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Sample records for weakly coordinating solvents

  1. Macrocyclic Weakly Coordinating Anions.

    PubMed

    Landskron, Kai

    2015-10-01

    Herein, the concept of macrocyclic weakly coordinating anions (M-WCAs) is introduced. Synthetic methodologies are described how to access M-WCAs by thermodynamically controlled self-assembly in high yields, in particular through condensation and alkyne metathesis reactions. The anticipated properties and applications of M-WCAs in solid state and in solution are discussed, specifically for gas storage and separation, homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, and as liquid and solid electrolytes. PMID:26272789

  2. Solvent-induced delamination of a multifunctional two dimensional coordination polymer.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Almudena; Hermosa, Cristina; Castillo, Oscar; Berlanga, Isadora; Gómez-García, Carlos J; Mateo-Martí, Eva; Martínez, José I; Flores, Fernando; Gómez-Navarro, Cristina; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; Delgado, Salome; Zamora, Félix

    2013-04-18

    A coordination polymer is fully exfoliated by solvent-assisted interaction only. The soft-delamination process results from the structure of the starting material, which shows a layered structure with weak layer-to-layer interactions and cavities with the ability to locate several solvents in an unselective way. These results represent a significant step forward towards the production of structurally designed one-molecule thick 2D materials with tailored physico-chemical properties. PMID:23345141

  3. Molecular dynamics study of the weakly solvent dependent relaxation dynamics following chlorine dioxide photoexcitation

    E-print Network

    Molecular dynamics study of the weakly solvent dependent relaxation dynamics following chlorine The solvation dynamics following photoexcitation of chlorine dioxide OClO in different solvents are investigated chemistry.1­3 Representative of this group of compounds, chlorine dioxide OClO has been the subject of much

  4. Weak Coordination as a Powerful Means for Developing Broadly Useful C–H Functionalization Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Engle, Keary M.; Mei, Tian-Sheng; Wasa, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    Conspectus Reactions that convert carbon–hydrogen (C–H) bonds into carbon–carbon (C–C) or carbon–heteroatom (C–Y) bonds are attractive tools for organic chemists, potentially expediting the synthesis of target molecules through new disconnections in retrosynthetic analysis. Despite extensive inorganic and organometallic study of the insertion of homogeneous metal species into unactivated C–H bonds, practical applications of this technology in organic chemistry are still rare. Only in the past decade have metal-catalyzed C–H functionalization reactions become more widely utilized in organic synthesis. Research in the area of homogeneous transition metal–catalyzed C–H functionalization can be broadly grouped into two subfields. They reflect different approaches and goals and thus have different challenges and opportunities. One approach involves reactions of completely unfunctionalized aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons, which we refer to as “first functionalization.” Here the substrates are nonpolar and hydrophobic and thus interact very weakly with polar metal species. To overcome this weak affinity and drive metal-mediated C–H cleavage, chemists often use hydrocarbon substrates in large excess (for example, as solvent). Because highly reactive metal species are needed in first functionalization, controlling the chemoselectivity to avoid over-functionalization is often difficult. Additionally, because both substrates and products are comparatively low-value chemicals, developing cost-effective catalysts with exceptionally high turnover numbers that are competitive with alternatives (including heterogeneous catalysts) is challenging. Although an exciting field, first functionalization is beyond the scope of this Account. The second subfield of C–H functionalization involves substrates containing one or more pre-existing functional groups, termed “further functionalization.” One advantage of this approach is that the existing functional group (or groups) can be used to chelate the metal catalyst and position it for selective C–H cleavage. Precoordination can overcome the paraffin nature of C–H bonds by increasing the effective concentration of the substrate so that it needn't be used as solvent. From a synthetic perspective, it is desirable to use a functional group that is an intrinsic part of the substrate so that extra steps for installation and removal of an external directing group can be avoided. In this way, dramatic increases in molecular complexity can be accomplished in a single stroke through stereo- and site-selective introduction of a new functional group. Although reactivity is a major challenge (as with first functionalization), the philosophy in further functionalization differs—the major challenge is developing reactions that work with predictable selectivity in intricately functionalized contexts on commonly occurring structural motifs. In this Account, we focus on an emergent theme within the further functionalization literature: the use of commonly occurring functional groups to direct C–H cleavage through weak coordinations. We discuss our motivation for studying Pd-catalyzed C–H functionalization assisted by weakly coordinating functional groups and chronicle our endeavors to bring reactions of this type to fruition. Through this approach, we have developed reactions with a diverse range of substrates and coupling partners, with the broad scope likely stemming from higher reactivity of the less stable cyclopalladated intermediates held in place by weak coordinations. PMID:22166158

  5. Lanthanide Coordination Polymers with 4,4'-Azobenzoic Acid: Enhanced Stability and Magnetocaloric Effect by Removing Guest Solvents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaowei; Duan, Eryue; Han, Zongsu; Li, Leilei; Cheng, Peng

    2015-07-01

    Three lanthanide coordination polymers (Ln-CPs) formulated as [Ln(azdc)(HCOO)]n [Ln = Gd(III) (1), Tb(III) (2), Dy(III) (3); H2azdc = 4,4'-azobenzoic acid] have been successfully obtained by the solvothermal reaction of Ln(III) ions with H2azdc ligands in the mixed solvent N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF)/H2O. Compared with our previous work on Ln-CPs with H2azdc ligands, [Gd2(azdc)3(DMA)2]n·2nDMA (1'; DMA = dimethylacetamide), in which the DMA molecules coordinate to Gd(III) ions that are replaced by HCOO(-) groups in 1, resulting in the distinct structures and properties of the final products. Adjacent Ln(III) ions in 1-3 are connected by HCOO(-) groups through bridging and chelating modes to give 2D layers, which are further linked by azdc(2-) ligands to produce 3D frameworks. Magnetic results declare that antiferromagnetic couplings exist in 1, although two different magnetic interactions among adjacent Gd(III) ions derived from antiferromagnetic interactions of the smaller Gd-O-Gd angles (Gd···Gd distances) and weak ferromagnetic interactions of the larger Gd-O-Gd angles (Gd···Gd distances) coexist in 1. Furthermore, the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) value of 1 is 1.5 times as large as that of 1'. More importantly, 1 exhibits excellent stabilities toward air, thermal, solvent, and acid/alkaline conditions. The results manifest that the crystalline structure of 1 can be stable at at least 425 °C supported by the in situ variable-temperature powder X-ray diffraction patterns and thermogravimetric analyses, in air for at least 3 months, and in common solvents for more than 1 week, as well as in aqueous solutions ranging from pH = 2 to 12 for more than 1 week. PMID:26097991

  6. Anions, solvents and spacer ligands assisted hydrogen-bonding coordination frameworks from tripodal ntb ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Mei; Lan, Mei-Hua; Jiang, Ji-Jun; Yang, Qing-Yuan; Su, Cheng-Yong

    2010-09-01

    Four new hydrogen-bonding (HB) coordination frameworks were synthesized and structurally characterized by using tris(2-benzimidazoylmethyl)amine (ntb) to react with different transition metal salts, which show diversified coordination motifs and hydrogen extending modes due to the contribution of counter-anions, methanol solvents, or spacer ligands, respectively. Among which, complexes 1 and 2 show mononuclear coordination units, connected by abundant N-H⋯N and N-H⋯O bonds formed between the units with trifluoromethanesulfonate (OTf -), azide ( N3-) anions or methanol solvents into 2D sheets, which are further connected by C-H⋯O or ?⋯? interactions into 3D topological nets; while in complexes 3 and 4, the spacer ligands 4-(pyridin-4-yl)pyridine (4'4-bipy) or 4,4'-bipyridine 1,1'-dioxide (dbpo) also participate in the coordination, resulting in either dinuclear coordination units linked by hydrogen-bonding into (4, 4) net or two different kinds of mononuclear units further extended by hydrogen-bonding into array of helical chains.

  7. Unusual Transformation from a Solvent-Stabilized 1D Coordination Polymer to a Metal-Organic Framework (MOF)-Like Cross-Linked 3D Coordination Polymer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Chul; Choi, Eun-Young; Lee, Sang-Beom; Kim, Sang-Wook; Kwon, O-Pil

    2015-10-26

    An unusual 1D-to-3D transformation of a coordination polymer based on organic linkers containing highly polar push-pull ?-conjugated side chains is reported. The coordination polymers are synthesized from zinc nitrate and an organic linker, namely, 2,5-bis{4-[1-(4-nitrophenyl)pyrrolidin-2-yl]butoxy}terephthalic acid, which possesses highly polar (4-nitrophenyl)pyrrolidine groups, with high dipole moments of about 7?D. The coordination polymers exhibit an unusual transformation from a soluble, solvent-stabilized 1D coordination polymer into an insoluble, metal-organic framework (MOF)-like 3D coordination polymer. The coordination polymer exhibits good film-forming ability, and the MOF-like films are insoluble in conventional organic solvents. PMID:26493879

  8. Reversible and selective solvent adsorption in layered metal-organic frameworks by coordination control.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xinbo; Chen, Haohong; Song, Yuna; Wang, Yang; Li, Qiaowei; Zhang, Lijuan

    2014-01-01

    With various functionalities in the framework and high thermal stability, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been extensively studied for the applications in adsorption and separation. In last decade, synthesizing new MOFs with desired structures and improved chemical stability to meet these applications has drawn great attention. In this report, by using an organic ligand with azolate moiety, benzo-bis(imidazole) (H2BBI), we synthesized two new 2D layered MOF structures with distinct topologies. Framework 1 {[Zn2Cl2(BBI)(MSM)2]n, MSM=methylsulfonylmethane}, constructed from tetrahedral Zn(II) and BBI, maintains its structure in organic solvents, such as methanol and benzene, and even in water. Meanwhile, framework 2 {[Cd2Cl2(BBI)(DMSO)2]n, DMSO=dimethyl sulfoxide} differs from framework 1, and is assembled from trigonal bipyramidal Cd(II) and square planar BBI. By removing the DMSO molecules coordinated to Cd(II) (25 weight% of the structure), 2 could transform to 3 {[Cd2Cl2(BBI)]n}, which was further characterized by high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction. The solvent-free 3 retains the original connectivity within each layer, and is capable of reversible and selective adsorption of DMSO molecules. The bistable four- and five-coordinated geometry exchange of Cd(II) is the origin of this adsorption with improved selectivity and capacity. PMID:24183447

  9. Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Magnesium Based Coordination Networks in Different Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    D Banerjee; J Finkelstein; A Smirnov; P Forster; L Borkowski; S Teat; J Parise

    2011-12-31

    Three magnesium based metal-organic frameworks, Mg{sub 3}(3,5-PDC){sub 3}(DMF){sub 3} {center_dot} DMF [1], Mg(3,5-PDC)(H{sub 2}O) {center_dot} (H{sub 2}O) [3], and Mg{sub 4}(3,5-PDC){sub 4}(DMF){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} {center_dot} 2DMF {center_dot} 4.5H{sub 2}O [4], and a 2-D coordination polymer, [Mg(3,5-PDC)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] [2] [PDC = pyridinedicarboxylate], were synthesized using a combination of DMF, methanol, ethanol, and water. Compound 1 [space group P2{sub 1}/n, a = 12.3475(5) {angstrom}, b = 11.1929(5) {angstrom}, c = 28.6734(12) {angstrom}, {beta} = 98.8160(10){sup o}, V = 3916.0(3) {angstrom}{sup 3}] consists of a combination of isolated and corner-sharing magnesium octahedra connected by the organic linkers to form a 3-D network with a 12.2 {angstrom} x 4.6 {angstrom} 1-D channel. The channel contains coordinated and free DMF molecules. In compound 2 [space group C2/c, a = 9.964(5) {angstrom}, b = 12.0694(6) {angstrom}, c = 7.2763(4) {angstrom}, {beta} = 106.4970(6){sup o}, V = 836.70(6) {angstrom}{sup 3}], PDC connects isolated seven coordinated magnesium polyhedra into a layered structure. Compound 3 [space group P6{sub 1}22, a = 11.479(1) {angstrom}, c = 14.735(3) {angstrom}, V = 1681.7(4) {angstrom}{sup 3}] (previously reported) contains isolated magnesium octahedra connected by the organic linker with each other forming a 3D network. Compound 4 [space group P2{sub 1}/c, a = 13.7442(14) {angstrom}, b = 14.2887(15) {angstrom}, c = 14.1178(14) {angstrom}, {beta} = 104.912(2){sup o}, V = 2679.2(5) {angstrom}{sup 3}] also exhibits a 3D network based on isolated magnesium octahedra with square cavities containing both disordered DMF and water molecules. The structural topologies originate due to the variable coordination ability of solvent molecules with the metal center. Water molecules coordinate with the magnesium metal centers preferably over other polar solvents (DMF, methanol, ethanol) used to synthesize the coordination networks. Despite testing multiple desolvation routes, we were unable to measure BET surface areas greater than 51.9 m{sup 2}/g for compound 1.

  10. Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Magnesium Based Coordination Networks in Different Solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Debasis; Finkelstein, Jeffrey; Smirnov, A.; Forster, Paul M.; Borkowski, Lauren A.; Teat, Simon J.; Parise, John B.

    2015-10-15

    Three magnesium based metal-organic frameworks, Mg{sub 3}(3,5-PDC){sub 3}(DMF){sub 3} {center_dot} DMF [1], Mg(3,5-PDC)(H{sub 2}O) {center_dot} (H{sub 2}O) [3], and Mg4(3,5-PDC)4(DMF){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} {center_dot} 2DMF {center_dot} 4.5H{sub 2}O [4], and a 2-D coordination polymer, [Mg(3,5-PDC)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] [2] [PDC = pyridinedicarboxylate], were synthesized using a combination of DMF, methanol, ethanol, and water. Compound 1 [space group P2{sub 1}/n, a = 12.3475(5) {angstrom}, b = 11.1929(5) {angstrom}, c = 28.6734(12) {angstrom}, {beta} = 98.8160(10){sup o}, V = 3916.0(3) {angstrom}{sup 3}] consists of a combination of isolated and corner-sharing magnesium octahedra connected by the organic linkers to form a 3-D network with a 12.2 {angstrom} x 4.6 {angstrom} 1-D channel. The channel contains coordinated and free DMF molecules. In compound 2 [space group C2/c, a = 9.964(5) {angstrom}, b = 12.0694(6) {angstrom}, c = 7.2763(4) {angstrom}, {beta} = 106.4970(6){sup o}, V = 836.70(6) {angstrom}{sup 3}], PDC connects isolated seven coordinated magnesium polyhedra into a layered structure. Compound 3 [space group P6{sub 1}22, a = 11.479(1) {angstrom}, c = 14.735(3) {angstrom}, V = 1681.7(4) {angstrom}{sup 3}] (previously reported) contains isolated magnesium octahedra connected by the organic linker with each other forming a 3D network. Compound 4 [space group P2{sub 1}/c, a = 13.7442(14) {angstrom}, b = 14.2887(15) {angstrom}, c = 14.1178(14) {angstrom}, {beta} = 104.912(2){sup o}, V = 2679.2(5) {angstrom}{sup 3}] also exhibits a 3D network based on isolated magnesium octahedra with square cavities containing both disordered DMF and water molecules. The structural topologies originate due to the variable coordination ability of solvent molecules with the metal center. Water molecules coordinate with the magnesium metal centers preferably over other polar solvents (DMF, methanol, ethanol) used to synthesize the coordination networks. Despite testing multiple desolvation routes, we were unable to measure BET surface areas greater than 51.9 m{sup 2}/g for compound 1.

  11. Distinct dissociation kinetics between ion pairs: Solvent-coordinate free-energy landscape analysis.

    PubMed

    Yonetani, Yoshiteru

    2015-07-28

    Different ion pairs exhibit different dissociation kinetics; however, while the nature of this process is vital for understanding various molecular systems, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, to examine the origin of different kinetic rate constants for this process, molecular dynamics simulations were conducted for LiCl, NaCl, KCl, and CsCl in water. The results showed substantial differences in dissociation rate constant, following the trend kLiCl < kNaCl < kKCl < kCsCl. Analysis of the free-energy landscape with a solvent reaction coordinate and subsequent rate component analysis showed that the differences in these rate constants arose predominantly from the variation in solvent-state distribution between the ion pairs. The formation of a water-bridging configuration, in which the water molecule binds to an anion and a cation simultaneously, was identified as a key step in this process: water-bridge formation lowers the related dissociation free-energy barrier, thereby increasing the probability of ion-pair dissociation. Consequently, a higher probability of water-bridge formation leads to a higher ion-pair dissociation rate. PMID:26233144

  12. Distinct dissociation kinetics between ion pairs: Solvent-coordinate free-energy landscape analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonetani, Yoshiteru

    2015-07-01

    Different ion pairs exhibit different dissociation kinetics; however, while the nature of this process is vital for understanding various molecular systems, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, to examine the origin of different kinetic rate constants for this process, molecular dynamics simulations were conducted for LiCl, NaCl, KCl, and CsCl in water. The results showed substantial differences in dissociation rate constant, following the trend kLiCl < kNaCl < kKCl < kCsCl. Analysis of the free-energy landscape with a solvent reaction coordinate and subsequent rate component analysis showed that the differences in these rate constants arose predominantly from the variation in solvent-state distribution between the ion pairs. The formation of a water-bridging configuration, in which the water molecule binds to an anion and a cation simultaneously, was identified as a key step in this process: water-bridge formation lowers the related dissociation free-energy barrier, thereby increasing the probability of ion-pair dissociation. Consequently, a higher probability of water-bridge formation leads to a higher ion-pair dissociation rate.

  13. Solvent-dependent zinc(II) coordination polymers with mixed ligands: selective sorption and fluorescence sensing.

    PubMed

    Hua, Ji-Ai; Zhao, Yue; Kang, Yan-Shang; Lu, Yi; Sun, Wei-Yin

    2015-07-01

    Starting from the same metal salts and mixed organic ligands of 1,3,5-tris(1-imidazolyl)benzene (tib) and 2-bromo-1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid (H2BDC-Br), two novel zinc(II) coordination polymers [Zn2(tib)2(BDC-Br)]2·2SO4·17H2O (1) and [Zn4(tib)2(BDC-Br)3(H2O)4SO4]·7.5H2O·2.5DMF (2) (DMF = N,N-dimethylformamide) were obtained by using different solvent systems of DMF/H2O and DMF/EtOH/H2O, respectively. 1 is an unusual (3,4)-connected 3D net with a Point symbol of {4·8·10(4)}{4·8·10}, while 2 is a complicated 1D chain, which is further connected to form a 3D supramolecular architecture by hydrogen bonding interactions. In particular, 1 and 2 exhibit selective adsorption of CO2 over N2 and show good selectivity for detection of acetone via fluorescence quenching. PMID:26032187

  14. Retrieval-based face annotation by weak label regularized local coordinate coding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dayong; Hoi, Steven C H; He, Ying; Zhu, Jianke; Mei, Tao; Luo, Jiebo

    2014-03-01

    Auto face annotation, which aims to detect human faces from a facial image and assign them proper human names, is a fundamental research problem and beneficial to many real-world applications. In this work, we address this problem by investigating a retrieval-based annotation scheme of mining massive web facial images that are freely available over the Internet. In particular, given a facial image, we first retrieve the top $(n)$ similar instances from a large-scale web facial image database using content-based image retrieval techniques, and then use their labels for auto annotation. Such a scheme has two major challenges: 1) how to retrieve the similar facial images that truly match the query, and 2) how to exploit the noisy labels of the top similar facial images, which may be incorrect or incomplete due to the nature of web images. In this paper, we propose an effective Weak Label Regularized Local Coordinate Coding (WLRLCC) technique, which exploits the principle of local coordinate coding by learning sparse features, and employs the idea of graph-based weak label regularization to enhance the weak labels of the similar facial images. An efficient optimization algorithm is proposed to solve the WLRLCC problem. Moreover, an effective sparse reconstruction scheme is developed to perform the face annotation task. We conduct extensive empirical studies on several web facial image databases to evaluate the proposed WLRLCC algorithm from different aspects. The experimental results validate its efficacy. We share the two constructed databases "WDB" (714,454 images of 6,025 people) and "ADB" (126,070 images of 1,200 people) with the public. To further improve the efficiency and scalability, we also propose an offline approximation scheme (AWLRLCC) which generally maintains comparable results but significantly reduces the annotation time. PMID:24457510

  15. Solvent exfoliation of transition metal dichalcogenides: dispersibility of exfoliated nanosheets varies only weakly between compounds.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Graeme; Lotya, Mustafa; Cucinotta, Clotilde S; Sanvito, Stefano; Bergin, Shane D; Menzel, Robert; Shaffer, Milo S P; Coleman, Jonathan N

    2012-04-24

    We have studied the dispersion and exfoliation of four inorganic layered compounds, WS(2), MoS(2), MoSe(2), and MoTe(2), in a range of organic solvents. The aim was to explore the relationship between the chemical structure of the exfoliated nanosheets and their dispersibility. Sonication of the layered compounds in solvents generally gave few-layer nanosheets with lateral dimensions of a few hundred nanometers. However, the dispersed concentration varied greatly from solvent to solvent. For all four materials, the concentration peaked for solvents with surface energy close to 70 mJ/m(2), implying that all four have surface energy close to this value. Inverse gas chromatography measurements showed MoS(2) and MoSe(2) to have surface energies of ?75 mJ/m(2), in good agreement with dispersibility measurements. However, this method suggested MoTe(2) to have a considerably larger surface energy (?120 mJ/m(2)). While surface-energy-based solubility parameters are perhaps more intuitive for two-dimensional materials, Hansen solubility parameters are probably more useful. Our analysis shows the dispersed concentration of all four layered materials to show well-defined peaks when plotted as a function of Hansen's dispersive, polar, and H-bonding solubility parameters. This suggests that we can associate Hansen solubility parameters of ?(D) ? 18 MPa(1/2), ?(P) ? 8.5 MPa(1/2), and ?(H) ? 7 MPa(1/2) with all four types of layered material. Knowledge of these properties allows the estimation of the Flory-Huggins parameter, ?, for each combination of nanosheet and solvent. We found that the dispersed concentration of each material falls exponentially with ? as predicted by solution thermodynamics. This work shows that solution thermodynamics and specifically solubility parameter analysis can be used as a framework to understand the dispersion of two-dimensional materials. Finally, we note that in good solvents, such as cyclohexylpyrrolidone, the dispersions are temporally stable with >90% of material remaining dispersed after 100 h. PMID:22394330

  16. Solvent induced rapid modulation of micro/nano structures of metal carboxylates coordination polymers: mechanism and morphology dependent magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Shen, Zhu-Rui; Li, Yue; Han, Song-De; Hu, Tong-Liang; Zhang, Da-Shuai; Bu, Xian-He; Ruan, Wen-Juan

    2014-08-01

    Rational modulation of morphology is very important for functional coordination polymers (CPs) micro/nanostructures, and new strategies are still desired to achieve this challenging target. Herein, organic solvents have been established as the capping agents for rapid modulating the growth of metal-carboxylates CPs in organic solvent/water mixtures at ambient conditions. Co-3,5-pyridinedicarboxylate (pydc) CPs was studied here as the example. During the reaction, the organic solvents exhibited three types of modulation effect: anisotropic growth, anisotropic growth/formation of new crystalline phase and the formation of new crystalline phase solely, which was due to the variation of their binding ability with metal cations. The following study revealed that the binding ability was critically affected by their functional groups and molecular size. Moreover, their modulation effect could be finely tuned by changing volume ratios of solvent mixtures. Furthermore, they could be applied for modulating other metal-carboxylates CPs: Co-1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic (BTC), Zn-pydc and Eu-pydc etc. Additionally, the as-prepared Co-pydc CPs showed a fascinating morphology-dependent antiferromagnetic behavior.

  17. Solvent induced rapid modulation of micro/nano structures of metal carboxylates coordination polymers: mechanism and morphology dependent magnetism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kun; Shen, Zhu-Rui; Li, Yue; Han, Song-De; Hu, Tong-Liang; Zhang, Da-Shuai; Bu, Xian-He; Ruan, Wen-Juan

    2014-01-01

    Rational modulation of morphology is very important for functional coordination polymers (CPs) micro/nanostructures, and new strategies are still desired to achieve this challenging target. Herein, organic solvents have been established as the capping agents for rapid modulating the growth of metal-carboxylates CPs in organic solvent/water mixtures at ambient conditions. Co-3,5-pyridinedicarboxylate (pydc) CPs was studied here as the example. During the reaction, the organic solvents exhibited three types of modulation effect: anisotropic growth, anisotropic growth/formation of new crystalline phase and the formation of new crystalline phase solely, which was due to the variation of their binding ability with metal cations. The following study revealed that the binding ability was critically affected by their functional groups and molecular size. Moreover, their modulation effect could be finely tuned by changing volume ratios of solvent mixtures. Furthermore, they could be applied for modulating other metal-carboxylates CPs: Co-1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic (BTC), Zn-pydc and Eu-pydc etc. Additionally, the as-prepared Co-pydc CPs showed a fascinating morphology-dependent antiferromagnetic behavior. PMID:25113225

  18. Hydrophobic Encapsulated Phosphonium Salts-Synthesis of Weakly Coordinating Cations and their Application in Wittig Reactions.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Ralf; Wagner, Manfred; Schollmeyer, Dieter; Baumgarten, Martin; Müllen, Klaus

    2015-06-15

    Large and rigid tetraarylphosphonium tetrafluoroborate salts have been synthesized representing weakly coordinating cations with diameters of several nanometers. Divergent dendritic growth by means of thermal Diels-Alder cycloaddition was employed for the construction of the hydrophobic polyphenylene framework up to the third generation. X-ray crystal structure analysis of first-generation phosphonium tetrafluoroborate supported the rigidity of the non-collapsible shell around the phosphorus center and gave insight into solid-state packing and cation-anion distances. Copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne ligation served as reliable method for the preparation of a first-generation triazolylphenyl hybrid phosphonium cation under mild reaction conditions. Furthermore, from the synthesis of triarylbenzylphosphonium bromides, Wittig precursors with unprecedented bulky substituents in the ?-position were accessible. Employment of these precursors under Wittig conditions by treatment with base and subsequent reaction with aldehydes preferentially provided (Z)-olefins with bulky polyphenylene substituents. PMID:25965029

  19. Solvent-vapour-assisted pathways and the role of pre-organization in solid-state transformations of coordination polymers

    PubMed Central

    Wright, James S.; Vitórica-Yrezábal, Iñigo J.; Adams, Harry; Thompson, Stephen P.; Hill, Adrian H.; Brammer, Lee

    2015-01-01

    A family of one-dimensional coordination polymers, [Ag4(O2C(CF2)2CF3)4(phenazine)2(arene)n]·m(arene), 1 (arene = toluene or xylene), have been synthesized and crystallographically characterized. Arene guest loss invokes structural transformations to yield a pair of polymorphic coordination polymers [Ag4(O2C(CF2)2CF3)4(phenazine)2], 2a and/or 2b, with one- and two-dimensional architectures, respectively. The role of pre-organization of the polymer chains of 1 in the selectivity for formation of either polymorph is explored, and the templating effect of toluene and p-xylene over o-xylene or m-xylene in the formation of arene-containing architecture 1 is also demonstrated. The formation of arene-free phase 2b, not accessible in a phase-pure form through other means, is shown to be the sole product of loss of toluene from 1-tol·tol [Ag4(O2C(CF2)2CF3)4(phenazine)2(toluene)]·2(toluene), a phase containing toluene coordinated to Ag(I) in an unusual ?:?1,?1 manner. Solvent-vapour-assisted conversion between the polymorphic coordination polymers and solvent-vapour influence on the conversion of coordination polymers 1 to 2a and 2b is also explored. The transformations have been examined and confirmed by X-ray diffraction, NMR spectroscopy and thermal analyses, including in situ diffraction studies of some transformations. PMID:25866656

  20. Solvent induced synthesis, structure and properties of coordination polymers based on 5-hydroxyisophthalic acid as linker and 1,10-phenanthroline as auxiliary ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kariem, Mukaddus; Yawer, Mohd; Sheikh, Haq Nawaz

    2015-11-01

    Three new coordination polymers [Mn(hip)(phen) (H2O)]n (1), [Co(hip)(phen) (H2O)]n (2), and [Cd(hip) (phen) (H2O)]n (3) (H2hip=5-hydroxyisophthalic acid; phen=1,10-phenanthroline) have been synthesized by solvo-hydrothermal method using diethyl formamide-water (DEF-H2O) as solvent system. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that all three coordination polymers 1, 2 and 3 crystallize in monoclinic space group P2/n. Metal ions are inter-connected by hydroxyisophthalate anions forming zig-zag 1D chain. 1D chains are further inter-connected by hydrogen bonding and ?-? stacking interactions leading to 3D supramolecular architecture. Hydrogen-bonding and ?-? stacking provide thermal stability to polymers. Compounds 1 and 2 are paramagnetic at room temperature and variable temperature magnetic moment measurements revealed weak ferromagnetic interactions between metal ions at low temperature. Compound 3 exhibits excellent photoluminescence with large Stokes shift.

  1. Weak coordination among petiole, leaf, vein, and gas-exchange traits across 41 Australian angiosperm species and its possible implications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and Aims Close coordination between leaf gas exchange and maximal hydraulic supply has been reported across diverse plant life-forms. However, recent reports suggest that this relationship may become weak or break down completely within the angiosperms. Methods To examine this possi...

  2. Salts of highly fluorinated weakly coordinating anions as versatile precursors towards hydrogen storage materials.

    PubMed

    Starobrat, A; Tyszkiewicz, M J; Wegner, W; Pancerz, D; Or?owski, P A; Leszczy?ski, P J; Fijalkowski, K J; Jaro?, T; Grochala, W

    2015-11-10

    We report the most recent results related to application of a metathetic pathway towards mixed-metal borohydrides. The synthetic protocol utilizes highly-fluorinated weakly coordinating anion salts as precursors. We discuss the technicalities related to the use of fluorine-rich anions as well as the improvements which are still needed to deliver high-purity materials with potential applications for hydrogen storage. The applicability of the method is expanded beyond the previously described complex borohydrides of alkali metal Zn or Y, towards the systems containing Mg(II), Sc(III), Mn(II), or Eu(III). We have prepared for the first time [Ph4P]2[Mn(BH4)4] and [Me4N]2[Mg(BH4)4], solved their crystal structures from powder x-ray diffraction, and used selected organic metal borohydride derivatives as precursors towards mixed-metal borohydrides (K2Mn(BH4)4, Rb3Mg(BH4)5, etc.). We have also prepared [Ph4P][Eu(BH4)4], which is the first derivative of Eu(III) in the homoleptic environment of borohydride anions. PMID:26242623

  3. Ionic Liquids with Weakly Coordinating [M(III)(OR(F))4](-) Anions.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Alexander B A; Krossing, Ingo

    2015-09-15

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are defined as salts with melting points below 100 °C. They attracted much attention in the last two decades due to their unique set of properties, including high conductivities, low viscosities, negligible vapor pressure, and high electrochemical resistance. ILs are seen as tunable systems, of which (also in mixtures) up to 10(19) combinations may exist. These properties make ILs interesting candidates for a variety of fundamental to industrial applications. Our addition to this field was weakly coordinating, little interacting anions, the highly fluorinated aluminates [Al(OR(F))4](-) (R(F) = C(CF3)3, C(CH3), (CF3)2, and CH(CF3)2 and later also CH2(CF3)). We have used these anions in a broad spectrum of applications, including the stabilization of reactive cations, (polymerization) catalysis, and conducting salts for cyclic voltammetry or in electrochemical cells. Especially the [Al(Ohfip)4](-) (hfip = CH(CF3)2) anions in combination with asymmetric organic cations turned out to be very well suited for the synthesis of ILs with very low melting points, some even far below 0 °C. Also the analogous borates, [B(OR(F))4](-), were shown to yield ILs, and currently a plethora of such aluminate and borate ILs have been synthesized and thoroughly investigated. In many aspects, at least the [Al(Ohfip)4](-) ILs present almost ideally noninteracting prototype ILs with (nearly) isotropic but weak and flat Coulomb potential. Consequently, their overall interionic interactions are significantly reduced compared with other classes of ILs, resulting in an extraordinarily low degree, or (for short cation chain lengths below six) even complete absence of ion pairing. From thorough analysis of the principles governing the physical properties of this highly fluorinated IL class with minimized interactions, we were able to learn basic principles that could be extended, for example, to the prediction of the principal properties of a wide variety of typical ILs. In this Account, we give a comprehensive review of their syntheses, thermal and toxicological behavior, physical as well as dynamic properties, and use in electrochemical applications. We delineate advantages and limitations of the [M(III)(OR(F))4](-) ILs developed in our lab and give an outlook on those fields, in which there is still a lack of knowledge. PMID:26299782

  4. Effect of Solvent Molecule in Pore for Flexible Porous Coordination Polymer upon Gas Adsorption and Iodine Encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Ar?c?, Mürsel; Ye?ilel, Okan Zafer; Ta?, Murat; Demiral, Hakan

    2015-12-01

    Four new Zn(II)-coordination polymers, namely, [Zn2(?6-ao2btc)(?-obix)2]n (1), [Zn2(?4-ao2btc)(?-obix)2]n (2), [Zn2(?4-ao2btc)(?-mbix)2]n (3), and {[Zn2(?4-ao2btc)(?-pbix)2]·2DMF·8H2O}n (4), where ao2btc = dioxygenated form of 3,3',5,5'-azobenzenetetracarboxylate and obix, mbix, and pbix = 1,2-, 1,3-, and 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-ylmethyl)benzene, have been synthesized with azobenzenetetracarboxylic acid and isomeric bis(imidazole) ligands and characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, single-crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction, and thermal analyses. X-ray results showed that 1, 2, and 4 had two-dimensional structures with 3,4L13 topology, while 3 was a three-dimensional coordination polymer with bbf topology. For 4, two types of activation strategies, solvent exchange + heating (which produced 4a) and direct heating (which produced 4b), were used to investigate the effect of a guest molecule in a flexible framework. Gas adsorption and iodine encapsulation properties of activated complexes were studied. The CO2 uptake capacities for 4a and 4b were 3.62% and 9.50%, respectively, and Langmuir surface areas calculated from CO2 isotherms were 167.4 and 350.7 m(2)/g, respectively. Moreover, 4b exhibited 19.65% and 15.27% iodine uptake in vapor phase and cyclohexane solution, respectively, which corresponded to 1.47 and 0.97 molecules of iodine/formula unit, respectively. Moreover, photoluminescence properties of the complexes were studied. PMID:26594910

  5. Continuum Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory for weakly bound deformed nuclei using the coordinate-space Green's function method

    SciTech Connect

    Oba, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Masayuki

    2009-08-15

    We formulate a new scheme of the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mean-field theory applicable to weakly bound and pair-correlated deformed nuclei using the coordinate-space Green's function technique. On the basis of a coupled-channel representation of the quasiparticle wave function expanded in terms of the partial waves, we impose the correct boundary condition of the asymptotically out-going waves on the continuum quasiparticle states. We perform numerical analysis for {sup 38}Mg to illustrate properties of the continuum quasiparticle states and the pair correlation in deformed nuclei near the neutron drip line.

  6. Substrate binding preferences and pKa determinations of a nitrile hydratase model complex: Variable solvent coordination to [(bmmp-TASN)Fe]OTf

    PubMed Central

    O’Toole, Martin G.; Bennett, Brian; Mashuta, Mark S.; Grapperhaus, Craig A.

    2009-01-01

    The five-coordinate iron-dithiolate complex (N,N?-4,7-bis-(2?-methyl-2?-mercatopropyl)-1-thia-4,7-diazacyclononane)iron(III), [LFe]+, has been isolated as the triflate salt from reaction of the previously reported LFeCl with thallium triflate. Spectroscopic characterization confirms an S = 1/2 ground state in non-coordinating solvents with room temperature µeff = 1.78 µB and EPR derived g-values of g1 = 2.06, g2 = 2.03 and g3 = 2.02. [LFe]+ binds a variety of coordinating solvents resulting in six-coordinate complexes [LFe-solvent]+. In acetonitrile the low-spin [LFe-NCMe]+ (g1 = 2.27, g2 = 2.18 and g3 = 1.98) is in equilibrium with [LFe]+ with a binding constant of Keq = 4.03 at room temperature. Binding of H2O, DMF, methanol, DMSO and pyridine to [LFe]+ yields high-spin six-coordinate complexes with EPR spectra that display significant strain in the rhombic zero-field splitting term E/D. Addition of one equivalent of triflic acid to the previously reported diiron species (LFe)2O results in the formation of [(LFe)2OH]OTf, which has been characterized by x-ray crystallography. The aqueous chemistry of [LFe]+ reveals three distinct species as a function of pH: [LFe-OH2]+, [(LFe)2OH]OTf, and (LFe)2O. The pKa values for [LFe-OH2]+ and [(LFe)2OH]OTf are 5.4 ± .1 and 6.52 ± .05 respectively. PMID:19166306

  7. Exploiting dimensional variability in coordination polymers: solvent promotes reversible conversion between 3D and chiral 1D architectures.

    PubMed

    Rancan, Marzio; Armelao, Lidia

    2015-08-21

    DMSO promotes dimensional variability driving the formation of Cu-bpy architectures such as a 3D nanoporous network (1) and a 1D chiral polymer (2) self-assembled from achiral building blocks. The same solvent rules a reversible conversion between 1 and 2. PMID:26165598

  8. Solvent effect on the blue shifted weakly H-bound F 3 CH…FCD 3 complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkowski, K. S.; Melikova, S. M.; Rodziewicz, P.; Herrebout, W. A.; van der Veken, B. J.; Koll, A.

    2008-05-01

    Solvent effect on the ?c frequency of CH stretching vibration of the blue shifted F 3CH…FCD 3 complex has been studied in liquefied N 2, CO, Ar, Kr and Xe. In the case of Xe, the spectroscopic measurements have also been extended to the solid state. It was found that the ?c position of the complex in the solutions studied lowers with respect to the value in the gas phase. In liquid Xe, characterized by the largest permittivity, this effect reaches its maximum value of ˜-14.5 cm -1. The ?c frequency begins to grow again just below the freezing point of Xe, where a noticeable (˜15%) increase of the density of Xe occurs. The experimental results obtained for the liquid phase have been analyzed in the framework of the Onsager-like reaction field model and Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) implemented into a standard Gaussian 98 Program.

  9. Micromolding of a Highly Fluorescent Reticular Coordination Polymer: Solvent-Mediated Reconfigurable Polymerization in a Soft Lithographic Mold

    SciTech Connect

    Y You; H Yang; J Chung; J Kim; Y Jung; S Park

    2011-12-31

    Coordination polymerization of pyridine-based ligands and zinc or silver ions was controlled by soft lithographic micromolding in capillaries. The polymer patterns that are produced are highly fluorescent and supramolecularly structured.

  10. One novel 1D coordination polymer with parallel dinuclear copper(II) macrocyclic platforms bridged by trans dimeric half-water molecules and two dinuclear copper(II) macrocyclic complexes with different coordination geometry obtained from different solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Zhaolian; You, Wei; Huang, Wei

    2009-02-01

    Three dinuclear copper(II) macrocyclic complexes, formulated as [Cu 2L(N 3) 2(0.5H 2O) 2] n ( 1), [Cu 2L(ClO 4) 2(CH 3CH 2OH)] ( 2) and [Cu 2L(CH 3OH) 2](ClO 4) 2 ( 3) (LH 2 = [2+2] Schiff base macrocyclic ligand condensed from 4-chloro-2,6-diformylphenol and 1,3-diaminopropane), have been prepared and determined by X-ray single-crystal diffraction. Complex 1 shows two six-coordinate Cu(II) centers in which two monodentate N3- anions and two half-water molecules are bonded at the apical positions in the trans configuration. Furthermore, the dimeric half-water molecules serve as a ?2-bridge linking adjacent macrocyclic units together with the multiple O sbnd H…N hydrogen bonds with azide anions, forming a novel 1D chain-like coordination polymer. Complexes 2 and 3 are obtained from different solvents (ethanol and methanol) and they can be converted into each other. The molecular structures and packing mode of 2 and 3 are different where six-coordinate and five-coordinate copper(II) centers are present, respectively.

  11. Solvent-induced synthesis of cobalt(II) coordination polymers based on a rigid ligand and flexible carboxylic acid ligands: syntheses, structures and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Zhang, Chuanlei; Ju, Zemin; Zheng, Hegen

    2015-04-21

    Five new cobalt(ii) coordination architectures, {[Co(L)2(H2O)2]·2H2O·2NO3}n (), {[Co(L)(ppda)]·2H2O}n (), {[Co2(L)(ppda)2]2·H2O}n (), {[Co(L)(nba)]·5H2O}n (), and {[Co(L)(oba)]2·3H2O}n (), have been constructed from the rigid ligand L [L = 2,8-di(1H-imidazol-1-yl)dibenzofuran] and different flexible carboxylic acid ligands [H2ppda = 4,4'-(perfluoropropane-2,2-diyl)dibenzoic acid, H2nba = 4,4'-azanediyldibenzoic acid, and H2oba = 4,4'-oxydibenzoic acid]. Depending on the nature of the solvent systems, these five different coordination polymers were synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, IR, PXRD and elemental analysis. Compounds , and were obtained by a one-pot method, and then we utilized the solvent-induced effect to obtain almost pure crystals of , respectively. Compound is an infinite 1D chain which is formed by L ligands and Co atoms. Compound contains a [Co2(CO2)4] secondary building unit (SBU), and can be topologically represented as a 6-connected 2-fold interpenetrating pcu net with the point symbol of {4(12)·6(3)}. Compound can be characterized as a 4-connected sql tetragonal planar network with the point symbol of {4(4)·6(2)}. In compounds and , there is a 1D chain which is formed by flexible carboxylic acid ligands and Co atoms; then the 1D chain is linked by L ligands in the tilting direction, leading to the formation of a 2D layer. Furthermore, UV-vis, TGA and magnetic properties have been investigated in detail. PMID:25778448

  12. A series of phenyl sulfonate metal coordination polymers as catalysts for one-pot Biginelli reactions under solvent-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin-Hua; Tang, Gui-Mei; Wang, Yong-Tao; Cui, Yue-Zhi; Wang, Jun-Jie; Ng, Seik Weng

    2015-10-28

    Three new metal coordination polymers, namely, [Co(DPP)2(H2O)2]·(BS)2·2H2O (1), [Co(DPP)2(H2O)2]·(ABS)2·2H2O (2) and [Co(DPP)2(MBS)2] (3) [DPP = 1,3-di(pyridin-4-yl)propane, BS = phenyl sulfonic acid, ABS = p-aminobenzene sulfonic acid, MBS = p-methylbenzene sulfonic acid] were obtained under hydrothermal conditions. Complexes 1-3 were structurally characterized using X-ray single-crystal diffraction, XRD and IR spectroscopy. Both complexes 1 and 2 display a 1D tape structure. Meanwhile, complex 3 exhibits a 2D layer and further stacks via C-H? interactions to generate a three-dimensional supramolecular architecture. These three metal coordination polymers have been applied as catalysts for the green synthesis of a variety of 3,4-dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-ones under solvent-free conditions through the Biginelli reaction. Interestingly, the catalysis products have been obtained in high yields under eco-friendly synthesis conditions. PMID:26399501

  13. Synthesis and optical properties of CdSe nanocrystals and CdSe/ZnS core/shell nanostructures in non-coordinating solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quang Nguyen, Hong

    2010-06-01

    We have performed a conventional and non-coordinated-based method for synthesis of CdSe and CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots in this work. This was the first time a CdSe/ZnS core/shell structure was successfully synthesized in a non-coordinating solvent without trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO). The obtained CdSe nanocrystals were characterized by using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, photoluminescent (PL) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which confirmed that a series of CdSe particles with a diameter of 1.9-3.5?nm, corresponding to the first peak of absorption spectra in the 450-570?nm range, was successfully achieved. The CdSe/ZnS core/shell structures were then fabricated by coating the previously synthesized CdSe core with various ZnS layers. These CdSe/ZnS semiconductor quantum dots exhibited very high photoluminescence in comparison to that of the original CdSe cores. The narrow width of the CdSe/ZnS quantum dots indicated that the as-produced quantum dots have uniform size distribution, desirable dispersibility and excellent fluorescent properties. These are the requirements for several potential utilizations, such as cellular imaging, biomedical sensing, and solar cell and other photovoltaic applications.

  14. Na4IrO4 : square-planar coordination of a transition metal in d(5) configuration due to weak on-site coulomb interactions.

    PubMed

    Kanungo, Sudipta; Yan, Binghai; Merz, Patrick; Felser, Claudia; Jansen, Martin

    2015-04-27

    Local environments and valence electron counts primarily determine the electronic states and physical properties of transition-metal complexes. For example, square-planar coordination geometries found in transition-metal oxometalates such as cuprates are usually associated with the d(8) ?or d(9) ?electron configuration. In this work, we address an unusual square-planar single oxoanionic [IrO4 ](4-) ?species, as observed in Na4 IrO4 in which Ir(IV) has a d(5) ?configuration, and characterize the chemical bonding through experiments and by ab?initio calculations. We find that the Ir(IV) ?center in ground-state Na4 IrO4 has square-planar coordination geometry because of the weak Coulomb repulsion of the Ir-5d electrons. In contrast, in its 3d counterpart Na4 CoO4 , the Co(IV) center is tetrahedrally coordinated because of strong electron correlation. Na4 IrO4 may thus serve as a simple yet important example to study the ramifications of Hubbard-type Coulomb interactions on local geometries. PMID:25772377

  15. Synthesis, structures, and reactivity of weakly coordinating anions with delocalized borate structure: the assessment of anion effects in metallocene polymerization catalysts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Lancaster, S J; Walker, D A; Beck, S; Thornton-Pett, M; Bochmann, M

    2001-01-17

    The formation of adducts of tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane with strongly coordinating anions such as CN(-) and [M(CN)(4)](2)(-) (M = Ni, Pd) is a synthetically facile route to the bulky, very weakly coordinating anions [CN[B(C(6)F(5))(3)](2)](-) and [M[CNB(C(6)F(5))(3)](4)](2-) which are isolated as stable NHMe(2)Ph(+) and CPh(3)(+) salts. The crystal structures of [CPh(3)][CN[B(C(6)F(5))(3)](2)] (1), [CPh(3)][ClB(C(6)F(5))(3)] (2), [NHMe(2)Ph](2)[Ni[CNB(C(6)F(5))(3)](4)].2Me(2)CO (4b.2Me(2)CO), [CPh(3)](2)[Ni[CNB(C(6)F(5))(3)](4)].2CH(2)Cl(2) (4c.2CH(2)Cl(2)), and [CPh(3)](2)[Pd[CNB(C(6)F(5))(3)](4)].2CH(2)Cl(2) (5c.2CH(2)Cl(2)) are reported. The CN stretching frequencies in 4 and 5 are shifted by approximately 110 cm(-1) to higher wavenumbers compared to the parent tetracyano complexes in aqueous solution, although the M-C and C-N distances show no significant change on B(C(6)F(5))(3) coordination. Zirconocene dimethyl complexes L(2)ZrMe(2) [L(2) = Cp(2), SBI = rac-Me(2)Si(Ind)(2)] react with 1, 4c or 5c in benzene solution at 20 degrees C to give the salts of binuclear methyl-bridged cations, [(L(2)ZrMe)(2)(mu-Me)][CN[B(C(6)F(5))(3)](2)] and [(L(2)ZrMe)(2)(mu-Me)](2)[M[CNB(C(6)F(5))(3)](4)]. The reactivity of these species in solution was studied in comparison with the known [[(SBI)ZrMe](2)(mu-Me)][B(C(6)F(5))(4)]. While the latter reacts with excess [CPh(3)][B(C(6)F(5))(4)] in benzene to give the mononuclear ion pair [(SBI)ZrMe(+).B(C(6)F(5))(4)(-)] in a pseudo-first-order reaction, k = 3 x 10(-4) s(-1), [(L(2)ZrMe)(2)(mu-Me)][CN[B(C(6)F(5))(3)](2)] reacts to give a mixture of L(2)ZrMe(mu-Me)B(C(6)F(5))(3) and L(2)ZrMe(mu-NC)B(C(6)F(5))(3). Recrystallization of [Cp' '(2)Zr(mu-Me)(2)AlMe(2)][CN[B(C(6)F(5))(3)](2)] affords Cp' '(2)ZrMe(mu-NC)B(C(6)F(5))(3) 6, the X-ray structure of which is reported. The stability of [(L(2)ZrMe)(2)(mu-Me)](+)X(-) decreases in the order X = [B(C(6)F(5))(4)] > [M[CNB(C(6)F(5))(3)](4)] > [CN[B(C(6)F(5))(3)](2)] and increases strongly with the steric bulk of L(2) = Cp(2) < SBI. Activation of (SBI)ZrMe(2) by 1 in the presence of AlBu(i)(3) gives extremely active ethene polymerization catalysts. Polymerization studies at 1-7 bar monomer pressure suggest that these, and by implication most other highly active ethene polymerization catalysts, are strongly mass-transport limited. By contrast, monitoring propene polymerization activities with the systems (SBI)ZrMe(2)/1/AlBu(i)(3) and CGCTiMe(2)/1/AlBu(i)(3) at 20 degrees C as a function of catalyst concentration demonstrates that in these cases mass-transport limitation is absent up to [metal] approximately 2 x 10(-5) mol L(-1). Propene polymerization activities decrease in the order [CN[B(C(6)F(5))(3)](2)](-) > [B(C(6)F(5))(4)](-) > [M[CNB(C(6)F(5))(3)](4)](2-) > [MeB(C(6)F(5))(3)](-), with differences in activation barriers relative to [CN[B(C(6)F(5))(3)](2)](-) of DeltaDeltaG = 1.1 (B(C(6)F(5))(4)(-)), 4.1 (Ni[CNB(C(6)F(5))(3)](4)(2-)) and 10.7-12.8 kJ mol(-)(1) (MeB(C(6)F(5))(3)(-)). The data suggest that even in the case of very bulky anions with delocalized negative charge the displacement of the anion by the monomer must be involved in the rate-limiting step. PMID:11456508

  16. Solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development and the Air Force Engineering and Services Center convened the First Annual International Workshop on Solvent Substitution on December 4--7, 1990. The primary objectives of this joint effort were to share information and ideas among attendees in order to enhance the development and implementation of required new technologies for the elimination of pollutants associated with industrial use of hazardous and toxic solvents; and to aid in accelerating collaborative efforts and technology transfer between government and industry for solvent substitution. There were workshop sessions focusing on Alternative Technologies, Alternative Solvents, Recovery/Recycling, Low VOC Materials and Treatment for Environmentally Safe Disposal. The 35 invited papers presented covered a wide range of solvent substitution activities including: hardware and weapons production and maintenance, paint stripping, coating applications, printed circuit boards, metal cleaning, metal finishing, manufacturing, compliance monitoring and process control monitoring. This publication includes the majority of these presentations. In addition, in order to further facilitate information exchange and technology transfer, the US Air Force and DOE solicited additional papers under a general Call for Papers.'' These papers, which underwent review and final selection by a peer review committee, are also included in this combined Proceedings/Compendium. For those involved in handling, using or managing hazardous and toxic solvents, this document should prove to be a valuable resource, providing the most up-to-date information on current technologies and practices in solvent substitution. Individual papers are abstracted separated.

