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Sample records for weight bearing gait

  1. On the Modulation of Brain Activation During Simulated Weight Bearing in Supine Gait-Like Stepping.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Lukas; Marchal-Crespo, Laura; Wolf, Peter; Luft, Andreas R; Riener, Robert; Michels, Lars; Kollias, Spyros

    2016-01-01

    To date, the neurophysiological correlates of muscle activation required for weight bearing during walking are poorly understood although, a supraspinal involvement has been discussed in the literature for many years. The present study investigates the effect of simulated ground reaction forces (0, 20, and 40% of individual body weight) on brain activation in sixteen healthy participants. A magnetic resonance compatible robot was applied to render three different levels of load against the feet of the participants during active and passive gait-like stepping movements. Brain activation was analyzed by the means of voxel-wise whole brain analysis as well as by a region-of-interest analysis. A significant modulation of brain activation in sensorimotor areas by the load level could neither be demonstrated during active nor during passive stepping. These observations suggest that the regulation of muscle activation under different weight-bearing conditions during stepping occurs at the level of spinal circuitry or the brainstem rather than at the supraspinal level. PMID:26206204

  2. The effect of weight-bearing exercise and non-weight-bearing exercise on gait in rats with sciatic nerve crush injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Hwangbo, Gak; Kim, Seong-Gil

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to access the effect of weight bearing exercise (treadmill exercise) and non-weight-bearing exercise (swimming exercise) on gait in the recovery process after a sciatic nerve crush injury. [Subjects and Methods] Rats were randomly divided into a swimming group (n=3) with non-weight-bearing exercise after a sciatic nerve crush and a treadmill group (n=3) with weight bearing exercise after a sciatic nerve crush. Dartfish is a program that can analyze and interpret motion through video images. The knee lateral epicondyle, lateral malleolus, and metatarsophalangeal joint of the fifth toe were marked by black dots before recording. [Results] There were significant differences in TOK (knee angle toe off) and ICK (knee angle at initial contact) in the swimming group and in TOK, ICA (ankle angle at initial contact), and ICK in the treadmill group. In comparison between groups, there were significant differences in TOA (ankle angle in toe off) and ICA at the 7th day. [Conclusion] There was no difference between weight bearing and non-weight-bearing exercise in sciatic nerve damage, and both exercises accelerated the recovery process in this study. PMID:25995583

  3. Using gait analysis to assess weight bearing in rats with Freund?s complete adjuvant-induced monoarthritis to improve predictivity: Interfering with the cyclooxygenase and nerve growth factor pathways.

    PubMed

    ngeby Mller, Kristina; Berge, Odd-Geir; Finn, Anja; Stenfors, Carina; Svensson, Camilla I

    2015-06-01

    Lack of predictive power for drug effects has been a major criticism against animal pain models. It is therefore important to define the utility and limitations of different models. The aim of this study was to extend previous work on gait analysis as a tool to investigate pharmacological effects in monoarthritic rats, specifically to test the hypothesis that monoarthritis induced by Freund?s complete adjuvant (FCA) provides a better estimate of overall analgesic efficacy of established, and novel, clinically effective and ineffective therapeutic approaches. Male rats injected intra-articularly into one ankle joint with FCA (1.0mg/ml) were treated with the monoclonal antibody to nerve growth factor (NGF), MEDI-578, the inhibitors of tropomyosin receptor kinases A, B and C (pan-Trk) AZ6623 or AZ7092, the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) inhibitor AZD1386, or the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors naproxen, ibuprofen, valdecoxib or rofecoxib. Effects on weight bearing during locomotion were tested using video capture of print images. The apparent efficacy in this model was Trk inhibitors?anti-NGF antibody>COX inhibitors. The TRPV1 inhibitor was ineffective. Together with previous data, the results support using gait-related parameters in the monoarthritis model. FCA as induction agent seems to provide a good overall prediction of analgesic efficacy in disorders with inflammatory joint pain. PMID:25792342

  4. [Controlled weight bearing after osteosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Perren, T; Matter, P

    1993-01-01

    Patient compliance with postoperative partial weight bearing can be a difficult management problem. The problem may be intentional or unintentional. There is no objective way to assess the amount of weight placed on the lower extremity by the patient. It is our clinical suspicion that patients place more weight than is desirable on the effected limb. There are few reports in the literature on this topic. One study has confirmed our suspicion of poor patient compliance with postoperative weight bearing. Our goal is to develop a system to accurately assess weight bearing and to improve this aspect of postoperative fracture care. Through an active feedback device we hope to improve patient education and understanding. We plan to study the clinical applications of using a pressure sensitive shoe insert device. Our ultimate goal is to improve upon the present device and to study the clinical application of there use. PMID:8123330

  5. Measuring Bearing Wear Via Weight Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keba, John E.; Moore, Richard S.

    1989-01-01

    Wear in critical parts of bearings measured via amounts of weight lost during use. Technique applicable in general to bearings made of nonporous materials. Weight-loss measurements easier, faster, more precise, and less likely to damage measured parts. Weight-loss measurements performed in clean rooms and under constraint of extreme cleanliness for compatability with liquid oxygen.

  6. Effects of conventional overground gait training and a gait trainer with partial body weight support on spatiotemporal gait parameters of patients after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byoung-Sun; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Yang, Seung-Min; Lee, Won-Deok; Noh, Ji-Woong; Shin, Yong-Sub; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Young; Kim, Junghwan

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to confirm the effects of both conventional overground gait training (CGT) and a gait trainer with partial body weight support (GTBWS) on spatiotemporal gait parameters of patients with hemiparesis following chronic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty stroke patients were alternately assigned to one of two treatment groups, and both groups underwent CGT and GTBWS. [Results] The functional ambulation classification on the affected side improved significantly in the CGT and GTBWS groups. Walking speed also improved significantly in both groups. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the GTBWS in company with CGT may be, in part, an effective method of gait training for restoring gait ability in patients after a stroke. PMID:26157272

  7. Effects of conventional overground gait training and a gait trainer with partial body weight support on spatiotemporal gait parameters of patients after stroke.

    PubMed

    Park, Byoung-Sun; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Yang, Seung-Min; Lee, Won-Deok; Noh, Ji-Woong; Shin, Yong-Sub; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Young; Kim, Junghwan

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to confirm the effects of both conventional overground gait training (CGT) and a gait trainer with partial body weight support (GTBWS) on spatiotemporal gait parameters of patients with hemiparesis following chronic stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty stroke patients were alternately assigned to one of two treatment groups, and both groups underwent CGT and GTBWS. [Results] The functional ambulation classification on the affected side improved significantly in the CGT and GTBWS groups. Walking speed also improved significantly in both groups. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the GTBWS in company with CGT may be, in part, an effective method of gait training for restoring gait ability in patients after a stroke. PMID:26157272

  8. Additional weight load increases freezing of gait episodes in Parkinson's disease; an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Mensink, Senja H G; Nonnekes, Jorik; van Bon, Geert; Snijders, Anke H; Duysens, Jacques; Weerdesteyn, Vivian; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Oude Nijhuis, Lars B

    2014-05-01

    Freezing of gait is an episodic gait disorder,characterized by the inability to generate effective forward stepping movements. The pathophysiology underlying freezing of gait remains insufficiently understood, and this hampers the development of better treatment strategies.Preliminary evidence suggests that impaired force control during walking may contribute to freezing episodes, with difficulty to unload the swing leg and initiate the swing phase. Here, we used external loading to manipulate force control and to investigate its influence on freezing of gait.Twelve Parkinson's disease patients with freezing of gait performed three contrasting tasks: (1) loaded gait while wearing a belt fortified with lead weights; (2) weight supported gait using a parachute harness connected to a rigid metal cable running above the gait trajectory; and (3)normal gait. Gait tasks were used to provoke freezing episodes, including rapid 360 turns. Freezing episodes were quantified using blinded, videotaped clinical assessment. Furthermore, ground reaction forces and body kinematics were recorded. Loading significantly increased the mean number of freezing episodes per trial compared to the normal gait condition (P<0.05), but the effect of weight support was not consistent. Loading particularly increased the number of freezing episodes during rapid short steps. Step length was significantly smaller during loaded gait compared to normal gait (P<0.05), but changes in anticipatory postural adjustments were not different.Our results may point to impaired force control playing a key role in freezing of gait. Future studies should further investigate the mechanism, i.e., the contribution of deficient load feedback, and evaluate which forms of weight support might offer treatment opportunities. PMID:24658705

  9. Grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) locomotion: gaits and ground reaction forces.

    PubMed

    Shine, Catherine L; Penberthy, Skylar; Robbins, Charles T; Nelson, O Lynne; McGowan, Craig P

