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Sample records for weak evidence base

  1. Evidence of weak pair coupling in the penetration depth of bi-based high-T sub c superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.R.; Sun, Yang Ren; Ossandon, J.G. . Dept. of Physics); Christen, D.K.; Chakoumakos, B.C.; Sales, B.C.; Kerchner, H.R.; Sonder, E.

    1990-01-01

    The magnetic penetration depth {lambda}(T) has been investigated in Bi(Pb)SrCaCuO high-{Tc} compounds having 2- and 3-layers of copper-oxygen per unit cell. Studies of the magnetization in the vortex state were employed and the results were compared with weak and strong coupling calculations. The temperature dependence of {lambda} is described well by BCS theory in the clean limit, giving evidence for weak pair coupling in this family of materials. For the short component of the {lambda} tensor, we obtain values of 292 and 220 nm (T = 0) for Bi-2212 and (BiPb)-2223, respectively.

  2. Evidence of Filamentary Switching in Oxide-based Memory Devices via Weak Programming and Retention Failure Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Younis, Adnan; Chu, Dewei; Li, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Further progress in high-performance microelectronic devices relies on the development of novel materials and device architectures. However, the components and designs that are currently in use have reached their physical limits. Intensive research efforts, ranging from device fabrication to performance evaluation, are required to surmount these limitations. In this paper, we demonstrate that the superior bipolar resistive switching characteristics of a CeO2:Gd-based memory device can be manipulated by means of UV radiation, serving as a new degree of freedom. Furthermore, the metal oxide-based (CeO2:Gd) memory device was found to possess electrical and neuromorphic multifunctionalities. To investigate the underlying switching mechanism of the device, its plasticity behaviour was studied by imposing weak programming conditions. In addition, a short-term to long-term memory transition analogous to the forgetting process in the human brain, which is regarded as a key biological synaptic function for information processing and data storage, was realized. Based on a careful examination of the device’s retention behaviour at elevated temperatures, the filamentary nature of switching in such devices can be understood from a new perspective. PMID:26324073

  3. Evidence of Filamentary Switching in Oxide-based Memory Devices via Weak Programming and Retention Failure Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younis, Adnan; Chu, Dewei; Li, Sean

    2015-09-01

    Further progress in high-performance microelectronic devices relies on the development of novel materials and device architectures. However, the components and designs that are currently in use have reached their physical limits. Intensive research efforts, ranging from device fabrication to performance evaluation, are required to surmount these limitations. In this paper, we demonstrate that the superior bipolar resistive switching characteristics of a CeO2:Gd-based memory device can be manipulated by means of UV radiation, serving as a new degree of freedom. Furthermore, the metal oxide-based (CeO2:Gd) memory device was found to possess electrical and neuromorphic multifunctionalities. To investigate the underlying switching mechanism of the device, its plasticity behaviour was studied by imposing weak programming conditions. In addition, a short-term to long-term memory transition analogous to the forgetting process in the human brain, which is regarded as a key biological synaptic function for information processing and data storage, was realized. Based on a careful examination of the device’s retention behaviour at elevated temperatures, the filamentary nature of switching in such devices can be understood from a new perspective.

  4. Evidence of Filamentary Switching in Oxide-based Memory Devices via Weak Programming and Retention Failure Analysis.

    PubMed

    Younis, Adnan; Chu, Dewei; Li, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Further progress in high-performance microelectronic devices relies on the development of novel materials and device architectures. However, the components and designs that are currently in use have reached their physical limits. Intensive research efforts, ranging from device fabrication to performance evaluation, are required to surmount these limitations. In this paper, we demonstrate that the superior bipolar resistive switching characteristics of a CeO2:Gd-based memory device can be manipulated by means of UV radiation, serving as a new degree of freedom. Furthermore, the metal oxide-based (CeO2:Gd) memory device was found to possess electrical and neuromorphic multifunctionalities. To investigate the underlying switching mechanism of the device, its plasticity behaviour was studied by imposing weak programming conditions. In addition, a short-term to long-term memory transition analogous to the forgetting process in the human brain, which is regarded as a key biological synaptic function for information processing and data storage, was realized. Based on a careful examination of the device's retention behaviour at elevated temperatures, the filamentary nature of switching in such devices can be understood from a new perspective. PMID:26324073

  5. The expression and interpretation of uncertain forensic science evidence: verbal equivalence, evidence strength, and the weak evidence effect.

    PubMed

    Martire, Kristy A; Kemp, Richard I; Watkins, Ian; Sayle, Malindi A; Newell, Ben R

    2013-06-01

    Standards published by the Association of Forensic Science Providers (2009, Standards for the formulation of evaluative forensic science expert opinion, Science & Justice, Vol. 49, pp. 161-164) encourage forensic scientists to express their conclusions in the form of a likelihood ratio (LR), in which the value of the evidence is conveyed verbally or numerically. In this article, we report two experiments (using undergraduates and Mechanical Turk recruits) designed to investigate how much decision makers change their beliefs when presented with evidence in the form of verbal or numeric LRs. In Experiment 1 (N = 494), participants read a summary of a larceny trial containing inculpatory expert testimony in which evidence strength (low, moderate, high) and presentation method (verbal, numerical) varied. In Experiment 2 (N = 411), participants read the same larceny trial, this time including either exculpatory or inculpatory expert evidence that varied in strength (low, high) and presentation method (verbal, numerical). Both studies found a reasonable degree of correspondence in observed belief change resulting from verbal and numeric formats. However, belief change was considerably smaller than Bayesian calculations would predict. In addition, participants presented with evidence weakly supporting guilt tended to "invert" the evidence, thereby counterintuitively reducing their belief in the guilt of the accused. This "weak evidence effect" was most apparent in the verbal presentation conditions of both experiments, but only when the evidence was inculpatory. These findings raise questions about the interpretability of LRs by jurors and appear to support an expectancy-based account of the weak evidence effect. PMID:23750600

  6. Evidence of Weak Habitat Specialisation in Microscopic Animals

    PubMed Central

    Fontaneto, Diego; Westberg, Martin; Hortal, Joaquín

    2011-01-01

    Macroecology and biogeography of microscopic organisms (any living organism smaller than 2 mm) are quickly developing into fruitful research areas. Microscopic organisms also offer the potential for testing predictions and models derived from observations on larger organisms due to the feasibility of performing lab and mesocosm experiments. However, more empirical knowledge on the similarities and differences between micro- and macro-organisms is needed to ascertain how much of the results obtained from the former can be generalised to the latter. One potential misconception, based mostly on anedoctal evidence rather than explicit tests, is that microscopic organisms may have wider ecological tolerance and a lower degree of habitat specialisation than large organisms. Here we explicitly test this hypothesis within the framework of metacommunity theory, by studying host specificify in the assemblages of bdelloid rotifers (animals about 350 µm in body length) living in different species of lichens in Sweden. Using several regression-based and ANOVA analyses and controlling for both spatial structure and the kind of substrate the lichen grow over (bark vs rock), we found evidence of significant but weak species-specific associations between bdelloids and lichens, a wide overlap in species composition between lichens, and wide ecological tolerance for most bdelloid species. This confirms that microscopic organisms such as bdelloids have a lower degree of habitat specialisation than larger organisms, although this happens in a complex scenario of ecological processes, where source-sink dynamics and geographic distances seem to have no effect on species composition at the analysed scale. PMID:21887355

  7. [Evidence-based physiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Bender, Tams

    2013-12-01

    This article on physiotherapy presents some current evidence stating the strengths and weaknesses of the physiotherapeutic procedures. In the area of physiotherapy empirical data obtained during decades were overtaken by evidence from current studies. The author points out the great problem of physiotherapy, namely the heterogeneity of the applied parameters. Knowledge of current evidence may be very important and helpful for the physicians, but the author proposes, from the practical point of view, that physiotherapeutical procedures based on exprience and used for many years should not be entirely neglected. Nowadays physiotherapy plays an important role in the treament of locomotor diseases but its use is increasing in other fields of medicine, as well. PMID:24273287

  8. Weak Acid Ionization Constants and the Determination of Weak Acid-Weak Base Reaction Equilibrium Constants in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyasulu, Frazier; McMills, Lauren; Barlag, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory to determine the equilibrium constants of weak acid negative weak base reactions is described. The equilibrium constants of component reactions when multiplied together equal the numerical value of the equilibrium constant of the summative reaction. The component reactions are weak acid ionization reactions, weak base hydrolysis

  9. Weak Acid Ionization Constants and the Determination of Weak Acid-Weak Base Reaction Equilibrium Constants in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyasulu, Frazier; McMills, Lauren; Barlag, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory to determine the equilibrium constants of weak acid negative weak base reactions is described. The equilibrium constants of component reactions when multiplied together equal the numerical value of the equilibrium constant of the summative reaction. The component reactions are weak acid ionization reactions, weak base hydrolysis…

  10. New Evidence about the Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking: Action of an Asymmetric Weak Heat Source.

    PubMed

    Mineo, Placido; Villari, Valentina; Scamporrino, Emilio; Micali, Norberto

    2015-09-17

    In the present study, we show how, in a stagnant water solution of uncharged aggregated achiral porphyrin-based molecules, a mirror-symmetry breaking (SB) can be induced and controlled by means of a weak asymmetric thermal gradient. In particular, it is shown that the optical activity of the aggregate porphyrin solution can be generated and reversed, in sign, only acting on the thermal ramp direction (heating or cooling). In order to avoid data misinterpretation, the aggregate structure modifications with the temperature change and the linear dichroism contribution to circular dichroism spectra were evaluated. A model simulation, using a finite element analysis approach describing the thermal flows, shows that small thermal gradients are able to give rise to asymmetric heat flow. The results reported here can be considered new evidence about the spontaneous symmetry breaking phenomenon induced by very weak forces having an important role in the natural chiral selective processes. PMID:26315854

  11. Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haycock, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Much has been written recently about the importance of "evidence based practice" for teacher librarians. Principals value most collaboration by teacher librarians. Collaboration affects achievement. This article discusses how principals can play a part in teacher-librarian collaboration.

  12. Evidence for weak coupling in sup 145 Pm

    SciTech Connect

    Glasmacher, T.; Caussyn, D.D.; Cottle, P.D.; Johnson, T.D.; Kemper, K.W.; Womble, P.C. )

    1992-04-01

    States in {sup 145}Pm were studied in the reaction {sup 130}Te({sup 19}F,4{ital n}) at a beam energy of 75 MeV using techniques of in-beam {gamma}-ray and conversion electron spectroscopy. Measurements were made of {gamma}-{gamma} coincidences, {gamma}-ray angular distributions, conversion electrons, and excitation functions between 70 and 85 MeV. The reduced {ital B}({ital E}3) transition strength for the 795 keV (11/2{sup {minus}}{r arrow}5/2{sub g.s.}{sup +}) transition was determined to be 7.8(18) Weisskopf units, supporting the interpretation of the 11/2{sup {minus}} state as a {ital h}{sub 11/2} proton state. A negative-parity sequence built on the 11/2{sup {minus}} state as well as eleven new states above the 1503 keV 15/2{sup +} state were found. A weak coupling model can explain the structure of the deduced decay scheme up to an energy of 2.5 MeV.

  13. Weak Evidence of Regeneration Habitat but Strong Evidence of Regeneration Niche for a Leguminous Shrub

    PubMed Central

    Delerue, Florian; Gonzalez, Maya; Michalet, Richard; Pellerin, Sylvain; Augusto, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The identification of an ecological niche specific to the regeneration phase has mobilised significant attention. However, the importance of the regeneration niche concept remains unclear. Our main objective was to study the existence of such a regeneration niche for a leguminous shrub, Ulex europaeus. This study was carried out in southwest France in the context of water and nutrient stresses (mainly phosphorus limitation) due to the presence of nutrient-poor sandy soils. We analysed the regeneration of the species from the germination of seeds and emergence of new seedlings until the seedlings reached young shrub size. Our design included a P fertilisation treatment. We also investigated microsite characteristics (micro-topography and vegetation development) as they can interact with meteorological conditions and determine water availability for seeds and seedlings. We found that P availability controlled seedling growth and the time necessary to reach young shrub size. Water availability appeared to impact the species germination and seedlings survival. We also found that P and water availability depended on the interactions between microsite characteristics and climatic variations. Finally we found evidence that P and water availability are important ecological factors shaping the regeneration niche of the species, but we found weak evidence that any microsite would be appropriate for the regeneration of the species in the long term. Future studies regarding regeneration niches need to distinguish more clearly the ecological factors important for regeneration (the regeneration niche per se) and the physical world where the seedlings appear and develop (the regeneration habitat). PMID:26098877

  14. Wafer weak point detection based on aerial images or WLCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Guoxiang; Philipp, Peter; Litt, Lloyd C.; Ackmann, Paul; Crell, Christian; Chen, Norman

    2015-10-01

    Aerial image measurement is a key technique for model based optical proximity correction (OPC) verification. Actual aerial images obtained by AIMS (aerial image measurement system) or WLCD (wafer level critical dimension) can detect printed wafer weak point structures in advance of wafer exposure and defect inspection. Normally, the potential wafer weak points are determined based on optical rule check (ORC) simulation in advance. However, the correlation to real wafer weak points is often not perfect due to the contribution of mask three dimension (M3D) effects, actual mask errors, and scanner lens effects. If the design weak points can accurately be detected in advance, it will reduce the wafer fab cost and improve cycle time. WLCD or AIMS tools are able to measure the aerial images CD and bossung curve through focus window. However, it is difficult to detect the wafer weak point in advance without defining selection criteria. In this study, wafer weak points sensitive to mask mean-to-nominal values are characterized for a process with very high MEEF (normally more than 4). Aerial image CD uses fixed threshold to detect the wafer weak points. By using WLCD through threshold and focus window, the efficiency of wafer weak point detection is also demonstrated. A novel method using contrast range evaluation is shown in the paper. Use of the slope of aerial images for more accurate detection of the wafer weak points using WLCD is also discussed. The contrast range can also be used to detect the wafer weak points in advance. Further, since the mean to nominal of the reticle contributes to the effective contrast range in a high MEEF area this work shows that control of the mask error is critical for high MEEF layers such as poly, active and metal layers. Wafer process based weak points that cannot be detected by wafer lithography CD or WLCD will be discussed.

  15. From evidence based bioethics to evidence based social policies.

    PubMed

    Bonneux, Luc

    2007-01-01

    In this issue, Norwegian authors demonstrate that causes of early expulsion out the workforce are rooted in childhood. They reconstruct individual biographies in administrative databases linked by an unique national identification number, looking forward 15 years in early adulthood and looking back 20 years till birth with close to negligible loss to follow up. Evidence based bioethics suggest that it is better to live in a country that allows reconstructing biographies in administrative databases then in countries that forbid access by restrictive legislation based on privacy considerations. The benefits of gained knowledge from existing and accessible information are tangible, particularly for the weak and the poor, while the harms of theoretical privacy invasion have not yet materialised. The study shows once again that disadvantage runs in families. Low parental education, parental disability and unstable marital unions predict early disability pensions and premature expulsion out gainful employment. The effect of low parental education is mediated by low education of the index person. However, in a feast of descriptive studies of socio-economic causes of ill health we still face a famine of evaluative intervention studies. An evidence based social policy should be based on effective interventions that are able to break the vicious circles of disability handed down from generation to generation. PMID:17657572

  16. Power-recycled weak-value-based metrology.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Kevin; Dressel, Justin; Jordan, Andrew N; Howell, John C; Kwiat, Paul G

    2015-05-01

    We improve the precision of the interferometric weak-value-based beam deflection measurement by introducing a power recycling mirror, creating a resonant cavity. This results in all the light exiting to the detector with a large deflection, thus eliminating the inefficiency of the rare postselection. The signal-to-noise ratio of the deflection is itself magnified by the weak value. We discuss ways to realize this proposal, using a transverse beam filter and different cavity designs. PMID:25978218

  17. Power-Recycled Weak-Value-Based Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Kevin; Dressel, Justin; Jordan, Andrew N.; Howell, John C.; Kwiat, Paul G.

    2015-05-01

    We improve the precision of the interferometric weak-value-based beam deflection measurement by introducing a power recycling mirror, creating a resonant cavity. This results in all the light exiting to the detector with a large deflection, thus eliminating the inefficiency of the rare postselection. The signal-to-noise ratio of the deflection is itself magnified by the weak value. We discuss ways to realize this proposal, using a transverse beam filter and different cavity designs.

  18. Evidence-Based Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Yammine, Kaissar

    2014-01-01

    Anatomy is a descriptive basic medical science that is no longer considered a research-led discipline. Many publications in clinical anatomy are prevalence studies treating clinically relevant anatomical variations and reporting their frequencies and/or associations with variables such as age, sex, side, laterality, and ancestry. This article discusses the need to make sense of the available literature. A new concept, evidence-based anatomy (EBA), is proposed to find, appraise, and synthetize the results reported in such publications. It consists in applying evidence-based principles to the field of epidemiological anatomy research through evidence synthesis using systematic reviews and meta-analyses to generate weighted pooled results. Pooled frequencies and associations based on large pooled sample size are likely to be more accurate and to reflect true population statistics and associations more closely. A checklist of a typical systematic review in anatomy is suggested and the implications of EBA for practice and future research, along with its scope, are discussed. The EBA approach would have positive implications for the future preservation of anatomy as a keystone basic science, for sound knowledge of anatomical variants, and for the safety of medical practice. Clin. Anat. 27:847852, 2014. PMID:24797314

  19. Experimentally quantifying the advantages of weak-value-based metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viza, Gerardo I.; Martnez-Rincn, Julin; Alves, Gabriel B.; Jordan, Andrew N.; Howell, John C.

    2015-09-01

    We experimentally investigate the relative advantages of implementing weak-value-based metrology versus standard methods. While the techniques outlined herein apply more generally, we measure small optical beam deflections both using a Sagnac interferometer with a monitored dark port (the weak-value-based technique), and by focusing the entire beam to a split detector (the standard technique). By introducing controlled external transverse detector modulations and transverse beam deflection momentum modulations, we quantify the mitigation of these sources in the weak-value-based experiment versus the standard focusing experiment. The experiments are compared using a combination of deterministic and stochastic methods. In all cases, the weak-value technique performs the same or better than the standard technique by up to two orders of magnitude in precision for our parameters. We further measure the statistical efficiency of the weak-value-based technique. By postselecting on 1 % of the photons, we obtain 99 % of the available Fisher information of the beam deflection parameter.

  20. School-Based Sexuality Education in Portugal: Strengths and Weaknesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rocha, Ana Cristina; Leal, Cludia; Duarte, Cidlia

    2016-01-01

    Portugal, like many other countries, faces obstacles regarding school-based sexuality education. This paper explores Portuguese schools' approaches to implementing sexuality education at a local level, and provides a critical analysis of potential strengths and weaknesses. Documents related to sexuality education in a convenience sample of 89

  1. Hydrogen sensing array based on weak fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Wei; Yang, Minghong; Hu, Chenyuan; Dai, Jixiang; Li, Zhi; Yu, Haihu

    2015-09-01

    Optical fiber hydrogen sensing system based on weak fiber Bragg grating (WFBG) array deposited with palladium (Pd) film is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. For multi-point measurement, three hydrogen WFBG sensors array are weld in a single optical fiber. A time-division multiplexing (TDM) interrogation system is employed to demodulate the sensing array. Sensing experiments to different hydrogen concentrations ranging from 0 to 3.6% are conducted, and the results show good agreement with standard FBG technology. Due to its strong multiplexing capability of weak FBG, the system is possible to integrate thousands of WFBG hydrogen sensors in a single optical fiber.

  2. A Weak Value Based QKD Protocol Robust Against Detector Attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troupe, James

    2015-03-01

    We propose a variation of the BB84 quantum key distribution protocol that utilizes the properties of weak values to insure the validity of the quantum bit error rate estimates used to detect an eavesdropper. The protocol is shown theoretically to be secure against recently demonstrated attacks utilizing detector blinding and control and should also be robust against all detector based hacking. Importantly, the new protocol promises to achieve this additional security without negatively impacting the secure key generation rate as compared to that originally promised by the standard BB84 scheme. Implementation of the weak measurements needed by the protocol should be very feasible using standard quantum optical techniques.

  3. On the interpretation of likelihood ratios in forensic science evidence: Presentation formats and the weak evidence effect.

    PubMed

    Martire, K A; Kemp, R I; Sayle, M; Newell, B R

    2014-07-01

    Likelihood ratios are increasingly being adopted to convey expert evaluative opinions to courts. In the absence of appropriate databases, many of these likelihood ratios will include verbal rather than numerical estimates of the support offered by the analysis. However evidence suggests that verbal formulations of uncertainty are a less effective form of communication than equivalent numerical formulations. Moreover, when evidence strength is low a misinterpretation of the valence of the evidence - a "weak evidence effect" - has been found. We report the results of an experiment involving N=404 (student and online) participants who read a brief summary of a burglary trial containing expert testimony. The expert evidence was varied across conditions in terms of evidence strength (low or high) and presentation method (numerical, verbal, table or visual scale). Results suggest that of these presentation methods, numerical expressions produce belief-change and implicit likelihood ratios which were most commensurate with those intended by the expert and most resistant to the weak evidence effect. These findings raise questions about the extent to which low strength verbal evaluative opinions can be effectively communicated to decision makers at trial. PMID:24814330

  4. [Evidence-based prevention].

    PubMed

    Valsecchi, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this contribution is to indicate the situation of the initiatives ongoing in the nation to abolish preventative action lacking evident and solid foundations of efficacy from our health legislation. The status of the proposal for the bill, "Measures for the simplification of administrative duties related to the protection of health and other health-related actions", is illustrated, as well as the ongoing work of the "EBP (Evidence Based Prevention) subcommittee" instituted within the permanent scientific committee of the CCM. The national situation regarding two of the first interventions of rationalization activated is presented: the abolition of health controls for food workers and health controls on minors with low-risk jobs. The first data are presented of the latest monitoring of the administrative and health effects in the Veneto Region following the abolition of LISA, which occurred in 2004. A troubling evaluation is expressed on the state of the attempt to renew prevention in the nation especially regarding the sectors of veterinary medicine and job-related medicine. Further effort on the part of scientific societies is hoped for and the necessity of a strong initiative by the coordinating inter-regional prevention round-table is demonstrated. The round-table should take the initiative to discuss with the CCM a work program that involves evaluation interventions in all areas of prevention, including those relative to work-places and veterinary services. In this way, an attempt to reconstruct, from the bottom-up, a unitary vision of intervention will be possible, one that is now strongly fragmented at the level of the central government. PMID:18773600

  5. Human action recognition based on estimated weak poses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Wenjuan; Gonzlez, Jordi; Roca, Francesc Xavier

    2012-12-01

    We present a novel method for human action recognition (HAR) based on estimated poses from image sequences. We use 3D human pose data as additional information and propose a compact human pose representation, called a weak pose, in a low-dimensional space while still keeping the most discriminative information for a given pose. With predicted poses from image features, we map the problem from image feature space to pose space, where a Bag of Poses (BOP) model is learned for the final goal of HAR. The BOP model is a modified version of the classical bag of words pipeline by building the vocabulary based on the most representative weak poses for a given action. Compared with the standard k-means clustering, our vocabulary selection criteria is proven to be more efficient and robust against the inherent challenges of action recognition. Moreover, since for action recognition the ordering of the poses is discriminative, the BOP model incorporates temporal information: in essence, groups of consecutive poses are considered together when computing the vocabulary and assignment. We tested our method on two well-known datasets: HumanEva and IXMAS, to demonstrate that weak poses aid to improve action recognition accuracies. The proposed method is scene-independent and is comparable with the state-of-art method.

  6. Weak target extraction algorithm based on nonsubsampled contourlet transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhang; Fan, Zhongcheng

    2015-12-01

    A new target extraction algorithm based Nonsubsampled Contourlet Transform(NSCT) is proposed according to the difficulty of weak target extraction. Paper detailed analyses and summarizes the data feature of image in NSCT domain, proposes a weak target extraction algorithm using high-frequency coefficients and mathematical morphology. The high-frequency coefficients were calculated by NSCT at first. Then the high-frequency coefficients were processed for noise cancellation by adaptive thresholds in corresponding sub-band. After these operations, the mathematical morphology method was adopted to remedy the defects of image contour. Finally, the object image is obtained by inverse NSCT. The simulation results show that this method can detect the target information fast and accurately, can meet the practical requirement.

  7. Weakly separable bases for fast segmented image coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philips, Wilfried R.

    1994-06-01

    In Segmented Image Coding (SIC), an image is segmented into several homogeneous regions. In each of the regions, the image intensity function is represented by a weighted sum of orthogonal base functions. In existing SIC-methods, the bases are generated by Gram-Schmidt Orthogonalization of a nonorthogonal polynomial (or sometimes sinusoidal) starting base. Unfortunately, the orthogonal base for a segment depends on the segment's shape and must be recomputed for every region. Therefore, the computational demands of SIC are much higher than those of block coding. This paper shows that when the starting base is orthogonalized in a different order, the resulting orthogonal base functions are the product of two component functions. This property is called weak separability. In the weakly separable case, only the component functions appear in computations, which implies that it is not necessary to explicitly evaluate the orthogonal bases. The major advantage of the new approach is that the component functions can be generated quickly using three-term recurrences and that little memory is needed for storing them. Consequently the (components of) the new bases can be computed much faster than the classical bases (typically 10-25 times) and using less memory. This is true, even though both methods produce images of the same subjective quality. The paper also shows that a wide variety of other orthogonal bases is obtained by considering more general starting bases. The spatial properties of the corresponding base functions are described qualitatively; they are determined by two parameter functions and can be modified by appropriately selecting these parameter functions.

  8. Weak hard X-ray emission from broad absorption line quasars: evidence for intrinsic X-ray weakness

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Scott, A. E.; Alexander, D. M.; Gandhi, P.; Stern, D.; Teng, S. H.; Arévalo, P.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Farrah, D.; Hailey, C. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Koss, M.; Ogle, P.; Puccetti, S.; Saez, C.; and others

    2014-10-10

    We report NuSTAR observations of a sample of six X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. These targets, at z = 0.148-1.223, are among the optically brightest and most luminous BAL quasars known at z < 1.3. However, their rest-frame ≈2 keV luminosities are 14 to >330 times weaker than expected for typical quasars. Our results from a pilot NuSTAR study of two low-redshift BAL quasars, a Chandra stacking analysis of a sample of high-redshift BAL quasars, and a NuSTAR spectral analysis of the local BAL quasar Mrk 231 have already suggested the existence of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars, i.e., quasars not emitting X-rays at the level expected from their optical/UV emission. The aim of the current program is to extend the search for such extraordinary objects. Three of the six new targets are weakly detected by NuSTAR with ≲ 45 counts in the 3-24 keV band, and the other three are not detected. The hard X-ray (8-24 keV) weakness observed by NuSTAR requires Compton-thick absorption if these objects have nominal underlying X-ray emission. However, a soft stacked effective photon index (Γ{sub eff} ≈ 1.8) for this sample disfavors Compton-thick absorption in general. The uniform hard X-ray weakness observed by NuSTAR for this and the pilot samples selected with <10 keV weakness also suggests that the X-ray weakness is intrinsic in at least some of the targets. We conclude that the NuSTAR observations have likely discovered a significant population (≳ 33%) of intrinsically X-ray weak objects among the BAL quasars with significantly weak <10 keV emission. We suggest that intrinsically X-ray weak quasars might be preferentially observed as BAL quasars.

  9. A weak blind signature scheme based on quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiaojun; Niu, Xiamu; Ji, Liping; Tian, Yuan

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we present a weak blind signature scheme based on the correlation of EPR (Einstein-Padolsky-Rosen) pairs. Different from classical blind signature schemes and current quantum signature schemes, our quantum blind signature scheme could guarantee not only the unconditionally security but also the anonymity of the message owner. To achieve that, quantum key distribution and one-time pad are adopted in our scheme. Experimental analysis proved that our scheme have the characteristics of non-counterfeit, non-disavowal, blindness and traceability. It has a wide application to E-payment system, E-government, E-business, and etc.

  10. Evidence-based follitropin.

    PubMed

    Cunha-Filho, Joao Sabino

    2006-08-01

    The proper utilization of gonadotrophin during ovarian stimulation is absolutely essential and can modify the results (pregnancy rates). Moreover, several compounds and preparations are now available for use. This commentary discusses those preparations of follitropin (FbM and FbB) and the most relevant epidemiological evidence to obtain the best result during ovarian stimulation. PMID:16895623

  11. Seismic evidence for a weak radial differential rotation in intermediate-mass core helium burning stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deheuvels, S.; Ballot, J.; Beck, P. G.; Mosser, B.; stensen, R.; Garca, R. A.; Goupil, M. J.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The detection of mixed modes that are split by rotation in Kepler red giants has made it possible to probe the internal rotation profiles of these stars, which brings new constraints on the transport of angular momentum in stars. Rotation rates in the central regions of intermediate-mass core helium burning stars (secondary clump stars) have recently been measured. Aims: Our aim is to exploit the rotational splittings of mixed modes to estimate the amount of radial differential rotation in the interior of secondary clump stars using Kepler data in order to place constraints on angular momentum transport in intermediate-mass stars. Methods: We select a subsample of Kepler secondary clump stars with mixed modes that are clearly rotationally split. By applying a thorough statistical analysis, we show that the splittings of gravity-dominated modes (trapped in central regions) and of p-dominated modes (trapped in the envelope) can be measured. We then use these splittings to estimate the amount of differential rotation by using inversion techniques and by applying a simplified approach based on asymptotic theory. Results: We obtain evidence for a weak radial differential rotation for six of the seven targets that were selected, with the central regions rotating from 1.8 0.3 to 3.2 1.0 times faster than the envelope. The last target is found to be consistent with a solid-body rotation. Conclusions: This demonstrates that an efficient redistribution of angular momentum occurs after the end of the main sequence in the interior of intermediate-mass stars, either during the short-lived subgiant phase or once He-burning has started in the core. In either case, this should bring constraints on the angular momentum transport mechanisms that are at work.

  12. Evidence-Based Compression

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Rhys J.; Woodcock, John P.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the currently published scientific evidence for the venous flow effects of mechanical devices, particularly intermittent pneumatic compression, and the relation to prevention of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Summary Background Data: While intermittent pneumatic compression is an established method of DVT prophylaxis, the variety of systems that are available can use very different compression techniques and sequences. In order for appropriate choices to be made to provide the optimum protection for patients, the general performance of systems, and physiological effects of particular properties, must be analyzed objectively. Methods: Medline was searched from 1970 to 2002, and all relevant papers were searched for further appropriate references. Papers were selected for inclusion when they addressed specifically the questions posed in this review. Results: All the major types of intermittent compression systems are successful in emptying deep veins of the lower limb and preventing stasis in a variety of subject groups. Compression stockings appear to function more by preventing distension of veins. Rapid inflation, high pressures, and graded sequential intermittent compression systems will have particular augmentation profiles, but there is no evidence that such features improve the prophylactic ability of the system. Conclusions: The most important factors in selecting a mechanical prophylactic system, particularly during and after surgery, are patient compliance and the appropriateness of the site of compression. There is no evidence that the peak venous velocity produced by a system is a valid measure of medical performance. PMID:14745323

  13. Evidence-Based Language Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, Eric J.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to examine evidence-based procedures in medicine and to demonstrate that the same protocols can be used in English language instruction. In the evidence-based methodology, studies are divided into those that address specific language problems. Integrated studies are presented as a systematic overview, meta-analysis,

  14. Direct Evidence of the Transition from Weak to Strong Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyrand, Romain; Galtier, Sébastien; Kiyani, Khurom H.

    2016-03-01

    One of the most important predictions in magnetohydrodynamics is that in the presence of a uniform magnetic field b0e^∥ a transition from weak to strong wave turbulence should occur when going from large to small perpendicular scales. This transition is believed to be a universal property of several anisotropic turbulent systems. We present, for the first time, direct evidence of such a transition using a decaying three-dimensional direct numerical simulation of incompressible balanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with a grid resolution of 30722×256 . From large to small scales, the change of regime is characterized by (i) a change of slope in the energy spectrum going from approximately -2 to -3 /2 , (ii) an increase of the ratio between the wave and nonlinear times, with a critical ratio of χc˜1 /3 , (iii) a modification of the isocontours of energy revealing a transition from a purely perpendicular cascade to a cascade compatible with the critical-balance-type phenomenology, and (iv) an absence followed by a dramatic increase of the communication between Alfvén modes. The changes happen at approximately the same transition scale and can be seen as manifest signatures of the transition from weak to strong wave turbulence. Furthermore, we observe a significant nonlocal three-wave coupling between strongly and weakly nonlinear modes resulting in an inverse transfer of energy from small to large scales.

  15. Direct Evidence of the Transition from Weak to Strong Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Meyrand, Romain; Galtier, Sébastien; Kiyani, Khurom H

    2016-03-11

    One of the most important predictions in magnetohydrodynamics is that in the presence of a uniform magnetic field b_{0}e[over ^]_{∥} a transition from weak to strong wave turbulence should occur when going from large to small perpendicular scales. This transition is believed to be a universal property of several anisotropic turbulent systems. We present, for the first time, direct evidence of such a transition using a decaying three-dimensional direct numerical simulation of incompressible balanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with a grid resolution of 3072^{2}×256. From large to small scales, the change of regime is characterized by (i) a change of slope in the energy spectrum going from approximately -2 to -3/2, (ii) an increase of the ratio between the wave and nonlinear times, with a critical ratio of χ_{c}∼1/3, (iii) a modification of the isocontours of energy revealing a transition from a purely perpendicular cascade to a cascade compatible with the critical-balance-type phenomenology, and (iv) an absence followed by a dramatic increase of the communication between Alfvén modes. The changes happen at approximately the same transition scale and can be seen as manifest signatures of the transition from weak to strong wave turbulence. Furthermore, we observe a significant nonlocal three-wave coupling between strongly and weakly nonlinear modes resulting in an inverse transfer of energy from small to large scales. PMID:27015486

  16. Risk Assessment: Evidence Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.

    2007-01-01

    Human systems PRA (Probabilistic Risk Assessment: a) Provides quantitative measures of probability, consequence, and uncertainty; and b) Communicates risk and informs decision-making. Human health risks rated highest in ISS PRA are based on 1997 assessment of clinical events in analog operational settings. Much work remains to analyze remaining human health risks identified in Bioastronautics Roadmap.

  17. Evidence-Based Management of Anticoagulant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Schulman, Sam; Witt, Daniel M.; Vandvik, Per Olav; Fish, Jason; Kovacs, Michael J.; Svensson, Peter J.; Veenstra, David L.; Crowther, Mark; Guyatt, Gordon H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: High-quality anticoagulation management is required to keep these narrow therapeutic index medications as effective and safe as possible. This article focuses on the common important management questions for which, at a minimum, low-quality published evidence is available to guide best practices. Methods: The methods of this guideline follow those described in Methodology for the Development of Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis Guidelines: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines in this supplement. Results: Most practical clinical questions regarding the management of anticoagulation, both oral and parenteral, have not been adequately addressed by randomized trials. We found sufficient evidence for summaries of recommendations for 23 questions, of which only two are strong rather than weak recommendations. Strong recommendations include targeting an international normalized ratio of 2.0 to 3.0 for patients on vitamin K antagonist therapy (Grade 1B) and not routinely using pharmacogenetic testing for guiding doses of vitamin K antagonist (Grade 1B). Weak recommendations deal with such issues as loading doses, initiation overlap, monitoring frequency, vitamin K supplementation, patient self-management, weight and renal function adjustment of doses, dosing decision support, drug interactions to avoid, and prevention and management of bleeding complications. We also address anticoagulation management services and intensive patient education. Conclusions: We offer guidance for many common anticoagulation-related management problems. Most anticoagulation management questions have not been adequately studied. PMID:22315259

  18. The Evidence Missing from Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Richard B.; Lilienfeld, Scott O.

    2007-01-01

    Comments on the report by the APA Presidential Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice (see record 2006-05893-001) entitled Evidence-based practice in psychology. Regrettably, the task force report was largely silent on three critical issues. As a consequence, it omitted much of the evidence necessary for a complete picture of evidence-based

  19. Insufficient Evidence: The Problems of Evidence-Based Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolfe, Gary

    1999-01-01

    Challenges the wisdom of basing nursing practice on the findings of statistical research and offers objections to the philosophy of evidence-based nursing. Proposes rethinking what counts as evidence, suggesting a model based on reflection after the event. (SK)

  20. Evidence-Based Chinese Medicine for Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Xiong, Xingjiang

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is an important worldwide public -health challenge with high mortality and disability. Due to the limitations and concerns with current available hypertension treatments, many hypertensive patients, especially in Asia, have turned to Chinese medicine (CM). Although hypertension is not a CM term, physicians who practice CM in China attempt to treat the disease using CM principles. A variety of approaches for treating hypertension have been taken in CM. For seeking the best evidence of CM in making decisions for hypertensive patients, a number of clinical studies have been conducted in China, which has paved the evidence-based way. After literature searching and analyzing, it appeared that CM was effective for hypertension in clinical use, such as Chinese herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, cupping, qigong, and Tai Chi. However, due to the poor quality of primary studies, clinical evidence is still weak. The potential benefits and safety of CM for hypertension still need to be confirmed in the future with well-designed RCTs of more persuasive primary endpoints and high-quality SRs. Evidence-based Chinese medicine for hypertension still has a long way to go. PMID:23861720

  1. School Centered Evidence Based Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milligan, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Achievement scores drive much of the effort in today's accountability system, however, there is much more that occurs in every school, every day. School Centered Evidence Based Accountability can be used from micro to macro giving School Boards and Administration a process for monitoring the results of the entire school operation effectively and…

  2. New furin inhibitors based on weakly basic amidinohydrazones

    PubMed Central

    Sielaff, Frank; Than, Manuel E.; Bevec, Dorian; Lindberg, Iris; Steinmetzer, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    A novel series of amidinohydrazone-derived furin inhibitors was prepared, the most potent compounds 17 and 21 inhibit furin with Ki values of 0.46 and 0.59 M, respectively. In contrast to inhibitor 17, which still contains a guanidino residue, compound 21 possesses only weakly basic amidinohydrazone groups. PMID:21168329

  3. GROUND MOTION ASSESSMENT BASED ON WEAK MOTION DATA IN TAIWAN Ground Motion Assessment Based on Weak Motion Data in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinci, A.; D'Amico, S.; Malagnini, L.

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we characterize the scaling of the ground motions for frequencies ranging between 0.25 and 5 Hz, obtaining results for seismic attenuation, geometrical spreading, and source parameters in Taiwan. We regressed this large number of weak-motion data in order to characterize the regional propagation and the absolute source scaling. Stochastic simulations are generated for finite-fault ruptures using the obtained parameters to predict the absolute peaks of the ground acceleration and velocity for several magnitude and distance range, as well as beyond the magnitude range of the weak-motion data set on which they are calculated. The predictions are then compared with recorded strong motion data and empirical ground motion prediction equation obtained for the study region. We showed that our regional parameters, obtained from independent weak-motion database, may be applied for evaluation of ground motion parameters for earthquakes of magnitude up to 7.6.

  4. Indirect evidences for existence of exotic mesons in hadronic weak decays of K and charm mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Terasaki, K.

    1998-05-29

    It is demonstrated that hadronic weak decays of K and charm mesons are intimately related to hadron spectroscopy. Long standing puzzles in hadronic weak decays of charm mesons can be solved by taking account of dynamical contributions of various hadrons including non-qq-bar mesons.

  5. Virtually-synchronous communication based on a weak failure suspector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiper, Andre; Ricciardi, Aleta

    1993-01-01

    Failure detectors (or, more accurately Failure Suspectors (FS)) appear to be a fundamental service upon which to build fault-tolerant, distributed applications. This paper shows that a FS with very weak semantics (i.e., that delivers failure and recovery information in no specific order) suffices to implement virtually-synchronous communication (VSC) in an asynchronous system subject to process crash failures and network partitions. The VSC paradigm is particularly useful in asynchronous systems and greatly simplifies building fault-tolerant applications that mask failures by replicating processes. We suggest a three-component architecture to implement virtually-synchronous communication: (1) at the lowest level, the FS component; (2) on top of it, a component (2a) that defines new views; and (3) a component (2b) that reliably multicasts messages within a view. The issues covered in this paper also lead to a better understanding of the various membership service semantics proposed in recent literature.

  6. Strong Public Health Recommendations from Weak Evidence? Lessons Learned in Developing Guidance on the Public Health Management of Meningococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hanquet, Germaine; Stefanoff, Pawel; Hellenbrand, Wiebke; Heuberger, Sigrid; Lopalco, Pierluigi; Stuart, James M.

    2015-01-01

    The evidence underpinning public health policy is often of low quality, leading to inconsistencies in recommended interventions. One example is the divergence in national policies across Europe for managing contacts of invasive meningococcal disease. Aiming to develop consistent guidance at the European level, a group of experts reviewed the literature and formulated recommendations. The group defined eight priority research questions, searched the literature, and formulated recommendations using GRADE methodology. Five of the research questions are discussed in this paper. After taking into account quality of evidence, benefit, harm, value, preference, burden on patient of the intervention, and resource implications, we made four strong recommendations and five weak recommendations for intervention. Strong recommendations related not only to one question with very low quality of evidence as well as to two questions with moderate to high quality of evidence. The weak recommendations related to two questions with low and very low quality of evidence but also to one question with moderate quality of evidence. GRADE methodology ensures a transparent process and explicit recognition of additional factors that should be considered when making recommendations for policy. This approach can be usefully applied to many areas of public health policy where evidence quality is often low. PMID:26693485

  7. Evidence-Based Practice and School Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

    2005-01-01

    School nurses need to demonstrate that their practice is based on the best evidence available, which is usually data obtained from research. Evidence-based practice involves combining the best evidence available with nursing expertise and patient and family preferences to determine optimum care. Evidence-based practice guidelines are developed by

  8. Combining large number of weak biomarkers based on AUC.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li; Tian, Lili; Liu, Song

    2015-12-20

    Combining multiple biomarkers to improve diagnosis and/or prognosis accuracy is a common practice in clinical medicine. Both parametric and non-parametric methods have been developed for finding the optimal linear combination of biomarkers to maximize the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), primarily focusing on the setting with a small number of well-defined biomarkers. This problem becomes more challenging when the number of observations is not order of magnitude greater than the number of variables, especially when the involved biomarkers are relatively weak. Such settings are not uncommon in certain applied fields. The first aim of this paper is to empirically evaluate the performance of existing linear combination methods under such settings. The second aim is to propose a new combination method, namely, the pairwise approach, to maximize AUC. Our simulation studies demonstrated that the performance of several existing methods can become unsatisfactory as the number of markers becomes large, while the newly proposed pairwise method performs reasonably well. Furthermore, we apply all the combination methods to real datasets used for the development and validation of MammaPrint. The implication of our study for the design of optimal linear combination methods is discussed. PMID:26227901

  9. ATLAS diboson excesses as an evidence for a heavy WW resonance with the weak isospin 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzov, Boris A.; Zaitsev, Ivan V.

    2015-12-01

    Recently reported diboson excesses at LHC are interpreted as indications for heavy resonance with weak isospin 2 due to would-be anomalous interaction of the weak bosons, which is defined by a constant ?. In the framework of an approach to the spontaneous generation of such interaction, we obtain estimates for the effect, which qualitatively agrees with ATLAS data. Effects are predicted in inclusive production of W+W+, W+(Z,?), W+W?, (Z,?)(Z,?), W?(Z,?), W?W? resonances in the vicinity of MR ? 2TeV, which could be reliably checked at the upgraded LHC with s = 13TeV.

  10. Epistemology of evidence based medicine.

    PubMed

    Michel, Luc

    2006-01-01

    Clinically relevant attitudes and guidelines issued by a rational evidence based medicine (EBM) approach integrate individual clinical expertise with the best available external clinical evidence from systematic research. However, many physicians, while considering the ultraliberal world they are practising in and fearing that the primary goal of managed care in a market environment is reducing cost in order to make profit or decrease spending, remain suspicious of this kind of tentative protocol driven medicine when applied to medical and surgical practice. If physicians want to develop a health policy agenda that emphasises patient care issues above providers' or payers' interests, they should share a common semantics (i.e. understand the words and the numbers), enhance education programmes, improve continuing objective assessment of the way medicine and surgery are performed, face moral issues raised by innovation, and assume an increased leadership role in sound critical evaluation of non-validated new techniques. They should no longer consider EBM as a weapon turned against the medical profession, but rather see it as a tool that may provide some answers to chronically unresolved questions in the evolving art of Medicine and Surgery. PMID:16929624

  11. Evidence-based Science Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahan, D.

    2012-12-01

    This presentation will describe a concrete strategy for bridging the gap between the *science* of science communication and the practice of it. In recent years, social scientists have made substantial progress in identifying the psychological influences that shape public receptivity to scientific information relating to climate change and other public policy issues. That work, however, has consisted nearly entirely of laboratory experiments and public opinion surveys; these methods identify general mechanisms of information processing but do not yield concrete prescriptions for communication in field settings. In order to integrate the findings of the science of science communication with the practice of it, field communication must now be made into a meaningful site of science communication research. "Evidence-based science communication" will involve collaborative work between social scientists and practitioners aimed at formulating and testing scientifically informed communication strategies in real-world contexts.

  12. Color-weak compensation using local affine isometry based on discrimination threshold matching.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Rika; Kojima, Takanori; Lenz, Reiner; Chao, Jinhui

    2015-11-01

    We develop algorithms for color-weak compensation and color-weak simulation based on Riemannian geometry models of color spaces. The objective function introduced measures the match of color discrimination thresholds of average normal observers and a color-weak observer. The developed matching process makes use of local affine maps between color spaces of color-normal and color-weak observers. The method can be used to generate displays of images that provide color-normal and color-weak observers with a similar color difference experience. It can also be used to simulate the perception of a color-weak observer for color-normal observers. We also introduce a new database of measurements of color discrimination threshold data for color-normal and color-weak observers obtained at different lightness levels in CIELUV space. The compensation methods include compensations of chromaticity using local affine maps between chromaticity planes of color-normal and color-weak observers, and one-dimensional (1D) compensation on lightness. We describe how to determine correspondences between the origins of local coordinates in color spaces of color-normal and color-weak observers using a neighborhood expansion method. After matching the origins of the two coordinate systems, a local affine map is estimated by solving a nonlinear equation, or singular-value-decomposition (SVD). We apply the methods to natural images and evaluate their performance using the semantic differential (SD) method. PMID:26560924

  13. Evidence-Based Practice in Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The evidence-based practice movement has become an important feature of health care systems and health care policy. Within this context, the APA 2005 Presidential Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice defines and discusses evidence-based practice in psychology (EBPP). In an integration of science and practice, the Task Force's report describes

  14. The Concept of Evidence in Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kvernbekk, Tone

    2011-01-01

    There exists a vast literature on evidence-based practice (EBP) in education. The debate branches out in several directions, for example, what EBP entails for the nature of educational practice, what it entails for the teaching profession, what counts as use and abuse of evidence, and what educational research could or should contribute to a what

  15. CCO Pulsars as Anti-Magnetars: Evidence of Neutron Stars Weakly Magnetized at Birth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotthelf, E. V.; Halpern, J. P.

    2008-02-01

    Our new study of the two central compact object pulsars, PSR J1210-5226 (P = 424 ms) and PSR J1852+0040 (P = 105 ms), leads us to conclude that a weak natal magnetic field shaped their unique observational properties. In the dipole spin-down formalism, the 2-sigma upper limits on their period derivatives, <210-16 for both pulsars, implies surface magnetic field strengths of Bs<31011 G and spin periods at birth equal to their present periods to three significant digits. Their X-ray luminosities exceed their respective spin-down luminosities, implying that their thermal spectra are derived from residual cooling and perhaps partly from accretion of supernova debris. For sufficiently weak magnetic fields an accretion disk can penetrate the light cylinder and interact with the magnetosphere while resulting torques on the neutron star remain within the observed limits. We propose the following as the origin of radio-quiet CCOs: the magnetic field, derived from a turbulent dynamo, is weaker if the NS is formed spinning slowly, which enables it to accrete SN debris. Accretion excludes neutron stars born with both Bs<1011 G and P>0.1 s from radio pulsar surveys, where such weak fields are not encountered except among very old (>40 Myr) or recycled pulsars. We predict that these birth properties are common, and may be attributes of the youngest detected neutron star, the CCO in Cassiopeia A, as well as an undetected infant neutron star in the SN 1987A remnant. In view of the far-infrared light echo discovered around Cas A and attributed to an SGR-like outburst, it is especially important to determine via timing whether Cas A hosts a magnetar or not. If not a magnetar, the Cas A NS may instead have undergone a one-time phase transition (corequake) that powered the light echo.

  16. Evidence-Based Practices in Secondary Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Test, David W.; Fowler, Catherine H.; Richter, Sharon M.; White, James; Mazzotti, Valerie; Walker, Allison R.; Kohler, Paula; Kortering, Larry

    2009-01-01

    A literature review was conducted to identify evidence-based practices in secondary transition using quality indicator checklists for experimental research. Practices were categorized by the Taxonomy for Transition Programming. Overall, 32 secondary transition evidence-based practices were identified. Two practices had a strong level of evidence,

  17. Towards Evidence Based Usability in Health Informatics?

    PubMed

    Marcilly, Romaric; Peute, Linda W; Beuscart-Zephir, Marie-Catherine; Jaspers, Monique W

    2015-01-01

    In a Health Information Technology (HIT) regulatory context in which the usability of this technology is more and more a critical issue, there is an increasing need for evidence based usability practice. However, a clear definition of evidence based usability practice and how to achieve it is still lacking. This paper underlines the need for evidence based HIT design and provides a definition of evidence based usability practice as the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions in design of interactive systems in health by applying usability engineering and usability design principles that have proven their value in practice. Current issues that hamper evidence based usability practice are highlighted and steps needed to achieve evidence are presented. PMID:26262527

  18. The Acid-Base Titration of a Very Weak Acid: Boric Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celeste, M.; Azevedo, C.; Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment based on the titration of boric acid with strong base in the presence of d-mannitol is described. Boric acid is a very weak acid and direct titration with NaOH is not possible. An auxiliary reagent that contributes to the release of protons in a known stoichiometry facilitates the acid-base titration. Students obtain the…

  19. The Acid-Base Titration of a Very Weak Acid: Boric Acid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celeste, M.; Azevedo, C.; Cavaleiro, Ana M. V.

    2012-01-01

    A laboratory experiment based on the titration of boric acid with strong base in the presence of d-mannitol is described. Boric acid is a very weak acid and direct titration with NaOH is not possible. An auxiliary reagent that contributes to the release of protons in a known stoichiometry facilitates the acid-base titration. Students obtain the

  20. Evidence-Based Research in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Exchange, 2003

    2003-01-01

    This educational newsletter highlights a lead article, "Evidence-Based Research in Education." The article explains that evidence-based research emerged in the field of medicine over 50 years ago, resulting in major advances in the treatment and prevention of disease. It adds that clinical guidelines and protocols are based on the results of

  1. Implementing Evidence-Based Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Edward J.; Bledsoe, Sarah E.; Bellamy, Jennifer L.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, social work has been influenced by new forms of practice that hold promise for bringing practice and research together to strengthen the scientific knowledge base supporting social work intervention. The most recent new practice framework is evidence-based practice. However, although evidence-based practice has many qualities that might

  2. Evidence for the Strangeness-Changing Weak Decay Ξ_{b}^{-}→Λ_{b}^{0}π^{-}.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellán Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Bel, L J; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Bird, T; Birnkraut, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borisyak, M; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Buchanan, E; Burr, C; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Aguiar Francisco, O; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Demmer, M; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fohl, K; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forshaw, D C; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kecke, M; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khairullin, E; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Kozeiha, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Lemos Cid, E; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, X; Loh, D; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusiani, A; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Michielin, E; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Mitzel, D S; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, D; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Osorio Rodrigues, B; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; 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Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zucchelli, S

    2015-12-11

    Using a pp collision data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0  fb^{-1}, collected by the LHCb detector, we present the first search for the strangeness-changing weak decay Ξ_{b}^{-}→Λ_{b}^{0}π^{-}. No b hadron decay of this type has been seen before. A signal for this decay, corresponding to a significance of 3.2 standard deviations, is reported. The relative rate is measured to be f_{Ξ_{b}^{-}}/f_{Λ_{b}^{0}}B(Ξ_{b}^{-}→Λ_{b}^{0}π^{-})=(5.7±1.8_{-0.9}^{+0.8})×10^{-4},where f_{Ξ_{b}^{-}} and f_{Λ_{b}^{0}} are the b→Ξ_{b}^{-} and b→Λ_{b}^{0} fragmentation fractions, and B(Ξ_{b}^{-}→Λ_{b}^{0}π^{-}) is the branching fraction. Assuming f_{Ξ_{b}^{-}}/f_{Λ_{b}^{0}} is bounded between 0.1 and 0.3, the branching fraction B(Ξ_{b}^{-}→Λ_{b}^{0}π^{-}) would lie in the range from (0.57±0.21)% to (0.19±0.07)%. PMID:26705625

  3. Evidence for the Strangeness-Changing Weak Decay Ξb-→Λb0π-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zucchelli, S.; LHCb Collaboration

    2015-12-01

    Using a p p collision data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb-1 , collected by the LHCb detector, we present the first search for the strangeness-changing weak decay Ξb-→Λb0π-. No b hadron decay of this type has been seen before. A signal for this decay, corresponding to a significance of 3.2 standard deviations, is reported. The relative rate is measured to be f/Ξb- fΛb0 B (Ξb-→Λb0π-)=(5.7 ±1. 8-0.9+0.8)×10-4, where fΞb- and fΛb0 are the b →Ξb- and b →Λb0 fragmentation fractions, and B (Ξb-→Λb0π-) is the branching fraction. Assuming fΞb-/fΛb0 is bounded between 0.1 and 0.3, the branching fraction B (Ξb-→Λb0π-) would lie in the range from (0.57 ±0.21 )% to (0.19 ±0.07 )%.

