Sample records for weather variability tides

  1. Yaquina Bay Weather & Tides

    E-print Network

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    Yaquina Bay Weather & Tides Clay Creech Phil Barbour #12;HMSC Weather Station #12;Temp-Humidity Sensor at Library #12;http://weather.hmsc.oregonstate.edu #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;Archived Data is Available every 15 mins. #12;#12;A pyranometer measures solar radiation #12;#12;National Weather Service

  2. Tides and Decadal Variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the mechanisms by which oceanic tides and decadal variability in the oceans are connected. We distinguish between variability caused by tides and variability observed in the tides themselves. Both effects have been detected at some level. The most obvious connection with decadal timescales is through the 18.6-year precession of the moon's orbit plane. This precession gives rise to a small tide of the same period and to 18.6-year modulations in the phase and amplitudes of short-period tides. The 18.6-year "node tide" is very small, no more than 2 cm anywhere, and in sea level data it is dominated by the ocean's natural Variability. Some authors have naively attributed climate variations with periods near 19 years directly to the node tide, but the amplitude of the tide is too small for this mechanism to be operative. The more likely explanation (Loder and Garrett, JGR, 83, 1967-70, 1978) is that the 18.6-y modulations in short-period tides, especially h e principal tide M2, cause variations in ocean mixing, which is then observed in temperature and other climatic indicators. Tidally forced variability has also been proposed by some authors, either in response to occasional (and highly predictable) tidal extremes or as a nonlinear low-frequency oscillation caused by interactions between short-period tides. The former mechanism can produce only short-duration events hardly more significant than normal tidal ranges, but the latter mechanism can in principle induce low-frequency oscillations. The most recent proposal of this type is by Keeling and Whorf, who highlight the 1800-year spectral peak discovered by Bond et al. (1997). But the proposal appears contrived and should be considered, in the words of Munk et al. (2002), "as the most likely among unlikely candidates."

  3. Intraseasonal variability and tides in Makassar Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susanto, R. Dwi; Gordon, Arnold L.; Sprintall, Janet; Herunadi, Bambang

    2000-05-01

    Intraseasonal variability and tides along the Makassar Strait, the major route of Indonesian throughflow, are investigated using spectral and time-frequency analyses which are applied to sea level, wind and mooring data. Semidiurnal and diurnal tides are dominant features, with higher (lower) semidiurnal (diurnal) energy in the north compared to the south. Sea levels and mooring data display intraseasonal variability which are probably a response to remotely forced Kelvin waves from the Indian Ocean through Lombok Strait and to Rossby waves from the Pacific Ocean. Sea levels in Tarakan and Balikpapan and Makassar mooring velocities reveal intraseasonal features with periods of 48-62 days associated with Rossby waves from the Sulawesi Sea. Kelvin wave features with periods of 67-100 days are seen in Bali (Lombok Strait), at the mooring sites and in Balikpapan, however, they are not seen in Tarakan, which implies that these waves diminish after passing through the Makassar Strait.

  4. Triggering and modulation of geyser eruptions in Yellowstone National Park by earthquakes, earth tides, and weather

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurwitz, Shaul; Sohn, Robert A.; Luttrell, Karen; Manga, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We analyze intervals between eruptions (IBEs) data acquired between 2001 and 2011 at Daisy and Old Faithful geysers in Yellowstone National Park. We focus our statistical analysis on the response of these geysers to stress perturbations from within the solid earth (earthquakes and earth tides) and from weather (air pressure and temperature, precipitation, and wind). We conclude that (1) the IBEs of these geysers are insensitive to periodic stresses induced by solid earth tides and barometric pressure variations; (2) Daisy (pool geyser) IBEs lengthen by evaporation and heat loss in response to large wind storms and cold air; and (3) Old Faithful (cone geyser) IBEs are not modulated by air temperature and pressure variations, wind, and precipitation, suggesting that the subsurface water column is decoupled from the atmosphere. Dynamic stress changes of 0.1?0.2?MPa resulting from the 2002?M-7.9 Denali, Alaska, earthquake surface waves caused a statistically significant shortening of Daisy geyser's IBEs. Stresses induced by other large global earthquakes during the study period were at least an order of magnitude smaller. In contrast, dynamic stresses of >0.5?MPa from three large regional earthquakes in 1959, 1975, and 1983 caused lengthening of Old Faithful's IBEs. We infer that most subannual geyser IBE variability is dominated by internal processes and interaction with other geysers. The results of this study provide quantitative bounds on the sensitivity of hydrothermal systems to external stress perturbations and have implications for studying the triggering and modulation of volcanic eruptions by external forces.

  5. Solar variability, weather, and climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Advances in the understanding of possible effects of solar variations on weather and climate are most likely to emerge by addressing the subject in terms of fundamental physical principles of atmospheric sciences and solar-terrestrial physis. The limits of variability of solar inputs to the atmosphere and the depth in the atmosphere to which these variations have significant effects are determined.

  6. Interannual variability of Martian weather

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. B. Leovy; J. E. Tillman; W. R. Guest; J. Barnes

    1985-01-01

    Pressure, temperature, imaging, and wind data from the Mutch Memorial Station, the Viking lander located in Mars' subtropics, are used to demonstrate the existence of two disctinct regimes of northern hemisphere winter weather on Mars. One of these regime is characterized by one or more intense global dust storms in which the optical depth reaches about 5 over most of

  7. Effects of weather and tides on feeding and flock positions of wintering redheads in the Chandeleur Sound, Louisiana

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas C. Michot; E. Barry Moser; Wayne Norling

    1994-01-01

    We studied the effects of weather and tides on percent feeding and flock positions of wintering redheads (Aythya americana Eyton) in the Chandeleur Sound, Louisiana, USA. Flock scans (n = 750) were made on 55 flocks from November through March of 1988–1989. The percent of the flock that was feeding was negatively correlated with time of day, temperature, water level,

  8. Tides and Tide Prediction

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Peter Brueggeman

    1999-01-01

    This tide and tide prediction resource directory links to online tide predictors, tide observations/sea level measurements, tide prediction software you install to generate tide predictions on demand, and general information on tides and tide prediction.

  9. Spatial and Temporal Variability of the M2 Internal Tide Generation and Propagation on the Oregon Shelf

    E-print Network

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Spatial and Temporal Variability of the M2 Internal Tide Generation and Propagation on the Oregon is implemented along the Oregon coast to study average characteristics and intermittency of the M2 internal tide the barotropic to baroclinic tide are computed from high-pass-filtered, harmonically analyzed model results

  10. A Link between Variability of the Semidiurnal Tide and Planetary Waves in the Opposite Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Anne K.; Pancheva, Dora V.; Mitchell, Nicholas J.; Marsh, Daniel R.; Russell, James M., III; Mlynczak, Martin G.

    2007-01-01

    Horizontal wind observations over four years from the meteor radar at Esrange (68 deg N) are analyzed to determine the variability of the semidiurnal tide. Simultaneous global observations of temperature and geopotential from the SABER satellite instrument are used to construct time series of planetary wave amplitudes and geostrophic mean zonal wind. During NH summer and fall, the temporal variability of the semidiurnal tide at Esrange is found to be well correlated with the amplitude of planetary wavenumber 1 in the stratosphere in high southern latitudes (i.e., in the opposite hemisphere). The correlations indicate that a significant part of the tidal variations at Esrange is due to dynamical interactions in the Southern Hemisphere. Other times of the year do not indicate a corresponding robust correlation pattern for the Esrange tides over multiple years.

  11. M2 baroclinic tide variability modulated by the ocean circulation south of Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlamov, Sergey M.; Guo, Xinyu; Miyama, Toru; Ichikawa, Kaoru; Waseda, Takuji; Miyazawa, Yasumasa

    2015-05-01

    We analyze a concurrent simulation result of the ocean circulation and tidal currents using a data-assimilative ocean general circulation model covering the Western North Pacific with horizontal resolution of 1/36° to investigate possible interactions between them. Four sites of active M2 internal tide variability in open ocean (hot spots), such as Tokara Strait, Izu Ridge, Luzon Strait, and Ogasawara Ridge, are detected from both the satellite observation and the simulation. Energy cycle analysis of the simulated M2 baroclinic tide indicates two types of the hot spots: dissipation (Tokara Strait and Izu Ridge) and radiation (Luzon Strait and Ogasawara Ridge) dominant sites. Energy conversion from barotropic to baroclinic M2 tides at the hot spots is modulated considerably by the lower-frequency changes in the density field. Modulation at the two spots (Tokara Strait and Izu Ridge) is affected by the Kuroshio path variation together with the seasonal variation of the shallow thermocline. At the other two sites, influence from changes in the relatively deep stratification through the Kuroshio intrusion into South China Sea (Luzon Strat) and mesoscale eddy activity (Ogasawara Ridge) is dominant in the modulation.

  12. Radar observations of the diurnal tide in the tropical mesosphere-lower thermosphere region: Longitudinal variabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurubaran, S.; Rajaram, R.; Nakamura, T.; Tsuda, T.; Riggin, D.; Vincent, R. A.

    2009-04-01

    Significant attention is being paid in recent times by several observational and modeling studies to quantify the spatial and temporal variabilities of diurnal tide in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region. These variabilities are ascribed to spatial and temporal variations in the tidal forcing or interactions between the propagating tides and background wind, planetary waves or gravity waves. The present work makes use of simultaneous ground-based radar wind observations of different durations from five equatorial/low latitude sites in the Indian, Indonesian and Pacific sectors: Tirunelveli (8.7°N, 77.8°E), Jakarta (6.4°S, 106.7°E), Pontianak (0.03°N, 109°E), Kauai (22°N, 160°W) and Christmas Island (2°N, 157°W). This study delineates the longitudinal differences in the tidal characteristics in (i) interannual time scales over Tirunelveli and Kauai during 1993-2002, (ii) seasonal time scales over Christmas Island, Jakarta and Tirunelveli for the years 1993-1997 and (iii) shorter than seasonal time scales over Christmas Island, Pontianak and Tirunelveli during 1996-1997. An important observational feature noticed in this work is the differing behavior of the long-term tidal fields over Tirunelveli and Kauai. The monthly tidal amplitudes over Tirunelveli reveal a strong QBO signature whereas a similar, strong QBO signal could not be traced in the long-term observations from Kauai.

  13. Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. LAi

    2007-02-08

    This project will help you understand the weather and investigate weather interactively. What are the components of weather? How do you measure weather? Investigate the WeatherScholastic: Weather WatchWeatherWeather Center for Our 4th Grade ...

  14. A knearest-neighbor simulator for daily precipitation and other weather variables

    E-print Network

    Balaji, Rajagopalan

    A k­nearest-neighbor simulator for daily precipitation and other weather variables Balaji simulation method is provided to generate random sequences of daily weather variables that "honor" the statistical properties of the historical data of the same weather variables at the site. A vector of weather

  15. Understanding Tides

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Tim Cook

    In this activity students investigate tidal phenomena by exploring water level observational (or predicted tidal) data from several locations around the world that provide examples of semi-diurnal, diurnal, and mixed tides. Students are asked to identify patterns of variability and differences among the sites on time scales of just a few days and over a period of a couple months. The activity is designed more to get students thinking about tides, asking questions about the causes of tidal variations, and thinking about ways to answer these questions, as opposed to providing an explanation of tidal processes. The activity leads to a body of observations that generate numerous questions about tides. The goal is to capture student's interest before spending subsequent class time developing a conceptual/theoretical model of how tides work.

  16. Intraannual variability of tides in the thermosphere from model simulations and in situ satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häusler, K.; Hagan, M. E.; Forbes, J. M.; Zhang, X.; Doornbos, E.; Bruinsma, S.; Lu, G.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we provide insights into limitations imposed by current satellite-based strategies to delineate tidal variability in the thermosphere, as well as the ability of a state-of-the-art model to replicate thermospheric tidal determinations. Toward this end, we conducted a year-long thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model (TIME-GCM) simulation for 2009, which is characterized by low solar and geomagnetic activity. In order to account for tropospheric waves and tides propagating upward into the ˜30-400 km model domain, we used 3-hourly MERRA (Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Application) reanalysis data. We focus on exospheric tidal temperatures, which are also compared with 72 day mean determinations from combined Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite observations to assess the model's capability to capture the observed tidal signatures and to quantify the uncertainties associated with the satellite exospheric temperature determination technique. We found strong day-to-day tidal variability in TIME-GCM that is smoothed out when averaged over as few as ten days. TIME-GCM notably overestimates the 72 day mean eastward propagating tides observed by CHAMP/GRACE, while capturing many of the salient features of other tidal components. However, the CHAMP/GRACE tidal determination technique only provides a gross climatological representation, underestimates the majority of the tidal components in the climatological spectrum, and moreover fails to characterize the extreme variability that drives the dynamics and electrodynamics of the ionosphere-thermosphere system. A multisatellite mission that samples at least six local times simultaneously is needed to provide this quantification.

  17. Tide generator

    SciTech Connect

    Feltenberger, B.D.

    1981-06-16

    A tidewater power system consisting of a high tide reservoir and a low tide reservoir. The high tide reservoir has an inlet adapted to be supported at high tide level and an outlet with a water wheel and generator between the outlet of the high tide reservoir and the low tide reservoir. The low tide reservoir has an outlet at the low tide level. The outlet from the high tide reservoir is adjustable to control the flow rate and the high tide reservoir can be closed at high tide to retain water for use over a period of time.

  18. Aerosol variability and weather regimes over the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabat, Pierre; Somot, Samuel; Mallet, Marc; Michou, Martine

    2015-04-01

    The Mediterranean region is characterized by the accumulation of aerosols from different sources: industrial and urban aerosols from Europe and North African towns, biomass burning, from Eastern Europe, dust aerosols from Africa, and marine particles from the sea. These aerosols show a strong spatio-temporal variability and a resulting large variety in aerosol optical properties over this basin. Maximal aerosol loads are observed in spring and summer, namely in the dry season favouring a longer residence time for atmospheric aerosols. Besides, dust outbreaks characterized by large plumes of Saharan desert dust particles, are more frequent in this season. This study realized in the framework of the ChArMEx initiative aims at explaining this aerosol variability and the relationship between aerosol loads and weather conditions. We consider here an approach based on weather regimes and regional modeling. From a multi-year (1979-2013) regional simulation carried out with the ALADIN-climate model (50 km resolution, ERA-Interim forcing) including an interactive aerosol scheme for the main species present in this region (desert dust, sea-salt, sulfates and carbonaceous particles), we have identified typical synoptic conditions that favour high aerosol loads over the Mediterranean, or on the contrary that are opposed to these high aerosol loads. These weather regimes are based on a statistical method of automated classification realized from surface pressure data. They are also related to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). In this work, we characterize the presence of the different aerosol types over the Mediterranean for each weather regime, as well as their effects on climate. Thus, anomalies in the occurrence of the regimes favourable to high aerosol loads could explain the frequent dust outbreaks observed during the ChArMEx campaigns in 2012 and 2013.

  19. The Space Weather and Ultraviolet Solar Variability (SWUSV) Microsatellite Mission

    PubMed Central

    Damé, Luc; Meftah, Mustapha; Hauchecorne, Alain; Keckhut, Philippe; Sarkissian, Alain; Marchand, Marion; Irbah, Abdenour; Quémerais, Éric; Bekki, Slimane; Foujols, Thomas; Kretzschmar, Matthieu; Cessateur, Gaël; Shapiro, Alexander; Schmutz, Werner; Kuzin, Sergey; Slemzin, Vladimir; Urnov, Alexander; Bogachev, Sergey; Merayo, José; Brauer, Peter; Tsinganos, Kanaris; Paschalis, Antonis; Mahrous, Ayman; Khaled, Safinaz; Ghitas, Ahmed; Marzouk, Besheir; Zaki, Amal; Hady, Ahmed A.; Kariyappa, Rangaiah

    2013-01-01

    We present the ambitions of the SWUSV (Space Weather and Ultraviolet Solar Variability) Microsatellite Mission that encompasses three major scientific objectives: (1) Space Weather including the prediction and detection of major eruptions and coronal mass ejections (Lyman-Alpha and Herzberg continuum imaging); (2) solar forcing on the climate through radiation and their interactions with the local stratosphere (UV spectral irradiance from 180 to 400 nm by bands of 20 nm, plus Lyman-Alpha and the CN bandhead); (3) simultaneous radiative budget of the Earth, UV to IR, with an accuracy better than 1% in differential. The paper briefly outlines the mission and describes the five proposed instruments of the model payload: SUAVE (Solar Ultraviolet Advanced Variability Experiment), an optimized telescope for FUV (Lyman-Alpha) and MUV (200–220 nm Herzberg continuum) imaging (sources of variability); UPR (Ultraviolet Passband Radiometers), with 64 UV filter radiometers; a vector magnetometer; thermal plasma measurements and Langmuir probes; and a total and spectral solar irradiance and Earth radiative budget ensemble (SERB, Solar irradiance & Earth Radiative Budget). SWUSV is proposed as a small mission to CNES and to ESA for a possible flight as early as 2017–2018. PMID:25685424

  20. NOAA Tides Online

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Access weather and water level observations for stations across coastal United States and the Great Lakes. Follow the "CO-OPS Website" link for tide predictions, additional weather-related observations, publications, and much more. Historical data is available for download. Site provides emergency information when a station's water level exceeds normal and is activated into Storm Surge mode.

  1. Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Stearns

    2008-10-25

    This is a first grade weather unit. SEASONS Fall Winter Build a Snowman Spring Summer What things determine and effect the weather? Cloud Precipitation Sunshine Temperature Visibility Wind Direction Wind Force WEATHER VIDEOS Tornado Hurricane Hail Lightning FUN AND GAMES Dress the Bear for the Weather The Great Weather Race Game Weather coloring books for kids ...

  2. Quantifying storm tide risk in Fiji due to climate variability and change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McInnes, Kathleen L.; Walsh, Kevin J. E.; Hoeke, Ron K.; O'Grady, Julian G.; Colberg, Frank; Hubbert, Graeme D.

    2014-05-01

    Extreme sea level events due to tropical cyclone storm surge combined with astronomical tide (storm tides) severely impact Pacific Island communities and these impacts are expected to increase with projected sea level rise. However, these sea level extremes are not well characterised by available tide gauge records owing to the low frequency of occurrence of tropical cyclones, the sparse array of tide gauges and the short time frame over which many gauges in this region have been operating. In this study, a combined statistical/dynamical method for estimating storm tide risk is presented. Tropical cyclones in the Fiji region over the period 1969-2007 are characterised in a statistical model that represents cyclone frequency, intensity and movement. The statistical model is then used to develop a population of “synthetic” cyclones that provide boundary conditions to a hydrodynamic storm surge and tidal model. This Monte-Carlo method is applied to the coasts of the Fiji archipelago. It is found that storm tide risk is higher on the northwest coasts of both the southern and northern main islands Viti Levu and Vanua Levu, respectively. Modelling suggests that there is a greater tendency for higher storm surges to occur on southwest Viti Levu under El Niño and La Niña years compared with average years, but elsewhere on Viti Levu and Vanua Levu, there is a tendency for slightly lower storm surges in La Niña years. Imposing perturbations to the cyclone statistical model that represent projected tropical cyclone changes in intensity and frequency for mid to late 21st Century, leads to storm tide return period curves that are steeper such that sea levels associated with return periods of 200 years or more become higher, those with return periods of 50 years and less become lower and the 1-in-100 year heights are little changed. Projected changes in sea level are found to make the largest contribution to increased extreme sea level risk.

  3. Red Tide

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    U.S. Centers for Disease Control

    This CDC web page includes links to PDF or html formatted files containing information about Karenia brevis, a phytoplankton responsible for toxic red tide events. Links include information about red tide, what the CDC is doing about red tide, links to other red tide related sites, and publications about red tide.

  4. Entropy Shows that Global Warming Should Cause Increased Variability in the Weather

    E-print Network

    John Michael Williams

    2001-02-21

    Elementary physical reasoning seems to leave it inevitable that global warming would increase the variability of the weather. The first two terms in an approximation to the global entropy are used to show that global warming has increased the free energy available to drive the weather, and that the variance of the weather should increase correspondingly.

  5. Congruent responses to weather variability in high arctic herbivores.

    PubMed

    Stien, Audun; Ims, Rolf A; Albon, Steve D; Fuglei, Eva; Irvine, R Justin; Ropstad, Erik; Halvorsen, Odd; Langvatn, Rolf; Loe, Leif Egil; Veiberg, Vebjørn; Yoccoz, Nigel G

    2012-12-23

    Assessing the role of weather in the dynamics of wildlife populations is a pressing task in the face of rapid environmental change. Rodents and ruminants are abundant herbivore species in most Arctic ecosystems, many of which are experiencing particularly rapid climate change. Their different life-history characteristics, with the exception of their trophic position, suggest that they should show different responses to environmental variation. Here we show that the only mammalian herbivores on the Arctic islands of Svalbard, reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) and sibling voles (Microtus levis), exhibit strong synchrony in population parameters. This synchrony is due to rain-on-snow events that cause ground ice and demonstrates that climate impacts can be similarly integrated and expressed in species with highly contrasting life histories. The finding suggests that responses of wildlife populations to climate variability and change might be more consistent in Polar regions than elsewhere owing to the strength of the climate impact and the simplicity of the ecosystem. PMID:23015455

  6. Atmospheric tides forced by troposphere heating: Longitudinal variability of upper atmosphere consequences

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaoli Zhang

    2010-01-01

    This PhD work is motivated by the unprecedented observations provided by the SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry) instrument on the TIMED (Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics) spacecraft. Through creative methods that avoid aliasing problems between tidal variations and mean background temporal variations, a fairly clear picture of both migrating and nonmigrating solar thermal tides from

  7. Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Rachelle Tuttle

    2005-10-25

    Meteorologists study the weather by recording and analyzing data. You can become an amateur meteorologist by building your own weather station and keeping a record of your measurements. After a while, you\\'ll notice the weather patterns that allow meteorologists to forecast the weather. Tasks: 1. As a group you will build a weather station outside. 2. Your group will build instruments to measure the weather. 3. Each person will record the data in personal weather journals. Process: 1.Since weather happens outside, you\\'ll need to make ...

  8. Weathering, Geomorphology and Climatic Variability in the Central Namib Desert

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heather Viles; Andrew Goudie

    Weathering is an important component of geomorphological change in the Central Namib Desert. Previous studies have reported on the weathering role of salt and dissolution, allied with wind abrasion. However, many surface are covered by luxuriant lichen growths, fed by fog precipitation, whose weathering role has not been clarified. Here we present preliminary investigations of the role of lichens and

  9. Interannual variability characteristics and simulated crop response of four stochastic weather generators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Theodoruos Mavromatis; James W Hansen

    2001-01-01

    Many stochastic weather generators commonly used with crop models tend to under predict interannual variability of climate and, as a result, distort distributions of crop simulation results. We examine the ability of four stochastic weather generators, WeatherMan, MARKSIM, WM2 and LARS-WG, to reproduce interannual variability of monthly climate and crop simulation results. Comparisons were based on bias and RMSE of

  10. Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Hendricks

    2007-12-06

    Introduction: How much do you know about weather? What kinds of weather do we have surrounding us? What is the weather like today? You may know a lot about weather already, you may not. Either way, you will learn more now as we take a look into what causes our weather and the methods we use to record and predict it. We will all become meteorologists, which are scientists who study the atmosphere and can predict weather. Put on your raincoats, and lets started! Task: You are the resident meteorologist at a local news station. It is your job to record and predict the weather each day, and then present it that night on the evening news. Not only should you be able to show the weather that we will be experiencing right ...

  11. Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provides these two Websites on weather. The first site serves as a major hub for information related to weather, with links to primary data sources, forecasts, maps, images (such as the latest satellite imagery for North America), and a wealth of other data, including space weather. Researchers will also find links to national weather research centers and other related agencies.

  12. Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Miss Jennie

    2009-10-22

    What are the different types of weather? In this project you will compare different types of weather by drawing pictures and making it into a flip book. First you will begin by learning about the different types of weather. Read about each topic. Then get together with your partner and draw a picture of each type of weather. 1. Thunder storm Thunder storm Thunder storm Kids 2. Lightning Lightning Lightning picture 3. Tornado Tornadoes Tornado Kids 4. ...

  13. Characteristics and seasonal variability of internal tides in the southern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xiaodong; Liu, Qian; Xie, Xiaohui; Chen, Guiying; Chen, Rongyu

    2015-04-01

    Two sets of current mooring records at the same location are used to investigate the generation and temporal variation of internal tides (ITs) near reefs in the southern South China Sea (SCS). The total records covered more than 900 days. ITs in this region are dominated by mode-1 diurnal motions, which are mainly composed of O1, P1 and K1 constituents. The major axes of both diurnal barotropic and baroclinic tidal ellipses are oriented in the northeast-southwest direction. The ITs over the entire observation period clearly show an approximately 14-day spring-neap cycle. Meanwhile, the diurnal ITs also displayed an evident seasonal change: their energy was higher in summer and winter than in spring and autumn. The modal decomposition of diurnal motion shows that their time-averaged kinetic energy in summer and winter was about 1.2 kJ/m2, which was approximately 60% higher than the values in spring and autumn. The same seasonal variation also occurred at the diurnal barotropic tides with prominent O1, P1 and K1 constituents. Because stratification does not show a significant seasonal variation in the southern SCS, the enhanced diurnal ITs in winter and summer can be attributed to the barotropic forcing with the semi-annual cycle caused by the modulation of diurnal P1 and K1.

  14. Mahogany Tides

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Smithsonian Education

    This Smithsonian K-12 Education website provides a brief overview of mahogany tide (also known as red tide) events. These events are caused by dinoflagellates, a special type of phytoplankton, and can harm sea life. This website also features links to other related red tide sites.

  15. Characterizing weather and climate variability for precipitation: A data-based stochastic modeling framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianotti, D.; Anderson, B. T.; Salvucci, G.

    2014-12-01

    Precipitation is a notoriously noisy variable at spatial scales from rain-gauges to GCM grid cells, partially due to the complexity of occurrence processes. To properly characterize variability of precipitation at so-called "weather" versus "climate" time scales, we demonstrate a probabilistic method for representing daily precipitation within a stationary-climate ("weather only") framework with applications for constraining unrealistic precipitation variability in climate models. This method accurately recreates the annual seasonal cycle and the daily variability of precipitation conditioned on the previous m days of data in a generalization of an autoregressive process optimal for zero-inflated empirical probability distributions. Monte Carlo simulations from these models create "weather" distributions for a given location at any spatial scale, which can then be compared to observations to determine the magnitude of "climate" variability (i.e., variability not well-represented by our stationary models). Weather distributions have applications in characterizing forecast confidence intervals, and climate/weather variance ratios allow us to calculate potential predictability for precipitation. Techniques for empirical model selection and calibration are highlighted, as are common assumptions about precipitation stationarity and variability. As an application, the variability of precipitation at weather/climate time scales is compared for observational data and a collection of historical runs from Global Climate Models.

  16. Earth tides

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Nineteen papers on gravity, tilt, and strain tides are compiled into this volume. Detailed chapters cover the calculation of the tidal forces and of the Earth's response to them, as well as actual observations of earth tides. Partial Contents: On Earth tides. The tidal forces: Tidal Forces. New Computations of the Tide-Generating Potential. Corrected Tables of Tidal Harmonics. The Theory of Tidal Deformations. Body Tides on an Elliptical, Rotating, Elastic and Oceanless Earth, Deformation of the Earth by Surface Loads. Gravimetric Tidal Loading Computed from Integrated Green's Functions. Tidal Friction in the Solid Earth. Loading Tides Versus Body Tides. Lunar Tidal Acceleration from Earth Satellite Orbit Analysis. Observations: gravity. Tidal Gravity in Britain: Tidal Loading and the Spatial Distribution of the Marine Tide. Tidal Loading along a Profile Europe-East Africa-South Asia-Australia and the Pacific Ocean. Detailed Gravity-Tide Spectrum between One and Four Cycles per Day. Observations: tilt and strain. Cavity and Topographic Effects in Tilt and Strain Measurement. Observations of Local Elastic Effects on Earth Tide Tilts and Strains.

  17. High-latitude oceanic variability associated with the 18. 6-year nodal tide

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, T.C. (Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States))

    1993-03-15

    Ocean temperatures in the upper 250 m in the northern North Pacific (60[degree]N, 149[degree]W) increased by more than 1[degree]C from 1972 to 1986 but are now decreasing. Subsurface temperature anomalies are well correlated ([approx] 0.58) with the air temperature anomalies at Sitka, Alaska; hence the coastal air temperatures can be used as a proxy data set to extend the ocean temperature time series back to 1828. Up to 30% of the low-frequency variance can be accounted for with the 18.6-year nodal signal. Additionally, spectral analysis of these air temperature variations indicates a significant low-frequency peak in the range of the 18.6-year signal. Similar low-frequency signals have been reported for Hudson Bay air temperatures since 1700, for sea surface temperatures in the North Atlantic from 1876 to 1939, and for sea level in the high-latitude southern hemisphere. The water column temperature variations presented here are the first evidence that the upper ocean is responding to this very long period tidal forcing. An enhanced high-latitude response to the 18.6-year forcing is predicted by equilibrium tide theory, and it should be most evident at latitudes poleward of about 50[degree]. These low-frequency ocean-atmosphere variations must be considered in high-latitude assessments of global climate change, since they are of the same magnitude as many of the predicted global changes. 29 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Edheads offers a Macromedia Flash Player enhanced interactive module allowing students to predict the weather by examining weather maps. Through this website, users can become familiar with the concepts of warm and cold fronts, wind direction and speed, air pressure, and humidity. Teachers looking to incorporate this site in their classroom can check out the "Teacher's Guide" for helpful hints on using the site with students.

  19. Spatial and temporal variability of tide-induced salt flux in a partially mixed estuary

    E-print Network

    Engel, Patricia Ann

    2009-01-01

    Mechanisms for the tidal component of salt flux in the Hudson River estuary are investigated using a 3D numerical model. Variations with river discharge, fortnightly tidal forcing, and along channel variability are explored. ...

  20. Ionospheric variability due to planetary waves and tides for solar minimum conditions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H.-L. Liu; W. Wang; A. D. Richmond; R. G. Roble

    2010-01-01

    Large ionospheric variability is found at low to middle latitudes when a quasi-stationary planetary wave is specified in the winter stratosphere in the National Center for Atmospheric Research thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere electrodynamics general circulation model for solar minimum conditions. The variability includes change of electric field\\/ion drift, F2 peak density and height, and the total electron content. The electric field\\/ion drift change

  1. On the occurrence and variability of the terdiurnal tide in the equatorial mesosphere and lower thermosphere and a comparison with the Kyushu-GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateswara Rao, N.; Tsuda, T.; Gurubaran, S.; Miyoshi, Y.; Fujiwara, H.

    2011-01-01

    We studied the occurrence characteristics and variability of the terdiurnal tide (8 hour period) in the equatorial mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT), using a meteor radar at Koto Tabang (0.2°S, 100.3°E) and MF radars at Tirunelveli (8.7°N, 77.8°E) and Pameungpeuk (7.4°S, 107.4°E). These locations, one being located right over the equator and the other two at conjugate points around the equator within ±10°, form a unique experimental setup to study equatorial MLT dynamics. The terdiurnal tide exists as a distinct wave signature at all three locations. While the daily amplitudes can be as large as 15 m s-1, the monthly mean amplitudes lie between 1 and 10 m s-1. The amplitude of the terdiurnal tide at Pameungpeuk is generally smaller than that observed at Tirunelveli and Koto Tabang. The seasonal variation in amplitude shows both annual and semiannual oscillations of ˜1 m s-1 at all three locations. The present observations combined with previous reports indicate that the timing of the primary maximum of the terdiurnal tide amplitude shifts from autumn to late spring and early summer as one moves from high latitudes to the equator (all with respect to the Northern Hemisphere). The amplitudes and seasonal variation in the present observations show good comparison with that simulated by the General Circulation Model (GCM) developed by Kyushu University, Japan. This study supports the occurrence of nonlinear interaction between diurnal and semidiurnal tides and shows that gravity waves play an important role in the generation of the terdiurnal tide.

  2. Meteogram: A Day's Weather Variables, Hour by Hour, on the Same Page

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Arden Rauch

    This activity is designed to teach students how to read and understand a meteogram. It should enable students to more readily understand the movements of fronts and the interactions of weather variables as illustrated by the meteogram. Generally students measure and observe the variables as separate entities but by viewing the weather variables including temperature, dew point, wind speed, wind direction, precipitation, cloud cover, atmospheric pressure, cloud elevation, maximum and minimum temperatures simultaneously hour by hour, the interrelationships are more evident. The site includes suggested questions and links to helpful sites.

  3. Red Tides

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Communications Directorate, Department of Fisheries and Oceans

    This comprehensive website answers questions such as: what is red tide, where are they found, why do they occur, how do they affect marine organisms, how do they affect humans, how are shellfish tested for the toxin, and what is being done to remediate the red tide problem. The site features color pictures and black and white maps.

  4. Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Caitlin

    2009-10-21

    In the project you will learn about thunderstorms and tornadoes and play a weather matching game. What exactly are thunderstorms and tornadoes? Use your T- chart to explain some facts about a thunderstorm and a tornado as we review each. T-Chart Begin by reviewing what a thunderstorm is and how they form. Thunderstorm information What is a thunderstorm? What are thunderstorms most likely to occur? What causes thunder? Next review what a tornado ...

  5. Decadal climatic variability and regional weather simulation: stochastic nature of forest fuel moisture and climatic forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsinko, Y.; Johnson, E. A.; Martin, Y. E.

    2014-12-01

    Natural range of variability of forest fire frequency is of great interest due to the current changing climate and seeming increase in the number of fires. The variability of the annual area burned in Canada has not been stable in the 20th century. Recently, these changes have been linked to large scale climate cycles, such as Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) phases and El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The positive phase of the PDO was associated with the increased probability of hot dry spells leading to drier fuels and increased area burned. However, so far only one historical timeline was used to assess correlations between the natural climate oscillations and forest fire frequency. To counteract similar problems, weather generators are extensively used in hydrological and agricultural modeling to extend short instrumental record and to synthesize long sequences of daily weather parameters that are different from but statistically similar to historical weather. In the current study synthetic weather models were used to assess effects of alternative weather timelines on fuel moisture in Canada by using Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index moisture codes and potential fire frequency. The variability of fuel moisture codes was found to increase with the increased length of simulated series, thus indicating that the natural range of variability of forest fire frequency may be larger than that calculated from available short records. It may be viewed as a manifestation of a Hurst effect. Since PDO phases are thought to be caused by diverse mechanisms including overturning oceanic circulation, some of the lower frequency signals may be attributed to the long term memory of the oceanic system. Thus, care must be taken when assessing natural variability of climate dependent processes without accounting for potential long-term mechanisms.

  6. Distribution Profiles of Key Weather Variables in Australian Capital Cities: Implications for Energy Efficient Building Design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lisa Guan

    2008-01-01

    Local climate is a critical element in the design of energy efficient buildings. In this paper, ten years of historical weather data in Australia's eight capital cities were profiled and analysed to characterize the variations of climatic variables in Australia. The method of descriptive statistics was employed. Either the pattern of cumulative distribution and\\/or the profile of percentage distribution are

  7. Weather variability, ecological processes and optimization of soil micro-environment for rangeland restoration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arid and semi-arid rangelands occupy over half of the earth’s surface and are characterized by relatively high variability in seasonal and annual patterns of precipitation. Invasive plants compete for soil and water resources and exacerbate inherent weather limitations for native plant establishmen...

  8. "Weather" Variability Of Close-in Extrasolar Giant Planets

    E-print Network

    Kristen Menou; James Y-K. Cho; Sara Seager; Brad Hansen

    2003-03-12

    Shallow-water numerical simulations show that the atmospheric circulation of the close-in extrasolar giant planet (EGP) HD 209458b is characterized by moving circumpolar vortices and few bands/jets (in contrast with ~10 bands/jets and absence of polar vortices on cloud-top Jupiter and Saturn). The large spatial scales of moving circulation structures on HD 209458b may generate detectable variability of the planet's atmospheric signatures. In this Letter, we generalize these results to other close-in EGPs, by noting that shallow-water dynamics is essentially specified by the values of the Rossby (Ro) and Burger (Bu) dimensionless numbers. The range of likely values of Ro (~ 0.01 - 10) and Bu (~ 1 - 200) for the atmospheric flow of known close-in EGPs indicates that their circulation should be qualitatively similar to that of HD 209458b. This results mostly from the slow rotation of these tidally-synchronized planets.

  9. Toxic Tide

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kumar Mahadevan

    This website provides access to a news article published in September 2005 by the Sarasota Herald-Tribune in which Mote Marine researchers responded to a series of questions posed by the Herald-Tribune editorial board about red tides. The article discusses a historical bloom event that occurred on Florida's Gulf Coast in 2005. The article also provides information about the causative organism, Karenia brevis, as well as about the general occurrence of red tides in this region, health effects, and the environmental factors that trigger a bloom event.

  10. Variability of the internal tide on the southern Monterey Bay continental shelf and associated bottom boundary layer sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberger, K. J.; Storlazzi, C. D.; Cheriton, O. M.; McPhee-Shaw, E. E.

    2014-12-01

    A 6-month deployment of instrumentation from April to October 2012 in 90 m water depth near the outer edge of the mid-shelf mud belt in southern Monterey Bay, California, reveals the relative importance of internal tides on the resuspension and transport of seabed sediment. Observations consisted of time-series measurements of water-column currents, temperature and salinity, and near-bed currents and suspended matter. The internal tide accounted for 15-25% of the water-column current variance and the barotropic tide accounted for up to 35%. The subtidal flow showed remarkably little shear and was dominated by the 7-14 day band, which is associated with relaxations in the dominant equatorward winds typical of coastal California in the spring and summer. Upwelling and relaxation events resulted in strong near-bed flows and accounted for almost half of the current stress on the seafloor (not accounting for wave orbital velocities), and may have driven along-shelf geostrophic flow during steady state conditions. Several elevated suspended particulate matter (SPM) events occurred within 3 m of the bed and were generally associated with higher, long-period surface waves. However, these peaks in SPM did not coincide with the predicted resuspension events from the modeled combined wave-current shear stress, indicating that the observed SPM at our site was most likely resuspended elsewhere and advected along-isobath. Sediment flux is almost equal in magnitude in the alongshore and cross-shore directions. Instances of wave-current shear stress that exceeded the threshold of resuspension for the silty-clays common at these water depths only occurred when near-bed orbital velocities due to long-period surface waves coincided with vigorous near-bed currents associated with the internal tide or upwelling/relaxation events. Thus, the internal tide and upwelling/relaxation dynamics are important in the transport of sediment during the relatively quiescent summer months.

  11. Kingdom of the Tides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Samuel, III

    Areas of discussion are the history of tides, the forces which exert an influence upon the earth's tides, the behavior of tides as modified by terrestrial features, "freak" behavior of tides, the marine life which inhabits tidal areas, the manner in which tides have helped to shape the course of history, how tides affect our lives on a day to day…

  12. WEATHER RELATED VARIABILITY OF CALORIMETERY PERFORMANCE IN A POORLY CONTROLLED ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    CAMERON, M.A.

    2007-04-16

    Four Antech airbath calorimeters at the Hanford site were studied for three summers and two winters in a location not well-shielded from outside temperature changes. Calorimeters showed significant increases in variability of standard measurements during hot weather. The increased variability is postulated to be due to a low setting of the Peltier cold face temperature, which doesn't allow the instrument to drain heat fast enough in a hot environment. A higher setting of the Peltier cold face might lead to better performance in environments subjected to a broad range of temperatures.

  13. WEATHER RELATED VARIABILITY OF CALORIMETERY PERFORMANCE IN A POORLY CONTROLLED ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    CAMERON, M.A.

    2007-04-16

    Four Antech airbath calorimeters at the Hanford site were studied for three summers and two winters in a location not well-shielded from outside temperature changes. All calorimeters showed significant increases in variability of standard measurements during hot weather. The increased variability is postulated to be due to a low setting of the Peltier cold face temperature, which doesn't allow the instrument to drain heat fast enough in a hot environment. A higher setting of the Peltier cold face might lead to better performance in environments subjected to a broad range of temperatures.

  14. Virtual Tide Pool

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Science NetLinks (PBS; )

    2003-04-29

    Virtual Tide Pool features a three dimensional view of a tide pool during both low and high tides. Students can see animals that live under, above, and at the waters surface. This site offers the ability to pan the tide pool for a 360 degree view, with zoom options, and gives descriptions of the animals found during both low and high tides.

  15. Weather Variability Associated with Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti (Dengue Vector) Oviposition Dynamics in Northwestern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Estallo, Elizabet L; Ludueña-Almeida, Francisco F; Introini, María V; Zaidenberg, Mario; Almirón, Walter R

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to develop a forecasting model by assessing the weather variability associated with seasonal fluctuation of Aedes aegypti oviposition dynamic at a city level in Orán, in northwestern Argentina. Oviposition dynamics were assessed by weekly monitoring of 90 ovitraps in the urban area during 2005-2007. Correlations were performed between the number of eggs collected weekly and weather variables (rainfall, photoperiod, vapor pressure of water, temperature, and relative humidity) with and without time lags (1 to 6 weeks). A stepwise multiple linear regression analysis was performed with the set of meteorological variables from the first year of study with the variables in the time lags that best correlated with the oviposition. Model validation was conducted using the data from the second year of study (October 2006- 2007). Minimum temperature and rainfall were the most important variables. No eggs were found at temperatures below 10°C. The most significant time lags were 3 weeks for minimum temperature and rains, 3 weeks for water vapor pressure, and 6 weeks for maximum temperature. Aedes aegypti could be expected in Orán three weeks after rains with adequate min temperatures. The best-fit forecasting model for the combined meteorological variables explained 70 % of the variance (adj. R2). The correlation between Ae. aegypti oviposition observed and estimated by the forecasting model resulted in rs = 0.80 (P < 0.05). The forecasting model developed would allow prediction of increases and decreases in the Ae. aegypti oviposition activity based on meteorological data for Orán city and, according to the meteorological variables, vector activity can be predicted three or four weeks in advance. PMID:25993415

  16. Mechanism for the effects of variable solar activity on the weather. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    None

    1981-01-01

    The goal of the research was to help in identifying the most likely physical mechanisms for the effects of variable solar activity on the weather. The method of attack was largely empirical, and this method was chosen for the following reasons: (1) in order to tap the great pool of scientific talent that may be able to offer sound physical mechanisms, it is necessary to demonstrate that there are some important relationships to explain; and (2) if the experiments are carefully designed, they can be useful in eliminating certain mechanisms which seem to have a low probability of success, and picking out the mechanisms which look more promising. Some results are presented.

  17. New Jersey Tide Telemetry System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoppe, Heidi L.

    2007-01-01

    Each summer the population of the barrier-island communities of New Jersey increases by tens of thousands. When a coastal storm threatens these communities, the limited number of bridges and causeways that connect the islands with the mainland become overcrowded, making evacuations from the barrier islands to the mainland difficult. Timely evacuation depends on well-defined emergency evacuation plans used in conjunction with accurate flood forecasting and up to the minute (real-time) tide-level information. The 'Great Nor'easter' storm that struck the coastal areas of New Jersey on December 11, 1992, caused about $270 million in insured damages to public and private property (Dorr and others, 1995). Most of the damage was due to tidal flooding and storm surge, which were especially severe along the back bay areas. Comprehensive and reliable tide-level and meteorological data for the back bays was needed to make accurate flood forecasts. Collection of tidal data for the ocean and large bays was adequately covered by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Ocean Service (NOAA's NOS), but in New Jersey little to no data are available for the back-bay areas. The back bays behave quite differently than the ocean as a result of the complex interaction between the winds and the geometry of the inlets and bays. A slow moving Nor'easter can keep tide levels in back bays several feet higher than the ocean tide by not allowing tides to recede, resulting in flooding of bridges and causeways that link the barrier islands to the mainland. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT), designed and installed the New Jersey Tide Telemetry System (NJTTS) with assistance from NOAA's NOS in 1997. This system is part of a statewide network of tide gages, weather stations, and stream gages that collect data in real time. The NJTTS supplies comprehensive, reliable real-time tide-level and meteorological data for flood-prone areas along the New Jersey shore and back bays. These data are transmitted to computer base stations located at offices of the National Weather Service, New Jersey State Police (NJSP), NJDOT, county emergency management agencies, other critical decision-making centers, and the World Wide Web (WWW). This fact sheet describes the NJTTS and identifies its benefits.

  18. Influence of seasonal weather and climate variability on crop yields in Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Iain

    2013-07-01

    The climatic sensitivity of four important agriculture crops (wheat, barley, oats, potatoes) in a northern temperate bioclimatic region is investigated using national-level yield data for 1963-2005. The climate variables include monthly and annual meteorological data, derived bioclimatic metrics, and the North Atlantic Oscillation index. Statistical analysis shows that significant relationships between yield and climate vary depending on the crop type and month but highlight the influence of precipitation (negative correlation) and sunshine duration (positive correlation) rather than temperature. Soil moisture deficit is shown to be a particular useful indicator of yield with drier summers providing the best yields for Scotland as a whole. It is also tentatively inferred that the sensitivity of these crops, particularly wheat and barley, to soil moisture deficits has increased in recent years. This suggests that improved crop yields are optimised for dry sunny years despite the continued prevalence of considerable inter-annual variability in seasonal weather.

  19. Influence of seasonal weather and climate variability on crop yields in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Brown, Iain

    2013-07-01

    The climatic sensitivity of four important agriculture crops (wheat, barley, oats, potatoes) in a northern temperate bioclimatic region is investigated using national-level yield data for 1963-2005. The climate variables include monthly and annual meteorological data, derived bioclimatic metrics, and the North Atlantic Oscillation index. Statistical analysis shows that significant relationships between yield and climate vary depending on the crop type and month but highlight the influence of precipitation (negative correlation) and sunshine duration (positive correlation) rather than temperature. Soil moisture deficit is shown to be a particular useful indicator of yield with drier summers providing the best yields for Scotland as a whole. It is also tentatively inferred that the sensitivity of these crops, particularly wheat and barley, to soil moisture deficits has increased in recent years. This suggests that improved crop yields are optimised for dry sunny years despite the continued prevalence of considerable inter-annual variability in seasonal weather. PMID:22960748

  20. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effects of extreme weather events and other weather-related variables on Cryptosporidium and Giardia in fresh surface waters.

    PubMed

    Young, Ian; Smith, Ben A; Fazil, Aamir

    2015-03-01

    Global climate change is expected to impact drinking water quality through multiple weather-related phenomena. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the relationship between various weather-related variables and the occurrence and concentration of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in fresh surface waters. We implemented a comprehensive search in four databases, screened 1,228 unique citations for relevance, extracted data from 107 relevant articles, and conducted random-effects meta-analysis on 16 key relationships. The average odds of identifying Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts in fresh surface waters was 2.61 (95% CI = 1.63-4.21; I² = 16%) and 2.87 (95% CI = 1.76-4.67; I² = 0%) times higher, respectively, during and after extreme weather events compared to baseline conditions. Similarly, the average concentration of Cryptosporidium and Giardia identified under these conditions was also higher, by approximately 4.38 oocysts/100 L (95% CI = 2.01-9.54; I(2) = 0%) and 2.68 cysts/100 L (95% CI = 1.08-6.55; I² = 48%). Correlation relationships between other weather-related parameters and the density of these pathogens were frequently heterogeneous and indicated low to moderate effects. Meta-regression analyses identified different study-level factors that influenced the variability in these relationships. The results can be used as direct inputs for quantitative microbial risk assessment. Future research is warranted to investigate these effects and potential mitigation strategies in different settings and contexts. PMID:25719461

  1. The effect of weather variability on hydrology and erosion in the Pamir Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, Eric; Gloaguen, Richard; Andermann, Christoff; Fuchs, Margret

    2015-04-01

    The Pamir Mountains (Pamirs) provide a unique climatological and geomorphological setting to investigate processes of mountain shaping. The two main atmospheric circulation systems in this region, the Westerlies in the western part, and the Indian summer monsoon in the south-eastern part, provide variable amounts of moisture. Strong inter-annual variations in moisture supply in other key-meteorological parameters suggest a very variable climate. Deflection of winds at the orogene margins and advective precipitation results in a strong precipitation gradient with moist margins and an arid central and eastern part. This gradient is generally accompanied by higher glaciation and more incised valleys at the margins and weak glaciation and preserved plateaus in the central and eastern parts. These differences seem to indicate a strong influence of precipitation and glaciation on erosion and mountain shaping, especially in the north-western part. However, recent studies utilizing cosmogenic nuclide (CN) techniques to derive basin-wide erosion rates revealed only weak correlations of modern climate with basin-wide erosion rates (integrated over ~1000 years). Independent analyses of historical suspended sediment yield (SSY) data for several rivers in the Pamirs show a similar distribution of high and low erosion rates compared to the CN method. However, CN-based erosion shows factor 3 to 30 higher erosion rates than SSY. We address this discrepancy by adopting a distributed hydrological model that we feed with state-of-the-art regional climate model, and remote sensing data. The model provides us with daily high spatial-resolution data of individual water components that allow to investigate effects of weather and weather variability on water mobilization. Based on the SSY analysis we infer individual water components responsible for sediment mobilization. We combine these findings in a coupled hydrology-erosion model approach to elucidate the complex underlying mechanisms that drive mountain shaping from a short-term meteorological -rather than a climatological- point of view.