    2015-10-01

    Locomotion of plantigrade generalists has been relatively little studied compared with more specialised postures even though plantigrady is ancestral among quadrupeds. Bears (Ursidae) are a representative family for plantigrade carnivorans, they have the majority of the morphological characteristics identified for plantigrade species, and they have the full range of generalist behaviours. This study compared the locomotion of adult grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis Linnaeus 1758), including stride parameters, gaits and analysis of three-dimensional ground reaction forces, with that of previously studied quadrupeds. At slow to moderate speeds, grizzly bears use walks, running walks and canters. Vertical ground reaction forces demonstrated the typical M-shaped curve for walks; however, this was significantly more pronounced in the hindlimb. The rate of force development was also significantly higher for the hindlimbs than for the forelimbs at all speeds. Mediolateral forces were significantly higher than would be expected for a large erect mammal, almost to the extent of a sprawling crocodilian. There may be morphological or energetic explanations for the use of the running walk rather than the trot. The high medial forces (produced from a lateral push by the animal) could be caused by frontal plane movement of the carpus and elbow by bears. Overall, while grizzly bears share some similarities with large cursorial species, their locomotor kinetics have unique characteristics. Additional studies are needed to determine whether these characters are a feature of all bears or plantigrade species. PMID:26254319

  10. Kinematic and kinetic changes in obese gait in bariatric surgery-induced weight loss.

    PubMed

    Vartiainen, Paavo; Bragge, Timo; Lyytinen, Tarja; Hakkarainen, Marko; Karjalainen, Pasi A; Arokoski, Jari P

    2012-06-26

    This study examines the effects of a radical bariatric surgery-induced weight loss on the gait of obese subjects. We performed a three-dimensional motion analysis of lower limbs, and collected force platform data in the gait laboratory to calculate knee and hip joint moments. Subjects (n=13) performed walking trials in the laboratory before and 8.8 months (SD 4.2) after the surgical procedure at two gait speeds (1.2m/s and 1.5m/s). The average weight loss was 26.7kg (SD 9.2kg), corresponding to 21.5% (SD 6.8%) of the initial weight. We observed a decrease in step width at both gait speeds, but no changes in relative double support or swing time or stride length. A significant decrease was noted in the absolute values of peak knee abductor, peak knee flexor and peak hip extensor moments. However, the moment values normalized by the body weight and height remained unchanged in most cases. Thus, we conclude that weight loss reduces hip and knee joint moments in proportion to the amount of weight lost. PMID:22633006

  11. Neuromuscular Fatigue and Tibiofemoral Joint Biomechanics When Transitioning From NonWeight Bearing to Weight Bearing

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Randy J.; Kim, Hyunsoo; Shultz, Sandra J.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Fatigue is suggested to be a risk factor for anterior cruciate ligament injury. Fatiguing exercise can affect neuromuscular control and laxity of the knee joint, which may render the knee less able to resist externally applied loads. Few authors have examined the effects of fatiguing exercise on knee biomechanics during the in vivo transition of the knee from nonweight bearing to weight bearing, the time when anterior cruciate ligament injury likely occurs. Objective: To investigate the effect of fatiguing exercise on tibiofemoral joint biomechanics during the transition from nonweight bearing to early weight bearing. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten participants (5 men and 5 women; age = 25.3 4.0 years) with no previous history of knee-ligament injury to the dominant leg. Intervention(s): Participants were tested before (preexercise) and after (postexercise) a protocol consisting of repeated leg presses (15 repetitions from 1040 of knee flexion, 10 seconds' rest) against a 60% body-weight load until they were unable to complete a full bout of repetitions. Main Outcome Measure(s): Electromagnetic sensors measured anterior tibial translation and knee-flexion excursion during the application of a 40% body-weight axial compressive load to the bottom of the foot, simulating weight acceptance. A force transducer recorded axial compressive force. Results: The axial compressive force (351.8 44.3 N versus 374.0 47.9 N; P = .018), knee-flexion excursion (8.0 4.0 versus 10.2 3.7; P = .046), and anterior tibial translation (6.7 1.7 mm versus 8.2 1.9 mm; P < .001) increased from preexercise to postexercise. No significant correlations were noted. Conclusions: Neuromuscular fatigue may impair initial knee-joint stabilization during weight acceptance, leading to greater accessory motion at the knee and the potential for greater anterior cruciate ligament loading. PMID:25375932

  12. A Gait Generation for an Unlocked Joint Failure of the Quadruped Robot with Balance Weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, C. H.; Min, B. C.; Kim, D. H.

    Assurance of a stability margin for a stabilized gait is the most important issue for the quadruped robot. Although various studies for dynamic stability of the quadruped robot have been studied, problems in which one of the legs has an unlocked joint failure havent been relatively studied so far. In this paper, assurance of stability margin for the unlocked joint failure of the quadruped robot is suggested by using gait stabilization and a control method of the moment of inertia. Then, efficiency of BW (balance weight) will be experimentally verified by comparing the two types of robot; one is equipped with the BW, the other is not equipped with BW.

  13. Immediate weight bearing of comminuted supracondylar femur fractures using locked plate fixation.

    PubMed

    Granata, Jaymes D; Litsky, Alan S; Lustenberger, David P; Probe, Robert A; Ellis, Thomas J

    2012-08-01

    Comminuted supracondylar femur fractures (AO-OTA 33A3) are commonly treated with locked plates. Weight bearing is generally restricted for 6 to 12 weeks until radiologic evidence exists of sufficient callous to support weight bearing. Recent clinical studies have reported high nonunion rates with distal femur locked plates. In an attempt to induce beneficial motion across the fracture site, some studies have recommended earlier weight bearing. The purpose of the current study was to determine the biomechanical feasibility of an immediate weight-bearing rehabilitation protocol to encourage healing of distal femur fractures treated with lateral locked plate fixation.Sixteen fresh-frozen cadaveric femora were used for this study. A 2.5-cm supracondylar gap osteotomy was made. Ten-hole, 4.5-mm distal femur locking plates were used with a standardized screw configuration that maximized the working length. The specimens were placed in a servohydraulic testing machine and axially loaded (unidirectional) at 1 Hz for up to 200,000 cycles. Failure was defined as 1 cm of deformation of the construct. The staircase method was used to determine the fatigue limit of the construct. The fatigue limit was calculated to be 1329106 N. No specimen failed through the non-locking diaphyseal screws. Plastic deformation, when present, occurred at the metaphyseal flare of the plate. The fatigue limit of the locked plate constructs equaled 1.9 times body weight for an average 70-kg patient over a simulated 10-week postoperative course. Given that distal femoral loads during gait have been estimated to be more than 2 times body weight, the data from this study do not support immediate full weight bearing. PMID:22868607

  14. The Combined Effects of Body Weight Support and Gait Speed on Gait Related Muscle Activity: A Comparison between Walking in the Lokomat Exoskeleton and Regular Treadmill Walking

    PubMed Central

    Van Kammen, Klaske; Boonstra, Annemarijke; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen; den Otter, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Background For the development of specialized training protocols for robot assisted gait training, it is important to understand how the use of exoskeletons alters locomotor task demands, and how the nature and magnitude of these changes depend on training parameters. Therefore, the present study assessed the combined effects of gait speed and body weight support (BWS) on muscle activity, and compared these between treadmill walking and walking in the Lokomat exoskeleton. Methods Ten healthy participants walked on a treadmill and in the Lokomat, with varying levels of BWS (0% and 50% of the participants’ body weight) and gait speed (0.8, 1.8, and 2.8 km/h), while temporal step characteristics and muscle activity from Erector Spinae, Gluteus Medius, Vastus Lateralis, Biceps Femoris, Gastrocnemius Medialis, and Tibialis Anterior muscles were recorded. Results The temporal structure of the stepping pattern was altered when participants walked in the Lokomat or when BWS was provided (i.e. the relative duration of the double support phase was reduced, and the single support phase prolonged), but these differences normalized as gait speed increased. Alternations in muscle activity were characterized by complex interactions between walking conditions and training parameters: Differences between treadmill walking and walking in the exoskeleton were most prominent at low gait speeds, and speed effects were attenuated when BWS was provided. Conclusion Walking in the Lokomat exoskeleton without movement guidance alters the temporal step regulation and the neuromuscular control of walking, although the nature and magnitude of these effects depend on complex interactions with gait speed and BWS. If normative neuromuscular control of gait is targeted during training, it is recommended that very low speeds and high levels of BWS should be avoided when possible. PMID:25226302

  15. Ankle muscle coactivation during gait is decreased immediately after anterior weight shift practice in adults after stroke.

