Education?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educationalists developed the concept of "evidence-based practice" during the 1990s because of concern about the relevance of educational research to practitioners and about its impact on their practice. This article outlines the different kinds of research evidence related to geographical education, which might inform practice. It then discusses…

Roberts, Margaret

2010-01-01

199

Evidence-Based Practice in the Early Childhood Field  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evidence-based practice is a decision-making process that integrates the best available scientific research evidence with family and professional wisdom and values. The editors argue that it has the potential to transform the services provided to children and families because it incorporates the "different ways of knowing" that characterize early…

Buysse, Virginia, Ed.; Wesley, Patricia W., Ed.

2006-01-01

200

What Works? Evidence-Based Practice in Education Is Complex  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a nascent movement towards evidence-based practice in education in Australia, evident in Federal and State education documents, if not in classrooms. Such a classroom-level outcome would require a number of conditions to be met. One of the critical requirements is that teachers be provided with knowledge and training in practices that…

Hempenstall, Kerry

2014-01-01

201

Integration of Evidence-Based Practice into the University Clinic  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author explains different principles, which can be used for the integration of evidence-based practice into the university clinic. Research literature, systematic reviews and practice guidelines are shown to work as the evidence for the teachers, as well as the students.

Goldstein, Brian A.

2008-01-01

202

Can Evidence-Based Dental Health Care Assure Quality?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is suggested that evidence-based health care is appropriate in dental care delivery, and dental educators can play an important role in overcoming barriers to teaching and practice of this approach. Obstacles include misinterpretations, insufficient evidence, undeveloped critical appraisal skills, skepticism, inadequate time, and poor access to…

McCulloch, Christopher A. G.

1994-01-01

203

Evidence-based medicine applied to cervical cancer.  

PubMed

All too frequently current healthcare is characterised by non evidence based practice, variation in practice, inadequate outcome data, inequality of access to optimal treatment and ultimately a lack of evidence base. By developing a culture of evidence based medicine some of these shortcomings could be addressed. In trying to develop a true assessment of evidence, we have to confront a huge literature, much of which does not inform clinical effectiveness which is a key underpinning of an evidence base. It is necessary to adopt methodologically sound protocols as well as a systematic approach to weighing the evidence. In general informative studies should specify the population studied, the intervention, with what it is being compared, and relevant clinical outcomes. It is clear that randomised controlled trials (RCTs) will carry most weight in terms of reducing outcome bias. The Cochrane Collaboration is an international collaboration dedicated to the science of systematic reviews and meta analysis. It functions through a process of peer review of Title of Review, Proposed Protocol, Completed Review with eventual publication in the electronic Cochrane Library. There is an active Cochrane Collaborative Review Group in Gynaecological Cancer. As far as evidence for the effective management of cervical cancer is concerned, the strongest evidence would relate to the effectiveness of concurrent chemoradiation for treating locally advanced disease compared with radiation alone. PMID:12445657

Kitchener, Henry

2002-11-01

204

Evidence-Based Clinical Voice Assessment: A Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: To determine what research evidence exists to support the use of voice measures in the clinical assessment of patients with voice disorders. Method: The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) National Center for Evidence-Based Practice in Communication Disorders staff searched 29 databases for peer-reviewed English-language…

Roy, Nelson; Barkmeier-Kraemer, Julie; Eadie, Tanya; Sivasankar, M. Preeti; Mehta, Daryush; Paul, Diane; Hillman, Robert

2013-01-01

205

Need to Address Evidence-Based Practice in Educational Administration  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This article presents a case for addressing evidence-based practice (EBP) in educational administration. Content is arranged around four objectives: (a) summarizing the status of educational administration as a profession, (b) defining evidence and the model, (c) explaining EBP's social and professional merit, and (d) identifying barriers…

Kowalski, Theodore

2009-01-01

206

Integrating Evidence-based Decision Making into Allied Health Curricula.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evidence-based decision making (EBDM) was incorporated into an institute for 42 dental hygiene, occupational therapy, and physical therapy faculty. The 4-day sessions addressed active teaching techniques, formulation of good questions, critical appraisal of evidence, and application, feedback, and evaluation. Most participants felt prepared to…

Forrest, Jane L.; Miller, Syrene A.

2001-01-01

207

Evidence-Based Versus Reported Epilepsy Management Practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence-based medicine practices are widely touted in medicine, although their adoption by busy practitioners is problematic and cumbersome. In this study, we examined published evidence underpinning 2 relevant clinical management questions in pediatric epilepsy: when to initiate an antiepileptic drug and when to prescribe the ketogenic diet. We surveyed practicing child neurologists who were attending their national meeting to determine

Katherine S. Mastriani; Virginia C. Williams; Thomas C. Hulsey; James W. Wheless; Bernard L. Maria

2008-01-01

208

The evidence base for case management practice.  

PubMed

Little is known about the role performance of case managers, who come from a variety of professional disciplines. The purpose of this secondary analysis is to identify and compare case management (CM) activities and knowledge elements by professions and by work settings. In an online field survey conducted by the Commission for Case Manager Certification in 2004, 4,419 case managers rated the frequency and importance of 103 activities (8 domains) and 64 knowledge statements (6 domains). Nursing and social work showed a relatively similar pattern as to their role activities and knowledge factors for CM practice. Similar patterns were seen in work settings: between hospitals and rehabilitation facilities; health insurance companies and managed care organizations; and CM companies, workers' compensation agencies, and third-party administrators. These results indicate that there is evidence for how to develop CM programs consistent with both organizational characteristics and strengths of the nursing profession. PMID:19349615

Park, Eun-Jun; Huber, Diane L; Tahan, Hussein A

2009-10-01

209

Proteomic tools for the investigation of human hair structural proteins and evidence of weakness sites on hair keratin coil segments.  

PubMed

Human hair is principally composed of hair keratins and keratin-associated proteins (KAPs) that form a complex network giving the hair its rigidity and mechanical properties. However, during their growth, hairs are subject to various treatments that can induce irreversible damage. For a better understanding of the human hair protein structures, proteomic mass spectrometry (MS)-based strategies could assist in characterizing numerous isoforms and posttranslational modifications of human hair fiber proteins. However, due to their physicochemical properties, characterization of human hair proteins using classical proteomic approaches is still a challenge. To address this issue, we have used two complementary approaches to analyze proteins from the human hair cortex. The multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPit) approach allowed identifying all keratins and the major KAPs present in the hair as well as posttranslational modifications in keratins such as cysteine trioxidation, lysine, and histidine methylation. Then two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with MS (2-DE gel MS) allowed us to obtain the most complete 2-DE gel pattern of human hair proteins, revealing an unexpected heterogeneity of keratin structures. Analyses of these structures by differential peptide mapping have brought evidence of cleaved species in hair keratins and suggest a preferential breaking zone in ?-helical segments. PMID:22056946

Barthélemy, Nicolas R; Bednarczyk, Audrey; Schaeffer-Reiss, Christine; Jullien, Dominique; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Cavusoglu, Nükhet

2012-02-01

210

JAMA Patient Page: Evidence-Based Medicine  

MedlinePLUS

... guidelines. This Patient Page is based on one published in the September 6, 2006, issue of JAMA . ... A Patient Page on randomized controlled trials was published in the June 21, 2006, issue; one on ...

211

Evidence-based health promotion: an emerging field.  

PubMed

There is much debate around the use of evidence in health promotion practice. This article aims to sharpen our understanding of this matter by reviewing and analyzing the 26 case studies presented in this special issue. These case studies suggest that health promotion practitioners are using a wide range of research evidence in interventions for high-risk individuals, entire populations, and vulnerable groups according to all five strategies for action described in the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion. In nearly every case, practitioners had to mediate and adapt research evidence for their case. Eight key levers helped practitioners embed research evidence into practice: local and cultural relevance of the evidence, community capacity-building, sustained dialogue from the outset with all stakeholders, established academic-supported partnerships, communication that responds to organizational and political readiness, acknowledgement and awareness of gaps between evidence and practice, advocacy, and adequate earmarked resources. These case studies provide some evidence that there is an evidence-based health promotion, that this evidence base is broad, and that practitioners use different strategies to adapt it for their case. PMID:21721308

Juneau, Carl-Etienne; Jones, Catherine M; McQueen, David V; Potvin, Louise

2011-03-01

212

Towards Evidence-Based Practice in Science Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suggests that teaching should be informed by research and reports interim findings from three of the four projects from the Evidence-based Practice in Science Education (EPSE) Research Network. (Author/DDR)

Millar, Robin; Leach, John; Osborne, Jonathan; Ratcliffe, Mary; Hames, Vicky; Hind, Andy; Bartholomew, Hannah; Collins, Sue; Lewis, Jenny; Scott, Phil; Duschl, Rick

2002-01-01

213

Hindawi Publishing Corporation Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine  

E-print Network

stimulating distal acupoints. 1. Introduction Acupuncture, a component of traditional Chinese medicine, hasHindawi Publishing Corporation Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine Volume 2013 446-701, Republic of Korea 4 Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Spaulding

Napadow, Vitaly

214

Development and evaluation of online evidence based guideline bank system.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate the online evidence-based nursing practice guideline bank system to support the best evidence-based decision in the clinical and community practice settings. The main homepage consisted of seven modules for introduction of site, EBN, guideline bank, guideline development, guideline review, related sites, and community. The major contents in the guidelines were purpose, developer, intended audience, method of development, target population, testing, knowledge components, and evaluation. Electronic versions of the guidelines were displayed by XML, PDF, and PDA versions. The system usability were evaluated by general users, guideline developers, and guideline reviewers on the web and the results showed high scores of satisfaction. This online evidence-based guideline bank system could support nurses' best and cost-effective clinical decision using the sharable standardized guidelines with education module of evidence based nursing. PMID:17102227

Park, Myonghwa

2006-01-01

215

An evidence-based assessment of prescribed grazing practices  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Synthesis findings regarding the evidence-based assessment of prescribed grazing practices include: 1) stocking rate, in conjunction with appropriate temporal and spatial animal distribution, is a key management variable that influences numerous conservation outcomes, 2) assumptions regarding livest...

216

Clarification and Elaboration on Evidence-Based Practice in Psychology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Responds to comments by D. C. Wendt and B. D. Slife (see record 2007-13085-019), P. H. Hunsberger (see record 2007-13085-020), and R. B. Stuart and S. O. Lilienfeld (see record 2007-13085-021) regarding the report by the APA Presidential Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice (see record 2006-05893-001) entitled Evidence-based practice in…

Wampold, Bruce E.; Goodheart, Carol D.; Levant, Ronald F.

2007-01-01

217

Evidence-Based Practice and Organizational Development in Libraries  

E-print Network

to information, and to data-driven decision making, anticipated the current movement toward evidence-based practice (EBP) in libraries. He suggests that libraries embrace the premises, philosophy, values, and practices of organizational development (OD... control over an ever-growing body of intellectual content and bibliographic information. Lancaster is one Evidence-Based Practice and Organizational Development in Libraries Keith Russell LIBRARY TRENDS, Vol. 56, No. 4, Spring 2008 (“The Evaluation...

Russell, Keith

2008-01-01

218

Evidence-based cognitive rehabilitation: Recommendations for clinical practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cicerone KD, Dahlberg C, Kalmar K, Langenbahn DM, Malec JF, Bergquist TF, Felicetti T, Giacino JT, Harley JP, Harrington DE, Herzog J, Kneipp S, Laatsch L, Morse PA. Evidence-based cognitive rehabilitation: recommendations for clinical practice. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2000;81:1596-615. Objective: To establish evidence-based recommendations for the clinical practice of cognitive rehabilitation, derived from a methodical review of the scientific

Keith D. Cicerone; Cynthia Dahlberg; Kathleen Kalmar; Donna M. Langenbahn; James F. Malec; Thomas F. Bergquist; Thomas Felicetti; Joseph T. Giacino; J. Preston Harley; Douglas E. Harrington; Jean Herzog; Sally Kneipp; Linda Laatsch; Philip A. Morse

2000-01-01

219

Quantum Key Distribution Based on a Weak-Coupling Cavity QED Regime  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present a quantum key distribution scheme using a weak-coupling cavity QED regime based on quantum dense coding. Hybrid entanglement states of photons and electrons are used to distribute information. We just need to transmit photons without storing them in the scheme. The electron confined in a quantum dot, which is embedded in a microcavity, is held by one of the legitimate users throughout the whole communication process. Only the polarization of a single photon and spin of electron measurements are applied in this protocol, which are easier to perform than collective-Bell state measurements. Linear optical apparatus, such as a special polarizing beam splitter in a circular basis and single photon operations, make it more flexible to realize under current technology. Its efficiency will approach 100% in the ideal case. The security of the scheme is also discussed.

Li, Chun-Yan; Li, Yan-Song

2011-12-01

220

Canadian Tire Money: An Analogy for Use When Discussing Weak Acid Strong Base Titrations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A simple analogy can often provide an instructor with a means of helping students to understand an unfamiliar concept. An analogy involving money can be particularly helpful as most students have experience in dealing with a range of financial transactions in their everyday lives. In this article, use is made of the practice of one well-known Canadian retail chain in returning to its customers a small percentage of an item's purchase price in the form of imitation bank notes that can subsequently be spent in the chain's stores. An analogy is drawn between this practice and the determination of the pKa of a weak acid by titrating it with a strong base, taking into account the hydrolysis of the anion produced.

Last, Arthur M.

2003-12-01

221

Linear titration plots for the analysis of mixtures of three weak acids or bases.  

PubMed

Linearly related functions have been derived which enable mixtures of three weak acids or bases in solution to be analysed by means of pH-titration data. This theory has been tested with data from the titration of a variety of mixtures of acids. The data required for the functions are pH, volume of titrant, the equilibrium constants relevant to the mixture, and an independently determined equivalence volume. This may be the equivalence volume for one of the components of the mixture or the sum of the equivalence volumes for any two or all three of the components. It is immaterial how this equivalence volume is obtained, but it is usually possible to obtain the total equivalence volume from data in another part of the same titration curve (when a large excess of titrant has been added). PMID:18963621

Midgley, D; McCallum, C

1984-06-01

222

Evidence for weakly bound electrons in non-irradiated alkane crystals: The electrons as a probe of structural differences in crystals  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is generally assumed that weakly bound (trapped) electrons in organic solids come only from radiolytical (or photochemical) processes like ionization caused by an excited positron entering the sample. This paper presents evidence for the presence of these electrons in non-irradiated samples of docosane. This can be due to the triboelectrification process. We argue that these electrons can be located (trapped) either in interlamellar gaps or in spaces made by non-planar conformers. Electrons from the former ones are bound more weakly than electrons from the latter ones. The origin of Vis absorption for the samples is explained. These spectra can be used as a probe indicating differences in the solid structures of hydrocarbons.

Pietrow, M.; Gago?, M.; Misiak, L. E.; Kornarzy?ski, K.; Szurkowski, J.; Rochowski, P.; Grzegorczyk, M.

2015-02-01

223

Evidence-Based Practice: Beyond Empirically Supported Treatments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Must the clinician choose between a practice that is strictly objective and data based and one that is purely subjective and experience based? Optimally, practitioners need to follow a model of evidence-based psychotherapy practice, such as the disciplined inquiry or local clinical scientist model, that encompasses a theoretical formulation, empirically supported treatments (ESTs), empirically supported therapy relationships, clinicians' accumulated practical

Stanley B. Messer

2004-01-01

224

Bringing Research Evidence into Software Industry Practice A Study on Evidence-based Practice in the Software Industrial Setting  

E-print Network

Bringing Research Evidence into Software Industry Practice A Study on Evidence-based Practice folklore; organizational culture; team practices; evidence-based and empirical software engineering. I]. The area calls for effective approaches to the dissemi- nation of empirical evidence into practice

225

Evidence Based Education Request Desk. EBE #652  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Which states are using which turnaround models, as represented in the recent U.S. Department of Education's "Blueprint for Reform: The Reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act?" A search for state-level policies on turnaround models was completed based on the targeted states list provided. According to US Department of…

Regional Educational Laboratory Southeast, 2010

2010-01-01

226

Crisis management in schools: evidence- based prevention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Critical incidents in or involving schools include shootings, stabbings, other forms of homicide, terrorist activity, suicide, road traffic accidents, major fires and natural disasters, which result or might result in death and\\/or serious injury to students and staff. Where crisis management plans exist, they might be based on 'common sense' or clinical judgement, risking worsening rather than improving outcomes. The

Wilson MacNeil; Keith Topping

2007-01-01

227

Evidence Based Education Request Desk. EBE #791  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Would anyone in your network be aware of any states that might provide differentiated funding for virtual programs based on the model used--for example, curriculum-in-a-box vs. one with high student-teacher interaction? Are you aware of any research that examines what factors to consider when developing this type of differentiated funding? This…

Regional Educational Laboratory Southeast, 2011

2011-01-01

228

Towards Trustable Digital Evidence with PKIDEV: PKI Based Digital Evidence Verification Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

How to Capture and Preserve Digital Evidence Securely? For the investigation and prosecution of criminal activities that involve computers, digital evidence collected in the crime scene has a vital importance. On one side, it is a very challenging task for forensics professionals to collect them without any loss or damage. On the other, there is the second problem of providing the integrity and authenticity in order to achieve legal acceptance in a court of law. By conceiving digital evidence simply as one instance of digital data, it is evident that modern cryptography offers elegant solutions for this second problem. However, to our knowledge, there is not any previous work proposing a systematic model having a holistic view to address all the related security problems in this particular case of digital evidence verification. In this paper, we present PKIDEV (Public Key Infrastructure based Digital Evidence Verification model) as an integrated solution to provide security for the process of capturing and preserving digital evidence. PKIDEV employs, inter alia, cryptographic techniques like digital signatures and secure time-stamping as well as latest technologies such as GPS and EDGE. In our study, we also identify the problems public-key cryptography brings when it is applied to the verification of digital evidence.

Uzunay, Yusuf; Incebacak, Davut; Bicakci, Kemal

229

Developing Evidence-Based Practice: The Role of Case-Based Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

How can practitioners engage in evidence-based practice when the evidence for effectiveness of psychological treatments comes from randomized controlled trials using patient populations different from those encountered in everyday settings and treatment manuals that seem oversimplified and inflexible? The authors argue that important evidence about best practice comes from case-based research, which builds knowledge in a clinically useful manner and

David J. A. Edwards; Frank M. Dattilio; Dennis B. Bromley

2004-01-01

230

The weak helps the strong: sigma-holes and the stability of MF(4)·base complexes.  

PubMed

Bonding interactions between an electron-deficient region (a sigma-hole) on M and electron donors in MF4-Base complexes, where M = C, Si, Ge, Sn, and Pb, are examined and rationalized. These interactions are seen to transition from weak primarily noncovalent interactions for all bases when M = C to stronger primarily covalent bonds in adducts as the valence shell expands for the heavier M atoms. For M = Ge, Sn, and Pb, the complexes are particularly stable. The consistent axial preference in these systems is anticipated by previous studies and is readily explained from the vantage point of sigma-hole interactions. A series of bound complexes of common bases such as pyridine, tetrahydrofuran, and water are identified, some of which are even more stable than the SiF4·NH3 and SiF4·N(CH3)3 complexes that have already been identified experimentally. Sigma-hole bonding to di- and poly-substituted central atoms, perhaps on par with halogen bonding, is expected to become increasingly important as an ordering interaction in materials science and engineering. Group 14 compounds have distinct advantages in this respect. PMID:24147896

Donald, Kelling J; Tawfik, Marina

2013-12-27

231

Evidence based update: Open versus closed reduction.  

PubMed

Outcomes after operative treatment of displaced femoral neck fractures in young adults are fraught with high complications rates including non-union and avascular necrosis. Among the therapeutic controversies that persist is the role of open reduction, which would allow surgeons a direct means to improve the quality of reduction, a predictor of successful treatment. We performed a systematic review of the literature to compare the outcomes (nonunion, avascular necrosis, and deep infection) after open reduction with internal fixation (ORIF) to closed reduction with internal fixation (CRIF) of acute (surgery performed less than 6 weeks from injury) femoral neck fractures in young adults (average age of 50 or younger) followed for at least one year. Despite the large literature investigating outcomes after operative treatment of femoral neck fracture, relatively few studies aimed to determine the relative risk of complications associated with method of reduction. Therefore, both observational and randomised studies as well as case series with clear descriptions of surgical approach and outcomes were included. We identified 21 studies that matched our inclusion criteria. The incidence of nonunion was 11.6% in closed reduction and 14.9% in the open reduction group (P=0.25). The incidence of avascular necrosis for CRIF and ORIF were 17.2% and 17.7% respectively (P=0.91). The incidence of deep wound infection was 0.49% in the closed reduction group and 3.9% in the open reduction group (P=0.0019). Meta-analysis of risk ratios estimated from six of the studies with comparative data revealed no significant difference in the incidence of nonunion, avascular necrosis or total complications between the two reduction techniques. In summary, systematic review of the literature reveals a lack of evidence in support of ORIF versus CRIF as a means of treating displaced femoral neck fractures in young patients with respect to union and avascular necrosis; however, the incidence of surgical site infections may be lower with CRIF. Firm conclusions cannot be drawn given the lack of high quality prospective studies and patient reported outcomes. In the future, randomised controlled trials will be required to test the effect of reduction method. PMID:25554424

Ghayoumi, Pouriya; Kandemir, Utku; Morshed, Saam

2015-03-01

232

A fast weak motif-finding algorithm based on community detection in graphs  

PubMed Central

Background Identification of transcription factor binding sites (also called ‘motif discovery’) in DNA sequences is a basic step in understanding genetic regulation. Although many successful programs have been developed, the problem is far from being solved on account of diversity in gene expression/regulation and the low specificity of binding sites. State-of-the-art algorithms have their own constraints (e.g., high time or space complexity for finding long motifs, low precision in identification of weak motifs, or the OOPS constraint: one occurrence of the motif instance per sequence) which limit their scope of application. Results In this paper, we present a novel and fast algorithm we call TFBSGroup. It is based on community detection from a graph and is used to discover long and weak (l,d) motifs under the ZOMOPS constraint (zero, one or multiple occurrence(s) of the motif instance(s) per sequence), where l is the length of a motif and d is the maximum number of mutations between a motif instance and the motif itself. Firstly, TFBSGroup transforms the (l, d) motif search in sequences to focus on the discovery of dense subgraphs within a graph. It identifies these subgraphs using a fast community detection method for obtaining coarse-grained candidate motifs. Next, it greedily refines these candidate motifs towards the true motif within their own communities. Empirical studies on synthetic (l, d) samples have shown that TFBSGroup is very efficient (e.g., it can find true (18, 6), (24, 8) motifs within 30 seconds). More importantly, the algorithm has succeeded in rapidly identifying motifs in a large data set of prokaryotic promoters generated from the Escherichia coli database RegulonDB. The algorithm has also accurately identified motifs in ChIP-seq data sets for 12 mouse transcription factors involved in ES cell pluripotency and self-renewal. Conclusions Our novel heuristic algorithm, TFBSGroup, is able to quickly identify nearly exact matches for long and weak (l, d) motifs in DNA sequences under the ZOMOPS constraint. It is also capable of finding motifs in real applications. The source code for TFBSGroup can be obtained from http://bioinformatics.bioengr.uic.edu/TFBSGroup/. PMID:23865838

2013-01-01

233

Clarification and elaboration on evidence-based practice in psychology.  

PubMed

Responds to comments by D. C. Wendt and B. D. Slife, P. H. Hunsberger, and R. B. Stuart and S. O. Lilienfeld regarding the report by the APA Presidential Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice entitled Evidence-based practice in psychology. The goal of the task force was to create a scheme that would suggest how evidence should be used to design and offer services that will benefit patients and to assure the public and the health care system that psychologists are providing evidence-based services. There were and will continue to be many scientific and philosophical issues inherent in any such enterprise, and agreement by all psychologists with every aspect of EBPP may not be possible. Nevertheless, the APA's EBPP policy and the report that accompanied it are remarkably inclusive of various perspectives while remaining unambiguous about the need to use evidence in a way that leads to effective services. What is needed at this point are clinically relevant evidence and investigations of how such evidence can be used to best benefit those served by psychological interventions. PMID:17874917

Wampold, Bruce E; Goodheart, Carol D; Levant, Ronald F

2007-09-01

234

3D modeling method for computer animate based on modified weak structured light method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A simple and affordable 3D scanner is designed in this paper. Three-dimensional digital models are playing an increasingly important role in many fields, such as computer animate, industrial design, artistic design and heritage conservation. For many complex shapes, optical measurement systems are indispensable to acquiring the 3D information. In the field of computer animate, such an optical measurement device is too expensive to be widely adopted, and on the other hand, the precision is not as critical a factor in that situation. In this paper, a new cheap 3D measurement system is implemented based on modified weak structured light, using only a video camera, a light source and a straight stick rotating on a fixed axis. For an ordinary weak structured light configuration, one or two reference planes are required, and the shadows on these planes must be tracked in the scanning process, which destroy the convenience of this method. In the modified system, reference planes are unnecessary, and size range of the scanned objects is expanded widely. A new calibration procedure is also realized for the proposed method, and points cloud is obtained by analyzing the shadow strips on the object. A two-stage ICP algorithm is used to merge the points cloud from different viewpoints to get a full description of the object, and after a series of operations, a NURBS surface model is generated in the end. A complex toy bear is used to verify the efficiency of the method, and errors range from 0.7783mm to 1.4326mm comparing with the ground truth measurement.

Xiong, Hanwei; Pan, Ming; Zhang, Xiangwei

2010-11-01

235

Evidence-based assessment: no more pride or prejudice.  

PubMed

Evidence-based practice is an important force in healthcare today. Its impact on the practice of the advanced practice nurse (APN) is becoming more apparent with the development of practice guidelines and protocols. The phrase, "That's the way I've always done it," is being replaced by, "This practice is evidence based." The philosophy of supporting practice with scientific evidence is not new but has been revitalized and emphasized as protocols have been developed to "mold" practice to achieve successful outcomes. This revolution is being applied to all areas of healthcare practice. Assessment of the patient is usually the first contact the APN has with the patient. It is an important time to gather information from the patient interview, physical examination, laboratory data, and test interpretation. Scientific evidence, properly interpreted, is applied in this step of assessment. The APN will then use clinical judgment and the knowledge gained from graduate education to assist with the formulation of a diagnosis. The APN has a unique opportunity to promote an evidence-based practice model at the grass roots level and persuade the bedside nurse to integrate this process into his or her practice. Ultimately, patients will receive better care and outcomes will be improved using evidence-based assessment. PMID:15586152

Munro, Nancy

2004-01-01

236

A strategy for the preparation of thioantimonates based on the concept of weak acids and corresponding strong bases.  

PubMed

By following a new synthetic approach, which is based on the in situ formation of a basic medium by the reaction between the strong base Sb(V)S4 (3-) and the weak acid H2 O, it was possible to prepare three layered thioantimonate(III) compounds of composition [TM(2,2'-bipyridine)3 ][Sb6 S10 ] (TM=Ni, Fe) and [Ni(4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine)3 ][Sb6 S10 ] under hydrothermal conditions featuring two different thioantimonate(III) network topologies. The antimony source, Na3 SbS4 ? 9?H2 O, undergoes several decomposition reactions and produces the Sb(III) S3 species, which condenses to generate the layered anion. The application of transition-metal complexes avoids crystallization of dense phases. The reactions are very fast compared to conventional hydrothermal/solvothermal syntheses and are much less sensitive to changes of the reaction parameters. PMID:25331718

Anderer, Carolin; Delwa de Alarcón, Natalie; Näther, Christian; Bensch, Wolfgang

2014-12-15

237

An Iterative Framework for EEG-based Image Search: Robust Retrieval with Weak Classifiers  

PubMed Central

We revisit the framework for brain-coupled image search, where the Electroencephalography (EEG) channel under rapid serial visual presentation protocol is used to detect user preferences. Extending previous works on the synergy between content-based image labeling and EEG-based brain-computer interface (BCI), we propose a different perspective on iterative coupling. Previously, the iterations were used to improve the set of EEG-based image labels before propagating them to the unseen images for the final retrieval. In our approach we accumulate the evidence of the true labels for each image in the database through iterations. This is done by propagating the EEG-based labels of the presented images at each iteration to the rest of images in the database. Our results demonstrate a continuous improvement of the labeling performance across iterations despite the moderate EEG-based labeling (AUC <75%). The overall analysis is done in terms of the single-trial EEG decoding performance and the image database reorganization quality. Furthermore, we discuss the EEG-based labeling performance with respect to a search task given the same image database. PMID:23977196

Uš?umli?, Marija; Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Millán, José del R.