  17. Comparative DNA binding abilities and phosphatase-like activities of mono-, di-, and trinuclear Ni(II) complexes: the influence of ligand denticity, metal-metal distance, and coordinating solvent/anion on kinetics studies.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Vimal K; Singh, Ajnesh

    2014-10-01

    Six novel Ni(II) complexes, namely, [Ni2(HL(1))(OAc)2] (1), [Ni3L(1)2]·H2O·2CH3CN (2), [Ni2(L(2))(L(3))(CH3CN)] (3), [Ni2(L(2))2(H2O)2] (4), [Ni2(L(2))2(DMF)2]2·2H2O (5), and [Ni(HL(2))2]·H2O (6), were synthesized by reacting nitrophenol-based tripodal (H3L(1)) and dipodal (H2L(2)) Schiff base ligands with Ni(II) metal salts at ambient conditions. All the complexes were fully characterized with different spectroscopic techniques such as elemental analyses, IR, UV-vis spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The solid-state structures of 2, 3, 5, and 6 were determined using single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The compounds 1, 3, 4, and 5 are dinuclear complexes where the two Ni(II) centers have octahedral geometry with bridging phenoxo groups. Compound 2 is a trinuclear complex with two different types of Ni(II) centers. In compound 3 one of the Ni(II) centers has a coordinated acetonitrile molecule, whereas in compound 4, a water molecule has occupied one coordination site of each Ni(II) center. In complex 5, the coordinated water of complex 4 was displaced by the dimethylformamide (DMF) during its crystallization. Complex 6 is mononuclear with two amine-bis(phenolate) ligands in scissorlike fashion around the Ni(II) metal center. The single crystals of 1 and 4 could not be obtained; however, from the spectroscopic data and physicochemical properties (electronic and redox properties) it was assumed that the structures of these complexes are quite similar to other analogues. DNA binding abilities and phosphatase-like activities of all characterized complexes were also investigated. The ligand denticity, coordinated anions/solvents (such as acetate, acetonitrile, water, and DMF), and cooperative action of two metal centers play a significant role in the phosphate ester bond cleavage of 2-hydroxypropyl-p-nitropenylphosphate by transesterification mechanism. Complex 3 exhibits highest activity among complexes 1-6 with 3.86 × 10(5) times greater rate enhancement than uncatalyzed reaction. PMID:25226493

  18. Solvent Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article describes production of butanol [acetone-butanol-ethanol, (also called AB or ABE or solvent)] by fermentation using both traditional and current technologies. AB production from agricultural commodities such as corn and molasses was an important historical fermentation. Unfortunately,...

  19. Solvent effect on the optical property of uranyl acetylacetonate monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Mukul; Basu, Mrinmoyee; Sarkar, Sougata; Sinha, Arun Kumar; Pal, Tarasankar

    2011-01-01

    The lability of the [UO 2(acac) 2H 2O] complex has been exploited to decipher solvent composition of a medium. Successive blue shift of the ?-?* band ( ?max = 282 nm) is observed due to alcohol substitution of increasing chain length in place of water. This observation helps to quantify the chain lengths of normal alcohol. The result has been accounted theoretically. However, in non-coordinating solvent, irregular red shift of the ?-?* band is observed because of the molecular complexity. Again, charge transfer (CT) band at 211 nm has been identified employing polar-polar and polar coordinating-non-coordinating solvent systems.

  20. Solvent effect on the optical property of uranyl acetylacetonate monohydrate.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Mukul; Basu, Mrinmoyee; Sarkar, Sougata; Sinha, Arun Kumar; Pal, Tarasankar

    2011-01-01

    The lability of the [UO2(acac)2H2O] complex has been exploited to decipher solvent composition of a medium. Successive blue shift of the ?-?* band (?max=282 nm) is observed due to alcohol substitution of increasing chain length in place of water. This observation helps to quantify the chain lengths of normal alcohol. The result has been accounted theoretically. However, in non-coordinating solvent, irregular red shift of the ?-?* band is observed because of the molecular complexity. Again, charge transfer (CT) band at 211 nm has been identified employing polar-polar and polar coordinating-non-coordinating solvent systems. PMID:21030297

  1. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, J.C.

    1984-03-13

    A process is claimed for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 vol % of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  2. Solvent wash solution

    DOEpatents

    Neace, James C. (Blackville, SC)

    1986-01-01

    Process for removing diluent degradation products from a solvent extraction solution, which has been used to recover uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. A wash solution and the solvent extraction solution are combined. The wash solution contains (a) water and (b) up to about, and including, 50 volume percent of at least one-polar water-miscible organic solvent based on the total volume of the water and the highly-polar organic solvent. The wash solution also preferably contains at least one inorganic salt. The diluent degradation products dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent and the organic solvent extraction solvent do not dissolve in the highly-polar organic solvent. The highly-polar organic solvent and the extraction solvent are separated.

  3. Solvents in novolak synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobodacha, Chet J.; Lynch, Thomas J.; Durham, Dana L.; Paradis, Valerie R.

    1993-09-01

    Novolac resins may be prepared with or without a solvent present. We have found that solvent power greatly affects the properties of the finished resin and thus gives the resist chemist another variable with which to `fine-tune' resist properties. Using designed experiments, we investigated the effect of solvent power, as measured by Hansen's Solubility Parameters, of a number of solvents and solvent mixtures on the final properties of the novolac resin. We found that the relative molecular weight (RMW) and dissolution rate of a novolac resin can be varied by selection of a solvent or solvent mixture with the appropriate polarity and hydrogen- bonding characteristics. The solvent polarity and hydrogen-bonding characteristics may affect the stability of the cresol/formaldehyde transition state, thus causing the observed changes in RMW and dissolution rate.

  4. Weak Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ales Psaker; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Anatoly Radyushkin

    2007-03-01

    We extend the analysis of the deeply virtual Compton scattering process to the weak interaction sector in the generalized Bjorken limit. The virtual Compton scattering amplitudes for the weak neutral and charged currents are calculated at the leading twist within the framework of the nonlocal light-cone expansion via coordinate space QCD string operators. Using a simple model, we estimate cross sections for neutrino scattering off the nucleon, relevant for future high intensity neutrino beam facilities.

  5. Solvent recycle/recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Paffhausen, M.W.; Smith, D.L.; Ugaki, S.N.

    1990-09-01

    This report describes Phase I of the Solvent Recycle/Recovery Task of the DOE Chlorinated Solvent Substitution Program for the US Air Force by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho, Inc., through the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The purpose of the task is to identify and test recovery and recycling technologies for proposed substitution solvents identified by the Biodegradable Solvent Substitution Program and the Alternative Solvents/Technologies for Paint Stripping Program with the overall objective of minimizing hazardous wastes. A literature search to identify recycle/recovery technologies and initial distillation studies has been conducted. 4 refs.

  6. Solvents and sustainable chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Solvents are widely recognized to be of great environmental concern. The reduction of their use is one of the most important aims of green chemistry. In addition to this, the appropriate selection of solvent for a process can greatly improve the sustainability of a chemical production process. There has also been extensive research into the application of so-called green solvents, such as ionic liquids and supercritical fluids. However, most examples of solvent technologies that give improved sustainability come from the application of well-established solvents. It is also apparent that the successful implementation of environmentally sustainable processes must be accompanied by improvements in commercial performance. PMID:26730217

  7. Insights into water coordination associated with the Cu(II)/Cu(I) electron transfer at a biomimetic Cu centre.

    PubMed

    Porras Gutiérrez, Ana Gabriela; Zeitouny, Joceline; Gomila, Antoine; Douziech, Bénédicte; Cosquer, Nathalie; Conan, Françoise; Reinaud, Olivia; Hapiot, Philippe; Le Mest, Yves; Lagrost, Corinne; Le Poul, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    The coordination properties of the biomimetic complex [Cu(TMPA)(H2O)](CF3SO3)2 (TMPA = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine) have been investigated by electrochemistry combined with UV-Vis and EPR spectroscopy in different non-coordinating media including imidazolium-based room-temperature ionic liquids, for different water contents. The solid-state X-ray diffraction analysis of the complex shows that the cupric centre lies in a N4O coordination environment with a nearly perfect trigonal bipyramidal geometry (TBP), the water ligand being axially coordinated to Cu(II). In solution, the coordination geometry of the complex remains TBP in all media. Neither the triflate ion nor the anions of the ionic liquids were found to coordinate the copper centre. Cyclic voltammetry in all media shows that the decoordination of the water molecule occurs upon monoelectronic reduction of the Cu(II) complex. Back-coordination of the water ligand at the cuprous state can be detected by increasing the water content and/or decreasing the timescale of the experiment. Numerical simulations of the voltammograms allow the determination of kinetics and thermodynamics for the water association-dissociation mechanism. The resulting data suggest that (i) the binding/unbinding of water at the Cu(I) redox state is relatively slow and equilibrated in all media, and (ii) the binding of water at Cu(I) is somewhat faster in the ionic liquids than in the non-coordinating solvents, while the decoordination process is weakly sensitive to the nature of the solvents. These results suggest that ionic liquids favour water exchange without interfering with the coordination sphere of the metal centre. This makes them promising media for studying host-guest reactions with biomimetic complexes. PMID:24619011

  8. Solvent-free synthesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter gives a brief introduction about solvent-free reactions whose importance can be gauged by the increasing number of publications every year during the last decade. The mechanistic aspects of the reactions under solvent-free conditions have been highlighted. Our observ...

  9. ONSITE SOLVENT RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic aspects of three technologies for onsite solvent recovery: atmospheric batch distillation, vacuum heat-pump distillation, and a low-emission vapor degreaser with closed solvent, liquid an...

  10. Alternative Green Solvents Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloney, Phillip R.

    2012-01-01

    Necessary for safe and proper functioning of equipment. Mainly halogenated solvents. Tetrachloride, Trichloroethylene (TCE), CFC-113. No longer used due to regulatory/safety concerns. Precision Cleaning at KSC: Small % of total parts. Used for liquid oxygen (LOX) systems. Dual solvent process. Vertrel MCA (decafluoropentane (DFP) and trons-dichloroethylene) HFE-7100. DFP has long term environmental concerns. Project Goals: a) Identify potential replacements. b) 22 wet chemical processes. c) 3 alternative processes. d) Develop test procedures. e) Contamination and cleaning. f) Analysis. g) Use results to recommend alternative processes. Conclusions: a) No alternative matched Vertrel in this study. b) No clear second place solvent. c) Hydrocarbons- easy; Fluorinated greases- difficult. d) Fluorinated component may be needed in replacement solvent. e) Process may need to make up for shortcoming of the solvent. f) Plasma and SCC02 warrant further testing.

  11. Solvent alternatives guide

    SciTech Connect

    Elion, J.M.; Monroe, K.R.; Hill, E.A.

    1996-06-01

    It is no longer legal to manufacture or import chlorofluorocarbon 113 or methyl chloroform solvents, and companies that currently clean their parts with either material are now required to implement environmentally safe substitutes. To help find alternative methods, Research Triangle Institute`s Surface Cleaning Technology Program has designed a Solvent Alternatives Guide (SAGE), an online tool that enables access to practical information and recommendations for acceptable solvents. Developed in partnership with the US Environmental Protection Agency, SAGE is available free of charge on the Internet`s World Wide Web.

  12. Reaction coordinate in electron transfer: What physical quantity should we use for it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachiya, M.

    2008-08-01

    In the Marcus theory of electron transfer the reaction coordinate due to solvent motion plays a central role. In 1991,Zhu and Rasaiah [J. Chem. Phys.95, 3325 (1991)] tried to define the reaction coordinate in terms of the solvent orientational polarization function. However, their definition is not consistent with the associated free energy curves as functions of the reaction coordinate. The appropriate definition of the reaction coordinate and the associated free energy curves are presented.

  13. Reaction coordinate in electron transfer: What physical quantity should we use for it?

    SciTech Connect

    Tachiya, M.

    2008-08-14

    In the Marcus theory of electron transfer the reaction coordinate due to solvent motion plays a central role. In 1991,Zhu and Rasaiah [J. Chem. Phys.95, 3325 (1991)] tried to define the reaction coordinate in terms of the solvent orientational polarization function. However, their definition is not consistent with the associated free energy curves as functions of the reaction coordinate. The appropriate definition of the reaction coordinate and the associated free energy curves are presented.

  14. Continuous countercurrent membrane column for the separation of solute/solvent and solvent/solvent systems

    DOEpatents

    Nerad, Bruce A. (Longmont, CO); Krantz, William B. (Boulder, CO)

    1988-01-01

    A reverse osmosis membrane process or hybrid membrane - complementary separator process for producing enriched product or waste streams from concentrated and dilute feed streams for both solvent/solvent and solute/solvent systems is described.

  15. Organic carbonates as stabilizing solvents for transition-metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Christian; Thomann, Ralf; Janiak, Christoph

    2012-08-28

    Biodegradable, non-toxic, "green" and inexpensive propylene carbonate (PC) solvent is shown to function as a stabilizing medium for the synthesis of weakly-coordinated transition-metal nanoparticles. Kinetically stable nanoparticles (M-NPs) with a small and uniform particle size (typically <5 ± 1 nm) have been reproducibly obtained by easy, rapid (3 min) and energy-saving 50 W microwave irradiation under an argon atmosphere from their metal-carbonyl precursors in PC. The M-NP/PC dispersions are stable for up to three weeks according to repeated TEM studies over this time period. The rhodium nanoparticle/PC dispersion is a highly active catalyst for the biphasic liquid-liquid hydrogenation of cyclohexene to cyclohexane with activities of up to and 1875 (mol product) (mol Rh)(-1) h(-1) and near quantitative conversion at 4 to 10 bar H(2) and 90 °C. From the PC dispersion the M-NPs can be coated with organic capping ligands such as 3-mercaptopropionic acid or trioctylphosphine oxide for further stabilization. PMID:22786622

  16. CHLORINATED SOLVENT PLUME CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This lecture will cover recent success in controlling and assessing the treatment of shallow ground water plumes of chlorinated solvents, other halogenated organic compounds, and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE).

  17. Supercritical solvent coal extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L. E. (inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Yields of soluble organic extract are increased up to about 50% by the supercritical extraction of particulate coal at a temperature below the polymerization temperature for coal extract fragments (450 C.) and a pressure from 500 psig to 5,000 psig by the conjoint use of a solvent mixture containing a low volatility, high critical temperature coal dissolution catalyst such as phenanthrene and a high volatility, low critical temperature solvent such as toluene.

  18. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, L. M.; Simandl, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92 percent. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting, and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes, and swelling of epoxies.

  19. Cleaning without chlorinated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.M.; Simandl, R.F.

    1994-12-31

    Because of health and environmental concerns, many regulations have been passed in recent years regarding the use of chlorinated solvents. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant has had an active program to find alternatives for these solvents used in cleaning applications for the past 7 years. During this time frame, the quantity of solvents purchased has been reduced by 92%. The program has been a twofold effort. Vapor degreasers used in batch cleaning-operations have been replaced by ultrasonic cleaning with aqueous detergent, and other organic solvents have been identified for use in hand-wiping or specialty operations. In order to qualify these alternatives for use, experimentation was conducted on cleaning ability as well as effects on subsequent operations such as welding, painting and bonding. Cleaning ability was determined using techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) which are capable of examining monolayer levels of contamination on a surface. Solvents have been identified for removal of rust preventative oils, lapping oils, machining coolants, lubricants, greases, and mold releases. Solvents have also been evaluated for cleaning urethane foam spray guns, swelling of urethanes and swelling of epoxies.

  20. Hydrogen Bond Lifetimes and Energetics for Solute/Solvent Complexes Studied with 2D-IR Vibrational Echo Spectroscopy

    E-print Network

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Hydrogen Bond Lifetimes and Energetics for Solute/Solvent Complexes Studied with 2D-IR Vibrational@stanford.edu Abstract: Weak hydrogen-bonded solute/solvent complexes are studied with ultrafast two the dissociation and formation rates of the hydrogen-bonded complexes. The dissociation rates of the weak hydrogen

  1. Coordinates Constellations

    E-print Network

    Walter, Frederick M.

    AST 105 The Sky Coordinates and Constellations #12;Early evening August 2014 40o N #12;Constellations · There are about 6000 stars visible to the naked eye under good conditions · About 2000://www.astro.uiuc.edu/~kaler/sow/const.html) #12;Scorpius #12;Patterns in the Sky Many societies have identified constellations Sumer (4000 BCE): 6

  2. COORDINATED AV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CLEAVES, PAUL C.; AND OTHERS

    THE INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS CENTER IS LOCATED IN THE LOCAL HIGH SCHOOL AND SUPPLIES ALL SCHOOLS IN THE AREA. AUDIOVISUAL EQUIPMENT ORDERS, AFTER SELECTIONS ARE MADE BY THE CLASSROOM TEACHER, ARE PROCESSED BY THE CENTER, CONFIRMED AND DELIVERED BY TRUCK THREE TIMES EACH WEEK. EACH SCHOOL HAS A BUILDING COORDINATOR WHO CHECKS THE ORDERS INTO THE…

  3. Solvent immersion imprint lithography.

    PubMed

    Vasdekis, A E; Wilkins, M J; Grate, J W; Kelly, R T; Konopka, A E; Xantheas, S S; Chang, T-M

    2014-06-21

    We present Solvent Immersion Imprint Lithography (SIIL), a technique for polymer functionalization and microsystem prototyping. SIIL is based on polymer immersion in commonly available solvents. This was experimentally and computationally analyzed, uniquely enabling two practical aspects. The first is imprinting and bonding deep features that span the 1 to 100 ?m range, which are unattainable with existing solvent-based methods. The second is a functionalization scheme characterized by a well-controlled, 3D distribution of chemical moieties. SIIL is validated by developing microfluidics with embedded 3D oxygen sensors and microbioreactors for quantitative metabolic studies of a thermophile anaerobe microbial culture. Polystyrene (PS) was employed in the aforementioned applications; however all soluble polymers - including inorganic ones - can be employed with SIIL under no instrumentation requirements and typical processing times of less than two minutes. PMID:24789571

  4. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOEpatents

    Sorenson, Kent S.

    2004-08-31

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. A preferred method includes adding a composition to the ground water wherein the composition is an electron donor for microbe-mediated reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents and enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative compositions effective in these methods include surfactants such as C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof. Especially preferred compositions for use in these methods include lactic acid, salts of lactic acid, such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the composition.

  5. Solvent resistant copolyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Alice C. (Inventor); St. Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A solvent resistant copolyimide was prepared by reacting 4,4'-oxydiphthalic anhydride with a diaimine blend comprising, based on the total amount of the diamine blend, about 75 to 90 mole percent of 3,4'-oxydianiline and about 10 to 25 mole percent p-phenylene diamine. The solvent resistant copolyimide had a higher glass transition temperature when cured at 350.degree. , 371.degree. and 400.degree. C. than LaRC.TM.-IA. The composite prepared from the copolyimide had similar mechanical properties to LaRC.TM.-IA. Films prepared from the copolyimide were resistant to immediate breakage when exposed to solvents such as dimethylacetamide and chloroform. The adhesive properties of the copolyimide were maintained even after testing at 23.degree., 150.degree., 177.degree. and 204.degree. C.

  6. Safe battery solvents

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Delmastro, Joseph R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stewart, Frederick F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-10-23

    An ion transporting solvent maintains very low vapor pressure, contains flame retarding elements, and is nontoxic. The solvent in combination with common battery electrolyte salts can be used to replace the current carbonate electrolyte solution, creating a safer battery. It can also be used in combination with polymer gels or solid polymer electrolytes to produce polymer batteries with enhanced conductivity characteristics. The solvents may comprise a class of cyclic and acyclic low molecular weight phosphazenes compounds, comprising repeating phosphorus and nitrogen units forming a core backbone and ion-carrying pendent groups bound to the phosphorus. In preferred embodiments, the cyclic phosphazene comprises at least 3 phosphorus and nitrogen units, and the pendent groups are polyethers, polythioethers, polyether/polythioethers or any combination thereof, and/or other groups preferably comprising other atoms from Group 6B of the periodic table of elements.

  7. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOEpatents

    Sorenson, Jr., Kent S. (Windsor, CO)

    2008-11-11

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. An illustrative method includes adding an electron donor for microbe-mediated anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents, which electron donor enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative electron donors include C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof, of which lactic acid, salts of lactic acid--such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof are particularly illustrative. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the electron donor.

  8. Unusual metal coordination chemistry from an amino-amide derivative of 4-nitrophenol, a surprising ligand.

    PubMed

    McGinley, John; McKee, Vickie; Toftlund, Hans; Walsh, John M D

    2009-10-21

    The simple ligand N-(2-aminoethyl)-2-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzamide () exhibits several coordination modes depending on the reaction conditions, acting as a zwitterion on its own or being ionic in the presence of acid and depending on the concentration of metal present in a reaction, it can coordinate to the metal in either a 1:1 or a 1:2 metal:ligand mode. Furthermore, the role of solvent plays an important role in these complexation reactions with both four and six coordinate copper complexes being obtained using water as solvent but only six coordinate copper complexes obtained using acetonitrile as solvent. PMID:19789795

  9. Solvents: Theory and Application

    E-print Network

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    .microchemicals.eu/technical-information Photoresists, developers, remover, adhesion promoters, etchants, and solvents ... Phone: +49 731 36080-409 Fax: Even in pure water without any traces of impurities, at room temperature the autoprotolysis forms ­ in case of bonded H- and O-atoms also called hydrogen bonds. The permanent dipole moment D of typical

  10. Organic solvent topical report

    SciTech Connect

    COWLEY, W.L.

    1999-05-13

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines. This report updates information contained in Analysis of Consequences of Postulated Solvent Fires in Hanford Site Waste Tanks. WHC-SD-WM-CN-032. Rev. 0A (Cowley et al. 1996). However, this document will not replace Cowley et al (1996) as the primary reference for the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) until the recently submitted BIO amendment (Hanson 1999) is approved by the US Department of Energy. This conclusion depends on the use of controls for preventing vehicle fuel fires and for limiting the use of flame cutting in areas where hot metal can fall on the waste surface.The required controls are given in the Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (Noorani 1997b). This is a significant change from the conclusions presented in Revision 0 of this report. Revision 0 of this calcnote concluded that some organic solvent fire scenarios exceeded risk evaluation guidelines, even with controls imposed.

  11. Organic solvent topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Cowley, W.L.

    1998-04-30

    This report is the technical basis for the accident and consequence analyses used in the Hanford Tank Farms Basis for Interim Operation. The report also contains the scientific and engineering information and reference material needed to understand the organic solvent safety issue. This report includes comments received from the Chemical Reactions Subcommittee of the Tank Advisory Panel.

  12. Solvent extraction processes compared

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, K.E.

    1994-04-01

    Solvent ectraction processes are often difficult to compare. Waste processors need to understand how the process works in order to make a good choice for waste stream applications. The technologies used by Carver-Greenfield Process, B.E.S.T., and NuKEM`s method are described.

  13. DESIGNING GREENER SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computer-aided design of chemicals and chemical mixtures provides a powerful tool to help engineers identify cleaner process designs and more-benign alternatives to toxic industrial solvents. Three software programs are discussed: (1) PARIS II (Program for Assisting the Replaceme...

  14. ONSITE SOLVENT RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic aspects of three technologies for onsite solvent recovery. The technologies were (1) atmospheric batch distillation, (2) vacuum heat-pump distillation, and (3) low-emission vapor degreas...

  15. Experimental Continuous Solvent Extraction Apparatus 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    -scale solvent drying processes that emit volatile organic compounds (VOC's). These exhausts could be recirculated for the purposes of emission point elimination, heat recovery and solvent reuse. The aim was to create an environmental control process which would...

  16. MUTAGENICITY OF SELECTED ORGANIC SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mutagenicity of selected organic solvents. Scand J Work Environ Health 11 (1985): suppl 1, 75-82. For certain organic solvents, such as benzene, vinyl chloride, styrene, technical grade trichloroethylene, and acrylonitrile, the available studies provide convincing evidence to dem...

  17. DESIGNING ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN SOLVENT SUBSTITUTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the signing of 1987 Montreal Protocol, reducing and eliminating the use of harmful solvents has become an internationally imminent environmental protection mission. Solvent substitution is an effective way to achieve this goal. The Program for Assisting the Replacement of...

  18. Solvent substitution for electronic products

    SciTech Connect

    Benkovich, M.K.

    1992-01-01

    Allied-Signal Inc., Kansas City Division (KCD), manufactures the electrical, electrochemical, mechanical, and plastic components for nuclear weapons. The KCD has made a commitment to eliminate the use of chlorohydrocarbon (CHC) and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) solvents to the greatest technical extent possible consistent with nuclear safety and stockpile reliability requirements. Current cleaning processes in the production departments use trichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and various CFC-113 based solvents. Several non-halogenated solvents (Solvent A - an aqueous solvent based on N,N-dimethylacetamide, Solvent B - an aqueous mixture of ethanol amines, Solvent C - a hydrocarbon solvent based on octadecyl acetate, Solvent D - a terpene (d-limonene) hydrocarbon solvent combined with emulsifiers, Solvent E - a terpene (d-limonene) hydrocarbon solvent combined with a separation agent, d-limonene, and isopropyl alcohol) were evaluated to determine the most effective, non-chlorinated, non-fluorinated, alternate solvent cleaning system. All of these solvents were evaluated using current manual spray cleaning processes. The solvents were evaluated for their effectiveness in removing a rosin based RMA solder flux, a particular silicone mold release, and oils, greases, mold releases, resins, etc. The Meseran Surface Analyzer was used to measure organic contamination on the samples before and after cleaning. An Omega Meter Model 600 was also used to detect solder flux residues. Solvents C, D, E and d-limonene the best alternatives to trichloroethylene for removing all of the contaminants tested. For this particular electronic assembly, d-limonene was chosen as the alternate because of material compatibility and long-term reliability concerns.

  19. PARIS II: DESIGNING GREENER SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PARIS II (the program for assisting the replacement of industrial solvents, version II), developed at the USEPA, is a unique software tool that can be used for customizing the design of replacement solvents and for the formulation of new solvents. This program helps users avoid ...

  20. Solvent Immersion Imprint Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Grate, Jay W.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Konopka, Allan; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Chang, M. T.

    2014-06-21

    The mechanism of polymer disolution was explored for polymer microsystem prototyping, including microfluidics and optofluidics. Polymer films are immersed in a solvent, imprinted and finally brought into contact with a non-modified surface to permanently bond. The underlying polymer-solvent interactions were experimentally and theoretically investigated, and enabled rapid polymer microsystem prototyping. During imprinting, small molecule integration in the molded surfaces was feasible, a principle applied to oxygen sensing. Polystyrene (PS) was employed for microbiological studies at extreme environmental conditions. The thermophile anaerobe Clostridium Thermocellum was grown in PS pore-scale micromodels, revealing a double mean generation lifetime than under ideal culture conditions. Microsystem prototyping through directed polymer dissolution is simple and accessible, while simultaneous patterning, bonding, and surface/volume functionalization are possible in less than one minute.

  1. A coordination chemistry study of hydrated and solvated cationic vanadium ions in oxidation states +III, +IV, and +V in solution and solid state

    PubMed Central

    Krakowiak, Joanna; Lundberg, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The coordination chemistry of hydrated and solvated vanadium(III), oxovanadium(IV), and dioxovanadium(V) ions in the oxygen donor solvents water, dimethylsulfoxide (dmso) and N,N?-dimethylpropyleneurea (dmpu) has been studied in solution by EXAFS and large angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and in solid state by single crystal X-ray diffraction and EXAFS. The hydrated vanadium(III) ion has a regular octahedral configuration with a mean V-O bond distance of 1.99 Å. In the hydrated and dimethylsulfoxide solvated oxovanadium(IV) ions vanadium binds strongly to an oxo group at ca. 1.6 Å. The solvent molecule trans to the oxo group is very weakly bound, at ca. 2.2 Å, while the remaining four solvent molecules, with a mean V-O bond distance of 2.0 Å, form a plane slightly below the vanadium atom; the mean O=V-Operp bond angle is ca. 98°. In the dmpu solvated oxovanadium(IV) ion, the space demanding properties of the dmpu molecule leaving no solvent molecule in the trans position to the oxo group which reduces the coordination number to 5. The O=V-O bond angle is consequently much larger, 106°, and the mean V=O and V-O bond distances decrease to 1.58 and 1.97 Å, respectively. The hydrated and dimethylsulfoxide solvated dioxovanadium(V) ions display a very distorted octahedral configuration with the oxo groups in cis position with mean V=O bond distances of 1.6 Å and a O=V=O bond angle of ca. 105°. The solvent molecules trans to the oxo groups are weakly bound, at ca. 2.2 Å, while the remaining two have bond distances of 2.02 Å. The experimental studies of the coordination chemistry of hydrated and solvated vanadium(III,IV,V) ions are complemented by summarizing previously reported crystal structures to yield a comprehensive description of the coordination chemistry of vanadium with oxygen donor ligands. PMID:22950803

  2. Solvent replacement for green processing.

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, J; Chin, B; Huibers, P D; Garcia-Valls, R; Hatton, T A

    1998-01-01

    The implementation of the Montreal Protocol, the Clean Air Act, and the Pollution Prevention Act of 1990 has resulted in increased awareness of organic solvent use in chemical processing. The advances made in the search to find "green" replacements for traditional solvents are reviewed, with reference to solvent alternatives for cleaning, coatings, and chemical reaction and separation processes. The development of solvent databases and computational methods that aid in the selection and/or design of feasible or optimal environmentally benign solvent alternatives for specific applications is also discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9539018

  3. SOLVENT FIRE BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D; Samuel Fink, S

    2006-05-22

    Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) conducted a burn test of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent to determine the combustion products. The testing showed hydrogen fluoride gas is not a combustion product from a solvent fire when up to 70% of the solvent is consumed. The absence of HF in the combustion gases may reflect concentration of the modifier containing the fluoride groups in the unburned portion. SwRI reported results for other gases (CO, HCN, NOx, formaldehyde, and hydrocarbons). The results, with other supporting information, can be used for evaluating the consequences of a facility fire involving the CSSX solvent inventory.

  4. Solvent effects on the resonance Raman and electronic absorption spectra of bacteriochlorophyll a cation radical

    SciTech Connect

    Misono, Yasuhito; Itoh, Koichi; Limanatara, Leenawaty; Koyama, Yasushi

    1996-02-08

    Resonance Raman and electronic absorption spectra of bacteriocholrophyll a cation radical (BChl a{sup .+}) were recorded in 14 different kinds of solvents. The frequency of the ring-breathing Raman band of BChl a{sup .+} was in the region of 1596-1599 cm{sup -1} in solvents forming the pentacoordinated state in neutral bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a), while it was in the region of 1584-1588 cm{sup -1} in solvents forming the hexacoordinated state. BChl a{sup .+} exhibited a key absorption band in the regions 546-554 and 557-563 nm in the above penta- and hexa-coordinating solvents. Therefore, it has been concluded that the penta- and hexa-coordinated states are retained even after conversion of BChl a into BChl a{sup .+} (one-electron oxidization). Application of this rule to the case of 2-propanol solution showed transformation from the penta- to the hexa-coordinated state upon one-electron oxidation in this particular solution. The coordination states of BChl a{sup .+} could be correlated with the donor number(DN) and the Taft parameters, {Beta} and {pi}{sup *}, of the solvent: The hexacoordinated state was formed in solvents with DN >= 18 or {Beta} > 0.5 showing higher electron donating power, while the pentacoordinated state was formed in solvents with {pi}{sup *} > 0.65 showing higher dielectric stabilization. 27 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. A thermodynamic study of selective solvation in solvent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Cabot, Rafel; Hunter, Christopher A

    2010-04-21

    Changes in the (31)P NMR chemical shift of tri-n-butylphosphine oxide have been measured as function of solvent composition in a number of binary solvent mixtures. The data were analysed using a model that separates the contributions of specific H-bond interactions with the first solvation shell and the non-specific effects of the bulk solvent on the chemical shift. This allowed measurement of equilibrium constants between differently solvated states of the probe and hence thermodynamic quantification of preferential solvation in the binary mixtures. The results are analysed in the context of the electrostatic solvent competition model, which assumes that solvent effects on intermolecular interactions can be interpreted based on the exchange of specific functional group contacts, with minimal involvement of the bulk solvent. The thermodynamic measurements of preferential solvation were used to determine the H-bond donor parameter alpha for cyclohexane, n-octane, n-dodecane, benzene, 1,4-dioxane, carbon tetrachloride, acetone, dichloromethane, dimethyl sulfoxide and chloroform. For solvents where the H-bond donor parameters have been measured as solutes in carbon tetrachloride solution, the H-bond donor parameters measured here for the same compounds as solvents are practically identical, i.e. solute and solvent H-bond parameters are directly interchangable. For alkanes, the experimental H-bond donor parameter is significantly larger than expected based on calculated molecular electrostatic potential surfaces. This might suggest an increase in the relative importance of van der Waals interactions when electrostatic effects are weak. PMID:20449502

  6. Solvent Fractionation of Lignin

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sabornie; Saito, Tomonori

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is a highly abundant source of renewable carbon that can be considered as a valuable sustainable source of biobased materials. The major issues for the commercial production of value added high performance lignin products are lignin s physical and chemical heterogenities. To overcome these problems, a variety of procedures have been developed to produce pure lignin suitable for high performace applications such as lignin-derived carbon materials. However, most of the isolation procedures affect lignin s properties and structure. In this chapter, a short review of the effect of solvent fractionation on lignin s properties and structure is presented.

  7. Coupling of protein dynamics with the solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliskan, Gokhan; Sauzan, Azzam; Mehtani, Disha; Sokolov, Alexei

    2003-03-01

    Glycerol and trehalose are among the many viscous solvents that are widely used for biostabilization and controlling the dynamics of proteins. It is believed that the suppression of the structural relaxations by high viscosity of solvent is responsible for improved stability in proteins. However, results of [1] and [2] demonstrate stronger suppression of biochemical activity and dynamics of proteins by liquid glycerol than by solid trehalose in a wide temperature range. The authors tried to explain the counterintuitive observations by a possible decoupling of the dynamics of the protein from trehalose. In order to test the validity of this assumption and to investigate the influence of the fast dynamics in proteins, the low frequency Raman scattering spectroscopy technique is used. Both relaxational and vibrational dynamics of glycerol, trehalose, and lysozyme in glycerol and in trehalose are studied in a wide temperature range. Dynamics of lysozyme in glycerol follows the strong temperature dependence of relaxational and vibrational dynamics of the bulk glycerol. On the other hand, the weak temperature dependence of dynamics of lysozyme in trehalose follows exactly the behavior of pure trehalose. This proves that there is a strong dynamic coupling between the protein and the solvents used. Interestingly, stronger relaxations in solid trehalose as compared to liquid glycerol are observed in the GHz region at low temperatures. This could be the reason for the enhanced protein activity observed in trehalose, compared to that in glycerol in this temperature range. Suppression of these fast relaxations should be the key for providing long-term stability to proteins. 1. Sastry, G.M. and N. Agmon, Trehalose prevents myoglobin collapse and preserves its internal mobility. BIOCHEMISTRY, 1997, 36(23): p. 7097-108. 2. Caliskan, G., et al., Influence of solvent on dynamics and stability of a protein. Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids, 2002, 307-310: p. 887-893.

  8. Solvent Blending Strategy to Upgrade MCU CSSX Solvent to Equivalent Next-Generation CSSX Solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Moyer, Bruce A

    2012-12-01

    The results of the present study have validated an equal-volume blending strategy for upgrading freshly prepared CSSX solvent to a blended solvent functionally equivalent to NG-CSSX solvent. It is shown that blending fresh CSSX solvent as currently used in MCU with an equal volume of an NG-CSSX solvent concentrate of appropriate composition yields a blended solvent composition (46.5 mM of MaxCalix, 3.5 mM of BOBCalixC6, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, 3 mM of guanidine suppressor, and 1.5 mM of TOA in Isopar L) that exhibits equivalent batch ESS performance to that of the NG-CSSX solvent containing 50 mM of MaxCalix, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, and 3 mM of guanidine suppressor in Isopar L. The solvent blend composition is robust to third-phase formation. Results also show that a blend containing up to 60% v/v of CSSX solvent could be accommodated with minimal risk. Extraction and density data for the effect of solvent concentration mimicking diluent evaporation or over-dilution of the equal-volume blended solvent are also given, providing input for setting operational limits. Given that the experiments employed all pristine chemicals, the results do not qualify a blended solvent starting with actual used MCU solvent, which can be expected to have undergone some degree of degradation. Consequently, further work should be considered to evaluate this risk and implement appropriate remediation if needed.

  9. Conformational transitions of a weak polyampholyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan Nair, Arun Kumar; Uyaver, Sahin; Sun, Shuyu

    2014-10-01

    Using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of a flexible polyelectrolyte where the charges are in contact with a reservoir of constant chemical potential given by the solution pH, we study the behavior of weak polyelectrolytes in poor and good solvent conditions for polymer backbone. We address the titration behavior and conformational properties of a flexible diblock polyampholyte chain formed of two oppositely charged weak polyelectrolyte blocks, each containing equal number of identical monomers. The change of solution pH induces charge asymmetry in a diblock polyampholyte. For diblock polyampholyte chains in poor solvents, we demonstrate that a discontinuous transition between extended (tadpole) and collapsed (globular) conformational states is attainable by varying the solution pH. The double-minima structure in the probability distribution of the free energy provides direct evidence for the first-order like nature of this transition. At the isoelectric point electrostatically driven coil-globule transition of diblock polyampholytes in good solvents is found to consist of different regimes identified with increasing electrostatic interaction strength. At pH values above or below the isoelectric point diblock chains are found to have polyelectrolyte-like behavior due to repulsion between uncompensated charges along the chain.

  10. Weak Value Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Shikano, Yutaka

    2011-03-28

    I show that the weak value theory is useful from the viewpoints of the experimentally verifiability, consistency, capacity for explanation as to many quantum paradoxes, and practical advantages. As an example, the initial state in the Hardy paradox can be experimentally verified using the weak value via the weak measurement.

  11. Generalized Born and Explicit Solvent Models for Free Energy Calculations in Organic Solvents: Cyclodextrin Dimerization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyang; Tan, Tianwei; van der Spoel, David

    2015-11-10

    Evaluation of solvation (binding) free energies with implicit solvent models in different dielectric environments for biological simulations as well as high throughput ligand screening remain challenging endeavors. In order to address how well implicit solvent models approximate explicit ones we examined four generalized Born models (GB(Still), GB(HCT), GB(OBC)I, and GB(OBC)II) for determining the dimerization free energy (?G(0)) of ?-cyclodextrin monomers in 17 implicit solvents with dielectric constants (D) ranging from 5 to 80 and compared the results to previous free energy calculations with explicit solvents ( Zhang et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2012 , 116 , 12684 - 12693 ). The comparison indicates that neglecting the environmental dependence of Born radii appears acceptable for such calculations involving cyclodextrin and that the GB(Still) and GB(OBC)I models yield a reasonable estimation of ?G(0), although the details of binding are quite different from explicit solvents. Large discrepancies between implicit and explicit solvent models occur in high-dielectric media with strong hydrogen bond (HB) interruption properties. ?G(0) with the GB models is shown to correlate strongly to 2(D-1)/(2D+1) (R(2) ? 0.90) in line with the Onsager reaction field ( Onsager J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1936 , 58 , 1486 - 1493 ) but to be very sensitive to D (D < 10) as well. Both high-dielectric environments where hydrogen bonds are of interest and low-dielectric media such as protein binding pockets and membrane interiors therefore need to be considered with caution in GB-based calculations. Finally, a literature analysis of Gibbs energy of solvation of small molecules in organic liquids shows that the Onsager relation does not hold for real molecules since the correlation between ?G(0) and 2(D-1)/(2D+1) is low for most solutes. Interestingly, explicit solvent calculations of the solvation free energy ( Zhang et al. J. Chem. Inf. Model . 2015 , 55 , 1192 - 1201 ) reproduce the weak experimental correlations with 2(D-1)/(2D+1) very well. PMID:26574308

  12. Supercritical multicomponent solvent coal extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, W. H.; Fong, W. S.; Pichaichanarong, P.; Chan, P. C. F.; Lawson, D. D. (inventors)

    1983-01-01

    The yield of organic extract from the supercritical extraction of coal with larger diameter organic solvents such as toluene is increased by use of a minor amount of from 0.1 to 10% by weight of a second solvent such as methanol having a molecular diameter significantly smaller than the average pore diameter of the coal.

  13. Focus Sensitive Coordination

    E-print Network

    Hulsey, Sarah McNearney

    2008-01-01

    This thesis investigates the role of the Focus Sensitive Operators (FSOs) even and also when found inside of a coordination. Coordinations of this form are called Focus Sensitive Coordinations (FSC) and include or even, ...

  14. COMPUTER AIDED SOLVENT DESIGN FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvent substitution is an effective and useful means of eliminating the use of harmful solvents, but finding substitute solvents which are less harmful and as effective as currently used solvents presents significant difficulties. Solvent substitution is a form of reverse engin...

  15. Optimized coordinates in vibrational coupled cluster calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Thomsen, Bo; Christiansen, Ove; Yagi, Kiyoshi

    2014-04-21

    The use of variationally optimized coordinates, which minimize the vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF) ground state energy with respect to orthogonal transformations of the coordinates, has recently been shown to improve the convergence of vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) towards the exact full VCI [K. Yagi, M. Keçeli, and S. Hirata, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 204118 (2012)]. The present paper proposes an incorporation of optimized coordinates into the vibrational coupled cluster (VCC), which has in the past been shown to outperform VCI in approximate calculations where similar restricted state spaces are employed in VCI and VCC. An embarrassingly parallel algorithm for variational optimization of coordinates for VSCF is implemented and the resulting coordinates and potentials are introduced into a VCC program. The performance of VCC in optimized coordinates (denoted oc-VCC) is examined through pilot applications to water, formaldehyde, and a series of water clusters (dimer, trimer, and hexamer) by comparing the calculated vibrational energy levels with those of the conventional VCC in normal coordinates and VCI in optimized coordinates. For water clusters, in particular, oc-VCC is found to gain orders of magnitude improvement in the accuracy, exemplifying that the combination of optimized coordinates localized to each monomer with the size-extensive VCC wave function provides a supreme description of systems consisting of weakly interacting sub-systems.

  16. Optimized coordinates in vibrational coupled cluster calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Bo; Yagi, Kiyoshi; Christiansen, Ove

    2014-04-01

    The use of variationally optimized coordinates, which minimize the vibrational self-consistent field (VSCF) ground state energy with respect to orthogonal transformations of the coordinates, has recently been shown to improve the convergence of vibrational configuration interaction (VCI) towards the exact full VCI [K. Yagi, M. Keçeli, and S. Hirata, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 204118 (2012)]. The present paper proposes an incorporation of optimized coordinates into the vibrational coupled cluster (VCC), which has in the past been shown to outperform VCI in approximate calculations where similar restricted state spaces are employed in VCI and VCC. An embarrassingly parallel algorithm for variational optimization of coordinates for VSCF is implemented and the resulting coordinates and potentials are introduced into a VCC program. The performance of VCC in optimized coordinates (denoted oc-VCC) is examined through pilot applications to water, formaldehyde, and a series of water clusters (dimer, trimer, and hexamer) by comparing the calculated vibrational energy levels with those of the conventional VCC in normal coordinates and VCI in optimized coordinates. For water clusters, in particular, oc-VCC is found to gain orders of magnitude improvement in the accuracy, exemplifying that the combination of optimized coordinates localized to each monomer with the size-extensive VCC wave function provides a supreme description of systems consisting of weakly interacting sub-systems.

  17. Solvent degradation products in nuclear fuel processing solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Shook, H.E. Jr.

    1988-06-01

    The Savannah River Plant uses a modified Purex process to recover enriched uranium and separate fission products. This process uses 7.5% tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) dissolved in normal paraffin hydrocarbons for the solvent extraction of a nitric acid solution containing the materials to be separated. Periodic problems in product decontamination result from solvent degradation. A study to improve process efficiency has identified certain solvent degradation products and suggested mitigation measures. Undecanoic acid, lauric acid, and tridecanoic acid were tentatively identified as diluent degradation products in recycle solvent. These long-chain organic acids affect phase separation and lead to low decontamination factors. Solid phase extraction (SPE) was used to concentrate the organic acids in solvent prior to analysis by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). SPE and HPLC methods were optimized in this work for analysis of decanoic acid, undecanoic acid, and lauric acid in solvent. Accelerated solvent degradation studies with 7.5% TBP in normal paraffin hydrocarbons showed that long-chain organic acids and long-chain alkyl butyl phosphoric acids are formed by reactions with nitric acid. Degradation of both tributyl phosphate and hydrocarbon can be minimized with purified normal paraffin replacing the standard grade presently used. 12 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  18. Cesium Concentration in MCU Solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D

    2006-01-18

    During Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) operations, Cs-137 concentrations in product streams will vary depending on the location in the process and on the recent process conditions. Calculations of cesium concentrations under a variety of operating conditions reveal the following: (1) Under nominal operations with salt solution feed containing 1.1 Ci Cs-137 per gallon, the maximum Cs-137 concentration in the process will occur in the strip effluent (SE) and equal 15-16.5 Ci/gal. (2) Under these conditions, the majority of the solvent will contain 0.005 to 0.01 Ci/gal, with a limited portion of the solvent in the contactor stages containing {approx}4 Ci/gal. (3) When operating conditions yield product near 0.1 Ci Cs-137/gal in the decontaminated salt solution (DSS), the SE cesium concentration will be the same or lower than in nominal operations, but majority of the stripped solvent will increase to {approx}2-3 Ci/gal. (4) Deviations in strip and waste stream flow rates cause the largest variations in cesium content: (a) If strip flow rates deviate by -30% of nominal, the SE will contain {approx}23 Ci/gal, although the cesium content of the solvent will increase to only 0.03 Ci/gal; (b) If strip flow rate deviates by -77% (i.e., 23% of nominal), the SE will contain 54 Ci/gal and solvent will contain 1.65 Ci/gal. At this point, the product DSS will just reach the limit of 0.1 Ci/gal, causing the DSS gamma monitors to alarm; and (c) Moderate (+10 to +30%) deviations in waste flow rate cause approximately proportional increases in the SE and solvent cesium concentrations. Recovery from a process failure due to poor cesium stripping can achieve any low cesium concentration required. Passing the solvent back through the contactors while recycling DSS product will produce a {approx}70% reduction during one pass through the contactors (assuming the stripping D value is no worse than 0.36). If the solvent is returned to the solvent hold tank (containing additional, unstripped solvent), 3.3 tank turnovers will reduce the cesium content by an order of magnitude. Under these conditions, the solvent cesium concentration can be reduced to <0.03 Ci/gal during 8 hours at nominal solvent flow rates (2.8 gpm).

  19. Swelling of lignites in organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    R.G. Makitra; D.V. Bryk

    2008-10-15

    Data on the swelling of Turkish lignites can be summarized using linear multiparameter equations that take into account various properties of solvents. Factors responsible for the amounts of absorbed solvents are the basicity and cohesion energy density of the solvents.