  4. Electrolyte diodes with weak acids and bases. II. Numerical model calculations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivn, Kristf; Wittmann, Mria; Simon, Pter L.; Noszticzius, Zoltn; nita, Dalimil

    2005-10-01

    This is the second part of our work dealing with electrolyte diodes with weak acids and bases. In the first part an approximative analytical solution was derived for the steady-state current-voltage characteristic (CVC) of a reverse-biased diode (a quasi-one-dimensional gel connecting an acidic and an alkaline reservoir), applying either strong or weak electrolytes. An approximative analytical solution is compared here with a numerical solution free of any approximations and with CVCs measured experimentally with both strong and weak electrolytes. It is shown that the deviations between the numerical and analytical solutions are mostly due to assumptions made for the fixed charge concentration profiles. The concept of optimal analytical solution is introduced which does not use such assumptions and applies only the quasielectroneutrality and quasiequilibrium approximations. It is proven that the slope of the CVC based on the optimum analytical solution can be calculated without the complicated derivation of that solution itself. The calculation of that slope is based on the fact that in the optimum analytical solution all currents are inversely proportional to the length if the boundary conditions are held constant and realizing that in the middle part of the gel the only mobile counterions of the fixed ionized groups are hydrogen ions. In the experimental part the apparatus and the preparation of the gel are described together with the CVCs measured with strong and weak electrolytes. From these CVCs the fixed ion concentration in the middle part of the gel can be determined. That fixed ion concentration is 1.9610-4M measured with weak electrolytes and 3.4810-4M measured with strong electrolytes. The deviation indicates that the strong base causes some hydrolysis of the gel. Finally, possible applications of weak acid-weak base diodes are discussed.

  5. In Vivo Predictive Dissolution: Comparing the Effect of Bicarbonate and Phosphate Buffer on the Dissolution of Weak Acids and Weak Bases.

    PubMed

    Krieg, Brian J; Taghavi, Seyed Mohammad; Amidon, Gordon L; Amidon, Gregory E

    2015-09-01

    Bicarbonate is the main buffer in the small intestine and it is well known that buffer properties such as pKa can affect the dissolution rate of ionizable drugs. However, bicarbonate buffer is complicated to work with experimentally. Finding a suitable substitute for bicarbonate buffer may provide a way to perform more physiologically relevant dissolution tests. The dissolution of weak acid and weak base drugs was conducted in bicarbonate and phosphate buffer using rotating disk dissolution methodology. Experimental results were compared with the predicted results using the film model approach of (Mooney K, Mintun M, Himmelstein K, Stella V. 1981. J Pharm Sci 70(1):22-32) based on equilibrium assumptions as well as a model accounting for the slow hydration reaction, CO2 + H2 O ? H2 CO3 . Assuming carbonic acid is irreversible in the dehydration direction: CO2 + H2 O ? H2 CO3 , the transport analysis can accurately predict rotating disk dissolution of weak acid and weak base drugs in bicarbonate buffer. The predictions show that matching the dissolution of weak acid and weak base drugs in phosphate and bicarbonate buffer is possible. The phosphate buffer concentration necessary to match physiologically relevant bicarbonate buffer [e.g., 10.5 mM (HCO3 (-) ), pH = 6.5] is typically in the range of 1-25 mM and is very dependent upon drug solubility and pKa . PMID:25980464

  6. Evidence for weak genetic recombination at the PTP2 locus of Nosema ceranae.

    PubMed

    Gmez-Moracho, Tamara; Bartolom, Carolina; Martn-Hernndez, Raquel; Higes, Mariano; Maside, Xulio

    2015-04-01

    The microsporidian Nosema ceranae is an emergent pathogen that threatens the health of honeybees and other pollinators all over the world. Its recent rapid spread across a wide variety of host species and environments demonstrated an enhanced ability of adaptation, which seems to contradict the lack of evidence for genetic recombination and the absence of a sexual stage in its life cycle. Here we retrieved fresh data of the patterns of genetic variation at the PTP2 locus in naturally infected Apis mellifera colonies, by means of single genome amplification. This technique, designed to prevent the formation of chimeric haplotypes during polymerase chain reaction (PCR), provides more reliable estimates of the diversity levels and haplotype structure than standard PCR-cloning methods. Our results are consistent with low but significant rates of recombination in the history of the haplotypes detected: estimates of the population recombination rate are of the order of 30 and support recent evidence for unexpectedly high levels of variation of the parasites within honeybee colonies. These observations suggest the existence of a diploid stage at some point in the life cycle of this parasite and are relevant for our understanding of the dynamics of its expanding population. PMID:25052231

  7. The Art of Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollio, David E.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss evidence-based practice (EBP) from the perspective of a self-identified evidence-based practitioner. Discussion of EBP includes choosing an initial intervention and evaluation procedures, the iterative process of rechoosing and refining an intervention over the treatment life span, and the importance of…

  8. An evidence-based business planning process.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Julie A; Reed Edwards, Donna; Cox Sullivan, Sheila; Zehler, Jean K; Grinder, Sandra; Scott, Karen J; Cook, Judy H; Roper, Debra; Dickey, Aurora; Maddox, Kathleen L

    2009-12-01

    Using a systematic, evidence-based approach for developing a business plan allows nurse executives to forecast the needs of the organization, involve nursing staff at all levels, evaluate the direction of the profession, and present a plan with clear, concise goals. The authors describe 4 steps necessary in developing an effective evidence-based business plan. PMID:19955962

  9. What's New about Evidence-Based Assessment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, David H.

    2005-01-01

    A clear consensus has emerged around the world concerning the desirability and even the urgency of basing health care delivery systems on evidence. Among behavioral health care providers such as psychologists, evidence-based practice (EBP) has been focused largely on interventions. Psychologists have long emphasized a scientifically based…

  10. Huge capacity fiber-optic sensing network based on ultra-weak draw tower gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Minghong; Bai, Wei; Guo, Huiyong; Wen, Hongqiao; Yu, Haihu; Jiang, Desheng

    2016-03-01

    This paper reviews the work on huge capacity fiber-optic sensing network based on ultra-weak draw tower gratings developed at the National Engineering Laboratory for Fiber Optic Sensing Technology (NEL-FOST), Wuhan University of Technology, China. A versatile drawing tower grating sensor network based on ultra-weak fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) is firstly proposed and demonstrated. The sensing network is interrogated with time- and wavelength-division multiplexing method, which is very promising for the large-scale sensing network.

  11. Evidence for Weak Crustal Magnetic Fields over the Hellas, Chryse, and Acidalia Planitiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. O.; Mitchell, D. L.; Lillis, R.; Lin, R. P.; Reme, H.; Cloutier, P. A.; Acuna, M. H.

    2003-04-01

    The Electron Reflectometer (ER) onboard Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) detected a plasma boundary between the ionosphere and the solar wind as the latter is diverted around and past the planet [Mitchell et al., GRL, 27, 1871, 2000; Mitchell et al., JGR, 106, 23419, 2001]. Above this boundary the 10-1000 eV electron population is dominated by solar wind electrons, while below the boundary it is dominated by ionospheric photoelectrons. This "photoelectron boundary", or PEB, is sensitive to pressure variations and moves vertically in response to changes in the ionospheric pressure from below and the solar wind pressure from above. The PEB is also sensitive to crustal magnetic fields, which locally increase the total ionospheric pressure and positively bias the PEB altitude. We have empirically modeled and removed systematic variations in the PEB altitude associated with the solar wind interaction, thus isolating perturbations caused by crustal magnetic fields. A map of the PEB altitude perturbations closely resembles maps of the horizontal component of the crustal magnetic field measured at 400 km by the MGS Magnetometer (MAG). We find a PEB altitude bias over the Hellas basin that is consistent with a horizontal magnetic field with an intensity of several nanotesla at 400 km altitude. This is compatible with upper limits to the horizontal crustal field strength set by MGS MAG measurements. Since there is no evidence for significant crustal magnetic sources within the basin from MAG data obtained during aerobraking [Acuna et al. Science, 284, 790, 1999] or from electron reflection data obtained in the mapping orbit [Lillis et al., this conference], the most likely explanation is that the observed horizontal field originates from sources around the Hellas perimeter. No detectable PEB or magnetic signature is observed over the younger Argyre and Isidis Basins. There is also evidence for a significant enhancement (several nanoteslas) in the crustal field strength over Chryse Planitia and much of Acidalia Planitia, which are thought to contain hundreds of meters of material from the main outflow channels on Mars [Carr, Lunar Planetary Sci., 18, 155, 1987]. These fields appear to extend northward from a group of crustal magnetic sources along the dichotomy boundary that were mapped by the MGS Magnetometer.

  12. The Young, the Weak and the Sick: Evidence of Natural Selection by Predation

    PubMed Central

    Genovart, Meritxell; Negre, Nieves; Tavecchia, Giacomo; Bistuer, Ana; Parpal, Lus; Oro, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    It is assumed that predators mainly prey on substandard individuals, but even though some studies partially support this idea, evidence with large sample sizes, exhaustive analysis of prey and robust analysis is lacking. We gathered data from a culling program of yellow-legged gulls killed by two methods: by the use of raptors or by shooting at random. We compared both data sets to assess whether birds of prey killed randomly or by relying on specific individual features of the prey. We carried out a meticulous post-mortem examination of individuals, and analysing multiple prey characteristics simultaneously we show that raptors did not hunt randomly, but rather preferentially predate on juveniles, sick gulls, and individuals with poor muscle condition. Strikingly, gulls with an unusually good muscle condition were also predated more than expected, supporting the mass-dependent predation risk theory. This article provides a reliable example of how natural selection may operate in the wild and proves that predators mainly prey on substandard individuals. PMID:20333305

  13. Weak evidence of bright light effects on human LH and FSH

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Most mammals are seasonal breeders whose gonads grow to anticipate reproduction in the spring and summer. As day length increases, secretion increases for two gonadotropins, luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). This response is largely controlled by light. Light effects on gonadotropins are mediated through effects on the suprachiasmatic nucleus and responses of the circadian system. There is some evidence that seasonal breeding in humans is regulated by similar mechanisms, and that light stimulates LH secretion, but primate responses seem complex. Methods To gain further information on effects of bright light on LH and FSH secretion in humans, we analyzed urine samples collected in three experiments conducted for other goals. First, volunteers ages 18-30 years and 60-75 commenced an ultra-short 90-min sleep-wake cycle, during which they were exposed to 3000 lux light for 3 hours at balanced times of day, repeated for 3 days. Urine samples were assayed to explore any LH phase response curve. Second, depressed participants 60-79 years of age were treated with bright light or dim placebo light for 28 days, with measurements of urinary LH and FSH before and after treatment. Third, women of ages 20-45 years with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) were treated to one 3-hour exposure of morning light, measuring LH and FSH in urine before and after the treatments. Results Two of the three studies showed significant increases in LH after light treatment, and FSH also tended to increase, but there were no significant contrasts with parallel placebo treatments and no significant time-of-day treatment effects. Conclusions These results gave some support for the hypothesis that bright light may augment LH secretion. Longer-duration studies may be needed to clarify the effects of light on human LH and FSH. PMID:20459826

  14. Allelic association but only weak evidence for linkage to the apolipoprotein E locus in late-onset Swedish Alzheimer families

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L.; Forsell, C.; Lilius, L.

    1996-05-31

    An association between the {epsilon}4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE) and late-onset Alzheimer`s disease (AD) was recently demonstrated. In order to confirm the association and to gauge the ability of standard genetic linkage methods to identify susceptibility genes, we investigated 15 Swedish late-onset AD families. We found an association of familial AD to the APOE {epsilon}4 allele (P = 0.01) but no indication of linkage to the APOE region using 2-point linkage analysis, and only weak evidence using the affected pedigree-member (APM) method. Our results confirm an APOE {epsilon}4 association with late-onset familial AD and indicate that susceptibility genes can easily be missed when using standard lod score and APM genetic linkage analysis. 19 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  15. Using Standards-Based Grading to Address Students' Strengths and Weaknesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knaack, Susan; Kreuz, Allie; Zawlocki, Erin

    2012-01-01

    This action research project report uses standard-based grading to address the problem of traditional grades not adequately assessing student content mastery and students' lack of awareness regarding their strengths and weaknesses. Research was conducted by one elementary and two middle school teachers with 158 students between the dates of

  16. The Making of Evidence-based Practice: The Case of Project ALERT

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Dennis M.; Conde, Eugenia

    2009-01-01

    Evidence-based practice has been enthusiastically embraced within the field of drug prevention during the past decade. Project ALERT, a school-based universal prevention program, is among the most widely advocated evidence-based interventions. We examined the results of three large-scale evaluations of Project ALERT, and concluded that assessment of data from the total samples shows that the program has little effect on drug use. Despite this, Project ALERT is included on evidence-based drug prevention lists because the criteria for inclusion are extremely weak. We discuss the implications of this for drug prevention evaluation research and the creation of evidence-based practice lists. PMID:20161479

  17. Fast nondeterministic random bit generator based on weakly correlated physical events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stip?evi?, Mario

    2004-11-01

    Nondeterministic random bits are needed in many scientific fields. Unfortunately today's computers are very limited in ability to produce them. We present here a method for extraction of nondeterministic random bits from random physics processes and one practical realization of a physical generator based on it. Even if processes are weakly correlateed the method is shown to deliver increasingly good randomness in the limit of slow sampling. A sample of approximately 109 bits produced by the physical generator prototype is subjected to a series of well-known statistical tests showing no weaknesses.

  18. Parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy and its application to weak signal detection

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinjing; Zhang, Tao

    2015-02-15

    The parameter-induced stochastic resonance based on spectral entropy (PSRSE) method is introduced for the detection of a very weak signal in the presence of strong noise. The effect of stochastic resonance on the detection is optimized using parameters obtained in spectral entropy analysis. Upon processing employing the PSRSE method, the amplitude of the weak signal is enhanced and the noise power is reduced, so that the frequency of the signal can be estimated with greater precision through spectral analysis. While the improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio is similar to that obtained using the Duffing oscillator algorithm, the computational cost reduces from O(N{sup 2}) to O(N). The PSRSE approach is applied to the frequency measurement of a weak signal made by a vortex flow meter. The results are compared with those obtained applying the Duffing oscillator algorithm.

  19. Understanding Evidence-Based Public Health Policy

    PubMed Central

    Chriqui, Jamie F.; Stamatakis, Katherine A.

    2009-01-01

    Public health policy has a profound impact on health status. Missing from the literature is a clear articulation of the definition of evidence-based policy and approaches to move the field forward. Policy-relevant evidence includes both quantitative (e.g., epidemiological) and qualitative information (e.g., narrative accounts). We describe 3 key domains of evidence-based policy: (1) process, to understand approaches to enhance the likelihood of policy adoption; (2) content, to identify specific policy elements that are likely to be effective; and (3) outcomes, to document the potential impact of policy. Actions to further evidence-based policy include preparing and communicating data more effectively, using existing analytic tools more effectively, conducting policy surveillance, and tracking outcomes with different types of evidence. PMID:19608941

  20. Evidence-Based ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E. Carlos

    2015-01-01

    There is controversy in the literature regarding a number of topics related to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The purpose of this article is to answer the following questions: 1) Bone-patellar tendon-bone reconstruction (BPTB-R) or hamstrimg reconstruction (H-R); 2) Double bundle or single bundle; 3) Allograft or authograft; 4) Early or late reconstruction; 5) Rate of return to sports after ACL reconstruction; 6) Rate of osteoarthritis after ACL reconstruction. A Cochrane Library and PubMed (MEDLINE) search of systematic reviews and meta-analysis related to ACL reconstruction was performed. The key words were: ACL reconstruction, systematic reviews and meta-analysis. The main criteria for selection were that the articles were systematic reviews and meta-analyses focused on the aforementioned questions. Sixty-nine articles were found, but only 26 were selected and reviewed because they had a high grade (I-II) of evidence. BPTB-R was associated with better postoperative knee stability but with a higher rate of morbidity. However, the results of both procedures in terms of functional outcome in the long-term were similar. The double-bundle ACL reconstruction technique showed better outcomes in rotational laxity, although functional recovery was similar between single-bundle and double-bundle. Autograft yielded better results than allograft. There was no difference between early and delayed reconstruction. 82% of patients were able to return to some kind of sport participation. 28% of patients presented radiological signs of osteoarthritis with a follow-up of minimum 10 years. PMID:25692162

  1. Evidence-Based ACL Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos

    2015-01-01

    There is controversy in the literature regarding a number of topics related to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The purpose of this article is to answer the following questions: 1) Bone-patellar tendon-bone reconstruction (BPTB-R) or hamstrimg reconstruction (H-R); 2) Double bundle or single bundle; 3) Allograft or authograft; 4) Early or late reconstruction; 5) Rate of return to sports after ACL reconstruction; 6) Rate of osteoarthritis after ACL reconstruction. A Cochrane Library and PubMed (MEDLINE) search of systematic reviews and meta-analysis related to ACL reconstruction was performed. The key words were: ACL reconstruction, systematic reviews and meta-analysis. The main criteria for selection were that the articles were systematic reviews and meta-analyses focused on the aforementioned questions. Sixty-nine articles were found, but only 26 were selected and reviewed because they had a high grade (I-II) of evidence. BPTB-R was associated with better postoperative knee stability but with a higher rate of morbidity. However, the results of both procedures in terms of functional outcome in the long-term were similar. The double-bundle ACL reconstruction technique showed better outcomes in rotational laxity, although functional recovery was similar between single-bundle and double-bundle. Autograft yielded better results than allograft. There was no difference between early and delayed reconstruction. 82% of patients were able to return to some kind of sport participation. 28% of patients presented radiological signs of osteoarthritis with a follow-up of minimum 10 years. PMID:25692162

  2. Evidence-based policymaking: a critique.

    PubMed

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Russell, Jill

    2009-01-01

    The idea that policy should be based on best research evidence might appear to be self-evident. But a closer analysis reveals a number of problems and paradoxes inherent in the concept of "evidence-based policymaking." The current conflict over evidence-based policymaking parallels a long-standing "paradigm war" in social research between positivist, interpretivist, and critical approaches. This article draws from this debate in order to inform the discussions over the appropriateness of evidence- based policymaking and the related question of what is the nature of policymaking. The positivist, empiricist worldview that underpins the theory and practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM) fails to address key elements of the policymaking process. In particular, a narrowly "evidence-based" framing of policymaking is inherently unable to explore the complex, context-dependent, and value-laden way in which competing options are negotiated by individuals and interest groups. Sociolinguistic tools such as argumentation theory offer opportunities for developing richer theories about how policymaking happens. Such tools also have potential practical application in the policymaking process: by enhancing participants' awareness of their own values and those of others, the quality of the collective deliberation that lies at the heart of policymaking may itself improve. PMID:19395827

  3. Born energy, acid-base equilibrium, structure and interactions of end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nap, R. J.; Tagliazucchi, M.; Szleifer, I.

    2014-01-01

    This work addresses the effect of the Born self-energy contribution in the modeling of the structural and thermodynamical properties of weak polyelectrolytes confined to planar and curved surfaces. The theoretical framework is based on a theory that explicitly includes the conformations, size, shape, and charge distribution of all molecular species and considers the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte. Namely, the degree of charge in the polymers is not imposed but it is a local varying property that results from the minimization of the total free energy. Inclusion of the dielectric properties of the polyelectrolyte is important as the environment of a polymer layer is very different from that in the adjacent aqueous solution. The main effect of the Born energy contribution on the molecular organization of an end-grafted weak polyacid layer is uncharging the weak acid (or basic) groups and consequently decreasing the concentration of mobile ions within the layer. The magnitude of the effect increases with polymer density and, in the case of the average degree of charge, it is qualitatively equivalent to a small shift in the equilibrium constant for the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte monomers. The degree of charge is established by the competition between electrostatic interactions, the polymer conformational entropy, the excluded volume interactions, the translational entropy of the counterions and the acid-base chemical equilibrium. Consideration of the Born energy introduces an additional energetic penalty to the presence of charged groups in the polyelectrolyte layer, whose effect is mitigated by down-regulating the amount of charge, i.e., by shifting the local-acid base equilibrium towards its uncharged state. Shifting of the local acid-base equilibrium and its effect on the properties of the polyelectrolyte layer, without considering the Born energy, have been theoretically predicted previously. Account of the Born energy leads to systematic, but in general small, corrections to earlier theoretical predictions describing the behavior of weak polyelectrolyte layers. However, polyelectrolyte uncharging results in a decrease in the concentration of counterions and inclusion of the Born Energy can result in a substantial decrease of the counterion concentration. The effect of considering the Born energy contribution is explored for end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers by calculating experimental observables which are known to depend on the presence of charges within the polyelectrolyte layer: inclusion of the Born energy contribution leads to a decrease in the capacitance of polyelectrolyte-modified electrodes, a decrease of conductivity of polyelectrolyte-modified nanopores and an increase in the repulsion exerted by a planar polyelectrolyte layer confined by an opposing wall.

  4. Born energy, acid-base equilibrium, structure and interactions of end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers.

    PubMed

    Nap, R J; Tagliazucchi, M; Szleifer, I

    2014-01-14

    This work addresses the effect of the Born self-energy contribution in the modeling of the structural and thermodynamical properties of weak polyelectrolytes confined to planar and curved surfaces. The theoretical framework is based on a theory that explicitly includes the conformations, size, shape, and charge distribution of all molecular species and considers the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte. Namely, the degree of charge in the polymers is not imposed but it is a local varying property that results from the minimization of the total free energy. Inclusion of the dielectric properties of the polyelectrolyte is important as the environment of a polymer layer is very different from that in the adjacent aqueous solution. The main effect of the Born energy contribution on the molecular organization of an end-grafted weak polyacid layer is uncharging the weak acid (or basic) groups and consequently decreasing the concentration of mobile ions within the layer. The magnitude of the effect increases with polymer density and, in the case of the average degree of charge, it is qualitatively equivalent to a small shift in the equilibrium constant for the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte monomers. The degree of charge is established by the competition between electrostatic interactions, the polymer conformational entropy, the excluded volume interactions, the translational entropy of the counterions and the acid-base chemical equilibrium. Consideration of the Born energy introduces an additional energetic penalty to the presence of charged groups in the polyelectrolyte layer, whose effect is mitigated by down-regulating the amount of charge, i.e., by shifting the local-acid base equilibrium towards its uncharged state. Shifting of the local acid-base equilibrium and its effect on the properties of the polyelectrolyte layer, without considering the Born energy, have been theoretically predicted previously. Account of the Born energy leads to systematic, but in general small, corrections to earlier theoretical predictions describing the behavior of weak polyelectrolyte layers. However, polyelectrolyte uncharging results in a decrease in the concentration of counterions and inclusion of the Born Energy can result in a substantial decrease of the counterion concentration. The effect of considering the Born energy contribution is explored for end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers by calculating experimental observables which are known to depend on the presence of charges within the polyelectrolyte layer: inclusion of the Born energy contribution leads to a decrease in the capacitance of polyelectrolyte-modified electrodes, a decrease of conductivity of polyelectrolyte-modified nanopores and an increase in the repulsion exerted by a planar polyelectrolyte layer confined by an opposing wall. PMID:24437914

  5. Born energy, acid-base equilibrium, structure and interactions of end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers

    SciTech Connect

    Nap, R. J.; Tagliazucchi, M.; Szleifer, I.

    2014-01-14

    This work addresses the effect of the Born self-energy contribution in the modeling of the structural and thermodynamical properties of weak polyelectrolytes confined to planar and curved surfaces. The theoretical framework is based on a theory that explicitly includes the conformations, size, shape, and charge distribution of all molecular species and considers the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte. Namely, the degree of charge in the polymers is not imposed but it is a local varying property that results from the minimization of the total free energy. Inclusion of the dielectric properties of the polyelectrolyte is important as the environment of a polymer layer is very different from that in the adjacent aqueous solution. The main effect of the Born energy contribution on the molecular organization of an end-grafted weak polyacid layer is uncharging the weak acid (or basic) groups and consequently decreasing the concentration of mobile ions within the layer. The magnitude of the effect increases with polymer density and, in the case of the average degree of charge, it is qualitatively equivalent to a small shift in the equilibrium constant for the acid-base equilibrium of the weak polyelectrolyte monomers. The degree of charge is established by the competition between electrostatic interactions, the polymer conformational entropy, the excluded volume interactions, the translational entropy of the counterions and the acid-base chemical equilibrium. Consideration of the Born energy introduces an additional energetic penalty to the presence of charged groups in the polyelectrolyte layer, whose effect is mitigated by down-regulating the amount of charge, i.e., by shifting the local-acid base equilibrium towards its uncharged state. Shifting of the local acid-base equilibrium and its effect on the properties of the polyelectrolyte layer, without considering the Born energy, have been theoretically predicted previously. Account of the Born energy leads to systematic, but in general small, corrections to earlier theoretical predictions describing the behavior of weak polyelectrolyte layers. However, polyelectrolyte uncharging results in a decrease in the concentration of counterions and inclusion of the Born Energy can result in a substantial decrease of the counterion concentration. The effect of considering the Born energy contribution is explored for end-grafted weak polyelectrolyte layers by calculating experimental observables which are known to depend on the presence of charges within the polyelectrolyte layer: inclusion of the Born energy contribution leads to a decrease in the capacitance of polyelectrolyte-modified electrodes, a decrease of conductivity of polyelectrolyte-modified nanopores and an increase in the repulsion exerted by a planar polyelectrolyte layer confined by an opposing wall.

  6. Evidence-Based Teaching: Rhetoric and Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrigley, Terry

    2015-01-01

    This essay connects a number of recent books relating, in different ways, to the contentious issue of how teaching might be better guided by research evidence. In order to shed light on this problematic area, Terry Wrigley begins by pointing out that raising awkward questions about terms such as "evidence- based teaching" is not the same

  7. Performance analysis of weak target detection via ground-based synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong-sheng; Zhou, Mei; Tang, Ling-li; Li, Chuan-rong

    2011-10-01

    Polarimetric Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (Pol-InSAR) is an emerging technique that combines interferometric SAR and polarimetric SAR techniques and has shown its effectiveness in the detection of buried weak targets. The detection performance is affected by the SAR parameters as well as the covering characteristics. In this paper, the effects of covering characteristics on the detection performance were emphasized and experimentally investigated by a ground-based Pol-InSAR system. Firstly, the detection principle for buried weak target by Pol-InSAR technique was presented, which is based on the use of interferometric coherence variation with polarization. Then the ground-based two dimensional rail (TDR) SAR used for investigation was introduced. Furthermore, the experiment target scene was designed and the effects of different covering type, different covering moisture, and different covering depth on the detection performance of weak targets were shown and analyzed. Preliminary results confirmed the effectiveness of Pol-InSAR technique used for weak target detection and it would be helpful for the further investigation of this technique.

  8. Infantile spasms--evidence based medical management.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Jitendra Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Infantile spasms constitute significant burden of refractory epilepsy in children. The first line treatment choice varies at different centres. The author presents concise evidence based update on medical management of infantile spasms. PMID:24986193

  9. Practice-Based Evidence: Delivering What Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brendtro, Larry K.; Mitchell, Martin L.

    2012-01-01

    Many methods claim to be Evidence-Based Practices. Yet success comes not from a particular practice, but principles that underlie all effective helping. This article uses the principle of consilience to tap knowledge from science, values, and practical experience.

  10. Knee surgery and its evidence base.

    PubMed

    Sharma, A; Hasan, K; Carter, A; Zaidi, R; Cro, S; Briggs, T; Goldberg, A

    2016-03-01

    Introduction Evidence driven orthopaedics is gaining prominence. It enables better management decisions and therefore better patient care. The aim of our study was to review a selection of the leading publications pertaining to knee surgery to assess changes in levels of evidence over a decade. Methods Articles from the years 2000 and 2010 in The Knee, the Journal of Arthroplasty, Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (American Volume) and the Bone and Joint Journal were analysed and ranked according to guidelines from the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. The intervening years (2003, 2005 and 2007) were also analysed to further define the trend. Results The percentage of high level evidence (level I and II) studies increased albeit without reaching statistical significance. Following a significant downward trend, the latter part of the decade saw a major rise in levels of published evidence. The most frequent type of study was therapeutic. Conclusions Although the rise in levels of evidence across the decade was not statistically significant, there was a significant drop and then rise in these levels in the interim. It is therefore important that a further study is performed to assess longer-term trends. Recent developments have made clear that high quality evidence will be having an ever increasing influence on future orthopaedic practice. We suggest that journals implement compulsory declaration of a published study's level of evidence and that authors consider their study designs carefully to enhance the quality of available evidence. PMID:26890835

  11. What's new about evidence-based assessment?

    PubMed

    Barlow, David H

    2005-09-01

    A clear consensus has emerged around the world concerning the desirability and even the urgency of basing health care delivery systems on evidence. Among behavioral health care providers such as psychologists, evidence-based practice (EBP) has been focused largely on interventions. Psychologists have long emphasized a scientifically based psychometric approach to the development of assessment procedures. Nevertheless, the era of evidence-based assessment highlights 2 somewhat different issues. First, sophisticated assessment is closely integrated with our emerging conceptions of psychopathology, rather than standing separate from these conceptions. Second, broad-based ongoing outcomes assessment systems are increasingly required for EBP on the part of governments and health care policymakers. This article summarizes these developments and looks to the future. PMID:16262456

  12. The Recovery of Weak Impulsive Signals Based on Stochastic Resonance and Moving Least Squares Fitting

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Kuosheng.; Xu, Guanghua.; Liang, Lin.; Tao, Tangfei.; Gu, Fengshou.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a stochastic resonance (SR)-based method for recovering weak impulsive signals is developed for quantitative diagnosis of faults in rotating machinery. It was shown in theory that weak impulsive signals follow the mechanism of SR, but the SR produces a nonlinear distortion of the shape of the impulsive signal. To eliminate the distortion a moving least squares fitting method is introduced to reconstruct the signal from the output of the SR process. This proposed method is verified by comparing its detection results with that of a morphological filter based on both simulated and experimental signals. The experimental results show that the background noise is suppressed effectively and the key features of impulsive signals are reconstructed with a good degree of accuracy, which leads to an accurate diagnosis of faults in roller bearings in a run-to failure test. PMID:25076220

  13. A Quantum Proxy Weak Blind Signature Scheme Based on Controlled Quantum Teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hai-Jing; Yu, Yao-Feng; Song, Qin; Gao, Lan-Xiang

    2015-04-01

    Proxy blind signature is applied to the electronic paying system, electronic voting system, mobile agent system, security of internet, etc. A quantum proxy weak blind signature scheme is proposed in this paper. It is based on controlled quantum teleportation. Five-qubit entangled state functions as quantum channel. The scheme uses the physical characteristics of quantum mechanics to implement message blinding, so it could guarantee not only the unconditional security of the scheme but also the anonymity of the messages owner.

  14. A Quantum Proxy Weak Blind Signature Scheme Based on Controlled Quantum Teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hai-Jing; Yu, Yao-Feng; Song, Qin; Gao, Lan-Xiang

    2014-09-01

    Proxy blind signature is applied to the electronic paying system, electronic voting system, mobile agent system, security of internet, etc. A quantum proxy weak blind signature scheme is proposed in this paper. It is based on controlled quantum teleportation. Five-qubit entangled state functions as quantum channel. The scheme uses the physical characteristics of quantum mechanics to implement message blinding, so it could guarantee not only the unconditional security of the scheme but also the anonymity of the messages owner.

  15. Evidence-based management of recurrent miscarriages

    PubMed Central

    Jeve, Yadava B.; Davies, William

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent miscarriages are postimplantation failures in natural conception; they are also termed as habitual abortions or recurrent pregnancy losses. Recurrent pregnancy loss is disheartening to the couple and to the treating clinician. There has been a wide range of research from aetiology to management of recurrent pregnancy loss. It is one of the most debated topic among clinicians and academics. The ideal management is unanswered. This review is aimed to produce an evidence-based guidance on clinical management of recurrent miscarriage. The review is structured to be clinically relevant. We have searched electronic databases (PubMed and Embase) using different key words. We have combined the searches and arranged them with the hierarchy of evidences. We have critically appraised the evidence to produce a concise answer for clinical practice. We have graded the evidence from level I to V on which these recommendations are based. PMID:25395740

  16. EMTP modeling of CIGRE benchmark based HVDC transmission system operating with weak AC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sood, V.K.; Khatri, V.; Jin, H.

    1995-12-31

    An EMTP based study of a CIGRE benchmark based HVDC system operating with weak ac systems is carried out. The modeled system provides a starting point for (a) educators teaching HVDC transmission courses and (b) for utility planners to develop their own low-cost dedicated digital simulators for training purposes. In this paper, modeling details of the ac-dc system, dc converters and control are presented. To validate the control schemes presented, the HVDC system is tested under ac-dc fault conditions. Results obtained from an EMTP-based study under these fault conditions are also presented in this paper.

  17. Weak bases affect late stages of Mayaro virus replication cycle in vertebrate cells.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, D F; Santo, M P; Rebello, M A; Rebello, M C

    2000-04-01

    This paper describes the effect of two weak bases (ammonium chloride and chloroquine) on the morphogenesis of Mayaro virus. When Mayaro virus-infected TC7 (monkey kidney) cells were treated with these agents it was observed that weak bases caused a significant reduction in virus yield. Also, cellular protein synthesis, which is inhibited by Mayaro virus infection, recovered to nearly normal levels. However, the synthesis of Mayaro virus proteins was affected. These phenomena were dose-dependent. The process of Mayaro virus infection in vertebrate cells is very rapid. Virus precursors are not observed in cell cytoplasm and budding through the plasma membrane seems to be the only way of virus release. Electron microscopy of cells infected with Mayaro virus and treated with weak bases revealed an accumulation of virus structures in cell cytoplasm. The study also noted an inhibition of budding through the plasma membrane and the appearance of virus particles inside intracytoplasmic vacuoles. These observations indicate an impairment at the final stages of the virus replication cycle. PMID:10755624

  18. Need for Evidence-Based Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groccia, James E.; Buskist, William

    2011-01-01

    Educators believe that rather than being a mere possibility to improve as teachers, it is always "necessary" to improve. One way of improving teaching is to adopt teaching methods that are based on or supported by evidence of success in enhancing student learning. Most teachers base their instructional practices on tradition, the opinion of…

  19. Need for Evidence-Based Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groccia, James E.; Buskist, William

    2011-01-01

    Educators believe that rather than being a mere possibility to improve as teachers, it is always "necessary" to improve. One way of improving teaching is to adopt teaching methods that are based on or supported by evidence of success in enhancing student learning. Most teachers base their instructional practices on tradition, the opinion of

  20. Evidence-Based Practices and Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesibov, Gary B.; Shea, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Interventions for autism are increasing being held to standards such as "evidence-based practice" in psychology and "scientifically-based research" in education. When these concepts emerged in the context of adult psychotherapy and regular education, they caused considerable controversy. Application of the concepts to autism treatments and special

  1. Evidence-Based Practices and Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesibov, Gary B.; Shea, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Interventions for autism are increasing being held to standards such as "evidence-based practice" in psychology and "scientifically-based research" in education. When these concepts emerged in the context of adult psychotherapy and regular education, they caused considerable controversy. Application of the concepts to autism treatments and special…

  2. [Evidence-based medicine: methods and critics].

    PubMed

    Bizouarn, P

    2007-04-01

    The evaluation of professional practices is now obligatory. Evidence-Based Medicine, defined as the use of current best evidence in making well-informed decisions, could play a major role for that purpose, as it allows an objective evaluation of the clinical practices by the use of there commendations it gives rise to. The aim of that study was to describe the EBM decision procedure with examples in anaesthesia, and to present its limits, particularly due to the problems of hierarchies of evidence. PMID:17276026

  3. Dispersion-corrected first-principles calculation of terahertz vibration, and evidence for weak hydrogen bond formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masae; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Ito, Hiromasa

    2013-03-01

    A weak hydrogen bond (WHB) such as CH-O is very important for the structure, function, and dynamics in a chemical and biological system WHB stretching vibration is in a terahertz (THz) frequency region Very recently, the reasonable performance of dispersion-corrected first-principles to WHB has been proven. In this lecture, we report dispersion-corrected first-principles calculation of the vibrational absorption of some organic crystals, and low-temperature THz spectral measurement, in order to clarify WHB stretching vibration. The THz frequency calculation of a WHB crystal has extremely improved by dispersion correction. Moreover, the discrepancy in frequency between an experiment and calculation and is 10 1/cm or less. Dispersion correction is especially effective for intermolecular mode. The very sharp peak appearing at 4 K is assigned to the intermolecular translational mode that corresponds to WHB stretching vibration. It is difficult to detect and control the WHB formation in a crystal because the binding energy is very small. With the help of the latest intense development of experimental and theoretical technique and its careful use, we reveal solid-state WHB stretching vibration as evidence for the WHB formation that differs in respective WHB networks The research was supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan (Grant No. 22550003).

  4. Evidence for Weak or Linear Conformity but Not for Hyper-Conformity in an Everyday Social Learning Context

    PubMed Central

    Claidire, Nicolas; Bowler, Mark; Whiten, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Conformity is thought to be an important force in cultural evolution because it has the potential to stabilize cooperation in large groups, potentiate group selection and thus explain uniquely human behaviors. However, the effects of such conformity on cultural and biological evolution will depend much on the way individuals are influenced by the frequency of alternative behavioral options witnessed. Theoretical modeling has suggested that only what we refer to as hyper-conformity, an exaggerated tendency to perform the most frequent behavior witnessed in other individuals, is able to increase within-group homogeneity and between-group diversity, for instance. Empirically however, few experiments have addressed how the frequency of behavior witnessed affects behavior. Accordingly we performed an experiment to test for the presence of conformity in a natural situation with humans. Visitors to a Zoo exhibit were invited to write or draw answers to questions on A5 cards and potentially win a small prize. We manipulated the proportion of existing writings versus drawings visible to visitors and measured the proportion of written cards submitted. We found a strong and significant effect of the proportion of text displayed on the proportion of text in the answers, thus demonstrating social learning. We show that this effect is approximately linear, with potentially a small, weak-conformist component but no hyper-conformist one. The present experiment therefore provides evidence for linear conformity in humans in a very natural context. PMID:22363524

  5. Evidence-based Practice of Radiology.

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Lisa P; Dunne, Ruth M; Carroll, Anne G; Malone, Dermot E

    2015-10-01

    Current health care reform in the United States is producing a shift in radiology practice from the traditional volume-based role of performing and interpreting a large number of examinations to providing a more affordable and higher-quality service centered on patient outcomes, which is described as a value-based approach to the provision of health care services. In the 1990 s, evidence-based medicine was defined as the integration of current best evidence with clinical expertise and patient values. When these methods are applied outside internal medicine, the process is called evidence-based practice (EBP). EBP facilitates understanding, interpretation, and application of the best current evidence into radiology practice, which optimizes patient care. It has been incorporated into "Practice-based Learning and Improvement" and "Systems-based Practice," which are two of the six core resident competencies of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and two of the 12 American Board of Radiology milestones for diagnostic radiology. Noninterpretive skills, such as systems-based practice, are also formally assessed in the "Quality and Safety" section of the American Board of Radiology Core and Certifying examinations. This article describes (a) the EBP framework, with particular focus on its relevance to the American Board of Radiology certification and maintenance of certification curricula; (b) how EBP can be integrated into a residency program; and (c) the current value and likely place of EBP in the radiology information technology infrastructure. Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26466187

  6. Queer challenges to evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Zeeman, Laetitia; Aranda, Kay; Grant, Alec

    2014-06-01

    This paper aims to queer evidence-based practice by troubling the concepts of evidence, knowledge and mental illness. The evidence-based narrative that emerged within biomedicine has dominated health care. The biomedical notion of 'evidence' has been critiqued extensively and is seen as exclusive and limiting, and even though the social constructionist paradigm attempts to challenge the authority of biomedicine to legitimate what constitutes acceptable evidence or knowledge for those experiencing mental illness, biomedical notions of evidence appear to remain relatively intact. Queer theory offers theoretical tools to disrupt biomedical norms and challenges biomedical normativity to indicate how marginalisation occurs when normative truths about mental health classify those who differ from the norm as 'ill' or 'disordered'. Queer theory's emphasis on normativity serves the political aim to subvert marginalisation and bring about radical social and material change. Reference will be made to mental health subjects within each discourse by indicating how the body acts as a vehicle for knowing. Deleuzian notions of the rhizome are used as metaphor to suggest a relational approach to knowledge that does away with either/or positions in either biomedical, or queer knowledge to arrive at a both/and position where the biomedical, constructionist and queer are interrelated and entangled in needing the other for their own evolution. However, queer does not ask for assimilation but celebrates difference by remaining outside to disrupt that which is easily overlooked, assumed to be natural or represented as the norm. The task of queer knowledge is to do justice to the lives lived in the name of evidence-based practice and demands that we consider the relations of power where knowledge is produced. This pursuit creates different knowledge spaces where we identify new intersections that allow for socially just understandings of knowing or evidence to emerge. PMID:23738815

  7. Lessons to be Learned from Evidence-based Medicine: Practice and Promise of Evidence-based Medicine and Evidence-based Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Fredric M.

    2000-01-01

    Presents statistics of deaths caused by medical errors and argues the effects of misconceptions in diagnosis and treatment. Suggests evidence-based medicine to enhance the quality of practice and minimize error rates. Presents 10 evidence-based lessons and discusses the possible benefits of evidence-based medicine to evidence-based education and

  8. Evidence-based healthcare in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Alan; Jordan, Zoe

    2010-06-01

    Developing countries have limited resources, so it is particularly important to invest in healthcare that works. The case for evidence-based practice has long been made in the West. However, poor access to information makes this endeavour near impossible for health professionals working with vulnerable communities in low-income economies. This paper provides a call to action to create an evidence base for health professionals in developing countries and identify appropriate strategies for the dissemination of this information in realistic and meaningful ways. PMID:21077397

  9. Weak snow layer detection based on relative differences in snow properties between layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, Fabiano; Schweizer, Jrg

    2013-04-01

    Snow stratigraphy information plays a prominent role in avalanche forecasting. Therefore, it is important how both manually collected and simulated snow profiles are interpreted in regard to snow stability. In the last few years several semi-quantitative methods have been developed to reduce the subjectivity of stability evaluation derived from snow profiles. One of them is the threshold sum approach (TSA), which identifies structural discontinuities related to mechanical stability within snow profiles by analyzing snow layers (i.e. grain size, type, hardness) and their interface properties (i.e. depth, difference in grain size and hardness). The threshold values identifying the structural properties were defined statistically and are optimized for the data sets they were based on. Since this approach relies entirely on absolute thresholds, problems arise, if properties (e.g. grain size estimation) are collected in a different way. Even though guidelines for collecting snow profiles are internationally defined, slight differences between observers of different avalanche services exist. The same problem arises when using this approach for simulated snow profiles. We propose a revised threshold sum approach for snow profile interpretation. Instead of using absolute values, we applied relative differences and values to the snow profiles, e.g. it was not considered how soft a snow layer is, but rather how soft it was compared to the weighted average value of the profile. This method allows the detection of potential weak layers within a snow profile but does not give an absolute estimation of their weakness. In other words, we give a probability that a particular layer is a weak layer. We tested this relative threshold approach (RTA) on a data set consisting of 128 manually recorded snow profiles, which were collected near the fracture line of or on slopes adjacent to skier-triggered avalanches. Results are encouraging since the RTA detected the weak layers related to the avalanches observed in the field as potential weak layers with a higher probability than the other layers of the profiles. This approach has the advantage to be independent from the subjectivity of the measurements (e.g. grain size estimation) - provided a variable is measured consistently within a profile - and can directly be applied to simulated profiles. A further step includes testing the RTA on simulated profiles and comparing the potential weak layers with failure layers identified in manually observed profiles completed with stability tests.

  10. Evidence-Based Practice: Promoting Evidence-Based Interventions in School Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochwill, Thomas R.; Steele Shernoff, Elisa

    2004-01-01

    We present an overview of issues related to evidence-based practice and the role that the school psychology profession can play in developing and disseminating evidence based interventions (EBIs). Historical problems relating to and the recurring debate about the integration of research into practice are presented as a context for the current

  11. Evidence-Based Practice: Promoting Evidence-Based Interventions in School Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochwill, Thomas R.; Shernoff, Elisa Steele

    2003-01-01

    We present an overview of issues related to evidence-based practice and the role that the school psychology profession can play in developing and disseminating evidence-based interventions (EBIs). Historical problems relating to and the recurring debate about the integration of research into practice are presented as a context for the current

  12. Evidence-Based Special Education in the Context of Scarce Evidence-Based Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based practices (EBPs) are supported as generally effective for populations of learners by bodies of high-quality and experimental research and, when aligned with stakeholder values and practical needs, should be prioritized for implementation. However, evidence-based practices are not currently available for all learner types in all

  13. Discrimination of enantiomers based on LSPR biosensors fabricated with weak enantioselective and nonselective receptors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Longhua; Wang, Daifang; Xu, Yang; Qiu, Bin; Lin, Zhenyu; Dai, Hong; Yang, Huang-Hao; Chen, Guonan

    2013-09-15

    Chiral recognition based on enantioselective sensors is superior to conventional chromatographic enantioseparation techniques in terms of simplicity and rapidity. Normally, highly specific enantioselective receptors are used for the fabrication of enantioselective sensors. However, to date there only limited number of highly specific chiral selectors are reported, which greatly confines the development of enantioselective sensors. Herein, we demonstrate the feasibility of using relatively weak chiral selectors to construct an enantioselective biosensor for accurate chiral discrimination of enantiomers. The detection of racemic mixture of (R)- and (S)-1,2,3,4-Tetrahydro-1-naphthylamine (TNA) was demonstrated as an example. The sensor was made up of a dual-channel microfluidic chip. One channel of the chip was modified with human serum albumin (HSA), which was reported to be a weak chiral selector for TNA; while the other channel was modified with a monoclonal anti-TNA antibody, which was a non-enantioselective TNA receptor. A portable localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) detection system was integrated with the microfluidic chip to accomplish the signal collection. Our investigation revealed that the combination of LSPR responses obtained from the two channels can be used for quantitative discrimination of the (R)- and (S)-TNA. The limit of detection was found to be 150nM for (R)-TNA and 100nM for (S)-TNA. The feasibility of use relatively weak chiral selectors could potentially promote the development of various enantioselective sensors. PMID:23578974

  14. Evidence Based Education Request Desk. EBE #555

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Educational Laboratory Southeast, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This Evidence Based Education (EBE) Request seeks to provide an overview of recent research regarding school improvement and reform with special concentration on turning around chronically low-performing schools. The response is divided into four main sections: Research on Effective Methods for Turning Around Low-Performing Schools, Frameworks for…

  15. The Evidence Base for Positive Peer Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laursen, Erik K.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the evidence base for Positive Peer Culture (PPC) which is a total system for developing positive youth cultures in youth serving organizations. It challenges a popular belief among some researchers that group programs which bring together troubled youth are inherently negative.

  16. Evidence Based Education Request Desk. EBE #741

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Educational Laboratory Southeast, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This Evidence Based Education (EBE) request asks for information relating to funding for virtual schools. The EBE Request Desk was asked to provide a scan of states for information on how they fund virtual schools and what the current funding levels are (most current year for which such data is available). This paper provides answers to this

  17. Evidence-Based Classroom Behaviour Management Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsonson, Barry S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews a range of evidence-based strategies for application by teachers to reduce disruptive and challenging behaviours in their classrooms. These include a number of antecedent strategies intended to help minimise the emergence of problematic behaviours and a range of those which provide positive consequences for appropriate student…

  18. Finding Evidence-Based Practice Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childs, Gary M.

    2009-01-01

    Locating sources that are rich in evidence-based practice information can be more difficult for physical as well as occupational therapists in practice settings in which there is not direct access to a health sciences library. In addition, once information has been found, there may not be an easy way to access the data. This commentary will

  19. Statewide Implementation of Evidence-Based Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fixsen, Dean; Blase, Karen; Metz, Allison; van Dyke, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based programs will be useful to the extent they produce benefits to individuals on a socially significant scale. It appears the combination of effective programs and effective implementation methods is required to assure consistent uses of programs and reliable benefits to children and families. To date, focus has been placed primarily

  20. Evidence Based Education Request Desk. EBE #798

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Educational Laboratory Southeast, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Evidence Based Education (EBE) #555 was in response to the request "Is there any new compelling research for turning around low-performing schools?" The articles included in that document are on target, but include articles through 2009. This EBE Request seeks to provide an updated review of recent research (2009-present) regarding school…

  1. Time for evidence-based cytology

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Pranab

    2007-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is a fashionable and an extremely hot topic for clinicians, patients and the health service planners. Evidence-based cytology (EBC) is an offshoot of EBM. The EBC is concerned with generating a reproducible, high quality and clinically relevant test result in the field of cytology. This is a rapidly evolving area with high practical importance. EBC is based entirely on research data. The various professional bodies on cytology design and recommend guidelines on the basis of evidences. Once the guideline is implemented and practiced then the experiences of the practicing cytopathologists may be used as a feed back to alter the existing guideline. The various facets of EBC are sampling and specimen adequacy, morphological identification and computer based expert system, integrated reporting, identification of the controversial areas and high quality researches for evidences. It is the duty of the individuals and institutions to practice EBC for better diagnosis and management of the patients. In this present paper, the various aspects of EBC have been discussed. PMID:17210074

  2. Evidence-Based Practice Goes beyond Google

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klitzing, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is applying research to assist in the selection of interventions that result in increased client quality care. Recently the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (2010), a new accreditation body for recreational therapy education, included standards that state students should obtain knowledge

  3. Evidence-Based Education in Plastic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Shepard P; Chung, Kevin C; Waljee, Jennifer F

    2015-08-01

    Educational reforms in resident training have historically been driven by reports from medical societies and organizations. Although educational initiatives are well intended, they are rarely supported by robust evidence. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education recently introduced competency-based training, a form of outcomes-based education that has been used successfully in nonmedical professional vocations. This initiative has promise to advance the quality of resident education, but questions remain regarding implementation within plastic surgery. In particular, how will competency-based training impact patient outcomes, and will the methodologies used to assess competencies (i.e., milestones) be accurate and validated by literature? This report investigates resident educational reform and the need for more evidence-based educational initiatives in plastic surgery training. PMID:26218400

  4. Enhancing the effect of radionuclide tumor targeting, using lysosomotropic weak bases

    SciTech Connect

    Sundberg, Asa Liljegren . E-mail: Asa.Liljegren@bms.uu.se; Steffen, Ann-Charlott

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present study was to investigate if treatment with lysosomotropic weak bases could increase the intracellular retention of radiohalogens and thereby increase the therapeutic effect of radionuclide tumor targeting. Methods and Materials: Four different lysosomotropic bases, chloroquine, ammonium chloride, amantadine, and thioridazine, were investigated for their ability to increase radiohalogen retention in vitro. The two most promising substances, chloroquine and ammonium chloride, were studied in several cell lines (A431, U343MGaCl2:6, SKOV-3, and SKBR-3) in combination with radiolabeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) or the HER2 binding affibody (Z{sub HER2:4}){sub 2}. Results: The uptake and retention of radionuclides was found to be substantially increased by simultaneous treatment with the lysosomotropic bases. The effect was, however, more pronounced in the epidermal growth factor:epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF:EGFR) system than in the (Z{sub HER2:4}){sub 2}:HER2 system. The therapeutic effect of ammonium chloride treatment combined with {sup 211}At-EGF was also studied. The effect obtained after combined treatment was found to be much better than after {sup 211}At-EGF treatment alone. Conclusions: The encouraging results from the present study indicate that the use of lysosomotropic weak bases is a promising approach for increasing the therapeutic effect of radionuclide targeting with radiohalogens.