2013-01-01

238

An iterative framework for EEG-based image search: robust retrieval with weak classifiers.  

PubMed

We revisit the framework for brain-coupled image search, where the Electroencephalography (EEG) channel under rapid serial visual presentation protocol is used to detect user preferences. Extending previous works on the synergy between content-based image labeling and EEG-based brain-computer interface (BCI), we propose a different perspective on iterative coupling. Previously, the iterations were used to improve the set of EEG-based image labels before propagating them to the unseen images for the final retrieval. In our approach we accumulate the evidence of the true labels for each image in the database through iterations. This is done by propagating the EEG-based labels of the presented images at each iteration to the rest of images in the database. Our results demonstrate a continuous improvement of the labeling performance across iterations despite the moderate EEG-based labeling (AUC <75%). The overall analysis is done in terms of the single-trial EEG decoding performance and the image database reorganization quality. Furthermore, we discuss the EEG-based labeling performance with respect to a search task given the same image database. PMID:23977196

Uš?umli?, Marija; Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Millán, José Del R

2013-01-01

239

Security Operation Center Design Based on DS Evidence Theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the widespread application of large and complicated network, network safety has become an important issue. In this paper, a security operation center (SOC) concept based on multi-sensor data fusion technology is presented from the viewpoint of the network security. A structure of a SOC system based on D-S evidence theory is proposed, and the detailed method of data fusion

Xuanzi Hu; Cunxi Xie

2006-01-01

240

Construct Definition Using Cognitively Based Evidence: A Framework for Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, we highlight the need for a precisely defined construct in score-based validation and discuss the contribution of cognitive theories to accurately and comprehensively defining the construct. We propose a framework for integrating cognitively based theoretical and empirical evidence to specify and evaluate the construct. We apply…

Ketterlin-Geller, Leanne R.; Yovanoff, Paul; Jung, EunJu; Liu, Kimy; Geller, Josh

2013-01-01

241

Evidence-Based Practice: A Framework for Making Effective Decisions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The research to practice gap in education has been a long-standing concern. The enactment of No Child Left Behind brought increased emphasis on the value of using scientifically based instructional practices to improve educational outcomes. It also brought education into the broader evidence-based practice movement that started in medicine and has…

Spencer, Trina D.; Detrich, Ronnie; Slocum, Timothy A.

2012-01-01

242

Evidence-Based Practice and Policy: Choices Ahead  

Microsoft Academic Search

Choices about how to view evidence-based practice (EBP) are being made by educators, practitioners, agency administrators, and staff in a variety of organizations designed to promote integration of research and practice such as clearinghouses on EBP. Choices range from narrow views of EBP such as use of empirically based guidelines and treatment manuals to the broad philosophy and evolving process

Eileen Gambrill

2006-01-01

243

Evidence-Based Psychosocial Treatments for Child and Adolescent Depression  

Microsoft Academic Search

The evidence-base of psychosocial treatment outcome studies for depressed youth conducted since 1998 is examined. All studies for depressed children meet Nathan and Gorman's (2002) criteria for Type 2 studies whereas the adolescent protocols meet criteria for both Type 1 and Type 2 studies. Based on the Task Force on the Promotion and Dissemination of Psychological Procedures guidelines, the cognitive-behavioral

Corinne David-Ferdon; Nadine J. Kaslow

2008-01-01

244

Evidence-based Laboratory Medicine: Supporting Decision-Making  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is an implicit acceptance that an evidence-based culture underpins the practice of laboratory medicine, in part because it is perceived as the scientific foundation of medicine. However, several reviews of specific test procedures or technologies have shown that the evi- dence base is limited and in many cases flawed. One of the key deficiencies in the scientific literature on

Christopher P. Price

2000-01-01

245

Evidence-Based Psychosocial Treatments for Child and Adolescent Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The evidence-base of psychosocial treatment outcome studies for depressed youth conducted since 1998 is examined. All studies for depressed children meet Nathan and Gorman's (2002) criteria for Type 2 studies whereas the adolescent protocols meet criteria for both Type 1 and Type 2 studies. Based on the Task Force on the Promotion and…

David-Ferdon, Corinne; Kaslow, Nadine J.

2008-01-01

246

Promoting Evidence-Based Practice in Child Protection  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article argues for the adoption of an evidence-based approach to decision-making in child protection. Such a change hinges upon the availability of good quality, up-to-date evidence that is readily accessible to practitioners and policy-makers. Following a resume' of the arguments for recognizing controlled trials as methodologically superior to other forms of methodology in evaluating professional interventions, the article presents

Geraldine Macdonald

1998-01-01

247

Evidence-based treatments in child abuse and neglect  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract This article summarizes the background and basic concepts of evidence-based practice (EBP), contrasts EBP with traditional approaches, and examines how EBP fits within child welfare and child maltreatment related service systems. The emerging,recommendations,of best practice workgroups are reviewed, along with evidence across a range of child welfare target areas, including prevention, treatment and foster care settings. The article concludes

Mark Chaffin; Bill Friedrich

2004-01-01

248

Ethics and Evidence-Based Medicine: Is There a Conflict?  

PubMed Central

This article addresses the advantages, disadvantages, and traps to which evidence-based medicine (EBM) may lead and suggests that, to be ethically valid, EBM must be aimed at the patient's best interests and not at the financial interests of others. While financial considerations are by no means trivial, it is hypocritical – if not dangerous – to hide them behind words like “evidence” or “quality.” PMID:18092036

Loewy, Erich H.

2007-01-01

249

[Glocalization: the outlook for Taiwan evidence based health care].  

PubMed

Public attention to evidence-based health care (EBHC) has increased significantly in recent years. Key problems related to applying EBHC in current healthcare practice include the timely update of up-to-date knowledge and skills and the methodology used to implement EBHC in clinical settings. EBHC has been introduced to the Taiwan healthcare system for the past two decades. The annual EBM (Evidence based medicine) National Competition is a unique and important EBHC activity in Taiwan. EBHC has been promoted widely in medicine, nursing, pharmacy, public health and other professions, and EBHC-related organizations such as the Taiwan Evidence Based Medicine Association (TEBMA), and Taiwan Evidence Based Nursing Association (TEBNA), have increased in number and grown in membership. In addition to domestic developments, Taiwan is also actively involved in global organizations, such as the Cochrane Collaboration, East Asian Cochrane Alliance (EACA), and the International Society for Evidence Based Health Care (ISEHC). In Taiwan, most medical professionals work cooperatively to promote EBHC, which facilitates the gradual improvement of healthcare quality. PMID:25464951

Chen, Chiehfeng

2014-12-01

250

Measuring use of evidence based psychotherapy for posttraumatic stress disorder.  

PubMed

To improve methods of estimating use of evidence-based psychotherapy for posttraumatic stress disorder in the Veteran's health administration, we evaluated administrative data and note text for patients newly enrolling in six VHA outpatient PTSD clinics in New England during the 2010 fiscal year (n = 1,924). Using natural language processing, we developed machine learning algorithms that mimic human raters in classifying note text. We met our targets for algorithm performance as measured by precision, recall, and F-measure. We found that 6.3 % of our study population received at least one session of evidence-based psychotherapy during the initial 6 months of treatment. Evidence-based psychotherapies appear to be infrequently utilized in VHA outpatient PTSD clinics in New England. Our method could support efforts to improve use of these treatments. PMID:22535469

Shiner, Brian; D'Avolio, Leonard W; Nguyen, Thien M; Zayed, Maha H; Young-Xu, Yinong; Desai, Rani A; Schnurr, Paula P; Fiore, Louis D; Watts, Bradley V

2013-07-01

251

Implementing Evidence-Based Practices: Considerations for the Hospice Setting  

PubMed Central

With tighter regulations and greater scrutiny of outcomes, hospice programs are being challenged to consider the implementation of Evidence-Based Practices (EBPs). This study reports the findings from interviews conducted with hospice directors and focus groups with the staff at eight experimental site hospice programs that occurred following the completion of a multifaceted translating research into practice (TRIP) intervention designed to promote the adoption of evidence-based pain management interventions. The purpose of this paper is to provide a background in the use of EBPs, to report the facilitators and barriers to overall implementation of evidence-based pain practices in the hospice setting, and to provide recommendations for hospices interested in improving use of EBPs in this setting. It was determined that hospice programs need to evaluate three main factors prior to the start of an EBP initiative: Community culture, Agency culture, and Staff culture. Recommendations for implementation of EBPs in hospice organizations are provided. PMID:20167834

Sanders, Sara; Mackin, Melissa Lehan; Reyes, Jimmy; Herr, Keela; Titler, Marita; Fine, Perry; Forcucci, Chris

2015-01-01

252

Extractive Evidence Based Medicine Summarisation Based on Sentence-Specific Abeed Sarker Diego Molla  

E-print Network

Extractive Evidence Based Medicine Summarisation Based on Sentence-Specific Statistics Abeed Sarker evidence-based summaries relevant to clinical questions. We approach this task as one of query-focused, ex- tractive, single-document summarisation using sentence- specific statistics for each target sentence. We

Aliod, Diego Mollá

253

Determination of component concentrations in mixtures of weak and strong acids and bases by linear algebraic methods.  

PubMed

A general expression for transforming potentiometric titration curves of mixtures of weak acids into a system of linear equations is derived. The solution of the linear equations gives directly the concentrations of the components. This linear transformation method is illustrated by the analysis of mixtures of weak acids with overlapping dissociation equilibria. The possible presence of a strong acid or strong base in the mixture can also be detected and its concentration simultaneously determined. The method can also be used for analysis of an ampholyte and solutions containing a weak acid and its conjugate base. For example a mixture of hydroxyacetic acid (pK approximately 3.6), acetic acid (pK approximately 4.6) and hydroxylamine hydrochloride (pK approximately 6) was analysed in the presence of strong acid with an average relative error of approximately 2%. PMID:18962767

Ivaska, A; Nagypál, I

1980-09-01

254

Pediatric Depression: Is There Evidence to Improve Evidence-Based Treatments?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although there have been advances in our ability to treat child and adolescent depression, use of evidence-based treatments still results in many patients with residual symptoms. Advances in our understanding of cognitive, emotional, and ecological aspects of early-onset depression have the potential to lead to improvements in the assessment and…

Brent, David A.; Maalouf, Fadi T.

2009-01-01

255

Evidence-Based Practice and School Libraries: Interconnections of Evidence, Advocacy, and Actions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This author states that a professional focus on evidence based practice (EBP) for school libraries emerged from the International Association of School Librarianship conference when he presented the concept. He challenged the school library profession to actively engage in professional and reflective practices that chart, measure, document, and…

Todd, Ross J.

2015-01-01

256

Untangling the Evidence: Introducing an Empirical Model for Evidence-Based Library and Information Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: This research is the first to investigate the experiences of teacher-librarians as evidence-based practice. An empirically derived model is presented in this paper. Method: This qualitative study utilised the expanded critical incident approach, and investigated the real-life experiences of fifteen Australian teacher-librarians,…

Gillespie, Ann

2014-01-01

257

Standard systems for measurement of pK values and ionic mobilities: 2. Univalent weak bases.  

PubMed

This paper contributes to the methodology of measuring pK values and ionic mobilities by capillary zone electrophoresis by introducing the principle of constant ionic strength and minimum interaction of analytes with counterionic components and presenting a standard system of cationic buffers for measurements of weak bases. The system is designed so that all buffers comprise the same concentration of Cl(-) present as the only counter anion. This minimizes problems caused by interactions between the counterion and the analytes which may otherwise bring biased values of obtained effective mobilities. Further, the buffer system provides constant and accurately known ionic strength for an entire set of measurements. When additionally all measurements are performed with constant Joule heating, one correction for ionic strength and temperature is then needed for the obtained set of experimental data. This considerably facilitates their evaluation and regression analysis as the corrections for ionic strength and Joule heating need not be implemented in the computation software and may be applied only once to the final regression results. An experimental example of the proposed methodology is presented and the reliability and the advantages of the proposed system are shown, where the known problematic groups of amines and pyridine were measured with high accuracy and without any notice of anomalous behavior. PMID:19168181

Slampová, Andrea; Krivánková, Ludmila; Gebauer, Petr; Bocek, Petr

2009-04-24

258

Strong and weak lensing analysis of cluster Abell 2219 based on optical and near infrared data  

E-print Network

We present a gravitational lensing study of the massive galaxy cluster A2219 (redshift 0.22). This investigation is based on multicolour images from U through H, which allows photometric redshifts to be estimated for the background sources. The redshifts provide useful extra information for the lensing models: we show how they can be used to identify a new multiple-image system (and rule out an old one), how this information can be used to anchor the mass model for the cluster, and how the redshifts can be used to construct optimal samples of background galaxies for a weak lensing analysis. Combining all results, we obtain the mass distribution in this cluster from the inner, strong lensing region, out to a radius of 1.5 Mpc. The mass profile is consistent with a singular isothermal model over this radius range. Parametric and non-parametric reconstructions of the mass distribution in the cluster are compared. The main features (elongation, sub-clumps, radial mass profile) are in good agreement.

J. Bezecourt; H. Hoekstra; M. E. Gray; H. M. AbdelSalam; K. Kuijken; R. S. Ellis

2000-01-29

259

Basis of antimalarial action: non-weak base effects of chloroquine on acid vesicle pH  

SciTech Connect

Biologically active concentrations of chloroquine increase the pH of the parasite's acid vesicles within 3-5 min. This increase in pH results from two mechanisms, one of which is markedly reduced in chloroquine-resistant parasites. Because chloroquine is a weak base, it increases vesicle pH by that mechanism in chloroquine-susceptible and resistant parasites and mammalian cells (based on its two pKs and on the delta pH between the acid vesicle and the extracellular environment). In chloroquine-susceptible parasites, but not resistant parasites or mammalian cells, chloroquine increases the pH of acid vesicles 700- to 800-fold more than can be accounted for by its properties as a weak base. The increase in acid vesicle pH caused by these non-weak base effects of nanomolar chloroquine in susceptible parasites suggests that chloroquine acts by interfering with acid vesicle functions in the parasite such as the endocytosis and proteolysis of hemoglobin, and the intracellular targeting of lysosomal enzymes. The non-weak base effects of nanomolar chloroquine on parasite vesicle pH are also responsible for its safety because these chloroquine concentrations do not affect mammalian cells.

Krogstad, D.J.; Schlesinger, P.H.

1987-03-01

260

Mental Health Clinicians’ Experiences of Implementing Evidence-Based Treatments  

PubMed Central

Implementation research has tremendous potential to bridge the research-practice gap; however, we know more about barriers to evidence-based care than the factors that contribute to the adoption and sustainability of evidence-based treatments (EBTs). This qualitative study explores the experiences of clinicians (N = 11) who were implementing EBTs, highlighting the factors that they perceived to be most critical to successful implementation. The clinicians’ narratives reveal many leverage points that can inform administrators, clinical supervisors, and clinicians who wish to implement EBTs, as well as other stakeholders who wish to develop and test strategies for moving EBTs into routine care. PMID:24066630

Powell, Byron J.; Hausmann-Stabile, Carolina; McMillen, J. Curtis

2013-01-01

261

Strategies for searching and managing evidence-based practice resources.  

PubMed

Evidence-based nursing practice requires the use of effective search strategies to locate relevant resources to guide practice change. Continuing education and staff development professionals can assist nurses to conduct effective literature searches. This article provides suggestions for strategies to aid in identifying search terms. Strategies also are recommended for refining searches by using controlled vocabulary, truncation, Boolean operators, PICOT (Population/Patient Problem, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome, Time) searching, and search limits. Suggestions for methods of managing resources also are identified. Using these approaches will assist in more effective literature searches and may help evidence-based practice decisions. PMID:25221988

Robb, Meigan; Shellenbarger, Teresa

2014-10-01

262

The professional clothing bank as evidence-based practice.  

PubMed

Little research exists linking interview-appropriate attire to improved employment outcomes for women. Thus, it appears that the professional clothing bank has not been investigated as evidence-based practice. To provide preliminary evidence for clothing banks, in this article the author synthesizes findings from existing research on the provision of a professional clothing bank as a means for offering interview-appropriate attire to poor women in job readiness programming. For context, job readiness programs are explored and a case study of one program operating a professional clothing bank is presented. Finally, preliminary considerations for planning and implementing clothing banks based on this literature review are given. PMID:25661895

Bishop, SueZanne Monique

2015-01-01

263

Application of meta-analysis in evidence-based oncology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Cochrane Collaboration is an international not-for-profit and independent organization, dedicated to providing up-to-date\\u000a evidence-based information about the effects of healthcare in the form of systematic reviews. Meta-analysis is a statistical\\u000a tool to prepare the systematic reviews. This paper briefly introduces the above terms and how to apply evidence-based oncology.\\u000a Recent findings by using meta-analysis for cancers of the breast,

Xiaoping Lin; Qingsheng Wang

2008-01-01

264

Evidence-based interventions for neonatal abstinence syndrome.  

PubMed

This review aimed to determine best nursing practice by systematically and critically reviewing the appropriate literature and expert guidelines. Using keyword and literature databases, over 480 journal titles were reviewed. Twenty-four articles and three expert guidelines were chosen. The majority of articles selected as evidence were Level IV--opinions of respected authorities based clinical experiences, descriptive studies, case reports, or reports of experts. Two articles were Level I-II--experimental studies. Results of the review showed that traditional supportive interventions also have a body of evidence for their use. Although there is much research regarding neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), the majority of future research needs to be at a higher level of evidence. Nursing applications include obtaining evidence for best practice through diligent searches of the literature and expert guidelines. PMID:25269356

MacMullen, Nancy J; Dulski, Laura A; Blobaum, Paul

2014-01-01

265

[Pharmacist's requirements for evidence-based self-medication guidelines].  

PubMed

Due to the removal of many pharmaceuticals from the prescription requirement, self-medication implies an increasing responsibility for pharmacists towards their patients. The application of evidence-based guidelines could be a responsible basis for consulting in pharmacies. Evidence-based guidelines represent the systematically accumulated and evaluated facts (the evidence) of desired and undesired effects of pharmaceuticals in the population. We wanted to find out which interest pharmaceutical professionals have in evidence-based guidelines and which are the exact requirements on their content, deducted from public pharmacies everyday demands. With this purpose, three surveys were conducted between March and August 2012, in which 365, 350, and 486 pharmaceutical professionals participated respectively. The results show that pharmacy staff is very interested in evidence based guidelines. Furthermore, they suggest that the pharmacy staff feel safe with the self-diagnosis of the customer, with the consideration of limits of self-medication, as well as with the selection of the--according to own assessment--appropriate active substance. For the selection of the correct active substance, the following criteria are named: self-security in the counselling, first-hand experiences as well as the wish of the customer. At the same time, it is striking that the most frequent critique the pharmacy staff gets from pharmacy customers is the lack of effectiveness of the selected medication. With that in mind, it is possible that not the appropriate medication was selected, and the chosen criteria as selection method should be replaced by an evidence-based decision. Secondly, the results show that in up to 52% of the cases, depending on the indications, the participating consultants felt less certain to uncertain with regards to possible interactions or contraindications. Also in this context, it is desirable to prepare the existing data in such a practical way, that the pharmacies are able to apply them directly. PMID:23573693

Laven, Anna; Läer, Stephanie

2013-03-01

266

Evidence-Based Practice for Treatment of Eating Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this chapter is to review the status of evidence-based practice (EBP) for the treatment of students with eating disorders in university and college counseling centers. Several issues affecting the application of the research findings to service delivery for eating disordered students will be addressed. These include discussion of…

Resnick, Jaquelyn Liss

2005-01-01

267

Evidence-Based Diagnosis: Incorporating Diagnostic Instruments into Clinical Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article is intended to serve as a practical guide for practitioners interested in incorporating evidence-based diagnosis (EBD) instruments into their clinical practices to refine the diagnostic process. Three measures are used to illustrate this process, the DISC-IV (Shaffer et al., 2000), the Schedule for Affective Disorders and…

Doss, Amanda Jensen

2005-01-01

268

An Evidence-Based Course in Complementary Medicines  

PubMed Central

Objective. To evaluate the impact of an evidence-based course in complementary medicines on the attitudes, knowledge, and professional practice behavior of undergraduate pharmacy students. Design. A required 12-week evidence-based complementary medicine course was designed and introduced into the third-year undergraduate pharmacy curriculum. The course included a combination of traditional lectures, interactive tutorial sessions, and a range of formal assessments. Assessment. Pre- and post-course survey instruments were administered to assess changes in students’ attitudes, perceptions, knowledge, and the likelihood they would recommend the use of complementary medicines in a pharmacy practice environment. Conclusion. Completion of a required evidence-based complementary medicines course resulted in a positive change in pharmacy students’ perceptions of the value of various complementary medicines as well as in their willingness to recommend them, and provided students with the required knowledge to make patient-centered recommendations for use of complementary medicines in a professional pharmacy practice setting. These findings support the need for greater evidence-based complementary medicine education within pharmacy curricula to meet consumer demand and to align with pharmacists’ professional responsibilities. PMID:23275665

Hughes, Jeff

2012-01-01

269

Urticaria: an evidence-based update. Conference report.  

PubMed

Summary Evidence-based update meetings are held annually by the Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham. Topics are chosen by delegates at the previous year's conference and in the past have included blistering disorders, psoriasis, hair disorders and skin cancers. Once the topic is identified, a trials database search is undertaken with the aim of including speakers who are actively involved in trials that address the subject in question. This year, the eighth Evidence Based Update meeting focused on urticaria and took place in Loughborough University on 14 May 2009. The latest data on the diagnosis and management of acute and chronic urticaria, including cold and solar urticaria, and the impact of food intolerance on chronic urticaria, were presented by an international panel of renowned speakers, who sometimes expressed different viewpoints. The highlights of the meeting included an informal atmosphere, an international perspective, and a practical question and answer session. Over 70% of the delegates stated that they would be changing their clinical practice following on from the meeting. The evidence-based update meeting in 2010 will be devoted to eczema. PMID:20666769

Alexandroff, A B; Harman, K E

2010-08-01

270

Decision Making in Evidence?Based Practice: Science and Art  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article the author reviews problems in the implementation of evidence?based practices (EBP) and concludes that these derive not only from numerous practical concerns, but also from fundamental epistemological issues. These include an antiquated understanding of the scientific method, involving types of naive inductivism and rationalism. The central argument of this article is that recent developments in the field

Christopher G. Hudson

2009-01-01

271

Not Funding the Evidence-Based Model in Ohio  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this descriptive case study was to describe the implementation of Ohio's version of the Evidence-Based Model (OEBM) state school finance system in 2009. Data sources included state budget documents and analyses as well as interviews with local school officials. The new system was responsive to three policy objectives ordered by the…

Edlefson, Carla

2010-01-01

272

Critical Thinking: Knowledge and Skills for Evidence-Based Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: I respond to Kamhi's (2011) conclusion in his article "Balancing Certainty and Uncertainty in Clinical Practice" that rational or critical thinking is an essential complement to evidence-based practice (EBP). Method: I expand on Kamhi's conclusion and briefly describe what clinicians might need to know to think critically within an EBP…

Finn, Patrick

2011-01-01

273

Hindawi Publishing Corporation Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine  

E-print Network

Chinese Medicine, San Francisco, CA 94103-2961, USA 11Center for Health Studies, Group Health CooperativeHindawi Publishing Corporation Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine Volume 2011-0127, USA 5Department of Research, Oregon College of Oriental Medicine, Portland, OR 97216-2859, USA 6

Napadow, Vitaly

274

Qualitative research in evidence-based practice: a valuable partnership  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to discuss the nature of the qualitative research paradigm, with a particular emphasis on the marginalization of qualitative approaches within the current discourse of evidence-based librarianship. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper presents examples of qualitative research in the field of library and information studies, reviews the discourse of EBL as it relates to

Lisa Given

2006-01-01

275

Evidence-Based Practices and Implementation Science in Special Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Establishing a process for identifying evidence-based practices (EBPs) in special education has been a significant advance for the field because it has the potential for generating more effective educational programs and producing more positive outcomes for students with disabilities. However, the potential benefit of EBPs is bounded by the…

Cook, Bryan G.; Odom, Samuel L.

2013-01-01

276

Is there an evidence-based practice for burns?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Doublts and questions about clinical decision making need to be answered. Evidence-based medicine aims to provide answers by systematically finding information from the vast assortmment of research papers in the literature and bringing it together to use in everyday practice and in the best interests of the patient. Although clinical (and experimental) studies have a variety of methodologics, ranging from

Charmaine Childs

1998-01-01

277

INTEGRATING EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE AND SOCIAL WORK FIELD EDUCATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

The social work academic community is currently considering and critiquing the idea of evidence-based practice (EBP). Given the vital part that practicum education plays in the social work profession, understanding the views of field instructors on this subject is essential. The George Warren Brown School of Social Work at Washington University surveyed 283 field instructors within 180 agencies and found

Tonya Edmond; Deborah Megivern; Cynthia Williams; Estelle Rochman; Matthew Howard

2006-01-01

278

How Evidence-Based Practices Contribute to Community Integration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the groundbreaking work of the Robert Wood Johnson Conference in 1998 identifying six evidence-based practices (EBPs) for people with severe mental illness (SMI), the mental health field has moved in the direction of re-examination and redesign of service systems. Surprisingly, one area that has not been fully explicated is the role that EBPs play in promoting community integration. In

Gary R. Bond; Michelle P. Salyers; Angela L. Rollins; Charles A. Rapp; Anthony M. Zipple

2004-01-01

279

Evidence-Based Interprofessional Practice: Learning and Behaviour  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this journal article is to investigate evidence-based practice (EBP) or He Ritenga Whaimohio, as one of the seven principles outlined in the "Resource Teacher: Learning and Behaviour (RTLB) Toolkit" (2011) that guides RTLB practice; and to critique the principle of EBP through practical reflection. (Contains 2 tables and 2…

Littek, Celeste

2013-01-01

280

Determining Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Determining evidence-based practices is a complicated enterprise that requires analyzing the methodological quality and magnitude of the available research supporting specific practices. This article reviews criteria and procedures for identifying what works in the fields of clinical psychology, school psychology, and general education; and it…

Cook, Bryan G.; Tankersley, Melody; Landrum, Timothy J.

2009-01-01

281

Developing Research Competence to Support Evidence-Based Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes one step in the process that was undertaken to prepare for the introduction of evidence-based practice (EBP) into the curriculum across the Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Master of Science in Nursing, and Doctor of Philosophy pro- grams, as well as the programs that were under development, Clinical Nurse Leader and Doctor of Nursing Practice, at the

Lora E. Burke; Elizabeth A. Schlenk; Susan M. Sereika; Susan M. Cohen; Mary Beth Happ; Janice S. Dorman

2005-01-01

282

Single-Subject Experimental Design for Evidence-Based Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Single-subject experimental designs (SSEDs) represent an important tool in the development and implementation of evidence-based practice in communication sciences and disorders. The purpose of this article is to review the strategies and tactics of SSEDs and their application in speech-language pathology research. Method: The authors…

Byiers, Breanne J.; Reichle, Joe; Symons, Frank J.

2012-01-01

283

Unraveling Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evidence-based practices (EBPs) are instructional techniques that meet prescribed criteria related to the research design, quality, quantity, and effect size of supporting research, which have the potential to help bridge the research-to-practice gap and improve student outcomes. In this article, the authors (a) discuss the importance of clear…

Cook, Bryan G.; Cook, Sara Cothren

2013-01-01

284

Disseminating Evidence-Based Practices in Secondary Transition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As educators move into a new era of educational reform, it becomes imperative that teachers use evidence-based instructional practices shown to be effective for students with disabilities. One area that plays a role in this process is secondary transition. The National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center has identified 63…

Mustian, April; Mazzotti, Valerie L.; Test, David W.

2013-01-01

285

Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education: Some Practical Considerations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A major tenet of both the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and the No Child Left Behind Act is the identification and use of evidence-based practices, or those instructional techniques shown by research as most likely to improve student outcomes meaningfully. However, much confusion exists regarding the meaning and potential…

Cook, Bryan G.; Tankersley, Melody; Cook, Lysandra; Landrum, Timothy J.