  20. Nonadiabatic dynamics of electron transfer in solution: Explicit and implicit solvent treatments that include multiple relaxation time scales

    SciTech Connect

    Schwerdtfeger, Christine A.; Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2014-01-21

    The development of efficient theoretical methods for describing electron transfer (ET) reactions in condensed phases is important for a variety of chemical and biological applications. Previously, dynamical dielectric continuum theory was used to derive Langevin equations for a single collective solvent coordinate describing ET in a polar solvent. In this theory, the parameters are directly related to the physical properties of the system and can be determined from experimental data or explicit molecular dynamics simulations. Herein, we combine these Langevin equations with surface hopping nonadiabatic dynamics methods to calculate the rate constants for thermal ET reactions in polar solvents for a wide range of electronic couplings and reaction free energies. Comparison of explicit and implicit solvent calculations illustrates that the mapping from explicit to implicit solvent models is valid even for solvents exhibiting complex relaxation behavior with multiple relaxation time scales and a short-time inertial response. The rate constants calculated for implicit solvent models with a single solvent relaxation time scale corresponding to water, acetonitrile, and methanol agree well with analytical theories in the Golden rule and solvent-controlled regimes, as well as in the intermediate regime. The implicit solvent models with two relaxation time scales are in qualitative agreement with the analytical theories but quantitatively overestimate the rate constants compared to these theories. Analysis of these simulations elucidates the importance of multiple relaxation time scales and the inertial component of the solvent response, as well as potential shortcomings of the analytical theories based on single time scale solvent relaxation models. This implicit solvent approach will enable the simulation of a wide range of ET reactions via the stochastic dynamics of a single collective solvent coordinate with parameters that are relevant to experimentally accessible systems.

  1. Nonadiabatic dynamics of electron transfer in solution: Explicit and implicit solvent treatments that include multiple relaxation time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwerdtfeger, Christine A.; Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    The development of efficient theoretical methods for describing electron transfer (ET) reactions in condensed phases is important for a variety of chemical and biological applications. Previously, dynamical dielectric continuum theory was used to derive Langevin equations for a single collective solvent coordinate describing ET in a polar solvent. In this theory, the parameters are directly related to the physical properties of the system and can be determined from experimental data or explicit molecular dynamics simulations. Herein, we combine these Langevin equations with surface hopping nonadiabatic dynamics methods to calculate the rate constants for thermal ET reactions in polar solvents for a wide range of electronic couplings and reaction free energies. Comparison of explicit and implicit solvent calculations illustrates that the mapping from explicit to implicit solvent models is valid even for solvents exhibiting complex relaxation behavior with multiple relaxation time scales and a short-time inertial response. The rate constants calculated for implicit solvent models with a single solvent relaxation time scale corresponding to water, acetonitrile, and methanol agree well with analytical theories in the Golden rule and solvent-controlled regimes, as well as in the intermediate regime. The implicit solvent models with two relaxation time scales are in qualitative agreement with the analytical theories but quantitatively overestimate the rate constants compared to these theories. Analysis of these simulations elucidates the importance of multiple relaxation time scales and the inertial component of the solvent response, as well as potential shortcomings of the analytical theories based on single time scale solvent relaxation models. This implicit solvent approach will enable the simulation of a wide range of ET reactions via the stochastic dynamics of a single collective solvent coordinate with parameters that are relevant to experimentally accessible systems.

  2. Fission product solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, B.A.; Bonnesen, P.V.; Sachleben, R.A.

    1998-02-01

    Two main objectives concerning removal of fission products from high-level tank wastes will be accomplished in this project. The first objective entails the development of an acid-side Cs solvent-extraction (SX) process applicable to remediation of the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) and dissolved calcine waste (DCW) at INEEL. The second objective is to develop alkaline-side SX processes for the combined removal of Tc, Cs, and possibly Sr and for individual separation of Tc (alone or together with Sr) and Cs. These alkaline-side processes apply to tank wastes stored at Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge. This work exploits the useful properties of crown ethers and calixarenes and has shown that such compounds may be economically adapted to practical processing conditions. Potential benefits for both acid- and alkaline-side processing include order-of-magnitude concentration factors, high rejection of bulk sodium and potassium salts, and stripping with dilute (typically 10 mM) nitric acid. These benefits minimize the subsequent burden on the very expensive vitrification and storage of the high-activity waste. In the case of the SRTALK process for Tc extraction as pertechnetate anion from alkaline waste, such benefits have now been proven at the scale of a 12-stage flowsheet tested in 2-cm centrifugal contactors with a Hanford supernatant waste simulant. SRTALK employs a crown ether in a TBP-modified aliphatic kerosene diluent, is economically competitive with other applicable separation processes being considered, and has been successfully tested in batch extraction of actual Hanford double-shell slurry feed (DSSF).

  3. Solvents and Parkinson disease: A systematic review of toxicological and epidemiological evidence

    PubMed Central

    Lock, Edward A.; Zhang, Jing; Checkoway, Harvey

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a debilitating neurodegenerative motor disorder, with its motor symptoms largely attributable to loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The causes of PD remain poorly understood, although environmental toxicants may play etiologic roles. Solvents are widespread neurotoxicants present in the workplace and ambient environment. Case reports of parkinsonism, including PD, have been associated with exposures to various solvents, most notably trichloroethylene (TCE). Animal toxicology studies have been conducted on various organic solvents, with some, including TCE, demonstrating potential for inducing nigral system damage. However, a confirmed animal model of solvent-induced PD has not been developed. Numerous epidemiologic studies have investigated potential links between solvents and PD, yielding mostly null or weak associations. An exception is a recent study of twins indicating possible etiologic relations with TCE and other chlorinated solvents, although findings were based on small numbers, and dose–response gradients were not observed. At present, there is no consistent evidence from either the toxicological or epidemiologic perspective that any specific solvent or class of solvents is a cause of PD. Future toxicological research that addresses mechanisms of nigral damage from TCE and its metabolites, with exposure routes and doses relevant to human exposures, is recommended. Improvements in epidemiologic research, especially with regard to quantitative characterization of long-term exposures to specific solvents, are needed to advance scientific knowledge on this topic. PMID:23220449

  4. SAGE--SOLVENT ALTERNATIVES GUIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    SAGE is a comprehensive guide designed to provide pollution prevention information on solvent and process alternatives for parts cleaning and degreasing. SAGE does not recommend any ozone depleting chemicals. SAGE was developed by the Surface Cleaning Program at Research Triang...

  5. ON-SITE SOLVENT RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study evaluated the product quality, waste reduction/pollution prevention, and economic aspects of three technologies for onsite solvent recovery: atmospheric batch distillation, vacuum heat-pump distillation, and low-emission vapor degreasing. The atmospheric and vacuum ...

  6. RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENT: HALOGENATED SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This source category previously subjected to a technology-based standard will be examined to determine if health or ecological risks are significant enough to warrant further regulation for Halogenated Solvent Degreasing Facilities. These assessments utilize existing models and d...

  7. MOFs by solvent free high temperature synthesis exemplified by ?3[Eu 3(Tz ?) 6(Tz ?H) 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Buschbaum, Klaus; Mokaddem, Yassin

    2008-04-01

    Solvent free synthesis methods of solid state chemistry can be utilized to synthesize MOFs (metal organic frameworks) and moreover render frameworks accessible that cannot be obtained from classic solvent reactions. Focusing on nitrogen coordinated rare earth compounds amides and nitriles can be successfully obtained from melts of the referring neutral N donor ligands. Exclusion of solvents prevents solvent co-coordination so that Ln-N-MOFs free of oxygen coordination become available. The success of this synthesis strategy is represented by the synthesis of ?3[Eu 3(Tz ?) 6(Tz ?H) 2], Tz ?H = 1 H-1,2,3-triazole, C 2N 3H 3, Tz ?- = 1,2,3-triazolate anion, the first 4f network of the aromatic N-heterocycle 1,2,3-triazole. The compound contains divalent europium and adopts a unique (12,4)-net.

  8. Water as a solvent for life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    “Follow the water” is our basic strategy in searching for life in the universe. The universality of water as the solvent for living systems is usually justified by arguing that water supports the rich organic chemistry that seeds life, but alternative chemistries are possible in other organic solvents. Here, other, essential criteria for life that have not been sufficiently considered so far, will be discussed.Life is based on non-covalent interactions. They might be either specific (enzyme-substrate interactions, selective ion transport) or nonspecific (lipid-lipid or lipid-protein interactions). Their strength needs to be properly tuned, and this is mediated by the solvent. If interactions are too weak, there might be undesired response to natural fluctuations of physical and chemical parameters. If they are too strong it could impede kinetics and energetics of cellular processes. Thus, the solvent must allow for balancing these interactions, which provides strong constraints for life.Water exhibits a remarkable trait that it promotes both solvophobic and solvophilic interactions. Solvophobic (hydrophobic in the case of water) interactions are necessary for self-organization of matter. They are responsible, among others, for the formation of membranes and protein folding. The diversity of structures supported by hydrophobic interactions is the hallmark of terrestrial life responsible for its diversity, evolution and the ability to survive environmental changes. Solvophilic interactions, in turn, are needed to ensure solubility of polar species. Water offers a large temperature domain of stable liquid and the characteristic hydrophobic effects are a consequence of the temperature insensitivity of essential properties of its liquid state. Water, however, might not be the only liquid with these properties. Properties of water and other pure liquids or their mixtures that have a high dielectric constant and simultaneously support self-organization will be compared. Properties that appear to be unfavorable to life (e.g. its chemical activity against polymerization reactions) will be discussed and the requirements for alternatives to water to support life in space will be summarized.

  9. Weakly exceptional quotient singularities 

    E-print Network

    Sakovics, Dmitrijs

    2013-11-28

    A singularity is said to be weakly-exceptional if it has a unique purely log terminal blow up. In dimension 2, V. Shokurov proved that weakly exceptional quotient singularities are exactly those of types Dn, E6, E7, E8. ...

  10. Solvent dependence of absorption and emission spectra of Ru(bpy)2(CN)2: experiment and explanation based on electronic structure theory.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Lajos; Lendvay, György; Horváth, Attila

    2007-12-20

    Measurements in acidic media and time-dependent density functional theory and DeltaSCF calculations were performed for Ru(bpy)2(CN)2 in 11 solvents of varying polarity to determine the solvent's influence on the absorption and emission spectra of the complex. The solvent effect caused by both the polarizable continuum nature of the solvent (characterized by the polarizable conductor model), and by the coordination of the cyano groups of the complex by solvent molecules were investigated. Both the absorption and emission maxima show a strong blue shift as the solute-solvent interaction increases, the magnitude of which is in good linear correlation with Gutmann's acceptor number of the solvent. The calculations reproduce the location, shape, and shift of the experimental metal-to-ligand charge transfer bands. The solvent shift is shown to be in good correlation with the charge difference between the Ru atom and the bpy ligand, which in turn is closely related to the HOMO energy. The coordination of the solvent molecule to the cyano group causes a smaller blue shift than the polarizable continuum solvent. The specific solute-solvent interaction becomes dominant, however, when the pH in a protic solvent is small and the complex is protonated. PMID:18031024

  11. Solvent/Non-Solvent Sintering To Make Microsphere Scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurencin, Cato T.; Brown, Justin L.; Nair, Lakshmi

    2011-01-01

    A solvent/non-solvent sintering technique has been devised for joining polymeric microspheres to make porous matrices for use as drug-delivery devices or scaffolds that could be seeded with cells for growing tissues. Unlike traditional sintering at elevated temperature and pressure, this technique is practiced at room temperature and pressure and, therefore, does not cause thermal degradation of any drug, protein, or other biochemical with which the microspheres might be loaded to impart properties desired in a specific application. Also, properties of scaffolds made by this technique are more reproducible than are properties of comparable scaffolds made by traditional sintering. The technique involves the use of two miscible organic liquids: one that is and one that is not a solvent for the affected polymer. The polymeric microspheres are placed in a mold having the size and shape of the desired scaffold, then the solvent/non-solvent mixture is poured into the mold to fill the void volume between the microspheres, then the liquid mixture is allowed to evaporate. Some of the properties of the resulting scaffold can be tailored through choice of the proportions of the liquids and the diameter of the microspheres.

  12. Coal liquefaction process with enhanced process solvent

    DOEpatents

    Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Kang, Dohee (Macungie, PA)

    1984-01-01

    In an improved coal liquefaction process, including a critical solvent deashing stage, high value product recovery is improved and enhanced process-derived solvent is provided by recycling second separator underflow in the critical solvent deashing stage to the coal slurry mix, for inclusion in the process solvent pool.

  13. Computational comparison of oxidation stability: Solvent/salt monomers vs solvent-solvent/salt pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Young; Park, Min Sik; Lim, Younhee; Kang, Yoon-Sok; Park, Jin-Hwan; Doo, Seok-Gwang

    2015-08-01

    A fundamental understanding of the anodic stabilities of electrolytes is important for the development of advanced high-voltage electrolytes. In this study, we calculated and systematically compared the oxidation stabilities of monomeric solvents and anions, and bimolecular solvent-solvent and anion-solvent systems that are considered to be high-voltage electrolyte components, using ab initio calculations. Oxidation stabilities of solvent or anion monomers without considering specific solvation molecules cannot represent experimental oxidation stabilities. The oxidation of electrolytes usually forms neutral or cationic radicals, which immediately undergo further reactions stabilizing the products. Oxidatively driven intermolecular reactions are the main reason for the lower oxidation stabilities of electrolytes compared with those of monomeric compounds. Electrolyte components such as tetramethylene sulfone (TMS), ethyl methyl sulfone (EMS), bis(oxalate)borate (BOB-), and bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonamide (TFSI-) that minimize such intermolecular chemical reactions on oxidation can maintain the oxidation stabilities of monomers. In predictions of the theoretical oxidation stabilities of electrolytes, simple comparisons of highest occupied molecular orbital energies can be misleading, even if microsolvation or bulk clusters are considered. Instead, bimolecular solvent complexes with a salt anion should be at least considered in oxidation calculations. This study provides important information on fundamental and applied aspects of the development of electrolytes.

  14. Weak measure expansive flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keonhee; Oh, Jumi

    2016-01-01

    A notion of measure expansivity for flows was introduced by Carrasco-Olivera and Morales in [3] as a generalization of expansivity, and they proved that there were no measure expansive flows on closed surfaces. In this paper we introduce a concept of weak measure expansivity for flows which is really weaker than that of measure expansivity, and show that there is a weak measure expansive flow on a closed surface. Moreover we show that any C1 stably weak measure expansive flow on a C? closed manifold M is ?-stable, and any C1 stably measure expansive flow on M satisfies both Axiom A and the quasi-transversality condition.

  15. DOE solvent handbook information sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, A.A.

    1992-01-01

    Solvents and cleaners are used in the Department of Defense (DOD) and the Department of Energy-Defense Program (DOE-DP) maintenance facilities for removing wax, grease, oil, carbon, machining fluids, solder fluxes, mold releases, and other contaminants before repairing or electroplating parts. Private industry also uses cleaners and degreasers for surface preparation of various metals. Growing environmental and worker safety concerns have brought attention to these solvents and cleaners, most of which are classified as toxic. Tightening government regulations have already excluded the use of some chemicals, and restrict the use of various halogenated hydrocarbons because of their atmospheric-ozone depleting effects, as well as their cancer-related risks. As a result, a program was established to develop an efficient, easily accessible, electronic solvent utilization handbook. This is being accomplished by: (1) identifying solvents (alternatives) that are not currently restricted by government regulations for use DOE-DP facilities, and private industry, (2) evaluating their cleaning performance, (3) evaluating their corrosivity, (4) evaluating their air emissions, (5) evaluating the possibility of recycling or recovering all or portions of the alternative degreasers, (6) testing substitute solvents compatibility with non-metallic materials, (7) inputting all of the data gathered (including previous biodegradability information) into a database, and (8) developing a methodology for efficient, widespread access to the data base information system.

  16. DOE solvent handbook information sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Chavez, A.A.

    1992-05-01

    Solvents and cleaners are used in the Department of Defense (DOD) and the Department of Energy-Defense Program (DOE-DP) maintenance facilities for removing wax, grease, oil, carbon, machining fluids, solder fluxes, mold releases, and other contaminants before repairing or electroplating parts. Private industry also uses cleaners and degreasers for surface preparation of various metals. Growing environmental and worker safety concerns have brought attention to these solvents and cleaners, most of which are classified as toxic. Tightening government regulations have already excluded the use of some chemicals, and restrict the use of various halogenated hydrocarbons because of their atmospheric-ozone depleting effects, as well as their cancer-related risks. As a result, a program was established to develop an efficient, easily accessible, electronic solvent utilization handbook. This is being accomplished by: (1) identifying solvents (alternatives) that are not currently restricted by government regulations for use DOE-DP facilities, and private industry, (2) evaluating their cleaning performance, (3) evaluating their corrosivity, (4) evaluating their air emissions, (5) evaluating the possibility of recycling or recovering all or portions of the alternative degreasers, (6) testing substitute solvents compatibility with non-metallic materials, (7) inputting all of the data gathered (including previous biodegradability information) into a database, and (8) developing a methodology for efficient, widespread access to the data base information system.

  17. Hand Eye Coordination

    E-print Network

    Speckert, Glen

    This paper describes a simple method of converting visual coordinates to arm coordinates which does not require knowledge of the position of the camera(s). Comparisons are made to other methods and two camera, three ...

  18. Modeling Solvent Broadening on the Vibronic Spectra of a Series of Coumarin Dyes. From Implicit to Explicit Solvent Models.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, Javier; Avila Ferrer, Francisco J; Prampolini, Giacomo; Santoro, Fabrizio

    2015-12-01

    We present a protocol to estimate the solvent-induced broadening of electronic spectra based on a model that explicitly takes into account the environment embedding the solute. Starting from a classical approximation of the solvent contribution to the spectrum, the broadening arises from the spread of the excitation energies due to the fluctuation of the solvent coordinates, and it is represented as a Gaussian line shape that convolutes the vibronic spectrum of the solute. The latter is computed in harmonic approximation at room temperature with a time-dependent approach. The proposed protocol for the computation of spectral broadening exploits molecular dynamics (MD) simulations performed on the solute-solvent system, keeping the solute degrees of freedom frozen, followed by the computation of the excitation properties with a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach. The factors that might influence each step of the protocol are analyzed in detail, including the selection of the empirical force field (FF) adopted in the MD simulations and the QM/MM partition of the system to compute the excitation energies. The procedure is applied to a family of coumarin dyes, and the results are compared with experiments and with the predictions of a very recent work (Cerezo et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2015, 17, 11401-11411 ), where an implicit model was adopted for the solvent. The final spectra of the considered coumarins were obtained without including ad hoc phenomenological parameters and indicate that the broadenings computed with explicit and implicit models both follow the experimental trend, increasing as the polarity change from the initial to the final state increases. More in detail, the implicit model provides larger estimations of the broadening that are closer to the experimental evidence, while explicit models appear to better capture relative differences arising from different solvents or different solutes. Possible inaccuracies of the adopted FF that may lead to the observed underestimation are analyzed in detail. PMID:26605552

  19. Nuclear spin hyperpolarization of the solvent using signal amplification by reversible exchange (SABRE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Karlos X.; Nasr, Khaled; Milne, Mark; Sherry, A. Dean; Goux, Warren J.

    2015-08-01

    Here we report the polarization of the solvent OH protons by SABRE using standard iridium-based catalysts under slightly acidic conditions. Solvent polarization was observed in the presence of a variety of structurally similar N-donor substrates while no solvent enhancement was observed in the absence of substrate or para-hydrogen (p-H2). Solvent polarization was sensitive to the polarizing field and catalyst:substrate ratio in a manner similar to that of substrate protons. SABRE experiments with pyridine-d5 suggest a mechanism where hyperpolarization is transferred from the free substrate to the solvent by chemical exchange while measured hyperpolarization decay times suggest a complimentary mechanism which occurs by direct coordination of the solvent to the catalytic complex. We found the solvent hyperpolarization to decay nearly 3 times more slowly than its characteristic spin-lattice relaxation time suggesting that the hyperpolarized state of the solvent may be sufficiently long lived (?20 s) to hyperpolarize biomolecules having exchangeable protons. This route may offer future opportunities for SABRE to impact metabolic imaging.

  20. Gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation near a weakly isolated horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xiaoning; Huang Chaoguang; Sun Jiarui

    2008-06-15

    Based on the idea of the work by Wilczek and his collaborators, we consider the gravitational anomaly near a weakly isolated horizon. We find that there exists a universal choice of tortoise coordinate for any weakly isolated horizon. Under this coordinate, the leading behavior of a quite arbitrary scalar field near a horizon is a 2-dimensional chiral scalar field. This means we can extend the idea of Wilczek and his collaborators to more general cases and show the relation between gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation is a universal property of a black hole horizon.

  1. Gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation near a weakly isolated horizon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoning; Huang, Chao-Guang; Sun, Jia-Rui

    2008-06-01

    Based on the idea of the work by Wilczek and his collaborators, we consider the gravitational anomaly near a weakly isolated horizon. We find that there exists a universal choice of tortoise coordinate for any weakly isolated horizon. Under this coordinate, the leading behavior of a quite arbitrary scalar field near a horizon is a 2-dimensional chiral scalar field. This means we can extend the idea of Wilczek and his collaborators to more general cases and show the relation between gravitational anomaly and Hawking radiation is a universal property of a black hole horizon.

  2. Processing Coordination Ambiguity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, Paul E.; Ferreira, Fernanda

    2010-01-01

    We examined temporarily ambiguous coordination structures such as "put the butter in the bowl and the pan on the towel." Minimal Attachment predicts that the ambiguous noun phrase "the pan" will be interpreted as a noun-phrase coordination structure because it is syntactically simpler than clausal coordination. Constraint-based theories assume…

  3. LCLS Undulator Coordinate System

    SciTech Connect

    Bong, E.

    2005-01-31

    This note defines the LCLS undulator coordinate system and relates that coordinate system to the linear accelerator coordinate system. The slight downward pitch of the SLAC linac and the finite radius of the Earth necessitate some choices and definitions for the undulator layout which is described here. The layout described is consistent with the LCLS optics MAD file ''LCLS13APR04''.

  4. Phase behavior and second osmotic virial coefficient for competitive polymer solvation in mixed solvent solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudowicz, Jacek; Freed, Karl F.; Douglas, Jack F.

    2015-11-01

    We apply our recently developed generalized Flory-Huggins (FH) type theory for the competitive solvation of polymers by two mixed solvents to explain general trends in the variation of phase boundaries and solvent quality (quantified by the second osmotic virial coefficient B 2 ) with solvent composition. The complexity of the theoretically predicted miscibility patterns for these ternary mixtures arises from the competitive association between the polymer and the solvents and from the interplay of these associative interactions with the weak van der Waals interactions between all components of the mixture. The main focus here lies in determining the influence of the free energy parameters for polymer-solvent association (solvation) and the effective FH interaction parameters {???} (driving phase separation) on the phase boundaries (specifically the spinodals), the second osmotic virial coefficient B 2 , and the relation between the positions of the spinodal curves and the theta temperatures at which B 2 vanishes. Our classification of the predicted miscibility patterns is relevant to numerous applications of ternary polymer solutions in industrial formulations and the use of mixed solvent systems for polymer characterization, such as chromatographic separation where mixed solvents are commonly employed. A favorable comparison of B 2 with experimental data for poly(methyl methacrylate)/acetonitrile/methanol (or 1-propanol) solutions only partially supports the validity of our theoretical predictions due to the lack of enough experimental data and the neglect of the self and mutual association of the solvents.

  5. A flexible polymer chain in a critical solvent: Coil or globule?

    E-print Network

    Yu. A. Budkov; A. L. Kolesnikov; N. Georgi; M. G. Kiselev

    2015-07-28

    We study the behavior of a flexible polymer chain in the presence of a low-molecular weight solvent in the vicinity of a liquid-gas critical point within the framework of a self-consistent field theory. The total free energy of the dilute polymer solution is expressed as a function of the radius of gyration of the polymer and the average solvent number density within the gyration volume at the level of the mean-field approximation. Varying the strength of attraction between polymer and solvent we show that two qualitatively different regimes occur at the liquid-gas critical point. In case of weak polymer-solvent interactions the polymer chain is in a globular state. On the contrary, in case of strong polymer-solvent interactions the polymer chain attains an expanded conformation. We discuss the influence of the critical solvent density fluctuations on the polymer conformation. The reported effect could be used to excert control on the polymer conformation by changing the thermodynamic state of the solvent. It could also be helpful to estimate the solvent density within the gyration volume of the polymer for drug delivery and molecular imprinting applications.

  6. A flexible polymer chain in a critical solvent: Coil or globule?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budkov, Yu. A.; Kolesnikov, A. L.; Georgi, N.; Kiselev, M. G.

    2015-02-01

    We study the behavior of a flexible polymer chain in the presence of a low-molecular weight solvent in the vicinity of a liquid-gas critical point within the framework of a self-consistent field theory. The total free energy of the dilute polymer solution is expressed as a function of the radius of gyration of the polymer and the average solvent number density within the gyration volume at the level of the mean-field approximation. Varying the strength of attraction between polymer and solvent we show that two qualitatively different regimes occur at the liquid-gas critical point. In case of weak polymer-solvent interactions the polymer chain is in a globular state. On the contrary, in case of strong polymer-solvent interactions the polymer chain attains an expanded conformation. We discuss the influence of the critical solvent density fluctuations on the polymer conformation. The reported effect could be used to excert control on the polymer conformation by changing the thermodynamic state of the solvent. It could also be helpful to estimate the solvent density within the gyration volume of the polymer for drug delivery and molecular imprinting applications.

  7. Phase behavior and second osmotic virial coefficient for competitive polymer solvation in mixed solvent solutions.

    PubMed

    Dudowicz, Jacek; Freed, Karl F; Douglas, Jack F

    2015-11-21

    We apply our recently developed generalized Flory-Huggins (FH) type theory for the competitive solvation of polymers by two mixed solvents to explain general trends in the variation of phase boundaries and solvent quality (quantified by the second osmotic virial coefficient B2) with solvent composition. The complexity of the theoretically predicted miscibility patterns for these ternary mixtures arises from the competitive association between the polymer and the solvents and from the interplay of these associative interactions with the weak van der Waals interactions between all components of the mixture. The main focus here lies in determining the influence of the free energy parameters for polymer-solvent association (solvation) and the effective FH interaction parameters {???} (driving phase separation) on the phase boundaries (specifically the spinodals), the second osmotic virial coefficient B2, and the relation between the positions of the spinodal curves and the theta temperatures at which B2 vanishes. Our classification of the predicted miscibility patterns is relevant to numerous applications of ternary polymer solutions in industrial formulations and the use of mixed solvent systems for polymer characterization, such as chromatographic separation where mixed solvents are commonly employed. A favorable comparison of B2 with experimental data for poly(methyl methacrylate)/acetonitrile/methanol (or 1-propanol) solutions only partially supports the validity of our theoretical predictions due to the lack of enough experimental data and the neglect of the self and mutual association of the solvents. PMID:26590552

  8. Automated Solvent Seaming of Large Polyimide Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rood, Robert; Moore, James D.; Talley, Chris; Gierow, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    A solvent-based welding process enables the joining of precise, cast polyimide membranes at their edges to form larger precise membranes. The process creates a homogeneous, optical-quality seam between abutting membranes, with no overlap and with only a very localized area of figure disturbance. The seam retains 90 percent of the strength of the parent material. The process was developed for original use in the fabrication of wide-aperture membrane optics, with areal densities of less than 1 kg/m2, for lightweight telescopes, solar concentrators, antennas, and the like to be deployed in outer space. The process is just as well applicable to the fabrication of large precise polyimide membranes for flat or inflatable solar concentrators and antenna reflectors for terrestrial applications. The process is applicable to cast membranes made of CP1 (or equivalent) polyimide. The process begins with the precise fitting together and fixturing of two membrane segments. The seam is formed by applying a metered amount of a doped solution of the same polyimide along the abutting edges of the membrane segments. After the solution has been applied, the fixtured films are allowed to dry and are then cured by convective heating. The weld material is the same as the parent material, so that what is formed is a homogeneous, strong joint that is almost indistinguishable from the parent material. The success of the process is highly dependent on formulation of the seaming solution from the correct proportion of the polyimide in a suitable solvent. In addition, the formation of reliable seams depends on the deposition of a precise amount of the seaming solution along the seam line. To ensure the required precision, deposition is performed by use of an automated apparatus comprising a modified commercially available, large-format, ink-jet print head on an automated positioning table. The printing head jets the seaming solution into the seam area at a rate controlled in coordination with the movement of the positioning table.

  9. Solvents and Parkinson disease: A systematic review of toxicological and epidemiological evidence

    SciTech Connect

    Lock, Edward A.; Zhang, Jing; Checkoway, Harvey

    2013-02-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a debilitating neurodegenerative motor disorder, with its motor symptoms largely attributable to loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. The causes of PD remain poorly understood, although environmental toxicants may play etiologic roles. Solvents are widespread neurotoxicants present in the workplace and ambient environment. Case reports of parkinsonism, including PD, have been associated with exposures to various solvents, most notably trichloroethylene (TCE). Animal toxicology studies have been conducted on various organic solvents, with some, including TCE, demonstrating potential for inducing nigral system damage. However, a confirmed animal model of solvent-induced PD has not been developed. Numerous epidemiologic studies have investigated potential links between solvents and PD, yielding mostly null or weak associations. An exception is a recent study of twins indicating possible etiologic relations with TCE and other chlorinated solvents, although findings were based on small numbers, and dose–response gradients were not observed. At present, there is no consistent evidence from either the toxicological or epidemiologic perspective that any specific solvent or class of solvents is a cause of PD. Future toxicological research that addresses mechanisms of nigral damage from TCE and its metabolites, with exposure routes and doses relevant to human exposures, is recommended. Improvements in epidemiologic research, especially with regard to quantitative characterization of long-term exposures to specific solvents, are needed to advance scientific knowledge on this topic. -- Highlights: ? The potential for organic solvents to cause Parkinson's disease has been reviewed. ? Twins study suggests etiologic relations with chlorinated solvents and Parkinson's. ? Animal studies with TCE showed potential to cause damage to dopaminergic neurons. ? Need to determine if effects in animals are relevant to human exposure levels.

  10. Exxon donor solvent liquefaction process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neavel, R. C.

    1981-03-01

    The Exxon donor solvent (EDS) coal liquefaction system is a direct liquefaction procedure. Coal is chemically reacted and dissolved in a recycle solvent that is hydrogenated between passes to the liquefaction reactor. More than 2.6 barrels of a synthetic crude boiling below 1000 F are produced per ton of dry, high volatile coal feed. Other ranks of coal can be effectively liquefied. The process development has proceeded to a 250 ton/day pilot plant stage that went into operation in June 1980. The presentation addresses the chemical reactions and process conditions that result in ease of operability and flexibility of the EDS process.

  11. Solvent reorganization of electron transitions in viscous solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorai, Pradip K.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2006-04-14

    We develop a model of electron transfer reactions at conditions of nonergodicity when the time of solvent relaxation crosses the observation time window set up by the reaction rate. Solvent reorganization energy of intramolecular electron transfer in a charge-transfer molecule dissolved in water and acetonitrile is studied by molecular dynamics simulations at varying temperatures. We observe a sharp decrease of the reorganization energy at a temperature identified as the temperature of structural arrest due to cage effect, as discussed by the mode-coupling theory. This temperature also marks the onset of the enhancement of translational diffusion relative to rotational relaxation signaling the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation. The change in the reorganization energy at the transition temperature reflects the dynamical arrest of the slow, collective relaxation of the solvent related to the relaxation of the solvent dipolar polarization. An analytical theory proposed to describe this effect agrees well with both the simulations and experimental Stokes shift data. The theory is applied to the analysis of charge-transfer kinetics in a low-temperature glass former. We show that the reorganization energy is substantially lower than its equilibrium value for the low-temperature portion of the data. The theory predicts the possibility of discontinuous changes in the dependence of the electron transfer rate on the free energy gap when the reaction switches between ergodic and nonergodic regimes.

  12. Why are dimethyl sulfoxide and dimethyl sulfone such good solvents?

    PubMed

    Clark, Timothy; Murray, Jane S; Lane, Pat; Politzer, Peter

    2008-08-01

    We have carried out B3PW91 and MP2-FC computational studies of dimethyl sulfoxide, (CH(3))(2)SO, and dimethyl sulfone, (CH(3))(2)SO(2). The objective was to establish quantitatively the basis for their high polarities and boiling points, and their strong solvent powers for a variety of solutes. Natural bond order analyses show that the sulfur-oxygen linkages are not double bonds, as widely believed, but rather are coordinate covalent single S(+)-->O(-) bonds. The calculated electrostatic potentials on the molecular surfaces reveal several strongly positive and negative sites (the former including sigma-holes on the sulfurs) through which a variety of simultaneous intermolecular electrostatic interactions can occur. A series of examples is given. In terms of these features the striking properties of dimethyl sulfoxide and dimethyl sulfone, their large dipole moments and dielectric constants, their high boiling points and why they are such good solvents, can readily be understood. PMID:18458968

  13. Theory of complicated liquids. Investigation of liquids, solvents and solvent effects with modern theoretical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, Barbara

    2007-03-01

    It is the aim of this work to elucidate the usefulness and feasibility of the first-principles approach and to extend it to the regime of liquid molecular substances of complex structure. Physical and thermodynamic properties of complicated liquids are investigated by means of Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) and also with static quantum chemical methods. The connection between the dynamic and static approach is given by the quantum cluster equilibrium (QCE) theory. Since the QCE theory is not yet well established, a new implementation in the MD post-processing program P EACEMAKER is presented. It can be shown that it is by far more important to include cooperative effects rather than to concentrate the effort on the inclusion of weak dispersion forces not present in current density functionals. Traditionally, investigations of complicated liquids were also undertaken with the tools of simple liquids, because for some problems the size of the system does not allow for a more accurate description. Although linear-scaling techniques are simplifications from the point of view of quantum chemistry, they might be severe improvements when compared to traditional molecular dynamics simulations. For the interpretation of the liquid state the introduction of local properties is inevitable. New methods are presented for the calculation of local dipole moments and for the estimation of hydrogen bond energies in quantum mechanically nondecomposable systems. The latter also allows for the detection of hydrogen bonds in simulations through a wavefunction-based criterion instead of one which is solely grounded on the geometric structure of the atomic nuclei involved. The article then discusses prominent liquids which show properties that are not yet understood. Another part of the work analyzes the effect of solvent molecules on solutes and their reactions in the solvent. Finaly, neoteric solvents, such as ionic liquids are discussed.

  14. Organic solvent desorption from two tegafur polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Bobrovs, Raitis; Acti?š, Andris

    2013-11-30

    Desorption behavior of 8 different solvents from ? and ? tegafur (5-fluoro-1-(tetrahydro-2-furyl)uracil) has been studied in this work. Solvent desorption from samples stored at 95% and 50% relative solvent vapor pressure was studied in isothermal conditions at 30 °C. The results of this study demonstrated that: solvent desorption rate did not differ significantly for both phases; solvent desorption in all cases occurred faster from samples with the largest particle size; and solvent desorption in most cases occurred in two steps. Structure differences and their surface properties were not of great importance on the solvent desorption rates because the main factor affecting desorption rate was sample particle size and sample morphology. Inspection of the structure packing showed that solvent desorption rate and amount of solvent adsorbed were mainly affected by surface molecule arrangement and ability to form short contacts between solvent molecule electron donor groups and freely accessible tegafur tetrahydrofuran group hydrogens, as well as between solvents molecule proton donor groups and fluorouracil ring carbonyl and fluoro groups. Solvent desorption rates of acetone, acetonitrile, ethyl acetate and tetrahydrofuran multilayers from ? and ? tegafur were approximately 30 times higher than those of solvent monolayers. Scanning electron micrographs showed that sample storage in solvent vapor atmosphere promotes small tegafur particles recrystallization to larger particles. PMID:24060368

  15. Variational Optimization of an All-Atom Implicit Solvent Force Field to Match Explicit Solvent Simulation Data

    PubMed Central

    Bottaro, Sandro; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Best, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    The development of accurate implicit solvation models with low computational cost is essential for addressing many large-scale biophysical problems. Here, we present an efficient solvation term based on a Gaussian solvent-exclusion model (EEF1) for simulations of proteins in aqueous environment, with the primary aim of having a good overlap with explicit solvent simulations, particularly for unfolded and disordered states – as would be needed for multiscale applications. In order to achieve this, we have used a recently proposed coarse-graining procedure based on minimization of an entropy-related objective function to train the model to reproduce the equilibrium distribution obtained from explicit water simulations. Via this methodology, we have optimized both a charge screening parameter and a backbone torsion term against explicit solvent simulations of an ?-helical and a ?-stranded peptide. The performance of the resulting effective energy function, termed EEF1-SB, is tested with respect to the properties of folded proteins, the folding of small peptides or fast-folding proteins, and NMR data for intrinsically disordered proteins. The results show that EEF1-SB provides a reasonable description of a wide range of systems, but its key advantage over other methods tested is that it captures very well the structure and dimension of disordered or weakly structured peptides. EEF1-SB is thus a computationally inexpensive (~ 10 times faster than Generalized-Born methods) and transferable approximation for treating solvent effects. PMID:24748852

  16. A carbohydrate-anion recognition system in aprotic solvents.

    PubMed

    Ren, Bo; Dong, Hai; Ramström, Olof

    2014-05-01

    A carbohydrate-anion recognition system in nonpolar solvents is reported, in which complexes form at the B-faces of ?-D-pyranosides with H1-, H3-, and H5-cis patterns similar to carbohydrate-? interactions. The complexation effect was evaluated for a range of carbohydrate structures; it resulted in either 1:1 carbohydrate-anion complexes, or 1:2 complex formation depending on the protection pattern of the carbohydrate. The interaction was also evaluated with different anions and solvents. In both cases it resulted in significant binding differences. The results indicate that complexation originates from van der Waals interactions or weak CH???A(-) hydrogen bonds between the binding partners and is related to electron-withdrawing groups of the carbohydrates as well as increased hydrogen-bond-accepting capability of the anions. PMID:24616327

  17. Movement Coordination during Conversation

    PubMed Central

    Latif, Nida; Barbosa, Adriano V.; Vatiokiotis-Bateson, Eric; Castelhano, Monica S.; Munhall, K. G.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral coordination and synchrony contribute to a common biological mechanism that maintains communication, cooperation and bonding within many social species, such as primates and birds. Similarly, human language and social systems may also be attuned to coordination to facilitate communication and the formation of relationships. Gross similarities in movement patterns and convergence in the acoustic properties of speech have already been demonstrated between interacting individuals. In the present studies, we investigated how coordinated movements contribute to observers’ perception of affiliation (friends vs. strangers) between two conversing individuals. We used novel computational methods to quantify motor coordination and demonstrated that individuals familiar with each other coordinated their movements more frequently. Observers used coordination to judge affiliation between conversing pairs but only when the perceptual stimuli were restricted to head and face regions. These results suggest that observed movement coordination in humans might contribute to perceptual decisions based on availability of information to perceivers. PMID:25119189

  18. Replacement solvents for use in chemical synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Molnar, Linda K. (Philadelphia, PA); Hatton, T. Alan (Sudbury, MA); Buchwald, Stephen L. (Newton, MA)

    2001-05-15

    Replacement solvents for use in chemical synthesis include polymer-immobilized solvents having a flexible polymer backbone and a plurality of pendant groups attached onto the polymer backbone, the pendant groups comprising a flexible linking unit bound to the polymer backbone and to a terminal solvating moiety. The polymer-immobilized solvent may be dissolved in a benign medium. Replacement solvents for chemical reactions for which tetrahydrofuran or diethyl may be a solvent include substituted tetrahydrofurfuryl ethers and substituted tetrahydro-3-furan ethers. The replacement solvents may be readily recovered from the reaction train using conventional methods.

  19. Method for analyzing solvent extracted sponge core

    SciTech Connect

    Ellington, W.E.; Calkin, C.L.

    1988-11-22

    For use in solvent extracted sponge core measurements of the oil saturation of earth formations, a method is described for quantifying the volume of oil in the fluids resulting from such extraction. The method consists of: (a) separating the solvent/oil mixture from the water in the extracted fluids, (b) distilling at least a portion of the solvent from the solvent/oil mixture substantially without co-distillation or loss of the light hydrocarbons in the mixture, (c) determining the volume contribution of the solvent remaining in the mixture, and (d) determining the volume of oil removed from the sponge by substracting the determined remaining solvent volume.

  20. NATURAL ATTENUATION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The protocol will simply describe in detail, with references and illustrations, the approach currently used by staff of the SPRD to evaluate natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents in ground water. Staff of SPRD, and staff of the Air Force Center for environmental excellence...

  1. Risk assessment for halogenated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    A recent development in the cancer risk area is the advent of biologically based pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models. These models allow for the incorporation of biological and mechanistic data into the risk assessment process. These advances will not only improve the risk assessment process for halogenated solvents but will stimulate and guide basic research in the biological area.

  2. Weak mutually unbiased bases

    E-print Network

    M. Shalaby; A. Vourdas

    2012-03-05

    Quantum systems with variables in ${\\mathbb Z}(d)$ are considered. The properties of lines in the ${\\mathbb Z}(d)\\times {\\mathbb Z}(d)$ phase space of these systems, are studied. Weak mutually unbiased bases in these systems are defined as bases for which the overlap of any two vectors in two different bases, is equal to $d^{-1/2}$ or alternatively to one of the $d_i^{-1/2},0$ (where $d_i$ is a divisor of $d$ apart from $d,1$). They are designed for the geometry of the ${\\mathbb Z}(d)\\times {\\mathbb Z}(d)$ phase space, in the sense that there is a duality between the weak mutually unbiased bases and the maximal lines through the origin. In the special case of prime $d$, there are no divisors of $d$ apart from $1,d$ and the weak mutually unbiased bases are mutually unbiased bases.

  3. COORDINATING EUROPEAN UNION ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY

    E-print Network

    Bateman, Ian J.

    COORDINATING EUROPEAN UNION ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY: SHIFTING FROM PASSIVE TO ACTIVE COORDINATION in the European Union (EU). The integration (or `mainstreaming') of environmental objectives into `non coordination. Keywords: Governance; coordination; European Union; environmental policy integration

  4. Weak bump quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkes, B. J.; Mcdowell, J.

    1994-01-01

    Research into the optical, ultraviolet and infrared continuum emission from quasars and their host galaxies was carried out. The main results were the discovery of quasars with unusually weak infrared emission and the construction of a quantitative estimate of the dispersion in quasar continuum properties. One of the major uncertainties in the measurement of quasar continuum strength is the contribution to the continuum of the quasar host galaxy as a function of wavelength. Continuum templates were constructed for different types of host galaxy and individual estimates made of the decomposed quasar and host continua based on existing observations of the target quasars. The results are that host galaxy contamination is worse than previously suspected, and some apparent weak bump quasars are really normal quasars with strong host galaxies. However, the existence of true weak bump quasars such as PHL 909 was confirmed. The study of the link between the bump strength and other wavebands was continued by comparing with IRAS data. There is evidence that excess far infrared radiation is correlated with weaker ultraviolet bumps. This argues against an orientation effect and implies a probable link with the host galaxy environment, for instance the presence of a luminous starburst. However, the evidence still favors the idea that reddening is not important in those objects with ultraviolet weak bumps. The same work has led to the discovery of a class of infrared weak quasars. Pushing another part of the envelope of quasar continuum parameter space, the IR-weak quasars have implications for understanding the effects of reddening internal to the quasars, the reality of ultraviolet turnovers, and may allow further tests of the Phinney dust model for the IR continuum. They will also be important objects for studying the claimed IR to x-ray continuum correlation.

  5. Weak Interactions and Instability Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Kadoya, Taku; McCann, Kevin S.

    2015-01-01

    Food web theory states that a weak interactor which is positioned in the food web such that it tends to deflect, or mute, energy away from a potentially oscillating consumer-resource interaction often enhances community persistence and stability. Here we examine how adding other weak interactions (predation/harvesting) on the stabilizing weak interactor alters the stability of food web using a set of well-established food web models/modules. We show that such “weak on weak” interaction chains drive an indirect dynamic cascade that can rapidly ignite a distant consumer-resource oscillator. Nonetheless, we also show that the “weak on weak” interactions are still more stable than the food web without them, and so weak interactions still generally act to stabilize food webs. Rather, these results are best interpreted to say that the degree of the stabilizing effect of a given important weak interaction can be severely compromised by other weak interactions (including weak harvesting). PMID:26219561

  6. WEAK CONVERGENCE EMPIRICAL PROCESSES

    E-print Network

    Wellner, Jon A.

    not aimed at giving an exhaustive coverage of the statistical background or related literature in presentingv WEAK CONVERGENCE AND EMPIRICAL PROCESSES With Applications to Statistics by Aad van der Vaart in the journal literature and has, as a result, been accessible only to a relatively small number of specialists

  7. Weak gravitational fields

    E-print Network

    Lerner, David E.; Porter, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    . 1528, 456 (2013); 10.1063/1.4803644 Exact Green function for a Dirac particle in a weak gravitational plane wave field. Alternative path integral approach J. Math. Phys. 53, 072303 (2012); 10.1063/1.4736720 Gravitational Aharonov-Bohm effect due...

  8. WEAKLY NONLOCAL SOLITARY WAVES

    E-print Network

    Boyd, John P.

    , Solitons and the Inverse Scattering, SIAM, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Good treatment of classical, exactly#12;WEAKLY NONLOCAL SOLITARY WAVES AND OTHER EXPONENTIALLY SMALL PHENOMENA Generalized Solitons of classical soliton for Bond number ¿ 1/3. Amick, C. J. and McLeod, J. B.: 1990, A singular perturbation

  9. Weak Lensing with LSST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittman, David M.; Jain, B.; Jarvis, M.; Knox, L.; Margoniner, V.; Takada, M.; Tyson, J.; Zhan, H.; LSST Weak Lensing Science Collaboration

    2006-12-01

    Constraining dark energy parameters with weak lensing is one of the primary science goals of the LSST. The LSST Weak Lensing Science Collaboration has been formed with the goal of optimizing the weak lensing science by optimizing the survey cadence; working with Data Management to insure high-quality pipeline processing which will meet our needs; developing the necessary analysis tools well before the onset of data-taking; participating in high-fidelity simulations to test the system end-to-end; and analyzing the real dataset as it becomes available. We review the major weak lensing probes, the twoand three-point shear correlations, and how they constrain dark energy parameters. We also review the possibility of going beyond dark energy models and testing gravity with the LSST data. To realize the promise of the awesome LSST statistical precision, we must ensure that systematic errors are kept under control. We review the major sources of systematics and our plans for mitigation. We present data that demonstrate that these sources of systematics can be kept to a level smaller than the statistical error.

  10. Water coordination structures and the excess free energy of the liquid

    E-print Network

    Merchant, Safir; Asthagiri, D

    2011-01-01

    For a distinguished water molecule, the solute water, we assess the contribution of each coordination state to its excess chemical potential, using a molecular aufbau approach. In this approach, we define a coordination sphere, the inner-shell, and separate the excess chemical potential into packing, outer-shell, and local chemical contributions; the coordination state is defined by the number of solvent water molecules within the coordination sphere. The packing term accounts for the free energy of creating a solute-free coordination sphere in the liquid. The outer-shell term accounts for the interaction of the solute with the fluid outside the coordination sphere and it is accurately described by a Gaussian model of hydration for coordination radii greater than the minimum of the oxygen-oxygen pair correlation function. Consistent with the conventional radial cut-off used for defining hydrogen-bonds in liquid water, theory helps identify a chemically meaningful coordination radius. The local chemical contri...

  11. Solvent Extraction of Furfural From Biomass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    Solvent-extraction method reduces energy required to remove furfural produced during acid hydrolysis of biomass. Acid hydrolysis performed in vessel containing both solvents and reacting ingredients. With intimate contact between solvents and aqueous hydrolyis liqour, furfural removed form liquor almost as fast as it forms.

  12. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOEpatents

    Derbidge, T. Craig (Sunnyvale, CA); Mulholland, James A. (Chapel Hill, NC); Foster, Edward P. (Macungie, PA)

    1986-01-01

    An air-purged burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired without the coking thereof on the burner components. The air-purged burner is designed for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal in a tangentially fired boiler.

  13. Solvent cleaning system and method for removing contaminants from solvent used in resin recycling

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2009-01-06

    A two step solvent and carbon dioxide based system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material and which further includes a solvent cleaning system for periodically removing the contaminants from the solvent so that the solvent can be reused and the contaminants can be collected and safely discarded in an environmentally safe manner.