    PubMed

    Kitatani, Ryosuke; Ohata, Koji; Sakuma, Kaoru; Aga, Yumi; Yamakami, Natsuki; Hashiguchi, Yu; Yamada, Shigehito

    2016-03-01

    Increased ankle muscle coactivation during gait has frequently been observed as an adaptation strategy to compensate for postural instability in adults after stroke. However, it remains unclear whether the muscle coactivation pattern increases or decreases after balance training. The aim of this study was to investigate the immediate effects of balance practice on ankle muscle coactivation during gait in adults after stroke. Standing balance practice performed to shift as much weight anteriorly as possible in 24 participants after stroke. The forward movement distance of the center of pressure (COP) during anterior weight shifting, gait speed, and ankle muscle activities during 10-m walking tests were measured immediately before and after balance practice. Forward movement of the COP during anterior weight shifting and gait speed significantly increased after balance practice. On the paretic side, tibialis anterior muscle activity significantly decreased during the single support and second double support phases, and the coactivation index at the ankle joint during the first double support and single support phases significantly decreased after balance practice. However, there were no significant relationships between the changes in gait speed, forward movement of the COP during anterior weight shifting, and ankle muscle coactivation during the stance phase. These results suggested that ankle muscle coactivation on the paretic side during the stance phase was decreased immediately after short-term anterior weight shift practice, which was not associated with improved gait speed or forward movement of the COP during anterior weight shifting in adults after stroke. PMID:26979880

  16. Improvement of gait ability with a short-term intensive gait rehabilitation program using body weight support treadmill training in community dwelling chronic poststroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    Takao, Toshifumi; Tanaka, Naoki; Iizuka, Noboru; Saitou, Hideyuki; Tamaoka, Akira; Yanagi, Hisako

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Most previous studies have shown that body weight support treadmill training (BWSTT) can improve gait speed poststroke patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate effectiveness of a short-term intensive program using BWSTT among community dwelling poststroke survivors. [Subjects] Eighteen subjects participated in this study. The treatment group was composed of 10 subjects (2 women; 8 men; mean age, 59.1 12.5?years; time since stroke onset, 35.3 33.2 months), whereas the control group was made up of 8 subjects (3 women; 5 men; mean age, 59.8 6.3?years; time since stroke onset, 39.3 27.3 months). [Methods] The treatment group received BWSTT 3 times a week for 4 weeks (a total of 12 times), with each session lasting 20 minutes. The main outcome measures were maximum gait speed on a flat floor, cadence, and step length. [Results] No differences were observed in the baseline clinical data between the 2 groups. The gait speed in the treatment group was significantly improved compared with that in the control by 2-way ANOVA, while the other parameters showed no significant interaction. [Conclusion] These results suggested that short-term intensive gait rehabilitation using BWSTT was useful for improving gait ability among community dwelling poststroke subjects. PMID:25642063

  17. Foot Loading Characteristics of Different Graduations of Partial Weight Bearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gusinde, Johannes; Pauser, Johannes; Swoboda, Bernd; Gelse, Kolja; Carl, Hans-Dieter

    2011-01-01

    Limited weight bearing of the lower extremity is a commonly applied procedure in orthopaedic rehabilitation after reconstructive forefoot surgery, trauma surgery and joint replacement. The most frequent limitations are given as percentage of body weight (BW) and represent 10 or 50% BW. The extent of foot loading under these graduations of partial

  18. Foot Loading Characteristics of Different Graduations of Partial Weight Bearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gusinde, Johannes; Pauser, Johannes; Swoboda, Bernd; Gelse, Kolja; Carl, Hans-Dieter

    2011-01-01

    Limited weight bearing of the lower extremity is a commonly applied procedure in orthopaedic rehabilitation after reconstructive forefoot surgery, trauma surgery and joint replacement. The most frequent limitations are given as percentage of body weight (BW) and represent 10 or 50% BW. The extent of foot loading under these graduations of partial…

  19. Design of a mechanical system in gait rehabilitation with progressive addition of weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braidot, Ariel A. A.; Aleman, Guillermo L.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we designed and developed a mechanical device for gait rehabilitation based on the application of "partial body weight reduction therapy". An evaluation of the characteristics of devices based on this therapy currently available on the market was carried out obtaining information of the different mechanisms used in it. The device was designed to adapt to different height and weight of patients and to be used with additional equipment in gait rehabilitation, for example, treadmills, elliptical trainers and vertical scalers. It was envisaged to be used by patients with asymmetry in the lower extremities capabilities. We developed a stable structure in steel ASTM A36 which does not depend on the building conditions of the installation site. RamAdvanse software was used to calculate structural stability. A winch with automatic brake mechanism was used to raise/lower the patient, who was tied to a comfortable harness which provided safety to the patient and therapist. It was possible to quantify precisely, using counterweights, the weight borne by the patient during therapy. We obtained a small-sized and ergonomic low-cost prototype, with similar features to those currently considered cutting-edge devices.

  20. Effects of Functional Limb Overloading on Symmetrical Weight Bearing, Walking Speed, Perceived Mobility, and Community Participation among Patients with Chronic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Alabdulwahab, Sami S; Ahmad, Fuzail; Singh, Harpreet

    2015-01-01

    Background. Stroke is a leading cause for long-term disability that often compromises the sensorimotor and gait function accompanied by spasticity. Gait abnormalities persist through the chronic stages of the condition and only a small percentage of these persons are able to walk functionally in the community. Material and Method. Patients with chronic stroke were recruited from outpatient rehabilitation unit at Department of Neurology & Neurosurgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, having a history of first stroke at least six months before recruitment, with unilateral motor deficits affecting gait. The patients were randomly assigned to either the functional limb overloading (FLO) or Limb Overloading Resistance Training (LORT) group and provided four weeks of training. Result. We found that there was an improvement in gait performance, weight bearing on affected limb, and perceived mobility and community participation. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that has evaluated the effects of functional limb overloading training on symmetric weight bearing, walking ability, and perceived mobility and participation in chronic hemiplegic population. The study demonstrated a beneficial effect of training on all the outcomes, suggesting that the functional limb overloading training can be a useful tool in the management of gait problems in chronic stroke patients. PMID:26600952

  1. Effects of Functional Limb Overloading on Symmetrical Weight Bearing, Walking Speed, Perceived Mobility, and Community Participation among Patients with Chronic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Alabdulwahab, Sami S.; Ahmad, Fuzail; Singh, Harpreet

    2015-01-01

    Background. Stroke is a leading cause for long-term disability that often compromises the sensorimotor and gait function accompanied by spasticity. Gait abnormalities persist through the chronic stages of the condition and only a small percentage of these persons are able to walk functionally in the community. Material and Method. Patients with chronic stroke were recruited from outpatient rehabilitation unit at Department of Neurology & Neurosurgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, having a history of first stroke at least six months before recruitment, with unilateral motor deficits affecting gait. The patients were randomly assigned to either the functional limb overloading (FLO) or Limb Overloading Resistance Training (LORT) group and provided four weeks of training. Result. We found that there was an improvement in gait performance, weight bearing on affected limb, and perceived mobility and community participation. Conclusion. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that has evaluated the effects of functional limb overloading training on symmetric weight bearing, walking ability, and perceived mobility and participation in chronic hemiplegic population. The study demonstrated a beneficial effect of training on all the outcomes, suggesting that the functional limb overloading training can be a useful tool in the management of gait problems in chronic stroke patients. PMID:26600952

  2. Weights and hematology of wild black bears during hibernation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DelGiudice, Glenn D.; Rogers, Lynn L.; Allen, Arthur W.; Seal, U.S.

    1991-01-01

    We compared weights and hematological profiles of adult (greater than 3-yr-old) female black bears (Ursus americanus) during hibernation (after 8 January). We handled 28 bears one to four times (total of 47) over 4 yr of varying mast and berry production. Mean weight of lactating bears was greater (P less than 0.0001) than that of non-lactating females. White blood cells (P less than 0.05) and mean corpuscular volume (P = 0.005) also differed between lactating and non-lactating bears. Hemoglobin (P = 0.006) and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (P = 0.02) varied among years; values were lowest during 1975, following decreased precipitation and the occurrence of a second year of mast and berry crop shortages in a three-year period. Significant (P less than 0.05) interaction between reproductive status (lactating versus non-lactating) and study year for hemoglobin, red blood cells, and packed cell volume, and increased mean corpuscular volume, suggested a greater nutritional challenge for lactating females compared to non-lactating females during the 1975 denning season. Our data suggest that hematological characteristics of denning bears may be more sensitive than weights as indicators of annual changes in nutritional status; however, other influential factors, in addition to mast and berry crop production, remain to be examined.

  3. Effects of backpack weight on posture, gait patterns and ground reaction forces of male children with obesity during stair descent.

    PubMed

    Song, Qipeng; Yu, Bing; Zhang, Cui; Sun, Wei; Mao, Dewei

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of backpack weight on posture, gait pattern, and ground reaction forces for children with obesity in an attempt to define a safe backpack weight limit for them. A total of 16 obese (11.19 0.66 years of age) and 21 normal body weight (11.13 0.69 years of age) schoolboys were recruited. Two force plates and two video cameras were used. Multivariate analysis of variance with repeated measures was employed. Obese children showed increased trunk and head forward inclination angle, gait cycle duration and stance phase, decreased swing phase, and increased ground reaction force in the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior directions when compared with male children with a normal body weight. The changes were observed even with an empty backpack in comparison with normal body weight children and a 15% increase in backpack weight led to further instability and damage on their already strained bodies. PMID:24650337

  4. The evolution of progressive postoperative weight bearing after autologous chondrocyte implantation in the tibiofemoral joint.