2008-01-01

286

Searching for Excellence & Diversity An evidence-based approach to  

E-print Network

#12;Searching for Excellence & Diversity An evidence-based approach to training search committees #12;Outline What is WISELI? Why focus on hiring? Searching for Excellence & Diversity workshops Emphasis on research on bias and assumptions How's it working? #12;Women in Science & Engineering

Sheridan, Jennifer

287

The Evidence-Based Reasoning Framework: Assessing Scientific Reasoning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent science education reforms have emphasized the importance of students engaging with and reasoning from evidence to develop scientific explanations. A number of studies have created frameworks based on Toulmin's (1958/2003) argument pattern, whereas others have developed systems for assessing the quality of students' reasoning to support…

Brown, Nathaniel J. S.; Furtak, Erin Marie; Timms, Michael; Nagashima, Sam O.; Wilson, Mark

2010-01-01

288

Evidence-Based Practice for Conduct Disorder Symptoms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Patients exhibiting symptoms associated with conduct disorder present challenges in assessment and treatment. The difficulties are not only the complexities of correct identification and appropriate intervention, but also that the knowledge is rapidly growing. Evidence-based practice (EBP) provides a useful framework for dealing with these issues.…

Thomas, Christopher R.

2006-01-01

289

Toward an Evidence-Based Assessment of Pediatric Bipolar Disorder  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article outlines a provisional evidence-based approach to the assessment of pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD). Public attention to PBD and the rate of diagnosis have both increased substantially in the past decade. Accurate diagnosis is crucial to avoid harm due to mislabeling or unnecessary medication exposure. Because there are no proven…

Youngstrom, Eric A.; Findling, Robert L.; Kogos Youngstrom, Jen; Calabrese, Joseph R.

2005-01-01

290

Inquiry in baccalaureate nursing education: fostering evidence-based practice.  

PubMed

With the increasing emphasis on evidence-based nursing practice, nurse educators need to more fully implement teaching strategies that help students gain critical thinking skills related to inquiry and understand the importance of evidence-based nursing practice. Research and scholarship emphases in one baccalaureate nursing program, student-identified benefits, and challenges associated with incorporating inquiry across the curriculum are described in this article. In clinical journal entries, students described the following benefits associated with curricular emphasis on inquiry: increased interest in evidence-based nursing practice and participating in the generation of research; enhanced critical thinking skills through the development of knowledge, experience, and competencies; increased motivation to continue professional growth and development by participating in lifelong learning; the desire to become better consumers of research findings; better understanding of the "real world" of clinical research; and increased desire to pursue graduate studies in nursing. The challenge to promote student growth toward competence in the application of evidence-based principles in clinical practice is ongoing. PMID:15719712

Callister, Lynn Clark; Matsumura, Gerry; Lookinland, Sandra; Mangum, Sandra; Loucks, Carol

2005-02-01

291

Evidence-Based Library Management: The Leadership Challenge  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper is an extension of the author's earlier work on developing management information services and creating a culture of assessment in libraries. The author will focus observations on the use of data in decision-making in libraries, specifically on the role of leadership in making evidence-based decision a reality, and will review new…

Lakos, Amos

2007-01-01

292

Evidence-based investigations and treatments of recurrent pregnancy loss  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose of review The majority of investigations and treatments offered to women with recurrent pregnancy loss are not evidence- based. In this review a critical analysis is given of the current management of recurrent pregnancy loss often recommended in meta-analyses and guidelines. Recent findings Our knowledge of genetic, endocrine, thrombophilic and immunological causes of recurrent pregnancy loss has been improved

Ole B. Christiansen

2006-01-01

293

Varicocele treatment in the light of evidence-based andrology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Treatment of varicoceles became the most common treatment for male infertility merely on an empirical basis. However, in the age of evidence-based medicine it is surprising that only a few, and mainly recent, randomized controlled clinical trials with relevant outcome parameters have been published to allow adequate judgement of treatment effectiveness. Moreover, difficulties in study design could also be detected

A. Kamischke; E. Nieschlag

2001-01-01

294

Marketing evidence-based practice: what a CROC™!  

PubMed

Nurses should be engaged in evidence-based practice (EBP) to ensure that nursing care is efficient and effective. This article describes one cancer center's use of the Marketing Mix framework to educate staff nurses with the CROC™: Clinging Rigidly to Outdated Care campaign. As a result of the campaign, five EBP projects have been initiated in the cancer center. PMID:20880823

Boyington, Alice R; Ferrall, Sheila M; Sylvanus, Terry

2010-10-01

295

Disruptive Innovations for Designing and Diffusing Evidence-Based Interventions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence-based therapeutic and preventive intervention programs (EBIs) have been growing exponentially. Yet EBIs have not been broadly adopted in the United States. In order for our EBI science to significantly reduce disease burden, we need to critically reexamine our scientific conventions and norms. Innovation may be spurred by reexamining the traditional biomedical model for validating, implementing, and diffusing EBI products

Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus; Dallas Swendeman; Bruce F. Chorpita

2012-01-01

296

Evidence-Based Rehabilitation Counseling Practice: A Pedagogical Imperative  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes how rehabilitation educators can aid students and practitioners in learning about and engaging in evidence-based rehabilitation counseling practice (EBRCP). Information describing (a) the definition and rationale for EBRCP, (b) controversies surrounding EBRCP, (c) facilitating rehabilitation counselor enthusiasm for EBRCP,…

Kosciulek, John F.

2010-01-01

297

A step to Evidence Based Homeopathy VERATRUM ALBUM  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Computerised daily practice gives us the opportunity to open the black box, to be confronted with the real world of homeopathy. Evidence Based Homeopathy is an approach specific to homeopathy, seeking to validate different homeopathic concepts, methodologies and strategies. Using Veratrum album and the KENT methodology as example, the author shows a new approach for the Clinical Verification of

Michel Van Wassenhoven

298

Evidence-Based Practices in Outpatient Treatment for Eating Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the current issues relevant to implementing evidence-based practices in the context of outpatient treatment for eating disorders. The study also examined the effectiveness of an outpatient treatment program for eating disorders among a group of 196 patients presenting with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or eating disorder…

Schaffner, Angela D.; Buchanan, Linda Paulk

2010-01-01

299

Evidence-Based Practice in Adapted Physical Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) has been strongly advocated by federal legislation as well as school districts in recent years, the concept has not been well accepted in adapted physical education (APE), perhaps due to a lack of understanding of the central notion of EBP. The purpose of this article is to discuss how APE…

Jin, Jooyeon; Yun, Joonkoo

2010-01-01

300

Evidence-Based Psychosocial Treatments for Ethnic Minority Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reviews research on evidence-based treatments (EBTs) for ethnic minority youth using criteria from Chambless et al. (1998), Chambless et al. (1996), and Chambless and Hollon (1998). Although no "well-established" treatments were identified, "probably efficacious" or "possibly efficacious" treatments were found for ethnic minority…

Huey, Stanley J., Jr.; Polo, Antonio J.

2008-01-01

301

Evidence-Based Practices Project for Suicide Prevention  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Suicide continues to be a serious public health problem. In response to this problem, a myriad of suicide prevention programs have been developed and employed across the United States. Unfortunately, the effectiveness of many of these programs is unknown because they have not been evaluated using rigorous methods. The Evidence-Based Practices…

Rodgers, Philip L.; Sudak, Howard S.; Silverman, Morton M.; Litts, David A.

2007-01-01

302

Organizing for Evidence-Based Decision Making and Improvement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In today's accountability climate, regional accrediting bodies are requiring colleges and universities to develop and sustain a culture of evidence-based decision making and improvement. But two-thirds of college presidents in a 2011 "Inside Higher Ed" survey said their institutions are not particularly strong at using data for making decisions.…

Leimer, Christina

2012-01-01

303

Study on the adsorption property of lysozyme on weak cation exchanger based on monodisperse poly(glycidymethacrylate-co-ethylenedimethacrylate) beads.  

PubMed

A type of weak cation exchanger was prepared based on poly(glycidylmethacrylate-co-ethylenedimethacrylate). The effects of pH and ionic strength on the adsorption behavior were studied, and the results suggested that the adsorption of lysozyme onto a weak cation exchanger is electrostatic interaction, and that the adsorption behavior is in accordance with the Langmuir adsorption model with a correlation coefficient greater than 0.99. It was also found that increasing ionic strength led to a decrease of the adsorption of lysozyme from 49.50 to 28.09 mg/g. Preliminary chromatographic experiments were conducted to test the separation properties of the weak cation exchanger, and the results demonstrated that the retention time of different proteins could be predicted in order of their isoelectric point. PMID:22776738

Zhang, Jing; Han, Yan-Ting; Bu, Xin-Li; Yue, Xuan-Feng

2013-02-01

304

Will reducing sugar-sweetened beverage consumption reduce obesity? Evidence supporting conjecture is strong, but evidence when testing effect is weak  

PubMed Central

We provide arguments to the debate question and update a previous meta-analysis with recently published studies on effects of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) on body weight/composition indices (BWIs). We abstracted data from randomized controlled trials examining effects of consumption of SSBs on BWIs. Six new studies met these criteria: 1) human trials, 2) 3 weeks duration, 3) random assignment to conditions differing only in consumption of SSBs, and 4) including a BWI outcome. Updated meta-analysis of a total of seven studies that added SSBs to persons’ diets showed dose-dependent increases in weight. Updated meta-analysis of eight studies attempting to reduce SSB consumption showed an equivocal effect on BWIs in all randomized subjects. When limited to subjects overweight at baseline, meta-analysis showed a significant effect of roughly 0.25 standard deviations (more weight loss/less weight gain) relative to controls. Evidence to date is equivocal in showing that decreasing SSB consumption will reduce the prevalence of obesity. Although new evidence suggests that an effect may yet be demonstrable in some populations, the integrated effect size estimate remains very small and of equivocal statistical significance. Problems in this research area and suggestions for future research are highlighted. PMID:23742715

Kaiser, Kathryn A.; Shikany, James M.; Keating, Karen D.; Allison, David B.

2014-01-01

305

Evidence-based Interventions Using HomeSchool Collaboration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Home-school collaboration refers to the relationship between families and schools where parents and educators work together to promote the academic and social development of children. Eighteen empirical studies of home-school collaboration interventions that also measured a school-based outcome were identified and evaluated according to guidelines outlined by the American Psychological Association’s Division 16 Task Force on Evidence-Based Interventions in School

Diane D. Cox

2005-01-01

306

Global health: the importance of evidence-based medicine  

PubMed Central

Global health is a varied field that comprises research, evaluation and policy that, by its definition, also occurs in disparate locations across the world. This forum article is introduced by our guest editor of the Medicine for Global Health article collection, Gretchen Birbeck. Here, experts based across different settings describe their personal experiences of global health, discussing how evidence-based medicine in resource-limited settings can be translated into improved health outcomes. PMID:24228722

2013-01-01

307

An evidence-based combining classifier for brain signal analysis.  

PubMed

Nowadays, brain signals are employed in various scientific and practical fields such as Medical Science, Cognitive Science, Neuroscience, and Brain Computer Interfaces. Hence, the need for robust signal analysis methods with adequate accuracy and generalizability is inevitable. The brain signal analysis is faced with complex challenges including small sample size, high dimensionality and noisy signals. Moreover, because of the non-stationarity of brain signals and the impacts of mental states on brain function, the brain signals are associated with an inherent uncertainty. In this paper, an evidence-based combining classifiers method is proposed for brain signal analysis. This method exploits the power of combining classifiers for solving complex problems and the ability of evidence theory to model as well as to reduce the existing uncertainty. The proposed method models the uncertainty in the labels of training samples in each feature space by assigning soft and crisp labels to them. Then, some classifiers are employed to approximate the belief function corresponding to each feature space. By combining the evidence raised from each classifier through the evidence theory, more confident decisions about testing samples can be made. The obtained results by the proposed method compared to some other evidence-based and fixed rule combining methods on artificial and real datasets exhibit the ability of the proposed method in dealing with complex and uncertain classification problems. PMID:24392125

Kheradpisheh, Saeed Reza; Nowzari-Dalini, Abbas; Ebrahimpour, Reza; Ganjtabesh, Mohammad

2014-01-01

308

Evidence-based versus reported epilepsy management practices.  

PubMed

Evidence-based medicine practices are widely touted in medicine, although their adoption by busy practitioners is problematic and cumbersome. In this study, we examined published evidence underpinning 2 relevant clinical management questions in pediatric epilepsy: when to initiate an antiepileptic drug and when to prescribe the ketogenic diet. We surveyed practicing child neurologists who were attending their national meeting to determine whether their current practices aligned with the evidence. Clinical studies were evaluated using the Oxford Scale, which was adopted by the American Academy of Neurology. In addition, using a novel rating approach, we examined the impact on overall recommendations by scoring results from studies refuting a given practice. The data show that child neurologists' attitudes firmly adhere to evidence-based practice on when to initiate treatment with an antiepileptic drug, but not on when to prescribe the ketogenic diet. It seems clear that important differences in attitudes of practitioners toward different management strategies for epilepsy cannot be explained only by differences in the evidence. Safety and efficacy data suggest that the ketogenic diet should be more widely adopted as a management strategy in pediatric epilepsy. PMID:18281618

Mastriani, Katherine S; Williams, Virginia C; Hulsey, Thomas C; Wheless, James W; Maria, Bernard L

2008-05-01

309

An Evidence Base for Human Spaceflight Risks in Wikipedia  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) is focused on understanding and mitigating thirty two risks to crew health and performance in exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit. The HRP has developed an evidence report for each of the risks. Most evidence reports are a brief review article describing the evidence related to a specified risk, written at a level appropriate for the scientifically educated, non-specialist reader. Each evidence report captured the current state of knowledge from both research and operations. Two limitations of the evidence reports have become apparent: 1) they are updated infrequently and 2) they do not take full advantage of the expertise available in other space agencies and in related fields of terrestrial research. Therefore, the HRP is experimenting with the use of Wikipedia articles as a repository for evidence. Wikipedia's accessibility to the international space flight community and researchers in related terrestrial fields creates the opportunity to generate a more timely and comprehensive evidence base. Initial Wikipedia articles were populated for seven risks using a subset of the information in the HRP-approved evidence reports: Fatigue and Sleep Loss, Treating An Ill or Injured Crew Member, Radiation Carcinogenesis, Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure, Renal Stone Formation, Team Cohesion, and Intervertebral Disc Damage. Since the initial articles were created, there have been additions to these Wikipedia articles, including content from sources outside the HRP, and editorial changes to the pages. We will report on the nature of the contributions made after the initial articles were created, the comprehensiveness of the resulting Wikipedia articles, and the effort required to maintain quality control of the content. The Wikipedia approach will also be compared to wiki efforts that exert more traditional editorial control of content prior to posting.

Kundrot, Craig; Steil, Jennifer; Lumpkins, Sarah; Pellis, Neal

2013-01-01

310

An evaluation of the evidence in "evidence-based" integrative medicine programs.  

PubMed

Alternative therapies are popular, and information about them should be included in the curricula of health profession schools. During 2000 to 2003, the National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine awarded five-year education grants to 14 health professions schools in the United States and to the American Medical Students Association Foundation. The purpose of the grants was to integrate evidence-based information about complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) into the curriculum. The authors reviewed the educational material concerning four popular CAM therapies-herbal remedies, chiropractic, acupuncture, and homeopathy-posted on the integrative medicine Web sites of the grant recipients and compared it with the best evidence available. The curricula on the integrative medicine sites were strongly biased in favor of CAM, many of the references were to poor-quality clinical trials, and they were five to six years out of date. These "evidence-based CAM" curricula, which are used all over the country, fail to meet the generally accepted standards of evidence-based medicine. By tolerating this situation, health professions schools are not meeting their educational and ethical obligations to learners, patients, or society. Because integrative medicine programs have failed to uphold educational standards, medical and nursing schools need to assume responsibility for their oversight. The authors suggest (1) appointing faculty committees to review the educational materials and therapies provided by integrative medicine programs, (2) holding integrative medicine programs' education about CAM to the same standard of evidence used for conventional treatments, and (3) providing ongoing oversight of integrative medicine education programs. PMID:19707062

Marcus, Donald M; McCullough, Laurence

2009-09-01

311

A magnetic method for testing the thickness of two-sided weakly magnetic coatings by a nonmagnetic base  

Microsoft Academic Search

The general case where the depth of the informative zone is greater than the thickness of a nonmagnetic base having a two-sided\\u000a weakly magnetic coating is considered. In this case, the informative signal is determined by the thickness of the base and\\u000a coating on both sides. A technique for separately measuring the coating thickness on either side taking into account

A. A. Lukhvich; A. L. Luk’yanov; N. V. Kremen’kova; A. K. Shukevich

2009-01-01

312

Evidence-based review of interventions for medically at-risk older drivers.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE. To conduct an evidence-based review of intervention studies of older drivers with medical conditions. METHOD. We used the American Occupational Therapy Association's classification criteria (Levels I-V, I = highest level of evidence) to identify driving interventions. We classified studies using letters to represent the strength of recommendations: A = strongly recommend the intervention; B = recommend intervention is provided routinely; C = weak evidence that the intervention can improve outcomes; D = recommend not to provide the intervention; I = insufficient evidence to recommend for or against the intervention. RESULTS. For clients with stroke, we recommend a graded simulator intervention (A) and multimodal training in traffic theory knowledge and on-road interventions (B); we make no recommendation for or against Dynavision, Useful Field of View, or visual-perceptual interventions (I). For clients with visual deficits, we recommend educational intervention (A) and bioptic training (B); we make no recommendation for or against prism lenses (I). For clients with dementia, we recommend driving restriction interventions (C) and make no recommendation for or against use of compensatory driving strategies (I). CONCLUSION. Level I studies are needed to identify effective interventions for medically at-risk older drivers. PMID:25005514

Classen, Sherrilene; Monahan, Miriam; Auten, Beth; Yarney, Abraham

2014-01-01

313

Evidence-Based Review of Interventions for Medically At-Risk Older Drivers  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE. To conduct an evidence-based review of intervention studies of older drivers with medical conditions. METHOD. We used the American Occupational Therapy Association’s classification criteria (Levels I–V, I = highest level of evidence) to identify driving interventions. We classified studies using letters to represent the strength of recommendations: A = strongly recommend the intervention; B = recommend intervention is provided routinely; C = weak evidence that the intervention can improve outcomes; D = recommend not to provide the intervention; I = insufficient evidence to recommend for or against the intervention. RESULTS. For clients with stroke, we recommend a graded simulator intervention (A) and multimodal training in traffic theory knowledge and on-road interventions (B); we make no recommendation for or against Dynavision, Useful Field of View, or visual–perceptual interventions (I). For clients with visual deficits, we recommend educational intervention (A) and bioptic training (B); we make no recommendation for or against prism lenses (I). For clients with dementia, we recommend driving restriction interventions (C) and make no recommendation for or against use of compensatory driving strategies (I). CONCLUSION. Level I studies are needed to identify effective interventions for medically at-risk older drivers. PMID:25005514

Monahan, Miriam; Auten, Beth; Yarney, Abraham

2014-01-01

314

Evidence-based macro practice: addressing the challenges and opportunities.  

PubMed

Steps involved in the process of evidence-based practice are reviewed in terms of their applicability to macro-level social work. These steps include (1) posing answerable questions; (2) locating credible research studies, (3) critically evaluating this research and its applicability to a practice situation; 4. selecting an intervention(s) by integrating research evidence with professional expertise, ethical standards, and the situation's unique circumstance; and (5) evaluating outcomes. This process has clear and compelling applications to macro-practice. A substantial body of research applicable to macro-level social work currently exists. Widespread adoption of EBP has great potential to improve social work programs and policies. PMID:19042876

Thyer, Bruce A

2008-01-01

315

The personalised medicine. A paradigm of evidence-based medicine.  

PubMed

The practice of "evidence-based medicine" aims at the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of the current best evidence in making decisions about the individualised patient care. The clinical genetics evolved from translational genetics research and contributes to the clinical care of patients and families through evidence-based health care in managing inherited disorders through accurate diagnosis, molecular pathology and assessing phenotypic correlations. Translational genetics and genomics research has led to the development of powerful tools for clinical diagnosis, assessing individual's genomic profile for disease prediction/prevention, high-throughput genome-wide screening for predisposition and/or protection to complex medical conditions, and discovery and development of new drugs and vaccines. Gene mapping and deciphering pathogenic mutations have helped in unravelling the basic biological mechanisms leading to new drug discovery and development. Targeted pharmacotherapy is now possible for managing the highly penetrant multi-system dominantly inherited conditions. Notable examples include rapamycin (sirolimus) in suppressing the mTOR pathway associated hamartomas in dominantly inherited cancer family syndromes and angiotensin converting enzyme receptor blockers (ACE-RB) in preventing aortic dilatation in Marfan syndrome and related familial arteriopathies. The translational genomic research is the essential prerequisite for developing sound evidence-based diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic clinical protocols for the practice of personalised clinical medicine. PMID:21430336

Kumar, Dhavendra

2011-01-01

316

Music therapy with disorders of consciousness: current evidence and emergent evidence-based practice.  

PubMed

Patients with prolonged disorders of consciousness (PDOC) stemming from acquired brain injury present one of the most challenging clinical populations in neurological rehabilitation. Because of the complex clinical presentation of PDOC patients, treatment teams are confronted with many medicolegal, ethical, philosophical, moral, and religious issues in day-to-day care. Accurate diagnosis is of central concern, relying on creative approaches from skilled clinical professionals using combined behavioral and neurophysiological measures. This paper presents the latest evidence for using music as a diagnostic tool with PDOC, including recent developments in music therapy interventions and measurement. We outline standardized clinical protocols and behavioral measures to produce diagnostic outcomes and examine recent research illustrating a range of benefits of music-based methods at behavioral, cardiorespiratory, and cortical levels using video, electrocardiography, and electroencephalography methods. These latest developments are discussed in the context of evidence-based practice in rehabilitation with clinical populations. PMID:25773642

Magee, Wendy L; O'Kelly, Julian

2015-03-01

317

A Model-based Way of Searching for Weak Planetary Dynamos  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Determining the upper limits to dynamo related fields at the weakly magnetized planets is subject to challenges produced by the typically stronger fields from the external plasma interaction. The induced fields are often expected to have zero time averages (at least in the solar wind) provided orbital sampling is long enough. However, there are many variations in these fields that complicate the process. In addition, it may be that any weak internal field signature is more identifiable at locations other than periapsis where ionospheric and body-related induced currents are strongest. We use BATS-R-US MHD models of the Venus-solar wind interaction with and without weak internal dipole fields to illustrate these issues, and then apply what we learn to Venus data sets from PVO and VEX observations.

Luhmann, J. G.; Ma, Y.; Villarreal, M.; Zhang, T.-L.; Wei, H.

2013-09-01

318

eEvidence: Information Seeking Support for Evidence-based Practice: An Implementation Case Study  

PubMed Central

We propose to collect freely available articles from the web to build an evidence-based practice resource collection with up-to-date coverage, and then apply automated classification and key information extraction on the collected articles to provide means for sounder relevance judgments. We implement these features into a dual-interface system that allows users to choose between an active or passive information seeking process depending on the amount of time available. PMID:21347115

Zhao, Jin; Kan, Min-Yen; Procter, Paula M.; Zubaidah, Siti; Yip, Wai Kin; Li, Goh Mien

2010-01-01

319

Mental Health Provider Attitudes Toward Adoption of Evidence-Based Practice: The Evidence-Based Practice Attitude Scale (EBPAS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mental health provider attitudes toward organizational change have not been well studied. Dissemination and implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs) into real-world settings represent organizational change that may be limited or facilitated by provider attitudes toward adoption of new treatments, interventions, and practices. A brief measure of mental health provider attitudes toward adoption of EBPs was developed and attitudes were examined

Gregory A. Aarons

2004-01-01

320

Understanding the Evolution of NSAID: A Knowledge Domain Visualization Approach to Evidence-Based Medicine  

E-print Network

in the practice of Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM). In this article, we describe a knowledge domain visualization-basedUnderstanding the Evolution of NSAID: A Knowledge Domain Visualization Approach to Evidence-Based in the medical literature? What is the big picture of all the available evidence? Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM

Chen, Chaomei

321

Evidence-Based Special Education and Professional Wisdom: Putting It All Together  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There has been an increasing focus on evidence-based practices in special education with efforts underway to authoritatively identify those practices that are evidence based. However, the identification of evidence-based practices is only the beginning of the process of implementing evidence-based special education. The professional wisdom of…

Cook, Bryan G.; Tankersley, Melody; Harjusola-Webb, Sanna

2008-01-01

322

Evidence based medicine and extradigestive manifestations of Helicobacter pylori.  

PubMed

A putative pathogenetic role has been ascribed to Helicobacter pylori in several extradigestive diseases, including vascular (atherosclerosis and ischaemic heart disease, primary Raynaud phenomenon, primary headache), autoimmune (Sjögren's syndrome, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, autoimmune thyroiditis, idiopathic arrythmias, Parkinson's disease, nonarterial anterior optic ischemic neuropathy), and skin diseases (chronic idiopathic urticaria, rosacea, alopecia areata), sideropenic anemia, growth retardation, late menarche, extragastric MALT lymphoma, diabetes mellitus, hepatic encephalopathy, sudden infant death syndrome, and anorexia of aging. We examine critically the strength of the evidence linking these diseases to Helicobacter pylori, using ischaemic heart disease as an example of epidemiological techniques, and skin diseases as an example of treatment studies. By the standards of evidence-based medicine, studies have been often of low quality. The best evidence usually is not indicative of a role for Helicobacter pylori in these diseases. PMID:11233523

De Koster, E; De Bruyne, I; Langlet, P; Deltenre, M

2000-01-01

323

[Computer work and De Quervain's tenosynovitis: an evidence based approach].  

PubMed

The debate around the role of the work at personal computer as cause of De Quervain's Tenosynovitis was developed partially, without considering multidisciplinary available data. A systematic review of the literature, using an evidence-based approach, was performed. In disorders associated with the use of VDU, we must distinguish those at the upper limbs and among them those related to an overload. Experimental studies on the occurrence of De Quervain's Tenosynovitis are quite limited, as well as clinically are quite difficult to prove the professional etiology, considering the interference due to other activities of daily living or to the biological susceptibility (i.e. anatomical variability, sex, age, exercise). At present there is no evidence of any connection between De Quervain syndrome and time of use of the personal computer or keyboard, limited evidence of correlation is found with time using a mouse. No data are available regarding the use exclusively or predominantly for personal laptops or mobile "smart phone". PMID:23405595

Gigante, M R; Martinotti, I; Cirla, P E

2012-01-01

324

Strengths and limitations of evidence-based dermatology.  