  14. Is Water a Universal Solvent for Life?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorill, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    There are strong reasons to believe that the laws, principles and constraints of physics and chemistry are universal. It is much less clear how this universality translates into our understanding of the origins of life. Conventionally, discussions of this topic focus on chemistry that must be sufficiently rich to seed life. Although this is clearly a prerequisite for the emergence of living systems, I propose to focus instead on self-organization of matter into functional structures capable of reproduction, evolution and responding to environmental changes. In biology, most essential functions are largely mediated by noncovalent interactions (interactions that do not involve making or breaking chemical bonds). Forming chemical bonds is only a small part of what living systems do. There are specific implications of this point of view for universality. I will concentrate on one of these implications. Strength of non-covalent interactions must be properly tuned. If they were too weak, the system would exhibit undesired, uncontrolled response to natural fluctuations of physical and chemical parameters. If they were too strong kinetics of biological processes would be slow and energetics costly. This balance, however, is not a natural property of complex chemical systems. Instead, it has to be achieved with the aid of an appropriate solvent for life. In particular, potential solvents for life must be characterized by a high dielectric constant to ensure solubility of polar species and sufficient flexibility of biological structures stabilized by electrostatic interactions. Among these solvents, water exhibits a remarkable trait that it also promotes solvophobic (hydrophobic) interactions between non-polar species, typically manifested by a tendency of these species to aggregate and minimize their contacts with the aqueous solvent. Hydrophobic interactions are responsible, at least in part, for many self-organization phenomena in biological systems, such as the formation of cellular boundary structures or protein folding. Strengths of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions are similar and can be balanced over a wide range of temperatures, which considerably increases the repertoire of interactions that can be used to modulate biological functions. Some properties of water, e.g. its chemical activity against polymerization reactions, are considered as unfavorable to life. In actuality, this might be a favorable trait because life requires a balance between constructive and destructive processes. For example, molecules synthesized in response to specific conditions must be degraded once these conditions change. Otherwise regulation of biological processes would be virtually impossible. Water might not be the only liquid with favorable properties for supporting life. It has been proposed that formamide, which might be present elsewhere in the universe in sufficient quantities to warrant interest, could be a potential alternative to water for the origin of life. However, this will remain highly hypothetical until it is demonstrated in further studies on its physical, chemical and biological properties it is capable of mediating self-organization of matter and providing proper balance between different types of non-covalent interactions.

  15. Co(III) protoporphyrin IX chloride in solution: spin-state and metal coordination revealed from resonant inelastic X-ray scattering and electronic structure calculations.

    PubMed

    Atak, Kaan; Golnak, Ronny; Xiao, Jie; Pflüger, Mika; Brandenburg, Tim; Winter, Bernd; Aziz, Emad F

    2015-02-01

    The local electronic structure of the cobalt centre-ion of Co(III) protoporphyrin IX chloride dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) liquid solution is studied by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) spectroscopy at the cobalt L-edge. The resulting cobalt 2p partial-fluorescence-yield (PFY) X-ray absorption (XA) spectrum, integrated from RIXS spectra, is simulated for various possible spin-states and coordination of the cobalt centre by using the newly developed density functional theory/restricted open shell single excitation configuration interaction (DFT/ROCIS) method. Comparison between experiment and calculation shows that the cobalt ion (3d(6) electronic configuration) adopts a low-spin state with all six 3d electrons paired, and the cobalt centre is either 5-coordinated by its natural ligands (one chloride ion and four nitrogen atoms), or 6-coordinated, when binding to an oxygen atom of a DMSO solvent molecule. Analysis of the measured RIXS spectra reveals weak 3d-3d electron correlation, and in addition a value of the local HOMO-LUMO gap at the Co sites is obtained. PMID:25529387

  16. Dynamics of weakly aggregated colloidal particles.

    PubMed

    Kilfoil, Maria L; Pashkovski, Eugene E; Masters, James A; Weitz, D A

    2003-04-15

    We discuss the behaviour of the dynamics of colloidal particles with a weak attractive interparticle interaction that is induced through the addition of polymer to the solvent. We briefly review the description of their behaviour in terms of the jamming phase diagram, which parametrized the fluid-to-solid transition due to changes in volume fraction, attractive energy or applied stress. We focus on a discussion of ageing of the solid gels formed by these colloid-polymer mixtures. They exhibit a delayed collapse induced by gravity. The time evolution of the height of the sediment exhibits an unexpected scaling behaviour, suggesting a universal nature to this delayed collapse. We complement these measurements of the scaling of the collapse with microscopic investigations of the evolution of the structure of the network using confocal microscopy. These results provide new insight into the origin of this ageing behaviour. PMID:12871623

  17. Structure modulation of manganese coordination polymers consisting of 1,4-naphthalene dicarboxylate and 1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yongbing; Wang, Jingjing; Tao, Yinhua; Chen, Jinxi; Mishima, Akio; Ohba, Masaaki

    2014-06-14

    Three new manganese coordination polymers, {[Mn2(1,4-NDC)2(phen)2](H2O)}n (1), [Mn2(1,4-NDC)2(phen)(H2O)]n (2) and {[Mn4(1,4-NDC)4(phen)4](DMF)2}n (3) (1,4-H2NDC = 1,4-naphthalene dicarboxylic acid; phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; DMF = N,N-dimethylformamide), have been synthesized solvo/hydrothermally. 1,4-NDC(2-) ligands adopt different coordination modes under different solvents and concentrations which promotes different crystal structure formation. X-ray crystal structural data reveal that compounds 1, 2 and 3 crystallize in monoclinic space groups C2/c, P21/c and C2/c, respectively. Compound 1 has Mn2 dimers connected by 1,4-NDC(2-) linkers, packing into a 2D structure in a grid pattern. Compound 2 has a three-dimensional (3D) structure which is constructed by Mn2 dimers and 1,4-NDC(2-) linkers. Each MnO4N2 node of compound 3 is linked to another by 1,4-NDC(2-) ligands to form a two-dimensional (2D) structure. Variable-temperature magnetic susceptibilities of compounds 1-3 exhibit overall weak antiferromagnetic coupling between the adjacent Mn(II) ions. PMID:24756312

  18. SOLVENT DISPERSION AND FLOW METER CALCULATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.; Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.

    2013-06-21

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) found that the dispersion numbers for the six combinations of CSSX:Next Generation Solvent (NGS) “blend” and pure NGS versus salt solution, caustic wash, and strip aqueous solutions are all good. The dispersion numbers are indications of processability with centrifugal contactors. A comparison of solvent physical and thermal properties shows that the Intek™ solvent flow meter in the plant has a reading biased high versus calibrated flow when NGS is used, versus the standard CSSX solvent. The flow meter, calibrated for CSSX solvent, is predicted to read 2.8 gpm of NGS in a case where the true flow of NGS is 2.16 gpm.

  19. Batch extracting process using magneticparticle held solvents

    DOEpatents

    Nunez, Luis (Elmhurst, IL); Vandergrift, George F. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    1995-01-01

    A process for selectively removing metal values which may include catalytic values from a mixture containing same, wherein a magnetic particle is contacted with a liquid solvent which selectively dissolves the metal values to absorb the liquid solvent onto the magnetic particle. Thereafter the solvent-containing magnetic particles are contacted with a mixture containing the heavy metal values to transfer metal values into the solvent carried by the magnetic particles, and then magnetically separating the magnetic particles. Ion exchange resins may be used for selective solvents.

  20. IVS Technology Coordinator Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This report of the Technology Coordinator includes the following: 1) continued work to implement the new VLBI2010 system, 2) the 1st International VLBI Technology Workshop, 3) a VLBI Digital- Backend Intercomparison Workshop, 4) DiFX software correlator development for geodetic VLBI, 5) a review of progress towards global VLBI standards, and 6) a welcome to new IVS Technology Coordinator Bill Petrachenko.

  1. Social Postural Coordination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varlet, Manuel; Marin, Ludovic; Lagarde, Julien; Bardy, Benoit G.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the current study was to investigate whether a visual coupling between two people can produce spontaneous interpersonal postural coordination and change their intrapersonal postural coordination involved in the control of stance. We examined the front-to-back head displacements of participants and the angular motion of their hip and…

  2. 6. Coordination and control.

    PubMed

    2014-05-01

    Any complex operation requires a system for management. In most societies, disaster management is the responsibility of the government. Coordination and control is a system that provides the oversight for all of the disaster management functions. The roles and responsibilities of a coordination and control centre include: (1) planning; (2) maintenance of inventories; (3) activation of the disaster response plan; (4) application of indicators of function; (5) surveillance; (6) information management; (7) coordination of activities of the BSFs; (8) decision-making; (9) priority setting; (10) defining overarching goal and objectives for interventions; (11) applying indicators of effectiveness; (12) applying indicators of benefit and impact; (13) exercising authority; (14) managing resources; (15) initiating actions; (16) preventing influx of unneeded resources; (17) defining progress; (18) providing information; (19) liasing with responding organisations; and (20) providing quality assurance. Coordination and control is impossible without communications. To accomplish coordination and control, three factors must be present: (1) mandate; (2) power and authority; and (3) available resources. Coordination and control is responsible for the evaluation of the effectiveness and benefits/impacts of all interventions. Coordination and control centres (CCCs) are organised hierarchically from the on-scene CCCs (incident command) to local provincial to national CCCs. Currently, no comprehensive regional and international CCCs have been universally endorsed. Systems such as the incident command system, the unified command system, and the hospital incident command system are described as are the humanitarian reform movement and the importance of coordination and control in disaster planning and preparedness. PMID:24785803

  3. Nadia Elliott Administrative Coordinator

    E-print Network

    Su, Xiao

    Karen Krumme Assistant Director New Program Coordinator Ruth Huard Dean SJSU COLLEGE OF INTERNATIONAL Financial Analyst Nieves Richardson College Resource Analyst New Int'l Marketing Coordinator Student Laura Schilling Enrllmnt Services Coord New Int'l Recruitment Specialist Student Assistants Student

  4. Colorimetric Humidity and Solvent Recognition Based on a Cation-Exchange Clay Mineral Incorporating Nickel(II)-Chelate Complexes.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Hitoshi; Mochida, Tomoyuki

    2015-12-01

    Solvatochromic nickel(II) complexes with diketonato and diamine ligands were incorporated into a saponite clay by ion exchange, and their colorimetric humidity- and solvent-recognition properties were investigated. These powders exhibit color change from red to blue-green depending on humidity, and the detection range can be controlled by modifying the metal complex. The humidity response takes advantage of the humidity-dependent water content in clay and the coordination of water molecules to the metal complex in equilibrium. The addition of organic solvents to the powders causes a color change to occur, varying from red to blue-green depending on the donor number of the solvent, thereby enabling solvent recognition. In the clay, the affinity of less sterically hindered complexes to water or solvent molecules is decreased compared with that in solution because the cationic complexes interact with the anionic layers in the clay. Incorporating diethylene glycol into the materials produced thermochromic powders. PMID:26542108

  5. Weakly supervised glasses removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhicheng; Zhou, Yisu; Wen, Lijie

    2015-03-01

    Glasses removal is an important task on face recognition, in this paper, we provide a weakly supervised method to remove eyeglasses from an input face image automatically. We choose sparse coding as face reconstruction method, and optical flow to find exact shape of glasses. We combine the two processes iteratively to remove glasses more accurately. The experimental results reveal that our method works much better than these algorithms alone, and it can remove various glasses to obtain natural looking glassless facial images.

  6. Composite weak bosons

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, M.

    1988-04-01

    Dynamical mechanism of composite W and Z is studied in a 1/N field theory model with four-fermion interactions in which global weak SU(2) symmetry is broken explicitly by electromagnetic interaction. Issues involved in such a model are discussed in detail. Deviation from gauge coupling due to compositeness and higher order loop corrections are examined to show that this class of models are consistent not only theoretically but also experimentally.

  7. Solution structures of ferrihaem in some dipolar aprotic solvents and their binary aqueous mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S. B.; Lantzke, I. R.

    1969-01-01

    1. Conductivity and u.v. and visible spectroscopic techniques were used to investigate the solution structure of the prosthetic group of the ferric haemoproteins (ferrihaem) in dimethyl sulphoxide, NN-dimethylacetamide, NN-dimethylformamide and sulpholane, and certain of their aqueous mixtures. 2. In neutral or acid dimethyl sulphoxide, chlorohaemin is monomeric and completely dissociated into Cl?ion and a ferrihaem species with dimethyl sulphoxide molecules in the fifth and sixth co-ordination positions on iron. 3. In neutral NN-dimethylacetamide and NN-dimethylformamide chlorohaemin is monomeric but is largely undissociated, giving different spectra from that of chlorohaemin in dimethyl sulphoxide. On acidification, dissociation occurs and the dimethyl sulphoxide type of spectrum results. 4. Studies in a fourth solvent, sulpholane, indicate that solvent co-ordinating power (ligand strength) rather than bulk dielectric constant is responsible for dissociation of chlorohaemin. 5. In neutral dimethyl sulphoxide–water mixtures chlorohaemin remains monomeric and completely dissociated, and spectra are independent of mixture composition, except at high water concentrations, when precipitation occurs. In alkaline dimethyl sulphoxide–water mixtures, where the complete solvent mixture range is accessible, ferrihaem is polymeric (probably dimeric) and spectra are dependent on solvent composition. A quantitative analysis indicates that the spectral changes are due to replacement by water of one molecule of co-ordinated dimethyl sulphoxide per ferrihaem aggregate, and do not involve a two-molecule replacement as has been suggested for the alkaline pyridine–water system. PMID:5378383

  8. Assembly of Cerium(III) 2,2?-Bipyridine-5,5?-dicarboxylate-based Metal–Organic Frameworks by Solvent Tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Ayhan, Ozan; Malaestean, Iurie L.; Ellern, Arkady; van Leusen, Jan; Baca, Svetlana G.; Kögerler, Paul

    2014-07-02

    Two cerium(III) 2,2?-bipyridine-5,5?-dicarboxylate-based 3D coordination networks highlight the ability of CeIII ions to adopt different coordination environments upon subtle changes to the reaction conditions, producing metal?organic frameworks that integrate varying crystal solvent contents.

  9. Mining Weak Lensing Surveys

    E-print Network

    N. Padmanabhan; U. Seljak; U. L. Pen

    2002-10-21

    We present a survey of the cosmological applications of the next generation of weak lensing surveys, paying special attention to the computational challenges presented by the number of galaxies, $N_{gal} ~$ 10$^{5}$. We focus on optimal methods with no pixelization and derive a multigrid $P^3M$ algorithm that performs the relevant computations in $O(N_{gal} \\log N_{gal})$ time. We test the algorithm by studying three applications of weak lensing surveys - convergence map reconstruction, cluster detection and $E$ and $B$ power spectrum estimation using realistic 1 deg^{2} simulations derived from N-body simulations. The map reconstruction is able to reconstruct large scale features without artifacts. Detecting clusters using only weak lensing is difficult because of line of sight contamination and noise, with low completeness if one desires low contamination of the sample. A power spectrum analysis of the convergence field is more promising and we are able to reconstruct the convergence spectrum with no loss of information down to the smallest scales. The numerical methods used here can be applied to other data sets with same $O(N\\log N)$ scaling and can be generalised to a sphere.

  10. Micro practices of coordination based on complex adaptive systems: user needs and strategies for coordinating public health in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Wittrup, Inge; Burau, Viola

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Many highly formalised approaches to coordination poorly fit public health and recent studies call for coordination based on complex adaptive systems. Our contribution is two-fold. Empirically, we focus on public health, and theoretically we build on the patient perspective and treat coordination as a process of contingent, two-level negotiations of user needs. Theory and Methods The paper draws on the concept of user needs-based coordination and sees coordination as a process, whereby needs emerging from the life world of the user are made amenable to the health system through negotiations. The analysis is based on an explorative case study of a health promotion initiative in Denmark. It adopts an anthropological qualitative approach and uses a range of qualitative data. Results The analysis identifies four strategies of coordination: the coordinator focusing on the individual user or on relations with other professionals; and the manager coaching the coordinator or providing structural support. Crucially, the coordination strategies by management remain weak as they do not directly relate to specific user needs. Discussion In process of bottom-up negotiations user needs become blurred and this is especially a challenge for management. The study therefore calls for an increased focus on the level nature of negotiations to bridge the gap that currently weakens coordination strategies by management. PMID:26528097

  11. Solvent Reorganization Energy and Electronic Coupling for Intramolecular Electron Transfer in Biphenyl-Acceptor Anion Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing-bo; Ma, Jian-yi; Li, Xiang-yuan; He, Fu-cheng; Fu, Ke-xiang

    2008-02-01

    A novel algorithm was designed and implemented to realize the numerical calculation of the solvent reorganization energy for electron transfer reactions, on the basis of nonequilibrium solvation theory and the dielectric polarizable continuum model. Applying the procedure to the well-investigated intramolecular electron transfer in biphenyl-androstane-naphthyl and biphenyl-androstane-phenanthryl systems, the numerical results of solvent reorganization energy were determined to be around 60 kJ/mol, in good agreement with experimental data. Koopman's theorem was adopted for the calculation of the electron transfer coupling element, associated with the linear reaction coordinate approximation. The values for this quantity obtained are acceptable when compared with experimental results.

  12. Organic ferromagnetism of Tc=6.7 K driven by evaporation of crystal solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, W.; Awaga, K.

    2002-05-01

    The crystals of the organic cation radical salt, BBDTA (benzo[1,2-d:4,5-d ']bis[1,3,2]dithiazole)·GaCl 4·CH 3CN, was found to consist of a ladder-type structure of BBDTA, coordinated by the crystal solvent, CH 3CN. While this material exhibited diamagnetic properties, removal of the crystal solvent resulted in a drastic change from diamagnetic to paramagnetic, probably caused by a packing modification of the BBDTA molecules. The desolvated form made bulk, ferromagnetic ordering at 6.7 K. This finding has superseded the highest Curie temperature of organic ferromagnets based on ferromagnetic interactions, <2 K.

  13. Lanthanide-organic complexes based on polyoxometalates: Solvent effect on the luminescence properties

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Qun; Liu Shuxia; Liang Dadong; Ma Fengji; Ren Guojian; Wei Feng; Yang Yuan; Li Congcong

    2012-06-15

    A series of lanthanide-organic complexes based on polyoxometalates (POMs) [Ln{sub 2}(DNBA){sub 4}(DMF){sub 8}][W{sub 6}O{sub 19}] (Ln=La(1), Ce(2), Sm(3), Eu(4), Gd(5); DNBA=3,5-dinitrobenzoate; DMF=N,N-dimethylformamide) has been synthesized. These complexes consist of [W{sub 6}O{sub 19}]{sup 2-} and dimeric [Ln{sub 2}(DNBA){sub 4}(DMF){sub 8}]{sup 2+} cations. The luminescence properties of 4 are measured in solid state and different solutions, respectively. Notably, the emission intensity increases gradually with the increase of solvent permittivity, and this solvent effect can be directly observed by electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The analyses of ESI-MS show that the eight coordinated solvent DMF units of dimeric cation are active. They can move away from dimeric cations and exchange with solvent molecules. Although the POM anions escape from 3D supramolecular network, the dimeric state structure of [Ln{sub 2}(DNBA){sub 4}]{sup 2+} remains unchanged in solution. The conservation of red luminescence is attributed to the maintenance of the aggregated state structures of dimeric cations. - Graphical abstract: 3D POMs-based lanthanide-organic complexes performed the solvent effect on the luminescence property. The origin of such solvent effect can be understood and explained on the basis of the existence of coordinated active sites by the studies of ESI-MS. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The solvent effect on the luminescence property of POMs-based lanthanide-organic complexes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ESI-MS analyses illuminate the correlation between the structure and luminescence property. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dimeric cations have eight active sites of solvent coordination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The aggregated state structure of dimer cation remains unchanged in solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Luminescence associating with ESI-MS is a new method for investigating the interaction of complex and solvent.

  14. Improvement of the biocatalytic properties of one phenylacetone monooxygenase mutant in hydrophilic organic solvents.

    PubMed

    de Gonzalo, Gonzalo; Rodríguez, Cristina; Rioz-Martínez, Ana; Gotor, Vicente

    2012-01-01

    The presence of different hydrophilic organic solvents or a water soluble polymer such as PEG 4000 led to an enhancement in the enzymatic activity of the M446G mutant of phenylacetone monooxygenase when it is employed in enantioselective sulfoxidations and Baeyer-Villiger reactions. By solvent engineering new substrates were found to be effectively converted by this Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase. The use of 5% methanol together with the weak anion exchange resin Lewatit MP62 also allows the dynamic kinetic resolution of a set of racemic benzylketones. By this approach (S)-benzylesters could be obtained with high yields and optical purities. PMID:22133439

  15. Weakly broken galileon symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirtskhalava, David; Santoni, Luca; Trincherini, Enrico; Vernizzi, Filippo

    2015-09-01

    Effective theories of a scalar phi invariant under the internal galileon symmetry phi?phi+b? x? have been extensively studied due to their special theoretical and phenomenological properties. In this paper, we introduce the notion of weakly broken galileon invariance, which characterizes the unique class of couplings of such theories to gravity that maximally retain their defining symmetry. The curved-space remnant of the galileon's quantum properties allows to construct (quasi) de Sitter backgrounds largely insensitive to loop corrections. We exploit this fact to build novel cosmological models with interesting phenomenology, relevant for both inflation and late-time acceleration of the universe.

  16. Weak Bisimulation Observable transitions

    E-print Network

    Gardner, Philippa

    transitions. 2 #12;Example P0 def = a.P0 + b.P1 + .P1 P1 def = a.P1 + .P2 P2 def = b.P0 Q1 def = a.Q1 + .Q2 Q2, whenever (P, Q) B and is a, a or for action name a, then · if P = P then Q = Q for some Q such that (P. present a candidate relation B with (P, Q) B; 2. prove that B is a weak bisimulation. Example P0 def = a.P

  17. Developmental coordination disorder

    MedlinePLUS

    Physical education and perceptual motor training (combining movement with tasks that require thinking, like math or reading) are the best ways to treat coordination disorder. Using a computer to ... Encouraging physical activity is important to prevent obesity.

  18. Kairoscope : coordinating time socially

    E-print Network

    Martin, Reed Eric

    2010-01-01

    If everyone says time is relative, why is it still so rigidly defined? There have been many attempts to address the issue of coordinating schedules, but each of these attempts runs into an issue of rigidity: in order to ...

  19. Weak Measurements of Light Chirality with a Plasmonic Slit

    E-print Network

    Y. Gorodetski; K. Y. Bliokh; B. Stein; C. Genet; N. Shitrit; V. Kleiner; E. Hasman; T. W. Ebbesen

    2012-07-09

    We examine, both experimentally and theoretically, an interaction of tightly focused polarized light with a slit on a metal surface supporting plasmon-polariton modes. Remarkably, this simple system can be highly sensitive to the polarization of the incident light and offers a perfect quantum-weak-measurement tool with a built-in post-selection in the plasmon-polariton mode. We observe the plasmonic spin Hall effect in both coordinate and momentum spaces which is interpreted as weak measurements of the helicity of light with real and imaginary weak values determined by the input polarization. Our experiment combines advantages of (i) quantum weak measurements, (ii) near-field plasmonic systems, and (iii) high-numerical aperture microscopy in employing spin-orbit interaction of light and probing light chirality.

  20. International Space Exploration Coordination Group

    E-print Network

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    International Space Exploration Coordination Group The Global Exploration Roadmap September 2011 in The Global Exploration Strategy: the Framework for Coordination, released in May 2007, space agencies participating in the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) are developing the Global

  1. Polar Coordinates Introduction

    E-print Network

    Vickers, James

    coordinates of a point P are (x, y) then P can be located on a Cartesian plane as indicated in Figure 1(a). xx y y O P r xx y y O P (a) (b) Figure 1. However, the same point P can be located by using polar (VERSION 1: March 18, 2004): Workbook Level 1 17.2: Polar Coordinates #12;x y a P + 2 + k x x y y P P

  2. Luminescent lanthanide coordination polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, L.; Evans, O.R.; Foxman, B.M.; Lin, W.

    1999-12-13

    One-dimensional lanthanide coordination polymers with the formula Ln(isonicotinate){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (Ln = Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb; 1a-f) were synthesized by treating nitrate or perchlorate salts of Ln(III) with 4-pyridinecarboxaldehyde under hydro(solvo)thermal conditions. Single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction studies indicate that these lanthanide coordination polymers adopt two different structures. While Ce(III), Pr(III), and Nd(III) complexes adopt a chain structure with alternating Ln-(carboxylate){sub 2}-Ln and Ln-(carboxylate){sub 4}-Ln linkages, Sm(III), Eu(III), and Tb(III) complexes have a doubly carboxylate-bridged infinite-chain structure with one chelating carboxylate group on each metal center. In both structures, the lanthanide centers also bind to two water molecules to yield an eight-coordinate, square antiprismatic geometry. The pyridine nitrogen atoms of the isonicotinate groups do not coordinate to the metal centers in these lanthanide(III) complexes; instead, they direct the formation of Ln(III) coordination polymers via hydrogen bonding with coordinated water molecules. Photoluminescence measurements show that Tb(isonicotinate){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} is highly emissive at room temperature with a quantum yield of {approximately}90%. These results indicate that highly luminescent lanthanide coordination polymers can be assembled using a combination of coordination and hydrogen bonds. Crystal data for 1a: monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/c, a = 9.712(2) {angstrom}, b = 19.833(4) {angstrom}, c = 11.616(2) {angstrom}, {beta} = 111.89(3){degree}, Z = 4. Crystal data for 1f: monoclinic space group C2/c, a = 20.253(4) {angstrom}, b = 11.584(2) {angstrom}, c = 9.839(2) {angstrom}, {beta} = 115.64(3){degree}, Z = 8.

  3. Asphaltene aggregation in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kyeongseok; Ring, Terry A; Deo, Milind D

    2004-03-01

    Asphaltenic solids formed in the Rangely field in the course of a carbon dioxide flood and heptane insolubles in the oil from the same field were used in this study. Four different solvents were used to dissolve the asphaltenes. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy was used to determine the onset of asphaltene precipitation by heptane titration. When the onset values were plotted versus asphaltene concentrations, distinct break points (called critical aggregation concentrations (CAC) in this paper) were observed. CACs for the field asphaltenes dissolved in toluene, trichloroethylene, tetrahydrofuran, and pyridine occurred at concentrations of 3.0, 3.7, 5.0, and 8.2 g/l, respectively. CACs are observed at similar concentrations as critical micelle concentrations (CMC) for the asphaltenes in the solvents employed and can be interpreted to be the points at which rates of asphaltene aggregations change. CMC values of asphaltenes determined from surface tension measurements (in pyridine and TCE) were slightly higher than the CAC values measured by NIR onset measurements. The CAC for heptane-insoluble asphaltenes in toluene was 3.1 g/l. Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and elemental compositions of the two asphaltenes showed that the H/C ratio of the heptane-insoluble asphaltenes was higher and molecular weight (measured by vapor pressure osmometry) was lower. PMID:14757097

  4. Glycerol and glycerol carbonate as ultraviscous solvents for mixture analysis by NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lameiras, Pedro; Boudesocque, Leslie; Mouloungui, Zéphirin; Renault, Jean-Hugues; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Lippens, Guy; Nuzillard, Jean-Marc

    2011-09-01

    NMR of weakly polar analytes in an apolar ultraviscous solvent has recently been proposed for mixture analysis as a pertinent alternative to the DOSY experiment. The present article reports the first use of glycerol and glycerol carbonate as polar solvents for the NMR analysis of a model mixture of dipeptides. This work demonstrates the high potentiality of these solvents for the analysis of mixtures made of polar and potentially bioactive compounds. Medium-sized molecules slowly reorient in glycerol and glycerol carbonate under particular temperature conditions, so that solute resonances may show spin diffusion in NOESY spectra, thus opening the way to mixture analysis. Glycerol and glycerol carbonate have turned out to be ultraviscous solvents of choice for the individualization of four structurally close mixed dipeptides: Leu-Val, Leu-Tyr, Gly-Tyr and Ala-Tyr by means of 1D and 2D NOESY experiments. Selective sample excitation and signal detection were implemented to eliminate the intense proton signals of the non-deuterated solvents. Moreover, the recording of a multiplet selective 2D NOESY-TOCSY has shown that the analytical power of NMR in highly viscous solvents is not limited to the extraction of mixture component 1D subspectra but may also yield some supplementary information about atom connectivity within components.

  5. Solvent Extraction External Radiation Stability Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, R.A.

    2001-01-05

    Personnel irradiated a number of samples of calixarene-based solvent. Analysis of these samples indicated that measurable loss of the calixarene occurred at very high doses (-16 Mrad). No measurable loss of the Cs-7SB modifier occurred at equivalent doses. The primary degradation product, 4-sec-butylphenol, observed during analysis of the samples came from degradation of the modifier. Also, TOA proved more susceptible to damage than the other components of the solvent. The total degradation of the solvent proved relatively minor. The consistent solvent performance, as indicated by the measured D Cs values, after exposure at high total doses serves as evidence of the relatively low degree of degradation of the solvent components. Additional tests employing internal irradiation of solvents with both simulants and SRS tank waste will be completed by the end of March 2001 to provide confirmation of the results presented herein.

  6. Solvent dependent photophysical properties of dimethoxy curcumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, Atanu; Indira Priyadarsini, K.

    2013-03-01

    Dimethoxy curcumin (DMC) is a methylated derivative of curcumin. In order to know the effect of ring substitution on photophysical properties of curcumin, steady state absorption and fluorescence spectra of DMC were recorded in organic solvents with different polarity and compared with those of curcumin. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of DMC, like curcumin, are strongly dependent on solvent polarity and the maxima of DMC showed red shift with increase in solvent polarity function (?f), but the above effect is prominently observed in case of fluorescence maxima. From the dependence of Stokes' shift on solvent polarity function the difference between the excited state and ground state dipole moment was estimated as 4.9 D. Fluorescence quantum yield (?f) and fluorescence lifetime (?f) of DMC were also measured in different solvents at room temperature. The results indicated that with increasing solvent polarity, ?f increased linearly, which has been accounted for the decrease in non-radiative rate by intersystem crossing (ISC) processes.

  7. Weakly-bridged dimeric diorganotin(IV) compounds derived from pyruvic acid hydrazone Schiff base ligands: Synthesis, characterization and crystal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Min; Yin, Han-Dong; Cui, Ji-Chun

    2011-03-01

    We report the synthesis of four diorganotin(IV) compounds of Schiff base pyruvic acid hydrazone derivatives formulated as [R 2SnLY] 2, where L 1 is 2-SC 4H 3CON 2C(CH 3)CO 2 with Y = CH 3CH 2CH 2CH 2OH, R = n-Bu ( 1); L 2 is C 6H 5CON 2C(CH 3)CO 2 with Y = CH 3CH 2OH, R = p-F-Bz ( 2); L 3 is 2-HOC 6H 4CON 2C(CH 3)CO 2 with Y dbnd H 2O, R = p-CN -Bz ( 3); and L 4 is 4-NO 2-C 6H 4CON 2C(CH 3)CO 2 with Y dbnd CH 3CH 2OH, R = Bz ( 4). The structures of all compounds have been established by a combination of single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, 1H and 119Sn NMR spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. Studies reveal that four ligands present the same coordination mode with tin center, which all present tridentate ONO donor Schiff bases and coordinate to the tin center in an enolic form. In compounds 1- 4, each tin atom is seven-coordinated and exhibits a distorted pentagonal bipyramid with a planar SnO 4N unit and two apical alkyl carbon atoms, thus forming a weakly-bridged dimeric molecule. Additionally, the distance of Sn⋯O bridge in each compound is obviously affected by the choice of different alkyl groups and coordination solvent molecules, which fluctuates in the range of 2.571(5)-2.839(4) Å. Furthermore, the supramolecular structure analysis show that there are two types of supramolecular infrastructures, 1D chain or 2D network, which are formed by intermolecular O-H···N or C-H⋯X (X = O, N or F) hydrogen bonds.

  8. Femtosecond dynamics in hydrogen-bonded solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Castner, E.W. Jr.; Chang, Y.J.

    1993-09-01

    We present results on the ultrafast dynamics of pure hydrogen-bonding solvents, obtained using femtosecond Fourier-transform optical-heterodyne-detected, Raman-induced Kerr effect spectroscopy. Solvent systems we have studied include the formamides, water, ethylene glycol, and acetic acid. Inertial and diffusive motions are clearly resolved. We comment on the effect that such ultrafast solvent motions have on chemical reactions in solution.

  9. Solvent effects on photostability of metal dithizonates

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, N.L.; Lai, E.P.C.

    1987-01-01

    The photodecompositions of five typical metal dithizonates have been studied in various solvents under the irradiation of 310-nm UV light and ordinary indoor illumination. In methylene chloride and chloroform the decomposition mechanism is confirmed to be the interaction of these metal dithizonates and the oxidants arising from the photodecomposition of the solvent. In carbon tetrachloride the decompositions were fast and were observed to be first-order in the dithizonates. In benzene, no apparent photodecomposition was found. Since these solvent effects are independent of the metal, benzene is probably the best solvent for the extraction-spectrophotometry of unstable dithizonates.

  10. Conserve Energy: Modernize Your Solvent Deasphalting Unit 

    E-print Network

    Lambert, J. S.; Gleitsmann, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    be modified easily to incorporate the en rgy saving features of modern units, at a small fraction of the investment required for complete replacement. EVAPORATIVE SOLVENT RECOVERY Because the solvent used has a high vapor pressure and the DAO and asphalt... products are almost non-volatile, recovery of the solvent is relatively easy. Older units relied on a single stage of solvent evaporation, using large amounts of low pressure steam to supply the heat required. However, tor the past 20 y ars Foster...

  11. MCU MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH CSSX SOLVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F

    2006-01-13

    The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) plans to use several new materials of construction not previously used with CSSX solvent. SRNL researchers tested seven materials proposed for service in seal and gasket applications. None of the materials leached detectable amounts of components into the CSSX solvent during 96 hour tests. All are judged acceptable for use based on their effect on the solvent. However, some of the materials adsorbed solvent or changed dimensions during contact with solvent. Consultation with component and material vendors with regard to performance impact and in-use testing of the materials is recommended. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK), a material selected for use in contactor bearing seals, did not gain weight or change dimensions on contact with CSSX solvent. Analysis of the solvent contacted with this material showed no impurities and the standard dispersion test gave acceptable phase separation results. The material contains a leachable hydrocarbon substance, detectable on exposed surfaces, that did not adversely contaminate the solvent within the limits of the testing. We recommend contacting the vendor to determine the source and purpose of this component, or, alternatively, pursue the infrared analysis of the PEEK in an effort to better define potential impacts.

  12. Single polymer chains in poor solvent: Using the bond fluctuation method with explicit solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentzsch, Christoph; Werner, Marco; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2013-03-01

    We use the bond fluctuation model with explicit solvent to study single polymer chains under poor solvent conditions. Static and dynamic properties of the bond fluctuation model with explicit solvent are compared with the implicit solvent model, and the ?-temperatures are determined for both solvent models. We show that even in the very poor solvent regime, dynamics is not frozen for the explicit solvent model. We investigate some aspects of the structure of a single collapsed globule and show that rather large chain lengths are necessary to reach the scaling regime of a dense sphere. The force-extension curve of a single polymer chain under poor solvent conditions in the fixed end-to-end distance ensemble is analyzed. We find that the transition of the tadpole conformation to the stretched chain conformation is rather smooth because of fluctuation effects, which is in agreement with recent experimental results.

  13. Quantitation of buried contamination by use of solvents. [degradation of silicone polymers by amine solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappas, S. P.; Hsiao, Y. C.; Hill, L. W.

    1973-01-01

    Spore recovery form cured silicone potting compounds using amine solvents to degrade the cured polymers was investigated. A complete list of solvents and a description of the effect of each on two different silicone polymers is provided.

  14. Weakly relativistic plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Fermous, Rachid Djebli, Mourad

    2015-04-15

    Plasma expansion is an important physical process that takes place in laser interactions with solid targets. Within a self-similar model for the hydrodynamical multi-fluid equations, we investigated the expansion of both dense and under-dense plasmas. The weakly relativistic electrons are produced by ultra-intense laser pulses, while ions are supposed to be in a non-relativistic regime. Numerical investigations have shown that relativistic effects are important for under-dense plasma and are characterized by a finite ion front velocity. Dense plasma expansion is found to be governed mainly by quantum contributions in the fluid equations that originate from the degenerate pressure in addition to the nonlinear contributions from exchange and correlation potentials. The quantum degeneracy parameter profile provides clues to set the limit between under-dense and dense relativistic plasma expansions at a given density and temperature.

  15. Recombination, Solvation and Reaction of CN Radicals Following Ultraviolet Photolysis of ICN in Organic Solvents.

    PubMed

    Coulter, Philip; Grubb, Michael P; Koyama, Daisuke; Sazanovich, Igor V; Greetham, Gregory M; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2015-12-31

    The fates of CN radicals produced by ultraviolet (UV) photolysis of ICN in various organic solvents have been examined by transient electronic and vibrational absorption spectroscopy (TEAS and TVAS). Near-UV and visible bands in the TEAS measurement enable direct observation of the CN radicals and their complexes with the solvent molecules. Complementary TVAS measurements probe the products of CN-radical reactions. Geminate recombination to form ICN and INC is a minor pathway on the 150 fs -1300 ps time scales of our experiments in the chosen organic solvents; nonetheless, large infrared transition dipole moments permit direct observation of INC that is vibrationally excited in the C?N stretching mode. The time constants for INC vibrational cooling range from 30 ps in tetrahydrofuran (THF) to 1400 ps in more weakly interacting solvents such as chloroform. The major channel for CN removal in the organic solvents is reaction with solvent molecules, as revealed by depletion of solvent absorption bands and growth of product bands in the TVA spectra. HCN is a reaction product of hydrogen atom abstraction in most of the photoexcited solutions, and forms with vibrational excitation in both the C-H and C?N stretching modes. The vibrational cooling rate of the C?N stretch in HCN depends on the solvent, and follows the same trend as the cooling rate of the C?N stretch in INC. However, in acetonitrile solution an additional reaction pathway produces C3H3N2(•) radicals, which release HCN on a much longer time scale. PMID:26634787

  16. Green Solvents for Precision Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandelli, Heather; Maloney, Phillip; DeVor, Robert; Surma, Jan; Hintze, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace machinery used in liquid oxygen (LOX) fuel systems must be precision cleaned to achieve a very low level of non-volatile residue (< 1 mg0.1 m2), especially flammable residue. Traditionally chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have been used in the precision cleaning of LOX systems, specifically CFC 113 (C2Cl3F3). CFCs have been known to cause the depletion of ozone and in 1987, were banned by the Montreal Protocol due to health, safety and environmental concerns. This has now led to the development of new processes in the precision cleaning of aerospace components. An ideal solvent-replacement is non-flammable, environmentally benign, non-corrosive, inexpensive, effective and evaporates completely, leaving no residue. Highlighted is a green precision cleaning process, which is contaminant removal using supercritical carbon dioxide as the environmentally benign solvent. In this process, the contaminant is dissolved in carbon dioxide, and the parts are recovered at the end of the cleaning process completely dry and ready for use. Typical contaminants of aerospace components include hydrocarbon greases, hydraulic fluids, silicone fluids and greases, fluorocarbon fluids and greases and fingerprint oil. Metallic aerospace components range from small nuts and bolts to much larger parts, such as butterfly valves 18 in diameter. A fluorinated grease, Krytox, is investigated as a model contaminant in these preliminary studies, and aluminum coupons are employed as a model aerospace component. Preliminary studies are presented in which the experimental parameters are optimized for removal of Krytox from aluminum coupons in a stirred-batch process. The experimental conditions investigated are temperature, pressure, exposure time and impeller speed. Temperatures of 308 - 423 K, pressures in the range of 8.3 - 41.4 MPa, exposure times between 5 - 60 min and impeller speeds of 0 - 1000 rpm were investigated. Preliminary results showed up to 86 cleaning efficiency with the moderate processing conditions of 323 K, 13.8 MPa, 30 min and 750 rpm.

  17. Generator Coordinate Truncations

    E-print Network

    K. Hagino; G. F. Bertsch; P. -G. Reinhard

    2003-04-17

    We investigate the accuracy of several schemes to calculate ground-state correlation energies using the generator coordinate technique. Our test-bed for the study is the $sd$ interacting boson model, equivalent to a 6-level Lipkin-type model. We find that the simplified projection of a triaxial generator coordinate state using the $S_3$ subgroup of the rotation group is not very accurate in the parameter space of the Hamiltonian of interest. On the other hand, a full rotational projection of an axial generator coordinate state gives remarkable accuracy. We also discuss the validity of the simplified treatment using the extended Gaussian overlap approximation (top-GOA), and show that it works reasonably well when the number of boson is four or larger.

  18. Pathwise Coordinate optimization

    E-print Network

    Friedman, Jerome Isaac; Hoefling, Holger; Tibshirani, Robert

    2007-01-01

    We consider ``one-at-a-time'' coordinate-wise descent algorithms for a class of convex optimization problems. An algorithm of this kind has been proposed for the L_1-penalized regression (lasso) in the lterature, but it seems to hav e been largely ignored. Indeed, it seems that coordinate-wise algorithms are not often used in convex optimization. We show that this algorithm is very competitive with the well known LARS (or hom otopy) procedure in large lasso problems, and that it can be applied to related methods such as t he garotte and elastic net. It turns out that coordinate-wise descent does not work in the ``fu sed lasso'' however, so we derive a generalized algorithm that yields the solution in much less time that a standard convex optimizer. Finally we generalize the procedure to the two-dimensional fused lasso, and demonstrate its performance on some image smoothing problems.

  19. Green chemicals: Searching for cleaner solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, A.

    1994-10-05

    While increased pressure from EPA has solvents producers scrambling to find greener alternatives, many say the cost effectiveness and performance characteristics of traditional technologies are such that they will not disappear quickly. Though a variety of alternative {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} solvents have been developed and commercialized, better means of solvent recovery have also come along, ensuring continued use of many organic solvents. The 1990 Clean Air Act (CAA), designed to eliminate volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ozone depleters, and other hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), has put limits on many organic solvents. Those most under fire are chlorinated solvents, such as methylene chloride, 1,1,1 trichloroethylene (methyl chloroform), and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-113. Producers have been developing a variety of lower VOC solvents to replace those being phased out or regulated. Among those likely to experience most growth are aliphatic hydrocarbons to replace chlorinated solvents in cleaning applications. Growth is also expected for alcohols, esters, and glycol ethers for other end-use applications.

  20. ENHANCED PROCESSING OF GREEN SOLVENTS - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvents are a valuable processing tool in the chemical and related industries. Solvents are used to enhance mass transfer, heat transfer and in most cases are a processing aid and eventually are not used in the final product but to enhance the fabrication of the final pr...

  1. Gallium complexes and solvent extraction of gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J.P.; Graham, C.R.; Monzyk, B.F.

    1988-05-03

    This patent describes a process for recovering gallium from aqueous solutions containing gallium which comprises contacting such a solution with an organic solvent containing at least 2% by weight of a water-insoluble N-organo hydroxamic acid having at least about 8 carbon atoms to extract gallium, and separating the gallium loaded organic solvent phase from the aqueous phase.

  2. REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SOILS BY SOLVENT FLUSHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvent flushing is a potential technique for remediating a waste disposal/spill site contaminated with organic chemicals. This technique involves the injection of a solvent mixture (e.g., water plus alcohols) that enhances contaminant solubility, reduces the retardation factor, ...

  3. EXPERIENCES IN DESIGNING SOLVENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvents used throughout industry are chosen to meet specific technological requirements such as solute solubility, cleaning and degreasing, or being a medium for paints and coatings. With the increasing awareness of the human health effects and environmental tisks of solvent use...

  4. EXPERIENCES IN DESIGNING SOLVENTS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvents used throughout industry are chosen to meet specific technological requirements such as solute solubility, cleaning and degreasing, or being a medium for paints and coatings. With the increasing awareness of the human health effects and environmental risks of solvent use...

  5. Interfacial chemistry in solvent extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in our research program investigating the interfacial chemistry in solvent extraction systems. Our present research is emphasizing characterization of the structure and dynamics of macroscopic and microscopic interfaces which occur in hydrometallurgical solvent extraction systems. Some highlights of our recent accomplishments are summarized in this report.

  6. Pneumatic conveying of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOEpatents

    Lennon, Dennis R. (Allentown, PA)

    1984-11-06

    A method for pneumatically conveying solvent refined coal to a burner under conditions of dilute phase pneumatic flow so as to prevent saltation of the solvent refined coal in the transport line by maintaining the transport fluid velocity above approximately 95 ft/sec.

  7. REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SOILS BY SOLVENT FLUSHING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvent flushing is a potential technique for remediating a waste disposal/spill site contaminated with organic chemicals. his technique involves the injection of a solvent mixture (e.g., water plus alcohols) that enhances contaminant solubility, reduces the retardation factor, a...

  8. Remediating pesticide contaminated soils using solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Sahle-Demessie, E.; Meckes, M.C.; Richardson, T.L.

    1996-12-31

    Bench-scale solvent extraction studies were performed on soil samples obtained from a Superfund site contaminated with high levels of p,p{prime}-DDT, p,p{prime}-DDE and toxaphene. The effectiveness of the solvent extraction process was assessed using methanol and 2-propanol as solvents over a wide range of operating conditions. It was demonstrated that a six-stage methanol extraction using a solvent-to-soil ratio of 1.6 can decrease pesticide levels in the soil by more than 99% and reduce the volume of material requiring further treatment by 25 times or more. The high solubility of the pesticides in methanol resulted in rapid extraction rates, with the system reaching quasi-equilibrium state in 30 minutes. The extraction efficiency was influenced by the number of extraction stages, the solvent-to-soil ratio, and the soil moisture content. Various methods were investigated to regenerate and recycle the solvent. Evaporation and solvent stripping are low cost and reliable methods for removing high pesticide concentrations from the solvent. For low concentrations, GAC adsorption may be used. Precipitating and filtering pesticides by adding water to the methanol/pesticide solution was not successful when tested with soil extracts. 26 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Coal mining with a liquid solvent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.; Miller, C. G.

    1979-01-01

    Study suggests carbonated water can dissolve or suspend coal and carry it to surface. Mixture of carbon dioxide and water may be coal solvent that will make unmanned mining reality. When used with proposed process monitoring coal solubility with conventional strain gage, solvent is basis for rapid cost effective extraction of coal from underground seams.

  10. REMEDIATING PESTICIDE CONTAMINATED SOILS USING SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench-scale solvent extraction studies were performed on soil samples obtained from a Superfund site contaminated with high levels of p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDD,, p,p'-DDE and toxaphene. The effectiveness of the solvent extraction process was assessed using methanol and 2-propanol as sol...

  11. SAFETY OF ORGANIC SOLVENTS IN WASTE TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    Van Tuyl, H. H.

    1983-08-01

    This report addresses flash points and flammability limits of flammable gases found in waste tanks, primarily hydrocarbon mixtures derived from waste solvents. The effect of vapor pressure is discussed. Particular attention is given to Purex solvent. The pertinent facts are then applied to the safety of the waste tanks of concern.

  12. Improved Supercritical-Solvent Extraction of Coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L.

    1982-01-01

    Raw coal upgraded by supercritical-solvent extraction system that uses two materials instead of one. System achieved extraction yields of 20 to 49 weight percent. Single-solvent yields are about 25 weight percent. Experimental results show extraction yields may be timedependent. Observed decreases in weight of coal agreed well with increases in ash content of residue.

  13. Supercritical-Multiple-Solvent Extraction From Coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, W.; Fong, W.; Pichaichanarong, P.; Chan, P.; Lawson, D.

    1983-01-01

    Large and small molecules dissolve different constituents. Experimental apparatus used to test supercritical extraction of hydrogen rich compounds from coal in various organic solvents. In decreasing order of importance, relevant process parameters were found to be temperature, solvent type, pressure, and residence time.

  14. SOLVENT RECOVERY AT VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a feasibility study of the addition of vapor recovery and solvent purification equipment for Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) to reuse the large quantities of waste solvent generated in space shuttle preparation operations. (NOTE: Operation of VAFB as ...

  15. Synthesis, structure and spectroscopic properties of two new trinuclear nickel(II) clusters possessing solvent effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wen-Kui; Chen, Xiao; Sun, Yin-Xia; Yang, Yu-Hua; Zhao, Li; Xu, Li; Yu, Tian-Zhi

    2009-10-01

    Two solvent-induced trinuclear nickel(II) clusters, [{NiL(CH 3OH)} 2(OAc) 2Ni]·2CH 3OH ( I) and [{NiL(C 2H 5OH)} 2(OAc) 2Ni]·2C 2H 5OH ( II), have been synthesized by the reaction of a new Salen-type bisoxime chelating ligand of 5,5'-di( N, N'-diethylamino)-2,2'-[(1,3-propylene)dioxybis(nitrilomethylidyne)]diphenol (H 2L) with nickel(II) acetate tetrahydrate in different solvents. Clusters I and II were characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra, UV-vis absorption spectra, TG-DTA and X-ray diffraction methods. In clusters I (or II), there are two ligand moieties (which provide N 2O 2 donors), two acetate ions, two coordinated methanol (or ethanol) molecules and two crystallizing methanol (or ethanol) molecules, which result in the formation of three slightly distorted octahedral geometries around Ni(II) ions. Interestingly, nickel(II) ions in the structures of clusters I and II are all six-coordinated geometry, but clusters I and II are grown up in different solvent. Right because of this, solvent effect cause to their different crystal structures.