  5. Could Our Pretest Probabilities Become Evidence Based?

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, W Scott; Polashenski, Walter A; Robbins, Brett W

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We sought to measure the proportion of patients on our clinical service who presented with clinical problems for which research evidence was available to inform estimates of pretest probability. We also aimed to discern whether any of this evidence was of sufficient quality that we would want to use it for clinical decision making. DESIGN Prospective, consecutive case series and literature survey. SETTING Inpatient medical service of a university-affiliated Veterans' Affairs hospital in south Texas. PATIENTS Patients admitted during the 3 study months for diagnostic evaluation. MEASUREMENTS Patients' active clinical problems were identified prospectively and recorded at the time of discharge, transfer, or death. We electronically searched medline and hand-searched bibliographies to find citations that reported research evidence about the frequency of underlying diseases that cause these clinical problems. We critically appraised selected citations and ranked them on a hierarchy of evidence. RESULTS We admitted 122 patients for diagnostic evaluation, in whom we identified 45 different principal clinical problems. For 35 of the 45 problems (78%; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 66% to 90%), we found citations that qualified as disease probability evidence. Thus, 111 of our 122 patients (91%; 95% CI, 86% to 96%) had clinical problems for which evidence was available in the medical literature. CONCLUSIONS During 3 months on our hospital medicine service, almost all of the patients admitted for diagnostic evaluation had clinical problems for which evidence is available to guide our estimates of pretest probability. If confirmed by others, these data suggest that clinicians' pretest probabilities could become evidence based. PMID:12648252

  6. Evidence-based practices and autism.

    PubMed

    Mesibov, Gary B; Shea, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Interventions for autism are increasing being held to standards such as 'evidence-based practice' in psychology and 'scientifically-based research' in education. When these concepts emerged in the context of adult psychotherapy and regular education, they caused considerable controversy. Application of the concepts to autism treatments and special education has raised additional concerns. An analysis of the benefits and limitations of current approaches to empiricism in autism interventions is presented, and suggestions for future research are made. PMID:20876165

  7. Retrieval-based face annotation by weak label regularized local coordinate coding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dayong; Hoi, Steven C H; He, Ying; Zhu, Jianke; Mei, Tao; Luo, Jiebo

    2014-03-01

    Auto face annotation, which aims to detect human faces from a facial image and assign them proper human names, is a fundamental research problem and beneficial to many real-world applications. In this work, we address this problem by investigating a retrieval-based annotation scheme of mining massive web facial images that are freely available over the Internet. In particular, given a facial image, we first retrieve the top $(n)$ similar instances from a large-scale web facial image database using content-based image retrieval techniques, and then use their labels for auto annotation. Such a scheme has two major challenges: 1) how to retrieve the similar facial images that truly match the query, and 2) how to exploit the noisy labels of the top similar facial images, which may be incorrect or incomplete due to the nature of web images. In this paper, we propose an effective Weak Label Regularized Local Coordinate Coding (WLRLCC) technique, which exploits the principle of local coordinate coding by learning sparse features, and employs the idea of graph-based weak label regularization to enhance the weak labels of the similar facial images. An efficient optimization algorithm is proposed to solve the WLRLCC problem. Moreover, an effective sparse reconstruction scheme is developed to perform the face annotation task. We conduct extensive empirical studies on several web facial image databases to evaluate the proposed WLRLCC algorithm from different aspects. The experimental results validate its efficacy. We share the two constructed databases "WDB" (714,454 images of 6,025 people) and "ADB" (126,070 images of 1,200 people) with the public. To further improve the efficiency and scalability, we also propose an offline approximation scheme (AWLRLCC) which generally maintains comparable results but significantly reduces the annotation time. PMID:24457510

  8. General Analytical Procedure for Determination of Acidity Parameters of Weak Acids and Bases

    PubMed Central

    Pilarski, Bogus?aw; Kaliszan, Roman; Wyrzykowski, Dariusz; M?odzianowski, Janusz; Bali?ska, Agata

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a new convenient, inexpensive, and reagent-saving general methodology for the determination of pKa values for components of the mixture of diverse chemical classes weak organic acids and bases in water solution, without the need to separate individual analytes. The data obtained from simple pH-metric microtitrations are numerically processed into reliable pKa values for each component of the mixture. Excellent agreement has been obtained between the determined pKa values and the reference literature data for compounds studied. PMID:25692072

  9. Strengths and weaknesses of Problem Based Learning from the professional perspective of registered nurses 1

    PubMed Central

    Cónsul-Giribet, María; Medina-Moya, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to identify competency strengths and weaknesses as perceived by nursing professionals who graduated with a integrated curriculum and competency-based through Problem Based Learning in small groups. METHOD: an intrinsic case study method was used, which analyzes this innovation through former students (from the first class) with three years of professional experience. The data were collected through a questionnaire and discussion groups. RESULTS: the results show that their competency level is valued in a very satisfactory manner. This level paradoxically contrasts with the lack of theoretical knowledge they perceived at the end of their education, when they started working in clinical practice. CONCLUSIONS: the teaching strategy was key to motivate an in-depth study and arouse the desire to know. In addition, Problem Based Learning favors and reinforces the decision to learn, which is that necessary in the course of professional life. PMID:25493666

  10. Weak bump quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, B. J.; Mcdowell, J.

    1994-01-01

    Research into the optical, ultraviolet and infrared continuum emission from quasars and their host galaxies was carried out. The main results were the discovery of quasars with unusually weak infrared emission and the construction of a quantitative estimate of the dispersion in quasar continuum properties. One of the major uncertainties in the measurement of quasar continuum strength is the contribution to the continuum of the quasar host galaxy as a function of wavelength. Continuum templates were constructed for different types of host galaxy and individual estimates made of the decomposed quasar and host continua based on existing observations of the target quasars. The results are that host galaxy contamination is worse than previously suspected, and some apparent weak bump quasars are really normal quasars with strong host galaxies. However, the existence of true weak bump quasars such as PHL 909 was confirmed. The study of the link between the bump strength and other wavebands was continued by comparing with IRAS data. There is evidence that excess far infrared radiation is correlated with weaker ultraviolet bumps. This argues against an orientation effect and implies a probable link with the host galaxy environment, for instance the presence of a luminous starburst. However, the evidence still favors the idea that reddening is not important in those objects with ultraviolet weak bumps. The same work has led to the discovery of a class of infrared weak quasars. Pushing another part of the envelope of quasar continuum parameter space, the IR-weak quasars have implications for understanding the effects of reddening internal to the quasars, the reality of ultraviolet turnovers, and may allow further tests of the Phinney dust model for the IR continuum. They will also be important objects for studying the claimed IR to x-ray continuum correlation.

  11. Management of Child and Adolescent Eating Disorders: The Current Evidence Base and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gowers, Simon; Bryant-Waugh, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    Although eating disorders in children and adolescents remain a serious cause of morbidity and mortality, the evidence base for effective interventions is surprisingly weak. The adult literature is growing steadily, but this is mainly with regard to psychological therapies for bulimia nervosa and to some extent in the field of pharmacotherapy. This…

  12. Management of Child and Adolescent Eating Disorders: The Current Evidence Base and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gowers, Simon; Bryant-Waugh, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    Although eating disorders in children and adolescents remain a serious cause of morbidity and mortality, the evidence base for effective interventions is surprisingly weak. The adult literature is growing steadily, but this is mainly with regard to psychological therapies for bulimia nervosa and to some extent in the field of pharmacotherapy. This

  13. Evidence-based recommendation on toothpaste use.

    PubMed

    Cury, Jaime Aparecido; Tenuta, Livia Maria Andalo

    2014-01-01

    Toothpaste can be used as a vehicle for substances to improve the oral health of individuals and populations. Therefore, it should be recommended based on the best scientific evidence available, and not on the opinion of authorities or specialists. Fluoride is the most important therapeutic substance used in toothpastes, adding to the effect of mechanical toothbrushing on dental caries control. The use of fluoride toothpaste to reduce caries in children and adults is strongly based on evidence, and is dependent on the concentration (minimum of 1000 ppm F) and frequency of fluoride toothpaste use (2'/day or higher). The risk of dental fluorosis due to toothpaste ingestion by children has been overestimated, since there is no evidence that: 1) fluoride toothpaste use should be postponed until the age of 3-4 or older, 2) low-fluoride toothpaste avoids fluorosis and 3) fluorosis has a detrimental effect on the quality of life of individuals exposed to fluoridated water and toothpaste. Among other therapeutic substances used in toothpastes, there is evidence that triclosan/copolymer reduce dental biofilm, gingivitis, periodontitis, calculus and halitosis, and that toothpastes containing stannous fluoride reduce biofilm and gingivitis. PMID:24554097

  14. Evidence-based medical education -quo vadis?

    PubMed

    Leung, Gabriel M; Johnston, Janice M

    2006-06-01

    The evidence base for most educational initiatives, at least until very recently, is largely composed of low-level evidence. Four major barriers underlie this historical observation, namely: (1) perceived ethical and acceptability problems arising from the unequal treatment of learners in experimental designs; (2) limited choice of outcome measures and validated instruments; (3) time and resource constraints; and (4) methodological issues concerning contextual confounding and small sample sizes. We advocate the adoption of a 'balanced scorecard' approach in the evaluation of education interventions that brings together a comprehensive panel of outcomes under one framework. We require a diversity of rigorously applied methods to generate these outcomes, drawing from the quantitative and qualitative disciplines of epidemiology, psychology and economics. We further suggest that the research community discuss and agree on a standardized set of common metrics or benchmarks. We conclude with a case study examining whether a hand-held computer clinical decision support tool improves clerkship learning of evidence-based medicine. The era of Brownian motion in health education research is over. What we demand in terms of burden of proof for educational effectiveness should be no less rigorous than our call for an ever escalating threshold concerning evidence of clinical care. PMID:16722922

  15. RFM-Based Block Adjustment for Spaceborne Images with Weak Convergent Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C. Q.; Zhang, J. X.; Huang, G. M.

    2015-06-01

    Block adjustment is one of the most important processing steps in topographic mapping. In order to achieve precise 3D photogrammetry points, the ratio of base-to-height(RBH) or the forward intersection angle(FIA) of stereo images should meet the requirement of specifications for topographic maps when the block images are used. In some fields, overlaps and ratios of base-toheight are often ignored, no gaps among the images are the basic requirements for block images. In this study we give a method to detect the forward intersection angle for homonymous points with RPCs, and create a indicator angler to reflect the level of weak convergence. In order to achieve stable and precise solver for block adjustment under the condition of weak convergence, this paper take the elevation value interpolated from DEM as observed values with errors, combine the height value and measured image coordinates to build adjustment model. The model can be steady solved in ill-pose situation and have little effects from the DEM errors. the model and the methods are validated by simulation and real data including optical ZY1-02C and TerraSAR images.

  16. What's Wrong with Evidence-Based Medicine?

    PubMed

    Fins, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Medicine in the last decades of the twentieth century was ripe for a data sweep that would bring systematic analysis to treatment strategies that seemingly had stood the test of time but were actually unvalidated. Coalescing under the banner of evidence-based medicine, this process has helped to standardize care, minimize error, and promote patient safety. But with this advancement, something of the art of medicine has been lost. PMID:26786040

  17. What Is Evidence-Based Behavior Analysis?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tristram

    2013-01-01

    Although applied behavior analysts often say they engage in evidence-based practice, they express differing views on what constitutes “evidence” and “practice.” This article describes a practice as a service offered by a provider to help solve a problem presented by a consumer. Solving most problems (e.g., increasing or decreasing a behavior and maintaining this change) requires multiple intervention procedures (i.e., a package). Single-subject studies are invaluable in investigating individual procedures, but researchers still need to integrate the procedures into a package. The package must be standardized enough for independent providers to replicate yet flexible enough to allow individualization; intervention manuals are the primary technology for achieving this balance. To test whether the package is effective in solving consumers' problems, researchers must evaluate outcomes of the package as a whole, usually in group studies such as randomized controlled trials. From this perspective, establishing an evidence-based practice involves more than analyzing the effects of discrete intervention procedures on behavior; it requires synthesizing information so as to offer thorough solutions to problems. Recognizing the need for synthesis offers behavior analysts many promising opportunities to build on their existing research to increase the quality and quantity of evidence-based practices. PMID:25729130

  18. Evidence Based Psychosocial Interventions in Substance Use

    PubMed Central

    Jhanjee, Sonali

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been significant progress and expansion in the development of evidence-based psychosocial treatments for substance abuse and dependence. A literature review was undertaken using the several electronic databases (PubMed, Cochrane Database of systemic reviews and specific journals, which pertain to psychosocial issues in addictive disorders and guidelines on this topic). Overall psychosocial interventions have been found to be effective. Some interventions, such as cognitive behavior therapy, motivational interviewing and relapse prevention, appear to be effective across many drugs of abuse. Psychological treatment is more effective when prescribed with substitute prescribing than when medication or psychological treatment is used alone, particularly for opiate users. The evidence base for psychological treatment needs to be expanded and should also include research on optimal combinations of psychological therapies and any particular matching effects, if any. Psychological interventions are an essential part of the treatment regimen and efforts should be made to integrate evidence-based interventions in all substance use disorder treatment programs. PMID:24860208

  19. Ab initio molecular dynamics study of the mechanism of proton recombination with a weak base.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Jrme; Hassanali, Ali A

    2014-12-01

    Despite its fundamental nature, many of the microscopic features of acidbase recombination remain poorly understood. In this work, we use ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to study the recombination of the proton with a weak base, the carbonate ion CO3(2). Our simulations elucidate the network structure around CO3(2) that provides a distribution of pathways over which recombination can occur. We observe that the penultimate neutralization step involves a correlated behavior of the transferred protons that is mediated by the water wires decorating the carbonate. These concerted proton transfers are coupled to collective compressions of these water wires. We show further that these processes are dynamically coupled to the reorganization of the water molecules hydrating the CO3(2) ion. The insights from these simulations help to bridge the structural and dynamical complexity of the microscopic mechanisms with those of phenomenological models invoked by experiments in this field. PMID:25415885

  20. Towards a spectrum-based bar code for identification of weakly fluorescent microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrek, Zden?k; Wiedemann, Jens; Schwille, Petra

    2014-03-01

    Spectrally resolved detection of fluorescent probes can be used to identify multiple labeled target molecules in an unknown mixture. We study how the spectral shape, the experimental noise, and the number of spectral detection channels affect the success of identification of weakly fluorescent beads on basis of their emission spectra. The proposed formalism allows to estimate the performance of the spectral identification procedure with a given set of spectral codes on the basis of the reference spectra only. We constructed a simple prism-based setup for spectral detection and demonstrate that seven distinct but overlapping spectral codes realized by combining up to three fluorescent dyes bound to a single bead in a barcode-based manner can be reliably identified. The procedure allows correct identification even in the presence of known autofluorescence background stronger than the actual signal.

  1. Some Results of Weak Anticipative Concept Applied in Simulation Based Decision Support in Enterprise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kljaji?, Miroljub; Kofja?, Davorin; Kljaji? Bortnar, Mirjana; kraba, Andrej

    2010-11-01

    The simulation models are used as for decision support and learning in enterprises and in schools. Tree cases of successful applications demonstrate usefulness of weak anticipative information. Job shop scheduling production with makespan criterion presents a real case customized flexible furniture production optimization. The genetic algorithm for job shop scheduling optimization is presented. Simulation based inventory control for products with stochastic lead time and demand describes inventory optimization for products with stochastic lead time and demand. Dynamic programming and fuzzy control algorithms reduce the total cost without producing stock-outs in most cases. Values of decision making information based on simulation were discussed too. All two cases will be discussed from optimization, modeling and learning point of view.

  2. Evidence-Based Practice for Outpatient Clinical Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, John D.

    2006-01-01

    This column focuses on evidence-based practice (EBP) within multidisciplinary outpatient settings, but first provides some definitions. Besides EBP (Burns and Hoagwood, 2005; Guyatt and Rennie, 2002), there are also evidence-based medicine (EBM; March et al., 2005), evidence-based service (EBS; Chorpita et al., 2002), and evidence-based treatment

  3. Evidence-Based Practice for Outpatient Clinical Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, John D.

    2006-01-01

    This column focuses on evidence-based practice (EBP) within multidisciplinary outpatient settings, but first provides some definitions. Besides EBP (Burns and Hoagwood, 2005; Guyatt and Rennie, 2002), there are also evidence-based medicine (EBM; March et al., 2005), evidence-based service (EBS; Chorpita et al., 2002), and evidence-based treatment…

  4. Evidence-based ethics? On evidence-based practice and the "empirical turn" from normative bioethics

    PubMed Central

    Goldenberg, Maya J

    2005-01-01

    Background The increase in empirical methods of research in bioethics over the last two decades is typically perceived as a welcomed broadening of the discipline, with increased integration of social and life scientists into the field and ethics consultants into the clinical setting, however it also represents a loss of confidence in the typical normative and analytic methods of bioethics. Discussion The recent incipiency of "Evidence-Based Ethics" attests to this phenomenon and should be rejected as a solution to the current ambivalence toward the normative resolution of moral problems in a pluralistic society. While "evidence-based" is typically read in medicine and other life and social sciences as the empirically-adequate standard of reasonable practice and a means for increasing certainty, I propose that the evidence-based movement in fact gains consensus by displacing normative discourse with aggregate or statistically-derived empirical evidence as the "bottom line". Therefore, along with wavering on the fact/value distinction, evidence-based ethics threatens bioethics' normative mandate. The appeal of the evidence-based approach is that it offers a means of negotiating the demands of moral pluralism. Rather than appealing to explicit values that are likely not shared by all, "the evidence" is proposed to adjudicate between competing claims. Quantified measures are notably more "neutral" and democratic than liberal markers like "species normal functioning". Yet the positivist notion that claims stand or fall in light of the evidence is untenable; furthermore, the legacy of positivism entails the quieting of empirically non-verifiable (or at least non-falsifiable) considerations like moral claims and judgments. As a result, evidence-based ethics proposes to operate with the implicit normativity that accompanies the production and presentation of all biomedical and scientific facts unchecked. Summary The "empirical turn" in bioethics signals a need for reconsideration of the methods used for moral evaluation and resolution, however the options should not include obscuring normative content by seemingly neutral technical measure. PMID:16277663

  5. Lingual orthodontic treatment: what is the current evidence base?

    PubMed

    Auluck, Angela

    2013-09-01

    As the number of adults that seek orthodontic treatment continues to grow, so too is the popularity of lingual fixed appliances. Although the aesthetic advantages associated with these systems are obvious, for some orthodontists, there has been a reluctance to offer lingual-based treatment to their patients. This is often based upon the perceived problems associated with lingual braces, relating to discomfort and difficulties with speech for the patient, and problems in using these appliances for the orthodontist. Although some of these factors have been investigated, the current evidence base is weak, possibly due to the fact that these are evolving appliance systems. Among the studies that have been carried out to date, pain and discomfort for the patient appears to be similar following the placement of labial or lingual appliances, although the onset can be earlier with lingual brackets and the location different, with the tongue more frequently being involved. Customized lingual brackets may be associated with less pain than pre-fabricated. In addition, patients do seem to be more likely to experience difficulties with speech and mastication when fitted with a lingual appliance. However, there is some evidence that the lingual surfaces of the teeth are more resistant to early demineralization and caries. Little data exist regarding treatment outcome and ease of use for the orthodontist, either between lingual or labial appliances or between different lingual systems. Further research is required to investigate the efficiency of lingual appliance systems, both for the patient and orthodontist. PMID:24005948

  6. Narrow Scale Flow and a Weak Field by the Top of Earth's Core: Evidence from Orsted, Magsat and Secular Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    2004-01-01

    As Earth's main magnetic field weakens, our magnetic shield against the onslaught of the solar wind thins. And the field strength needed to fend off battering by solar coronal mass ejections is decreasing, just when the delicate complexity of modem, vulnerable, electro-technological systems is increasing at an unprecedented rate. Recently, a working group of distinguished scientist from across the nation has asked NASA's Solid Earth and Natural Hazards program a key question: What are the dynamics of Earth s magnetic field and its interactions with the Earth system? Paleomagnetic studies of crustal rocks magnetized in the geologic past reveal that polarity reversals have occurred many times during Earth s history. Networked super-computer simulations of core field and flow, including effects of gravitational, pressure, rotational Coriolis, magnetic and viscous forces, suggest how this might happen in detail. And space-based measurements of the real, time-varying magnetic field help constrain estimates of the speed and direction of fluid iron flowing near the top of the core and enable tests of some hypotheses about such flow. Now scientists at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center have developed and applied methods to test the hypotheses of narrow scale flow and of a dynamically weak magnetic field near the top of Earth s core. Using two completely different methods, C. V. Voorhies has shown these hypotheses lead to specific theoretical forms for the "spectrum" of Earth s main magnetic field and the spectrum of its rate of change. Much as solar physicists use a prism to separate sunlight into its spectrum, from long wavelength red to short wavelength blue light, geophysicists use a digital prism, spherical harmonic analysis, to separate the measured geomagnetic field into its spectrum, from long to short wavelength fields. They do this for the rate of change of the field as well.

  7. Weak edge enhancement based on contextual modulation of non-classical receptive field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jie; Cai, Chao

    2015-12-01

    Edges and contours of an object contain a lot of information, so the detection and extraction of saliency edges and contours in the image become one of the most active issues in the research field of automatic target recognition. Weak edge enhancement plays an important role in contour detection. Based on psychophysical and physiological findings, a contour detection method which focuses on weak edge enhancement and inspired by the visual mechanism in the primary visual cortex (V1) is proposed in this paper. The method is divided in three steps. Firstly, the response of every single visual neuron in V1 is computed by local energy. Secondly, the local contrast which corresponds to the CRF is computed. If the local contrast in the image is below the low contrast threshold, expand NCRF to change the spatially modulatory range by increasing the NCRF radius. Thirdly, the facilitation and suppression (the contextual influence) on a neuron through horizontal interactions are obtained by using a spatially unified modulating function. We tested it on synthetic images and encouraging results were acquired.

  8. Fast coding of arbitrarily shaped image segments using weakly separable bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philips, Wilfried R.

    1996-01-01

    Segmented image coding (SIC) produces images of better subjective quality than techniques such as the Joint Photographic Experts Group at very low bit rates. It segments images into regions of similar texture and codes their contour and texture separately. Most SIC techniques represent the texture as a linear combination of orthonormal base functions, which differ from region to region. In earlier SIC methods, the orthonormal bases were generated by the Gram- Schmidt (GS) procedure, whose excessive computational requirements are unacceptable in many applications. This paper introduces a new class of weakly separable (WS) orthonormal bases. The WS base functions are the product of two components, which can be generated very quickly and using a modest amount of memory. The class of WS base functions includes polynomials, cosines, and warped polynomials. The paper describes the spatial properties of these base functions. Experimental data show that for typical coding parameters, WS SIC is 8 to 40 times faster than traditional SIC, at the expense of a 3% to 6% larger root-mean-square error. However, the subject quality of the compressed images is only slightly smaller for the WS method. Considering its computational advantages, WS SIC is therefore a promising technique for fast, low bit rate coding.

  9. Quantum discord with weak measurement operators of quasi-Werner states based on bipartite entangled coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, E.; Gómez, R.; Ladera, C. L.; Zambrano, A.

    2013-11-01

    Among many applications quantum weak measurements have been shown to be important in exploring fundamental physics issues, such as the experimental violation of the Heisenberg uncertainty relation and the Hardy paradox, and have also technological implications in quantum optics, quantum metrology and quantum communications, where the precision of the measurement is as important as the precision of quantum state preparation. The theory of weak measurement can be formulated using the pre-and post-selected quantum systems, as well as using the weak measurement operator formalism. In this work, we study the quantum discord (QD) of quasi-Werner mixed states based on bipartite entangled coherent states using the weak measurements operator, instead of the projective measurement operators. We then compare the quantum discord for both kinds of measurement operators, in terms of the entanglement quality, the latter being measured using the concept of concurrence. It's found greater quantum correlations using the weak measurement operators.

  10. [Acupressure and Evidence-Based Nursing].

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Li; Lin, Jun-Dai

    2015-12-01

    Acupressure is a traditional Chinese medicine approach to disease prevention and treatment that may be operated by nurses independently. Therefore, acupressure is being increasingly applied in clinical nursing practice and research. Recently, the implementation of evidence-based nursing (EBN) in clinical practice has been encouraged to promote nursing quality. Evidence-based nursing is a method-ology and process of implementation that applies the best-available evidence to clinical practice, which is acquired through the use of empirical nursing research. Therefore, in this paper, we address the topic of acupressure within the context of empirical nursing practice. We first introduce the current status of acupressure research and provide the locations of common acupoints in order to guide future empirical nursing research and to help nurses use these acupoints in clinical practice. Finally, we describe the steps that are necessary to apply the current empirical information on acupressure as well as provide suggestions to promote safety and efficacy in order to guide nurses in the accurate application of acupressure in nursing practice. PMID:26645442

  11. How to Practice Evidence-Based Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Jennifer A.; Schmitz, DeLaine; Chung, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is defined as the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence, combined with individual clinical expertise and patient preferences and values, in making decisions about the care of individual patients. In an effort to emphasize the importance of EBM in plastic surgery, ASPS and PRS have launched an initiative to improve the understanding of EBM concepts and provide tools for implementing EBM in practice. Through a series of special articles aimed at educating plastic surgeons, our hope is that readers will be compelled to learn more about EBM and incorporate its principles into their own practices. As the first of the series, this article provides a brief overview of the evolution, current application, and practice of EBM. PMID:20224459

  12. Canadian Tire Money: An Analogy for Use When Discussing Weak Acid Strong Base Titrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Last, Arthur M.

    2003-12-01

    A simple analogy can often provide an instructor with a means of helping students to understand an unfamiliar concept. An analogy involving money can be particularly helpful as most students have experience in dealing with a range of financial transactions in their everyday lives. In this article, use is made of the practice of one well-known Canadian retail chain in returning to its customers a small percentage of an item's purchase price in the form of imitation bank notes that can subsequently be spent in the chain's stores. An analogy is drawn between this practice and the determination of the pKa of a weak acid by titrating it with a strong base, taking into account the hydrolysis of the anion produced.

  13. Thermooptic-based differential measurements of weak solute absorptions with an interferometer.

    PubMed

    Cremers, D A; Keller, R A

    1982-05-01

    An interferometric method of measuring small differences between weak optical absorptions of solutions has been developed using the thermooptic effect. To record the small changes in optical path length ~lambda/200 due to heating, it was necessary to stabilize the fringe pattern with respect to slow thermal drift using a galvanometer-driven compensator plate controlled by a closed feedback loop. Fringe shifts from background absorptions were nulled out to better than 1 part in 400, permitting the measurement of differences in absorptions between two solutions that were l/100th of background. Using laser powers of 100 mW, absorptions approximately 5 x 10(-6) cm(-1) (base e) could be measured with CC1(4) solutions. PMID:20389912

  14. Evidence for Unexpected Weaknesses in Learning in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder without Reading Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutting, Laurie E.; Koth, Christine W.; Mahone, E. Mark; Denckla, Martha B.

    2003-01-01

    Eighteen children (ages 6-16) with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were compared to 20 controls on both process and product scores from the California Verbal Learning Test for Children. Children with ADHD initially learned the same number of words as controls but showed weaknesses recalling the words after delays. (Contains

  15. Evidence-based psychosocial treatment for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fenton, W S; Schooler, N R

    2000-01-01

    Current recommendations for evidence-based schizophrenia treatment support a comprehensive, individualized approach that integrates advances in psychopharmacology with psychosocial strategies for disease management. In this issue of the Schizophrenia Bulletin, we invited clinician investigators to summarize new empirical data concerning the efficacy of psychosocial interventions that target common and particularly problematic aspects of schizophrenia. A rich formulary of psychosocial interventions with demonstrated efficacy is now available. With new neuroleptic medications, these interventions should define the current standard of care for schizophrenia. PMID:10755666

  16. Microdermabrasion: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Karimipour, Darius J; Karimipour, Gholamreza; Orringer, Jeffrey S

    2010-01-01

    Microdermabrasion is a popular technique used in the treatment of several skin problems, including acne, acne scarring, striae distensae, and photoaging. This article will review the relevant literature and use an evidence-based approach to evaluate the clinical efficacy of microdermabrasion in skin care. In summary, microdermabrasion appears to be a procedure that can produce changes in dermal matrix constituents and result in improvement in skin contour irregularities. It may also be beneficial in improving transepidermal delivery of certain medications. Its role in the treatment of dyschromias and acne vulgaris is limited. PMID:20048628

  17. Cost Evaluation of Evidence-Based Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Sindelar, Jody L.; Ball, Samuel A.

    2010-01-01

    Many treatment programs have adopted or are considering adopting evidence-based treatments (EBTs). When a program evaluates whether to adopt a new intervention, it must consider program objectives, operational goals, and costs. This article examines cost concepts, cost estimation, and use of cost information to make the final decision on whether to adopt an EBT. Cost categories, including variable and fixed, accounting and opportunity, and costs borne by patients and others, are defined and illustrated using the example of expenditures for contingency management. Ultimately, cost is one consideration in the overall determination of whether implementing an EBT is the best use of a programs resources. PMID:22002453

  18. Seeking best practices: a conceptual framework for planning and improving evidence-based practices.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Lorine M; Schooley, Michael W; Anderson, Lynda A; Kochtitzky, Chris S; DeGroff, Amy S; Devlin, Heather M; Mercer, Shawna L

    2013-01-01

    How can we encourage ongoing development, refinement, and evaluation of practices to identify and build an evidence base for best practices? On the basis of a review of the literature and expert input, we worked iteratively to create a framework with 2 interrelated components. The first - public health impact - consists of 5 elements: effectiveness, reach, feasibility, sustainability, and transferability. The second - quality of evidence - consists of 4 levels, ranging from weak to rigorous. At the intersection of public health impact and quality of evidence, a continuum of evidence-based practice emerges, representing the ongoing development of knowledge across 4 stages: emerging, promising, leading, and best. This conceptual framework brings together important aspects of impact and quality to provide a common lexicon and criteria for assessing and strengthening public health practice. We hope this work will invite and advance dialogue among public health practitioners and decision makers to build and strengthen a diverse evidence base for public health programs and strategies. PMID:24331280

  19. 3D modeling method for computer animate based on modified weak structured light method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanwei; Pan, Ming; Zhang, Xiangwei

    2010-11-01

    A simple and affordable 3D scanner is designed in this paper. Three-dimensional digital models are playing an increasingly important role in many fields, such as computer animate, industrial design, artistic design and heritage conservation. For many complex shapes, optical measurement systems are indispensable to acquiring the 3D information. In the field of computer animate, such an optical measurement device is too expensive to be widely adopted, and on the other hand, the precision is not as critical a factor in that situation. In this paper, a new cheap 3D measurement system is implemented based on modified weak structured light, using only a video camera, a light source and a straight stick rotating on a fixed axis. For an ordinary weak structured light configuration, one or two reference planes are required, and the shadows on these planes must be tracked in the scanning process, which destroy the convenience of this method. In the modified system, reference planes are unnecessary, and size range of the scanned objects is expanded widely. A new calibration procedure is also realized for the proposed method, and points cloud is obtained by analyzing the shadow strips on the object. A two-stage ICP algorithm is used to merge the points cloud from different viewpoints to get a full description of the object, and after a series of operations, a NURBS surface model is generated in the end. A complex toy bear is used to verify the efficiency of the method, and errors range from 0.7783mm to 1.4326mm comparing with the ground truth measurement.

  20. The weak helps the strong: sigma-holes and the stability of MF(4)base complexes.

    PubMed

    Donald, Kelling J; Tawfik, Marina

    2013-12-27

    Bonding interactions between an electron-deficient region (a sigma-hole) on M and electron donors in MF4-Base complexes, where M = C, Si, Ge, Sn, and Pb, are examined and rationalized. These interactions are seen to transition from weak primarily noncovalent interactions for all bases when M = C to stronger primarily covalent bonds in adducts as the valence shell expands for the heavier M atoms. For M = Ge, Sn, and Pb, the complexes are particularly stable. The consistent axial preference in these systems is anticipated by previous studies and is readily explained from the vantage point of sigma-hole interactions. A series of bound complexes of common bases such as pyridine, tetrahydrofuran, and water are identified, some of which are even more stable than the SiF4NH3 and SiF4N(CH3)3 complexes that have already been identified experimentally. Sigma-hole bonding to di- and poly-substituted central atoms, perhaps on par with halogen bonding, is expected to become increasingly important as an ordering interaction in materials science and engineering. Group 14 compounds have distinct advantages in this respect. PMID:24147896

  1. Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines and School Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Susan; McCarthy, Ann Marie

    2007-01-01

    The use of evidence-based practice (EBP) has become the standard of health care practice. Nurses are expected to use best evidence on a wide range of topics, yet most nurses have limited time, resources, and/or skills to access and evaluate the quality of research and evidence needed to practice evidence-based nursing. EBP guidelines allow nurses

  2. Weak superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Benacka, S.; Kedro, M.

    1990-01-01

    This Proceedings consist of invited papers and contributions presented at the Fifth Czechoslovak Symposium on Weak Superconductivity (5CSSWS) held at Smolenice Castle from May 29 to June 2, 1989. This five-days meeting was organized by the Institute of Electrical Engineering, Electro-Physical Research Center, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, in cooperation with the Institute of Measurement and Measuring Techniques, EPRC, SAS, Bratislava and the Institute of Physics, CSAS, in Prague. From the beginning the Czechoslovak activities in weak superconductivity were concerned with preparation and study of properties of weak links based on superconducting thin films of Pb, Nb, and Nb{sub 3}Sn, as well as bulk point contacts and rf SQUIDs for magnetometry. The possibility of application of superconducting weak links with tunnel and bridge junctions in measuring techniques, magnetometry, medicine, metrology, radiometry, etc., were studied. Some of these activities are still in progress. These Proceedings include contributions on the properties of tunnel junctions, electrodynamics of SQUIDs, computer simulation of interferometers, multi-channel magnetometry for biomagnetic applications, etc. The discovery of high T{sub c} superconductivity influenced strongly the topics of 5CSSWS. Most contributions of this volume are devoted to the preparation of high T{sub c} superconductor thin films by vacuum deposition techniques because of their dominant role in technology of cryoelectronic microcircuits. Further, results in the study of physical properties of high T{sub c} superconducting thin films by means of both dc and rf methods, tunnel and microcontact spectroscopy, are documented. Other contributions deal with preparation of rf SQUIDs, radiation detectors, etc.

  3. Total phenol analysis of weakly supported water using a laccase-based microband biosensor.

    PubMed

    Sekretaryova, Alina N; Volkov, Anton V; Zozoulenko, Igor V; Turner, Anthony P F; Vagin, Mikhail Yu; Eriksson, Mats

    2016-02-11

    The monitoring of phenolic compounds in wastewaters in a simple manner is of great importance for environmental control. Here, a novel screen printed laccase-based microband array for in situ, total phenol estimation in wastewaters and for water quality monitoring without additional sample pre-treatment is presented. Numerical simulations using the finite element method were utilized for the characterization of micro-scale graphite electrodes. Anodization followed by covalent modification was used for the electrode functionalization with laccase. The functionalization efficiency and the electrochemical performance in direct and catechol-mediated oxygen reduction were studied at the microband laccase electrodes and compared with macro-scale electrode structures. The reduction of the dimensions of the enzyme biosensor, when used under optimized conditions, led to a significant improvement in its analytical characteristics. The elaborated microsensor showed fast responses towards catechol additions to tap water - a weakly supported medium - characterized by a linear range from 0.2 to 10 μM, a sensitivity of 1.35 ± 0.4 A M(-1) cm(-2) and a dynamic range up to 43 μM. This enhanced laccase-based microsensor was used for water quality monitoring and its performance for total phenol analysis of wastewater samples from different stages of the cleaning process was compared to a standard method. PMID:26803001

  4. Polymethacrylate-based monolithic capillary column with weak cation exchange functionalities for capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Aydoğan, Cemil; Tuncel, Ali; Denizli, Adil

    2012-04-01

    Polymethacrylate-based monolith with weak cation exchange functionalities was prepared in capillary column (i.d. 100 μm, o.d. 375 μm) by in situ polymerization of butyl methacrylate, ethylene dimethacrylate and N-methacryloyl-L-glutamic acid in presence of porogens. The porogen mixture included N,N-dimethyl formamide and phosphate buffer. The preparation procedure of stationary phase contained the synthesis of monomer, silanization of capillary inner wall and in situ polymerization. The use of amino acid based monomer for the monolith synthesis is one of the originalities of this novel approach. N-methacryloyl-L-glutamic acid has two carboxyl functionalities. The separation of the solutes were performed at different acetonitrile/phosphate buffer and acetonitrile/sodium hydroxide contents. The applied voltage for the alkyl benzenes was changed between +5 and +30 kV. CEC separations of alkyl benzenes, acidic, basic, phenolic and some polycylic aromatic compounds were succesfully performed under capillary-electrochromatography mode with cathodic electroosmotic flow. PMID:22589162

  5. [THE FOUNDATIONS OF EVIDENCE-BASED MEDICINE].

    PubMed

    Pasleau, F

    2015-01-01

    The fundamentals of Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) are the clinical experience, the application of best evidences from research and the consideration of patient expectations. It enabled significant progresses in the management of diseases with a low or multifactorial causality. But it has also led to unintended negative consequences, partly related to conflicts of interest. The objective of this article is to bring the attention back to the scientific rigor that must sustain the medical practice, namely in the occurrence : 1) formulating a question that addresses all the elements of an individual clinical situation; 2) exploring the literature systematically; 3) estimating the degree of confidence in the conclusions of clinical trials. EBM provides intuitive tools to address some uncomfortable concepts of biostatistics and to identify the biases and the embellished data that invalidate many studies. However, it is difficult to decide of the care of a single patient from observations issued from the comparison of'heterogeneous groups. Personalized medicine should help to overcome this difficulty and should facilitate clinical decision making by targeting the patients who are most likely to benefit from an intervention without much inconvenience. PMID:26285443

  6. Evidence for weakly bound electrons in non-irradiated alkane crystals: The electrons as a probe of structural differences in crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Pietrow, M. Misiak, L. E.; Gagoś, M.; Kornarzyński, K.; Szurkowski, J.; Grzegorczyk, M.; Rochowski, P.

    2015-02-14

    It is generally assumed that weakly bound (trapped) electrons in organic solids come only from radiolytical (or photochemical) processes like ionization caused by an excited positron entering the sample. This paper presents evidence for the presence of these electrons in non-irradiated samples of docosane. This can be due to the triboelectrification process. We argue that these electrons can be located (trapped) either in interlamellar gaps or in spaces made by non-planar conformers. Electrons from the former ones are bound more weakly than electrons from the latter ones. The origin of Vis absorption for the samples is explained. These spectra can be used as a probe indicating differences in the solid structures of hydrocarbons.

  7. Training the Evidence-Based Practitioner

    PubMed Central

    LeFebvre, Ronald P.; Peterson, David H.; Haas, Mitchell; Gillette, Richard G.; Novak, Charles W.; Tapper, Janet; Muench, John P.

    2011-01-01

    An important goal of chiropractic clinical education should be to teach specific evidence-based practice (EBP) skills to chiropractic students, interns, and doctors. Using a nominal group process, the authors produced a document similar to the Council of Chiropractic Education standards for clinical competencies that can be used to drive an EBP curriculum. Standard texts and journal articles were consulted to create the standards for this program and each standard and corresponding learning objective was discussed in detail and was then graded by the committee in terms of importance and the level of competency that should be attained. Six standards and 31 learning objectives were generated with the learning objectives being further divided into lists of specific competencies. It is the hope of these authors that by sharing this document it can serve as a comprehensive and detailed seed document for other institutions. PMID:21677870

  8. Nanotheranostics in evidence based personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sushil

    2014-01-01

    Efficient drug delivery systems are exceedingly important for novel drug discovery. The evidence-based personalized medicine (EBPM) promises to deliver the right drug at the right time to a right patient as it covers clinicallysignificant genetic predisposition and chronopharmacological aspects of nanotheranostics. Recently nanotechnology has provided clinically-significant information at the cellular, molecular, and genetic level to facilitate evidence-based personalized treatment. Particularly drug encapsulation in pegylated liposomes has improved pharmacodynamics of cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and neurodegenerative diseases. Long-circulating liposomes and block copolymers concentrate slowly via enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect in the solid tumors and are highly significant for the drug delivery in cancer chemotherapeutics. Selective targeting of siRNA and oligonucleotides to tumor cells with a potential to inhibit multi-drug resistant (MDR) malignancies has also shown promise. In addition, implantable drug delivery devices have improved the treatment of several chronic diseases. Recently, microRNA, metallothioneins (MTs), ?-synuclein index, and Charnoly body (CB) have emerged as novel drug discovery biomarkers. Hence CB antagonists-loaded ROSscavenging targeted nanoparticles (NPs) may be developed for the treatment of neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Nonspecific induction of CBs in the hyper-proliferative cells may cause alopecia, gastrointestinal tract (GIT) symptoms, myelosuppression, neurotoxicity, and infertility. Therefore selective CB agonists may be developed to augment cancer stem cell specific CB formation to eradicate MDR malignancies with minimum or no adverse effects. This review highlights recent advances on safe, economical, and effective treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer by adopting emerging nanotheranostic strategies to accomplish EBPM. PMID:25174340

  9. Toward Evidence-Based Transport of Evidence-Based Treatments: MST as an Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenwald, Sonja K.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the journey toward evidence-based transport and implementation in usual care settings of Multisystemic Therapy (MST) for youth with drug abuse and behavioral problems (Henggeler, Schoenwald, Borduin, Rowland, & Cunningham, 1998). Research and experience informing the design of the MST transport strategy, progress in

  10. Toward Evidence-Based Transport of Evidence-Based Treatments: MST as an Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenwald, Sonja K.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the journey toward evidence-based transport and implementation in usual care settings of Multisystemic Therapy (MST) for youth with drug abuse and behavioral problems (Henggeler, Schoenwald, Borduin, Rowland, & Cunningham, 1998). Research and experience informing the design of the MST transport strategy, progress in…

  11. An Iterative Framework for EEG-based Image Search: Robust Retrieval with Weak Classifiers

    PubMed Central

    Ušćumlić, Marija; Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Millán, José del R.

    2013-01-01

    We revisit the framework for brain-coupled image search, where the Electroencephalography (EEG) channel under rapid serial visual presentation protocol is used to detect user preferences. Extending previous works on the synergy between content-based image labeling and EEG-based brain-computer interface (BCI), we propose a different perspective on iterative coupling. Previously, the iterations were used to improve the set of EEG-based image labels before propagating them to the unseen images for the final retrieval. In our approach we accumulate the evidence of the true labels for each image in the database through iterations. This is done by propagating the EEG-based labels of the presented images at each iteration to the rest of images in the database. Our results demonstrate a continuous improvement of the labeling performance across iterations despite the moderate EEG-based labeling (AUC <75%). The overall analysis is done in terms of the single-trial EEG decoding performance and the image database reorganization quality. Furthermore, we discuss the EEG-based labeling performance with respect to a search task given the same image database. PMID:23977196

  12. Density functional method including weak interactions: Dispersion coefficients based on the local response approximation.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takeshi; Nakai, Hiromi

    2009-12-14

    A new method to calculate the atom-atom dispersion coefficients in a molecule is proposed for the use in density functional theory with dispersion (DFT-D) correction. The method is based on the local response approximation due to Dobson and Dinte [Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 1780 (1996)], with modified dielectric model recently proposed by Vydrov and van Voorhis [J. Chem. Phys. 130, 104105 (2009)]. The local response model is used to calculate the distributed multipole polarizabilities of atoms in a molecule, from which the dispersion coefficients are obtained by an explicit frequency integral of the Casimir-Polder type. Thus obtained atomic polarizabilities are also used in the damping function for the short-range singularity. Unlike empirical DFT-D methods, the local response dispersion (LRD) method is able to calculate the dispersion energy from the ground-state electron density only. It is applicable to any geometry, free from physical constants such as van der Waals radii or atomic polarizabilities, and computationally very efficient. The LRD method combined with the long-range corrected DFT functional (LC-BOP) is applied to calculations of S22 weakly bound complex set [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 8, 1985 (2006)]. Binding energies obtained by the LC-BOP+LRD agree remarkably well with ab initio references. PMID:20001021

  13. Density functional method including weak interactions: Dispersion coefficients based on the local response approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Takeshi; Nakai, Hiromi

    2009-12-01

    A new method to calculate the atom-atom dispersion coefficients in a molecule is proposed for the use in density functional theory with dispersion (DFT-D) correction. The method is based on the local response approximation due to Dobson and Dinte [Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 1780 (1996)], with modified dielectric model recently proposed by Vydrov and van Voorhis [J. Chem. Phys. 130, 104105 (2009)]. The local response model is used to calculate the distributed multipole polarizabilities of atoms in a molecule, from which the dispersion coefficients are obtained by an explicit frequency integral of the Casimir-Polder type. Thus obtained atomic polarizabilities are also used in the damping function for the short-range singularity. Unlike empirical DFT-D methods, the local response dispersion (LRD) method is able to calculate the dispersion energy from the ground-state electron density only. It is applicable to any geometry, free from physical constants such as van der Waals radii or atomic polarizabilities, and computationally very efficient. The LRD method combined with the long-range corrected DFT functional (LC-BOP) is applied to calculations of S22 weakly bound complex set [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 8, 1985 (2006)]. Binding energies obtained by the LC-BOP+LRD agree remarkably well with ab initio references.

  14. Developing a robust evidence base for nursing.

    PubMed

    Hopp, Lisa

    2014-12-01

    Systematic reviews provide robust evidence for nursing practice because of the exhaustiveness of search, the critical appraisal methods to determine the risks of bias, and synthesis methods that pool evidence to increase the power of statistical estimates or credibility of aggregated metasynthesis of qualitative findings. More consistency in publication standards will enhance the rigor of available evidence and allow nursing to live up to the promise of best available evidence. PMID:25458132

  15. Specialized Community-Based Care: An Evidence-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Specialized community-based care (SCBC) refers to services that manage chronic illness through formalized links between primary and specialized care. Objectives The objectives of this evidence-based analysis (EBA) were as follows: to summarize the literature on SCBC, also known as intermediate care to synthesize the evidence from previous Medical Advisory Secretariat (now Health Quality Ontario) EBAs on SCBC for heart failure, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and chronic wounds to examine the role of SCBC in family practice Results Part 1: Systematic Review of Intermediate Care Seven systematic reviews on intermediate care since 2008 were identified. The literature base is complex and difficult to define. There is evidence to suggest that intermediate care is effective in improving outcomes; however, the effective interventions are still uncertain. Part 2: Synthesis of Evidence in Intermediate Care Mortality Heart failure Significant reduction in patients receiving SCBC COPD Nonsignificant reduction in patients receiving SCBC Hospitalization Heart failure Nonsignificant reduction in patients receiving SCBC COPD Significant reduction in patients receiving SCBC Emergency Department Visits Heart failure Nonsignificant reduction in patients receiving SCBC COPD Significant reduction in patients receiving SCBC Disease-Specific Patient Outcomes COPD Nonsignificant improvement in lung function in patients receiving SCBC Diabetes Significant reduction in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and systolic blood pressure in patients receiving SCBC Chronic wounds Significant increase in the proportion of healed wounds in patients receiving SCBC Quality of Life Heart failure Trend toward improvement in patients receiving SCBC COPD Significant improvement in patients receiving SCBC Part 3: Intermediate Care in Family PracticeEvidence-Based Analysis Five randomized controlled trials were identified comparing SCBC to usual care in family practice. Inclusion criteria were 1) the presence of multiple chronic conditions, and 2) interventions that included 2 or more health care professions. The GRADE quality of the evidence was assessed as low for all outcomes due to the inconsistency and indirectness of the results. Limitations This review did not look at disease-specific studies on intermediate care in family practice. Conclusions Specialized community-based care effectively improves outcomes in patients with heart failure, COPD, and diabetes. The effectiveness of SCBC in family practice is unclear. PMID:23226812

  16. Information Retrieval for Evidence-Based Decision Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Nigel; Miller, Dave; Booth, Andrew; O'Rourke, Alan; Ralph, Jane; Turnock, Edward

    1999-01-01

    Discusses evidence-based decision making; describes techniques to support evidence-based retrieval in the field of medicine which emphasize the retrieval and application of high quality knowledge to solve real-world problems; and considers the transferability of evidence-based information seeking to other fields. (Contains 69 references.) (LRW)

  17. Evidence-Based Health Policy: A Preliminary Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Gareth

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The development of evidence-based health policy is challenging. This study has attempted to identify some of the underpinning factors that promote the development of evidence based health policy. Methods: A preliminary systematic literature review of published reviews with "evidence based health policy" in their title was conducted

  18. Evidence-Based Medicine in the Education of Psychiatrists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srihari, Vinod

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Evidence-based medicine has an important place in the teaching and practice of psychiatry. Attempts to teach evidence-based medicine skills can be weakened by conceptual confusions feeding a false polarization between traditional clinical skills and evidence-based medicine. Methods: The author develops a broader conception of clinical

  19. Evidence-Based Medicine in the Education of Psychiatrists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srihari, Vinod

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Evidence-based medicine has an important place in the teaching and practice of psychiatry. Attempts to teach evidence-based medicine skills can be weakened by conceptual confusions feeding a false polarization between traditional clinical skills and evidence-based medicine. Methods: The author develops a broader conception of clinical…

  20. The ABCs of Evidence-Based Practice for Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kretlow, Allison G.; Blatz, Sharon L.

    2011-01-01

    It is critical teachers adhere to federal policies regarding evidence-based practices. Quickly identifying and effectively using evidence-based programs and practices is particularly important for special educators, because students in special education often already have academic or behavioral deficits. Using evidence-based practices with

  1. Evidence-Based Health Policy: A Preliminary Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Gareth

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The development of evidence-based health policy is challenging. This study has attempted to identify some of the underpinning factors that promote the development of evidence based health policy. Methods: A preliminary systematic literature review of published reviews with "evidence based health policy" in their title was conducted…

  2. Faculty Training in Evidence-Based Medicine: Improving Evidence Acquisition and Critical Appraisal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Laura J.; Warde, Carole M.; Boker, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Evidence-based medicine (EBM) integrates published clinical evidence with patient values and clinical expertise, the output of which is informed medical decision making. Key skills for evidence-based practice include acquisition and appraisal of clinical information. Faculty clinicians often lack expertise in these skills and are

  3. Evidence of weak ferromagnetism in doped plasticized polyaniline (PANI-DDoESSA)0.5 from electron spin resonance measurements.

    PubMed

    Santana, V T; Nascimento, O R; Djurado, D; Travers, J P; Pron, A; Walmsley, L

    2013-03-20

    X-band electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements have been performed on a conducting free-standing film of polyaniline plasticized and protonated with di-n-dodecyl ester of sulfosuccinic acid (DDoESSA). The magnetic field was applied parallel and perpendicular to the plane of the film. At around 75 K a transition is observed from Pauli susceptibility to a localized state in which the spin 1/2 polarons behave as spin 1/2 dimers. A rough estimation of the intradimer and interdimer exchange constants is obtained. Below 5 K, ESR data reveal a weak ferromagnetism with the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya vector mainly oriented in the plane of the film. The existence of a relatively well-defined n-fold axis along the chain direction in the crystalline regions confers a symmetry compatible with such analysis. PMID:23423800

  4. Evidence-based Diagnostics: Adult Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Christopher R.; Schuur, Jeremiah D.; Everett, Worth W.; Pines, Jesse M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Acutely swollen or painful joints are common complaints in the emergency department (ED). Septic arthritis in adults is a challenging diagnosis, but prompt differentiation of a bacterial etiology is crucial to minimize morbidity and mortality. Objectives The objective was to perform a systematic review describing the diagnostic characteristics of history, physical examination, and bedside laboratory tests for nongonococcal septic arthritis. A secondary objective was to quantify test and treatment thresholds using derived estimates of sensitivity and specificity, as well as best-evidence diagnostic and treatment risks and anticipated benefits from appropriate therapy. Methods Two electronic search engines (PUBMED and EMBASE) were used in conjunction with a selected bibliography and scientific abstract hand search. Inclusion criteria included adult trials of patients presenting with monoarticular complaints if they reported sufficient detail to reconstruct partial or complete 2 2 contingency tables for experimental diagnostic test characteristics using an acceptable criterion standard. Evidence was rated by two investigators using the Quality Assessment Tool for Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS). When more than one similarly designed trial existed for a diagnostic test, meta-analysis was conducted using a random effects model. Interval likelihood ratios (LRs) were computed when possible. To illustrate one method to quantify theoretical points in the probability of disease whereby clinicians might cease testing altogether and either withhold treatment (test threshold) or initiate definitive therapy in lieu of further diagnostics (treatment threshold), an interactive spreadsheet was designed and sample calculations were provided based on research estimates of diagnostic accuracy, diagnostic risk, and therapeutic risk/benefits. Results The prevalence of nongonococcal septic arthritis in ED patients with a single acutely painful joint is approximately 27% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 17% to 38%). With the exception of joint surgery (positive likelihood ratio [+LR] = 6.9) or skin infection overlying a prosthetic joint (+LR = 15.0), history, physical examination, and serum tests do not significantly alter posttest probability. Serum inflammatory markers such as white blood cell (WBC) counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) are not useful acutely. The interval LR for synovial white blood cell (sWBC) counts of 0 10925 109/ L was 0.33; for 25 10950 109/L, 1.06; for 50 109100 109/L, 3.59; and exceeding 100 109/L, infinity. Synovial lactate may be useful to rule in or rule out the diagnosis of septic arthritis with a +LR ranging from 2.4 to infinity, and negative likelihood ratio (?LR) ranging from 0 to 0.46. Rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of synovial fluid may identify the causative organism within 3 hours. Based on 56% sensitivity and 90% specificity for sWBC counts of >50 109/L in conjunction with best-evidence estimates for diagnosis-related risk and treatment-related risk/benefit, the arthrocentesis test threshold is 5%, with a treatment threshold of 39%. Conclusions Recent joint surgery or cellulitis overlying a prosthetic hip or knee were the only findings on history or physical examination that significantly alter the probability of nongonococcal septic arthritis. Extreme values of sWBC (>50 109/L) can increase, but not decrease, the probability of septic arthritis. Future ED-based diagnostic trials are needed to evaluate the role of clinical gestalt and the efficacy of nontraditional synovial markers such as lactate. PMID:21843213

  5. Rapid Linguistic Ambiguity Resolution in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Eye Tracking Evidence for the Limits of Weak Central Coherence.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Noemi; Snedeker, Jesse; Rabagliati, Hugh

    2015-12-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have often been reported to have difficulty integrating information into its broader context, which has motivated the Weak Central Coherence theory of ASD. In the linguistic domain, evidence for this difficulty comes from reports of impaired use of linguistic context to resolve ambiguous words. However, recent work has suggested that impaired use of linguistic context may not be characteristic of ASD, and is instead better explained by co-occurring language impairments. Here, we provide a strong test of these claims, using the visual world eye tracking paradigm to examine the online mechanisms by which children with autism resolve linguistic ambiguity. To address concerns about both language impairments and compensatory strategies, we used a sample whose verbal skills were strong and whose average age (7; 6) was lower than previous work on lexical ambiguity resolution in ASD. Participants (40 with autism and 40 controls) heard sentences with ambiguous words in contexts that either strongly supported one reading or were consistent with both (John fed/saw the bat). We measured activation of the unintended meaning through implicit semantic priming of an associate (looks to a depicted baseball glove). Contrary to the predictions of weak central coherence, children with ASD, like controls, quickly used context to resolve ambiguity, selecting appropriate meanings within a second. We discuss how these results constrain the generality of weak central coherence. Autism Res 2015, 8: 717-726. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25820816

  6. Basis of antimalarial action: non-weak base effects of chloroquine on acid vesicle pH

    SciTech Connect

    Krogstad, D.J.; Schlesinger, P.H.