    PubMed

    Ebert, Jay R; Edwards, Peter K

    2014-08-01

    Autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) has demonstrated good clinical success in the repair of articular cartilage defects in the knee. Postoperative rehabilitation after ACI is considered critical in returning the patient to an optimal level of function by attempting to create the appropriate mechanical environment for cartilage regrowth, and it involves a progressive program that emphasizes full motion, progressive partial weight bearing (PWB), and controlled exercises. While evidence-based research is clearly lacking in all components of ACI rehabilitation, one important element in this treatment algorithm that has been subjected to some early scientific study is the gradual progression of the patient back to full weight-bearing (WB) gait after surgery. With the continual advancement of ACI surgical techniques, along with clinical experience and improved knowledge of histology and of the maturation process of chondrocytes, proposed postoperative WB protocols have evolved to better reflect the nature of the specific ACI surgery. The purpose of this article is to present the varied PWB programs that have been practiced alongside the evolving ACI surgical technique, the experimental basis for such protocols, the issues pertinent to the accurate prescription of WB, and future directions for developing such methods to best return patients to an optimal level of function after ACI. PMID:24306967

  5. Determinants of bone density among athletes engaged in weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Block, Jon E.; Friedlander, Anne L.; Brooks, George A.; Steiger, Peter; Stubbs, Harrison A.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of weight bearing activity on the bone density was investigated in athletes by comparing the measures of bone density of athletes engaged in weight-training programs with those of polo players and nonexercising subjects. All subjects had measurements of spinal trabecular and integral bone density by quantitative tomography, as well as determinations of hip bone density by dual photon absorptiometry. Results confirmed previous findings by Block et al. (1987) of significantly greater bone density among highly trained athletes compared with nonexercising subjects of similar age. Results also indicated that athletes engaged in non-weight-bearing forms of rigorous exercise had greater levels of bone density. However, as the participants in this study were exceptional athletes, engaged in a strenuous sport with both aerobic and heavy resistance components, a confirmation of these data is needed, using larger samples of individuals.

  6. Eccentric exercise training as a countermeasure to non-weight-bearing soleus muscle atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Christopher R.; Ryan, Mirelle J.; Booth, Frank W.

    1992-01-01

    This investigation tested whether eccentric resistance training could prevent soleus muscle atrophy during non-weight bearing. Adult female rats were randomly assigned to either weight bearing +/- intramuscular electrodes or non-weight bearing +/- intramuscular electrodes groups. Electrically stimulated maximal eccentric contractions were performed on anesthetized animals at 48-h intervals during the 10-day experiment. Non-weight bearing significantly reduced soleus muscle wet weight (28-31 percent) and noncollagenous protein content (30-31 percent) compared with controls. Eccentric exercise training during non-weight bearing attenuated but did not prevent the loss of soleus muscle wet weight and noncollagenous protein by 77 and 44 percent, respectively. The potential of eccentric exercise training as an effective and highly efficient counter-measure to non-weight-bearing atrophy is demonstrated in the 44 percent attenuation of soleus muscle noncollagenous protein loss by eccentric exercise during only 0.035 percent of the total non-weight-bearing time period.

  7. Pediatric Obesity and Perceived Exertion: Difference Between Weight-Bearing and Non-Weight-Bearing Exercises Performed at Different Intensities.

    PubMed

    Thivel, D; Isacco, L; O'Malley, G; Duché, P

    2016-03-01

    Excess body weight composes an important limitation to exercise in obese youth. The aim of this study was to compare the perceived exertion of obese adolescents between weight-bearing (WB; running) and non-weight-Bearing (NWB; cycling) exercises performed at moderate (55%VO2max) and high (75%VO2max) intensities. Twenty-four obese adolescents were recruited. After assessment of their body composition and physical capacities, they had to complete four isoenergetic exercise sessions: (1) a cycling session performed at 55% of their maximal capacities (NWB-55%); (2) a cycling session set at 75% (NWB-75%); (3) a running session at 55% (WB-55%); and (4) a running session at 75% (WB-75%). Perceived exertion was assessed using a visual scale at regular interval. While no significant difference between WB and NWB modalities was observed, the adolescents expressed a significantly lower rate of perceived exertion (RPE) during exercises at 55%VO2max (P < 0.0001). An intensity × modality interaction revealed that RPE was lower at 75% VO2max during NWB exercises (P < 0.05). While obese adolescents expressed lower RPE during exercise at moderate intensity whatever its modality, low level of perceived exertion has been observed during high-intensity exercises and especially during NWB. High-intensity exercise appears well tolerated in adolescents when their body weight is supported. PMID:26090822

  8. Changes in skeletal muscle gene expression consequent to altered weight bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.; Kirby, C. R.

    1992-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a dynamic organ that adapts to alterations in weight bearing. This brief review examines changes in muscle gene expression resulting from the removal of weight bearing by hindlimb suspension and from increased weight bearing due to eccentric exercise. Acute (less than or equal to 2 days) non-weight bearing of adult rat soleus muscle alters only the translational control of muscle gene expression, while chronic (greater than or equal to 7 days) removal of weight bearing appears to influence pretranslational, translational, and posttranslational mechanisms of control. Acute and chronic eccentric exercise are associated with alterations of translational and posttranslational control, while chronic eccentric training also alters the pretranslational control of muscle gene expression. Thus alterations in weight bearing influence multiple sites of gene regulation.

  9. Syme's amputation. Follow-up study of weight-bearing in sixty-eight patients.

    PubMed

    Hornby, R; Harris, R

    1975-04-01

    Sixty-eight patients with Syme amputations resulting from industrial injuries were reviewed. The amount of end-weight-bearing was measured with a capacitance transducer. The majority of patients required fitting with a prosthesis designed to relieve end-weight-bearing. The old-fashioned prosthesis with a leather corset was the most effective in achieving reduction of end-weight-bearing. PMID:1123389

  10. Weight-Bearing Exercise and Foot Health in Native Americans

    PubMed Central

    Cuaderes, Elena; DeShea, Lise; Lamb, W. Lyndon

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes contributes to sensory peripheral neuropathy, which has been linked to lower limb abnormalities that raise the risk for foot ulcers and amputations. Because amputations are a reason for pain and hospitalization in those with diabetes, it is of critical importance to gain insight about prevention of ulcer development in this population. Although the American Diabetes Association (ADA) now recommends that individuals with neuropathy can engage in moderate-intensity weight-bearing activity (WBA), they must wear appropriate footwear and inspect their feet daily. The physical forces and inflammatory processes from WBA may contribute to plantar characteristics that lead to ulcers. The purpose of this study was to compare neuropathic status and foot characteristics in Native Americans according to WBA classification. The t tests for unequal sample sizes found that exercisers had more difficulty sensing baseline temperature than nonexercisers, except at the right foot (all p values < .05). By dividing groups into no/low risk and high risk for ulcer, a majority showed no/low risk according to touch and vibration sense. Exercisers demonstrated higher surface skin temperature gradients at the first metatarsal head, a plantar site where wounds tend to form. The more consistently exercisers performed, the higher the plan-tar pressures were at the right second (r = .24, p = .02) and third metatarsal heads (r = .26, p = .01). Findings from this investigation do not refute current ADA recommendations and further intervention studies are needed that are longitudinal and measures WBA more accurately. PMID:26294899

  11. Neonatal Biomarkers of Inflammation: Correlates of Early Neurodevelopment and Gait in Very-Low-Birth-Weight Preterm Children.

    PubMed

    Rose, Jessica; Vassar, Rachel; Cahill-Rowley, Katelyn; Hintz, Susan R; Stevenson, David K

    2016-01-01

    Objective?Neonatal biomarkers of inflammation were examined in relation to early neurodevelopment and gait in very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) preterm children. We hypothesized that preterm infants exposed to higher levels of neonatal inflammation would demonstrate lower scores on Bayley Scales of Infant Toddler Development, 3rd ed. (BSID-III) and slower gait velocity at 18 to 22 months adjusted age. Study Design?A total of 102 VLBW preterm infants (birthweight [BW]???1,500?g, gestational age [GA]???32 weeks) admitted to neonatal intensive care unit [NICU] were recruited. Neonatal risk factors examined were GA at birth, BW, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, necrotizing enterocolitis, retinopathy of prematurity, sepsis, and serum C-reactive protein (CRP), albumin, and total bilirubin over first 2 postnatal weeks. At 18 to 22 months, neurodevelopment was assessed with BSID-III and gait was assessed with an instrumented mat. Results?Children with neonatal CRP???0.20 mg/dL (n?=?52) versus < 0.20 mg/dL (n?=?37) had significantly lower BSID-III composite cognitive (92.0??13.1 vs. 100.1??9.6, p?=?0.002), language (83.9??16.0 vs. 95.8??14.2, p?gait velocity (84.9??19.0 vs. 98.0??22.4 cm/s, p?=?0.004). Higher neonatal CRP correlated with lower cognitive (rho?=??-?0.327, p?=?0.002), language (rho?=??-?0.285, p?=?0.007), and motor scores (rho?=??-?0.257, p?=?0.015), and slower gait (rho?=??-?0.298, p?=?0.008). Multivariate analysis demonstrated neonatal CRP ? 0.20 mg/dL significantly predicted BSID-III cognitive (adjusted R(2)?=?0.104, p?=?0.008), language (adjusted R(2)?=?0.124, p?=?0.001), and motor scores (adjusted R(2)?=?0.122, p?=?0.004). Conclusions?Associations between low-level neonatal inflammation and neurodevelopment suggest early biomarkers that may inform neuroprotective treatment for preterm children. PMID:26212060