  16. PARIS II: Computer Aided Solvent Design for Pollution Prevention

    EPA Science Inventory

    This product is a summary of U.S. EPA researchers' work developing the solvent substitution software tool PARIS II (Program for Assisting the Replacement of Industrial Solvents, version 2.0). PARIS II finds less toxic solvents or solvent mixtures to replace more toxic solvents co...

  17. Toxic hepatitis in occupational exposure to solvents

    PubMed Central

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Cataudella, Emanuela; Giordano, Maria; Nunnari, Giuseppe; Chisari, Giuseppe; Malaguarnera, Mariano

    2012-01-01

    The liver is the main organ responsible for the metabolism of drugs and toxic chemicals, and so is the primary target organ for many organic solvents. Work activities with hepatotoxins exposures are numerous and, moreover, organic solvents are used in various industrial processes. Organic solvents used in different industrial processes may be associated with hepatotoxicity. Several factors contribute to liver toxicity; among these are: species differences, nutritional condition, genetic factors, interaction with medications in use, alcohol abuse and interaction, and age. This review addresses the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity. The main pathogenic mechanisms responsible for functional and organic damage caused by solvents are: inflammation, dysfunction of cytochrome P450, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. The health impact of exposure to solvents in the workplace remains an interesting and worrying question for professional health work. PMID:22719183

  18. Characterization of Nanoparticles by Solvent Infrared Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Johannes; Grabow, Janet; Kurland, Heinz-Dieter; Müller, Frank A

    2015-12-15

    The characterization of the surface chemistry of nanoparticles using infrared spectroscopy of adsorbed solvents is proposed. In conventional IR spectroscopy of nanomaterials the capability of characterizing the chemistry of the surface is limited. To overcome these limitations, we record IR spectra of different solvents inside a fixed bed of the nanopowder to be tested. Using water and different alcohols as solvents enables the characterization of the nanomaterial's surface chemistry via the molecular interactions affecting the hydrogen-bonding network in the solvent. Different ceramic nanopowders (titania, two different iron oxides, and iron oxide nanocrystallites embedded in a closed silica matrix) are studied using water, ethanol, and n-butanol as solvents. The OH stretching region of the IR spectra reveals characteristic differences in the surface chemistry of the nanoparticles. The proposed method is fast and straightforward, and hence, it can be a versatile tool for rapid screening. PMID:26593634

  19. Weak Carbon-Hydrogen-Nitrogen Interactions Affect the Heterocyclic Ligand Bonding Modes in Barium Complexes Containing 2-Tetrazolato

    E-print Network

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    Weak Carbon-Hydrogen-Nitrogen Interactions Affect the Heterocyclic Ligand Bonding Modes in Barium ligands.6 Our idea is that the coordination chemistry of these nitrogen- rich heterocyclic ligands should

  20. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Nnnn of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...to Subpart NNNN of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  1. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Qqqq of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...to Subpart QQQQ of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  2. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Qqqq of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...to Subpart QQQQ of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  3. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Nnnn of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...to Subpart NNNN of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  4. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Rrrr of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...to Subpart RRRR of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...Solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  5. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Nnnn of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...to Subpart NNNN of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  6. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Qqqq of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...to Subpart QQQQ of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  7. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Vvvv of... - Default Organic HAP Contents of Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Contents of Solvents and Solvent Blends...to Subpart VVVV of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Contents of Solvents and Solvent Blends...63.5758(a)(6), when detailed organic HAP content data for solvent blends...

  8. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Rrrr of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...to Subpart RRRR of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...Solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  9. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Vvvv of... - Default Organic HAP Contents of Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Contents of Solvents and Solvent Blends...to Subpart VVVV of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Contents of Solvents and Solvent Blends...63.5758(a)(6), when detailed organic HAP content data for solvent blends...

  10. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Vvvv of... - Default Organic HAP Contents of Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Contents of Solvents and Solvent Blends...to Subpart VVVV of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Contents of Solvents and Solvent Blends...63.5758(a)(6), when detailed organic HAP content data for solvent blends...

  11. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Nnnn of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...to Subpart NNNN of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  12. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Rrrr of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...to Subpart RRRR of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...Solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  13. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Vvvv of... - Default Organic HAP Contents of Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Contents of Solvents and Solvent Blends...to Subpart VVVV of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Contents of Solvents and Solvent Blends...63.5758(a)(6), when detailed organic HAP content data for solvent blends...

  14. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Vvvv of... - Default Organic HAP Contents of Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Contents of Solvents and Solvent Blends...to Subpart VVVV of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Contents of Solvents and Solvent Blends...63.5758(a)(6), when detailed organic HAP content data for solvent blends...

  15. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Rrrr of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...to Subpart RRRR of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...Solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic...

  16. Bayesian Interpretation of Weak Values

    E-print Network

    Akio Hosoya

    2015-09-24

    The real part of the weak value is identified as the conditional Bayes probability through the quantum analog of the Bayes relation. We present an explicit protocol to get the the weak values in a simple Mach-Zehnder interferometer model and derive the formulae for the weak values in terms of the experimental data consisting of the positions and momenta of detected photons on the basis of the quantum Bayes relation. The formula gives a way of tomography of the initial state almost without disturbing it in the weak coupling limit.

  17. Block coordination copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Koh, Kyoung Moo; Wong-Foy, Antek G; Matzger, Adam J; Benin, Annabelle I; Willis, Richard R

    2012-11-13

    The present invention provides compositions of crystalline coordination copolymers wherein multiple organic molecules are assembled to produce porous framework materials with layered or core-shell structures. These materials are synthesized by sequential growth techniques such as the seed growth technique. In addition, the invention provides a simple procedure for controlling functionality.

  18. Block coordination copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Koh, Kyoung Moo; Wong-Foy, Antek G.; Matzger, Adam J.; Benin, Annabelle I.; Willis, Richard R.

    2012-12-04

    The present invention provides compositions of crystalline coordination copolymers wherein multiple organic molecules are assembled to produce porous framework materials with layered or core-shell structures. These materials are synthesized by sequential growth techniques such as the seed growth technique. In addition, the invention provides a simple procedure for controlling functionality.

  19. Block coordination copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, Kyoung Moo; Wong-Foy, Antek G; Matzger, Adam J; Benin, Annabelle I; Willis, Richard R

    2014-11-11

    The present invention provides compositions of crystalline coordination copolymers wherein multiple organic molecules are assembled to produce porous framework materials with layered or core-shell structures. These materials are synthesized by sequential growth techniques such as the seed growth technique. In addition, the invention provides a simple procedure for controlling functionality.

  20. Coordination of Hand Shape

    PubMed Central

    Pesyna, Colin; Pundi, Krishna; Flanders, Martha

    2011-01-01

    The neural control of hand movement involves coordination of the sensory, motor and memory systems. Recent studies have documented the motor coordinates for hand shape, but less is known about the corresponding patterns of somatosensory activity. To initiate this line of investigation, the present study characterized the sense of hand shape by evaluating the influence of differences in the amount of grasping or twisting force, and differences in forearm orientation. Human subjects were asked to use the left hand to report the perceived shape of the right hand. In Experiment 1, six commonly grasped items were arranged on the table in front of the subject: bottle, doorknob, egg, notebook, carton, pan. With eyes closed, subjects used the right hand to lightly touch, forcefully support or imagine holding each object, while 15 joint angles were measured in each hand with a pair of wired gloves. The forces introduced by supporting or twisting did not influence the perceptual report of hand shape, but for most objects, the report was distorted in a consistent manner by differences in forearm orientation. Subjects appeared to adjust the intrinsic joint angles of the left hand, as well as the left wrist posture, so as to maintain the imagined object in its proper spatial orientation. In a second experiment, this result was largely replicated with unfamiliar objects. Thus somatosensory and motor information appear to be coordinated in an object-based, spatial coordinate system, sensitive to orientation relative to gravitational forces, but invariant to grasp forcefulness. PMID:21389230

  1. Origins of Coordinate Searching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilgour, Frederick G.

    1997-01-01

    Reviews the origins of post-coordinate searching and emphasizes that the focal point should be on the searcher, not on the item being indexed. Highlights include the history of the term information retrieval; edge notched punch cards; the "peek-a-boo" system; the Uniterm system; and using computers to search for information. (LRW)

  2. Manual for Youth Coordinators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Council on Youth Opportunity, Washington, DC.

    This manual was designed primarily for use by coordinators responsible for developing comprehensive community youth opportunity programs of employment, education, and recreation, but the material may also be of assistance to community and business leaders, educators, and others involved in expanding local opportunities for young people. Contents…

  3. Sherri Snyder HR Coordinator

    E-print Network

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Residential & Auxiliary Facilities 478-5944 Custodial II Supervisors (7) Painting Supervisor II Plumber II (3) Appliances (2) Painter I (2) HVAC Supervisor (2) Custodial I (29) Assign. Clerk III (2) Telephone Clerk Information Systems Coordinator Plumber Supervisor Cherelle Pinckney, RD Kennedy 478-2039 ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

  4. Information Session Student Coordinators

    E-print Network

    Al Faruque, Mohammad Abdullah

    teach self advocacy and build self-esteem in a safe space. Our National Program Coordinator Mariel! #12 highly important aspects: Mentoring Art Safe Space Self Advocacy #12;How Is The Program StructuredFadden Intermediate) Work together to talk about LD/ADHD, promote self confidence and self advocacy while following

  5. 27 CFR 21.125 - Rubber hydrocarbon solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. 21.125 Section 21.125...Specifications for Denaturants § 21.125 Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. (a) Rubber hydrocarbon solvent is a petroleum derivative....

  6. THE DESIGN OF TECHNOLOGICALLY EFFECTIVE AND ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN SOLVENT SUBSTITUTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is presently considerable interest in finding environmentally benign replacement solvents that can perform in many different applications as solvents normally do. This requires solvents with desirable properties, e.g., ability to dissolve certain compounds, and without oth...

  7. Treatment of Chlorinated Solvents by Nitrogen-Fixing and

    E-print Network

    Chu, Kung-Hui "Bella"

    Treatment of Chlorinated Solvents by Nitrogen-Fixing and Nitrate-Supplied Methane Oxidizers in predicting chlorinated solvent removals in such systems. Nitrogen-fixing columns consistently outperformed beneficial. Volatilecontaminantsofparticularconcernforsubsurface remediation include chlorinated solvents

  8. Environmental Impacts on Nuclear Reprocessing Solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillens, A. R.; Fessenden, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    Nuclear tests have been employed ever since the first nuclear explosion in Alamogordo, NM during the mid-1940s. Nuclear weapons pose a threat to civil society and result in extensive biological (medical) damages. For this reason, treaties banning nuclear tests and weapons have been employed since the 1960s to cease proliferation of weapons. However, as nuclear tests continue in secrecy and actinides, such as plutonium and uranium, are eligible for theft, nuclear forensics is needed to prevent weapons proliferation. In this study, solvents [tributyl phosphate (TBP), dodecane, decanol] used in reprocessing spent nuclear fuel are analyzed using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer, which provides indisputable evidence in identifying the operation in which solvents were used. Solvent samples are observed under variable conditions in the laboratory for different time periods. It is assumed that their carbon isotope values (?13C) will become more positive (shift heavy) with time. It is found that the solvents are hygroscopic. TBP leaves the most robust signature compared to the other solvents studied and the isotope values for all solvents under all conditions become more positive with time. This study serves as primary research in understanding how solvents behave under variable conditions in the laboratory and how this could be translated to the environment in fate and transport studies.

  9. Organic Solvent Tolerant Lipases and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, Shamsher S.

    2014-01-01

    Lipases are a group of enzymes naturally endowed with the property of performing reactions in aqueous as well as organic solvents. The esterification reactions using lipase(s) could be performed in water-restricted organic media as organic solvent(s) not only improve(s) the solubility of substrate and reactant in reaction mixture but also permit(s) the reaction in the reverse direction, and often it is easy to recover the product in organic phase in two-phase equilibrium systems. The use of organic solvent tolerant lipase in organic media has exhibited many advantages: increased activity and stability, regiospecificity and stereoselectivity, higher solubility of substrate, ease of products recovery, and ability to shift the reaction equilibrium toward synthetic direction. Therefore the search for organic solvent tolerant enzymes has been an extensive area of research. A variety of fatty acid esters are now being produced commercially using immobilized lipase in nonaqueous solvents. This review describes the organic tolerance and industrial application of lipases. The main emphasis is to study the nature of organic solvent tolerant lipases. Also, the potential industrial applications that make lipases the biocatalysts of choice for the present and future have been presented. PMID:24672342

  10. Cyclic Solvent Vapor Annealing for Rapid, Robust Vertical Orientation of Features in BCP Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradiso, Sean; Delaney, Kris; Fredrickson, Glenn

    2015-03-01

    Methods for reliably controlling block copolymer self assembly have seen much attention over the past decade as new applications for nanostructured thin films emerge in the fields of nanopatterning and lithography. While solvent assisted annealing techniques are established as flexible and simple methods for achieving long range order, solvent annealing alone exhibits a very weak thermodynamic driving force for vertically orienting domains with respect to the free surface. To address the desire for oriented features, we have investigated a cyclic solvent vapor annealing (CSVA) approach that combines the mobility benefits of solvent annealing with selective stress experienced by structures oriented parallel to the free surface as the film is repeatedly swollen with solvent and dried. Using dynamical self-consistent field theory (DSCFT) calculations, we establish the conditions under which the method significantly outperforms both static and cyclic thermal annealing and implicate the orientation selection as a consequence of the swelling/deswelling process. Our results suggest that CSVA may prove to be a potent method for the rapid formation of highly ordered, vertically oriented features in block copolymer thin films.

  11. Noncommutativity in weakly curved background by canonical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovic, Lj.; Sazdovic, B.

    2011-03-15

    Using the canonical method, we investigate the Dp-brane world-volume noncommutativity in a weakly curved background. The term 'weakly curved' means that, in the leading order, the source of nonflatness is an infinitesimally small Kalb-Ramond field B{sub {mu}{nu}}, linear in coordinate, while the Ricci tensor does not contribute, being an infinitesimal of the second order. On the solution of boundary conditions, we find a simple expression for the space-time coordinates in terms of the effective coordinates and momenta. This basic relation helped us to prove that noncommutativity appears only on the world sheet boundary. The noncommutativity parameter has a standard form, but with the infinitesimally small and coordinate-dependent antisymmetric tensor B{sub {mu}{nu}}. This result coincides with that obtained on the group manifolds in the limit of the large level n of the current algebra. After quantization, the algebra of the functions on the Dp-brane world volume is represented with the Kontsevich star product instead of the Moyal one in the flat background.

  12. Effect of solvent characteristics on coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, He; Wang, Shaojie; Wang, Keyu; Klein, M.T.; Calkins, W.H.

    1996-12-31

    It has been known for a long time that the characteristics of the liquefaction solvent has a profound effect on direct coal liquefaction. The amount of hydrogen consumed during the liquefaction process, the degree and quantity of retrograde reactions that occur, and the quality of the liquid products are all influenced by the process solvent. A number of analytical approaches have been developed to determine the important characteristics of the solvent for coal liquefaction. The hydrogen donor ability has clearly been important. However, such other characteristics of a liquefaction solvent as solubility parameter, content and type of higher aromatic hydrocarbons, and phenolic content have also been found to be significant. Finseth et al. have shown that the bulk of the hydrogen consumed from an uncatalyzed donor solvent liquefaction above 400{degrees}C is consumed in gas generation, heteroatom removal and hydrogenolysis of the coal matrix. Wilson et al. have also shown that the major role of hydrogen in uncatalyzed liquefaction is consumed by alkyl fission and hydrogenolysis reactions and not with hydrogenating aromatic rings. McMillan et al. have postulated that a radical hydrogen transfer process along with donor solvent capping of thermally produced radicals from the coal as possible processes involved with the hydroaromatic donor solvents in coal liquefaction. With the development of a short contact time batch reactor (SCTBR), determining the influence of the processing solvent on the liquefaction rates, conversion profiles and the quality of the liquid product at a particular time became possible. The influence of type of solvent, combined with other effects, such as gas atmosphere (i.e., in hydrogen and in nitrogen) and catalyst, on the coal liquefaction is reported in this paper.

  13. Logistic regression Weakly informative priors

    E-print Network

    Gelman, Andrew

    Logistic regression Weakly informative priors Conclusions Bayesian generalized linear models default p #12;Logistic regression Weakly informative priors Conclusions Classical logistic regression The problem of separation Bayesian solution Logistic regression -6 -4 -2 0 2 4 6 0.00.20.40.60.81.0 y = logit

  14. What makes critical-solvent processes work

    SciTech Connect

    Brule, M.R.; Corbett, R.W.

    1984-06-01

    Critical-solvent processing (sometimes called supercritical-gas extraction) is an ongoing technology based on phase-equilibrium phenomena in the critical region. Many new practical applications of critical-solvent processing are being conceived and implemented in the food, drug and chemical industries. The advantages afforded by critical-solvent processing in performing difficult separations such as caffeine from coffee, nicotine from tobacco, chemotherapeutic drugs from plants, and chemical feedstocks from petroleum and synfuels residua have been realized just in the last decade or so.

  15. Cleaning solvent substitution in electronic assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, G.J.

    1993-09-01

    Alternatives to chlorinated and fluorinated solvents have been identified, qualified, and implemented into production of complex electronic assemblies. Extensive compatibility studies were performed with components, piece-parts, and materials. Electrical testing and accelerated aging were used to screen for detrimental, long-term effects. A terpene, d-limonene, has been selected as the solvent of choice for cleaning complex electronic assemblies, and has been found to be compatible with the components and materials tested. A brief history of the overall project will be presented, along with representative cleaning efficiency results, compatibility results, and residual solvent data.

  16. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOEpatents

    Lennon, Dennis R. (Allentown, PA); Snedden, Richard B. (McKeesport, PA); Foster, Edward P. (Macungie, PA); Bellas, George T. (Library, PA)

    1990-05-15

    A burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired successfully without any performance limitations and without the coking of the solvent refined coal on the burner components. The burner is provided with a tangential inlet of primary air and pulverized fuel, a vaned diffusion swirler for the mixture of primary air and fuel, a center water-cooled conical diffuser shielding the incoming fuel from the heat radiation from the flame and deflecting the primary air and fuel steam into the secondary air, and a watercooled annulus located between the primary air and secondary air flows.

  17. Optical nonlinearity of HBI in different solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Feng; Ma, Lina; Geng, Yaohui; Zhang, Siwen; Wang, Zhe; Cheng, Xiaoman

    2014-04-01

    2-(2'-Hydroxyphenyl) benzimidazole (HBI) is one kind of organic molecules featuring excited-state proton transfer (ESPT). The nonlinear optical properties of 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl) benzimidazole (HBI) in different polar solvents were investigated by means of Z-scan technique under the excitation of the 1064 nm picoseconds laser pulse. The experimental results show that the nonlinear refractive indices decrease with the enhancement of the polarity of the solvent. The nonlinear refractive indices sensitive to the solvent polarity allow them to be widely used for the optoelectronic devices.

  18. Genomic and Genetic Approaches to Solvent Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Eleftherios T. Papoutsakis

    2005-06-10

    The proposed research is to understand and exploit the molecular basis that determines tolerance of the industrially important anaerobic clostridia to solvents. Furthermore, we aim to develop general genomic and metabolic engineering strategies for understanding the molecular basis of tolerance to chemicals and for developing tolerant strains. Our hypothesis is that the molecular basis of what makes bacterial cells able to withstand high solvent concentrations can be used to metabolically engineer cells so that they can tolerate higher concentrations of solvents and related chemicals.

  19. Switchable solvents and methods of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jessop, Philip G.; Eckert, Charles A.; Liotta, Charles L.; Heldebrant, David J.

    2013-08-20

    A solvent that reversibly converts from a nonionic liquid mixture to an ionic liquid upon contact with a selected trigger, e.g., contact with CO.sub.2, is described. In preferred embodiments, the ionic solvent is readily converted back to the nonionic liquid mixture. The nonionic liquid mixture includes an amidine or guanidine or both, and water, alcohol, or a combination thereof. Single component amine solvents that reversibly convert between ionic and non-ionic states are also described. Some embodiments require increased pressure to convert; others convert at 1 atmosphere.

  20. Switchable solvents and methods of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jessop, Philip G. (Kingston, CA); Eckert, Charles A. (Atlanta, GA); Liotta, Charles L. (Atlanta, GA); Heldebrant, David J. (Richland, WA)

    2011-07-19

    A solvent that reversibly converts from a nonionic liquid mixture to an ionic liquid upon contact with a selected trigger, e.g., contact with CO.sub.2, is described. In preferred embodiments, the ionic solvent is readily converted back to the nonionic liquid mixture. The nonionic liquid mixture includes an amidine or guanidine or both, and water, alcohol, or a combination thereof. Single component amine solvents that reversibly convert between ionic and non-ionic states are also described. Some embodiments require increased pressure to convert; others convert at 1 atmosphere.

  1. Switchable solvents and methods of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Jessop, Philip G; Eckert, Charles A; Liotta, Charles L; Heldebrant, David J

    2014-04-29

    A solvent that reversibly converts from a nonionic liquid mixture to an ionic liquid upon contact with a selected trigger, e.g., contact with CO.sub.2, is described. In preferred embodiments, the ionic solvent is readily converted back to the nonionic liquid mixture. The nonionic liquid mixture includes an amidine or guanidine or both, and water, alcohol, or a combination thereof. Single component amine solvents that reversibly convert between ionic and non-ionic states are also described. Some embodiments require increased pressure to convert; others convert at 1 atmosphere.

  2. Color-weak compensation using local affine isometry based on discrimination threshold matching.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Rika; Kojima, Takanori; Lenz, Reiner; Chao, Jinhui

    2015-11-01

    We develop algorithms for color-weak compensation and color-weak simulation based on Riemannian geometry models of color spaces. The objective function introduced measures the match of color discrimination thresholds of average normal observers and a color-weak observer. The developed matching process makes use of local affine maps between color spaces of color-normal and color-weak observers. The method can be used to generate displays of images that provide color-normal and color-weak observers with a similar color difference experience. It can also be used to simulate the perception of a color-weak observer for color-normal observers. We also introduce a new database of measurements of color discrimination threshold data for color-normal and color-weak observers obtained at different lightness levels in CIELUV space. The compensation methods include compensations of chromaticity using local affine maps between chromaticity planes of color-normal and color-weak observers, and one-dimensional (1D) compensation on lightness. We describe how to determine correspondences between the origins of local coordinates in color spaces of color-normal and color-weak observers using a neighborhood expansion method. After matching the origins of the two coordinate systems, a local affine map is estimated by solving a nonlinear equation, or singular-value-decomposition (SVD). We apply the methods to natural images and evaluate their performance using the semantic differential (SD) method. PMID:26560924

  3. Coordinating Autonomous Planning Agents

    E-print Network

    Kuzmanov, Georgi

    the Collective Agent Based Systems (CABS) research group -- I won't need more than a month or two to write my in the planning of its tasks, we require that planning and coordination be separated. In the literature on multi-agent. Witteveen ir. H.J.A.M Geers ir. J.M. Valk #12;#12;Preface Sooner or later, but probably sooner, every

  4. Hipparchus' coordinate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Dennis W.

    2002-07-01

    In his "Histoire de l'Astronomie Ancienne" Delambre concludes unequivocally that Hipparchus knew and used a definite system of celestial spherical coordinates, namely the right ascension and declination system that we use today. The basis of Delambre's conclusion was disarmingly simple: he pointed out that in the "Commentary to Aratus" Hipparchus actually quotes the positions of numerous stars directly in right ascension and declination (or more often its complement, polar distance). Nearly two centuries later, in his "A History of Ancient Mathematical Astronomy", Neugebauer not only completely ignores Delambre's conclusion on this issue, but goes further to propose his own, as we shall see quite fanciful, theory that begins "From the Commentary to Aratus, it is quite obvious that at Hipparchus' time a definite system of spherical coordinates for stellar positions did not yet exist." and concludes "...nowhere in Greek astronomy before the catalogue of stars in the Almagest is it attested that orthogonal spherical coordinates are used to determine stellar positions." Today it is clear that Neugebauer's theory is conventionally accepted. It is the purpose of this paper to offer fresh arguments that Delambre was correct.

  5. Coordinating Shared Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, Bradley

    2004-01-01

    Shared Activity Coordination (ShAC) is a computer program for planning and scheduling the activities of an autonomous team of interacting spacecraft and exploratory robots. ShAC could also be adapted to such terrestrial uses as helping multiple factory managers work toward competing goals while sharing such common resources as floor space, raw materials, and transports. ShAC iteratively invokes the Continuous Activity Scheduling Planning Execution and Replanning (CASPER) program to replan and propagate changes to other planning programs in an effort to resolve conflicts. A domain-expert specifies which activities and parameters thereof are shared and reports the expected conditions and effects of these activities on the environment. By specifying these conditions and effects differently for each planning program, the domain-expert subprogram defines roles that each spacecraft plays in a coordinated activity. The domain-expert subprogram also specifies which planning program has scheduling control over each shared activity. ShAC enables sharing of information, consensus over the scheduling of collaborative activities, and distributed conflict resolution. As the other planning programs incorporate new goals and alter their schedules in the changing environment, ShAC continually coordinates to respond to unexpected events.

  6. Ion Exchange and Solvent Extraction: Supramolecular Aspects of Solvent Exchange Volume 21

    SciTech Connect

    Gloe, Karsten; Tasker, Peter A; Oshima, Tatsuya; Watarai, Hitoshi; Nilsson, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Preface The theme of supramolecular chemistry (SC), entailing the organization of multiple species through noncovalent interactions, has permeated virtually all aspects of chemical endeavor over the past several decades. Given that the observed behavior of discrete molecular species depends upon their weak interactions with one another and with matrix components, one would have to conclude that SC must indeed form part of the fabric of chemistry itself. A vast literature now serves to categorize SC phenomena within a body of consistent terminology. The word supramolecular itself appears in the titles of dozens of books, several journals, and a dedicated encyclopedia. Not surprisingly, the theme of SC also permeates the field of solvent extraction (SX), inspiring the framework for this volume of Ion Exchange and Solvent Extraction. It is attempted in the six chapters of this volume to identify both how supramolecular behavior occurs and is studied in the context of SX and how SC is influencing the current direction of SX. Researchers and practitioners have long dealt with supramolecular interactions in SX. Indeed, the use of polar extractant molecules in nonpolar media virtually assures that aggregative interactions will dominate the solution behavior of SX. Analytical chemists working in the 1930s to the 1950s with simple mono- and bidentate chelating ligands as extractants noted that extraction of metal ions obeyed complicated mass-action equilibria involving complex stoichiometries. As chemists and engineers developed processes for nuclear and hydrometallurgical applications in the 1950s and 1960s, the preference for aliphatic diluents only enhanced the complexity and supramolecular nature of extraction chemistry. Use of physical techniques such as light scattering and vapor-pressure measurements together with various spectroscopic methods revealed organic-phase aggregates from well-defined dimers to small aggregates containing a few extractant molecules to large inverse micelles swollen with water molecules. Extraction systems involving long-chain cations such as alkylammonium species or long-chain anions such as sulfonates or carboxylates proved especially prone to extensive aggregate formation. The related phenomenon of third-phase formation in SX systems, long misunderstood, is now yielding to spectroscopic and scattering techniques showing extensive long-range organization. Over the last 50 years, tools for studying the structure and thermodynamics of aggregation have grown increasingly sophisticated, leading to a rich and detailed understanding of what we can now recognize as SC phenomena in SX. In the 1970s and 1980s, the rapid growth of SC elicited a paradigm shift in SX. The influence of SC principles had two major effects on the course of SX research. First, it provided a framework for understanding the supramolecular behavior that was already well appreciated in the field of SX, though earlier without the SC terminology. Second, it provided the conceptual tools to control supramolecular behavior in SX, direct it for intended functionality, and to simplify it. Extraction by designed reagents has been steadily progressing ever since, with commercial applications emerging to successfully validate this approach. With the discovery of crown ethers in the late 1960s, the advancement of extractant design has fruitfully employed the concept of inclusion. While considerable initial progress occurred with such molecules, especially because of their affinity and selectivity for alkali and alkaline earth metals, other molecular platforms such as calixarenes have proven more versatile. Multidentate receptors for partial to full inclusion of cations, anions, ion pairs, as well as neutral species, have now become commonplace for selective extraction. This volume of Ion Exchange and Solvent Extraction examines how the principles of SC are being employed both in advancing the design of new highly selective SX systems and in understanding aggregation phenomena in SX systems. Chapter 1 discusses the nature and definition of SC

  7. Accelerated solvent extraction of petroleum contaminated sediments 

    E-print Network

    Bauguss, Jeffery Lynn

    1997-01-01

    Attempts have been made in recent years to find acceptable alternatives to classical soxhlet extraction of petroleum contaminated sediments. One such method that is very promising is accelerated solvent extraction also referred to as high pressure...

  8. Optimizing injected solvent fraction in stratified reservoirs 

    E-print Network

    Moon, Gary Michael

    1993-01-01

    Waterflooding has become standard practice for extending the productive life of many solution gas drive reservoirs, but has the disadvantage of leaving a substantial residual oil volume in the reservoir. Solvent flooding has been offered as a...

  9. Innovative Technologies for Chlorinated Solvent Remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennell, Kurt D.; Cápiro, Natalie L.

    2014-07-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * TRADITIONAL REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES (1980s) * RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF INNOVATIVE REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES (1990s-2000s) * CURRENT TRENDS IN CHLORINATED SOLVENT REMEDIATION (2010s) * CLOSING THOUGHTS * REFERENCES

  10. Volatile Solvent Use among Western Australian Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Annemaree; Houghton, Stephen; Odgers, Peta

    1998-01-01

    Semistructured interviews were conducted with 40 adolescents who reported inhaling volatile solvents. All were aware of the short-term health risks involved in use, and most reported experiencing ill effects. Offers suggestions for intervention. (Author/GCP)

  11. United States Air Force Wipe Solvent Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornung, Steven D.; Beeson, Harold D.

    2000-01-01

    The Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), as part of the Air Force Material Command, requested that NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) conduct testing and analyses in support of the United States Air Force Wipe Solvent Development Project. The purpose of the wipe solvent project is to develop an alternative to be used by Air Force flight line and maintenance personnel for the wipe cleaning of oxygen equipment. This report provides material compatibility, liquid oxygen (LOX) mechanical impact, autogenous ignition temperature (AIT), and gauge cleaning test data for some of the currently available solvents that may be used to replace CFC-113 and methyl chloroform. It provides data from previous WSTF test programs sponsored by the Naval Sea Systems Command, the Kennedy Space Center, and other NASA programs for the purpose of assisting WP AFB in identifying the best alternative solvents for validation testing.

  12. "Solvent Effects" in 1H NMR Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaleiro, Jose A. S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a simple undergraduate experiment in chemistry dealing with the "solvent effects" in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Stresses the importance of having students learn NMR spectroscopy as a tool in analytical chemistry. (TW)

  13. Brayton Solvent Recovery Heat Pump Technology Update 

    E-print Network

    Enneking, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    The Brayton cycle technology was developed to reduce the temperature of gas streams containing solvents in order to condense and recover them. While the use of turbo compressor/expander machinery in conjunction with an energy recuperator...

  14. How solvent vapors can improve steam floods

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J.

    1996-11-01

    Thermal recovery methods depend for their success on the viscosity reduction of heavy crude oils at high temperatures. The viscosity of a heavy oil can also be reduced if it is diluted with a low-viscosity solvent, such as one of the lighter hydrocarbons. It is not surprising that there has been considerable interest in combining the two methods. The process of injecting vaporized solvent with the steam for a gravity drainage type recovery is described here along with a description of the particular phase behavior of steam/solvent mixtures which is beneficial to the process. And computer simulations which compare steam-only and steam/solvent floods under Athabasca-type conditions are overviewed.

  15. Modelling the effect of solvents on carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbohydrates are polar molecules and their conformational and anomeric equilibrium can be strongly influenced by solvents. This review provides examples of studies addressing different issues of glycochemistry, such as anomeric equilibrium, conformational changes in rings, modelling of inter-residu...

  16. Biological monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Monster, A.C.

    1986-08-01

    The possibility of biological monitoring of exposure to some volatile, halogenated hydrocarbons will be discussed. Most of these agents are widely used as solvents. All agents act on the nervous system as narcotics and differ widely in toxicity. Most of the solvents undergo biotransformation to metabolites. This allows biological assessment of exposure by measurement of the solvent and/or metabolites in exhaled air, blood, and/or urine. However, the same metabolites may occur with exposure to different chlorinated hydrocarbons, eg, trichloroethanol and trichloroacetic acid from exposure to trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and 1,1,1-trichloroethane. On the other hand, these agents differ widely in the percentage that is metabolized. There are large gaps in our knowledge, however, and much research will have to be carried out before even tentative data can be established for most of the solvents.

  17. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF ORGANIC WATER POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Based on experiments with model systems of known organic water pollutants and environmental samples, conclusions are reached concerning the best general solvent for extraction and the most appropriate methods for related manipulations. Chloroform, methylene chloride-ether mixture...

  18. Process for solvent refining of coal using a denitrogenated and dephenolated solvent

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Schweighardt, Frank K. (Allentown, PA)

    1984-01-01

    A process is disclosed for the solvent refining of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures and pressure in a hydrogen atmosphere using a hydrocarbon solvent which before being recycled in the solvent refining process is subjected to chemical treatment to extract substantially all nitrogenous and phenolic constituents from the solvent so as to improve the conversion of coal and the production of oil in the solvent refining process. The solvent refining process can be either thermal or catalytic. The extraction of nitrogenous compounds can be performed by acid contact such as hydrogen chloride or fluoride treatment, while phenolic extraction can be performed by caustic contact or contact with a mixture of silica and alumina.

  19. International Space Exploration Coordination Group

    E-print Network

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    International Space Exploration Coordination Group The Global Exploration Roadmap September 2011, and stimulating technical and commercial innovation. As more nations undertake space exploration activities established in The Global Exploration Strategy: the Framework for Coordination, released in May 2007, space

  20. Hydrogen recovery by novel solvent systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shinnar, R.; Ludmer, Z.; Ullmann, A.

    1991-08-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a novel method for purification of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gas. The study involved a search for suitable mixtures of solvents for their ability to separate hydrogen from the coal derived gas stream in significant concentration near their critical point of miscibility. The properties of solvent pairs identified were investigated in more detail to provide data necessary for economic evaluation and process development.

  1. Method of stripping metals from organic solvents

    DOEpatents

    Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocatello, ID); Herbst, R. Scott (Idaho Falls, ID); Romanovskiy, Valeriy N. (St. Petersburg, RU); Smirnov, Igor V. (St.-Petersburg, RU); Babain, Vasily A. (St-Petersburg, RU); Esimantovski, Vyatcheslav M. (St-Petersburg, RU)

    2009-02-24

    A new method to strip metals from organic solvents in a manner that allows for the recycle of the stripping agent. The method utilizes carbonate solutions of organic amines with complexants, in low concentrations, to strip metals from organic solvents. The method allows for the distillation and reuse of organic amines. The concentrated metal/complexant fraction from distillation is more amenable to immobilization than solutions resulting from current practice.

  2. Solvent tuned single molecule dual emission in protic solvents: effect of polarity and H-bonding.

    PubMed

    Chevreux, S; Allain, C; Wilbraham, L; Nakatani, K; Jacques, P; Ciofini, I; Lemercier, G

    2015-12-22

    has recently been proposed as a promising new molecule displaying solvent-tuned dual emission, highlighting an original and newly-described charge transfer model. The study of the photophysical behaviour of this molecule was extended to include protic solvents. The effects of polarity and hydrogen bonding lead to an even more evident dual emission associated with a large multi-emission band in some solvents like methanol, highlighting as a promising candidate for white light emission. PMID:26411633

  3. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Chemical and Physical Properties of the Optimized Solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Delmau, L.H.

    2002-10-08

    This work was undertaken to optimize the solvent used in the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process and to measure key chemical and physical properties related to its performance in the removal of cesium from the alkaline high-level salt waste stored in tanks at the Savannah River Site. The need to adjust the solvent composition arose from the prior discovery that the previous baseline solvent was supersaturated with respect to the calixarene extractant. The following solvent-component concentrations in Isopar{reg_sign} L diluent are recommended: 0.007 M calix[4]arene-bis(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6) extractant, 0.75 M 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol (Cs-7SB) phase modifier, and 0.003 M tri-n-octylamine (TOA) stripping aid. Criteria for this selection included BOBCalixC6 solubility, batch cesium distribution ratios (D{sub Cs}), calculated flowsheet robustness, third-phase formation, coalescence rate (dispersion numbers), and solvent density. Although minor compromises within acceptable limits were made in flowsheet robustness and solvent density, significant benefits were gained in lower risk of third-phase formation and lower solvent cost. Data are also reported for the optimized solvent regarding the temperature dependence of D{sub Cs} in extraction, scrubbing, and stripping (ESS); ESS performance on recycle; partitioning of BOBCalixC6, Cs-7SB, and TOA to aqueous process solutions; partitioning of organic anions; distribution of metals; solvent phase separation at low temperatures; solvent stability to elevated temperatures; and solvent density and viscosity. Overall, the technical risk of the CSSX process has been reduced by resolving previously identified issues and raising no new issues.

  4. Series of solvent-induced single-crystal to single-crystal transformations with different sizes of solvent molecules.

    PubMed

    He, Yuan-Chun; Yang, Jin; Liu, Ying-Ying; Ma, Jian-Fang

    2014-07-21

    A highly stable soft porous coordination polymer (PCP), namely [Cu3(TP)4(N3)2(DMF)2]·2H2O·2DMF (1), has been synthesized via an in situ synthesis of 4-tetrazole pyridine (TP) under solvothermal conditions (DMF = N,N'-dimethylformamide). Remarkably, the solvent molecules in 1 can be respectively exchanged with cyclohexane (C6H12), cyclopentane (C5H10), decahydronaphthalene (C10H18), 1,4-dioxane (C4H8O2), and tetrahydropyrane (C5H10O) in single-crystal to single-crystal (SCSC) manners to yield [Cu3(TP)4(N3)2(DMF)2]·3C6H12 (1a), [Cu3(TP)4(N3)2(DMF)2]·2C5H10 (1b), [Cu3(TP)4(N3)2(DMF)2]·H2O·C10H18 (1c), [Cu3(TP)4(N3)2(DMF)2]·C4H8O2 (1d), [Cu3(TP)4(N3)2]·3C4H8O2 (1e), and [Cu3(TP)4(N3)2]·2H2O·C5H10O (1f). Further, the occluded cyclohexane molecules in 1a can be removed by heating to give its porous guest-free form [Cu3(TP)4(N3)2(DMF)2] (1g). Particularly, in water, 1 can lose its coordinated N3(-) anions to generate [Cu(TP)2(H2O)4]·4H2O (1h). More interestingly, the soft PCP (1) demonstrates the guest selectivity for the cycloalkane solvents, namely cyclohexane, cyclopentane, and decahydronaphthalene, in SCSC manners for the first time, attributed to the synergy effect between the size and geometry of the solvent and the shape of the framework cavity. Moreover, the desolvated samples of 1e show the highly selective gas adsorption of CO2 over N2, indicating its potential application in the separation of the CO2/N2 mixture. PMID:24983509

  5. Solvent Extraction and Ion Exchange in Radiochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarnemark, G.

    In 1805, Bucholz extracted uranium from a nitric acid solution into ether and back-extracted it into pure water. This is probably the first reported solvent-extraction investigation. During the following decades, the distribution of neutral compounds between aqueous phases and pure solvents was studied, e.g., by Peligot, Berthelot and Jungfleisch, and Nernst. Selective extractants for analytical purposes became available during the first decades of the twentieth century. From about 1940, extractants such as organophosphorous esters and amines were developed for use in the nuclear fuel cycle. This connection between radiochemistry and solvent-extraction chemistry made radiochemists heavily involved in the development of new solvent extraction processes, and eventually solvent extraction became a major separation technique in radiochemistry. About 160 years ago, Thompson and Way observed that soil can remove potassium and ammonium ions from an aqueous solution and release calcium ions. This is probably the first scientific report on an ion-exchange separation. The first synthesis of the type of organic ion exchangers that are used today was performed by Adams and Holmes in 1935. Since then, ion-exchange techniques have been used extensively for separations of various radionuclides in trace as well as macro amounts. During the last 4 decades, inorganic ion exchangers have also found a variety of applications. Today, solvent extraction as well as ion exchange are used extensively in the nuclear industry and for nuclear, chemical, and medical research. Some of these applications are discussed in the chapter.

  6. Experimental investigations of weak definite and weak indefinite noun phrases.

    PubMed

    Klein, Natalie M; Gegg-Harrison, Whitney M; Carlson, Greg N; Tanenhaus, Michael K

    2013-08-01

    Definite noun phrases typically refer to entities that are uniquely identifiable in the speaker and addressee's common ground. Some definite noun phrases (e.g., the hospital in Mary had to go the hospital and John did too) seem to violate this uniqueness constraint. We report six experiments that were motivated by the hypothesis that these "weak definite" interpretations arise in "incorporated" constructions. Experiments 1-3 compared nouns that seem to allow for a weak definite interpretation (e.g., hospital, bank, bus, radio) with those that do not (e.g., farm, concert, car, book). Experiments 1 and 2 used an instruction-following task and picture-judgment task, respectively, to demonstrate that a weak definite need not uniquely refer. In Experiment 3 participants imagined scenarios described by sentences such as The Federal Express driver had to go to the hospital/farm. Scenarios following weak definite noun phrases were more likely to include conventional activities associated with the object, whereas following regular nouns, participants were more likely to imagine scenarios that included typical activities associated with the subject; similar effects were observed with weak indefinites. Experiment 4 found that object-related activities were reduced when the same subject and object were used with a verb that does not license weak definite interpretations. In Experiment 5, a science fiction story introduced an artificial lexicon for novel concepts. Novel nouns that shared conceptual properties with English weak definite nouns were more likely to allow weak reference in a judgment task. Experiment 6 demonstrated that familiarity for definite articles and anti-familiarity for indefinite articles applies to the activity associated with the noun, consistent with predictions made by the incorporation analysis. PMID:23685208

  7. Experimental investigations of weak definite and weak indefinite noun phrases

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Natalie M.; Gegg-Harrison, Whitney M.; Carlson, Greg N.; Tanenhaus, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Definite noun phrases typically refer to entities that are uniquely identifiable in the speaker and addressee’s common ground. Some definite noun phrases (e.g. the hospital in Mary had to go the hospital and John did too) seem to violate this uniqueness constraint. We report six experiments that were motivated by the hypothesis that these “weak definite” interpretations arise in “incorporated” constructions. Experiments 1-3 compared nouns that seem to allow for a weak definite interpretation (e.g. hospital, bank, bus, radio) with those that do not (e.g. farm, concert, car, book). Experiments 1 and 2 used an instruction-following task and picture-judgment task, respectively, to demonstrate that a weak definite need not uniquely refer. In Experiment 3 participants imagined scenarios described by sentences such as The Federal Express driver had to go to the hospital/farm. The imagined scenarios following weak definite noun phrases were more likely to include conventional activities associated with the object, whereas following regular nouns, participants were more likely to imagine scenarios that included typical activities associated with the subject; similar effects were observed with weak indefinites. Experiment 4 found that object-related activities were reduced when the same subject and object were used with a verb that does not license weak definite interpretations. In Experiment 5, a science fiction story introduced an artificial lexicon for novel concepts. Novel nouns that shared conceptual properties with English weak definite nouns were more likely to allow weak reference in a judgment task. Experiment 6 demonstrated that familiarity for definite articles and anti- familiarity for indefinite articles applies to the activity associated with the noun, consistent with predictions made by the incorporation analysis. PMID:23685208

  8. On deriving nonreflecting boundary conditions in generalized curvilinear coordinates

    E-print Network

    Adrian Sescu

    2015-01-20

    In this work, nonreflecting boundary conditions in generalized three-dimensional curvilinear coordinates are derived, relying on the original analysis that was done in Cartesian two-dimensional coordinates by Giles (AIAA Journal, 28.12, 2050-2058, 1990). A thorough Fourier analysis of the linearized Euler equation is performed to determine the eigenvalues and the eigenvectors that are then used to derive the appropriate inflow and outflow boundary conditions. The analysis lacks rigorous proof of the well-posedness in the general case, which is open to investigation (a weak assumption is introduced here to complete the boundary conditions). The boundary conditions derived here are not tested on specific applications.

  9. BERGMAN COORDINATES Steven R. Bell

    E-print Network

    BERGMAN COORDINATES Steven R. Bell Abstract. Various incarnations of Stefan Bergman's notion of represen- tative coordinates will be given that are useful in a variety of contexts. Bergman wanted his, however, that it is possible to define generalized Bergman coordinates that map multiply connected domains

  10. Weak-shock reflection factors

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-09-07

    The purpose of this paper is to compare reflection factors for weak shocks from various surfaces, and to focus attention on some unsolved questions. Three different cases are considered: square-wave planar shock reflection from wedges; square-wave planar shock reflection from cylinders; and spherical blast wave reflection from a planar surface. We restrict ourselves to weak shocks. Shocks with a Mach number of M{sub O} < 1.56 in air or with an overpressure of {Delta}{sub PI} < 25 psi (1.66 bar) under normal ambient conditions are called weak.

  11. Phase separation phenomena of polysulfone/solvent/organic nonsolvent and polyethersulfone/solvent/organic nonsolvent systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dongliang; Li, K.; Sourirajan, S.; Teo, W.K. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-12-10

    The precipitation values (PVs) of several organic nonsolvents in polysulfone (PSf)/solvent and polyethersulfone (PESf)/solvent systems were measured in temperatures ranging from 10 to 80 C by the direct titration method and compared with those of water in the same systems. The solvents used were N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAC); the organic nonsolvents employed were methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, 1-pentanol, ethylene glycol, and diethylene glycol as well as acetic acid and propionic acid. The compositions of nonsolvent, polymer, and solvent at the precipitation points for different polymer concentrations up to 10 wt% were also determined at 30 C with respect to both the polymers and six nonsolvents presented. These results were used to obtain the polymer precipitation curves in the polymer-solvent-nonsolvent triangular phase diagrams and to determine the theta composition of solvent-nonsolvent triangular phase diagrams and to determine the theta composition of solvent-nonsolvent for a polymer. The effect of temperature on the precipitation value was observed to be dramatically different for different polymer/solvent/nonsolvent systems. These results were explained on the basis of polar and nonpolar interactions of the polymer, solvent, and nonsolvent system.

  12. CHEMICAL STABILITY OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIDE IN THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT FOR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2011-12-08

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. For simplicity, this solvent is referred to as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The initial deployment target envisioned for the technology was within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), the polymer used in the coalescers within MCU. This report provides the data from exposing PPS polymer to NGS. The test was conducted over a three month period. PPS is remarkably stable in the presence of the next generation solvent. Testing showed no indication of swelling or significant leaching. Preferential sorption of the Modifier on PPS was observed but the same behavior occurs with the baseline solvent. Therefore, PPS coalescers exposed to the NGS are expected to perform comparably to those in contact with the baseline solvent.

  13. Work Coordination Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zendejas, Silvino; Bui, Tung; Bui, Bach; Malhotra, Shantanu; Chen, Fannie; Kim, Rachel; Allen, Christopher; Luong, Ivy; Chang, George; Sadaqathulla, Syed

    2009-01-01

    The Work Coordination Engine (WCE) is a Java application integrated into the Service Management Database (SMDB), which coordinates the dispatching and monitoring of a work order system. WCE de-queues work orders from SMDB and orchestrates the dispatching of work to a registered set of software worker applications distributed over a set of local, or remote, heterogeneous computing systems. WCE monitors the execution of work orders once dispatched, and accepts the results of the work order by storing to the SMDB persistent store. The software leverages the use of a relational database, Java Messaging System (JMS), and Web Services using Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) technologies to implement an efficient work-order dispatching mechanism capable of coordinating the work of multiple computer servers on various platforms working concurrently on different, or similar, types of data or algorithmic processing. Existing (legacy) applications can be wrapped with a proxy object so that no changes to the application are needed to make them available for integration into the work order system as "workers." WCE automatically reschedules work orders that fail to be executed by one server to a different server if available. From initiation to completion, the system manages the execution state of work orders and workers via a well-defined set of events, states, and actions. It allows for configurable work-order execution timeouts by work-order type. This innovation eliminates a current processing bottleneck by providing a highly scalable, distributed work-order system used to quickly generate products needed by the Deep Space Network (DSN) to support space flight operations. WCE is driven by asynchronous messages delivered via JMS indicating the availability of new work or workers. It runs completely unattended in support of the lights-out operations concept in the DSN.

  14. Weak interactions and presupernova evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Aufderheide, M.B. State Univ. of New York . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-02-19

    The role of weak interactions, particularly electron capture and {beta}{sup {minus}} decay, in presupernova evolution is discussed. The present uncertainty in these rates is examined and the possibility of improving the situation is addressed. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Solvent disperser for removing oil from sponge core

    SciTech Connect

    Di Foggio, R.

    1988-09-20

    This patent describes method for dispersing solvent for use in determining the oil saturation of an earth formation by means of sponge coring, comprising: (a) receiving solvent dripping downwardly, and (b) conducting the received solvent by means of capillary action to an application zone located and dimensioned for passing such solvent to the sponge in a sponge core barrel.