  2. Influence of weather variables and plant communities on grasshopper density in the Southern Pampas, Argentina.

    PubMed

    de Wysiecki, María Laura; Arturi, Marcelo; Torrusio, Sandra; Cigliano, María Marta

    2011-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the influence of weather (precipitation and temperature) and plant communities on grasshopper density over a 14-year period (1996-2009) in Benito Juárez County, Southern Pampas, Argentina. Total density strongly varied among plant communities. Highest values were registered in 2001 and 2003 in highly disturbed pastures and in 2002 and 2009 in halophilous grasslands. Native grasslands had the lowest density values. Seasonal precipitation and temperature had no significant effect on total grasshopper density. Dichroplus elongatus (Giglio-Tos) (Orthoptera: Acridoidea), Covasacris pallidinota (Bruner), Dichroplus pratensis Bruner, Scotussa lemniscata Stål, Borellia bruneri (Rehn) and Dichroplus maculipennis (Blanchard) comprised, on average, 64% of the grasshopper assemblages during low density years and 79% during high density years. Dichroplus elongatus, S. lemniscata and C. pallidinota were the most abundant species in 2001, 2002 and 2003, while D. elongatus, B. brunneri and C. pallidinota in 2009. Dichroplus elongatus and D. pratensis, mixed feeders species, were positively affected by summer rainfall. This suggests that the increase in summer precipitation had a positive effect on the quantity and quality forage production, affecting these grasshopper populations. Scotussa lemniscata and C. pallidinota were negatively affected by winter and fall temperature, possibly affecting the embryonic development before diapause and hatching. Dichroplus elongatus and D. pratensis were associated with highly disturbed pastures, S. lemniscata with pastures and B. bruneri and D. maculipennis with halophilous grasslands. Covasacris pallidinota was closely associated with halophilous grasslands and moderately disturbed pastures. Weather conditions changed over the years, with 2001, 2002 and 2003 having excessive rainfall while 2008 and 2009 were the driest years since the study started. We suggest that although seasonal precipitation and temperature had no significant effect on total grasshopper density, these weather variables and plant communities had differential influence on the dominant grasshopper species. PMID:22220572

  3. Influence of Weather Variables and Plant Communities on Grasshopper Density in the Southern Pampas, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    de Wysiecki, María Laura; Arturi, Marcelo; Torrusio, Sandra; Cigliano, María Marta

    2011-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the influence of weather (precipitation and temperature) and plant communities on grasshopper density over a 14-year period (1996–2009) in Benito Juárez County, Southern Pampas, Argentina. Total density strongly varied among plant communities. Highest values were registered in 2001 and 2003 in highly disturbed pastures and in 2002 and 2009 in halophilous grasslands. Native grasslands had the lowest density values. Seasonal precipitation and temperature had no significant effect on total grasshopper density. Dichroplus elongatus (Giglio-Tos) (Orthoptera: Acridoidea), Covasacris pallidinota (Bruner), Dichroplus pratensis Bruner, Scotussa lemniscata Stål, Borellia bruneri (Rehn) and Dichroplus maculipennis (Blanchard) comprised, on average, 64% of the grasshopper assemblages during low density years and 79% during high density years. Dichroplus elongatus, S. lemniscata and C. pallidinota were the most abundant species in 2001, 2002 and 2003, while D. elongatus, B. brunneri and C. pallidinota in 2009. Dichroplus elongatus and D. pratensis, mixed feeders species, were positively affected by summer rainfall. This suggests that the increase in summer precipitation had a positive effect on the quantity and quality forage production, affecting these grasshopper populations. Scotussa lemniscata and C. pallidinota were negatively affected by winter and fall temperature, possibly affecting the embryonic development before diapause and hatching. Dichroplus elongatus and D. pratensis were associated with highly disturbed pastures, S. lemniscata with pastures and B. bruneri and D. maculipennis with halophilous grasslands. Covasacris pallidinota was closely associated with halophilous grasslands and moderately disturbed pastures. Weather conditions changed over the years, with 2001, 2002 and 2003 having excessive rainfall while 2008 and 2009 were the driest years since the study started. We suggest that although seasonal precipitation and temperature had no significant effect on total grasshopper density, these weather variables and plant communities had differential influence on the dominant grasshopper species. PMID:22220572

  4. The origin of tides

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    McGraw-Hill

    This QuickTime animation points out how the pull of gravity results in the tides. A high tide results on the near side of the Earth-moon alignment. The bulge on the opposite side results as the solid earth is pulled away from water on its far side where the moon?s gravitational pull is weakest. These two high tide bulges stay in place as the earth rotates, leading to two high tides and two low tides every day.

  5. Control of equatorial ionospheric morphology by atmospheric tides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. J. Immel; E. Sagawa; S. L. England; S. B. Henderson; M. E. Hagan; S. B. Mende; H. U. Frey; C. M. Swenson; L. J. Paxton

    2006-01-01

    A newly discovered 1000-km scale longitudinal variation in ionospheric densities is an unexpected and heretofore unexplained phenomenon. Here we show that ionospheric densities vary with the strength of non-migrating, diurnal atmospheric tides that are, in turn, driven mainly by weather in the tropics. A strong connection between tropospheric and ionospheric conditions is unexpected, as these upward propagating tides are damped

  6. Squeezing of Particle Distributions by Expanding Magnetic Turbulence and Space Weather Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffolo, D.; Seripienlert, A.; Tooprakai, P.; Chuychai, P.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2013-12-01

    Among the space weather effects due to gradual solar storms, greatly enhanced high-energy ion fluxes contribute to radiation damage to satellites, spacecraft, and astronauts and dominate the hazards to air travelers, which motivates examination of the transport of high-energy solar ions to Earth's orbit. Ions of low kinetic energy (up to ~2 MeV nucleon-1) from impulsive solar events exhibit abrupt changes due to filamentation of the magnetic connection from the Sun, indicating that anisotropic, field-aligned magnetic flux tubelike structures persist to Earth's orbit. By employing a corresponding spherical two-component model of Alfvénic (slab) and two-dimensional magnetic fluctuations to trace simulated trajectories in the solar wind, we show that the distribution of high-energy (E >= 1 GeV) protons from gradual solar events is squeezed toward magnetic flux structures with a specific polarity because of the conical shape of the flux structures. Conical flux structures and the squeezing of energetic particle distributions should occur in any astrophysical wind or jet with expanding, magnetized, turbulent plasma. This transport phenomenon contributes to event-to-event variability in ground level enhancements of GeV-range ions from solar storms, presenting a fundamental uncertainty in space weather prediction.

  7. Squeezing of particle distributions by expanding magnetic turbulence and space weather variability

    SciTech Connect

    Ruffolo, D.; Seripienlert, A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Tooprakai, P.; Chuychai, P. [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, CHE, Ministry of Education, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Matthaeus, W. H., E-mail: david.ruf@mahidol.ac.th, E-mail: achara.ser@mahidol.ac.th, E-mail: paisan@astro.phys.sc.chula.ac.th, E-mail: p.chuychai@sci.mfu.ac.th, E-mail: whm@udel.edu [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2013-12-10

    Among the space weather effects due to gradual solar storms, greatly enhanced high-energy ion fluxes contribute to radiation damage to satellites, spacecraft, and astronauts and dominate the hazards to air travelers, which motivates examination of the transport of high-energy solar ions to Earth's orbit. Ions of low kinetic energy (up to ?2 MeV nucleon{sup –1}) from impulsive solar events exhibit abrupt changes due to filamentation of the magnetic connection from the Sun, indicating that anisotropic, field-aligned magnetic flux tubelike structures persist to Earth's orbit. By employing a corresponding spherical two-component model of Alfvénic (slab) and two-dimensional magnetic fluctuations to trace simulated trajectories in the solar wind, we show that the distribution of high-energy (E ? 1 GeV) protons from gradual solar events is squeezed toward magnetic flux structures with a specific polarity because of the conical shape of the flux structures. Conical flux structures and the squeezing of energetic particle distributions should occur in any astrophysical wind or jet with expanding, magnetized, turbulent plasma. This transport phenomenon contributes to event-to-event variability in ground level enhancements of GeV-range ions from solar storms, presenting a fundamental uncertainty in space weather prediction.

  8. Forecasting the Coastal Ocean: Resolution, Tide, and Operational Data in the South Atlantic Bight

    E-print Network

    Forecasting the Coastal Ocean: Resolution, Tide, and Operational Data in the South Atlantic Bight D motion on the shelf occurs in this mode, in the tide- and weather-bands. The former is completely agreement with oceanic tides over the whole East Coast; (ADCIRC 1995); and quality data along the coast (NOS

  9. Forecasting the Coastal Ocean: Resolution, Tide, and Operational Data in the South Atlantic Bight

    E-print Network

    Forecasting the Coastal Ocean: Resolution, Tide, and Operational Data in the South Atlantic Bight D on the shelf occurs in this mode, in the tide- and weather-bands. The former is completely a remotely agreement with oceanic tides over the whole East Coast; (ADCIRC 1995); and quality data along the coast (NOS

  10. Pseudowhitening of weather Radar signals to improve spectral moment and polarimetric variable estimates at low signal-to-noise ratios

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sebastián M. Torres; Christopher D. Curtis; J. R. Cruz

    2004-01-01

    Pseudowhitening of oversampled signals in range is proposed as a method to improve the performance of spectral moment and polarimetric variable estimators on weather surveillance radars. In an attempt to overcome the noise sensitivity of the whitening transformation, a solution based on the minimum mean-square-error criterion is considered first; however, this transformation is less practical than whitening because it requires

  11. Rainfall generator for the Rhine basin: multi-site simulation of daily weather variables by nearest-neighbour resampling

    E-print Network

    Beersma, Jules

    Rainfall generator for the Rhine basin: multi-site simulation of daily weather variables by nearest (KMNI) Abstract Nearest-neighbour resampling is used here for the joint simulation of daily rainfall rainfall over the drainage basin and the dependence between daily rainfall and temperature without making

  12. HarborTides.com

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    HarborTides.com is a neat, user-friendly facility for tide information for over 2,500 harbors in the US (and Bermuda). Users may browse by state or search by zip code for information on high and low tides, sunrise and sunset, and longitude and latitude for every harbor. After filling out a form for free membership, users can also print out monthly tide tables.

  13. On Typhoon storm tides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Arakawa

    1957-01-01

    Summary After reviewing current theories on synoptic types producing coastal inundations, the author proposed a theory on the dynamics of catastrophic typhoon tides after resonance and hydraulic analogy. As examples, case studies of the storm tides caused by the Muroto Typhoon of 1934 and the 1917 Typhoon are given. Another type of the storm tide caused by the crossing of

  14. Moon and Tide Patterns

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Michael Passow

    In this activity, students will use Moon and tide data from the internet to construct charts and answer questions about the patterns they see. They will be reminded that the Moon has something to do with ocean tides and will discover what the connections are. They will also discover when tides, moonrise and moonset, and phases of the Moon occur.

  15. Climate Variability and Weather Extremes: Model-Simulated and Historical Data. Chapter 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Siegfried D.; Lim, Young-Kwon

    2012-01-01

    Extremes in weather and climate encompass a wide array of phenomena including tropical storms, mesoscale convective systems, snowstorms, floods, heat waves, and drought. Understanding how such extremes might change in the future requires an understanding of their past behavior including their connections to large-scale climate variability and trends. Previous studies suggest that the most robust findings concerning changes in short-term extremes are those that can be most directly (though not completely) tied to the increase in the global mean temperatures. These include the findings that (IPCC 2007): There has been a widespread reduction in the number of frost days in mid-latitude regions in recent decades, an increase in the number of warm extremes, particularly warm nights, and a reduction in the number of cold extremes, particularly cold nights. For North America in particular (CCSP SAP 3.3, 2008): There are fewer unusually cold days during the last few decades. The last 10 years have seen a lower number of severe cold waves than for any other 10-year period in the historical record that dates back to 1895. There has been a decrease in the number of frost days and a lengthening of the frost-free season, particularly in the western part of North America. Other aspects of extremes such as the changes in storminess have a less clear signature of long term change, with considerable interannual, and decadal variability that can obscure any climate change signal. Nevertheless, regarding extratropical storms (CCSP SAP 3.3, 2008): The balance of evidence suggests that there has been a northward shift in the tracks of strong low pressure systems (storms) in both the North Atlantic and North Pacific basins. For North America: Regional analyses suggest that there has been a decrease in snowstorms in the South and lower Midwest of the United States, and an increase in snowstorms in the upper Midwest and Northeast. Despite the progress already made, our understanding of the basic mechanisms by which extremes vary is incomplete. As noted in IPCC (2007), Incomplete global data sets and remaining model uncertainties still restrict understanding of changes in extremes and attribution of changes to causes, although understanding of changes in the intensity, frequency and risk of extremes has improved. Separating decadal and other shorter-term variability from climate change impacts on extremes requires a better understanding of the processes responsible for the changes. In particular, the physical processes linking sea surface temperature changes to regional climate changes, and a basic understanding of the inherent variability in weather extremes and how that is impacted by atmospheric circulation changes at subseasonal to decadal and longer time scales, are still inadequately understood. Given the fundamental limitations in the time span and quality of global observations, substantial progress on these issues will rely increasingly on improvements in models, with observations continuing to play a critical role, though less as a detection tool, and more as a tool for addressing physical processes, and to insure the quality of the climate models and the verisimilitude of the simulations (CCSP SAP 1.3, 2008).

  16. Characterizing the Temporal Variability of Atmosphere Zenith Delay using a High Resolution Numerical Weather Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niell, A. E.; Leidner, M.

    2006-12-01

    The temporal variations of the atmosphere delay affect the estimation of other parameters of interest from space geodetic observations in two ways: the estimated values depend on the characteristics of the variability, and the uncertainties of the estimated values also depend on those characteristics. An accurate assessment of the contribution of each source of error is important for evaluating which areas should be addressed to improve the measurements. A possible source of the statistical properties of the zenith atmosphere delay is a high horizontal resolution Numerical Weather Model (NWM). The actual zenith delays calculated from the NWM are not accurate enough to provide corrections to the space geodetic observations, but the statistics of the time variability may be useful as an external source of information on the temporal variations. This information may be in the form of a constraint on the change in zenith delay rate between segments of a piecewise linear model, or it may provide a daily value for the variance rate for a stochastic model as used in a Kalman filter estimation). To evaluate the accuracy of the NWM we will compare the statistical properties, such as the temporal structure function, of the zenith wet delays calculated from MM5 forecasts with three kilometer horizontal resolution with those from water vapor radiometer (WVR) measurements. The observation period is the CONT02 VLBI campaign in 2002 October. A WVR was operated at three of the eight participating VLBI sites. For geodetic VLBI data analysis the statistical properties of the atmosphere delay should cover time intervals as short as 30 seconds. For at least one WVR (Kokee, Hawaii) the sampling interval was sixteen seconds. For the MM5 forecasts the time step for the three kilometer resolution grid (the smallest of four nested grids) is only nine seconds. Comparison will also be made with the statistical model of Treuhaft and Lanyi (1987 Radio Science, V22, 251-265).

  17. Variability of the essential oil content and composition of chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) affected by weather conditions.

    PubMed

    Gosztola, Beáta; Sárosi, Szilvia; Németh, Eva

    2010-03-01

    In our study we examined the variability of the essential oil content and composition of chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.) during three years (2005-2007). Twenty-eight populations of wild origin and 4 registered cultivars ('Soroksári 40', 'Lutea', 'Goral' and 'Bona') were evaluated in open field experiments. It could be established that the experimental populations represented different genetic potential for essential oil accumulation and composition. The best populations of wild growing origin from the Somogy-region and four cultivars produced the highest essential oil contents (above 0.6 g/100g) in each year. Additionally, the quality of the characteristic main compound of the oil determining the "chemotype", according to Schilcher, was found to be stable during the three years period. However, the actual chemosyndroms are significantly influenced by the weather conditions. In the three years' experiment, the moderately warm and relatively wet year of 2006 produced the highest contents of essential oil and also that of its alpha-bisabolol component. Although bisabolol oxide A also showed a high variability through the years, its direct connection with weather conditions could not be proved. A moderate variability was established for the proportions of chamazulene, and the lowest one for bisabolol-oxide B. Considerable genotype-weather interaction was supposed, especially for the essential oil content and for the ratio of bisabolol-oxide A. PMID:20420329

  18. Variable spikes in tick-borne encephalitis incidence in 2006 independent of variable tick abundance but related to weather

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Sarah E; Asokliene, Loreta; Avsic-Zupanc, Tatjana; Bormane, Antra; Burri, Caroline; Gern, Lise; Golovljova, Irina; Hubalek, Zdenek; Knap, Natasa; Kondrusik, Maceij; Kupca, Anne; Pejcoch, Milan; Vasilenko, Veera; Žygutiene, Milda

    2008-01-01

    Background The incidence of tick-borne encephalitis showed a dramatic spike in several countries in Europe in 2006, a year that was unusually cold in winter but unusually warm and dry in summer and autumn. In this study we examine the possible causes of the sudden increase in disease: more abundant infected ticks and/or increased exposure due to human behaviour, both in response to the weather. Methods For eight countries across Europe, field data on tick abundance for 2005–2007, collected monthly from a total of 41 sites, were analysed in relation to total annual and seasonal TBE incidence and temperature and rainfall conditions. Results The weather in 2006–2007 was exceptional compared with the previous two decades, but neither the very cold start to 2006, nor the very hot period from summer 2006 to late spring 2007 had any consistent impact on tick abundance. Nor was the TBE spike in 2006 related to changes in tick abundance. Countries varied in the degree of TBE spike despite similar weather patterns, and also in the degree to which seasonal variation in TBE incidence matched seasonal tick activity. Conclusion The data suggest that the TBE spike was not due to weather-induced variation in tick population dynamics. An alternative explanation, supported by qualitative reports and some data, involves human behavioural responses to weather favourable for outdoor recreational activities, including wild mushroom and berry harvest, differentially influenced by national cultural practices and economic constraints. PMID:19068106

  19. Star Gardens: Tides

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this activity students will learn that tides are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon and sun on the surface of the ocean. They will discover that tides are predictable changes in sea level that occur at regular intervals, and rise and fall roughly twice during each 24-hour period. Students will also find that tides follow the phases of the moon, with the highest and lowest tides occurring during the full and new moons. They will create a tide calendar by plotting a month-long tidal curve on an ordinary pictorial calendar. They will realize that because tides affect both the natural environment and human activities in many ways, it is important to know when they will occur.

  20. The Causes of Tides

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Oberrecht, Kenn

    This document explains the predictable and periodic movements of ocean waters that are known as tides and how they are produced by the gravitational forces of the moon and sun. It describes how gravitational attraction and centrifugal force create bulges on either side of the Earth (the high tides), and how two coinciding and simultaneous low tides occur at equal distances around the earth between them. It also explains tidal range and why it varies greatly with geographic location.

  1. Non-systematic weathering profile in the Blue Ridge Mountains, N. C. : Role of geochemical variables

    SciTech Connect

    Ciampone, M.A.; McVey, D.E.; Gerke, T.L.; Briggs, W.D.; Zhang, Yangsheng; Maynard, J.B.; Huff, W.D. (Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Weathering profiles from representative cores of the Coweeta Group, schist, and Tallulah Falls Fm, gneiss, in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina were examined. The predominant alteration minerals, which formed from the partial alteration of biotite and plagioclase, include kaolinite, chlorite, vermiculite interstratified with biotite, gibbsite. These mineral phases were identified using petrographic observation, SEM, X-ray diffraction, and selected electron microprobe analysis. These minerals commonly represent a weathering profile (developed from surface to depth on a single source rock) ranging from mature (gibbsite), to intermediate (kaolinite + interlayered biotite/vermiculite), to immature (plagioclase + biotite) at depth. In this study, however, there is no clear vertical zonation of the weathering profile. This indicates a more selective weathering process than would typically be assumed. This nonsystematic weathering profile may reflect variations in bulk composition of the parent rock and/or variations in the composition of ground water. The presence and abundance of gibbsite in these weathering profiles is unusual because it is normally associated with bauxite in which the Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] content is > 80 wt.%. In this study the Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] content of the regolith is approximately 20 wt.%. The presence of gibbsite emphasizes the importance of solution-reprecipitation of Al-rich phases as an independent process in temperature climates, and suggests the activity of silica is more critical than regional climatological effects in controlling regolith formation.

  2. a Study of Risk Preferences and Perceptions of Weather Variability of Smallholder Subsistence Farmers in Malawi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, S.; Michelson, H. C.

    2013-12-01

    In 2011, the global population reached seven billion people. According to Foley et al. (2011) nearly one billion still suffer from chronic hunger. World population is expected to increase by another 9-11 billion by 2050. As demand for food grows, the world food system faces three primary challenges: to ensure that the current population of seven billion is adequately fed, to double food production to meet future population growth, and to achieve both in an environmentally sustainable way. As pressures on the global food system grow, sub-Saharan presents a special set of opportunities and challenges. In parts of sub-Saharan Africa, smallholder adoption of productivity-increasing agricultural technologies has proved a pervasive challenge and staple grain yields in the region lag significantly behind the rest of the world. National policies and internationally-funded initiatives such as the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA) have proposed to close the agricultural yield gap through promotion of small farmer adoption of technologies that increase production efficiency, such as improved seeds, fertilizer and irrigation. However, research has found that even when these productivity-enhancing technologies are provided at subsidized costs, many projects report take-up rates well below 100%. In order to understand why farmers are not making investments to improve staple crop yields, it is critical to investigate the nature of the problem of the low take-up rate. Possible hypotheses include: credit constraints, opportunity costs, and farmer risk and/or time preferences that lead them to delay investment. Our project in Mwandama, Malawi uses techniques from prospect theory and expected utility theory to provide insight into farmer decision-making around technology adoption. We build on past research conducted in Ethiopia, India and Uganda, which has found that poor farmers systematically underweight the likelihood of good outcomes. We use a new methodology called parametric Dynamic Experiments for Estimating Preferences developed at Columbia University to measure three prospect theory parameters using an adaptive survey tool installed on a tablet PC. Our work is the first to use an adaptive survey tool to measure risk preferences and to combine these measures with both panel data on agricultural investments and beliefs about climate change using scenarios. Despite the need for better understanding of how farmer preferences over time and risk might influence technology adoption and production decisions made by farmers in sub-Saharan Africa, there is a critical gap in research about this topic. Whether and how vulnerability to climate change has entered the mind frame of farmers is explored with a scenario setup, in which farmers are asked to provide advice to a hypothetical farmer facing low yields due to a prolonged drought. Farmer responses to the scenarios give us information about both the channel through which farmers receive information about agriculture and adaptation and primary factors mentioned to be important agricultural strategies in the face of increasingly unpredictable weather patterns. This research offers insights to understand decision-making process of smallholder farmers, who face adverse effects of weather variability and the present problem of low soil fertility.

  3. Winter Storms Weather Quizzes

    E-print Network

    and report more exact measurements. As it comes closer to land, special weather radars track the hurricane, the sea may rise as high as 25 feet above normal high tide! That is taller than six kids standing on each up all the small things laying around your yard, like toys, tools and flower pots and bring them

  4. Tide operated power generating apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kertzman, H. Z.

    1981-02-03

    An improved tide operated power generating apparatus is disclosed in which a hollow float, rising and falling with the ocean tide, transmits energy to a power generator. The improvement comprises means for filling the float with water during the incoming tide to provide a substantial increase in the float dead weight during the outgoing tide. Means are further provided to then empty the float before the outgoing tide whereby the float becomes free to rise again on the next incoming tide.

  5. Regional Differences in the Growing Incidence of Dengue Fever in Vietnam Explained by Weather Variability

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Ha Hai; Okumura, Junko; Hashizume, Masahiro; Tran, Duong Nhu; Yamamoto, Taro

    2014-01-01

    Dengue fever is a major health problem in Vietnam, but its incidence differs from province to province. To understand this at the local level, we assessed the effect of four weather components (humidity, rainfall, temperature and sunshine) on the number of dengue cases in nine provinces of Vietnam. Monthly data from 1999 to 2009 were analysed by time-series regression using negative binomial models. A test for heterogeneity was applied to assess the weather-dengue association in the provinces. Those associations were significantly heterogeneous (for temperature, humidity, and sunshine: P < 0.001 heterogeneity test; for rainfall: P = 0.018 heterogeneity test). This confirms that weather components strongly affect dengue transmission at a lag time of 0 to 3 months, with considerable variation in their influence among different areas in Vietnam. This finding may promote the strategic prevention of dengue disease by suggesting specific plans at the local level, rather than a nationally unified approach. PMID:24808744

  6. The potential impacts of climate variability and change on health impacts of extreme weather events in the United States.

    PubMed Central

    Greenough, G; McGeehin, M; Bernard, S M; Trtanj, J; Riad, J; Engelberg, D

    2001-01-01

    Extreme weather events such as precipitation extremes and severe storms cause hundreds of deaths and injuries annually in the United States. Climate change may alter the frequency, timing, intensity, and duration of these events. Increases in heavy precipitation have occurred over the past century. Future climate scenarios show likely increases in the frequency of extreme precipitation events, including precipitation during hurricanes, raising the risk of floods. Frequencies of tornadoes and hurricanes cannot reliably be projected. Injury and death are the direct health impacts most often associated with natural disasters. Secondary effects, mediated by changes in ecologic systems and public health infrastructure, also occur. The health impacts of extreme weather events hinge on the vulnerabilities and recovery capacities of the natural environment and the local population. Relevant variables include building codes, warning systems, disaster policies, evacuation plans, and relief efforts. There are many federal, state, and local government agencies and nongovernmental organizations involved in planning for and responding to natural disasters in the United States. Future research on health impacts of extreme weather events should focus on improving climate models to project any trends in regional extreme events and as a result improve public health preparedness and mitigation. Epidemiologic studies of health effects beyond the direct impacts of disaster will provide a more accurate measure of the full health impacts and will assist in planning and resource allocation. PMID:11359686

  7. Dynamics of ocean tides

    SciTech Connect

    Maarchuk, G.I.; Kagan, B.A. (P.P. Shirshov Inst. of Oceanology, Moscow (SU))

    1989-01-01

    Ocean tide information can solve vital problems in oceanology and geophysics. Elastic properties of the Earth's crust, tidal gravity variations and deviations in trajectories of artificial satellites can be studied from the dynamics of ocean tides. This book contains mathematical models and applications on several problems related to ocean tide dynamics. The first part serves as an introduction to studies of tidal dynamics equations and the application in experimental studies. Specific problems like free oscillations and forced tidal oscillations in the oceans and the ocean-shelf system are discussed. The book deals with tidal flow in the bottom boundary layer. Data and models are presented and experimental and theoretical results are compared.

  8. Effects of Altered Weather Variables and Increased CO2 Concentrations on the Main Agricultural Crops of California's Central Valley Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Lopez, F.; Young, C. A.; Tansey, M.; Yates, D.

    2010-12-01

    Potential changes in crop water demand and due to climate change is a growing concern among scientists and policy makers. In this study we analyze the potential response of evapotranspiration to climate change through the estimation of agricultural crops’ water use response to altered weather variables (temperature, precipitation, solar radiation, relative humidity, and wind speed) and an increased atmospheric CO2 concentration. Changes in growing season length, production of biomass and crop yields are also estimated through the use of downscaled climate futures selected to cover a wide range of the existing GCM results. An existing model, the Land, Air, and Water Simulator (LAWS) has been modified to include algorithms that account for the effects of altered weather variables, and the modeling of the top five agricultural crops in three representative regions of the California’s Central Valley Project System (Sacramento, San Joaquin river basin and the Delta area) is described. Study results show that atmospheric conditions can have complex and opposing influences on important evaluation metrics such as plant transpiration rates and cumulative water use, initiation and duration of the growing season, biomass production and crop yields. The magnitude of changes relative to historic conditions could be significant. Additional simulations are underway to expand the scope of the results throughout the California’s Central Valley Project System. These results will be directly relevant to the development of climate adaptation strategies effecting future Delta inflows.

  9. Modelling the impacts of weather and climate variability on crop productivity over a large area: A new process-based model development, optimization, and uncertainties analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fulu Tao; Masayuki Yokozawa; Zhao Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Process-based crop models are increasingly being used to investigate the impacts of weather and climate variability (change) on crop growth and production, especially at a large scale. Crop models that account for the key impact mechanisms of climate variability and are accurate over a large area must be developed. Here, we present a new process-based general Model to capture the

  10. Contribution of sand-associated enterococci to dry weather water quality.

    PubMed

    Halliday, Elizabeth; Ralston, David K; Gast, Rebecca J

    2015-01-01

    Culturable enterococci and a suite of environmental variables were collected during a predominantly dry summer at a beach impacted by nonpoint source pollution. These data were used to evaluate sands as a source of enterococci to nearshore waters, and to assess the relationship between environmental factors and dry-weather enterococci abundance. Best-fit multiple linear regressions used environmental variables to explain more than half of the observed variation in enterococci in water and dry sands. Notably, during dry weather the abundance of enterococci in dry sands at the mean high-tide line was significantly positively related to sand moisture content (ranging from <1-4%), and the daily mean ENT in water could be predicted by a linear regression with turbidity alone. Temperature was also positively correlated with ENT abundance in this study, which may indicate an important role of seasonal warming in temperate regions. Inundation by spring tides was the primary rewetting mechanism that sustained culturable enterococci populations in high-tide sands. Tidal forcing modulated the abundance of enterococci in the water, as both turbidity and enterococci were elevated during ebb and flood tides. The probability of samples violating the single-sample maximum was significantly greater when collected during periods with increased tidal range: spring ebb and flood tides. Tidal forcing also affected groundwater mixing zones, mobilizing enterococci from sand to water. These data show that routine monitoring programs using discrete enterococci measurements may be biased by tides and other environmental factors, providing a flawed basis for beach closure decisions. PMID:25479559

  11. Space weather or the solar variability effects on the terrestrial environment: the Italian activities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Francia; M. Candidi; U. Villante; E. Amata

    2003-01-01

    The near-Earth space is an highly dynamic environment because of the highly variable conditions of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field which originate from the Sun. In the last years, human technological systems which operate in this environment have increased and can be affected by such variability; then, it becomes more and more important to understand the solar-terrestrial relation

  12. Role of lunar atmospheric tides in thermosphere density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palus, Shannon

    2014-11-01

    Half a million objects, including debris, satellites, and the International Space Station, orbit Earth in the thermosphere, the largest layer of the planet's atmosphere. To predict the orbits—and potential collisions—of all this stuff, scientists must forecast the weather in the thermosphere. To help develop a more comprehensive and nuanced model of this weather, Zhang et al. explored the role that lunar atmospheric tides play in the density of thermosphere air.

  13. Role of asymptomatic carriers and weather variables in persistent transmission of malaria in an endemic district of Assam, India

    PubMed Central

    Das, Nani Gopal; Dhiman, Sunil; Talukdar, Pranab Kumar; Goswami, Diganta; Rabha, Bipul; Baruah, Indra; Veer, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Background Malaria transmission is perennial in the Assam–Arunachal Pradesh interstate border areas in the Sonitpur district of Assam, India. A yearlong study was carried out on the incidence of symptomatic and asymptomatic malaria and the role of asymptomatic malaria carriers in persistent transmission of the disease. The relationships between malaria incidence and weather parameters were also investigated. Methods Active and mass blood surveys were conducted on a monthly basis in Bengenajuli, Sapairaumari Pathar, and Nigam villages near the Assam–Arunachal Pradesh border. Epidemiological indices were estimated for malaria-positive cases. Multiple linear regression between monthly malaria incidence and monthly average temperature, and relative humidity along with monthly total rainfall was carried out. The known malaria vectors collected in CDC light traps were identified and recorded. Results Slide positivity rate (SPR) and Plasmodium falciparum percent (Pf%) for symptomatic malaria were 26.1 and 79.8, respectively. Prevalence of malaria vectors was observed throughout the year with varying density. Anopheles philippinensis/nivipes and A. annularis were predominant among the seven known vector species recorded currently. Asymptomatic parasitemia was detected throughout the year with SPR ranging from 4.8 to 5.3. Monthly rainfall with 1-month lag had the highest correlation (r=0.92) with SPR. The relationship between SPR and weather factors was established as SPR=?114.22+0.58 T min+1.38 RH+0.03 RF (R 2=0.89; p=0.00). Conclusion Low and relatively constant levels of asymptomatic parasitemia was present in the study area. High malaria vector density and presence of asymptomatic malaria parasite carriers were responsible for persistent malaria transmission in the region. This study concludes that passive detection and prompt treatment of asymptomatic carriers is essential for preventing persistent disease transmission. Rainfall along with some other weather variables may be used for predicting the malaria epidemics in the region. The predictive information could be useful to target resources more effectively. PMID:25595688

  14. Longitudinal variation of tides in the MLT region: 2. Relative effects of solar radiative and latent heating

    E-print Network

    Forbes, Jeffrey

    Click Here for Full Article Longitudinal variation of tides in the MLT region: 2. Relative effects for vertically propagating tides that impose longitude variability on mesospherelower thermosphere (MLT) winds is more important than latent heating in accounting for MLT longitude variability due to tides although

  15. Waves: Internal Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.

    1999-01-01

    Oceanic internal tides are internal waves with tidal periodicities. They are ubiquitous throughout the ocean, although generally more pronounced near large bathymetric features such as mid-ocean ridges and continental slopes. The internal vertical displacements associated with these waves can be extraordinarily large. Near some shelf breaks where the surface tides are strong, internal displacements (e.g., of an isothermal surface) can exceed 200 meters. Displacements of 10 meters in the open ocean are not uncommon. The associated current velocities are usually comparable to or larger than the currents of the surface tide. On continental shelves internal tides can occasionally generate packets of internal solitons, which are detectable in remote sensing imagery. Other common nonlinear features are generation of higher harmonics (e.g., 6-hr waves) and wave breaking. Internal tides are known to be an important energy source for mixing of shelf waters. Recent research suggests that they may also be a significant energy source for deep-ocean mixing.

  16. Variability of the chemistry of streamwater and bedrock groundwater in a small catchment at a weathered granite mountain, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, M.; Kosugi, K.; Banba, N.; Shimogakiuchi, Y.; Tani, M.; Fukagawa, R.

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have noted that bedrock groundwater is one of the important factors influencing stream discharge and streamwater chemistry. To better understand the dynamics of bedrock groundwater, we investigated groundwater table movement and water chemistry of bedrock groundwater using dense borehole wells at a small catchment in a mountainous area. The study was performed at the Fudoji Experimental Watershed located in the Tanakami Mountains in the southeastern part of central Japan. Precipitation was monitored and discharges were observed at eight small catchments, ranging in area from 0.1 to 2.3 ha. Seven small catchments (subcatchments) were included in the largest catchment (2.3 ha), within which we installed 61 borehole wells. Rainwater, streamwater from the small catchments and bedrock groundwater from the borehole wells were sampled, and the concentrations of major ions, SiO2 and the water stable-isotope ratios (d18O and dD) were measured. The results indicated that there were several fluctuating characteristics and that these characteristics of groundwater table change had locality. At the area having higher altitude in the ridge, the bedrock groundwater-table changes were gradual but the ranges of fluctuation were larger than those of the lower wells. At the lower-altitude points, although the bedrock groundwater table responded rapidly, the ranges of fluctuation of the groundwater table were small relative to those of the higher points. Based on the groundwater flux analysis, bedrock groundwater moves across the surface divide. A catchment inflowed by a neighboring catchment showed a high specific discharge. The results of chemistries indicated that although the weathering processes were similar in the catchment, the weathering level varied among the borehole wells. The chemistries of bedrock groundwater at each catchment and of streamwater at each catchment showed large variability. The concentrations of Na+ and Ca2+ had local characteristics, but no clear characteristics were observed among other bedrock groundwater components. The chemical concentrations of bedrock groundwater were higher than those of streamwater. These results indicate that complex processes of chemical dynamics occur in the weathered bedrock and from the weathered bedrock to the stream.

  17. Integrating interannual climate variability forecasts into weather-indexed crop insurance. The case of Malawi, Kenya and Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicarelli, M.; Giannini, A.; Osgood, D.

    2009-12-01

    In this study we explore the potential for re-insurance schemes built on regional climatic forecasts. We focus on micro-insurance contracts indexed on precipitation in 9 villages in Kenya, Tanzania (Eastern Africa) and Malawi (Southern Africa), and analyze the precipitation patterns and payouts resulting from El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The inability to manage future climate risk represents a “poverty trap” for several African regions. Weather shocks can potentially destabilize not only household, but also entire countries. Governments in drought-prone countries, donors and relief agencies are becoming aware of the importance to develop an ex-ante risk management framework for weather risk. Joint efforts to develop innovative mechanisms to spread and pool risk such as microinsurance and microcredit are currently being designed in several developing countries. While ENSO is an important component in modulating the rainfall regime in tropical Africa, the micro-insurance experiments currently under development to address drought risk among smallholder farmers in this region do not take into account ENSO monitoring or forecasting yet. ENSO forecasts could be integrated in the contracts and reinsurance schemes could be designed at the continental scale taking advantage of the different impact of ENSO on different regions. ENSO is associated to a bipolar precipitation pattern in Southern and Eastern Africa. La Niña years (i.e. Cold ENSO Episodes) are characterized by dry climate in Eastern Africa and wet climate in Southern Africa. During El Niño (or Warm Episode) the precipitation dipole is inverted, and Eastern Africa experiences increased probability for above normal rainfall (Halpert and Ropelewski, 1992, Journal of Climate). Our study represents the first exercise in trying to include ENSO forecasts in micro weather index insurance contract design. We analyzed the contracts payouts with respect to climate variability. In particular (i) we simulated possible payouts using historical precipitation data and analyzed the differences between years with different ENSO states from 1961 to 2005; (ii) we applied Monte Carlo methods to simulate precipitation distributions in each location and calculated the mean and variance of payouts associated to different ENSO states. The results obtained from historical precipitation data indicate that more abundant rainfall reduces payouts and the risk of loan default during La Niña in southern Kenya and Malawi, during El Niño in Tanzania. The results of the Monte Carlo simulations confirm our findings. Our results suggest that re-insurance schemes could be successfully designed to exploit the anti-correlation patterns related to interannual climate variability for different regions in Africa. Moreover, the exploratory framework presented can potentially be refined applied to other regions (e.g. Central and Latin America).

  18. Types of Tides and Tidal Currents

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This text discusses differences in ocean tides. Along America's Atlantic Coast, two high and low tides occur daily. Such tides are called semidiurnal. On the north shore of the Gulf of Mexico, the tide is diurnal, meaning that it moves in and out again once a day while in the Pacific Northwest, there are mixed tides, two highs and two lows a day, characterized by significant disparity between successive tides. The site also explains flood current or flood tide, ebb current or ebb tide, and slack water or slack tide. There is a detailed discussion of spring tide and neap tide and also an explanation of the difference between riptide and tiderip.

  19. Characteristics that Help Households Weather Climate Variability, Now and in the Future

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. G. Phillips; A. Seth

    2002-01-01

    A number of characteristics of rural livelihood management are directly related to improving resilience against the impacts of seasonal variability in climate, such as diversification of crops or income strategies. However, traditional strategies that confer resilience to the household may be difficult to sustain in the modern era. Additionally, the frequency and distribution of extreme rainfall events or seasons may

  20. Florida Red Tide Current Status

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Fish and Wildlife Research Institute website provides links to several Florida-based red tide sites. These sites include the current status of Florida's red tide, a photo gallery of red tide distribution maps, and regional Florida red tide statuses. The site expands further on its research and contains information on the Florida manatee, Florida panther, freshwater, geographic information systems/mapping, habitat, saltwater and wildlife. This is a nice resource for a broad overview of Florida ecosystems and natural resources.

  1. Science 101: What causes tides?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Deborah Donovan

    2004-07-01

    Tides exhibit predictable cycles on daily, monthly, and yearly scales. The magnitude of the tides is dependent on the position of the Earth and Moon in relation to the Sun, but is also influenced by other factors. This is a brief introduction to what causes tides.

  2. Climate Variability, Weather and Enteric Disease Incidence in New Zealand: Time Series Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Aparna; Ikeda, Takayoshi; French, Nigel; Baker, Michael G.; Hales, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Background Evaluating the influence of climate variability on enteric disease incidence may improve our ability to predict how climate change may affect these diseases. Objectives To examine the associations between regional climate variability and enteric disease incidence in New Zealand. Methods Associations between monthly climate and enteric diseases (campylobacteriosis, salmonellosis, cryptosporidiosis, giardiasis) were investigated using Seasonal Auto Regressive Integrated Moving Average (SARIMA) models. Results No climatic factors were significantly associated with campylobacteriosis and giardiasis, with similar predictive power for univariate and multivariate models. Cryptosporidiosis was positively associated with average temperature of the previous month (??=? 0.130, SE?=? 0.060, p <0.01) and inversely related to the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI) two months previously (??=? ?0.008, SE?=? 0.004, p <0.05). By contrast, salmonellosis was positively associated with temperature (? ?=?0.110, SE?=?0.020, p<0.001) of the current month and SOI of the current (? ?=?0.005, SE?=?0.002, p<0.050) and previous month (? ?=?0.005, SE?=?0.002, p<0.05). Forecasting accuracy of the multivariate models for cryptosporidiosis and salmonellosis were significantly higher. Conclusions Although spatial heterogeneity in the observed patterns could not be assessed, these results suggest that temporally lagged relationships between climate variables and national communicable disease incidence data can contribute to disease prediction models and early warning systems. PMID:24376707

  3. A complete spherical harmonic approach to luni-solar tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, S. R.

    1989-01-01

    In this work a spherical harmonic theory of ocean tides is presented. The theory is based on Laplace tide equations modified to include turbulence with constant eddy viscosity, linearized bottom friction, and oceanic loading and self-gravitation. Variable bathymetry is also treated in harmonic terms, and no-flow boundary conditions are applied at continental coastlines. The tide and boundary constraint equations are reduced to matrix form and solved by a weighted least-squares procedure. Five zonal luni-solar tides, ranging in period from 14 days to 18.6 yr, are investigated using the theory; such tides have typically been difficult to compute using traditional numerical approaches. The polar motion and changes in the length of day induced by these long-period tides are calculated. Tidal solutions are compared extensively with results from other tidal theories and from recent satellite and sea-level observations. The greatest limitation to accurate prediction of zonal tides - for any theory - appears to be the marginal failure of all tide theories to conserve mass globally; the use of additional mass constraints may be warranted.

  4. How reliable is the offline linkage of Weather Research & Forecasting Model (WRF) and Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chunling; Dennis, Robin L.

    2014-05-01

    The aim for this research is to evaluate the ability of the offline linkage of Weather Research & Forecasting Model (WRF) and Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model to produce hydrological, e.g. evaporation (ET), soil moisture (SM), runoff, and baseflow. First, the VIC model was run by using observed meteorological data and calibrated in the Upper Mississippi River Basin (UMRB) from 1980 to 2010. Subsequently, a simulation based on an offline linkage of WRF and VIC was performed in the UMRB with the calibrated parameters established above from 2006 to 2009. Standard measured meteorological inputs to VIC were replaced by WRF meteorological variables. A spatiotemporal comparison of offline simulated ET, SM, runoff, and baseflow produced by the VIC calibrated run (base data) and by the offline linkage run was conducted. The results showed that the offline linkage of VIC with WRF was able to achieve good agreement in the simulation of monthly and daily soil moisture, and monthly evaporation. This suggests the VIC linkage should function without causing a large change in the moisture budget. However, the offline linkage showed most disagreement in daily and monthly runoff, and baseflow which is related to errors in WRF precipitation.

  5. Wind, waves, and tides

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. F. Merriam

    1978-01-01

    Wind, waves, and tides are of interest today as possible future energy sources primarily because of their nondepletable character and their favorable environmental aspect, in comparison with energy technologies presently in use. Studies comparing the cost of energy often have difficulties making a case for immediate economic viability of the renewable sources. If, however, oil and gas resources of the

  6. Tides and Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, R.

    2014-04-01

    The relatively low luminosities of M dwarfs, white dwarfs, and brown dwarfs result in habitable zones that are close enough in for strong tidal processes between the planet and its host to occur. As is well known, tidal despinning can result in slow or synchronous rotation for close-in planets, but recent investigations have revealed that tides impact habitability in other ways. Tides can drive planetary obliquity to 0, eliminating seasons and creating strong cold traps at the poles. Tides can force a migration of the semi-major axis, possibly removing planets from the habitable zone. Tidal despinning and orbital evolution produces internal heating that can alter both the interior and the atmosphere. For modest eccentricities, tidal heating can be comparable to the modern Earth's (non-tidal) energy sources, changing the thermal profile in the planet and possibly quenching dynamo generation. For larger eccentricities tidal heating can be orders of magnitude larger, suggesting some super-Earths are actually "super-Ios." In extreme cases tidal heating could trigger a runaway greenhouse for hundreds of millions of years, threatening permanent sterilization. Tides damp eccentricity, which lowers the heating rate, but companion planets can perturb orbits and maintain non-zero eccentricities. In some cases, tidal heating sustained by companions could power geochemical cycles that permit habitability for trillions of years.

  7. Florida's Red Tide Infestation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    CBS News

    This CBS news article reports a toxic algae bloom that spread along the Florida's west coast in 2001, threatening the wildlife of Tampa Bay's estuary. The article briefly discusses the cause of the red tide and its affect on the shellfish industry.

  8. Ocean tide energy converter

    SciTech Connect

    Rainey, D.E.

    1980-06-24

    A tide motor energy source includes a tidal piston with a valved chamber. The piston drives a hydraulic ram to generate electrical power through a pressure accumulator and hydraulic motor. The ram can be locked hydraulically to enable the tidal piston to be held fixed at a desired elevation and the valves in the chamber permit it to be filled with water or air. The piston with its chamber filled with air at its low tide position and then released for controlled ascent while submerged acts as a submerged float for driving the ram upwardly while the tide runs in during one phase of its operation. The piston with its chamber filled with water while locked at its highest position as the tide begins to run out, and then released to fall under control, acts as a weight suspended in air after the water level drops below the piston for driving the ram downwardly during the second phase of its operation. The rising and falling motion of the tidal piston is used as the energy source.