PubMed

The need for understanding and reflecting on evidence-based dermatology (EBD) has never been greater given the exponential growth of new external evidence to inform clinical practice. Like any other branch of medicine, dermatologists need to acquire new skills in constructing answerable questions, efficiently searching electronic bibliographic databases, and critically appraising different types of studies. Secondary summaries of evidence in the form of systematic reviews (SR), that is, reviews that are conducted in a systematic, unbiased and explicit manner, reside at the top of the evidence hierarchy, because they are less prone to bias than traditional expert reviews. In addition to providing summaries of the best external evidence, systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are also powerful ways of identifying research gaps and ultimately setting the agenda of future clinical research in dermatology. But like any paradigm, EBD can have its limitations. Wrong application, misuse and overuse of EBD can have serious consequences. For example, mindless pooling together of data from dissimilar studies in a meta-analysis may render it a form of reductionism that does not make any sense. Similarly, even highly protocolised study designs such as SRs and RCTs are still susceptible to some degree of dishonesty and bias. Over-reliance on randomized controlled trials (RCT) may be inappropriate, as RCTs are not a good source for picking up rare but important adverse effects such as lupus syndrome with minocycline. A common criticism leveled against SRs is that these frequently conclude that there is lack of sufficient evidence to inform current clinical practice, but arguably, such a perception is grounded more on the interpretation of the SRs than anything else. The apparent absence of evidence should not paralyze the dermatologist to adopt a state of therapeutic nihilism. Poor primary data and an SR based on evidence that is not up-to-date are also limitations that can only improve with better primary studies and updated reviews such as those done by the Cochrane Collaboration. Most dermatologists are interested in integrating the best external evidence with the care of individual patients and have been practicing good EBD without realizing it. PMID:24700929

Williams, Hywel C

2014-03-01

325

Strengths and Limitations of Evidence-Based Dermatology  

PubMed Central

The need for understanding and reflecting on evidence-based dermatology (EBD) has never been greater given the exponential growth of new external evidence to inform clinical practice. Like any other branch of medicine, dermatologists need to acquire new skills in constructing answerable questions, efficiently searching electronic bibliographic databases, and critically appraising different types of studies. Secondary summaries of evidence in the form of systematic reviews (SR), that is, reviews that are conducted in a systematic, unbiased and explicit manner, reside at the top of the evidence hierarchy, because they are less prone to bias than traditional expert reviews. In addition to providing summaries of the best external evidence, systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are also powerful ways of identifying research gaps and ultimately setting the agenda of future clinical research in dermatology. But like any paradigm, EBD can have its limitations. Wrong application, misuse and overuse of EBD can have serious consequences. For example, mindless pooling together of data from dissimilar studies in a meta-analysis may render it a form of reductionism that does not make any sense. Similarly, even highly protocolised study designs such as SRs and RCTs are still susceptible to some degree of dishonesty and bias. Over-reliance on randomized controlled trials (RCT) may be inappropriate, as RCTs are not a good source for picking up rare but important adverse effects such as lupus syndrome with minocycline. A common criticism leveled against SRs is that these frequently conclude that there is lack of sufficient evidence to inform current clinical practice, but arguably, such a perception is grounded more on the interpretation of the SRs than anything else. The apparent absence of evidence should not paralyze the dermatologist to adopt a state of therapeutic nihilism. Poor primary data and an SR based on evidence that is not up-to-date are also limitations that can only improve with better primary studies and updated reviews such as those done by the Cochrane Collaboration. Most dermatologists are interested in integrating the best external evidence with the care of individual patients and have been practicing good EBD without realizing it. PMID:24700929

Williams, Hywel C

2014-01-01

326

The Notion of Evidence in Evidence-Based Practice by the Nursing Philosophy Working Group.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Addresses these questions: To what end is evidence sought? What is the nature of evidence? What kinds of evidence are valued by the nursing profession? and What kinds of evidence should underlie clinical decision making? (Contains 28 references.) (SK)

Romyn, Donna M.; Allen, Marion N.; Boschma, Geertje; Duncan, Susan M.; Edgecombe, Nancy; Jensen, Louise A.; Ross-Kerr, Janet C.; Marck, Patricia; Salsali, Mahvash; Tourangeau, Ann E.; Warnock, Fay

2003-01-01

327

Treatment of infantile spasms: an evidence-based approach.  

PubMed

The object of this work was to subject established empirical medical treatment regimens for infantile spasms to evidence-based medicine analysis in order to determine the current best practice for the treatment of infantile spasms in children. Clinical studies of infantile spasms reported during the presteroid era were reviewed critically to define the natural history of the disorder. Treatment trials of infantile spasms conducted since 1958 were rigorously assessed using MEDLINE and hand searches of the English language literature. Inclusion criteria were the documented presence of infantile spasms and hypsarrhythmia. Outcome measures included complete cessation of spasms, resolution of hypsarrhythmia, relapse rate, developmental outcome, the presence or absence of epilepsy, and/or an epileptiform electroencephalogram. Evidence was defined as class I, II, or III, and practice parameter recommendations were made using the framework devised by the American Academy of Neurology. Class I and III evidence support a standard of practice recommendation for the use of vigabatrin in the treatment of infantile spasms in children with tuberous sclerosis. Class I and III evidence support a guidelines recommendation for the use of either ACTH or vigabatrin in infantile spasms in nontuberous sclerosis patients. There is no strong evidence that successful treatment of infantile spasms improves the long-term prognosis for cognitive outcome or decreases the incidence of later epilepsy. A practice option recommendation for the use of oral corticosteroids in the treatment of infantile spasms is supported by limited and inconclusive class I and III data. Based on the evidence, no recommendation can be made for the use of pyridoxine, benzodiazepines, or the newer antiepileptic drugs in the treatment of infantile spasms. ACTH and vigabatrin are the most effective agents in the treatment of infantile spasms, but concerns remain about the risk/benefit profiles of these drugs. PMID:12040891

Mackay, Mark; Weiss, Shelly; Snead, O Carter

2002-01-01

328

Detection of weak transient signals based on wavelet packet transform and manifold learning for rolling element bearing fault diagnosis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The kurtogram-based methods have been proved powerful and practical to detect and characterize transient components in a signal. The basic idea of the kurtogram-based methods is to use the kurtosis as a measure to discover the presence of transient impulse components and to indicate the frequency band where these occur. However, the performance of the kurtogram-based methods is poor due to the low signal-to-noise ratio. As the weak transient signal with a wide spread frequency band can be easily masked by noise. Besides, selecting signal just in one frequency band will leave out some transient features. Aiming at these shortcomings, different frequency bands signal fusion is adopted in this paper. Considering that manifold learning aims at discovering the nonlinear intrinsic structure which embedded in high dimensional data, this paper proposes a waveform feature manifold (WFM) method to extract the weak signature from waveform feature space which obtained by binary wavelet packet transform. Minimum permutation entropy is used to select the optimal parameter in a manifold learning algorithm. A simulated bearing fault signal and two real bearing fault signals are used to validate the improved performance of the proposed method through the comparison with the kurtogram-based methods. The results show that the proposed method outperforms the kurtogram-based methods and is effective in weak signature extraction.

Wang, Yi; Xu, Guanghua; Liang, Lin; Jiang, Kuosheng

2015-03-01

329

Space-Time Correlation of Stable Boundary-Layer, Weak Wind Data from Ground Based Acoustic Sensors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present data collected using ground based acoustic sensing in order to connect near-surface motions including turbulence and sub-meso modes under stable, weak wind conditions to possible external forcing mechanisms from aloft. Under stable stratification and weak wind conditions the generation of the weak, intermittent turbulence is poorly understood, but critical to understanding and modeling the dispersion and diffusion of pollutants and other trace gases. Recent studies have suggested that the driving processes behind weak wind turbulence may include external forcing on the sub-meso scale. The forcing mechanisms may include gravity waves, 2 dimensional horizontal modes, solitons, or interactions between surface flow and low-level jets. Efforts to detect weak wind, sub-meso scale processes have failed so far due to a lack of sufficient spatial coverage necessary for capturing these events. This research has taken an unconventional observational approach by using a pair of SODAR (Sound Detection And Ranging) units. The SODARs have collected data on short time scales with a significant vertical (15 - 300 meters) and horizontal (200 - 1000 meters) coverage. The experiment took place on Oregon State University's Research Farms located roughly a mile to the east of OSU's campus. The site was chosen for its homogenous terrain which allowed the two SODAR's to be separated across the domain without their measurements being contaminated by influence from surface heterogeneity. The experiment has provided a data set comprised of more than 3 months of semi-continuous SODAR data. By making use of the Multi-resolution Decomposition method we will present results on the space-time correlations of the boundary-layer winds on multiple different time scales. The results will be a significant step towards improving the predictability of weak wind meanderings, identifying scaling parameters for sub-meso scale motions, and help to improve air quality and diffusion models.

Smoot, A. R.; Thomas, C. K.

2011-12-01

330

Miocene climate seasonality in southern India - first direct evidence for a weak Indian monsoon during the Middle Miocene Climate Optimum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Asian monsoon is an integral component of the global climate system. This large-scale atmospheric circulation comprises the East Asian summer and winter monsoon and the Indian monsoon subsystems, all characterized by seasonal reversing winds and precipitation changes associated with asymmetric heating of land and sea. The Neogene monsoon history is mainly reconstructed from chemical and physical weathering rates recorded in widely continuous marine sequences of the Indus Fan, Bengal Fan and South China Sea, which, depending on the source, physiography and sediment, indicate drier or wetter climates. These indirect climate proxies display an unusually dry period during the Middle Miocene Climate Optimum (MMCO, 16.5-15 Ma). As part of the FWF-projects P18189, P21414 and P23492, we present an Early/Middle Miocene coastal palynoflora record from the siliciclastic Ambalapuzha Formation at the coastal cliff of Varkala (Kerala Basin, SW India). Pollen assemblages and facies document a coastal wetland with mangrove vegetation. The Coexistence Approach was applied for palaeoclimatic reconstructions. This method uses climatic tolerances of all nearest living relatives known for a fossil flora by assuming that the tolerances of a fossil taxon are not significantly different from its modern counterpart. The maximum overlap of the environmental tolerances of all nearest living relatives (coexistence interval) is then regarded as being indicative of the most likely palaeoenvironment. By enquiring the Palaeoflora Database (http://www.palaeoflora.de/), the palaeoclimatic parameters of the pollen flora were calculated. The reconstructed climatic parameters for the MMCO show a seasonal precipitation pattern with a dry and a wet period and moderate rainfalls during the warmest period, which is comparable to the present day annual precipitation cycle in coastal Kerala, and affirms the presence of a monsoon-like atmospheric circulation over South India during the MMCO. However, the precipitation amounts during the wet (average 75%) and the warmest period (average 68%) were significantly reduced compared to today, while the rainfalls during the dry seasons are in the same order. This implies a weak Indian monsoon during the MMCO and a low thermal land - sea gradient between the Eurasian landmass and the Indian Ocean. Although a ~3°C warmer global climate during the MMCO and a weaker monsoon accounts for a higher near-surface air temperature during summer, the calculated mean annual temperature (MAT; 24.4°C) is 2.7°C lower than at present. The estimated warmest month temperature is, however, in the same range as today. Therefore, the low coldest month temperature (CMT; 20.6-22.8°C) in the Miocene has to account for the high MAT difference. This parameter represents the lower temperature threshold of the Varkala flora, and displays only the minimum temperature during the coldest month, which is significantly lower than the average CMT. Accordingly, the Miocene CMT approximates the present 24-h minimum temperature during the coldest month in Kerala (22.4°C). The reconstructed seasonal temperature cycle supports climate models, which suggest a higher temperature increase in mid-latitudes than in low-latitudes as well as warmer equatorial sea surface temperatures during the MMCO.

Piller, W. E.; Reuter, M.; Kern, A. K.; Harzhauser, M.

2012-04-01

331

Fault zone fabric and fault weakness.  

PubMed

Geological and geophysical evidence suggests that some crustal faults are weak compared to laboratory measurements of frictional strength. Explanations for fault weakness include the presence of weak minerals, high fluid pressures within the fault core and dynamic processes such as normal stress reduction, acoustic fluidization or extreme weakening at high slip velocity. Dynamic weakening mechanisms can explain some observations; however, creep and aseismic slip are thought to occur on weak faults, and quasi-static weakening mechanisms are required to initiate frictional slip on mis-oriented faults, at high angles to the tectonic stress field. Moreover, the maintenance of high fluid pressures requires specialized conditions and weak mineral phases are not present in sufficient abundance to satisfy weak fault models, so weak faults remain largely unexplained. Here we provide laboratory evidence for a brittle, frictional weakening mechanism based on common fault zone fabrics. We report on the frictional strength of intact fault rocks sheared in their in situ geometry. Samples with well-developed foliation are extremely weak compared to their powdered equivalents. Micro- and nano-structural studies show that frictional sliding occurs along very fine-grained foliations composed of phyllosilicates (talc and smectite). When the same rocks are powdered, frictional strength is high, consistent with cataclastic processes. Our data show that fault weakness can occur in cases where weak mineral phases constitute only a small percentage of the total fault rock and that low friction results from slip on a network of weak phyllosilicate-rich surfaces that define the rock fabric. The widespread documentation of foliated fault rocks along mature faults in different tectonic settings and from many different protoliths suggests that this mechanism could be a viable explanation for fault weakening in the brittle crust. PMID:20016599

Collettini, Cristiano; Niemeijer, André; Viti, Cecilia; Marone, Chris

2009-12-17

332

Meta-Analyses and Orthodontic Evidence-Based Clinical Practice in the 21st Century  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Aim of this systematic review was to assess the orthodontic related issues which currently provide the best evidence as documented by meta-analyses, by critically evaluating and discussing the methodology used in these studies. Material and Methods: Several electronic databases were searched and handsearching was also performed in order to identify the corresponding meta-analyses investigating orthodontic related subjects. In total, 197 studies were retrieved initially. After applying specific inclusion and exclusion criteria, 27 articles were identified as meta-analyses treating orthodontic-related subjects. Results: Many of these 27 papers presented sufficient quality and followed appropriate meta-analytic approaches to quantitatively synthesize data and presented adequately supported evidence. However, the methodology used in some of them presented weaknesses, limitations or deficiencies. Consequently, the topics in orthodontics which currently provide the best evidence, include some issues related to Class II or Class III treatment, treatment of transverse problems, external apical root resorption, dental anomalies, such as congenital missing teeth and tooth transposition, frequency of severe occlusal problems, nickel hypersensitivity, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, and computer-assisted learning in orthodontic education. Conclusions: Only a few orthodontic related issues have been so far investigated by means of MAs. In addition, for some of these issues investigated in the corresponding MAs no definite conclusions could be drawn, due to significant methodological deficiencies of these studies. According to this investigation, it can be concluded that at the begin of the 21st century there is evidence for only a few orthodontic related issues as documented by meta-analyses, and more well-conducted high quality research studies are needed to produce strong evidence in order to support evidence-based clinical practice in orthodontics. PMID:21673839

Papadopoulos, Moschos A.

2010-01-01

333

Therapeutic management of anal eczema: an evidence-based review  

PubMed Central

Aim To conduct a systematic review of treatments for anal eczema (AE). Methods We conducted a Medline search for clinical trial data for the treatment of perianal diseases including AE, including papers not published in the English language. We assessed the study reports using the system recommended by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine. No meta-analysis was attempted. Results The evidence base for topical treatments used to treat AE is very poor: there are very few studies and many of those that exist are of poor quality. The best evidence was found for medications that are yet to be licensed for AE. Among products with existing licences for the treatment of eczema, our assessment found some evidence to support the continued use of mild-to-moderate corticosteroids first line in most patients. Discussion Features of the perianal region, and the fact that it is almost always occluded, mean that not all medications recommended in the general treatment guidelines for eczema are appropriate for AE. However, there are no specific treatment guidelines for these patients. This may in part be because of the lack of high-quality evidence-based medicine in this therapy area. Many frequently prescribed medications were developed and licensed many years ago, in an era when clinical trial design was not expected to be as rigorous as it is today. Conclusion This review highlights the need to conduct more high-quality clinical trials in patients with AE in order that specific guidelines for the management of this difficult proctological condition can be prepared. PMID:24898365

Havlickova, B; Weyandt, G H

2014-01-01

334

Promoting consumers' demand for evidence-based medicine.  

PubMed

The widespread implementation of rationing and priority-setting policies in health care opposes the stochastic practice of medicine induced by professional uncertainty and professional vested interests in market-oriented clinical environments. It also clashes with consumers' overly optimistic and "mythical" view of the effectiveness of medicine, which is bound to support a potentially unlimited provision of health services. Thus, for consumers and society at large, it is necessary to create conditions favorable for a more conscious demand of evidence-based health care. In pursuit of this goal, we suggest the adoption of a community-oriented strategy based upon delivery of information to the public in order a) to generate greater awareness ("healthy skepticism") among consumers, through disclosure of data on the true effectiveness of health care interventions and on the existing variation in their utilization, and b) to provide tools to empower consumers in dealing better with both the uncertainty in their own individual patient-physician relationships and with the health policy issues to be faced in the future. Such a community-oriented strategy could also reinforce and support, through the generation of a "bottom-up" pressure from consumers toward physicians, a wider adoption of evidence-based interventions by health care professionals. This paper, using data from surveys on public opinions and attitudes toward the practice of medicine, focuses on how consumer demand for more evidence-based medical practice can be promoted. PMID:9509798

Domenighetti, G; Grilli, R; Liberati, A

1998-01-01

335

Management of REM sleep behavior disorder: An evidence based review  

PubMed Central

Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is characterized by dream enactment behavior resulting from a loss of REM skeletal muscle atonia. The neurobiology of REM sleep and the characteristic features of REM atonia have an important basis for understanding the aggravating etiologies the proposed pharmacological interventions in its management. This review outlines the evidence for behavioral and therapeutic measures along with evidence-based guidelines for their implementation, impact on falls, and effect on polysomnography (PSG) while highlighting the non-motor, autonomic, and cognitive impact of this entity. PubMed databases were reviewed upto May 2013 in peer-reviewed scientific literature regarding the pathophysiology and management of RBD in adults. The literature was graded according to the Oxford centre of evidence-based Medicine Levels. An early intervention that helps prevent consequences such as falls and provides a base for intervention with neuroprotective mechanisms and allocates a unique platform that RBD portrays with its high risk of disease conversion with a sufficiently long latency. RBD provides a unique platform with its high risk of disease conversion with a sufficiently long latency, providing an opportunity for early intervention both to prevent consequences such as falls and provide a base for intervention with neuroprotective mechanisms. PMID:25745301

Devnani, Preeti; Fernandes, Racheal

2015-01-01

336

Psychodynamic psychotherapies: evidence-based practice and clinical wisdom.  

PubMed

This article is based on an exhaustive review of the psychotherapy outcomes literature, undertaken originally at the instigation of the UK Department of Health by Roth and Fonagy (Department of Health, 1995). We have recently updated this review (Fonagy, Target, Cottrell, Phillips, & Kurtz, 2002; Roth & Fonagy, 2004) and extended it to identify all studies of psychoanalytic psychotherapy. The usual methods for identifying studies were employed (Fonagy, Target, et al., 2002; Roth & Fonagy, in press). The key questions that should be asked of this literature given the current state of research in this area (also see Westen, Morrison, & Thompson-Brenner, 2004) are: Are there any disorders for which short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP) can be considered evidence-based, Are there any disorders for which STPP is uniquely effective as either the only evidence-based treatment or as a treatment that is more effective than alternatives, and Is there any evidence base for long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (LTPP) either in terms of achieving effects not normally associated with short-term treatment or addressing problems that have not been addressed by STPP? In this context, short-term therapy is conceived of as a treatment of around 20 sessions delivered usually once weekly. PMID:15899755

Fonagy, Peter; Roth, Anthony; Higgitt, Anna

2005-01-01

337

Continuing to challenge practice to be evidence based.  

PubMed

Practice habits continue in clinical practice despite the availability of research and other forms of evidence that should be used to guide critical care practice interventions. This article is based on a presentation at the 2014 National Teaching Institute of the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses. The article is part of a series of articles that challenge critical care nurses to examine the evidence guiding nursing practice interventions. Four common practice interventions are reviewed: (1) weight-based medication administration, (2) chest tube patency maintenance, (3) daily interruption of sedation, and (4) use of chest physiotherapy in children. For weight-based administration of medication, the patient's actual weight should be measured, rather than using an estimate. The therapeutic effectiveness and dosages of medications used in obese patients must be critically evaluated. Maintaining patency of chest tubes does not require stripping and milking, which probably do more harm than good. Daily interruption of sedation and judicious use of sedatives are appropriate in most patients receiving mechanical ventilation. Traditional chest physiotherapy does not help children with pneumonia, bronchiolitis, or asthma and does not prevent atelectasis after extubation. Critical care nurses are challenged to evaluate their individual practice and to adopt current evidence-based practice interventions into their daily practice. PMID:25834007

Makic, Mary Beth Flynn; Rauen, Carol; Jones, Kimmith; Fisk, Anna C

2015-04-01

338

Evidence-based practice, step by step: asking the clinical question: a key step in evidence-based practice.  

PubMed

This is the third article in a series from the Arizona State University College of Nursing and Health Innovation's Center for the Advancement of Evidence-Based Practice. Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a problem-solving approach to the delivery of health care that integrates the best evidence from studies and patient care data with clinician expertise and patient preferences and values. When delivered in a context of caring and in a supportive organizational culture, the highest quality of care and best patient outcomes can be achieved.The purpose of this series is to give nurses the knowledge and skills they need to implement EBP consistently, one step at a time. Articles will appear every two months to allow you time to incorporate information as you work toward implementing EBP at your institution. Also, we've scheduled "Ask the Authors" call-ins every few months to provide a direct line to the experts to help you resolve questions. Details about how to participate in the next call will be published with May's Evidence-Based Practice, Step by Step. PMID:20179464

Stillwell, Susan B; Fineout-Overholt, Ellen; Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek; Williamson, Kathleen M

2010-03-01

339

Evidence-based health care management: what is the research evidence available for health care managers?  

PubMed

In light of increasing interest in evidence-based management, we conducted a scoping review of systematic reviews (SRs) and meta-analyses (MAs) to determine the availability and accessibility of evidence for health care managers; 14 MAs and 61 SRs met the inclusion criteria. Most reviews appeared in medical journals (53%), originated in the United States (29%) or United Kingdom (22%), were hospital-based (55%), and targeted clinical providers (55%). Topics included health services organization (34%), quality/patient safety (17%), information technology (15%), organization/workplace management (13%), and health care workforce (12%). Most reviews addressed clinical topics of relevance to managers; management-related interventions were rare. The management issues were mostly classified as operational (65%). Surprisingly, 96.5% of search results were not on target. A better classification within PubMed is needed to increase the accessibility of meaningful resources and facilitate evidence retrieval. Health care journals should take initiatives encouraging the publication of reviews in relevant management areas. PMID:24296471

Jaana, Mirou; Vartak, Smruti; Ward, Marcia M

2014-09-01

340

Evidence-Based Staff Training: A Guide for Practitioners  

PubMed Central

Behavior analysts in human service agencies are commonly expected to train support staff as one of their job duties. Traditional staff training is usually didactic in nature and generally has not proven particularly effective. We describe an alternative, evidence-based approach for training performance skills to human service staff. The description includes a specific means of conducting a behavioral skills training session with a group of staff followed by on-the-job training requirements. A brief case demonstration then illustrates application of the training approach and its apparent effectiveness for training staff in two distinct skill sets: use of most-to-least prompting within teaching procedures and use of manual signs. Practical issues associated with applying evidence-based behavioral training are presented with a focus on providing training that is effective, efficient, and acceptable to staff trainees. PMID:23730462

Parsons, Marsha B.; Rollyson, Jeannia H.; Reid, Dennis H.

2012-01-01

341

Evidence-based assessment of depression in adults.  

PubMed

From diverse perspectives, there is little doubt that depressive symptoms cohere to form a valid and distinct syndrome. Research indicates that an evidence-based assessment of depression would include (a) measures with adequate psychometric properties; (b) adequate coverage of symptoms; (c) adequate coverage of depressed mood, anhedonia, and suicidality; (d) an approach to suicidality that distinguishes between resolved plans and preparations and desire and ideation; (e) assessment of the atypical, seasonal, and melancholic subtypes; (f) parameters of course and chronicity; and (g) comorbidity and bipolarity. These complexities need to be accounted for when certain assessment approaches are preferred, and when ambiguity exists regarding the categorical versus dimensional nature of depression, and whether and when clinician ratings outperform self-report. The authors conclude that no one extant procedure is ideal and suggest that the combination of certain interviews and self-report scales represents the state of the art for evidence-based assessment of depression. PMID:16262453

Joiner, Thomas E; Walker, Rheeda L; Pettit, Jeremy W; Perez, Marisol; Cukrowicz, Kelly C

2005-09-01

342

Single-Subject Experimental Design for Evidence-Based Practice  

PubMed Central

Purpose Single-subject experimental designs (SSEDs) represent an important tool in the development and implementation of evidence-based practice in communication sciences and disorders. The purpose of this article is to review the strategies and tactics of SSEDs and their application in speech-language pathology research. Method The authors discuss the requirements of each design, followed by advantages and disadvantages. The logic and methods for evaluating effects in SSED are reviewed as well as contemporary issues regarding data analysis with SSED data sets. Examples of challenges in executing SSEDs are included. Specific exemplars of how SSEDs have been used in speech-language pathology research are provided throughout. Conclusion SSED studies provide a flexible alternative to traditional group designs in the development and identification of evidence-based practice in the field of communication sciences and disorders. PMID:23071200

Byiers, Breanne J.; Reichle, Joe; Symons, Frank J.

2014-01-01

343

An Evidence-based Elective on Dietary Supplements  

PubMed Central

Objective To implement and evaluate the effectiveness of a pharmacy elective on dietary supplements that emphasized evidence-based care. Design A 3-credit elective that employed both traditional lectures and a variety of active-learning exercises was implemented. The course introduction provided a background in dietary supplement use and evidence-based medicine principles before addressing dietary supplements by primary indication. Assessment Student learning was assessed through quizzes, case assignments, discussion board participation, and completion of a longitudinal group project. Precourse and postcourse surveys were conducted to assess students' opinions, knowledge, and skills related to course objectives. Conclusion The course was an effective way to increase students' knowledge of dietary supplements and skills and confidence in providing patient care in this area. PMID:19777095

Caron, Whitney; Zeolla, Mario

2009-01-01

344

Telehealth for underserved families: an evidence-based parenting program.  

PubMed

Families with a child diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder completed an 8-session parenting program, the Group Triple P Positive Parenting Program, provided by videoconferencing technology. Families reported improved child behavior (effect size of d = -1.23) and decreased parent distress (d = -0.34). Parent training implemented with videoconferencing technology can be an effective way of delivering evidence-based services to families with specialized needs. PMID:22867126

Reese, Robert J; Slone, Norah C; Soares, Neelkamal; Sprang, Rob

2012-08-01

345

Evidence-Based Psychological Treatments for Insomnia in Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The review describes evidence-based psychological treatments (EBTs) for insomnia in older adults. Following coding procedures developed by the American Psychological Association's Committee on Science and Practice of the Society for Clinical Psychology, two treatments were found to meet EBT criteria: sleep restriction–sleep compression therapy and multicomponent cognitive–behavioral therapy. One additional treatment (stimulus control therapy) partially met criteria, but further corroborating

Susan M. McCurry; Rebecca G. Logsdon; Linda Teri; Michael V. Vitiello

2007-01-01

346

[Vegetarian diets and cardiovascular health: evidence-based and pondering].  

PubMed

The correlation between vegetarian diets and cardiovascular health is always one of the hotspots. Many scholars have performed so many clinical researches all over the world, providing evidence-based medicine (EBM) reference for clarifying their correlation. In this paper, we raise ideas and expectation on the basis of a Meta-analysis about vegetarian diets and blood pressure (published on JAMA Internal Medicine in Feb 2014) in combination of main clinical research literature in this field in recent 20 years. PMID:25046943

Chen, Keji; Liu, Yue

2014-06-01

347

Practitioner Attitudes Toward Evidence-based Practice: Themes and Challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

 Abstract  The widespread successful implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs) into community mental health settings will require\\u000a a thorough understanding of practitioner attitudes toward these approaches. This study reports on the results of two community\\u000a mental health practitioner focus groups investigating attitudes toward EBPs, perceived challenges to implementing EBPs, and\\u000a recommendations for researchers interested in facilitating EBP use in community settings. The

Timothy D. Nelson; Ric G. Steele; Jennifer A. Mize

2006-01-01

348

Meniere's disease: an evidence based approach to assessment and management.  

PubMed

Menière's disease (MD) is frequently over-diagnosed in both primary and secondary care. This is unfortunate given the significant medical and social implications of such a diagnosis. Difficulties may arise in differentiating the patient with true MD from those individuals with less clearly defined disorders of cochleo-vestibular function. In this review, we suggest a practical evidence based approach to assessment and management of the patient with MD. PMID:22257041

Syed, I; Aldren, C

2012-02-01

349

Evidence-Based Family-School Interventions with Preschool Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fifteen studies of family-school interventions with preschool children conducted between 1980 and 2002, and published in peer-reviewed journals, were reviewed and evaluated according to the criteria developed by the Task Force on Evidence-Based Intervention in School Psychology (Division 16 and Society for the Study of School Psychology Task Force, 2003). Results indicate that family-school interventions with preschool children have taken

Stacey L. Bates

2005-01-01

350

Evidence-Based Psychosocial Treatments for Ethnic Minority Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews research on evidence-based treatments (EBTs) for ethnic minority youth using criteria from Chambless et al. (1998), Chambless et al. (1996), and Chambless and Hollon (1998). Although no well-established treatments were identified, probably efficacious or possibly efficacious treatments were found for ethnic minority youth with anxiety-related problems, attention-deficit\\/hyperactivity disorder, depression, conduct problems, substance use problems, trauma-related syndromes, and

Stanley J. Huey Jr; Antonio J. Polo

2008-01-01

351

Social media, evidence-based tweeting, and JCEHP.  