  16. 29 CFR 1915.32 - Toxic cleaning solvents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Toxic cleaning solvents. 1915.32 Section 1915...and Preservation § 1915.32 Toxic cleaning solvents. (a) When toxic solvents...exposed to these solvents. (1) The cleaning operation shall be completely...

  17. 29 CFR 1915.32 - Toxic cleaning solvents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Toxic cleaning solvents. 1915.32 Section 1915...and Preservation § 1915.32 Toxic cleaning solvents. (a) When toxic solvents...exposed to these solvents. (1) The cleaning operation shall be completely...

  18. 29 CFR 1915.32 - Toxic cleaning solvents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Toxic cleaning solvents. 1915.32 Section 1915...and Preservation § 1915.32 Toxic cleaning solvents. (a) When toxic solvents...exposed to these solvents. (1) The cleaning operation shall be completely...

  19. 29 CFR 1915.32 - Toxic cleaning solvents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Toxic cleaning solvents. 1915.32 Section 1915...and Preservation § 1915.32 Toxic cleaning solvents. (a) When toxic solvents...exposed to these solvents. (1) The cleaning operation shall be completely...

  20. 29 CFR 1915.32 - Toxic cleaning solvents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Toxic cleaning solvents. 1915.32 Section 1915...and Preservation § 1915.32 Toxic cleaning solvents. (a) When toxic solvents...exposed to these solvents. (1) The cleaning operation shall be completely...

  1. COMPUTER-AIDED SOLVENT DESIGN FOR POLLUTION PREVENTION: PARIS II

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvent substitution is an attractive way of elijminating the use of regulated solvents because it usually does not require major chanages in existing processes, equipment or operations. Successful solvent substitution is dependent on finding solvents that are as effective or be...

  2. Small Weakly Universal Turing Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neary, Turlough; Woods, Damien

    We give small universal Turing machines with state-symbol pairs of (6,2), (3,3) and (2,4). These machines are weakly universal, which means that they have an infinitely repeated word to the left of their input and another to the right. They simulate Rule 110 and are currently the smallest known weakly universal Turing machines. Despite their small size these machines are efficient polynomial time simulators of Turing machines.

  3. Precision metrology using weak measurements.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijian; Datta, Animesh; Walmsley, Ian A

    2015-05-29

    Weak values and measurements have been proposed as a means to achieve dramatic enhancements in metrology based on the greatly increased range of possible measurement outcomes. Unfortunately, the very large values of measurement outcomes occur with highly suppressed probabilities. This raises three vital questions in weak-measurement-based metrology. Namely, (Q1) Does postselection enhance the measurement precision? (Q2) Does weak measurement offer better precision than strong measurement? (Q3) Is it possible to beat the standard quantum limit or to achieve the Heisenberg limit with weak measurement using only classical resources? We analyze these questions for two prototypical, and generic, measurement protocols and show that while the answers to the first two questions are negative for both protocols, the answer to the last is affirmative for measurements with phase-space interactions, and negative for configuration space interactions. Our results, particularly the ability of weak measurements to perform at par with strong measurements in some cases, are instructive for the design of weak-measurement-based protocols for quantum metrology. PMID:26066422

  4. Precision Metrology Using Weak Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijian; Datta, Animesh; Walmsley, Ian A.

    2015-05-01

    Weak values and measurements have been proposed as a means to achieve dramatic enhancements in metrology based on the greatly increased range of possible measurement outcomes. Unfortunately, the very large values of measurement outcomes occur with highly suppressed probabilities. This raises three vital questions in weak-measurement-based metrology. Namely, (Q1) Does postselection enhance the measurement precision? (Q2) Does weak measurement offer better precision than strong measurement? (Q3) Is it possible to beat the standard quantum limit or to achieve the Heisenberg limit with weak measurement using only classical resources? We analyze these questions for two prototypical, and generic, measurement protocols and show that while the answers to the first two questions are negative for both protocols, the answer to the last is affirmative for measurements with phase-space interactions, and negative for configuration space interactions. Our results, particularly the ability of weak measurements to perform at par with strong measurements in some cases, are instructive for the design of weak-measurement-based protocols for quantum metrology.

  5. Precision metrology using weak measurements

    E-print Network

    Lijian Zhang; Animesh Datta; Ian A. Walmsley

    2015-05-31

    Weak values and measurements have been proposed as means to achieve dramatic enhancements in metrology based on the greatly increased range of possible measurement outcomes. Unfortunately, the very large values of measurement outcomes occur with highly suppressed probabilities. This raises three vital questions in weak-measurement-based metrology, namely, (Q1) Does post-selection enhance the measurement precision? (Q2) Does weak measurement offer better precision than strong measurement? (Q3) Is it possible to beat the standard quantum limit or to achieve the Heisenberg limit with weak measurement using only classical resources? We analyse these questions for two prototypical, and generic, measurement protocols and show that while the answers to the first two questions are negative for both protocols, the answer to the last is affirmative for measurements with phase-space interactions, and negative for configuration space interactions. Our results, particularly the ability of weak measurements to perform at par with strong measurements in some cases, are instructive for the design of weak-measurement-based protocols for quantum metrology.

  6. Solvent dependent assembly of lanthanide metallacrowns using building blocks with incompatible symmetry preferences.

    PubMed

    Jankolovits, Joseph; Kampf, Jeff W; Pecoraro, Vincent L

    2014-07-21

    Solvent dependence in the assembly of coordination driven macrocycles is a poorly understood phenomenon. This work presents the solvent dependent assembly of 8 lanthanide metallacrowns (LnMCs) in solution using picoline hydroxamic acid (picHA), Zn(II), and Ln(III) ions. ESI-MS and single-crystal X-ray crystallography reveal the selective assembly of LnZn4(picHA)4(3+), LnZn5(picHA)5(3+), LnZn8(picHA)8(3+), LnZn12(picHA)12(3+), LnZn16(picHA)16(3+), Ln2Zn3(picHA)4(4+), Ln2Zn7-9(picHA)8-10, and Ln4Zn4-5(picHA)8-9 complexes in five different solvents. The coordination preferences of the hard Ln(III) ion and relatively soft Zn(II) ion dictate the solvent selectivity in this system. The LnMCs assemble with open or closed Zn(II) and/or Ln(III) coordination sites based on the behavior of the solvent as an ancillary ligand. This structural promiscuity is attributed to the symmetry incompatible building blocks, which generate assemblies with substantial geometric strain such that no clear thermodynamic minimum exists between the different LnMCs. These LnMCs assemble from a Zn5(picHA)4(2+) intermediate, which is monitored using (1)H NMR and ESI-MS to assess the stability of the complexes and possible assembly pathways based on kinetic considerations. LnMC assemblies that can be generated through central metal substitution reactions such as the LnZn4(picHA)4(3+), LnZn5(picHA)5(3+), and LnZn8(picHA)8(3+) effectively reach equilibrium after 24 h at room temperature. In contrast, LnMCs that must disrupt the Zn5L4(2+) structure to assemble, such as the LnZn16L16(3+), reach equilibrium after heating for 24 h at 65 °C. A pathway for LnMC assembly is presented where the Zn5L4(2+) is the key intermediate based on these reaction data and shared structural motifs in the complexes. These results correlate solvent dependent assembly to the building block geometry, highlighting synthetic approaches for generating novel complexes. PMID:24956137

  7. Chlorinated solvent replacements recycle/recovery review report

    SciTech Connect

    Beal, M.; Hsu, D.; McAtee, R.E.; Weidner, J.R. ); Berg, L.; McCandless, F.P.; Waltari, S.; Peterson, C. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-08-01

    This report is a literature review of waste solvents recycle/recovery methods and shows the results of solvent separations using membrane and distillation technologies. The experimental solvent recovery methods were conducted on solvent replacements for chlorinated solvents at Montana State University. The literature review covers waste solvents separation using distillation, membranes decantation, filtration, carbon adsorption, solvent extraction, and other vapor-phase separation techniques. The results of this study identify solvent distillation methods as the most common separation technique. The alternative separation methods typically supplement distillation. The study shows the need for industries to identify waste solvent disposal methods and investigate the economics of waste solvent recycling as a possible waste reduction method.

  8. Conformal Fermi Coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liang; Pajer, Enrico; Schmidt, Fabian

    2015-11-01

    Fermi Normal Coordinates (FNC) are a useful frame for isolating the locally observable, physical effects of a long-wavelength spacetime perturbation. Their cosmological application, however, is hampered by the fact that they are only valid on scales much smaller than the horizon. We introduce a generalization that we call Conformal Fermi Coordinates (CFC). CFC preserve all the advantages of FNC, but in addition are valid outside the horizon. They allow us to calculate the coupling of long- and short-wavelength modes on all scales larger than the sound horizon of the cosmological fluid, starting from the epoch of inflation until today, by removing the complications of the second order Einstein equations to a large extent, and eliminating all gauge ambiguities. As an application, we present a calculation of the effect of long-wavelength tensor modes on small scale density fluctuations. We recover previous results, but clarify the physical content of the individual contributions in terms of locally measurable effects and ``projection'' terms.

  9. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Mmmm of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...to Subpart MMMM of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...CAS number for an entry, that entry's organic HAP mass fraction must be used for...

  10. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Pppp of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...to Subpart PPPP of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...CAS number for an entry, that entry's organic HAP mass fraction must be used for...

  11. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Mmmm of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...to Subpart MMMM of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...CAS number for an entry, that entry's organic HAP mass fraction must be used for...

  12. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Pppp of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...to Subpart PPPP of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...CAS number for an entry, that entry's organic HAP mass fraction must be used for...

  13. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Pppp of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...to Subpart PPPP of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...CAS number for an entry, that entry's organic HAP mass fraction must be used for...

  14. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Mmmm of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...to Subpart MMMM of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...CAS number for an entry, that entry's organic HAP mass fraction must be used for...

  15. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Mmmm of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...to Subpart MMMM of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...CAS number for an entry, that entry's organic HAP mass fraction must be used for...

  16. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Mmmm of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...to Subpart MMMM of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...CAS number for an entry, that entry's organic HAP mass fraction must be used for...

  17. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Pppp of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...to Subpart PPPP of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...CAS number for an entry, that entry's organic HAP mass fraction must be used for...

  18. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Pppp of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...to Subpart PPPP of Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent...CAS number for an entry, that entry's organic HAP mass fraction must be used for...

  19. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Oooo of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP,...

  20. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Qqqq of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the.... Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  1. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the... Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  2. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Oooo of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction... formulation data. Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP,...

  3. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart IIIi of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the... Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Averageorganic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  4. 40 CFR Table 5 to Subpart Qqqq of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the.... Solvent/solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass...

  5. Changes in psychological performances of solvent-poisoned and solvent-exposed workers

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstroem, K.

    1980-01-01

    The changes in psychological performances associated with long-term exposure to organic solvents and solvent mixtures were studied in a group of 56 male workers diagnosed as having an occupational disease caused by solvents. Their mean duration of exposure was 9.1 +/- SD 8.3 years, and they were exposed mainly to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons and to mixtures of paint solvents. The psychological performances of these solvent-exposed patients were compared with those of 98 styrene-exposed workers and a nonexposed group of 43 construction workers. The applied psychological test variables were factor analyzed, before other statistical analysis, in order to clarify what they measured in the present study. The solvent-exposed group was characterized by a decline in visuomotor performance and decreased freedom from distractibility. The poor visuomotor performances were also related to the long duration of solvent exposure in this group of patients. The index applied for the exposure level revealed no significant relationships to psychological performances among the solvent-exposed patients. The psychological performances of the styrene-exposed group differed only very slightly from those of the nonexposed workers.

  6. Non-aqueous cleaning solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, G.J.

    1994-01-01

    A variety of environmental, safety, and health concerns exist over use of chlorinated and fluorinated cleaning solvents. Sandia National Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, and the Kansas City Division of Allied Signal have combined efforts to focus on finding alternative cleaning solvents and processes which are effective, environmentally safe, and compliant with local, state, and federal regulations. An alternative solvent has been identified, qualified, and implemented into production of complex electronic assemblies, where aqueous and semi-aqueous cleaning processes are not allowed. Extensive compatibility studies were performed with components, piece-parts, and materials. Electrical testing and accelerated aging were used to screen for detrimental, long-term effects. A terpene, d-limonene, has been selected as the solvent of choice, and has been found to be compatible with the components and materials tested. A brief history of the overall project will be presented, along with representative cleaning efficiency results, compatibility results, and residual solvent data. The electronics industry is constantly searching for proven methods and environmentally safe materials to use in manufacturing processes. The information in this presentation will provide another option to consider on future projects for applications requiring high levels of quality, reliability, and cleanliness from non-aqueous cleaning processes.

  7. Solvent gating of intramolecular electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.M. ); Spears, K.G.; Gong, J.H.; Wach, M. )

    1994-02-03

    The rates for ionic photodissociation of malachite green leucocyanide to form cyanide ion and a malachite green carbonium ion were measured as a function of solvent and temperature. The observed rates in mixtures of polar and nonpolar solvents all had an activation energy of about 1 kcal/mol for a wide range of dielectric constants. This dissociative intramolecular electron transfer (DIET) is unusual because it is the first example where solvent configurational entropy changes are required to enable a large amplitude molecular distortion leading to a nonadiabatic electron transfer and ionic dissociation. This solvent gated intramolecular electron-transfer mechanism is supported by analysis of the preexponential and activation energy trends in dipolar aprotic solven mixtures and alcohol solvents. The large amplitude motion is not separately measurable due to the slow gating rates, but viscosity effects on both the preexponential and the activation energy are analyzed to demonstrate consistency with a barrierless diffusion model having a structural dependence on electron-transfer rate. The rate has an inverse dependence on viscosity raised to the 0.53 power. 36 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Protein folding is slaved to solvent motions

    PubMed Central

    Frauenfelder, H.; Fenimore, P. W.; Chen, G.; McMahon, B. H.

    2006-01-01

    Proteins, the workhorses of living systems, are constructed from chains of amino acids, which are synthesized in the cell based on the instructions of the genetic code and then folded into working proteins. The time for folding varies from microseconds to hours. What controls the folding rate is hotly debated. We postulate here that folding has the same temperature dependence as the ?-fluctuations in the bulk solvent but is much slower. We call this behavior slaving. Slaving has been observed in folded proteins: Large-scale protein motions follow the solvent fluctuations with rate coefficient k? but can be slower by a large factor. Slowing occurs because large-scale motions proceed in many small steps, each determined by k?. If conformational motions of folded proteins are slaved, so a fortiori must be the motions during folding. The unfolded protein makes a Brownian walk in the conformational space to the folded structure, with each step controlled by k?. Because the number of conformational substates in the unfolded protein is extremely large, the folding rate coefficient, kf, is much smaller than k?. The slaving model implies that the activation enthalpy of folding is dominated by the solvent, whereas the number of steps nf = k?/kf is controlled by the number of accessible substates in the unfolded protein and the solvent. Proteins, however, undergo not only ?- but also ?-fluctuations. These additional fluctuations are local protein motions that are essentially independent of the bulk solvent fluctuations and may be relevant at late stages of folding. PMID:17030792

  9. Non-aqueous cleaning solvent substitution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, Gerald J.

    1994-01-01

    A variety of environmental, safety, and health concerns exist over use of chlorinated and fluorinated cleaning solvents. Sandia National Laboratories, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, and the Kansas City Division of AlliedSignal have combined efforts to focus on finding alternative cleaning solvents and processes which are effective, environmentally safe, and compliant with local, state, and federal regulations. An alternative solvent has been identified, qualified, and implemented into production of complex electronic assemblies, where aqueous and semi-aqueous cleaning processes are not allowed. Extensive compatibility studies were performed with components, piece-parts, and materials. Electrical testing and accelerated aging were used to screen for detrimental, long-term effects. A terpene, d-limonene, was selected as the solvent of choice, and it was found to be compatible with the components and materials tested. A brief history of the overall project will be presented, along with representative cleaning efficiency results, compatibility results, and residual solvent data. The electronics industry is constantly searching for proven methods and environmentally-safe materials to use in manufacturing processes. The information in this presentation will provide another option to consider on future projects for applications requiring high levels of quality, reliability, and cleanliness from non-aqueous cleaning processes.

  10. Solvent, Thermal and Solvent-Thermal Methods on Block Copolymer Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Thomas; Gu, Xiaodan; Gunkel, Ilja; Hexemer, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    Real-time grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering experiments were used to study block copolymer self-assembly in thin films during thermal and solvent vapor annealing, where copolymer thin films were exposed to the vapor of a solvent having near equal interactions with the blocks and to elevated temperature in an inert gas atmosphere, respectively. Similarities between both annealing techniques were identified and advantages and disadvantages of each annealing method are discussed. We show that the product of the effective Flory-Huggins interaction parameter, ?, and the degree of polymerization, N, determines the grain size, irrespective of the specific annealing technique. Thermal-solvent annealing, where the thin films were exposed to solvent vapors at elevated temperatures, is also discussed and compared to solvent vapor and thermal annealing. Current Address: Stanford University.

  11. Correlation of recycle solvent quality to coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect

    Schweighardt, F.K.

    1983-01-01

    ''Solvent quality'' is a contrived solvent property used in coal liquefaction. It is assumed to be an important guide for expressing how well a recycle solvent will convert coal to products soluble in tetrahydrofuran (THF) or pyridine. Over the past 40-50 years, much has been written about the solvents used to prepare coal slurries, yet few solvent quality parameters have been quantified and related to process conditions or feedstocks. For this report, solvent quality was measured by kinetic microautoclave test as used at the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Facility. The microautoclave method, originally developed by the Conoco Coal Development Company, has been used to quantify solvent quality at Wilsonville since 1978. This method defines solvent quality as the weight percent tetrahydrofuran solubles generated, based on weight percent moisture- and ash-free (MAF) coal. Traditionally, a solvent quality test result in the lower range (approx. =65) warned of potential preheater coking problems. More recently, solvent quality has been used to monitor the effects of adding light solvent refined coal (LSRC) and distillates to the solvent stream to enhance coal liquefaction and maintain solvent balance. This study attempts to identify important independent and dependent variables associated with the solvent refining of coal (SRC) by relating plant operation to coal feedstock and product state and by correlating the impact to changes in the results from the microautoclave solvent quality test.

  12. 78 FR 73819 - Forest Resource Coordinating Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-09

    ... Forest Service Forest Resource Coordinating Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of...-18, 2013 meeting of the Forest Resource Coordinating Committee due to the Government partial shutdown... INFORMATION CONTACT: Maya Solomon, Forest Resource Coordinating Committee Program Coordinator; by phone...

  13. The structures of CyMe4-BTBP complexes of americium(iii) and europium(iii) in solvents used in solvent extraction, explaining their separation properties.

    PubMed

    Ekberg, Christian; Löfström-Engdahl, Elin; Aneheim, Emma; Foreman, Mark R StJ; Geist, Andreas; Lundberg, Daniel; Denecke, Melissa; Persson, Ingmar

    2015-11-14

    Separation of trivalent actinoid (An(iii)) and lanthanoid (Ln(iii)) ions is extremely challenging due to their similar ionic radii and chemical properties. Poly-aromatic nitrogen compounds acting as tetradentate chelating ligands to the metal ions in the extraction, have the ability to sufficiently separate An(iii) from Ln(iii). One of these compounds, 6,6'-bis(5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-benzol[1,2,4]triazin-3-yl)[2,2]bipyridine, CyMe4-BTBP, has proven to be resistant towards acidic environments and strong radiation from radioactive decomposition. EXAFS studies of the dicomplexes of CyMe4-BTBP with americium(iii) and europium(iii) in nitrobenzene, cyclohexanone, 1-hexanol, 1-octanol and malonamide (DMDOHEMA) in 1-octanol have been carried out to get a deeper understanding of the parameters responsible for the separation. The predominating complexes independent of solvent used are [Am(CyMe4-BTBP)2(NO3)](2+) and [Eu(CyMe4-BTBP)2](3+), respectively, which are present as outer-sphere ion-pairs with nitrate ions in the studied solvents with low relative permittivity. The presence of a nitrate ion in the first coordination sphere of the americium(iii) complex compensates the charge density of the complex considerably in comparison when only outer-sphere ion-pairs are formed as for the [Eu(CyMe4-BTBP)2](3+) complex. The stability and solubility of a complex in a solvent with low relative permittivity increase with decreasing charge density. The [Am(CyMe4-BTBP)2(NO3)](2+) complex will therefore be increasingly soluble and stabilized over the [Eu(CyMe4-BTBP)2](3+) complex in solvents with decreasing relative permittivity of the solvent. The separation of americium(iii) from europium(iii) with CyMe4-BTBP as extraction agent will increase with decreasing relative permittivity of the solvent, and thereby also with decreasing solubility of CyMe4-BTBP. The choice of solvent is therefore a balance of a high separation factor and sufficient solubility of the CyMe4-BTBP ligand. PMID:26426842

  14. Vapochromic Luminescence and Flexibility Control of Porous Coordination Polymers by Substitution of Luminescent Multinuclear Cu(I) Cluster Nodes.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Ohara, Hiroki; Yoshida, Masaki; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Chang, Ho-Chol; Kato, Masako

    2015-09-21

    Two luminescent porous coordination polymers (PCPs), i.e., [Cu2(?2-I)2ctpyz]n and [Cu4(?3-I)4ctpyz]n (Cu2 and Cu4, respectively; ctpyz = cis-1,3,5-cyclohexanetriyl-2,2',2?-tripyrazine), were successfully synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and luminescence spectroscopic measurements. Cu2 consists of rhombus-type dinuclear {Cu2I2} cores bridged by ctpyz ligands, while Cu4 is constructed of cubane-type tetranuclear {Cu4I4} cores bridged by ctpyz ligands. The void fraction of Cu4 is estimated to be 48.0%, which is significantly larger than that of Cu2 (19.9%). Under UV irradiation, both PCPs exhibit red luminescence at room temperature in the solid state (?em values of 660 and 614 nm for Cu2 and Cu4, respectively). Although the phosphorescence of Cu2 does not change upon removal and/or adsorption of EtOH solvent molecules in the porous channels, the solid-state emission maximum of Cu4 red-shifts by 36 nm (?em = 650 nm) upon the removal of the adsorbed benzonitrile (PhCN) molecules from the porous channels (and vice versa). This large difference in the vapochromic behavior of Cu2 and Cu4 is closely related to the framework flexibility. The framework of Cu2 is sufficiently rigid to retain the porous structure without solvated EtOH molecules, whereas the porous structure of Cu4 collapses easily after removal of the adsorbed PhCN molecules to form a nonporous amorphous phase. The original vapor-adsorbed porous structure of Cu4 is regenerated by exposure of the amorphous solid to not only PhCN vapor but also tetrahydrofuran, acetone, ethyl acetate, and N,N-dimethylformamide vapors. The Cu4 structures with the various adsorbed solvents showed almost the same emission maxima as the original PhCN-adsorbed Cu4, except for DMF-adsorbed Cu4, which showed no luminescence probably because of weak coordination of the DMF vapor molecules to the Cu(I) centers of the tetranuclear {Cu4I4} core. PMID:25984761

  15. Quantum discord with weak measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Uttam Pati, Arun Kumar

    2014-04-15

    Weak measurements cause small change to quantum states, thereby opening up the possibility of new ways of manipulating and controlling quantum systems. We ask, can weak measurements reveal more quantum correlation in a composite quantum state? We prove that the weak measurement induced quantum discord, called as the “super quantum discord”, is always larger than the quantum discord captured by the strong measurement. Moreover, we prove the monotonicity of the super quantum discord as a function of the measurement strength and in the limit of strong projective measurement the super quantum discord becomes the normal quantum discord. We find that unlike the normal discord, for pure entangled states, the super quantum discord can exceed the quantum entanglement. Our results provide new insights on the nature of quantum correlation and suggest that the notion of quantum correlation is not only observer dependent but also depends on how weakly one perturbs the composite system. We illustrate the key results for pure as well as mixed entangled states. -- Highlights: •Introduced the role of weak measurements in quantifying quantum correlation. •We have introduced the notion of the super quantum discord (SQD). •For pure entangled state, we show that the SQD exceeds the entanglement entropy. •This shows that quantum correlation depends not only on observer but also on measurement strength.

  16. On weak lensing shape noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, Sami-Matias; Kitching, Thomas D.; Cropper, Mark

    2015-12-01

    One of the most powerful techniques to study the dark sector of the Universe is weak gravitational lensing. In practice, to infer the reduced shear, weak lensing measures galaxy shapes, which are the consequence of both the intrinsic ellipticity of the sources and of the integrated gravitational lensing effect along the line of sight. Hence, a very large number of galaxies is required in order to average over their individual properties and to isolate the weak lensing cosmic shear signal. If this `shape noise' can be reduced, significant advances in the power of a weak lensing surveys can be expected. This paper describes a general method for extracting the probability distributions of parameters from catalogues of data using Voronoi cells, which has several applications, and has synergies with Bayesian hierarchical modelling approaches. This allows us to construct a probability distribution for the variance of the intrinsic ellipticity as a function of galaxy property using only photometric data, allowing a reduction of shape noise. As a proof of concept the method is applied to the CFHTLenS survey data. We use this approach to investigate trends of galaxy properties in the data and apply this to the case of weak lensing power spectra.

  17. 300 Area solvent evaporator closure plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This document describes activities for the closure of a dangerous waste treatment tank facility, owned and operated by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and co-operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford). This tank treatment facility is the 300 Area Solvent Evaporator (300 ASE), which was located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site from 1975 to 1986, and was managed for the DOE-RL by UNC Nuclear Industries, Incorporated. The 300 ASE evaporator unit was a modified load lugger (dumpster) in which solvent wastes were evaporated, and the adjacent 333 East Concrete Pad, where 55-gallon barrels of waste solvents were temporarily stored while awaiting liquid transfers into the evaporator. 26 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Solvent-responsive structural colored balloons.

    PubMed

    Higashiguchi, Kenji; Inoue, Masafumi; Oda, Tomohiro; Matsuda, Kenji

    2012-03-27

    The structural colored balloons (SCBs) consisting of polymer microcapsules showed several structural colors developed by optical thin-layer interference. The SCBs were prepared using a mixture of low- and high-molecular-weight polystyrene to give solvent responsiveness. When the surrounding solvent was transferred from water to the acetone/water mixture using a flow cell, the SCBs swelled at first and shrunk subsequently. The gradual color change of the SCBs was observed along with the size change. The color change accompanying the size change was successfully reproduced by assuming that the total amount of polymer in the thin film does not change. The swelling rate was rationalized by the diffusion of solvent through the shell polystyrene film to the inside of the balloons. PMID:22381002

  19. Solvent effects on model telechelic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Cuellar, Alejandro J.

    A theory to predict the competition between intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonding is extended to mixtures and applied to a model telechelic mixture. The theory is tested by comparing with simulation results for a mixture of fully flexible linear chains that can associate in a hydrogen bonding solvent. The simulation model for the telechelic is a flexible linear tetramer hard sphere chain with two hydrogen bonding sites, one on each terminal segment. The solvent is modelled as a hard sphere with four tetrahedrally arranged hydrogen bonding sites. The solvent is seen to affect the ability of the solute to bond intermolecularly and intramolecularly. The extent of hydrogen bonding and thermodynamic properties of the system were studied using Monte Carlo simulation and compared with predictions from a new statistical mechanics based theory for mixtures. Agreement of simulation and theory is good over the range of densities, temperatures and compositions studied.

  20. Permeation of Solvent through Adsorbed Polymer Brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Yoon-Kyoung; Dhinojwala, Ali; Granick, Steve

    1997-03-01

    We are investigating the drainage of a ?-solvent(trans-decalin at 24 ^circC) between solid surfaces bearing polystyrene(PS) brushes. PS brush was formed by selective adsorption of PVP(polyvinylpyridine) block of PS-PVP diblock copolymer onto mica. A newly modified surface forces apparatus (SFA) which allows applying small amplitude of oscillatory displacement both to the shear and the normal direction simultaneously has been used. In-phase motion in the normal direction implies the elastic forces while the out-of-phase motion reflects the viscous flow of solvent. Intriguing relationships between hydrodynamic forces, slip plane thickness, and viscoelastic properties of solvent with decreasing surface separation are discussed. The coupling between shear and normal forces is also addressed.

  1. Solvent Environment Revealed by Positively Chirped Pulses.

    PubMed

    Konar, Arkaprabha; Lozovoy, Vadim V; Dantus, Marcos

    2014-03-01

    The spectroscopy of large organic molecules and biomolecules in solution has been investigated using various time-resolved and frequency-resolved techniques. Of particular interest is the early response of the molecule and the solvent, which is difficult to study due to the ambiguity in assigning and differentiating inter- and intramolecular contributions to the electronic and vibrational populations and coherence. Our measurements compare the yield of fluorescence and stimulated emission for two laser dyes IR144 and IR125 as a function of chirp. While negatively chirped pulses are insensitive to solvent viscosity, positively chirped pulses are found to be uniquely sensitive probes of solvent viscosity. The fluorescence maximum for IR125 is observed near transform-limited pulses; however, for IR144, it is observed for positively chirped pulses once the pulses have been stretched to hundreds of femtoseconds. We conclude that chirped pulse spectroscopy is a simple one-beam method that is sensitive to early solvation dynamics. PMID:26274090

  2. Network Coordinator Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Himwich, Ed; Strand, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This report includes an assessment of the network performance in terms of lost observing time for the 2012 calendar year. Overall, the observing time loss was about 12.3%, which is in-line with previous years. A table of relative incidence of problems with various subsystems is presented. The most significant identified causes of loss were electronics rack problems (accounting for about 21.8% of losses), antenna reliability (18.1%), RFI (11.8%), and receiver problems (11.7%). About 14.2% of the losses occurred for unknown reasons. New antennas are under development in the USA, Germany, and Spain. There are plans for new telescopes in Norway and Sweden. Other activities of the Network Coordinator are summarized.

  3. Coordination using Implicit Communication

    E-print Network

    Cuff, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We explore a basic noise-free signaling scenario where coordination and communication are naturally merged. A random signal X_1,...,X_n is processed to produce a control signal or action sequence A_1,...,A_n, which is observed and further processed (without access to X_1,...,X_n) to produce a third sequence B_1,...,B_n. The object of interest is the set of empirical joint distributions p(x,a,b) that can be achieved in this setting. We show that H(A) >= I(X;A,B) is the necessary and sufficient condition for achieving p(x,a,b) when no causality constraints are enforced on the encoders. We also give results for various causality constraints. This setting sheds light on the embedding of digital information in analog signals, a concept that is exploited in digital watermarking, steganography, cooperative communication, and strategic play in team games such as bridge.

  4. Coordination of temporal plans in dynamic environments

    E-print Network

    Coordination of temporal plans in dynamic environments for mobile agents Amal El Fallah Seghrouchni planning Multi-Agent Planning & Coordination Framework 1 : multi-agent temporal planning and coordination based on Coordinated-SAPA Coordination during planning Coordination after planning P-CLAIM Framework 2

  5. Solvent-resistant microporous polymide membranes

    DOEpatents

    Miller, W.K.; McCray, S.B.; Friesen, D.T.

    1998-03-10

    An asymmetric microporous membrane with exceptional solvent resistance and highly desirable permeability is disclosed. The membrane is made by a solution-casting or solution-spinning process from a copolyamic acid comprising the condensation reaction product in a solvent of at least three reactants selected from certain diamines and dianhydrides and post-treated to imidize and in some cases cross-link the copolyamic acid. The membrane is useful as an uncoated membrane for ultrafiltration, microfiltration, and membrane contactor applications, or may be used as a support for a permselective coating to form a composite membrane useful in gas separations, reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, pervaporation, or vapor permeation.

  6. Solvent-resistant microporous polymide membranes

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Warren K. (Bend, OR); McCray, Scott B. (Bend, OR); Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR)

    1998-01-01

    An asymmetric microporous membrane with exceptional solvent resistance and highly desirable permeability is disclosed. The membrane is made by a solution-casting or solution-spinning process from a copolyamic acid comprising the condensation reaction product in a solvent of at least three reactants selected from certain diamines and dianhydrides and post-treated to imidize and in some cases cross-link the copolyamic acid. The membrane is useful as an uncoated membrane for ultrafiltration, microfiltration, and membrane contactor applications, or may be used as a support for a permselective coating to form a composite membrane useful in gas separations, reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, pervaporation, or vapor permeation.

  7. Catalog solvent extraction: anticipate process adjustments

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, S.G.; Brass, E.A.; Brown, S.J.; Geeting, M.W.

    2008-07-01

    The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) utilizes commercially available centrifugal contactors to facilitate removal of radioactive cesium from highly alkaline salt solutions. During the fabrication of the contactor assembly, demonstrations revealed a higher propensity for foaming than was initially expected. A task team performed a series of single-phase experiments that revealed that the shape of the bottom vanes and the outer diameter of those vanes are key to the successful deployment of commercial contactors in the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process. (authors)

  8. Warping the Weak Gravity Conjecture

    E-print Network

    Kooner, Karta; Zavala, Ivonne

    2015-01-01

    The Weak Gravity Conjecture, if valid, rules out simple models of Natural Inflation by restricting their axion decay constant to be sub-Planckian. We revisit stringy attempts to realise Natural Inflation, with a single open string axionic inflaton from D-branes in a warped throat. We show that warping allows the requisite super-Planckian axion decay constant to be achieved consistently with the Weak Gravity Conjecture. However, there is a tension between large axion decay constant and high string scale, where the requisite high string scale is difficult to achieve in all attempts to realise large field inflation using perturbative string theory. We comment on the Generalized Weak Gravity Conjecture in the light of our results.

  9. Weak values in continuous weak measurement of qubits

    E-print Network

    Lupei Qin; Pengfei Liang; Xin-Qi Li

    2015-02-09

    For continuous weak measurement of qubits, we obtain exact expressions for weak values (WVs) from the post-selection restricted average of measurement outputs, by using both the quantumtrajectory- equation (QTE) and quantum Bayesian approach. The former is applicable to short-time weak measurement, while the latter can relax the measurement strength to finite. We find that even in the "very" weak limit the result can be essentially different from the one originally proposed by Aharonov, Albert and Vaidman (AAV), in a sense that our result incorporates non-perturbative correction which could be important when the AAV's WV is large. Within the Bayesian framework, we obtain also elegant expressions for finite measurement strength and find that the amplifier's noise in quantum measurement has no effect on the WVs. In particular, we obtain very useful result for homodyne measurement in circuit-QED system, which allows for measuring the real and imaginary parts of the AAV's WV by simply tuning the phase of the local oscillator. This advantage can be exploited as efficient state-tomography technique.

  10. Weak values in continuous weak measurements of qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Lupei; Liang, Pengfei; Li, Xin-Qi

    2015-07-01

    For continuous weak measurements of qubits, we obtain exact expressions for weak values (WVs) from the postselection restricted average of measurement outputs, by using both the quantum-trajectory equation (QTE) and the quantum Bayesian approach. The former is applicable to short-time weak measurement, while the latter can relax the measurement strength to finite. We find that even in the "very" weak limit the result can be essentially different from the one originally proposed by Aharonov, Albert, and Vaidman (AAV), in the sense that our result incorporates nonperturbative correction which could be important when the AAV WV is large. Within the Bayesian framework, we obtain also elegant expressions for finite measurement strength and find that the amplifier's noise in quantum measurement has no effect on the WVs. In particular, we obtain very useful results for homodyne measurement in a circuit-QED system, which allows for measuring the real and imaginary parts of the AAV WV by simply tuning the phase of the local oscillator. This advantage can be exploited as an efficient state-tomography technique.

  11. Coordination polymers from a highly flexible alkyldiamine-derived ligand: structure, magnetism and gas adsorption studies.

    PubMed

    Hawes, Chris S; Chilton, Nicholas F; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Knowles, Gregory P; Chaffee, Alan L; Murray, Keith S; Batten, Stuart R; Turner, David R

    2015-10-28

    The synthesis and structural, magnetic and gas adsorption properties of a series of coordination polymer materials prepared from a new, highly flexible and internally functional tetrakis-carboxybenzyl ligand H4L derived from 1,2-diaminoethane have been examined. The compound poly-[Ni3(HL)2(OH2)4]·2DMF·2H2O 1, a two-dimensional coordination polymer, contains aqua- and carboxylato-bridged trinuclear Ni(II) clusters, the magnetic behaviour of which can be well described through experimental fitting and ab initio modelling to a ferromagnetically coupled trimer with a positive axial zero-field splitting parameter D. Compound poly-[Zn2L]·2DMF·3H2O 2, a three-dimensional coordination polymer displaying frl topology, contains large and well-defined solvent channels, which are shown to collapse on solvent exchange or drying. Compound poly-[Zn2(L)(DMSO)4]·3DMSO·3H2O 3, a highly solvated two-dimensional coordination polymer, displayed poor stability characteristics, however a structurally related material poly-[Zn2(L)(bpe)(DMSO)2]·DMSO·3H2O 4 was prepared under similar synthetic conditions by including the 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene bpe co-ligand. Compound 4, containing small one-dimensional solvent channels, shows excellent structural resilience to solvent exchange and evacuation, and the evacuated material displays selective adsorption of CO2 over N2 at 273 K in the pressure range 0-1 atm. Each of the coordination polymers displays subtle differences in the conformation and binding mode of the ligand species, with switching between two distinct conformers (X-shaped and H-shaped), as well as a variable protonation state of the central core, with significant effects on the resulting network structures and physical properties of the materials. PMID:26223788

  12. Cosmology and the weak interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, D.N. ):)

    1989-12-01

    The weak interaction plays a critical role in modern Big Bang cosmology. This review will emphasize two of its most publicized cosmological connections: Big Bang nucleosynthesis and Dark Matter. The first of these is connected to the cosmological prediction of Neutrino Flavours, N{sub {nu}} {approximately} 3 which is now being confirmed at SLC and LEP. The second is interrelated to the whole problem of galaxy and structure formation in the universe. This review will demonstrate the role of the weak interaction both for dark matter candidates and for the problem of generating seeds to form structure. 87 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Cosmology and the weak interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, David N.

    1989-01-01

    The weak interaction plays a critical role in modern Big Bang cosmology. Two of its most publicized comological connections are emphasized: big bang nucleosynthesis and dark matter. The first of these is connected to the cosmological prediction of neutrine flavors, N(sub nu) is approximately 3 which in now being confirmed. The second is interrelated to the whole problem of galacty and structure formation in the universe. The role of the weak interaction both for dark matter candidates and for the problem of generating seeds to form structure is demonstrated.

  14. Weak and Strong Sequential Measurements

    E-print Network

    Aharon Brodutch; Eliahu Cohen

    2015-04-28

    Quantum systems usually travel a multitude of different paths when evolving through time from an initial to a final state. In general, the possible paths will depend on the future and past boundary conditions, as well as the system's dynamics. We present a gedankenexperiment where mutually exclusive paths are followed deterministically and simultaneously, by the same system, depending on which measurement was performed. We show how this `paradoxical' behavior is interpreted in the weak measurement formalism where the back action of the measurement cannot be used to account for the strange behavior. To support our predictions we present a method for performing both the strong and weak measurement.

  15. Solvent effects on the catalytic activity of subtilisin suspended in organic solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Correa de Sampaio, T.; Melo, R.B.; Moura, T.F.; Michel, S.; Barreiros, S.

    1996-05-05

    The authors studied a model transesterification reaction catalyzed by subtilisin Carlsberg suspended in toluene, n-hexane, diisopropyl ether, and mixtures of these solvents. To account for solvent effects due to differences in water partitioning between the enzyme and the bulk solvents, the authors measured water sorption isotherms for the enzyme in each solvent. They measured catalytic activity as a function of enzyme hydration and obtained bell-shaped curves with maxima at the same enzyme hydration in all the solvents. However, the activity maxima were different in all the media, being the lowest in toluene. Differences in the partitioning of substrates and product between the bulk solvent phase and the enzyme active site were accounted for but could not explain the lower catalytic activity observed in toluene. The fact that toluene is very similar to one of the substrates suggested the possibility of competitive inhibition by this solvent. The authors derived a model allowing for differences in solvation of the substrates, by using thermodynamic activities instead of concentrations, as well as for competitive inhibition by toluene. The model fit the experimental data well, confirming that toluene had a direct adverse effect on the catalytic activity of the enzyme.

  16. Microphase separation in weakly charged hydrophobic polyelectrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, O.; Boué, F.; Candau, F.

    2002-02-01

    Aqueous solutions of a well-defined poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-sodium 2-acrylamido-methyl propanesulfonate) (NIPAM/NaAMPS in a 95/5 molar ratio) have been investigated by means of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and rheological experiments as a function of temperature (25\\un{^circ C} leqslant T leqslant 60\\un{^circ C}) and polymer concentration (0.5\\un{wt%} leqslant C leqslant 12\\un{wt%}). The solutions remain optically transparent and isotropic over the whole temperature range, in contrast with the homopolyNIPAM which precipitates above its lower critical solution temperature (LCST = 32\\un{^circ C}). Upon addition of salt, the systems undergo a micro-macrophase separation. At temperatures above 45\\un{^circ C}, the SANS spectra exhibit a sharp peak at a scattering wave vector, q_max, which increases slightly with temperature. At high temperature (T sim 60\\un{^circ C}), the scattered intensity follows a power law I(q) sim q^{-4} in the asymptotic regime, characteristic of two-density media with sharp interfaces, and q_{max} is found to vary with polymer concentration as q_{max} sim C^{{0.22}}. Estimates of the typical sizes give values between 40 Å and 200 Å. These results provide a strong evidence of a thermally induced microphase separation, which is corroborated by the very sharp increases of the viscosity (over 2 decades) and of the stress relaxation time of the solutions, occurring in the temperature range where the scattering peak is observed. The results are discussed and compared with the theoretical models proposed for weakly charged polyelectrolytes in a poor solvent.

  17. Internship Coordinators in Majors MAJOR Internship Coordinator Email Office Location

    E-print Network

    Courtier, Anna M.

    Internship Coordinators in Majors MAJOR Internship Coordinator Email Office Location internships for credit Dietetics Dr. Janet Gloeckner gloeckjw@jmu.edu HHS 3124 Earth Science L@jmu.edu Keezell Hall 407 Finance & Business Law Don't offer internships for credit Foreign

  18. Next Generation Solvent Performance in the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Process - 15495

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T.; Scherman, C.; Martin, D.; Suggs, P.

    2015-01-14

    Changes to the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) flow-sheet were implemented in the facility. Implementation included changing the scrub and strip chemicals and concentrations, modifying the O/A ratios for the strip, scrub, and extraction contactor banks, and blending the current BoBCalixC6 extractant based solvent in MCU with clean MaxCalix extractant based solvent. During the successful demonstration period, the MCU process was subject to rigorous oversight to ensure hydraulic stability and chemical/radionuclide analysis of the key process tanks (caustic wash tank, solvent hold tank, strip effluent hold tank, and decontaminated salt solution hold tank) to evaluate solvent carryover to downstream facilities and the effectiveness of cesium removal from the liquid salt waste. Results indicated the extraction of cesium was significantly more effective with an average Decontamination Factor (DF) of 1,129 (range was 107 to 1,824) and that stripping was effective. The contactor hydraulic performance was stable and satisfactory, as indicated by contactor vibration, contactor rotational speed, and flow stability; all of which remained at or near target values. Furthermore, the Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) level and specific gravity was as expected, indicating that solvent integrity and organic hydraulic stability were maintained. The coalescer performances were in the range of processing results under the BOBCalixC6 flow sheet, indicating negligible adverse impact of NGS deployment. After the Demonstration period, MCU began processing via routine operations. Results to date reiterate the enhanced cesium extraction and stripping capability of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) flow sheet. This paper presents process performance results of the NGS Demonstration and continued operations of MCU utilizing the blended BobCalixC6-MaxCalix solvent under the NGS flowsheet.

  19. DEGRADED TBP SOLVENT REGENERATION TECHNOLOGY USING BUTYLAMINE AS A SOLVENT WASHING TO REDUCE SOLID SALT WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Asakura, T.; Itoh, Y.; Hotoku, S.; Morita, Y.; Uchiyama, G.

    2003-02-27

    Normal butylamine compounds are studied as salt-free wash reagents for degraded solvent used in PUREX process in spent fuel reprocessing. The solvent wash tests were carried out with two types of butylamine compounds, n-butylamine oxalate and n-butylamine bicarbonate, by counter-current mode using a small size mixer-settler composed of two 4-stage wash steps. Di-n-butyl phosphoric acid (HDBP), the main degradation product from TBP, was removed from real degraded solvent with decontamination factor of 2.5 {approx} 7.9. The study on electrolytic decomposition of butylamine compounds was also conducted for waste treatment.

  20. Gas separation by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOEpatents

    Matson, Stephen L. (Harvard, MA); Lee, Eric K. L. (Acton, MA); Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Kelly, Donald J. (Bend, OR)

    1989-01-01

    There is disclosed a composite immobulized liquid membrane of a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous organic or inorganic support, the solvent being at least one highly polar solvent containing at least one nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous or sulfur atom, and having a boiling point of at least 100.degree. C. and a specified solubility parameter. The solvent or solvent mixture is homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. The membrane is suitable for acid gas scrubbing and oxygen/nitrogen separation.

  1. Gas separation by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOEpatents

    Matson, S.L.; Lee, E.K.L.; Friesen, D.T.; Kelly, D.J.

    1989-04-25

    There is disclosed a composite immobilized liquid membrane of a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous organic or inorganic support, the solvent being at least one highly polar solvent containing at least one nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus or sulfur atom, and having a boiling point of at least 100 C and a specified solubility parameter. The solvent or solvent mixture is homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. The membrane is suitable for acid gas scrubbing and oxygen/nitrogen separation. 3 figs.

  2. Organic solvent nanofiltration: prospects and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, A. V.; Korneeva, G. A.; Tereshchenko, Gennadii F.

    2008-11-01

    The key lines of research in a new field of the membrane science and technology, viz., organic solvent nanofiltration, are considered. The prospects for its use in chemical, petrochemical and food industries are discussed. Attention is focused on membranes developed for this method.

  3. Selective solvent absorption in coal conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Lapucha, A.; Lazarov, L.; Amui, J.

    1992-04-01

    The objectives of this project are: (1) to determine the importance of the presence of added hydrogen donor compounds within the coal in the first stage of direct liquefaction processes; and (2) to determine the composition of the solvent absorbed by and present within the coal in the first stage of direct coal liquefaction.

  4. Crystal growth in fused solvent systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, D. R.; Noone, M. J.; Spear, K. E.; White, W. B.; Henry, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    Research is reported on the growth of electronic ceramic single crystals from solution for the future growth of crystals in a microgravity environment. Work included growth from fused or glass solvents and aqueous solutions. Topics discussed include: crystal identification and selection; aqueous solution growth of triglycine sulphate (TGS); and characterization of TGS.

  5. Structure and Solvent Properties of Microemulsions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Civia A.; Calzola, Zachary J.; Mbindyo, Jeremiah K. N.

    2008-01-01

    A microscale laboratory experiment to investigate the formation and utility of microemulsions is described. Microemulsions are technologically important fluids that can reduce the use of toxic organic solvents. In the experiment, students prepare a microemulsion and compare the solubility of sudan III dye in the microemulsion and in dodecane. They…

  6. Solvent-Free Synthesis of Chalcones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palleros, Daniel R.

    2004-01-01

    The synthesis of twenty different chalcones in the absence of solvent is presented. The results indicated that out of the twenty different chalcones investigated seventeen can be obtained in a matter of minutes by mixing the corresponding benzaldehyde and acetophenone in the presence of solid NaOH in a mortar with pestle.

  7. Solvent treatment of coal for improved liquefaction

    DOEpatents

    Appell, Herbert R. (Pitcairn, PA); Narain, Nand K. (Bethel Park, PA); Utz, Bruce R. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1986-05-06

    Increased liquefaction yield is obtained by pretreating a slurry of solid carbonaceous material and a liquid hydrocarbonaceous solvent at a temperature above 200.degree. C. but below 350.degree. C. for a period of 10 minutes to four hours prior to exposure to liquefaction temperatures.

  8. REPLACING SOLVENT CLEANING WITH AQUEOUS CLEANING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents actions taken by Robert Bosch Corp., Charleston, SC, in replacing the cleaning solvents 1, 1, 2- trichloro-1, 2, 2-trifluoroethane (CFC-113) and trichloroethylene (TCE) with aqueous solutions. Bosch has succeeded in eliminating all their CFC-113 use and so f...

  9. REPLACING SOLVENT CLEANING WITH AQUEOUS CLEANING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents actions taken by Robert Bosch Corp., Charleston, SC, in replacing the cleaning solvents 1, 1, 2- trichloro-1, 2, 2-trifluoroethane (CFC-113) and trichloroethylene (TCE) with aqueous solutions. osch has succeeded in eliminating all their CFC-113 use and so far...

  10. Industrial solvents step up to the mound

    SciTech Connect

    Hairston, D.