  12. Effect of a textured insole on balance and gait symmetry.

    PubMed

    Aruin, Alexander S; Kanekar, Neeta

    2013-11-01

    Asymmetry of standing balance and gait is common in individuals with neurological disorders, and achieving symmetrical stance and gait is an important goal of rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a novel discomfort-induced approach (that is based on using a single textured insole) on the alteration in the symmetry of gait and balance. Eleven healthy subjects (6 females and 5 males, mean age of 28.0 ± 4.1 years) were tested using the Computerized Dynamic Posturography and GaitRite systems when standing or walking while wearing standard footwear with the textured insole positioned either in the left or in the right shoe, and without the insole. Significant immediate effect of the textured insole was seen in the outcome measures of static (weight bearing) and dynamic (weight symmetry index, strength symmetry) balance tests (p < 0.05) as well as in gait symmetry (single support and swing phases) (p < 0.05). The results of the study indicate that a textured insole can significantly modify the symmetry of stance and gait in healthy individuals. Pilot data from individuals with stroke also showed a reduction in the asymmetry of gait when walking with the single textured insole in the shoe on the unaffected side. This outcome provides support for future studies on the efficacy of the textured insole in minimizing asymmetry of gait and posture in individuals in need. PMID:23979014

  13. Effects of Weight-Bearing Biofeedback Training on Functional Movement Patterns Following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Cory L.; Bade, Michael J.; Davidson, Bradley S.; Dayton, Michael R.; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Randomized controlled trial. OBJECTIVES Examine the effects of weight-bearing (WB) biofeedback training on WB symmetry and functional joint moments following unilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA). BACKGROUND Individuals post unilateral TKA place more weight on the non-surgical limb compared to the surgical limb during function. It is unknown if targeted intervention can improve surgical limb use and resolve altered movement patterns. METHODS Twenty-six patients were randomized to 2 groups: RELOAD or CONTROL. The RELOAD group had standard of care rehabilitation augmented with WB biofeedback training and the CONTROL group had dose-matched standard of care. Lower limb weight-bearing ratios (WBRs) were measured preoperatively and 6 and 26 weeks after TKA during a Five Times Sit-to-Stand Test (FTSST) and walking. Secondary outcomes were FTSST time, walking speed, and lower limb joint moments during the FTSST and walking. RESULTS No between-group differences were found in WBR. FTSST time improved in the RELOAD group compared to the CONTROL group at 6 (P=.021) and 26 weeks (P=.021) and there was a tendency for improved walking speed in the RELOAD group at 26 weeks (P=.068). There were no between-group differences in knee extension moment during the FTSST. Surgical-limb knee extension moments during walking increased from baseline to 26 weeks in the RELOAD group and decreased in the CONTROL group (P=.008). CONCLUSION WB biofeedback training had no effect on functional WB symmetry or knee extension moments during the FTSST. However, the biofeedback training resulted in increases of knee extension moments during gait and improved FTSST times. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE Therapy, level 2b. PMID:26207975

  14. Gait characteristics of children with cerebral palsy as they walk with body weight unloading on a treadmill and over the ground.

    PubMed

    Celestino, Melissa L; Gama, Gabriela L; Barela, Ana M F

    2014-12-01

    Body weight support (BWS) has become a typical strategy for gait training, in special with children with cerebral palsy (CP). Although several findings have been reported in the literature, it remains uncertain how different types of surfaces and gradual amount of BWS can facilitate the mobility of children with CP. The aim of this study was to investigate gait kinematic parameters of children with CP by manipulating BWS and two different types of ground surfaces. Ten children (7.7 2.1 years old) diagnosed with spastic CP and GMFCS classification between levels II and IV were asked to walk on a treadmill and over the ground. In both conditions, BWS was manipulated to minimize gravitational effects and spatial-temporal gait parameters and lower limb joints were analyzed. The results revealed that the type of ground surface causes greater impact on the gait pattern of children with CP as compared to body weight unloading. This finding may provide new insights into the behavioral heterogeneity of children with CP, and offers critical information to be considered on interventional programs specifically designed to improve mobility on this population. PMID:25244695

  15. The Effect of Body Weight Support Treadmill Training on Gait Recovery, Proximal Lower Limb Motor Pattern, and Balance in Patients with Subacute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yu-Rong; Lo, Wai Leung; Lin, Qiang; Li, Le; Xiao, Xiang; Raghavan, Preeti; Huang, Dong-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Gait performance is an indicator of mobility impairment after stroke. This study evaluated changes in balance, lower extremity motor function, and spatiotemporal gait parameters after receiving body weight supported treadmill training (BWSTT) and conventional overground walking training (CT) in patients with subacute stroke using 3D motion analysis. Setting. Inpatient department of rehabilitation medicine at a university-affiliated hospital. Participants. 24 subjects with unilateral hemiplegia in the subacute stage were randomized to the BWSTT (n = 12) and CT (n = 12) groups. Parameters were compared between the two groups. Data from twelve age matched healthy subjects were recorded as reference. Interventions. Patients received gait training with BWSTT or CT for an average of 30 minutes/day, 5 days/week, for 3 weeks. Main Outcome Measures. Balance was measured by the Brunel balance assessment. Lower extremity motor function was evaluated by the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale. Kinematic data were collected and analyzed using a gait capture system before and after the interventions. Results. Both groups improved on balance and lower extremity motor function measures (P < 0.05), with no significant difference between the two groups after intervention. However, kinematic data were significantly improved (P < 0.05) after BWSTT but not after CT. Maximum hip extension and flexion angles were significantly improved (P < 0.05) for the BWSTT group during the stance and swing phases compared to baseline. Conclusion. In subacute patients with stroke, BWSTT can lead to improved gait quality when compared with conventional gait training. Both methods can improve balance and motor function. PMID:26649295

  16. A theoretical model for fault diagnosis of localized bearing defects under non-weight-dominant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Q. K.; Chu, F. L.

    2015-07-01

    Fault diagnosis of localized bearing defects under non-weight-dominant conditions is studied in this paper. A theoretical model with eight degrees of freedom is established, considering two transverse vibrations of the rotor and bearing raceway and one high-frequency resonant degree of freedom. Both the Hertzian contact between rolling elements and raceways, bearing clearance, unbalance force and self-weight of rotor are taken into account in the model. The localized defects in both inner and outer raceways are modeled as half sinusoidal waves. Then, the theoretical model is solved numerically and the vibrational responses are obtained. Through envelope analysis, the fault characteristic frequencies of inner/outer raceway defects for various conditions, including the weight-dominant condition and non-weight-dominant condition, are presented and compared with each other.

  17. When Should Open Reduction and Internal Fixation Ankle Fractures Begin Weight Bearing? A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Smith, Toby O; Davies, Leigh

    2008-02-01

    The objective of this paper was to review the literature to assess when open reduction and internal fixation ankle fractures should commence weight bearing for the best outcome. An electronic search was undertaken of the databases AMED, Cinahl, Embase, Medline (via Ovid), Pedro and Pubmed, from their inception to November 2005. References lists were scrutinised and a hand search was also performed. We included all English language, human subject, controlled clinical trials, comparing the effects of early against later weight bearing following open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures. Two reviewers independently assessed the methodological quality of the literature using the PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database) scoring system. Five papers comprising of 366 ankle fractures were reviewed. Overall, there was no significant difference between commencing early, compared to later weight bearing in subjects following open reduction and internal fixation, when evaluated against function, pain, range of movement, radiological assessment, complications, and return to work. The evidence reviewed was generally poor, with numerous methodological design limitations. The literature suggested that were was little difference between encouraging early or delayed weight bearing after open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures. Neither early nor later weight bearing significantly improves or jeopardises outcomes. However, due to the plethora of methodological limitations and limited evidence, it is not possible to reference this conclusion with conviction. Further large, well-designed randomized controlled trials are required to evaluate this area. PMID:26815494

  18. Improvements in gait speed and weight shift of persons with traumatic brain injury and vestibular dysfunction using a virtual reality computer-assisted rehabilitation environment.

    PubMed

    Sessoms, Pinata H; Gottshall, Kim R; Collins, John-David; Markham, Amanda E; Service, Kathrine A; Reini, Seth A

    2015-03-01

    Many people sustaining a traumatic brain injury experience vestibular pathology requiring physical therapy for treatment. This study measured improvements in gait speed and weight shift for subjects receiving vestibular physical therapy using a Computer-Assisted Rehabilitation Environment (CAREN). A 6-session CAREN, 6-session traditional vestibular therapy group was compared with a 12-session CAREN only (0 traditional sessions) therapy group. These two groups were compared to each other and with data from healthy controls performing similar tasks on the CAREN. Those participating in 12 CAREN sessions had greater improvements in gait speed (p=0.014) and weight shift scores (p<0.001) and demonstrated similar values achieved by a healthy control population. PMID:25747645

  19. Seismic velocities for hydrate-bearing sediments using weighted equation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Hutchinson, D.R.; Collett, T.S.; Dillon, William P.