PubMed

Medical practice and medical journals must adapt to a constantly changing environment, in which social media plays an ever-increasing role. Social media platforms such as Twitter can provide an opportunity to disseminate information in innovative ways. The concept of evidence-based tweeting is introduced, especially as "tweeting the meeting" continues to expand within medical conferences and other venues important for continuing education for health care providers. Future social media strategies for the journal are outlined. PMID:25530289

Djuricich, Alexander M

2014-01-01

352

Evidence-based Treatment of Chronic Heart Failure  

Microsoft Academic Search

The past two decades have seen a knowledge explosion in the field of cardiovascular diseases, in general, and in the understanding\\u000a of chronic heart failure (HF) as a complex neurohumoral syndrome in particular. A new staging system for chronic HF has been\\u000a developed within the last decade to facilitate the evidence-based prescription of medications and medical devices for each\\u000a of

David Rosen; Matthew V. Decaro; Mark G. Graham

2007-01-01

353

Using motivational interviewing: through evidence-based health coaching.  

PubMed

To enhance compliance and achieve better outcomes, providers must actively engage their patients and caregivers in different ways than in the past. One strategy that has gained national attention is motivational interviewing through evidence-based health coaching. A closer look at this exciting new clinical skill reveals what it is, how it works, why it is so successful, and why our traditional patient approach has fallen short. PMID:25268529

Huffman, Melinda

2014-10-01

354

Creating an evidence-based practice environment: one hospital's journey.  

PubMed

There is increasing effort in promoting evidence-based practice (EBP) that supports the best possible care to patients and families. This article describes essential concepts for developing an environment of EBP and its implementation at a large pediatric hospital. Essential components for creating an EBP environment include vision, engagement, integration, and evaluation. An institutional initiative to decrease procedure-related pain demonstrates how EBP is used to improve clinical care. PMID:17563590

Hockenberry, Marilyn; Walden, Marlene; Brown, Terri; Barrera, Patrick

2007-01-01

355

Evidence-based approach to harmonised reference intervals.  

PubMed

Although we are in the era of evidence-based medicine, there is still a substantial gap between theory and current practice with the application of reference intervals as decision making tools. Different laboratories may have different reference intervals for the same tests using the same analytical methods and platforms. These differences have the potential to confuse physicians making the assessment and monitoring of patients more difficult by providing discordant information. This paper attempts to demonstrate how to use evidence-based approach for harmonising reference intervals. In order to consider harmonisation we must first have an appreciation of the various factors that influence the determination of that reference interval such as the choice of individuals within the population studied, biological variability of the analyte studied, partitioning, sample collection, analytical aspects such as bias and statistical models. An a priori approach for determining reference intervals, whilst recommended, may be beyond the scope of most laboratories and consideration should be given to the use of a validated indirect a posteriori approach. Regardless of method used, the continuing application of an evidence-based approach in harmonised reference intervals to meet the quality expectations of physicians should be pursued. PMID:24183842

Koerbin, Gus; Sikaris, Ken Andrew; Jones, Graham Ross Dallas; Ryan, Julie; Reed, Maxine; Tate, Jill

2014-05-15

356

Evidence-based Assessment in Pediatric Psychology: Family Measures  

PubMed Central

Objective?To provide a review of the evidence base of family measures relevant to pediatric psychology.?Method?Twenty-nine family measures were selected based upon endorsement by Division 54 listserv members, expert judgment, and literature review. Spanning observational and self-report methods, the measures fell into three broad assessment categories: Family functioning, Dyadic family relationships, and Family functioning in the context of childhood chronic health conditions. Measures were categorized as: “Well-established”, “Approaching well-established”, or “Promising.”?Results?Nineteen measures met “well-established” criteria and the remaining ten were “approaching well-established.” “Well-established” measures were documented for each of the broad assessment categories named above.?Conclusions?Many measures deemed “well-established” in the general population are proving to be reliable and useful in pediatric samples. More evidence of the validity of family measures is needed in this context. This review should prove helpful to clinicians and researchers as they strive to make evidence-based decisions regarding family measures. PMID:17905801

Fiese, Barbara H.; Gold, Jeffrey I.; Cutuli, J. J.; Holmbeck, Grayson N.; Goldbeck, Lutz; Chambers, Christine T.; Abad, Mona; Spetter, Dante; Patterson, Joän

2008-01-01

357

The Determination of the pKaof Multiprotic, Weak Acids by Analyzing Potentiometric Acid Base Titration Data with Difference Plots  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the pKa determination of mono-, di-, and triprotic weak acids with the help of difference (Bjerrum) plots, and the effect of strong acid base concentration errors, ligand weight errors, and nonlinear electrode response. Experimental examples are given for the titration of an acidic heterocycle, as well as glycine, ethylenediamine, and tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (the last two after addition of

Arno Kraft

2003-01-01

358

A redox-controllable molecular switch based on weak recognition of BPX26C6 at a diphenylurea station.  

PubMed

The Na+ ion-assisted recognition of urea derivatives by BPX26C6 has allowed the construction of a redox-controllable [2]rotaxane-type molecular switch based on two originally very weakly interacting host/guest systems. Using NOBF4 to oxidize the triarylamine terminus into a corresponding radical cation attracted the macrocyclic component toward its adjacent carbamate station; subsequent addition of Zn powder moved the macrocyclic component back to its urea station. PMID:25621422

Chang, Jia-Cheng; Lai, Chien-Chen; Chiu, Sheng-Hsien

2015-01-01

359

Making research relevant: if it is an evidence-based practice, where's the practice-based evidence?  

PubMed

The usual search for explanations and solutions for the research-practice gap tends to analyze ways to communicate evidence-based practice guidelines to practitioners more efficiently and effectively from the end of a scientific pipeline. This examination of the pipeline looks upstream for ways in which the research itself is rendered increasingly irrelevant to the circumstances of practice by the process of vetting the research before it can qualify for inclusion in systematic reviews and the practice guidelines derived from them. It suggests a 'fallacy of the pipeline' implicit in one-way conceptualizations of translation, dissemination and delivery of research to practitioners. Secondly, it identifies a 'fallacy of the empty vessel' implicit in the assumptions underlying common characterizations of the practitioner as a recipient of evidence-based guidelines. Remedies are proposed that put emphasis on participatory approaches and more practice-based production of the research and more attention to external validity in the peer review, funding, publication and systematic reviews of research in producing evidence-based guidelines. PMID:18794201

Green, Lawrence W

2008-12-01

360

Detection of weak forces based on noise-activated switching in bistable optomechanical systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose to use cavity optomechanical systems in the regime of optical bistability for the detection of weak harmonic forces. Due to the optomechanical coupling an external force on the mechanical oscillator modulates the resonance frequency of the cavity and consequently the switching rates between the two bistable branches. A large difference in the cavity output fields then leads to a strongly amplified homodyne signal. We determine the switching rates as a function of the cavity detuning from extensive numerical simulations of the stochastic master equation as appropriate for continuous homodyne detection. We develop a two-state rate equation model that quantitatively describes the slow switching dynamics. This model is solved analytically in the presence of a weak harmonic force to obtain approximate expressions for the power gain and signal-to-noise ratio that we then compare to force detection with an optomechanical system in the linear regime.

Aldana, Samuel; Bruder, Christoph; Nunnenkamp, Andreas

2014-12-01

361

Neuropsychology 3.0: Evidence-Based Science and Practice  

PubMed Central

Neuropsychology is poised for transformations of its concepts and methods, leveraging advances in neuroimaging, the human genome project, psychometric theory, and information technologies. It is argued that a paradigm shift towards evidence-based science and practice can be enabled by innovations, including: (1) formal definition of neuropsychological concepts and tasks in cognitive ontologies; (2) creation of collaborative neuropsychological knowledgebases; and (3) design of web-based assessment methods that permit free development, large-sample implementation, and dynamic refinement of neuropsychological tests and the constructs these aim to assess. This article considers these opportunities, highlights selected obstacles, and offers suggestions for stepwise progress towards these goals. PMID:21092355

Bilder, Robert M.

2011-01-01

362

Treating bipolar disorder. Evidence-based guidelines for family medicine.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To provide an evidence-based summary of medications commonly used for bipolar disorders and a practical approach to managing bipolar disorders in the office. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Articles from 1990 to 2003 were selected from MEDLINE using the key words "bipolar disorder," "antiepileptics," "antipsychotics," "antidepressants," and "mood stabilizers." Good-quality evidence for many of these treatments comes from randomized trials. Lithium, divalproex, carbamazepine, lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, and some novel antipsychotics all have level I evidence for treating various aspects of the disorder. MAIN MESSAGE: Treatment of bipolar disorder involves three therapeutic domains: acute mania, acute depression, and maintenance. Lithium has been a mainstay of treatment for some time, but antiepileptic drugs like divalproex, carbamazepine, and lamotrigine, along with novel antipsychotic drugs like olanzapine, risperidone, and quetiapine, alone or in combination, are increasingly being used successfully to treat acute mania and to maintain mood stability. CONCLUSION: Bipolar disorder is more common in family practice than previously believed. Drug treatments for this complex disorder have evolved rapidly over the past decade, radically changing its management. Treatment now tends to be very successful. PMID:15318676

McIntyre, Roger S.; Mancini, Deborah A.; Lin, Peter; Jordan, John

2004-01-01

363

Current Treatment of Toxoplasma Retinochoroiditis: An Evidence-Based Review  

PubMed Central

Objective. To perform an evidence-based review of treatments for Toxoplasma retinochoroiditis (TRC). Methods. A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed database and the key phrase “ocular toxoplasmosis treatment” and the filter for “controlled clinical trial” and “randomized clinical trial” as well as OVID medline (1946 to May week 2 2014) using the keyword ‘‘ocular toxoplasmosis”. The included studies were used to evaluate the various treatment modalities of TRC. Results. The electronic search yielded a total of 974 publications of which 44 reported on the treatment of ocular toxoplasmosis. There were 9 randomized controlled studies and an additional 3 comparative studies on the treatment of acute TRC with systemic or intravitreous antibiotics or on reducing the recurrences of TRC. Endpoints of studies included visual acuity improvement, inflammatory response, lesion size changes, recurrences of lesions, and adverse effects of medications. Conclusions. There was conflicting evidence as to the effectiveness of systemic antibiotics for TRC. There is no evidence to support that one antibiotic regimen is superior to another so choice needs to be informed by the safety profile. Intravitreous clindamycin with dexamethasone seems to be as effective as systemic treatments. There is currently level I evidence that intermittent trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prevents recurrence of the disease. PMID:25197557

Carvounis, Petros E.

2014-01-01

364

Integration of Evidence Base into a Probabilistic Risk Assessment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

INTRODUCTION: A probabilistic decision support model such as the Integrated Medical Model (IMM) utilizes an immense amount of input data that necessitates a systematic, integrated approach for data collection, and management. As a result of this approach, IMM is able to forecasts medical events, resource utilization and crew health during space flight. METHODS: Inflight data is the most desirable input for the Integrated Medical Model. Non-attributable inflight data is collected from the Lifetime Surveillance for Astronaut Health study as well as the engineers, flight surgeons, and astronauts themselves. When inflight data is unavailable cohort studies, other models and Bayesian analyses are used, in addition to subject matters experts input on occasion. To determine the quality of evidence of a medical condition, the data source is categorized and assigned a level of evidence from 1-5; the highest level is one. The collected data reside and are managed in a relational SQL database with a web-based interface for data entry and review. The database is also capable of interfacing with outside applications which expands capabilities within the database itself. Via the public interface, customers can access a formatted Clinical Findings Form (CLiFF) that outlines the model input and evidence base for each medical condition. Changes to the database are tracked using a documented Configuration Management process. DISSCUSSION: This strategic approach provides a comprehensive data management plan for IMM. The IMM Database s structure and architecture has proven to support additional usages. As seen by the resources utilization across medical conditions analysis. In addition, the IMM Database s web-based interface provides a user-friendly format for customers to browse and download the clinical information for medical conditions. It is this type of functionality that will provide Exploratory Medicine Capabilities the evidence base for their medical condition list. CONCLUSION: The IMM Database in junction with the IMM is helping NASA aerospace program improve the health care and reduce risk for the astronauts crew. Both the database and model will continue to expand to meet customer needs through its multi-disciplinary evidence based approach to managing data. Future expansion could serve as a platform for a Space Medicine Wiki of medical conditions.

Saile, Lyn; Lopez, Vilma; Bickham, Grandin; Kerstman, Eric; FreiredeCarvalho, Mary; Byrne, Vicky; Butler, Douglas; Myers, Jerry; Walton, Marlei

2011-01-01

365

The Development of a Research Template to Assist Music Therapy Clinicians in Evidence-Based Practice  

E-print Network

One of the most prevalent trends in healthcare today is the movement toward evidence-based practice. Evidence-based practice requires that health care providers base their treatment decisions not only on their own professional experiences...

Edwards, Robin

2009-04-23

366

Evidence-Based Practice in Group Care: The Effects of Policy, Research, and Organizational Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes the effect of a province-wide vision of evidence-based and outcome-based services for children and youth and the challenges of implementing evidence-based practice (EBP) and evidence-based treatment (EBT) approaches within group care settings. The paper is based on the results of a survey of group care settings in the…

Stuart, Carol; Sanders, Larry; Gurevich, Maria; Fulton, Robert

2011-01-01

367

[Evidence based surgery of cancer of head of pancreas].  

PubMed

Physicians and surgeons who treat patients with gastrointestinal or hepatic disease must prescribe the most appropriate diagnostic tests, together with an accurate prognosis and effective and safe therapy. This paper examines the best modalities of surgical treatment for cancer of the pancreas, in an evidence-based approach. Evidence was classified as follows: Grade A : evidence from large randomized controlled trials (RCT) or systematic reviews (including meta-analyses) of multiple randomized trials which collectively have at least as much data as one single well-defined trial. Grade B: evidence from at least one high-quality study of non-randomized cohorts or evidence from at least one high-quality case-control study or one high-quality case series. Grade C: opinions from experts without references or access to any of the foregoing The data were obtained from Medline and from controlled randomized trials listed in the Cochrane Library up to the end of 2003. Two series (grade B) showed the superiority of Whipple over total pancreatectomy, with respective median survival times of 12.6 months and 9.6 months. Extensive lymphadenectomy (grade A) in patients with positive lymph nodes gave significantly better survival than standard resection in one trial, but this was not confirmed in the other trial. Results of pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PPPD) were not different from those of the Whipple procedure on postoperative mortality, morbidity or survival (grade A). Portal vein resection increased the resectability rate. Post-operative mortality was not increased: survival was not different in four studies and was shorter in another four studies (grade C). Low-dose postoperative erythromycin accelerates gastric emptying if the right gastric artery is preserved (grade A). One trial suggests that pancreaticogastrostomy reduces the risk of pancreatic fistula. The two other trials are controversial and showed no difference. One prospective non randomized study showed that stenting in pancreaticojejunostomy reduces the risk of pancreatic fistulae and intraabdominal abscess. To prevent this risk of pancreatic fistula, six controlled trials involving patients receiving octreotride were performed Three European trials showed a smaller volume of abdominal drainage fluid and an abnormal amylase concentration; however, two American trials failed to demonstrate a significant difference. Occlusion of the pancreatic duct with fibrin glue did not reduce the risk of pancreatic fistula, but increased the risk of developing diabetes. Intraabdominal drainage after pancreatic resection significantly increased post-operative complications (grade A). Surgical resection and reconstruction procedures for pancreatic cancer must be based on evidence-based studies. However, the most important prognostic factor is the surgeon's experience, not only with regard to the post-operative course, but also survival. Specific teaching and training is thus essential. PMID:15656235

Launois, Bernard; Huguier, Michel

2004-01-01

368

Perspectives--A Problem in Our Field: Making Distinctions between Evidence-Based Treatment and Evidence-Based Practice as a Decision-Making Process  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors contend that the term "evidence-based treatment" (EBT) is often used synonymously with the term "evidence-based practice" (EBP) without making an important distinction. If a practitioner is applying an EBT, it should not be assumed that one is "practicing" the evidence. Within the infant-family and early childhood field, this confusion…

Brandt, Kristie; Diel, James; Feder, Joshua; Lillas, Connie

2012-01-01

369

Cochrane Lecture 1997. What evidence do we need for evidence based medicine?  

PubMed Central

As presently understood, evidence based medicine aims to advance practice from its traditional unverifiable mix of art and science to rational use of measurable inputs and outputs. In practice, however, its advocates accept uncritically a desocialised definition of science, assume that major clinical decisions are taken at the level of secondary specialist rather than primary generalist care, and ignore the multiple nature of most clinical problems, as well as the complexity of social problems within which clinical problems arise and have to be solved. These reductionist assumptions derive from the use of evidence based medicine as a tool for managed care in a transactional model for consultations. If these assumptions persist, they will strengthen reification of disease and promote the episodic output of process regardless of health outcome. We need to work within a different paradigm based on development of patients as co-producers rather than consumers, promoting continuing output of health gain through shared decisions using all relevant evidence, within a broader, socialised definition of science. Adoption of this model would require a major social and cultural shift for health professionals. This shift has already begun, promoted by changes in public attitudes to professional authority, changes in the relation of professionals to managers, and pressures for improved effectiveness and efficiency which, contrary to received wisdom, seem more likely to endorse cooperative than transactional clinical production. Progress on these lines is resisted by rapidly growing and extremely powerful economic and political interests. Health professionals and strategists have yet to recognise and admit the existence of this choice. PMID:9519124

Hart, J T

1997-01-01

370

Integration of Evidence Based Medicine into a Medical Curriculum  

PubMed Central

The College of Medicine at King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences (KSAU-HS) was established in January 2004. The four-year curriculum was based on the Problem Based Learning (PBL) format and involved the web-based graduate medical program adopted from the University of Sydney, Australia. At KSAU-HS, one additional semester was added to the beginning of this curriculum to prepare the students in English language skills, PBL, Information Technology and Evidence Based Medicine (EBM). EBM is part of the Personal and Professional Development (PPD) theme of the medical curriculum and is integrated into each stage of the medical curriculum. These modifications of the University of Sydney curriculum are presented here as a model of EBM integration into a college of medicine curriculum. PMID:20165529

Tamim, H M; Ferwana, M; Al Banyan, E; Al Alwan, I; Hajeer, AH

2009-01-01

371

Evaluation of nurse engagement in evidence-based practice.  

PubMed

The purpose of this project was to explore nurses' willingness to question and change practice. Nurses were invited to report practice improvement opportunities, and participants were supported through the process of a practice change. The project leader engaged to the extent desired by the participant. Meetings proceeded until the participant no longer wished to continue, progress was blocked, or practice was changed. Evaluation of the evidence-based practice change process occurred. Fifteen nurses reported 23 practice improvement opportunities. The majority (12 of 15) preferred to have the project leader review the evidence. Fourteen projects changed practice; 4 were presented at conferences. Multiple barriers were identified throughout the process and included loss of momentum, the proposed change involved other disciplines, and low level or controversial evidence. Practice issues were linked to quality metrics, cost of care, patient satisfaction, regulatory compliance, and patient safety. Active engagement by nurse leaders was needed for a practice change to occur. Participants identified important problems previously unknown to hospital administrators. The majority of nurses preferred involvement in practice change based on clinical problem solving when supported by others to provide literature review and manage the process through committees. Recommendations include supporting a culture that encourages employees to report practice improvement opportunities and provide resources to assist in navigating the identified practice change. PMID:24441453

Davidson, Judy E; Brown, Caroline

2014-01-01

372

Information systems: the key to evidence-based health practice.  

PubMed Central

Increasing prominence is being given to the use of best current evidence in clinical practice and health services and programme management decision-making. The role of information in evidence-based practice (EBP) is discussed, together with questions of how advanced information systems and technology (IS&T) can contribute to the establishment of a broader perspective for EBP. The author examines the development, validation and use of a variety of sources of evidence and knowledge that go beyond the well-established paradigm of research, clinical trials, and systematic literature review. Opportunities and challenges in the implementation and use of IS&T and knowledge management tools are examined for six application areas: reference databases, contextual data, clinical data repositories, administrative data repositories, decision support software, and Internet-based interactive health information and communication. Computerized and telecommunications applications that support EBP follow a hierarchy in which systems, tasks and complexity range from reference retrieval and the processing of relatively routine transactions, to complex "data mining" and rule-driven decision support systems. PMID:11143195

Rodrigues, R. J.

2000-01-01

373

Evidence-based Kernels: Fundamental Units of Behavioral Influence  

PubMed Central

This paper describes evidence-based kernels, fundamental units of behavioral influence that appear to underlie effective prevention and treatment for children, adults, and families. A kernel is a behavior–influence procedure shown through experimental analysis to affect a specific behavior and that is indivisible in the sense that removing any of its components would render it inert. Existing evidence shows that a variety of kernels can influence behavior in context, and some evidence suggests that frequent use or sufficient use of some kernels may produce longer lasting behavioral shifts. The analysis of kernels could contribute to an empirically based theory of behavioral influence, augment existing prevention or treatment efforts, facilitate the dissemination of effective prevention and treatment practices, clarify the active ingredients in existing interventions, and contribute to efficiently developing interventions that are more effective. Kernels involve one or more of the following mechanisms of behavior influence: reinforcement, altering antecedents, changing verbal relational responding, or changing physiological states directly. The paper describes 52 of these kernels, and details practical, theoretical, and research implications, including calling for a national database of kernels that influence human behavior. PMID:18712600

Biglan, Anthony

2008-01-01

374

Original research in pathology: judgment, or evidence-based medicine?  

PubMed

Pathology is both a medical specialty and an investigative scientific discipline, concerned with understanding the essential nature of human disease. Ultimately, pathology is accountable as well, as measured by the accuracy of our diagnoses and the resultant patient care outcomes. As such, we must consider the evidence base underlying our practices. Within the realm of Laboratory Medicine, extensive attention has been given to testing accuracy and precision. Critical examination of the evidence base supporting the clinical use of specific laboratory tests or technologies is a separate endeavor, to which specific attention must be given. In the case of anatomic pathology and more specifically surgical pathology, the expertise required to render a diagnosis is derived foremost from experience, both personal and literature-based. In the first instance, knowledge of the linkage between one's own diagnoses and individual patient outcomes is required, to validate the role of one's own interpretations in the clinical course of patients. Experience comes from seeing this linkage first hand, from which hopefully comes wisdom and, ultimately, good clinical judgment. In the second instance, reading the literature and learning from experts is required. Only a minority of the relevant literature is published in pathology journals to which one may subscribe. A substantial portion of major papers relevant to the practice of anatomic pathology are published in collateral clinical specialty journals devoted to specific disease areas or organs. Active effort is therefore required to seek out the literature beyond the domain of pathology journals. In examining the published literature, the essential question then becomes: Does the practice of anatomic pathology fulfill the tenets of 'evidence-based medicine' (EBM)? If the pinnacle of EBM is 'systematic review of randomized clinical trials, with or without meta-analysis', then anatomic pathology falls far short. Our published literature is largely observational in nature, with reports of case series (with or without statistical analysis) constituting the majority of our 'evidence base'. Moreover, anatomic pathology is subject to 'interobserver variation', and potentially to 'error'. Taken further, individual interpretation of tissue samples is not an objective endeavor, and it is not easy to fulfill the role of a 'gold standard'. Both for rendering of an overall interpretation, and for providing the semi-quantitative and quantitative numerical 'scores' which support evidence-based clinical treatment algorithms, the Pathologist has to exercise a high level of interpretive judgment. Nevertheless, the contribution of anatomic pathology to 'EBM' is remarkably strong. To the extent that our judgmental interpretations become data, our tissue interpretations become the arbiters of patient care management decisions. In a more global sense, we support highly successful cancer screening programs, and play critical roles in the multidisciplinary management of complex patients. The true error is for the clinical practitioners of 'EBM' to forget the contribution to the supporting evidence base of the physicians that are Anatomic Pathologists. Finally, the academic productivity of pathology faculty who operate in the clinical realm must be considered. A survey of six North American academic pathology departments reveals that 26% of all papers published in 2005 came from 'unfunded' clinical faculty. While it is likely that their academic productivity is lower than that of 'funded' research faculty, the contribution of clinical faculty to the knowledge base for the practice of modern medicine, and to the academic reputation of the department, must not be overlooked. The ability of clinical faculty in academic departments of pathology to pursue original scholarship must be supported if our specialty is to retain its preeminence as an investigative scientific discipline in the age of EBM. PMID:17318193

Crawford, James M

2007-02-01

375

Minimally invasive treatment of Peyronie's disease: evidence-based progress.  

PubMed

Peyronie's disease (PD) is often physically and psychologically devastating for patients, and the goal of treatment is to improve symptoms and sexual function without adding treatment-related morbidity. The potential for treatment-related morbidity after more invasive interventions, e.g. surgery, creates a need for effective minimally invasive treatments. We critically examined the available literature using levels of evidence to determine the reported support for each treatment. Most available minimally invasive treatments lack critical support for effectiveness due to the absence of randomised, placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) or non-significant results after RCTs. Iontophoresis, oral therapies (vitamin E, potassium para-aminobenzoate, tamoxifen, carnitine, and colchicine), extracorporeal shockwave therapy, and intralesional injection with verapamil or nicardipine have shown mixed or negative results. Treatments that have decreased penile curvature deformity in Level 1 or Level 2 evidence-based, placebo-controlled studies include intralesional injection with interferon ?-2b or collagenase clostridium histolyticum. PMID:24447536

Jordan, Gerald H; Carson, Culley C; Lipshultz, Larry I

2014-07-01

376

Evidence-based decision-making 3: health technology assessment.  

PubMed

This chapter begins with a brief introduction to health technology assessment (HTA). HTA is concerned with the systematic evaluation of the consequences of the adoption and use of new health technologies and improving the evidence on existing technologies. The objective of mainstream HTA is to support evidence-based decision- and policy-making that encourage the uptake of efficient and effective health care technologies. This chapter provides a basic framework for conducting an HTA as well as some fundamental concepts and challenges in assessing health technologies. A case study of the assessment of drug eluting stents in Ontario is presented to illustrate the HTA process. Whether HTA is beneficial-supporting timely access to needed technologies-or detrimental depends on three critical issues: when the assessment is performed; how it is performed; and how the findings are used. PMID:25694325

O'Reilly, Daria; Campbell, Kaitryn; Vanstone, Meredith; Bowen, James M; Schwartz, Lisa; Assasi, Nazila; Goeree, Ron

2015-01-01

377

Fast Physical Random-Number Generation Based on Room-Temperature Chaotic Oscillations in Weakly Coupled Superlattices  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An all-electronic physical random number generator at rates up to 80Gbit/s is presented, based on weakly coupled GaAs/Ga0.55Al0.45As superlattices operated at room temperature. It is based on large-amplitude, chaotic current oscillations characterized by a bandwidth of several hundred MHz and do not require external feedback or conversion to an electronic signal prior to digitization. The method is robust and insensitive to external perturbations and its fully electronic implementation suggests scalability and minimal postprocessing in comparison to existing optical implementations.