  9. Time Series Analyses of Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease Integrating Weather Variables

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yuanbin; Wang, Fan; Wang, Bin; Tao, Shaohua; Zhang, Huiping; Liu, Sai; Ramirez, Oscar; Zeng, Qiyi

    2015-01-01

    Background The past decade witnessed an increment in the incidence of hand foot mouth disease (HFMD) in the Pacific Asian region; specifically, in Guangzhou China. This emphasized the requirement of an early warning system designed to allow the medical community to better prepare for outbreaks and thus minimize the number of fatalities. Methods Samples from 1,556 inpatients (hospitalized) and 11,004 outpatients (non-admitted) diagnosed with HFMD were collected in this study from January 2009 to October 2013. Seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (SARIMA) model was applied to establish high predictive model for inpatients and outpatient as well as three viral serotypes (EV71, Pan-EV and CA16). To integrate climate variables in the data analyses, data from eight climate variables were simultaneously obtained during this period. Significant climate variable identified by correlation analyses was executed to improve time series modeling as external repressors. Results Among inpatients with HFMD, 248 (15.9%) were affected by EV71, 137 (8.8%) were affected by Pan-EV+, and 436 (28.0%) were affected by CA16. Optimal Univariate SARIMA model was identified: (2,0,3)(1,0,0)52 for inpatients, (0,1,0)(0,0,2)52 for outpatients as well as three serotypes (EV71, (1,0,1)(0,0,1)52; CA16, (1,0,1)(0,0,0)52; Pan-EV, (1,0,1)(0,0,0)52). Using climate as our independent variable, precipitation (PP) was first identified to be associated with inpatients (r = 0.211, P = 0.001), CA16-serotype (r = 0.171, P = 0.007) and outpatients (r = 0.214, P = 0.01) in partial correlation analyses, and was then shown a significant lag in cross-autocorrelation analyses. However, inclusion of PP [lag -3 week] as external repressor showed a moderate impact on the predictive performance of the SARIMA model described here-in. Conclusion Climate patterns and HFMD incidences have been shown to be strongly correlated. The SARIMA model developed here can be a helpful tool in developing an early warning system for HFMD. PMID:25729897

  10. Red Tide in the Northeast

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Elenor Ely

    This Rhode Island Sea Grant fact sheet provides information about red tide algal blooms in New England. It addresses where and when red tides occur, how to know if shellfish are safe to consume, and other important facts about red tide. The site features a black and white picture of the dinoflagellate responsible for red tide in New England and a regional map of where infected shell fish have been found. It also features links to other red tide related sites and a list of pertinent reading material.

  11. The effects of daily weather variables on psychosis admissions to psychiatric hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, Stephen; Kinsella, Anthony; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard

    2013-07-01

    Several studies have noted seasonal variations in admission rates of patients with psychotic illnesses. However, the changeable daily meteorological patterns within seasons have never been examined in any great depth in the context of admission rates. A handful of small studies have posed interesting questions regarding a potential link between psychiatric admission rates and meteorological variables such as environmental temperature (especially heat waves) and sunshine. In this study, we used simple non-parametric testing and more complex ARIMA and time-series regression analysis to examine whether daily meteorological patterns (wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, rainfall, sunshine, sunlight and temperature) exert an influence on admission rates for psychotic disorders across 12 regions in Ireland. Although there were some weak but interesting trends for temperature, barometric pressure and sunshine, the meteorological patterns ultimately did not exert a clinically significant influence over admissions for psychosis. Further analysis is needed.

  12. SUAVE: a UV telescope for space weather and solar variability studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damé, L.; Meftah, M.; Irbah, A.; Hauchecorne, A.; Keckhut, P.; Quémerais, E.

    2014-07-01

    SUAVE (Solar Ultraviolet Advanced Variability Experiment) is a far ultraviolet (FUV) imaging solar telescope of novel design for ultimate thermal stability and long lasting performances. SUAVE is a 90 mm Ritchey- Chrétien telescope with SiC (Silicon Carbide) mirrors and no entrance window for long and uncompromised observations in the UV (no coatings of mirrors, flux limited to less than a solar constant on filters to avoid degradation), associated with an ultimate thermal control (heat evacuation, focus control, stabilization). Design of the telescope and early thermal modeling leading to a representative breadboard (a R and T program supported by CNES) will be presented. SUAVE is the main instrument of the SUITS (Solar Ultraviolet Influence on Troposphere/Stratosphere) microsatellite mission, a small-size mission proposed to CNES and ESA.

  13. Is coastal mean sea level rising faster than the global mean? A comparison between tide gauges and satellite altimetry

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Is coastal mean sea level rising faster than the global mean? A comparison between tide gauges 2008; accepted 9 January 2009; published 6 March 2009. [1] Based on a careful selection of tide gauges. Although trends agree well, tide gauges-based mean sea level exhibits much larger interannual variability

  14. Altimetry, Orbits and Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, O. L.

    1984-01-01

    The nature of the orbit error and its effect on the sea surface heights calculated with satellite altimetry are explained. The elementary concepts of celestial mechanics required to follow a general discussion of the problem are included. Consideration of errors in the orbits of satellites with precisely repeating ground tracks (SEASAT, TOPEX, ERS-1, POSEIDON, amongst past and future altimeter satellites) are detailed. The theoretical conclusions are illustrated with the numerical results of computer simulations. The nature of the errors in this type of orbits is such that this error can be filtered out by using height differences along repeating (overlapping) passes. This makes them particularly valuable for the study and monitoring of changes in the sea surface, such as tides. Elements of tidal theory, showing how these principles can be combined with those pertinent to the orbit error to make direct maps of the tides using altimetry are presented.

  15. Red Tide Activities

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Making Waves

    This University of South Florida web site contains links to the article "Tiny Toxic Terrors: Harmful Algal Blooms" and four computer-based activities that teach students about various aspects of red tide. Activities include: "Where could they be?," "Is it a plant or animal cell?," "What is bioluminescence?," and "How does plankton shape affect plankton movement?" Each activity contains hyperlinks to pertinent materials, maps, and information to complete the activity.

  16. Deep sea tides determination from GEOS-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, G. A.; Yanaway, A.

    1978-01-01

    GEOS 3 altimeter data in a 5 degree X 5 degree square centered at 30 deg N, 70 deg W were analyzed to evaluate deep sea tide determination from a spacecraft. The signal to noise ratio of known tidal variability to altimeter measurement of sea level above the ellipsoid was 0.1. A sample was obtained in a 5 deg x 5 deg area approximately once every four days. The randomly spaced time series was analyzed using two independent least squares techniques.

  17. Tides of the Caribbean Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Kjerfve, B.

    1981-05-20

    Analysis of tidal characteristics from 45 gauge locations indicates that the Caribbean Sea has a microtidal range, for the most part between 10 and 20 cm. The tide is primarily either mixed semidiurnal or mixed diurnal but a substantial section from Puerto Rico to Venezuela experiences diurnal tides. Empirical charts of six component tides (M/sub 2/, S/sub 2/, N/sub 2/, K/sub 1/, O/sub 1/, and P/sub 1/) show local detail of phase and amplitude. Each of the semidiurnal component tides is characterized by anticlockwise rotating amphidromes centered in the eastern Caribbean. There is evidence of strong radiational forcing of the S/sub 2/ tide in the south-western Caribbean. The diurnal component tides are largely uniform in both phase and amplitude for most of the western and central Caribbean. However, the diurnal phases increase rapidly towards the northwest and the Yucatan Channel.

  18. Longitudinal variation of tides in the MLT region: 1. Tides driven by tropospheric net radiative heating

    E-print Network

    Forbes, Jeffrey

    Click Here for Full Article Longitudinal variation of tides in the MLT region: 1. Tides driven to estimate the corresponding MLT tides is the GlobalScale Wave Model (GSWM). The radiative flux products are 20 ± 5 K for the diurnal tide and 6 ± 2 K for the semidiurnal tide. The computed tides

  19. SWUSV: a microsatellite mission for space weather early forecasting of major flares and CMEs and the complete monitoring of the ultraviolet solar variability influence on climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damé, Luc

    The SWUSV (Space Weather & Ultraviolet Solar Variability) proposed microsatellite mission encompasses three major scientific objectives: (1) Space Weather including the prediction and detection of major eruptions and coronal mass ejections (using Lyman-Alpha and Herzberg continuum imaging and H-Alpha ground support); (2) solar forcing on the climate through radiation and their interactions with the local stratosphere (UV spectral irradiance from 180 to 400 nm by bands of 10 to 20 nm, including ozone, plus Lyman-Alpha and the CN bandhead); (3) simultaneous local radiative budget of the Earth, UV to IR, with an accuracy better than 1% in differential. The mission is on a sun-synchronous polar orbit and proposes 5 instruments to the model payload: SUAVE (Solar Ultraviolet Advanced Variability Experiment), an optimized telescope for FUV (Lyman-Alpha) and MUV (200-220 nm Herzberg continuum) imaging (sources of variability); UPR (Ultraviolet Passband Radiometers), with 64 UV filter radiometers; a vector magnetometer; thermal plasma measurements and Langmuir probes; and a total and spectral solar irradiance and Earth radiative budget ensemble (SERB, Solar irradiance & Earth Radiative Budget). SWUSV is proposed as a small mission to CNES and to ESA for a possible flight as early as 2020-2021. With opening to Chinese collaboration (ESA-CAS Small Mission) a further instrument could be added (HEBS, High Energy Burst Spectrometers) to reinforced Space Weather flares prediction objectives.

  20. NOAA: About Water Levels, Tides and Currents

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    A comprehensive lesson on what causes tides, current and past techniques for predicting tides, how and why water level is measured, and the challenges of measuring water currents. Site provides additional links to other NOAA tide resources.

  1. The ultimate high tide

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, R.G. (Florida Dept. of Natural Resources, Tallahassee (USA))

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the possible coastal impacts of a rise in sea level. Control measures that are available to coastal communities are emphasized, including pumping of seawater into the ground, replenishing beach sand, protection or moving of potable-water intakes, elevating roadways, and building dikes. Economics will determine which, if any, measures are reasonable at a particular site. There is an upward trend in the mean CO{sub 2} concentration and predictions about the greenhouse effect are creating a rising tide of concern.

  2. Geography & Weather. Weather Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mogil, H. Michael; Levine, Barbara G.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are 35 activities that center around television and newspaper weather reports. Geography, weather, and other disciplines are included as well as various grade levels. Available resource materials are listed and their uses explained. Parent, administrator, and other faculty member involvement is emphasized. (KR)

  3. Eddy modulation of Internal Tides over the East Pacific Rise near 10°

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, X.; Thurnherr, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    Internal tides are ubiquitous in the World Ocean and are one of the dominant energy sources for deep ocean mixing. Here, semidiurnal internal tides in the deep ocean near a segment of the East Pacific Rise between 9o and 10oN are examined using observations from a set of current meter moorings. The data were collected during the LADDER project (LArval Dispersal along the Deep East pacific Rise). The observations reveal significant spatial and temporal variations of the semidiurnal internal tide. Directly over the ridge crest, the semidiurnal internal tide is dominated by the zonal component and coherent along the entire ridge segment. In the direction across the ridge crest, the semidiurnal internal tide is not clearly coherent and its magnitude decreases with increasing distance from the ridge crest. Vertically, the semidiurnal internal tide is coherent in the few hundred meters near the sea-floor, except for the bottom boundary layer. The semidiurnal internal tide at all stations reveals significant temporal variability in both kinetic energy and vertical shear. By comparing the temporal modulation with regional background forcing, it is revealed that the temporal modulation of the semidiurnal internal tide is mainly controlled by the spring-neap cycle of barotropic tides. In addition, low-frequency flows, including mesoscale eddies, also play a role in modulating the semidiurnal internal tide, especially at the axial stations. By examining the relationship between the tidal ellipses and the strike of the ridge crest, we conclude that the semidiurnal internal tide directly over the ridge crest is dominated by locally generated internal tides. The findings underscore the importance of accurately representing topography in ocean general circulation models and the fact that the impacts of low-frequency flows, including mesoscale eddies, should be taken into account when simulating internal tides as well as understanding tide-induced ocean mixing.

  4. Tides in water saturated rock

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hans-Joachim Kctmpel

    Analysis of water table records from wells or boreholes often reveals the presence of tidal fluctuations. Amplitudes of well tides can attain several centimeters when the well or borehole is open to a confined aquifer. The phenomenon reflects extension and compression cycles of the aquifer rock, i.e. volume strain tides of a water saturated formation. Besides tidal fluctuations, barometric pressure

  5. Tide pushing shellfishers into red

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Rick Hampson

    This USA Today article provides very general information about the 2005 red tide outbreak off the Gulf of Maine. It offers possible explanations for the outbreak, what is being done to protect people from hazards related to red tide, and how the outbreak has devastated local shellfishers.

  6. Tidal variability in the lower thermosphere: Comparison of Whole Atmosphere Model (WAM) simulations with observations from TIMED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akmaev, R. A.; Fuller-Rowell, T. J.; Wu, F.; Forbes, J. M.; Zhang, X.; Anghel, A. F.; Iredell, M. D.; Moorthi, S.; Juang, H.-M.

    2008-02-01

    The upper atmosphere and ionosphere exhibit variability on spatial and temporal scales characteristic of tides and planetary waves originating in the lower atmosphere. To study their generation, vertical propagation, possible nonlinear interactions and effects a new Whole Atmosphere Model (WAM) has been developed as part of the Integrated Dynamics through Earth's Atmosphere (IDEA) project. WAM is a 150-layer general circulation model based on the US National Weather Service's operational Global Forecast System (GFS) model extended upward to cover the atmosphere from the ground to about 600 km. First simulations reveal the presence of migrating and nonmigrating tides modulated at planetary wave periods in the upper atmosphere. Comparisons with observations from the TIMED satellite in the lower thermosphere show that WAM reproduces the seasonal variability of tides remarkably well, including the diurnal eastward harmonic with zonal wavenumber 3 (DE3) recently implicated in the observed spatial morphology of the ionosphere.

  7. Modelling the barotropic tide along the West-Iberian margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quaresma, Luis S.; Pichon, Annick

    2013-01-01

    The present work explores the use of a numerical model to predict the barotropic tide along the West-Iberian region, extending from the Gulf of Cadiz to the Bay of Biscay and from the shelf to nearby seamounts (Gorringe and Galicia banks). The model is used, in a single isopycnal layer, to simulate the 2D propagation of the following eight principal tidal constituents: M2, S2, N2, K2, K1, O1, P1 and Q1. Astronomical tide-raising force is introduced into the equations of motion in order to improve model results. Recently updated global tide solutions are optimally combined to force a polychromatic tidal spectrum at the open boundaries. New bathymetry is built from hydrographic databases and used to increase the accuracy of the model, especially over the Portuguese continental shelf. Data from several tide gauges and acoustic Doppler current profilers are used to validate the numerical solution. Tidal amplitude and tidal current velocity solutions are evaluated by classical harmonic analysis of in situ and simulated time-series. Model outputs demonstrate the improvement of the regional hydrodynamic tide solution from earlier references. The harmonic solutions highlight small-scale variability over the shelf, and over nearby seamounts, due to the generation of diurnal continental shelf waves and topographic modulation of the semi-diurnal tidal ellipses. The barotropic forcing term is calculated over the study region and the main internal tide generation "hotspots" are revealed.

  8. Lunar Core and Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2,3,4] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening, which in the past has been marginal but improving [3,4,5], now seems significant. Direct detection of the core moment has not yet been achieved.

  9. Relative sea level trend and variability in the central Mediterranean in the time span 1872-2014 from tide gauge data: implications for future projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anzidei, Marco; Vecchio, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    We used tidal data collected in the time span 1872-2014 from a set of historical and modern stations located in the central Mediterranean, along the coasts of Italy, France, Slovenia and Croatia. The longest records span across the last two or three centuries for the tidal stations of Genova, Marseille, Trieste and Venice. While data from Bakar, Dubrovink, Rovinji and Split, all located along the coast of the Adriatic sea, provide valid records for a time span about 50 years long. In addition to these stations, since 1998 become available for the Italian region new sea level data from the dense national tidal network (www.mareografico.it). These digital stations are collecting data continuously at 10 minute sampling interval with a nominal accuracy at 1 mm. Therefore, in addition to the historical stations, we have the opportunity to analyze a sea level data set that cover about the last 16 years. In this study we show and discuss the results of our analysis of sea level data for the central Mediterranean, providing new insights on sea level trend and variability for about the past 140 years. Finally, based on sea level data and IPCC reports, we provide future sea level projections for this region for the year 2100 with implications for coastal flooding of lowland areas.

  10. Integrating filamentous ‘green tide’ algae into tropical pond-based aquaculture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pedro H. de Paula Silva; Shannon McBride; Rocky de Nys; Nicholas A. Paul

    2008-01-01

    ‘Green tide’ algae bloom in eutrophic environments with fast growth rates and efficient nutrient uptake. These same characteristics are sought after for algae in integrated aquaculture systems. We examined the effect of two key variables, salinity and total ammonia nitrogen (TAN), on the growth of three filamentous ‘green tide’ algae, Cladophora coelothrix, Chaetomorpha indica and Ulva sp. Survival and growth

  11. Weather Forecasting

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This activity is designed to give students an understanding of how to forecast weather and how to use weather reports for their personal benefit. They will be able to tell what weather is, read weather instruments, understand basic cloud formations in relation to the weather, and make forecasts for two days in advance.

  12. Perigean Spring Tides and Apogean Neap Tides in History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Donald W.

    2012-01-01

    On January 4, 1912 - almost exactly 100 years ago - both a full Moon and a lunar perigee occurred, with these two events separated by only a few minutes of time and with the Earth near perihelion. The resulting lunar distance (356,375 km) on that date stands as the closest approach of the Moon to the Earth in an interval of more than 1400 years. The centennial of this extreme lunar perigee is an appropriate time to consider the effect of lunar distance on the range of ocean tides. At most ocean ports, spring tides of increased range occur near new and full Moon. If a lunar perigee falls near new or full Moon, then perigean spring tides of even greater range are possible. Conversely, if a lunar apogee falls near first quarter or last quarter Moon, then apogean neap tides of unusually reduced range can occur. Examples of perigean spring tides include a near-coincidence of lunar perigee and new Moon in December 1340 that may be related to a plot device in Chaucer's "The Franklin's Tale,” a Canterbury tale that describes an extreme high tide covering the rocks on the coast of Brittany in "the cold and frosty season of December.” Another example, the disaster known as the Bristol Channel Flood, occurred shortly after a lunar perigee and new Moon in January 1607. A German U-boat employed an exceptionally high perigean spring tide shortly after the new Moon of October 1939 to enter Scapa Flow by an unexpected route and sink the HMS Royal Oak. An apogean neap tide prevailed during the amphibious assault of the U. S. Marines at Tarawa in November 1943, making the eventual victory more costly because the landing craft were unable to reach the island and instead grounded on the surrounding reef.

  13. M2 world ocean tide from tide gauge measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, O.; Mazzega, P. (CNES/CNRS, Toulouse (France))

    1991-06-01

    An empirical model of the M2 oceanic tide has been computed form the harmonic constants of a subset of deep sea and coastal tide gauge measurements. The optimal interpolation of these data based on inverse theory' uses a priori covariance functions deduced from a global hydrodynamical model. The inverse solution, produced with its associated error maps and samples of error spectra, is surprisingly good when compared to in situ data and to a hydrodynamical model.

  14. Tides in the Weddell Sea Robertson et al., 1998 TIDES IN THE WEDDELL SEA

    E-print Network

    Robertson, Robin

    Tides in the Weddell Sea Robertson et al., 1998 TIDES IN THE WEDDELL SEA Robin Robertson, Laurie of baroclinic tides. Model results indicate that tides play a significant role in the circulation and heat flux in the Weddell Sea. We discuss the influence of tides on mean flow through the modified effective bot- tom drag

  15. How Can Conventional Drinking Water Treatment Facilities Build Resilience to Climate and Weather Induced Water Supply Variability?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Water supplies are vulnerable to a host of climate- and weather-related stressors such as droughts, intense storms/flooding, snowpack depletion, sea level changes, and consequences from fires, landslides, and excessive heat or cold. Surface water resources (lakes, reser...

  16. Weather Watch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bratt, Herschell Marvin

    1973-01-01

    Suggests a number of ways in which Federal Aviation Agency weather report printouts can be used in teaching the weather section of meteorology. These weather sequence reports can be obtained free of charge at most major airports. (JR)

  17. Weather Vane

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Fresno Community Science Workshop

    2011-01-01

    In this meteorology activity, learners build weather vanes using straws, paperclips, and cardstock. Learners will explore wind and air resistance as well as how weather vanes are used to understand and predict weather.

  18. Solutions to Avoid Red Tide, Inc.

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Solutions to Avoid Red Tide, Inc.

    This "Solutions to Avoid Red Tide" (START) webpage offers basic information and videos about red tide, effects of red tide, and research being done regarding red tide. START is a grassroots, non-profit organization based in Florida. Their mission is to keep federal, state, and local officials aware of red tide and to get these officials to fund projects to remediate and/or prevent the problem. Information on how to join or help START is also provided.

  19. Red Tide and Shellfish Poisoning

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Maneveldt, Gavin W.

    This EnviroFacts informational page discusses how red tide develops and how people might be affected by this phenomenon. It covers physical damage, oxygen depletion, direct poisoning, and indirect poisoning including paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP), diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP), neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP), amnesiac shellfish poisoning (ASP), and aerosol toxins. The page concludes with a discussion of red tide and the role of the sea fisheries research institute.

  20. Solar heating using the tide

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinal, D.E.

    1980-04-08

    A fixed tank is disposed in the sea adjacent a floating solar still, with a flexible conduit extending between a lower portion of the tank and the interior of the still. A one-way check valve disposed in the lower portion of the tank permits sea water to enter the tank and fill it as the tide rises. As the tide lowers, water flows from the tank through a restriction in the conduit to the solar still.

  1. Hydrochemical and Isotopic Constraints on the Temporal and Spatial Variability of Chemical Weathering and CO2 Fluxes: An Example From the Australian Victorian Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagedorn, B.; Cartwright, I.

    2007-12-01

    Water from a network of 11 pristine rivers draining the Australian Victorian Alps was collected at different locations during (i) high discharge (June 2006) and (ii) low discharge (February 2007) conditions and was analyzed for dissolved major ions, ?2H and ?18O, and ?34S of dissolved sulphate. River water chemistry implies that solutes are largely derived from precipitation and chemical weathering of silicate lithologies. Cl/Br ratios as low as 30 molar suggest that rivers have not dissolved halite, however, higher salinity (?100 mmol/L) winter samples have intermediate Cl/Br ratios (600 to 2000 molar) that are attributed to minor halite dissolution at the onset of the rainy season. Subsequent mixing of river water homogenizes ratios and evaporation is the dominant process that increases downstream salinities. Oxygen and Hydrogen isotopes also indicate that mixing and evaporation have occurred. Despite the lack of carbonate outcrops in the study area and uniform negative calcite saturation indices, the dissolution of hydrothermal calcite may account for up to 67% of the total dissolved cations, generating up to 92% of all dissolved Ca and Mg. The sulphur isotope data (16 to 20°CDT) indicates that the dissolved SO4 is derived predominantly from atmospheric deposition and minor gypsum weathering and not from bacterial reduction of FeS. This militates against sulphuric acid weathering in Victorian rivers. Si/(Na* + K*) ratios suggest that silicate weathering is dominated by the transformation of plagioclase (An40) to smectite and, to a lesser extend, the production of kaolinite. In total, chemical weathering consumes 17.6 x 106 (summer) to 71.59 x 106(winter) mol/km2/yr CO2, with the highest values in rivers draining the basement outcrops rather than sedimentary rocks. This range is at the upper end of the global scale and shows that the predominance of fresh silicate lithologies exerts the main control on higher CO2 fluxes; temperature and runoff, in turn, are crucial variables for the inter- seasonal variability in this region. Data on discharge and major ion chemistry, measured in regular intervals between 1977 and 1990, support this; however, the timing of absolute maxima of Si/(Na* + K*) and CO2 flux peaks do not coincide. We suggest that the combination of dissolution of diatoms that precipitated under low flow- and high temperature conditions in the tributaries and Na-adsorption by suspended clay particles, that were probably redistributed locally after bushfires and/or duststorms during drought periods in the early 1980's, as mechanisms to spontaneously elevate Si/(Na* + K*) ratios and, when coupled with irregular discharge fluctuations, explain deviations from seasonal CO2 fluxes.

  2. Tides in Colliding Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Pierre-Alain; Renaud, Florent

    Long tails and streams of stars are the most noticeable traces of galaxy collisions. However, their tidal origin was recognized only less than 50 years ago and more than 10 years after their first observations. This review describes how the idea of galactic tides has emerged thanks to advances in numerical simulations, from the first simulations that included tens of particles to the most sophisticated ones with tens of millions of them and state-of-the-art hydrodynamical prescriptions. Theoretical aspects pertaining to the formation of tidal tails are then presented. The third part turns to observations and underlines the need for collecting deep multi-wavelength data to tackle the variety of physical processes exhibited by collisional debris. Tidal tails are not just stellar structures, but turn out to contain all the components usually found in galactic disks, in particular atomic/molecular gas and dust. They host star-forming complexes and are able to form star-clusters or even second-generation dwarf galaxies. The final part of the review discusses what tidal tails can tell us (or not) about the structure and the content of present-day galaxies, including their dark components, and explains how they may be used to probe the past evolution of galaxies and the history of their mass assembly. On-going deep wide-field surveys disclose many new low-surface brightness structures in the nearby Universe, offering great opportunities for attempting galactic archeology with tidal tails.

  3. Baroclinic effects and tides on the Cape Hatteras continental shelf

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dana K. Savidge; Catherine R. Edwards; Mark Santana

    2007-01-01

    Seasonal variability has been identified on the shelf near Cape Hatteras in the semidiurnal and diurnal frequency bands. Large summertime semidiurnal currents appear to be an M2 internal tide whose propagation shoreward is supported by strong Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) seasonal stratification. At the southern limit of the MAB, strong MAB stratification gives way to weaker seasonal stratification in the

  4. Wide variability in physical activity environments and weather-related outdoor play policies in child-care centers within a single county of Ohio

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, Kristen A; Sherman, Susan N; Khoury, Jane C; Foster, Karla E; Saelens, Brian E; Kalkwarf, Heidi J

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To examine the variability of physical activity environments and outdoor play-policies in child-care centers, and to determine if they are associated with center demographic characteristics Design Telephone survey—the Early Learning Environments Physical Activity and Nutrition Telephone Survey (ELEPhANTS) Setting Child-care centers in Hamilton County (Cincinnati area), Ohio, 2008–9. Participants Directors of all 185 licensed full-time child-care centers in Hamilton County. Outcome Measures Descriptive measures of center playground and indoor physical activity environments, and weather-related outdoor-play policies. Results 162 (88%) centers responded. Most (93%) centers reported an on-site playground, but only half reported their playgrounds as large, at least 1/3rd covered in shade, or having a variety of portable play equipment. Only half reported having a dedicated indoor gross-motor room where children could be active during inclement weather. Only 20% of centers allowed children to go outside in temperatures below 32°F, and 43% of centers reported allowing children outdoors during light rain. A higher percent of children receiving tuition-assistance was associated with lower quality physical activity facilities and stricter weather-related practices. National accreditation was associated with more physical-activity promoting practices. Conclusion We found considerable variability in the indoor and outdoor playground offerings among child-care centers, even within a single county of Ohio. Per center policy and limited inside options, children’s active opportunities are curtailed due to sub-freezing temperatures or light rain. Policy change and parent/teacher education may be needed to ensure children achieve ample opportunity for daily physical activity. PMID:21199969

  5. Improved estimation of heavy rainfall by weather radar after reflectivity correction and accounting for raindrop size distribution variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazenberg, Pieter; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2015-04-01

    Between 25 and 27 August 2010 a long-duration mesoscale convective system was observed above the Netherlands, locally giving rise to rainfall accumulations exceeding 150 mm. Correctly measuring the amount of precipitation during such an extreme event is important, both from a hydrological and meteorological perspective. Unfortunately, the operational weather radar measurements were affected by multiple sources of error and only 30% of the precipitation observed by rain gauges was estimated. Such an underestimation of heavy rainfall, albeit generally less strong than in this extreme case, is typical for operational weather radar in The Netherlands. In general weather radar measurement errors can be subdivided into two groups: (1) errors affecting the volumetric reflectivity measurements (e.g. ground clutter, radar calibration, vertical profile of reflectivity) and (2) errors resulting from variations in the raindrop size distribution that in turn result in incorrect rainfall intensity and attenuation estimates from observed reflectivity measurements. A stepwise procedure to correct for the first group of errors leads to large improvements in the quality of the estimated precipitation, increasing the radar rainfall accumulations to about 65% of those observed by gauges. To correct for the second group of errors, a coherent method is presented linking the parameters of the radar reflectivity-rain rate (Z-R) and radar reflectivity-specific attenuation (Z-k) relationships to the normalized drop size distribution (DSD). Two different procedures were applied. First, normalized DSD parameters for the whole event and for each precipitation type separately (convective, stratiform and undefined) were obtained using local disdrometer observations. Second, 10,000 randomly generated plausible normalized drop size distributions were used for rainfall estimation, to evaluate whether this Monte Carlo method would improve the quality of weather radar rainfall products. Using the disdrometer information, the best results were obtained in case no differentiation between precipitation type (convective, stratiform and undefined) was made, increasing the event accumulations to more than 80% of those observed by gauges. For the randomly optimized procedure, radar precipitation estimates further improve and closely resemble observations in case one differentiates between precipitation type. However, the optimal parameter sets are very different from those derived from disdrometer observations. It is therefore questionable if single disdrometer observations are suitable for large-scale quantitative precipitation estimation, especially if the disdrometer is located relatively far away from the main rain event, which was the case in this study. In conclusion, this study shows the benefit of applying detailed error correction methods to improve the quality of the weather radar product, but also confirms the need to be cautious using locally obtained disdrometer measurements.

  6. Seasonal and Day-to-day Variations of Thermospheric Tides and Dynamo Fields Studied with a Long-term Whole Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupled Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, H.; Miyoshi, Y.; Fujiwara, H.; Shinagawa, H.

    2014-12-01

    Day-to-day and longer variations of ionospheric electron density, which affect various space weather applications, are caused originally from the solar activity variations and the rotation of the sun as well as the lower atmospheric activity. For the latter source, atmospheric waves such as tides and planetary waves are generated in the moist convection, which propagate through the middle atmosphere affected by various dynamical processes such as their interactions with the mean zonal wind and other waves, and reach the lower thermosphere where they induce dynamo electric fields. According to the recent satellite and ground-based observations, the characteristics of tides and planetary waves in the lower thermosphere are becoming known more clearly, such as the seasonal and latitude variations of major tides, planetary wave-like oscillations, and irregular variations during stratospheric sudden warming, and so on. In this paper, we use a whole atmosphere-ionosphere coupled model called GAIA, and have carried out a simulation from 1996 to 2013 with realistic forcing from the lower atmosphere by nudging the meteorological reanalysis (JRA) into the model. By analyzing the long-term model data, we investigate how the tidal variability and planetary waves in the lower thermosphere produce the seasonal and day-to-day variations in the dynamo electric field as well as the origin of the variations in the lower and middle atmospheres.

  7. UM Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sponsored by The Weather Underground at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, UM Weather bills itself as the "Internet's premier source of weather information." The site offers several general audience tools such as the Fast Forecast for any city in the US, ski weather, and weather cams. But, it also provides access to over two dozen weather software packages, a new computer model forecasts page, and most impressively a list of close to 400 other weather related Web sites. Professionals and researchers will appreciate the non-technical feel of the site and the valuable information they can procure from it.

  8. Severe Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

    2005-04-01

    Meteorologists disagree as to what constitutes severe weather. However, most concur that thunderstorms, tornadoes, and hurricanes, all considered to be "convective" weather, fit the definition of severe weather, which is a weather condition likely to cause hardship. This science guide will explore each of the three weather phenomena. By virtue of their locations, most students are familiar with at least one of the three severe weather events. Students who tour the web sites will have an opportunity to make connections between the familiar and the perhaps less understood weather events.

  9. Galalctic Tides & the Sinusoidal Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, David F.

    2011-05-01

    The sinusoidal potential is a nonNewtonian alternative to dark matter. Instead of ? = -GM/r we write ? = -(GM/r) cos kor, where ko= 2?/ ?o and ?o = Ro/20= 400 pc. Evidence for this choice for the "wavelength” ?o has been given in one article and many previous meetings of the AAS & DDA. The solar system and nearby stars are trapped in a local groove of width ?r < 400 pc. The rapid alternation of attraction and repulsion within the groove gives very strong Galactic radial tides. The epicyclic period is only 7 Myr . The Keplerian period for comets in the middle of the Oort cloud is also 7 Myr. The 1:1 resonance between material in the groove and the cloud provides a new mechanism for filling the Oort cloud. The Oort cloud is emptied by the same strong radial tides. Evidence is found in the 499 comets with calculated 1/aoriginal in the latest Catalogue of Cometary Orbits (Marsden & Williams 2008). . I separate the comets into 12 classes on the basis of Quality (4 types) and semi-major axis aoriginal . For 10 of the 12 classes radial tides dominate Z-tides. The classic Oort cloud comets (1851-1996) have a particularly strong modulation with galactic longitude. This modulation is exactly in those directions where a radial tide would be important. The equally numerous recent Oort comets (1996-2008) show a different evidence for strong radial tides. The recent comets generally have much larger perihelion distances q than the classic ones. Here the evidence is that a radial tide is removing angular momentum from the orbit and thus bringing the perihelion closer to the earth and to observers.

  10. Red Tide off Texas Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Red tides (algae) bloomed late this summer along a 300-mile stretch of Texas' Gulf Coast, killing millions of fish and shellfish as well as making some people sick. State officials are calling this the worst red tide bloom in 14 years. The algae produces a poison that paralyzes fish and prevents them from breathing. There is concern that the deadly algae could impact or even wipe out this year's oyster harvest in Texas, which usually peaks during the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. The red tides were first observed off the Texas coast in mid-August and have been growing steadily in size ever since. Red tides tend to bloom and subside rapidly, depending upon changes in wind speed and direction, water temperature, salinity, and rainfall patterns (as the algae doesn't do as well in fresher water). This true-color image of the Texas Gulf Coast was acquired on September 29, 2000, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The red tide can be seen as the dark reddish discoloration in the ocean running southwest to northeast along the coast. In this scene, the bloom appears to be concentrated north and east of Corpus Christi, just off Matagorda Island. The image was made at 500-meter resolution using a combination of MODIS' visible bands 1 (red), 4 (green), and 3 (blue). The city of Houston can be seen clearly as the large, greyish cluster of pixels to the north and west of Galveston Bay, which is about mid-way up the coastline in this image. Also visible in this image are plumes of smoke, perhaps wildfires, both to the north and northeast of Houston. For more information about red tides, refer to the Texas Red Tide Web site. Image courtesy Andrey Savtchenko, MODIS Data Support Team, and the MODIS Ocean Team, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

  11. BBC Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    At this website, the BBC offers an array of materials dealing with weather. Meteorologists can discover employment opportunities. Individuals with spectacular photographs of weather phenomenon can submit their images to the photo gallery. Students and educators can find introductory materials on basic weather concepts, forecasting, extreme events, and broadcasting the weather. The website offers fun weather-related games and projects, a meteorology glossary, and links to other educational websites.

  12. The tides of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoder, C. F.; Peale, S. J.

    1981-01-01

    A theory is developed for the origin and evaluation of the orbital resonances between the Galilean satellites Io, Europa and Ganymede as a result of the effects of dissipative tides in Jupiter and its satellites. Following a preliminary consideration of the consequences of tidal interaction for satellite orbits and a comprehensive Hamiltonian theory of the resonance interactions which allows terms up to third order in eccentricity to be included, a dynamic model of the origin and evolution of the resonance locks is presented in which the relative expansion of the orbits by tidal torques from Jupiter together with tidal dissipation in Io lead to the rapid driving out of Io until it is captured into a 2:1 resonance with Europa and the resonance with Ganymede is achieved. Consideration of the effects of other commensurabilities on the orbital evolution of the system reveals that second-order Laplace-like resonances would act to excite free eccentricites, while the resonances associated with the two-body 3:1 commensurability could not have been encountered. Analysis of the hypothesis that the Laplace relation is primordial shows that the bounds on the tidal dissipation of Jupiter still can not be relaxed. Recent determinations of the tidal dissipation in Jupiter are discussed, and it is noted that none is sufficiently small to be consistent with the high heat flux estimates for Io. Finally, the possibility of the observational determination of the tidal dissipation in Jupiter by the measurement of the secular acceleration of Io's main motion is considered.

  13. The tides of Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoder, C. F.; Peale, S. J.

    1981-07-01

    A theory is developed for the origin and evaluation of the orbital resonances between the Galilean satellites Io, Europa and Ganymede as a result of the effects of dissipative tides in Jupiter and its satellites. Following a preliminary consideration of the consequences of tidal interaction for satellite orbits and a comprehensive Hamiltonian theory of the resonance interactions which allows terms up to third order in eccentricity to be included, a dynamic model of the origin and evolution of the resonance locks is presented in which the relative expansion of the orbits by tidal torques from Jupiter together with tidal dissipation in Io lead to the rapid driving out of Io until it is captured into a 2:1 resonance with Europa and the resonance with Ganymede is achieved. Consideration of the effects of other commensurabilities on the orbital evolution of the system reveals that second-order Laplace-like resonances would act to excite free eccentricites, while the resonances associated with the two-body 3:1 commensurability could not have been encountered. Analysis of the hypothesis that the Laplace relation is primordial shows that the bounds on the tidal dissipation of Jupiter still can not be relaxed. Recent determinations of the tidal dissipation in Jupiter are discussed, and it is noted that none is sufficiently small to be consistent with the high heat flux estimates for Io. Finally, the possibility of the observational determination of the tidal dissipation in Jupiter by the measurement of the secular acceleration of Io's main motion is considered.

  14. Nonadiabatic resonant dynamic tides and orbital evolution in close binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willems, B.; van Hoolst, T.; Smeyers, P.

    2003-01-01

    This investigation is devoted to the effects of nonadiabatic resonant dynamic tides generated in a uniformly rotating stellar component of a close binary. The companion is considered to move in a fixed Keplerian orbit, and the effects of the centrifugal force and the Coriolis force are neglected. Semi-analytical solutions for the linear, nonadiabatic resonant dynamic tides are derived by means of a two-time variable expansion procedure. The solution at the lowest order of approximation consists of the resonantly excited oscillation mode and displays a phase shift with respect to the tide-generating potential. Expressions are established for the secular variations of the semi-major axis, the orbital eccentricity, and the star's angular velocity of rotation caused by the phase shift. The orders of magnitude of these secular variations are considerably larger than those derived earlier by {{Zahn}} (\\cite{Zahn1977}) for the limiting case of dynamic tides with small frequencies. For a 5 M_sun ZAMS star, an orbital eccentricity e = 0.5, and orbital periods in the range from 2 to 5 days, numerous resonances of dynamic tides with second-degree lower-order g+-modes are seen to induce secular variations of the semi-major axis, the orbital eccentricity, and the star's angular velocity of rotation with time scales shorter than the star's nuclear life time.

  15. Evaluation of a global internal-tide resolving and submesoscale admitting ocean simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubelmann, C.; Menemenlis, D.; Fu, L. L.; Zhao, Z.

    2014-12-01

    We will present ongoing evaluation of a global ocean and sea ice configuration of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm) that has 0.75 to 2.2 km horizontal grid spacing and 1-m thick vertical levels near the surface. Surface boundary conditions are from the 0.14-degree European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) atmospheric operational model analysis, starting in 2011, including atmospheric pressure forcing. The simulation also includes tidal forcing. A unique feature of this simulation is that we save hourly output of full 3-dimensional model prognostic variables, making it a remarkable tool for the study of ocean processes and for the simulation of satellite observations. Although this initial simulation was run without ocean data constraints, it already presents very interesting features and interactions between an exceptionally wide range of scales. The simulation resolves geostrophic eddies and internal tides and admits submesoscale variability and unbalanced dynamics such as internal waves at non-tidal frequencies.We will present some evaluation of these different components based on altimetry observations and moorings. As a first result, the internal tides for the major tidal components have overall realistic amplitudes and spatial patterns compared to independent analyses from altimetry, although some discrepancies arise in equatorial regions. Despite discrepancies with observations, this simulation already constitutes an extremely useful tool for ocean process studies and for satellite observation system experiments, for example, in preparation for the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission. As a preliminary exercise, the simulation has been tested in the SWOT simulator developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (Fu et al., in this session). Some illustrations of the challenges will be presented.

  16. WWW Tide and Current Predictor

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    From the University of South Carolina's Wethey Lab Homepage, the tide and current predictor contains up-to-date basic predictions and a format for obtaining customized predictions. Access to data is organized by location. Location choices include US Upper East Coast (Maine through Virginia), US Lower East Coast (North Carolina through Florida Keys), US Gulf Coast sites (East to West), US West Coast sites (North to South), Northern sites (except Japan) outside contiguous US (East to West), Southern sites outside contiguous US (East to West), and Japan and nearby sites (North to South). Also, the site includes answers to FAQs concerning this tide predictor.

  17. Secular Changes in the Solar Semidiurnal Tide of the Western North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of twentieth century tide gauge records reveals that the solar semidiurnal tide S, has been decreasing in amplitude along the eastern coast of North America and at the mid-ocean site Bermuda. In relative terms the observed rates are unusually large, of order 10% per century. Periods of greatest change, however, are inconsistent among the stations, and roughly half the stations show increasing amplitude since the late 1990s. Excepting the Gulf of Maine, lunar tides are either static or slightly increasing in amplitude; a few stations show decreases. Large changes in solar, but not lunar, tides suggest causes related to variable radiational forcing, but the hypothesis is at present unproven. Citation: Ray, R. D. (2009), Secular changes in the solar semidiurnal tide of the western North Atlantic Ocean

  18. ACOUSTICAL EFFECTS OF INTERNAL TIDES ACOUSTICAL EFFECTS OF INTERNAL TIDES ON SHALLOW WATER

    E-print Network

    Jesus, Sérgio M.

    ACOUSTICAL EFFECTS OF INTERNAL TIDES ACOUSTICAL EFFECTS OF INTERNAL TIDES ON SHALLOW WATER tides on the acoustic propagation. A towed broadband acoustic source and a 4-hydro- phone vertical array dissipates the lunar energy [2]. The internal tide appears to be a key link in the cascade of energy from

  19. Trapped diurnal internal tides, propagating semidiurnal internal tides, and mixing estimates in the California

    E-print Network

    Johnston, Shaun

    Trapped diurnal internal tides, propagating semidiurnal internal tides, and mixing estimates profiles. Elevated diffusivity estimates and energetic diurnal (D1) and semidiurnal (D2) internal tides and associated with internal tides is not novel, the combination of resolution and extent in this ongoing data

  20. Rates of Chemical Weathering

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Michael Passow

    In this activity, students will investigate the weathering of rocks by chemical processes. They will use effervescent cleansing tablets as a model for rock, and vary surface area, temperature, and acidity to see how rapidly the "rock" dissolves. This investigation will help them understand three of the factors that affect the rate of chemical weathering and develop better understanding of how to design controlled experiments by exploring only one experimental variable at a time.

  1. Weather Report

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This printable weather report is designed to help students easily note a field site's important meteorological details. The one-page PDF form asks for the following information: date, temperature, precipitation, weather type, and wind speed (based on environmental clues).

  2. Winter Weather

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About CDC.gov . Natural Disasters and Severe Weather Earthquakes Being Prepared Emergency Supplies Home Hazards Indoor Safety ... What's New A - Z Index Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis Volcanoes ...

  3. NOAA New England Red Tide Information Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This NOAA website offers a brief explanation of red tide and a large bloom that spread from the Gulf of Maine to the Massachusetts Bay in 2005. The site explains NOAA's efforts to remediate red tide in New England as well as prevent new occurrences. The site features hyperlinks to research funding, legislation, and other NOAA sites that feature red tide.

  4. 4, 371398, 2007 Internal tides and

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    OSD 4, 371­398, 2007 Internal tides and energy fluxes over Great Meteor Seamount T. Gerkema and H-access review for the journal Ocean Science Internal tides and energy fluxes over Great Meteor Seamount T@nioz.nl) 371 #12;OSD 4, 371­398, 2007 Internal tides and energy fluxes over Great Meteor Seamount T. Gerkema

  5. Tide and Current Glossary Silver Spring, MD

    E-print Network

    Tide and Current Glossary Silver Spring, MD January 2000 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Products and Services #12;Tide and Current Glossary U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Norman Mineta, Secretary Printing History of Tide and Current Glossary Special Publication No. 228, Coast and Geodetic Survey

  6. Weather Talk

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Weather Talk is a primer on weather and naval meteorology. It provides a brief overview of major weather elements and is presented in a non-mathematical way, so that the reader will have a better understanding of the basic mechanisms of weather and use it to their advantage and safety in planning and carrying out their own activities. The site explains temperature, wind, pressure, atmospheric moisture, air masses and fronts, thunderstorms, tornadoes, hurricanes, and climatology.

  7. Weather on the Nearest Brown Dwarfs: Resolved Simultaneous Multi-wavelength Variability Monitoring of WISE J104915.57-531906.1AB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biller, Beth A.; Crossfield, Ian J. M.; Mancini, Luigi; Ciceri, Simona; Southworth, John; Kopytova, Taisiya G.; Bonnefoy, Mickaël; Deacon, Niall R.; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Buenzli, Esther; Brandner, Wolfgang; Allard, France; Homeier, Derek; Freytag, Bernd; Bailer-Jones, Coryn A. L.; Greiner, Jochen; Henning, Thomas; Goldman, Bertrand

    2013-11-01

    We present two epochs of MPG/ESO 2.2 m GROND simultaneous six-band (r'i'z' JHK) photometric monitoring of the closest known L/T transition brown dwarf binary WISE J104915.57-531906.1AB. We report here the first resolved variability monitoring of both the T0.5 and L7.5 components. We obtained 4 hr of focused observations on the night of 2013 April 22 (UT), as well as 4 hr of defocused (unresolved) observations on the night of 2013 April 16 (UT). We note a number of robust trends in our light curves. The r' and i' light curves appear to be anti-correlated with z' and H for the T0.5 component and in the unresolved light curve. In the defocused dataset, J appears correlated with z' and H and anti-correlated with r' and i', while in the focused dataset we measure no variability for J at the level of our photometric precision, likely due to evolving weather phenomena. In our focused T0.5 component light curve, the K band light curve displays a significant phase offset relative to both H and z'. We argue that the measured phase offsets are correlated with atmospheric pressure probed at each band, as estimated from one-dimensional atmospheric models. We also report low-amplitude variability in i' and z' intrinsic to the L7.5 component.

  8. tides 8/16/2007 1 2.3 Fitting the tide

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Peter

    tides 8/16/2007 1 2.3 Fitting the tide Find a vertical pier at the edge of the sea, put a scale tides, a resonance effect caused by the funneling shape of the basin. As you can see from the graph, the amplitude of these tides is almost 6 meters whereas on the ocean, tides are a third or a quarter of that

  9. RELENTLESS TIDE: AN UNSTOPPABLE MEGABRAND

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick Barwise; Seán Meehan; Emma MacDonald

    2011-01-01

    Sixty?five years after the introduction of Tide in the US, it still dominates the market. How did Procter & Gamble achieve such a feat? Through continuous incremental innovation, consumer relevance and brand support, say Patrick Barwise, Seán Meehan and Emma Macdonald.

  10. RELENTLESS TIDE: AN UNSTOPPABLE MEGABRAND

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrick Barwise; Seán Meehan; Emma MacDonald

    Sixty?five years after the introduction of Tide in the US, it still dominates the market. How did Procter & Gamble achieve such a feat? Through continuous incremental innovation, consumer relevance and brand support, say Patrick Barwise, Seán Meehan and Emma Macdonald.

  11. The magnetic tides of Honolulu

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Rigler, Erin Joshua

    2013-01-01

    We review the phenomenon of time-stationary, periodic quiet-time geomagnetic tides. These are generated by the ionospheric and oceanic dynamos, and, to a lesser-extent, by the quiet-time magnetosphere, and they are affected by currents induced in the Earth's electrically conducting interior. We examine historical time series of hourly magnetic-vector measurements made at the Honolulu observatory. We construct high-resolution, frequency-domain Lomb-periodogram and maximum-entropy power spectra that reveal a panorama of stationary harmonics across periods from 0.1 to 10000.0-d, including harmonics that result from amplitude and phase modulation. We identify solar-diurnal tides and their annual and solar-cycle sideband modulations, lunar semi-diurnal tides and their solar-diurnal sidebands, and tides due to precession of lunar eccentricity and nodes. We provide evidence that a method intended for separating the ionospheric and oceanic dynamo signals by midnight subsampling of observatory data time series is prone to frequency-domain aliasing. The tidal signals we summarize in this review can be used to test our fundamental understanding of the dynamics of the quiet-time ionosphere and magnetosphere, induction in the ocean and in the electrically conducting interior of the Earth, and they are useful for defining a quiet-time baseline against which magnetospheric-storm intensity is measured.

  12. Sources of interannual yield variability in JULES-crop and implications for forcing with seasonal weather forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, K. E.; Falloon, P. D.