    1996-01-01

    A weighted equation based on the three-phase time-average and Wood equations is applied to derive a relationship between the compressional wave (P wave) velocity and the amount of hydrates filling the pore space. The proposed theory predicts accurate P wave velocities of marine sediments in the porosity range of 40-80% and provides a practical means of estimating the amount of in situ hydrate using seismic velocity. The shear (S) wave velocity is derived under the assumption that the P to S wave velocity ratio of the hydrated sediments is proportional to the weighted average of the P to S wave velocity ratios of the constituent components of the sediment. In the case that all constituent components are known, a weighted equation using multiphase time-average and Wood equations is possible. However, this study showed that a three-phase equation with modified matrix velocity, compensated for the clay content, is sufficient to accurately predict the compressional wave velocities for the marine sediments. This theory was applied to the laboratory measurements of the P and S wave velocities in permafrost samples to infer the amount of ice in the unconsolidated sediment. The results are comparable to the results obtained by repeatedly applying the two-phase wave scattering theory. The theory predicts that the Poisson's ratio of the hydrated sediments decreases as the hydrate concentration increases and the porosity decreases. In consequence, the amplitude versus offset (AVO) data for the bottom-simulating reflections may reveal positive, negative, or no AVO anomalies depending on the concentration of hydrates in the sediments.

  20. Effects of robot-assisted gait training on the balance and gait of chronic stroke patients: focus on dependent ambulators

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Duk Youn; Park, Si-Woon; Lee, Min Jin; Park, Dae Sung; Kim, Eun Joo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to confirm the effect of robot-assisted gait training on the balance and gait ability of stroke patients who were dependent ambulators. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty stroke patients participated in this study. The participants were allocated to either group 1, which received robot-assisted gait training for 4 weeks followed by conventional physical therapy for 4 weeks, or group 2, which received the same treatments in the reverse order. Robot-assisted gait training was conducted for 30?min, 3 times a week for 4 weeks. The Berg Balance Scale, Modified Functional Reach Test, Functional Ambulation Category, Modified Ashworth Scale, Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Motricity Index, and Modified Barthel Index were assessed before and after treatment. To confirm the characteristics of patients who showed a significant increase in Berg Balance Scale after robot-assisted gait training as compared with physical therapy, subgroup analysis was conducted. [Results] Only lateral reaching and the Functional Ambulation Category were significantly increased following robot-assisted gait training. Subscale analyses identified 3 patient subgroups that responded well to robot-assisted gait training: a subgroup with hemiplegia, a subgroup in which the guidance force needed to be decreased to needed to be decreased to ?45%, and a subgroup in which weight bearing was decreased to ?21%. [Conclusion] The present study showed that robot-assisted gait training is not only effective in improving balance and gait performance but also improves trunk balance and motor skills required by high-severity stroke patients to perform activities daily living. Moreover, subscale analyses identified subgroups that responded well to robot-assisted gait training. PMID:26644642

  1. Effects of robot-assisted gait training on the balance and gait of chronic stroke patients: focus on dependent ambulators.

    PubMed

    Cho, Duk Youn; Park, Si-Woon; Lee, Min Jin; Park, Dae Sung; Kim, Eun Joo

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to confirm the effect of robot-assisted gait training on the balance and gait ability of stroke patients who were dependent ambulators. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty stroke patients participated in this study. The participants were allocated to either group 1, which received robot-assisted gait training for 4 weeks followed by conventional physical therapy for 4 weeks, or group 2, which received the same treatments in the reverse order. Robot-assisted gait training was conducted for 30?min, 3 times a week for 4 weeks. The Berg Balance Scale, Modified Functional Reach Test, Functional Ambulation Category, Modified Ashworth Scale, Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Motricity Index, and Modified Barthel Index were assessed before and after treatment. To confirm the characteristics of patients who showed a significant increase in Berg Balance Scale after robot-assisted gait training as compared with physical therapy, subgroup analysis was conducted. [Results] Only lateral reaching and the Functional Ambulation Category were significantly increased following robot-assisted gait training. Subscale analyses identified 3 patient subgroups that responded well to robot-assisted gait training: a subgroup with hemiplegia, a subgroup in which the guidance force needed to be decreased to needed to be decreased to ?45%, and a subgroup in which weight bearing was decreased to ?21%. [Conclusion] The present study showed that robot-assisted gait training is not only effective in improving balance and gait performance but also improves trunk balance and motor skills required by high-severity stroke patients to perform activities daily living. Moreover, subscale analyses identified subgroups that responded well to robot-assisted gait training. PMID:26644642

  2. Delayed healing of a navicular stress fracture, following limited weight-bearing activity

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Matthew; Fulcher, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a 21-year-old man, a semiprofessional football (soccer) player, with a navicular stress fracture. It highlights the difficulty in diagnosing the condition and the complications arising from inadequate management. The case discusses the optimal management of these stress fractures and the detrimental role of weight-bearing recovery. The diagnosis of navicular stress fractures is challenging, and a high index of suspicion is required. The available literature indicates that limited weightbearing is not an appropriate treatment for navicular stress injuries. Non-weight-bearing (NWB) cast immobilisation for 6–8 weeks appears to be the gold standard treatment; however, open reduction with internal fixation (ORIF) has similar success rates and an equal return-to-play time but should also be followed by a period of NWB. NWB cast immobilisation for 6 weeks remains a good second option at any time following failed limited weight-bearing activity. PMID:24618870

  3. Weight-Bearing Locomotion in the Developing Opossum, Monodelphis domestica following Spinal Transection: Remodeling of Neuronal Circuits Caudal to Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Wheaton, Benjamin J.; Noor, Natassya M.; Whish, Sophie C.; Truettner, Jessie S.; Dietrich, W. Dalton; Zhang, Moses; Crack, Peter J.; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M.; Saunders, Norman R.

    2013-01-01

    Complete spinal transection in the mature nervous system is typically followed by minimal axonal repair, extensive motor paralysis and loss of sensory functions caudal to the injury. In contrast, the immature nervous system has greater capacity for repair, a phenomenon sometimes called the infant lesion effect. This study investigates spinal injuries early in development using the marsupial opossum Monodelphis domestica whose young are born very immature, allowing access to developmental stages only accessible in utero in eutherian mammals. Spinal cords of Monodelphis pups were completely transected in the lower thoracic region, T10, on postnatal-day (P)7 or P28 and the animals grew to adulthood. In P7-injured animals regrown supraspinal and propriospinal axons through the injury site were demonstrated using retrograde axonal labelling. These animals recovered near-normal coordinated overground locomotion, but with altered gait characteristics including foot placement phase lags. In P28-injured animals no axonal regrowth through the injury site could be demonstrated yet they were able to perform weight-supporting hindlimb stepping overground and on the treadmill. When placed in an environment of reduced sensory feedback (swimming) P7-injured animals swam using their hindlimbs, suggesting that the axons that grew across the lesion made functional connections; P28-injured animals swam using their forelimbs only, suggesting that their overground hindlimb movements were reflex-dependent and thus likely to be generated locally in the lumbar spinal cord. Modifications to propriospinal circuitry in P7- and P28-injured opossums were demonstrated by changes in the number of fluorescently labelled neurons detected in the lumbar cord following tracer studies and changes in the balance of excitatory, inhibitory and neuromodulatory neurotransmitter receptors gene expression shown by qRT-PCR. These results are discussed in the context of studies indicating that although following injury the isolated segment of the spinal cord retains some capability of rhythmic movement the mechanisms involved in weight-bearing locomotion are distinct. PMID:23951105

  4. Osteoporosis Knowledge, Calcium Intake, and Weight-Bearing Physical Activity in Three Age Groups of Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrio, Kate; Auld, Garry W.

    2002-01-01

    Determined the extent and integration of osteoporosis knowledge in three age groups of women, comparing knowledge to calcium intake and weight bearing physical activity (WBPA). Overall calcium intake was relatively high. There were no differences in knowledge, calcium intake, or WBPA by age, nor did knowledge predict calcium intake and WBPA. None…

  5. Osteoporosis Knowledge, Calcium Intake, and Weight-Bearing Physical Activity in Three Age Groups of Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrio, Kate; Auld, Garry W.

    2002-01-01

    Determined the extent and integration of osteoporosis knowledge in three age groups of women, comparing knowledge to calcium intake and weight bearing physical activity (WBPA). Overall calcium intake was relatively high. There were no differences in knowledge, calcium intake, or WBPA by age, nor did knowledge predict calcium intake and WBPA. None

  6. Surface texture and micromechanics of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) orthopaedic implant bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Monica A.