    1995-06-01

    In the field of industrial solvents, 1,1,1-trichloroethane is known for its ability to cover the bases. Versatile, the organic chemical is widely used for a variety of applications, from vapor degreasing to cold cleaning. But its number is about to be retired. Under a timetable established by the Montreal Protocol, production of this ozone-depleting compound is scheduled to be phased out by the end of the year. As the deadline approaches, the impact of the inevitable exit of 1,1,1 from the marketplace is being cushioned by three developments: the gradual shutdown of some capacity, exemptions for the continued production of 1,1,1 for certain applications, and the rapid development of alternative solvents. So far, industry observers agree, none of the alternative solvents quite match the performance of 1,1,1. Certainly there is some interest in finding a one-for-one replacement for 1,1,1, but it is not the top priority for companies currently pursuing the development of alternative solvents. Instead, they are focused on creating families of environmentally safe products that closely match the performance of 1,1,1 in specific applications. The paper discusses this technology.

  11. Cosmology with weak lensing surveys.

    PubMed

    Munshi, Dipak; Valageas, Patrick

    2005-12-15

    Weak gravitational lensing is responsible for the shearing and magnification of the images of high-redshift sources due to the presence of intervening mass. Since the lensing effects arise from deflections of the light rays due to fluctuations of the gravitational potential, they can be directly related to the underlying density field of the large-scale structures. Weak gravitational surveys are complementary to both galaxy surveys and cosmic microwave background observations as they probe unbiased nonlinear matter power spectra at medium redshift. Ongoing CMBR experiments such as WMAP and a future Planck satellite mission will measure the standard cosmological parameters with unprecedented accuracy. The focus of attention will then shift to understanding the nature of dark matter and vacuum energy: several recent studies suggest that lensing is the best method for constraining the dark energy equation of state. During the next 5 year period, ongoing and future weak lensing surveys such as the Joint Dark Energy Mission (JDEM; e.g. SNAP) or the Large-aperture Synoptic Survey Telescope will play a major role in advancing our understanding of the universe in this direction. In this review article, we describe various aspects of probing the matter power spectrum and the bi-spectrum and other related statistics with weak lensing surveys. This can be used to probe the background dynamics of the universe as well as the nature of dark matter and dark energy. PMID:16286284

  12. N-{Delta} weak transition

    SciTech Connect

    Graczyk, Krzysztof M.

    2011-11-23

    A short review of the Rein-Sehgal and isobar models is presented. The attention is focused on the nucleon-{Delta}(1232) weak transition form-factors. The results of the recent re-analyses of the ANL and BNL bubble chamber neutrino-deuteron scattering data are discussed.

  13. Ulysses: UVCS Coordinated Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Poletto, G.; Corti, G.; Simnett, G.; Noci, G.; Romoli, M.; Kohl, J.; Goldstein, B.

    1998-01-01

    We present results from coordinated observations in which instruments on Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and Ulysses were used to measure the density and flow speed of plasma at the Sun and to again measure the same properties of essentially the same plasma in the solar wind. Plasma was sampled by Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) at 3.5 and 4.5 solar radii and by Ulysses/SWOOPS at 5 AU. Data were acquired during a nearly 2 week period in May-June 1997 at a latitude of 9-10 degrees north of the equator, on the east limb and, hence, in the streamer belt and the source location of slow wind. Density and outflow speed are compared, in order to check for preservation of the near Sun characteristics in the interplanetary medium. By chance, Ulysses was at the very northern edge of the visible streamer belt. Nevertheless, no evidence of fast wind, or mixing with fast wind coming from the northern polar coronal hole, was evident at Ulysses. The morphology of the streamer belt was similar at the beginning and end of the observation period, but was markedly different during the middle of the period. A corresponding change in density (but not flow speed) was noted at Ulysses.

  14. Coordinated Transportation: Problems and Promise?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Examines the legal, administrative, and logistical barriers that have prevented the wide acceptance of coordinating community and school transportation services and why these barriers may be breaking down. Two examples of successful implementation of coordinated transportation are examined: employing a single system to serve all transportation…

  15. Fuzzy coordinator in control problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rueda, A.; Pedrycz, W.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a hierarchical control structure using a fuzzy system for coordination of the control actions is studied. The architecture involves two levels of control: a coordination level and an execution level. Numerical experiments will be utilized to illustrate the behavior of the controller when it is applied to a nonlinear plant.

  16. 75 FR 55947 - Coordinated Communications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... Proposed Rulemaking on Coordinated Communications, 75 FR 6590 (Feb. 10, 2010). The SNPRM invited comments..., 68 FR at 427. The first content standard was satisfied if the communication was an electioneering... Proposed Rulemaking on Coordinated ] Communications, 70 FR 73946 (Dec. 14, 2005) (``2005 NPRM'')....

  17. Drift Hamiltonian in magnetic coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Boozer, A.H.; Hay, R.

    1982-02-01

    A Hamiltonian formulation of the guiding-center drift in arbitrary, steady state, magnetic and electric fields is given. The canonical variables of this formulation are simply related to the magnetic coordinates. The modifications required to treat ergodic magnetic fields using magnetic coordinates are explicitly given in the Hamiltonian formulation.

  18. [Measurement of diffusion coefficients of polar solvent and nonpolar solvent at infinite dilution in polyethylene].

    PubMed

    Bian, Yu; Li, Ji-Ding; Chen, Cui-Xian; Lü, Shao-Hua; Zhang, Shu-Hua

    2002-09-01

    Gas chromatography is a new, fast, accurate and convenient technique to study the correlation of small molecule solvents and polymer membrane materials. It can measure many parameters of dissolution and diffusing characters of a small molecule in a polymer. The retention times and the peak widths at half-height of five small molecule solvents (n-hexane, n-heptane, n-decane, ethanol and water) in the stationary phase of polyethylene were measured. The diffusion coefficients of the small molecule solvents at infinite dilution were calculated with van Deemter equation. The graph plotted according to the results of the diffusion coefficients of n-decane at infinite dilution vs temperatures agreed with the Arrhenius equation. The variance in the diffusion coefficients at infinite dilution of five small molecule solvents was analyzed according to the differences in molecular mass and polarity. PMID:16358690

  19. Two terphenyl-based diol hosts and corresponding solvent inclusions with dimethylformamide and acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Klien, Hendrik; Seichter, Wilhelm; Skobridis, Konstantinos; Weber, Edwin

    2015-09-01

    Having reference to an elongated structural modification of 2,2'-bis(hydroxydiphenylmethyl)biphenyl, (I), the two 1,1':4',1''-terphenyl-based diol hosts 2,2''-bis(hydroxydiphenylmethyl)-1,1':4',1''-terphenyl, C44H34O2, (II), and 2,2''-bis[hydroxybis(4-methylphenyl)methyl]-1,1':4',1''-terphenyl, C48H42O2, (III), have been synthesized and studied with regard to their crystal structures involving different inclusions, i.e. (II) with dimethylformamide (DMF), C44H34O2·C2H6NO, denoted (IIa), (III) with DMF, C48H42O2·C2H6NO, denoted (IIIa), and (III) with acetonitrile, C48H42O2·CH3CN, denoted (IIIb). In the solvent-free crystals of (II) and (III), the hydroxy H atoms are involved in intramolecular O-H...? hydrogen bonding, with the central arene ring of the terphenyl unit acting as an acceptor. The corresponding crystal structures are stabilized by intermolecular C-H...? contacts. Due to the distinctive acceptor character of the included DMF solvent species in the crystal structures of (IIa) and (IIIa), the guest molecule is coordinated to the host via O-H...O=C hydrogen bonding. In both crystal structures, infinite strands composed of alternating host and guest molecules represent the basic supramolecular aggregates. Within a given strand, the O atom of the solvent molecule acts as a bifurcated acceptor. Similar to the solvent-free cases, the hydroxy H atoms in inclusion structure (IIIb) are involved in intramolecular hydrogen bonding, and there is thus a lack of host-guest interaction. As a result, the solvent molecules are accommodated as C-H...N hydrogen-bonded inversion-symmetric dimers in the channel-like voids of the host lattice. PMID:26322608

  20. Solvent-based nanocomposite coatings I. Dispersion of organophilic montmorillonite in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Burgentzlé, D; Duchet, J; Gérard, J F; Jupin, A; Fillon, B

    2004-10-01

    This study aims to determine the relevant parameters controlling the organophilic montmorillonite dispersion in various organic solvents which can be used as dispersion media for polymer coatings. These suspensions were studied at three scales: At nanometer scale by looking to interlayer distance: When the solvent surface energy is higher than the organophilic clay surface energy, i.e., gamma solvent > or = gamma montmorillonite, the intercalated organic chains of the quaternary ammonium modifier swell, leading to an increase of the interlayer distance. The balance between hydrophilic and hydrophobic character is the key to dispersion of nanoclays. At micrometer scale by studying the rheological behaviour of clay suspensions: Gels are formed by percolation of microgels, based on swollen 3-4 platelet tactoids. The viscoelastic properties and the flow behavior reveal the gel structuration by measuring the gel stiffness and the flowing stress. At macroscopic scale analyzed from the swelling of the nanoclay into solvents: The compatibility between solvent and organophilic clay governs the macroscopic swelling, i.e., interactions between organic chains borne by the intercalated ions and solvents govern the final suspension morphologies. The same methodology can be adopted for monomers or prepolymers selected for one in situ intercalation/exfoliation processing route. PMID:15313634

  1. Solvent Effects on the Formation of Surface Nanodroplets by Solvent Exchange.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ziyang; Xu, Haolan; Zeng, Hongbo; Zhang, Xuehua

    2015-11-10

    Solvent exchange is a simple process to form oil nanodroplets at solid-liquid interfaces with well-defined location and morphology. In this process, a good solvent of the oil is displaced by a poor solvent, leading to the nucleation and growth of oil droplets from a transient oversaturation at the mixing front. Our recent work has shown that the final volume of the droplets is related to the flow conditions. In this work, we investigate the effects of the type and the composition of solvents on the droplet formation under the same flow conditions. Water nanodroplets were produced by ethanol/cyclohexane (solution A) and cyclohexane (solution B) on a hydrophilic substrate. We found that the droplet size increases first and then decreases with an increase of the initial ethanol concentration in solution A. This is attributed to the phase separation of ethanol-cyclohexane-water; in particular, the composition of solution A on the phase boundary above the Ouzo region. The same reason also contributes to the lower efficiency in droplet formation for a longer alkane. The important implication from this work is that the maximal droplet volume is limited by the phase separation of the solvents used in the solvent exchange. PMID:26488386

  2. Organic Solvent Tropical Report [SEC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect

    COWLEY, W.L.

    2000-06-21

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an unmitigated organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines.

  3. Filming the Birth of Molecules and Accompanying Solvent Rearrangement

    E-print Network

    Ihee, Hyotcherl

    Filming the Birth of Molecules and Accompanying Solvent Rearrangement Jae Hyuk Lee, Michael Wulff. The birth and vibrational relaxation of I2 molecules and the associated rearrangement of solvent molecules

  4. The Ideal Solvent for Paper Chromatography of Food Dyes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markow, Peter G.

    1988-01-01

    Uses paper chromatography with food dyes to provide a simple and inexpensive basis for teaching chromatography. Provides experimental methodology and tabled results. Includes a solvent system comparison (Rf) for seven dyes and twenty-two solvents. (MVL)

  5. Integrating Safety Issues in Optimizing Solvent Selection and Process Design 

    E-print Network

    Patel, Suhani Jitendra

    2011-10-21

    Incorporating consideration for safety issues while designing solvent processes has become crucial in light of the chemical process incidents involving solvents that have taken place in recent years. The implementation of ...

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electroconvection in a Polar Organic Solvent

    E-print Network

    Augustine, Mathew P.

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Electroconvection in a Polar Organic Solvent Scott A. Riley solvent nitrobenzene induced by an electric field is studied by magnetic resonance imaging. Rf pulse; magnetic resonance imaging; molecular motion. INTRODUCTION Determination of chemical structure

  7. Construction of prototype system for directional solvent extraction desalination

    E-print Network

    Fowler, Michael James

    2012-01-01

    Directional solvent extraction has been demonstrated as a low temperature, membrane free desalination process. This method dissolves the water into an inexpensive, benign directional solvent, rejects the contaminants, then ...

  8. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Cyclohexane as a Cryoscopic Solvent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steffel, Margaret J.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests that cyclohexane be used as a solvent in experiments usually using benzene, which has been placed on the list of chemicals that are confirmed carcinogens. Reasons for selection of cyclohexane and experimental procedures using this solvent are described. (CS)

  9. BIODEGRADATION OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS: REACTIONS NEAR DNAPL AND ENZYME FUNCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chlorinated solvents are among the most common organic chemical groundwater contaminants at DOE sites, as well as at DOD and industrial facilities. Included are the solvents trichloroethene (TCE), tetrachloroethene (PCE), and carbon tetrachloride (CT). Commonly these contaminan...

  10. Weak values and weak coupling maximizing the output of weak measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Di Lorenzo, Antonio

    2014-06-15

    In a weak measurement, the average output ?o? of a probe that measures an observable A{sup -hat} of a quantum system undergoing both a preparation in a state ?{sub i} and a postselection in a state E{sub f} is, to a good approximation, a function of the weak value A{sub w}=Tr[E{sub f}A{sup -hat} ?{sub i}]/Tr[E{sub f}?{sub i}], a complex number. For a fixed coupling ?, when the overlap Tr[E{sub f}?{sub i}] is very small, A{sub w} diverges, but ?o? stays finite, often tending to zero for symmetry reasons. This paper answers the questions: what is the weak value that maximizes the output for a fixed coupling? What is the coupling that maximizes the output for a fixed weak value? We derive equations for the optimal values of A{sub w} and ?, and provide the solutions. The results are independent of the dimensionality of the system, and they apply to a probe having a Hilbert space of arbitrary dimension. Using the Schrödinger–Robertson uncertainty relation, we demonstrate that, in an important case, the amplification ?o? cannot exceed the initial uncertainty ?{sub o} in the observable o{sup -hat}, we provide an upper limit for the more general case, and a strategy to obtain ?o???{sub o}. - Highlights: •We have provided a general framework to find the extremal values of a weak measurement. •We have derived the location of the extremal values in terms of preparation and postselection. •We have devised a maximization strategy going beyond the limit of the Schrödinger–Robertson relation.

  11. Mechanism and Dynamics of Molecular Exchange at the Silica/Binary Solvent Mixtures Interface.

    PubMed

    Karnes, John J; Benjamin, Ilan

    2015-12-17

    Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of acetonitrile/methanol mixtures in contact with a hydroxylated silica surface are used to elucidate the mechanism of molecular exchange at a hydrophilic liquid/solid interface. The different hydrogen-bonding ability of the two solvents provides a driving force for the adsorption/desorption process, which is followed by examining several structural and energetic properties of the system. Two different reaction coordinates for the hydrogen bonding exchange are defined and are used to identify transition states in which the methanol attains a well-defined orientation. The reaction coordinates are used to examine the mechanism and dynamics of the exchange. We find that the exchange process involves multiple recrossing of the transition state and can progress via two different mechanisms, depending whether the methanol first acts as a hydrogen bond donor or acceptor at the silica surface. PMID:26186086

  12. TRIFORCE: Tessellated Semianalytical Solvent Exposed Surface Areas and Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present a new approach to the calculation of solvent-accessible surface areas of molecules with potential application to surface area based methods for determination of solvation free energies. As in traditional analytical and statistical approaches, this new algorithm, called TRIFORCE, reports both component areas and derivatives as a function of the atomic coordinates and radii. Unique to TRIFORCE are the rapid and scalable approaches for the determination of sphere intersection points and numerical estimation of the surface areas, derivatives, and other properties that can be associated with the surface area facets. The algorithm performs a special tessellation and semianalytical integration that uses a precomputed look-up table. This provides a simple way to balance numerical accuracy and memory usage. TRIFORCE calculates derivatives in the same manner, enabling application in force-dependent activities such as molecular geometry minimization. TRIFORCE is available free of charge for academic purposes as both a C++ library, which can be directly interfaced to existing molecular simulation packages, and a web-accessible application. PMID:25221446

  13. Interfacial Bond-Breaking Electron Transfer in Mixed Water–Ethylene Glycol Solutions: Reorganization Energy and Interplay between Different Solvent Modes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We explore solvent dynamics effects in interfacial bond breaking electron transfer in terms of a multimode approach and make an attempt to interpret challenging recent experimental results (the nonmonotonous behavior of the rate constant of electroreduction of S2O82– from mixed water–EG solutions when increasing the EG fraction; see Zagrebin, P.A. et al. J. Phys. Chem. B2010, 114, 311). The exact expansion of the solvent correlation function (calculated using experimental dielectric spectra) in a series predicts the splitting of solvent coordinate in three independent modes characterized by different relaxation times. This makes it possible to construct a 5D free-energy surface along three solvent coordinates and one intramolecular degree of freedom describing first electron transfer at the reduction of a peroxodisulphate anion. Classical molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the solvation of a peroxodisulphate anion (S2O82–) in oxidized and reduced states in pure water and ethylene glycol (EG) as well as mixed H2O–EG solutions. The solvent reorganization energy of the first electron-transfer step at the reduction of S2O82– was calculated for several compositions of the mixed solution. This quantity was found to be significantly asymmetric. (The reorganization energies of reduction and oxidation differ from each other.) The averaged reorganization energy slightly increases with increasing the EG content in solution. This finding clearly indicates that for the reaction under study the static solvent effect no longer competes with solvent dynamics. Brownian dynamics simulations were performed to calculate the electron-transfer rate constants as a function of the solvent composition. The results of the simulations explain the experimental data, at least qualitatively. PMID:23768162

  14. Coupling hydrophobicity, dispersion, and electrostatics in continuum solvent models.

    PubMed

    Dzubiella, J; Swanson, J M J; McCammon, J A

    2006-03-01

    An implicit solvent model is presented that couples hydrophobic, dispersion, and electrostatic solvation energies by minimizing the system Gibbs free energy with respect to the solvent volume exclusion function. The solvent accessible surface is the output of the theory. The method is illustrated with the solvation of simple solutes on different length scales and captures the sensitivity of hydration to the particular form of the solute-solvent interactions in agreement with recent computer simulations. PMID:16606226

  15. The weak scale from BBN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Lawrence J.; Pinner, David; Ruderman, Joshua T.

    2014-12-01

    The measured values of the weak scale, v, and the first generation masses, m u, d, e , are simultaneously explained in the multiverse, with all these parameters scanning independently. At the same time, several remarkable coincidences are understood. Small variations in these parameters away from their measured values lead to the instability of hydrogen, the instability of heavy nuclei, and either a hydrogen or a helium dominated universe from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. In the 4d parameter space of ( m u , m d , m e , v), catastrophic boundaries are reached by separately increasing each parameter above its measured value by a factor of (1.4, 1.3, 2.5, ˜ 5), respectively. The fine-tuning problem of the weak scale in the Standard Model is solved: as v is increased beyond the observed value, it is impossible to maintain a significant cosmological hydrogen abundance for any values of m u, d, e that yield both hydrogen and heavy nuclei stability.

  16. Keep meaning in conversational coordination

    PubMed Central

    Cuffari, Elena C.

    2014-01-01

    Coordination is a widely employed term across recent quantitative and qualitative approaches to intersubjectivity, particularly approaches that give embodiment and enaction central explanatory roles. With a focus on linguistic and bodily coordination in conversational contexts, I review the operational meaning of coordination in recent empirical research and related theorizing of embodied intersubjectivity. This discussion articulates what must be involved in treating linguistic meaning as dynamic processes of coordination. The coordination approach presents languaging as a set of dynamic self-organizing processes and actions on multiple timescales and across multiple modalities that come about and work in certain domains (those jointly constructed in social, interactive, high-order sense-making). These processes go beyond meaning at the level that is available to first-person experience. I take one crucial consequence of this to be the ubiquitously moral nature of languaging with others. Languaging coordinates experience, among other levels of behavior and event. Ethical effort is called for by the automatic autonomy-influencing forces of languaging as coordination. PMID:25520693

  17. Interaction forces between asphaltene surfaces in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengqun; Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Liyan; Masliyah, Jacob; Xu, Zhenghe

    2010-01-01

    The colloidal interactions between asphaltene surfaces in heptol, a mixture of n-heptane and toluene, were studied for the first time by colloidal force measurements using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Asphaltenes were deposited on silica wafers and silica spheres using the Langmuir-Blodgett upstroke technique. The results showed that the ratio of toluene to heptane can significantly change solvent quality in terms of the ability to solubilize asphaltenes and hence the nature and the magnitude of the interaction forces between asphaltene surfaces. In pure toluene, there is a steric long-range repulsion which can be well fitted by the scaling theory of polymer brushes. As toluene volume fraction in heptol (Phi(T)) is gradually decreased from Phi(T) = 1 (pure toluene) to Phi(T) = 0 (pure n-heptane), the steric repulsion reduced and changed to weak attraction when Phi(T) < 0.2. The attraction in heptane can be fitted by van der Waals forces alone which are thus believed to promote asphaltene aggregation, leading to asphaltene precipitation. The results obtained in this study provide an insight into interactions that determine asphaltene behavior in an organic medium and hence in crude oils. PMID:19645456

  18. 27 CFR 21.125 - Rubber hydrocarbon solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. 21.125 Section 21.125 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU....125 Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. (a) Rubber hydrocarbon solvent is a petroleum derivative....

  19. 27 CFR 21.125 - Rubber hydrocarbon solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. 21.125 Section 21.125 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU....125 Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. (a) Rubber hydrocarbon solvent is a petroleum derivative....

  20. 27 CFR 21.125 - Rubber hydrocarbon solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. 21.125 Section 21.125 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU....125 Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. (a) Rubber hydrocarbon solvent is a petroleum derivative....

  1. 27 CFR 21.125 - Rubber hydrocarbon solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. 21.125 Section 21.125 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU....125 Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. (a) Rubber hydrocarbon solvent is a petroleum derivative....

  2. 27 CFR 21.125 - Rubber hydrocarbon solvent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. 21.125 Section 21.125 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU....125 Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. (a) Rubber hydrocarbon solvent is a petroleum derivative....

  3. Catalytic coal liquefaction with treated solvent and SRC recycle

    DOEpatents

    Garg, D.; Givens, E.N.; Schweighardt, F.K.

    1986-12-09

    A process is described for the solvent refining of coal to distillable, pentane soluble products using a dephenolated and denitrogenated recycle solvent and a recycled, pentane-insoluble, solvent-refined coal material, which process provides enhanced oil-make in the conversion of coal. 2 figs.

  4. USE OF ORGANIC SOLVENTS IN TEXTILE SIZING AND DESIZING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of textile sizing and desizing in organic solvents. Properties of materials applicable as warp sizes in organic solvents were satisfactory for use as warp sizes. Properties of fabrics made from solvent-sized yarns were equal in quality to those...

  5. 25 CFR 11.451 - Abuse of psychotoxic chemical solvents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Abuse of psychotoxic chemical solvents. 11.451 Section 11... OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.451 Abuse of psychotoxic chemical solvents. (a) It is unlawful to: (1) Intentionally smell or inhale the fumes of any psychotoxic chemical solvent...

  6. 25 CFR 11.451 - Abuse of psychotoxic chemical solvents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Abuse of psychotoxic chemical solvents. 11.451 Section 11... OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.451 Abuse of psychotoxic chemical solvents. (a) It is unlawful to: (1) Intentionally smell or inhale the fumes of any psychotoxic chemical solvent...

  7. 25 CFR 11.451 - Abuse of psychotoxic chemical solvents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Abuse of psychotoxic chemical solvents. 11.451 Section 11... OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.451 Abuse of psychotoxic chemical solvents. (a) It is unlawful to: (1) Intentionally smell or inhale the fumes of any psychotoxic chemical solvent...

  8. 25 CFR 11.451 - Abuse of psychotoxic chemical solvents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Abuse of psychotoxic chemical solvents. 11.451 Section 11... OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.451 Abuse of psychotoxic chemical solvents. (a) It is unlawful to: (1) Intentionally smell or inhale the fumes of any psychotoxic chemical solvent...

  9. 25 CFR 11.451 - Abuse of psychotoxic chemical solvents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Abuse of psychotoxic chemical solvents. 11.451 Section 11... OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.451 Abuse of psychotoxic chemical solvents. (a) It is unlawful to: (1) Intentionally smell or inhale the fumes of any psychotoxic chemical solvent...

  10. Catalytic coal liquefaction with treated solvent and SRC recycle

    DOEpatents

    Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Schweighardt, Frank K. (Allentown, PA)

    1986-01-01

    A process for the solvent refining of coal to distillable, pentane soluble products using a dephenolated and denitrogenated recycle solvent and a recycled, pentane-insoluble, solvent-refined coal material, which process provides enhanced oil-make in the conversion of coal.

  11. 40 CFR 52.1145 - Regulation on organic solvent use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regulation on organic solvent use. 52... on organic solvent use. (a) Definitions: (1) Organic solvents include diluents and thinners and are defined as organic materials which are liquids at standard conditions and which are used as...

  12. 40 CFR 52.1145 - Regulation on organic solvent use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Regulation on organic solvent use. 52... on organic solvent use. (a) Definitions: (1) Organic solvents include diluents and thinners and are defined as organic materials which are liquids at standard conditions and which are used as...

  13. Phosphotungstic acid as a versatile catalyst for the synthesis of fragrance compounds by alpha-pinene oxide isomerization: solvent-induced chemoselectivity.

    PubMed

    da Silva Rocha, Kelly A; Hoehne, Juliana L; Gusevskaya, Elena V

    2008-01-01

    The remarkable effect of the solvent on the catalytic performance of H3PW12O40, the strongest heteropoly acid in the Keggin series, allows direction of the transformations of alpha-pinene oxide (1) to either campholenic aldehyde (2), trans-carveol (3), trans-sobrerol (4 a), or pinol (5). Each of these expensive fragrance compounds was obtained in good to excellent yields by using an appropriate solvent. Solvent polarity and basicity strongly affect the reaction pathways: nonpolar nonbasic solvents favor the formation of aldehyde 2; polar basic solvents favor the formation of alcohol 3; whereas in polar weakly basic solvents, the major products are compounds 4 a and 5. On the other hand, in 1,4-dioxane, which is a nonpolar basic solvent, both aldehyde 2 and alcohol 3 are formed in comparable amounts. The use of very low catalyst loading (0.005-1 mol %) and the possibility of catalyst recovery and recycling without neutralization are significant advantages of this simple, environmentally benign, and low-cost method. This method represents the first example of the synthesis of isomers from alpha-pinene oxide, other than campholenic aldehyde, with a selectivity that is sufficient for practical usage. PMID:18512831

  14. Coordination games, anti-coordination games, and imitative learning.

    PubMed

    McCain, Roger A; Hamilton, Richard

    2014-02-01

    Bentley et al.'s scheme generates distributions characteristic of situations of high and low social influence on decisions and of high and low salience ("transparency") of rewards. Another element of decisions that may influence the placement of a decision process in their map is the way in which individual decisions interact to determine the payoffs. This commentary discusses the role of Nash equilibria in game theory, focusing especially on coordination and anti-coordination games. PMID:24572231

  15. Deep eutectic solvents: sustainable media for nanoscale and functional materials.

    PubMed

    Wagle, Durgesh V; Zhao, Hua; Baker, Gary A

    2014-08-19

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) represent an alternative class of ionic fluids closely resembling room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), although, strictly speaking, they are distinguished by the fact that they also contain an organic molecular component (typically, a hydrogen bond donor like a urea, amide, acid, or polyol), frequently as the predominant constituent. Practically speaking, DESs are attractive alternatives to RTILs, sharing most of their remarkable qualities (e.g., tolerance to humidity, negligible vapor pressure, thermostability, wide electrochemical potential windows, tunability) while overcoming several limitations associated with their RTIL cousins. Particularly, DESs are typically, less expensive, more synthetically accessible (typically, from bulk commodity chemicals using solvent/waste-free processes), nontoxic, and biodegradable. In this Account, we provide an overview of DESs as designer solvents to create well-defined nanomaterials including shape-controlled nanoparticles, electrodeposited films, metal-organic frameworks, colloidal assemblies, hierarchically porous carbons, and DNA/RNA architectures. These breakthroughs illustrate how DESs can fulfill multiple roles in directing chemistry at the nanoscale: acting as supramolecular template, metal/carbon source, sacrificial agent (e.g., ammonia release from urea), and/or redox agent, all in the absence of formal stabilizing ligand (here, solvent and stabilizer are one and the same). The ability to tailor the physicochemical properties of DESs is central to controlling their interfacial behavior. The preorganized "supramolecular" nature of DESs provides a soft template to guide the formation of bimodal porous carbon networks or the evolution of electrodeposits. A number of essential parameters (viscosity, polarity, surface tension, hydrogen bonding), plus coordination with solutes/surfaces, all play significant roles in modulating species reactivity and mass transport properties governing the genesis of nanostructure. Furthermore, DES components may modulate nucleation and growth mechanisms by charge neutralization, modification of reduction potentials (or chemical activities), and passivation of particular crystal faces, dictating growth along preferred crystallographic directions. Broad operational windows for electrochemical reactions coupled with their inherent ionic nature facilitate the electrodeposition of alloys and semiconductors inaccessible to classical means and the use of cosolvents or applied potential control provide under-explored strategies for mediating interfacial interactions leading to control over film characteristics. The biocompatibility of DESs suggests intriguing potential for the construction of biomolecular architectures in these novel media. It has been demonstrated that nucleic acid structures can be manipulated in the ionic, crowded, dehydrating (low water activity) DES environment-including the adoption of duplex helical structures divergent from the canonical B form and parallel G-quadruplex DNA persisting near water's boiling point-challenging the misconception that water is a necessity for maintenance of nucleic acid structure/functionality and suggesting an enticing trajectory toward DNA/RNA-based nanocatalysis within a strictly anhydrous medium. DESs offer tremendous opportunities and open intriguing perspectives for generating sophisticated nanostructures within an anhydrous or low-water medium. We conclude this Account by offering our thoughts on the evolution of the field, pointing to areas of clear and compelling utility which will surely see fruition in the coming years. Finally, we highlight a few hurdles (e.g., need for a universal nomenclature, absence of water-immiscible, oriented-phase, and low-viscosity DESs) which, once navigated, will hasten progress in this area. PMID:24892971

  16. Functionalization of graphene using deep eutectic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayyan, Maan; Abo-Hamad, Ali; AlSaadi, Mohammed AbdulHakim; Hashim, Mohd Ali

    2015-08-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have received attention in various applications because of their distinctive properties. In this work, DESs were used as functionalizing agents for graphene due to their potential to introduce new functional groups and cause other surface modifications. Eighteen different types of ammonium- and phosphonium-salt-based DESs were prepared and characterized by FTIR. The graphene was characterized by FTIR, STA, Raman spectroscopy, XRD, SEM, and TEM. Additional experiments were performed to study the dispersion behavior of the functionalized graphene in different solvents. The DESs exhibited both reduction and functionalization effects on DES-treated graphene. Dispersion stability was investigated and then characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and zeta potential. DES-modified graphene can be used in many applications, such as drug delivery, wastewater treatment, catalysts, composite materials, nanofluids, and biosensors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on the use of DESs for graphene functionalization.

  17. Functionalization of graphene using deep eutectic solvents.

    PubMed

    Hayyan, Maan; Abo-Hamad, Ali; AlSaadi, Mohammed AbdulHakim; Hashim, Mohd Ali

    2015-12-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) have received attention in various applications because of their distinctive properties. In this work, DESs were used as functionalizing agents for graphene due to their potential to introduce new functional groups and cause other surface modifications. Eighteen different types of ammonium- and phosphonium-salt-based DESs were prepared and characterized by FTIR. The graphene was characterized by FTIR, STA, Raman spectroscopy, XRD, SEM, and TEM. Additional experiments were performed to study the dispersion behavior of the functionalized graphene in different solvents. The DESs exhibited both reduction and functionalization effects on DES-treated graphene. Dispersion stability was investigated and then characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and zeta potential. DES-modified graphene can be used in many applications, such as drug delivery, wastewater treatment, catalysts, composite materials, nanofluids, and biosensors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on the use of DESs for graphene functionalization. PMID:26264683

  18. Structuring of polymer solutions upon solvent evaporation.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, C; van der Schoot, P; Michels, J J

    2015-02-01

    The morphology of solution-cast, phase-separated polymers becomes finer with increasing solvent evaporation rate. We address this observation theoretically for a model polymer where demixing is induced by steady solvent evaporation. In contrast to what is the case for a classical, thermal quench involving immiscible blends, the spinodal instability initially develops slowly and the associated length scale is not time invariant but decreases with time as t(-1/2). After a time lag, phase separation accelerates. Time lag and characteristic length exhibit power-law behavior as a function of the evaporation rate with exponents of -2/3 and -1/6. Interestingly, at later stages the spinodal structure disappears completely while a second length scale develops. The associated structure coarsens but does not follow the usual Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner kinetics. PMID:25768523

  19. Redispersity/Solubility of nanopowder in solvents.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunan; Wang, Minmin; Liu, Yan; Cui, Hongtao

    2014-01-01

    Because of the high surface energy, nanoparticles show strong tendency to agglomeration or aggregation during preparations and applications, which thus greatly deteriorate their performance. Investigations have proven that redispersible nanoparticles can exhibit enhanced performances or be used in new technical applications as compared with the non-redispersible nanoparticles. The redispersity or solubility of particles is defined as their ability for re-forming colloid-like suspension after they are redispersed in solvent. The redispersity/solubility of particles can be obtained by establishing compatibility between particles and solvent through various techniques. In this review, we will give summary descriptions about related methods and their mechanism for the fabrication of redispersible or soluble particles. Also, outlook for the development and applications in this area will be given. PMID:24635206

  20. Interfacial chemistry in solvent extraction systems

    SciTech Connect

    Neuman, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Research last year emphasized the nature of microscopic interfaces, i. e., reversed micelles and other association microstructures, which form in both practical and simplified acidic organophosphorus extraction systems associated with Ni, Co and Na in order to improve on a recently proposed model for aggregation of metal-extractant complexes. Also, the macroscopic interfacial behavior of extractant molecules and their interactions with metal ions which occur in hydrometallurgical solvent extraction systems were further investigated.

  1. Solvent extraction of Southern US tar sands

    SciTech Connect

    Penney, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Arkansas, in association with Diversified Petroleum Recovery, Inc. (DPR) of Little Rock, Arkansas, has been developing a solvent extraction process for the recovery of bitumen from tar sands for the past five years. The unique feature of the process is that the bitumen is recovered from the solvent by contacting with a co-solvent, which causes the bitumen to precipitate. The overall purpose of this project is to study both the technical and economic feasibility of applying this technology for recovery of bitumen from tar sands by (1) investigating the socioeconmic factors which affect (a) plant siting and (b) the market value of recovered bitumen; (2) operating a process demonstration unit at the rate of 1 lb/hr recovered bitumen while producing clean sand and recyclable solvents; and (3) determine the economic conditions which will make a bitumen recovery project economical. DPR has analyzed the historical trends of domestic production, consumption, discoveries and reserves of crude oil. They have started an investigation of the volatility in the price of crude oil and of gasoline prices and of the differential between gasoline and crude oil. DPR continues to analyze the geographical movement and demand for asphalt products. Utah does not appear economically attractive as a site for a bitumen from tar sands asphalt plant. Oklahoma sites are now being studied. This report also contains the quarterly progress report from a University of Nevada study to determine bitumen composition, oxygen uptake rates, and viscosities of Alabama and Utah bitumens. Both reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  2. Reducing systematic error in weak lensing cluster surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, Yousuke; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Hamana, Takashi; Geller, Margaret J.; Kurtz, Michael J.; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Dell'Antonio, Ian P.; Oguri, Masamune

    2014-05-10

    Weak lensing provides an important route toward collecting samples of clusters of galaxies selected by mass. Subtle systematic errors in image reduction can compromise the power of this technique. We use the B-mode signal to quantify this systematic error and to test methods for reducing this error. We show that two procedures are efficient in suppressing systematic error in the B-mode: (1) refinement of the mosaic CCD warping procedure to conform to absolute celestial coordinates and (2) truncation of the smoothing procedure on a scale of 10'. Application of these procedures reduces the systematic error to 20% of its original amplitude. We provide an analytic expression for the distribution of the highest peaks in noise maps that can be used to estimate the fraction of false peaks in the weak-lensing ?-signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) maps as a function of the detection threshold. Based on this analysis, we select a threshold S/N = 4.56 for identifying an uncontaminated set of weak-lensing peaks in two test fields covering a total area of ?3 deg{sup 2}. Taken together these fields contain seven peaks above the threshold. Among these, six are probable systems of galaxies and one is a superposition. We confirm the reliability of these peaks with dense redshift surveys, X-ray, and imaging observations. The systematic error reduction procedures we apply are general and can be applied to future large-area weak-lensing surveys. Our high-peak analysis suggests that with an S/N threshold of 4.5, there should be only 2.7 spurious weak-lensing peaks even in an area of 1000 deg{sup 2}, where we expect ?2000 peaks based on our Subaru fields.

  3. Solvent stark effects and spectral shifts. II

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, M; Swain, J; Shum, Y Y; Merin, R; Chen, R H.H.

    1981-03-01

    Solvent shifts of the energies of the lowest /sup 1/L/sub a/ bands of the electronic absorption spectra of anthracene, chrysene, phenanthrene, and tetracene and of the lowest /sup 1/L/sub b/ bands of the electronic absorption spectra of naphthalene, phenanthrene, chrysene, and picene are reported. The origins of these shifts are analyzed in terms of theories developed by Baur and Nicol and by Abe. Satisfactory fits of the experimental data are obtained for theoretical expressions derived from both theories, but discrepancies are observed between the relative magnitudes assigned to the various contributions to the shifts by the two theories. The magnitudes of the parameters of the Baur and Nicol theory, relating solvent shifts to the dielectric constant and refractive index of the solvent, are found to be the same within experimental precision for the /sup 1/L/sub a/ transitions in all of the molecules studied; a similar regularity of the parameters for the /sup 1/L/sub b/ transitions also is observed.

  4. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Nnnn of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the following.../solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass 1....

  5. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Nnnn of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the following.../solvent blend CAS. No. Average organic HAP mass fraction Typical organic HAP, percent by mass 1....

  6. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Mmmm of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction.... If a solvent blend matches both the name and CAS number for an entry, that entry's organic HAP...

  7. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Mmmm of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Part 63—Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction.... If a solvent blend matches both the name and CAS number for an entry, that entry's organic HAP...

  8. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Pppp of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the... solvent blend matches both the name and CAS number for an entry, that entry's organic HAP mass...

  9. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Pppp of... - Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Default Organic HAP Mass Fraction for... Organic HAP Mass Fraction for Solvents and Solvent Blends You may use the mass fraction values in the... solvent blend matches both the name and CAS number for an entry, that entry's organic HAP mass...

  10. QUIP Coordinator Internship Program (QUIP)

    E-print Network

    Fletcher, Robin

    QUIP Coordinator Internship Program (QUIP) Phone: 613-533-6000 Ext. 77324 Fax: 613-533-2535 Email______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Queen's Undergraduate Internship Program (QUIP) #12;JUDGEMENT Unusual ability to develop alternatives

  11. Markov Tracking for Agent Coordination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washington, Richard; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Partially observable Markov decision processes (POMDPs) axe an attractive representation for representing agent behavior, since they capture uncertainty in both the agent's state and its actions. However, finding an optimal policy for POMDPs in general is computationally difficult. In this paper we present Markov Tracking, a restricted problem of coordinating actions with an agent or process represented as a POMDP Because the actions coordinate with the agent rather than influence its behavior, the optimal solution to this problem can be computed locally and quickly. We also demonstrate the use of the technique on sequential POMDPs, which can be used to model a behavior that follows a linear, acyclic trajectory through a series of states. By imposing a "windowing" restriction that restricts the number of possible alternatives considered at any moment to a fixed size, a coordinating action can be calculated in constant time, making this amenable to coordination with complex agents.

  12. Midterm Picnic New CIP Coordinator

    E-print Network

    Sin, Peter

    students! All ELI students, staff, and friends are invited. There will be food, games, sports, and great at the ELI for over 20 years. Everyone now knows Noreen as the Cultural Immersion Program Coordinator

  13. Excited state properties of chlorophyll f in organic solvents at ambient and cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Liu, Haijun; Chen, Min; Blankenship, Robert E

    2014-07-01

    Chlorophyll f is a photosynthetic pigment that was discovered in 2010. In this study, we present investigations on spectral and dynamic characteristics of singlet-excited and triplet states of Chl f with the application of ultrafast time-resolved absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies. The pigment was studied at room temperature in two organic solvents: pyridine and diethyl ether that have different characters of coordination of the chlorophyll magnesium (Mg) atom (hexa- and penta-coordination, respectively). Cryogenic measurements (77 K) were performed in 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (hexa-coordination). The singlet-excited state lifetime was measured to be 5.6 ns at room temperature regardless of Mg coordination and 8.1 ns at 77 K. The fluorescence quantum yield of Chl f was also determined in pyridine to be 0.16. The triplet state lifetime was studied in detail in pyridine at room temperature, and the inherent lifetime was estimated to ~150 ?s. Selective measurements at 77 K demonstrated that the metastability of the triplet state greatly enhances, and its lifetime increases by a factor of more than three. PMID:24549930

  14. Evaluation of solvent selectivity in dewaxing and deoiling

    SciTech Connect

    Al'perovich, N.V.; Leonidov, A.N.; Sokolova, S.P.

    1983-05-01

    Previous literature on the efficiency of solvents used in removing paraffin wax by decrystallization is insufficient. A method for evaluating selectivity and mixtures of solvents is offered. General solvents MEK, acetone, MIBK are tested in various raw materials, then graphed. It is found that the ratio of the slope of the curve for the temperature of equal solubility (TES) as a function of the content of the solvent (that is, the solubility curve) to the slope of the corresponding denormalization curve is constant. This ratio gives a formula, and is therefore a criterion for selectivity. The greater the ratio, the higher the selectivity. The ratio is also generalized to solvents of any composition.

  15. Batch extracting process using magnetic particle held solvents

    DOEpatents

    Nunez, L.; Vandergrift, G.F.

    1995-11-21

    A process is described for selectively removing metal values which may include catalytic values from a mixture containing same, wherein a magnetic particle is contacted with a liquid solvent which selectively dissolves the metal values to absorb the liquid solvent onto the magnetic particle. Thereafter the solvent-containing magnetic particles are contacted with a mixture containing the heavy metal values to transfer metal values into the solvent carried by the magnetic particles, and then magnetically separating the magnetic particles. Ion exchange resins may be used for selective solvents. 5 figs.

  16. Theoretical and experimental study of mixed solvent electrolytes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    P.T. Cummings; J.P. O'Connell

    1995-01-31

    The goals of the research program evolved into six areas: Molecular simulation of phase equilibria in aqueous and mixed solvent electrolyte solutions. Molecular simulation of solvation and structure in supercritical aqueous systems. Extension of experimental database on mixed solvent electrolytes. Analysis of the thermodynamic properties of mixed solvent electrolyte solutions and mixed electrolyte solutions using fluctuation solution theory. Development of analytic expressions for thermodynamic properties of mixed solvent electrolyte solutions using analytically solved integral equation approximations. Fundamental modeling of mixed solvent electrolytes using numerically solved integral equation approximation theories.

  17. Evaluating non-chlorinated solvents for welding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustaleski, T. M., Jr.

    1993-08-01

    There is interest in eliminating the use of chlorinated solvents such as methyl chloroform at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for environmental reasons. Solvent 140 has been offered as an acceptable replacement. Methyl chloroform has frequently been used for the final cleaning of materials just prior to welding. Electron beam welds were made in an aluminum alloy to compare the potential contamination effect of Solvent 140 to that of methyl chloroform. Tests indicated that the Solvent 140 did not have an adverse effect on pump-down time of electron beam welding equipment during normal handling. Solvent 140 resulted in significantly less weld porosity than methyl chloroform in this test.

  18. Definition and determination of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate

    SciTech Connect

    Zapata, Felipe; Marazzi, Marco; Castaño, Obis; Frutos, Luis Manuel; Acuña, A. Ulises

    2014-01-21

    A definition of the triplet-triplet energy transfer reaction coordinate within the very weak electronic coupling limit is proposed, and a novel theoretical formalism is developed for its quantitative determination in terms of internal coordinates The present formalism permits (i) the separation of donor and acceptor contributions to the reaction coordinate, (ii) the identification of the intrinsic role of donor and acceptor in the triplet energy transfer process, and (iii) the quantification of the effect of every internal coordinate on the transfer process. This formalism is general and can be applied to classical as well as to nonvertical triplet energy transfer processes. The utility of the novel formalism is demonstrated here by its application to the paradigm of nonvertical triplet-triplet energy transfer involving cis-stilbene as acceptor molecule. In this way the effect of each internal molecular coordinate in promoting the transfer rate, from triplet donors in the low and high-energy limit, could be analyzed in detail.

  19. 78 FR 57128 - Forest Resource Coordinating Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-17

    ... Forest Service Forest Resource Coordinating Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Forest Resource Coordinating Committee Meeting will meet in Rosslyn, Virginia. The... inspect comments received on the Forest Resource Coordinating Committee Web site at...

  20. 78 FR 44519 - Forest Resource Coordinating Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... Office of the Secretary Forest Resource Coordinating Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice; Re-establishment of the Forest Resource Coordinating Committee and call for nominations. SUMMARY: The Department of Agriculture re-established the Forest Resource Coordinating Committee...

  1. 78 FR 34035 - Forest Resource Coordinating Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... Forest Service Forest Resource Coordinating Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Forest Resource Coordinating Committee will meet via teleconference every month on... conference call will be posted to the Forest Resource Coordinating Committee Web site,...

  2. COMPUTER AIDED SOLVENT DESIGN FOR POLLUTION PREVENTION - PARIS II (SYSTEMS ANALYSIS BRANCH, SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGY DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This method was designed to facilitate the replacement of environmentally objectionable industrial solvents by using computer aided methods to design benign replacement solvents or solvent mixtures. The method generates a short list of recommended replacement solvents or mixtures...

  3. Solvent constraints on the property space of acetylcholine. I. Isotropic solvents.

    PubMed

    Vistoli, Giulio; Pedretti, Alessandro; Villa, Luigi; Testa, Bernard

    2005-03-24

    The objective of this study was, first, to examine the property space of a test molecule and, second, to assess solvent constraints. Acetylcholine was chosen as the object of study given its interesting molecular structure and major biological significance. Molecular dynamics simulations of long duration (30 ns) were carried out with acetylcholine in a vacuum or in a box of solvent (chloroform, water, water plus one chloride counterion). For each of the 6000 conformers stored during each run, various geometric and physicochemical properties were calculated, namely, N(+)-C8 distance, solvent-accessible surface area (SAS), polar surface area (PSA), dipole moment, and lipophilicity (virtual log P). The variations of these properties as a function of the dihedral angles tau(2) and tau(3) were unexpectedly broad for such a small molecule. Dipole moment and virtual log P were well correlated, and they varied in a complex manner with the dihedral angles. For example, each of the seven conformational clusters was able to access much of the lipophilicity space of acetylcholine. Solvent constraints on the property space clearly indicate that a polar medium tends to favor polar conformers, whereas the opposite is true for a solvent of low polarity. PMID:15771422

  4. Nonhazardous solvent composition and method for cleaning metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Simandl, Ronald F. (Farragut, TN); Thompson, Lisa M. (Knoxville, TN)

    1993-01-01

    A solvent composition for displacing greasy and oily contaminants as well as water and/or aqueous residue from metallic surfaces, especially surfaces of radioactive materials so that such surfaces can be wiped clean of the displaced contaminants, water and/or aqueous residue. The solvent composition consists essentially of a blend of nonpolar aliphatic hydrocarbon solvent having a minimum flash point of about 140.degree. F. and 2 to 25 volume percent of a polar solvent having a flash point sufficiently high so as to provide the solvent composition with a minimum flash point of at least 140.degree. F. The solvent composition is nonhazardous so that when it is used to clean the surfaces of radioactive materials the waste in the form of paper or cloth wipes, lab coats and the like used in the cleaning operation is not considered to be mixed waste composed of a hazardous solvent and a radioactive material.

  5. Nonhazardous solvent composition and method for cleaning metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Googin, J.M.; Simandl, R.F.; Thompson, L.M.

    1993-05-04

    A solvent composition for displacing greasy and oily contaminants as well as water and/or aqueous residue from metallic surfaces, especially surfaces of radioactive materials so that such surfaces can be wiped clean of the displaced contaminants, water and/or aqueous residue. The solvent composition consists essentially of a blend of nonpolar aliphatic hydrocarbon solvent having a minimum flash point of about 140 F and 2 to 25 volume percent of a polar solvent having a flash point sufficiently high so as to provide the solvent composition with a minimum flash point of at least 140 F. The solvent composition is nonhazardous so that when it is used to clean the surfaces of radioactive materials the waste in the form of paper or cloth wipes, lab coats and the like used in the cleaning operation is not considered to be mixed waste composed of a hazardous solvent and a radioactive material.