    2015-06-01

    JULES-crop is a parametrisation of crops in the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES). We investigate the sources of the interannual variability in the modelled maize yield, using global runs driven by reanalysis data, with a view to understanding the impact of various approximations in the driving data and initialisation. The standard forcing dataset for JULES consists of a combination of meteorological variables describing precipitation, radiation, temperature, pressure, specific humidity and wind, at subdaily time resolution. We find that the main characteristics of the modelled yield can be reproduced with a subset of these variables and using daily forcing, with internal disaggregation to the model timestep. This has implications in particular for the use of the model with seasonal forcing data, which may not have been provided at subdaily resolution for all required driving variables. We also investigate the effect on annual yield of initialising the model with climatology on the sowing date. This approximation has the potential to considerably simplify the use of the model with seasonal forecasts, since obtaining observations or reanalysis output for all the initialisation variables required by JULES for the start date of the seasonal forecast would present significant practical challenges.

  13. World Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Elias, Jaume Sanchez

    2014-02-20

    What's going on in the world of weather? Are there storms around Sri Lanka? What about the snows of Kilimanjaro? These can be pressing questions, indeed, and the World Weather app is a great way to stay in touch with weather patterns around the globe. Users will find that they can just type in a city name to see the current weather and also zoom around the globe as they see fit. It's a remarkable addition to the world of existing weather tracking apps and is compatible with all operating systems.

  14. Weather Watcher

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Singer, Mike

    As spring progresses, weather conditions can continue to fluctuate dramatically, something that may foil vacation plans or other outings. Keeping that in mind, visitors may do well to download the Weather Watcher application created by Mike Singer. With this application, users may automatically retrieve the current weather conditions, look through hourly forecasts, keep abreast of severe weather alerts, and take a look at weather maps for almost any city world-wide. This application is compatible with all systems running Windows 98 and above.

  15. Weather and Forecasting Fine-Scale Orographic Precipitation Variability and Gap-Filling Radar Potential in Little

    E-print Network

    Steenburgh, Jim

    Potential in Little Cottonwood Canyon, Utah --Manuscript Draft-- Manuscript Number: WAF-D-13-00129 Full Title: Fine-Scale Orographic Precipitation Variability and Gap-Filling Radar Potential in Little is placed on precipitation features in and around Little Cottonwood Canyon (LCC), which cuts orthogonally

  16. A new model of solar EUV irradiance variability 2. Comparisons with empirical models and observations and implications for space weather

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. L. Lean; H. P. Warren; J. T. Mariska; J. Bishop

    2003-01-01

    Motivated by the need for reliable specification of the Sun's electromagnetic radiation in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrum, we have developed a new model of solar EUV irradiance variability at wavelengths from 50 to 1200 Å. Solar images are used to quantify changes in the sources of EUV irradiance during the solar cycle. Optically thin EUV emission line fluxes are

  17. Table 1 Highest tides (tide ranges) of the global ocean Country Site Tide range (m)

    E-print Network

    Gorban, Alexander N.

    Puerto Rio Gallegos 13.3 Russia Bay of Mezen (White Sea) 10.0 Russia Penzhinskaya Guba 13.4 (Sea into narrow bays and river estuaries along a coastline. For instance, the tides in the Bay of Fundy in Canada coast of Austra- lia, and the Okhotsk Sea of Russia. Table 1 contains ranges of amplitude for some

  18. Middle and upper thermosphere density structures due to nonmigrating tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Jeffrey M.; Zhang, Xiaoli; Bruinsma, Sean

    2012-11-01

    Density measurements from the SETA satellites near 200 km during 1982-1984, and the CHAMP and GRACE satellites between 350 and 550 km during 2002-2009, are used to investigate longitudinal structures in density due to nonmigrating tides, and to evaluate performance of the recently-created Climatological Tidal Model of the Thermosphere (CTMT). Amplitudes for the diurnal and semidiurnal tidal components fall roughly in the range of 4-10%. Diurnal tides at middle and low latitudes are often characterized by wave-3 and/or wave-4 structures, consistent with the presence of the eastward-propagating diurnal tides with zonal wave numbers s = 2 and s = 3 (DE2 and DE3, respectively) and with expected seasonal variability based on previous works. Semidiurnal structures often reflect the presence of the eastward-propagating tide with s = 2 (SE2), which gives rise to wave-4 structures that have a more antisymmetric relationship between N. and S. hemispheres. Similarities in structures between different years underscore the fact that the thermosphere is subject to repeatable and reproducible forcing by upward-propagating tides, but there are also occasions where considerable departures from climatology occur. Wave-2 structures at high latitudes likely contain signatures of the eastward-propagating diurnal tide with s = 1 (DE1) and the zonally-symmetric (s = 0) semidiurnal oscillation (S0) propagating upwards from below, but these and other waves that produce wave-2 can also be forced in-situ by high-latitude processes. The CTMT captures the salient features of the observations at middle and low latitudes, although with lower amplitudes that are likely due to phase cancelation effects resulting from averaging over multiple years (2002-2006). We propose that some discrepancies between the CTMT and our observational results may be associated with wave components arising in-situ in the thermosphere as the result of nonlinear tide-tide interactions and plasma neutral interactions, the latter being especially prominent at high latitudes where the displaced geomagnetic frame is particularly influential. Modeling studies are required to validate these proposed mechanisms, however.

  19. Mixing and Energy Produced by Explicit Internal Tides In The Indonesian Seas Using Realistic OGCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugroho, Dwiyoga; Koch-larrouy, Ariane; Tranchant, Benoit; Reffray, Guillaume; Gaspar, Phillipe; Madec, Gurvan

    2015-04-01

    As a semi-enclosed basin with complex bottom topography, Indonesia archipelago is a region of strong internal tides generation that produce large water mass transformation, leading to a homohaline stratification at the exit passage. This intense mixing has been proved to play an important role in the above atmospheric convection, and thus on entire tropical climate and its variability. We have conducted a series of numerical experiments using a regional general circulation model (NEMO) with a 1/12 degree resolution forced at the boundaries by a global assimilated simulation to study the characteristics of internal tides and its impact on circulation and mixing. The model shows good agreement with the observations, where strong water mass transformation has been previously diagnosed. Barotropic tides are well validated with observed surface tides. Internal tides generation compares well with previous estimates in the region. Comparisons with a simulation without tidal forcing and another including previous physically based parameterisation are done. The results show that explicit baroclinic tides and internal tides parameterisation produce nearly same mixing in the thermocline. However, in the surface, the barotropic tides create larger mixing on the shelves, than on the region of internal tides generation. Different tracer advection schemes have been tested that differ in particular for their diffusive part. A energy budget of the dissipation in the model has been calculated for all the simulations. Spurious mixing from the most diffusive advection scheme combined with the high frequency forcing of the tides produce a similar water mass transformation as the dedicated physical parameterisation. However, this mixing is numerical mixing and varies from different advection scheme to another in intensity and localisation. Altogether, our results demonstrate the sensitivity of mixing to advection schemes and suggest caution when introducing explicit tidal forcing to obtain realistic simulations of the internal mixing and circulation in the Indonesian Seas.

  20. The tides of Titan.

    PubMed

    Iess, Luciano; Jacobson, Robert A; Ducci, Marco; Stevenson, David J; Lunine, Jonathan I; Armstrong, John W; Asmar, Sami W; Racioppa, Paolo; Rappaport, Nicole J; Tortora, Paolo

    2012-07-27

    We have detected in Cassini spacecraft data the signature of the periodic tidal stresses within Titan, driven by the eccentricity (e = 0.028) of its 16-day orbit around Saturn. Precise measurements of the acceleration of Cassini during six close flybys between 2006 and 2011 have revealed that Titan responds to the variable tidal field exerted by Saturn with periodic changes of its quadrupole gravity, at about 4% of the static value. Two independent determinations of the corresponding degree-2 Love number yield k(2) = 0.589 ± 0.150 and k(2) = 0.637 ± 0.224 (2?). Such a large response to the tidal field requires that Titan's interior be deformable over time scales of the orbital period, in a way that is consistent with a global ocean at depth. PMID:22745254

  1. Whole Atmosphere Model (WAM) simulations of tides over Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akmaev, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    Ground-based radar and optical observations of winds and temperatures have revealed a rich and variable spectrum of tidal oscillations in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) over Antarctica, including the South Pole. Formally, polar geometry can only support large-scale oscillations with zonal wavenumbers 0 or 1. The only migrating tide that can exist here is the diurnal westward DW1. Other tidal periods project on the permitted wavenumbers, making the Pole an ideal place for studying nonmigrating oscillations such as the well documented semidiurnal westward SW1. Migrating tides still make a substantial contribution over the edges of the continent posing an identification problem for any single station on the ground. WAM simulations showing promising agreement with existing observations in amplitude, phase, and day-to-day variability of prominent tidal components over Antarctica will be presented and analyzed.

  2. Variable Strength of Forest Stand Attributes and Weather Conditions on the Questing Activity of Ixodes ricinus Ticks over Years in Managed Forests

    PubMed Central

    Lauterbach, Ralf; Wells, Konstans; O'Hara, Robert B.; Renner, Swen C.

    2013-01-01

    Given the ever-increasing human impact through land use and climate change on the environment, we crucially need to achieve a better understanding of those factors that influence the questing activity of ixodid ticks, a major disease-transmitting vector in temperate forests. We investigated variation in the relative questing nymph densities of Ixodes ricinus in differently managed forest types for three years (2008–2010) in SW Germany by drag sampling. We used a hierarchical Bayesian modeling approach to examine the relative effects of habitat and weather and to consider possible nested structures of habitat and climate forces. The questing activity of nymphs was considerably larger in young forest successional stages of thicket compared with pole wood and timber stages. Questing nymph density increased markedly with milder winter temperatures. Generally, the relative strength of the various environmental forces on questing nymph density differed across years. In particular, winter temperature had a negative effect on tick activity across sites in 2008 in contrast to the overall effect of temperature across years. Our results suggest that forest management practices have important impacts on questing nymph density. Variable weather conditions, however, might override the effects of forest management practices on the fluctuations and dynamics of tick populations and activity over years, in particular, the preceding winter temperatures. Therefore, robust predictions and the detection of possible interactions and nested structures of habitat and climate forces can only be quantified through the collection of long-term data. Such data are particularly important with regard to future scenarios of forest management and climate warming. PMID:23372852

  3. Stratospheric Tides and Data Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swinbank, R.; Orris, R. L.; Wu, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    In the upper stratosphere, the atmosphere exhibits significant diurnal and semi-diurnal tidal variations, with typical amplitude of about 2K in mid-latitudes. In this paper we examine how well the tidal variations in temperature are represented by the Goddard Geodesic Earth Orbiting Satellite (GEOS-2) data assimilation system. We show that the GEOS-2 atmospheric model is quite successful at simulating the tidal temperature variations. However, the assimilation of satellite temperature soundings significantly damps the simulated tides. The reason is because the tides are not well represented by the satellite retrievals used by the assimilation system (which have a typical tidal amplitude of around 1K). As a result of this study, we suggest improvements that should be made to the treatment of satellite soundings by the assimilation system.

  4. Toxic Blooms: Understanding Red Tides

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dr. Don Anderson

    This online seminar reviews the topic of red tides in four sessions, which review the effect HABs have on public health, wildlife and the economy; describe common harmful algal species and their toxins; identify poisoning symptoms; compare methods of treatment if poisoned; describe some potential methods to control HABs; and identify research areas where information on HABs is still inadequate. After completing the sessions, an optional knowledge test is provided based on the seminar material.

  5. Weather Instruments

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Topic in Depth discusses the variety of instruments used to collect climate and weather data. The first two websites provide simple introductions to the many weather instruments. Bethune Academy's Weather Center (1) discusses the functions of psychrometers, anemometers, weather balloons, thermometers, and barometers. The Illinois State Water Survey (2) furnishes many images of various instruments that collect data daily for legal issues, farmers, educators, students, and researchers. The third website (3), created by the Center for Improving Engineering and Science Education (CIESE), provides a classroom activity to educate users on how to build and use weather instruments. By the end of the group project, students should know all about wind vanes, rain gauges, anemometers, and thermometers. Next, the Miami Museum of Science provides a variety of activities to help students learn about the many weather instruments including wind scales and wind chimes (4). Students can learn about the wind, air pressure, moisture, and temperature. At the fifth website, the Tyson Research Center at Washington University describes the devices it uses in its research (5). At the various links, users can find out the center's many projects that utilize meteorological data such as acid rain monitoring. The sixth website, a pdf document created by Dr. John Guyton at the Mississippi State University Extension Service, provides guidance to teachers about the education of weather patterns and instruments (6). Users can find helpful information on pressure systems, humidity, cloud patterns, and much more. Next, the University of Richmond discusses the tools meteorologists use to learn about the weather (7). While providing materials about the basic tools discussed in the other websites, this site also offers information about weather satellites, radar, and computer models. After discovering the many weather instruments, users can learn about weather data output and analysis at the Next Generation Weather Lab website (8). This expansive website provides an abundance of surface data and upper air data as well as satellite and radar images for the United States.

  6. Low-tide rainfall effects on metal content of suspended sediment in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalski, Susanne M.; Torres, Raymond; Bizimis, Michael; Goni, Miguel; Bergamaschi, Brian; Fleck, Jacob

    2013-03-01

    Rain falling at or near low tide is capable of eroding and transporting cohesive sediment from intertidal areas. Given that metals adsorb strongly to silt- and clay-sized particles, it is conceivable that low-tide rainfall may also liberate previously-deposited metals from storage in intertidal sediment. To investigate the potential for rainfall as an agent of remobilization, this study tested the hypothesis that suspended sediment in a tidal creek during low tide rainfall events contains different suites of adsorbed metals than during wind-only events and fair weather days. Water samples were collected during low-tide rain events in winter and wind resuspension events in summer. The concentrations of suspended sediment, particulate organic carbon and nitrogen, and the total adsorbed concentration (g L-1) of most metals were higher for a low-tide rainfall event than during wind-only and fair-weather conditions. Metal contents (g g-1) were also greater during the rain event for most metals. Principal components analysis and relationships between metal content and suspended sediment concentration suggest that rainfall during low tide can mobilize a different source of sediment than wind-wave resuspension and regular tidal action. The metal content of bulk sediment samples from around the study area could not be matched satisfactorily to the suspended sediment in any of the events. This implies that bulk sediment composition should not be used to extrapolate to suspended sediment composition in terms of adsorbed metal content.

  7. Observing sea level with coastal tide gauges in a geocentric reference frame: experience with the Dual CGPS methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plag, H.-P.; Kristiansen, O.

    2003-04-01

    For several applications of tide gauge observations, such as calibration of satellite altimeter or studies of long-period and secular absolute sea level changes, knowledge of vertical crustal motion close to the tide gauge is required. Increasingly, continuous GPS (CGPS) is co-located with tide gauges in order (1) to fix the tide gauge and its movement with respect to a geocentric reference frame and (2) to studying the crustal vertical motion in the vicinity of the tide gauge by monitoring a stable reference point on land. Connecting the tide gauge to the reference point then allows to determine both relative and absolute sea level variations. At many tide gauges, conditions for GPS observations are poor due to distortions of horizon, multi-path, electro-magnetic jaming and variability of the micro-environment. In these case, the dual receiver concept advocated by the European Sea Level Service (ESEAS) provides a methodology to connect the tide gauge to a high-quality GPS reference station on land without the need of frequent levelling between the tide gauge and the reference site. About 7 km away from the tide gauge at Andenes, Northern Norway, a permanent reference GPS receiver has been operated since 1996. Since December 2000, the tide gauge is collocated with a permanent GPS receiver operated on the pier directly at the tide gauge. The two GPS records are compared on the basis of several observation-related parameters such as data rejection and post-fit residuals, as well as the coordinate time series resulting from independent precise point positioning. Except for a differential seasonal signal, no significant differences between the two records are found.

  8. The Tides of Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iess, L.; Jacobson, R.; Ducci, M.; Stevenson, D. J.; Lunine, J. I.; Armstrong, J. W.; Asmar, S.; Racioppa, P.; Rappaport, N. J.; Tortora, P.

    2012-12-01

    Titan has long been thought to host a subsurface water ocean. A liquid water or water-ammonia layer underneath the outer icy shell was invoked to explain the Voyager and Cassini observations of abundant methane (an easily dissociated species) in the atmosphere of the satellite. Given the paucity of surface hydrocarbon reservoirs, the atmospheric methane must be supplied by the interior, and an ocean can both provide a large storage volume and facilitate the outgassing from the deeper layers of the satellite to the surface. Huygens probe observations of a Schumann-like resonance point to the presence of an electrically conductive layer at a depth of 50-100 km, which has been interpreted to be the top of an ammonia-doped ocean [1]. Cassini gravity observations provide stronger evidence of the existence of such subsurface ocean. By combining precise measurements of the spacecraft range rate during six flybys, suitably distributed along Titan's orbit (three near pericenter, two near apocenter one near quadrature), we have been able to determine the k2 Love number to be k2 = 0.589±0.150 and k2 = 0.637±0.224 in two independent so-lutions (quoted uncertainties are 2-sigma) [2]. Such a large value indicates that Titan is highly deformable over time scales of days, as one would expect if a global ocean were hidden beneath the outer icy shell. The inclusion of time-variable gravity in the solution provided also a more reliable estimate of the static field, including an updated long-wavelength geoid. We discuss the methods adopted in our solutions and some implications of our results for the interior structure of Titan, and outline the expected improvements from the additional gravity flybys before the end of mission in 2017. [1] C. Beghin, C. Sotin, M. Hamelin, Comptes Rendue Geoscience, 342, 425 (2010). [2] L. Iess, R.A. Jacobson, M. Ducci, D.J. Stevenson, J.I. Lunine, J.W. Armstrong, S.W. Asmar, P. Racioppa, N.J. Rappaport, P. Tortora, Science, 337, 457 (2012).

  9. Weather, Climate, and You.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    Information from the American Institute of Medical Climatologists on human responses to weather and climatic conditions, including clouds, winds, humidity, barometric pressure, heat, cold, and other variables that may exert a pervasive impact on health, behavior, disposition, and the level of efficiency with which individuals function is reviewed.…

  10. Weather Forecasting

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Twin Cities Public Television, Inc.

    2005-01-01

    This activity (on page 2 of the PDF) is a full inquiry investigation into meteorology and forecasting. Learners will research weather folklore, specifically looking for old-fashioned ways of predicting the weather. Then, they'll record observations of these predictors along with readings from their own homemade barometer, graphing the correct predictions for analysis. Relates to linked video, DragonflyTV: Forecasting.

  11. Tide effects removed from well tests

    SciTech Connect

    Aase, E.P.B.; Jelmert, T.A. [Norwegian Inst. of Technology, Trondeim (Norway); Vik, S.A. [Saga Petroleum A.S., Sandvika (Norway)

    1995-05-01

    To avoid distorted data when analyzing well pressure tests of permeable offshore reservoirs, one needs to account for periodic ocean tidal stress. Quartz-crystal bottom hole pressure recorders provide a high resolution of reservoir pressure but also measures pressure fluctuations from tidal effects during well testing. Periodic oscillations in the reservoir pressure are due to the three mechanisms: solid earth tide; barometric tide/effect; and ocean tide. The paper uses sample data from an offshore reservoir to illustrate how tide effects can be identified in the data and the correction procedure to use to remove these effects.

  12. River-tide dynamics: Exploration of nonstationary and nonlinear tidal behavior in the Yangtze River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Leicheng; van der Wegen, Mick; Jay, David A.; Matte, Pascal; Wang, Zheng Bing; Roelvink, Dano; He, Qing

    2015-05-01

    River-tide dynamics remain poorly understood, in part because conventional harmonic analysis (HA) does not cope effectively with nonstationary signals. To explore nonstationary behavior of river tides and the modulation effects of river discharge, this work analyzes tidal signals in the Yangtze River estuary using both HA in a nonstationary mode and continuous wavelet transforms (CWT). The Yangtze is an excellent natural laboratory to analyze river tides because of its high and variable flow, its length, and the fact that there are do dams or reflecting barriers within the tidal part of the system. Analysis of tidal frequencies by CWT and analysis of subtidal water level and tidal ranges reveal a broad range of subtidal variations over fortnightly, monthly, semiannual, and annual frequencies driven by subtidal variations in friction and by variable river discharges. We employ HA in a nonstationary mode (NSHA) by segregating data within defined flow ranges into separate analyses. NSHA quantifies the decay of the principal tides and the modulation of M4 tide with increasing river discharges. M4 amplitudes decrease far upriver (landward portion of the estuary) and conversely increase close to the ocean as river discharge increases. The fortnightly frequencies reach an amplitude maximum upriver of that for over tide frequencies, due to the longer wavelength of the fortnightly constituents. These methods and findings should be applicable to large tidal rivers globally and have broad implications regarding management of navigation channels and ecosystems in tidal rivers.

  13. Weather effects on returns: Evidence from the Korean stock market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seong-Min; Kang, Sang Hoon

    2009-03-01

    In this study, we attempted to determine whether a relationship exists between stock returns and the weather variables of temperature, humidity, and cloud cover in the Korean stock market. We delineated three key implications with regard to weather effects. First, after the 1997 financial crisis, the presence of a weather effect disappeared. Second, the inclusion of weather variables helps to model the GJR-GARCH process in the conditional variance. Third, the interaction effects of weather variables fully demonstrate the weather effect, but the interaction effects also vanished after the crisis. Overall, the findings of this study indicate that the weather effect was weakened as the result of heightened market efficiency.

  14. Weather Forecasting

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    John Nielsen-Gammon

    1996-09-01

    Weather Forecasting is a set of computer-based learning modules that teach students about meteorology from the point of view of learning how to forecast the weather. The modules were designed as the primary teaching resource for a seminar course on weather forecasting at the introductory college level (originally METR 151, later ATMO 151) and can also be used in the laboratory component of an introductory atmospheric science course. The modules assume no prior meteorological knowledge. In addition to text and graphics, the modules include interactive questions and answers designed to reinforce student learning. The module topics are: 1. How to Access Weather Data, 2. How to Read Hourly Weather Observations, 3. The National Collegiate Weather Forecasting Contest, 4. Radiation and the Diurnal Heating Cycle, 5. Factors Affecting Temperature: Clouds and Moisture, 6. Factors Affecting Temperature: Wind and Mixing, 7. Air Masses and Fronts, 8. Forces in the Atmosphere, 9. Air Pressure, Temperature, and Height, 10. Winds and Pressure, 11. The Forecasting Process, 12. Sounding Diagrams, 13. Upper Air Maps, 14. Satellite Imagery, 15. Radar Imagery, 16. Numerical Weather Prediction, 17. NWS Forecast Models, 18. Sources of Model Error, 19. Sea Breezes, Land Breezes, and Coastal Fronts, 20. Soundings, Clouds, and Convection, 21. Snow Forecasting.

  15. Impact of tidal density variability on orbital and reentry predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, J. M.; Forbes, J. M.; Born, G. H.

    2012-12-01

    Since the first satellites entered Earth orbit in the late 1950's and early 1960's, the influences of solar and geomagnetic variability on the satellite drag environment have been studied, and parameterized in empirical density models with increasing sophistication. However, only within the past 5 years has the realization emerged that "troposphere weather" contributes significantly to the "space weather" of the thermosphere, especially during solar minimum conditions. Much of the attendant variability is attributable to upward-propagating solar tides excited by latent heating due to deep tropical convection, and solar radiation absorption primarily by water vapor and ozone in the stratosphere and mesosphere, respectively. We know that this tidal spectrum significantly modifies the orbital (>200 km) and reentry (60-150 km) drag environments, and that these tidal components induce longitude variability not yet emulated in empirical density models. Yet, current requirements for improvements in orbital prediction make clear that further refinements to density models are needed. In this paper, the operational consequences of longitude-dependent tides are quantitatively assessed through a series of orbital and reentry predictions. We find that in-track prediction differences incurred by tidal effects are typically of order 200 ± 100 m for satellites in 400-km circular orbits and 15 ± 10 km for satellites in 200-km circular orbits for a 24-hour prediction. For an initial 200-km circular orbit, surface impact differences of order 15° ± 15° latitude are incurred. For operational problems with similar accuracy needs, a density model that includes a climatological representation of longitude-dependent tides should significantly reduce errors due to this source.

  16. Planetary Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This lesson plan is part of the DiscoverySchool.com lesson plan library for grades 6-8. It focuses on the weather conditions on other planets. After learning more about weather patterns, students research the weather on a given planet and create a visual display of the conditions there. It includes objectives, materials, procedures, discussion questions, evaluation ideas, suggested readings, and vocabulary. There are videos available to order which complement this lesson, and links to teaching tools for making custom quizzes, worksheets, puzzles and lesson plans.

  17. GPS estimates of ocean tide loading in NW-France: Determination of ocean tide loading constituents and comparison with a recent ocean tide model

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 GPS estimates of ocean tide loading in NW-France: Determination of ocean tide loading constituents and comparison with a recent ocean tide model Vergnolle, M.1,* , M.-N. Bouin2 , L. Morel1 , F estimates of ocean tide loading in NW-France Corresponding author: Mathilde VERGNOLLE Phone: 00 33 4

  18. WEATHER ON OTHER WORLDS. I. DETECTION OF PERIODIC VARIABILITY IN THE L3 DWARF DENIS-P J1058.7-1548 WITH PRECISE MULTI-WAVELENGTH PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Heinze, Aren N.; Metchev, Stanimir [Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3800 (United States); Apai, Daniel; Flateau, Davin [University of Arizona Department of Astronomy, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Kurtev, Radostin [Departamento de Fisica y Astronomia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valparaiso, Av. Gran Bretana 1111, Casilla 5030, Valparaiso (Chile); Marley, Mark [NASA Ames Research Center, MS-245-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Radigan, Jacqueline [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Burgasser, Adam J. [University of California San Diego, Center for Astrophysics and Space Science, 9500 Gilman Drive, Mail Code 0424, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Artigau, Etienne [Departement de Physique and Observatoire du Mont Megantic, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, QC, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Plavchan, Peter, E-mail: aren.heinze@stonybrook.edu, E-mail: stanimir.metchev@stonybrook.edu [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, California Institute of Technology, M/C 100-22, 770 South Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-04-20

    Photometric monitoring from warm Spitzer reveals that the L3 dwarf DENIS-P J1058.7-1548 varies sinusoidally in brightness with a period of 4.25{sup +0.26}{sub -0.16} hr and an amplitude of 0.388% {+-} 0.043% (peak-to-valley) in the 3.6 {mu}m band, confirming the reality of a 4.31 {+-} 0.31 hr periodicity detected in J-band photometry from the SOAR telescope. The J-band variations are a factor of 2.17 {+-} 0.35 larger in amplitude than those at 3.6 {mu}m, while 4.5 {mu}m Spitzer observations yield a 4.5 {mu}m/3.6 {mu}m amplitude ratio of only 0.23 {+-} 0.15, consistent with zero 4.5 {mu}m variability. This wide range in amplitudes indicates rotationally modulated variability due to magnetic phenomena and/or inhomogeneous cloud cover. Weak H{alpha} emission indicates some magnetic activity, but it is difficult to explain the observed amplitudes by magnetic phenomena unless they are combined with cloud inhomogeneities (which might have a magnetic cause). However, inhomogeneous cloud cover alone can explain all our observations, and our data align with theory in requiring that the regions with the thickest clouds also have the lowest effective temperature. Combined with published vsin (i) results, our rotation period yields a 95% confidence lower limit of R{sub *} {>=} 0.111 R{sub Sun }, suggesting upper limits of 320 Myr and 0.055 M{sub Sun} on the age and mass. These limits should be regarded cautiously because of {approx}3{sigma} inconsistencies with other data; however, a lower limit of 45 Degree-Sign on the inclination is more secure. DENIS-P J1058.7-1548 is only the first of nearly two dozen low-amplitude variables discovered and analyzed by the Weather on Other Worlds project.

  19. NOS Tides and Water Levels Discovery Kit

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Ocean Service (NOS) scientists collect, study, predict and disseminate information about tides and water levels. Tutorial introduces the causes and variations of tides and currents, their impacts on human activities, navigation and organisms. Lesson plans include data for classroom activities, as well as resource links and teacher guides. A NSTA SciLinks selected site.

  20. Accuracy assessment of recent ocean tide models

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. K. Shum; P. L. Woodworth; O. B. Andersen; G. D. Egbert; O. Francis; C. King; S. M. Klosko; C. Le Provost; X. Li; J.-M. Molines; M. E. Parke; R. D. Ray; M. G. Schlax; D. Stammer; C. C. Tierney; P. Vincent; C. I. Wunsch

    1997-01-01

    Over 20 global ocean tide models have been developed since 1994, primarily as a consequence of analysis of the precise altimetric measurements from TOPEX\\/POSEIDON and as a result of parallel developments in numerical tidal modeling and data assimilation. This paper provides an accuracy assessment of 10 such tide models and discusses their benefits in many fields including geodesy, oceanography, and

  1. Weather Tools

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Miami Museum of Science provides a variety of activities to help students learn about the many weather instruments including wind scales and wind chimes. Students can learn about the wind, air pressure, moisture, and temperature.

  2. Gravestone Weathering

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Leanne Wiberg

    2000-01-01

    In this activity (located on pages 9-14 of PDF), learners visit a cemetery to examine the distinguishing characteristics of rock weathering. After researching stone weathering and acid rain, learners apply their knowledge to collect data related to chemical decomposition and physical disintegration at a cemetery site. This detailed lesson guide includes tips for educators, pre/post activity suggestions, hands-outs, and background information.

  3. Exploring Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Miss Emily

    2010-01-29

    Second Grade Standard 3: Students will develop an understanding of their environment. Objective 2: Observe and describe weather. Indicator a: Observe and describe patterns of change in weather. Monday, February 1st: Look at the five-day forecast for Salt Lake City, Utah at Five day forecasts. The high temperature for the day will be in red and the low temperature will be in blue. Make sure you look at the temperature listed in degrees Farenheit (F) not degrees Celcius (C). Make ...

  4. Weather Creator

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    KShumway

    2009-09-28

    This project explores factors that help create severe winter weather. An interactive simulation provides hands-on experience, followed by guiding questions and resource exploration. Form groups of three. Explore the following simulation: Weather Maker Simulator Use the simulation to answer the following questions on paper. 1. In general, when are winds formed? 2. When winds are blowing, how can you get them to stop? 3. What can you do to make it rain or even snow? 4. Does it always snow when ...

  5. Weather from the Stratosphere?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Mark P.; Thompson, David W. J.; Shuckburgh, Emily F.; Norton, Warwick A.; Gillett, Nathan P.

    2006-01-01

    Is the stratosphere, the atmospheric layer between about 10 and 50 km, important for predicting changes in weather and climate? The traditional view is that the stratosphere is a passive recipient of energy and waves from weather systems in the underlying troposphere, but recent evidence suggests otherwise. At a workshop in Whistler, British Columbia (1), scientists met to discuss how the stratosphere responds to forcing from below, initiating feedback processes that in turn alter weather patterns in the troposphere. The lowest layer of the atmosphere, the troposphere, is highly dynamic and rich in water vapor, clouds, and weather. The stratosphere above it is less dense and less turbulent (see the figure). Variability in the stratosphere is dominated by hemispheric-scale changes in airflow on time scales of a week to several months. Occasionally, however, stratospheric air flow changes dramatically within just a day or two, with large-scale jumps in temperature of 20 K or more. The troposphere influences the stratosphere mainly through atmospheric waves that propagate upward. Recent evidence shows that the stratosphere organizes this chaotic wave forcing from below to create long-lived changes in the stratospheric circulation. These stratospheric changes can feed back to affect weather and climate in the troposphere.

  6. Revelations in the Study of Geospace Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Recent investigations reveal an important and previously inconspicuous set of drivers of quiescent thermosphere-ionosphere variability, and confirm that the Earth's atmosphere behaves as a complex component of the solar-terrestrial system, rather than a series of independent layers. Lower atmospheric drivers produce manifest thermosphere-ionosphere variations that characterize quiescent space weather conditions and underlie any geospace response to solar geomagnetic disturbances. Diurnal heating of the Earth's lower and middle atmosphere through the absorption of solar infrared and ultraviolet radiation, as well as latent heating of evaporation associated with raindrop formation in deep convective tropical clouds, excite a spectrum of global-scale waves known as atmospheric tides. Some of these tides propagate upward, grow exponentially in the increasingly rarified atmosphere, and penetrate geospace. Therein, they impact the electro-dynamo process in the lower thermosphere-ionosphere or directly modulate the diurnal variations generated by in-situ absorption of extreme ultraviolet radiation aloft. The lower atmospheric tidal drivers are in turn affected by meteorological disturbances and carry those impacts into geospace as well. They also evolve from month-to-month and inter-annually, further complicating our ability to fully anticipate their impacts. This presentation traces the evolution in our understanding of the drivers of thermosphere-ionosphere variability, underscores the challenges associated with unraveling the inherent complexity of this coupled subsystem that is also affected by the geomagnetic field, and identifies some unresolved questions for geospace research.

  7. Investigation on empirical estimation of minor tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Wolfgang; Madzak, Matthias; Hagedorn, Jan; Schuh, Harald; Böhm, Sigrid

    2014-05-01

    In general recent global ocean tide models provide tidal constants for the most dominant semi-diurnal, diurnal, selected shallow water and some long period tides, typically M2, N2, N2 , K2, 2N2, O1 , P1 , Q1 , K1, S1, M4, Mf and Mm. Contributions of minor tidal terms and modulations of the main terms are in general considered by inferring admittance assumptions and nodal corrections. The rather new hydrodynamic model FES2012 extends this list and now provides additional tables for tidal constants for some 18 complementary minor tides. We investigate here if the long time series of precise multi-mission altimeter data (e.g. on the repeated ground tracks of TOPEX/Jason1/Jason2) allows a robust empirical estimation of those minor tides which appear to be (after the major tides listed above) the next dominant tidal waves. Candidate minor tidal waves are M1, J1, ?1, ?2, L2, T2, ?2. Can these partial tides empirically separated from tides with adjacent frequencies (e.g. ?2 versus 2N2 or T2 versus S2)? How do the tidal constant for those minor tides compare with those of the hydrodynamic model FES2012? What are the quantitative differences between applying admittance theory and using the tidal constants derived empirically? These investigations are performed in the context of the SPOT-project, aiming to improve the transfer function from ocean tide angular momentum to Earth rotation parameters, the variations of polar motion and LOD.

  8. Florida Red Tide Perception: Residents versus Tourists

    PubMed Central

    Nierenberg, Kate; Byrne, Margaret; Fleming, Lora E.; Stephan, Wendy; Reich, Andrew; Backer, Lorraine C.; Tanga, Elvira; Dalpra, Dana R.; Kirkpatrick, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    The west coast of Florida has annual blooms of the toxin-producing dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis with Sarasota, FL considered the epicenter for these blooms. Numerous outreach materials, including Frequently Asked Question (FAQ) cards, exhibits for local museums and aquaria, public beach signs, and numerous websites have been developed to disseminate information to the public about this natural hazard. In addition, during intense onshore blooms, a great deal of media attention, primarily via newspaper (print and web) and television, is focused on red tide. However to date, the only measure of effectiveness of these outreach methods has been counts of the number of people exposed to the information, e.g., visits to a website or number of FAQ cards distributed. No formal assessment has been conducted to determine if these materials meet their goal of informing the public about Florida red tide. Also, although local residents have the opinion that they are very knowledgeable about Florida red tide, this has not been verified empirically. This study addressed these issues by creating and administering an evaluation tool for the assessment of public knowledge about Florida red tide. A focus group of Florida red tide outreach developers assisted in the creation of the evaluation tool. The location of the evaluation was the west coast of Florida, in Sarasota County. The objective was to assess the knowledge of the general public about Florida red tide. This assessment identified gaps in public knowledge regarding Florida red tides and also identified what information sources people want to use to obtain information on Florida red tide. The results from this study can be used to develop more effective outreach materials on Florida red tide. PMID:20824108

  9. Bottom friction optimization for a better barotropic tide modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutet, Martial; Lathuilière, Cyril; Son Hoang, Hong; Baraille, Rémy

    2015-04-01

    At a regional scale, barotropic tides are the dominant source of variability of currents and water heights. A precise representation of these processes is essential because of their great impacts on human activities (submersion risks, marine renewable energies, ...). Identified sources of error for tide modelling at a regional scale are the followings: bathymetry, boundary forcing and dissipation due to bottom friction. Nevertheless, bathymetric databases are nowadays known with a good accuracy, especially over shelves, and global tide models performances are better than ever. The most promising improvement is thus the bottom friction representation. The method used to estimate bottom friction is the simultaneous perturbation stochastic approximation (SPSA) which consists in the approximation of the gradient based on a fixed number of cost function measurements, regardless of the dimension of the vector to be estimated. Indeed, each cost function measurement is obtained by randomly perturbing every component of the parameter vector. An important feature of SPSA is its relative ease of implementation. In particular, the method does not require the development of tangent linear and adjoint version of the circulation model. Experiments are carried out to estimate bottom friction with the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) in barotropic mode (one isopycnal layer). The study area is the Northeastern Atlantic margin which is characterized by strong currents and an intense dissipation. Bottom friction is parameterized with a quadratic term and friction coefficient is computed with the water height and the bottom roughness. The latter parameter is the one to be estimated. Assimilated data are the available tide gauge observations. First, the bottom roughness is estimated taking into account bottom sediment natures and bathymetric ranges. Then, it is estimated with geographical degrees of freedom. Finally, the impact of the estimation of a mixed quadratic/linear friction is evaluated.

  10. Planform Morphology of Tide-Dominated Rivers: Satellite Morphometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolinsky, M. A.; Metz, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    Coastal environments house a diversity of channel forms, from delta distributaries to salt marsh networks to tidal inlets. While morphometric studies of purely fluvial and purely tidal channels abound in geomorphology, tide-influenced rivers have been relatively ignored. We use satellite imagery to quantify planform morphology in tide-dominated rivers with a funnel shape, where channel width rapidly decreases inland of the channel mouth. Our dataset consists of 17 rivers with varying tidal range (2.5-15 m), river discharge (0.24-145 km3/yr), sediment supply (0.04-140 Mt/yr), and size (mouth width 0.5-80 km), and includes both estuaries (e.g. Severn, UK) and deltas (e.g. Fly, PNG). We adapt established image processing and computational geometry algorithms to automatically map channels and compute morphometrics. In estuaries we measure channel width, while in deltas we measure container width, which ignores in-channel bars and islands. Prior work suggests estuary width decays exponentially inland. Our data confirms this is a good first order model for both channel width (estuaries) and container width (deltas) in tide-dominated rivers (R2 > 85%). Moreover, we find systematic relationships between exponential parameters and environmental forcing variables. Funnel width is well predicted by upstream river discharge (R2 = 65%), while funnel flare (percentage decay of width per unit distance) is predicted by downstream tidal range (R2 = 32%). We also find several systematic deviations from the exponential model. First, many systems have a lip, where width initially increases inland before decaying. Second, most systems show an excess flare near the funnel apex. Lastly, while the exponential model predicts shape well for all rivers in our dataset, the RMS error increases with the density of islands, suggesting second order differences in the bulk funnel morphology of estuaries and tide-dominated deltas.

  11. The Weather Doctor

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Heidorn, Keith C.

    Published by Spectrum Educational Enterprises, The Weather Doctor Web site is maintained by meteorologist Keith Heidorn. Visitors to the site will find everything from the joys of weather watching, to making rain, to weather history, to much more. Coming from someone who clearly enjoys what they do, this site explores unique aspects of weather including weather people, weather history, and weather and arts.

  12. Wild Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    In this online, interactive module, students learn about severe weather (thunderstorms, hurricanes, tornadoes, and blizzards) and the key features for each type of "wild weather" using satellite images. The module is part of an online course for grades 7-12 in satellite meteorology, which includes 10 interactive modules. The site also includes lesson plans developed by teachers and links to related resources. Each module is designed to serve as a stand-alone lesson, however, a sequential approach is recommended. Designed to challenge students through the end of 12th grade, middle school teachers and students may choose to skim or skip a few sections.

  13. Unisys Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Unisys weather website offers a host of weather analyses and forecasts. In the Analyses link, visitors can find satellite images as well as surface, upper air, and radar images. Visitors can learn the intricacies of Unisys's many forecast models such as the Nested Grid Model (NGM), Aviation Model, and the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) Model. Users can find archived hurricane data for the Atlantic, the Eastern Pacific, and the Western Pacific. The site also furnishes archived surface maps, infrared satellite images, upper air charts, and sea surface temperature (SST) plots.

  14. Weather Forecasting

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this online, interactive module, students will learn how to interpret weather patterns from satellite images, predict storm paths and forecast the weather for their area. The module is part of an online course for grades 7-12 in satellite meteorology, which includes 10 interactive modules. The site also includes lesson plans developed by teachers and links to related resources. Each module is designed to serve as a stand-alone lesson, however, a sequential approach is recommended. Designed to challenge students through the end of 12th grade, middle school teachers and students may choose to skim or skip a few sections.

  15. Weather One

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1969-12-31

    From the University of Illinois Extension comes the Weather One instructional Web site for kids. The lesson consists of six pages that cover various weather related topics including seasons, clouds, the atmosphere, wind, global warming, and storms. Each page describes the particular subject, provides related photographs, and contains several activities that reinforce the learning. For example, the clouds page shows how kids can make a cloud and create a collage out of simple material found around the house. The effective organization and clean look of the site will surely make it easy for students to follow and enjoy.

  16. Wonderful Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Broadhead

    2007-11-06

    Second Grade Standard 3: Students will develop an understanding of their environment. Objective 2: Observe and describe weather. Indicator a: Observe and describe patterns of change in weather. Monday November 6th: Look at the five-day forecast for Logan Utah at Five Day Forecast in Utah. The high temperature for the day will be in red and the low temperature will be in blue. Look at the temperature listed in degrees Farenheit (F) not degrees Celcius (C). Make a bar graph for the ...

  17. Weather Forecasting

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-01-01

    Weather Forecasting is one of several online guides produced by the Weather World 2010 project at the University of Illinois. These guides use multimedia technology and the dynamic capabilities of the web to incorporate text, colorful diagrams, animations, computer simulations, audio, and video to introduce topics and concepts in the atmospheric sciences. This module introduces forecast methods and the numerous factors one must consider when attempting to make an accurate forecast. Sections include forecasting methods for different scenarios, surface features affecting forecasting, forecasting temperatures for day and night, and factors for forecasting precipitation.

  18. THE EARTH TIDE EFFECTS ON PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS Preliminary Study

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    THE EARTH TIDE EFFECTS ON PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS Preliminary Study A THESIS SUBMITTED ON THE STRESS-STRAIN THEORY AND THE EARTH TIDE MECHANISM 4 2.1 Stress-Strain Theory 4 2.2 General Information on Tides 14 3. THE EFFECTS OF EARTH TIDES ON OPEN WELL-AQUIFER SYSTEMS: STATE OF THE ART 22 3.1 Static

  19. Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Symposium on Red Tide

    E-print Network

    21 Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Symposium on Red Tide By James E. Sykes Marine Biological, Donald L. McKernan, Director Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Symposium on Red Tide By James E. Sykes causing Red-Tide blooms as deduced from field observations 2 Red- Tide research at the Florida State

  20. Tide: Achieving Self-Scaling in Virtualized Datacenter Management Middleware

    E-print Network

    Liu, Ling

    Tide: Achieving Self-Scaling in Virtualized Datacenter Management Middleware Shicong Meng, Ling Liu of Tide, a self-scaling framework for virtu- alized datacenter management. A salient feature of Tide middleware. We eval- uate the effectiveness of Tide with both synthetic and real world workloads. Our results

  1. LECTURES ON TIDES UNIS, Longyearbyen, 26 -30 Sept. 2011

    E-print Network

    Gjevik, Bjørn

    LECTURES ON TIDES UNIS, Longyearbyen, 26 - 30 Sept. 2011 by B. Gjevik Department of Mathematics Introduction 3 2 Tide generating force 5 3 Harmonic decomposition of the tide generating force 10 4 Ocean closely associated with the flow of time as the very name tides indicates. When Newton (1697) first

  2. The Application of Synoptic Weather Forecasting Rules to Selected Weather Situations in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohler, Fred E.

    The document describes the use of weather maps and data in teaching introductory college courses in synoptic meteorology. Students examine weather changes at three-hour intervals from data obtained from the "Monthly Summary of Local Climatological Data." Weather variables in the local summary include sky cover, air temperature, dew point, relative…

  3. Putting Weather into Weather Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. A.; Smith, L. A.

    2001-12-01

    Just as weather forecasting has a colorful and often farsighted history within geophysics, financial mathematics has a long and turbulent history within mathematics. Thus it is no surprise that the intersection of real physics and real financial mathematics provides a rich source of problems and insight in both fields. This presentation targets open questions in one such intersection: quantifying ``weather risk.'' There is no accepted (operational) method for including deterministic information from simulation models (numerical weather forecasts, either best guess or by ensemble forecasting methods), into the stochastic framework most common within financial mathematics. Nor is there a stochastic method for constructing weather surrogates which has been proven successful in application. Inasmuch as the duration of employable observations is short, methods of melding short term, medium-range and long term forecasts are needed. On these time scales, model error is a substantial problem, while many methods of traditional statistical practice are simply inappropriate given our physical understanding of the system. A number of specific open questions, along with a smaller number of potential solutions, will be presented. >http://www.maths.ox.ac.uk/~lenny/WeatherRisk

  4. Today's Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This activity is part of Planet Diary and contains an online exploration of weather maps. Students use current maps to learn about and locate different features such as low-pressure areas and fronts. They then explore how these are related to severe storms.

  5. Weather Stations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is a series of seven brief activities about Jupiter's atmosphere and weather. Learners will look at Jupiter's distinct banded appearance, violent storms, and clouds of many different colors. The activities are part of Explore! Jupiter's Family Secrets, a series designed to engage children in space and planetary science in libraries and informal learning environments.

  6. Weather Alert

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

    Students discuss the characteristics of storms, including the relationship of weather fronts and storms. Using everyday materials, they develop models of basic lightning detection systems (similar to a Benjamin Franklin design) and analyze their models to determine their effectiveness as community storm warning systems.

  7. QBO Generated Inter-annual Variations of the Diurnal Tide in the Mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayr, Hans G.; Mengel, John G.

    2004-01-01

    We report results from a study with the Numerical Spectral Model (NSM), which produces in the d i d tide significant inter-annual variations. Applying Hines' Doppler Spread Parameterization (DPS), small-scale gravity waves (GW) drive the Quasi-biennial Oscillation (QBO) and Semi-annual Oscillation (SAO). With a GW source that peaks at the equator and is taken to be isotropic and independent of season, the NSM generates a QBO with variable periods around 27 months and zonal wind amplitudes close to 20 m/s at 30 lan, As reported earlier, the NSM reproduces the observed equinoctial maxima in the diurnal tide at altitudes around 95 km. In the present paper it is shown that the QBO modulates the tide such that the seasonal amplitude maxima can vary from one year to another by as much as 30%. Since the period of the QBO is variable, its phase relative to the seasonal cycle changes. The magnitude of the QBO modulation of the tide thus varies considerably as our long-term model simulation shows. To shed light on the underlying mechanisms, we discuss (a) the relative importance of the linearized advection terms that involve the meridional and vertical winds of the diurnal tide and (b) the effects momentum deposition from GWs filtered by the QBO.

  8. Differences Between Climate and Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This activity will provide students with first hand knowledge of local weather changes and how they relates to local climates. After this activity students will understand the general distinctions between weather and climate, that daily weather measurements are highly variable compared to long-term climate data, and appreciate the difficulty of identifying climate trends based on limited data. The instructor guide contains detailed background material, learning goals, alignment to national standards, grade level/time, details on materials and preparation, procedure, assessment ideas, and modifications for alternative learners.

  9. Investigations in Marine Chemistry: Tide Pool Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    Students investigated the salinity of tide pools at different levels in the intertidal zone. Data are analyzed collectively. Students graphed and discussed data. Included are suggestions for evaluation and further study. (Author)

  10. Nonlinear tides in close binary systems

    E-print Network

    Weinberg, Nevin N.

    We study the excitation and damping of tides in close binary systems, accounting for the leading-order nonlinear corrections to linear tidal theory. These nonlinear corrections include two distinct physical effects: ...