    2001-07-01

    Tibial bearings of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) were characterized to identify differences in morphology, surface texture (roughness and skewness), and micro-scale mechanical behavior. These orthopaedic implant components were fabricated by direct molding or by machining after isostatic compression molding. Sterilization was by gamma irradiation (3.3 Mrad) in air, followed by shelf aging for 2 years. Comparisons were made between unsterile and sterile bearings to identify differences in structure and properties related to wear debris. Characterization methods included confocal optical microscopy, nanoindentation, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and polarized light microscopy. Morphology was compared between bulk and surface (top and bottom) specimens of the bearings. Cryo-microtomy was used to prepare thin specimens transverse to the top surface for polarized microscopy. Nanoindentation was performed on the top bearing surfaces, near areas examined by confocal microscopy. Processing methods affected both small- and large-scale morphology of UHMWPE. Direct molding produced thinner lamellae, thicker long periods, and slightly lower crystallinity than isostatic compression molding. Both bearing types contained a thick interface between the crystalline and amorphous phases. Interfacial free energy varied with interface thickness. Resin particles were consolidated better in direct molded bearings than in machined bearings. Segregated amorphous regions were observed in the machined bearings. Sterilization and shelf aging affected nanometer-scale morphology. Chain scission significantly decreased the interface thickness, causing an increase in lamellar thickness and a small increase in crystallinity. Only a small decrease in the amorphous thickness resulted. Heterogeneous oxidation increased these changes in interface thickness and lamellar thickness at the surfaces. Thin lamellae were created in the direct molded bearing, uniformly through its thickness, following chain scission and crystallization at low temperature. Both surface roughness and morphology affected micromechanical behavior by nanoindentation. Indents must extend deeper than the peak-to-valley height (2--11 mum) of surface features, near the scale of wear debris. Hardness and elastic modulus correlated with lamellar thickness. Machined bearings were harder and stiffer than direct molded bearings. Sterilization increased lamellar thickness, so properties of the sterile, molded bearing approached those of the unsterile, machined bearing.

  7. Walking assistance apparatus using a spatial parallel link mechanism and a weight bearing lift.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Eiichirou; Ikehara, Tadaaki; Sato, Yusuke; Yusa, Hirokazu; Sakurai, Tomohiro; Saegusa, Shozo; Ito, Kazuhisa; Yuge, Louis

    2011-01-01

    A prototype for a walking assistance apparatus for the elderly or motor palsy patients was developed as a next-generation vehicle or movable neuro-rehabilitation training appliance, using a novel spatial parallel link mechanism and a bearing lift. The flat steps of the apparatus move in parallel with the ground; the apparatus can support entire leg alignment (including soles) and assist; walking behavior at ankle, knee and hip joints simultaneously. In order to respond the variation of equipped person's walking velocity, the length of stride and walking cycle while walking with wearing the apparatus were compensated by using the relation of walking ratio. Therefore the apparatus can be controlled in response to equipped person's will. Motor palsy and muscle weakness patients can walk by themselves by using the apparatus; patients who have ambulation difficulty can use the apparatus with weight bearing lift that we developed. Using the apparatus with the weight bearing lift prevents stumbling and enables input of walking movement to the brain motor area. It is very effective for rehabilitation to use the apparatus with the weight bearing lift. This newly developed system facilitates motor palsy and muscle weakness patients in the rehabilitation program. PMID:22275667

  8. Periprosthetic bone mineral density and fixation of the uncemented CLS stem related to different weight bearing regimes

    PubMed Central

    Mattsson, Per; Milbrink, Jan; Larsson, Sune; Mallmin, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose There is no consensus on the best rehabilitation regime after uncemented total hip arthroplasty. Theoretically, bone ingrowth into the implant should benefit from initial partial weight bearing. We investigated whether the degree of postoperative weight bearing influences the periprosthetic bone mineral density (BMD) and/or the stability of the CLS stem. Patients and methods 38 patients received an uncemented CLS stem and were randomized to either unrestricted postoperative weight bearing or to partial weight bearing for 3 months. Periprosthetic BMD was measured in the 7 Gruen zones with DXA and the stability of the femoral stem was assessed by radiostereometric analysis (RSA) after surgery and at 3, 12, 24, and 60 months. Results Periprosthetic BMD was not influenced by the type of postoperative weight bearing. BMD was reduced by 8–15% in all Gruen zones at 3 months. Restoration toward initial BMD was observed in all zones except in zone 7 (calcar region), where BMD was reduced by 22% at 5 years. Immediate weight bearing after surgery had no influence on the stability of the CLS stem, as assessed by RSA. Interpretation Immediate full weight bearing after uncemented total hip arthroplasty is safe. There is no difference in the periprosthetic BMD or in stability of the stem as measured by RSA compared to partial weight bearing for 3 months. BMD is reduced by more than 20% in the calcar region around a CLS stem after 5 years. PMID:20446828

  9. Short communication: Estimation of genetic parameters for gait in Canadian Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Chapinal, N; Sewalem, A; Miglior, F

    2012-12-01

    Lameness is one of the most important welfare and economic problems in modern dairy herds. In addition to environmental factors, lameness is affected by genetics and thus, long-term improvement of lameness can be accomplished through genetic selection. The objective of the study was to estimate the genetic parameters of a validated gait score and specific gait attributes for Holstein cows from a university dairy research herd. Two hundred thirty-three cows were gait scored multiple times over time (n=1,664 records) in different experiments using a 1-to-5 numerical rating system (NRS). One hundred seventy-two cows (n=657 records) also had 6 gait attributes scored using a 100-unit continuous visual analog scale (back arch, head bob, tracking up, joint flexion, asymmetric gait, and reluctance to bear weight). Single-trait linear animal models were used to estimate the heritability of NRS and each gait attribute, whereas a multivariate linear animal model was used to estimate genetic correlations between traits. The NRS and the gait attributes deteriorated with parity, and the scores for NRS, back arch, joint flexion, and asymmetry of the steps increased rapidly in early lactation. The heritability estimate (±SE) for NRS was 0.09±0.09. Four of the gait attributes (reluctance to bear weight, head bob, tracking up, and asymmetry of the steps) had higher heritability than NRS, ranging from 0.11±0.13 to 0.42±0.15, whereas back arch showed no genetic variation. However, the small sample of animals resulted in large standard error of the estimates. The genetic correlations between NRS and the gait attributes were >0.70, whereas the genetic correlations among the different gait attributes ranged from 0.14 to 0.92. In conclusion, NRS and most gait attributes showed genetic variation, indicating the opportunity to improve gait through genetic selection. Some specific gait attributes were more heritable than NRS and were genetically correlated with NRS. Further research with a larger population is needed to assess whether specific gait attributes would be suitable candidate traits to consider in genetic evaluations in the future. PMID:23063149

  10. Recovery of lower limb function following 6 weeks of non-weight bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacIntyre, Donna L.; Eng, Janice J.; Allen, Trevor J.

    2005-05-01

    Skeletal muscle weakness and atrophy occur following an extended period of decreased use, including space flight and limb unloading. It is also likely that affected muscles will be susceptible to a re-loading injury when they begin return to earth or weight bearing. However, there is a paucity of literature evaluating the response of human unloaded muscle to exercise and return to activity. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the soreness, function and strength response of muscle to re-loading in seven patients who were non-weight bearing for 6 weeks, compared to five healthy subjects. Function improved significantly over time for the patients but was still less than the healthy subjects over 12 weeks of physiotherapy. Concentric quadriceps muscle strength increased significantly over time for the patients. There was considerable variability in the patients' reports of muscle soreness but there were no significant changes over time or between groups.

  11. EMG Activity of the Abductor Hallucis Muscle during Foot Arch Exercises Using Different Weight Bearing Postures

    PubMed Central

    Goo, Young-Mi; Heo, Hyo-Jin; An, Duk-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of different weight-bearing postures on the activation of the abductor hallucis muscle during foot-arch exercises. [Subjects] The study recruited 11 healthy volunteers who were pain-free, had no history of foot or ankle surgery, and were able to maintain a standing posture. [Methods] The subjects performed short-foot and toe-spreading exercises while sitting and standing. [Results] The abductor hallucis muscle activation in the toe-spreading exercise was significantly greater when standing than in sitting, while that in the short-foot exercise did not differ significantly between the two postures. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggests that a weight bearing posture such as standing is the most effective method of increasing the EMG activity of abductor hallucis muscle in the toe-spreading exercise. PMID:25364132

  12. The impact of adding weight-bearing exercise versus nonweight bearing programs to the medical treatment of elderly patients with osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Shanb, Alsayed A.; Youssef, Enas F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Osteoporosis is a major public health problem affecting the elderly population, particularly women. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effects of adding weight-bearing exercise as opposed to nonweight-bearing programs to the medical treatment of bone mineral density (BMD) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of elderly patients with osteoporosis. Materials and Methods: Participating in the study were 40 elderly osteoporotic patients (27 females and 13 males), with ages ranging from 60 to 67 years, who were receiving medical treatment for osteoporosis. They were assigned randomly into two groups: Group-I: Twenty patients practiced weight-bearing exercises. Group-II: Twenty patients did nonweight-bearing exercises. All patients trained for 45-60 min/session, two sessions/week for 6 months. BMD of the lumbar spine, right neck of femur, and right distal radial head of all patients were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry before and after both treatment programs. In addition, the QoL was measured by means of the HRQoL ECOS-16 questionnaire. Results: T-tests proved that mean values of BMD of the lumbar spine, right neck of femur and right distal radial head were significantly increased in both groups with greater improvement in the weight-bearing group. The QoL was significantly improved in both groups, but the difference between them was not significant. Conclusion: Addition of weight-bearing exercise program to medical treatment increases BMD more than nonweight-bearing exercise in elderly subjects with osteoporosis. Furthermore, both weight-bearing and nonweight-bearing exercise programs significantly improved the QoL of patients with osteoporosis. PMID:25374469

  13. Quadriceps Fatigue Alters Human Muscle Performance during a Novel Weight Bearing Task

    PubMed Central

    Ballantyne, Bryon T.; Shields, Richard K.