    1987-03-01

    Biologically active concentrations of chloroquine increase the pH of the parasite's acid vesicles within 3-5 min. This increase in pH results from two mechanisms, one of which is markedly reduced in chloroquine-resistant parasites. Because chloroquine is a weak base, it increases vesicle pH by that mechanism in chloroquine-susceptible and resistant parasites and mammalian cells (based on its two pKs and on the delta pH between the acid vesicle and the extracellular environment). In chloroquine-susceptible parasites, but not resistant parasites or mammalian cells, chloroquine increases the pH of acid vesicles 700- to 800-fold more than can be accounted for by its properties as a weak base. The increase in acid vesicle pH caused by these non-weak base effects of nanomolar chloroquine in susceptible parasites suggests that chloroquine acts by interfering with acid vesicle functions in the parasite such as the endocytosis and proteolysis of hemoglobin, and the intracellular targeting of lysosomal enzymes. The non-weak base effects of nanomolar chloroquine on parasite vesicle pH are also responsible for its safety because these chloroquine concentrations do not affect mammalian cells.

  7. Information literacy for evidence-based practice in perianesthesia nurses: readiness for evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jacqueline

    2010-04-01

    Information literacy, the recognition of information required, and the development of skills for locating, evaluating, and effectively using relevant evidence is needed for evidence-based practice (EBP). The purpose of this study was to examine perianesthesia nurses' perception of searching skills and access to evidence sources. The design was a descriptive, exploratory survey. The sample consisted of ASPAN members (n = 64) and nonmembers (n = 64). The Information Literacy for Evidence-Based Nursing Practice instrument was used. Findings were that ASPAN members read more journal articles, were more proficient with computers, and used Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) more frequently than nonmembers. The three top barriers to use of research were: lack of understanding of organization or structure of electronic databases, lack of skills to critique and/or synthesize the literature, and difficulty in accessing research materials. In conclusion, education is needed for critiquing literature and understanding electronic databases and research articles to promote EBP in perianesthesia areas. PMID:20359640

  8. Evidence-based clinical practice, [corrected] evidence-based medicine and the Cochrane collaboration.

    PubMed

    Gambrill, E

    1999-03-01

    Encouraging professionals in training and later to consider practice-related research findings when making important clinical decisions is an on-going concern. Evidenced-Based Medicine (EBM) and the Cochrane Collaboration (CC) provide a source of tools and ideas for doing so, as well as a roster of colleagues who share this interest. Evidenced-based medicine involves integrating clinical expertise with the best available external evidence from systematic research as well as considering the values and expectations of patients/clients. Advantage can be taken of educational formats developed in EBM, such as problem-based learning and critical-appraisal workshops in which participants learn how to ask key answerable questions related to important clinical practice questions (e.g., regarding effectiveness, accuracy of assessment measures, prediction, prevention, and quality of clinical practice guidelines) and to access and critically appraise related research. The Cochrane Collaboration is a world-wide network of centers that prepare, maintain, and disseminate high-quality systematic reviews on the efficacy of healthcare. These databases allow access to evidence related to clinical practice decisions. Forging reciprocal working relationships with those involved in EBM reciprocal and the CC should contribute to the pursuit of shared goals such as basing clinical decisions on the best-available evidence and involving clients as informed consumers. PMID:10365860

  9. Oligomers Based on a Weak Hydrogen Bond Network: the Rotational Spectrum of the Tetramer of Difluoromethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Gang; Evangelisti, Luca; Caminati, Walther; Cacelli, Ivo; Carbonaro, Laura; Prampolini, Giacomo

    2013-06-01

    Following the investigation of the rotational spectra of three conformers (so-called ``book'', ``prism'' and ``cage'') of the water hexamer, and of some other water oligomers, we report here the rotational spectrum of the tetramer of a freon molecule. The pulse jet Fourier transform microwave (pj-FTMW) spectrum of an isomer of the difluoromethane tetramer has been assigned. This molecular system is made of units of a relatively heavy asymmetric rotor, held together by a network of weak hydrogen bonds. The search of the rotational spectrum has been based on a high-level reference method, the CCSD(T)/CBS protocol. It is interesting to outline that the rotational spectrum of the water tetramer was not observed, probably because the minimum energy structures of this oligomer is effectively nonpolar in its ground states, or because of high energy tunnelling splittings. The rotational spectra of the monomer, dimer, trimer and tetramer of difluoromethane have been assigned in 1952, 1999, 2007, and 2013 (present work), with a decreasing time spacing between the various steps, looking then promising for a continuous and rapid extension of the size limits of molecular systems accessible to MW spectroscopy. C. Prez, M. T. Muckle, D. P. Zaleski, N. A. Seifert, B. Temelso, G. C. Shields, Z. Kisiel, B. H. Pate, Science {336} (2012) 897. D. R. Lide, Jr., J. Am. Chem. Soc. {74} (1952) 3548. W. Caminati, S. Melandri, P. Moreschini, P. G. Favero, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. {38} (1999) 2924. S. Blanco, S. Melandri, P. Ottaviani, W. Caminati, J. Am. Chem. Soc. {129} (2007) 2700.

  10. Evidence-based treatment of maisonneuve fractures.

    PubMed

    Stufkens, Sjoerd A; van den Bekerom, Michel P J; Doornberg, Job N; van Dijk, C Niek; Kloen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to review the published clinical evidence available for the treatment of Maisonneuve fractures. Medline via PubMed, Orthopaedic Trauma Association (OTA) annual meetings' abstracts archives Web site, Embase, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and the Cochrane Clinical Trial register were searched for the period extending from January 1970 to May 2009 in order to identify studies relating to the treatment of Maisonneuve ankle fractures. Six level 4 (case series, N ≥ 5) studies, describing a total of 83 patients with a Maisonneuve fracture, were included in the review. Although the authors did not compare the different treatment strategies described in the reports, the overall outcomes were generally good, and included 74 (89%) patients in which the outcome was considered good or excellent, and 9 (11%) patients in which the outcome was considered fair or poor. Based on this review, some grade B and C recommendations for the treatment of Maisonneuve fractures were formulated, including: 1) the medial malleolus should be fixated, 2) the torn deltoid ligament need not be directly repaired, 3) syndesmotic instability can be treated with one or two 3- or 4-cortical screws and these can be placed percutaneously, and 4) the proximal fibular fracture does not require direct internal fixation. Recommendations for future research were also formulated and described in this report. PMID:21172642

  11. Fundamental shortcomings of evidence-based medicine.

    PubMed

    Valkenburg, Govert; Achterhuis, Hans; Nijhof, Andr

    2003-01-01

    The development of any scientific theory has a certain logic. Bruno Latour formulated a theory, describing the development of science and technology. Outcomes of science are not guided by nature or "the truth", but by a complex negotiation. It starts with ideas, which follow paths of publications and assessment. Then they are either rejected or accepted. Analysing the development of evidence-based medicine with Latour's theory, we find two fundamental problems. First, EBM tends to standardise moral considerations. Second, EBM standardises the patient, since test populations are usually composed homogeneously. Presumptions concerning methods and morals are slid into the EBM-methodology during its development. With Latour we should say, that the conceptions of the standard patient and standard morals have been delegated to this methodology. They are carried out strictly, and this causes the discomfort with practitioners and scientists within EBM. A solution should be sought for in redesigning trials, in a less morally charged fashion, and concerning less standardised patients. PMID:14730800

  12. Subjective evidence based ethnography: method and applications.

    PubMed

    Lahlou, Saadi; Le Bellu, Sophie; Boesen-Mariani, Sabine

    2015-06-01

    Subjective Evidence Based Ethnography (SEBE) is a method designed to access subjective experience. It uses First Person Perspective (FPP) digital recordings as a basis for analytic Replay Interviews (RIW) with the participants. This triggers their memory and enables a detailed step by step understanding of activity: goals, subgoals, determinants of actions, decision-making processes, etc. This paper describes the technique and two applications. First, the analysis of professional practices for know-how transferring purposes in industry is illustrated with the analysis of nuclear power-plant operators' gestures. This shows how SEBE enables modelling activity, describing good and bad practices, risky situations, and expert tacit knowledge. Second, the analysis of full days lived by Polish mothers taking care of their children is described, with a specific focus on how they manage their eating and drinking. This research has been done on a sub-sample of a large scale intervention designed to increase plain water drinking vs sweet beverages. It illustrates the interest of SEBE as an exploratory technique in complement to other more classic approaches such as questionnaires and behavioural diaries. It provides the detailed "how" of the effects that are measured at aggregate level by other techniques. PMID:25579747

  13. Evidence of weak contaminant-related oxidative stress in glaucous gulls (Larus hyperboreus) from the Canadian Arctic.

    PubMed

    Wayland, Mark; Hoffman, David J; Mallory, Mark L; Alisauskas, Ray T; Stebbins, Katherine R

    2010-01-01

    Environmental contaminants are transported over great distances to Arctic ecosystems, where they can accumulate in wildlife. Whether contaminant concentrations in wildlife are sufficient to produce adverse effects remains poorly understood. Exposure to contaminants elevates oxidative stress with possible fitness consequences. The glaucous gull (Larus hyperboreus), an Arctic top predator, was used as a bioindicator for investigating relationships between contaminant levels (organochlorines and polychlorinated biphenyls [OC/PCB], mercury [Hg], and selenium [Se]) and measures of oxidative stress (glutathione [GSH] metabolism and lipid peroxidation) in Canadian Arctic ecosystems. Contaminant levels were low and associations between contaminant exposure and oxidative stress were weak. Nevertheless, glutathione peroxidase activity rose with increasing hepatic Se concentrations, levels of thiols declined as Hg and OC/PCB levels rose, and at one of the two study sites levels of lipid peroxidation were elevated with increasing levels of hepatic Hg. These results suggest the possibility of a deleterious effect of exposure to contaminants on gull physiology even at low contaminant exposures. PMID:20526953

  14. Evidence-Based Reform in Education: What Will It Take?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    If education is to make significant progress in the twenty-first century, it must embrace evidence-based reforms. Perhaps the most important requirement for evidence-based reform is the development of a substantial set of replicable programs and practices with strong evidence of effectiveness. Educators and policy makers must have a variety of…

  15. Evidence-based guidelines: Improving AGREEment on consistence evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Vincenzi, Bruno; Napolitano, Andrea; Santini, Daniele; Maiello, Evaristo; Torri, Valter; Tonini, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Modern clinical practice relies on evidence-based medicine (EBM) and evidence-based guidelines (EBGs). The critical evaluation of EBGs value is therefore an essential step to further improve clinical practice. In our opinion, correlating levels of evidence and grades of recommendation can be an easy tool to quickly display internal consistence of EBGs.

  16. Creating Evidence-Based Research in Adapted Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Greg; Bouffard, Marcel; MacDonald, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Professional practice guided by the best research evidence is a usually referred to as evidence-based practice. The aim of the present paper is to describe five fundamental beliefs of adapted physical activity practices that should be considered in an 8-step research model to create evidence-based research in adapted physical activity. The five

  17. Evidence-Based Practice in Rehabilitation Counseling: Perceptions and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bezyak, Jill L.; Kubota, Coleen; Rosenthal, David

    2010-01-01

    This study describes certified rehabilitation counselors' attitudes (n=163) about evidence based practice, knowledge and skills related to obtaining and evaluating evidence, use of literature in practice, availability of information, and perceived barriers to evidence-based practice. Responses related to knowledge and skills were mixed with strong

  18. Pay as you throw: strengths and weaknesses of weight-based billing in household waste collection systems in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Dahln, Lisa; Lagerkvist, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Householders' response to weight-based billing for the collection of household waste was investigated with the aim of providing decision support for waste management policies. Three questions were addressed: How much and what kind of information on weight-based billing is discernible in generic Swedish waste collection statistics? Why do local authorities implement weight-based billing, and how do they perceive the results? and, Which strengths and weaknesses of weight-based billing have been observed on the local level? The study showed that municipalities with pay-by-weight schemes collected 20% less household waste per capita than other municipalities. Surprisingly, no part of this difference could be explained by higher recycling rates. Nevertheless, the majority of waste management professionals were convinced that recycling had increased as a result of the billing system. A number of contradicting strengths and weaknesses of weight-based billing were revealed. PMID:19833498

  19. An advanced educational program promoting evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Laura; Titler, Marita G; Rempel, Grace

    2011-04-01

    Evidence-based practice has led to improved health care quality and safety; greater patient, family, and staff satisfaction; and reduced costs. Despite these promising outcomes, use of evidence-based practice is inconsistent. The purpose of this article is to describe an advanced educational program for nurses in leadership roles responsible for guiding teams and mentoring colleagues through the challenges inherent in the evidence-based practice process. The Advanced Practice Institute: Promoting Adoption of Evidence-Based Practice is an innovative program designed to develop advanced skills essential for completing evidence-based practice projects and building organizational capacity for evidence-based practice programs. Learning is facilitated through group discussion, facilitated work time, networking, and consultation. Content includes finding and synthesizing evidence, learning effective strategies for implementation and evaluation, and discussing techniques for building an EBP program in the nurses' organization. Program evaluations are extremely positive, and the long-term impact is described. PMID:20705775

  20. Building a Performance-Based Assessment System To Diagnose Strengths and Weaknesses in Reading Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennings, Sara S.; Hughes, Kay E.

    This paper provides a brief description of the development of the Diagnostic Assessments of Reading with Trial Teaching Strategies (DARTTS) program by F. G. Roswell and J. S. Chall. It also describes the editorial and statistical procedures that were used to validate the program for determining students' strengths and weaknesses in important areas

  1. Evidence base in guideline generation in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mhlhauser, I; Meyer, G

    2013-06-01

    During recent years much emphasis has been on the validity, reliability, reproducibility, clinical applicability, clarity, multidisciplinary process, scheduled review and documentation of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs). Still, CPGs show substantial variance in methodological quality. The present paper mainly focuses on two aspects that are particularly critical and contemporary from the perspective of evidence-based medicine: patient centredness and shared decision making, and conflict of interest. Sophisticated patient and consumer involvement at all stages of CPG development could be judged as being the gold standard. However, co-opting patients or consumer representatives and using other techniques of active patient involvement does not replace individual patient preferences in clinical decision-making processes. Current CPGs do not meet patient needs, since they do not provide concise, easy-to-read summaries of the benefits and risks of medicines together with more comprehensive scientific data as a prerequisite for informed or shared decision making. The vast majority of CPG panels have a financial conflict of interest (COI) and under-reporting is common. Not all organisations producing CPGs have set up COI policies, and existing policies vary widely. To solve the problem, CPG experts have recommended that methodologists without any important COI should lead the development process and have primary responsibility. There is a lot of room for other improvements through network transnational activities in the field of CPG development. Waste of time and resources should be avoided through sharing published and unpublished data identified, appraised and extracted for guideline development. The EASD could provide such a clearing house. PMID:23475367

  2. Evidence based management of Bell's palsy.

    PubMed

    McCaul, James A; Cascarini, Luke; Godden, Daryl; Coombes, Darryl; Brennan, Peter A; Kerawala, Cyrus J

    2014-05-01

    Bell's palsy (idiopathic facial paralysis) is caused by the acute onset of lower motor neurone weakness of the facial nerve with no detectable cause. With a lifetime risk of 1 in 60 and an annual incidence of 11-40/100,000 population, the condition resolves completely in around 71% of untreated cases. In the remainder facial nerve function will be impaired in the long term. We summarise current published articles regarding early management strategies to maximise recovery of facial nerve function and minimise long-term sequelae in the condition. PMID:24685475

  3. Merging Evidence-Based Psychosocial Interventions in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Lecomte, Tania; Corbire, Marc; Simard, Stphanie; Leclerc, Claude

    2014-01-01

    Psychosocial interventions are an essential part of the treatment for people with severe mental illness such as schizophrenia. The criteria regarding what makes an intervention evidence-based along with a current list of evidence-based interventions are presented. Although many evidence-based interventions exist, implementation studies reveal that few, if any, are ever implemented in a given setting. Various theories and approaches have been developed to better understand and overcome implementation obstacles. Among these, merging two evidence-based interventions, or offering an evidence-based intervention within an evidence-based service, are increasingly being reported and studied in the literature. Five such merges are presented, along with their empirical support: cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) with skills training; CBT and family psychoeducation; supported employment (SE) and skills training; SE and cognitive remediation; and SE and CBT. PMID:25431447

  4. Miocene climate seasonality in southern India - first direct evidence for a weak Indian monsoon during the Middle Miocene Climate Optimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piller, W. E.; Reuter, M.; Kern, A. K.; Harzhauser, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Asian monsoon is an integral component of the global climate system. This large-scale atmospheric circulation comprises the East Asian summer and winter monsoon and the Indian monsoon subsystems, all characterized by seasonal reversing winds and precipitation changes associated with asymmetric heating of land and sea. The Neogene monsoon history is mainly reconstructed from chemical and physical weathering rates recorded in widely continuous marine sequences of the Indus Fan, Bengal Fan and South China Sea, which, depending on the source, physiography and sediment, indicate drier or wetter climates. These indirect climate proxies display an unusually dry period during the Middle Miocene Climate Optimum (MMCO, 16.5-15 Ma). As part of the FWF-projects P18189, P21414 and P23492, we present an Early/Middle Miocene coastal palynoflora record from the siliciclastic Ambalapuzha Formation at the coastal cliff of Varkala (Kerala Basin, SW India). Pollen assemblages and facies document a coastal wetland with mangrove vegetation. The Coexistence Approach was applied for palaeoclimatic reconstructions. This method uses climatic tolerances of all nearest living relatives known for a fossil flora by assuming that the tolerances of a fossil taxon are not significantly different from its modern counterpart. The maximum overlap of the environmental tolerances of all nearest living relatives (coexistence interval) is then regarded as being indicative of the most likely palaeoenvironment. By enquiring the Palaeoflora Database (http://www.palaeoflora.de/), the palaeoclimatic parameters of the pollen flora were calculated. The reconstructed climatic parameters for the MMCO show a seasonal precipitation pattern with a dry and a wet period and moderate rainfalls during the warmest period, which is comparable to the present day annual precipitation cycle in coastal Kerala, and affirms the presence of a monsoon-like atmospheric circulation over South India during the MMCO. However, the precipitation amounts during the wet (average 75%) and the warmest period (average 68%) were significantly reduced compared to today, while the rainfalls during the dry seasons are in the same order. This implies a weak Indian monsoon during the MMCO and a low thermal land - sea gradient between the Eurasian landmass and the Indian Ocean. Although a ~3C warmer global climate during the MMCO and a weaker monsoon accounts for a higher near-surface air temperature during summer, the calculated mean annual temperature (MAT; 24.4C) is 2.7C lower than at present. The estimated warmest month temperature is, however, in the same range as today. Therefore, the low coldest month temperature (CMT; 20.6-22.8C) in the Miocene has to account for the high MAT difference. This parameter represents the lower temperature threshold of the Varkala flora, and displays only the minimum temperature during the coldest month, which is significantly lower than the average CMT. Accordingly, the Miocene CMT approximates the present 24-h minimum temperature during the coldest month in Kerala (22.4C). The reconstructed seasonal temperature cycle supports climate models, which suggest a higher temperature increase in mid-latitudes than in low-latitudes as well as warmer equatorial sea surface temperatures during the MMCO.

  5. Evidence Based Practice of Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Rakesh; Joshi, Saurabh; Mishra, Seema; Bhatnagar, Sushma

    2012-01-01

    The patients with chronic pain are increasingly reporting to the physicians for its management. Chronic pain are associated with head, neck and shoulder pain, spinal pain, pain in the joints and extremities, complex regional pain syndrome and phantom pain. The chronic pain is being managed worldwide. The different specialty of medicine is producing a lot of evidence through the published literature but the same is not being published in the field of chronic pain management. Though some evidence is being reported as to different aspects of pain management from different parts of the world but same is lacking from Indian subcontinent. This is in contrast to much done clinical work in this field as well. We present here the available evidence in relation to chronic pain management. PMID:23439674

  6. Evidence-Based Practice: Integrating Classroom Curriculum and Field Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuchman, Ellen; Lalane, Monique

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the use of problem-based learning to teach the scope and consequences of evidence-based practices in mental health through an innovative assignment that integrates classroom and field learning. The authors illustrate the planning and implementation of the Evidence-Based Practice: Integrating Classroom Curriculum and Field…

  7. Evidence-Based Practice: Integrating Classroom Curriculum and Field Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuchman, Ellen; Lalane, Monique

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the use of problem-based learning to teach the scope and consequences of evidence-based practices in mental health through an innovative assignment that integrates classroom and field learning. The authors illustrate the planning and implementation of the Evidence-Based Practice: Integrating Classroom Curriculum and Field

  8. Detection of weak transient signals based on wavelet packet transform and manifold learning for rolling element bearing fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Xu, Guanghua; Liang, Lin; Jiang, Kuosheng

    2015-03-01

    The kurtogram-based methods have been proved powerful and practical to detect and characterize transient components in a signal. The basic idea of the kurtogram-based methods is to use the kurtosis as a measure to discover the presence of transient impulse components and to indicate the frequency band where these occur. However, the performance of the kurtogram-based methods is poor due to the low signal-to-noise ratio. As the weak transient signal with a wide spread frequency band can be easily masked by noise. Besides, selecting signal just in one frequency band will leave out some transient features. Aiming at these shortcomings, different frequency bands signal fusion is adopted in this paper. Considering that manifold learning aims at discovering the nonlinear intrinsic structure which embedded in high dimensional data, this paper proposes a waveform feature manifold (WFM) method to extract the weak signature from waveform feature space which obtained by binary wavelet packet transform. Minimum permutation entropy is used to select the optimal parameter in a manifold learning algorithm. A simulated bearing fault signal and two real bearing fault signals are used to validate the improved performance of the proposed method through the comparison with the kurtogram-based methods. The results show that the proposed method outperforms the kurtogram-based methods and is effective in weak signature extraction.

  9. Will reducing sugar-sweetened beverage consumption reduce obesity? Evidence supporting conjecture is strong, but evidence when testing effect is weak.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, K A; Shikany, J M; Keating, K D; Allison, D B

    2013-08-01

    We provide arguments to the debate question and update a previous meta-analysis with recently published studies on effects of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) on body weight/composition indices (BWIs). We abstracted data from randomized controlled trials examining effects of consumption of SSBs on BWIs. Six new studies met these criteria: (i) human trials, (ii) ??3 weeks duration, (iii) random assignment to conditions differing only in consumption of SSBs and (iv) including a BWI outcome. Updated meta-analysis of a total of seven studies that added SSBs to persons' diets showed dose-dependent increases in weight. Updated meta-analysis of eight studies attempting to reduce SSB consumption showed an equivocal effect on BWIs in all randomized subjects. When limited to subjects overweight at baseline, meta-analysis showed a significant effect of roughly 0.25 standard deviations (more weight loss/less weight gain) relative to controls. Evidence to date is equivocal in showing that decreasing SSB consumption will reduce the prevalence of obesity. Although new evidence suggests that an effect may yet be demonstrable in some populations, the integrated effect size estimate remains very small and of equivocal statistical significance. Problems in this research area and suggestions for future research are highlighted. PMID:23742715

  10. Will reducing sugar-sweetened beverage consumption reduce obesity? Evidence supporting conjecture is strong, but evidence when testing effect is weak

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Kathryn A.; Shikany, James M.; Keating, Karen D.; Allison, David B.

    2014-01-01

    We provide arguments to the debate question and update a previous meta-analysis with recently published studies on effects of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) on body weight/composition indices (BWIs). We abstracted data from randomized controlled trials examining effects of consumption of SSBs on BWIs. Six new studies met these criteria: 1) human trials, 2) 3 weeks duration, 3) random assignment to conditions differing only in consumption of SSBs, and 4) including a BWI outcome. Updated meta-analysis of a total of seven studies that added SSBs to persons’ diets showed dose-dependent increases in weight. Updated meta-analysis of eight studies attempting to reduce SSB consumption showed an equivocal effect on BWIs in all randomized subjects. When limited to subjects overweight at baseline, meta-analysis showed a significant effect of roughly 0.25 standard deviations (more weight loss/less weight gain) relative to controls. Evidence to date is equivocal in showing that decreasing SSB consumption will reduce the prevalence of obesity. Although new evidence suggests that an effect may yet be demonstrable in some populations, the integrated effect size estimate remains very small and of equivocal statistical significance. Problems in this research area and suggestions for future research are highlighted. PMID:23742715

  11. Integrating evidence-based perfusion into practices: the International Consortium for Evidence-Based Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Likosky, Donald S

    2006-12-01

    There is surmounting pressure for clinicians domestically and abroad not only to practice evidence-based perfusion, but also to supplement practice with documentation thereof. In this editorial, I shall describe an international initiative aimed at embracing this dictum from patients, regulatory bodies, and payers. "Research is the only hope that the future will be different than the past"- Daniel Mintz, MD "Practical men who believe themselves to be quite exempt from any intellectual influences are usually the slaves of some defunct economist.... It is ideas not vested interests which are dangerous for good or evil."-John Maynard Keynes. PMID:17312899

  12. Integrating Evidence-Based Perfusion Into Practices: The International Consortium for Evidence-Based Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Likosky, Donald S.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: There is surmounting pressure for clinicians domestically and abroad not only to practice evidence-based perfusion, but also to supplement practice with documentation thereof. In this editorial, I shall describe an international initiative aimed at embracing this dictum from patients, regulatory bodies, and payers. Research is the only hope that the future will be different than the pastDaniel Mintz, MD Practical men who believe themselves to be quite exempt from any intellectual influences are usually the slaves of some defunct economist. It is ideas not vested interests which are dangerous for good or evil.John Maynard Keynes PMID:17312899

  13. The Heart of the Matter of Opinion and Evidence: The Value of Evidence-Based Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Masvidal, Daniel; Lavie, Carl J.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine is an important aspect of continuing medical education. This article reviews previous and current examples of conflicting topics that evidence-based medicine has clarified to allow us to provide the best possible patient care. PMID:22438783

  14. Why the Evidence-Based Paradigm in Early Childhood Education and Care Is Anything but Evident

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandenbroeck, Michel; Roets, Griet; Roose, Rudi

    2012-01-01

    Praxeological research is a necessary contribution to the research field in early childhood education and care, which is currently dominated by an evidence-based paradigm that tends to consider the measurement of predefined outcomes as the most valid form of research. We analyse the history of the evidence-based paradigm in the field of medicine

  15. Justifying Physical Education Based on Neuroscience Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Kris

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown that exercise improves cognitive function and psychological traits that influence behavior (e.g., mood, level of motivation). The evidence in the literature also shows that physical education may enhance learning or that academic performance is at least maintained despite a reduction in classroom time in order to increase time

  16. Justifying Physical Education Based on Neuroscience Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Kris

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown that exercise improves cognitive function and psychological traits that influence behavior (e.g., mood, level of motivation). The evidence in the literature also shows that physical education may enhance learning or that academic performance is at least maintained despite a reduction in classroom time in order to increase time…

  17. Prediction of oral absorption of cinnarizine--a highly supersaturating poorly soluble weak base with borderline permeability.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Mark; Przyklenk, Karl-Heinz; Richtberg, Annette; Baumann, Wolfgang; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2014-11-01

    Two important driving forces for oral absorption of active pharmaceutical ingredients are drug dissolution and permeability in the gastrointestinal tract. Poorly soluble weak bases typically exhibit high solubility under fasted gastric conditions. However, the solubility of such drugs usually decreases drastically in the fasted small intestine, constraining drug absorption. Since there is a discrepancy in solubility between the fasted state stomach and intestine, it is crucial to examine the influence of dissolution, supersaturation and precipitation on the oral absorption of poorly soluble weak bases during and after fasted state gastric emptying. Cinnarizine is a poorly soluble weak base with borderline permeability, exhibiting supersaturation and precipitation under simulated fasted state gastric emptying conditions. Interestingly, supersaturation and precipitation of cinnarizine under fed state conditions is not expected to occur, since the drug shows good solubility in fed state biorelevant media and exhibits a positive food effect in pharmacokinetic studies. The present work is aimed at investigating the dissolution, supersaturation and precipitation behavior of marketed cinnarizine tablets under fasted and fed state conditions using biorelevant dissolution and transfer methods. In order to predict the in vivo performance of these cinnarizine formulations, the in vitro results were then coupled with different physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models, which considered either only dissolution or a combination of dissolution, supersaturation and precipitation kinetics. The results of the in silico predictions were then compared with in vivo observations. The study revealed that under fasting conditions, plasma profiles could be accurately predicted only when supersaturation and precipitation as well as dissolution were taken into account. It was concluded that for poorly soluble weak bases with moderate permeability, supersaturation and precipitation during fasted state gastric emptying may have an essential influence on oral drug absorption and thus on in vivo drug performance. PMID:25195981

  18. How close is evidence to truth in evidence-based treatment of mental disorders?

    PubMed

    Mller, Hans-Jrgen

    2012-06-01

    Given the importance of the term 'evidence' in evidence-based medicine (EBM), the meaning of this term is evaluated, going back to the philosophical tradition and current meaning of the terms 'evidence' and 'truth'. Based on this, current problems in the definition of evidence and in the grading of evidence in EBM are described, taking examples from the field of psychiatry and especially pharmacopsychiatry. These problems underline that the use of the term evidence in EBM is inconsistent and inconclusive. This should be fairly stated in all EBM-related publications, especially in EBM-based guidelines, to avoid severe misunderstandings in and outside the field of psychiatry. Although EBM might have increased empirically driven rational decision-making in psychiatry/medicine, the current limitations should be carefully considered. PMID:22105603

  19. Optimization-Based Drift Prevention for Learning Control of Underdetermined Linear and Weakly Nonlinear Time-Varying Systems

    SciTech Connect

    DRIESSEN,BRIAN JAMES; SADEGH,NADER; KWOK,KWAN S.

    2000-10-20

    In this paper an optimization-based method of drift prevention is presented for learning control of underdetermined linear and weakly nonlinear time-varying dynamic systems. By defining a fictitious cost function and the associated model-based sub-optimality conditions, a new set of equations results, whose solution is unique, thus preventing large drifts from the initial input. Moreover, in the limiting case where the modeling error approaches zero, the input that the proposed method converges to is the unique feasible (zero error) input that minimizes the fictitious cost function, in the linear case, and locally minimizes it in the (weakly) nonlinear case. Otherwise, under mild restrictions on the modeling error, the method converges to a feasible sub-optimal input.

  20. Wave-Packet Collapse Based on Weak Repeatability or Covariant Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhao-Qi; Zhu, Chuan-Xi; Wang, Jian-Hui

    2016-02-01

    The conflict between the dynamics postulate (unitary evolution) and the measurement postulate (wave-packet collapse) of quantum mechanics has been reconciled by Zurek from an information transfer perspective [Phys. Rev. A 76 (2007) 052110], and has further been extended to a more general scenario [Phys. Rev. A 87 (2013) 052111]. In this paper, we reconsider Zurek's new derivation by using weak repeatability postulate or covariant condition instead of repeatability postulate. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11461045, 11326099, 11361042, 11265010, and Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province of China under Grant Nos. 20142BAB211016, 20132BAB201001, 20132BAB212009

  1. Evidence-based treatments for cluster headache

    PubMed Central

    Gooriah, Rubesh; Buture, Alina; Ahmed, Fayyaz

    2015-01-01

    Cluster headache (CH), one of the most painful syndromes known to man, is managed with acute and preventive medications. The brief duration and severity of the attacks command the use of rapid-acting pain relievers. Inhalation of oxygen and subcutaneous sumatriptan are the two most effective acute therapeutic options for sufferers of CH. Several preventive medications are available, the most effective of which is verapamil. However, most of these agents are not backed by strong clinical evidence. In some patients, these options can be ineffective, especially in those who develop chronic CH. Surgical procedures for the chronic refractory form of the disorder should then be contemplated, the most promising of which is hypothalamic deep brain stimulation. We hereby review the pathogenesis of CH and the evidence behind the treatment options for this debilitating condition. PMID:26635477

  2. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Gastric Cancer in Korea: An Evidence-Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Haeng; Jung, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Jung Hoon; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Jeon, Tae Joo; Kim, Joon Mee; Kim, Young Il; Ryu, Keun Won; Kong, Seong-Ho; Kim, Hyoung-Il; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Kim, Yong Sik; Zang, Dae Young; Cho, Jae Yong; Park, Joon Oh; Lim, Do Hoon; Jung, Eun Sun; Ahn, Hyeong Sik; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2014-01-01

    Although gastric cancer is quite common in Korea, the treatment outcome is relatively favorable compared to those in western countries. However, there are currently no Korean multidisciplinary guidelines for gastric cancer. Experts from related societies developed guidelines de novo to meet Korean circumstances and requirements, including 23 recommendation statements for diagnosis (n=9) and treatment (n=14) based on relevant key questions. The quality of the evidence was rated according to the GRADE evidence evaluation framework: the evidence levels were based on a systematic review of the literature, and the recommendation grades were classified as either strong or weak. The applicability of the guidelines was considered to meet patients' view and preferences in the context of Korea. The topics of the guidelines cover diagnostic modalities (endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound, and radiologic diagnosis), treatment modalities (surgery, therapeutic endoscopy, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy), and pathologic evaluation. An external review of the guidelines was conducted during the finalization phase. PMID:25061536

  3. Criteria for evidence-based practice in Iranian traditional medicine.

    PubMed

    Soltani Arabshahi, SeyyedKamran; Mohammadi Kenari, Hoorieh; Kordafshari, Gholamreza; Shams-Ardakani, MohammadReza; Bigdeli, Shoaleh

    2015-07-01

    The major difference between Iranian traditional medicine and allopathic medicine is in the application of evidence and documents. In this study, criteria for evidence-based practice in Iranian traditional medicine and its rules of practice were studied. The experts' views were investigated through in- depth, semi-structured interviews and the results were categorized into four main categories including Designing clinical questions/clinical question-based search, critical appraisal, resource search criteria and clinical prescription appraisal. Although the application of evidence in Iranian traditional medicine follows Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) principles but it benefits from its own rules, regulations, and criteria that are compatible with EBM. PMID:26520629

  4. Fault zone fabric and fault weakness.

    PubMed

    Collettini, Cristiano; Niemeijer, Andr; Viti, Cecilia; Marone, Chris

    2009-12-17

    Geological and geophysical evidence suggests that some crustal faults are weak compared to laboratory measurements of frictional strength. Explanations for fault weakness include the presence of weak minerals, high fluid pressures within the fault core and dynamic processes such as normal stress reduction, acoustic fluidization or extreme weakening at high slip velocity. Dynamic weakening mechanisms can explain some observations; however, creep and aseismic slip are thought to occur on weak faults, and quasi-static weakening mechanisms are required to initiate frictional slip on mis-oriented faults, at high angles to the tectonic stress field. Moreover, the maintenance of high fluid pressures requires specialized conditions and weak mineral phases are not present in sufficient abundance to satisfy weak fault models, so weak faults remain largely unexplained. Here we provide laboratory evidence for a brittle, frictional weakening mechanism based on common fault zone fabrics. We report on the frictional strength of intact fault rocks sheared in their in situ geometry. Samples with well-developed foliation are extremely weak compared to their powdered equivalents. Micro- and nano-structural studies show that frictional sliding occurs along very fine-grained foliations composed of phyllosilicates (talc and smectite). When the same rocks are powdered, frictional strength is high, consistent with cataclastic processes. Our data show that fault weakness can occur in cases where weak mineral phases constitute only a small percentage of the total fault rock and that low friction results from slip on a network of weak phyllosilicate-rich surfaces that define the rock fabric. The widespread documentation of foliated fault rocks along mature faults in different tectonic settings and from many different protoliths suggests that this mechanism could be a viable explanation for fault weakening in the brittle crust. PMID:20016599

  5. Evidence Based Medicine in Pediatric Practice: Brief Review

    PubMed Central

    Kianifar, Hamid-Reza; Akhondian, Javad; Najafi-Sani, Mehri; Sadeghi, Ramin

    2010-01-01

    Practicing medicine according to the best evidence is gaining popularity in the medical societies. Although this concept, which is usually called Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) has been explained in many resources, it has not been addressed enough in pediatrics. In this review, we briefly explained Evidence Based Medicine approach and its applications in pediatrics in order to help the pediatricians to efficiently integrate EBM into their daily practice. PMID:23056715

  6. Hydrogen Bonding Based Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Poly(vinyl alcohol) with Weak Polyacids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyomin; Mensire, Remy; Cohen, Robert; Rubner, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Multilayer thin films that consist of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and weak polyacids such as poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) were prepared by hydrogen bonding interactions. Both the degree of hydrolysis and molecular weight of PVA were investigated in terms of their influence on growth behavior and pH stability. Multilayer films containing PVA and PAA could be assembled successfully only by using partially hydrolyzed PVA and low pH solutions. By comparing films containing PAA with those containing a more strongly interacting partner, PMAA, it was shown that the extent of PVA hydrolysis becomes significant only when weak hydrogen bonding pairs such as PVA and PAA were used. pH-triggered dissolution experiments demonstrated that the degree of hydrolysis can be used as an additional parameter by which to tune the pH stability of the film. Also, the presence of an abundance of free hydroxyl and carboxylic acid groups in the multilayer allowed enhanced pH stability to be obtained by thermal and chemical methods as well as numerous opportunities for post-assembly functionalization.

  7. Evidence-based gene predictions in plant genomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Automated evidence-based gene building is a rapid and cost-effective way to provide reliable gene annotations on newly sequenced genomes. One of the limitations of evidence-based gene builders, however, is their requirement for gene expression evidence—known proteins, full-length cDNAs, or expressed...

  8. Evidence-Based Treatment and Stuttering--Historical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prins, David; Ingham, Roger J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To illustrate the way in which both fluency shaping (FS) and stuttering management (SM) treatments for developmental stuttering in adults are evidence based. Method: A brief review of the history and development of FS and SM is provided. It illustrates that both can be justified as evidence-based treatments, each treatment seeking…

  9. Evidence-Based Practice in Education. Conducting Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pring, Richard; Thomas, Gary

    2004-01-01

    The book begins with an explication of evidence-based practice. Some of the ideas of its proponents are discussed, including the Campbell Collaboration, and the application to education of Cochrane-style reviews and meta-analyses. The thinking behind evidence-based practice has been the subject of much criticism, particularly in education, and

  10. Evidence-Based Assessment of Anxiety Disorders in Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antony, Martin M.; Rowa, Karen

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses issues related to the development and dissemination of evidence-based assessment strategies for anxiety disorders and associated problems. It begins with a review of the criteria that should be considered when determining whether particular assessment procedures are evidence-based. These include such factors as reliability,

  11. Behavioral Activation Is an Evidence-Based Treatment for Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturmey, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Recent reviews of evidence-based treatment for depression did not identify behavioral activation as an evidence-based practice. Therefore, this article conducted a systematic review of behavioral activation treatment of depression, which identified three meta-analyses, one recent randomized controlled trial and one recent follow-up of an earlier…

  12. Barriers and Enablers to Evidence-Based Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Robyn

    2014-01-01

    The importance of educational practices based on evidence is well-supported in the literature, however barriers to their implementation in classrooms still exist. This paper examines the phenomenon of evidence-based practice in education highlighting enablers and barriers to their implementation with particular reference to RTLB practice.

  13. Evidence-Based Practice: The Wave of the Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stricker, George

    2003-01-01

    Chwalisz (2003) proposed an evidence-based practice model for training in counseling psychology, based on the apparent failures of the scientist-practitioner model and the need for an expanded view of scientific evidence. Although I am sympathetic to the model she developed, and also to a local clinical scientist model that I have written about

  14. Evidence-Based Treatment and Stuttering--Historical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prins, David; Ingham, Roger J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To illustrate the way in which both fluency shaping (FS) and stuttering management (SM) treatments for developmental stuttering in adults are evidence based. Method: A brief review of the history and development of FS and SM is provided. It illustrates that both can be justified as evidence-based treatments, each treatment seeking

  15. Towards an Understanding of Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Digennaro Reed, Florence D.; Reed, Derek D.

    2008-01-01

    The past two decades have seen a rise in the use of the term "evidence-based practice" and a simultaneous increase in the variations in its definition and evaluation. Subsequently, this rise in interest for evidence-based practices has become a double-edged sword for practitioners--that is, while there are a number of interpretations on the…

  16. Behavioral Activation Is an Evidence-Based Treatment for Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturmey, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Recent reviews of evidence-based treatment for depression did not identify behavioral activation as an evidence-based practice. Therefore, this article conducted a systematic review of behavioral activation treatment of depression, which identified three meta-analyses, one recent randomized controlled trial and one recent follow-up of an earlier

  17. Evidence-based Nursing Practice: To Infinity and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pape, Tess M.

    2003-01-01

    Provides an historical background for evidence-based practice and methods for assimilating research into practice. Information searching, systematic reviews, and other decision-making models are discussed using specific questions for establishing policy guidelines. Stresses the need for evidence-based practice implementing the best-known practices

  18. Combination approach of highly conflicting evidence based on weighted distance of evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhicheng; He, Jiazhou; Qiao, Hui

    2013-10-01

    In order to fuse highly conflicting evidence effectively, a novel combination method based on weighted distance of evidence is proposed by taking the ideas of Murphy's averaging method and Deng's weighted averaging method. Firstly, the essentiality of each element in the frame of discernment is given by Murphy's idea. Secondly, the weighted averaging distance between any two bodies of evidence(BOEs) is calculated under the modified City Block distance norm, further the support degree of each evidence supported by other evidences can be obtained. Thirdly, the normalized total support degree of each evidence is considered as the weights of BOEs, and a new weighted averaging BOE will be gained. Finally, the information fusion process can be realized by using the Dempster's rule of combination. Simulation results show that the proposed method can deal with the highly conflicting evidence with better performance of convergence, and it also can recognize the target more effectively and fleetly.

  19. Building performance-based accountability with limited empirical evidence: performance measurement for public health preparedness.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Shoshana R; Nelson, Christopher D; McLees, Anita W; Mumford, Karen; Thomas, Craig

    2013-08-01

    Efforts to respond to performance-based accountability mandates for public health emergency preparedness have been hindered by a weak evidence base linking preparedness activities with response outcomes. We describe an approach to measure development that was successfully implemented in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Public Health Emergency Preparedness Cooperative Agreement. The approach leverages insights from process mapping and experts to guide measure selection, and provides mechanisms for reducing performance-irrelevant variation in measurement data. Also, issues are identified that need to be addressed to advance the science of measurement in public health emergency preparedness. PMID:24229520

  20. [Forensic evidence-based medicine in computer communication networks].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yun-Liang; Peng, Ming-Qi

    2013-12-01

    As an important component of judicial expertise, forensic science is broad and highly specialized. With development of network technology, increasement of information resources, and improvement of people's legal consciousness, forensic scientists encounter many new problems, and have been required to meet higher evidentiary standards in litigation. In view of this, evidence-based concept should be established in forensic medicine. We should find the most suitable method in forensic science field and other related area to solve specific problems in the evidence-based mode. Evidence-based practice can solve the problems in legal medical field, and it will play a great role in promoting the progress and development of forensic science. This article reviews the basic theory of evidence-based medicine and its effect, way, method, and evaluation in the forensic medicine in order to discuss the application value of forensic evidence-based medicine in computer communication networks. PMID:24665620

  1. Implementing Evidence-Based Practice to Reduce Infections Following Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mori, Candy

    2015-01-01

    Surgical site infections can have a devastating effect on a patient's morbidity impacting their quality of life and productivity in society. Financial burdens are placed on healthcare organizations because of surgical site infections as well. Evidence has shown that it is a worthwhile endeavor to implement a practice to screen and treat patients who are nasal carriers of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Implementing evidence-based practices to combat surgical site infections can help ensure quality healthcare, while producing best possible patient outcomes; however, getting evidence to the bedside can be a challenge. The Johns Hopkins nursing evidence-based practice model is designed to help nurses translate evidence into practice. This article describes the steps one community hospital took to implement an evidence-based practice using the Johns Hopkins model to decrease the likelihood of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus surgical site infections in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty. PMID:26213870

  2. Evidence-based medicine and ethics: a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Vineis, P

    2004-04-01

    The clinical decision is supposed to be based on evidence. In fact, what counts as evidence is far from being established. Some definition of "proof" is needed to distinguish between scientific medicine and charlatanism. My thesis is that unfortunately a clear-cut boundary between evidence and lack of evidence cannot be found, for several reasons that I summarise in the paper. Evidence in medicine very often has fuzzy boundaries, and dichotomising fuzziness and uncertainty can have serious consequences. Physicians and patients should accept the irreducible fuzziness of many of the concepts they use when dealing with health and disease. PMID:15082803

  3. Investigation of a Bubble Detector based on Active Electrolocation of Weakly Electric Fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, M.; Mayekar, K.; Zhou, R.; von der Emde, G.; Bousack, H.

    2013-04-01

    Weakly electric fish employ active electrolocation for navigation and object detection. They emit an electric signal with their electric organ in the tail and sense the electric field with electroreceptors that are distributed over their skin. We adopted this principle to design a bubble detector that can detect gas bubbles in a fluid or, in principle, objects with different electric conductivity than the surrounding fluid. The evaluation of the influence of electrode diameter on detecting a given bubble size showed that the signal increases with electrode diameter. Therefore it appears that this detector will be more appropriate for large sized applications such as bubble columns than small sized applications such as bubble detectors in dialysis.

  4. Exploring Weak LigandProtein Interactions by Long-Lived NMR States: Improved Contrast in Fragment-Based Drug Screening**

    PubMed Central

    Buratto, Roberto; Mammoli, Daniele; Chiarparin, Elisabetta; Williams, Glyn; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2014-01-01

    Ligands that have an affinity for protein targets can be screened very effectively by exploiting favorable properties of long-lived states (LLS) in NMR spectroscopy. In this work, we describe the use of LLS for competitive binding experiments to measure accurate dissociation constants of fragments that bind weakly to the ATP binding site of the N-terminal ATPase domain of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), a therapeutic target for cancer treatment. The LLS approach allows one to characterize ligands with an exceptionally wide range of affinities, since it can be used for ligand concentrations [L] that are several orders of magnitude smaller than the dissociation constants KD. This property makes the LLS method particularly attractive for the initial steps of fragment-based drug screening, where small molecular fragments that bind weakly to a target protein must be identified, which is a difficult task for many other biophysical methods. PMID:25196717

  5. High-sensitivity photovoltaic responses in manganite-based heterojunctions on Si substrates for weak light detection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, S S; Ni, H; Zhao, K; Zhao, S Q; Kong, Y C; Wong, H K

    2011-06-10

    We have fabricated and characterized a weak light photodetector in a heterojunction composed of manganite La0.4Ca0.6MnO3 and n-type Si. High-sensitivity photoresponse properties were investigated. The responsivities of open-circuit photovoltage and short-circuit photocurrent reach ?1000 ?V/mJ and ?30 ?A/mJ, respectively, without any amplification bias under irradiation by 20-ps-wide and 355, 532, and 1064-nm-wavelength laser pulses in nanojoule to microjoule order. The present results demonstrate that the manganite-based heterojunction on Si substrate has potential applications in weak light detection from ultraviolet to near-infrared light. PMID:21673770

  6. Archie Cochrane and his vision for evidence-based medicine

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Hriday M.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2009-01-01

    Archibald (Archie) Cochrane's most influential mark on healthcare was his 1971 publication, Effectiveness and Efficiency. This book strongly criticized the lack of reliable evidence behind many of the commonly accepted healthcare interventions at the time. His criticisms spurred rigorous evaluations of healthcare interventions and highlighted the need for evidence in medicine. His call for a collection of systematic reviews led to the creation of The Cochrane Collaboration. Archie Cochrane was a visionary person who helped lay down much of the foundation for evidence-based medicine. This paper will introduce evidence-based medicine to Plastic Surgery by tracing its history to the seminal efforts by Archie Cochrane. PMID:19730323

  7. Fast Physical Random-Number Generation Based on Room-Temperature Chaotic Oscillations in Weakly Coupled Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen; Reidler, Igor; Aviad, Yaara; Huang, Yuyang; Song, Helong; Zhang, Yaohui; Rosenbluh, Michael; Kanter, Ido

    2013-07-01

    An all-electronic physical random number generator at rates up to 80Gbit/s is presented, based on weakly coupled GaAs/Ga0.55Al0.45As superlattices operated at room temperature. It is based on large-amplitude, chaotic current oscillations characterized by a bandwidth of several hundred MHz and do not require external feedback or conversion to an electronic signal prior to digitization. The method is robust and insensitive to external perturbations and its fully electronic implementation suggests scalability and minimal postprocessing in comparison to existing optical implementations.