Li, Wen; Reidler, Igor; Aviad, Yaara; Huang, Yuyang; Song, Helong; Zhang, Yaohui; Rosenbluh, Michael; Kanter, Ido

2013-07-01

378

Practice-Based Evidence to Evidence-Based Practice: Building the National Radiation Oncology Registry  

PubMed Central

The National Radiation Oncology Registry (NROR), sponsored by the Radiation Oncology Institute and the American Society for Radiation Oncology, is designed to collect standardized information on cancer care delivery among patients treated with radiotherapy in the United States and will focus on patients with prostate cancer. Stakeholders were engaged through a forum that emphasized the need for patient-centered outcomes, minimal data burden, and maximal connectivity to existing registries and databases. An electronic infrastructure is under development to provide connectivity across radiation oncology and hospital information systems. The NROR Gateway features automatic abstraction as well as aggregation of treatment and outcome data. The prostate cancer data dictionary provides standardized elements in four domains: facility, physician, patient, and treatment. The pilot phase will consist of clinical centers chosen to provide a representative mix of radiation treatment modalities, facility types, population-based settings, and regional locations. The initial set of radiation practice metrics includes physician board certification and maintenance, ordering of staging scans, active surveillance discussion, dose prescriptions for low-risk/high-risk disease, radiation fields for low-risk/high-risk disease, image-guided radiation therapy use, androgen deprivation therapy use, post-brachytherapy implant computed tomography dosimetry, collection of toxicity assessments, and longitudinal patient follow-up. The NROR pilot study will provide the framework for expansion to a nationwide electronic registry for radiation oncology. PMID:23942508

Efstathiou, Jason A.; Nassif, Deborah S.; McNutt, Todd R.; Bogardus, C. Bob; Bosch, Walter; Carlin, Jeffrey; Chen, Ronald C.; Chou, Henry; Eggert, Dave; Fraass, Benedick A.; Goldwein, Joel; Hoffman, Karen E.; Hotz, Ken; Hunt, Margie; Kessler, Marc; Lawton, Colleen A.F.; Mayo, Charles; Michalski, Jeff M.; Mutic, Sasa; Potters, Louis; Rose, Christopher M.; Sandler, Howard M.; Sharp, Gregory; Tomé, Wolfgang; Tran, Phuoc T.; Wall, Terry; Zietman, Anthony L.; Gabriel, Peter E.; Bekelman, Justin E.

2013-01-01

379

A Design for Evidence-based Software Architecture WenQian Liu  

E-print Network

A Design for Evidence-based Software Architecture Research WenQian Liu , Charles L. Chen, Vidya studies. The first step is to collect evidence about practice in industry before design- ing relevant issues on evidence-based SE particularly on combining and using evidence, describe triangulation

Perry, Dewayne E.

380

Caught on Video! Using Handheld Digital Video Cameras to Support Evidence-Based Reasoning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Engaging elementary students in evidence-based reasoning is an essential aspect of science and engineering education. Evidence-based reasoning involves students making claims (i.e., answers to questions, or solutions to problems), providing evidence to support those claims, and articulating their reasoning to connect the evidence to the claim. In…

Lottero-Perdue, Pamela S.; Nealy, Jennifer; Roland, Christine; Ryan, Amy

2011-01-01

381

Evidence-based Management Strategies for Treatment of Chronic Wounds  

PubMed Central

The care and management of patients with chronic wounds and their far-reaching effects challenge both the patient and the practitioner. Further complicating this situation is the paucity of evidence-based treatment strategies for chronic wound care. After searching both MEDLINE and Cochrane databases, we reviewed currently available articles concerning chronic wound care. Utilizing this information, we have outlined a review of current, evidence-based concepts as they pertain to the treatment of chronic wounds, focusing on fundamental treatment principles for the management of venous, arterial, diabetic, and pressure ulcers. Individualized treatment options as well as general wound management principles applicable to all varieties of chronic wounds are described. Classification and treatment guidelines as well as the adoption of the TIME acronym facilitate an organized conceptional approach to wound care. In so doing, individual aspects of generalized wound care such as debridement, infection, and moisture control as well as attention to the qualities of the wound edge are comprehensively evaluated, communicated, and addressed. Effective adjuvant agents for the therapy of chronic wounds including nutritional and social support measures are listed, as is a brief review of strategies helpful for preventing recurrence. An appreciation of evidence-based treatment pathways and an understanding of the pathophysiology of chronic wounds are important elements in the management of patients with chronic wounds. To achieve effective and long-lasting results, a multidisciplinary approach to patient care, focused on the education and coordination of patient, family as well as medical and support staff can prove invaluable. PMID:19578487

Werdin, Frank; Tennenhaus, Mayer; Schaller, Hans-Eberhardt; Rennekampff, Hans-Oliver

2009-01-01

382

Perfectionism in Anorexia Nervosa: Novel Performance Based Evidence  

PubMed Central

Existing research into perfectionism in Anorexia Nervosa (AN) is limited by a reliance upon self-report measures. This study used novel performance based measures to investigate whether there is behavioural evidence for elevated perfectionism in AN. 153 participants took part in the study – 81 with a diagnosis of AN and 72 healthy controls (HCs). Participants completed two performance based tasks assessing perfectionism – a text replication task and a bead sorting task – along with self-report measures of perfectionism. Significant group differences were observed on both tasks. In the text replication task the AN group took significantly longer compared with healthy controls (p?=?0.03, d?=?0.36) and produced significantly higher quality copies (p?=?<0.01, d?=?0.45). In the bead sorting task, there was a trend towards more participants in the AN group choosing to check their work compared with the HC group (p?=?0.07, d?=?0.30) and the AN group took significantly longer checking than those in the HC group (p?=?<0.01, d?=?0.45). Only copy quality uniquely predicted scores on self report measures of perfectionism. This study provides empirically tested evidence of elevated performance based perfectionism in AN compared with a healthy control group. PMID:25360690

Lloyd, Samantha; Yiend, Jenny; Schmidt, Ulrike; Tchanturia, Kate

2014-01-01

383

Evidence for a Particle Produced in Association with Weak Bosons and Decaying to a Bottom-Antibottom Quark Pair in Higgs Boson Searches at the Tevatron  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We combine searches by the CDF and D0 Collaborations for the associated production of a Higgs boson with a W or Z boson and subsequent decay of the Higgs boson to a bottom-antibottom quark pair. The data, originating from Fermilab Tevatron pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV, correspond to integrated luminosities of up to 9.7fb-1. The searches are conducted for a Higgs boson with mass in the range 100-150GeV/c2. We observe an excess of events in the data compared with the background predictions, which is most significant in the mass range between 120 and 135GeV/c2. The largest local significance is 3.3 standard deviations, corresponding to a global significance of 3.1 standard deviations. We interpret this as evidence for the presence of a new particle consistent with the standard model Higgs boson, which is produced in association with a weak vector boson and decays to a bottom-antibottom quark pair.

Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Álvarez González, B.; Alverson, G.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurisano, A.; Avila, C.; Azfar, F.; Badaud, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bartos, P.; Bassler, U.; Bauce, M.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Bedeschi, F.; Begalli, M.; Behari, S.; Bellantoni, L.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Bose, T.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brigliadori, L.; Brock, R.; Bromberg, C.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Bu, X. B.; Budd, H. S.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Chokheli, D.; Choudhary, B.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Cihangir, S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Claes, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Clutter, J.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corbo, M.; Corcoran, M.; Cordelli, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Croc, A.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cutts, D.; Dagenhart, D.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Das, A.; Datta, M.; Davies, G.; de Barbaro, P.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Dell'Orso, M.; Demina, R.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; d'Errico, M.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dittmann, J. R.; Dominguez, A.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Ebina, K.; Edmunds, D.; Elagin, A.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Fiedler, F.; Field, R.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Fuess, S.; Funakoshi, Y.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia, J. E.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Ginther, G.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Golovanov, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Gomez, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hagopian, S.; Hahn, S. R.; Haley, J.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Han, L.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Harder, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harel, A.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, M.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinrich, J.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herndon, M.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hewamanage, S.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hocker, A.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.

2012-08-01

384

Evidence for a particle produced in association with weak bosons and decaying to a bottom-antibottom quark pair in higgs boson searches at the tevatron.  

PubMed

We combine searches by the CDF and D0 Collaborations for the associated production of a Higgs boson with a W or Z boson and subsequent decay of the Higgs boson to a bottom-antibottom quark pair. The data, originating from Fermilab Tevatron pp collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV, correspond to integrated luminosities of up to 9.7 fb(-1). The searches are conducted for a Higgs boson with mass in the range 100-150 GeV/c(2). We observe an excess of events in the data compared with the background predictions, which is most significant in the mass range between 120 and 135 GeV/c(2). The largest local significance is 3.3 standard deviations, corresponding to a global significance of 3.1 standard deviations. We interpret this as evidence for the presence of a new particle consistent with the standard model Higgs boson, which is produced in association with a weak vector boson and decays to a bottom-antibottom quark pair. PMID:23006359

Aaltonen, T; Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alvarez González, B; Alverson, G; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Auerbach, B; Augsten, K; Aurisano, A; Avila, C; Azfar, F; Badaud, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartlett, J F; Bartos, P; Bassler, U; Bauce, M; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Bedeschi, F; Begalli, M; Behari, S; Bellantoni, L; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bortoletto, D; Bose, T; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brigliadori, L; Brock, R; Bromberg, C; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Bu, X B; Budd, H S; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Calancha, C; Camacho-Pérez, E; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Caughron, S; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chevalier-Théry, S; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, D K; Cho, K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Chokheli, D; Choudhary, B; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Cihangir, S; Ciocci, M A; Claes, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Clutter, J; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corbo, M; Corcoran, M; Cordelli, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Croc, A; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cutts, D; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Das, A; Datta, M; Davies, G; de Barbaro, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Dell'orso, M; Demina, R; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; d'Errico, M; Desai, S; Deterre, C; Devaughan, K; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Dong, P; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Ebina, K; Edmunds, D; Elagin, A; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Fiedler, F; Field, R; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fuess, S; Funakoshi, Y; Gallinaro, M; Garcia-Bellido, A; Garcia, J E; García-González, J A; García-Guerra, G A; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gershtein, Y; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Ginther, G; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Golovanov, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Gomez, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Grinstein, S; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Hagopian, S; Hahn, S R; Haley, J; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Han, L; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Harder, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harel, A; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauptman, J M; Hays, C; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Heck, M; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinrich, J; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herndon, M; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hewamanage, S; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hocker, A; Hoeneisen, B; Hogan, J; Hohlfeld, M; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ito, A S; Ivanov, A; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; James, E; Jang, D; Jayasinghe, A; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D T; Jeon, E J; Jeong, M S; Jesik, R; Jiang, P; Jindariani, S; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jones, M; Jonsson, P; Joo, K K; Joshi, J; Jun, S Y; Jung, A W; Junk, T R; Juste, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Karmanov, D; Kasmi, A; Kasper, P A; Kato, Y; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S

2012-08-17

385

Evidence for a particle produced in association with weak bosons and decaying to a bottom-antibottom quark pair in Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron  

SciTech Connect

We combine searches by the CDF and D0 Collaborations for the associated production of a Higgs boson with a W or Z boson and subsequent decay of the Higgs boson to a bottom-antibottom quark pair. The data, originating from Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s=1.96 TeV, correspond to integrated luminosities of up to 9.7 fb{sup -1}. The searches are conducted for a Higgs boson with mass in the range 100-150 GeV/c{sup 2}. We observe an excess of events in the data compared with the background predictions, which is most significant in the mass range between 120 and 135 GeV/c{sup 2}. The largest local significance is 3.3 standard deviations, corresponding to a global significance of 3.1 standard deviations. We interpret this as evidence for the presence of a new particle consistent with the standard model Higgs boson, which is produced in association with a weak vector boson and decays to a bottom-antibottom quark pair.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Abazov, V.M.; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, B.; /Oklahoma U.; Acharya, B.S.; /Tata Inst.; Adams, M.; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, T.; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, G.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, A.; /Michigan U.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Alverson, G.; /Northeastern U. /INFN, Padua

2012-07-01

386

Dental education and evidence-based educational best practices: bridging the great divide.  

PubMed

Research about educational best practices is negatively perceived by many dental faculty. Separation between teaching and learning strategies commonly employed in dental education and evidence-based educational techniques is real and caused by a variety of factors: the often incomprehensible jargon of educational specialists; traditional academic dominance of research, publication, and grantsmanship in faculty promotions; institutional undervaluing of teaching and the educational process; and departmentalization of dental school governance with resultant narrowness of academic vision. Clinician-dentists hired as dental school faculty may model teaching activities on decades-old personal experiences, ignoring recent educational evidence and the academic culture. Dentistry's twin internal weaknesses--factionalism and parochialism--contribute to academic resistance to change and unwillingness to share power. Dental accreditation is a powerful impetus toward inclusion of best teaching and learning evidence in dental education. This article will describe how the gap between traditional educational strategies and research-based practices can be reduced by several approaches including dental schools' promotion of learning cultures that encourage and reward faculty who earn advanced degrees in education, regular evaluation of teaching by peers and educational consultants with inclusion of the results of these evaluations in promotion and tenure committee deliberations, creating tangible reward systems to recognize and encourage teaching excellence, and basing faculty development programs on adult learning principles. Leadership development should be part of faculty enrichment, as effective administration is essential to dental school mission fulfillment. Finally, faculty who investigate the effectiveness of educational techniques need to make their research more available by publishing it, more understandable by reducing educational jargon, and more relevant to the day-to-day teaching issues that dental school faculty encounter in classrooms, labs, and clinics. PMID:15576815

Masella, Richard S; Thompson, Thomas J

2004-12-01

387

Evidence base for pre-employment medical screening.  

PubMed

This paper examines the evidence base for the use of pre-employment/pre-placement medical examinations. The use of pre-employment examinations is often driven more by cultural practices than evidence. There is a lack of evidence on their effectiveness in preventing health-related occupational risks. Hypertension screening is highlighted as a common pre-employment practice for which there is no standardized criteria to use to determine fitness for work. There are inherent problems in screening for psychiatric disorders and substance abuse as well as potential for racial bias and other unintended negative effects. This paper questions the economic case for this practice and also expresses concerns about paternalism related to identified risk factors. Health assessments should only be included when appropriate to the task environment and the general use of pre-employment exams and drug screening should be eliminated. Generally, a health assessment by questionnaire should suffice. Occupational health providers should advise against the application of physical or mental standards that are not relevant to fulfilment of the essential job functions. Consensus development regarding best practice, as well as consideration for acquiring outcome data related to pre-employment practice, is recommended. PMID:19649367

Pachman, Joseph

2009-07-01

388

Teaching evidence-based practice using a mock trial.  

PubMed

The mock trial, which is an educational tool used in many different professions, is a scripted form of debate that teaches the critical thinking process. Using the mock trial approach, two nurse educators at one medical center taught nursing staff and students the major elements of evidence-based practice. The verdict to be decided in the trial was whether family-witnessed resuscitation should be used in practice. This article outlines the steps taken to carry out this endeavor. Nursing faculty can use this mock trial approach to teach a variety of concepts in nursing education. PMID:22998038

Centrella-Nigro, Andrea M; Flynn, Donna

2012-12-01

389

Post partial nephrectomy surveillance imaging: an evidence-based approach.  

PubMed

To ensure the early detection of recurrent disease, all patients should undergo routine surveillance following partial nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma. In order to optimize resource allocation and avoid unnecessary radiation exposure, the frequency and duration of surveillance should be tailored to the individual patient's risk of cancer recurrence. The evidence for surveillance after partial nephrectomy is presented reviewing the current literature on prognostic models and proposed surveillance protocols based on the timing and patterns of renal cell carcinoma recurrence. In addition, we review recent guidelines on post partial nephrectomy surveillance as well as the literature on novel imaging techniques that may aid in early disease discovery. PMID:25749808

Marconi, Lorenzo; Gorin, Michael A; Allaf, Mohamad E

2015-04-01

390

Interdisciplinary Evidence-based Practice: Moving from Silos to Synergy  

PubMed Central

Despite the assumption that health care providers work synergistically in practice, professions have tended to be more exclusive than inclusive when it comes to educating students in a collaborative approach to interdisciplinary evidence-based practice (EBP). This article explores the state of academic and clinical training regarding interdisciplinary EBP, describes efforts to foster interdisciplinary EBP, and suggests strategies to accelerate the translation of EBP across disciplines. Moving from silos to synergy in interdisciplinary EBP will require a paradigm shift. Changes can be leveraged professionally and politically using national initiatives currently in place on improving quality and health care reform. PMID:21074648

Newhouse, Robin P.; Spring, Bonnie

2010-01-01

391

NLM Evidence-based Information at Your Fingertips - NBNA  

SciTech Connect

The workshop titled, National Library of Medicine: Evidence-based Information At Your Fingertips, is a computer training class designed to meet the needs of nurses who require access to information on specific medical topics and on the adverse health effects of exposure to hazardous substances. The Specialized Information Services Division of the National Library of Medicine (NLM) is sponsoring this workshop for the National Black Nurses Association to increase the awareness of health professionals of the availability and value of the free NLM medical, environmental health, and toxicology databases.

Womble, R.

2010-08-06

392

Developing an evidence-based list of journals for nursing.  

PubMed

The Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section (NAHRS) of the Medical Library Association created the 2012 NAHRS Selected List of Nursing Journals to assist librarians with collection development and to provide nurses and librarians with data on nursing and interdisciplinary journals to assist their decisions about where to submit articles for publication. This list is a continuation and expansion of a list initially known as the Key Nursing Journals list. It compares database coverage and full-text options for each title and includes an analysis of the number of evidence-based, research, and continuing education articles. PMID:24860267

Sherwill-Navarro, Pamela; Kennedy, Joy C; Allen, Margaret Peg

2014-04-01

393

Gallstone disease: from genes to evidence-based therapy.  

PubMed

The number of gallstone patients is increasing in ageing populations with a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and obesity. Recently variants of hepatic ATP binding cassette transporters have been identified as genetic susceptibility factors for gallstone disease, pointing to novel means for risk assessment and prevention. Although laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the mainstay of therapy for symptomatic gallbladder stones, the clinical management of gallstone disease is changing rapidly, with an increase in day case surgery and the advent of transluminal endoscopic surgery. Here, we summarize the molecular and genetic mechanisms of gallstone formation as well as the current evidence-based algorithms for diagnosis and therapy of gallbladder and bile duct stones. PMID:18308417

Lammert, Frank; Miquel, Juan-Francisco

2008-01-01

394

Evidence-based integrative medicine in clinical veterinary oncology.  

PubMed

Integrative medicine is the combined use of complementary and alternative medicine with conventional or traditional Western medicine systems. The demand for integrative veterinary medicine is growing, but evidence-based research on its efficacy is limited. In veterinary clinical oncology, such research could be translated to human medicine, because veterinary patients with spontaneous tumors are valuable translational models for human cancers. An overview of specific herbs, botanics, dietary supplements, and acupuncture evaluated in dogs, in vitro canine cells, and other relevant species both in vivo and in vitro is presented for their potential use as integrative therapies in veterinary clinical oncology. PMID:25174902

Raditic, Donna M; Bartges, Joseph W

2014-09-01

395

Strategies for Training Counselors in Evidence-Based Treatments  

PubMed Central

Evidence-based treatments (EBTs) for substance abuse and dependence have demonstrated superiority over treatment as usual when applied with strict fidelity in controlled clinical trials. Effective counselor training is critical if substance abuse programs are to realize these interventions’ full potential to enhance client outcomes in community practice. Although few empirical evaluations of training in EBTs have been conducted to date, the existing data warrant tentative conclusions concerning the appropriate roles and effectiveness of workshops, clinical supervision, distance learning, and blended learning. Among several outstanding research issues are questions of benchmarks for counselors’ performance in training and the relationships between such performance and clients’ substance abuse outcomes. PMID:22002451

Martino, Steve

2010-01-01

396

Investigation of a Bubble Detector based on Active Electrolocation of Weakly Electric Fish  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Weakly electric fish employ active electrolocation for navigation and object detection. They emit an electric signal with their electric organ in the tail and sense the electric field with electroreceptors that are distributed over their skin. We adopted this principle to design a bubble detector that can detect gas bubbles in a fluid or, in principle, objects with different electric conductivity than the surrounding fluid. The evaluation of the influence of electrode diameter on detecting a given bubble size showed that the signal increases with electrode diameter. Therefore it appears that this detector will be more appropriate for large sized applications such as bubble columns than small sized applications such as bubble detectors in dialysis.

Mohan, M.; Mayekar, K.; Zhou, R.; von der Emde, G.; Bousack, H.

2013-04-01

397

Evidence-based prognostication in a case of sciatica  

PubMed Central

Objective: To present an evidence-based case report on the prognosis of a patient with sciatica. Case: A 43-year-old man presented with right-sided buttock and lower extremity pain and numbness of 10 weeks’ duration. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lumbosacral disc herniation. Straight leg raise testing provoked the patient’s right sciatic pain, and neurologic examination revealed a diminished right Achilles tendon reflex and mild hypoesthesia along the patient’s outer right foot. Outcome: PubMed was searched and two cohort studies relevant to sciatic prognosis were found. These articles were critically appraised for their validity, importance, and applicability in making a prognostic estimate for this particular patient. Based on the appraised research evidence, and the confidence intervals calculated therein, the overall prognosis for sciatic pain recovery with conservative care was estimated as favourable for this patient, though sensory recovery (even with surgical care) was not. Summary: This case report illustrates how to use research literature in estimating the clinical prognosis for an individual patient, and how this can be useful towards clinical decision-making concerning treatment. PMID:25729082

Emary, Peter C.

2015-01-01

398

Evidence-based treatment strategies in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.  

PubMed

Recently updated guidelines have provided revised recommendations, based on the GRADE criteria, for the diagnosis and pharmacological and non-pharmacological management of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Cochrane reviews are also a highly respected and reliable source of evidence-based information that identify and analyse all available data of overall treatment effects from appropriate studies. A recent update of one Cochrane review failed to identify any new evidence supporting the use of corticosteroids in IPF. Another review of data from 15 randomised controlled studies of non-steroid agents for the treatment of IPF identified two trials of interferon-?-1b suitable for analysis. However, the pooled analysis revealed no treatment effect in terms of survival. A further meta-analysis of three phase III studies of pirfenidone treatment in IPF patients suggested a significant increase in progression-free survival. The interpretation of recent international and national European guideline updates and treatment recommendations, available clinical data from published and ongoing trials investigating potential pharmacological agents, and the individual patient's preferences, must be considered in the clinical management of this disease. PMID:23728871

Behr, Jürgen

2013-06-01

399

Three Collaborative Models for Scaling Up Evidence-Based Practices  

PubMed Central

The current paper describes three models of research-practice collaboration to scale-up evidence-based practices (EBP): (1) the Rolling Cohort model in England, (2) the Cascading Dissemination model in San Diego County, and (3) the Community Development Team model in 53 California and Ohio counties. Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC) and KEEP are the focal evidence-based practices that are designed to improve outcomes for children and families in the child welfare, juvenile justice, and mental health systems. The three scale-up models each originated from collaboration between community partners and researchers with the shared goal of wide-spread implementation and sustainability of MTFC/KEEP. The three models were implemented in a variety of contexts; Rolling Cohort was implemented nationally, Cascading Dissemination was implemented within one county, and Community Development Team was targeted at the state level. The current paper presents an overview of the development of each model, the policy frameworks in which they are embedded, system challenges encountered during scale-up, and lessons learned. Common elements of successful scale-up efforts, barriers to success, factors relating to enduring practice relationships, and future research directions are discussed. PMID:21484449

Roberts, Rosemarie; Jones, Helen; Marsenich, Lynne; Sosna, Todd; Price, Joseph M.

2015-01-01

400

Evidence for site-specific strong and weak pinning of the modulation wave in the incommensurate phases of randomly quenched Rb2ZnCl4 systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The influence of randomly quenched disorder in the incommensurate phases of Rb2(Zn1-xCux)Cl4 (for x = 0.03), Rb2(Zn1-xCdx)Cl4 (for x = 0.03 and 0.05), Rb2(Zn1-xHgx)Cl4 (for x = 0.03 and 0.05) and Rb2Zn(Cl1-xBrx)4 (for x = 0.01 and 0.03) is investigated via the amplitudon and phason dynamics using 35Cl nuclear quadrupole resonance studies. Defect pinning at the metal and halogen sites in the prototype compound Rb2ZnCl4 has been attempted for the first time and has yielded novel results. Quenched randomness at the metal site (Zn) in Rb2ZnCl4 induced strong pinning of the modulation wave (irrespective of the size of the dopant compared to the host). This is evident from a temperature-independent icons/Journals/Common/Delta" ALT="Delta" ALIGN="TOP"/>icons/Journals/Common/phi" ALT="phi" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/> and consequently T1icons/Journals/Common/phi" ALT="phi" ALIGN="TOP"/> unlike the case for impurity pinning at the other sites (cation and anion). The effect is enhanced with increasing concentration of the dopant. This result is contrasted with defect pinning at the halogen site (Cl) in Rb2ZnCl4 with Br substitution which induced weak pinning of the modulation wave (temperature-dependent icons/Journals/Common/Delta" ALT="Delta" ALIGN="TOP"/>icons/Journals/Common/phi" ALT="phi" ALIGN="MIDDLE"/> and consequently T1icons/Journals/Common/phi" ALT="phi" ALIGN="TOP"/>) similarly to substitution at the cation site as seen from earlier studies. Furthermore, the impurities have been categorized as random-field or random-potential type by evaluating the symmetry parameter (m) associated with the impurity. It is seen that Cu, Cd and Hg are random-field-type impurities inducing strong pinning of the modulation wave (m < 6; m = 6 for Rb2ZnCl4) while the Br impurity is of a random-potential type inducing a weak pinning of the modulation wave.

Maheswari, S. Uma; Venu, K.; Sastry, V. S. S.

1999-07-01

401

Scientifically Based Research and Evidence-Based Education: A Federal Policy Context.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article provides a look at the federal policy context for the scientifically based research (SBR) and evidence-based education (EBE) initiatives by sharing U.S. Department of Education presentations and related publications about SBR and EBE. It discusses the impact of these policy initiatives on special education research activities.…

Smith, Anne

2003-01-01

402

The Move to Evidence-Based Practice: How Well Does it Fit Child Welfare Services?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Child welfare services are engaged in examining and applying concepts from evidence-based practice. This article provides background on evidence-based practice in child welfare and suggests the areas of least and greatest fit between the methods of evidence-based practice and child welfare services. Implications for the emergence of more evidence-based approaches to child welfare services are forwarded. Suggestions for social work

Richard P. Barth

2008-01-01

403

Implementation of evidence in practice settings: some methodological issues arising from the South Thames Evidence Based Practice Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is acknowledged that the NHS fails to benefit from its research investment. Effective methods for implementing evidence into practice are contested within medicine and, as yet, are poorly understood in nursing and professions allied to medicine. This paper discusses the methodological development of the model used in the South Thames Evidence Based Practice project in the context of contemporary

S. M. G. McLaren; F. Ross

2000-01-01

404

The Benefits of Breakfast Cereal Consumption: A Systematic Review of the Evidence Base1234  

PubMed Central

There have been no comprehensive reviews of the relation of breakfast cereal consumption to nutrition and health. This systematic review of all articles on breakfast cereals to October 2013 in the Scopus and Medline databases identified 232 articles with outcomes related to nutrient intake, weight, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, digestive health, dental and mental health, and cognition. Sufficient evidence was available to develop 21 summary evidence statements, ranked from A (can be trusted to guide practice) to D (weak and must be applied with caution). Breakfast cereal consumption is associated with diets higher in vitamins and minerals and lower in fat (grade B) but is not associated with increased intakes of total energy or sodium (grade C) or risk of dental caries (grade B). Most studies on the nutritional impact are cross-sectional, with very few intervention studies, so breakfast cereal consumption may be a marker of an overall healthy lifestyle. Oat-, barley-, or psyllium-based cereals can help lower cholesterol concentrations (grade A), and high-fiber, wheat-based cereals can improve bowel function (grade A). Regular breakfast cereal consumption is associated with a lower body mass index and less risk of being overweight or obese (grade B). Presweetened breakfast cereals do not increase the risk of overweight and obesity in children (grade C). Whole-grain or high-fiber breakfast cereals are associated with a lower risk of diabetes (grade B) and cardiovascular disease (grade C). There is emerging evidence of associations with feelings of greater well-being and a lower risk of hypertension (grade D), but more research is required. PMID:25225349

Williams, Peter G.