  11. PRACTICES FOR QUALITY IMPLEMENTATION OF THE TIDEE \\

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denny Davis; Michael Trevisan; Larry McKenzie; Steven Beyerlein; Patricia Daniels; Teodora Rutar; Philip Thompson; Kenneth Gentili

    This paper outlines practices that ensure quality in administering, interpreting, reporting, and maintaining the 'Design Team Readiness Assessment' developed by the Transferable Integrated Design Engineering Education (TIDEE) consortium in the Pacific Northwest. A copy of the instrument can be downloaded from www.cea.wsu.edu\\/tidee. The instrument assesses design process, teamwork, and design communication skills in three different contexts. Previous work has demonstrated

  12. Red Tide and Harmful Algal Blooms

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Project Oceanography

    This Project Oceanography pdf document contains information and activities related to red tide and harmful algal blooms (HABs). The activities and lesson plans are designed for elementary school, middle school, and may be adapted for high school students. Articles include: harmful algal blooms, Florida red tide, implications of harmful algal blooms, and student information about harmful algal blooms. Activities are introduced with background information and include: "Growing Algae" and "Algal Explosion." The document also features activity extension projects and a glossary of terms.

  13. Red Tide Current Status Statewide Information

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This summary report of current red tide conditions around Florida includes a map of sampling results and regional status reports. Reports are generally updated on Friday afternoon and additional information, if available, is provided on Tuesday afternoon. The web page also includes links to hotlines and reporting sites for red tide effects on marine animals and humans, shellfish information, volunteer opportunities, subscriptions, and related websites.

  14. Global charts of ocean tide loading effects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Francis; P. Mazzega

    1990-01-01

    Global ocean tide loading charts of the radial displacement, the potential divided by g (gravity acceleration), and the gravity effect have been computed using the 11 constituents M2, S2, N2, K2, K1, O1, P1, Q1, Mf, Mm, Ssa of Schwiderski's tide model. These new charts have a resolution of 1°×1° on the continents as well as on the oceanic area.

  15. Internal tide in the Barent Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, E.

    2003-04-01

    The properties of internal tides in the Barents Sea are studied using a nonlinear numerical model taking into account dissipation and diffusion. The generation of internal tide is determined by water transport by the barotropic tide, geometrical form of the bottom topography, and stratification. The transport by tidal currents was specified on the basis of the TOPEX/POSEIDON data. We specified the characteristic stratification in different regions of the Barents Sea. The conditions of internal tide generation near the critical latitude (~75¦ N) were studied. The dependence of internal tide generation conditions on the position of the region under study with respect to the critical frequency (~75@ N), where the Coriolis parameter is equal to the M2 frequency, was analyzed. It was shown that over the submarine slopes in the regions close to the critical frequency internal waves are forced and rapidly decay with the distance from the slope. A chart of amplitudes of internal tide for the Barents Sea is contrived.

  16. Asymmetric tide in Lake Vallunden (Spitsbergen)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, A. V.; Morozov, E. G.

    2013-11-01

    We observed strongly asymmetric tide in a channel connecting the Van Mijen Fjord and Lake Vallunden in Spitsbergen. The channel is approximately 100 m long, 10 m wide, and 1-2 m deep. Asymmetric tide was also observed in the lake. The form of the semidiurnal tide is described by a combination of only three harmonics (M2, S2 and M4) with different amplitudes and phases. The flood dominant form of the surface elevation in the channel (unlike the ebb dominant tide in the fjord) is formed over a horizontal distance of 50 m over a shallow bottom at the entrance to the channel. The tide in shallow places becomes asymmetric due to nonlinear effects caused by the influence of the bottom and especially by choking of the tidal flow over a sill that is located between the fjord and channel. We think that such a small distance, over which the form of the tide changes, is caused by the small scale of the channel related to the fjord. We suggest a numerical model related to these measurements.

  17. Tides in asynchronous binary systems

    E-print Network

    Oswaldo Toledano; Edmundo Moreno; Gloria Koenigsberger; R. Detmers; Norbert Langer

    2006-10-18

    Stellar oscillations are excited in non-synchronously rotating stars in binary systems due to the tidal forces. Tangential components of the tides can drive a shear flow which behaves as a differentially forced rotating structure in a stratified outer medium. In this paper we show that our single-layer approximation for the calculation of the forced oscillations yields results that are consistent with the predictions for the synchronization timescales in circular orbits. In addition, calibrating our model results to fit Zahn's relationship between synchronization timescales and orbital separation, we are able to constrain the value of the kinematical viscosity parameter. For the 4Mo+5Mo binary modeled in this paper, the kinematical viscosity is in the range 0.0015 -- 0.0043 Ro^2/d for orbital periods in the range 2.5 -- 25 d. Furthermore, the energy dissipation rate due to the shear flow is found to decrease by ~2 orders of magnitude as synchronization is approached, implying that binary systems may approach synchronization relatively quickly but that it takes a much longer timescale to actually attain this condition. Our model can be used to calculate the energy dissipation rates throughout the orbital cycle for arbitrary values of eccentricity and stellar rotational velocity. We suggest that the asymmetric distribution of energy dissipation over the stellar surface may lead to the appearance of localized regions of enhanced surface activity.

  18. Wind Forcing of the North Sea Pole Tide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OConnor, W.; Chao, B. F.; Zheng, D. W.; Au, Z. Y.

    1998-01-01

    The Chandler wobble of the earth's rotation has a period near 14 months and sets up the 0.5 cm amplitude pole tide in the deep oceans, However, the pole tide is anomalously large in the North Sea, where the amplitude increases sharply up to 3 cm along the continental coast. It is shown here that the sea levels are well correlated with winds at the pole tide frequency. The Princeton Ocean Model is used to investigate the response of the North Sea to wind forcing. The barotropic numerical ocean model depicts realistic coastlines and bathymetry at 5 ft x 5 ft resolution, with 97 x 73 grid points. The monthly mean wind fields for the 40-year period (1958-1997) from the National Centers for Atmospheric Prediction (NCEP) reanalysis were used to force the model. The winds were converted to stress with a neutral drag coefficient that varied linearly with windspeed (instead of using the NCEP windstress). A 5-day simulation was made for each month until the resulting flow regime came into equilibrium, and model water levels at various station locations were saved for comparison with tidal-gauge observed sea levels from the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL). The comparison is made for 10 North Sea stations with high quality tide gauge data. We find: (1) good agreement in annual and semi-annual phases and in the trend of amplitude w.r.t. latitude; (2) more importantly for this study, the model-predicted and observed non-seasonal sea level variations show a very significant temporal correlation as well as spectral coherence. However, a large amplitude difference exists between the two sets -- the overall amplitude variability of the observed is generally a factor of 2-3 larger than the model prediction (this same phenomenon has been reported in ocean circulation studies, although the cause is not yet clear.) Our results indicate that the wind forcing is the main cause of the observed large pole tide in the North Sea.

  19. The Diurnal Cycle of Convection and Atmospheric Tides in an Aquaplanet GCM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. J. Woolnough; J. M. Slingo; B. J. Hoskins

    2004-01-01

    The diurnal cycle of tropical convection and its relationship to the atmospheric tides is investigated using an aquaplanet GCM. The diurnal and semidiurnal harmonics of precipitation are both found to contribute significantly to the total diurnal variability of precipitation in the model, which is broadly consistent with observations of the diurnal cycle of convection over the open ocean. The semidiurnal

  20. Weather Science Hotlist

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1969-12-31

    The Franklin Institute Online offers the metadata Web site Weather Science Hotlist. The page contains dozens of links organized into ten topics that include Online Exhibits, Weather Right Now, Background Information, Severe Weather, El Nino/ La Nina, Historical Weather, Career Connections, Activities, Atmosphere, and Weather Forecasting. A great source for anyone looking for online weather information.

  1. Weather Cycles

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Mitchell

    2010-09-23

    We are professionals in the teaching profession. We designed this project for children ranging from 4th grade to 6th grade. This project explores factors that help create severe winter weather. An interactive simulation provides hands-on experience, followed by guiding questions and resource exploration. YOU WILL NEED: Paper with copied questions, Overhead projector and Students broken up into groups of 3. Form groups of three. Have each group explore the following simulation: Weather Maker Simulator Have students use the simulation to answer the following questions on paper. They should be discussing the questions in their groups. 1. In general, when are winds formed? 2. When winds are blowing, how can you get them to stop? 3. What ...

  2. A climate-related continental strain tide identified from PBO borehole strainmeter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Wen, L.

    2014-12-01

    We perform an analysis of tidal signals recorded in the strainmeters of the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) in the United States of America. The original strain data are decomposed into various components of tide signal and other terms of a trend, air pressure response and random noise, using BAYTAP, a program that applies a Bayesian modeling procedure to analyze the strainmeter data. The extracted tidal amplitudes and phase delays of some of the Sun-related tides (P1, S1K1, S2 and K2) exhibit obvious annual cycles of variation, with some of the amplitude variations reaching 30% and phase delays 30° respectively, while those of the Moon-related tides (Q1, N2 and M2) do not show annul cycles. The inferred annual cycles of the Sun-related tides cannot be explained by the inaccuracies of relative Earth-Sun positions at different seasons. Neither can they be explained by the annual variations of sea water loading. They can be best explained by existence of an additional climate-related strain tide induced by a combination of annual and daily changes of climatological variables (e.g. temperature and hydrology) in the continental areas.

  3. The Global S$_1$ Ocean Tide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Egbert, G. D.

    2003-01-01

    The small S$_1$ ocean tide is caused primarily by diurnal atmospheric pressure loading. Its excitation is therefore unlike any other diurnal tide. The global character of $S-1$ is here determined by numerical modeling and by analysis of Topex/Poseidon satellite altimeter data. The two approaches yield reasonably consistent results, and large ( $ greater than $l\\cm) amplitudes in several regions are further confirmed by comparison with coastal tide gauges. Notwithstanding their excitation differences, S$-1$ and other diurnal tides are found to share several common features, such as relatively large amplitudes in the Arabian Sea, the Sea of Okhotsk, and the Gulf of Alaska. The most noticeable difference is the lack of an S$-1$ Antarctic Kelvin wave. These similarities and differences can be explained in terms of the coherences between near-diurnal oceanic normal modes and the underlying tidal forcings. While gravitational diurnal tidal forces excite primarily a 28-hour Antarctic-Pacific mode, the S$_1$ air tide excites several other near-diurnal modes, none of which has large amplitudes near Antarctica.

  4. On tidal variability induced by nonlinear interaction with planetary waves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hector Teitelbaum; Francois Vial

    1991-01-01

    The short-time variability of the atmospheric tides is examined using a numerical simulation of tide-wave interaction similar to one described by Teitelbaum et al. (1989). It is shown that at least some observations of short-time tidal variability can be explained by the nonlinear interaction between tides and planetary waves whose periods are the same as the periods of the tidal

  5. Weather Activities

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This entertaining, interactive website is the perfect tool to educate users about the basics of weather forecasting and reporting. The two educational modules, created by EdHeads, each contain three levels and are designed for grades four through nine. While discovering how to predict a three-day forecast, students learn about warm and cold fronts, wind direction and speed, high and low pressure systems, isobars, and humidity. Teachers can find a helpful guide discussing how best to use the site as well as providing an overview of science standards, lesson plans, and pre- and post-tests for students.

  6. Weather Tamers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Donna R. Sterling

    2007-03-01

    Problem-based learning experiences that extend at least two weeks provide an opportunity for students to investigate a real-world problem while learning science content and skills in an exciting way. Meteorology provides a wealth of problems students can investigate while learning specific science concepts and skills found frequently in middle level national and state curricula standards. The hands-on activity described in this article helps students learn about the science behind weather events by planning, constructing, and testing models of cities exposed to a series of simulated hurricanes and tornado conditions.

  7. Mountain Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mountains can be awe-inspiring both for the vistas they provide and for the weather events and long-term climate systems they support. This interactive feature illustrates how a moisture-laden air mass interacts with a mountain slope to produce characteristic patterns of precipitation over the mountain and surrounding areas. Viewers can see how clouds and precipitation form as the air mass ascends the windward side of the peak, and observe the rain shadow created on the leeward side by the descending, warmed, and moisture-depleted air. A background essay and list of discussion questions supplement the interactive feature.

  8. Weather Photography

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ph.D. student Harald Edens describes himself as a "photographer of lightning, clouds, atmospheric optical phenomena and astronomy". His Web site entitled Weather Photography proves this by providing a stunning collection of photographs and movies of atmospheric optics, lightning, clouds, and astronomy. The author describes how the photographs were taken, what equipment was used, and even discusses many of the phenomenon being observed such as mirages and halos. An added bonus of this very interesting site is that the author generously allows free personal use of the photographs.

  9. Destructive Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    alizabethirwin

    2010-11-03

    What are the effects of different types of destructive weather? Learn All About Hurricanes Record on your chart 3 things that you learned. Watch a Hurricane Video These are the devastating Effects of Hurricanes Learn All About Tornadoes Record on your chart 3 things that you learned. Watch a Tornado Video These are the devastating Effects of tornadoes Learn All About Thunderstorms Record on your chart 3 things that you learned. These are the devastating Effects of thunderstorms Follow these important tips To keep safe. ...

  10. Nutrient and chlorophyll a anomaly in red-tide periods of 2003-2008 in Sishili Bay, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yanju; Tang, Danling; Yu, Long; Xing, Qianguo

    2011-05-01

    Sishili Bay is the most important aquiculture and tourism area for the city of Yantai, China; however, red tides occurred frequently and have caused huge economic losses in this bay in recent years. To gain a better understanding of the local ecological environments in the bay, we conducted this research between 2003 and 2008 to analyze variations in nutrients and chlorophyll (chl- a) during high frequency red tide period (May to September). The results show that the chl- a concentration increased from 2.70 in 2003 to 7.26 mg/m3 in 2008, while the concentration of total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) and silicate (SiO3-Si) increased lineally from 5.18 and 1.45 ?mol/L in 2003 to 18.57 and 9.52 ?mol/L in 2008, respectively, and the annual phosphate (PO4-P) varied between 0.15 and 0.46 ?mol/L. Special attention was given to a red tide in August 2007 occurred when water temperature was high and nutrient concentrations increased sharply because of a heavy rainfall. Overall, the results show the P limitation in Sishili Bay, and reveal that red tides were caused by eutrophication from terrestrial inputs and local warm weather, particularly during rainy periods. Therefore, to control red tide, greater efforts should be made to reduce sewage discharges into Sishili Bay, particularly during rainfall seasons.

  11. Non-stationary internal tides observed with satellite altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, R. D.; Zaron, E. D.

    2011-09-01

    Temporal variability of the internal tide is inferred from a 17-year combined record of Topex/Poseidon and Jason satellite altimeters. A global sampling of along-track sea-surface height wavenumber spectra finds that non-stationary variance is generally 25% or less of the average variance at wavenumbers characteristic of mode-1 tidal internal waves. With some exceptions the non-stationary variance does not exceed 0.25 cm2. The mode-2 signal, where detectable, contains a larger fraction of non-stationary variance, typically 50% or more. Temporal subsetting of the data reveals interannual variability barely significant compared with tidal estimation error from 3-year records. Comparison of summer vs. winter conditions shows only one region of noteworthy seasonal changes, the northern South China Sea. Implications for the anticipated SWOT altimeter mission are briefly discussed.

  12. FINITE ELEMENT MODEL FOR TIDES AND CURRENTS WITH FIELD APPLICATIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, Roy A.

    1988-01-01

    A finite element model, based upon the shallow water equations, is used to calculate tidal amplitudes and currents for two field-scale test problems. Because tides are characterized by line spectra, the governing equations are subjected to harmonic decomposition. Thus the solution variables are the real and imaginary parts of the amplitude of sea level and velocity rather than a time series of these variables. The time series is recovered through synthesis. This scheme, coupled with a modified form of the governing equations, leads to high computational efficiency and freedom from excessive numerical noise. Two test-cases are presented. The first is a solution for eleven tidal constituents in the English Channel and southern North Sea, and three constituents are discussed. The second is an analysis of the frequency response and tidal harmonics for south San Francisco Bay.

  13. Equilibrium tides in differentially rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathis, S.; Zahn, J.-P.

    2005-11-01

    In this work, we present new theoretical advances in the modelization of the equilibrium tide in the convective envelope of solar-type binary stars. We simplify the problem by assuming that all the spins are aligned but we take into account the two-dimensional character of the rotation law in the convection zone. Following the method of Zahn (1966) we first derive the adiabatic tide which is in phase with the perturbing potential exerted by the companion. Next, we derive the dissipative tide which is in quadrature with it, using the crude MLT eddy-viscosity to model the action of turbulence on the large scale tidal flow. Finally, we discuss the impact of those processes on the dynamical evolution of binary systems. Note that our results may be applied as well to giant planets and to exo-planets, since these possess also a convection zone.

  14. The IERS Special Bureau for Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Chao, B. F.; Desai, S. D.

    2002-01-01

    The Global Geophysical Fluids Center of the International Earth Rotation Service (IERS) comprises 8 special bureaus, one of which is the Special Bureau for Tides. Its purpose is to facilitate studies related to tidal effects in earth rotation. To that end it collects various relevant datasets and distributes them, primarily through its website at bowie.gsfc.nasa.gov/ggfc/tides. Example datasets include tabulations of tidal variations in angular momentum and in earth rotation as estimated from numerical ocean tide models and from meteorological reanalysis products. The web site also features an interactive tidal prediction "machine" which generates tidal predictions (e.g., of UT1) from lists of harmonic constants. The Special Bureau relies on the tidal and earth-rotation communities to build and enlarge its datasets; further contributions from this community are most welcome.

  15. Tides in asynchronous binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledano, O.; Moreno, E.; Koenigsberger, G.; Detmers, R.; Langer, N.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Stellar oscillations are excited in non-synchronously rotating stars in binary systems due to the tidal forces. Tangential components of the tides can drive a shear flow which behaves as a differentially forced rotating structure in a stratified outer medium. Aims: The aims of this paper are to show that our single-layer approximation for the calculation of the forced oscillations yields results that are consistent with the predictions for the synchronization timescales in circular orbits, ?_sync a^6, thus providing a simplified means of computing the energy dissipation rates, dot{E}. Furthermore, by calibrating our model results to fit the relationship between synchronization timescales and orbital separation, we are able to constrain the value of the kinematical viscosity parameter, ?. Methods: We compute the values of dot{E} for a set of 5 M_? + 4 M_? model binary systems with different orbital separations, a, and use these to estimate the synchronization timescales. Results: The resulting ?_synch vs. a relation is comparable to that of Zahn (1977, A&A, 57, 383) for convective envelopes, providing a calibration method for the values of ?. For the 4+5 M_? binary modeled in this paper, ? is in the range 0.0015-0.0043 R_? 2 /day for orbital periods in the range 2.5-25 d. In addition, dot{E} is found to decrease by 2 orders of magnitude as synchronization is approached, implying that binary systems may approach synchronization relatively quickly but that it takes a much longer timescale to actually attain this condition. Conclusions: .The relevance of these results is threefold: 1) our model allows an estimate for the numerical value of ? under arbitrary conditions in the binary system; 2) it can be used to calculate the energy dissipation rates throughout the orbital cycle for any value of eccentricity and stellar rotational velocity; and 3) it provides values of the tangential component of the velocity perturbation at any time throughout the orbit and predicts the location on the stellar surface where the largest shear instabilities may be occurring. We suggest that one of the possible implication of the asymmetric distribution of dot{E} over the stellar surface is the generation of localized regions of enhanced surface activity.

  16. The Weather Dude

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Walker, Nick.

    2002-01-01

    The Weather Dude is a weather education Web site offered by meteorologist Nick Walker of The Weather Channel. For kids, the site offers a great online textbook entitled Weather Basics, which explains everything from precipitation to the seasons, using simple text and fun graphics. Other fun things for kids include weather songs, questions and quizzes, weather proverbs, and more. Teachers are also provided with helpful resources such as weather activity sheets and printable blank maps, as well as many other links to weather forecasts and information that will help make teaching about weather fun.

  17. Concerning thermal tides on hot Jupiters

    E-print Network

    Goodman, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    By analogy with a mechanism proposed by Gold and Soter to explain the retrograde rotation of Venus, Arras and Socrates suggest that thermal tides may excite hot jovian exoplanets into nonsynchronous rotation, and perhaps also noncircular orbits. It is shown here that because of the absence of a solid surface above the convective core of a jovian planet, the coupling of the gravitational and thermal tides vanishes to zeroth order in the ratio of the atmospheric scale height to the planetary radius. At the next order, the effect probably has the sign opposite to that claimed by the latter authors, hence reinforcing synchronous and circular orbits.

  18. A Model for Teaching the Dynamical Theory of Tides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Railsback, L. Bruce

    1991-01-01

    The dynamical theory of tides is often neglected in teaching oceanography because students have difficulty in visualizing the movements of the tides across the glove. A schematic diagram portraying amphidromic systems as mechanical gears helps overcome these problems. (Author)

  19. Internal tide generation by arbitrary two-dimensional topography

    E-print Network

    Peacock, Thomas

    To date, analytical models of internal tide generation by two-dimensional ridges have considered only idealized shapes. Here, we advance the Green function approach to address the generation of internal tides by two-dimensional ...

  20. Weather, Information Security, and Markets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pythagoras Petratos

    2007-01-01

    The most common examples of financial variables are traded assets such as stocks and bonds. Derivatives have greatly facilitated financial management, the most useful technique of which is hedging, a trading activity that aims to reduce exposure to risk. The weather derivatives market has similarities to both the potential evolution and pricing of information security derivatives. Financial markets and investors

  1. New Miscellaneous Results in Tides from Topex/Poseidon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Egbert, G.; Cartwright, D.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a variety of new results concerning ocean tides that have been derived from Topex/Poseidon satellite altimeter data. Most of these results are based on new tidal solutions employing nearly 8 years of data. The topics covered include internal tides and long-period tides.

  2. COUNTS OF RED-TIDE ORGANISMS, Gymnodinium breve, AND ASSOCIATED

    E-print Network

    455: COUNTS OF RED-TIDE ORGANISMS, Gymnodinium breve, AND ASSOCIATED OCEANOGRAPHIC DATA FROM F. Pautzke, Commissioner Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, Donald L. McKernan, Director COUNTS OF RED-TIDE Acknowledgment 4 Literature cited 5 Explanation of column headings 7 Station data 7 iii #12;#12;COUNTS OF RED-TIDE

  3. SMLTM simulations of the diurnal tide: comparison with UARS observations

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SMLTM simulations of the diurnal tide: comparison with UARS observations R. A. Akmaev1 , V. A seasonal variations of tides, a dominant compo- nent of the MLT dynamics. Simulations with the Spectral with the observations. The diurnal tide is generated by forcing speci®ed at the model lower boundary and by in situ

  4. COUNTS OF RED TIDE ORGANISMS, Gymnodinium breve, AND

    E-print Network

    369: COUNTS OF RED TIDE ORGANISMS, Gymnodinium breve, AND ASSOCIATED OCEANOGRAPHIC DATA FROMKernan, Director COUNTS OF RED TIDE ORGANISMS, Gymnodinium breve, AND ASSOCIATED OCEANOGRAPHIC DATA FROM FLORIDA OF RED TIDE ORGANISMS, Gymnodinium breve, AND ASSOCIATED OCEANOGRAPHIC DATA FROM FLORIDA WEST COAST, 1957

  5. NLOADF: A program for computing ocean-tide loading

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Duncan Carr Agnew

    1997-01-01

    The loading of the Earth by the ocean tides produces several kinds of signals which can be measured by geodetic technique. In order to compute these most accurately, a combi- nation of global and local models of the ocean tides may be needed. The program NLOADF convolves the Green functions for loading with ocean tide models using a station-centered grid

  6. From Tides to Mixing Along the Hawaiian Ridge

    E-print Network

    Kurapov, Alexander

    From Tides to Mixing Along the Hawaiian Ridge Daniel L. Rudnick,1 * Timothy J. Boyd,2 Russell E tides to turbulence has been hypothesized to serve as a major energy pathway for ocean mixing. We of internal tidal energy flux observed at the ridge agrees with the predictions of internal tide models. Large

  7. The lunar tide in sporadic E R. J. Stening

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The lunar tide in sporadic E R. J. Stening School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney. Some examples from Arecibo are displayed to show this. The eect of lunar tides should then modify the wind-shear theory in a manner that yields the observed features of the lunar tide in the critical

  8. Progress Towards an Operational Model Recent red tides in 2006

    E-print Network

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Progress Towards an Operational Model Recent red tides in 2006 dand 2007: Progress towards an operational model of Florida red tide onset, dispersal, and maintenance within the Gulf of Mexicowithin tides] ­ J J Walsh R Htides] J.J. Walsh, R.H. Weisberg, and C.A. Heil` #12;Center for Prediction

  9. Nonlinear disintegration of the internal tide Karl R. Helfrich1

    E-print Network

    Nonlinear disintegration of the internal tide Karl R. Helfrich1 and Roger H. J. Grimshaw2 1 The disintegration of a first-mode internal tide into shorter solitary-like waves is considered. Because observations frequently show both tides and waves with amplitudes beyond the re- strictions of weakly nonlinear theory

  10. Impact of Tropospherically-Generated Tides on the Mean State of the Ionosphere-Thermosphere System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, McArthur; Forbes, Jeffrey; Hagan, Maura; Maute, Astrid

    2013-04-01

    It is now widely recognized that vertically-propagating tides exert significant variability on the ionosphere-thermosphere (IT) system. In particular, the impact of tropospherically-generated non-migrating tides on longitudinal variability of the IT system has been a topic of intense research in recent years. However, relatively little is known about how dissipation of these upward propagating waves affects the zonal mean state of the IT system. Herein we report on numerical experiments performed with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM) that explore this topic using observationally based tidal lower boundary conditions near 97 km from the Climatological Tidal Model of the Thermosphere (CTMT after Oberheide et al., [2011]) for average solar conditions over a climatological year (i.e., steady-state monthly runs). A robust evaluation of the NCAR TIE-GCM close to the model lower boundary was performed to assess the validity of our results, since the TIE-GCM lower boundary is close to the height regime where many of these upward propagating tides dissipate and exchange energy and momentum with the background IT. Differences between simulations with and without tidal forcing are analyzed to establish the aggregate effects of tidal dissipation on the zonal mean circulation and temperature structure. Numerical experiments are also performed with several different combinations of tides at the lower boundary to identify those components that most effectively alter the zonal mean structure of the IT.

  11. Weather Prediction Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacmeister, Julio T.

    Awareness of weather and concern about weather in the proximate future certainly must have accompanied the emergence of human self-consciousness. Although weather is a basic idea in human existence, it is difficult to define precisely.

  12. Winter Weather Checklists

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Matters What's New Preparation & Planning Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis ... Weather Information on Specific Types of Emergencies Winter Weather Checklists Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ...

  13. Hot Weather Tips

    MedlinePLUS

    HOT Weather Tips Printer-friendly version We all suffer in hot weather. However, for elderly and disabled people and ... stress and following these tips for dealing with hot weather. Wear cool clothing: See that the person ...

  14. NOAA New England Red Tide Information Center: More About Red Tides and Harmful Algal Blooms

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Ocean Service (NOS)

    This web page features links to information about NOAA-funded harmful algal bloom (HAB) research, HAB species, and HAB toxins and their impacts on humans, marine environments, and coastal economies. It also offers a brief description of Red Tide.

  15. Ocean tide energy converter having improved efficiency

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rainey

    1980-01-01

    A tide motor useful for converting periodic rising and falling water levels to useful work such as electric power generation includes a primary piston having a large enclosed chamber that can selectively be filled with air for generation of upward thrust when submerged in rising tidal water or filled with water for generating downward gravitational thrust when the piston is

  16. Characterizing internal tides near the Luzon Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-09-01

    In the Luzon Strait, which lies between the Philippines and Taiwan and connects the western Pacific Ocean and the South China Sea, ridges extending along the ocean bottom generate large internal tides—waves with a tidal frequency within the ocean, not on its surface—that propagate into the South China Sea and the Pacific Ocean.

  17. Nonlinearity in rock - Evidence from earth tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agnew, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    The earth is sinusoidally stressed by tidal forces; if the stress-strain relation for rock is nonlinear, energy should appear in an earth tide record at frequencies which are multiples of those of the larger tidal lines. An examination of the signals to be expected for different nonlinear deformation laws shows that for a nonlinear response without dissipation, the largest anomalous signal should occur at twice the forcing frequency, whereas for nonlinear laws involving dissipation (cusped hysteresis loops) the anomalous signal will be greatest at three times this frequency. The size of the signal in the dissipative case depends on the amount by which dissipation affects the particular response being measured. For measurements of strain tides this depends on whether dissipation is assumed to be present throughout the earth or localized around the point of measurement. An analysis of 5.7 years of strain tide records from Pinon Flat, California, shows a small signal at twice the frequency of the largest (M2) tide.

  18. Red Tide or Neurotoxic Shellfish Poisoning

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This web page discusses Red Tide and Neurotoxic Shellfish Poisoning, a milder gastroenteritis with neurologic symptoms compared with Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning. The classic causative organism is the dinoflagellate Gymnodinium breve, which produces neurotoxic toxins known as brevetoxins. This page describes clinical presentation of NSP (including symptoms), diagnosis, management and treatment, molecular mechanism of action, and references.

  19. Parents Who Moved against the Tide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perske, Robert

    2003-01-01

    This article recounts the historical discrimination against children with mental retardation and the extraordinary efforts made by parents of children with disabilities to speak out against the tide that dehumanized their children. The growth of national, state, and local Arcs and parent advocacy efforts are discussed. (Contains 5 references.) (CR)

  20. Nonlinear Tides in Close Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, Nevin N.; Arras, Phil; Quataert, Eliot; Burkart, Josh

    2012-06-01

    We study the excitation and damping of tides in close binary systems, accounting for the leading-order nonlinear corrections to linear tidal theory. These nonlinear corrections include two distinct physical effects: three-mode nonlinear interactions, i.e., the redistribution of energy among stellar modes of oscillation, and nonlinear excitation of stellar normal modes by the time-varying gravitational potential of the companion. This paper, the first in a series, presents the formalism for studying nonlinear tides and studies the nonlinear stability of the linear tidal flow. Although the formalism we present is applicable to binaries containing stars, planets, and/or compact objects, we focus on non-rotating solar-type stars with stellar or planetary companions. Our primary results include the following: (1) The linear tidal solution almost universally used in studies of binary evolution is unstable over much of the parameter space in which it is employed. More specifically, resonantly excited internal gravity waves in solar-type stars are nonlinearly unstable to parametric resonance for companion masses M' >~ 10-100 M ? at orbital periods P ? 1-10 days. The nearly static "equilibrium" tidal distortion is, however, stable to parametric resonance except for solar binaries with P <~ 2-5 days. (2) For companion masses larger than a few Jupiter masses, the dynamical tide causes short length scale waves to grow so rapidly that they must be treated as traveling waves, rather than standing waves. (3) We show that the global three-wave treatment of parametric instability typically used in the astrophysics literature does not yield the fastest-growing daughter modes or instability threshold in many cases. We find a form of parametric instability in which a single parent wave excites a very large number of daughter waves (N ? 103[P/10 days] for a solar-type star) and drives them as a single coherent unit with growth rates that are a factor of ?N faster than the standard three-wave parametric instability. These are local instabilities viewed through the lens of global analysis; the coherent global growth rate follows local rates in the regions where the shear is strongest. In solar-type stars, the dynamical tide is unstable to this collective version of the parametric instability for even sub-Jupiter companion masses with P <~ a month. (4) Independent of the parametric instability, the dynamical and equilibrium tides excite a wide range of stellar p-modes and g-modes by nonlinear inhomogeneous forcing; this coupling appears particularly efficient at draining energy out of the dynamical tide and may be more important than either wave breaking or parametric resonance at determining the nonlinear dissipation of the dynamical tide.

  1. Modulation of Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic climate by variable drawdown of atmospheric pCO2 from weathering of basaltic provinces on continents drifting through the equatorial humid belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, D. V.; Muttoni, G.

    2013-03-01

    The small reservoir of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere (pCO2) that modulates climate through the greenhouse effect reflects a delicate balance between large fluxes of sources and sinks. The major long-term source of CO2 is global outgassing from sea-floor spreading, subduction, hotspot activity, and metamorphism; the ultimate sink is through weathering of continental silicates and deposition of carbonates. Most carbon cycle models are driven by changes in the source flux scaled to variable rates of ocean floor production, but ocean floor production may not be distinguishable from being steady since 180 Ma. We evaluate potential changes in sources and sinks of CO2 for the past 120 Ma in a paleogeographic context. Our new calculations show that decarbonation of pelagic sediments by Tethyan subduction contributed only modestly to generally high pCO2 levels from the Late Cretaceous until the early Eocene, and thus shutdown of this CO2 source with the collision of India and Asia at the early Eocene climate optimum at around 50 Ma was inadequate to account for the large and prolonged decrease in pCO2 that eventually allowed the growth of significant Antarctic ice sheets by around 34 Ma. Instead, variation in area of continental basalt terranes in the equatorial humid belt (5° S-5° N) seems to be a dominant factor controlling how much CO2 is retained in the atmosphere via the silicate weathering feedback. The arrival of the highly weatherable Deccan Traps in the equatorial humid belt at around 50 Ma was decisive in initiating the long-term slide to lower atmospheric pCO2, which was pushed further down by the emplacement of the 30 Ma Ethiopian Traps near the equator and the southerly tectonic extrusion of SE Asia, an arc terrane that presently is estimated to account for 1/4 of CO2 consumption from all basaltic provinces that account for ~1/3 of the total CO2 consumption by continental silicate weathering (Dessert et al., 2003). A negative climate-feedback mechanism that (usually) inhibits the complete collapse of atmospheric pCO2 is the accelerating formation of thick cation-deficient soils that retard chemical weathering of the underlying bedrock. Nevertheless, equatorial climate seems to be relatively insensitive to pCO2 greenhouse forcing and thus with availability of some rejuvenating relief as in arc terranes or thick basaltic provinces, silicate weathering in this venue is not subject to a strong negative feedback, providing an avenue for ice ages. The safety valve that prevents excessive atmospheric pCO2 levels is the triggering of silicate weathering of continental areas and basaltic provinces in the temperate humid belt. Excess organic carbon burial seems to have played a negligible role in atmospheric pCO2 over the Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic.

  2. The Weathering of Micrometeorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Ginneken, M.; Genge, M. J.; Folco, L.

    2014-09-01

    Despite the favorable conditions for their preservation, micrometeorites from Antarctica are affected by terrestrial weathering. Here we present a comprehensive work on the weathering of micrometeorites from Antarctica.

  3. LETTER doi:10.1038/nature12400 A rigid and weathered ice shell on Titan

    E-print Network

    Nimmo, Francis

    LETTER doi:10.1038/nature12400 A rigid and weathered ice shell on Titan D. Hemingway1 , F. Nimmo1 , H. Zebker2 & L. Iess3 Several lines of evidence suggest that Saturn's largest moon, Titan, has to wavelengths that are controlled by tides and rotation, we suggest that Titan's moment of inertia may be even

  4. Introduction to special section on Climate and Weather of the Sun Earth System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübken, F.-J.; Austin, J.; Langematz, U.; Oberheide, J.

    2010-01-01

    In the special section on CAWSES (Climate and Weather of the Sun Earth System) a total of 19 papers are published covering several aspects of Sun-Earth coupling. Six papers concentrate on summer mesospheric ice clouds including detection by satellites, radar-based derivation of particle properties, and water vapor observations in the mesosphere. Solar radiation affects ice clouds on time scales of the 11 year solar cycle and 27 days. Stratospheric shrinking contributes significantly to long-term trends of ice clouds. The seasonal variability of smoke particles is confirmed to be impacted by global circulation. Six papers address the external forcing of the atmosphere caused by the Sun. The relevance of radionuclei and solar radiation spectral irradiance is presented. The impact of precipitating energetic solar particles on trace gas concentrations is studied. Ion chemistry and electron production can be important to destroy ozone in the mesosphere and upper stratosphere. Strong solar events can reduce ice clouds on short time scales owing to dynamical feed back mechanisms. The 27 day solar signal is identified in ozone concentration using satellite measurements. Model studies show that the dynamical response of the stratospheric polar vortex to solar cycle forcing depends on the phase of the quasi-biennial oscillation. The year 2009 was a remarkable exception from this rule reinforcing natural variability. Regarding centennial time scales it is shown that changes in the stratosphere can influence tropospheric circulation. Tides have extensively been studied within CAWSES. As is demonstrated, nonmigrating tides originating in the troposphere can propagate into the thermosphere.

  5. Apparent Relations Between Solar Activity and Solar Tides Caused by the Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh

    2007-01-01

    A solar storm is a storm of ions and electrons from the Sun. Large solar storms are usually preceded by solar flares, phenomena that can be characterized quantitatively from Earth. Twenty-five of the thirty-eight largest known solar flares were observed to start when one or more tide-producing planets (Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Jupiter) were either nearly above the event positions (less than 10 deg. longitude) or at the opposing side of the Sun. The probability for this to happen at random is 0.039 percent. This supports the hypothesis that the force or momentum balance (between the solar atmospheric pressure, the gravity field, and magnetic field) on plasma in the looping magnetic field lines in solar corona could be disturbed by tides, resulting in magnetic field reconnection, solar flares, and solar storms. Separately, from the daily position data of Venus, Earth, and Jupiter, an 11-year planet alignment cycle is observed to approximately match the sunspot cycle. This observation supports the hypothesis that the resonance and beat between the solar tide cycle and nontidal solar activity cycle influences the sunspot cycle and its varying magnitudes. The above relations between the unpredictable solar flares and the predictable solar tidal effects could be used and further developed to forecast the dangerous space weather and therefore reduce its destructive power against the humans in space and satellites controlling mobile phones and global positioning satellite (GPS) systems.

  6. On modeling migrating solar tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagan, M. E.; Forbes, J. M.; Vial, F.

    1995-01-01

    Recent updates and extensions to a steady-state two-dimensional linearized model of global-scale atmospheric waves have facilitated improved calculations of those which are subharmonics of a solar day and propagate with the apparent motion of the sun. The model improvements are briefly described and some updated predictions of the migrating solar diurnal component are highlighted. The latter represent the first numerical modeling effort to examining the seasonal variability of the migrating diurnal harmonic as it propagates into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere.

  7. Monitoring storm tide and flooding from Hurricane Isaac along the Gulf Coast of the United States, August 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCallum, Brian E.; McGee, Benton D.; Kimbrow, Dustin R.; Runner, Michael S.; Painter, Jaime A.; Frantz, Eric R.; Gotvald, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) deployed a temporary monitoring network of water-level and barometric pressure sensors at 127 locations along the gulf coast from Alabama to Louisiana to record the timing, areal extent, and magnitude of hurricane storm tide and coastal flooding generated by Hurricane Isaac. This deployment was undertaken as part of a coordinated federal emergency response as outlined by the Stafford Act under a directed mission assignment by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Storm tide, as defined by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 2008), is the water-level rise generated by a combination of storm surge and astronomical tide during a coastal storm. Hurricane Isaac initially made landfall on the coast of Louisiana in Plaquemines Parish on August 28, 2012, as a Category 1 hurricane on the Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale (National Weather Service, 1974) and then stalled over southern Louisiana for several days, causing prolonged storm-tide impacts. A total of 188 water-level and wave-height sensors were deployed at 127 locations during August 27–28 prior to landfall. More than 90 percent of the sensors and all high-water marks (HWMs) were recovered and surveyed to North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88) within 7 days of the Isaac landfall. Only a handful of sensors in the Plaquemines Parish area of Louisiana could not be retrieved until weeks later due to prolonged flooding in the area. Data collected from this event can be used to evaluate the performance of storm-tide models for maximum and incremental water level and flood extent and the site-specific effects of storm tide on natural and anthropogenic features of the environment.

  8. Backyard Weather Station

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-18

    Students use their senses to describe what the weather is doing and predict what it might do next. After gaining a basic understanding of weather patterns, students act as state park engineers and design/build "backyard weather stations" to gather data to make actual weather forecasts.

  9. The Weather and Climate

    E-print Network

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    The Weather and Climate Emergent Laws and Multifractal Cascades Shaun LovEjoy and DaniEL SChErTzEr #12;2/15/12 DRAFT TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 DRAFT 1 The Weather And The Climate:2 Emergent Laws, weather, low frequency weather and the climate1 1.2.7 The scaling of the atmospheric boundary conditions2

  10. Weather Modification A Theoretician's Viewpoint.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Kenneth C.

    1996-11-01

    Early progress in weather modification is attributed to a healthy interaction between theory and experiment. During the 1970s, a divergence of approaches took place. A "theoretical/experimental" approach, exemplified by the Cascade Project, focused on testing scientific hypotheses; an "observational/experimental" approach, exemplified by the Colorado River Basin Pilot Project, sought to enhance understanding of the seeding process through more detailed observations.The theoretical/experimental school soon came to focus almost exclusively on natural cloud processes, leaving the field of weather modification nearly devoid of a theoretical component. It is suggested that this theoretical component is necessary to revitalize the field of weather modification.Key questions are addressed. These include 1) identification of clouds that are amenable to seeding; 2) glaciogenic versus hygroscopic seeding; 3) optimizing critical seeding variables, such as seed particle concentration for glaciogenic seeding and seed particle size for hygroscopic seeding; and 4) seeding for hail suppression.

  11. Weather Derivative Valuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewson, Stephen; Brix, Anders

    2005-04-01

    Weather Derivative Valuation is the first book to cover all the meteorological, statistical, financial and mathematical issues that arise in the pricing and risk management of weather derivatives. There are chapters on meteorological data and data cleaning, the modelling and pricing of single weather derivatives, the modelling and valuation of portfolios, the use of weather and seasonal forecasts in the pricing of weather derivatives, arbitrage pricing for weather derivatives, risk management, and the modelling of temperature, wind and precipitation. Specific issues covered in detail include the analysis of uncertainty in weather derivative pricing, time-series modelling of daily temperatures, the creation and use of probabilistic meteorological forecasts and the derivation of the weather derivative version of the Black-Scholes equation of mathematical finance. Written by consultants who work within the weather derivative industry, this book is packed with practical information and theoretical insight into the world of weather derivative pricing.

  12. Tide-influenced sedimentary environments and facies

    SciTech Connect

    De Boer, P.L.; Van Gelder, A.; Nio, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    This volume contains examples of recent as well as fossil tide-influenced sedimentary facies. Studies of recent tidal processes and sediments provide an insight into the way in which tidal facies and sequences develop, and into the processes which are active. The studies performed on fossil rocks give information on one-to-one scale model experiments that have been executed by nature both relatively recently and in the distant past. In this work, the parallel presentation of papers on recent and fossil examples of tide-influenced sedimentary facies and environments follows the philosophy of comparative sedimentology, aiming at an understanding of both the past and the present, with the aim also, of forecasting future developments.

  13. Arctic Ocean Tides from GRACE Satellite Accelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killett, B.; Wahr, J. M.; Desai, S. D.; Yuan, D.; Watkins, M. M.

    2010-12-01

    Because missions such as TOPEX/POSEIDON don't extend to high latitudes, Arctic ocean tidal solutions aren't constrained by altimetry data. The resulting errors in tidal models alias into monthly GRACE gravity field solutions at all latitudes. Fortunately, GRACE inter-satellite ranging data can be used to solve for these tides directly. Seven years of GRACE inter-satellite acceleration data are inverted using a mascon approach to solve for residual amplitudes and phases of major solar and lunar tides in the Arctic ocean relative to FES 2004. Simulations are performed to test the inversion algorithm's performance, and uncertainty estimates are derived from the tidal signal over land. Truncation error magnitudes and patterns are compared to the residual tidal signals.

  14. The association of weather variability and under five malaria mortality in KEMRI/CDC HDSS in Western Kenya 2003 to 2008: a time series analysis.

    PubMed

    Sewe, Maquins; Rocklöv, Joacim; Williamson, John; Hamel, Mary; Nyaguara, Amek; Odhiambo, Frank; Laserson, Kayla

    2015-02-01

    Malaria is among the leading causes of mortality in the younger under-five group of children zero to four years of age. This study aims at describing the relationship between rainfall and temperature on under-five malaria or anaemia mortality in Kenya Medical Research Institute and United States Centers for Disease Control (KEMRI/CDC) Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS). This study was conducted through the ongoing KEMRI and CDC collaboration. A general additive model with a Poisson link function was fit to model the weekly association of lagged cumulative rainfall and average temperature on malaria/anemia mortality in KEMRI/CDC HDSS for the period 2003 to 2008. A trend function was included in the model to control for time trends and seasonality not explained by weather fluctuations. 95% confidence intervals was presented with estimates. Malaria or anemia mortality was found to be associated with changes in temperature and rainfall in the KEMRI HDSS, with a delay up to 16 weeks. The empirical estimates of associations describe established biological relationships well. This information, and particularly, the strength of the relationships over longer lead times can highlight the possibility of developing a predictive forecast with lead times up to 16 weeks in order to enhance preparedness to high transmission episodes. PMID:25674784

  15. The Association of Weather Variability and Under Five Malaria Mortality in KEMRI/CDC HDSS in Western Kenya 2003 to 2008: A Time Series Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sewe, Maquins; Rocklöv, Joacim; Williamson, John; Hamel, Mary; Nyaguara, Amek; Odhiambo, Frank; Laserson, Kayla

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is among the leading causes of mortality in the younger under-five group of children zero to four years of age. This study aims at describing the relationship between rainfall and temperature on under-five malaria or anaemia mortality in Kenya Medical Research Institute and United States Centers for Disease Control (KEMRI/CDC) Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS). This study was conducted through the ongoing KEMRI and CDC collaboration. A general additive model with a Poisson link function was fit to model the weekly association of lagged cumulative rainfall and average temperature on malaria/anemia mortality in KEMRI/CDC HDSS for the period 2003 to 2008. A trend function was included in the model to control for time trends and seasonality not explained by weather fluctuations. 95% confidence intervals was presented with estimates. Malaria or anemia mortality was found to be associated with changes in temperature and rainfall in the KEMRI HDSS, with a delay up to 16 weeks. The empirical estimates of associations describe established biological relationships well. This information, and particularly, the strength of the relationships over longer lead times can highlight the possibility of developing a predictive forecast with lead times up to 16 weeks in order to enhance preparedness to high transmission episodes. PMID:25674784

  16. Improving Coastal Tide Forecasts with Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaron, E. D.; Smith, S. R.; Martin, P.

    2012-12-01

    A model of the Yellow Sea is used as a prototype for improving tidal water levels in coastal ocean models. An incremental variational data assimilation method has been implemented in which a linear data-assimilative tidal model, OTIS, is used to compute model forcing corrections for a non-linear regional model derived from POM. Both OTIS and the POM-derived model are configured with identical 8km-resolution grids, and OTIS uses a bottom drag formulation linearized around the prior POM solution. Assimilated data consist of satellite altimeter data as well as harmonically analyzed tide gauge data, where half of the latter are withheld for parameter calibration. It is found that M2 tide error is reduced from 21cm to 12cm in the regional model, which compares favorably with the 11cm error for the linear OTIS solution. Smaller constituents are also improved to a lesser degree. In contrast, the alternative approach of using OTIS to provide boundary conditions for the POM-derived model yields M2 tides with an error of 20 to 40cm, depending on the version of the OTIS solution used.

  17. Global charts of ocean tide loading effects

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, O.; Mazzega, P. (CNES, Toulouse (France))

    1990-07-15

    Global ocean tide loading charts of the radial displacement, the potential divided by g (gravity acceleration), and the gravity effect have been computed using the 11 constituents M{sub 2}, S{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, K{sub 2}K{sub 1}, O{sub 1}, P{sub 1}, Q{sub 1}, M{sub f}, M{sub m}, S{sub s a} of Schwiderski's tidal model. These new charts have a resolution of 1{degree}{times}1{degree} on the continents as well as on the oceanic area. A description of Farrell's convolution method to compute the loading effects is given, and an estimate of the numerical errors leads to the conclusion that these global charts have a precision better than 2.5% independent of the accuracy of Schwiderski's maps. The current approximation of the loading effects by a proportionality relation with the local oceanic tides is also compared with Farrell's convolution method. Departures of several centimeters systematically appear, in particular over the continental shelves. The authors then show that the maps of the oceanic tides deduced from satellite altimetry could be corrected for the loading effect by an iterative computational procedure based on their algorithm of Farrell's convolution.