  8. Alopecia areata: evidence-based treatments.

    PubMed

    Garg, Seema; Messenger, Andrew G

    2009-03-01

    Alopecia areata is a common condition causing nonscarring hair loss. It may be patchy, involve the entire scalp (alopecia totalis) or whole body (alopecia universalis). Patients may recover spontaneously but the disorder can follow a course of recurrent relapses or result in persistent hair loss. Alopecia areata can cause great psychological distress, and the most important aspect of management is counseling the patient about the unpredictable nature and course of the condition as well as the available effective treatments, with details of their side effects. Although many treatments have been shown to stimulate hair growth in alopecia areata, there are limited data on their long-term efficacy and impact on quality of life. We review the evidence for the following commonly used treatments: corticosteroids (topical, intralesional, and systemic), topical sensitizers (diphenylcyclopropenone), psoralen and ultraviolet A phototherapy (PUVA), minoxidil and dithranol. PMID:19341938

  9. Rotator cuff tears: An evidence based approach.

    PubMed

    Sambandam, Senthil Nathan; Khanna, Vishesh; Gul, Arif; Mounasamy, Varatharaj

    2015-12-18

    Lesions of the rotator cuff (RC) are a common occurrence affecting millions of people across all parts of the globe. RC tears are also rampantly prevalent with an age-dependent increase in numbers. Other associated factors include a history of trauma, limb dominance, contralateral shoulder, smoking-status, hypercholesterolemia, posture and occupational dispositions. The challenge lies in early diagnosis since a high proportion of patients are asymptomatic. Pain and decreasing shoulder power and function should alert the heedful practitioner in recognizing promptly the onset or aggravation of existing RC tears. Partial-thickness tears (PTT) can be bursal-sided or articular-sided tears. Over the course of time, PTT enlarge and propagate into full-thickness tears (FTT) and develop distinct chronic pathological changes due to muscle retraction, fatty infiltration and muscle atrophy. These lead to a reduction in tendon elasticity and viability. Eventually, the glenohumeral joint experiences a series of degenerative alterations - cuff tear arthropathy. To avert this, a vigilant clinician must utilize and corroborate clinical skill and radiological findings to identify tear progression. Modern radio-diagnostic means of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging provide excellent visualization of structural details and are crucial in determining further course of action for these patients. Physical therapy along with activity modifications, anti-inflammatory and analgesic medications form the pillars of nonoperative treatment. Elderly patients with minimal functional demands can be managed conservatively and reassessed at frequent intervals. Regular monitoring helps in isolating patients who require surgical interventions. Early surgery should be considered in younger, active and symptomatic, healthy patients. In addition to being cost-effective, this helps in providing a functional shoulder with a stable cuff. An easily reproducible technique of maximal strength and sturdiness should by chosen among the armamentarium of the shoulder surgeon. Grade 1 PTTs do well with debridement while more severe lesions mandate repair either by trans-tendon technique or repair following conversion into FTT. Early repair of repairable FTT can avoid appearance and progression of disability and weakness. The choice of surgery varies from surgeon-to-surgeon with arthroscopy taking the lead in the current scenario. The double-row repairs have an edge over the single-row technique in some patients especially those with massive tears. Stronger, cost-effective and improved functional scores can be obtained by the former. Both early and delayed postoperative rehabilitation programmes have led to comparable outcomes. Guarded results may be anticipated in patients in extremes of age, presence of comorbidities and severe tear patters. Overall, satisfactory results are obtained with timely diagnosis and execution of the appropriate treatment modality. PMID:26716086

  10. Rotator cuff tears: An evidence based approach

    PubMed Central

    Sambandam, Senthil Nathan; Khanna, Vishesh; Gul, Arif; Mounasamy, Varatharaj

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the rotator cuff (RC) are a common occurrence affecting millions of people across all parts of the globe. RC tears are also rampantly prevalent with an age-dependent increase in numbers. Other associated factors include a history of trauma, limb dominance, contralateral shoulder, smoking-status, hypercholesterolemia, posture and occupational dispositions. The challenge lies in early diagnosis since a high proportion of patients are asymptomatic. Pain and decreasing shoulder power and function should alert the heedful practitioner in recognizing promptly the onset or aggravation of existing RC tears. Partial-thickness tears (PTT) can be bursal-sided or articular-sided tears. Over the course of time, PTT enlarge and propagate into full-thickness tears (FTT) and develop distinct chronic pathological changes due to muscle retraction, fatty infiltration and muscle atrophy. These lead to a reduction in tendon elasticity and viability. Eventually, the glenohumeral joint experiences a series of degenerative alterations - cuff tear arthropathy. To avert this, a vigilant clinician must utilize and corroborate clinical skill and radiological findings to identify tear progression. Modern radio-diagnostic means of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging provide excellent visualization of structural details and are crucial in determining further course of action for these patients. Physical therapy along with activity modifications, anti-inflammatory and analgesic medications form the pillars of nonoperative treatment. Elderly patients with minimal functional demands can be managed conservatively and reassessed at frequent intervals. Regular monitoring helps in isolating patients who require surgical interventions. Early surgery should be considered in younger, active and symptomatic, healthy patients. In addition to being cost-effective, this helps in providing a functional shoulder with a stable cuff. An easily reproducible technique of maximal strength and sturdiness should by chosen among the armamentarium of the shoulder surgeon. Grade 1 PTTs do well with debridement while more severe lesions mandate repair either by trans-tendon technique or repair following conversion into FTT. Early repair of repairable FTT can avoid appearance and progression of disability and weakness. The choice of surgery varies from surgeon-to-surgeon with arthroscopy taking the lead in the current scenario. The double-row repairs have an edge over the single-row technique in some patients especially those with massive tears. Stronger, cost-effective and improved functional scores can be obtained by the former. Both early and delayed postoperative rehabilitation programmes have led to comparable outcomes. Guarded results may be anticipated in patients in extremes of age, presence of comorbidities and severe tear patters. Overall, satisfactory results are obtained with timely diagnosis and execution of the appropriate treatment modality. PMID:26716086

  11. Evidence-based programs registry: blueprints for Healthy Youth Development.

    PubMed

    Mihalic, Sharon F; Elliott, Delbert S

    2015-02-01

    There is a growing demand for evidence-based programs to promote healthy youth development, but this growth has been accompanied by confusion related to varying definitions of evidence-based and mixed messages regarding which programs can claim this designation. The registries that identify evidence-based programs, while intended to help users sift through the findings and claims regarding programs, has oftentimes led to more confusion with their differing standards and program ratings. The advantages of using evidence-based programs and the importance of adopting a high standard of evidence, especially when taking programs to scale,are described. One evidence-based registry is highlighted--Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development hosted at the University of Colorado Boulder. Unlike any previous initiative of its kind, Blueprints established unmatched standards for identifying evidence-based programs and has acted in a way similar to the FDA--evaluating evidence, data and research to determine which programs meet their high standard of proven efficacy. PMID:25193177

  12. Evidence-based medicine in health care reform.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Gordon B

    2011-10-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 mandates a national comparative outcomes research project agenda. Comparative effectiveness research includes both clinical trials and observational studies and is facilitated by electronic health records. A national network of electronic health records will create a vast electronic data "warehouse" with exponential growth of observational data. High-quality associations will identify research topics for pragmatic clinical trials, and systematic reviews of clinical trials will provide optimal evidence-based medicine. Evidence-based medicine is the conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients. Thus, health care reform will provide a robust environment for comparative effectiveness research, systematic reviews, and evidence-based medicine, and implementation of evidence-based medicine should lead to improved quality of care. PMID:21860057

  13. Evidence-based research and practice in clinical neuropsychology.

    PubMed

    Chelune, Gordon J

    2010-04-01

    While a definition for evidence-based clinical neuropsychological practice (EBCNP) has yet to emerge, it is likely to integrate the same core features as evidence-based medicine; namely, best research evidence, clinical expertise, and individual patient needs. Given the nascent stage of EBCNP, suggestions are made to advance evidence-based approaches in both research and practice. The common elements are: recognition that clinical outcomes are recorded at the level of the individual; and to be useful, outcomes research must be presented in a way that can be directly applied on a case-by-case basis. Tracking the outcomes of our clinical services in an evidence-based manner that is publicly verifiable will demonstrate the value of neuropsychological services to our patients, our referral sources, and ultimately to payers. PMID:18821179

  14. From Opinion-Based to Evidence-Based Social Work: The Swedish Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundell, Knut; Soydan, Haluk; Tengvald, Karin; Anttila, Sten

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an account of Sweden's Institute for Evidence-Based Social Work Practice (IMS), located in Stockholm, Sweden. The article places IMS in the context of making Swedish social care services less opinion-based and more evidence-based. The institute is an example of how policy-driven processes promote the use of evidence-based

  15. Dissemination of evidence-based standards of care.

    PubMed

    Barkhordarian, Andre; Hacker, Brett; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Standards of care pertain to crafting and implementing patient-centered treatment interventions. Standards of care must take into consideration the patient's gender, ethnicity, medical and dental history, insurance coverage (or socioeconomic level, if a private patient), and the timeliness of the targeted scientific evidence. This resolves into a process by which clinical decision-making about the optimal patient-centered treatment relies on the best available research evidence, and all other necessary inputs and factors to provide the best possible treatment. Standards of care must be evidence-based, and not merely based on the evidence - the dichotomy being critical in contemporary health services research and practice. Evidence-based standards of care must rest on the best available evidence that emerges from a concerted hypothesis-driven process of research synthesis and meta-analysis. Health information technology needs to become an every-day reality in health services research and practice to ensure evidence-based standards of care. Current trends indicate that user-friendly methodologies, for the dissemination of evidence-based standards of care, must be developed, tested and distributed. They should include approaches for the quantification and analysis of the textual content of systematic reviews and of their summaries in the form of critical reviews and lay-language summaries. PMID:22355229

  16. Dissemination of Evidence-Based Standards of Care

    PubMed Central

    Barkhordarian, Andre; Hacker, Brett; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Standards of care pertain to crafting and implementing patient-centered treatment interventions. Standards of care must take into consideration the patient's gender, ethnicity, medical and dental history, insurance coverage (or socioeconomic level, if a private patient), and the timeliness of the targeted scientific evidence. This resolves into a process by which clinical decision-making about the optimal patient-centered treatment relies on the best available research evidence, and all other necessary inputs and factors to provide the best possible treatment. Standards of care must be evidence-based, and not merely based on the evidence the dichotomy being critical in contemporary health services research and practice. Evidence-based standards of care must rest on the best available evidence that emerges from a concerted hypothesis-driven process of research synthesis and meta-analysis. Health information technology needs to become an every-day reality in health services research and practice to ensure evidence-based standards of care. Current trends indicate that user-friendly methodologies, for the dissemination of evidence-based standards of care, must be developed, tested and distributed. They should include approaches for the quantification and analysis of the textual content of systematic reviews and of their summaries in the form of critical reviews and lay-language summaries. PMID:22355229

  17. A Third-Generation Evidence Base for Human Spaceflight Risks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundrot, Craig E.; Lumpkins, Sarah; Steil, Jennifer; Pellis, Neal; Charles, John

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Human Research Program seeks to understand and mitigate risks to crew health and performance in exploration missions center dot HRP's evidence base consists of an Evidence Report for each HRP risk center dot Three generations of Evidence Reports 1) Review articles + Good content - Limited authorship, infrequent updates 2) Wikipedia articles + Viewed often, very open to contributions - Summary of reviews, very few contributions 3) HRP-controlled wiki articles + Incremental additions to review articles with editorial control

  18. Applying Evidence-Based Medicine Principles to Hip Fracture Management

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Joseph; Morshed, Saam; Helfet, David L.; Bhandari, Mohit; Ahn, Jaimo

    2014-01-01

    Bone has the capacity to regenerate and not scar after injury – sometimes leaving behind no evidence at all of a prior fracture. As surgeons capable of facilitating such healing, it becomes our responsibility to help choose a treatment that minimizes functional deficits and residual symptoms. And in the case of the geriatric hip fracture, we have seen the accumulation of a vast amount of evidence to help guide us. The best method we currently have for selecting treatment plans is by the practice of evidence-based medicine. According to the now accepted hierarchy, the best is called Level I evidence (e.g., well performed randomized controlled trials) – but this evidence is best only if it is available and appropriate. Lower forms of accepted evidence include cohort studies, case control studies, case series, and case reports, and last, expert opinion – all of which can be potentially instructive. The hallmark of evidence-based treatment is not so much the reliance on evidence in general, but to use the best available evidence relative to the particular patient, the clinical setting and surgeon experience. Correctly applied, varying forms of evidence each have a role in aiding surgeons offer appropriate care for their patients – to help them best fix the fracture. PMID:25593964

  19. Evidence Based Education Request Desk. EBE #791

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Educational Laboratory Southeast, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Would anyone in your network be aware of any states that might provide differentiated funding for virtual programs based on the model used--for example, curriculum-in-a-box vs. one with high student-teacher interaction? Are you aware of any research that examines what factors to consider when developing this type of differentiated funding? This

  20. Evidence-Based Practice: Separating Science From Pseudoscience.

    PubMed

    Lee, Catherine M; Hunsley, John

    2015-12-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) requires that clinicians be guided by the best available evidence. In this article, we address the impact of science and pseudoscience on psychotherapy in psychiatric practice. We describe the key principles of evidence-based intervention. We describe pseudoscience and provide illustrative examples of popular intervention practices that have not been abandoned, despite evidence that they are not efficacious and may be harmful. We distinguish efficacy from effectiveness, and describe modular approaches to treatment. Reasons for the persistence of practices that are not evidence based are examined at both the individual and the professional system level. Finally, we offer suggestions for the promotion of EBP through clinical practice guidelines, modelling of scientific decision making, and training in core skills. PMID:26720821

  1. Evidence-based pharmacotherapy of eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Flament, Martine F; Bissada, Hany; Spettigue, Wendy

    2012-03-01

    The objective was to review scientific evidence for efficacy and safety of pharmacotherapy in adults or children with an eating disorder (ED). We conducted a computer search for all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published between 1960 and May 2010 for treatment of anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN) or binge-eating disorder (BED). For drugs for which no RCT was found, open trials or case reports were retrieved. Clinically relevant RCTs in the treatment of AN have used atypical antipsychotics, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and zinc supplementation. Olanzapine demonstrated an adjunctive effect for in-patient treatment of underweight AN patients, and fluoxetine helped prevent relapse in weight-restored AN patients in 1/2 studies. For treatment of BN, controlled studies have used SSRIs, other antidepressants, and mood stabilizers. In 9/11 studies, pharmacotherapy yielded a statistically significant although moderate reduction in binge/purge frequency, and some additional benefits. For BED, RCTs have been conducted using SSRIs and one serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), mood stabilizers, and anti-obesity medications. In 11/12 studies, there was a statistically significant albeit limited effect of medication. Meta-analyses on efficacy of pharmacotherapy for BN and BED support moderate effect sizes for medication, but generally low recovery rates. Treatment resistance is an inherent feature of AN, where treatment should focus on renourishment plus psychotherapy. For BN and BED, combined treatment with pharmacotherapy and cognitive behaviour therapy has been more effective than either alone. Data on the long-term efficacy of pharmacotherapy for EDs are scarce. Short- and long-term pharmacotherapy of EDs still remains a challenge for the clinician. PMID:21414249

  2. Integrating Evidence-based Decision Making into Allied Health Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest, Jane L.; Miller, Syrene A.

    2001-01-01

    Evidence-based decision making (EBDM) was incorporated into an institute for 42 dental hygiene, occupational therapy, and physical therapy faculty. The 4-day sessions addressed active teaching techniques, formulation of good questions, critical appraisal of evidence, and application, feedback, and evaluation. Most participants felt prepared to…

  3. Practice-Based Evidence--Overcoming Insecure Attachments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This article examines educational psychologists' (EPs') engagement with evidence-based practice (EBP). In particular it considers the limitations of randomised controlled trials and the difficulties of obtaining sufficient evidence about the effectiveness of interventions. This means that there is a possibility that EPs continue to use

  4. Need to Address Evidence-Based Practice in Educational Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Theodore

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This article presents a case for addressing evidence-based practice (EBP) in educational administration. Content is arranged around four objectives: (a) summarizing the status of educational administration as a profession, (b) defining evidence and the model, (c) explaining EBP's social and professional merit, and (d) identifying barriers

  5. Making the Case for Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Joanne; McClure, Janelle; Spinks, Andy

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based practice is the collection, interpretation, and use of data, such as collection statistics or assessment results, that measure the effectiveness of a library media program. In this article, the authors will present various forms of evidence and show that any library media specialist can use data to make informed decisions that

  6. Evidence-Based Clinical Voice Assessment: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Nelson; Barkmeier-Kraemer, Julie; Eadie, Tanya; Sivasankar, M. Preeti; Mehta, Daryush; Paul, Diane; Hillman, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine what research evidence exists to support the use of voice measures in the clinical assessment of patients with voice disorders. Method: The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) National Center for Evidence-Based Practice in Communication Disorders staff searched 29 databases for peer-reviewed English-language

  7. Evidence on the Effectiveness of Competency Based Teacher Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Robert A.

    The purpose of this study was to gather evidence on the effectiveness of Competency Based Teacher Education (CBTE) programs. A letter requesting such information was sent to 215 CBTE programs, and an ERIC search was conducted using a variety of descriptors covering the period January 1970 to July 1975. The data were classified into three evidence

  8. Evidence-Based Clinical Voice Assessment: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Nelson; Barkmeier-Kraemer, Julie; Eadie, Tanya; Sivasankar, M. Preeti; Mehta, Daryush; Paul, Diane; Hillman, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine what research evidence exists to support the use of voice measures in the clinical assessment of patients with voice disorders. Method: The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) National Center for Evidence-Based Practice in Communication Disorders staff searched 29 databases for peer-reviewed English-language…

  9. What Works? Evidence-Based Practice in Education Is Complex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hempenstall, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    There is a nascent movement towards evidence-based practice in education in Australia, evident in Federal and State education documents, if not in classrooms. Such a classroom-level outcome would require a number of conditions to be met. One of the critical requirements is that teachers be provided with knowledge and training in practices that

  10. What Is "Evidence-Based Practice" in Geography Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Educationalists developed the concept of "evidence-based practice" during the 1990s because of concern about the relevance of educational research to practitioners and about its impact on their practice. This article outlines the different kinds of research evidence related to geographical education, which might inform practice. It then discusses

  11. Developing the Skills Required for Evidence-Based Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Beverley

    1998-01-01

    Evidence-based practice, the ability to find and apply research evidence in health care practice, requires the ability to define the question, access information, make comparative analyses, and aggregate knowledge. Systematic research review should be part of nursing education. (SK)

  12. Evidence based update: open versus closed reduction.

    PubMed

    Ghayoumi, Pouriya; Kandemir, Utku; Morshed, Saam

    2015-03-01

    Outcomes after operative treatment of displaced femoral neck fractures in young adults are fraught with high complications rates including non-union and avascular necrosis. Among the therapeutic controversies that persist is the role of open reduction, which would allow surgeons a direct means to improve the quality of reduction, a predictor of successful treatment. We performed a systematic review of the literature to compare the outcomes (nonunion, avascular necrosis, and deep infection) after open reduction with internal fixation (ORIF) to closed reduction with internal fixation (CRIF) of acute (surgery performed less than 6 weeks from injury) femoral neck fractures in young adults (average age of 50 or younger) followed for at least one year. Despite the large literature investigating outcomes after operative treatment of femoral neck fracture, relatively few studies aimed to determine the relative risk of complications associated with method of reduction. Therefore, both observational and randomised studies as well as case series with clear descriptions of surgical approach and outcomes were included. We identified 21 studies that matched our inclusion criteria. The incidence of nonunion was 11.6% in closed reduction and 14.9% in the open reduction group (P=0.25). The incidence of avascular necrosis for CRIF and ORIF were 17.2% and 17.7% respectively (P=0.91). The incidence of deep wound infection was 0.49% in the closed reduction group and 3.9% in the open reduction group (P=0.0019). Meta-analysis of risk ratios estimated from six of the studies with comparative data revealed no significant difference in the incidence of nonunion, avascular necrosis or total complications between the two reduction techniques. In summary, systematic review of the literature reveals a lack of evidence in support of ORIF versus CRIF as a means of treating displaced femoral neck fractures in young patients with respect to union and avascular necrosis; however, the incidence of surgical site infections may be lower with CRIF. Firm conclusions cannot be drawn given the lack of high quality prospective studies and patient reported outcomes. In the future, randomised controlled trials will be required to test the effect of reduction method. PMID:25554424

  13. Evidence-Based Appraisal of Antireflux Fundoplication

    PubMed Central

    Catarci, Marco; Gentileschi, Paolo; Papi, Claudio; Carrara, Alessandro; Marrese, Renato; Gaspari, Achille Lucio; Grassi, Giovanni Battista

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To highlight the current available evidence in antireflux surgery through a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Summary Background Data: Laparoscopic fundoplication is currently suggested as the gold standard for the surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease, but many controversies are still open concerning the influence of some technical details on its results. Methods: Papers related to RCTs identified via a systematic literature search were evaluated according to standard criteria. Data regarding the patient sample, study methods, and outcomes were abstracted and summarized across studies. Defined outcomes were examined for 41 papers published from 1974 to 2002 related to 25 RCTs. A meta-analysis was performed pooling the results as odds ratios (OR), rate differences (RD), and number needed to treat (NNT). Data given as mean and/or median values were pooled as a mean SD (SD). Results: No perioperative deaths were found in any of the RCTs. Immediate results showed a significantly lower operative morbidity rate (10.3% versus 26.7%, OR 0.33, RD ?12%, NNT 8), shorter postoperative stay (3.1 versus 5.2 days, P = 0.03), and shorter sick leave (20.1 versus 35.8 days, P = 0.03) for laparoscopic versus open fundoplication. No significant differences were found regarding the incidence of recurrence, dysphagia, bloating, and reoperation for failure at midterm follow-up. No significant differences in operative morbidity (13.1% versus 9.4%) and in operative time (90.2 versus 84.2 minutes) were found in partial versus total fundoplication. A significantly lower incidence of reoperation for failure (1.6% versus 9.6%, OR 0.21, RD ?7%, NNT 14) was found after partial fundoplication, with no significant differences regarding the incidence of recurrence and/or dysphagia. Routine division of short gastric vessels during total fundoplication showed no significant advantages regarding the incidence of postoperative dysphagia and recurrence when compared with no division. The use of ultrasonic scalpel compared with clips or bipolar cautery for the division of short gastric vessels showed no significant effect on operative time, postoperative complications, and costs. Conclusions: Laparoscopic antireflux surgery is at least as safe and as effective as its open counterpart, with reduced morbidity, shortened postoperative stay, and sick leave. Partial fundoplication significantly reduces the risk of reoperations for failure over total fundoplication. Routine versus no division of short gastric vessels showed no significant advantages. A word of caution is needed when implementing these results derived from RCTs performed in specialized centers into everyday clinical practice, where experience and skills may be suboptimal. PMID:15075649

  14. [Evidence-based medicine: a critical analysis of the concept of evidence in medicine].

    PubMed

    Federspil, G; Vettor, R

    2001-06-01

    There is currently a lively debate involving scholars from diverse cultural background on the subject of evidence-based medicine. In order to set out the grounds of discussion this paper deals with the problem of "evidence", both the concept and meaning of this term. After a brief history of the idea of "evidence" from antiquity to the present day, it will be underlined how modern day thinking recognizes the existence of two types of "evidence": rational evidence supported first by René Descartes, and perceptible evidence, defended by Francis Bacon. In contemporary epistemology the idea of "evidence" has been conceived above all as perceptible and is closely linked to the idea of fact. The concept of "scientific fact" will therefore be analyzed and will reveal how in science, contrary to prevailing opinion, "pure facts" practically do not exist and how the "facts" which scientists talk about in their research are always "facts depending on theory". Subsequently the capacity of "facts" to prove scientific hypothesis will be examined. In the light of more recent epistemological reflection the thesis will be maintained according to which facts are not capable of definitively proving the truth of a theory. Such reflection leads to the conclusion that in medicine "evidence" is always dependent on the theoretical and practical context in which researchers work. In the final part of the paper the epistemological presumptions and ambitions of evidence-based medicine will be examined. This analysis concludes that the epistemology on which evidence-based medicine relies upon does not grasp the true complexity of the scientific methodology and can weaken in doctors the beneficial stimulus that is doubt. PMID:11460834

  15. [Building an evidence-based practice culture: incorporating evidence-based nursing in the clinical ladder system].

    PubMed

    Kuo, Hsueh-Ming; Lin, Chen-Hsiu; Lee, Hsiu-Hsien; Chang, Mei-Jen; Fan, Sheng-Hsin; Chang, Ying-Ju

    2011-04-01

    Evidence-based practice has become a dominant trend in the healthcare with the objective of providing efficient, high quality health care, and policy making. Traditional problem-solving methods may not adequately address consumer needs in the rapidly changing modern healthcare system. In order to make correct decisions, a systematic and scientific approach to the collection, assessment, and interpretation of clinical information is essential for the health care provider. Creating an evidence-based practice nursing culture is the most fundamental way for nurses to recognize the importance of evidence-based nursing and, subsequently, adapt to solving clinical problems. This paper elaborates the strategy for incorporating evidence-based nursing into the clinical ladder system used at the authors' affiliated medical center. Three strategies are introduced. These are: (1) including the EBN concept in newcomer in-service training; (2) adopting evidence-based nursing practice competence as a criterion in the clinical ladder system, with various evidence-based, ladder-related reports required for promotion; and (3) providing support to nurses through centralized and decentralized education as well as individual consultation. The proposed strategy is provided as a practical reference for educators and policy makers working to foster evidence-based practice nursing cultures. PMID:21455895

  16. From Opinion-Based to Evidence-Based Social Work: The Swedish Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundell, Knut; Soydan, Haluk; Tengvald, Karin; Anttila, Sten

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an account of Sweden's Institute for Evidence-Based Social Work Practice (IMS), located in Stockholm, Sweden. The article places IMS in the context of making Swedish social care services less opinion-based and more evidence-based. The institute is an example of how policy-driven processes promote the use of evidence-based…

  17. Evidence for a particle produced in association with weak bosons and decaying to a bottom-antibottom quark pair in higgs boson searches at the tevatron.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alvarez González, B; Alverson, G; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Auerbach, B; Augsten, K; Aurisano, A; Avila, C; Azfar, F; Badaud, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartlett, J F; Bartos, P; Bassler, U; Bauce, M; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Bedeschi, F; Begalli, M; Behari, S; Bellantoni, L; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bortoletto, D; Bose, T; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brigliadori, L; Brock, R; Bromberg, C; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Bu, X B; Budd, H S; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Calancha, C; Camacho-Pérez, E; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Caughron, S; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chevalier-Théry, S; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, D K; Cho, K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Chokheli, D; Choudhary, B; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Cihangir, S; Ciocci, M A; Claes, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Clutter, J; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corbo, M; Corcoran, M; Cordelli, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Croc, A; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cutts, D; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Das, A; Datta, M; Davies, G; de Barbaro, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Dell'orso, M; Demina, R; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; d'Errico, M; Desai, S; Deterre, C; Devaughan, K; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Dong, P; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Ebina, K; Edmunds, D; Elagin, A; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Fiedler, F; Field, R; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fuess, S; Funakoshi, Y; Gallinaro, M; Garcia-Bellido, A; Garcia, J E; García-González, J A; García-Guerra, G A; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gershtein, Y; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Ginther, G; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Golovanov, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Gomez, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Grinstein, S; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Hagopian, S; Hahn, S R; Haley, J; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Han, L; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Harder, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harel, A; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauptman, J M; Hays, C; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Heck, M; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinrich, J; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herndon, M; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hewamanage, S; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hocker, A; Hoeneisen, B; Hogan, J; Hohlfeld, M; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ito, A S; Ivanov, A; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; James, E; Jang, D; Jayasinghe, A; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D T; Jeon, E J; Jeong, M S; Jesik, R; Jiang, P; Jindariani, S; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jones, M; Jonsson, P; Joo, K K; Joshi, J; Jun, S Y; Jung, A W; Junk, T R; Juste, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Karmanov, D; Kasmi, A; Kasper, P A; Kato, Y; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Kiselevich, I; Klimenko, S; Knoepfel, K; Kohli, J M; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kulikov, S; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurata, M; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lammers, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lebrun, P; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lei, X; Lellouch, J; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, D; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lim, J K; Limosani, A; Lincoln, D; Lin, C-J; Lindgren, M; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipeles, E; Lipton, R; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, H; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Lubatti, H J; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Luna-Garcia, R; Lungu, G; Lyon, A L; Lysak, R; Lys, J; Maciel, A K A; Madar, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Maravin, Y; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ortega, J; Mastrandrea, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McCarthy, R; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miao, T; Miconi, F; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondal, N K; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nett, J; Neubauer, M S; Neu, C; Neustroev, P; Nguyen, H T; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Nunnemann, T; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Orduna, J; Ortolan, L; Osman, N; Osta, J; Padilla, M; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Pal, A; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patrick, J; Patwa, A; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penning, B; Penzo, A; Perfilov, M; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pondrom, L; Popov, A V; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ranjan, N; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Redondo, I; Renkel, P; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ripp-Baudot, I; Ristori, L; Rizatdinova, F; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Rominsky, M; Roser, R; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sajot, G; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Salcido, P; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santi, L; Santos, A S; Sato, K; Savage, G; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schlabach, P; Schlobohm, S; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schwanenberger, C; Schwarz, T; Schwienhorst, R; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Sekaric, J; Semenov, A; Severini, H; Sforza, F; Shabalina, E; Shalhout, S Z; Shary, V; Shaw, S; Shchukin, A A; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shivpuri, R K; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simak, V; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Smith, K J; Snider, F D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Soha, A; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, H; Sonnenschein, L; Sorin, V; Soustruznik, K; Squillacioti, P; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stark, J; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stelzer, B; Stentz, D; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Titov, M; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tokmenin, V V; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Tsai, Y-T; Tschann-Grimm, K; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varganov, A; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Verdier, P; Verkheev, A Y; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilanova, D; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wahl, H D; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Wang, M H L S; Wang, R-J; Warburton, A; Warchol, J; Waters, D; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weichert, J; Welty-Rieger, L; Wester, W C; White, A; Whiteson, D; Wick, F; Wicke, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wobisch, M; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wood, D R; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yamada, R; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, S; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, W-C; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, W; Ye, Z; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Youn, S W; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, J M; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zennamo, J; Zhao, T; Zhao, T G; Zhou, B; Zhou, C; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zucchelli, S

    2012-08-17

    We combine searches by the CDF and D0 Collaborations for the associated production of a Higgs boson with a W or Z boson and subsequent decay of the Higgs boson to a bottom-antibottom quark pair. The data, originating from Fermilab Tevatron pp collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV, correspond to integrated luminosities of up to 9.7 fb(-1). The searches are conducted for a Higgs boson with mass in the range 100-150 GeV/c(2). We observe an excess of events in the data compared with the background predictions, which is most significant in the mass range between 120 and 135 GeV/c(2). The largest local significance is 3.3 standard deviations, corresponding to a global significance of 3.1 standard deviations. We interpret this as evidence for the presence of a new particle consistent with the standard model Higgs boson, which is produced in association with a weak vector boson and decays to a bottom-antibottom quark pair. PMID:23006359

  18. CDMBE: A Case Description Model Based on Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianlin; Yang, Xiaoping; Zhou, Jing

    2015-01-01

    By combining the advantages of argument map and Bayesian network, a case description model based on evidence (CDMBE), which is suitable to continental law system, is proposed to describe the criminal cases. The logic of the model adopts the credibility logical reason and gets evidence-based reasoning quantitatively based on evidences. In order to consist with practical inference rules, five types of relationship and a set of rules are defined to calculate the credibility of assumptions based on the credibility and supportability of the related evidences. Experiments show that the model can get users' ideas into a figure and the results calculated from CDMBE are in line with those from Bayesian model. PMID:26421006

  19. An evidence-based assessment of prescribed grazing practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synthesis findings regarding the evidence-based assessment of prescribed grazing practices include: 1) stocking rate, in conjunction with appropriate temporal and spatial animal distribution, is a key management variable that influences numerous conservation outcomes, 2) assumptions regarding livest...

  20. Evidence-Based Cardiology in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac events are the major cause of death in hemodialysis patients. Because of the paucity of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in hemodialysis patients, most cardiovascular therapies in this population are based on observational studies or results extrapolated from studies that excluded hemodialysis patients. However, associations discovered in observational studies do not prove causality, and these studies often report surrogate outcomes rather than clinical end points. Furthermore, interventions that show effectiveness in the general population may have drastically different outcomes and side effect profiles in hemodialysis patients. This review discusses the results of RCTs undertaken recently to evaluate cardiovascular therapies in hemodialysis patients and emphasizes clinically relevant outcomes. Although some interventions have produced similar outcomes in hemodialysis patients and the general population, others have not, suggesting that the management of cardiovascular disease in hemodialysis patients may require strategies that differ from the best practice guidelines applied to general population. PMID:24136920

  1. Evidence-based medicine - are we boiling the frog?

    PubMed

    Muckart, D J J

    2013-07-01

    Evidence-based medicine has been defined as 'The conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients.' There are two major assumptions in this statement. First, it is assumed that the evidence is in fact the best. Unfortunately this is not necessarily so, and published evidence is affected by bias, sponsorship, and blind faith in mathematical probability which may not be clinically relevant. Second, the evidence is population based and may not be applicable to the individual, and blind adherence to this concept may cause harm. We must not abandon clinical experience and judgement in favour of a series of inanimate data points. Medicine is an uncertain science. PMID:23802201

  2. Clarification and Elaboration on Evidence-Based Practice in Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wampold, Bruce E.; Goodheart, Carol D.; Levant, Ronald F.

    2007-01-01

    Responds to comments by D. C. Wendt and B. D. Slife (see record 2007-13085-019), P. H. Hunsberger (see record 2007-13085-020), and R. B. Stuart and S. O. Lilienfeld (see record 2007-13085-021) regarding the report by the APA Presidential Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice (see record 2006-05893-001) entitled Evidence-based practice in…

  3. Clarification and Elaboration on Evidence-Based Practice in Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wampold, Bruce E.; Goodheart, Carol D.; Levant, Ronald F.

    2007-01-01

    Responds to comments by D. C. Wendt and B. D. Slife (see record 2007-13085-019), P. H. Hunsberger (see record 2007-13085-020), and R. B. Stuart and S. O. Lilienfeld (see record 2007-13085-021) regarding the report by the APA Presidential Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice (see record 2006-05893-001) entitled Evidence-based practice in

  4. A regional evidence-based practice fellowship: collaborating competitors.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Susan Mace; Moore, Penny; Allender, Marinda

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe the development of an effort by 21 hospitals and 2 academic institutions in a metropolitan area to strengthen the diffusion of evidence-based practice in their organizations. This has been accomplished by providing collaborative training, mentoring, and support for direct-care RNs through an evidence-based fellowship. The participating direct-care nurses are prepared to take the new knowledge, skills, and abilities they have gained back to the bedside care environment. PMID:21157238

  5. Embedding a culture of evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimons, Emma; Cooper, Joanne

    2012-11-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) can improve patient outcomes, cost effectiveness and staff satisfaction, and nursing care should be based on the best available evidence. However, this does not happen consistently. A study tour to the US, funded by the Florence Nightingale Foundation, was undertaken to identify methods of embedding effective EBP in nursing culture. This article presents the findings specifically related to leadership and discusses implications for practice. PMID:23189530

  6. A liposomal fluorescence assay to study permeation kinetics of drug-like weak bases across the lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Eyer, Klaus; Paech, Franziska; Schuler, Friedrich; Kuhn, Phillip; Kissner, Reinhard; Belli, Sara; Dittrich, Petra S; Krmer, Stefanie D

    2014-01-10

    Lipid bilayer permeation is considered the major route for in vivo barrier passage of drugs. Despite this fact, no technique is currently available to measure the kinetics of permeation across a single lipid bilayer of structurally unrelated drug-like solutes. We developed a liposomal fluorescence assay capable to determine permeation kinetics of basic drug-like solutes across lipid bilayers. The assay is based on the hypothesis that permeation of a weak base along a concentration gradient results in net proton release at the cis-side and net proton capture at the trans-side of the bilayer. The resulting pH changes were monitored with pH-sensitive fluorophores: Test compounds were incubated with liposomes containing a pH-sensitive fluorophore at the bilayer surfaces or in the aqueous lumen and fluorescence changes were monitored with a stopped-flow apparatus in solution or by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy with surface-captured liposomes on a microfluidic platform. Incubation with lipophilic basic drugs resulted in the expected fluorescence changes while incubation with compounds without basic functionality or high polarity did not affect fluorescence. Kinetics of fluorescence changes followed bi-exponential functions. Logarithmic permeation coefficients (logPermapp) determined in solution and by microfluidics technology showed a good correlation (r(2)=0.94, n=7) and logPermapp increased with increasing lipophilicity. Neither diffusion in the aqueous phase nor partitioning into the bilayer was rate-limiting. PEGylation of 2% of the liposomal lipids reduced Permapp by a factor ~300. In conclusion, the presented liposomal fluorescence assay is capable to determine permeation kinetics of weak basic drug-like solutes across lipid bilayers. The method is adaptable to microfluidics technology for high-throughput measurements and can potentially be modified to work for weak acid solutes. PMID:24211703

  7. Integrating the online nursing evidence-based information resources for evidence-based nursing study in China.

    PubMed

    He, Mengxue; Hu, Yan

    2012-10-01

    At present Chinese nurses could not get the up-to-date and high-quality evidences efficiently and conveniently due to language barrier and other practical difficulties. This program built a Chinese website of integrated evidence-based network information resources for EBN studies. Researchers hope to provide practical guidance and advice for nurses in non-English-speaking countries.. PMID:23009371

  8. Weak Behavioral Equivalences for Verifying Secure and Performance-Aware Component-Based Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldini, Alessandro; Bernardo, Marco

    Component-based systems are characterized by several orthogonal requirements, ranging from security to quality of service, which may demand for the use of opposite strategies and interfering mechanisms. To achieve a balanced tradeoff among these aspects, we have previously proposed the use of a predictive methodology, which encompasses classical tools such as the noninterference approach to security analysis and standard performance evaluation techniques. The former tool, which is based on equivalence checking, is used to reveal functional dependencies among component behaviors, while the latter tool, which relies on reward-based numerical analysis, is used to study the quantitative impact of these dependencies on the system performance. In order to strengthen the relation between these two different analysis techniques we advocate the use of performance-aware notions of behavioral equivalence as a formal means for detecting functional and performance dependencies and then pinpointing the metrics at the base of a balanced tradeoff.

  9. Evidence-based medicine and epistemological imperialism: narrowing the divide between evidence and illness.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Helen; Lipworth, Wendy; Kerridge, Ian

    2011-10-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) has been rapidly and widely adopted because it claims to provide a method for determining the safety and efficacy of medical therapies and public health interventions more generally. However, as others have noted, EBM may be riven through with cultural bias, both in the generation of evidence and in its translation. We suggest that technological and scientific advances in medicine accentuate and entrench these cultural biases, to the extent that they may invalidate the evidence we have about disease and its treatment. This creates a significant ethical, epistemological and ontological challenge for medicine. PMID:21815969

  10. An evidence-based approach to the development of national dietary guidelines.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Marcia Janet; Zlotkin, Stanley Howard

    2003-12-01

    It has become apparent that confusing and conflicted nutritional advice from the media in combination with a quick reversal of policymakers' national nutrition recommendations have the potential to lead to public disbelief and cynicism for both the process and the conclusions. Consequently, poor design of policy can lead to ineffective communications with health professionals and the public. The ultimate result is that the public will ignore the recommendations with potentially adverse outcomes. Formal evidence-based clinical practice guidelines are being used regularly in the medical community. The methodology used to develop these guidelines includes a systematic review of the literature, filtering the literature for relevant articles, assessing the scientific quality of the available evidence, and rating the strength or weakness of the final recommendation. This article suggests that national dietary guidelines may be improved if they are based on a more formal evidence-based approach. Current research that is being conducted to test components of a generic, standardized methodology for developing evidence-based population targeted dietary guidelines is described. PMID:14666497

  11. Model-based drug development: strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats for broad application of pharmacometrics in drug development.

    PubMed

    Wetherington, Jeffrey D; Pfister, Marc; Banfield, Christopher; Stone, Julie A; Krishna, Rajesh; Allerheiligen, Sandy; Grasela, Dennis M

    2010-09-01

    Systematic implementation of model-based drug development (MBDD) to drug discovery and development has the potential to significantly increase the rate of medical breakthroughs and make available new and better treatments to patients. An analysis of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (ie, SWOT) was conducted through focus group discussions that included 24 members representing 8 pharmaceutical companies to systematically assess the challenges to implementing MBDD into the drug development decision-making process. The application of the SWOT analysis to the successful implementation of MBDD yielded 19 strengths, 27 weaknesses, 34 opportunities, and 22 threats, which support the following conclusions. The shift from empirical drug development to MBDD requires a question-based mentality; early, proactive planning; dynamic access to multisource data; quantitative knowledge integration; multidisciplinary collaboration; effective communication and leadership skills; and innovative, impactful application of pharmacometrics focused on enhancing quantitative decision making. The ultimate goal of MBDD is to streamline discovery and development of innovative medicines to benefit patients. PMID:20881215

  12. Fluoxetine: a review on evidence based medicine

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Andrea; Barraco, Alessandra; Donda, Pietro

    2004-01-01

    Background Fluoxetine was the first molecule of a new generation of antidepressants, the Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitors (SSRIs). It is recurrently the paradigm for the development of any new therapy in the treatment of depression. Many controlled studies and meta-analyses were performed on Fluoxetine, to improve the understanding of its real impact in the psychiatric area. The main objective of this review is to assess the quality and the results reported in the meta-analyses published on Fluoxetine. Methods Published articles on Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases reporting meta-analyses were used as data sources for this review. Articles found in the searches were reviewed by 2 independent authors, to assess if these were original meta-analyses. Only data belonging to the most recent and comprehensive meta-analytic studies were included in this review. Results Data, based on a group of 9087 patients, who were included in 87 different randomized clinical trials, confirms that fluoxetine is safe and effective in the treatment of depression from the first week of therapy. Fluoxetine's main advantage over previously available antidepressants (TCAs) was its favorable safety profile, that reduced the incidence of early drop-outs and improved patient's compliance, associated with a comparable efficacy on depressive symptoms. In these patients, Fluoxetine has proven to be more effective than placebo from the first week of therapy. Fluoxetine has shown to be safe and effective in the elderly population, as well as during pregnancy. Furthermore, it was not associated with an increased risk of suicide in the overall evaluation of controlled clinical trials. The meta-analysis available on the use of Fluoxetine in the treatment of bulimia nervosa shows that the drug is as effective as other agents with fewer patients dropping out of treatment. Fluoxetine has demonstrated to be as effective as chlomipramine in the treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive-Disorder (OCD). Conclusion Fluoxetine can be considered a drug successfully used in several diseases for its favorable safety/efficacy ratio. As the response rate of mentally ill patients is strictly related to each patient's personal characteristics, any new drug in this area, will have to be developed under these considerations. PMID:14962351

  13. Fluoxetine: a review on evidence based medicine.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Andrea; Barraco, Alessandra; Donda, Pietro

    2004-02-12

    BACKGROUND: Fluoxetine was the first molecule of a new generation of antidepressants, the Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitors (SSRIs). It is recurrently the paradigm for the development of any new therapy in the treatment of depression. Many controlled studies and meta-analyses were performed on Fluoxetine, to improve the understanding of its real impact in the psychiatric area. The main objective of this review is to assess the quality and the results reported in the meta-analyses published on Fluoxetine. METHODS: Published articles on Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases reporting meta-analyses were used as data sources for this review.Articles found in the searches were reviewed by 2 independent authors, to assess if these were original meta-analyses. Only data belonging to the most recent and comprehensive meta-analytic studies were included in this review. RESULTS: Data, based on a group of 9087 patients, who were included in 87 different randomized clinical trials, confirms that fluoxetine is safe and effective in the treatment of depression from the first week of therapy. Fluoxetine's main advantage over previously available antidepressants (TCAs) was its favorable safety profile, that reduced the incidence of early drop-outs and improved patient's compliance, associated with a comparable efficacy on depressive symptoms. In these patients, Fluoxetine has proven to be more effective than placebo from the first week of therapy.Fluoxetine has shown to be safe and effective in the elderly population, as well as during pregnancy. Furthermore, it was not associated with an increased risk of suicide in the overall evaluation of controlled clinical trials.The meta-analysis available on the use of Fluoxetine in the treatment of bulimia nervosa shows that the drug is as effective as other agents with fewer patients dropping out of treatment.Fluoxetine has demonstrated to be as effective as chlomipramine in the treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive-Disorder (OCD). CONCLUSION: Fluoxetine can be considered a drug successfully used in several diseases for its favorable safety/efficacy ratio. As the response rate of mentally ill patients is strictly related to each patient's personal characteristics, any new drug in this area, will have to be developed under these considerations. PMID:14962351

  14. Evidence-based reproductive medicine: a critical appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Dhont, M.

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine has become the golden standard of good medical practice. I analysed meta-analyses and systematic reviews, the cornerstones of evidence-based medicine, pertaining to two important problems in in vitro fertilization: failed implantation and poor ovarian response to ovarian stimulation. Numerous interventions and procedures have been tried to facilitate implantation and to enhance the ovarian response to stimulation. Notwithstanding the fact that many clinical trials have been performed, very few procedures can as yet stand the critical test of evidence-based medicine. A plea is made for co-ordination between clinicians and reviewers and co-operation between infertility centres to combine their efforts to set up sufficiently powered clinical trials to arrive at more solid evidence for a number of interventions in in vitro fertilization programmes. PMID:24753948

  15. Physiology versus evidence-based guidance for critical care practice

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Evidence based medicine is an attempt to optimize the medical decision process through methods primarily based on evidence coming from meta-analyses, systematic reviews, and randomized controlled trials ("evidence-based medicine"), rather than on "clinical judgment" alone. The randomized trials are the cornerstones of this process. However, the randomized trials are just a method to prove or disprove a given hypothesis, which, in turn, derives from a general observation of the reality (premises or theories). In this paper we will examine some of the most recent randomized trials performed in Intensive Care, analyzing their premises, hypothesis and outcome. It is quite evident that when the premises are wrong or too vague the unavoidable consequences will be a negative outcome. We should pay when designing the trial an equal attention in defining premises and hypothesis that we pay for the trial conduction. PMID:26729063

  16. The vanishing mother: Cesarean section and "evidence-based obstetrics".

    PubMed

    Wendland, Claire L

    2007-06-01

    The philosophy of "evidence-based medicine"--basing medical decisions on evidence from randomized controlled trials and other forms of aggregate data rather than on clinical experience or expert opinion--has swept U.S. medical practice in recent years. Obstetricians justify recent increases in the use of cesarean section, and dramatic decreases in vaginal birth following previous cesarean, as evidence-based obstetrical practice. Analysis of pivotal "evidence" supporting cesarean demonstrates that the data are a product of its social milieu: The mother's body disappears from analytical view; images of fetal safety are marketing tools; technology magically wards off the unpredictability and danger of birth. These changes in practice have profound implications for maternal and child health. A feminist project within obstetrics is both feasible and urgently needed as one locus of resistance. PMID:17601085

  17. Strengths and Weaknesses of Elementary and Secondary Education in Uganda: Evaluation Based on a Teachers' Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walugembe, Frederick

    2009-01-01

    This study intends to identify the aspects of the Ugandan teachers' jobs and work environment perceived by selective participants as satisfactory, as well as those perceived as less satisfactory or unsatisfactory. The study is based on the assumption that teachers, being directly involved in the current activities of educational institutions, have…

  18. A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED KINETIC MODEL OF RAT AND MOUSE GESTATION: DISPOSITION OF A WEAK ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    A physiologically based toxicokinetic model of gestation in the rat mouse has been developed. The model is superimposed on the normal growth curve for nonpregnant females. It describes the entire gestation period including organogenesis. The model consists of uterus, mammary tiss...

  19. Strengths and Weaknesses of Elementary and Secondary Education in Uganda: Evaluation Based on a Teachers' Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walugembe, Frederick

    2009-01-01

    This study intends to identify the aspects of the Ugandan teachers' jobs and work environment perceived by selective participants as satisfactory, as well as those perceived as less satisfactory or unsatisfactory. The study is based on the assumption that teachers, being directly involved in the current activities of educational institutions, have

  20. Web-based Examination System Check on e having Self-check Capability of Advantages and Weaknesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fushimi, Shigeo; Watanabe, Akira; Nouda, Hideo

    NEC Learning Ltd. has developed Check on e , web-based examination system. The purpose is to check basic knowledge of young engineers engaged in development of electronic equipments, like digital electronic household appliances, which Japan has some favorable potential. We describe first, benefits and characteristics of Check on e . Utilizing this web-based test, young engineers are able to diagnose their advantages and weaknesses. Furthermore, since Check on e system sets questions randomly from the database of triple questions of those in actual test, it has sure ability to evaluate result of training or education. Finally, we show some examples on electric circuit field and LSI design (System on a Chip) field, and navigation system to introduce education after taking this examination.

  1. Evidence-based practices in geriatric mental health care.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Stephen J; Dums, Aricca R; Oxman, Thomas E; Schneider, Lon S; Areán, Patricia A; Alexopoulos, George S; Jeste, Dilip V

    2002-11-01

    The past decade has seen dramatic growth in research on treatments for the psychiatric problems of older adults. An emerging evidence base supports the efficacy of geriatric mental health interventions. The authors provide an overview of the evidence base for clinical practice. They identified three sources of evidence-evidence-based reviews, meta-analyses, and expert consensus statements-on established and emerging interventions for the most common disorders of late life, which include depression, dementia, substance abuse, schizophrenia, and anxiety. The most extensive research support was found for the effectiveness of pharmacological and psychosocial interventions for geriatric major depression and for dementia. Less is known about the effectiveness of treatments for the other disorders, although emerging evidence is promising for selected interventions. Empirical support was also found for the effectiveness of community-based, multidisciplinary, geriatric psychiatry treatment teams. The authors discuss barriers to implementing evidence-based practices in the mental health service delivery system for older adults. They describe approaches to overcoming these barriers that are based on the findings of research on practice change and dissemination. Successful approaches to implementing change in the practices of providers emphasize moving beyond traditional models of continuing medical education to include educational techniques that actively involve the learner, as well as systems change interventions such as integrated care management, implementation toolkits, automated reminders, and decision support technologies. The anticipated growth in the population of older persons with mental disorders underscores the need for a strategy to facilitate the systematic and effective implementation of evidence-based practices in geriatric mental health care. PMID:12407270

  2. Evidence-Based Practice: The Psychology of EBP Implementation.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Denise M; Gunia, Brian C

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is an approach used in numerous professions that focuses attention on evidence quality in decision making and action. We review research on EBP implementation, identifying critical underlying psychological factors facilitating and impeding its use. In describing EBP and the forms of evidence it employs, we highlight the challenges individuals face in appraising evidence quality, particularly that of their personal experience. We next describe critical EBP competencies and the challenges underlying their acquisition: foundational competencies of critical thinking and domain knowledge, and functional competencies such as question formulation, evidence search and appraisal, and outcome evaluation. We then review research on EBP implementation across diverse fields from medicine to management and organize findings around three key contributors to EBP: practitioner ability, motivation, and opportunity to practice (AMO). Throughout, important links between psychology and EBP are highlighted, along with the contributions psychological research can make to further EBP development and implementation. PMID:26361048

  3. Evidence-based assessment: no more pride or prejudice.

    PubMed

    Munro, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    Evidence-based practice is an important force in healthcare today. Its impact on the practice of the advanced practice nurse (APN) is becoming more apparent with the development of practice guidelines and protocols. The phrase, "That's the way I've always done it," is being replaced by, "This practice is evidence based." The philosophy of supporting practice with scientific evidence is not new but has been revitalized and emphasized as protocols have been developed to "mold" practice to achieve successful outcomes. This revolution is being applied to all areas of healthcare practice. Assessment of the patient is usually the first contact the APN has with the patient. It is an important time to gather information from the patient interview, physical examination, laboratory data, and test interpretation. Scientific evidence, properly interpreted, is applied in this step of assessment. The APN will then use clinical judgment and the knowledge gained from graduate education to assist with the formulation of a diagnosis. The APN has a unique opportunity to promote an evidence-based practice model at the grass roots level and persuade the bedside nurse to integrate this process into his or her practice. Ultimately, patients will receive better care and outcomes will be improved using evidence-based assessment. PMID:15586152

  4. New gel-like polymers as selective weak-base anion exchangers.

    PubMed

    Gierczyk, B?a?ej; Ceg?owski, Micha?; Zalas, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    A group of new anion exchangers, based on polyamine podands and of excellent ion-binding capacity, were synthesized. The materials were obtained in reactions between various poly(ethyleneamines) with glycidyl derivatives of cyclotetrasiloxane. The final polymeric, strongly cross-linked materials form gel-like solids. Their structures and interactions with anions adsorbed were studied by spectroscopic methods (CP-MAS NMR, FR-IR, UV-Vis). The sorption isotherms and kinetic parameters were determined for 29 anions. Materials studied show high ion capacity and selectivity towards some important anions, e.g., selenate(VI) or perrhenate. PMID:25946220

  5. New Gel-Like Polymers as Selective Weak-Base Anion Exchangers

    PubMed Central

    Gierczyk, B?a?ej; Ceg?owski, Micha?; Zalas, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    A group of new anion exchangers, based on polyamine podands and of excellent ion-binding capacity, were synthesized. The materials were obtained in reactions between various poly(ethyleneamines) with glycidyl derivatives of cyclotetrasiloxane. The final polymeric, strongly cross-linked materials form gel-like solids. Their structures and interactions with anions adsorbed were studied by spectroscopic methods (CP-MAS NMR, FR-IR, UV-Vis). The sorption isotherms and kinetic parameters were determined for 29 anions. Materials studied show high ion capacity and selectivity towards some important anions, e.g., selenate(VI) or perrhenate. PMID:25946220

  6. Evidence-based dentistry: a model for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Faggion, Clvis M; Tu, Yu-Kang

    2007-06-01

    Making decisions in dentistry should be based on the best evidence available. The objective of this study was to demonstrate a practical procedure and model that clinicians can use to apply the results of well-conducted studies to patient care by critically appraising the evidence with checklists and letter grade scales. To demonstrate application of this model for critically appraising the quality of research evidence, a hypothetical case involving an adult male with chronic periodontitis is used as an example. To determine the best clinical approach for this patient, a four-step, evidence-based model is demonstrated, consisting of the following: definition of a research question using the PICO format, search and selection of relevant literature, critical appraisal of identified research reports using checklists, and the application of evidence. In this model, the quality of research evidence was assessed quantitatively based on different levels of quality that are assigned letter grades of A, B, and C by evaluating the studies against the QUOROM (Quality of Reporting Meta-Analyses) and CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) checklists in a tabular format. For this hypothetical periodontics case, application of the model identified the best available evidence for clinical decision making, i.e., one randomized controlled trial and one systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Both studies showed similar answers for the research question. The use of a letter grade scale allowed an objective analysis of the quality of evidence. A checklist-driven model that assesses and applies evidence to dental practice may substantially improve dentists' decision making skill. PMID:17554100

  7. The Determination of the pKaof Multiprotic, Weak Acids by Analyzing Potentiometric Acid Base Titration Data with Difference Plots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Arno

    2003-05-01

    This paper discusses the pKa determination of mono-, di-, and triprotic weak acids with the help of difference (Bjerrum) plots, and the effect of strong acid base concentration errors, ligand weight errors, and nonlinear electrode response. Experimental examples are given for the titration of an acidic heterocycle, as well as glycine, ethylenediamine, and tris(2-aminoethyl)amine (the last two after addition of excess HCl to ensure complete protonation) with standarized NaOH. The analysis procedure makes use of Microsoft Excel spreadsheets and nonlinear least squares curve fitting of the experimental data to the theoretical Bjerrum function. In addition to providing pKa values for mono- and multiprotic acids, this approach has been found suitable for detecting small errors in parameters, such as strong acid and ligand concentration, and corrections can often become necessary to achieve the best fit. Difference plots allow the pKa values of monoprotic and multiprotic weak acids to be determined rapidly and with good precision.

  8. Investigation of product design weaknesses using model-based OPC sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnikov, Sergei V.; Lucas, Kevin; Garza, Cesar M.; Wimmer, Karl; LaCour, Patrick; Word, James C.

    2003-07-01

    Due to the challenging CD control and resolution requirements of future device generations, a large number of complex lithography enhancement techniques are likely to be used for random logic devices. This increased design, reticle, process and OPC complexity must be handled flawlessly by process engineers in order to create working circuits. Additionally, the rapidly increasing cost and cycletime of advanced reticles has increased the urgency of obtaining reticles devoid of process limiting design or OPC errors. We have extended the capability of leading edge model-based OPC software to find and analyze process-limiting regions in real product designs. Specifically, we have implemented and verified software usefulness to find design-process limitations due to measured lens aberrations, as well as errors in focus, exposure or reticle CD control. We present results showing the applications and limitations of these new model-based analysis methods to discover process-design interaction errors in 90nm and 130nm patterning processes; and to propose design rule, process or OPC improvements to mitigate these errors.

  9. Construct Definition Using Cognitively Based Evidence: A Framework for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketterlin-Geller, Leanne R.; Yovanoff, Paul; Jung, EunJu; Liu, Kimy; Geller, Josh

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we highlight the need for a precisely defined construct in score-based validation and discuss the contribution of cognitive theories to accurately and comprehensively defining the construct. We propose a framework for integrating cognitively based theoretical and empirical evidence to specify and evaluate the construct. We apply

  10. Evidence-Based Psychosocial Treatments for Child and Adolescent Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David-Ferdon, Corinne; Kaslow, Nadine J.

    2008-01-01

    The evidence-base of psychosocial treatment outcome studies for depressed youth conducted since 1998 is examined. All studies for depressed children meet Nathan and Gorman's (2002) criteria for Type 2 studies whereas the adolescent protocols meet criteria for both Type 1 and Type 2 studies. Based on the Task Force on the Promotion and…

  11. Evidence-Based Psychosocial Treatments for Child and Adolescent Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David-Ferdon, Corinne; Kaslow, Nadine J.

    2008-01-01

    The evidence-base of psychosocial treatment outcome studies for depressed youth conducted since 1998 is examined. All studies for depressed children meet Nathan and Gorman's (2002) criteria for Type 2 studies whereas the adolescent protocols meet criteria for both Type 1 and Type 2 studies. Based on the Task Force on the Promotion and

  12. Evidence-Based Practice: A Framework for Making Effective Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Trina D.; Detrich, Ronnie; Slocum, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    The research to practice gap in education has been a long-standing concern. The enactment of No Child Left Behind brought increased emphasis on the value of using scientifically based instructional practices to improve educational outcomes. It also brought education into the broader evidence-based practice movement that started in medicine and has

  13. A successful teaching strategy for applying evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Killeen, Mary B; Barnfather, Janet S

    2005-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is the conscientious use of the best evidence contained in the literature to guide healthcare decisions. The authors describe how their baccalaureate program prepares its graduates to be successful in implementing EBP in their nursing practice. Outcomes of sustained student projects in agency settings are presented. They posit that bachelor of science in nursing students, agency personnel, and faculty can lead practice innovations supported by EBP. PMID:15900207

  14. Challenges to evidence-based prescribing in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Mamdani, Muhammad; Ching, Andrew; Golden, Brian; Melo, Magda; Menzefricke, Ulrich

    2008-05-01

    Although there appears to be widespread support of evidence-based medicine as a basis for rational prescribing, the challenges to it are significant and often justified. A multitude of factors other than evidence drive clinical decision-making, including patient preferences and social circumstances, presence of disease-drug and drug-drug interactions, clinical experience, competing demands from more pressing clinical conditions, marketing and promotional activity, and system-level drug policies. PMID:18413694

  15. Ethics and Evidence-Based Medicine: Is There a Conflict?

    PubMed Central

    Loewy, Erich H.