  6. Dynamic structural transformations of coordination supramolecular systems upon exogenous stimulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Peng; Chen, Jing; Liu, Chun-Sen; Du, Miao

    2015-02-18

    Reactions in the solid state, especially single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SC-SC) transformations, provide an appealing pathway to obtain target crystalline materials with modified properties via a solvent-free green chemistry approach. This feature article focuses on the progress to date in the context of coordination supramolecular systems (CSSs), especially coordination polymers (CPs) or metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), which show interesting dynamic natures upon exposure to various exogenous stimuli, including concentration, temperature, light and mechanical force, as well as their synergic effect. In essence, dynamic CSSs normally possess crucial crystalline-reactive characteristics: (i) metal ions or clusters with unstable or metastable electronic configurations and coordination geometries; (ii) organic ligands bearing physicochemically active functional groups for subsequent reactions; (iii) polymeric networks of high flexibility for structural bending, rotation, swelling, or shrinking; (iv) guest moieties to be freely exchanged or eliminated by varying the environmental conditions. The significant changes in catalytic, sorption, magnetic, or luminescent properties accompanied by the structural transformations will also be discussed, which reveal the proof-of-concept thereof in designing new functional crystalline materials. PMID:25501443

  7. Multidimensional treatment of stochastic solvent dynamics in photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer processes: Sequential, concerted, and complex branching mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soudackov, Alexander V.; Hazra, Anirban; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-10-01

    A theoretical approach for the multidimensional treatment of photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) processes in solution is presented. This methodology is based on the multistate continuum theory with an arbitrary number of diabatic electronic states representing the relevant charge distributions in a general PCET system. The active electrons and transferring proton(s) are treated quantum mechanically, and the electron-proton vibronic free energy surfaces are represented as functions of multiple scalar solvent coordinates corresponding to the single electron and proton transfer reactions involved in the PCET process. A dynamical formulation of the dielectric continuum theory is used to derive a set of coupled generalized Langevin equations of motion describing the time evolution of these collective solvent coordinates. The parameters in the Langevin equations depend on the solvent properties, such as the dielectric constants, relaxation time, and molecular moment of inertia, as well as the solute properties. The dynamics of selected intramolecular nuclear coordinates, such as the proton donor-acceptor distance or a torsional angle within the PCET complex, may also be included in this formulation. A surface hopping method in conjunction with the Langevin equations of motion is used to simulate the nonadiabatic dynamics on the multidimensional electron-proton vibronic free energy surfaces following photoexcitation. This theoretical treatment enables the description of both sequential and concerted mechanisms, as well as more complex processes involving a combination of these mechanisms. The application of this methodology to a series of model systems corresponding to collinear and orthogonal PCET illustrates fundamental aspects of these different mechanisms and elucidates the significance of proton vibrational relaxation and nonequilibrium solvent dynamics.

  8. From neutral currents to weak vector bosons

    E-print Network

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    12 From neutral currents to weak vector bosons The unification of weak and electromagnetic is an isosinglet. The Higgs mechanism is invoked to give mass to the W bosons. At the same time, the two neutral

  9. Reversing entanglement change by a weak measurement 

    E-print Network

    Sun, Qingqing; Al-Amri, M.; Davidovich, Luiz; Zubairy, M. Suhail.

    2010-01-01

    into a weak measurement. Here we show that the entanglement change of a two-qubit state due to amplitude damping or weak measurement can be probabilistically reversed. For the amplitude-damping case, the entanglement partially recovers under most...

  10. 7 CFR 51.894 - Weak.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...VEGETABLES AND OTHER PRODUCTS 1,2 (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Table Grapes (European or Vinifera Type) 1 Definitions § 51.894 Weak. Weak means that individual berries are somewhat...

  11. Effect of metal coordination on photocurrent response properties of a tetrathiafulvalene organogel film.

    PubMed

    Ji, Shu-Fang; Sun, Yong-Gang; Huo, Peng; Shen, Wei-Chun; Huang, Yu-De; Zhu, Qin-Yu; Dai, Jie

    2014-04-01

    Organic low molecular weight gelators with a tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) unit have received considerable attention because the formed gels usually exhibit redox active response and conducting or semiconducting properties. However, to our knowledge, metal coordination systems have not been reported for TTF-derived gels up to date. We have designed and synthesized a series of TTF derivatives with a diamide-diamino moiety that can coordinate to specific metal ions with square coordination geometry. Gelation properties and morphologies of the films prepared by the gelators in different hydrophobic solvents are characterized. The TTF derivative with a dodecyl group shows effective gelation properties, and electrodes with the organogel films are prepared. The effect of the Ni(II) and Cu(II) coordination on the photocurrent response property of the electrodes is examined. The metal square coordination significantly increases the photocurrent response. This gel system is the first metal coordination related TTF-gel-based photoelectric material. The mechanism of the metal coordination-improved photocurrent response property is discussed based on the crystal structural analysis and theoretical calculations. PMID:24646411

  12. Low-overhead distributed transaction coordination

    E-print Network

    Cowling, James (James Alexander)

    2012-01-01

    This thesis presents Granola, a transaction coordination infrastructure for building reliable distributed storage applications. Granola provides a strong consistency model, while significantly reducing transaction coordination ...

  13. Electromagnetic weak turbulence theory revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, P. H.; Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R.; Pavan, J.

    2012-10-15

    The statistical mechanical reformulation of weak turbulence theory for unmagnetized plasmas including fully electromagnetic effects was carried out by Yoon [Phys. Plasmas 13, 022302 (2006)]. However, the wave kinetic equation for the transverse wave ignores the nonlinear three-wave interaction that involves two transverse waves and a Langmuir wave, the incoherent analogue of the so-called Raman scattering process, which may account for the third and higher-harmonic plasma emissions. The present paper extends the previous formalism by including such a term.

  14. Weak ? production off the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M. Rafi; Athar, M. Sajjad; Alvarez-Ruso, L.; Vacas, M. J. Vicente

    2015-05-15

    The weak ?-meson production off the nucleon induced by (anti)neutrinos is studied at low and intermediate energies, the range of interest for several ongoing and future neutrino experiments. We consider Born diagrams and the excitation of N{sup *} (1535)S{sub 11} and N{sup *} (1650)S{sub 11} resonances. The vector part of the N-S{sub 11} transition form factors has been obtained from the MAID helicity amplitudes while the poorly known axial part is constrained with the help of the partial conservation of the axial current (PCAC) and assuming the pion-pole dominance of the pseudoscalar form factor.

  15. Single Stage Contactor Testing Of The Next Generation Solvent Blend

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, D. T.; Peters, T. B.; Duignan, M. R.; Williams, M. R.; Poirier, M. R.; Brass, E. A.; Garrison, A. G.; Ketusky, E. T.

    2014-01-06

    The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is actively pursuing the transition from the current BOBCalixC6 based solvent to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS)-MCU solvent to increase the cesium decontamination factor. To support this integration of NGS into the MCU facility the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed testing of a blend of the NGS (MaxCalix based solvent) with the current solvent (BOBCalixC6 based solvent) for the removal of cesium (Cs) from the liquid salt waste stream. This testing utilized a blend of BOBCalixC6 based solvent and the NGS with the new extractant, MaxCalix, as well as a new suppressor, tris(3,7dimethyloctyl) guanidine. Single stage tests were conducted using the full size V-05 and V-10 liquid-to-liquid centrifugal contactors installed at SRNL. These tests were designed to determine the mass transfer and hydraulic characteristics with the NGS solvent blended with the projected heel of the BOBCalixC6 based solvent that will exist in MCU at time of transition. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the organic carryover phases using several analytical methods. The results indicate that hydraulically, the NGS solvent performed hydraulically similar to the current solvent which was expected. For the organic carryover 93% of the solvent is predicted to be recovered from the stripping operation and 96% from the extraction operation. As for the mass transfer, the NGS solvent significantly improved the cesium DF by at least an order of magnitude when extrapolating the One-stage results to actual Seven-stage extraction operation with a stage efficiency of 95%.

  16. The Method of Strained Coordinates for Vibrations with Weak Unilateral Springs

    E-print Network

    Junca, Stéphane

    - eral spring, approximate nonlinear normal mode. Mathematics Subject Classification. Primary: 34E15 or the Lindstedt method. It is a simple and efficient method which gives approximate nonlinear normal modes for approximate nonlinear normal modes, then, with less accuracy with all modes. We check numerically

  17. Conforming to coordinate: children use majority information for peer coordination.

    PubMed

    Grueneisen, Sebastian; Wyman, Emily; Tomasello, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Humans are constantly required to coordinate their behaviour with others. As this often relies on everyone's convergence on the same strategy (e.g., driving on the left side of the road), a common solution is to conform to majority behaviour. In this study, we presented 5-year-old children with a coordination problem: To retrieve some rewards, they had to choose the same of four options as a peer partner--in reality a stooge--whose decision they were unable to see. Before making a choice, they watched a video showing how other children from their partner's peer group had behaved; a majority chose the same option and a minority chose a different one. In a control condition, children watched the same video but could then retrieve the reward irrespective of their partner's choice (i.e., no coordination was necessary). Children followed the majority more often when coordination was required. Moreover, conformers mostly justified their choices by referring to the majority from the video demonstration. This study is the first to show that young children are able to strategically coordinate decisions with peers by conforming to the majority. PMID:25495153

  18. Structural Assessment and Catalytic Consequences of the Oxygen Coordination Environment in Grafted Ti-Calixarenes

    E-print Network

    Iglesia, Enrique

    Ti- calix[4]arenes were weakly dependent on thermal treatment below 573 K, and the relative-visible spectroscopies confirmed the presence of Ti-O-Si connectivity and identical ligand-to-metal transitions. Grafted centers are electron deficient and can expand their coordination to bind oxidants or substrates

  19. Developmental Co-Ordination Disorder (DCD) in Adolescents and Adults in Further and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Amanda; Sugden, David; Beveridge, Sally; Edwards, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Few studies have looked at the strengths and weaknesses and needs of students with developmental co-ordination disorder (DCD). This paper describes a cohort of 93 UK students currently studying at further or higher education and who have reported motor difficulties present since childhood. The study group consisted of 21 reporting to have DCD…

  20. Behaviour of water bound in bone marrow cells affected by organic solvents of different polarity.

    PubMed

    Turov, Vladimir V; Kerus, Sergey V; Gun'ko, Vladimir M

    2009-08-01

    The behaviour of intracellular water affected by organic solvents of different polarity in partially dehydrated marrow cells obtained from tubular bones of broiler chickens was studied using (1)H NMR spectroscopy at 210-290K. The (1)H NMR spectra of intracellular water include two signals which can be assigned to strongly (SAW, chemical shift of the proton resonance delta(H)=4-5ppm) and weakly (WAW, delta(H)=1.2-1.7ppm) associated waters which can be also divided into weakly (WBW, frozen at 250-0.8kJ/mol) and strongly (SBW, unfrozen at T<250K, DeltaG<-0.8kJ/mol) bound intracellular waters. Solvents of different polarity such as dimethylsulfoxide-d(6) (Me(2)SO-d(6)), acetonitrile-d(3), and chloroform-d differently affect structure, Gibbs free energy, and molecular mobility of intracellular water. A maximal fraction of SBW in WAW and a minimal fraction of SBW in SAW are observed on absorption of acetonitrile (0.8g/g) by cells. The opposite results are on addition of Me(2)SO (0.8g/g) which strongly changes organisation of intracellular water and enhances the freezing point depression of SBW. PMID:19481072

  1. Quantum Weak Measurements and Cosmology

    E-print Network

    Paul Davies

    2013-09-03

    The indeterminism of quantum mechanics generally permits the independent specification of both an initial and a final condition on the state. Quantum pre-and-post-selection of states opens up a new, experimentally testable, sector of quantum mechanics, when combined with statistical averages of identical weak measurements. In this paper I apply the theory of weak quantum measurements combined with pre-and-post-selection to cosmology. Here, pre-selection means specifying the wave function of the universe or, in a popular semi-classical approximation, the initial quantum state of a subset of quantum fields propagating in a classical back-ground spacetime. The novel feature is post-selection: the additional specification of a condition on the quantum state in the far future. I discuss "natural" final conditions, and show how they may lead to potentially large and observable effects at the present cosmological epoch. I also discuss how pre-and-post-selected quantum contrast to the expectation value of the stress-energy-momentum tensor, resolving a vigorous debate from the 1970's. The paper thus provides a framework for computing large-scale cosmological effects arising from this new sector of quantum mechanics. A simple experimental test is proposed.

  2. Weak D in the Tunisian population

    PubMed Central

    Ouchari, Mouna; Romdhane, Houda; Chakroun, Taher; Abdelkefi, Saida; Houissa, Batoul; Hmida, Slama; Yacoub, Saloua Jemni

    2015-01-01

    Background More than 90 weak D types have been discovered to date. As there are no published data on the frequencies of weak D types in the Tunisian population, the aim of this study was to determine the composition of weak D alleles in our population. Material and methods Blood samples from 1777 D+ and 223 D? blood donors were tested for markers 809G, 1154C, 8G, 602G, 667G, 446A, and 885T relative to translation start codon by polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers to estimate the frequencies of weak D type 1, weak D type 2, weak D type 3, weak D type 4, weak D type 5 and weak D type 11 in our population. Twenty-three samples with positive reactions were re-evaluated by DNA sequencing of RHD exons 1–10 and adjacent intronic sequences. Results Among the D+ donor cohort, weak D type 4 was the most prevalent allele (n=33, 1.2%) followed by weak D type 2 (n=6, 0.17%), weak D type 1 (n=4, 0.11%), and weak D type 5 (n=1, 0.28%) and weak D type 11 (n=1, 0.28%). RHD sequencing identified a weak D type 4.0 allele in all 19 samples tested. Among the D? pool, comprising 223 samples, we detected one sample with weak D type 4.0 associated with a C+c+E?e+ phenotype which had been missed by routine serological methods. Discussion Weak D type 4.0 appears to be the most prevalent weak D in our population. However, all samples must be sequenced in order to determine the exact subtype of weak D type 4, since weak D type 4.2 has considerable clinical importance, being associated with anti-D alloimmunisation. One case of weak D type 4 associated with dCe in trans had been missed by serology, so quality control of serological tests should be developed in our country. PMID:25369614

  3. Refractive index measured by laser beam displacement at {lambda}=1064 nm for solvents and deuterated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, David P.

    2011-07-20

    The refractive index of a liquid is determined with 0.0003 accuracy from measurements of laser beam displacement by a liquid-filled standard 10 mm spectrophotometer cell. The apparatus and methods are described and the results of measurements at {lambda}=1064 nm and T=25.0 deg. C for 30 solvents and deuterated solvents are presented. Several sources of potential systematic errors as large as 0.003 are identified, the most important being the curvature of the liquid cell windows. The measurements are analyzed accounting for the significant imperfections of the apparatus.

  4. Effect of organic solvents on particle size of Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles synthesized by a solvothermal method

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Rui; Feng, Shouhua; Wang, Hongjun; Hou, Changmin

    2013-06-15

    In this paper, a modified simple solvothermal method is employed to synthesize Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocrystals using four different solvents: acetone, ethanol, N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with a tetragonal hausmannite nano-structure are characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), as well as superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer (SQUID). The Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} particle size is found to have a strong dependency on the solvent used. A reaction scheme is proposed to understand this dependency, suggesting that the solvent coordinating capability has a critical effect on Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} particle size. The stronger the coordinating capability of the solvent is, the smaller the Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} particle size is. In addition, magnetic properties of the nano-structured Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} are also tested and discussed. - Graphical abstract: The comparison of the particle size of Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles synthesized using different solvents and HRTEM image of Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} individual nanoparticle revealed its single-crystal nature. - Highlights: • Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocrystals were synthesized using different solvents by a solvothermal method. • The particle size of Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocrystal is found to have a strong dependency on the solvent used. • A reaction mechanism is proposed to explain the difference of particle size of Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocrystals. • Magnetic properties of Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanocrystals with different particle size are tested and compared.

  5. Promoting Coordination for Disaster Relief - From Crowdsourcing to Coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Huiji; Wang, Xufei; Barbier, Geoffrey; Liu, Huan

    The efficiency at which governments and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are able to respond to a crisis and provide relief to victims has gained increased attention. This emphasis coincides with significant events such as tsunamis, hurricanes, earthquakes, and environmental disasters occuring during the last decade. Crowdsourcing applications such as Twitter, Ushahidi, and Sahana have proven useful for gathering information about a crisis yet have limited utility for response coordination. In this paper, we briefly describe the shortfalls of current crowdsourcing applications applied to disaster relief coordination and discuss one approach aimed at facilitating efficient collaborations amongst disparate organizations responding to a crisis.

  6. Scenarios Evaluation Tool for Chlorinated Solvent MNA

    SciTech Connect

    Vangelas, Karen; Michael J. Truex; Charles J. Newell; Brian Looney

    2007-02-28

    Over the past three decades, much progress has been made in the remediation of chlorinated solvents from the subsurface. Yet these pervasive contaminants continue to present a significant challenge to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), other federal agencies, and other public and private organizations. The physical and chemical properties of chlorinated solvents make it difficult to rapidly reach the low concentrations typically set as regulatory limits. These technical challenges often result in high costs and long remediation time frames. In 2003, the DOE through the Office of Environmental Management funded a science-based technical project that uses the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's technical protocol (EPA, 1998) and directives (EPA, 1999) on Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) as the foundation on which to introduce supporting concepts and new scientific developments that will support remediation of chlorinated solvents based on natural attenuation processes. This project supports the direction in which many site owners want to move to complete the remediation of their site(s), that being to complete the active treatment portion of the remedial effort and transition into MNA. The overarching objective of the effort was to examine environmental remedies that are based on natural processes--remedies such as Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) or Enhanced Attenuation (EA). The research program did identify several specific opportunities for advances based on: (1) mass balance as the central framework for attenuation based remedies, (2) scientific advancements and achievements during the past ten years, (3) regulatory and policy development and real-world experience using MNA, and (4) exploration of various ideas for integrating attenuation remedies into a systematic set of ''combined remedies'' for contaminated sites. These opportunities are summarized herein and are addressed in more detail in referenced project documents and journal articles, as well as in the technical and regulatory documents being developed within the ITRC.

  7. Conformation of a Lennard-Jones polymer in explicit solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yuting; Taylor, Mark

    2012-04-01

    The conformation of a polymer chain is solution is coupled to the local structure of the surrounding solvent and can undergo large changes in response to variations in solvent density and temperature. The many-body effects of solvent on the structure of an n-mer chain can be formally mapped to an exact n-body solvation potential. These potentials map the chain-solvent system to a single chain, thereby dramatically reducing the computational complexity of the polymer chain-in-solvent problem. We have recently shown that a pair-decomposition of this n-body potential is valid for short Lennard-Jones (LJ) chains in explicit LJ solvent [1]. Here we use these short chain results to construct solvation potentials for long chains. We present results for the size and intramolecular structure of LJ chains up to length n=400 in LJ solvent at state points spanning the solvent phase diagram (including vapor, liquid, and super-critical regions). In comparison with simulation results for the corresponding full chain-in-solvent system, our solvation potential approach is found to be quantitatively accurate for a wide range of solvent conditions and chain lengths.[4pt] [1] M.P. Taylor and S.R. Adhikari, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 044903 (2011).

  8. Nonflammable, Nonaqueous, Low Atmospheric Impact, High Performance Cleaning Solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhooge, P. M.; Glass, S. M.; Nimitz, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    For many years, chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and chlorocarbon solvents have played an important part in aerospace operations. These solvents found extensive use as cleaning and analysis (EPA) solvents in precision and critical cleaning. However, CFCs and chlorocarbon solvents have deleterious effects on the ozone layer, are relatively strong greenhouse gases, and some are suspect or known carcinogens. Because of their ozone-depletion potential (ODP), the Montreal Protocol and its amendments, as well as other environmental regulations, have resulted in the phaseout of CFC-113 and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA). Although alternatives have been recommended, they do not perform as well as the original solvents. In addition, some analyses, such as the infrared analysis of extracted hydrocarbons, cannot be performed with the substitute solvents that contain C-H bonds. CFC-113 solvent has been used for many critical aerospace applications. CFC-113, also known as Freon (registered) TF, has been used extensively in NASA's cleaning facilities for precision and critical cleaning, in particular the final rinsing in Class 100 areas, with gas chromatography analysis of rinse residue. While some cleaning can be accomplished by other processes, there are certain critical applications where CFC-113 or a similar solvent is highly cost-effective and ensures safety. Oxygen system components are one example where a solvent compatible with oxygen and capable of removing fluorocarbon grease is needed. Electronic components and precision mechanical components can also be damaged by aggressive cleaning solvents.

  9. Membrane separation of hydrocarbons using cycloparaffinic solvents

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, S.S.; Chang, Y.A.; Gatsis, J.G.; Funk, E.W.

    1988-06-14

    Heavy crude oils which contain metal contaminants such as nickel, vanadium and iron may be separated from light hydrocarbon oils by passing a solution of the crude oil dissolved in a cycloparaffinic hydrocarbon solvent containing from about 5 to about 8 carbon atoms by passing through a polymeric membrane which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds. The light hydrocarbon oils which possess relatively low molecular weights will be recovered as the permeate while the heavy oils which possess relatively high molecular weights as well as the metal contaminants will be recovered as the retentate.

  10. Membrane separation of hydrocarbons using cycloparaffinic solvents

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Sudhir S. (Hoffman Estates, IL); Chang, Y. Alice (Westmont, IL); Gatsis, John G. (Des Plaines, IL); Funk, Edward W. (Highland Park, IL)

    1988-01-01

    Heavy crude oils which contain metal contaminants such as nickel, vanadium and iron may be separated from light hydrocarbon oils by passing a solution of the crude oil dissolved in a cycloparaffinic hydrocarbon solvent containing from about 5 to about 8 carbon atoms by passing through a polymeric membrane which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds. The light hydrocarbon oils which possess relatively low molecular weights will be recovered as the permeate while the heavy oils which possess relatively high molecular weights as well as the metal contaminants will be recovered as the retentate.

  11. Non-representative Quantum Mechanical Weak Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, B. E. Y.

    2015-09-01

    The operational definition of a weak value for a quantum mechanical system involves the limit of the weak measurement strength tending to zero. I study how this limit compares to the situation for the undisturbed (no weak measurement) system. Under certain conditions, which I investigate, this limit is discontinuous in the sense that it does not merge smoothly to the Hilbert space description of the undisturbed system. Hence, in these discontinuous cases, the weak value does not represent the undisturbed system. As a result, conclusions drawn from such weak values regarding the properties of the studied system cannot be upheld. Examples are given.

  12. Non-representative Quantum Mechanical Weak Values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, B. E. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The operational definition of a weak value for a quantum mechanical system involves the limit of the weak measurement strength tending to zero. I study how this limit compares to the situation for the undisturbed (no weak measurement) system. Under certain conditions, which I investigate, this limit is discontinuous in the sense that it does not merge smoothly to the Hilbert space description of the undisturbed system. Hence, in these discontinuous cases, the weak value does not represent the undisturbed system. As a result, conclusions drawn from such weak values regarding the properties of the studied system cannot be upheld. Examples are given.

  13. Essential roles of protein-solvent many-body correlation in solvent-entropy effect on protein folding and denaturation: Comparison between hard-sphere solvent and water

    SciTech Connect

    Oshima, Hiraku; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2015-04-14

    In earlier works, we showed that the entropic effect originating from the translational displacement of water molecules plays the pivotal role in protein folding and denaturation. The two different solvent models, hard-sphere solvent and model water, were employed in theoretical methods wherein the entropic effect was treated as an essential factor. However, there were similarities and differences in the results obtained from the two solvent models. In the present work, to unveil the physical origins of the similarities and differences, we simultaneously consider structural transition, cold denaturation, and pressure denaturation for the same protein by employing the two solvent models and considering three different thermodynamic states for each solvent model. The solvent-entropy change upon protein folding/unfolding is decomposed into the protein-solvent pair (PA) and many-body (MB) correlation components using the integral equation theories. Each component is further decomposed into the excluded-volume (EV) and solvent-accessible surface (SAS) terms by applying the morphometric approach. The four physically insightful constituents, (PA, EV), (PA, SAS), (MB, EV), and (MB, SAS), are thus obtained. Moreover, (MB, SAS) is discussed by dividing it into two factors. This all-inclusive investigation leads to the following results: (1) the protein-water many-body correlation always plays critical roles in a variety of folding/unfolding processes; (2) the hard-sphere solvent model fails when it does not correctly reproduce the protein-water many-body correlation; (3) the hard-sphere solvent model becomes problematic when the dependence of the many-body correlation on the solvent number density and temperature is essential: it is not quite suited to studies on cold and pressure denaturating of a protein; (4) when the temperature and solvent number density are limited to the ambient values, the hard-sphere solvent model is usually successful; and (5) even at the ambient values, however, the many-body correlation plays significant roles in the ?-sheet formation and argument of relative stabilities of very similar structures of a protein. These results are argued in detail with respect to the four physically insightful constituents and the two factors mentioned above. The relevance to the absence or presence of hydrogen-bonding properties in the solvent is also discussed in detail.

  14. Essential roles of protein-solvent many-body correlation in solvent-entropy effect on protein folding and denaturation: Comparison between hard-sphere solvent and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Hiraku; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2015-04-01

    In earlier works, we showed that the entropic effect originating from the translational displacement of water molecules plays the pivotal role in protein folding and denaturation. The two different solvent models, hard-sphere solvent and model water, were employed in theoretical methods wherein the entropic effect was treated as an essential factor. However, there were similarities and differences in the results obtained from the two solvent models. In the present work, to unveil the physical origins of the similarities and differences, we simultaneously consider structural transition, cold denaturation, and pressure denaturation for the same protein by employing the two solvent models and considering three different thermodynamic states for each solvent model. The solvent-entropy change upon protein folding/unfolding is decomposed into the protein-solvent pair (PA) and many-body (MB) correlation components using the integral equation theories. Each component is further decomposed into the excluded-volume (EV) and solvent-accessible surface (SAS) terms by applying the morphometric approach. The four physically insightful constituents, (PA, EV), (PA, SAS), (MB, EV), and (MB, SAS), are thus obtained. Moreover, (MB, SAS) is discussed by dividing it into two factors. This all-inclusive investigation leads to the following results: (1) the protein-water many-body correlation always plays critical roles in a variety of folding/unfolding processes; (2) the hard-sphere solvent model fails when it does not correctly reproduce the protein-water many-body correlation; (3) the hard-sphere solvent model becomes problematic when the dependence of the many-body correlation on the solvent number density and temperature is essential: it is not quite suited to studies on cold and pressure denaturating of a protein; (4) when the temperature and solvent number density are limited to the ambient values, the hard-sphere solvent model is usually successful; and (5) even at the ambient values, however, the many-body correlation plays significant roles in the ?-sheet formation and argument of relative stabilities of very similar structures of a protein. These results are argued in detail with respect to the four physically insightful constituents and the two factors mentioned above. The relevance to the absence or presence of hydrogen-bonding properties in the solvent is also discussed in detail.

  15. Effects of anharmonicity on diffusive-controlled symmetric electron transfer rates: From the weak to the strong electronic coupling regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenjuan; Zhao, Yi

    2008-11-01

    The approach for the diffusive-controlled electron transfer rates [W. Zhu and Y. Zhao, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 184105 (2007)], which is modeled after the Sumi-Marcus theory, is applied to symmetric electron-transfer reactions in a solvent environment with anharmonic potential functions. The electron-transfer rates are evaluated using the quantum R-matrix theory for dealing with the intramolecular vibrational motions and imaginary-time split operator technique for solving the diffusive equations, thereby taking explicit account of the weak-to-strong electronic couplings. The effect of anharmonicity for both the solvent and intramolecular vibrational degrees of freedom are investigated. It is found that the anharmonicity of the intramolecular modes always enhances the rate while the solvent anharmonicity decreases the rate, compared with the harmonic modes. The possible mechanisms have been clarified.

  16. Coupling dynamics in interlimb coordination.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, R C; Shaw, B K; Turvey, M T

    1993-04-01

    In 1:1 frequency locking, the interlimb phase difference phi is an order parameter quantifying the spatial-temporal organization of 2 rhythmic subsystems. Dynamical modeling and experimental analyses indicate that an intentional parameter phi psi (intended coordination mode, phi = 0 degrees or phi = 180 degrees) and 2 control parameters omega c (coupled frequency) and delta omega (difference between uncoupled eigen-frequencies) affect phi. An experiment was conducted on 1:1 frequency locking in which phi psi, omega c, and delta omega were manipulated using a paradigm in which a person swings hand-held pendulums. As delta omega deviated from 0, the observed phi deviated from the phi psi, indicating a displacement in the phi attractor point. The displacements were exaggerated by increasing omega c. The displacements were coordinated with a decrease in the stability of phi and with higher harmonics in power spectrum of phi. Implications of the results for modeling interlimb coordination are discussed. PMID:8473847

  17. Solvent effects on spectrophotometric titrations and vibrational spectroscopy of 5,10,15-triphenyl-20-(4-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin in aqueous DMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hongwei; Jiang, Junguang; Shi, Yingyan; Wang, Yuling; Dong, Shaojun

    2007-05-01

    The spectrophotometric titration by sodium hydroxide of 5,10,15-triphenyl-20-(4-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin ((OH) 1PH 2) is studied as a function of solvent composition of DMF-H 2O binary solvent mixture ([OH -] = 0.04 M). Combining the structure changes of the porphyrin and the "four orbital" model of Gouterman, many features of the optical spectra of this deprotonated para-hydroxy-substituted tetraphenylporphyrin in different composition of binary solvent mixtures can be rationalized. In highly aqueous solvents, the changes of the titration curves are shown to be mainly due to hydrogen-bonding of the oxygen of the phenoxide anion group by the hydroxylic solvent, Which decreases the energy of the phenoxide anion ? orbital. Thus the phenoxide anion ? orbital cannot cross over the porphyrin ? orbital being a different HOMO. However, its energy is close to that of the porphyrin ? orbitals. As a result, in the visible region, no charge-transfer band is observed, while in the visible-near region, the Soret peak split into two components. In nonaqueous solvents, the changes are mainly attributed to further deprotonation of pyrrolic-Hs of (OH) 1PH 2 by NaOH and coordination with two sodium ions to form the sodium complex of (OH) 1PH 2, which turns hyperporphyrin spectra of deprotonated of phenolic-H of (OH) 1PH 2 into three-banded spectra of regular metalloporphyrin.

  18. Weak lensing cosmology beyond ?CDM

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sudeep; Linder, Eric V.; Nakajima, Reiko; Putter, Roland de E-mail: rdeputter@icc.ub.edu E-mail: reiko@astro.uni-bonn.de

    2012-11-01

    Weak gravitational lensing is one of the key probes of the cosmological model, dark energy, and dark matter, providing insight into both the cosmic expansion history and large scale structure growth history. Taking into account a broad spectrum of physics affecting growth — dynamical dark energy, extended gravity, neutrino masses, and spatial curvature — we analyze the cosmological constraints. Similarly we consider the effects of a range of systematic uncertainties, in shear measurement, photometric redshifts, intrinsic alignments, and the nonlinear power spectrum, on cosmological parameter extraction. We also investigate, and provide fitting formulas for, the influence of survey parameters such as redshift depth, galaxy number densities, and sky area on the cosmological constraints in the beyond-?CDM parameter space. Finally, we examine the robustness of results for different fiducial cosmologies.

  19. ACTIVE EFFLUX OF ORGANIC SOLVENTS BY PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA S12 IS INDUCED BY SOLVENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induction of the membrane-associated organic solvent efflux system SrpABC of Pseudomonas putida S12 was examined by cloning a 312-bp DNA fragment, containing the srp promoter, in the broad-host-range reporter vector pKRZ-1. Compounds that are capable of inducing expression of the...

  20. CHLORINATED SOLVENT CONTAMINATED SOILS AND GROUNDWATER: FIELD APPLICATION OF THE SOLVENT EXTRACTION RESIDUAL BIOTREATMENT TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot scale demonstration of the Solvent Extraction Residual Biotreatment (SERB) technology was conducted at the former Sage's Dry Cleaner site in Jacksonville, FL. The SERB technology is a treatment train approach to complete site restoration, which combines an active in situ...

  1. INVESTIGATION OF PLUTONIUM AND URANIUM UPTAKE INTO MCU SOLVENT AND NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-06

    At the request of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) customer, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) examined the plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) uptake into the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) that will be used at the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). SRNL examined archived samples of solvent used in Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests, as well as samples from new tests designed explicitly to examine the Pu and U uptake. Direct radiocounting for Pu and U provided the best results. Using the radiocounting results, we found that in all cases there were <3.41E-12 g Pu/g of NGS and <1.17E-05 g U/g of NGS in multiple samples, even after extended contact times and high aqueous:organic volume phase ratios. These values are conservative as they do not allow for release or removal of the actinides by scrub, strip, or solvent wash processes. The values do not account for extended use or any increase that may occur due to radiolytic damage of the solvent.

  2. Deep eutectic solvents as efficient solvent system for the extraction of ?-carrageenan from Kappaphycus alvarezii.

    PubMed

    Das, Arun Kumar; Sharma, Mukesh; Mondal, Dibyendu; Prasad, Kamalesh

    2016-01-20

    Three different deep eutectic solvents (DESs) prepared by the complexation of choline chloride with urea, ethylene glycol and glycerol along with their hydrated counterparts were used for the selective extraction of ?-carrageenan from Kappaphycus alvarezii. Upon comparison of the quality of the polysaccharide with the one obtained using water as extraction media as well as the one extracted using widely practiced conventional method, it was found that, the physicochemical as well as rheological properties of ?-carrageenan obtained using DESs as solvents was at par to the one obtained using conventional method and was superior in quality when compared to ?-carrageenan obtained using water as solvent. Considering the tedious nature of the extraction method employed in conventional extraction process, the DESs can be considered as suitable alternative solvents for the facile extraction of the polysaccharide directly from the seaweed. However, among the hydrated and non-hydrated DESs, the hydrated ones were found to be more effective in comparison to their non-hydrated counterparts. PMID:26572431

  3. Weak Solutions of the Cohomological Equation on ? 2 {mathbb {R}}(2) for Regular Vector Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Leo, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    In a recent article (De Leo, R., Ann. Glob. Anal. Geom., 39, 3, 231-248 2011), we studied the global solvability of the so-called cohomological equation L ? f = g in , where ? is a regular vector field on the plane and L ? the corresponding Lie derivative operator. In a joint article with T. Gramchev and A. Kirilov (2011), we studied the existence of global weak solutions of the cohomological equation for planar vector fields depending only on one coordinate. Here we generalize the results of both articles by providing explicit conditions for the existence of global weak solutions to the cohomological equation when ? is intrinsically Hamiltonian or of finite type.

  4. Mixing of immiscible polymers using nanoporous coordination templates.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Takashi; Kaseda, Tetsuya; Sasaki, Yotaro; Inukai, Munehiro; Toriyama, Takaaki; Takahara, Atsushi; Jinnai, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of methodologies for the mixing of immiscible substances is highly desirable to facilitate the development of fundamental science and materials technology. Herein we describe a new protocol for the compatibilization of immiscible polymers at the molecular level using porous coordination polymers (PCPs) as removable templates. In this process, the typical immiscible polymer pair of polystyrene (PSt) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was prepared via the successive homopolymerizations of their monomers in a PCP to distribute the polymers inside the PCP particles. Subsequent dissolution of the PCP frameworks in a chelator solution affords a PSt/PMMA blend that is homogeneous in the range of several nanometers. Due to the unusual compatibilization, the thermal properties of the polymer blend are remarkably improved compared with the conventional solvent-cast blend. This method is also applicable to the compatibilization of PSt and polyacrylonitrile, which have very different solubility parameters. PMID:26130294

  5. Mixing of immiscible polymers using nanoporous coordination templates

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Takashi; Kaseda, Tetsuya; Sasaki, Yotaro; Inukai, Munehiro; Toriyama, Takaaki; Takahara, Atsushi; Jinnai, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of methodologies for the mixing of immiscible substances is highly desirable to facilitate the development of fundamental science and materials technology. Herein we describe a new protocol for the compatibilization of immiscible polymers at the molecular level using porous coordination polymers (PCPs) as removable templates. In this process, the typical immiscible polymer pair of polystyrene (PSt) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was prepared via the successive homopolymerizations of their monomers in a PCP to distribute the polymers inside the PCP particles. Subsequent dissolution of the PCP frameworks in a chelator solution affords a PSt/PMMA blend that is homogeneous in the range of several nanometers. Due to the unusual compatibilization, the thermal properties of the polymer blend are remarkably improved compared with the conventional solvent-cast blend. This method is also applicable to the compatibilization of PSt and polyacrylonitrile, which have very different solubility parameters. PMID:26130294

  6. NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH POLYMER COMPONENTS WITHIN MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2011-09-29

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The first deployment target for the technology is within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the facility. This report provides the data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The test was conducted over six months. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers present in MCU (i.e., PEEK, Grafoil{reg_sign}, Tefzel{reg_sign} and Isolast{reg_sign}) in the modified NGS (where the concentration of the guanidine suppressor and MaxCalix was varied systematically) showed that guanidine (LIX{reg_sign}79) selectively affected Tefzel{reg_sign} (by an increase in size and lowering its density). The copolymer structure of Tefzel{reg_sign} and possibly its porosity allows for the easier diffusion of guanidine. Tefzel{reg_sign} is used as the seat material in some of the valves at MCU. Long term exposure to guanidine, may make the valves hard to operate over time due to the seat material (Tefzel{reg_sign}) increasing in size. However, since the physical changes of Tefzel{reg_sign} in the improved solvent are comparable to the changes in the CSSX baseline solvent, no design changes are needed with respect to the Tefzel{reg_sign} seating material. PEEK, Grafoil{reg_sign} and Isolast{reg_sign} were not affected by guanidine and MaxCalix within six months of exposure. The initial rapid weight gain observed in every polymer is assigned to the finite and limited uptake of Isopar{reg_sign} L/Modifier by the polymers probably due to the polymers porosity and rough surfaces. Spectroscopic data on the organic liquid and the polymer surfaces showed no preferential adsorption of any component in the NGS to the polymers and no leachate was observed in the NGS from any of the polymers studied.

  7. Non-Ideal Behavior in Solvent Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Zalupski

    2011-09-01

    This report presents a summary of the work performed to meet FCR&D level 3 milestone M31SW050801, 'Complete the year-end report summarizing FY11 experimental and modeling activities.' This work was carried out under the auspices of the Non-Ideality in Solvent Extraction Systems FCR&D work package. The report summarizes our initial considerations of potential influences that non-ideal chemistry may impose on computational prediction of outcomes in solvent extraction systems. The report is packaged into three separate test cases where a robustness of the prediction by SXFIT program is under scrutiny. The computational exercises presented here emphasize the importance of accurate representation of both an aqueous and organic mixtures when modeling liquid-liquid distribution systems. Case No.1 demonstrates that non-ideal behavior of HDEHP in aliphatic diluents, such as n-dodecane, interferes with the computation. Cases No.2 and No.3 focus on the chemical complexity of aqueous electrolyte mixtures. Both exercises stress the need for an improved thermodynamic model of an aqueous environment present in the europium distribution experiments. Our efforts for year 2 of this project will focus on the improvements of aqueous and non-aqueous solution models using fundamental physical properties of mixtures acquired experimentally in our laboratories.

  8. Solvent vapor sensor & bolus detector for radiosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ducret, A.; Veyre, L.; Landais, P.; Le Bars, D.

    1994-12-31

    One of the key points in the Hamacher method of [{sup 18}F]FDG synthesis, in common with many other chemical reactions, is the need for an anhydrous state of the {sup 18}F/Kryptofix complex before addition of the mannose triflate. This is usually done by ensuring enough time elapses after the additions of acetonitrile for azeotropic distillation of the carbonate/K 2.2.2 solution, with the resulting possibility of overheating the dry kryptofix adduct. In this system, the entire [{sup 18}F]FDG synthesis is controlled by a Siemens Simatic S100 PLC; the fluorination takes place in an open Sigradur{reg_sign} vessel. The authors choose to automate this evaporation step with the control of this little vapor sensor, used otherwise to detect explosive atmospheres. The sensor is based on a miniature flammable gas sensor designed for detection of propane, butane, natural and {open_quotes}town{close_quotes} gas, using the platinum wire (pellistor) principle. Acetonitrile and organic flammable solvents are easily detected, the difference ({approximately} 30 mV) between the platinum sensing filament and compensating filament is measured and drives a K relay interfacing the Simatic PLC. Response time is within 3 seconds after complete disappearance of the solvent.

  9. MILESTONES AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS IN THE SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF CAESIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, Bruce A

    2011-01-01

    The remarkable development of solvent-extraction (SX) chemistry for caesium separation over the past half a century as driven by the needs of the nuclear industry now constitutes an instructive case study in exploring the limits of selectivity and cycle efficiency in SX. In this review, key milestones in the pursuit of both fundamentals and applications of caesium extraction will be highlighted along with a look at future prospects. The high-yield fission-product 137Cs constitutes a major fraction of the radioactivity in nuclear wastes, and in view of its heat production, environmental mobility, radiation hazard, and even uses as a radiation source, methods have long been sought for its separation. Toward this end, the evolving science has been challenged by daunting requirements for decontamination in the presence of high concentrations of competing cations, and demands for small footprint, modular design, and high throughput place a premium on selectivity and efficiency. Fortunately, the science has also benefited from the peculiar economics of nuclear separations, which have afforded the development of wonderfully sophisticated reagents. With its location in the lower left side of the periodic table, the Cs+ cation has the distinction of having the lowest charge density of any metal cation except short-lived francium. For practical purposes, Cs+ is thus the least hydrated and, in principle, the most directly extractable metal cation. Technologies employing liquid-liquid cation exchange with very large, durable anions like those from the dicarbollide family have therefore been quite effective based solely on solvation principles. Alternatively, researchers have turned to macrocyclic coordinating extractants, such as calix-crown ethers, following principles of molecular recognition, with dramatic results. Overall, strides continue along these lines, though it is apparent that caesium SX has reached a state of excellent fundamental understanding and technical maturity, evidenced by a suite of highly effective technologies.

  10. Acid gas scrubbing by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOEpatents

    Matson, S.L.; Lee, E.K.L.; Friesen, D.T.; Kelly, D.J.

    1988-04-12

    A composite immobilized liquid membrane suitable for acid gas scrubbing is disclosed. The membrane is a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous polymeric support, the solvent being selected from a class of highly polar solvents containing at least one atom selected from nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and sulfur, and having a boiling point of at least 100 C and a solubility parameter of from about 7.5 to about 13.5 (cal/cm[sup 3]-atm)[sup 1/2]. Such solvents are homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. Also disclosed are methods of acid gas scrubbing of high- and low-Btu gas effluents with such solvent-swollen membranes. 3 figs.

  11. Acid gas scrubbing by composite solvent-swollen membranes

    DOEpatents

    Matson, Stephen L. (Harvard, MA); Lee, Eric K. L. (Acton, MA); Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Kelly, Donald J. (Bend, OR)

    1988-01-01

    A composite immobilized liquid membrane suitable for acid gas scrubbing is disclosed. The membrane is a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous polymeric support, the solvent being selected from a class of highly polar solvents containing at least one atom selected from nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous and sulfur, and having a boiling point of at least 100.degree. C. and a solubility parameter of from about 7.5 to about 13.5 (cal/cm.sup.3 -atm).sup.1/2. Such solvents are homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. Also disclosed are methods of acid gas scrubbing of high- and low-Btu gas effluents with such solvent-swollen membranes.

  12. Method for destroying halocarbon compositions using a critical solvent

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Fox, Robert V.; Janikowski, Stuart K.

    2006-01-10

    A method for destroying halocarbons. Halocarbon materials are reacted in a dehalogenation process wherein they are combined with a solvent in the presence of a catalyst. A hydrogen-containing solvent is preferred which functions as both a solvating agent and hydrogen donor. To augment the hydrogen donation capacity of the solvent if needed (or when non-hydrogen-containing solvents are used), a supplemental hydrogen donor composition may be employed. In operation, at least one of the temperature and pressure of the solvent is maintained near, at, or above a critical level. For example, the solvent may be in (1) a supercritical state; (2) a state where one of the temperature or pressure thereof is at or above critical; or (3) a state where at least one of the temperature and pressure thereof is near-critical. This system provides numerous benefits including improved reaction rates, efficiency, and versatility.

  13. Automated spray cleaning using flammable solvents in a glovebox

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, P.; Meirans, L.

    1998-05-01

    The phase-out of the ozone-depleting solvents has forced industry to look to solvents such as alcohol, terpenes and other flammable solvents to perform the critical cleaning processes. These solvents are not as efficient as the ozone-depleting solvents in terms of soil loading, cleaning time and drying when used in standard cleaning processes such as manual sprays or ultrasonic baths. They also require special equipment designs to meet part cleaning specifications and operator safety requirements. This paper describes a cleaning system that incorporates the automated spraying of flammable solvents to effectively perform precision cleaning processes. Key to the project`s success was the development of software that controls the robotic system and automatically generates robotic cleaning paths from three dimensional CAD models of the items to be cleaned.

  14. Organic solvent-induced bipolar disorder: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sprouse, Adrienne; Curtis, Luke; Bartlik, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have reported neurological and neuropsychiatric symptoms, including a significantly increased risk of depression and suicide, from exposure to low to moderate levels of organic solvents. However, few studies have reported a link between organic solvent exposure and bipolar disorder. The authors present a case of a 43-y-old man who developed new-onset bipolar disorder following exposure to organic solvents in a textile printing plant. The man had elevated blood levels of several common solvents. His symptoms abated following avoidance of solvent exposures at his workplace and after nutritional and sauna detoxification treatments that one of the authors formulated to clear xenobiotics. Following avoidance and detoxification, the patient's blood concentrations of organic solvents fell to undetectable levels and his manic symptoms disappeared, with no significant recurrences over the past 13 y, as evaluated by the authors and his other physicians. PMID:23784607

  15. Toward Coordinated Colloids: Site-Selective Growth of Titania on Patchy Silica Particles

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Changdeuck; Kim, Hyunchul; Montero Moreno, Josep M.; Yi, Gi-Ra; Shin, Hyunjung

    2015-01-01

    Rational synthesis of coordinated spherical colloids is reported by site-selective growth of secondary hemispherical patches on primary spherical particles with quasi-defined coordination numbers and positions. We clarify the importance of mass transport phenomena on the site-specific secondary nucleation/growth in nanoparticulate colloidal systems. By comparing ultrasonic and conventional agitation during patch growth, we found that enhanced mass transfer is the key to controlled, homogeneous transport of the molecular precursors in a solvent onto the nanoparticles. With chemically defined nucleation sites, the surfaces of spherical silica particles were modified for use as a new kind of colloid with patches at desired coordination positions. Our observations represent a significant breakthrough in colloidal chemistry and self-assembly. PMID:25797616

  16. The Air or Brayton Cycle Solvent Recovery System 

    E-print Network

    Fox, B. J.

    1986-01-01

    CYCLE SOLVENT RECOVERY SYSTEM Bryce J. Fox 3M Company St. Paul, ABSTRACT The required temperature and technique for condensing common industrial solvents from the exhaust air of drying ovens is explained. ?:The benefits of the Air Cycle... for this application are discussed. The operation of the 8000 CFM Air Cycle Solvent Recovery System developed by the AiResearch Manufacturi ng Company of Cal i forni a under contract to the Department of Energy is di scussed. Performance data for the recovery...

  17. Effect of Solvents on Stabiliziation of Micro Drug Particles

    SciTech Connect

    C Desai; X Meng; D Yang; X Wang; V Akkunuru; S Mitra

    2011-12-31

    Antisolvent synthesis of micron scale Griseofulvin was carried out with simultaneous suspension stabilization under low power ultrasonic agitation. The organic solvent plays an important role because the supersaturation could be varied by using different solvents and the physicochemical characteristics of the suspension are also altered, which affects stability. In this study we present the effect of solvents on particle formation, polymorphism and stability of micron scale Griseofulvin formation in aqueous media.

  18. Solvent and process for recovery of hydroxide from aqueous mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Chambliss, C. Kevin (Macon, GA); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN); Keever, Tamara J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2001-01-01

    Hydroxide values and associated alkali metal may be recovered from alkaline aqueous solutions using classes of fluorinated alcohols in a water immiscible solvent. The alcohols are characterized by fluorine substituents which are proximal to the acidic alcohol protons and are located to adjust the acidity of the extractant and the solubility of the extractant in the solvent. A method for stripping the extractant and solvent to regenerate the extractant and purified aqueous hydroxide solution is described.

  19. Alcohols as hydrogen-donor solvents for treatment of coal

    DOEpatents

    Ross, David S. (Palo Alto, CA); Blessing, James E. (Menlo Park, CA)

    1981-01-01

    A method for the hydroconversion of coal by solvent treatment at elevated temperatures and pressure wherein an alcohol having an .alpha.-hydrogen atom, particularly a secondary alcohol such as isopropanol, is utilized as a hydrogen donor solvent. In a particular embodiment, a base capable of providing a catalytically effective amount of the corresponding alcoholate anion under the solvent treatment conditions is added to catalyze the alcohol-coal reaction.

  20. Solvent effects on enzymes - Implications for extraterrestrial life.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinrich, M. R.

    1972-01-01

    Review of several studies on the alterations taking place in the structure, catalytic activity, specificity, and stability of an enzyme when some or all of the water in the medium is replaced by another solvent. These studies show the utility of solvents as a tool for probing enzyme function. They also suggest that solvents other than water should be investigated as media for controlling and directing enzyme reactions.