  18. Weather Camp 2012 "Weather and Climate All Around Us"

    E-print Network

    Farritor, Shane

    Weather Camp 2012 "Weather and Climate All Around Us" Are you interested in the weather? Come to Weather Camp at UNL What is Weather Camp? For more information Weather camp is a week long day camp for students who will be 11-14 years old at the time of the camp Most of the activities at Weather Camp 2012

  19. Longitudinal variation of tides in the MLT region: 2. Relative effects of solar radiative and latent heating

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaoli Zhang; Jeffrey M. Forbes; Maura E. Hagan

    2010-01-01

    Part 2 of our study examines the relative importance of radiative heating and latent heating in accounting for vertically propagating tides that impose longitude variability on mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT) winds, temperatures, and densities. Our results are based upon numerical simulations using the Global-Scale Wave Model (GSWM) and new tidal heating rates derived from International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) radiative

  20. Weather and climate applications for rangeland restoration planning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rangeland ecosystems generally have an arid or semi-arid climatology, and are characterized by relatively high variability in seasonal and annual patterns of precipitation. Weather variability during seedling establishment is universally acknowledged as a principal determinant of rangeland seeding...

  1. Predicting the Texas Windstorm Insurance Association Payout for Commercial Property Loss Due to Ike Based on Weather, Geographical, and Building Variables 

    E-print Network

    Zhu, Kehui

    2013-04-04

    NOMENCLATURE TWIA Texas Windstorm Insurance Association IMP Improvement Value GIS Geographic Information System HGAC Houston ? Galveston Area Council FEMA Federal Emergency Management Agency VIF Variance Inflation Factors ANOVA Analysis of Variance... variable: location of property within Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) floodplain zone (A, X, X500). o X4: located in the Floodplain zone A (0/1) o X5: located in the Floodplain zone X500 (0/1) ? X6: building area (sq.m) ? X7: number...

  2. NONLINEAR TIDES IN CLOSE BINARY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Nevin N. [Department of Physics, and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Arras, Phil [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Quataert, Eliot; Burkart, Josh, E-mail: nevin@mit.edu [Astronomy Department and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, 601 Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    We study the excitation and damping of tides in close binary systems, accounting for the leading-order nonlinear corrections to linear tidal theory. These nonlinear corrections include two distinct physical effects: three-mode nonlinear interactions, i.e., the redistribution of energy among stellar modes of oscillation, and nonlinear excitation of stellar normal modes by the time-varying gravitational potential of the companion. This paper, the first in a series, presents the formalism for studying nonlinear tides and studies the nonlinear stability of the linear tidal flow. Although the formalism we present is applicable to binaries containing stars, planets, and/or compact objects, we focus on non-rotating solar-type stars with stellar or planetary companions. Our primary results include the following: (1) The linear tidal solution almost universally used in studies of binary evolution is unstable over much of the parameter space in which it is employed. More specifically, resonantly excited internal gravity waves in solar-type stars are nonlinearly unstable to parametric resonance for companion masses M' {approx}> 10-100 M{sub Circled-Plus} at orbital periods P Almost-Equal-To 1-10 days. The nearly static 'equilibrium' tidal distortion is, however, stable to parametric resonance except for solar binaries with P {approx}< 2-5 days. (2) For companion masses larger than a few Jupiter masses, the dynamical tide causes short length scale waves to grow so rapidly that they must be treated as traveling waves, rather than standing waves. (3) We show that the global three-wave treatment of parametric instability typically used in the astrophysics literature does not yield the fastest-growing daughter modes or instability threshold in many cases. We find a form of parametric instability in which a single parent wave excites a very large number of daughter waves (N Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 3}[P/10 days] for a solar-type star) and drives them as a single coherent unit with growth rates that are a factor of Almost-Equal-To N faster than the standard three-wave parametric instability. These are local instabilities viewed through the lens of global analysis; the coherent global growth rate follows local rates in the regions where the shear is strongest. In solar-type stars, the dynamical tide is unstable to this collective version of the parametric instability for even sub-Jupiter companion masses with P {approx}< a month. (4) Independent of the parametric instability, the dynamical and equilibrium tides excite a wide range of stellar p-modes and g-modes by nonlinear inhomogeneous forcing; this coupling appears particularly efficient at draining energy out of the dynamical tide and may be more important than either wave breaking or parametric resonance at determining the nonlinear dissipation of the dynamical tide.

  3. On the Use of QuikSCAT Scatterometer Measurements of Surface Winds for Marine Weather Prediction

    E-print Network

    Kurapov, Alexander

    and ECMWF global numerical weather prediction models considerably underestimated the spatial variability Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) global numerical weather prediction (NWP) modelsOn the Use of QuikSCAT Scatterometer Measurements of Surface Winds for Marine Weather Prediction

  4. Mapping M2 Internal Tides Using a Data-Assimilative Reduced Gravity Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egbert, G. D.; Erofeeva, S.

    2014-12-01

    We have developed data assimilation methods for mapping low-mode phase-locked internal tides from altimetry data, using a reduced gravity (RG) approach. Dynamical equations are derived following the approach of Griffiths and Grimshaw (2007), with the vertical dependence of pressure and velocities in the linear Boussinesq 3D equations expanded in basis functions derived from local 1D modes for a stratified ocean. This results in a system of coupled 2D PDEs for the coefficients of the modal expansion. Excluding coupling terms between modes (which arise in the presence of variable bottomt opography) the resulting equations for each mode are analogous to the usual shallow water equations for the barotropic tide. With modest changes to the OSU tidal inversion software (OTIS) an assimilation scheme for this linear model is readily implemented. The coupling terms can be used to derive the forcing (by the barotropic tide), and also can be used to quantify the component of model error associated with unmodeled topographic scattering. Because the inversion yields currents as well as elevations, mode energy fluxes can obtained with minimal further calculation. Relatively high spatial resolution (at least 1/30 degree) is required for the RG dynamical model, so the inversion must be done in modest sized overlapping patches, which can then be merged to obtain global maps of phase-locked low-mode internal tides. To obtain reliable results some care with preliminary data processing has proved necessary, including correction for lower frequency SSH variations in areas of strong mesoscale activity, and filtering to reduce Long wavelength error, especially in ERS/Envisat data. Because the assimilation essentially derives dynamically consistent spatio-temporal basis functions for data fitting, the RG scheme may also provide a means to better quantify at least slowly varying incoherent internal tides.

  5. Algae That Cause Red Tide Found Off Maine Coast

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Misty Edgecomb

    This Bangor Daily News article provides general information about red tide in Maine and efforts being done to track the harmful algal bloom (HAB) events. There are four major red tide causing algae in Maine: Alexandrium, Dinophysis, Prorocentrum and Pseudonitzschia. These algae can cause serious health problems in humans and other marine animals. The &quot;first alert system&quot; now in place now monitors for sunlight and nutrient concentrations that may lead to red tide events.

  6. Long-period perturbations in Starlette orbit and tide solution

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, M.K.; Shum, C.K.; Eanes, R.J.; Schutz, B.E.; Tapley, B.D. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

    1990-06-10

    Continuous and dynamically consistent orbits have been computed using satellite laser ranging (SLR) data to Starlette for one-year period during 1976 and 1977 and the three-year period from 1983 through 1985. A low degree and order ocean tide solution, consisting of a total of 66 tidal parameters from 14 tidal constituents, was obtained in a combined solution using both the one-and three-year Starlette orbits. Yearly values for the second-degree annual tides, S{sub a}, which produce seasonal variations on the Starlette node, were obtained also. These variations were found to have year-to-year fluctuations of more than 25% about the mean value and produced significant long-period perturbations in the Starlette orbit. The Starlette tide solution is in good agreement with the Schwiderski tide solutions and with other satellite solutions, including multi-satellite tide solutions. The average uncertainties are approximately 0.1 cm for the estimated semidiurnal and diurnal tides and 0.4 cm for the long-period tides. The discrepancies of effective k{sub 2} inferred from the Starlette tide solution and other tide solutions are less than 0.01. The tide solutions were evaluated using orbit fits of a three-year LAGEOS and a one-year Starlette long arc. The results indicate that the Starlette tide solution produces significantly improved orbit fits for both LAGEOS and Starlette. The uncertainties for the estimated tide model coefficients were used to predict tidal errors for the LAGEOS orbit and were found to be consistent with the apparent tidal errors present in this orbit. The computed secular change in the Moon's mean motion due to tidal dissipation is {minus}24.8 {plus minus} 0.8 arc second/century{sup 2}, which is in good agreement with the results obtained from other investigations.

  7. The Weather Man

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Emma Grasser

    2012-09-27

    This project is designed to let you be "The Weather Man" and control the weather through simulation, and hands on experience, followed by guided questioning and resource exploration. Form groups of three. Explore the following simulation: Weather Maker Simulator Use the simulation to answer the following questions on paper. 1. How does humility play a role in weather? How does more or less change weather? 2. What is water vapor? Where does it come from? 3. What happens when the weather drops below zero degrees? ...

  8. Science Sampler: Weather RATS

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mary Taft

    2006-02-01

    Weather RATS, or Weather Research and Tracking Systems, is a collaborative effort among a national network of K-12 students, their teachers, wireless weather stations, internet data sharing, and professional engineers and meteorologists. Weather Rats is a new way to teach K-12 science and technology by tracking and comparing weather data from schools in Massachusetts, Arizona, Oklahoma, and Puerto Rico. In addition, it is hoped through this enriching project that Weather RATS will inspire many more students, especially girls and minorities, to pursue careers in science and engineering as a result of this project.

  9. Pilot weather advisor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, W. A.; Seth, S.; Crabill, N. L.; Shipley, S. T.; Graffman, I.; Oneill, J.

    1992-01-01

    The results of the work performed by ViGYAN, Inc., to demonstrate the Pilot Weather Advisor cockpit weather data system using a broadcast satellite communication system are presented. The Pilot Weather Advisor demonstrated that the technical problems involved with transmitting significant amount of weather data to an aircraft in-flight or on-the-ground via satellite are solvable with today's technology. The Pilot Weather Advisor appears to be a viable solution for providing accurate and timely weather information for general aviation aircraft.

  10. Interactive Weather Information Network

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Offered by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Interactive Weather Information Network (IWIN) is a collection of interactive weather maps and satellite images that is updated every five seconds. Visitors can see cloud cover animation loops, NEXRAD Radar images of precipitation, a map of all current weather fronts, and an interactive national map to see information about any particular state. Other information on the site includes a listing of any active weather warnings, a link for world weather data, and more, making this a must-see site for all those users interested in the most current weather happenings anywhere.

  11. Weather and Precipitation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Jones

    2012-04-12

    How are different types of weather common in our everyday life? How can we use what we know about weather to go about everyday activities? First, use the Weather Chart to write down what you learn from each website. Then, go to Weather Information Website #1 and click on "What's the Weather?" to dress the bear for the day. Make sure you write it down on your graphic organizer. Next, go to Weather Information Website #3 and explore at least 5(clouds, thunderstorms, winter storms, etc.) of ...

  12. Time-varying trends in regional sea level from tide gauge data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederikse, Thomas; Riva, Riccardo; Slobbe, Cornelis; Broerse, Taco

    2015-04-01

    Sea level rise affects many people living in coastal areas and therefore knowledge and understanding of contemporary changes is necessary. One of the primary observational datasets is represented by tide gauge records. We propose a new method to estimate trends from tide gauge data by using a state space formulation, which couples the direct observations to a predefined state space model by using a Kalman filter. The model consists of a time-varying trend and seasonal cycle, and variability induced by several physical processes, such as wind, atmospheric pressure changes and teleconnection patterns. This model has two advantages over the classical least-squares method that uses regression to explain variations due to known processes: a seasonal cycle with time-varying phase and amplitude can be estimated, and the trend is allowed to vary over time. This time-varying trend consists of a secular trend and low-frequency variance that is not explained by any other term in the model. As a test case, we have used tide gauge data from stations around the North Sea over the period 1980-2013. The time-varying trend clearly shows a large decadal variability that would not emerge from a classical least-squares approach. To validate whether our model is correctly explaining the observed variance, we have compared our results against time-series where the variability has been predicted by the Dutch Continental Shelf Model (DCSM), a 2-dimensional storm surge model that estimates the effects of wind, pressure and tides. Trends obtained from the DCSM-corrected run show patterns at inter-annual and decadal scales that are very similar to the trends obtained with our state space model. The mean trends over the period 1980-2013 are also very similar for both models, but there are significant differences when these estimates are compared to results from a classical least-squares analysis.

  13. Internal tides and turbulent mixing observed in the Bussol Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Yuki; Yasuda, Ichiro; Osafune, Satoshi; Tanaka, Takahiro; Nishioka, Jun; Volkov, Yuri N.

    2014-08-01

    Repeated observations with a period of about 24 h of hydrography, current velocity, and microstructures were performed at three stations surrounding a seamount in the middle of the Bussol Strait, the deepest and widest one of the Kuril Straits, to reveal spatial and temporal variability of internal tides and associated turbulent mixing. It is found that isopycnal displacements are dominated by diurnal tidal components, which show phase differences (namely, time lags) between the three stations that can be explained by a first mode topographically trapped wave (TTW) propagating clockwise around the seamount. Furthermore, at the station located near the center of the strait where energy dissipation rates are largest, diurnal variations of isopycnals and velocities are amplified toward the ocean bottom, consistent with the vertical structure of the first mode TTW. At that station, vigorous turbulent mixing with the energy dissipation rate exceeding 10-6 m2 s-3 and diapycnal diffusivity exceeding 10-1 m2 s-1 was observed in deep layers when the diurnal tidal current consisting of the first mode TTW flows from the Okhotsk Sea to the North Pacific, enhancing the mean current. These spatial and temporal variation patterns are confirmed to be reproduced by a previous numerical model successfully for the isopycnals and velocities, and partially for the turbulent mixing. The total energy dissipation rate is, however, by up to a factor of 3-10 smaller than predicted by the numerical model although the observations were performed during spring tides, suggesting that the actual diapycnal mixing is overall weaker than the previous model estimate and/or that extremely strong mixing occurs within highly localized areas.

  14. Oceanic tide maps and spherical harmonic coefficients from Geosat altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, D. E.; Ray, R. D.; Sanchez, B. V.

    1991-01-01

    Maps and tables for the global ocean tides, 69 degree N to 68 degree S, derived from two years of Geosat altimetry are presented. Global maps of local and Greenwich admittance of the (altimetric) ocean tide, and maps of amplitude and Greenwich phase lag of the ocean tide are shown for M(sub 2), S(sub 2), N(sub 2), O(sub 1), and K(sub 1). Larger scale maps of amplitude and phases are also shown for regional areas of special interest. Spherical harmonic coefficients of the ocean tide through degree and order 8 are tabulated for the six major constituents.

  15. Internet Weather Links: Weather and Weather Related Lesson Plans

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Internet Weather Links is a collection of lesson plans provided by the Utah Education Network's Weather Report Web site. The activities are organized by grade level from kindergarten to fourth grade and include such topics as Sunny Colors, Weather in a Box, Changes Due to Freezing, and Geological Features. Each lesson is well organized with explanations of its objectives, intended learning outcomes, and instructional procedures. Downloadable documents, related links, extensions to the lesson, and even rating systems for teachers are also provided, making it a great resource especially for use with younger students.

  16. Weather Camp 2012: Weather and Climate All Around Us Are you interested in the weather?

    E-print Network

    Farritor, Shane

    Weather Camp 2012: Weather and Climate All Around Us Are you interested in the weather? Come to Weather Camp at UNL! What is Weather Camp? For more information Weather camp is a week-long day camp for students who will be 11-14 years old at the time of the camp. Most of the activities at Weather Camp 2012

  17. Comparison of diurnal tide in models and ground-based observations during the 2005 equinox CAWSES tidal campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, L. C.; Ward, W. E.; Palo, S. E.; Du, J.; Wang, D.-Y.; Liu, H.-L.; Hagan, M. E.; Portnyagin, Y.; Oberheide, J.; Goncharenko, L. P.; Nakamura, T.; Hoffmann, P.; Singer, W.; Batista, P.; Clemesha, B.; Manson, A. H.; Riggin, D. M.; She, C.-Y.; Tsuda, T.; Yuan, T.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, ground-based observations of equinox diurnal tide wind fields from the first CAWSES Global Tidal Campaign are compared with results from five commonly used models, in order to identify systematic differences. WACCM3 and Extended CMAM are both self-consistent general circulation models, which resolve general climatological features, while TIME-GCM can be forced to approximate specific conditions using reanalysis fields. GSWM is a linear mechanistic model; while GEWM is an empirical model derived from ground-based and satellite observations. The models resolve diurnal tides consistent in latitudinal structure with observations, dominated by the upward propagating (1,1) mode. There is disagreement in the magnitudes of the tidal amplitudes and vertical wavelengths, while differences in longitudinal tidal variability indicate differences in the nonmigrating tides in the models. These points suggest inconsistencies in model forcing, dissipation, and background winds that must be examined as part of a coordinated effort from the modeling community.

  18. Modelling the effects of tides and storm surges on coastal aquifers using a coupled surface-subsurface approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Graf, Thomas; Herold, Maria; Ptak, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Coastal aquifers are complex hydrologic systems because many physical processes interact: (i) variably saturated flow, (ii) spatial-temporal fluid density variations, (iii) tidal fluctuations, (iv) storm surges overtopping dykes, and (v) surface runoff of storm water. The HydroGeoSphere model is used to numerically simulate coastal flow dynamics, assuming a fully coupled surface-subsurface approach, accounting for all processes listed above. The diffusive wave approximation of the St. Venant equation is used to describe surface flow. Surface flow and salt transport are fully coupled with subsurficial variably saturated, variable-density flow and salt transport through mathematical terms that represent exchange of fluid mass and solute mass, respectively. Tides and storm surges induce a time-variant head that is applied to nodes of the surface domain. The approach is applied to real cases of tide and storm surge events. Tide simulation results confirm the existence of a recirculating zone, forming beneath the upper part of the intertidal zone. By monitoring the exchange fluid flux rates through the beach, it was found that the major inflow to the aquifer takes place at the upper part of the intertidal zone, which explains the formation of the recirculating zone. The recirculating zone is forming particularly during rising tide. Results from a storm surge simulation show that plume fingers develop below the flooded land surface. Natural remediation by seaward flowing freshwater is relatively slow, such that reducing the salt concentration in the aquifer down to drinking water standards takes up to 10 years.

  19. Intelligent weather agent for aircraft severe weather avoidance

    E-print Network

    Bokadia, Sangeeta

    2002-01-01

    avoidance capability has increased. In this thesis, an intelligent weather agent is developed for general aviation aircraft. Using a radar image from an onboard weather radar, the intelligent weather agent determines the safest path around severe weather...

  20. On Observing the Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Peter Crane

    2004-05-01

    In this article, Mount Washington Observatory meteorologist Tim Markle shares the ins and outs of his daily weather-observing routine and offers insights on making weather observations at home or at school.

  1. Winter Weather: Hypothermia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Matters What's New Preparation & Planning Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis ... be successfully resuscitated. More Information: Frostbite Disasters & Severe Weather ... Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis ...

  2. Winter Weather: Indoor Safety

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Matters What's New Preparation & Planning Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis ... Outdoor Safety Winter PSAs and Podcasts Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis ...

  3. In Depth Winter Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-01-01

    Winter Weather is an In-Depth Special Report form the National Center for Atmospheric Research. It contains articles, images, activities, video clips, and interactive graphs to inform learners about meteorology and weather in the colder seasons.

  4. Winter Weather: Outdoor Safety

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About CDC.gov . Natural Disasters and Severe Weather Earthquakes Being Prepared Emergency Supplies Home Hazards Indoor Safety ... What's New A - Z Index Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis Volcanoes ...

  5. Winter Weather: Frostbite

    MedlinePLUS

    ... About CDC.gov . Natural Disasters and Severe Weather Earthquakes Being Prepared Emergency Supplies Home Hazards Indoor Safety ... What's New A - Z Index Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis Volcanoes ...

  6. Numerical simulation of tides in Ontario Lacus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, David; Karatekin, Ozgür

    2015-04-01

    Hydrocarbons liquid filled lakes has been recently detected on Titan's surface. Most of these lakes are located in the northern latitudes but there is a substantial lake in the southern latitudes: Ontario Lacus. This lake gets our attention because of possible shoreline changes suggested by Cassini flybys over Ontario Lacus between September 2005 (T7) et January 2010 (T65). The shoreline changes could be due to evaporation-precipitation processes but could also be a consequence of tides. Previous studies showed that the maximal tidal amplitudes of Ontario Lacus would be about 0.2m (for an uniform bathymetry of 20m). In this study we simulate tidal amplitude and currents with SLIM (Second-generation Louvain-la-Neuve Ice-ocean Model, http://sites.uclouvain.be/slim/ ) which resolves 2D shallow water equation on an unstructured mesh. Unstructured mesh prevents problems like mesh discontinuities at poles and allows higher accuracy at some place like coast or straits without drastically increasing computing costs. The tide generating force modeled in this work is the gradient of tidal potential due to titan's obliquity and titan's orbital eccentricity around Saturn (other contribution such as sun tide generating force are unheeded). The uncertain input parameters such as the wind direction and amplitude, bottom friction and thermo-physical properties of hydrocarbons liquids are varied within their expected ranges. SAR data analysis can result in different bathymetry according to the method. We proceed simulations for different bathymetries: tidal amplitudes doesn't change but this is not the case for tidal currents. Using a recent bathymetry deduced from most recent RADAR/SAR observations and a finer mesh, the peak-to peak tidal amplitudes are calculated to be up to 0.6 m. which is more than a factor two larger than the previous results. The maximal offshore tidal currents magnitude is about 0.06 m/s.

  7. Impact of Tropospherically-Generated Tides on the Mean State of the Ionosphere-Thermosphere System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M.; Forbes, J. M.; Hagan, M. E.; Maute, A. I.

    2012-12-01

    It is now widely recognized that vertically-propagating tides exert significant variability on the ionosphere-thermosphere (IT) system. In particular, the impact of tropospherically-generated non-migrating tides on longitudinal variability of the IT system has been a topic of intense research in recent years. However, relatively little is known about how dissipation of these upward propagating waves affects the zonal mean state of the IT system. Herein we report on numerical experiments performed with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIME-GCM) that explore this topic using tidal lower boundary conditions near 30 km from the Global Scale Wave Model 2009 (GSWM-09) for average solar conditions during September and December. Differences between simulations with and without tidal forcing are analyzed to establish the aggregate effects of tidal dissipation on the zonal mean circulation and temperature structure, minor species concentrations, and ionospheric parameters. Numerical experiments are also performed with several different combinations of tides at the lower boundary to identify those components that most effectively alter the zonal mean structure of the IT.

  8. Tides over Antarctica: Comparison of Whole Atmosphere Model (WAM) Simulations with Ground-Based Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akmaev, R. A.; Murphy, D. J.; Luebken, F. J.; Forbes, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Ground-based radar and optical observations of winds and temperature reveal a rich and variable spectrum of tidal oscillations in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) over Antarctica, including the South Pole. Large-scale perturbations over the pole may formally be represented only with zonal wavenumbers 0 or 1. Only the latter may support winds and the only migrating tide that can exist over the pole is the diurnal westward DW1. Other tidal periods projecting on the permitted wavenumbers inevitably correspond to nonmigrating waves such as the well documented semidiurnal westward SW1. Migrating tides make a noticeable contribution over the edges of the continent posing an identification problem for stations on the ground. Free-running WAM simulations show good agreement in amplitude, phase, seasonal and day-to-day variability of prominent tides with observations by some ground-based instruments but less so with others. Because the model dynamics is self-consistent, this implies that estimates of tidal variations of different parameters, e.g., temperature and winds, or from different instruments cannot be all correct. More cross-validation and detailed analyses of estimate errors and biases are needed.

  9. TIDE: Lightweight Device Composition for Enhancing Tabletop Environments with Smartphone Applications

    E-print Network

    TIDE: Lightweight Device Composition for Enhancing Tabletop Environments with Smartphone of applications. This paper pre- sents TIDE, a lightweight device composition middleware to bring existing smartphone applications onto the tabletop. Through TIDE, applications running on the smartphone are displayed

  10. The internal tide off Panama City, Florida 

    E-print Network

    Boston, Noel Edward James

    1963-01-01

    THE INTERNAI SIDE OFF PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA A Thesis Noel E. J. Boston Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... June 1963 Ma)or Sub)ect: Physical Oceanography THE INTERNAL TIDE OFF PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA A Thesis By Noel E. J. Boston Approved as to style and content by: a an o t e omm ttee a o t e epartm June 1963 856088 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The work...

  11. Red Tide Strands South African Rock Lobsters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Although some red tides form a healthy part of phytoplankton production, recurrent harmful or toxic blooms also occur, with results depending upon the type of plankton and on atmospheric and oceanic conditions. At Elands Bay in South Africa's Western Cape province, about 1000 tons of rock lobsters beached themselves during February 2002, when the decay of dense blooms of phytoplankton caused a rapid reduction in the oxygen concentration of nearshore waters. The lobsters (or crayfish, as they are known locally) moved toward the breaking surf in search of oxygen, but were stranded by the retreating tide.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer's nadir camera acquired these red, green, blue composites on February 2 and 18, 2002, during Terra orbits 11315 and 11548. The colors have been accentuated to highlight the bloom, and land and water have been enhanced separately. The two views show the shoreward migration of the algal bloom. Each image represents an area of about 205 kilometers x 330 kilometers. Elands Bay is situated near the mouth of the Doring River, about 75 kilometers northeast of the jutting Cape Columbine.

    The term 'red tide' is used to refer to a number of different types of phytoplankton blooms of various hues. The wine color of certain parts of this bloom are consistent with the ciliate species Mesodinium rubrum, which has been associated with recurring harmful algal blooms along the Western Cape coast. Under these conditions, the lobsters are not poisoned. During the recent event, government and military staff transported as many of the living lobsters as possible to areas that were less affected by the red tide. At the same time, people came from across South Africa to gather the undersized creatures for food. The effects of the losses on the maritime economy are expected to be felt over the next few years.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  12. Red Tide Strands South African Rock Lobsters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Although some red tides form a healthy part of phytoplankton production, recurrent harmful or toxic blooms also occur, with results depending upon the type of plankton and on atmospheric and oceanic conditions. At Elands Bay in South Africa's Western Cape province, about 1000 tons of rock lobsters beached themselves during February 2002, when the decay of dense blooms of phytoplankton caused a rapid reduction in the oxygen concentration of nearshore waters. The lobsters (or crayfish, as they are known locally) moved toward the breaking surf in search of oxygen, but were stranded by the retreating tide. The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer's nadir camera acquired these red, green, blue composites on February 2 and 18, 2002, during Terra orbits 11315 and 11548. The colors have been accentuated to highlight the bloom, and land and water have been enhanced separately. The two views show the shoreward migration of the algal bloom. Each image represents an area of about 205 kilometers x 330 kilometers. Elands Bay is situated near the mouth of the Doring River, about 75 kilometers northeast of the jutting Cape Columbine. The term 'red tide' is used to refer to a number of different types of phytoplankton blooms of various hues. The wine color of certain parts of this bloom are consistent with the ciliate species Mesodinium rubrum, which has been associated with recurring harmful algal blooms along the Western Cape coast. Under these conditions, the lobsters are not poisoned. During the recent event, government and military staff transported as many of the living lobsters as possible to areas that were less affected by the red tide. At the same time, people came from across South Africa to gather the undersized creatures for food. The effects of the losses on the maritime economy are expected to be felt over the next few years. MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology. Image credit: NASA/GSFC/LaRC/JPL, MISR Team.

  13. How's the Weather Today?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This lesson plan asks students to think about the weather in their area and introduces them to weather and temperature trends in different latitudes of the United States. They will look at the current weather map and record the high temperatures for a few cities. They will conclude by drawing pictures of themselves outdoors in their hometown and in another place that has different weather.

  14. Enviropedia: Introduction to Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2007-12-12

    This resource provides an overview of weather, the day-to-day changes in temperature, air pressure, moisture, wind, cloudiness, rainfall and sunshine. Links embedded in the text provide access to descriptions of cloud types and to information on weather hazards such as fog, hurricanes, thunderstorms, and tornadoes. Other topics include meteorology, weather measurements, and weather mapping. Materials are also provided on the water cycle and its elements, such as evaporation, uplift and cooling of air, dew point, condensation, and precipitation.

  15. Stormfax Weather Services

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2002-06-10

    This site offers links to a variety of weather information, including national, international and local weather maps and forecasts, satellite and radar imagery, and severe weather warnings. There are also links to diverse resources such as fire maps, glacier inventories, snow depths, storm surges and tropical storms. There are reports and advisories about El Nino and La Nina. The site also has a glossary of weather terms and conversion charts for temperature, wind speed and atmospheric pressure.

  16. Space Weather Now

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Space Environment Center

    The Space Weather Now page is intended to give the non-technical user a "plain language" look at space weather. It includes information about relevant events and announcements, data from and about different instruments and satellites watching various aspects of space weather, alerts and advisories, daily themes of products and services, and links appropriate for the various groups of users.

  17. Aviation weather services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprinkle, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    The primary responsibilities of the National Weather Service (NWS) are to: provide warnings of severe weather and flooding for the protection of life and property; provide public forecasts for land and adjacent ocean areas for planning and operation; and provide weather support for: production of food and fiber; management of water resources; production, distribution and use of energy; and efficient and safe air operations.

  18. Weather Girl Goes Rogue

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Deep Rogue Ram

    This humorous video suggests what might happen if a weather forecaster reported the weather in the context of climate change. There is a sharp contrast between the anchor focusing on short-term local concerns and the weather forecaster describing what is happening on a long-term global basis.

  19. Climate and Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Geographic

    This video discusses the differences between climate and weather by defining and presenting examples of each. When presenting examples of weather, the video focuses on severe events and how meteorologists predict and study the weather using measurement, satellites, and radar. The climate focus is primarily on an overview of climate zones.

  20. Weather Fundamentals: Meteorology. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    The videos in this educational series, for grades 4-7, help students understand the science behind weather phenomena through dramatic live-action footage, vivid animated graphics, detailed weather maps, and hands-on experiments. This episode (23 minutes) looks at how meteorologists gather and interpret current weather data collected from sources…

  1. Weather Maps in Motion

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Charles Burrows

    In this activity, students learn to interpret current weather maps. They will observe weather map loop animations on the internet, learn the concept of Zulu time (Universal Time Coordinated, UTC) and visualize the movement of fronts and air masses. They will then analyze a specific weather station model, generate a meteogram from their observations, and answer a set of questions about their observations.

  2. METEOROLOGICAL Weather and Forecasting

    E-print Network

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY Weather and Forecasting EARLY ONLINE RELEASE This is a preliminary School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology University of Hawaii at Manoa U.S.A. Yun-Ching Lin submitted to Weather and Forecasting July 05, 2010 Corresponding author: Dr. Mong-Ming Lu, Central Weather

  3. Spaceborne weather radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Meneghini; Toshiaki Kozu

    1990-01-01

    The present work on the development status of spaceborne weather radar systems and services discusses radar instrument complementarities, the current forms of equations for the characterization of such aspects of weather radar performance as surface and mirror-image returns, polarimetry, and Doppler considerations, and such essential factors in spaceborne weather radar design as frequency selection, scanning modes, and the application of

  4. Weather Data Gamification 

    E-print Network

    Gargate, Rohit

    2013-07-25

    . With the huge amount of weather data available, we have designed and developed a fantasy weather game. People manage a team of cities with the goal of predicting weather better than other players in their league, and in the process gain an understanding...

  5. Mean winds, tides and gravity waves in the upper middle atmosphere during ALOHA-90

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, R.A.; Lesicar, D. (Univ. of Adelaide (Australia))

    1991-07-01

    Wind measurements made with a partial reflection radar located on Christmas Island (2{degree}N, 157{degree}W) are used to describe the dynamical state of the equatorial mesopause region during ALOHA-90. Time mean westward (easterly) winds prevailed at most heights, and reached their maximum values of about {minus}60 ms{sup {minus}1} near 85 km, but the mean meridional motions were weak. Strong oscillations due to the 24, 12, and 8 hr atmospheric tides were also observed in both wind components. The inferred vertical wavelengths were large, even for the diurnal tide. On the nights of 22 and 25 March, when airborne lidar observations were made in the vicinity of Christmas Island, the prevailing and tidal winds combined to produce especially strong westward winds ({minus}100 ms{sup {minus}1}). Gravity wave activity was also high during March/April, especially for short period waves, although considerable day-to-day variability was noted.

  6. Convective Weather Avoidance with Uncertain Weather Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karahan, Sinan; Windhorst, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Convective weather events have a disruptive impact on air traffic both in terminal area and in en-route airspaces. In order to make sure that the national air transportation system is safe and efficient, it is essential to respond to convective weather events effectively. Traffic flow control initiatives in response to convective weather include ground delay, airborne delay, miles-in-trail restrictions as well as tactical and strategic rerouting. The rerouting initiatives can potentially increase traffic density and complexity in regions neighboring the convective weather activity. There is a need to perform rerouting in an intelligent and efficient way such that the disruptive effects of rerouting are minimized. An important area of research is to study the interaction of in-flight rerouting with traffic congestion or complexity and developing methods that quantitatively measure this interaction. Furthermore, it is necessary to find rerouting solutions that account for uncertainties in weather forecasts. These are important steps toward managing complexity during rerouting operations, and the paper is motivated by these research questions. An automated system is developed for rerouting air traffic in order to avoid convective weather regions during the 20- minute - 2-hour time horizon. Such a system is envisioned to work in concert with separation assurance (0 - 20-minute time horizon), and longer term air traffic management (2-hours and beyond) to provide a more comprehensive solution to complexity and safety management. In this study, weather is dynamic and uncertain; it is represented as regions of airspace that pilots are likely to avoid. Algorithms are implemented in an air traffic simulation environment to support the research study. The algorithms used are deterministic but periodically revise reroutes to account for weather forecast updates. In contrast to previous studies, in this study convective weather is represented as regions of airspace that pilots are likely to avoid. The automated system periodically updates forecasts and reassesses rerouting decisions in order to account for changing weather predictions. The main objectives are to reroute flights to avoid convective weather regions and determine the resulting complexity due to rerouting. The eventual goal is to control and reduce complexity while rerouting flights during the 20 minute - 2 hour planning period. A three-hour simulation is conducted using 4800 flights in the national airspace. The study compares several metrics against a baseline scenario using the same traffic and weather but with rerouting disabled. The results show that rerouting can have a negative impact on congestion in some sectors, as expected. The rerouting system provides accurate measurements of the resulting complexity in the congested sectors. Furthermore, although rerouting is performed only in the 20-minute - 2-hour range, it results in a 30% reduction in encounters with nowcast weather polygons (100% being the ideal for perfectly predictable and accurate weather). In the simulations, rerouting was performed for the 20-minute - 2-hour flight time horizon, and for the en-route segment of air traffic. The implementation uses CWAM, a set of polygons that represent probabilities of pilot deviation around weather. The algorithms were implemented in a software-based air traffic simulation system. Initial results of the system's performance and effectiveness were encouraging. Simulation results showed that when flights were rerouted in the 20-minute - 2-hour flight time horizon of air traffic, there were fewer weather encounters in the first 20 minutes than for flights that were not rerouted. Some preliminary results were also obtained that showed that rerouting will also increase complexity. More simulations will be conducted in order to report conclusive results on the effects of rerouting on complexity. Thus, the use of the 20-minute - 2-hour flight time horizon weather avoidance teniques performed in the simulation is expected to provide benefits for short-term weather avoidan

  7. Cultural Implications of Out-of-Phase Weather across northern Alaska after 500 CE: Regional Variability during the Medieval Climate Anomaly and Little Ice Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, O. K.; Alix, C. M.; Bigelow, N. H.; Hoffecker, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    From a global perspective, a diverse mélange of paleoclimate data reveal that Northwest Alaska is partially out of phase with northwest Europe, witnessing cooler periods during the Medieval Climate Anomaly ca. CE 1000 and warmer conditions in the 16th and 17th centuries. The search for climatic forcers in northern Alaska relies on integration of data drawn from tree-rings, lacustrine varves and moraines, diatoms, beach ridges and dunes. At Cape Espenberg, northern Seward Peninsula, a 1500-year reconstruction of settlement, landscape evolution and climatic variability employs >100 14C ages from accreting dunes with shell-laden storm beds, intercalated driftwood and superimposed soils, archaeological sites and marsh peats within swale ponds. Large storms occurred along the Chukchi Sea from Cape Espenberg and Deering (Kotzebue Sound) to Point Barrow prior to 1000 CE, and at decadal intervals during the Little Ice Age (LIA) from 1300 to 1700. Architecural driftwood logs from several excavated houses capped by sand dunes yield several 14C dated floating chronologies covering intervals from 700 to 1700, suggest the identification of cooler intervals 800 to 1000 and intermittently after 1300. Peat aggradation followed isolation from the sea from 500 onward, and was interrupted by two pulses of fresh water, one ca. 1300 and a second ca. 1800, with diatoms suggesting relative aridity during the LIA. The occupation history of Cape Espenberg generally follows dune growth, and may be inversely related to cooler temperatures.

  8. The ocean tide gravimetric loading reconsidered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llubes, M.; Mazzega, P.

    In 1994-95, a set of new global ocean tide models computed by different teams was made available to the scientific community. These models were derived from the analysis of satellite altimetric data, numerical hydrodynamics or a combination of both. The task is now to evaluate their relative accuracy, in particular with independent data. The data bank prepared by the International Center for Earth Tides (ICET, Melchior 1994) gives us a unique opportunity to compare the tidal models by testing their capability to predict the induced gravimetric loading effects. The more recent versions (released in 1995) of the models by Ma et al. (1994) and by Schrama and Ray (1994) both completed at high latitudes by the Le Provost et al. (1994) FES94.1 model have the best scores for the semidiurnal M2 wave, with a standard deviation (SD) of the gravimetric data residues less than 0.540 µgal. Schwiderski (1980) and Egbert et al. (1994) models give the smallest residual SD, about 0.370 µgal, for the diurnal O1 component. However, the ordering of the models may change when we focus on some particular regions of the globe.

  9. Tide-induced recirculation across the aquifer-ocean interface

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Robinson; L. Li; H. Prommer

    2007-01-01

    A parametric analysis is conducted to examine the influence of tides, inland hydraulic conditions, and aquifer properties on the rate of tide-induced seawater recirculation through the nearshore aquifer. Understanding such influence is crucial for accurate prediction of subsurface chemical fluxes to coastal waters via groundwater discharge. The analysis is based on numerical simulations of density-dependent groundwater flow in a coastal

  10. Current and tide observations in the southern Yellow Sea

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. J. Teague; H. T. Perkins; Z. R. Hallock; G. A. Jacobs

    1998-01-01

    Determination of mean currents and tides are particularly difficult in coastal regions. Flows are often nongeostrophic and short lived. Bathymetry is frequently not adequately known and can greatly influence coastal dynamics. To better quantify tides and currents in the southern Yellow Sea, three pressure gauges and three acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) were bottom moored for 4-6 month intervals at

  11. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF A RUBBER "DUCK BILL" TIDE GATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A unique 54 in. diameter "duckbill" rubber tide gate (RTG) was designed, fabricated, and installed in a typical New York City tide gate chamber. The operation of the RTG was observed over two years. The RTG was very effective in preventing the inflow of tidal waters and generally...

  12. From Tides to Mixing Along the Hawaiian Ridge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel L. Rudnick; Timothy J. Boyd; Russell E. Brainard; Glenn S. Carter; Gary D. Egbert; Michael C. Gregg; Peter E. Holloway; Jody M. Klymak; Eric Kunze; Craig M. Lee; Murray D. Levine; Douglas S. Luther; Joseph P. Martin; Mark A. Merrifield; James N. Moum; Jonathan D. Nash; Robert Pinkel; Luc Rainville; Thomas B. Sanford

    2003-01-01

    The cascade from tides to turbulence has been hypothesized to serve as a major energy pathway for ocean mixing. We investigated this cascade along the Hawaiian Ridge using observations and numerical models. A divergence of internal tidal energy flux observed at the ridge agrees with the predictions of internal tide models. Large internal tidal waves with peak-to-peak amplitudes of up

  13. Research-Based Teaching Unit on the Tides. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viiri, Jouni; Saari, Heikki

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new research-based learning unit for tides to be used in lower secondary schools. The learning unit was based on the scientific theory of tides, textbooks, and also an analysis of students' conceptions. Descriptions are included of the content and the teaching-learning activities of the unit. The teacher talk…

  14. Weather affects us

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kimmy

    2009-11-09

    2nd grade weather unit. The students will learn how weather affects us in our daily lives Read and view the video on meteorologists Kid Meteorologist Learn about clouds - watch S'cool Clouds All About Clouds Do scholastic: weather watch and game Weather Read winter storms Interactive Weather Web Pages Read a reason for the season A Reason for the Season Read about precipitation Precipitation Read and view video on flooding Flood: Farming and Erosion Read about air pressure It's a Breeze: How Air Pressure Affects You Read about Hurricanes Hurricanes Do the activities and read ...

  15. Irrigation as an Adaptation Strategy to Climate Change: The Relative Influence of Groundwater and Canal Irrigation on Winter Crop Production and its Sensitivity to Weather Variability in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, M.; Fishman, R.; Mondal, P.; Galford, G. L.; Naeem, S.; Modi, V.; DeFries, R. S.

    2014-12-01

    India is a hotspot for food security issues over the upcoming decades, due to increasing population pressures, groundwater depletion, and climate change. Investing in additional irrigation infrastructure may bolster food security, however, the relative influence of different types of irrigation (e.g. groundwater versus canal) on agricultural production remains unclear. One reason that the relative impact of different irrigation strategies on agricultural production has not been analyzed across India is because national-scale data on crop production and the types of irrigation technologies used are typically available at too coarse of spatial and temporal resolutions to answer this question adequately. Thus, we develop a novel algorithm to map cropped area across India at a 1 x 1 km scale using MODIS satellite data, and link these high-resolution cropped area maps with village-level data (n = 600,000) on irrigation. This allowed us to assess the relative impact of groundwater (i.e. dug, shallow, and deep wells) and canal irrigation (i.e. surface lift and flow canals) on winter cropped area and its sensitivity to rainfall across India at the village-scale from 2000 to 2006. We find that deep well irrigation is both associated with the greatest amount of winter cropped area, and is also the least sensitive to monsoon and winter rainfall variability. However, the effectiveness of deep well irrigation varies across India, with the greatest benefits seen in the regions that are most at risk for losing groundwater as a possible source of irrigation over the upcoming decades (e.g. Northwest India). This work highlights the need to develop ways to use remaining groundwater more efficiently (e.g. drip irrigation, less water-intensive crops) given that canal irrigation is not an adequate substitute, particularly in the regions that are facing the greatest levels of groundwater depletion.

  16. Diurnal tides at low latitudes: Radar, satellite, and model results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore Kumar, G.; Singer, W.; Oberheide, J.; Grieger, N.; Batista, P. P.; Riggin, D. M.; Schmidt, H.; Clemesha, B. R.

    2014-10-01

    Mean winds and tidal signatures in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region are derived from meteor radar observations at three sites around 22°S acquired in 2005. The observed differences of mean winds and tides are discussed in relation to the meteorological situation in the lower atmosphere and the possible generation of non-migrating tides. The longitudinally well separated radar sites allowed the evaluation of the migrating tidal component. The seasonal variation of signatures of the diurnal tide derived from ground-based radar observations, TIDI measurements aboard TIMED satellite, and model results obtained with HAMMONIA (Hamburg Model of the Neutral and Ionized Atmosphere) are compared. The ground-based, satellite, and model results of the total diurnal tide are in good agreement. The same is true for the migrating diurnal tide obtained from the radar observations, TIDI observations and from the model studies of HAMMONIA and GSWM00 (Global Scale Wave Model).

  17. POPULATION SYNCHRONY WITHIN AND AMONG LEPIDOPTERA SPECIES IN RELATION TO WEATHER, PHYLOGENY, AND LARVEL PHENOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. The population dynamics of native herbivore species in central Appalachian deciduous forests were studied by analysing patterns of synchrony among intra- and interspecific populations and weather. 2. Spatial synchrony of 10 Lepidoptera species and three weather variables (min...

  18. National Weather Service- Severe Weather Awareness

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website provides access to information designed to protect and prepare individuals from severe weather. Materials presented here include forecasts for aviation and marine interests and the general public, maps, statistical data, educational materials, publications, and links to related sites.

  19. Space Weathering of Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Space weathering discussions have generally centered around soils but exposed rocks will also incur the effects of weathering. On the Moon, rocks make up only a very small percentage of the exposed surface and areas where rocks are exposed, like central peaks, are often among the least space weathered regions we find in remote sensing data. However, our studies of weathered Ap 17 rocks 76015 and 76237 show that significant amounts of weathering products can build up on rock surfaces. Because rocks have much longer surface lifetimes than an individual soil grain, and thus record a longer history of exposure, we can study these products to gain a deeper perspective on the weathering process and better assess the relative impo!1ance of various weathering components on the Moon. In contrast to the lunar case, on small asteroids, like Itokowa, rocks make up a large fraction of the exposed surface. Results from the Hayabusa spacecraft at Itokowa suggest that while the low gravity does not allow for the development of a mature regolith, weathering patinas can and do develop on rock surfaces, in fact, the rocky surfaces were seen to be darker and appear spectrally more weathered than regions with finer materials. To explore how weathering of asteroidal rocks may differ from lunar, a set of ordinary chondrite meteorites (H, L, and LL) which have been subjected to artificial space weathering by nanopulse laser were examined by TEM. NpFe(sup 0) bearing glasses were ubiquitous in both the naturally-weathered lunar and the artificially-weathered meteorite samples.

  20. Tides on Satellites of Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rambaux, Nicolas; Castillo-Rogez, Julie

    The discovery of the satellites of the giant planets started in 1610 when Galileo Galilei pointed his telescope toward Jupiter. Since then observations from Earth- and space-based telescopes and outstanding in-situ observations by several space missions have revealed worlds of great richness and extreme diversity. One major source of energy driving the evolution of these satellites is the gravitational pull exerted by their planets. This force shapes and deforms the satellites and the resulting dissipation of mechanical energy can heat their interiors and drive spectacular activity, such as volcanic eruptions, as for Io or Enceladus. In addition, tides drive orbital evolution by circularizing the satellites' orbits and synchronizing their rotational motions.

  1. Wave and tide powered generation apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Suggs, L. F.

    1985-09-03

    A wave and tide powered generation apparatus includes a frame which is fixed relative to the varying level of the body of water, and includes a float operably associated with the frame for movement in response to the varying level of the body of water. A rotatable drum is attached to the float and has a drive line with a middle portion wrapped around the rotatable drum. Upper and lower ends of the drive line are attached to upper and lower portions of the frame. Movement of the float upward or downward relative to the frame causes the rotatable drum to be rotated due to its engagement with the drive line. A power transfer apparatus transmits the rotary motion of the drum to a generator.

  2. Mars mesosphere and thermosphere coupling - Semidiurnal tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bougher, S. W.; Fesen, C. G.; Ridley, E. C.; Zurek, R. W.

    1993-02-01

    The Mars thermospheric general circulation model (MTGCM) is modified to examine the impact of a prescribed semidiurnal tidal wave upon Martian thermospheric fields corresponding to near solar minimum (Mariner 9) and solar maximum (Mariner 6-7) observational periods. The effects of upward propagating tides are introduced into the Mars Thermospheric General circulation Model (MTGCM) by appropriately specifying its lower boundary condition according to classical tidal theory. Estimates of the amplitude and phase of the likely dominant semidiurnal (2,2) mode at the mesopause (about 100 km) are specified for a range of possible lower atmosphere dust conditions. MTGCM simulations contrasting tidally driven fields with solar-only forced ones exhibit a dramatic change in the horizontal and vertical wind patterns, whereby the global temperature and oxygen distributions are also modified significantly.