2014-01-01

405

A Bridge Too Far? Stepping Stones for Evidence Based Practice in an Academic Context  

Microsoft Academic Search

Entering its second decade, evidence based library and information practice (EBLIP), the now-preferred term for evidence based librarianship, can count some notable successes. In particular, the initiation and growth of an international open access journal, the ongoing development of an International Conference series, and a proliferation of articles on the stages of the evidence based process attest to its ongoing

Andrew Booth

2009-01-01

406

Classifying Medical Questions based on an Evidence Taxonomy , Carl Sable2  

E-print Network

strategies. In the medical domain, physicians are urged to practice Evidence Based Medicine when facedClassifying Medical Questions based on an Evidence Taxonomy Hong Yu1 , Carl Sable2 , Hai Ran Zhu3 1 classify medical questions based on a hierarchical evidence taxonomy created by physicians. We show

Yu, Hong

407

MedView: A Declarative Approach to Evidence-Based Medicine  

E-print Network

practice [2]. Information visualisation is an important component in any system for evidence-based medicineMedView: A Declarative Approach to Evidence-Based Medicine Göran Falkman Department of Computer Abstract. MedView is a project that meets the challenges of evidence-based oral medicine by providing

Torgersson, Olof

408

Danger and Opportunity: Challenges in Teaching Evidence-Based Practice in the Social Work Curriculum  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evidence-based practice has received increased emphasis within the social work field in the past decade and social work educational programs are including more evidence-based practice content in their curricula. This article examines some issues social work educators may wish to consider as they teach evidence-based practice to social work…

Scheyett, Anna

2006-01-01

409

Some considerations on the validity of evidence-based practice in social work  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary This paper considers the validity of evidence-based practice in social work. It critically examines various underlying presuppositions and assumptions entailed in evidence- based practice and draws out their implications for social work. The paper is divided into three main parts. Following a consideration of the background to the develop- ment of evidence-based practice and a discussion of its key

Stephen A. Webb

2001-01-01

410

A liposomal fluorescence assay to study permeation kinetics of drug-like weak bases across the lipid bilayer.  

PubMed

Lipid bilayer permeation is considered the major route for in vivo barrier passage of drugs. Despite this fact, no technique is currently available to measure the kinetics of permeation across a single lipid bilayer of structurally unrelated drug-like solutes. We developed a liposomal fluorescence assay capable to determine permeation kinetics of basic drug-like solutes across lipid bilayers. The assay is based on the hypothesis that permeation of a weak base along a concentration gradient results in net proton release at the cis-side and net proton capture at the trans-side of the bilayer. The resulting pH changes were monitored with pH-sensitive fluorophores: Test compounds were incubated with liposomes containing a pH-sensitive fluorophore at the bilayer surfaces or in the aqueous lumen and fluorescence changes were monitored with a stopped-flow apparatus in solution or by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy with surface-captured liposomes on a microfluidic platform. Incubation with lipophilic basic drugs resulted in the expected fluorescence changes while incubation with compounds without basic functionality or high polarity did not affect fluorescence. Kinetics of fluorescence changes followed bi-exponential functions. Logarithmic permeation coefficients (logPermapp) determined in solution and by microfluidics technology showed a good correlation (r(2)=0.94, n=7) and logPermapp increased with increasing lipophilicity. Neither diffusion in the aqueous phase nor partitioning into the bilayer was rate-limiting. PEGylation of 2% of the liposomal lipids reduced Permapp by a factor ~300. In conclusion, the presented liposomal fluorescence assay is capable to determine permeation kinetics of weak basic drug-like solutes across lipid bilayers. The method is adaptable to microfluidics technology for high-throughput measurements and can potentially be modified to work for weak acid solutes. PMID:24211703

Eyer, Klaus; Paech, Franziska; Schuler, Friedrich; Kuhn, Phillip; Kissner, Reinhard; Belli, Sara; Dittrich, Petra S; Krämer, Stefanie D

2014-01-10

411

Design and synthesis of stable cobalt-based weak ferromagnetic framework with large spin canting angle.  

PubMed

It still remains a great challenge to design and construct framework-structured weak ferromagnets with large canting angle which is an effective approach for high performance magnets. According to the strategy of antisymmetric interaction causing spin canting, we report the design of four cobalt compounds, which were tested by X-ray single crystal diffraction, TGA, PXRD, and magnetic measurement. Single-crystal structure analysis reveals that compound 1 has a 2D structure, complex 2 has a 3,4-connected 3D framework, and complex 3 exhibits a 3D net structure with rare 3,5-connected 2-nodal ?-SnF2 topology and the solvent MeOH trapped in the 3D channels as guests. The magnetic property of 3 is spin canting just as designed, with TN about 4.0 K and large canting angle of 14.8°. Highly stable compound 3 sustains its framework in air for more than 12 months, in which the guest MeOH molecules can be replaced by water to form complex 4. PMID:25454842

Liu, Ting; Gao, Su-Mei; Xu, Long-Yang; Zhao, Jiong-Peng; Liu, Fu-Chen; Hu, Hai-Liang; Kang, Zhen-Hui

2014-12-15

412

Disruptive Innovations for Designing and Diffusing Evidence-based Interventions  

PubMed Central

The numbers of evidence-based interventions (EBIs) have been growing exponentially, both therapeutic and prevention programs. Yet, EBIs have not been broadly adopted in the United States. In order for our EBI science to significantly reduce disease burden, we need to critically re-examine our scientific conventions and norms. Innovation may be spurred by re-examining the biomedical model for validating EBIs and the compartmentalization of EBIs as disease-specific, institutionally-based, counseling programs. The model of Disruptive Innovations suggests that we re-engineer EBIs based on their most robust features in order to reach more people in less time and at lower cost. Four new research agendas will be required to support disruptive innovations in EBI science: synthesize common elements across EBIs; experiment with new delivery formats (e.g., consumer controlled, self-directed, brief, paraprofessional, coaching, and technology and media strategies); adopt market strategies to promote and diffuse EBI science, knowledge, and products; and adopt continuous quality improvement as a research paradigm for systematically improving EBIs, based on ongoing data and feedback. EBI science can have more impact if it can better leverage what we know from existing EBIs in order to inspire, engage, inform, and support families and children to adopt and sustain healthy daily routines and lifestyles. PMID:22545596

Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Swendeman, Dallas; Chorpita, Bruce F.

2013-01-01

413

Pharmacological management of tetanus: an evidence-based review  

PubMed Central

Tetanus is becoming rarer in both industrialized and developing nations due to an effective vaccination program. In 2010, the World Health Organization estimated there was a 93% reduction in newborns dying from tetanus worldwide, compared to the situation in the late 1980s. Due to its rarity, many diagnostic delays occur as physicians may not consider the diagnosis until the manifestations become overt. Without timely diagnosis and proper treatment, severe tetanus is fatal (mortality is also influenced by the comorbidities of the patient). The principles of treating tetanus are: reducing muscle spasms, rigidity and autonomic instability (with ventilatory support when necessary); neutralization of tetanus toxin with human antitetanus immunoglobulin or equine antitetanus sera; wound debridement; and administration of antibiotics to eradicate locally proliferating bacteria at the wound site. It is difficult to conduct trials on different treatment modalities in tetanus due to both logistical and ethical reasons. However, it is imperative that physicians are aware of the best evidence-based treatment strategies currently available to improve the outcome of patients. This review concentrates on analyzing the current evidence on the pharmacological management of tetanus. PMID:25029486

2014-01-01

414

Eating Disorder Prevention: Current Evidence-Base and Future Directions  

PubMed Central

Objective This narrative review sought to (a) characterize prevention programs that have produced reliable, reproducible, and clinically meaningful effects in efficacy trials, (b) discuss effectiveness trials that have tested whether prevention programs produce intervention effects under ecologically valid real-world conditions, (c) discuss dissemination efforts and research on dissemination, and (d) offer suggestions regarding directions for future research in this field. Conclusion A literature revealed that 6 prevention programs have produced significant reductions in eating disorder symptoms through at least 6-month follow-up and that 2 have significantly reduced future eating disorder onset. Effectiveness trials indicate that 2 prevention programs have produced effects under ecologically valid conditions that are only slightly attenuated. Although there have been few dissemination efforts, evidence suggests that a community participatory approach is most effective. Lastly, it would be useful to develop programs that produce larger and more persistent reductions in eating disorder symptoms and eating disorder onset, focus more on effectiveness trials that confirm that prevention programs produce clinically meaningful effects under real-world conditions, conduct meditational, mechanisms of action, and moderator research that provides stronger support for the intervention theory of prevention programs, and investigate the optimal methods of disseminating and implementing evidence-based prevention programs. PMID:23658095

Stice, Eric; Becker, Carolyn Black; Yokum, Sonja

2014-01-01

415

Knowledge management in evidence-based healthcare: issues raised when specialist information services search for the evidence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Knowledge management is in many ways a new paradigm in healthcare. This paper discusses how knowledge-management problems arising in evidence-based practice can be explored using ‘soft systems methodology’ and action research. An information centre working exclusively in evidence-based practice is used as a case study to explore how work teams and systems can be better utilized to provide clinical effectiveness

G. Fennessy

2001-01-01

416

Model-based drug development: strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats for broad application of pharmacometrics in drug development.  

PubMed

Systematic implementation of model-based drug development (MBDD) to drug discovery and development has the potential to significantly increase the rate of medical breakthroughs and make available new and better treatments to patients. An analysis of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (ie, SWOT) was conducted through focus group discussions that included 24 members representing 8 pharmaceutical companies to systematically assess the challenges to implementing MBDD into the drug development decision-making process. The application of the SWOT analysis to the successful implementation of MBDD yielded 19 strengths, 27 weaknesses, 34 opportunities, and 22 threats, which support the following conclusions. The shift from empirical drug development to MBDD requires a question-based mentality; early, proactive planning; dynamic access to multisource data; quantitative knowledge integration; multidisciplinary collaboration; effective communication and leadership skills; and innovative, impactful application of pharmacometrics focused on enhancing quantitative decision making. The ultimate goal of MBDD is to streamline discovery and development of innovative medicines to benefit patients. PMID:20881215

Wetherington, Jeffrey D; Pfister, Marc; Banfield, Christopher; Stone, Julie A; Krishna, Rajesh; Allerheiligen, Sandy; Grasela, Dennis M

2010-09-01

417

Developing and evaluating communication strategies to support informed decisions and practice based on evidence (DECIDE): protocol and preliminary results  

PubMed Central

Background Healthcare decision makers face challenges when using guidelines, including understanding the quality of the evidence or the values and preferences upon which recommendations are made, which are often not clear. Methods GRADE is a systematic approach towards assessing the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations in healthcare. GRADE also gives advice on how to go from evidence to decisions. It has been developed to address the weaknesses of other grading systems and is now widely used internationally. The Developing and Evaluating Communication Strategies to Support Informed Decisions and Practice Based on Evidence (DECIDE) consortium (http://www.decide-collaboration.eu/), which includes members of the GRADE Working Group and other partners, will explore methods to ensure effective communication of evidence-based recommendations targeted at key stakeholders: healthcare professionals, policymakers, and managers, as well as patients and the general public. Surveys and interviews with guideline producers and other stakeholders will explore how presentation of the evidence could be improved to better meet their information needs. We will collect further stakeholder input from advisory groups, via consultations and user testing; this will be done across a wide range of healthcare systems in Europe, North America, and other countries. Targeted communication strategies will be developed, evaluated in randomized trials, refined, and assessed during the development of real guidelines. Discussion Results of the DECIDE project will improve the communication of evidence-based healthcare recommendations. Building on the work of the GRADE Working Group, DECIDE will develop and evaluate methods that address communication needs of guideline users. The project will produce strategies for communicating recommendations that have been rigorously evaluated in diverse settings, and it will support the transfer of research into practice in healthcare systems globally. PMID:23302501

2013-01-01

418

Directing the public to evidence-based online content.  

PubMed

To direct online users searching for gynecologic cancer information to accurate content, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) 'Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer' campaign sponsored search engine advertisements in English and Spanish. From June 2012 to August 2013, advertisements appeared when US Google users entered search terms related to gynecologic cancer. Users who clicked on the advertisements were directed to relevant content on the CDC website. Compared with the 3?months before the initiative (March-May 2012), visits to the CDC web pages linked to the advertisements were 26 times higher after the initiative began (June-August 2012) (p<0.01), and 65 times higher when the search engine advertisements were supplemented with promotion on television and additional websites (September 2012-August 2013) (p<0.01). Search engine advertisements can direct users to evidence-based content at a highly teachable moment-when they are seeking relevant information. PMID:25053580

Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Gelb, Cynthia A; Vaughn, Alexandra N; Smuland, Jenny; Hughes, Alexandra G; Hawkins, Nikki A

2014-07-22

419

Disseminating evidence-based psychological treatments for eating disorders.  

PubMed

The research-practice gap is of concern in the treatment of eating disorders. Despite the existence of empirically supported treatments, few receive them. The barriers to wider dissemination and implementation of evidence-based treatment include clinician attitudes towards such treatments and the lack of sufficient numbers of suitably trained therapists to provide treatment. In this review we discuss these barriers in the context of the wider issue of the dissemination and implementation of psychological treatments and review the research with regard to the treatment of eating disorders. Particular emphasis is placed on examining recent efforts to expand the availability and reach of treatments by making treatment delivery and training more scalable. We highlight promising developments and areas where further research is needed. PMID:25663154

Cooper, Zafra; Bailey-Straebler, Suzanne

2015-03-01

420

The professional portfolio: an evidence-based assessment method.  

PubMed

Competency assessment is critical for a myriad of disciplines, including medicine, law, education, and nursing. Many nurse managers and educators are responsible for nursing competency assessment, and assessment results are often used for annual reviews, promotions, and satisfying accrediting agencies' requirements. Credentialing bodies continually seek methods to measure and document the continuing competence of licensees or certificants. Many methods and frameworks for continued competency assessment exist. The portfolio process is one method to validate personal and professional accomplishments in an interactive, multidimensional manner. This article illustrates how portfolios can be used to assess competence. One specialty nursing certification board's process of creating an evidence-based portfolio for recertification or reactivation of a credential is used as an example. The theoretical background, development process, implementation, and future implications may serve as a template for other organizations in developing their own portfolio models. PMID:20000263

Byrne, Michelle; Schroeter, Kathryn; Carter, Shannon; Mower, Julie

2009-12-01

421

Preparing quality improvement, research, and evidence-based practice manuscripts.  

PubMed

Understanding how to organize a manuscript reporting quality improvement (QI), research, and evidence-based practice (EBP) initiatives is important to provide essential information for readers to evaluate the findings for possible use in their own settings and replicate studies. Using guidelines for reporting QI, research studies, and EBP initiatives will help ensure authors submitting manuscripts to peer-reviewed publications report essential information and communicate it clearly to readers. This framework also guides the design and implementation of a project to ensure the information needed for a manuscript is collected and recorded for use in dissemination when the project is completed. Providing this specific information may also affect the likelihood of the manuscript being accepted for publication. PMID:24834629

Oermann, Marilyn H; Turner, Kathleen; Carman, Margaret

2014-01-01

422

Introducing Evidence-based Medicine to Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery  

PubMed Central

An effective healthcare system is one in which healthcare spending provides acceptable returns in terms of health outcomes and broad coverage for its citizens. By this measure, the United States healthcare system unfortunately falls short. Tremendous pressure for improvement has given rise to several initiatives designed to decrease healthcare expenditure and improve outcomes, access, and quality of care. The outcomes movement, which is revolutionary in American medicine, has heightened awareness about the need to critically examine our treatment outcomes. However, the early euphoria surrounding the outcomes movement was met with restraint at the realization of its limitations. Although the outcomes movement has verified the effectiveness of many existing treatments in plastic surgery, most of the investments in these projects unfortunately have resulted in few, if any, positive changes for the patient, physician or healthcare system (1). US healthcare is now moving towards the adoption of evidence-based medicine (EBM), which may potentially be another revolution in American healthcare (2). PMID:19337107

Chung, Kevin C.; Swanson, Jennifer A.; Schmitz, DeLaine; Sullivan, Daniel; Rohrich, Rod J.

2009-01-01

423

Evidence-based practice: triumph of style over substance?  

PubMed

This feature examines the success of evidence-based practice (EBP) and the associated Cochrane Collaboration. It seeks to identify critical success factors associated with the way that both initiatives have been marketed. The simplicity of the original message used by each initiative allowed for subsequent assimilation of nuances and variants. Two implications for health librarians are highlighted; recognition that EBP is simply the embodiment of one world view and that many others may make a useful contribution and the need to craft a simple message capturing the unique selling points of the profession. To create a unique contribution health librarians require a detailed picture from market research of user information needs. PMID:21831224

Booth, Andrew

2011-09-01

424

Evidence-based medicine and the practicing clinician  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To assess the attitudes of practicing general internists toward evidence-based medicine (EBM—defined as the process of systematically\\u000a finding, appraising, and using contemporaneous research findings as the basis for clinical decisions) and their perceived\\u000a barriers to its use.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a DESIGN: Cross-sectional, self-administered mail questionnaire conducted between June and October 1997.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a SETTING: Canada.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a PARTICIPANTS: Questionnaires were sent to all 521 physician members

Finlay A. McAlister; Ian Graham; Gerald W. Karr; Andreas Laupacis

1999-01-01

425

Interventional Techniques: Evidence-based Practice Guidelines in the Management of Chronic Spinal Pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The evidence-based practice guidelines for the management of chronic spinal pain with interventional techniques were developed to provide recommendations to clinicians in the United States. Objective: To develop evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for interventional techniques in the diagnosis and treatment of chronic spinal pain, utilizing all types of evidence and to apply an evidence-based approach, with broad representation of

Mark V. Boswell; Andrea M. Trescot; Sukdeb Datta; David M. Schultz; Hans C. Hansen; Salahadin Abdi; Nalini Sehgal; Rinoo V. Shah; Vijay Singh; Ramsin M. Benyamin; Vikram B. Patel; Ricardo M. Buenaventura; James D. Colson; Harold J. Cordner; Richard S. Epter; Joseph F. Jasper; Elmer E. Dunbar; Sairam L. Atluri; Richard C. Bowman; Timothy R. Deer; John Swicegood; Peter S. Staats; Howard S. Smith; Allen W. Burton; David S. Kloth; James Giordano; Laxmaiah Manchikanti

2007-01-01

426

Factors associated with non evidence-based prescribing of antipsychotics  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Non evidence-based prescribing of antipsychotics is common in the UK and internationally with high doses and polypharmacy the norm. These practices often remain even after systematic attempts are made to change. We aimed to establish which factors are linked to antipsychotic prescribing quality so we can identify and target patients for interventions to improve quality and allow us to understand further the drivers of non evidence-based prescribing. Objectives: A cross-sectional survey with a collection of factors potentially affecting antipsychotic prescribing quality outcomes was carried out in eight secondary care units in England. Participants were inpatients prescribed regular antipsychotics on the day of the survey. Antipsychotic dose, polypharmacy, type and route were the main outcome measures. Objectives: Data were collected for 1198 patients. Higher total dose was associated with greater weight, higher number of previous admissions, longer length of admission, noncompliance with medication and use of an atypical antipsychotic. A lower total dose was associated with clozapine use. Polypharmacy was associated with not being a patient at the South London and Maudsley NHS Trust centre, the subject having a forensic history, a greater number of previous admissions and higher total dose. Younger age, not being detained under a Mental Health Act section, atypical antipsychotic use and oral route were predictors of antipsychotic monotherapy. Atypical antipsychotic use was associated with oral route, higher total dose, being administered only one antipsychotic, having had fewer previous antipsychotics and no anticholinergic use. Use of the oral route was associated with not being sectioned under the Mental Health Act, atypical antipsychotic use, younger age, non-schizophrenia diagnosis, fewer previous admissions and a lower total dose. Objectives: In patients with chronic illness who are detained, heavier, noncompliant, not taking clozapine and on a depot antipsychotic, prescribers use larger doses and antipsychotic polypharmacy. We found that use of percentage of licensed maximum doses favours typical antipsychotics arbitrarily, and that high doses and polypharmacy are inextricably linked. PMID:25489476

Connolly, Anne

2014-01-01

427

An evidence and consensus based guideline for acute diarrhoea management  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE—To develop an evidence and consensus based guideline for the management of the child who presents to hospital with diarrhoea (with or without vomiting), a common problem representing 16% of all paediatric medical attenders at an accident and emergency department. Clinical assessment, investigations (biochemistry and stool culture in particular), admission, and treatment are addressed. The guideline aims to aid junior doctors in recognising children who need admission for observation and treatment and those who may safely go home.?EVIDENCE—A systematic review of the literature was performed. Selected articles were appraised, graded, and synthesised qualitatively. Statements on recommendation were generated.?CONSENSUS—An anonymous, postal Delphi consensus process was used. A panel of 39 selected medical and nursing staff were asked to grade their agreement with the generated statements. They were sent the papers, appraisals, and literature review. On the second and third rounds they were asked to re-grade their agreement in the light of other panellists' responses. Consensus was predefined as 83% of panellists agreeing with the statement.?RECOMMENDATIONS—Clinical signs useful in assessment of level of dehydration were agreed. Admission to a paediatric facility is advised for children who show signs of dehydration. For those with mild to moderate dehydration, estimated deficit is replaced over four hours with oral rehydration solution (glucose based, 200-250 mOsm/l) given "little and often". A nasogastric tube should be used if fluid is refused and normal feeds started following rehydration. Children at high risk of dehydration should be observed to ensure at least maintenance fluid is tolerated. Management of more severe dehydration is detailed. Antidiarrhoeal medication is not indicated.?VALIDATION—The guideline has been successfully implemented and evaluated in a paediatric accident and emergency department.?? PMID:11466188

Armon, K; Stephenson, T; MacFaul, R; Eccleston, P; Werneke, U; BAUMER, H.

2001-01-01

428

Treatment of cutaneous warts: an evidence-based review.  

PubMed

Cutaneous warts are common skin lesions caused by human papillomavirus infection. Treatment is aimed at relieving the patient's physical and psychological discomfort and at preventing the spread of infection by autoinoculation. Among the available medical and destructive therapeutic options for cutaneous warts, none is uniformly effective or virucidal. Moreover, in most cases their safety and efficacy has not been assessed in double-blind, controlled clinical trials, so that the reproducibility of many of the listed treatments is difficult to evaluate and a possible placebo effect cannot be ruled out. The aim of this article is to describe the outcome of current therapies for each clinical wart type according to evidence-based medicine studies published in the literature. For each clinical form, the existing treatments are classified as first-, second-, and third-line therapy. First-line therapy includes medical treatments (salicylic acid, silver nitrate, glutaraldehyde) that are useful to treat a single wart or a few and/or small common warts of short duration (less than 1 year). If these treatments have failed or are contraindicated, cryotherapy may be considered as second-line therapy. For recurrent or difficult-to-treat lesions, third-line therapy includes a variety of alternative therapeutic options (topical, intralesional, systemic, and physical destruction) that are generally off-label (not US FDA approved), and whose use is limited by drawbacks or adverse effects. From pooled evidence-based medicine data, it is possible to conclude that significantly higher remission rates may be expected only with cryotherapy and salicylic acid used in combination. PMID:22292461

Dall'oglio, Federica; D'Amico, Valentina; Nasca, Maria R; Micali, Giuseppe

2012-04-01

429

Automatic classification of sentences to support Evidence Based Medicine  

PubMed Central

Aim Given a set of pre-defined medical categories used in Evidence Based Medicine, we aim to automatically annotate sentences in medical abstracts with these labels. Method We constructed a corpus of 1,000 medical abstracts annotated by hand with specified medical categories (e.g. Intervention, Outcome). We explored the use of various features based on lexical, semantic, structural, and sequential information in the data, using Conditional Random Fields (CRF) for classification. Results For the classification tasks over all labels, our systems achieved micro-averaged f-scores of 80.9% and 66.9% over datasets of structured and unstructured abstracts respectively, using sequential features. In labeling only the key sentences, our systems produced f-scores of 89.3% and 74.0% over structured and unstructured abstracts respectively, using the same sequential features. The results over an external dataset were lower (f-scores of 63.1% for all labels, and 83.8% for key sentences). Conclusions Of the features we used, the best for classifying any given sentence in an abstract were based on unigrams, section headings, and sequential information from preceding sentences. These features resulted in improved performance over a simple bag-of-words approach, and outperformed feature sets used in previous work. PMID:21489224

2011-01-01

430

New Evidence-Based Treatment Approach in Behçet's Disease  

PubMed Central

Behçet's disease (BD) is a chronic, relapsing, and debilitating systemic vasculitis of unknown aetiology with the clinical features of mucocutaneous lesions, ocular, vascular, articular, neurologic, gastrointestinal, urogenital, and pulmonary involvement. The disease is much more frequent along the ancient “Silk Route” extending from Eastern Asia to the Mediterranean basin, compared with Western countries. The disease usually starts around the third or fourth decade of life. Male sex and a younger age of onset are associated with more severe disease. Although the treatment has become much more effective in recent years, BD is still associated with severe morbidity and considerable mortality. The main aim of the treatment should be the prevention of irreversible organ damage. Therefore, close monitoring, early, and appropriate treatment is mandatory to reduce morbidity and mortality. The treatment is mainly based on the suppression of inflammatory attacks of the disease using immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive agents. In this paper, current state of knowledge regarding the therapeutic approaches is outlined. To provide a rational framework for selecting the appropriate therapy along the various treatment choices, a stepwise, symptom-based, evidence-based algorithmic approach was developed. PMID:22007346

Alpsoy, Erkan

2012-01-01

431

Evidence-Based Practice Knowledge, Use, and Factors that Influence Decisions: Results from an Evidence-Based Practice Survey of Providers in American Indian/Alaska Native Communities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data from the Evidence-based Treatment Survey were used to compare providers serving families in American Indian and Alaska Native communities to their counterparts in non-American Indian/Alaska Native communities on provider characteristics and factors that influence their decision to use evidence-based practices (N = 467). The findings suggest…

Sheehan, Angela; Walrath-Greene, Christine; Fisher, Sylvia; Crossbear, Shannon; Walker, Joseph

2007-01-01

432

Using informatics principles and tools to harness research evidence for patient care: evidence-based informatics.  

PubMed

With the huge worldwide investment in biomedical research during the past 50 years, there are many important advances in health care knowledge each year. Unfortunately, it commonly takes over 20 years for even the most important of these advances to be widely integrated into clinical practice. Many potentially remediable factors are responsible for this dilemma in research transfer, including defective continuing education for health professionals and patients; increasingly complex medical regimens; diminishing resources for health care; and inadequate evidence management. The principles and procedures of health informatics can help overcome some of these barriers to research transfer, particularly such evidence management tasks as retrieving, processing, summarizing, disseminating and applying evidence for clinical care. Evidence retrieval has been improved by better indexing and electronic search engines, by improved access from clinical and other settings, and by integration of evidence into clinical decision support systems. Evidence processing has been greatly accelerated by streamlined methods of critical appraisal of research and by centralization of these procedures for the development of current awareness publications and cumulative "best evidence" databases. The Cochrane Collaboration has revolutionized the summarization (systematic review) of evidence. The internet has provided access to patients, practitioners, and policy makers, alike. Direct-from-patient automated data collection promises to move the connection between evidence and practice to a higher level. In all of these innovations, health care practice is most likely to be enhanced by intertwining best evidence with best informatics techniques. PMID:10384550

Haynes, R B

1998-01-01

433

Weak Behavioral Equivalences for Verifying Secure and Performance-Aware Component-Based Systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Component-based systems are characterized by several orthogonal requirements, ranging from security to quality of service, which may demand for the use of opposite strategies and interfering mechanisms. To achieve a balanced tradeoff among these aspects, we have previously proposed the use of a predictive methodology, which encompasses classical tools such as the noninterference approach to security analysis and standard performance evaluation techniques. The former tool, which is based on equivalence checking, is used to reveal functional dependencies among component behaviors, while the latter tool, which relies on reward-based numerical analysis, is used to study the quantitative impact of these dependencies on the system performance. In order to strengthen the relation between these two different analysis techniques we advocate the use of performance-aware notions of behavioral equivalence as a formal means for detecting functional and performance dependencies and then pinpointing the metrics at the base of a balanced tradeoff.