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the advantages, disadvantages, and traps to which evidence-based medicine (EBM) may lead and suggests that, to be ethically valid, EBM must be aimed at the patient's best interests and not at the financial interests of others. While financial considerations are by no means trivial, it is hypocritical if not dangerous to hide them behind words like evidence or quality. PMID:18092036

  16. Optimization-based additive decomposition of weakly coercive problems with applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bochev, Pavel B.; Ridzal, Denis

    2016-01-27

    In this study, we present an abstract mathematical framework for an optimization-based additive decomposition of a large class of variational problems into a collection of concurrent subproblems. The framework replaces a given monolithic problem by an equivalent constrained optimization formulation in which the subproblems define the optimization constraints and the objective is to minimize the mismatch between their solutions. The significance of this reformulation stems from the fact that one can solve the resulting optimality system by an iterative process involving only solutions of the subproblems. Consequently, assuming that stable numerical methods and efficient solvers are available for every subproblem,more » our reformulation leads to robust and efficient numerical algorithms for a given monolithic problem by breaking it into subproblems that can be handled more easily. An application of the framework to the Oseen equations illustrates its potential.« less

  17. Weak-lensing detection of intracluster filaments with ground-based data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maturi, Matteo; Merten, Julian

    2013-11-01

    According to the current standard model of cosmology, matter in the Universe arranges itself along a network of filamentary structure. These filaments connect the main nodes of this so-called "cosmic web", which are clusters of galaxies. Although its large-scale distribution is clearly characterized by numerical simulations, constraining the dark-matter content of the cosmic web in reality turns out to be difficult. The natural method of choice is gravitational lensing. However, the direct detection and mapping of the elusive filament signal is challenging and in this work we present two methods that are specifically tailored to achieve this task. A linear matched filter aims at detecting the smooth mass-component of filaments and is optimized to perform a shear decomposition that follows the anisotropic component of the lensing signal. Filaments clearly inherit this property due to their morphology. At the same time, the contamination arising from the central massive cluster is controlled in a natural way. The filament 1σ detection is of about κ ~ 0.01 - 0.005 according to the filter's template width and length, enabling the detection of structures beyond reach with other approaches. The second, complementary method seeks to detect the clumpy component of filaments. The detection is determined by the number density of subclump identifications in an area enclosing the potential filament, as was found within the observed field with the filter approach. We tested both methods against mocked observations based on realistic N-body simulations of filamentary structure and proved the feasibility of detecting filaments with ground-based data.

  18. Evaluation of Evidence-based Nursing Pain Management Practice.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenjia; Eaton, Linda H; Gordon, Debra B; Hoyle, Christine; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2015-08-01

    It is important to ensure that cancer pain management is based on the best evidence. Nursing evidence-based pain management can be examined through an evaluation of pain documentation. The aim of this study was to modify and test an evaluation tool for nursing cancer pain documentation, and describe the frequency and quality of nursing pain documentation in one oncology unit via the electronic medical system. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used for this study at an oncology unit of an academic medical center in the Pacific Northwest. Medical records were examined for 37 adults hospitalized during April and May 2013. Nursing pain documentations (N = 230) were reviewed using an evaluation tool modified from the Cancer Pain Practice Index to consist of 13 evidence-based pain management indicators, including pain assessment, care plan, pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions, monitoring and treatment of analgesic side effects, communication with physicians, and patient education. Individual nursing documentation was assigned a score ranging from 0 (worst possible) to 13 (best possible), to reflect the delivery of evidence-based pain management. The participating nurses documented 90% of the recommended evidence-based pain management indicators. Documentation was suboptimal for pain reassessment, pharmacologic interventions, and bowel regimen. The study results provide implications for enhancing electronic medical record design and highlight a need for future research to understand the reasons for suboptimal nursing documentation of cancer pain management. For the future use of the data evaluation tool, we recommend additional modifications according to study settings. PMID:26256215

  19. Evidence-based history taking under time constraint

    PubMed Central

    Moayyeri, Alireza; Soltani, Akbar; Moosapour, Hamideh; Raza, Mohsin

    2011-01-01

    Physicians all through the world visit patients under time limitations. The most important troubled clinical skill under time constraint is the diagnostic approach. In this situation, clinicians need some diagnostic approaches to reduce both diagnostic time and errors. It seems that highly experienced physicians utilize some special tactics in this regard. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) as a relatively new paradigm for clinical practice stresses on using research evidences in diagnostic evaluations. The authors aimed to evaluate experts strategies and assess what EBM can add to these tactics. They reviewed diagnostic strategies of some veteran internists in their busy outpatient clinics and proposed an evidence-based diagnostic model engaging clinical experience and research evidence. It appears that every clinician utilizes a set of key pointer questions for decision-making. In addition to use of evidence-based resources for making differential diagnosis and estimating utility of various diseases, clinicians should use key pointers with significant likelihood ratios and from independent systems to reduce time and errors of history taking. Clinical trainees can improve their practice by constructing their own set of pointers from valid research evidences. Using this diagnostic model, EBM can help physicians to struggle against their time constraint. PMID:22091274

  20. Weak Interactions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lee, T. D.

    1957-06-01

    Experimental results on the non-conservation of parity and charge conservation in weak interactions are reviewed. The two-component theory of the neutrino is discussed. Lepton reactions are examined under the assumption of the law of conservation of leptons and that the neutrino is described by a two- component theory. From the results of this examination, the universal Fermi interactions are analyzed. Although reactions involving the neutrino can be described, the same is not true of reactions which do not involve the lepton, as the discussion of the decay of K mesons and hyperons shows. The question of the invariance of time reversal is next examined. (J.S.R.)

  1. Hydroxamic acids as weak base indicators: protonation in strong acid media.

    PubMed

    García, B; Ibeas, S; Hoyuelos, F J; Leal, J M; Secco, F; Venturini, M

    2001-11-30

    The protonation equilibria of N-phenylbenzohydroxamic, benzohydroxamic, salicylhydroxamic, and N-p-tolylcinnamohydroxamic acids have been studied at 25 degrees C in concentrated sulfuric, hydrochloric, and perchloric acid media; the UV-vis spectral measurements were analyzed using the Hammett equation and the Bunnett-Olsen and excess acidity methods. The medium effects observed in the UV spectral curves were corrected with the Cox-Yates and vector analysis methods. The H(A) acidity function based on benzamides provided the best results. The range of variation of the solvation coefficient m is similar to that of amides, this indicating similar solvation requirements for amides and hydroxamic acids. For the same substrate, the observed variations of pK(BH)(+) with the mineral acid used was justified by formation of solvent-separated ion pairs; for the same mineral acid, the observed changes in pK(BH)(+) can be explained by the solvation of BH(+). The change of the pK(BH)(+) values was in reasonably good agreement with the sequence of the catalytic efficiency of the mineral acids used, HCl > H(2)SO(4) > HClO(4). PMID:11722195

  2. What is the evidence that postgraduate teaching in evidence based medicine changes anything? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Coomarasamy, Arri; Khan, Khalid S

    2004-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of standalone versus clinically integrated teaching in evidence based medicine on various outcomes in postgraduates. Design Systematic review of randomised and non-randomised controlled trials and before and after comparison studies. Data sources Medline, Embase, ERIC, Cochrane Library, DARE, HTA database, Best Evidence, BEME, and SCI. Study selection 23 studies: four randomised trials, seven non-randomised controlled studies, and 12 before and after comparison studies. 18 studies (including two randomised trials) evaluated a standalone teaching method, and five studies (including two randomised trials) evaluated a clinically integrated teaching method. Main outcome measures Knowledge, critical appraisal skills, attitudes, and behaviour. Results Standalone teaching improved knowledge but not skills, attitudes, or behaviour. Clinically integrated teaching improved knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviour. Conclusion Teaching of evidence based medicine should be moved from classrooms to clinical practice to achieve improvements in substantial outcomes. PMID:15514348

  3. Creating the evidence base for quality improvement collaboratives.

    PubMed

    Mittman, Brian S

    2004-06-01

    Intensive efforts are under way to improve health care quality and safety throughout the United States and abroad. Many of these efforts use the quality improvement collaborative method, an approach emphasizing collaborative learning and exchange of insights and support among a set of health care organizations. Unfortunately, the widespread acceptance and reliance on this approach are based not on solid evidence but on shared beliefs and anecdotal affirmations that may overstate the actual effectiveness of the method. More effective use of the collaborative method will require a commitment by users, researchers, and other stakeholders to rigorous, objective evaluation and the creation of a valid, useful knowledge and evidence base. Development of this evidence base will require improved conceptions of the nature of quality problems, quality improvement processes, and the types of research needed to elucidate these processes. Researchers, journal editors, and funding agencies must also cooperate to ensure that published evaluations are relevant, comprehensive, and cumulative. PMID:15172904

  4. Implementing Evidence-Based Practices: Considerations for the Hospice Setting

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Sara; Mackin, Melissa Lehan; Reyes, Jimmy; Herr, Keela; Titler, Marita; Fine, Perry; Forcucci, Chris

    2015-01-01

    With tighter regulations and greater scrutiny of outcomes, hospice programs are being challenged to consider the implementation of Evidence-Based Practices (EBPs). This study reports the findings from interviews conducted with hospice directors and focus groups with the staff at eight experimental site hospice programs that occurred following the completion of a multifaceted translating research into practice (TRIP) intervention designed to promote the adoption of evidence-based pain management interventions. The purpose of this paper is to provide a background in the use of EBPs, to report the facilitators and barriers to overall implementation of evidence-based pain practices in the hospice setting, and to provide recommendations for hospices interested in improving use of EBPs in this setting. It was determined that hospice programs need to evaluate three main factors prior to the start of an EBP initiative: Community culture, Agency culture, and Staff culture. Recommendations for implementation of EBPs in hospice organizations are provided. PMID:20167834

  5. Evidence-based practice and the professionalization of dental hygiene.

    PubMed

    Cobban, Sandra J

    2004-11-01

    The application of knowledge is fundamental to human problem solving. In health disciplines, knowledge utilization commonly manifests through evidence-based decision making in practice. The purpose of this paper is to explore the development of the evidence-based practice (EBP) movement in health professions in general, and dental hygiene in particular, and to examine its relationship to the professionalization agenda of dental hygiene in Canada. EBP means integrating practitioner expertise with the best available external evidence from research. Proponents of EBP believe that it holds promise for reducing a research-practice gap by encouraging clinicians to seek current research results. Both the Canadian and American Dental Hygienists Associations support practice based on current research evidence, yet recent studies show variation in practice. Professionalization refers to the developmental stages through which an organized occupation passes as it develops traits that characterize it as a profession. The status conferred by professionalization privileges a group to make and monitor its own decisions relative to practice. Dental hygiene's success in acquiring attributes of a profession suggests that transformation to a profession is occurring. This paper compares the assumptions and challenges of both movements, and argues the need for a principal focus on the development of a culture of evidence-based dental hygiene practice. PMID:16451489

  6. Pediatric Depression: Is There Evidence to Improve Evidence-Based Treatments?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brent, David A.; Maalouf, Fadi T.

    2009-01-01

    Although there have been advances in our ability to treat child and adolescent depression, use of evidence-based treatments still results in many patients with residual symptoms. Advances in our understanding of cognitive, emotional, and ecological aspects of early-onset depression have the potential to lead to improvements in the assessment and…

  7. Evidence and Rigor: Scrutinizing the Rhetorical Embrace of Evidence-Based Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Bruce; Welner, Kevin G.

    2012-01-01

    The nation's lawmakers have frequently voiced the basic principle that important policy decisions should be evidence based. In this commentary, the authors describe the approach the U.S. Department of Education has taken in its Increasing Educational Productivity project. The authors argue that the department's actual practice in this instance has…

  8. Evidence-Based Practice and School Libraries: Interconnections of Evidence, Advocacy, and Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Ross J.

    2015-01-01

    This author states that a professional focus on evidence based practice (EBP) for school libraries emerged from the International Association of School Librarianship conference when he presented the concept. He challenged the school library profession to actively engage in professional and reflective practices that chart, measure, document, and…

  9. Evidence-Based Practice and School Libraries: Interconnections of Evidence, Advocacy, and Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Ross J.

    2015-01-01

    This author states that a professional focus on evidence based practice (EBP) for school libraries emerged from the International Association of School Librarianship conference when he presented the concept. He challenged the school library profession to actively engage in professional and reflective practices that chart, measure, document, and

  10. Evidence and Rigor: Scrutinizing the Rhetorical Embrace of Evidence-Based Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Bruce; Welner, Kevin G.

    2012-01-01

    The nation's lawmakers have frequently voiced the basic principle that important policy decisions should be evidence based. In this commentary, the authors describe the approach the U.S. Department of Education has taken in its Increasing Educational Productivity project. The authors argue that the department's actual practice in this instance has

  11. The Evidence. Supported Education: A Promising Practice. Evidence-Based Practices KIT (Knowledge Informing Transformation)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unger, Karen V.

    2011-01-01

    Supported Employment is an evidence-based practice that helps people with mental illness find and keep meaningful jobs in the community. Given these outcomes the challenge for Supported Employment programs is to rethink the emphasis on immediate work for everyone and help consumers utilize appropriate education and training opportunities available

  12. Untangling the Evidence: Introducing an Empirical Model for Evidence-Based Library and Information Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This research is the first to investigate the experiences of teacher-librarians as evidence-based practice. An empirically derived model is presented in this paper. Method: This qualitative study utilised the expanded critical incident approach, and investigated the real-life experiences of fifteen Australian teacher-librarians,

  13. Pediatric Depression: Is There Evidence to Improve Evidence-Based Treatments?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brent, David A.; Maalouf, Fadi T.

    2009-01-01

    Although there have been advances in our ability to treat child and adolescent depression, use of evidence-based treatments still results in many patients with residual symptoms. Advances in our understanding of cognitive, emotional, and ecological aspects of early-onset depression have the potential to lead to improvements in the assessment and

  14. Towards evidence-based health administration education: the tasks ahead.

    PubMed

    Griffith, J R

    2000-01-01

    The vision of a more objective, patient-oriented and quantitative evaluation of medicine motivates much current activity in health care, and has come to be called "evidence-based" medicine (Atkins, Kamerow and Eisenberg 1998). A similar vision underlies this special issue. It derives from the 1998 AUPHA annual meeting theme of teaching management technology and the work of an AUPHA task force. The task force is seeking support for a collaborative program to develop measures of educational outcomes and use them in the systematic improvement of member programs (Stephen F. Loebs, PhD, Chair. Members include Ray Davis, PhD; Jeptha W. Dalston, PhD; Gary Filerman, PhD; Barry Greene, PhD; the author; and Douglas Wakefield, PhD.) The task force calls this effort "evidence-based health administration education." It intends a systematic, outcomes-oriented, evaluation and improvement of the educational process, as the evidence-based medicine movement does of medical care. Evolution of member programs using measured performance and continuous improvement is implied, rather than dramatic change (Griffith 1998). Just as evidence-based medicine relies on a disease-oriented taxonomy, evidence-based education must rely on an agreed-upon set of specific skills, knowledge, and abilities (SKAs) that can be learned by students and tested in graduates. This paper discusses what lessons can be learned from the papers reported in the issue, identifies the components necessary to implement the vision, and suggests how AUPHA can proceed in the near future to implement evidence-based education. PMID:11183261

  15. School Psychology: A Public Health Framework: I. From Evidence-Based Practices to Evidence-Based Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoagwood, Kimberly; Johnson, Jacqueline

    2003-01-01

    Describes current perspectives on evidence-based practices in psychology, medicine, and education; discusses challenges in the implementation and dissemination of research-based findings into schools; describes differences between current models of organizational behavior as studied in children's mental health services and in education; and

  16. Developing Traditional Chinese Medicine in the Era of Evidence-Based Medicine: Current Evidences and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Foon Yin; Linn, Yeh Ching

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM), by integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available clinical evidence from systematic research, has in recent years been established as the standard of modern medical practice for greater treatment efficacy and safety. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), on the other hand, evolved as a system of medical practice from ancient China more than 2000 years ago based on empirical knowledge as well as theories and concepts which are yet to be mapped by scientific equivalents. Despite the expanding TCM usage and the recognition of its therapeutic benefits worldwide, the lack of robust evidence from the EBM perspective is hindering acceptance of TCM by the Western medicine community and its integration into mainstream healthcare. For TCM to become an integral component of the healthcare system so that its benefits can be rationally harnessed in the best interests of patients, it is essential for TCM to demonstrate its efficacy and safety by high-level evidence in accordance with EBM, though much debate remains on the validity and feasibility of applying the EBM model on this traditional practice. This review aims to discuss the current status of research in TCM, explore the evidences available on its efficacy and safety, and highlight the issues and challenges faced in applying EBM to TCM. PMID:25949261

  17. Premenstrual syndrome. Evidence-based treatment in family practice.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Sue

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the strength of evidence for treatments for premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and to derive a set of practical guidelines for managing PMS in family practice. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: An advanced MEDLINE search was conducted from January 1990 to December 2001. The Cochrane Library and personal contacts were also used. Quality of evidence in studies ranged from level I to level III, depending on the intervention. MAIN MESSAGE: Good scientific evidence shows that calcium carbonate (1200 mg/d) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are effective treatments for PMS. The most commonly used therapies (including vitamin B6, evening primrose oil, and oral contraceptives) are based on inconclusive evidence. Other treatments for which there is inconclusive evidence include aerobic exercise, stress reduction, cognitive therapy, spironolactone, magnesium, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, various hormonal regimens, and a complex carbohydrate-rich diet. Although evidence for them is inconclusive, it is reasonable to recommend healthy lifestyle changes given their overall health benefits. Progesterone and bromocriptine, which are still widely used, are ineffective. CONCLUSION: Calcium carbonate should be recommended as first-line therapy for women with mild-to-moderate PMS. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors can be considered as first-line therapy for women with severe affective symptoms and for women with milder symptoms who have failed to respond to other therapies. Other therapies may be tried if these measures fail to provide adequate relief. PMID:12489244

  18. A prototype system to support evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Demner-Fushman, Dina; Seckman, Charlotte; Fisher, Cheryl; Hauser, Susan E; Clayton, Jennifer; Thoma, George R

    2008-01-01

    Translating evidence into clinical practice is a complex process that depends on the availability of evidence, the environment into which the research evidence is translated, and the system that facilitates the translation. This paper presents InfoBot, a system designed for automatic delivery of patient-specific information from evidence-based resources. A prototype system has been implemented to support development of individualized patient care plans. The prototype explores possibilities to automatically extract patients problems from the interdisciplinary team notes and query evidence-based resources using the extracted terms. Using 4,335 de-identified interdisciplinary team notes for 525 patients, the system automatically extracted biomedical terminology from 4,219 notes and linked resources to 260 patient records. Sixty of those records (15 each for Pediatrics, Oncology & Hematology, Medical & Surgical, and Behavioral Health units) have been selected for an ongoing evaluation of the quality of automatically proactively delivered evidence and its usefulness in development of care plans. PMID:18998835

  19. Accreditation and certification for evidence-based design.

    PubMed

    Stichler, Jaynelle F

    2010-04-01

    The Evidence-Based Design Accreditation and Certification (EDAC) is a professional certification that validates that individuals have a core body of knowledge and experience necessary to lead and engage in an evidence-based design process for healthcare facilities. This bimonthly department expands nurse leaders' knowledge and competencies in health facility design and enables them to lead in design efforts. In this article, the vision and mission of EDAC and specific content are shared to increase nurse leaders' awareness of the certification when interviewing prospective architectural firms or for nurse leaders who aspire to have a career in the healthcare design field. PMID:20305460

  20. Evidence integration in model-based tree search.

    PubMed

    Solway, Alec; Botvinick, Matthew M

    2015-09-15

    Research on the dynamics of reward-based, goal-directed decision making has largely focused on simple choice, where participants decide among a set of unitary, mutually exclusive options. Recent work suggests that the deliberation process underlying simple choice can be understood in terms of evidence integration: Noisy evidence in favor of each option accrues over time, until the evidence in favor of one option is significantly greater than the rest. However, real-life decisions often involve not one, but several steps of action, requiring a consideration of cumulative rewards and a sensitivity to recursive decision structure. We present results from two experiments that leveraged techniques previously applied to simple choice to shed light on the deliberation process underlying multistep choice. We interpret the results from these experiments in terms of a new computational model, which extends the evidence accumulation perspective to multiple steps of action. PMID:26324932

  1. Evidence integration in model-based tree search

    PubMed Central

    Solway, Alec; Botvinick, Matthew M.

    2015-01-01

    Research on the dynamics of reward-based, goal-directed decision making has largely focused on simple choice, where participants decide among a set of unitary, mutually exclusive options. Recent work suggests that the deliberation process underlying simple choice can be understood in terms of evidence integration: Noisy evidence in favor of each option accrues over time, until the evidence in favor of one option is significantly greater than the rest. However, real-life decisions often involve not one, but several steps of action, requiring a consideration of cumulative rewards and a sensitivity to recursive decision structure. We present results from two experiments that leveraged techniques previously applied to simple choice to shed light on the deliberation process underlying multistep choice. We interpret the results from these experiments in terms of a new computational model, which extends the evidence accumulation perspective to multiple steps of action. PMID:26324932

  2. Foundations for evidence-based intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring.

    PubMed

    Howick, Jeremy; Cohen, Bernard Allan; McCulloch, Peter; Thompson, Matthew; Skinner, Stanley A

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we recommend means to enhance the evidence-base for intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM). We address two preliminary issues: (1) whether IONM should be evaluated as a diagnostic test or an intervention, and (2) the state of the evidence for IONM (as presented in systematic reviews, for example). Three reasons may be suggested to evaluate at least some IONM applications as interventions (or as part of an "interventional cascade"). First, practical barriers limit our ability to measure IONM diagnostic accuracy. Second, IONM results are designed to be correlated with interventions during surgery. Third, IONM should improve patient outcomes when IONM-directed intervention alters the course of surgery. Observational evidence for IONM is growing yet more is required to understand the conditions under which IONM, in its variety of settings, can benefit patients. A multi-center observational cohort study would represent an important initial compromise between the pragmatic difficulties with conducting controlled trials in IONM and the Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) view that large scale randomized trials are required. Such a cohort study would improve the evidence base and (if justified) provide the rationale for controlled trials. PMID:26268581

  3. EVIDENCEBASED MEDICINE/PRACTICE IN SPORTS PHYSICAL THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Lehecka, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    A push for the use of evidence‐based medicine and evidence‐based practice patterns has permeated most health care disciplines. The use of evidence‐based practice in sports physical therapy may improve health care quality, reduce medical errors, help balance known benefits and risks, challenge views based on beliefs rather than evidence, and help to integrate patient preferences into decision‐making. In this era of health care utilization sports physical therapists are expected to integrate clinical experience with conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of research evidence in order to make clearly informed decisions in order to help maximize and optimize patient well‐being. One of the more common reasons for not using evidence in clinical practice is the perceived lack of skills and knowledge when searching for or appraising research. This clinical commentary was developed to educate the readership on what constitutes evidence‐based practice, and strategies used to seek evidence in the daily clinical practice of sports physical therapy. PMID:23091778

  4. GRADE in Systematic Reviews of Acupuncture for Stroke Rehabilitation: Recommendations based on High-Quality Evidence.

    PubMed

    Xin, Zhang; Xue-Ting, Liu; De-Ying, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Systematic reviews (SRs) of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have demonstrated acupuncture's effectiveness in stroke rehabilitation. The current study reviews the quality of evidence in SRs of acupuncture in stroke rehabilitation, and rates the strength of recommendation for its use based on this evidence using the GRADE (grading of recommendations, assessment, development and evaluations) approach. A comprehensive literature search was performed using multiple databases (e.g., Medline, Embase) with advanced search strategies. Two authors independently selected articles, collected data, and assessed the methodological quality of each identified SR according to AMSTAR (a measurement tool to assess systematic reviews) and OQAQ (Oxman and Guyatt's overview quality assessment questionnaire). Outcomes related to stroke rehabilitation were evaluated. SRs of high methodological quality (AMSTAR score ?9 and OQAQ score ?7) were graded using GRADE. Ultimately, acupuncture yields benefits in stroke rehabilitation (neurological function improvement: RR?=?1.34; swallowing improvement: RR?=?1.61, 1.49, 1.07; disability: SMD?=?0.49 or 0.07). Poor evidentiary quality and insufficient information about harm led to weak recommendations. In conclusion, acupuncture may improve stroke rehabilitation, as the GRADE approach indicated a weak recommendation for acupuncture's usage in this context. PMID:26560971

  5. GRADE in Systematic Reviews of Acupuncture for Stroke Rehabilitation: Recommendations based on High-Quality Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Zhang; Xue-Ting, Liu; De-Ying, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Systematic reviews (SRs) of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have demonstrated acupuncture’s effectiveness in stroke rehabilitation. The current study reviews the quality of evidence in SRs of acupuncture in stroke rehabilitation, and rates the strength of recommendation for its use based on this evidence using the GRADE (grading of recommendations, assessment, development and evaluations) approach. A comprehensive literature search was performed using multiple databases (e.g., Medline, Embase) with advanced search strategies. Two authors independently selected articles, collected data, and assessed the methodological quality of each identified SR according to AMSTAR (a measurement tool to assess systematic reviews) and OQAQ (Oxman and Guyatt’s overview quality assessment questionnaire). Outcomes related to stroke rehabilitation were evaluated. SRs of high methodological quality (AMSTAR score ≥9 and OQAQ score ≥7) were graded using GRADE. Ultimately, acupuncture yields benefits in stroke rehabilitation (neurological function improvement: RR = 1.34; swallowing improvement: RR = 1.61, 1.49, 1.07; disability: SMD = 0.49 or 0.07). Poor evidentiary quality and insufficient information about harm led to weak recommendations. In conclusion, acupuncture may improve stroke rehabilitation, as the GRADE approach indicated a weak recommendation for acupuncture’s usage in this context. PMID:26560971

  6. How to teach evidence-based medicine to urologists

    PubMed Central

    Hajebrahimi, Sakineh; Mostafaie, Ali

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this article is to help develop, disseminate, and evaluate resources that can be used to practice and teach EBM for urology residents and continuing education of urologists to reduce the gap between research and clinical practice. Urology departments should build capacity for residents to shape the future of quality and safety in healthcare through translating evidence into practice. Cutting edge approaches require knowing how to teach Evidence-based urology, to make Bio-statistics easy to understanding and how to lead improvement at every level. The authors shared their experience about what works in a surgical department to building an Evidence-based environment and high quality of cares. PMID:22279316

  7. Feedback informed treatment: evidence-based practice meets social construction.

    PubMed

    Tilsen, Julie; McNamee, Sheila

    2015-03-01

    This article explores the challenges presented by the mandate for evidence-based practice for family therapists who identify with the philosophical stance of social construction. The history of psychotherapy outcome research is reviewed, as are current findings that provide empirical evidence for an engaged, dialogic practice. The authors suggest that the binary between empiricism and social construction may be unhinged by understanding empiricism as a particular discursive frame (i.e., a particular way of talking, acting, and being in the world), one of many available as a way of understanding and talking about our work. Through a case vignette, the authors introduce the evidence-based practice of Feedback Informed Treatment as an elaboration of social construction, and as an example of bridging the gap between the discursive frames of empiricism and social construction. PMID:25394600

  8. A framework for disseminating evidence-based health promotion practices.

    PubMed

    Harris, Jeffrey R; Cheadle, Allen; Hannon, Peggy A; Forehand, Mark; Lichiello, Patricia; Mahoney, Eustacia; Snyder, Susan; Yarrow, Judith

    2012-01-01

    Wider adoption of evidence-based, health promotion practices depends on developing and testing effective dissemination approaches. To assist in developing these approaches, we created a practical framework drawn from the literature on dissemination and our experiences disseminating evidence-based practices. The main elements of our framework are 1) a close partnership between researchers and a disseminating organization that takes ownership of the dissemination process and 2) use of social marketing principles to work closely with potential user organizations. We present 2 examples illustrating the framework: EnhanceFitness, for physical activity among older adults, and American Cancer Society Workplace Solutions, for chronic disease prevention among workers. We also discuss 7 practical roles that researchers play in dissemination and related research: sorting through the evidence, conducting formative research, assessing readiness of user organizations, balancing fidelity and reinvention, monitoring and evaluating, influencing the outer context, and testing dissemination approaches. PMID:22172189

  9. Correlation of self-assessment with attendance in an evidence-based medicine course.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Beatriz U

    2015-12-01

    In previous studies, correlations between attendance and grades in lectures have given variable results and, when statistically significant, the correlation has been weak. In some studies, a sex effect has been reported. Lectures are a teacher-centered learning activity. Therefore, it appeared interesting to evaluate if a stronger correlation between attendance and grades would occur in a face-to-face "evidence-based medicine" course with few lectures and more time dedicated to active learning methods. Small-group work and peer learning were used to foster deep learning and to engage students in their own learning process. Most of the time, students worked in small groups solving contextualized problems and critically analyzing the quality of published medical literature. Peer learning was also developed in collaborative evaluations, and constant feedback was provided. Therefore, it was hypothesized that high attenders would develop a higher self-perception of learning and obtain higher marks than low attenders. Student self-perceptions of their capacity to apply evidence-based medicine were measured by the application of an online self-assessment survey, and objective learning was measured as the grades obtained in a final accumulative individual test. It was found that male students obtained higher grades and were more confident in their achievements than their female peers, despite male and female student attendance being similar. In addition, attendance was correlated with the perceived capacity to apply evidence-based medicine only in male students and was not correlated with academic outcome. PMID:26628663

  10. Evidence-based Assessment in Pediatric Psychology: Measures of Psychosocial Adjustment and Psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Thill, Azure Welborn; Bachanas, Pamela; Garber, Judy; Miller, Karen Bearman; Abad, Mona; Bruno, Elizabeth Franks; Carter, Jocelyn Smith; David-Ferdon, Corinne; Jandasek, Barbara; Mennuti-Washburn, Jean E.; O’Mahar, Kerry; Zukerman, Jill

    2008-01-01

    Objective To provide an evidence-based review of measures of psychosocial adjustment and psychopathology, with a specific focus on their use in the field of pediatric psychology. Methods As part of a larger survey of pediatric psychologists from the Society of Pediatric Psychology e-mail listserv (American Psychological Association, APA, Division 54), 37 measures were selected for this psychometric review. Measures that qualified for the review fell into one of the following three categories: (a) internalizing or externalizing rating scales, (b) broad-band rating scales, and (c) self-related rating scales. Results Psychometric characteristics (i.e., three types of reliability, two types of validity) were strong for the majority of measures reviewed, with 34 of the 37 measures meeting “well-established” evidence-based assessment (EBA) criteria. Strengths and weaknesses of existing measures were noted. Conclusions Recommendations for future work in this area of assessment are presented, including suggestions that more fine-grained EBA criteria be developed and that evidence-based “profiles” be devised for each measure. PMID:17728305

  11. Interteaching: An Evidence-Based Approach to Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Thomas Wade; Killingsworth, Kenneth; Alavosius, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes "interteaching" as an evidence-based method of instruction. Instructors often rely on more traditional approaches, such as lectures, as means to deliver instruction. Despite high usage, these methods are ineffective at achieving desirable academic outcomes. We discuss an innovative approach to delivering instruction

  12. Evidence-Based Youth Psychotherapy in the Mental Health Ecosystem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisz, John R.; Ugueto, Ana M.; Cheron, Daniel M.; Herren, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Five decades of randomized trials research have produced dozens of evidence-based psychotherapies (EBPs) for youths. The EBPs produce respectable effects in traditional efficacy trials, but the effects shrink markedly when EBPs are tested in practice contexts with clinically referred youths and compared to usual clinical care. We considered why…

  13. Evidence-Based Practice in Adapted Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jin, Jooyeon; Yun, Joonkoo

    2010-01-01

    Although implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) has been strongly advocated by federal legislation as well as school districts in recent years, the concept has not been well accepted in adapted physical education (APE), perhaps due to a lack of understanding of the central notion of EBP. The purpose of this article is to discuss how APE…

  14. Marketing evidence-based practice: what a CROC™!

    PubMed

    Boyington, Alice R; Ferrall, Sheila M; Sylvanus, Terry

    2010-10-01

    Nurses should be engaged in evidence-based practice (EBP) to ensure that nursing care is efficient and effective. This article describes one cancer center's use of the Marketing Mix framework to educate staff nurses with the CROC™: Clinging Rigidly to Outdated Care campaign. As a result of the campaign, five EBP projects have been initiated in the cancer center. PMID:20880823

  15. Evidence-Based Practice in Stuttering: Some Questions to Consider

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratner, Nan Bernstein

    2005-01-01

    A recent forum in "JFD" (28/3, 2003) evaluated the status of evidence-based practice in fluency disorders, and offered recommendations for improvement. This article re-evaluates the level of support available for some popular approaches to stuttering therapy and questions the relative value placed on some types of programs endorsed by the forum.…

  16. Evidence-Based Youth Psychotherapy in the Mental Health Ecosystem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisz, John R.; Ugueto, Ana M.; Cheron, Daniel M.; Herren, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Five decades of randomized trials research have produced dozens of evidence-based psychotherapies (EBPs) for youths. The EBPs produce respectable effects in traditional efficacy trials, but the effects shrink markedly when EBPs are tested in practice contexts with clinically referred youths and compared to usual clinical care. We considered why

  17. Evidence-Based Practice Empowers Practitioners: A Response to Epstein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Epstein makes a strong argument for the value of clinical data mining (CDM), although he minimizes some of the potential limitations in that methodology, such as attrition. Epstein's portrayal of evidence-based practice (EBP) as practitioner-bashing and treasuring intervention manuals overlooks the emphasis in the EBP process on the need for

  18. Situational Analysis: A Framework for Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annan, Jean

    2005-01-01

    Situational analysis is a framework for professional practice and research in educational psychology. The process is guided by a set of practice principles requiring that psychologists' work is evidence-based, ecological, collaborative and constructive. The framework is designed to provide direction for psychologists who wish to tailor their

  19. Teaching Evidence-based Medicine Using Literature for Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mottonen, Merja; Tapanainen, Paivi; Nuutinen, Matti; Rantala, Heikki; Vainionpaa, Leena; Uhari, Matti

    2001-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine--the process of using research findings systematically as the basis for clinical decisions--can be taught using problem-solving teaching methods. Evaluates whether it was possible to motivate students to use the original literature by giving them selected patient problems to solve. (Author/ASK)

  20. Teaching Evidence-based Medicine: Caveats and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, H. Gilbert; Lurie, Jon D.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses three caveats to the evidence-based paradigm in medical education: (1) detection of abnormalities that may not ever be overtly expressed inflates apparent diagnostic test performance; (2) probability revision is valuable primarily as an exercise to gain qualitative insights; and (3) patients are likely to be interested in more than just

  1. Teaching Evidence-Based Medicine: A Regional Dissemination Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leipzig, Rosanne M.; Wallace, Eleanor Z.; Smith, Lawrence G.; Sullivant, Jean; Dunn, Kathel; McGinn, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Described and evaluated an interactive course designed to create a cadre of medical school faculty in New York who could integrate evidence-based medicine into their training programs. Findings for representatives of 30 internal medicine residency programs show the usefulness of the regional dissemination model used. (SLD)

  2. Unraveling Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Bryan G.; Cook, Sara Cothren

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based practices (EBPs) are instructional techniques that meet prescribed criteria related to the research design, quality, quantity, and effect size of supporting research, which have the potential to help bridge the research-to-practice gap and improve student outcomes. In this article, the authors (a) discuss the importance of clear

  3. Evidence-Based Practices Project for Suicide Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Philip L.; Sudak, Howard S.; Silverman, Morton M.; Litts, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Suicide continues to be a serious public health problem. In response to this problem, a myriad of suicide prevention programs have been developed and employed across the United States. Unfortunately, the effectiveness of many of these programs is unknown because they have not been evaluated using rigorous methods. The Evidence-Based Practices

  4. Evidence-Based Practices and Implementation Science in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Bryan G.; Odom, Samuel L.

    2013-01-01

    Establishing a process for identifying evidence-based practices (EBPs) in special education has been a significant advance for the field because it has the potential for generating more effective educational programs and producing more positive outcomes for students with disabilities. However, the potential benefit of EBPs is bounded by the

  5. Implementing Evidence-Based Programs: Lessons Learned from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Jane; Maley, Mary; Purington, Amanda; Schantz, Karen; Dotterweich, Jutta

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based programs (EBPs) are used in many health promotion efforts to ensure that the intended positive behavioral and health outcomes will be achieved. However, because EBPs are developed and tested in research settings, the contextual elements of real world implementation play an important role in their successful delivery in communities.

  6. Evidence-Based Diagnosis: Incorporating Diagnostic Instruments into Clinical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doss, Amanda Jensen

    2005-01-01

    This article is intended to serve as a practical guide for practitioners interested in incorporating evidence-based diagnosis (EBD) instruments into their clinical practices to refine the diagnostic process. Three measures are used to illustrate this process, the DISC-IV (Shaffer et al., 2000), the Schedule for Affective Disorders and

  7. Evidence-Based Practices and Implementation Science in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Bryan G.; Odom, Samuel L.

    2013-01-01

    Establishing a process for identifying evidence-based practices (EBPs) in special education has been a significant advance for the field because it has the potential for generating more effective educational programs and producing more positive outcomes for students with disabilities. However, the potential benefit of EBPs is bounded by the…

  8. Evidence-Based Kernels: Fundamental Units of Behavioral Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Embry, Dennis D.; Biglan, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes evidence-based kernels, fundamental units of behavioral influence that appear to underlie effective prevention and treatment for children, adults, and families. A kernel is a behavior-influence procedure shown through experimental analysis to affect a specific behavior and that is indivisible in the sense that removing any of

  9. Urticaria: an evidence-based update. Conference report.

    PubMed

    Alexandroff, A B; Harman, K E

    2010-08-01

    Summary Evidence-based update meetings are held annually by the Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham. Topics are chosen by delegates at the previous year's conference and in the past have included blistering disorders, psoriasis, hair disorders and skin cancers. Once the topic is identified, a trials database search is undertaken with the aim of including speakers who are actively involved in trials that address the subject in question. This year, the eighth Evidence Based Update meeting focused on urticaria and took place in Loughborough University on 14 May 2009. The latest data on the diagnosis and management of acute and chronic urticaria, including cold and solar urticaria, and the impact of food intolerance on chronic urticaria, were presented by an international panel of renowned speakers, who sometimes expressed different viewpoints. The highlights of the meeting included an informal atmosphere, an international perspective, and a practical question and answer session. Over 70% of the delegates stated that they would be changing their clinical practice following on from the meeting. The evidence-based update meeting in 2010 will be devoted to eczema. PMID:20666769

  10. Not Funding the Evidence-Based Model in Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edlefson, Carla

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive case study was to describe the implementation of Ohio's version of the Evidence-Based Model (OEBM) state school finance system in 2009. Data sources included state budget documents and analyses as well as interviews with local school officials. The new system was responsive to three policy objectives ordered by the

  11. Evidence-Based Practices Project for Suicide Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Philip L.; Sudak, Howard S.; Silverman, Morton M.; Litts, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Suicide continues to be a serious public health problem. In response to this problem, a myriad of suicide prevention programs have been developed and employed across the United States. Unfortunately, the effectiveness of many of these programs is unknown because they have not been evaluated using rigorous methods. The Evidence-Based Practices…

  12. Evidence-Based Practice in Communication Disorders: Progress Not Perfection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Ray D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This commentary is written in response to a companion paper by Nan Bernstein Ratner ("Evidence-Based Practice: An Examination of its Ramifications for the Practice of Speech-Language Pathology"). Method: The comments reflect my experience as Vice President for Research and Technology of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association…

  13. Organizing for Evidence-Based Decision Making and Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leimer, Christina

    2012-01-01

    In today's accountability climate, regional accrediting bodies are requiring colleges and universities to develop and sustain a culture of evidence-based decision making and improvement. But two-thirds of college presidents in a 2011 "Inside Higher Ed" survey said their institutions are not particularly strong at using data for making decisions.

  14. Unraveling Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Bryan G.; Cook, Sara Cothren

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based practices (EBPs) are instructional techniques that meet prescribed criteria related to the research design, quality, quantity, and effect size of supporting research, which have the potential to help bridge the research-to-practice gap and improve student outcomes. In this article, the authors (a) discuss the importance of clear…

  15. Single-Subject Experimental Design for Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byiers, Breanne J.; Reichle, Joe; Symons, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Single-subject experimental designs (SSEDs) represent an important tool in the development and implementation of evidence-based practice in communication sciences and disorders. The purpose of this article is to review the strategies and tactics of SSEDs and their application in speech-language pathology research. Method: The authors

  16. The Evidence-Based Reasoning Framework: Assessing Scientific Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Nathaniel J. S.; Furtak, Erin Marie; Timms, Michael; Nagashima, Sam O.; Wilson, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Recent science education reforms have emphasized the importance of students engaging with and reasoning from evidence to develop scientific explanations. A number of studies have created frameworks based on Toulmin's (1958/2003) argument pattern, whereas others have developed systems for assessing the quality of students' reasoning to support

  17. Evidence-Based Practice and Evaluation: From Insight to Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunsmuir, Sandra; Brown, Emma; Iyadurai, Suzi; Monsen, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    With the growing emphasis on accountability and evidence-based practice, evaluation has become increasingly important in the contexts in which educational psychologists (EPs) practice. This paper describes a Target Monitoring and Evaluation (TME) system, derived from Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS) which was developed to evaluate outcomes of a wide

  18. Evidence-Based Practices in Outpatient Treatment for Eating Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffner, Angela D.; Buchanan, Linda Paulk

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the current issues relevant to implementing evidence-based practices in the context of outpatient treatment for eating disorders. The study also examined the effectiveness of an outpatient treatment program for eating disorders among a group of 196 patients presenting with anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or eating disorder…

  19. An Evidence-Based Protocol for Protecting Newborns From Pertussis.

    PubMed

    Stinson, Cynthia F; Hooper, Gwendolyn; Oliver, JoAnn S

    2015-01-01

    Pertussis, also known as whooping cough, is a vaccine-preventable disease most commonly affecting infants and young children. This article describes a project to develop an evidence-based protocol for implementing prenatal vaccination and cocooning in a major medical center in Georgia. PMID:26460912

  20. Determining Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Bryan G.; Tankersley, Melody; Landrum, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Determining evidence-based practices is a complicated enterprise that requires analyzing the methodological quality and magnitude of the available research supporting specific practices. This article reviews criteria and procedures for identifying what works in the fields of clinical psychology, school psychology, and general education; and it…

  1. Evidence-Based Interprofessional Practice: Learning and Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littek, Celeste

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this journal article is to investigate evidence-based practice (EBP) or He Ritenga Whaimohio, as one of the seven principles outlined in the "Resource Teacher: Learning and Behaviour (RTLB) Toolkit" (2011) that guides RTLB practice; and to critique the principle of EBP through practical reflection. (Contains 2 tables and 2…

  2. Critical Thinking: Knowledge and Skills for Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finn, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: I respond to Kamhi's (2011) conclusion in his article "Balancing Certainty and Uncertainty in Clinical Practice" that rational or critical thinking is an essential complement to evidence-based practice (EBP). Method: I expand on Kamhi's conclusion and briefly describe what clinicians might need to know to think critically within an EBP

  3. Expanding Minds: A Commitment to Research-Based Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    All Kinds of Minds, 2005

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, the Research, Program Evaluation and Information Department of "All Kinds of Minds" guided a research initiative designed to advance evidence-based scholarship about the impact of the Schools Attuned[R] Program to demonstrate the impact of Schools Attuned[R] on student outcomes; on special education; and on teacher knowledge and

  4. Using Family Paradigms to Improve Evidence-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hidecker, Mary Jo Cooley; Jones, Rebecca S.; Imig, David R.; Villarruel, Francisco A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Evidence-based practice (EBP) describes clinical decision making using research, clinical experience, and client values. For family-centered practices, the client's family is integral to this process. This article proposes that using family paradigms, a family science framework, may help elicit and understand client/family values within

  5. Integrating Evidence-Based Practices in Middle Science Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroeger, Stephen D.; Burton, Cathy; Preston, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of an evidence-based practice that addresses the learning needs of middle school students who have difficulty comprehending science texts. The teachers used a single-subject reversal design to implement peer-mediated instruction while asking to what degree the use of peer-mediated

  6. Toward an Evidence-Based Assessment of Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youngstrom, Eric A.; Findling, Robert L.; Kogos Youngstrom, Jen; Calabrese, Joseph R.

    2005-01-01

    This article outlines a provisional evidence-based approach to the assessment of pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD). Public attention to PBD and the rate of diagnosis have both increased substantially in the past decade. Accurate diagnosis is crucial to avoid harm due to mislabeling or unnecessary medication exposure. Because there are no proven

  7. Determining Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Bryan G.; Tankersley, Melody; Landrum, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Determining evidence-based practices is a complicated enterprise that requires analyzing the methodological quality and magnitude of the available research supporting specific practices. This article reviews criteria and procedures for identifying what works in the fields of clinical psychology, school psychology, and general education; and it

  8. Disseminating Evidence-Based Practices in Secondary Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mustian, April; Mazzotti, Valerie L.; Test, David W.

    2013-01-01

    As educators move into a new era of educational reform, it becomes imperative that teachers use evidence-based instructional practices shown to be effective for students with disabilities. One area that plays a role in this process is secondary transition. The National Secondary Transition Technical Assistance Center has identified 63

  9. Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education: Some Practical Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Bryan G.; Tankersley, Melody; Cook, Lysandra; Landrum, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    A major tenet of both the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and the No Child Left Behind Act is the identification and use of evidence-based practices, or those instructional techniques shown by research as most likely to improve student outcomes meaningfully. However, much confusion exists regarding the meaning and potential

  10. Fostering Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rambur, Betty

    1999-01-01

    Evidence-based nursing practice is impeded by low numbers of baccalaureate nurses, lack of critical perspectives toward research, the volume of information, and conflicting worldviews. Teaching strategies to address the challenge include fostering the ability to question and initiating teacher/student dialog. (SK)

  11. Evidence-Based Rehabilitation Counseling Practice: A Pedagogical Imperative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosciulek, John F.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how rehabilitation educators can aid students and practitioners in learning about and engaging in evidence-based rehabilitation counseling practice (EBRCP). Information describing (a) the definition and rationale for EBRCP, (b) controversies surrounding EBRCP, (c) facilitating rehabilitation counselor enthusiasm for EBRCP,

  12. Evidence-Based Practice Empowers Practitioners: A Response to Epstein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Epstein makes a strong argument for the value of clinical data mining (CDM), although he minimizes some of the potential limitations in that methodology, such as attrition. Epstein's portrayal of evidence-based practice (EBP) as practitioner-bashing and treasuring intervention manuals overlooks the emphasis in the EBP process on the need for…

  13. Evidence-Based Practice in Communication Disorders: Progress Not Perfection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Ray D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This commentary is written in response to a companion paper by Nan Bernstein Ratner ("Evidence-Based Practice: An Examination of its Ramifications for the Practice of Speech-Language Pathology"). Method: The comments reflect my experience as Vice President for Research and Technology of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

  14. Modeling Sensor Reliability in Fault Diagnosis Based on Evidence Theory.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kaijuan; Xiao, Fuyuan; Fei, Liguo; Kang, Bingyi; Deng, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Sensor data fusion plays an important role in fault diagnosis. Dempster-Shafer (D-R) evidence theory is widely used in fault diagnosis, since it is efficient to combine evidence from different sensors. However, under the situation where the evidence highly conflicts, it may obtain a counterintuitive result. To address the issue, a new method is proposed in this paper. Not only the statistic sensor reliability, but also the dynamic sensor reliability are taken into consideration. The evidence distance function and the belief entropy are combined to obtain the dynamic reliability of each sensor report. A weighted averaging method is adopted to modify the conflict evidence by assigning different weights to evidence according to sensor reliability. The proposed method has better performance in conflict management and fault diagnosis due to the fact that the information volume of each sensor report is taken into consideration. An application in fault diagnosis based on sensor fusion is illustrated to show the efficiency of the proposed method. The results show that the proposed method improves the accuracy of fault diagnosis from 81.19% to 89.48% compared to the existing methods. PMID:26797611

  15. Modeling Sensor Reliability in Fault Diagnosis Based on Evidence Theory

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Kaijuan; Xiao, Fuyuan; Fei, Liguo; Kang, Bingyi; Deng, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Sensor data fusion plays an important role in fault diagnosis. Dempster–Shafer (D-R) evidence theory is widely used in fault diagnosis, since it is efficient to combine evidence from different sensors. However, under the situation where the evidence highly conflicts, it may obtain a counterintuitive result. To address the issue, a new method is proposed in this paper. Not only the statistic sensor reliability, but also the dynamic sensor reliability are taken into consideration. The evidence distance function and the belief entropy are combined to obtain the dynamic reliability of each sensor report. A weighted averaging method is adopted to modify the conflict evidence by assigning different weights to evidence according to sensor reliability. The proposed method has better performance in conflict management and fault diagnosis due to the fact that the information volume of each sensor report is taken into consideration. An application in fault diagnosis based on sensor fusion is illustrated to show the efficiency of the proposed method. The results show that the proposed method improves the accuracy of fault diagnosis from 81.19% to 89.48% compared to the existing methods. PMID:26797611

  16. An Evidence-Based Combining Classifier for Brain Signal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kheradpisheh, Saeed Reza; Nowzari-Dalini, Abbas; Ebrahimpour, Reza; Ganjtabesh, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, brain signals are employed in various scientific and practical fields such as Medical Science, Cognitive Science, Neuroscience, and Brain Computer Interfaces. Hence, the need for robust signal analysis methods with adequate accuracy and generalizability is inevitable. The brain signal analysis is faced with complex challenges including small sample size, high dimensionality and noisy signals. Moreover, because of the non-stationarity of brain signals and the impacts of mental states on brain function, the brain signals are associated with an inherent uncertainty. In this paper, an evidence-based combining classifiers method is proposed for brain signal analysis. This method exploits the power of combining classifiers for solving complex problems and the ability of evidence theory to model as well as to reduce the existing uncertainty. The proposed method models the uncertainty in the labels of training samples in each feature space by assigning soft and crisp labels to them. Then, some classifiers are employed to approximate the belief function corresponding to each feature space. By combining the evidence raised from each classifier through the evidence theory, more confident decisions about testing samples can be made. The obtained results by the proposed method compared to some other evidence-based and fixed rule combining methods on artificial and real datasets exhibit the ability of the proposed method in dealing with complex and uncertain classification problems. PMID:24392125

  17. An evidence-based combining classifier for brain signal analysis.

    PubMed

    Kheradpisheh, Saeed Reza; Nowzari-Dalini, Abbas; Ebrahimpour, Reza; Ganjtabesh, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, brain signals are employed in various scientific and practical fields such as Medical Science, Cognitive Science, Neuroscience, and Brain Computer Interfaces. Hence, the need for robust signal analysis methods with adequate accuracy and generalizability is inevitable. The brain signal analysis is faced with complex challenges including small sample size, high dimensionality and noisy signals. Moreover, because of the non-stationarity of brain signals and the impacts of mental states on brain function, the brain signals are associated with an inherent uncertainty. In this paper, an evidence-based combining classifiers method is proposed for brain signal analysis. This method exploits the power of combining classifiers for solving complex problems and the ability of evidence theory to model as well as to reduce the existing uncertainty. The proposed method models the uncertainty in the labels of training samples in each feature space by assigning soft and crisp labels to them. Then, some classifiers are employed to approximate the belief function corresponding to each feature space. By combining the evidence raised from each classifier through the evidence theory, more confident decisions about testing samples can be made. The obtained results by the proposed method compared to some other evidence-based and fixed rule combining methods on artificial and real datasets exhibit the ability of the proposed method in dealing with complex and uncertain classification problems. PMID:24392125

  18. An Evidence Base for Human Spaceflight Risks in Wikipedia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundrot, Craig; Steil, Jennifer; Lumpkins, Sarah; Pellis, Neal

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) is focused on understanding and mitigating thirty two risks to crew health and performance in exploration missions beyond low Earth orbit. The HRP has developed an evidence report for each of the risks. Most evidence reports are a brief review article describing the evidence related to a specified risk, written at a level appropriate for the scientifically educated, non-specialist reader. Each evidence report captured the current state of knowledge from both research and operations. Two limitations of the evidence reports have become apparent: 1) they are updated infrequently and 2) they do not take full advantage of the expertise available in other space agencies and in related fields of terrestrial research. Therefore, the HRP is experimenting with the use of Wikipedia articles as a repository for evidence. Wikipedia's accessibility to the international space flight community and researchers in related terrestrial fields creates the opportunity to generate a more timely and comprehensive evidence base. Initial Wikipedia articles were populated for seven risks using a subset of the information in the HRP-approved evidence reports: Fatigue and Sleep Loss, Treating An Ill or Injured Crew Member, Radiation Carcinogenesis, Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure, Renal Stone Formation, Team Cohesion, and Intervertebral Disc Damage. Since the initial articles were created, there have been additions to these Wikipedia articles, including content from sources outside the HRP, and editorial changes to the pages. We will report on the nature of the contributions made after the initial articles were created, the comprehensiveness of the resulting Wikipedia articles, and the effort required to maintain quality control of the content. The Wikipedia approach will also be compared to wiki efforts that exert more traditional editorial control of content prior to posting.