  3. Bifurcation analysis of brown tide by reaction-diffusion equation using finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Mutsuto; Ding, Yan [Chuo Univ., Tokyo (Japan)] [Chuo Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    In this paper, we analyze the bifurcation of a biodynamics system in a two-dimensional domain by virtue of reaction-diffusion equations. The discretization method in space is the finite element method. The computational algorithm for an eigenspectrum is described in detail. On the basis of an analysis of eigenspectra according to Helmholtz`s equation, the discrete spectra in regards to the physical variables are numerically obtained in two-dimensional space. In order to investigate this mathematical model in regards to its practical use, we analyzed the stability of two cases, i.e., hydranth regeneration in the marine hydroid Tubularia and a brown tide in a harbor in Japan. By evaluating the stability according to the linearized stability definition, the critical parameters for outbreaks of brown tide can be theoretically determined. In addition, results for the linear combination of eigenspectrum coincide with the distribution of the observed brown tide. Its periodic characteristic was also verified. 10 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Fortnightly Earth rotation, ocean tides and mantle anelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Egbert, Gary D.

    2012-04-01

    This study of the fortnightly Mf tide comprises three main topics: (1) a new determination of the fortnightly component of polar motion and length of day (LOD) from a multidecade time-series of observed space-geodetic data; (2) the use of the polar motion determination as one constraint in the development of a hydrodynamic ocean model of the Mf tide and (3) the use of these results to place new constraints on mantle anelasticity at the Mf tidal period. Our model of the Mf ocean tide assimilates more than 14 years of altimeter data from the Topex/Poseidon and Jason-1 satellites. Because the Mf altimetric signal-to-noise ratio is very small, it is critical that altimeter data not be overweighted. The polar motion data, plus tide-gauge data and independent altimeter data, give useful additional information, with only the polar motion putting constraints on tidal current velocities. The resulting ocean-tide model, plus the dominant elastic body tide, leaves a small residual in observed LOD caused by mantle anelasticity. The inferred effective tidal Q of the anelastic body tide is 90 and is in line with a ?? frequency dependence with ? in the range 0.2-0.3.

  5. Gastrointestinal Emergency Room Admissions and Florida Red Tide Blooms.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Bean, Judy A; Fleming, Lora E; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Grief, Lynne; Nierenberg, Kate; Reich, Andrew; Watkins, Sharon; Naar, Jerome

    2010-01-01

    Human exposure to brevetoxins during Florida red tide blooms formed by Karenia brevis has been documented to cause acute gastrointestinal, neurologic, and respiratory health effects.. Traditionally, the routes of brevetoxin exposure have been through the consumption of contaminated bivalve shellfish and the inhalation of contaminated aerosols. However, recent studies using more sensitive methods have demonstrated the presence of brevetoxins in many components of the aquatic food web which may indicate potential alternative routes for human exposure.This study examined whether the presence of a Florida red tide bloom affected the rates of admission for a gastrointestinal diagnosis to a hospital emergency room in Sarasota, FL. The rates of gastrointestinal diagnoses admissions were compared for a 3-month time period in 2001 when Florida red tide bloom was present onshore to the same 3-month period in 2002 when no Florida red tide bloom occurred. A significant 40% increase in the total number of gastrointestinal emergency room admissions for the Florida red tide bloom period was found compared to the non red tide period.These results suggest that the healthcare community may experience a significant and unrecognized impact from patients needing emergency medical care for gastrointestinal illnesses during Florida red tide blooms. Thus, additional studies characterizing the potential sources of exposure to the toxins, as well as the dose/effect relationship of brevetoxin exposure, should be undertaken. PMID:20161425

  6. NOAA Daily Weather Maps

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Hydrometeorological Prediction Center

    2011-01-01

    The charts on this website are the principal charts of the former Weather Bureau publication, "Daily Weather Map." They are the Surface Weather Map, the 500-Millibar Height Contours chart, the Highest and Lowest Temperatures chart, and the Precipitation Areas and Amounts chart. For each day, simple charts are arranged on a single page. These charts are the surface analysis of pressure and fronts, color shading, in ten degree intervals,of maximum and minimum temperature, 500-Millibar height contours, and color shaded 24-hour total precipitation. These charts act as links to their respective Daily Weather Map charts. All charts are derived from the operational weather maps prepared at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction, Hydrometeorological Prediction Center, National Weather Service.

  7. Spectral characteristics analysis of red tide water in mesocosm experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Tingwei; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Hongliang; Ma, Yi; Gao, Xuemin

    2003-05-01

    Mesocosm ecosystem experiment with seawater enclosed of the red tide was carried out from July to September 2001. We got four species of biology whose quantities of bion are dominant in the red tide. During the whole process from the beginning to their dying out for every specie, in situ spectral measurements were carried out. After data processing, characteristic spectra of red tide of different dominant species are got. Via comparison and analysis of characteristics of different spectra, we find that in the band region between 685 and 735 nanometers, spectral characteristics of red tide is apparently different from that of normal water. Compared to spectra of normal water, spectra of red tide have a strong reflectance peak in the above band region. As to spectra of red tide dominated by different species, the situations of reflectance peaks are also different: the second peak of Mesodinium rubrum spectrum lies between 726~732 nm, which is more than 21nm away from the other dominant species spectra"s Leptocylindrus danicus"s second spectral peak covers 686~694nm; that of Skeletonema costatum lies between 691~693 nm. Chattonella marina"s second spectral peak lies about 703~705 nm. Thus we can try to determine whether red tide has occurred according to its spectral data. In order to monitor the event of red tide and identify the dominant species by the application of the technology of hyperspectral remote sensing, acquiring spectral data of different dominant species of red tide as much as possible becomes a basic work to be achieved for spectral matching, information extraction and so on based on hyperspectral data.

  8. Space Weather Media Viewer

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-01-01

    This is version 3 of the space Weather Media Viewer, created to work with the space Weather Action Center to see near-real time data and to provide additional images and resources available for educational use. It features easy downloads that can also be added to news reports and space weather reports. It was designed for ease in adding any media (videos, images) data.

  9. Everything Weather- Archived Data

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2001-01-01

    Users can obtain current weather forecasts for their own areas by entering a ZIP code, or they can access a large archive of historic data on severe weather (tornadoes, hail, high winds, hurricanes). Materials presented in the archive include dates, times, and intensities of storms, a photo gallery, maps, radar and other satellite data, storm chaser reports, and links to other weather sites. Raw data can be found in several forms for teachers wishing to have unprocessed data to work with.

  10. Weather and climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Recommendations for using space observations of weather and climate to aid in solving earth based problems are given. Special attention was given to: (1) extending useful forecasting capability of space systems, (2) reducing social, economic, and human losses caused by weather, (3) development of space system capability to manage and control air pollutant concentrations, and (4) establish mechanisms for the national examination of deliberate and inadvertent means for modifying weather and climate.

  11. Weather and Climate Data

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Weather and Climate Data site for the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies (COLA) contains analyses of current conditions and the state of the atmosphere; weather forecasts; metropolitan quick-look weather summaries and meteograms; short-term climate outlooks for temperature, precipitation and soil moisture; El Nino forecasts for understanding the ocean-atmosphere system; and maximum potential hurricane intensity maps showing potential minimum pressure and potential maximum winds for the oceans.

  12. Winter weather activity

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Whitney Frankovic

    2009-09-28

    This project explores factors that help create severe winter weather. An interactive simulation provides hands-on experience, followed by guiding questions and resource exploration. Weather Maker Simulator Use the weather simulation above to answer the following questions in complete sentences on paper. 1. In general, when are winds formed? 2. When winds are blowing, how can you get them to stop? 3. What usually happens when there is a large difference between the temperatures? 4. What happens when there is high ...

  13. Weather assessment and forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Data management program activities centered around the analyses of selected far-term Office of Applications (OA) objectives, with the intent of determining if significant data-related problems would be encountered and if so what alternative solutions would be possible. Three far-term (1985 and beyond) OA objectives selected for analyses as having potential significant data problems were large-scale weather forecasting, local weather and severe storms forecasting, and global marine weather forecasting. An overview of general weather forecasting activities and their implications upon the ground based data system is provided. Selected topics were specifically oriented to the use of satellites.

  14. Net-Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Net-Weather presents a host of meteorological information for the UK at this website. Users can find out seasonal, monthly, 10-day, and additional relevant weather forecasts. The Charts and Data link offers live satellite images, links to numerous forecast models, and data on sea temperatures and anomalies. For people who like winter and snow, the website offers interesting stories about famous British winters as well as snow reports. The Net-Weather Forum is a great place to discuss any weather-related topic.

  15. Pilot Weather Advisor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindamood, Glenn; Martzaklis, Konstantinos Gus; Hoffler, Keith; Hill, Damon; Mehrotra, Sudhir C.; White, E. Richard; Fisher, Bruce D.; Crabill, Norman L.; Tucholski, Allen D.

    2006-01-01

    The Pilot Weather Advisor (PWA) system is an automated satellite radio-broadcasting system that provides nearly real-time weather data to pilots of aircraft in flight anywhere in the continental United States. The system was designed to enhance safety in two distinct ways: First, the automated receipt of information would relieve the pilot of the time-consuming and distracting task of obtaining weather information via voice communication with ground stations. Second, the presentation of the information would be centered around a map format, thereby making the spatial and temporal relationships in the surrounding weather situation much easier to understand

  16. Winter Storm (weather)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Aubree Miller

    2009-09-28

    This project explores factors that help create severe winter weather. An interactive simulation provides hands-on experience, followed by guiding questions and resource exploration. First think about these questions: 1. What is your favorite aspect of winter weather? 2. How does the weather effect your everyday life? Form groups of THREE. Explore the following simulation: Weather Maker Simulator Use the simulation to answer the following questions on paper... 1. In general, when are winds formed? 2. When winds are blowing, how can you ...

  17. Living in the Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Science Teachers Association (NSTA)

    2006-12-13

    What is weather? Is climate different from weather? It doesn't matter where you live or where you travel, weather patterns influence your daily life. In this guide, students will engage in exploring and predicting the conditions in the atmosphere that are responsible for weather patterns and climatic conditions, and investigate how extreme weather impacts humans and the environment. While many of the keywords embedded into the "Living in the Weather" themes will be familiar, do your students really understand them? This guide provides teacher-tested, reliable links that allow you and your students to "surf" the internet in a quest to better understand how atmospheric conditions directly relate to weather on Earth. Understanding weather and climate can be a great opportunity for you to engage students in topics and themes that connect Earth and space science, life science, and physical science in a real way. The National Science Education Standards (NSES) focus on the study of weather and climate and their impact on human life. This guide uses the ongoing work and technology of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (known to the public simply as NOAA). NOAA scientists study our planet Earth in a global way. Working together with scientists worldwide, NOAA scientists study the diversity of living organisms (including humans) and their impact on our environment--not only in our country but in every country and continent around the world.

  18. Washington Post Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Washington Post makes a bid for the already crowded Internet weather market with WeatherPost. Coverage includes current conditions and four-day forecasts for 3,600 cities worldwide, as well as snapshot and time-lapse satellite maps (provided by Accu Weather). For US cities, users may also access UV and air quality maps and data, as well as seasonal maps (snow cover, tanning index, heat index, and BeachCast) and other radar images such as precipitation. Users may enter a city name into the homepage search box, or may browse by country or state/province. The historical weather database offers compiled monthly average weather data for nearly 1,000 cities worldwide; the database is searchable. An aspect of the site that sets it apart from many other weather pages is the weather reference desk, which includes a weather glossary, weather calculators (JavaScript converters for temperature, wind chill, heat index, etc.) and a page devoted to storm chasers.

  19. The shaping of continental slopes by internal tides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cacchione, D.A.; Pratson, Lincoln F.; Ogston, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    The angles of energy propagation of semidiurnal internal tides may determine the average gradient of continental slopes in ocean basins (???2 to 4 degrees). Intensification of near-bottom water velocities and bottom shear stresses caused by reflection of semi-diurnal internal tides affects sedimentation patterns and bottom gradients, as indicated by recent studies of continental slopes off northern California and New Jersey. Estimates of bottom shear velocities caused by semi-diurnal internal tides are high enough to inhibit deposition of fine-grained sediment onto the slopes.

  20. Global ionospheric weather

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, D.T.; Doherty, P.H.

    1994-02-28

    In the last year, the authors have studied several issues that are critical for understanding ionospheric weather. Work on global F-region modeling has consisted of testing the Phillips Laboratory Global Theoretical Ionosphere Model. Comparisons with both data and other theoretical models have been successfully conducted and are ongoing. GPS observations, as well as data analysis, are also ongoing. Data have been collected for a study on the limitations in making absolute ionospheric measurements using GPS. Another study on ionospheric variability is the first of its kind using GPS data. The observed seasonal total electron content behavior is consistent with that determined from the Faraday rotation technique. Work on the FAA's Phase 1 Wide Area Differential GPS (WADGPS) Satellite Navigation Testbed Experiment also continues. Initial results indicate that stations using operational WADGPS should be located no greater than 430 km apart. Work comparing the authors electron-proton-H atom model to both observations and other models has been generally successful. They have successfully modeled the creation of high-latitude large-scale plasma structures using two separate mechanisms (time-varying global convection and meso-scale convection events).

  1. Amphipods and isopods in the rocky intertidal: dispersal and movements during high tide

    E-print Network

    Agnarsson, Ingi

    Amphipods and isopods in the rocky intertidal: dispersal and movements during high tide Received patterns is, however, almost exclusively based on surveys made during low tide, when many animals Iceland, both by traditional sampling at low tide as well as by sampling during high tide

  2. Modeling the diurnal tide with dissipation derived from UARS/HRDI measurements

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modeling the diurnal tide with dissipation derived from UARS/HRDI measurements M. A. Geller1 , V. A UARS/HRDI observations in a recently published diurnal-tide model. These model structures compare quite the annual variation of the diurnal tide. 1 Introduction The diurnal tide in the mesosphere

  3. Modeling tides in Monterey Bay, California Xiaochun Wang a,b

    E-print Network

    Dong, Changming "Charles"

    Modeling tides in Monterey Bay, California Xiaochun Wang a,b , Yi Chao a,Ã, Changming Dong c , John October 2008 Keywords: Monterey Bay Barotropic tides Baroclinic tides Modeling Energy flux High-frequency radar a b s t r a c t In the process of developing a tide-permitting coastal ocean forecasting system

  4. Will global warming affect males and females differently? FHL Tide Bites #4 Dec. 2013

    E-print Network

    Carrington, Emily

    Will global warming affect males and females differently? FHL Tide Bites #4 Dec. 2013 Life on a rocky shore is challenging. With each passing tide, the animals and plants of this land-sea interface that her focal snails eat in rhythm with the tides, feeding in hoards when low tide exposure is at night

  5. Tide Model Accuracy in the Amundsen Sea, Antarctica, from InSAR Observations of Ice

    E-print Network

    Tide Model Accuracy in the Amundsen Sea, Antarctica, from InSAR Observations of Ice Shelf Motion.mcmillan@leeds.ac.uk. Abstract Tide Model Evaluation This study assesses the accuracy of tide model predictions in the Amundsen Sea Sector of West Antarctica. · Tide model accuracy in this remote region is poorly constrained, yet

  6. Long-Range Propagation of the Semidiurnal Internal Tide from the Hawaiian Ridge ZHONGXIANG ZHAO

    E-print Network

    MacKinnon, Jennifer

    Long-Range Propagation of the Semidiurnal Internal Tide from the Hawaiian Ridge ZHONGXIANG ZHAO internal tide from French Frigate Shoals (FFS), Hawaii, is studied with an array of six simultaneous tide's coherent portion. Together these two approaches provide a unique view of the internal tide

  7. ORIGINAL PAPER Interannual variations in fire weather, fire extent,

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Alan

    -Euroamerican tree-ring-based fire records. We investigated how interannual variability in two fire weather indicesORIGINAL PAPER Interannual variations in fire weather, fire extent, and synoptic-scale circulation by wet winters and dry summers, and by high fire activity. The importance of synoptic-scale circulation

  8. ELABORATION OF A NEW TOOL FOR WEATHER DATA SEQUENCES GENERATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laetitia Adelard; Mara Thierry; Harry Boyer; Jean Claude Gatina

    This paper deals about the presentation of a new software RUNEOLE used to provide weather data in buildings physics. RUNEOLE associates three modules leading to the description, the modelling and the generation of weather data. The first module is dedicated to the description of each climatic variable included in the database. Graphic representation is possible (with histograms for example). Mathematical

  9. Multilingual Weather Forecast Generation System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tianfang Yao; Dongmo Zhang; Qian Wang

    The MLWFA (Multilingual Weather Forecasts Assistant) system will be demonstrated. It is developed to generate the multilingual text of the weather forecasts automatically. The raw data from the weather observation can be used to generate the weather element chart. According to the weather change trend, the forecasters can directly modify the value Of the element on the chart, such as

  10. Health Issues and Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, N.

    2009-04-01

    The possibility that solar activity and variations in the Earth's magnetic field may affect human health has been debated for many decades but is still a "scientific topic" in its infancy. By learning whether and, if so, how much the Earth's space weather can influence the daily health of people will be of practical importance. Knowing whether human genetics, include regulating factors that take into account fluctuations of the Earth's magnetic field and solar disturbances, indeed exist will also benefit future interplanetary space travelers. Because the atmospheres on other planets are different from ours, as well as their interaction with the space environment, one may ask whether we are equipped with the genetics necessary to take this variability into account. The goal of this presentation is to define what is meant by space weather as a health risk and identify the long-term socio-economic effects on society that such health risks would have. Identifying the physical links between space weather sources and different effects on human health, as well as the parameters (direct and indirect) to be monitored, the potential for such a cross-disciplinary study will be invaluable, for scientists and medical doctors, as well as for engineers.

  11. Tide- and wind-driven flushing of Boston Harbor, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Signell, Richard

    1992-01-01

    The flushing of Boston Harbor, a shallow, tidally dominated embayment with little fresh water input, is investigated using a depth-averaged model. The modeled tidal currents exhibit strong spatial variability and ebb/flood asymmetry due to complex topography and coastline geometry and were verified by shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements. At the inlets to the harbor, the asymmetry between flood and ebb gives rise to a net exchange of water, which acts over successive tidal cycles to flush the harbor. The flushing is examined by tracking water that starts out in Boston Harbor for 40 M2 tidal cycles. The tidal flushing is very efficient at mixing water in the vicinity of the inlets over several tidal cycles, but efficiency decreases with time as ``tidal mixing regions'' form on either side of the harbor inlets. When wind forcing is included, the wind-driven currents act to flush the tidal mixing regions, giving rise to more efficient flushing. The exception is when the wind is from the southwest, which confines the jet-like ebb flow from the harbor and therefore reduces the flushing efficiency. In general, flushing is shown to be a two-step process: (1) rapid exchange due to tides over a large region in the vicinity of the harbor inlets and (2) flushing of this region by wind-driven flow. The model also demonstrates that flushing is not uniform over the entire harbor but occurs rapidly in the deep tidal channels and slowly in the regions of weak tidal currents around the harbor periphery. Although the depth-averaged approach to flushing is appropriate over most of the harbor due to the harbor's shallow depth and broad depth distribution, the lack of bathymetric variability and the presence of locally important density driven currents in the Boston Inner Harbor indicates that flushing of this localized area must be approached with a three-dimensional model.

  12. Riser tensioning wave and tide compensating system for a floating platform

    SciTech Connect

    Heeres, C.J.; Larsen, C.H.

    1980-09-16

    A riser tensioner cylinder is provided with a hollow piston rod which forms a second cylinder in which a ram is reciprocated. The free end of the ram is connected to a link which in turn is connected to the end of the riser for providing tension on the riser. The ram reciprocates in the second cylinder under constant pressure to compensate for wave action on the floating platform and the second cylinder is automatically positioned within the first cylinder for adjustment for tide, vessel offset or other infrequent but variable factors.

  13. Three essays on weather and crop yield

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tian Yu

    2011-01-01

    The general theme of this dissertation is the study of impacts of weather variability on crop yields, with each chapter addressing a specific topic related to this theme. Chapter 2 tests the hypothesis that corn and soybeans have become more drought tolerant by regressing county yields on a drought index and time. Results indicate that corn yield losses from drought

  14. Course Syllabus Weather Radar Theory and Practice

    E-print Network

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    Motivation and Historical Perspective of Weather Radar Chapter 2 Electromagnetic Waves and Propagation and P. Hobbs, 2006 Fundamentals of Signals and Systems, 2nd Ed, E. W. Kamen and B. S. Heck, 2000 Probability, Random Variables, and Stochastic Processes, 3rd Ed, A. Papoulis, 1991 Fundamental of Applied

  15. 5. Detail of west side of pier, at low tide. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Detail of west side of pier, at low tide. - Charlestown Navy Yard, Pier 10, Between Piers 9 & 11 along Mystic River on Charlestown Waterfront at eastern edge of Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  16. 2. Pilings at end of Pier 11, low tide, view ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Pilings at end of Pier 11, low tide, view to north. - Charlestown Navy Yard, Pier 11, Charlestown Waterfront at confluence of Little Mystic Channel & Mystic River at northernmost ent of Navy Yard, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  17. 3. View of Sterling Creek Marsh at low tide showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of Sterling Creek Marsh at low tide showing rubble at the entrance of dam/bridge looking southwest - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Marsh, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  18. 4. View of Sterling Creek Marsh at low tide showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View of Sterling Creek Marsh at low tide showing rubble at the entrance of the dam/bridge looking east - Richmond Hill Plantation, Sterling Creek Marsh, East of Richmond Hill on Ford Neck Road, Richmond Hill, Bryan County, GA

  19. Atmospheric Tides in the Latest Generation of Climate Models

    E-print Network

    Covey, Curt

    For atmospheric tides driven by solar heating, the database of climate model output used in the most recent assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) confirms and extends the authors’ earlier ...

  20. Energy Dissipation by Tides and Librations in Synchronous Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bills, B. G.; Ray, R. D.

    2000-01-01

    Energy dissipation associated with physical librations of large synchronous satellites may be important for maintaining internal fluid layers. Depending on the depth and viscosity of the fluid layer, viscous heating from librations may exceeed that from tides.

  1. Seasonal variations in Pluto's atmospheric tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Richard G.; Toigo, Anthony D.; Gierasch, Peter J.; Hansen, Candice J.; Young, Leslie A.; Sicardy, Bruno; Dias-Oliveira, Alex; Guzewich, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Pluto's tenuous atmosphere exhibits remarkable seasonal change as a result of the planet's substantial obliquity and highly eccentric orbit. Over the past two decades, occultations have revealed that the atmospheric pressure on Pluto has increased substantially, perhaps by a factor as large as 2 to 4, as the planet has moved from equinox towards solstice conditions. These data have also shown variations in the strength of the dynamical activity in the atmosphere, as revealed by the varying abundance and amplitude of spikes in the occultation light curves resulting from refractive focussing by atmospheric waves. Toigo et al. (Toigo et al. [2010]. Icarus, 208, 402-411) explored the possibility that these waves are caused by solar-induced sublimation and diurnal deposition from N2 frost patches, driven by weak vertical winds resulting from the rising and sinking gas as it is released from or deposited onto the surface. Here, we extend this model to account explicitly for seasonal variations in average insolation and for the significant damping of vertical wave propagation by kinematic viscosity and thermal diffusivity (Hubbard et al. [2009]. Icarus, 204, 284-289). Damping is extremely effective in suppressing vertical propagation of waves with vertical wavelengths of a few kilometers or less, and the dominant surviving tidal modes have characteristic vertical wavelengths ? ? 10- 13 km . We estimate the expected strength and regional characteristics of atmospheric tides over the course of Pluto's orbit for a variety of assumed spatial distributions of surface frost and atmospheric surface pressure. We compute the predicted strength of tide-induced wave activity based on the actual frost distribution observed on Pluto from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations (Stern et al. [1997]. Astron. J., 113, 827; Buie et al. [2010]. Astron. J., 139, 1128-1143), and compare the results to calculations for volatile transport models of Young (Young [2013]. Astrophys. J., 766, L22) and Hansen et al. (Hansen et al. [2015]. Icarus, 246, 183-191). We develop simple scaling rules to estimate the variation of the strength of tidal activity with surface pressure PS and solar declination ?? , and show that the maximum expected temperature perturbation at an atmospheric pressure of P = 0.1 Pa scales as dTmax ? cos?? /?{PS } . Wave activity is strongest in the near-equatorial region (latitude | ? | ? 30 °), being only weakly dependent on the detailed frost distribution. Using a 3-D time-dependent geometric optics ray-tracing code, we compute model light curves for the geometric circumstances of three high-SNR occultations (2002 August 21, 2006 June 12, and 2012 July 18), taking into account the detailed three-dimensional characteristics of the tides as different regions of the atmosphere are probed over the course of each occultation chord. We compare the strength and abundance of the scintillations in the models with those seen in the data, using both the HST frost maps and the volatile transport model predictions. The striking asymmetries in the strengths of spikes between ingress and egress seen in some events are reproduced in the tidal model simulations, due primarily to the latitudes probed during the occultation: occultations at high northern or southern latitudes uniformly have much weaker wave activity than more equatorial events. A surface pressure range of PS = 1-2 Pa provides the best match between models and observations. With the impending arrival of the New Horizons spacecraft at Pluto in 2015, we predict that wave activity in the upper atmosphere will be strongest at equatorial regions, and controlled in amplitude primarily by the surface pressure and damping effects, rather than by the detailed frost distribution. If Pluto's atmosphere begins to collapse in the coming decades, we expect that future stellar occultations will provide evidence for greatly enhanced atmospheric wave activity.

  2. Home Weatherization Visit

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Secretary Steven Chu visits a home that is in the process of being weatherized in Columbus, OH, along with Ohio Governor Ted Strickland and Columbus Mayor Michael Coleman. They discuss the benefits of weatherization and how funding from the recovery act is having a direct impact in communities across America.

  3. People and Weather.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NatureScope, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Provides: (1) background information on ways weather influences human lives; (2) activities related to this topic; and (3) a ready-to-copy page with weather trivia. Each activity includes an objective, list of materials needed, recommended age level(s), subject area(s), and instructional strategies. (JN)

  4. Weather Fundamentals: Clouds. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    The videos in this educational series, for grades 4-7, help students understand the science behind weather phenomena through dramatic live-action footage, vivid animated graphics, detailed weather maps, and hands-on experiments. This episode (23 minutes) discusses how clouds form, the different types of clouds, and the important role they play in…

  5. Tracking Weather Satellites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Helen E.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of weather satellites in providing an exciting, cohesive framework for students learning Earth and space science and in providing a hands-on approach to technology in the classroom. Discusses the history of weather satellites and classroom satellite tracking. (JRH)

  6. Weather Fundamentals: Wind. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    The videos in this educational series, for grades 4-7, help students understand the science behind weather phenomena through dramatic live-action footage, vivid animated graphics, detailed weather maps, and hands-on experiments. This episode (23 minutes) describes the roles of the sun, temperature, and air pressure in creating the incredible power…

  7. Designing a Weather Station

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    The collection and analysis of weather data is crucial to the location of alternate energy systems like solar and wind. This article presents a design challenge that gives students a chance to design a weather station to collect data in advance of a large wind turbine installation. Data analysis is a crucial part of any science or engineering…

  8. Weather Vane and Anemometer

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Watsonville Environmental Science Workshop

    2011-01-01

    In this meteorology activity, learners construct simple devices to measure the direction and speed of wind. Learners will explore wind and air resistance as well as how weather vanes and generators work to analyze weather patterns. Note: a drill and other specialty tools are required for this activity, but are not included in the cost of materials.

  9. Home Weatherization Visit

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steven

    2013-05-29

    Secretary Steven Chu visits a home that is in the process of being weatherized in Columbus, OH, along with Ohio Governor Ted Strickland and Columbus Mayor Michael Coleman. They discuss the benefits of weatherization and how funding from the recovery act is having a direct impact in communities across America.

  10. Northwest Weather Watch

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sue Palewicz

    This educational module is designed to teach students about predicting weather. This includes a series of activites about clouds, moisture, air and rain for students to complete. There are curriculum connections to art, writing and math as well as links for more resources and live weather data.

  11. Teacher's Weather Sourcebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konvicka, Tom

    This book is a teaching resource for the study of weather-related phenomena. A "weather unit" is often incorporated into school study because of its importance to our daily lives and because of its potential to cut across disciplinary content. This book consists of two parts. Part I covers the major topics of atmospheric science such as the modern…

  12. Weather and radar interactions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. Booth

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the effects of weather on radar system performance. This discussion were based on computer simulations and climatological data. The relationships between frequency and range were explored as they interact with the weather. This effort is being conducted in the RF Technology Division of the Applied Sensors, Guidance, and Electronics Directorate, US Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development,

  13. Advanced Aviation Weather Forecasts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marilyn M. Wolfson; David A. Clark

    2006-01-01

    n The U.S. air transportation system faces a continuously growing gap between the demand for air transportation and the capacity to meet that demand. Two key obstacles to bridging this gap are traffic delays due to en route severe- weather conditions and airport weather conditions. Lincoln Laboratory has been addressing these traffic delays and related safety problems under the Federal

  14. New weather forecasting aid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A new, computerized weather analysis and display system developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is being used to provide air traffic controllers in Colorado with up-to-date information on weather systems that could affect aircraft within their control areas. The system, called PROFS (Prototype Regional Observing and Forecasting Services), was under development for four years at NOAA's Environmental Research Laboratories in Boulder, and is undergoing operational evaluation at the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) Denver Air Route Traffic Control Center in Longmont, Colo. FAA officials see the new system as a first step in upgrading the weather support services for the nation's air traffic control system. Originally created to help National Weather Service personnel with their forecasting duties (Eos, April 13, 1982, p. 233), the PROFS system was specially tailored for aviation use before being installed at the Longmont center. The system uses computers to process weather data from satellites, regional radar, wind profilers, a network of automated weather stations in eastern Colorado, and other sources, some of which are not normally available to forecasters. When this information is collected and formatted, weather personnel at the center can choose from several types of visual display on their terminals, depending on what information they require. The forecasters can then make printed copies of any display and distribute them within moments to controllers who use the information to alert air traffic to storms, wind shifts, and other weather disturbances.

  15. The impact of deep internal tides on acoustic propagation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Subramaniam D. Rajan; James K. Lewis; Peter J. Stein

    2001-01-01

    Strong deep (~250 m) internal tides have been observed off the south shores of Oahu. These tides result in large fluctuations in temperature (6-8°C) on a semi-diurnal basis, and in turn change the sound speed structure of the region where present. The authors quantify the impact of these tidally-induced sound speed variations on sonar system performance. Examples include an ASW

  16. Internal tides and waves near the continental shelf edge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Huthnance

    1989-01-01

    The subject is reviewed from the viewpoints of theory, internal tide and wave structure and their implications.A wider theoretical context suggests scope for further investigation of natural or nearly-trapped forms above the inertial frequency.Although internal tides in many locations are observed to have first-mode vertical structure, higher modes are seen offshore from shallow shelf-break forcing and for particular Froude numbers,

  17. TIDE Observations of Cusp and Cleft Multiple Ion Populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, Victoria N.; Chandler, Michael O.; Moore, Thomas E.

    2000-01-01

    The southern pole pass of Polar/TIDe at 5000 km allows a study of the distributions of the cusp and cleft. We discuss observations of TIDE (Thermal Ion Dynamics Experiment) as it passes the southern pole on March 29, 1999. A mixture of several cold outflowing ions (0.3-10 eV) are measured simultaneously with magnetospheric precipitation (greater than 100 eV). We will show a study of these multiple plasma distributions, their source, and their interaction.

  18. Fair weather atmospheric electricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, R. G.

    2011-06-01

    Not long after Franklin's iconic studies, an atmospheric electric field was discovered in "fair weather" regions, well away from thunderstorms. The origin of the fair weather field was sought by Lord Kelvin, through development of electrostatic instrumentation and early data logging techniques, but was ultimately explained through the global circuit model of C.T.R. Wilson. In Wilson's model, charge exchanged by disturbed weather electrifies the ionosphere, and returns via a small vertical current density in fair weather regions. New insights into the relevance of fair weather atmospheric electricity to terrestrial and planetary atmospheres are now emerging. For example, there is a possible role of the global circuit current density in atmospheric processes, such as cloud formation. Beyond natural atmospheric processes, a novel practical application is the use of early atmospheric electrostatic investigations to provide quantitative information on past urban air pollution.

  19. Predicting the Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Topic in Depth explores the science behind predicting the weather. First, the United States Search and Rescue Task Force describe the basic tools and knowledge used to create weather forecasts (1). Students can find concise, clear explanations of weather, fronts and air masses, high and low pressure, precipitation, and water vapor and humidity as well. By performing the activities presented in the second website, fourth grade students can learn about weather instruments and data collection (2). This website, produced by the Government of Saskatchewan, also explores how the weather can impact local communities. Third, Edheads offers a Macromedia Flash Player enhanced interactive module allowing students to predict the weather by examining weather maps (3 ). Through this website, users can become familiar with the concepts of warm and cold fronts, wind direction and speed, air pressure, and humidity. The fourth website, supplied by Annenberg / CPB, discusses weather satellites, Doppler radar, and additional tools forecasters use to predict the weather (4). Students can find a wind chill calculator along with a brief discussion of the history of forecasting and weather lore. Next, NOAA provides graphics for five forecast models: the ETA, the Global Forecast System (GFS), the Wave Watch III (WW3), the Nested Grid model (NGM), and the Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) (5). Outputs are available for North America, North Pacific, Western North Atlantic, and the Polar Ice Drift. Users can find links to detailed descriptions of the inputs and history of each model. Sixth, the British government's Met Office describes numerical modeling and its components (6). Students and educators can learn about the future in forecasting as well as educational opportunities with the Cooperative Program for Meteorology, Education, and Training (COMET).

  20. Winter Weather Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Matters What's New Preparation & Planning Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis ... Weather Information on Specific Types of Emergencies Winter Weather Frequently Asked Questions Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ...

  1. Weathering and weathering rates of natural stone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Erhard M.

    1987-06-01

    Physical and chemical weathering were studied as separate processes in the past. Recent research, however, shows that most processes are physicochemical in nature. The rates at which calcite and silica weather by dissolution are dependent on the regional and local climatic environment. The weathering of silicate rocks leaves discolored margins and rinds, a function of the rocks' permeability and of the climatic parameters. Salt action, the greatest disruptive factor, is complex and not yet fully understood in all its phases, but some of the causes of disruption are crystallization pressure, hydration pressure, and hygroscopic attraction of excess moisture. The decay of marble is complex, an interaction between disolution, crack-corrosion, and expansion-contraction cycies triggered by the release of residual stresses. Thin spalls of granites commonly found near the street level of buildings are generally caused by a combination of stress relief and salt action. To study and determine weathering rates of a variety of commercial stones, the National Bureau of Standards erected a Stone Exposure Test Wall in 1948. Of the many types of stone represented, only a few fossiliferous limestones permit a valid measurement of surface reduction in a polluted urban environment.

  2. Weather Event Simulator Weather Event Simulator

    E-print Network

    Training Branch National Weather Service Norman, OK John Ferree Warning Decision Training Branch National for Applied Behavioral Science D iscus Audio/ Teac Le #12;Learn By DoingLearn By Doing #12;Simulations Improve ­ All Major Airlines ­ Flight Schools #12;Simulations Improve Job Performance Simulations Improve Job

  3. Fortnightly Earth Rotation, Ocean Tides, and Mantle Anelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Egbert, Gary D.

    2011-01-01

    Sustained accurate measurements of earth rotation are one of the prime goals of Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS). We here concentrate on the fortnightly (Mf) tidal component of earth-rotation data to obtain new results concerning anelasticity of the mantle at this period. The study comprises three parts: (1) a new determination of the Mf component of polar motion and length-of-day from a multi-decade time series of space-geodetic data; (2) the use of the polar-motion determination as one constraint in the development of a hydrodynamic ocean model of the Mf tide; and (3) the use of these results to place new constraints on mantle anelasticity. Our model of the Mf ocean tide assimilates more than fourteen years of altimeter data from the Topex/Poseidon and Jason-1 satellites. The polar motion data, plus tide-gauge data and independent altimeter data, give useful additional information, with only the polar motion putting constraints on tidal current velocities. The resulting ocean-tide model, plus the dominant elastic body tide, leaves a small residual in observed length-of-day caused by mantle anelasticity. The inferred effective tidal 0 of the anelastic body tide is 90 and is in line with a omega-alpha frequency dependence with alpha in the range 0.2--0.3.

  4. Fortnightly Ocean Tides, Earth Rotation, and Mantle Anelasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard; Egbert, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The fortnightly Mf ocean tide is the largest of the long-period tides (periods between 1 week and 18.6 years), but Mf is still very small, generally 2 cm or less. All long-period tides are thought to be near equilibrium with the astronomical tidal potential, with an almost pure zonal structure. However, several lines of evidence point to Mf having a significant dynamic response to forcing. We use a combination of numerical modeling, satellite altimetry, and observations of polar motion to determine the Mf ocean tide and to place constraints on certain global properties, such as angular momentum. Polar motion provides the only constraints on Mf tidal currents. With a model of the Mf ocean tide in hand, we use it to remove the effects of the ocean from estimates of fortnightly variations in length-of-day. The latter is dominated by the earth's body tide, but a small residual allows us to place new constraints on the anelasticity of the earth's mantle. The result gives the first experimental confirmation of theoretical predictions made by Wahr and Bergen in 1986.

  5. Dynamic ocean-tide effects on Earth's rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, S. R.

    1993-01-01

    This article develops 'broad-band' Liouville equations which are capable of determining the effects on the rotation of the Earth of a periodic excitation even at frequencies as high as semi-diurnal; these equations are then used to predict the rotational effects of altimetric, numerical and 32-constituent spherical harmonic ocean-tide models. The rotational model includes a frequency-dependent decoupled core, the effects of which are especially marked near retrograde diurnal frequencies; and a fully dynamic oceanic response, whose effects appear to be minor despite significant frequency dependence. The model also includes solid-earth effects which are frequency dependent as the result of both anelasticity at long periods and the fluid-core resonance at nearly diurnal periods. The effects of both tidal inertia and relative angular momentum on Earth rotation (polar motion, length of day, 'nutation' and Universal Time) are presented for 32 long- and short-period ocean tides determined as solutions to the author's spherical harmonic tide theory. The lengthening of the Chandler wobble period by the pole tide is also re-computed using the author's full theory. Additionally, using the spherical harmonic theory, tidal currents and their effects on rotation are determined for available numerical and altimetric tide height models. For all models, we find that the effects of tidal currents are at least as important as those of tide height for diurnal and semi-diurnal constituents.

  6. Geodynamic Effects of Ocean Tides: Progress and Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, Ray

    1999-01-01

    Satellite altimetry, particularly Topex/Poseidon, has markedly improved our knowledge of global tides, thereby allowing significant progress on some longstanding problems in geodynamics. This paper reviews some of that progress. Emphasis is given to global-scale problems, particularly those falling within the mandate of the new IERS Special Bureau for Tides: angular momentum, gravitational field, geocenter motion. For this discussion I use primarily the new ocean tide solutions GOT99.2, CSR4.0, and TPXO.4 (for which G. Egbert has computed inverse-theoretic error estimates), and I concentrate on new results in angular momentum and gravity and their solid-earth implications. One example is a new estimate of the effective tidal Q at the M_2 frequency, based on combining these ocean models with tidal estimates from satellite laser ranging. Three especially intractable problems are also addressed: (1) determining long-period tides in the Arctic [large unknown effect on the inertia tensor, particularly for Mf]; (2) determining the global psi_l tide [large unknown effect on interpretations of gravimetry for the near-diurnal free wobble]; and (3) determining radiational tides [large unknown temporal variations at important frequencies]. Problems (2) and (3) are related.

  7. Mixotrophy in red tide algae raphidophytes.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hae Jin

    2011-01-01

    Marine raphidophytes are common red tide organisms that are distributed worldwide. They are known to be harmful to other plankton and fish and have often caused large-scale fish mortality in many countries. Thus, the population dynamics of raphidophytes is a critical concern for scientists, the aquaculture industry, and government officers from many countries. Raphidophyte growth and mortality should be investigated to understand bloom dynamics. Raphidophytes were thought to be exclusively autotrophic organisms. However, several recent studies have revealed that raphidophytes are able to feed on heterotrophic and autotrophic bacteria, i.e. raphidophytes are mixotrophic algae. Further, high-resolution video microscopy has revealed the mechanism by which raphidophytes feed on bacteria, which involves capturing prey cells in the mucus excreted by mucocysts and engulfing the cells through mucocysts. These discoveries may influence the conventional view on both raphidophyte bloom dynamics and plankton energy flow and carbon cycling. In the present study, I review prey, feeding mechanisms, and ingestion rates of mixotrophic marine raphidophytes. In addition, I examine the ecological significance of raphidophyte mixotrophy. PMID:21518079

  8. Statistical Sampling of Tide Heights Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the study was to determine if it was possible to reduce the cost of verifying computational models of tidal waves and currents. Statistical techniques were used to determine the least number of samples required, in a given situation, to remain statistically significant, and thereby reduce overall project costs. Commercial, academic, and Federal agencies could benefit by applying these techniques, without the need to 'touch' every item in the population. For example, the requirement of this project was to measure the heights and times of high and low tides at 8,000 locations for verification of computational models of tidal waves and currents. The application of the statistical techniques began with observations to determine the correctness of submitted measurement data, followed by some assumptions based on the observations. Among the assumptions were that the data were representative of data-collection techniques used at the measurement locations, that time measurements could be ignored (that is, height measurements alone would suffice), and that the height measurements were from a statistically normal distribution. Sample means and standard deviations were determined for all locations. Interval limits were determined for confidence levels of 95, 98, and 99 percent. It was found that the numbers of measurement locations needed to attain these confidence levels were 55, 78, and 96, respectively.

  9. Dynamical Tides in Rotating Planets and Stars

    E-print Network

    Jeremy Goodman; Claire Lackner

    2008-12-04

    Tidal dissipation may be important for the internal evolution as well as the orbits of short-period massive planets--hot Jupiters. We revisit a mechanism proposed by Ogilvie and Lin for tidal forcing of inertial waves, which are short-wavelength, low-frequency disturbances restored primarily by Coriolis rather than buoyancy forces. This mechanism is of particular interest for hot Jupiters because it relies upon a rocky core, and because these bodies are otherwise largely convective. Compared to waves excited at the base of the stratified, externally heated atmosphere, waves excited at the core are more likely to deposit heat in the convective region and thereby affect the planetary radius. However, Ogilvie and Lin's results were numerical, and the manner of the wave excitation was not clear. Using WKB methods, we demonstrate the production of short waves by scattering of the equilibrium tide off the core at critical latitudes. The tidal dissipation rate associated with these waves scales as the fifth power of the core radius, and the implied tidal $Q$ is of order ten million for nominal values of the planet's mass, radius, orbital period, and core size. We comment upon an alternative proposal by Wu for exciting inertial waves in an unstratified fluid body by means of compressibility rather than a core. We also find that even a core of rock is unlikely to be rigid. But Ogilvie and Lin's mechanism should still operate if the core is substantially denser than its immediate surroundings.

  10. DYNAMICAL TIDES IN ROTATING PLANETS AND STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, J.; Lackner, C. [Princeton University Observatory, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)], E-mail: jeremy@astro.princeton.edu

    2009-05-10

    Tidal dissipation may be important for the internal evolution as well as the orbits of short-period massive planets-hot Jupiters. We revisit a mechanism proposed by Ogilvie and Lin for tidal forcing of inertial waves, which are short-wavelength, low-frequency disturbances restored primarily by Coriolis rather than buoyancy forces. This mechanism is of particular interest for hot Jupiters, because it relies upon a rocky core, and because these bodies are otherwise largely convective. Compared to waves excited at the base of the stratified, externally heated atmosphere, waves excited at the core are more likely to deposit heat in the convective region and thereby affect the planetary radius. However, Ogilvie and Lin's results were numerical, and the manner of the wave excitation was not clear. Using WKB methods, we demonstrate the production of short waves by scattering of the equilibrium tide off the core at critical latitudes. The tidal dissipation rate associated with these waves scales as the fifth power of the core radius, and the implied tidal Q is of order ten million for nominal values of the planet's mass, radius, orbital period, and core size. We comment upon an alternative proposal by Wu for exciting inertial waves in an unstratified fluid body by means of compressibility rather than a core. We also find that even a core of rock is unlikely to be rigid. But Ogilvie and Lin's mechanism should still operate if the core is substantially denser than its immediate surroundings.

  11. Space Weather CD

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2013-04-10

    This is a software package about space weather: what it is and what it does in space and here on Earth. The disc includes software that displays movies and images of the aurora and of the Sun in various wavelengths from the ground and from orbiting NASA spacecraft; a tutorial about what space weather is and how the aurora is formed; and more. Users will also find real-time space weather conditions from current satellite missions and can download the latest data without leaving the Space Weather application. A TicTacToe game is also included that tests space weather knowledge. The disc contains many other Space Weather resources, programs, sounds, and games for use at home or school, and there are several educational websites included in full on the disc for offline viewing. In addition there is an exhaustive list of links to a variety of space weather resources available online. The disc is available for free from a number of sites if downloaded.

  12. Global ocean tides. Part V. The diurnal principal lunar tide (O1), atlas of tidal charts and maps. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwiderski, E.W.

    1981-05-20

    In Part I of this report (AD-A060 913), a unique hydrodynamical interpolation technique was introduced, extensively tested, and evaluated in order to compute partial global ocean tides in great detail and with a high degree of accuracy. This novel method has been applied to construct the diurnal principal lunar (O1) ocean tide with a relative accuracy of better than 5 cm anywhere in the open oceans. The resulting tidal amplitudes and phases are tabulated on a 1 deg x 1 deg grid system in an atlas of 42 deg x 71 deg overlapping charts covering the whole oceanic globe. A corresponding atlas of global corange and cotidal maps is included to provide the reader with a quick general overview of the major tidal phenomena. The specifying hydrodynamical parameters of the model are listed along with quoted sources of empirical tide data, and significant tidal features are explained and discussed. The diurnal O1 ocean tide is found to resemble closely the diurnal K1 tide and qualitatively also the semidiurnal S2 and M2 tides which were presented in Parts IV, III, and II of this report, respectively (AD's A104 334, A104 333, and A084 694).

  13. Global ocean tides. Part VII. The diurnal principal solar tide (P1), atlas of tidal charts and maps. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwiderski, E.W.

    1981-05-01

    In Part I (Schwiderski, 1978a) of this report, a unique hydrodynamical interpolation technique was introduced, extensively tested, and evaluated in order to compute partial global ocean tides in great detail and with a high degree of accuracy. This novel method has been applied to construct the diurnal principal solar (P1) ocean tide with a relative accuracy of better than 5 cm anywhere in the open oceans. The resulting tidal amplitudes and phases are tabulated on a 1 deg X 1 deg grid system in an atlas of 42 deg X 71 deg overlapping charts covering the whole oceanic globe. A corresponding atlas of global corange and cotidal maps is included to provide the reader with a quick general overview of the major tidal phenomena. The specifying hydrodynamical parameters of the model are listed along with quoted sources of empirical tide data, and significant tidal features are explained and discussed. As expected, since the periods of the diurnal tides P1 (24.07h) and K1 (23.93 h) differ by only 0.14 h, these two tides resemble very closely each other (compare Part IV). Significant differences occur only in regions of rapid tidal variations. Of course, P1 resembles also the diurnal 01 tide but to a visibly lesser degree (see Part V).

  14. MarkSim: Software to Generate Daily Weather Data for Latin America and Africa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter G. Jones; Philip K. Thornton

    Lack of interpolation facilities, meaning that analy- sis can be performed only for sites where data exist. A software package to generate daily weather data for Latin Amer- 2. Limited number of weather variables in the data- ica and Africa is described. The program is based on a stochastic base, precluding the running of certain types of models weather generator

  15. Improved Estimates of Temporally Coherent Internal Tides and Energy Fluxes from Satellite Altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Chao, Benjamin F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Satellite altimetry has opened a surprising new avenue to observing internal tides in the open ocean. The tidal surface signatures are very small, a few cm at most, but in many areas they are robust, owing to averaging over many years. By employing a simplified two dimensional wave fitting to the surface elevations in combination with climatological hydrography to define the relation between the surface height and the current and pressure at depth, we may obtain rough estimates of internal tide energy fluxes. Initial results near Hawaii with Topex/Poseidon (T/P) data show good agreement with detailed 3D (three dimensional) numerical models, but the altimeter picture is somewhat blurred owing to the widely spaced T/P tracks. The resolution may be enhanced somewhat by using data from the ERS-1 (ESA (European Space Agency) Remote Sensing) and ERS-2 satellite altimeters. The ERS satellite tracks are much more closely spaced (0.72 deg longitude vs. 2.83 deg for T/P), but the tidal estimates are less accurate than those for T/P. All altimeter estimates are also severely affected by noise in regions of high mesoscale variability, and we have obtained some success in reducing this contamination by employing a prior correction for mesoscale variability based on ten day detailed sea surface height maps developed by Le Traon and colleagues. These improvements allow us to more clearly define the internal tide surface field and the corresponding energy fluxes. Results from throughout the global ocean will be presented.