Aldini, Alessandro; Bernardo, Marco

434

The Impact of Evidence-Based Practice Implementation and Fidelity Monitoring on Staff Turnover: Evidence for a Protective Effect  

PubMed Central

Staff retention is an ongoing challenge in mental health and community-based service organizations. Little is known about the impact of evidence-based practice implementation on the mental health and social service workforce. The present study examined the effect of evidence-based practice implementation and ongoing fidelity monitoring on staff retention in a children’s services system. The study took place in the context of a statewide regionally randomized effectiveness trial of an evidence-based intervention designed to reduce child neglect. Twenty-one teams consisting of 153 home-based service providers were followed over a 29 month period. Survival analyses revealed greater staff retention in the condition where the evidence-based practice was implemented along with ongoing fidelity monitoring presented to staff as supportive consultation. These results should help to allay concerns about staff retention when implementing evidence-based practices where there is good values-innovation fit and when fidelity monitoring is designed as an aid and support to service providers in providing a high standard of care for children and families. PMID:19309186

Aarons, Gregory A.; Sommerfeld, David H.; Hecht, Debra B.; Silovsky, Jane F.; Chaffin, Mark J.

2009-01-01

435

78 FR 33853 - Announcement for the National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices (NREPP): Open...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices (NREPP): Open...National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices (NREPP): Open...National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP) is a...

2013-06-05

436

Nurse practitioner clinical decision-making and evidence-based practice.  

PubMed

Evidence-based practice is key to improving patient outcomes but can be challenging for busy nurse practitioners to implement. This article describes the process of critically appraising evidence for use in clinical practice and offers strategies for implementing evidence-based innovations and disseminating the findings. PMID:25882453

Vincent, Deborah; Hastings-Tolsma, Marie; Gephart, Sheila; Alfonzo, Paige M

2015-05-15

437

Evidence-Based Practices in the Field of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: An International Consensus Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As evidence-based practices become increasingly advocated for and used in the human services field it is important to integrate issues raised by three perspectives on evidence: empirical-analytical, phenomenological-existential, and post-structural. This article presents and discusses an evidence-based conceptual model and measurement framework…

Schalock, Robert L.; Verdugo, Miguel Angel; Gomez, Laura E.

2011-01-01

438

Cancer Detection and Prevention 26 (2002) 350361 Evidence-based policy recommendations on cancer  

E-print Network

Cancer Detection and Prevention 26 (2002) 350­361 Review Evidence-based policy recommendations Ideally, practice guidelines for cancer prevention should reflect the available empirical evidence of evidence-based medicine has underscored the need for consortia of researchers specialized in reviewing

Barthelat, Francois

439

Evidence-Based Practice in Psychology among College Counseling Center Clinicians  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This empirically based study sought to discover factors underlying diverse sources of information used to inform therapy practice, perceived salience of sources of evidence for clinical practice, importance of common factors to therapy efficiency, and beliefs about evidence-based practice, particularly in the form of evidence-supported treatments…

Cooper, Stewart E.; Benton, Sherry A.; Benton, Stephen L.; Phillips, Julia C.

2008-01-01

440

Evidence-based Radiology: A New Approach to the Practice of Radiology1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Top ABSTRACT In this review, the principles of evidence-based health care and their application to radiology are discussed. Evidence-based health care involves the more formal integration of the best research evidence with clinical expertise and explicit acknowledgment of patient values in clinical decision making, as compared with conventional practice. Recently, many health care disciplines have adopted the principles and practice

Harald O. Stolberg

441

Evidence-Based Practice, Person-in-Environment, and Clinical Social Work: Issues of Practical Concern  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a movement that has gained recent momentum in social work following the tradition of evidence-based medicine (EBM). Use of EBP as a guiding philosophy of clinical social work practice has been debated among academics, researchers, and clinicians for more than a decade. An area of complexity within EBP involves selecting the best available evidence while accounting

Beverly M. Simmons

2012-01-01

442

Community-Based Prevention Using Simple, Low-Cost, Evidence-Based Kernels and Behavior Vaccines  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A paradox exists in community prevention of violence and drugs. Good research now exists on evidence-based programs, yet extensive expenditures on prevention have not produced community-level results. Various multiproblems are quite prevalent in the United States, such as violence, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), conduct problems,…

Embry, Dennis D.

2004-01-01

443

Advancing the Evidence Base of Rehabilitation Treatments: A Developmental Approach  

PubMed Central

Translational research refers to the development of new scientific discoveries into evidence-based treatments for human diseases and conditions. This developmental process requires that a number of scientific, as well as social and psychological obstacles, be overcome during a sequence of research stages that address different goals. Rehabilitation, like other biomedical disciplines, requires this kind of developmental process. For a variety of reasons, however, development of rehabilitation treatments is less linear than the familiar phases of pharmaceutical research. In addition, research on treatments intended to address impairments (body structure/function, in terms of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health), faces the challenge of determining the likely impact of an impairment-level treatment on the multifaceted activities and aspects of participation that are the typical goals of rehabilitation treatments. This article describes the application of treatment theory and enablement theory to the development of new impairment-based treatments, and examines similarities and differences between the developmental sequence needed for rehabilitation treatment research versus pharmaceutical research in other areas of medicine. PMID:22683206

Whyte, John; Barrett, A.M.

2013-01-01

444

A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED KINETIC MODEL OF RAT AND MOUSE GESTATION: DISPOSITION OF A WEAK ACID  

EPA Science Inventory

A physiologically based toxicokinetic model of gestation in the rat mouse has been developed. The model is superimposed on the normal growth curve for nonpregnant females. It describes the entire gestation period including organogenesis. The model consists of uterus, mammary tiss...

445

Mining Weakly Labeled Web Facial Images for Search-Based Face Annotation  

E-print Network

3 1 INTRODUCTION Due to the popularity of various digital cameras and the rapid growth of social media tools for internet-based photo sharing [1], recent years have witnessed an explosion of the number to annotate facial images automatically. Auto face annotation can be beneficial to many real- world

Hoi, Steven Chu-Hong

446

Strengths and Weaknesses of Elementary and Secondary Education in Uganda: Evaluation Based on a Teachers' Survey  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study intends to identify the aspects of the Ugandan teachers' jobs and work environment perceived by selective participants as satisfactory, as well as those perceived as less satisfactory or unsatisfactory. The study is based on the assumption that teachers, being directly involved in the current activities of educational institutions, have…

Walugembe, Frederick

2009-01-01

447

Limitations of Observational Evidence: Implications for Evidence-Based Dietary Recommendations12  

PubMed Central

Data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) provide the strongest evidence for establishing relations between exposures, including dietary exposures, and health outcomes. However, not all diet and health outcome relations can be practically or ethically evaluated by using RCTs; therefore, many dietary recommendations are supported by evidence primarily from observational data, particularly those from prospective cohort studies. Although such evidence is of critical importance, limitations are often underappreciated by nutrition scientists and policymakers. This editorial review is intended to 1) highlight some of these limitations of observational evidence for diet-disease relations, including imprecise exposure quantification, collinearity among dietary exposures, displacement/substitution effects, healthy/unhealthy consumer bias, residual confounding, and effect modification; and 2) advocate for greater caution in the communication of dietary recommendations for which RCT evidence of clinical event reduction after dietary intervention is not available. PMID:24425715

Maki, Kevin C.; Slavin, Joanne L.; Rains, Tia M.; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.

2014-01-01

448

Evidence-Based Practice among Dutch Occupational Therapists: Barriers, Perceptions, and Use of Resources  

E-print Network

This study explored how evidence-based practice (EBP) is perceived by Dutch occupational therapists (OTs), what sources of evidence they use to make clinical decisions, and what barriers they experience when implementing EBP. Two-hundred members...

Dö pp, Carola Maria Elizabeth

2009-04-02

449

Evidence for high-pressure core-mantle differentiation from the metal-silicate partitioning of lithophile and weakly-siderophile elements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Liquid Fe metal-liquid silicate partition coefficients for the lithophile and weakly-siderophile elements Ta, Nb, V, Cr, Si, Mn, Ga, In and Zn have been measured in multianvil experiments performed from 2 to 24 GPa, 2023-2873 K and at oxygen fugacities of -1.3 to -4.2 log units relative to the iron-wüstite buffer. Compositional effects of light elements dissolved in the metal liquid (S, C) have been examined and experiments were performed in both graphite and MgO capsules, specifically to address the effect of C solubility in Fe-metal on siderophile element partitioning. The results were used to examine whether there is categorical evidence that a significant portion of metal-silicate equilibration occurred under very high pressures during core-mantle fractionation on Earth. Although the depletion of V from the mantle due to core formation is significantly greater than that of Nb, our results indicate that both elements have similar siderophile tendencies under reducing conditions at low pressures. With increasing pressure, however, Nb becomes less siderophile than V, implying that average metal-silicate equilibration pressures of at least 10-40 GPa are required to explain the Nb/V ratio of the mantle. Similarly the moderately-siderophile, volatile element ratios Ga/Mn and In/Zn are chondritic in the mantle but both volatility and core-mantle equilibration at low pressure would render these ratios strongly sub-chondritic. Our results indicate that pressures of metal-silicate partitioning exceeding 30-60 GPa would be required to render these element ratios chondritic in the mantle. These observations strongly indicate that metal-silicate equilibration must have occurred at high pressures, and therefore support core-formation models that involve deep magma oceans. Moreover, our results allow us to exclude models that envisage primarily low-pressure (<1 GPa) equilibration in relatively small planetary bodies. We also argue that the core cannot contain significant U as this would require metal-silicate equilibration at oxygen fugacities low enough for significant amounts of Ta to have also been extracted from the mantle. Likewise, as In is more siderophile than Pb but similarly volatile and also quite chalcophile it would have been difficult for Pb to enter the core without reversing the relative depletions of these elements in the mantle unless metal-silicate equilibration occurred at high pressures >20 GPa.

Mann, Ute; Frost, Daniel J.; Rubie, David C.

2009-12-01

450

Determination of dissociation constants of weak acids by feedback-based flow ratiometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

We applied the principle of feedback-based flow ratiometry, originally developed for continuous titrations, to the determination of acid dissociation constants (Ka). The titrant (NaOH) flow rate FB was varied in response to a control voltage Vc from a controller, while the total (titrant+titrand) flow rate FT was held constant. The titrand was aspirated to the flow system at the flow

Hideji Tanaka; Kiriko Aritsuka; Takahiro Tachibana; Hiroshi Chuman; Purnendu K. Dasgupta

2003-01-01

451

Novel Evidence-Based Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Responder Index  

PubMed Central

Objective To describe a new systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) Responder Index (SRI) based on the belimumab phase II SLE trial and demonstrate its potential utility in SLE clinical trials. Methods Data from a 449-patient randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 3 doses of belimumab (1, 4, 10 mg/kg) or placebo plus standard of care therapy (SOC) over a 56-week period were analyzed. SELENA-SLEDAI and BILAG SLE disease activity instruments, SF-36 Health Survey, and biomarker analyses were used to create a novel SRI. Response to treatment in a subset of SLE patients (n=321) who were serologically active (ANA ?1:80 and/or anti-dsDNA antibody ?30 IU) at baseline was retrospectively evaluated using the SRI. Results SRI response is defined as: 1) ?4-point reduction in SELENA-SLEDAI score; 2) no new BILAG A or no more than 1 new BILAG B domain score; and 3) no deterioration from baseline in the Physician’s Global Assessment (PGA) by ?0.3 points. In serologically active patients, addition of belimumab to SOC resulted in a response in 46% of patients at week 52 compared with 29% for the placebo patients (P=0.006). SRI responses were independent of baseline autoantibody subtype. Conclusion Evidence-based evaluation of a large randomized, placebo-controlled trial in SLE resulted in the ability to define a robust responder index based on improvement in disease activity without worsening of the overall condition or the development of significant disease activity in new organ systems. PMID:19714615

Furie, Richard A.; Petri, Michelle A.; Wallace, Daniel J.; Ginzler, Ellen M.; Merrill, Joan T.; Stohl, William; Chatham, W. Winn; Strand, Vibeke; Weinstein, Arthur; Chevrier, Marc R.; Zhong, John; Freimuth, William W.

2009-01-01

452

Evidence based practice beliefs and implementation among nurses: a cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Having a positive attitude towards evidence-based practice and being able to see the value of evidence-based practice for patients have been reported as important for the implementation of evidence-based practice among nurses. The aim of this study was to map self-reported beliefs towards EBP and EBP implementation among nurses, and to investigate whether there was a positive correlation between EBP beliefs and EBP implementation. Method We carried out a cross-sectional study among 356 nurses at a specialist hospital for the treatment of cancer in Norway. The Norwegian translations of the Evidence-based Practice Belief Scale and the Evidence-based Practice Implementation Scale were used. Results In total, 185 nurses participated in the study (response rate 52%). The results showed that nurses were positive towards evidence-based practice, but only practised it to a small extent. There was a positive correlation (r) between beliefs towards evidence-based practice and implementation of evidence-based practice (r?=?0.59, p?=?0.001). There was a statistical significant positive, but moderate correlation between all the four subscales of the EBP Beliefs Scale (beliefs related to: 1) knowledge, 2) resources, 3) the value of EBP and 4) difficulty and time) and the EBP Implementation Scale, with the highest correlation observed for beliefs related to knowledge (r?=?0.38, p?evidence-based practice had significantly higher scores on the Evidence-based Practice Belief Scale than participants who were unfamiliar with evidence-based practice. Those involved in evidence-based practice working groups also reported significantly higher scores on the Evidence-based Practice Belief Scale than participants not involved in these groups. Conclusion This study shows that nurses have a positive attitude towards evidence-based practice, but practise it to a lesser extent. There was a positive correlation between beliefs about evidence-based practice and implementation of evidence-based practice. Beliefs related to knowledge appear to have the greatest effect on implementation of evidence-based practice. Having knowledge and taking part in evidence-based practice working groups seem important. PMID:24661602

2014-01-01

453

Treatment Following an Evidence-Based Algorithm versus Individualised Symptom-Oriented Treatment for Atopic Eczema  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Evidence-based treatment algorithms, successfully established for asthma, are missing for atopic eczema (AE). Objectives: To investigate whether treatment according to an evidence-based algorithm is an effective and applicable concept for the management of AE. Methods: Based on a systematic literature review, we developed an evidence-based severity-score-oriented treatment algorithm for AE and compared its effectiveness to that of an individualised

Jochen Schmitt; Michael Meurer; Uta Schwanebeck; Xina Grählert; Knut Schäkel

2008-01-01

454

Introduction to the basics of evidence-based dentistry: concepts and skills.  

PubMed

The purpose of this section of the ADA Champions Pre-Conference is to review the basics of Evidence-based dentistry (EBD), research designs and levels of evidence, and identify the skills necessary for clinicians to efficiently use an evidence-based approach in practice. This session of the pre-conference preceded the session on the skills needed to define a clinical question and search for the evidence to answer that question. PMID:19737662

Forrest, Jane L

2009-09-01

455

The Ozone Trends Panel - CFCs and evidence-based policymaking  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

My involvement with the issue of stratospheric ozone depletion started with my Ph.D studies, which predated the seminal paper of Rowland and Molina in 1974, and focussed on understanding how chlorine and bromine atoms and free radicals interacted with atmospheric constituents (e.g., ozone, oxygen atoms, nitric oxide, nitrogen oxide, methane, etc). My post-doctoral studies and work at the Jet Propulsion laboratory continued my gas-phase kinetic studies into reactions of both stratospheric and tropospheric importance, including understanding the rates of reactions between the hydroxyl radical and HCFCs. This work, along with the results of other laboratory studies, provided a major input to the theoretical modelling work which was projecting significant ozone losses from continued use of chlorofluorocarbons and halons. In 1980 I became the program manager for stratospheric ozone depletion at NASA and provided funding for some ground-breaking laboratory studies, field measurements and theoretical modelling, some in collaboration with NOAA, the fluorocarbon industry and international partners. Highlights included the Antarctic and Arctic aircraft campaigns, which demonstrated beyond doubt that chlorinated and brominated species were the cause of the significant losses of ozone in the polar spring, initiated through novel heterogeneous chemical reactions in the lower stratosphere - the most dramatic observation being the so-called Antarctic Ozone hole. These findings played a critical role in strengthening the Montreal Protocol. In 1980, after joining NASA, I initiated the first International Stratospheric Ozone Assessment, which provided much of the scientific evidence used to develop the 1985 Convention to protect stratospheric ozone. Subsequent international assessments provided the scientific basis for the 1987 Montreal Protocol and the following adjustments and amendments. Key among these assessments was the International Ozone Trends Panel where Sherry Rowland played a pivotal role by chairing the chapter which demonstrated, using ground-based Dobson measurements and satellite observations, significant ozone losses in mid- and high latitudes in both hemispheres, especially in winter. These findings that basically validated the models focussed the attention of Governments that it was not only polar ozone that was being depleted, but ozone over heavily inhabited areas. This provided a stimulus for even stronger regulations to protect the ozone layer. Another facet of my career was to be the technical advisor to the US Government as the Ozone Convention and Montreal Protocol were negotiated. It was a pleasure to see that Governments recognized the importance of world-class research and the international assessments, in developing the Montreal Protocol and the subsequent amendments and adjustments. It is possibly the best example to date of evidence-based policymaking at the global scale.

Watson, R.

2012-12-01

456

Highly sensitive liquid-level sensor based on weak uniform fiber Bragg grating with narrow-bandwidth  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A highly sensitive liquid-level sensor based on weak uniform fiber Bragg grating (FBG) with narrow-bandwidth is proposed and demonstrated. The resonance wavelength of FBG varies as a result of the change of axial strain. According to this characteristic, a precise approach utilizing fiber grating as sensing element to measure height of liquid is achieved. The grating is directly bonded to a float which can transfer buoyancy into axial strain on the fiber. Measurement of liquid level can be realized by monitoring the central wavelength shift of the sensing FBG. The experimental results show that for a liquid-level variation of 25 mm, a high sensitivity of 5.9×10-6 m/pm with a good linearity of 0.991 is achieved. Within bidirectional change of liquid level, crossing sensitivity and long term stability taken into account, the system is of good reliability and stability.

Dai, Yi; Sun, Qizhen; Wo, Jianghai; Li, Xiaolei; Zhang, Manliang; Liu, Deming

2012-04-01

457

Evidence-based pathology: systematic literature reviews as the basis for guidelines and best practices.  

PubMed

Context .- Evidence-based medicine has been proposed as a new paradigm for the identification and evaluation of medical information. Best available evidence or data are identified and used as the basis for the diagnosis and treatment of individual patients. Evidence-based pathology has adapted basic evidence-based medicine concepts to the specific needs of pathology and laboratory medicine. Objectives .- To briefly review the history and basic concepts of evidence-based medicine and evidence-based pathology, describe how to perform and interpret systematic reviews, and discuss how to integrate best evidence into guidelines. Data Sources .- PubMed (National Library of Medicine, Washington, DC) and Web of Science (Thompson Reuters, New York, New York) were used. Conclusions .- Evidence-based pathology provides methodology to evaluate the quality of information published in pathology journals and apply it to the diagnosis of tissue samples and other tests from individual patients. Information is gathered through the use of systematic reviews, using a method that is less biased and more comprehensive than ad hoc literature searches. Published data are classified into evidence levels to provide readers with a quick impression about the quality and probable clinical validity of available information. Best available evidence is combined with personal experience for the formulation of evidence-based, rather than opinion-based, guidelines that address specific practice needs. PMID:25356986

Marchevsky, Alberto M; Wick, Mark R

2015-03-01

458

Weak-lensing detection of intracluster filaments with ground-based data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

According to the current standard model of cosmology, matter in the Universe arranges itself along a network of filamentary structure. These filaments connect the main nodes of this so-called "cosmic web", which are clusters of galaxies. Although its large-scale distribution is clearly characterized by numerical simulations, constraining the dark-matter content of the cosmic web in reality turns out to be difficult. The natural method of choice is gravitational lensing. However, the direct detection and mapping of the elusive filament signal is challenging and in this work we present two methods that are specifically tailored to achieve this task. A linear matched filter aims at detecting the smooth mass-component of filaments and is optimized to perform a shear decomposition that follows the anisotropic component of the lensing signal. Filaments clearly inherit this property due to their morphology. At the same time, the contamination arising from the central massive cluster is controlled in a natural way. The filament 1? detection is of about ? ~ 0.01 - 0.005 according to the filter's template width and length, enabling the detection of structures beyond reach with other approaches. The second, complementary method seeks to detect the clumpy component of filaments. The detection is determined by the number density of subclump identifications in an area enclosing the potential filament, as was found within the observed field with the filter approach. We tested both methods against mocked observations based on realistic N-body simulations of filamentary structure and proved the feasibility of detecting filaments with ground-based data.

Maturi, Matteo; Merten, Julian

2013-11-01

459

Evidence-Based Psychosocial Treatments for Ethnic Minority Youth  

PubMed Central

This article reviews research on evidence-based treatments (EBTs) for ethnic minority youth using criteria from Chambless et al. (1998), Chambless et al. (1996), and Chambless and Hollon (1998). Although no well-established treatments were identified, probably efficacious or possibly efficacious treatments were found for ethnic minority youth with anxiety-related problems, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, depression, conduct problems, substance use problems, trauma-related syndromes, and other clinical problems. In addition, all studies met either Nathan and Gorman's (2002) Type 1 or Type 2 methodological criteria. A brief meta-analysis showed overall treatment effects of medium magnitude (d = .44). Effects were larger when EBTs were compared to no treatment (d = .58) or psychological placebos (d = .51) versus treatment as usual (d = .22). Youth ethnicity (African American, Latino, mixed/other minority), problem type, clinical severity, diagnostic status, and culture-responsive treatment status did not moderate treatment outcome. Most studies had low statistical power and poor representation of less acculturated youth. Few tests of cultural adaptation effects have been conducted in the literature and culturally validated outcome measures are mostly lacking. Recommendations for clinical practice and future research directions are provided. PMID:18444061

Huey, Stanley J.; Polo, Antonio J.

2008-01-01

460

[Parameter of evidence-based medicine in health care economics].  

PubMed

In the view of scarcity of resources, economic evaluations in health care, in which not only effects but also costs related to a medical intervention are examined and a incremental cost-outcome-ratio is build, are an important supplement to the program of evidence based medicine. Outcomes of a medical intervention can be measured by clinical effectiveness, quality-adjusted life years, and monetary evaluation of benefits. As far as costs are concerned, direct medical costs, direct non-medical costs and indirect costs have to be considered in an economic evaluation. Data can be used from primary studies or secondary analysis; metaanalysis for synthesizing of data may be adequate. For calculation of incremental cost-benefit-ratios, models of decision analysis (decision tree models, Markov-models) often are necessary. Methodological and ethical limits for application of the results of economic evaluation in resource allocation decision in health care have to be regarded: Economic evaluations and the calculation of cost-outcome-rations should only support decision making but cannot replace it. PMID:10519192

Wasem, J; Siebert, U

1999-08-01

461

Cultural competence in the era of evidence-based practice.  

PubMed

Cultural competence has become an important concern for contemporary health care delivery, with ethical and legal implications. Numerous educational approaches have been developed to orient clinicians, and standards and position statements promoting cultural competence have been published by both the American Medical Association and the American Nurses Association. Although a number of health care regulatory agencies have developed standards or recommendations, clinical application to patient care has been challenging. These challenges include the abstract nature of the concept, essentializing culture to race or ethnicity, and the attempts to associate culture with health disparities. To make cultural competence relevant to clinical practice, we linked a cultural competency continuum that identifies the levels of cultural competency (cultural destructiveness, cultural incapacity, cultural blindness, cultural precompetence, and cultural proficiency) to well-established values in health care. This situates cultural competence and proficiency in alignment with patient-centered care. A model integrating the cultural competency continuum with the components of evidence-based care (i.e., best research practice, clinical expertise, and patient's values and circumstances) is presented. PMID:18504032

Engebretson, Joan; Mahoney, Jane; Carlson, Elizabeth D

2008-01-01

462

Why evidence-based practice now?: a polemic.  

PubMed

Evidence-based practice (EBP) first appeared on the healthcare horizon just over a decade ago. In 2003 its presence has intensified and extended beyond its initial relation to medicine embracing as it does now, nursing and the allied health disciplines. In this paper, I contend that its appearance and subsequent growth and development are the effects of potent "regimes of truth", four of which bear the names: positivism, empiricism, pragmatism and economic rationalism. My aim is to show how EBP generates the controversy it does because its nature and methods are inextricably interwoven with the way it has become politicised and professionalised. This exegesis is an attempt to outline how the combined effects of the four forms of rationality mentioned above allow for both the methods and objectives of EBP to be constructed as they are, while at the same moment producing the particular effects of knowledge and power in terms of who sells and who buys the idea of EBP in the culture of contemporary healthcare. PMID:12940967

Walker, Kim

2003-09-01

463

A philosophical analysis of the evidence-based medicine debate  

PubMed Central

Background The term "evidence-based medicine" (or EBM) was introduced about ten years ago, and there has been considerable debate about the value of EBM. However, this debate has sometimes been obscured by a lack of conceptual clarity concerning the nature and status of EBM. Discussion First, we note that EBM proponents have obscured the current debate by defining EBM in an overly broad, indeed almost vacuous, manner; we offer a clearer account of EBM and its relation to the alternative approaches to medicine. Second, while EBM proponents commonly cite the philosophical work of Thomas Kuhn and claim that EBM is a Kuhnian 'paradigm shift,' we argue that such claims are seriously mistaken and unduly polarize the EBM debate. Third, we suggest that it is much more fruitful to understand the relationship between EBM and its alternatives in light of a different philosophical metaphor: W.V. Quine's metaphor of the web of belief. Seen in this way, we argue that EBM is an approach to medical practice that is indeed importantly different from the alternatives. Summary We can have a more productive debate about the value of EBM by being clearer about the nature of EBM and its relationship to alternative approaches to medicine. PMID:12873351

Sehon, Scott R; Stanley, Donald E

2003-01-01

464

Orthodontic anchorage--Evidence-based evaluation of anchorage capacity and patients' perceptions.  

PubMed

Orthodontic anchorage is the ability to resist unwanted reciprocal forces and reinforcement of anchorage by supplementary appliances, in or outside the mouth, is often needed to obtain successful results. In the last 10 years, interest in appliances that use implants has been growing. Successful orthodontic treatment demands effective methods and systematic evaluation of different treatment approaches is therefore essential. Several studies on the efficiency of various anchorage systems have been published, but a critical appraisal or interpretation of evidence that systematically considers validity, results, and relevance has not been made. Analysis of treatment modalities must also include patients' perceptions and potential side-effects. The overall aim of this thesis was to evaluate a new anchorage technique that incorporates osseointegration and compare it with conventional methods concerning effects on tooth movements in adolescents and their acceptance and experience of the additional surgical procedures that osseointegration involves. The following anchorage systems were analyzed: Onplant system, Orthosystem implant, headgear and transpalatal bar. This thesis was based on four studies: Paper I systematically reviewed the efficiency of orthodontic anchorage systems and interpreted the methodological quality of the selected studies from an evidence-based perspective. The literature search spanned January 1966 - December 2004 and was later extended to July 2007. Paper II, a methodological study involving 60 adolescent patients, examined the validity and reliability of a new questionnaire for assessing adolescent patients' perceptions of orthodontic treatment. The questionnaire was based on focus group interviews. Papers III and IV were randomized controlled trials involving 120 adolescent patients in orthodontic treatment. Paper III evaluated and compared adolescent patients' perceptions of premolar extractions and surgical placement of Onplants and Orthosystem implants. Paper IV compared anchorage capacities of the four systems. These conclusions were drawn: The scientific evidence, found in the review, was too weak to evaluate the efficiency of various anchorage systems (conventional and osseointegrated) during space closure after premolar extraction, and most studies have quality problems. Future randomized controlled trials are recommended. The new questionnaire, developed from focus group interviews, had overall acceptable to good reliability and high face validity. It can therefore be recommended for use in the assessment of adolescents' experiences of orthodontic treatment. Pain intensity after surgical placement of an Orthosystem implant was less than after Onplant installation and premolar extraction. Pain intensity after Onplant installation and premolar extractions were comparable. With respect to pain intensity, discomfort, and analgesic PMID:18210769

Feldmann, Ingalill

2007-01-01

465

Finding, retrieving and evaluating journal and web-based information for evidence-based optometry.  

PubMed

How can optometrists ensure they are basing their advice to patients on the most reliable information available? This paper discusses search tools, databases, websites and journals, which provide free, full-text, web-based access to evidence-based literature. Brief tips on searching these resources are provided for the time-poor practitioner or researcher. Criteria, such as credibility, currency and bias are used to evaluate written material and will be discussed with particular reference to the problems inherent in evaluating web pages. PMID:17535362

Graham, Ann-Maree

2007-07-01