  19. Global health: the importance of evidence-based medicine.

    PubMed

    Birbeck, Gretchen L; Wiysonge, Charles S; Mills, Edward J; Frenk, Julio J; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Jha, Prabhat

    2013-01-01

    Global health is a varied field that comprises research, evaluation and policy that, by its definition, also occurs in disparate locations across the world. This forum article is introduced by our guest editor of the Medicine for Global Health article collection, Gretchen Birbeck. Here, experts based across different settings describe their personal experiences of global health, discussing how evidence-based medicine in resource-limited settings can be translated into improved health outcomes. PMID:24228722

  20. Global health: the importance of evidence-based medicine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Global health is a varied field that comprises research, evaluation and policy that, by its definition, also occurs in disparate locations across the world. This forum article is introduced by our guest editor of the Medicine for Global Health article collection, Gretchen Birbeck. Here, experts based across different settings describe their personal experiences of global health, discussing how evidence-based medicine in resource-limited settings can be translated into improved health outcomes. PMID:24228722

  1. Music therapy with disorders of consciousness: current evidence and emergent evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Magee, Wendy L; O'Kelly, Julian

    2015-03-01

    Patients with prolonged disorders of consciousness (PDOC) stemming from acquired brain injury present one of the most challenging clinical populations in neurological rehabilitation. Because of the complex clinical presentation of PDOC patients, treatment teams are confronted with many medicolegal, ethical, philosophical, moral, and religious issues in day-to-day care. Accurate diagnosis is of central concern, relying on creative approaches from skilled clinical professionals using combined behavioral and neurophysiological measures. This paper presents the latest evidence for using music as a diagnostic tool with PDOC, including recent developments in music therapy interventions and measurement. We outline standardized clinical protocols and behavioral measures to produce diagnostic outcomes and examine recent research illustrating a range of benefits of music-based methods at behavioral, cardiorespiratory, and cortical levels using video, electrocardiography, and electroencephalography methods. These latest developments are discussed in the context of evidence-based practice in rehabilitation with clinical populations. PMID:25773642

  2. Evidence-based clinical practice for the neurointerventionalist.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Joshua A; Turk, Aquilla S; Mocco, J; Fiorella, David J; Jayaraman, Mahesh V; Meyers, Phillip M; Yoo, Albert J; Manchikanti, Laxmaiah

    2015-03-01

    The field of neurointerventional (NI) surgery has developed in the context of technologic innovation. Many treatments readily provided in 2014 would have been hard to imagine as recently as 10 years ago. The reality of present day NI care is that, while providers, payors, policy makers and patients rely on evidence to guide NI decision-making, the available data are often less robust than participants might desire. In this paper we will explore the fundamentals of evidence-based clinical practice. PMID:24578482

  3. Developing evidence-based screening recommendations, with consideration for rheumatology.

    PubMed

    Calonge, Ned

    2014-11-01

    Screening for presymptomatic disease provides the potential for early intervention and improved outcomes. However, although this practice has potential benefits, it also has potential harms that must be considered. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) is a nonfederal panel of experts convened by the Agency for Health Research and Policy to systematically review the evidence for preventive services, including disease screening, and to create evidence-based recommendations for primary care practice in the United States. As rheumatologists contemplate the potential of screening for preclinical disease, understanding the process used by the USPSTF can help guide research efforts supporting such screening. PMID:25437292

  4. Improving Search for Evidence-based Practice using Information Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jin; Kan, Min-Yen; Procter, Paula M.; Zubaidah, Siti; Yip, Wai Kin; Li, Goh Mien

    2010-01-01

    The search for applicable and valid research evidence-based practice articles is not supported well in common EBP resources, as some crucial study data, such as patient details, study design and results, are not available or presented explicitly. We propose to extract these data from research articles using a two-step supervised soft classification method. Compared to manual annotation, our approach is less labor-intensive and more flexible, hence opening up the possibility of utilizing these data to facilitate the evidence selection process in information seeking support systems. PMID:21347116

  5. Evidence-based Medicine Search: a customizable federated search engine

    PubMed Central

    Bracke, Paul J.; Howse, David K.; Keim, Samuel M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper reports on the development of a tool by the Arizona Health Sciences Library (AHSL) for searching clinical evidence that can be customized for different user groups. Brief Description: The AHSL provides services to the University of Arizona's (UA's) health sciences programs and to the University Medical Center. Librarians at AHSL collaborated with UA College of Medicine faculty to create an innovative search engine, Evidence-based Medicine (EBM) Search, that provides users with a simple search interface to EBM resources and presents results organized according to an evidence pyramid. EBM Search was developed with a web-based configuration component that allows the tool to be customized for different specialties. Outcomes/Conclusion: Informal and anecdotal feedback from physicians indicates that EBM Search is a useful tool with potential in teaching evidence-based decision making. While formal evaluation is still being planned, a tool such as EBM Search, which can be configured for specific user populations, may help lower barriers to information resources in an academic health sciences center. PMID:18379665

  6. eEvidence: Information Seeking Support for Evidence-based Practice: An Implementation Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jin; Kan, Min-Yen; Procter, Paula M.; Zubaidah, Siti; Yip, Wai Kin; Li, Goh Mien

    2010-01-01

    We propose to collect freely available articles from the web to build an evidence-based practice resource collection with up-to-date coverage, and then apply automated classification and key information extraction on the collected articles to provide means for sounder relevance judgments. We implement these features into a dual-interface system that allows users to choose between an active or passive information seeking process depending on the amount of time available. PMID:21347115

  7. Evidence-Based Behavioral Interventions for Repetitive Behaviors in Autism

    PubMed Central

    McDonough, Stephen G.; Bodfish, James W.

    2013-01-01

    Restricted and repetitive behaviors (RRBs) are a core symptom of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). There has been an increased research emphasis on repetitive behaviors; however, this research primarily has focused on phenomenology and mechanisms. Thus, the knowledge base on interventions is lagging behind other areas of research. The literature suggests there are evidence-based practices to treat “lower order” RRBs in ASD (e.g., stereotypies); yet, there is a lack of a focused program of intervention research for “higher order” behaviors (e.g., insistence on sameness). This paper will (a) discuss barriers to intervention development for RRBs; (b) review evidence-based interventions to treat RRBs in ASD, with a focus on higher order behaviors; and (c) conclude with recommendations for practice and research. PMID:21584849

  8. Evidence-Based Practice: Promoting Evidence-Based Interventions in School Psychology. WCER Working Paper No. 2003-13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratochwill, Thomas R.; Shernoff, Elisa Steele

    2003-01-01

    The Evidence-Based Intervention (EBI) movement has gained tremendous momentum in the past few years with developments in psychology, medicine (e.g., psychiatry), education, and prevention science. The purpose of this paper is to present some of the issues relating to the adoption of EBIs in practice and, specifically, the multiple roles

  9. The Notion of Evidence in Evidence-Based Practice by the Nursing Philosophy Working Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romyn, Donna M.; Allen, Marion N.; Boschma, Geertje; Duncan, Susan M.; Edgecombe, Nancy; Jensen, Louise A.; Ross-Kerr, Janet C.; Marck, Patricia; Salsali, Mahvash; Tourangeau, Ann E.; Warnock, Fay

    2003-01-01

    Addresses these questions: To what end is evidence sought? What is the nature of evidence? What kinds of evidence are valued by the nursing profession? and What kinds of evidence should underlie clinical decision making? (Contains 28 references.) (SK)

  10. Evidence based medicine and extradigestive manifestations of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    De Koster, E; De Bruyne, I; Langlet, P; Deltenre, M

    2000-01-01

    A putative pathogenetic role has been ascribed to Helicobacter pylori in several extradigestive diseases, including vascular (atherosclerosis and ischaemic heart disease, primary Raynaud phenomenon, primary headache), autoimmune (Sjgren's syndrome, Henoch-Schnlein purpura, autoimmune thyroiditis, idiopathic arrythmias, Parkinson's disease, nonarterial anterior optic ischemic neuropathy), and skin diseases (chronic idiopathic urticaria, rosacea, alopecia areata), sideropenic anemia, growth retardation, late menarche, extragastric MALT lymphoma, diabetes mellitus, hepatic encephalopathy, sudden infant death syndrome, and anorexia of aging. We examine critically the strength of the evidence linking these diseases to Helicobacter pylori, using ischaemic heart disease as an example of epidemiological techniques, and skin diseases as an example of treatment studies. By the standards of evidence-based medicine, studies have been often of low quality. The best evidence usually is not indicative of a role for Helicobacter pylori in these diseases. PMID:11233523

  11. The Four Cornerstones of Evidence-Based Practice in Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilgun, Jane F.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to place evidence-based practice within its wider scholarly contexts and draw lessons from the experiences of other professions that are engaged in implementing it. The analysis is based primarily on evidence-based medicine, the parent discipline of evidence-based practice, but the author also draws on evidence-based

  12. Evidence-Based Programs. Technical Assistance Fact Sheets. Fact Sheet 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyler, Sandee J.; Bumbarger, Brian K.; Greenberg, Mark T.

    2005-01-01

    The term "evidence-based programs" is becoming quite common in prevention and human service work. However, many still struggle to recognize the importance of evidence-based programs and to understand what qualifies as "evidence-based." The language used may even seem to confound the issue further. The terms evidence-based, research-based,…

  13. Evidence-based volcanology: application to eruption crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspinall, W. P.; Woo, G.; Voight, B.; Baxter, P. J.

    2003-11-01

    The way in which strands of uncertain volcanological evidence can be used for decision-making, and the weight that should be given them, is a problem requiring formulation in terms of the logical principles of Evidence Science. The basic ideas are outlined using the explosion at Galeras volcano in Colombia in January 1993 as an example. Our retrospective analysis suggests that if a robust precautionary appraisal had been made of the circumstances in which distinctive tornillo signals were detected at Galeras, those events might have been construed as stronger precursory evidence for imminent explosive activity than were the indications for quiescence, given by the absence of other warning traits. However, whilst visits to the crater might have been recognised as involving elevated risk if this form of analysis had been applied to the situation in January 1993, a traditional scientific consideration of the available information was likely to have provided a neutral assessment of short-term risk levels. We use these inferences not to criticise interpretations or decisions made at the time, but to illustrate how a structured, evidence-based analysis procedure might have provided a different perspective to that derived from the conventional scientific standpoint. We advocate a formalism that may aid such decision-making in future: graphical Bayesian Belief Networks are introduced as a tool for performing the necessary numerical procedures. With this approach, Evidence Science concepts can be incorporated rationally, efficiently and reliably into decision support during volcanic crises.

  14. Meta-Analyses and Orthodontic Evidence-Based Clinical Practice in the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Moschos A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Aim of this systematic review was to assess the orthodontic related issues which currently provide the best evidence as documented by meta-analyses, by critically evaluating and discussing the methodology used in these studies. Material and Methods: Several electronic databases were searched and handsearching was also performed in order to identify the corresponding meta-analyses investigating orthodontic related subjects. In total, 197 studies were retrieved initially. After applying specific inclusion and exclusion criteria, 27 articles were identified as meta-analyses treating orthodontic-related subjects. Results: Many of these 27 papers presented sufficient quality and followed appropriate meta-analytic approaches to quantitatively synthesize data and presented adequately supported evidence. However, the methodology used in some of them presented weaknesses, limitations or deficiencies. Consequently, the topics in orthodontics which currently provide the best evidence, include some issues related to Class II or Class III treatment, treatment of transverse problems, external apical root resorption, dental anomalies, such as congenital missing teeth and tooth transposition, frequency of severe occlusal problems, nickel hypersensitivity, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, and computer-assisted learning in orthodontic education. Conclusions: Only a few orthodontic related issues have been so far investigated by means of MAs. In addition, for some of these issues investigated in the corresponding MAs no definite conclusions could be drawn, due to significant methodological deficiencies of these studies. According to this investigation, it can be concluded that at the begin of the 21st century there is evidence for only a few orthodontic related issues as documented by meta-analyses, and more well-conducted high quality research studies are needed to produce strong evidence in order to support evidence-based clinical practice in orthodontics. PMID:21673839

  15. Therapeutic management of anal eczema: an evidence-based review

    PubMed Central

    Havlickova, B; Weyandt, G H

    2014-01-01

    Aim To conduct a systematic review of treatments for anal eczema (AE). Methods We conducted a Medline search for clinical trial data for the treatment of perianal diseases including AE, including papers not published in the English language. We assessed the study reports using the system recommended by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine. No meta-analysis was attempted. Results The evidence base for topical treatments used to treat AE is very poor: there are very few studies and many of those that exist are of poor quality. The best evidence was found for medications that are yet to be licensed for AE. Among products with existing licences for the treatment of eczema, our assessment found some evidence to support the continued use of mild-to-moderate corticosteroids first line in most patients. Discussion Features of the perianal region, and the fact that it is almost always occluded, mean that not all medications recommended in the general treatment guidelines for eczema are appropriate for AE. However, there are no specific treatment guidelines for these patients. This may in part be because of the lack of high-quality evidence-based medicine in this therapy area. Many frequently prescribed medications were developed and licensed many years ago, in an era when clinical trial design was not expected to be as rigorous as it is today. Conclusion This review highlights the need to conduct more high-quality clinical trials in patients with AE in order that specific guidelines for the management of this difficult proctological condition can be prepared. PMID:24898365

  16. Evidence-based guideline update: Plasmapheresis in neurologic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cortese, I.; Chaudhry, V.; So, Y.T.; Cantor, F.; Cornblath, D.R.; Rae-Grant, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To reassess the role of plasmapheresis in the treatment of neurologic disorders. Methods: We evaluated the available evidence based on a structured literature review for relevant articles from 1995 through September 2009. In addition, due to revision of the definitions of classification of evidence since the publication of the previous American Academy of Neurology assessment in 1996, the evidence cited in that manuscript was reviewed and reclassified. Results and Recommendations: Plasmapheresis is established as effective and should be offered in severe acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP)/Guillain-Barr syndrome (GBS) and in the short-term management of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (Class I studies, Level A). Plasmapheresis is established as ineffective and should not be offered for chronic or secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) (Class I studies, Level A). Plasmapheresis is probably effective and should be considered for mild AIDP/GBS, as second-line treatment of steroid-resistant exacerbations in relapsing forms of MS, and for neuropathy associated with immunoglobulin A or immunoglobulin G gammopathy, based on at least one Class I or 2 Class II studies (Level B). Plasmapheresis is probably not effective and should not be considered for neuropathy associated with immunoglobulin M gammopathy, based on one Class I study (Level B). Plasmapheresis is possibly effective and may be considered for acute fulminant demyelinating CNS disease (Level C). There is insufficient evidence to support or refute the use of plasmapheresis for myasthenia gravis, pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcus infection, and Sydenham chorea (Class III evidence, Level U). PMID:21242498

  17. Paving the way for evidence-based medicine in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Zareen; Hashim, Jawad; Iqbal, Mobeen; Quadri, K Mujtaba

    2007-11-01

    Evidence-based Medicine (EBM) is the process of systematically reviewing, appraising and using clinical research findings to aid the delivery of optimal clinical care to patients. EBM has become popular due to: the need for valid information about diagnosis, prognosis, therapy and prevention during patient care; traditional sources such as textbooks and expert opinion being frequently out-of-date; and knowledge of current best evidence declining with time from graduation from medical college. EBM has become feasible for practicing clinicians due to: new strategies for appraising studies; availability of systematic reviews (summaries) of current best evidence; and information technology (computers with Internet access). In a resource-limited country such as Pakistan, an evidence-based approach can be cost-effective by reducing clinical practices that have no proven benefit. Commonly perceived obstacles to EBM include limited access to computers, the Internet and online resources. Reliable resources of EBM are available (such as The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews http://www.cochrane.org) although many of these require paid subscriptions. Another difficulty is the issue of applicability of data from other countries to patients in our setting with different socio-economic factors. Other barriers to EBM in developing countries include: inexperience in small-group learning, limited time to attend workshops, and the lack of role models for practicing EBM. We have also tried to address the common fallacies related to EBM in the hope of greater use of these skills by busy clinicians as well as academic researchers. PMID:18062522

  18. Evidence-based medicine: an overview of key concepts.

    PubMed

    Carter, Marissa J

    2010-04-01

    Since Sackett et al established the defining principles almost 20 years ago, the concept evidence-based medicine (EBM) has grown and is reflected in the current US healthcare reform debate. To determine the relevancy of EBM elements to wound care, a review of the literature was conducted using several electronic databases. English-language literature was searched for articles published between 1985 and 2009 with regard to EBM principles, study design, systematic reviews, meta-analysis, safety, and clinical practice guidelines to find insightful and balanced studies and commentary. Current literature shows general agreement on the hierarchy of clinical trial design and the value of systematic reviews and meta-analysis but a divergence of opinions about optimal EBM rating schemes remains. Randomized controlled trials will continue to be the gold standard of trial design to evaluate treatment efficacy, but they often are poorly executed. The value of comparative observational trials is frequently underrated and although systematic reviews and meta-analysis are valuable for summarizing the evidence, care needs to be taken to avoid pitfalls. Research also suggests that clinical practice guideline implementation studies are needed if their content is to be fully appreciated by practicing clinicians. Thus, while EBM has advanced considerably in the last 20 years, tradition-based care is still evident in wound care. The challenge is to ensure EBM continues to integrate individual clinical expertise with the best available external clinical evidence from high quality research. PMID:20424294

  19. Mixing Strong and Weak Targets Provides No Evidence against the Unequal-Variance Explanation of zRoc Slope: A Comment on Koen and Yonelinas (2010)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starns, Jeffrey J.; Rotello, Caren M.; Ratcliff, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Koen and Yonelinas (2010; K&Y) reported that mixing classes of targets that had short (weak) or long (strong) study times had no impact on zROC slope, contradicting the predictions of the encoding variability hypothesis. We show that they actually derived their predictions from a mixture unequal-variance signal detection (UVSD) model, which

  20. Management of REM sleep behavior disorder: An evidence based review

    PubMed Central

    Devnani, Preeti; Fernandes, Racheal

    2015-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is characterized by dream enactment behavior resulting from a loss of REM skeletal muscle atonia. The neurobiology of REM sleep and the characteristic features of REM atonia have an important basis for understanding the aggravating etiologies the proposed pharmacological interventions in its management. This review outlines the evidence for behavioral and therapeutic measures along with evidence-based guidelines for their implementation, impact on falls, and effect on polysomnography (PSG) while highlighting the non-motor, autonomic, and cognitive impact of this entity. PubMed databases were reviewed upto May 2013 in peer-reviewed scientific literature regarding the pathophysiology and management of RBD in adults. The literature was graded according to the Oxford centre of evidence-based Medicine Levels. An early intervention that helps prevent consequences such as falls and provides a base for intervention with neuroprotective mechanisms and allocates a unique platform that RBD portrays with its high risk of disease conversion with a sufficiently long latency. RBD provides a unique platform with its high risk of disease conversion with a sufficiently long latency, providing an opportunity for early intervention both to prevent consequences such as falls and provide a base for intervention with neuroprotective mechanisms. PMID:25745301

  1. Vacancy ion-exclusion/adsorption chromatography of aliphatic amines on a polymethacrylate-based weakly basic anion-exchange column.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masanobu; Helaleh, Murad I H; Xu, Qun; Hu, Wenzhi; Ikedo, Mikaru; Ding, Ming-Yu; Taoda, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kazuhiko

    2004-06-11

    Vacancy ion-exclusion/adsorption chromatography has been applied to investigate the separation behavior of five aliphatic amines (ethylamine, propylamine, butylamine, pentylamine and hexylamine) on a polymethacrylate-based weakly basic anion-exchange column (Tosoh TSKgel DEAE-5PW). This system is consisted of analytes as a mobile phase and water as an injected sample. In the vacancy ion-exclusion/adsorption chromatography, the elution order was as follows: ethylamine < propylamine < butylamine < pentylamine < hexylamine, depending on their hydrophobicity. The retention times of the amines were decreased with decreasing their concentrations in the mobile phase. The retention times and resolutions of the amines were increased by adding a basic compound (e.g., lithium hydroxide or heptylamine) and by increasing the pH of mobile phase (pH > 11). This was because the dissociations of amine samples in the mobile phase were suppressed and thus the hydrophobic adsorption effects were enhanced. The linearity of calibration graphs could be obtained from the peak areas of the amine samples injected to the 0.05, 0.5 and 5 mM of amine mobile phase at pH 11 by heptylamine. The detection limits of aliphatic amines as injected samples were around 1 microM for five aliphatic amines at three different amine mobile phases. From these results, the retention behaviors of aliphatic amines on vacancy ion-exclusion/adsorption chromatography were concluded to be governed by the hydrophobic adsorption effect. PMID:15250414

  2. pH-dependent drug-drug interactions for weak base drugs: potential implications for new drug development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Wu, F; Lee, S C; Zhao, H; Zhang, L

    2014-08-01

    Absorption of an orally administered drug with pH-dependent solubility may be altered when it is coadministered with a gastric acid-reducing agent (ARA). Assessing a drug's potential for pH-dependent drug-drug interactions (DDIs), considering study design elements for such DDI studies, and interpreting and communicating study results in the drug labeling to guide drug dosing are important for drug development. We collected pertinent information related to new molecular entities approved from January 2003 to May 2013 by the US Food and Drug Administration for which clinical DDI studies with ARAs were performed. On the basis of assessments of data on pH solubility and in vivo DDIs with ARAs, we proposed a conceptual framework for assessing the need for clinical pH-dependent DDI studies for weak base drugs (WBDs). Important study design considerations include selection of ARAs and timing of dosing of an ARA relative to the WBD in a DDI study. Labeling implications for drugs having DDIs with ARAs are also illustrated. PMID:24733008

  3. Detection of Weak Circumstellar Gas around the DAZ White Dwarf WD 1124-293: Evidence for the Accretion of Multiple Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debes, J. H.; Kilic, M.; Faedi, F.; Shkolnik, E. L.; Lopez-Morales, M.; Weinberger, A. J.; Slesnick, C.; West, R. G.

    2012-07-01

    Single metal-polluted white dwarfs with no dusty disks are believed to be actively accreting metals from a circumstellar disk of gas caused by the destruction of asteroids perturbed by planetary systems. We report, for the first time, the detection of circumstellar Ca II gas in absorption around the DAZ WD 1124-293, which lacks an infrared excess. We constrain the gas to >7 R WD and <32000 AU, and estimate it to be at ~54 R WD, well within WD 1124-293's tidal disruption radius. This detection is based on several epochs of spectroscopy around the Ca II H and K lines (? = 3968 , 3933 ) with the MIKE spectrograph on the Magellan/Clay Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. We confirm the circumstellar nature of the gas by observing nearby sightlines and finding no evidence for gas from the local interstellar medium. Through archival data we have measured the equivalent width of the two photospheric Ca lines over a period of 11 years. We see <5%-7% epoch-to-epoch variation in equivalent widths over this time period, and no evidence for long term trends. The presence of a circumstellar gas implies a near edge-on inclination to the system, thus we place limits to short period transiting planetary companions with R > R ? using the Wide Angle Search for Planets survey. The presence of gas in orbit around WD 1124-293 implies that most DAZs could harbor planetary systems. Since 25%-30% of white dwarfs show metal line absorption, the dynamical process for perturbing small bodies must be robust. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 meter Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  4. DETECTION OF WEAK CIRCUMSTELLAR GAS AROUND THE DAZ WHITE DWARF WD 1124-293: EVIDENCE FOR THE ACCRETION OF MULTIPLE ASTEROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Debes, J. H.; Kilic, M.; Faedi, F.; Shkolnik, E. L.; Lopez-Morales, M.; Weinberger, A. J.; Slesnick, C.; West, R. G.

    2012-07-20

    Single metal-polluted white dwarfs with no dusty disks are believed to be actively accreting metals from a circumstellar disk of gas caused by the destruction of asteroids perturbed by planetary systems. We report, for the first time, the detection of circumstellar Ca II gas in absorption around the DAZ WD 1124-293, which lacks an infrared excess. We constrain the gas to >7 R{sub WD} and <32000 AU, and estimate it to be at {approx}54 R{sub WD}, well within WD 1124-293's tidal disruption radius. This detection is based on several epochs of spectroscopy around the Ca II H and K lines ({lambda} = 3968 A, 3933 A) with the MIKE spectrograph on the Magellan/Clay Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. We confirm the circumstellar nature of the gas by observing nearby sightlines and finding no evidence for gas from the local interstellar medium. Through archival data we have measured the equivalent width of the two photospheric Ca lines over a period of 11 years. We see <5%-7% epoch-to-epoch variation in equivalent widths over this time period, and no evidence for long term trends. The presence of a circumstellar gas implies a near edge-on inclination to the system, thus we place limits to short period transiting planetary companions with R > R{sub Circled-Plus} using the Wide Angle Search for Planets survey. The presence of gas in orbit around WD 1124-293 implies that most DAZs could harbor planetary systems. Since 25%-30% of white dwarfs show metal line absorption, the dynamical process for perturbing small bodies must be robust.

  5. Evidence Base for Quality Control Activities in Cardiovascular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Eskandari, Mehdi; Kramer, Christopher M; Hecht, Harvey S; Jaber, Wael A; Marwick, Thomas H

    2016-03-01

    Quality control is pervasive in most modern business, but, surprisingly, is in its infancy in medicine in general-and cardiovascular imaging in particular. The increasing awareness of the cost of cardiovascular imaging, matched by a desire to show benefits from imaging to patient outcome, suggests that this deficiency should be reassessed. Demonstration of improved quality has been proposed to require a focus on several domains: laboratory organization, patient selection, image acquisition, image interpretation, and results communication. Improvement in these steps will require adoption of a variety of interventions, including laboratory accreditation, appropriate use criteria, and continuous quality control and enhancements in reporting, but the evidence base for the benefit of interventions on these steps has been sparse. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the current status and future goals of developing the evidence base for these processes in cardiovascular imaging. PMID:26965731

  6. Evidence-Based Staff Training: A Guide for Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Marsha B.; Rollyson, Jeannia H.; Reid, Dennis H.

    2012-01-01

    Behavior analysts in human service agencies are commonly expected to train support staff as one of their job duties. Traditional staff training is usually didactic in nature and generally has not proven particularly effective. We describe an alternative, evidence-based approach for training performance skills to human service staff. The description includes a specific means of conducting a behavioral skills training session with a group of staff followed by on-the-job training requirements. A brief case demonstration then illustrates application of the training approach and its apparent effectiveness for training staff in two distinct skill sets: use of most-to-least prompting within teaching procedures and use of manual signs. Practical issues associated with applying evidence-based behavioral training are presented with a focus on providing training that is effective, efficient, and acceptable to staff trainees. PMID:23730462

  7. Evidence-based Value of Prophylactic Drainage in Gastrointestinal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Petrowsky, Henrik; Demartines, Nicolas; Rousson, Valentin; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the evidence-based value of prophylactic drainage in gastrointestinal (GI) surgery. Methods: An electronic search of the Medline database from 1966 to 2004 was performed to identify articles comparing prophylactic drainage with no drainage in GI surgery. The studies were reviewed and classified according to their quality of evidence using the grading system proposed by the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine. Seventeen randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were found for hepato-pancreatico-biliary surgery, none for upper GI tract, and 13 for lower GI tract surgery. If sufficient RCTs were identified, we performed a meta-analysis to characterize the drain effect using the random-effects model. Results: There is evidence of level 1a that drains do not reduce complications after hepatic, colonic, or rectal resection with primary anastomosis and appendectomy for any stage of appendicitis. Drains were even harmful after hepatic resection in chronic liver disease and appendectomy. In the absence of RCTs, there is a consensus (evidence level 5) about the necessity of prophylactic drainage after esophageal resection and total gastrectomy due to the potential fatal outcome in case of anastomotic and gastric leakage. Conclusion: Many GI operations can be performed safely without prophylactic drainage. Drains should be omitted after hepatic, colonic, or rectal resection with primary anastomosis and appendectomy for any stage of appendicitis (recommendation grade A), whereas prophylactic drainage remains indicated after esophageal resection and total gastrectomy (recommendation grade D). For many other GI procedures, especially involving the upper GI tract, there is a further demand for well-designed RCTs to clarify the value of prophylactic drainage. PMID:15570212

  8. [Implementation of evidence based medicine in primary care].

    PubMed

    Rinnerberger, Andreas; Grafinger, Michaela; Melchardt, Thomas; Snnichsen, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    The particular situation of primary care - i.e. decentralized setting, comprehensive medical care, and limited access to continuous medical education - makes it difficult to implement evidence-based medicine into daily practice. Therefore, the Institute of General Practice of the Paracelsus University (PMU) in Salzburg and Actavis GmbH Austria developed "REM" (Rechercheservice evidenzbasierte Medizin). This is a web-based enquiry service offered mainly to GPs who can submit questions arising in daily practice which are answered by the service according to current best evidence. In 8.5 months 176 physicians registered to participate. A total of 31 submitted at least one question. In total, REM processed 134 questions. The number of physicians registered and the frequency of enquiries show that REM can facilitate the implementation of evidence-based medicine in primary care. Nonetheless, only a small proportion of the physicians registered actually made use of the service. Improvements are necessary to promote interest in this new way of continuous medical education. PMID:19412696

  9. Evidence-Based Care of Acute Wounds: A Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ubbink, Dirk T.; Brlmann, Fleur E.; Go, Peter M. N. Y. H.; Vermeulen, Hester

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Large variation and many controversies exist regarding the treatment of, and care for, acute wounds, especially regarding wound cleansing, pain relief, dressing choice, patient instructions, and organizational aspects. Recent Advances: A multidisciplinary team developed evidence-based guidelines for the Netherlands using the AGREE-II and GRADE instruments. A working group, consisting of 17 representatives from all professional societies involved in wound care, tackled five controversial issues in acute-wound care, as provided by any caregiver throughout the whole chain of care. Critical Issues: The guidelines contain 38 recommendations, based on best available evidence, additional expert considerations, and patient experiences. In summary, primarily closed wounds need no cleansing; acute open wounds are best cleansed with lukewarm (drinkable) water; apply the WHO pain ladder to choose analgesics against continuous wound pain; use lidocaine or prilocaine infiltration anesthesia for wound manipulations or closure; primarily closed wounds may not require coverage with a dressing; use simple dressings for open wounds; and give your patient clear instructions about how to handle the wound. Future Directions: These evidence-based guidelines on acute wound care may help achieve a more uniform policy to treat acute wounds in all settings and an improved effectiveness and quality of wound care. PMID:26005594

  10. Nonconvulsive seizures in patients presenting with altered mental status: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Zehtabchi, Shahriar; Abdel Baki, Samah G; Malhotra, Shweta; Grant, Arthur C

    2011-10-01

    Definitive diagnosis of nonconvulsive seizures (NCS) can be made only by electroencephalography, and delay in diagnosis can increase morbidity, resource utilization, and length of hospitalization. We performed an evidence-based literature review to estimate the prevalence of NCS in patients with altered mental status (AMS) of unknown cause. PUBMED, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and other resources were searched for studies that included AMS and seizure as topics. The resulting 276 articles were screened for predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria, leaving 5 studies enrolling 478 patients for review. The prevalence of NCS in patients with AMS ranged from 8 to 30% (overall prevalence of 21.5%, 95% CI: 18-25%), suggesting that the prevalence of NCS is sufficiently high to consider routine use of urgent electroencephalography in such patients. However, methodological weaknesses limit the generalizability of the results. A large, prospective study enrolling and screening for NCS in all patients who present with acute AMS is needed. PMID:21784709

  11. Neuropsychology 3.0: Evidence-Based Science and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bilder, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Neuropsychology is poised for transformations of its concepts and methods, leveraging advances in neuroimaging, the human genome project, psychometric theory, and information technologies. It is argued that a paradigm shift towards evidence-based science and practice can be enabled by innovations, including: (1) formal definition of neuropsychological concepts and tasks in cognitive ontologies; (2) creation of collaborative neuropsychological knowledgebases; and (3) design of web-based assessment methods that permit free development, large-sample implementation, and dynamic refinement of neuropsychological tests and the constructs these aim to assess. This article considers these opportunities, highlights selected obstacles, and offers suggestions for stepwise progress towards these goals. PMID:21092355

  12. An Implementation Strategy of Evidence-Based Application Lifecycle Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong Ah; Choi, Seungyong

    Application lifecycle management (ALM) facilitate and integrate facilitate and integrate requirements management, architecture, coding, testing, tracking, and release management. Process automation and seamless traceability among tools are getting important. In this paper, we suggest new approach to achieve the seamless traceability and process automation. For these features, knowledge formalization is critical. Evidence-based medicine is good reference architecture to ALM2. Software Engineering ontology is powerful solution to semantic gap between tools and guideline-based process execution environment can be practical solution to process automation.

  13. Hepatocellular carcinoma review: current treatment, and evidence-based medicine.

    PubMed

    Karaman, Bulent; Battal, Bilal; Sari, Sebahattin; Verim, Samet

    2014-12-21

    We read with great interest the recent article entitled "Hepatocellular carcinoma review: Current treatment, and evidence-based medicine" by Raza et al, published in World Journal of Gastroenterology. Authors evaluated treatments for early and advanced stage hepatocellular carcinoma based on an extensive review of the relevant literature. They reported that radiofrequency ablation is the most effective local ablative therapy. They concluded that RF ablation is equivalent to surgical resection in well selected patients with early stage hepatocellular carcinoma. In addition, we want to mention microwave ablation besides RF ablation. PMID:25548509

  14. An Evidence-Based Videotaped Running Biomechanics Analysis.

    PubMed

    Souza, Richard B

    2016-02-01

    Running biomechanics play an important role in the development of injuries. Performing a running biomechanics analysis on injured runners can help to develop treatment strategies. This article provides a framework for a systematic video-based running biomechanics analysis plan based on the current evidence on running injuries, using 2-dimensional (2D) video and readily available tools. Fourteen measurements are proposed in this analysis plan from lateral and posterior video. Identifying simple 2D surrogates for 3D biomechanic variables of interest allows for widespread translation of best practices, and have the best opportunity to impact the highly prevalent problem of the injured runner. PMID:26616185

  15. Integration of Evidence Base into a Probabilistic Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saile, Lyn; Lopez, Vilma; Bickham, Grandin; Kerstman, Eric; FreiredeCarvalho, Mary; Byrne, Vicky; Butler, Douglas; Myers, Jerry; Walton, Marlei

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A probabilistic decision support model such as the Integrated Medical Model (IMM) utilizes an immense amount of input data that necessitates a systematic, integrated approach for data collection, and management. As a result of this approach, IMM is able to forecasts medical events, resource utilization and crew health during space flight. METHODS: Inflight data is the most desirable input for the Integrated Medical Model. Non-attributable inflight data is collected from the Lifetime Surveillance for Astronaut Health study as well as the engineers, flight surgeons, and astronauts themselves. When inflight data is unavailable cohort studies, other models and Bayesian analyses are used, in addition to subject matters experts input on occasion. To determine the quality of evidence of a medical condition, the data source is categorized and assigned a level of evidence from 1-5; the highest level is one. The collected data reside and are managed in a relational SQL database with a web-based interface for data entry and review. The database is also capable of interfacing with outside applications which expands capabilities within the database itself. Via the public interface, customers can access a formatted Clinical Findings Form (CLiFF) that outlines the model input and evidence base for each medical condition. Changes to the database are tracked using a documented Configuration Management process. DISSCUSSION: This strategic approach provides a comprehensive data management plan for IMM. The IMM Database s structure and architecture has proven to support additional usages. As seen by the resources utilization across medical conditions analysis. In addition, the IMM Database s web-based interface provides a user-friendly format for customers to browse and download the clinical information for medical conditions. It is this type of functionality that will provide Exploratory Medicine Capabilities the evidence base for their medical condition list. CONCLUSION: The IMM Database in junction with the IMM is helping NASA aerospace program improve the health care and reduce risk for the astronauts crew. Both the database and model will continue to expand to meet customer needs through its multi-disciplinary evidence based approach to managing data. Future expansion could serve as a platform for a Space Medicine Wiki of medical conditions.

  16. Acute Stroke: Current Evidence-based Recommendations for Prehospital Care

    PubMed Central

    Glober, Nancy K.; Sporer, Karl A.; Guluma, Kama Z.; Serra, John P.; Barger, Joe A.; Brown, John F.; Gilbert, Gregory H.; Koenig, Kristi L.; Rudnick, Eric M.; Salvucci, Angelo A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In the United States, emergency medical services (EMS) protocols vary widely across jurisdictions. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of a patient with a suspected stroke and to compare these recommendations against the current protocols used by the 33 EMS agencies in the state of California. Methods We performed a literature review of the current evidence in the prehospital treatment of a patient with a suspected stroke and augmented this review with guidelines from various national and international societies to create our evidence-based recommendations. We then compared the stroke protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. The specific protocol components that we analyzed were the use of a stroke scale, blood glucose evaluation, use of supplemental oxygen, patient positioning, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and cardiac monitoring, fluid assessment and intravenous access, and stroke regionalization. Results Protocols across EMS agencies in California varied widely. Most used some sort of stroke scale with the majority using the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale (CPSS). All recommended the evaluation of blood glucose with the level for action ranging from 60 to 80mg/dL. Cardiac monitoring was recommended in 58% and 33% recommended an ECG. More than half required the direct transport to a primary stroke center and 88% recommended hospital notification. Conclusion Protocols for a patient with a suspected stroke vary widely across the state of California. The evidence-based recommendations that we present for the prehospital diagnosis and treatment of this condition may be useful for EMS medical directors tasked with creating and revising these protocols. PMID:26973735

  17. Cochrane Lecture 1997. What evidence do we need for evidence based medicine?

    PubMed Central

    Hart, J T

    1997-01-01

    As presently understood, evidence based medicine aims to advance practice from its traditional unverifiable mix of art and science to rational use of measurable inputs and outputs. In practice, however, its advocates accept uncritically a desocialised definition of science, assume that major clinical decisions are taken at the level of secondary specialist rather than primary generalist care, and ignore the multiple nature of most clinical problems, as well as the complexity of social problems within which clinical problems arise and have to be solved. These reductionist assumptions derive from the use of evidence based medicine as a tool for managed care in a transactional model for consultations. If these assumptions persist, they will strengthen reification of disease and promote the episodic output of process regardless of health outcome. We need to work within a different paradigm based on development of patients as co-producers rather than consumers, promoting continuing output of health gain through shared decisions using all relevant evidence, within a broader, socialised definition of science. Adoption of this model would require a major social and cultural shift for health professionals. This shift has already begun, promoted by changes in public attitudes to professional authority, changes in the relation of professionals to managers, and pressures for improved effectiveness and efficiency which, contrary to received wisdom, seem more likely to endorse cooperative than transactional clinical production. Progress on these lines is resisted by rapidly growing and extremely powerful economic and political interests. Health professionals and strategists have yet to recognise and admit the existence of this choice. PMID:9519124

  18. Clinical Evidence: a useful tool for promoting evidence-based practice?

    PubMed Central

    Formoso, Giulio; Moja, Lorenzo; Nonino, Francesco; Dri, Pietro; Addis, Antonio; Martini, Nello; Liberati, Alessandro

    2003-01-01

    Background Research has shown that many healthcare professionals have problems with guidelines as they would prefer to be given all relevent information relevent to decision-making rather than being told what they should do. This study assesses doctors' judgement of the validity, relevance, clarity and usability of the Italian translation of Clinical Evidence (CE) after its free distribution launched by the Italian Ministry of Health Methods Opinions elicited using a standardised questionnaire delivered either by mail or during educational or professional meetings Results Twenty percent (n = 1350) doctors participated the study. Most of them found CE's content valid, useful and relevant for their clinical practice, and said CE can foster communications among clinicians, particularly among GPs and specialists. Hospital doctors (63%) more often than GPs (48%) read the detailed presentation of individual chapters. Twenty-nine percent said CE brought changes in their clinical practice. Doctors appreciated CE's nature of an evidence-based information compendium and would have not preferred a collection of practice guidelines. Conclusions Overall, the pilot initiative launched by the Italian Ministry of Health seems to have been well received and to support the subsequent decision to make the Italian edition of Clinical Evidence concise available to all doctors practising in the country. Local implementation initiatives should be warranted to favour doctor's use of CE. PMID:14693035

  19. Evidence-based Kernels: Fundamental Units of Behavioral Influence

    PubMed Central

    Biglan, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes evidence-based kernels, fundamental units of behavioral influence that appear to underlie effective prevention and treatment for children, adults, and families. A kernel is a behavior–influence procedure shown through experimental analysis to affect a specific behavior and that is indivisible in the sense that removing any of its components would render it inert. Existing evidence shows that a variety of kernels can influence behavior in context, and some evidence suggests that frequent use or sufficient use of some kernels may produce longer lasting behavioral shifts. The analysis of kernels could contribute to an empirically based theory of behavioral influence, augment existing prevention or treatment efforts, facilitate the dissemination of effective prevention and treatment practices, clarify the active ingredients in existing interventions, and contribute to efficiently developing interventions that are more effective. Kernels involve one or more of the following mechanisms of behavior influence: reinforcement, altering antecedents, changing verbal relational responding, or changing physiological states directly. The paper describes 52 of these kernels, and details practical, theoretical, and research implications, including calling for a national database of kernels that influence human behavior. PMID:18712600

  20. Information systems: the key to evidence-based health practice.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    Increasing prominence is being given to the use of best current evidence in clinical practice and health services and programme management decision-making. The role of information in evidence-based practice (EBP) is discussed, together with questions of how advanced information systems and technology (IS&T) can contribute to the establishment of a broader perspective for EBP. The author examines the development, validation and use of a variety of sources of evidence and knowledge that go beyond the well-established paradigm of research, clinical trials, and systematic literature review. Opportunities and challenges in the implementation and use of IS&T and knowledge management tools are examined for six application areas: reference databases, contextual data, clinical data repositories, administrative data repositories, decision support software, and Internet-based interactive health information and communication. Computerized and telecommunications applications that support EBP follow a hierarchy in which systems, tasks and complexity range from reference retrieval and the processing of relatively routine transactions, to complex "data mining" and rule-driven decision support systems. PMID:11143195

  1. Evidence-based reform of teaching and learning.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Melanie M

    2014-01-01

    Over the years a great deal of time and attention has been devoted to reform of teaching and learning in chemistry. However, many of these efforts have focused on individual faculty's experiences and intuition, rather than our understanding of how people learn or evidence about the effects of such reforms. For example, while it is widely known that students emerge from our courses with non-scientific ideas about core concepts, the reasons why this happens are often ascribed to the students' lack of ability or work ethic. However, there is emerging evidence that both the traditional pedagogical approach and the structure of the curriculum contribute to this problem. Students must be provided both with a strong foundation on which to build and link new knowledge, and an understanding of what that knowledge will be used for. In order to achieve this we need to rely on the research base and evidence emerging from discipline-based education research (DBER)-a field that combines deep disciplinary expertise with knowledge and understanding of the science of teaching and learning. This paper presents a short overview of these ideas. PMID:24220758

  2. The Care and Feeding of Evidence Based Medicine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Wide interest in evidence based medicine (EBM) and its value in patient care, insurance payment decisions, and public health planning has triggered intense medical journal and media coverage that merits review, explanation, and comment. Published EBM data vary in quality for reasons that have been the subject of many perceptive literature reviews. Study design can be faulted, and conflicts of interest, personal and economic, can potentially bias study results and their publication. Practical guides for data evaluation are presented here, with discussion of technical and sociological issues that affect information quality and its clinical application. Clinical practice often appears to resist good evidence in making clinical choices. Personal views of some practicing physicians about EBM are presented that underlie the occasional difficulties in applying valid research information in patient care. Improvements in study design and publication standards may enhance the clinical application of evidence-based information. EBM guided practice holds promise to improve outcomes and expense, to standardize and streamline process in ways that make for much safer patient care. PMID:22532934

  3. Telemedicine framework using case-based reasoning with evidences.

    PubMed

    Sene, A; Kamsu-Foguem, B; Rumeau, P

    2015-08-01

    Telemedicine is the medical practice of information exchanged from one location to another through electronic communications to improve the delivery of health care services. This research article describes a telemedicine framework with knowledge engineering using taxonomic reasoning of ontology modeling and semantic similarity. In addition to being a precious support in the procedure of medical decision-making, this framework can be used to strengthen significant collaborations and traceability that are important for the development of official deployment of telemedicine applications. Adequate mechanisms for information management with traceability of the reasoning process are also essential in the fields of epidemiology and public health. In this paper we enrich the case-based reasoning process by taking into account former evidence-based knowledge. We use the regular four steps approach and implement an additional (iii) step: (i) establish diagnosis, (ii) retrieve treatment, (iii) apply evidence, (iv) adaptation, (v) retain. Each step is performed using tools from knowledge engineering and information processing (natural language processing, ontology, indexation, algorithm, etc.). The case representation is done by the taxonomy component of a medical ontology model. The proposed approach is illustrated with an example from the oncology domain. Medical ontology allows a good and efficient modeling of the patient and his treatment. We are pointing up the role of evidences and specialist's opinions in effectiveness and safety of care. PMID:26001421

  4. Evidence Based Conservative Management of Patello-femoral Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E. Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is defined as pain surrounding the patella when sitting with bent knees for prolonged periods of time or when performing activities like ascending or descending stairs, squatting or athletic activities. Patella dislocation is not included in PFPS. This review analyzes the evidence based conservative management of PFPS. A Cochrane Library search related to PFPS was performed until 18 January 2014. The key words were: patellofemoral pain syndrome. Eight papers were found, of which three were reviewed because they were focused on the topic of the article. We also searched the PubMed using the following keywords: evidence based conservative management of patellofemoral pain syndrome. Twelve articles were found, of which seven were reviewed because they were focused on the topic of the article. Overall ten articles were analyzed. Different treatments can be tried for PFPS, including pharmacotherapy, therapeutic ultrasound, exercise therapy, and taping and braces. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce pain in the short term, but pain does not improve after three months. Therapeutic ultrasound appears not to have a clinically important effect on pain relief for patients with PFPS. The evidence that exercise therapy is more effective in treating PFPS than no exercise is limited with respect to pain reduction, and conflicting with respect to functional improvement. No significant difference has been found between taping and non-taping. The role of knee braces is still controversial. More well-designed studies are needed. PMID:25207305

  5. Detection of planets in extremely weak central perturbation microlensing events via next-generation ground-based surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sun-Ju; Lee, Chung-Uk; Koo, Jae-Rim E-mail: leecu@kasi.re.kr

    2014-04-20

    Even though the recently discovered high-magnification event MOA-2010-BLG-311 had complete coverage over its peak, confident planet detection did not happen due to extremely weak central perturbations (EWCPs, fractional deviations of ≲ 2%). For confident detection of planets in EWCP events, it is necessary to have both high cadence monitoring and high photometric accuracy better than those of current follow-up observation systems. The next-generation ground-based observation project, Korea Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet), satisfies these conditions. We estimate the probability of occurrence of EWCP events with fractional deviations of ≤2% in high-magnification events and the efficiency of detecting planets in the EWCP events using the KMTNet. From this study, we find that the EWCP events occur with a frequency of >50% in the case of ≲ 100 M {sub E} planets with separations of 0.2 AU ≲ d ≲ 20 AU. We find that for main-sequence and sub-giant source stars, ≳ 1 M {sub E} planets in EWCP events with deviations ≤2% can be detected with frequency >50% in a certain range that changes with the planet mass. However, it is difficult to detect planets in EWCP events of bright stars like giant stars because it is easy for KMTNet to be saturated around the peak of the events because of its constant exposure time. EWCP events are caused by close, intermediate, and wide planetary systems with low-mass planets and close and wide planetary systems with massive planets. Therefore, we expect that a much greater variety of planetary systems than those already detected, which are mostly intermediate planetary systems, regardless of the planet mass, will be significantly detected in the near future.

  6. A method to solve the forward problem in magnetic induction tomography based on the weakly coupled field approximation.

    PubMed

    Dekdouk, Bachir; Yin, Wuliang; Ktistis, Christos; Armitage, David W; Peyton, Anthony J

    2010-04-01

    Magnetic induction tomography (MIT) is a noninvasive modality for imaging the complex conductivity (kappa = sigma + jomegaepsilon) or the magnetic permeability (mu) of a target under investigation. Because MIT employs noncontact coils for excitation and detection, MIT may be suitable for imaging biological tissues. In medical applications where high resolutions are sought, image reconstruction is a time and memory consuming task because the associated inverse problem is nonlinear and ill-posed. The time and memory constraints are mainly imposed by the solution of the forward problem within the iterative image reconstruction procedure. This paper investigates the application of a weakly coupled approximation to the solution of the forward problem and examines the accuracy against the computation time and memory gained in adopting this approximation. Initially, an analytical solution for mutual impedance change of a coil pair due to a large planar conductive object is presented based on a full wave theory and used to demonstrate a 10 MHz frequency excitation as an acceptable upper frequency limit under which the approximation is valid. Subsequently, a numerical impedance method adopting the approximation is presented. Here the impedance method is used to solve the forward problem, which employs electrical circuit analogues to mesh the target into a network that can be solved using circuit analysis and sparse matrix technique. The error due to the approximation is further estimated numerically with the impedance method against a commercial finite-element package (commercial FE solver, COMSOL) and results show at 10 MHz excitation a 0.4% of tolerance is achieved for conductivities in the range <0.5 S/m. The results also show the method can be applied for low conductivity medical applications and is computationally efficient compared to equivalent finite-element methods. PMID:19932988

  7. Evaluating the effect of stellar multiplicity on the point spread function of space-based weak lensing surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntzer, T.; Courbin, F.; Meylan, G.

    2016-02-01

    The next generation of space-based telescopes used for weak lensing surveys will require exquisite point spread function (PSF) determination. Previously negligible effects may become important in the reconstruction of the PSF, in part because of the improved spatial resolution. In this paper, we show that unresolved multiple star systems can affect the ellipticity and size of the PSF and that this effect is not cancelled even when using many stars in the reconstruction process. We estimate the error in the reconstruction of the PSF due to the binaries in the star sample both analytically and with image simulations for different PSFs and stellar populations. The simulations support our analytical finding that the error on the size of the PSF is a function of the multiple stars distribution and of the intrinsic value of the size of the PSF, i.e. if all stars were single. Similarly, the modification of each of the complex ellipticity components (e1,e2) depends on the distribution of multiple stars and on the intrinsic complex ellipticity. Using image simulations, we also show that the predicted error in the PSF shape is a theoretical limit that can be reached only if large number of stars (up to thousands) are used together to build the PSF at any desired spatial position. For a lower number of stars, the PSF reconstruction is worse. Finally, we compute the effect of binarity for different stellar magnitudes and show that bright stars alter the PSF size and ellipticity more than faint stars. This may affect the design of PSF calibration strategies and the choice of the related calibration fields.

  8. Strategies for advancing evidence-based practice in clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Fineout-Overholt, Ellen; Levin, Rona F; Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a problem-solving approach that incorporates the best available scientific evidence, clinicians' expertise, and patients' preferences and values. Melnyk and Fineout-Overholt have developed the ARCC (Advancing Research and Clinical practice through close Collaboration) model for the purpose of implementing EBP. A pilot study was conducted to test the ARCC model at two acute-care sites. This article shares information learned from the pilot study about what is necessary for successful implementation of EBP in the acute-care setting. These essentials include identifying EBP champions, redefining nurses' roles to include EBP activities, allocating time and money to the EBP process, and creating an organizational culture that fosters EBP. In addition, practical strategies for implementing EBP are presented to encourage implementation of EBP. PMID:15884483

  9. Knowledge Sources for Evidence-Based Practice in Rheumatology Nursing.

    PubMed

    Neher, Margit; Sthl, Christian; Ellstrm, Per-Erik; Nilsen, Per

    2015-12-01

    As rheumatology nursing develops and extends, knowledge about current use of knowledge in rheumatology nursing practice may guide discussions about future knowledge needs. To explore what perceptions rheumatology nurses have about their knowledge sources and about what knowledge they use in their practice, 12 nurses working in specialist rheumatology were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. The data were analyzed using conventional qualitative content analysis. The analysis yielded four types of knowledge sources in clinical practice: interaction with others in the workplace, contacts outside the workplace, written materials, and previous knowledge and experience. Colleagues, and physicians in particular, were important for informal learning in daily rheumatology practice. Evidence from the medical arena was accessed through medical specialists, while nursing research was used less. Facilitating informal learning and continuing formal education is proposed as a way toward a more evidence-based practice in extended roles. PMID:25059719

  10. Ethical deliberation: a foundation for evidence-based practice.

    PubMed

    Chabon, Shelly; Morris, John; Lemoncello, Rik

    2011-11-01

    Infusing evidence-based practice (EBP) into the clinical setting implies that professionals use evidence that is relevant and credible, maintain their pursuit of best current knowledge, respect their clients' preferences and values, and keep these clients and their families appropriately informed about their treatment options. Thus, rational and judicious EBP must be guided by speech-language pathologists' or audiologists' ethical principles of beneficence, non-maleficence, justice, and autonomy. In this article, we will affirm the centrality of ethical reasoning in EBP by describing what it means to be a professional as reflected in our Code of Ethics, reviewing the principles of ethics that underlie clinical decision making, and demonstrating how an ethical framework can and should provide the context in which EBP is conducted. PMID:22144080

  11. [Evidence-based therapy of polycystic ovarian syndrome].

    PubMed

    Gődény, Sándor; Csenteri, Orsolya Karola

    2015-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is recognized as the most common hormonal and metabolic disorder likely to affect women. The heterogeneous endocrinopathy is characterized by clinical and/or biochemical hyperandrogenism, oligo- or amenorrhoea, anovulatory infertility, and polycystic ovarian morphology. The syndrome is often associated with obesity, hyperinsulinemia and adversely affects endocrine, metabolic, and cardiovascular health. The symptoms and complaint of the patients vary with age. To maximise health gain of the syndrome, adequate, evidence based effective, efficient and safe treatment is necessary. This article summarises the highest available evidence provided by studies, meta-analysis and systematic reviews about the therapeutical possibilities for treating obesity, hyperandrogenism, menstrual abnormalities, infertility and psychological problems related to polycystic ovary syndrome. PMID:26551444

  12. Strengthening the evidence base for health programming in humanitarian crises.

    PubMed

    Ager, A; Burnham, G; Checchi, F; Gayer, M; Grais, R F; Henkens, M; Massaquoi, M B F; Nandy, R; Navarro-Colorado, C; Spiegel, P

    2014-09-12

    Given the growing scale and complexity of responses to humanitarian crises, it is important to develop a stronger evidence base for health interventions in such contexts. Humanitarian crises present unique challenges to rigorous and effective research, but there are substantial opportunities for scientific advance. Studies need to focus where the translation of evidence from noncrisis scenarios is not viable and on ethical ways of determining what happens in the absence of an intervention. Robust methodologies suited to crisis settings have to be developed and used to assess interventions with potential for delivery at scale. Strengthening research capacity in the low- to middle-income countries that are vulnerable to crises is also crucial. PMID:25214616

  13. A new application of high-efficient silver salts-based photocatalyst under natural indoor weak light for wastewater cleaning.