  16. Weather satellite launched

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2006-06-01

    NASA launched on 24 May the weather satellite GOES-N, the first of the new N series of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites. The satellite, which becomes GOES-13 once it reaches its final orbit, joins the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration collection of weather satellites that provide the agency with data for weather forecasts and warnings. The GOES-N series has several improvements over previous GOES satellites. A highly stable pointing platform will allow improved performance from the satellite's sounder-which gathers atmospheric data- and its imager. In addition, the satellite will enable NOAA to improve forecasts and warnings of solar disturbances.

  17. Weather and Climate

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Medina, Philip

    This unit introduces younger students to the concepts of weather and climate. Topics include the structure of the atmosphere, the definitions of weather and climate, and temperature and how it is measured. There are also discussions of heat transfers (radiation, conduction, convection), air pressure, wind, and the Coriolis effect. Other topics include types of storms, larger-scale weather systems such as pressure systems and fronts, and factors (insolation, land-sea breezes, orographic effect) that influence the climate in a given region. A vocabulary list and downloadable, printable student worksheets are provided.

  18. Wonderful World of Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2006-01-01

    This website uses real time data for many activities for learning about the weather. It can be modified to fit virtually any grade level. The project is broken up into 3 sets of lessons; Introductory Activities, Real Time Data Activities, and Language Arts Activities. Each lesson gives a recommended time for completion, to help keep students and teachers on track. There is a helpful teachers guide section with background information about real time data, curriculum standards, and assessment suggestions. Th students gallery has many examples of real projects other students have already created. There is also a helpful reference guide, with information on real time weather, projects, and weather lesson plans.

  19. Sun, weather, and climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.; Goldberg, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The general field of sun-weather/climate relationships, that is, apparent weather and climate responses to solar activity is introduced and theoretical and experimental suggestions for further research to identify and investigate the unknown causal mechanisms are provided. Topics of discussion include: (1) solar-related correlation factors and energy sources; (2) long-term climatic trends; (3) short-term meteorological correlations; (4) miscellaneous obscuring influences; (5) physical processes and mechanisms; (6) recapitulation of sun-weather relationships; and (7) guidelines for experiments.

  20. Weather Observing Fundamentals

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    COMET

    2014-03-11

    "Weather Observing Fundamentals" provides guidance for U.S. Navy Aerographer's Mates, Quartermasters, and civilian observers tasked with taking and reporting routine, special, and synoptic observations. Although the focus of this lesson is on shipboard observations, much of the content applies to land-based observing and reporting as well. The lesson details standard procedures for taking accurate weather observations and for encoding those observations on COMNAVMETOCCOM Report 3141/3. Exercises throughout the lesson and four weather identification drills at the end provide learners with opportunities to practice and build their skills. The lesson covers a large amount of content. You may wish to work through the material in multiple sessions.

  1. World Weather Information Service

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The World Meteorological Organization Web site offers the World Weather Information Service page. Here, visitors will find official weather forecasts and climatological information for selected cities worldwide. Users choose a particular continent and country, and are then presented with a list of various cities they can get information on. This includes the date and time of the current forecast, minimum and maximum temperatures for that day, a general cloud description, and a monthly review of various data for that city. If for nothing else, the site does a good job of providing a very straightforward and easy way to find weather information from hundreds of cities around the globe.

  2. Weather and Climate

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site features visual resources and supporting data that illustrate the relationship between weather and climate. Resources are divided by topic including climate resources, weather forecasting, warnings and data, and evidence for global warming. Visualizations and data sets include GIS-based animated maps, static maps, simple animations, and links to real-time stream gauge data. This site provides an array of visual resources that help demonstrate the difference between weather and climate and may be incorporated into lectures, labs, or other activities.

  3. Long before a hurricane hits land, the National Weather Service knows about it. Satellites have taken pictures of the storm and computers have

    E-print Network

    fly into the storm and report more exact measurements. As it comes closer to land, special weather toys, tools and flower pots and bring them inside. The wind could pick them up and send them slamming, the sea may rise as high as 25 feet above normal high tide! That is taller than six kids standing on each

  4. Developing hourly weather data for locations having only daily weather data

    SciTech Connect

    Talbert, S.G.; Herold, K.E.; Jakob, F.E.; Lundstrom, D.K.

    1983-06-01

    A methodology was developed to modify an hourly TMY weather tape to be representative of a location for which only average daily weather parameters were avilable. Typical hourly and daily variations in solar flux, and other parameters, were needed to properly exercise a computer model to predict the transient performance of a solar controlled greenhouse being designed for Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The starting point was a TMY tape for Yuma, Arizona, since the design temperatures for summer and winter are nearly identical for Yuma and Riyadh. After comparing six of the most important weather variables, the hourly values on the Yuma tape were individually adjusted to give the same overall daily average conditions as existed in the long-term Riyadh data. Finally, a statistical analysis was used to confirm quantitatively that the daily variations between the long term average values for Riyadh and the modified TMY weather tape for Yuma matched satisfactorily.

  5. Interpretation of earth tide response of three deep, confined aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.; Kanehiro, B.Y.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1984-03-10

    The response of a confined, areally infinite aquifer to external loads imposed by earth tides is examined. Because the gravitational influence of celestial objects occurs over large areas of the earth, the confined aquifer is assumed to respond in an undrained fashion. Since undrained response is controlled by water compressibility, earth tide response can be directly used only to evaluate porous medium compressibility if porosity is known. Moreover, since specific storage S/sub s/ quantifies a drained behavior of the porous medium, one cannot directly estimate S/sub s/from earth tide response. Except for the fact that barometric changes act both on the water surface in the well and on the aquifer as a whole while stress changes associated with earth tides act only in the aquifer, the two phenomena influence the confined aquifer in much the same way. In other words, barometric response contains only as much information on the elastic properties of the aquifer as the earth tide response does. Factors such as well bore storage, aquifer transmissivity, and storage coefficient contribute to time lag and damping of the aquifer response as observed in the well. Analysis shows that the observation of fluid pressure changes alone, without concurrent measurement of external stress changes, is sufficient to interpret uniquely earth tide response. In the present work, change in external stress is estimated from dilatation by assuming a reasonable value for bulk modulus. Earth tide response of geothermal aquifers from Marysville, Montana. East Mesa, California; and Raft River Valley, Idaho, were analyzed, and the ratio of S/sub 3/ to porosity was estimated. Comparison of these estimates with independent pumping tests show reasonable agreement.

  6. Role of tides on the formation of the Antarctic Slope Front at the Weddell-Scotia Confluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flexas, M. M.; Schodlok, M. P.; Padman, L.; Menemenlis, D.; Orsi, A. H.

    2015-05-01

    The structure of the Antarctic Slope Front (ASF) and the associated Antarctic Slope Current (ASC) on the Scotia Sea side of the Weddell-Scotia Confluence (WSC) is described using data from a hydrographic survey and three 1 year long moorings across the continental slope. The ASC in this region flows westward along isobaths with an annual mean speed of ˜0.2 m s-1, with time variability dominated by the K1 and O1 tidal diurnal constituents, a narrowband oscillation with ˜2-week period attributable to the spring/neap tidal cycle, and seasonal variability. Realistic and idealized high-resolution numerical simulations are used to determine the contribution of tides to the structure of the ASF and the speed of the ASC. Two simulations forced by realistic atmospheric forcing and boundary conditions integrated with and without tidal forcing show that tidal forcing is essential to reproduce the measured ASF/ASC cross-slope structure, the time variability at our moorings, and the reduced stratification within the WSC. Two idealized simulations run with tide-only forcing, one with a homogeneous ocean and the other with initial vertical stratification that is laterally homogeneous, show that tides can generate the ASC and ASF through volume flux convergence along the slope initiated by effects including the Lagrangian component of tidal rectification and mixing at the seabed and in the stratified ocean interior. Climate models that exclude the effects of tides will not correctly represent the ASF and ASC or their influence on the injection of intermediate and dense waters from the WSC to the deep ocean.

  7. On the factors behind large Labrador Sea tides during the last glacial cycle and the potential implications for Heinrich events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbic, Brian K.; Mitrovica, Jerry X.; Macayeal, Douglas R.; Milne, Glenn A.

    2008-09-01

    Labrador Sea (LS) tidal elevations over the last glacial cycle are investigated in a near-global numerical model that accurately captures the present-day tides. From ˜65 ka to ˜7 ka, the modeled elevations at the debouchement point of the Hudson Strait ice stream in the LS are exceptionally large, comparable to the largest elevations seen anywhere in the present-day ocean. New numerical simulations performed for this article demonstrate that both local changes in basin geometry (e.g., ice cover over Hudson Bay) and changes outside of the LS led to enhanced LS paleotides. New simulations run at higher horizontal resolution and a considered examination of uncertainties, including uncertainties in the adopted sea level models, strengthen confidence in the robustness of the large LS paleotides. The tide model is run with both spatially uniform sea level drops (taken from curves of eustatic and Red Sea sea levels versus time) and spatially variable sea level maps (taken from two different gravitationally self-consistent viscoelastic solid earth/sea level models, which both account for ice sheet geometry). The tides are larger when the spatially variable sea level models are used. Observations in present-day Antarctica indicate that the mechanical action of tides significantly impacts the dynamics of both continental ice streams and their associated floating ice shelves. It is postulated here that large LS paleotides played a key role in the formation of Heinrich event icebergs, that is, massive discharges of ice from the LS into the glacial North Atlantic ocean. The paleotide calculations described here provide a potential explanation for why the LS region, more than any other, dominated the production of Heinrich event icebergs. Most previous hypotheses of a tidal role in climate variability and ice sheet dynamics focus on tidal mixing. In contrast, here the role of tidal mechanical forcing of ice sheets is emphasized.

  8. On the use of SAR Interferometry for assessing tide gauge stability for long term sea-level estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raucoules, Daniel; Cozannet, Gonéri; Woppelmann, Guy

    2015-04-01

    One of the important consequences of climate change is the global sea level rise of 20cm since the end of the 19th century. This process is very likely to continue and accelerate in the future. Future projections of global sea level rise range from about 30cm to 80cm by 2100 with significant regional variability). Local and regional vertical ground motions are one of the important sources of uncertainties to consider in sea level rise impact assessments. However, it is very difficult, if not impossible, to evaluate them without observations due to their complex causes and evolution in space and time. Consequently, a first motivation to accurately characterize vertical ground motions in large coastal cities is to reduce the uncertainties of sea level rise impact assessments. A second challenge motivating a precise characterization of vertical ground motions in coastal cities is to reconcile sea level estimates for the 20th century: over this period, there is a slight disagreement between (1) observations of sea level rise obtained from the available tide gauge data sets, and (2) the sum of contributions from each process causing sea level rise. Accurate knowledge about the ground motions affecting tide gauges is thus highly desirable, especially in regions poorly covered by tide gauges. Indeed, one of the possible explanations of the 20th century sea level budget imbalance is an inappropriate spatial sampling of historical tide gauges along the oceans' coastlines, most being located in Europe and in the United States. In addition, noteworthy is the fact that Tide Gauges with long Time Series are generally located in urbanized areas. Growing of urbanizations in development during the last century can result in local changes of ground surface level (in particular: groundwater extraction produces subsidence phenomena). In this perspective, we propose the use of Differential SAR interferometry techniques for characterizing the ground surface deformation in the neighborhood of the Tide-Gauges. The objective is therefore to qualify the relevancy of a given Tide Gauge time series over the last decades/century to contribute to the global sea-level estimation. In addition, in certain cases a correction to the Time Series can be derived from such surface deformation mapping. This utilization of DInSAR is illustrated by three test cases that correspond to different ground surface deformation characteristics (slight regular displacements, dm/yr irregular motions, negligible motion) and data acquisition conditions (available data amount, sensors). The test areas are located in Alexandria (Egypt), Manila (Philippines) and Dakar (Senegal).

  9. Tides stir up deep Arctic heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Mattias; Rippeth, Tom; Lincoln, Ben; Lenn, Yueng; Bacon, Sheldon; Sundfjord, Arild

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic is warming at twice the rate of the rest of the planet. One of the largest sources of heat to the Arctic Ocean is the warm salty Atlantic water (AW) which enters through the Fram Strait and circulates at intermediate depth round the Arctic basin. The heat contained in the AW is sufficient to entirely melt the Arctic sea ice but is insulated from the surface by a layer of colder fresher water. Across much of the Arctic Ocean there is insufficient turbulence to drive vertical mixing, and so heat fluxes are a result of double diffusion (DD) and are consequently weak (< 0.1 W m-2). Here we present a new pan-Arctic series of direct measurements of TKE dissipation rate. The new measurements show enhanced turbulent mixing, and hence heat fluxes, over much of the continental slope around the Arctic boundary. The rate of TKE dissipation is found to increase with the bathymetric slope and vary longitudinally with the largest values to the north of Svalbard resulting in enhanced diapycnal heat fluxes over this region (20 W m-2). The observed 2-order of magnitude longitudinal variation in TKE dissipation rate correlates with the rate of dissipation of tidal energy, estimated from the local difference between the work done by the tide generating force and the tidal energy flux divergence from the TPXO8 inverse tidal solution. This correlation leads to the conclusion that the enhanced mixing observed over the continental shelf break north of Svalbard is a result of tidal processes.

  10. Semidiurnal internal tides in a Patagonian fjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, L.; Pérez-Santos, I.; Valle-Levinson, A.; Schneider, W.

    2014-12-01

    The fjords of central Chilean Patagonia (47°S) receive fresh water from both precipitation and the Baker River. This buoyancy input generates a two layer hydrographic system characterized by strong salinity stratification (?30 g kg-1 over a depth range of 7-15 m), which favors baroclinic conditions in the fjord. Hourly current velocity profiles were collected with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) moored at a depth of 40 m during March-April 2009, and complemented by 11 CTD profiles and hourly sea level time series. These data allowed the detection of semidiurnal internal tidal waves for the first time in this region. Wavelength and horizontal phase speeds were determined by the dynamical mode 1 for internal waves. Maximum wavelength was 52 km, travelling at a horizontal phase speed of ?1.16 m s-1. Wavelet, spectral and empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis techniques applied to the echo anomaly signal and to the baroclinic velocity showed largest semidiurnal amplitudes near the pycnocline. Out of three modes obtained from the EOF analysis, two modes displayed a two- or three-layer flow structure with flow direction reversing at the pycnocline. The semidiurnal internal waves were found as fluctuations near the pycnocline in sporadic packets correlated to high discharge pulses of the Baker River (r2 = 0.77). Additionally, internal Froude number calculations at the mouth of the Baker River indicated critical flow conditions, which allowed for generation of internal waves at the plume front. These waves are separated from the river plume after internal wave phase speeds surpassed frontal speeds. This suggests that the internal waves were modulated by pulses in high river discharge rather than the interaction of barotropic tide with bathymetry (a sill). An implication of these internal waves would be to increase vertical mixing of nutrients toward the surface, through shear instabilities, which would favor primary production.

  11. CHEMICAL WEATHERING AND SOLUTION CHEMISTRY IN ACID FOREST SOILS: DIFFERENTIAL INFLUENCE OF SOIL TYPE, BIOTIC PROCESSES, AND H+ DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the investigation, weathering rates were calculated for three eastern North American forest soils using five separate estimation techniques. In addition, leaching experiments were performed to examine the influence of selected environmental variables on the weathering process....

  12. Sun, weather, and climate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Herman; R. A. Goldberg

    1985-01-01

    The general field of sun-weather\\/climate relationships that is, apparent weather and climate responses to solar activity is introduced and theoretical and experimental suggestions for further research to identify and investigate the unknown casual mechanisms are provided. Topics of discussion include: (1) solar-related correlation factors and energy sources; (2) long-term climate trends; (3) short-term meteorological correlations; (4) miscellaneous obscuring influences; (5)

  13. Wonderful World of Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-01-01

    This standards-based unit has been created for use by students in the elementary grades to investigate weather phenomena both locally as well as in other places around the world. By using hands-on activities and real-time data investigations, students develop a basic understanding of how weather can be described in measurable quantities. The lesson plans have been designed to allow teachers to select the ones which fit into their curriculum, and to allow for flexibility in implementation.

  14. Weather Radar Network Design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francesc Junyent; V. Chandrasekar

    2008-01-01

    The Engineering Research Center for Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere (CASA) is investigating the use of dense networks of short-range radars for weather sensing. A first test-bed of this new paradigm is currently deployed in southwest Oklahoma. The potential benefits of closely deployed, overlapping, short-range weather radars are easy to see intuitively amounting to a greater ability to measure

  15. Weathering and Erosion

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-06-26

    In this multi-station lab, learners conduct a series of experiments to explore the processes and effects of weathering and erosion. Using the results from these explorations, learners design and conduct an experiment comparing the rate of erosion in different biomes. Use this activity to teach weathering and erosion, and also to illustrate how scientists often use the results of one experiment to inspire another. This activity is intended to be conducted over multiple meetings.

  16. An Ocean of Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this lesson, students will investigate the close relationship between the ocean and the atmosphere to determine the extent the ocean affects the Earth's weather in the South Atlantic Bight region. As they study this relationship, students will learn that the ocean and atmosphere work together as a system. They will experiment to find out that heat transfer from the ocean is a cause of much of Earth's weather and will make and explain an ocean water cycle.

  17. 2012 Severe Weather Awareness Guide

    E-print Network

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Florida's 2012 Severe Weather Awareness Guide 2012 Severe Weather Awareness Guide F L O R I D A D I of Emergency Management #12;Florida's Severe Weather Awareness Guide 2 Florida is affected by many natural. That is why I am proud to present the 2012 Severe Weather Awareness Guide. By reading this guide you can learn

  18. Recall of Television Weather Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyatt, David; And Others

    1978-01-01

    A Minneapolis/St. Paul telephone survey revealed that most people interviewed relied on radio weather reports for weather information, that the amount of weather information retained from radio and television forecasts was minimal, and that most people were satisfied with television weather reports. (GW)

  19. Stratospheric variability in summer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, D.; Donn, W. L.; Robinson, W.

    1981-01-01

    Rocketsonde observations and infrasound results are used to investigate the variability of the summer stratopause region during one month in summer. Fluctuations of 2-3 days and about 16-day periods are evident, and they appear to be propagating vertically. In this month the 2-3 day oscillations have an amplitude envelope equal in period to the longer period oscillations, implying a connection between the two phenomena. Observations of the diurnal tide and shorter period variability during the month are also presented.

  20. Lunar and Solar Torques on the Oceanic Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Richard D.; Bills, Bruce G.; Chao, Benjamin F.

    1998-01-01

    Brosche and Seiler recently suggested that direct lunar and solar tidal torques on the oceanic tides play a significant role in the earth's short-period angular momentum balance ("short-period" here meaning daily and sub-daily). We reexamine that suggestion here, concentrating on axial torques and hence on variations in rotation rate. Only those spherical harmonic components of the ocean tide having the same degree and order as the tidal potential induce nonzero torques. Prograde components (those moving in the same direction as the tide-generating body) produce the familiar secular braking of the earth's rotation. Retrograde components, however, produce rapid variations in UTI at twice the tidal frequency. There also exist interaction torques between tidal constituents, e.g. solar torques on lunar tides. They generate UTI variations at frequencies equal to the sums and differences of the original tidal frequencies. We give estimates of the torques and angular momentum variations for each of the important regimes, secular to quarter-diurnal. For the M(sub 2) potential acting on the M(sub 2) ocean tide, we find an associated angular momentum variation of amplitude 3 x 10(exp 19) N m. This is 5 to 6 orders of magnitude smaller than the angular momentum variations associated with tidal currents. We conclude that these torques do not play a significant role in the short-period angular momentum balance.

  1. The signature of atmospheric tides in sub-daily variations of Earth rotation as unveiled by globally-gridded atmospheric angular momentum functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindelegger, M.; Böhm, J.; Salstein, D. A.; Schuh, H.

    2012-12-01

    Thermally-driven atmospheric tides provide a small but distinct contribution to shortperiod variations of Earth rotation parameters (ERP). The effect of diurnal and semi-diurnal tides, commonly denoted as S1 and S2, respectively, is in the range of 2 - 10 uas for polar motion and 2 - 10 uas for changes in length-of-day (LOD). Even though ocean tides represent a much more dominant driving agent for ERP fluctuations at short time scales, high-frequency atmospheric effects are non-negligible, particularly given the prospective measurement accuracy of space geodetic techniques. However, previous studies, such as Brzezinski et al. (2002), de Viron et al. (2005) or Schindelegger et al. (2011), have been noticeably inconclusive on the exact amplitude and phase values of S1 and S2 atmospheric excitation signals. This study aims at shedding light on the origin of these uncertainties with respect to the axial component of Earth's rotation vector by investigating times series of atmospheric angular momentum (AAM) functions that are given on global grids and computed from three-hourly meteorological data of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The signature of diurnal and semi-diurnal atmospheric tides is clearly visible in the gridded axial AAM functions, revealing a distinct spatial and temporal phase difference between pressure and wind tidal constituents of about ± ?. It is shown that due to this counterbalance and the explicit axisymmetric spatial structure of S1 and S2, the net effect in sub-diurnal AAM (which is calculated from the global sum of gridded AAM functions) is always a small quantity, particularly sensitive to minor differences between the analysis fields of numerical weather models.

  2. Weather and Environmental Hazards at Mass Gatherings

    PubMed Central

    Soomaroo, Lee; Murray, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Reviews of mass gathering events have traditionally concentrated on crowd variables that affect the level and type of medical care needed. Weather and environmental hazards at mass gathering events have not been fully researched. This review examines these events and aims to provide future suggestions for event organisers, medical resource planners, and emergency services, including local hospital emergency departments. Methods A review was conducted using computerised data bases: MEDLINE, The Cochrane Library, HMIC and EMBASE, with Google used to widen the search beyond peer-reviewed publications, to identify grey literature. All peer-review literature articles found containing information pertaining to lessons identified from mass gathering disasters due to weather or environmental hazards leading to participant death, injury or illness were analysed and reviewed. Disasters occurring due to crowd variables were not included. These articles were read, analysed, abstracted and summarised. Results 20 articles from literature search were found detailing mass gathering disasters relating directly to weather or environmental hazards from 1988 – 2011, with only 17 cases found within peer-review literature. Two events grey literature from 2011 are due to undergo further inquiry while one article reviews an event originally occurring in 1922. Analysis of cases were categorised in to heat and cold-related events, lightning and storms and disease outbreak. Conclusions Mass gathering events have an enormous potential to place a severe strain on the local health care system, Prior health resource and environmental planning for heat & cold-related illness, lightning & storms, and disease outbreak can advance emergency preparedness and response to potential disasters. Citation: Soomaroo L, Murray V. Weather and Environmental Hazards at Mass Gatherings. PLoS Currents Disasters. 2012 Jul 31 Keywords: Mass Gatherings, Disasters, Sporting Events, Festivals, Concerts, Storm, Lightning, Cyclone, Hot-weather illness, Cold-weather illness, Disease, Public Health, Syndromic Surveillance Abbreviations: ALS – Advance Life support; BLS – Basic Life support; ED – Emergency Department; EMS – Emergency Medical Services; PPR – Patient Presentation Rate PMID:22953242

  3. Weather and The Water Cycle

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Merritt

    2005-10-15

    Students will be able to do activities dealing with weather and water cycles. Learn what makes weather wet and wild, forcast and predict weather. Webweather For Kids Learn about tornadoes and hurricanes. Kidstorm Learn about the water cycles. water Cycles Now click on the following link: Interactive weather maker 1. How much change in temperature is needed to make it snow? On the right side of the page click on Weather Detective Web Quest. Follow the ...

  4. Using GRACE Satellite Acceleration Data to Recover Arctic Ocean Tides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killett, B.; Wahr, J.; Desai, S. D.; Yuan, D.; Watkins, M.

    2008-12-01

    Arctic ocean tidal solutions are not constrained by altimetry data because missions such as TOPEX/POSEIDON do not extend to high latitudes. The resulting errors in tidal models alias into the monthly GRACE gravity field solutions at all latitudes. Fortunately, it is possible to use the GRACE inter-satellite ranging data to solve for these tides directly. Five years of GRACE inter-satellite acceleration data are inverted to solve for the amplitude and phase of major solar and lunar tides in the Arctic ocean using a mascon approach. The resulting tidal amplitudes are compared to existing tidal models using in-situ data from coastal tide gauges and deep sea bottom pressure recorders. Simulations were performed to verify that the inversion algorithm works as designed.

  5. Influence of fortnightly earth tides at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, D.

    1980-01-01

    Analysis of 52 historic eruptions confirms the premise that fortnightly earth tides play a significant role in triggering activity at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Since January 1832, nearly twice as many eruptions have occurred nearer fortnightly tidal maximum than tidal minimum (34 vs. 18). A straightforward significance test indicates that the likelihood of a fortnightly tidal influence on Kilauea eruptions is roughly 90%. This is not the case for Mauna Loa Volcano, where 37 historic eruptions have been distributed randomly with respect to the fortnightly tide. At Kilauea, stresses induced by fortnightly earth tides presumably act in concert with volcanic and tectonic stresses to trigger shallow magma movements along preexisting zones of weakness. Differences in structure or internal plumbing may limit the effectiveness of this mechanism at Mauna Loa. Tidal effects seem to be less marked at shields than at some island-arc volcanoes, possibly because higher average volcanic stress rates in Hawaii more often override the effects of tidal stresses.-Author

  6. Global ocean tides. Part III. The semidiurnal principal solar tide (S2), atlas of tidal charts and maps. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schwiderski, E.W.

    1981-03-15

    In Part I of this report (AD-A060 913), a unique hydrodynamical interpolation technique was introduced, extensively tested, and evaluated in order to compute partial global ocean tides in great detail and with a high degree of accuracy. This novel method has been applied to construct the semidiurnal principal solar (S2) ocean tide with a relative accuracy of better than 5 cm anywhere in the open oceans. The resulting tidal amplitudes and phases are tabulated on a 1 deg x 1 deg grid system in an atlas of 42 deg x 71 deg overlapping charts covering the whole oceanic globe. A corresponding atlas of global corange and cotidal maps is included to provide the reader with a quick general overview of the major tidal phenomena. The specifying hydrodynamical parameters of the model are listed along with quoted sources of empirical tide data, and significant tidal features are explained and discussed. The S2 ocean tide is found to resemble closely the corresponding lunar M2 tide presented in Part II of this report (AD-A084 694).

  7. Influence of tides and planetary waves on E sporadic layer at mid latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzopane, Michael; Pignalberi, Alessio; Zuccheretti, Enrico

    This paper describes the influence that tides and planetary waves have on the variability shown by the main characteristics of the E sporadic (Es) layer, that is the top frequency (ftEs) and the lowest virtual height (h’Es). The study is based on ionograms recorded during the summertime of 2013, a year falling in the maximum of solar activity of cycle 24, and precisely in June, July, August and September, by the Advanced Ionospheric Sounder by Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (AIS-INGV) ionosondes installed at Rome (41.8°N, 12.5°E) and Gibilmanna (37.9°N, 14.0°E), Italy. We applied the height-time-intensity (HTI) methodology proposed by Haldoupis et al. (2006) to investigate how tides control the Es dynamics. As a whole, the HTI analysis showed that a well-defined semidiurnal periodicity characterizes the Es layer descent and occurrence for all the considered months, although in September some cases which showed a prevailing diurnal periodicity were recorded. Through the application of the wavelet analysis it was also found that the tidal oscillations shown by ftEs and h’Es are affected by a strong amplitude modulation with periods of several days but with important differences between the two parameters. This amplitude modulation is a proof that Es layers are indirectly affected by planetary waves through their nonlinear interaction with tides at lower altitudes; this nonlinear interaction produces the presence of secondary waves with frequencies that are the sum and difference of the primary waves frequencies involved in the interaction as proposed by Teitelbaum and Vial [1991]. This work adds to those that were already done by Haldoupis et al. (2004, 2006), and confirms that ionosonde data, especially those registered in summertime, can be used as a powerful tool for studying tidal and planetary waves properties, as well as their climatology, in the mesosphere-low-termosphere region.

  8. Linking Europa's plume activity to tides, tectonics, and liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoden, Alyssa Rose; Hurford, Terry A.; Roth, Lorenz; Retherford, Kurt

    2015-06-01

    Much of the geologic activity preserved on Europa's icy surface has been attributed to tidal deformation, mainly due to Europa's eccentric orbit. Although the surface is geologically young (30-80 Myr), there is little information as to whether tidally-driven surface processes are ongoing. However, a recent detection of water vapor near Europa's south pole suggests that it may be geologically active. Initial observations indicated that Europa's plume eruptions are time-variable and may be linked to its tidal cycle. Saturn's moon, Enceladus, which shares many similar traits with Europa, displays tidally-modulated plume eruptions, which bolstered this interpretation. However, additional observations of Europa at the same time in its orbit failed to yield a plume detection, casting doubt on the tidal control hypothesis. The purpose of this study is to analyze the timing of plume eruptions within the context of Europa's tidal cycle to determine whether such a link exists and examine the inferred similarities and differences between plume activity on Europa and Enceladus. To do this, we determine the locations and orientations of hypothetical tidally-driven fractures that best match the temporal variability of the plumes observed at Europa. Specifically, we identify model faults that are in tension at the time in Europa's orbit when a plume was detected and in compression at times when the plume was not detected. We find that tidal stress driven solely by eccentricity is incompatible with the observations unless additional mechanisms are controlling the eruption timing or restricting the longevity of the plumes. The addition of obliquity tides, and corresponding precession of the spin pole, can generate a number of model faults that are consistent with the pattern of plume detections. The locations and orientations of these hypothetical source fractures are robust across a broad range of precession rates and spin pole directions. Analysis of the stress variations across the fractures suggests that the plumes would be best observed earlier in the orbit (true anomaly ?120°). Our results indicate that Europa's plumes, if confirmed, differ in many respects from the Enceladean plumes and that either active fractures or volatile sources are rare.

  9. Oceans, Climate and Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kimberly Lightle

    2006-01-01

    What is the difference between weather and climate? What do the oceans have to do with them? Weather is the day-to-day state of the atmosphere and its short-term (minutes to weeks) variation. Climate is typically described by the regional patterns of seasonal temperature and precipitation over 30 years. The averages of annual temperature, rainfall, cloud cover, and depth of frost penetration are all typical climate-related statistics. The oceans influence the worlds climate by storing solar energy and distributing it around the planet through currents and atmospheric winds.This publication is all about developing your students understandings of earths oceans and the major effect they have on climate. Understanding and interpreting local weather data and understanding the relationship between weather and climate are important first steps to understanding larger-scale global climate changes. Activities that ask students to collect and analyze local weather data as well as analyze global data can be found in the Lessons and Activities section. Analyzing and interpreting data is a major focus of this publication. Numerous data sets can be found in the Sources for Real Data section. The Background Information section and the article Tomorrows Forecast will help reinforce your own content knowledge.

  10. Storm surge and tide interaction: a complete paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsburgh, Kevin; Williams, Jane; Proctor, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Globally, 200 million people live on coastal floodplains and about 1 trillion worth of assets lie within 1 metre of mean sea level. Any change in the statistics of flood frequency or severity would impact on economic and social systems. It is therefore crucial to understand the physical drivers of extreme storm surges, and to have confidence in datasets used for extreme sea level statistics. Much previous research has focussed on the process of tide-surge interaction, and it is now widely accepted that the physical basis of tide-surge interaction is that a phase shift of the tidal signal represents the effect of the surge on the tide. The second aspect of interaction is that shallow water momentum considerations imply that differing tidal states should modulate surge generation: wind stress should have greater surge-generating potential on lower tides. This has been shown previously by analytical models but not as yet confirmed by fully non-linear models of the continental shelf. We present results from an operational model of the European shelf that demonstrate that tidal range does have an effect on the surges generated. The cycle-integrated effects of wind stress (i.e. the skew surge) are generally greater when tidal range is low. Our results contradict the absence of any such correlation observed in the complete record of UK tide gauge data. This suggests that whilst the modulating effect of the tide on the skew surge (the time-independent difference between peak prediction and observations) is significant, the difference between individual storms is dominant. This implies that forecasting systems must predict salient detail of the most intense storms. A further implication is that operational models need to simulate tides with acceptable accuracy at all coastal locations. We extend our model analysis to show that the same modulation of storm surges (by tidal conditions) applies to tropical cyclones. We conduct simulations using a mature operational storm surge model in the Bay of Bengal with tropical cyclones from the IBTrACs database; we demonstrate that - just as with the extra-tropical case - higher storm surges on the Bangladesh coastline are generated during smaller tides.

  11. Storm Surge and Tide Interaction: A Complete Paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsburgh, K.

    2014-12-01

    Estimates show that in 2005, in the largest 136 coastal cities, there were 40 million people and 3,000 billion of assets exposed to 1 in 100 year coastal flood events. Mean sea level rise will increase this exposure to 150 million people and 35,000 billion of assets by 2070. Any further change in the statistics of flood frequency or severity would impact severely on economic and social systems. It is therefore crucial to understand the physical drivers of extreme storm surges, and to have confidence in datasets used for extreme sea level statistics. Much previous research has focussed on the process of tide-surge interaction, and it is now widely accepted that the physical basis of tide-surge interaction is that a phase shift of the tidal signal represents the effect of the surge on the tide. The second aspect of interaction is that shallow water momentum considerations imply that differing tidal states should modulate surge generation: wind stress should have greater surge-generating potential on lower tides. We present results from a storm surge model of the European shelf that demonstrate that tidal range does have an effect on the surges generated. The cycle-integrated effects of wind stress (i.e. the skew surge) are greater when tidal range is low. Our results contradict the absence of any such correlation in tide gauge records. This suggests that whilst the modulating effect of the tide on the skew surge (the time-independent difference between peak prediction and observations) is significant, the difference between individual storms is dominant. This implies that forecasting systems must predict salient detail of the most intense storms. A further implication is that flood forecasting models need to simulate tides with acceptable accuracy at all coastal locations. We extend our model analysis to show that the same modulation of storm surges (by tidal conditions) applies to tropical cyclones. We conduct simulations using a mature operational storm surge model in the Bay of Bengal with tropical cyclones from the IBTrACs database; we demonstrate that - just as with the extra-tropical case - higher storm surges on the Bangladesh coastline are generated during smaller tides.

  12. The Role of Tides in Known Multi-Planet Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The first known extrasolar planet system, upsilon Andromedae, was discovered in 1999. The number of stars known to possess more than one planet has been growing rapidly since then. The dynamical interactions among such planets can be quite strong. These interactions can excite the orbital eccentricities of planets, even planets orbiting very close to their stars. Stellar tides can damp the eccentricities of such close-in planets, removing dynamical energy from the system and ultimately affecting the motions of all of the planets. These and other effects of tides in extrasolar multi-planet systems will be discussed.

  13. New weather radar coming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    What would you call the next generation of radar for severe weather prediction? NEXRAD, of course. A prototype for the new system was recently completed in Norman, Okla., and by the early 1990s up to 195 stations around the United States will be tracking dangerous weather and sending faster, more accurate, and more detailed warnings to the public.NEXRAD is being built for the Departments of Commerce, Transportation, and Defense by the Unisys Corporation under a $450 million contract signed in December 1987. Th e system will be used by the National Weather Service, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the U.S. Air Force and Navy. The NEXRAD radar tower in Norman is expected to be operational in October.

  14. Spaceborne weather radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, Robert; Kozu, Toshiaki

    1990-01-01

    The present work on the development status of spaceborne weather radar systems and services discusses radar instrument complementarities, the current forms of equations for the characterization of such aspects of weather radar performance as surface and mirror-image returns, polarimetry, and Doppler considerations, and such essential factors in spaceborne weather radar design as frequency selection, scanning modes, and the application of SAR to rain detection. Attention is then given to radar signal absorption by the various atmospheric gases, rain drop size distribution and wind velocity determinations, and the characteristics of clouds, as well as the range of available estimation methods for backscattering, single- and dual-wavelength attenuation, and polarimetric and climatological characteristics.

  15. Titan's Methane Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, Henry G.

    2012-05-01

    Conditions in Titan's troposphere are near the triple point of methane, the second most abundant component of its atmosphere. Our understanding of Titan's lower atmosphere has shifted considerably in the past decade. Ground-based observations, Hubble Space Telescope images, and data returned from the Cassini and Huygens spacecraft show that Titan's troposphere hosts a methane-based meteorology in direct analogy to the water-based meteorology of Earth. What once was thought to be a quiescent place, lacking in clouds or localized weather and changing only subtly on long seasonal timescales, is now understood to be a dynamic system with significant weather events regularly occurring against the backdrop of dramatic seasonal changes. Although the observational record of Titan's weather covers only a third of its 30-year seasonal cycle, Titan's atmospheric processes appear to be more closely analogous to those of Earth than to those of any other object in our solar system.

  16. Weather and Climate

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    This background chapter reviews the basic principles of meteorology that educators need to guide inquiry activities in the classroom. Topics include structure of the atmosphere, Coriolis effect, water cycle, greenhouse effect, cyclones, anticyclones, and jet streams. This is chapter 2 of Meteorology: An Educator's Resource for Inquiry-Based Learning for Grades 5-9. The guide includes a discussion of learning science, the use of inquiry in the classroom, instructions for making simple weather instruments, and more than 20 weather investigations ranging from teacher-centered to guided and open inquiry investigations.

  17. Wonderful World of Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2003-01-01

    This standards-based module uses hands-on activities and real-time data investigations to allow students in the elementary grades to investigate weather phenomena both locally as well as in other places around the world. By using hands-on activities and real-time data investigations, the students will develop a basic understanding of how weather can be described in measurable quantities, such as temperature, wind and precipitation. The lesson plans which make up this module have been designed to allow teachers to select the ones which fit into their curriculum to allow for flexibility in implementation

  18. Wisconsin Weather Stories

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    University of Wisconsin meteorologists and folklorists along with Wisconsin teachers created this website to offer classroom materials "that integrate earth science, social studies, language arts, and math." Students can learn about severe weather and the importance of forecasting by listening to and reading people's accounts. Each lesson contains benchmarks and standards for grades four, eight, and twelve; as well as many fun activities. The website features a concise glossary and many links where teachers can discover more resources. Visitors who remember the weather discussed, such as the Ice Bowl of 1967, can find out how to submit their accounts to the website.

  19. Indigenous Weather Knowledge

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Produced by the Commonwealth Bureau of Meteorology, this Web site exhibits seasonal weather calendars created by Indigenous people thousands of years ago. The site first discusses the Aboriginal people in Australia and their methods for dealing with past climate changes. Studying the calendars, users will notice that Indigenous people dealt with climate on a local scale and recognized a varying number of seasons. For comparison, the site presents the Bureau of Meteorology's Temperature and Rainfall Graphs and climate group classification maps. Because it is still in the early stages of development, users should revisit this site to learn more about Aboriginal knowledge of weather and climate.

  20. Weather and Health

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    COMET

    2008-11-25

    This course will help meteorologists and others broaden their understanding of the impacts of weather and climate on public health, including the impacts of heat waves and cold temperatures, winter storms and thunderstorms, flooding, drought, poor air quality, tornadoes, hurricanes, wildfire, UV radiation, and others. This course is directed to broadcast meteorologists, in particular, who play a critical role in the community by helping the public to protect against weather-related health threats and by promoting good health. The course also describes the public health communication system, providing information about reliable public health services, tools, and resources.

  1. The effect of tides on dense water formation in Arctic shelf seas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. F. Postlethwaite; M. A. Morales Maqueda; V. Le Fouest; G. R. Tattersall; J. Holt; A. J. Willmott

    2010-01-01

    Ocean tides are not explicitly included in many ocean general circulation models, which will therefore omit any interactions between tides and the cryosphere. We present model simulations of the wind and buoyancy driven circulation and tides of the Barents and Kara Seas, using a 25 km × 25 km 3-D ocean circulation model coupled to a dynamic and thermodynamic sea

  2. The effect of tides on dense water formation in Arctic shelf seas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. F. Postlethwaite; M. A. Morales Maqueda; V. Le Fouest; G. R. Tattersall; J. Holt; A. J. Willmott

    2011-01-01

    Ocean tides are not explicitly included in many ocean general circulation models, which will therefore omit any interactions between tides and the cryosphere. We present model simulations of the wind and buoyancy driven circulation and tides of the Barents and Kara Seas, using a 25 km × 25 km 3-D ocean circulation model coupled to a dynamic and thermodynamic sea

  3. Powering Triton's recent geological activity by obliquity tides: Implications for Pluto geology

    E-print Network

    Nimmo, Francis

    Powering Triton's recent geological activity by obliquity tides: Implications for Pluto geology F, dynamics Tides, solid body Pluto Triton a b s t r a c t We investigate the origins of Triton's deformed by obliquity tides, which arise because of its inclination. In contrast, Pluto is unlikely to be experiencing

  4. Harmful Algae 3 (2004) 305320 Assessment of brown tide blooms, caused by Aureococcus

    E-print Network

    Caron, David

    2004-01-01

    Harmful Algae 3 (2004) 305­320 Assessment of brown tide blooms, caused by Aureococcus.D. Gastrich et al. / Harmful Algae 3 (2004) 305­320 1. Introduction Brown tide blooms, caused by the minute and Technology (DSRT) in cooperation with several partners to assess brown tide blooms in coastal waters in NJ

  5. Red-Tide Research Summarized to 1964 Including an Annotated Bibliography

    E-print Network

    535^ Red-Tide Research Summarized to 1964 Including an Annotated Bibliography By George A, Harold E. Crowther, Acting Director Red-Tide Research Summarized to 1964 Including an Annotated Historical 2 General conditions during red-tide outbreaks 3 Temperature 3 Salinity 3 Rainfall 4 Wind 4 Light

  6. Internal tides and baroclinicity in the southern Weddell Sea 1. Model description

    E-print Network

    Robertson, Robin

    Internal tides and baroclinicity in the southern Weddell Sea 1. Model description Robin Robertson mechanisms, such as internal tides, have the potential to mix these water masses and form Antarctic Bottom fields generated by the interaction of the M2 barotropic tide with topography for transects across

  7. Coastal Inundation due to Tide, Surge, Waves, and Sea Level Rise at Naval Station Norfolk

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Coastal Inundation due to Tide, Surge, Waves, and Sea Level Rise at Naval Station Norfolk Honghai elevation and storm induced inundation for combined influence of tide, surge, waves, wind, and SLR Stresses CMS-Flow Hydrodynamics Tide, Wind, Waves Coriolis, River flux Sediment Transport Advection

  8. A laboratory study of low-mode internal tide scattering by finite-amplitude topography

    E-print Network

    Dauxois, Thierry

    A laboratory study of low-mode internal tide scattering by finite-amplitude topography Thomas concerning the scattering of a low-mode internal tide by finite-amplitude Gaussian topography. Experiments produces significant reflection of the internal tide and transfer of energy from low to high modes. © 2009

  9. Multi-point tidal prediction using artificial neural network with tide-generating forces

    E-print Network

    Multi-point tidal prediction using artificial neural network with tide-generating forces Hsien Available online 23 June 2006 Abstract This paper presents a neural network model of simulating tides at multi-points considering tide-generating forces. A comparison on the root mean square and correlation

  10. The King Tide Photo Initiative is an international project which aims to

    E-print Network

    Tullos, Desiree

    The King Tide Photo Initiative is an international project which aims to document areas flooded by the most extreme winter high tides. These high water events allow us to visualize now how sea level rise. Then visit Oregon's King Tide website and pick a day and time to photograph high water levels. Website

  11. Solar Semidiurnal Tide in the Dusty Atmosphere of Mars JEFFREY M. FORBES

    E-print Network

    Forbes, Jeffrey

    Solar Semidiurnal Tide in the Dusty Atmosphere of Mars JEFFREY M. FORBES Department of Aerospace November 2005) ABSTRACT Vertical coupling due to the solar semidiurnal tide in Mars's atmosphere km. Breaking (convective instability) of the semidiurnal tide is parameterized using a linear

  12. Internal tide generation at the continental shelf modelled using a modal decomposition

    E-print Network

    Internal tide generation at the continental shelf modelled using a modal decomposition: two are required. Using this formulation, we calculate the internal tide generated by a time-periodic barotropic fluxes associated with the internal tide. For the uniformly stratified case, we study numerically how

  13. Journal of Geodynamics 41 (2006) 128132 Advances in Southern Ocean tide modeling

    E-print Network

    2006-01-01

    Journal of Geodynamics 41 (2006) 128­132 Advances in Southern Ocean tide modeling Yuchan Yia,, Koji Kingdom Accepted 30 August 2005 Abstract Tides in the polar region play a major role in the dynamics of sea ice and floating glacial ice shelves. Existing ocean tide models are much less accurate in coastal

  14. NOTES ON A COLLECTION OF TIDE-POOL FISHES FROM KADIAK ISLAND By CLOUDSLEY RUTTER,

    E-print Network

    NOTES ON A COLLECTION OF TIDE-POOL FISHES FROM KADIAK ISLAND IN ALASKA. By CLOUDSLEY RUTTER, there being no harbor. In some places the tide recedes .as much as 100 yards, in which case there are a few true tide pools. Most of the fishes, however, were obtained among the bowlders. Just west of Karluk

  15. Energetics of internal tides around the Kerguelen Plateau from modeling and altimetry

    E-print Network

    Energetics of internal tides around the Kerguelen Plateau from modeling and altimetry Claire of possible M2 internal tide generation in the Kerguelen Plateau region. Barotropic energy flux energy into baroclinic tide generation over the northern Kerguelen Plateau shelf break, consistent

  16. A Review of Internal Tide Observations by Acoustic Tomography and Altimetry Brian Dushaw

    E-print Network

    Dushaw, Brian

    A Review of Internal Tide Observations by Acoustic Tomography and Altimetry Brian Dushaw Applied@apl.washington.edu Internal-tide waves that travel great distances from their origin at ocean topographic features have been that low-mode internal tides can travel great distances. The MODE array consisted of 16 moorings

  17. Latin America Pink Tide Symposium Friday November 14th Saturday November 15th

    E-print Network

    Sibille, Etienne

    Latin America Pink Tide Symposium Friday November 14th ­ Saturday November 15th Humanities Center ­ 602 Cathedral ­ University of Pittsburgh The Pink Tide is the label used for the wave of Latin, Ecuador, Uruguay and Venezuela. The Pink Tide seems to be receding, but it may have transformed politics

  18. Observations of thermal tides in the middle atmosphere of Mars by the SPICAM instrument

    E-print Network

    Withers, Paul

    Observations of thermal tides in the middle atmosphere of Mars by the SPICAM instrument Paul density, pressure, and temperature from the Mars Express SPICAM UV spectrometer to study thermal tides in the poorly studied middle atmosphere region at 70­120 km. Here we show that nonmigrating tides cause zonal

  19. An Experimental Investigation of Internal Tide Generation by Two-Dimensional THOMAS PEACOCK AND PAULA ECHEVERRI

    E-print Network

    Balmforth, Neil

    An Experimental Investigation of Internal Tide Generation by Two-Dimensional Topography THOMAS December 2006, in final form 23 February 2007) ABSTRACT Experimental results of internal tide generation-dimensional (2D) ridges are considered to be the strongest generators of baroclinic (internal) tides because

  20. OBSERVATIONS OF THERMAL TIDES IN THE MIDDLE ATMOSPHERE OF MARS BY THE SPICAM INSTRUMENT.

    E-print Network

    Withers, Paul

    OBSERVATIONS OF THERMAL TIDES IN THE MIDDLE ATMOSPHERE OF MARS BY THE SPICAM INSTRUMENT. P. Withers, such as density, pressure and temperature, that are driven by periodic solar forcing are known as thermal tides (Chapman and Lindzen, 1970; Forbes, 1995). Thermal tides are particularly prominent on Mars due to its