    PubMed

    Hua, Xia; Teng, Fei; Zhao, Yunxuan; Xu, Juan; Xu, Chuangye; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Qiqi; Paul, Shashi; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Mindong; Zhao, Xudong

    2015-09-15

    As a high-quantum-efficiency photocatalyst, the serious photo-corrosion of silver phosphate (Ag3PO4), limits the practical applications in water purification and challenges us. Herein, Ag3PO4 is found to have a high stability under natural indoor weak light irradiation, suggesting that we can employ it by adopting a new application strategy. In our studies, rhodamine B (RhB, cationic dye), methyl orange (MO, anionic dye) and RhB-MO mixture aqueous solutions are used as the probing reaction for the degradation of organic wastewater. It is found that RhB, MO and RhB-MO can be completely degraded after 28h under natural indoor weak light irradiation, indicating that multi-component organic contaminants can be efficiently degraded by Ag3PO4 under natural indoor weak light irradiation. The density of natural indoor weak light is measured to be 72cd, which is merely one-thousandth of 300W xenon lamp (68.2נ10(3)cd). Most importantly, Ag3PO4 shows a high stability under natural indoor weak light irradiation, demonstrated by the formation of fairly rare Ag. Furthermore, we also investigate the influence of inorganic ions on organic dyes degradation. It shows that the Cl(-) and Cr(6+) ions with high concentrations in wastewater have significantly decreased the degradation rate. From the viewpoint of energy saving and stability, this study shows us that we can utilize the Ag-containing photocatalysts under natural indoor weak light, which could be extended to indoor air cleaning process. PMID:26107659

  14. Efficiencies and Optimization of Weak Base Anion Ion-Exchange Resin for Groundwater Hexavalent Chromium Removal at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Nesham, Dean O.; Ivarson, Kristine A.; Hanson, James P.; Miller, Charles W.; Meyers, P.; Jaschke, Naomi M.

    2014-02-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) contractor, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, has successfully converted a series of groundwater treatment facilities to use a new treatment resin that is delivering more than $3 million in annual cost savings and efficiency in treating groundwater contamination at the DOE Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. During the production era, the nuclear reactors at the Hanford Site required a continuous supply of high-quality cooling water during operations. Cooling water consumption ranged from about 151,417 to 378,541 L/min (40,000 to 100,000 gal/min) per reactor, depending on specific operating conditions. Water from the Columbia River was filtered and treated chemically prior to use as cooling water, including the addition of sodium dichromate as a corrosion inhibitor. Hexavalent chromium was the primary component of the sodium dichromate and was introduced into the groundwater at the Hanford Site as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from the reactors starting in 1944. Groundwater contamination by hexavalent chromium and other contaminants related to nuclear reactor operations resulted in the need for groundwater remedial actions within the Hanford Site reactor areas. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated, leading to the use of pump-and-treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex™ 21K, a regenerable, strong-base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which was performed offsite. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion for the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. As a result, CH2M HILL performed testing at the Hanford Site in 2009 and 2010 to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at different waste sites. The testing demonstrated that a weak-base anion, single-use resin, specifically ResinTech SIR-700 ®, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher capacity, could be disposed of efficiently onsite, and would eliminate the complexities and programmatic risks from sampling, packaging, transportation, and return of resin for regeneration.

  15. Identifying Educational Practices Supported by Rigorous Evidence: A Guide to the Selection of Evidence-Based Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regional Resource Center Program, 2014

    2014-01-01

    One component of the recently required State Systemic Improvement Plan (SSIP) for State Departments of Education calls for the selection and implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs). This report provides six steps to guide the process of selecting evidence based practices (EBP): (1) Begin with the End in Mind--Determine Targeted Outcomes;…

  16. [Alternative medicines and "Evidence-Based Medicine" a possible reconciliation?].

    PubMed

    Vanherweghem, J-L

    2015-09-01

    The contrast between the efficiency of Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM), a scientific fact, and the popularity of Complementary and Alternative Medicines (CAM) is a paradox of the art of healing. EBM is based on the paradigm of positivism and materialism while CAM are based on those of relativism and vitalism. These paradigms are diametrically opposed and the aim of an integrative medicine is aporetic. However, EBM is today in a dead end. The objective proof of a disease according to the rules of EBM is often lacking face to the expectations of patients demanding their illness to be taken into account. EBM and CAM have thus to coexist. Lessons can be drawn from CAM : patient expectations should be given a meaning and be integrated in his or her psychosocial context. PMID:26591330

  17. [Evidence-based health promotion and prevention in settings: which types of study designs are needed?].

    PubMed

    Gerhardus, Ansgar; Rehfuess, Eva; Zeeb, Hajo

    2015-01-01

    Health promotion and health prevention are cornerstones of public health. In Germany, a draft health prevention law was rejected in 2013, partly because it almost exclusively focused on measures at the individual level. Many health promotion and prevention measures, by contrast, (also) address the societal level and the environment, but there are few robust studies on their effectiveness, not least because of a lack of resources, the complexity of the measures, or randomisation problems. For example, regulations that protect non-smokers from smoke are subject to political processes where the majority of decision-makers would decline consent for randomisation. In a workshop at the 15(th) Annual Meeting of the German Network for Evidence-based Medicine (DNEbM) two case studies on controlled before-and-after studies (CBA) and interrupted time series (ITS) were developed by the audience as possible alternatives to randomised controlled trials for the evaluation of health promotion and health prevention programmes. The suggestions made by the audience were compared to the study designs chosen in published studies, and the strengths and weaknesses of the different study designs were discussed. The wide array of suggestions for effectiveness studies illustrated the potential of evidence-based health promotion and prevention, but also the specific challenges to be faced. PMID:25839364

  18. Outcome (competency) based education: an exploration of its origins, theoretical basis, and empirical evidence.

    PubMed

    Morcke, Anne Mette; Dornan, Tim; Eika, Berit

    2013-10-01

    Outcome based or competency based education (OBE) is so firmly established in undergraduate medical education that it might not seem necessary to ask why it was included in recommendations for the future, like the Flexner centenary report. Uncritical acceptance may not, however, deliver its greatest benefits. Our aim was to explore the underpinnings of OBE: its historical origins, theoretical basis, and empirical evidence of its effects in order to answer the question: How can predetermined learning outcomes influence undergraduate medical education? This literature review had three components: A review of historical landmarks in the evolution of OBE; a review of conceptual frameworks and theories; and a systematic review of empirical publications from 1999 to 2010 that reported data concerning the effects of learning outcomes on undergraduate medical education. OBE had its origins in behaviourist theories of learning. It is tightly linked to the assessment and regulation of proficiency, but less clearly linked to teaching and learning activities. Over time, there have been cycles of advocacy for, then criticism of, OBE. A recurring critique concerns the place of complex personal and professional attributes as "competencies". OBE has been adopted by consensus in the face of weak empirical evidence. OBE, which has been advocated for over 50years, can contribute usefully to defining requisite knowledge and skills, and blueprinting assessments. Its applicability to more complex aspects of clinical performance is not clear. OBE, we conclude, provides a valuable approach to some, but not all, important aspects of undergraduate medical education. PMID:22987194

  19. Perspectives--A Problem in Our Field: Making Distinctions between Evidence-Based Treatment and Evidence-Based Practice as a Decision-Making Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandt, Kristie; Diel, James; Feder, Joshua; Lillas, Connie

    2012-01-01

    The authors contend that the term "evidence-based treatment" (EBT) is often used synonymously with the term "evidence-based practice" (EBP) without making an important distinction. If a practitioner is applying an EBT, it should not be assumed that one is "practicing" the evidence. Within the infant-family and early childhood field, this confusion

  20. A Conditional Model of Evidence-Based Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Falzer, Paul R.; Garman, D. Melissa

    2009-01-01

    Rationale Efforts to describe how individual treatment decisions are informed by systematic knowledge have been hindered by a standard that gauges the quality of clinical decisions by their adherence to guidelines and evidence-based practices. This paper tests a new contextual standard that gauges the incorporation of knowledge into practice and develops a model of evidence-based decision making. Aims and objectives Previous work found that the forecasted outcome of a treatment guideline exerts a highly significant influence on how it is used in making decisions. This study proposed that forecasted outcomes affect the recognition of a treatment scenario, and this recognition triggers distinct contextual decision strategies. Method N=21 volunteers from a psychiatric residency program responded to 64 case vignettes, 16 in each of four treatment scenarios. The vignettes represented a fully balanced within-subjects design that included guideline switching criteria and patient-specific factors. For each vignette, participants indicated whether they endorsed the guideline’s recommendation. Results Clinicians employed consistent contextual decision strategies in responding to clearly positive or negative forecasts. When forecasts were more ambiguous or risky, their strategies became complex and relatively inconsistent. Conclusion The results support a three step model of evidence-based decision making, in which clinicians recognize a decision scenario, apply a simple contextual strategy, then if necessary engage a more complex strategy to resolve discrepancies between general guidelines and specific cases. The paper concludes by noting study limitations and discussing implications of the model for future research in clinical and shared decision making, training, and guideline development. PMID:20367718

  1. Evidence-based ergonomics: a model and conceptual structure proposal.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Dierci Marcio

    2012-01-01

    In Human Factors and Ergonomics Science (HFES), it is difficult to identify what is the best approach to tackle the workplace and systems design problems which needs to be solved, and it has been also advocated as transdisciplinary and multidisciplinary the issue of "How to solve the human factors and ergonomics problems that are identified?". The proposition on this study is to combine the theoretical approach for Sustainability Science, the Taxonomy of the Human Factors and Ergonomics (HFE) discipline and the framework for Evidence-Based Medicine in an attempt to be applied in Human Factors and Ergonomics. Applications of ontologies are known in the field of medical research and computer science. By scrutinizing the key requirements for the HFES structuring of knowledge, it was designed a reference model, First, it was identified the important requirements for HFES Concept structuring, as regarded by Meister. Second, it was developed an evidence-based ergonomics framework as a reference model composed of six levels based on these requirements. Third, it was devised a mapping tool using linguistic resources to translate human work, systems environment and the complexities inherent to their hierarchical relationships to support future development at Level 2 of the reference model and for meeting the two major challenges for HFES, namely, identifying what problems should be addressed in HFE as an Autonomous Science itself and proposing solutions by integrating concepts and methods applied in HFES for those problems. PMID:22316771

  2. Problem-Based Learning for Engineering Students: An Evidence-Based Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Cynthia; Knight, Lorrie

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes two studies, one a pilot and the second, an enhanced study, that compare problem-based learning and lecture-based learning in library instruction for first-year engineering students. Two distinct assessment strategies were used to provide empirical evidence that supports the use of problem-based learning as an effective

  3. Evidence-based practice: how nurse leaders can facilitate innovation.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2006-01-01

    Evidence-based nursing practice (EBNP) is the wave of the future. Increasingly, EBNP is being identified as a key to quality and excellence in nursing services. Incorporating evidence into practice is necessary to deliver scientifically sound patient care. In addition, understanding the importance of evidence is crucial for meeting the excellence requirements of Magnet designation. Despite the growing popularity of EBNP and its documented significant benefits, the literature demonstrates that only 15% of the nursing workforce consistently practices within an EBNP framework. If EBNP adoption is to increase in the profession, it will require the active efforts of nurse leaders to pursue an aggressive innovation diffusion strategy. The purpose of this article is to discuss the nurse leader's role in facilitating EBNP in nursing using a theoretical framework grounded in innovation diffusion theory. The article develops 4 areas of focus. First, the components of innovation diffusion theory are discussed. Second, a pertinent empirical review of the EBNP adoption literature is presented. Third, strategies for applying innovation diffusion theory to facilitate EBNP adoption are proposed. Lastly, the article ends with a leadership call to action. PMID:16878011

  4. Creating a nursing strategic planning framework based on evidence.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Lorie K; Fischer, Brenda

    2011-03-01

    This article describes an evidence-informed strategic planning process and framework used by a Magnet-recognized public health system in California. This article includes (1) an overview of the organization and its strategic planning process, (2) the structure created within nursing for collaborative strategic planning and decision making, (3) the strategic planning framework developed based on the organization's balanced scorecard domains and the new Magnet model, and (4) the process undertaken to develop the nursing strategic priorities. Outcomes associated with the structure, process, and key initiatives are discussed throughout the article. PMID:21320657

  5. Identifying influential nodes in weighted networks based on evidence theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Daijun; Deng, Xinyang; Zhang, Xiaoge; Deng, Yong; Mahadevan, Sankaran

    2013-05-01

    The design of an effective ranking method to identify influential nodes is an important problem in the study of complex networks. In this paper, a new centrality measure is proposed based on the Dempster-Shafer evidence theory. The proposed measure trades off between the degree and strength of every node in a weighted network. The influences of both the degree and the strength of each node are represented by basic probability assignment (BPA). The proposed centrality measure is determined by the combination of these BPAs. Numerical examples are used to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Evidence-based botanical research: applications and challenges.

    PubMed

    Yeung, K Simon; Gubili, Jyothirmai; Cassileth, Barrie

    2008-08-01

    Use of herbal supplements is on the rise around the world, but limited data exist on the safety and efficacy of botanical products. Efforts to subject botanicals to rigorous scientific research began recently. There are many problems associated with botanicals research, however. These include procuring the study agents, selecting appropriate study method and clinical trial design, navigating through regulatory obstacles, and obtaining funding. Evidence-based botanical research can help to validate traditional uses and to facilitate new drug development. Concerted efforts of governmental agencies and industry are essential to ensure continuance of high-quality botanicals research. PMID:18638694

  7. Developing an evidence-based list of journals for nursing

    PubMed Central

    Sherwill-Navarro, Pamela; Kennedy, Joy C.; Allen, Margaret (Peg)

    2014-01-01

    The Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section (NAHRS) of the Medical Library Association created the 2012 NAHRS Selected List of Nursing Journals to assist librarians with collection development and to provide nurses and librarians with data on nursing and interdisciplinary journals to assist their decisions about where to submit articles for publication. This list is a continuation and expansion of a list initially known as the Key Nursing Journals list. It compares database coverage and full-text options for each title and includes an analysis of the number of evidence-based, research, and continuing education articles. PMID:24860267

  8. NLM Evidence-based Information at Your Fingertips - NBNA

    SciTech Connect

    Womble, R.

    2010-08-06

    The workshop titled, National Library of Medicine: Evidence-based Information At Your Fingertips, is a computer training class designed to meet the needs of nurses who require access to information on specific medical topics and on the adverse health effects of exposure to hazardous substances. The Specialized Information Services Division of the National Library of Medicine (NLM) is sponsoring this workshop for the National Black Nurses Association to increase the awareness of health professionals of the availability and value of the free NLM medical, environmental health, and toxicology databases.

  9. Evidence-Based Practice in Group Care: The Effects of Policy, Research, and Organizational Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Carol; Sanders, Larry; Gurevich, Maria; Fulton, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the effect of a province-wide vision of evidence-based and outcome-based services for children and youth and the challenges of implementing evidence-based practice (EBP) and evidence-based treatment (EBT) approaches within group care settings. The paper is based on the results of a survey of group care settings in the

  10. The semantic origin of unconscious priming: Behavioral and event-related potential evidence during category congruency priming from strongly and weakly related masked words.

    PubMed

    Ortells, Juan J; Kiefer, Markus; Castillo, Alejandro; Megías, Montserrat; Morillas, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying masked congruency priming, semantic mechanisms such as semantic activation or non-semantic mechanisms, for example response activation, remain a matter of debate. In order to decide between these alternatives, reaction times (RTs) and event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded in the present study, while participants performed a semantic categorization task on visible word targets that were preceded either 167ms (Experiment 1) or 34ms before (Experiment 2) by briefly presented (33ms) novel (unpracticed) masked prime words. The primes and targets belonged to different categories (unrelated), or they were either strongly or weakly semantically related category co-exemplars. Behavioral (RT) and electrophysiological masked congruency priming effects were significantly greater for strongly related pairs than for weakly related pairs, indicating a semantic origin of effects. Priming in the latter condition was not statistically reliable. Furthermore, priming effects modulated the N400 event-related potential (ERP) component, an electrophysiological index of semantic processing, but not ERPs in the time range of the N200 component, associated with response conflict and visuo-motor response priming. The present results demonstrate that masked congruency priming from novel prime words also depends on semantic processing of the primes and is not exclusively driven by non-semantic mechanisms such as response activation. PMID:26412392

  11. Inversion of calcite twin data, paleostress reconstruction and multiphase weak deformation in cratonic interior - Evidence from the Proterozoic Cuddapah basin, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathy, Vikash; Saha, Dilip

    2015-08-01

    Paleostress orientations from mechanically twinned calcite in carbonate rocks and veins in the neighborhood of large faults were investigated to comment on the nature of weak upper crustal stresses affecting sedimentary successions within the Proterozoic Cuddapah basin, India. Application of Turner's P-B-T method and Spang's Numerical dynamic analysis on Cuddapah samples provided paleostress orientations comparable to those derived from fault-slip inversion. Results from the neighborhood of E-W faults cutting through the Paleoproterozoic Papaghni and Chitravati groups and the Neoproterozoic Kurnool Group in the western Cuddapah basin, reveal existence of multiple deformation events-(1) NE-SW ?3 in strike-slip to extensional regime along with an additional event having NW-SE ?3, for lower Cuddapah samples; (2) compressional/transpressional event with ESE-WNW or NNE-SSW ?1 mainly from younger Kurnool samples. Integrating results from calcite twin data inversion, fault-slip analysis and regional geology we propose that late Mesoproterozoic crustal extension led to initial opening of the Kurnool sub-basin, subsequently influenced by weak compressional deformation. The dynamic analysis of calcite twins thus constrains the stress regimes influencing basin initiation in the southern Indian cratonic interior and subsequent basin inversion in relation to craton margin mobile belts and plausible global tectonic events in the Proterozoic.

  12. Evidence-based guideline update: Medical treatment of infantile spasms

    PubMed Central

    Go, C.Y.; Mackay, M.T.; Weiss, S.K.; Stephens, D.; Adams-Webber, T.; Ashwal, S.; Snead, O.C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To update the 2004 American Academy of Neurology/Child Neurology Society practice parameter on treatment of infantile spasms in children. Methods: MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched from 2002 to 2011 and searches of reference lists of retrieved articles were performed. Sixty-eight articles were selected for detailed review; 26 were included in the analysis. Recommendations were based on a 4-tiered classification scheme combining pre-2002 evidence and more recent evidence. Results: There is insufficient evidence to determine whether other forms of corticosteroids are as effective as adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) for short-term treatment of infantile spasms. However, low-dose ACTH is probably as effective as high-dose ACTH. ACTH is more effective than vigabatrin (VGB) for short-term treatment of children with infantile spasms (excluding those with tuberous sclerosis complex). There is insufficient evidence to show that other agents and combination therapy are effective for short-term treatment of infantile spasms. Short lag time to treatment leads to better long-term developmental outcome. Successful short-term treatment of cryptogenic infantile spasms with ACTH or prednisolone leads to better long-term developmental outcome than treatment with VGB. Recommendations: Low-dose ACTH should be considered for treatment of infantile spasms. ACTH or VGB may be useful for short-term treatment of infantile spasms, with ACTH considered preferentially over VGB. Hormonal therapy (ACTH or prednisolone) may be considered for use in preference to VGB in infants with cryptogenic infantile spasms, to possibly improve developmental outcome. A shorter lag time to treatment of infantile spasms with either hormonal therapy or VGB possibly improves long-term developmental outcomes. PMID:22689735

  13. Practice-Based Evidence of Evidence-Based Practice: Professional Practice Portfolios for the Assessment of Work-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This article proposes that professional education programmes can help promote the development of professional judgment by the use of a well-designed professional practice portfolio as an assessment tool. An explanation of the portfolio process is followed by evidence from a four-year action research study, demonstrating how compiling a

  14. Knowledge-Based Query Construction Using the CDSS Knowledge Base for Efficient Evidence Retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Muhammad; Hussain, Maqbool; Ali, Taqdir; Hussain, Jamil; Khan, Wajahat Ali; Lee, Sungyoung; Kang, Byeong Ho

    2015-01-01

    Finding appropriate evidence to support clinical practices is always challenging, and the construction of a query to retrieve such evidence is a fundamental step. Typically, evidence is found using manual or semi-automatic methods, which are time-consuming and sometimes make it difficult to construct knowledge-based complex queries. To overcome the difficulty in constructing knowledge-based complex queries, we utilized the knowledge base (KB) of the clinical decision support system (CDSS), which has the potential to provide sufficient contextual information. To automatically construct knowledge-based complex queries, we designed methods to parse rule structure in KB of CDSS in order to determine an executable path and extract the terms by parsing the control structures and logic connectives used in the logic. The automatically constructed knowledge-based complex queries were executed on the PubMed search service to evaluate the results on the reduction of retrieved citations with high relevance. The average number of citations was reduced from 56,249 citations to 330 citations with the knowledge-based query construction approach, and relevance increased from 1 term to 6 terms on average. The ability to automatically retrieve relevant evidence maximizes efficiency for clinicians in terms of time, based on feedback collected from clinicians. This approach is generally useful in evidence-based medicine, especially in ambient assisted living environments where automation is highly important. PMID:26343669

  15. Knowledge-Based Query Construction Using the CDSS Knowledge Base for Efficient Evidence Retrieval.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Muhammad; Hussain, Maqbool; Ali, Taqdir; Hussain, Jamil; Khan, Wajahat Ali; Lee, Sungyoung; Kang, Byeong Ho

    2015-01-01

    Finding appropriate evidence to support clinical practices is always challenging, and the construction of a query to retrieve such evidence is a fundamental step. Typically, evidence is found using manual or semi-automatic methods, which are time-consuming and sometimes make it difficult to construct knowledge-based complex queries. To overcome the difficulty in constructing knowledge-based complex queries, we utilized the knowledge base (KB) of the clinical decision support system (CDSS), which has the potential to provide sufficient contextual information. To automatically construct knowledge-based complex queries, we designed methods to parse rule structure in KB of CDSS in order to determine an executable path and extract the terms by parsing the control structures and logic connectives used in the logic. The automatically constructed knowledge-based complex queries were executed on the PubMed search service to evaluate the results on the reduction of retrieved citations with high relevance. The average number of citations was reduced from 56,249 citations to 330 citations with the knowledge-based query construction approach, and relevance increased from 1 term to 6 terms on average. The ability to automatically retrieve relevant evidence maximizes efficiency for clinicians in terms of time, based on feedback collected from clinicians. This approach is generally useful in evidence-based medicine, especially in ambient assisted living environments where automation is highly important. PMID:26343669

  16. Online tools for teaching evidence-based veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Steele, Michael; Crabb, Nicholas P; Moore, Lynda J; Reyher, Kristen K; Baillie, Sarah; Eisler, Mark C

    2013-01-01

    Evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM) is of interest and relevance to veterinary practitioners. Consequently, veterinary schools take responsibility for teaching students how to appraise scientific articles and for equipping them with the skills needed to obtain and evaluate the best evidence and to apply this approach to their own cases. As part of our farm animal clinical rotation, we train students in qualitative and quantitative EBVM methods using an e-learning environment, online teaching materials, a wiki (a Web site that allows its users to edit its content via a Web browser), and face-to-face tutorials that support learning. Students working in small groups use a wiki to record details of the history, clinical presentation, diagnostic tests, herd data, and management plans for their chosen farm animal clinical cases. Using a standardized patient, intervention, comparison, and outcome (PICO) format, each group formulates a patient question based on either a proposed intervention or diagnostic procedure for the case and conducts an online scientific literature database search. The students appraise the articles retrieved using EBVM approaches and record the information in the wiki. The summation of this body of work, the group's critically appraised topic (CAT), includes the original PICO, a standardized table of the scientific evidence for the effectiveness of the intervention or diagnostic procedure, a summary statement in the form of a clinical bottom line, and their reflections upon the CAT. At the end of the rotation, students take part in a structured "CAT Club" where they present and discuss their findings with fellow students and clinicians. PMID:23975071

  17. Three Collaborative Models for Scaling Up Evidence-Based Practices

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rosemarie; Jones, Helen; Marsenich, Lynne; Sosna, Todd; Price, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    The current paper describes three models of research-practice collaboration to scale-up evidence-based practices (EBP): (1) the Rolling Cohort model in England, (2) the Cascading Dissemination model in San Diego County, and (3) the Community Development Team model in 53 California and Ohio counties. Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC) and KEEP are the focal evidence-based practices that are designed to improve outcomes for children and families in the child welfare, juvenile justice, and mental health systems. The three scale-up models each originated from collaboration between community partners and researchers with the shared goal of wide-spread implementation and sustainability of MTFC/KEEP. The three models were implemented in a variety of contexts; Rolling Cohort was implemented nationally, Cascading Dissemination was implemented within one county, and Community Development Team was targeted at the state level. The current paper presents an overview of the development of each model, the policy frameworks in which they are embedded, system challenges encountered during scale-up, and lessons learned. Common elements of successful scale-up efforts, barriers to success, factors relating to enduring practice relationships, and future research directions are discussed. PMID:21484449

  18. Evidence-based practice in group work with incarcerated youth.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Ashley; Shera, Wes

    2009-01-01

    As a result of the Youth Criminal Justice Act's increased focus on restorative justice, treatment, rehabilitation, and reintegration of youth, many more juvenile offenders require mental health services while resident in youth detention facilities [Youth Criminal Justice Act (2002, c.1). Ottawa: Department of Justice Canada. Retrieved September 19, 2008 from http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/Y-1.5]. Several common characteristics such as violence, aggression, and other antisocial behaviors, associated with criminal behavior, have been identified among male and female offenders. Dialectical behavior therapy, originally developed by Linehan [Linehan, M. M., 1993a. Cognitive-behavioural treatment of borderline personality disorder. New York: Guildford Press] for chronically parasuicidal women diagnosed with borderline personality disorder, has been successfully modified for use with other populations, including violent and impulse-oriented male and female adolescents residing in correctional facilities. The intent of this article is to encourage the wider use of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) with young offenders. It includes an extensive review of the evidence-base to date and describes some of the creative modifications that have been made to standard DBT program format to meet the particular needs of various groups in both Canada and the United States. In keeping with the movement toward more evidence-based practice, the authors argue that DBT is a promising approach in group work with incarcerated adolescents and should be more widely used. PMID:19647875

  19. Evidence-based standards for cancer pain management.

    PubMed

    Dy, Sydney M; Asch, Steven M; Naeim, Arash; Sanati, Homayoon; Walling, Anne; Lorenz, Karl A

    2008-08-10

    High-quality management of cancer pain depends on evidence-based standards for screening, assessment, treatment, and follow-up for general cancer pain and specific pain syndromes. We developed a set of standards through an iterative process of structured literature review and development and refinement of topic areas and standards and subjected recommendations to rating by a multidisciplinary expert panel. Providers should routinely screen for the presence or absence and intensity of pain and should perform descriptive pain assessment for patients with a positive screen, including assessment for likely etiology and functional impairment. For treatment, providers should provide pain education, offer breakthrough opioids in patients receiving long-acting formulations, offer bowel regimens in patients receiving opioids chronically, and ensure continuity of opioid doses across health care settings. Providers should also follow up on patients after treatment for pain. For metastatic bone pain, providers should offer single-fraction radiotherapy as an option when offering radiation, unless there is a contraindication. When spinal cord compression is suspected, providers should treat with corticosteroids and evaluate with whole-spine magnetic resonance imaging scan or myelography as soon as possible but within 24 hours. Providers should initiate definitive treatment (radiotherapy or surgical decompression) within 24 hours for diagnosed cord compression and should follow up on patients after treatment. These standards provide an initial framework for high-quality evidence-based management of general cancer pain and pain syndromes. PMID:18688056

  20. Reality of evidence-based practice in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Visser, Claire; Hadley, Gina; Wee, Bee

    2015-09-01

    There has been a paradigm shift in medicine away from tradition, anecdote and theoretical reasoning from the basic sciences towards evidence-based medicine (EBM). In palliative care however, statistically significant benefits may be marginal and may not be related to clinical meaningfulness. The typical treatment vs. placebo comparison necessitated by 'gold standard' randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is not necessarily applicable. The complex multimorbidity of end of life care involves considerations of the patient's physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs. In addition, the field of palliative care covers a heterogeneous group of chronic and incurable diseases no longer limited to cancer. Adequate sample sizes can be difficult to achieve, reducing the power of studies and high attrition rates can result in inadequate follow up periods. This review uses examples of the management of cancer-related fatigue and death rattle (noisy breathing) to demonstrate the current state of EBM in palliative care. The future of EBM in palliative care needs to be as diverse as the patients who ultimately derive benefit. Non-RCT methodologies of equivalent quality, validity and size conducted by collaborative research networks using a 'mixed methods approach' are likely to pose the correct clinical questions and derive evidence-based yet clinically relevant outcomes. PMID:26487964

  1. Evidence based guidelines for complex regional pain syndrome type 1

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Treatment of complex regional pain syndrome type I (CRPS-I) is subject to discussion. The purpose of this study was to develop multidisciplinary guidelines for treatment of CRPS-I. Method A multidisciplinary task force graded literature evaluating treatment effects for CRPS-I according to their strength of evidence, published between 1980 to June 2005. Treatment recommendations based on the literature findings were formulated and formally approved by all Dutch professional associations involved in CRPS-I treatment. Results For pain treatment, the WHO analgesic ladder is advised with the exception of strong opioids. For neuropathic pain, anticonvulsants and tricyclic antidepressants may be considered. For inflammatory symptoms, free-radical scavengers (dimethylsulphoxide or acetylcysteine) are advised. To promote peripheral blood flow, vasodilatory medication may be considered. Percutaneous sympathetic blockades may be used to increase blood flow in case vasodilatory medication has insufficient effect. To decrease functional limitations, standardised physiotherapy and occupational therapy are advised. To prevent the occurrence of CRPS-I after wrist fractures, vitamin C is recommended. Adequate perioperative analgesia, limitation of operating time, limited use of tourniquet, and use of regional anaesthetic techniques are recommended for secondary prevention of CRPS-I. Conclusions Based on the literature identified and the extent of evidence found for therapeutic interventions for CRPS-I, we conclude that further research is needed into each of the therapeutic modalities discussed in the guidelines. PMID:20356382

  2. Evidence-based health promotion programs for schools and communities.

    PubMed

    Inman, Dianna D; van Bakergem, Karen M; Larosa, Angela C; Garr, David R

    2011-02-01

    Healthy People 2020 includes an objective to increase the proportion of elementary, middle, and senior high schools that provide comprehensive school health education to prevent health problems in the following areas: unintentional injury; violence; suicide; tobacco use and addiction; alcohol or other drug use; unintended pregnancy, HIV/AIDS, and sexually transmitted infections (STI); unhealthy dietary patterns; and inadequate physical activity. These specific goals are part of the efforts of Healthy People 2020 to increase the proportion of elementary, middle, and senior high schools that have health education goals or objectives that address the knowledge and skills articulated in the National Health Education Standards. A focus on Pre-K through 12 health education is a prerequisite for the implementation of a coordinated, seamless approach to health education as advocated by the Healthy People Curriculum Task Force and incorporated into the Education for Health framework. To help accomplish these goals, this article views the role of education as part of the broader socioecologic model of health. A comprehensive literature review was undertaken to identify evidence-based, peer-reviewed programs, strategies, and resources. The results of this review are presented organized as sexual health, mental and emotional health, injury prevention, tobacco and substance abuse, and exercise and healthy eating. Evidence-based implementation strategies, often considered the missing link, are recommended to help achieve the Healthy People 2020 objective of increasing the prevalence of comprehensive school health education programs designed to reduce health risks for children. PMID:21238871

  3. Reality of evidence-based practice in palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Claire; Hadley, Gina; Wee, Bee

    2015-01-01

    There has been a paradigm shift in medicine away from tradition, anecdote and theoretical reasoning from the basic sciences towards evidence-based medicine (EBM). In palliative care however, statistically significant benefits may be marginal and may not be related to clinical meaningfulness. The typical treatment vs. placebo comparison necessitated by gold standard randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is not necessarily applicable. The complex multimorbidity of end of life care involves considerations of the patients physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs. In addition, the field of palliative care covers a heterogeneous group of chronic and incurable diseases no longer limited to cancer. Adequate sample sizes can be difficult to achieve, reducing the power of studies and high attrition rates can result in inadequate follow up periods. This review uses examples of the management of cancer-related fatigue and death rattle (noisy breathing) to demonstrate the current state of EBM in palliative care. The future of EBM in palliative care needs to be as diverse as the patients who ultimately derive benefit. Non-RCT methodologies of equivalent quality, validity and size conducted by collaborative research networks using a mixed methods approach are likely to pose the correct clinical questions and derive evidence-based yet clinically relevant outcomes. PMID:26487964

  4. [German hospital nurses' attitudes concerning evidence-based nursing practice].

    PubMed

    Kpke, Sascha; Koch, Frauke; Behncke, Anja; Balzer, Katrin

    2013-06-01

    The relevance of nurses' attitudes for establishing an evidence-based nursing practice (EBP) has been proven internationally. For German-speaking countries so far only few data are available. The present survey aims at assessing nurses' perceptions of relevant context factors for implementing an EBP. Therefore, 1384 nurses in 21 hospitals in Northern-Germany received a self-developed questionnaire based on established instruments in March and April 2012. 1023 (74 %) nurses responded. In principal, results show a positive attitude towards EBP. The majority of participants regards research as relevant for nursing practice. Support from superiors and colleagues is seen as important prerequisite. However, implementation remains a challenge. Nurses are not informed about recent research results. Original articles are hardly used. Only a minority is prepared to spend own money on congresses or to start academic nursing training in the near future. For the first time in German-speaking countries, the study provides meaningful data on nurses' attitudes towards EBP. Nurses confirm the value of research for their own practice. However, there is a lack of basic requirements to identify and implement relevant research findings as for example the use of recent scientific evidence. Nursing education in Germany should therefore focus more strongly on building competencies required for EBP, for example through properly designed academic nursing training. PMID:23732313

  5. Evidence-based prognostication in a case of sciatica

    PubMed Central

    Emary, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To present an evidence-based case report on the prognosis of a patient with sciatica. Case: A 43-year-old man presented with right-sided buttock and lower extremity pain and numbness of 10 weeks duration. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lumbosacral disc herniation. Straight leg raise testing provoked the patients right sciatic pain, and neurologic examination revealed a diminished right Achilles tendon reflex and mild hypoesthesia along the patients outer right foot. Outcome: PubMed was searched and two cohort studies relevant to sciatic prognosis were found. These articles were critically appraised for their validity, importance, and applicability in making a prognostic estimate for this particular patient. Based on the appraised research evidence, and the confidence intervals calculated therein, the overall prognosis for sciatic pain recovery with conservative care was estimated as favourable for this patient, though sensory recovery (even with surgical care) was not. Summary: This case report illustrates how to use research literature in estimating the clinical prognosis for an individual patient, and how this can be useful towards clinical decision-making concerning treatment. PMID:25729082

  6. Pediatric depression: is there evidence to improve evidence-based treatments?

    PubMed Central

    Brent, David A.; Maalouf, Fadi T.

    2014-01-01

    Although there have been advances in our ability to treat child and adolescent depression, use of evidence-based treatments still results in many patients with residual symptoms. Advances in our understanding of cognitive, emotional, and ecological aspects of early-onset depression have the potential to lead to improvements in the assessment and treatment of depression. A search for endophenotypes, i.e., traits that are related to depression, mediate the familial transmission of depression, and are genetically determined, may help in understanding etiology and in personalizing treatment. However, advances in treatment may also come from the identification of biomarkers, i.e., modifiable neurocognitive, physiological, or biochemical indices that are correlated with, or mediate, treatment outcome. More effective treatments may emerge from being able to personalize interventions to the patients cognitive, emotional, and developmental profile. PMID:19220597

  7. Frequency of Testing for Dyslipidemia: An Evidence-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dyslipidemias include high levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and triglycerides and low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. Dyslipidemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, which is a major contributor to mortality in Canada. Approximately 23% of the 2009/11 Canadian Health Measures Survey (CHMS) participants had a high level of LDL cholesterol, with prevalence increasing with age, and approximately 15% had a total cholesterol to HDL ratio above the threshold. Objectives To evaluate the frequency of lipid testing in adults not diagnosed with dyslipidemia and in adults on treatment for dyslipidemia. Research Methods A systematic review of the literature set out to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs), systematic reviews, health technology assessments (HTAs), and observational studies published between January 1, 2000, and November 29, 2012, that evaluated the frequency of testing for dyslipidemia in the 2 populations. Results Two observational studies assessed the frequency of lipid testing, 1 in individuals not on lipid-lowering medications and 1 in treated individuals. Both studies were based on previously collected data intended for a different objective and, therefore, no conclusions could be reached about the frequency of testing at intervals other than the ones used in the original studies. Given this limitation and generalizability issues, the quality of evidence was considered very low. No evidence for the frequency of lipid testing was identified in the 2 HTAs included. Canadian and international guidelines recommend testing for dyslipidemia in individuals at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. The frequency of testing recommended is based on expert consensus. Conclusions Conclusions on the frequency of lipid testing could not be made based on the 2 observational studies. Current guidelines recommend lipid testing in adults with increased cardiovascular risk, with the frequency of testing based on individual cardiovascular risk. PMID:26316920

  8. Nonequilibrium Steady-State Differences in Partial Pressure of CO2 and in Concentration of Weak Acids and Bases between Blood and Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gurtner, Gail H.

    1972-01-01

    Several investigators have demonstrated that under conditions where little or no gas exchange occurs across the alveolar capillary membrane the PCO2 is higher in the alveolus than in the mixed venous blood, whereas there are no PO2 differences. Gurtner et al. have explained the ?PCO2 by a model in which H+ dissociation of proteins due to an electrical field caused by a negatively charged capillary wall (Wien effect) sets up an intracapillary PCO2 difference between wall and bulk phase which is maintained by blood flow. The model is not specific for CO2 and predicts that weak acids should be concentrated in a manner similar to CO2 whereas weak bases should be relatively excluded from the alveolar space. Measurements of the steady-state distribution of the uncharged forms of the weak acids 5,5-dimethyloxyazoladinedione (DMO) and barbital and of the weak base tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (THAM) between mixed venous blood and a fluid-filled lobe of lung were made in living dogs. The results agree fairly well with the predicted values. PMID:5029430

  9. Revitalising the evidence base for public health: an assets model.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Antony; Ziglio, Erio

    2007-01-01

    Historically, approaches to the promotion of population health have been based on a deficit model. That is, they tend to focus on identifying the problems and needs of populations that require professional resources and high levels of dependence on hospital and welfare services. These deficit models are important and necessary to identify levels of needs and priorities. But they need to be complemented by some other perspectives as they have some drawbacks. Deficit models tend to define communities and individuals in negative terms, disregarding what is positive and works well in particular populations. In contrast 'assets' models tend to accentuate positive capability to identify problems and activate solutions. They focus on promoting salutogenic resources that promote the self esteem and coping abilities of individuals and communities, eventually leading to less dependency on professional services. Much of the evidence available to policy makers to inform decisions about the most effective approaches to promoting health and to tackling health inequities is based on a deficit model and this may disproportionately lead to policies and practices which disempower the populations and communities who are supposed to benefit from them. An assets approach to health and development embraces a 'salutogenic' notion of health creation and in doing so encourages the full participation of local communities in the health development process. The asset model presented here aims to revitalise how policy makers, researchers and practitioners think and act to promote a more resourceful approach to tackling health inequities. The model outlines a systematic approach to asset based public health which can provide scientific evidence and best practice on how to maximise the stock of key assets necessary for promoting health. Redressing the balance between the assets and deficit models for evidence based public health could help us to unlock some of the existing barriers to effective action on health inequities. This re-balancing would help in better understanding the factors that influence health and what can be done about them. It would promote a positive and inclusive approach to action. PMID:17685075

  10. Caught on Video! Using Handheld Digital Video Cameras to Support Evidence-Based Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lottero-Perdue, Pamela S.; Nealy, Jennifer; Roland, Christine; Ryan, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Engaging elementary students in evidence-based reasoning is an essential aspect of science and engineering education. Evidence-based reasoning involves students making claims (i.e., answers to questions, or solutions to problems), providing evidence to support those claims, and articulating their reasoning to connect the evidence to the claim. In

  11. Caught on Video! Using Handheld Digital Video Cameras to Support Evidence-Based Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lottero-Perdue, Pamela S.; Nealy, Jennifer; Roland, Christine; Ryan, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Engaging elementary students in evidence-based reasoning is an essential aspect of science and engineering education. Evidence-based reasoning involves students making claims (i.e., answers to questions, or solutions to problems), providing evidence to support those claims, and articulating their reasoning to connect the evidence to the claim. In…

  12. The Benefits of Breakfast Cereal Consumption: A Systematic Review of the Evidence Base1234

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    There have been no comprehensive reviews of the relation of breakfast cereal consumption to nutrition and health. This systematic review of all articles on breakfast cereals to October 2013 in the Scopus and Medline databases identified 232 articles with outcomes related to nutrient intake, weight, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, digestive health, dental and mental health, and cognition. Sufficient evidence was available to develop 21 summary evidence statements, ranked from A (can be trusted to guide practice) to D (weak and must be applied with caution). Breakfast cereal consumption is associated with diets higher in vitamins and minerals and lower in fat (grade B) but is not associated with increased intakes of total energy or sodium (grade C) or risk of dental caries (grade B). Most studies on the nutritional impact are cross-sectional, with very few intervention studies, so breakfast cereal consumption may be a marker of an overall healthy lifestyle. Oat-, barley-, or psyllium-based cereals can help lower cholesterol concentrations (grade A), and high-fiber, wheat-based cereals can improve bowel function (grade A). Regular breakfast cereal consumption is associated with a lower body mass index and less risk of being overweight or obese (grade B). Presweetened breakfast cereals do not increase the risk of overweight and obesity in children (grade C). Whole-grain or high-fiber breakfast cereals are associated with a lower risk of diabetes (grade B) and cardiovascular disease (grade C). There is emerging evidence of associations with feelings of greater well-being and a lower risk of hypertension (grade D), but more research is required. PMID:25225349

  13. The benefits of breakfast cereal consumption: a systematic review of the evidence base.

    PubMed

    Williams, Peter G

    2014-09-01

    There have been no comprehensive reviews of the relation of breakfast cereal consumption to nutrition and health. This systematic review of all articles on breakfast cereals to October 2013 in the Scopus and Medline databases identified 232 articles with outcomes related to nutrient intake, weight, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, digestive health, dental and mental health, and cognition. Sufficient evidence was available to develop 21 summary evidence statements, ranked from A (can be trusted to guide practice) to D (weak and must be applied with caution). Breakfast cereal consumption is associated with diets higher in vitamins and minerals and lower in fat (grade B) but is not associated with increased intakes of total energy or sodium (grade C) or risk of dental caries (grade B). Most studies on the nutritional impact are cross-sectional, with very few intervention studies, so breakfast cereal consumption may be a marker of an overall healthy lifestyle. Oat-, barley-, or psyllium-based cereals can help lower cholesterol concentrations (grade A), and high-fiber, wheat-based cereals can improve bowel function (grade A). Regular breakfast cereal consumption is associated with a lower body mass index and less risk of being overweight or obese (grade B). Presweetened breakfast cereals do not increase the risk of overweight and obesity in children (grade C). Whole-grain or high-fiber breakfast cereals are associated with a lower risk of diabetes (grade B) and cardiovascular disease (grade C). There is emerging evidence of associations with feelings of greater well-being and a lower risk of hypertension (grade D), but more research is required. PMID:25225349

  14. Sleep disturbances as an evidence-based suicide risk factor.

    PubMed

    Bernert, Rebecca A; Kim, Joanne S; Iwata, Naomi G; Perlis, Michael L

    2015-03-01

    Increasing research indicates that sleep disturbances may confer increased risk for suicidal behaviors, including suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, and death by suicide. Despite increased investigation, a number of methodological problems present important limitations to the validity and generalizability of findings in this area, which warrant additional focus. To evaluate and delineate sleep disturbances as an evidence-based suicide risk factor, a systematic review of the extant literature was conducted with methodological considerations as a central focus. The following methodologic criteria were required for inclusion: the report (1) evaluated an index of sleep disturbance; (2) examined an outcome measure for suicidal behavior; (3) adjusted for presence of a depression diagnosis or depression severity, as a covariate; and (4) represented an original investigation as opposed to a chart review. Reports meeting inclusion criteria were further classified and reviewed according to: study design and timeframe; sample type and size; sleep disturbance, suicide risk, and depression covariate assessment measure(s); and presence of positive versus negative findings. Based on keyword search, the following search engines were used: PubMed and PsycINFO. Search criteria generated N = 82 articles representing original investigations focused on sleep disturbances and suicide outcomes. Of these, N = 18 met inclusion criteria for review based on systematic analysis. Of the reports identified, N = 18 evaluated insomnia or poor sleep quality symptoms, whereas N = 8 assessed nightmares in association with suicide risk. Despite considerable differences in study designs, samples, and assessment techniques, the comparison of such reports indicates preliminary, converging evidence for sleep disturbances as an empirical risk factor for suicidal behaviors, while highlighting important, future directions for increased investigation. PMID:25698339

  15. Disruptive Innovations for Designing and Diffusing Evidence-based Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Swendeman, Dallas; Chorpita, Bruce F.

    2013-01-01

    The numbers of evidence-based interventions (EBIs) have been growing exponentially, both therapeutic and prevention programs. Yet, EBIs have not been broadly adopted in the United States. In order for our EBI science to significantly reduce disease burden, we need to critically re-examine our scientific conventions and norms. Innovation may be spurred by re-examining the biomedical model for validating EBIs and the compartmentalization of EBIs as disease-specific, institutionally-based, counseling programs. The model of Disruptive Innovations suggests that we re-engineer EBIs based on their most robust features in order to reach more people in less time and at lower cost. Four new research agendas will be required to support disruptive innovations in EBI science: synthesize common elements across EBIs; experiment with new delivery formats (e.g., consumer controlled, self-directed, brief, paraprofessional, coaching, and technology and media strategies); adopt market strategies to promote and diffuse EBI science, knowledge, and products; and adopt continuous quality improvement as a research paradigm for systematically improving EBIs, based on ongoing data and feedback. EBI science can have more impact if it can better leverage what we know from existing EBIs in order to inspire, engage, inform, and support families and children to adopt and sustain healthy daily routines and lifestyles. PMID:22545596

  16. Do short courses in evidence based medicine improve knowledge and skills? Validation of Berlin questionnaire and before and after study of courses in evidence based medicine

    PubMed Central

    Fritsche, L; Greenhalgh, T; Falck-Ytter, Y; Neumayer, H-H; Kunz, R

    2002-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate an instrument for measuring knowledge and skills in evidence based medicine and to investigate whether short courses in evidence based medicine lead to a meaningful increase in knowledge and skills. Design Development and validation of an assessment instrument and before and after study. Setting Various postgraduate short courses in evidence based medicine in Germany. Participants The instrument was validated with experts in evidence based medicine, postgraduate doctors, and medical students. The effect of courses was assessed by postgraduate doctors from medical and surgical backgrounds. Intervention Intensive 3 day courses in evidence based medicine delivered through tutor facilitated small groups. Main outcome measure Increase in knowledge and skills. Results The questionnaire distinguished reliably between groups with different expertise in evidence based medicine. Experts attained a threefold higher average score than students. Postgraduates who had not attended a course performed better than students but significantly worse than experts. Knowledge and skills in evidence based medicine increased after the course by 57% (mean score before course 6.3 (SD 2.9) v 9.9 (SD 2.8), P<0.001). No difference was found among experts or students in absence of an intervention. Conclusions The instrument reliably assessed knowledge and skills in evidence based medicine. An intensive 3 day course in evidence based medicine led to a significant increase in knowledge and skills. What is already known on this topicNumerous observational studies have investigated the impact of teaching evidence based medicine to healthcare professionals, with conflicting resultsMost of the studies were of poor methodological qualityWhat this study addsAn instrument assessing basic knowledge and skills required for practising evidence based medicine was developed and validatedAn intensive 3 day course on evidence based medicine for doctors from various backgrounds and training level led to a clinically meaningful improvement of knowledge and skills PMID:12468485

  17. Eating Disorder Prevention: Current Evidence-Base and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Stice, Eric; Becker, Carolyn Black; Yokum, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    Objective This narrative review sought to (a) characterize prevention programs that have produced reliable, reproducible, and clinically meaningful effects in efficacy trials, (b) discuss effectiveness trials that have tested whether prevention programs produce intervention effects under ecologically valid real-world conditions, (c) discuss dissemination efforts and research on dissemination, and (d) offer suggestions regarding directions for future research in this field. Conclusion A literature revealed that 6 prevention programs have produced significant reductions in eating disorder symptoms through at least 6-month follow-up and that 2 have significantly reduced future eating disorder onset. Effectiveness trials indicate that 2 prevention programs have produced effects under ecologically valid conditions that are only slightly attenuated. Although there have been few dissemination efforts, evidence suggests that a community participatory approach is most effective. Lastly, it would be useful to develop programs that produce larger and more persistent reductions in eating disorder symptoms and eating disorder onset, focus more on effectiveness trials that confirm that prevention programs produce clinically meaningful effects under real-world conditions, conduct meditational, mechanisms of action, and moderator research that provides stronger support for the intervention theory of prevention programs, and investigate the optimal methods of disseminating and implementing evidence-based prevention programs. PMID:23658095

  18. Pharmacological management of tetanus: an evidence-based review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Tetanus is becoming rarer in both industrialized and developing nations due to an effective vaccination program. In 2010, the World Health Organization estimated there was a 93% reduction in newborns dying from tetanus worldwide, compared to the situation in the late 1980s. Due to its rarity, many diagnostic delays occur as physicians may not consider the diagnosis until the manifestations become overt. Without timely diagnosis and proper treatment, severe tetanus is fatal (mortality is also influenced by the comorbidities of the patient). The principles of treating tetanus are: reducing muscle spasms, rigidity and autonomic instability (with ventilatory support when necessary); neutralization of tetanus toxin with human antitetanus immunoglobulin or equine antitetanus sera; wound debridement; and administration of antibiotics to eradicate locally proliferating bacteria at the wound site. It is difficult to conduct trials on different treatment modalities in tetanus due to both logistical and ethical reasons. However, it is imperative that physicians are aware of the best evidence-based treatment strategies currently available to improve the outcome of patients. This review concentrates on analyzing the current evidence on the pharmacological management of tetanus. PMID:25029486

  19. Vitiligo: concise evidence based guidelines on diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Gawkrodger, David J; Ormerod, Anthony D; Shaw, Lindsay; Mauri-Sole, Inma; Whitton, Maxine E; Watts, M Jane; Anstey, Alex V; Ingham, Jane; Young, Katharine

    2010-08-01

    Vitiligo is a common disease that causes a great degree of psychological distress. In its classical forms it is easily recognised and diagnosed. This review provides an evidence based outline of the management of vitiligo, particularly with the non-specialist in mind. Treatments for vitiligo are generally unsatisfactory. The initial approach to a patient who is thought to have vitiligo is to make a definite diagnosis, offer psychological support, and suggest supportive treatments such as the use of camouflage cosmetics and sunscreens, or in some cases after discussion the option of no treatment. Active therapies open to the non-specialist, after an explanation of potential side effects, include the topical use of potent or highly potent steroids or calcineurin inhibitors for a defined period of time (usually 2 months), following which an assessment is made to establish whether or not there has been a response. Patients whose condition is difficult to diagnose, unresponsive to straightforward treatments, or is causing psychological distress, are usually referred to a dermatologist. Specialist dermatology units have at their disposal phototherapy, either narrow band ultraviolet B or in some cases photochemotherapy, which is the most effective treatment presently available and can be considered for symmetrical types of vitiligo. Depigmenting treatments and possibly surgical approaches may be appropriate for vitiligo in selected cases. There is no evidence that presently available systemic treatments are helpful and safe in vitiligo. There is a need for further research into the causes of vitiligo, and into discovering better treatments. PMID:20709768

  20. Pharmacological management of tetanus: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Fernando, Deepika; Rajapakse, Senaka

    2014-01-01

    Tetanus is becoming rarer in both industrialized and developing nations due to an effective vaccination program. In 2010, the World Health Organization estimated there was a 93% reduction in newborns dying from tetanus worldwide, compared to the situation in the late 1980s. Due to its rarity, many diagnostic delays occur as physicians may not consider the diagnosis until the manifestations become overt. Without timely diagnosis and proper treatment, severe tetanus is fatal (mortality is also influenced by the comorbidities of the patient). The principles of treating tetanus are: reducing muscle spasms, rigidity and autonomic instability (with ventilatory support when necessary); neutralization of tetanus toxin with human antitetanus immunoglobulin or equine antitetanus sera; wound debridement; and administration of antibiotics to eradicate locally proliferating bacteria at the wound site. It is difficult to conduct trials on different treatment modalities in tetanus due to both logistical and ethical reasons. However, it is imperative that physicians are aware of the best evidence-based treatment strategies currently available to improve the outcome of patients. This review concentrates on analyzing the current evidence on the pharmacological management of tetanus. PMID:25029486