    2010-01-01

    Limited information is currently available regarding muscle synergistic patterns and triggered reflex responses during dynamic weight bearing activities in the presence of muscle fatigue. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of quadriceps muscle fatigue on patterns of muscle activation and performance in response to sudden, unexpected perturbations during a weight-bearing task. Methods Motion of the knee was measured as subjects were asked to track a visual target as accurately as possible while performing a resisted single leg squat task. Random perturbations were delivered in 20% of the trials by unexpectedly releasing the resistance during the flexion phase of the exercise. Absolute and constant errors were calculated to evaluate target tracking performance. Quadriceps and hamstring muscle activity was recorded during both perturbed and unperturbed trials. Twelve healthy females were tested before and after completing a repetitive submaximal eccentric quadriceps fatigue protocol. A second group of 12 females served as controls. Unexpected perturbations elicited long latency responses characterized by facilitation of the quadriceps and inhibition of the hamstrings. Results Muscle fatigue increased the amplitude of the long latency response in vastus lateralis by 4.3% maximum voluntary isometric contraction (p=.004). Changes in tracking error occurred in response to perturbations after fatigue in spite of significantly increased quadriceps muscle activity, especially during the extension phase of the exercise. Conclusion Quadriceps muscle fatigue alters the patterns of coordinated muscle activity and may render subjects less able to cope with unexpected perturbations during weight bearing tasks. PMID:20164810

  14. Electromyography activity of the deltoid muscle of the weight-bearing side during shoulder flexion in various weight-bearing positions

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Sung-kwang; Yoo, Won-gyu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the deltoid muscle activation during shoulder flexion exercise in various weight-bearing positions. [Subjects] A total of 15 males participated. [Methods] The participants completed three repetitions of shoulder flexion exercises in three positions (prone-on-elbow, quadruped, and standing) with electromyography activity being collected from the exercised. The muscle activations in each position by each exercise were compared using a one-way analysis of variance. [Results] The electromyography activities of the middle and posterior deltoids differed significantly among positions. The prone-on-elbow and quadruped position showed a significantly higher activity than the standing position. There were no significant differences between the prone-on-elbow and quadruped positions. [Conclusion] The deltoid muscles were further strengthened in the low posture positions (prone-on-elbows and quadruped) than in standing. PMID:26644694

  15. Electromyography activity of the deltoid muscle of the weight-bearing side during shoulder flexion in various weight-bearing positions.

    PubMed

    Ju, Sung-Kwang; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the deltoid muscle activation during shoulder flexion exercise in various weight-bearing positions. [Subjects] A total of 15 males participated. [Methods] The participants completed three repetitions of shoulder flexion exercises in three positions (prone-on-elbow, quadruped, and standing) with electromyography activity being collected from the exercised. The muscle activations in each position by each exercise were compared using a one-way analysis of variance. [Results] The electromyography activities of the middle and posterior deltoids differed significantly among positions. The prone-on-elbow and quadruped position showed a significantly higher activity than the standing position. There were no significant differences between the prone-on-elbow and quadruped positions. [Conclusion] The deltoid muscles were further strengthened in the low posture positions (prone-on-elbows and quadruped) than in standing. PMID:26644694

  16. A prospective study comparing attempted weight bearing in fiberglass below-knee casts and prefabricated pneumatic braces.

    PubMed

    Mason, Lyndon W; Dodds, Alex

    2010-04-01

    Partial weight bearing is commonly advised after fracture of the lower extremity. Research has determined this to be inaccurate both in its instruction and its reproducibility. Many trauma departments are commonly using alternatives to plaster in the splintage of fractures, such as fiberglass and the prefabricated pneumatic braces. This study's null hypothesis is that there is no difference between partial weight bearing through a fiberglass cast as compared with a pneumatic walker. A prospective study was conducted in our department including all patients who had metatarsal or ankle fractures and could partially weight bear. Patients were excluded if they were not allowed to bear weight, had received operative fixation of their fracture, or were younger than age 16 years. The patients' total weight was measured first, and then they were trained to place 50% of their weight through the splinted limb. Three measurements were taken of their attempted weight bearing at 50%, and they were blinded to the results. Over a 16-month period, 117 patients were enrolled for this study: 72 in the pneumatic walker group and 45 in the fiberglass group. There was no significant difference in sex, age, or fracture type. There was a significant difference in percentage of weight placed through the splinted limb, with the pneumatic brace group placing much greater force than the fiberglass group. This may have been caused by altered proprioception from the walker. It is important to realize this when prescribing partial weight bearing in a particular splint as this may result in avoidable complications. PMID:20400414

  17. A weighted multi-scale morphological gradient filter for rolling element bearing fault detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Zhang, Pei-lin; Wang, Zheng-jun; Mi, Shuang-shan; Liu, Dong-sheng

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a novel signal processing scheme, named the weighted multi-scale morphological gradient filter (WMMG), for rolling element bearing fault detection. The WMMG can depress the noise at large scale and preserve the impulsive shape details at small scale. Both a simulated signal and vibration signals from a bearing test rig are employed to evaluate the performance of the proposed technique. The traditional envelope analysis and a multi-scale enveloping spectrogram algorithm combining continuous wavelet transform and envelope analysis (WT-EA) are also studied and compared with the presented WMMG. Experimental results have demonstrated the effectiveness of the WMMG to extract the impulsive components from the raw vibration signal with strong background noise. We also investigated the classification performance on identifying bearing faults based on the WMMG and statistical parameters with varied noise levels. Application results reveal that the WMMG achieves the same or better performance as EA and WT-EA. Meanwhile, the WMMG requires low computation cost and is very suitable for on-line condition monitoring of bearing operating states. PMID:21723552

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of weight-bearing subchondral trabecular bone in the knee

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Grace H.; Sloane, Gretchen; Fanella, Lynn; Hunter, David J.; Eaton, Charles B.; McAlindon, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Changes in weight-bearing subchondral bone are central to osteoarthritis (OA) pathophysiology. Using MR, knee trabecular bone is typically assessed in the axial plane, however partial volume artifacts limit the utility of MR methods for femorotibial compartment subchondral bone analysis. Oblique-coronal acquisitions may enable direct visualization and quantification of the expected increases in femorotibial subchondral trabecular bone. Methods MR acquisition parameters were first optimized at 3 Tesla. Thereafter, five volunteers underwent axial and coronal exams of their right knee. Each image series was evaluated visually and quantitatively. An anatomically standardized region-of-interest was placed on both the medial and lateral tibial plateaus of all coronal slices containing subchondral bone. Mean and maximum marrow signal was measured, and bone signal was calculated. Results The MR acquisition had spatial resolution 0.2 0.21.0 mm and acquisition time 10.5 min. The two asymptomatic knees exhibited prominent horizontal trabeculae in the tibial subchondral bone, while the one confirmed OA knee had disorganized subchondral bone and absent horizontal trabeculae. The subchondral bone signal was 814% higher in both compartments of the OA knee than the asymptomatic knees. Conclusion The weight-bearing femorotibial subchondral trabecular bone can be directly visualized and changes quantified in the coronal-oblique plane. Qualitative and quantitative assessments can be performed using the resultant images and may provide a method to discriminate between the healthy and OA knees. These methods should enable a quantitative evaluation of the role of weight-bearing subchondral bone in the natural history of knee OA to be undertaken. PMID:20449585

  19. In Vivo Kinematics of the Knee during Weight Bearing in High Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Wei; Hosseini, Ali; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Li, Jing-Sheng; Rubash, Harry E.; Li, Guoan

    2013-01-01

    Achieving high flexion is an objective of contemporary total knee arthoplasty, however little is known on the knee biomechanics at high flexion under weight-bearing conditions. This study is to investigate the 6DOF kinematics and tibiofemoral cartilage contact biomechanics of the knee during weight-bearing flexion from full extension to maximal flexion. Eight knees from seven healthy subjects with no history of injuries or chronic pain were recruited. The knees were MRI scanned to create 3D models of the tibia and femur, including their articular cartilage surfaces. The subjects were then imaged using a dual fluoroscopic image system while performing a weight-bearing quasi-static single-legged lunge from full extension to maximal flexion. The 6DOF kinematics and the articular cartilage contact locations were measured along the flexion path of the knee. The result indicated that the internal tibial rotation increased sharply at low flexion angles (full extension to 30°), maintained a small variation in the middle range of flexion (30° to 120°), and then sharply increased again at high flexion angles (120° to maximal flexion). The contact point moved similarly in the medial and lateral compartments before 120° of flexion, but less on the medial compartment at high flexion angles. The results indicated that the knee motion couldn’t be described using one character in the entire range of flexion, especially in high flexion. The knee kinematic data in the entire range of flexion of the knee could be instrumental for designing new knee prostheses to achieve physical high flexion and improving rehabilitation protocols after knee injuries. PMID:23591448

  20. In vivo kinematics of the knee during weight bearing high flexion.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wei; Hosseini, Ali; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Li, Jing-Sheng; Rubash, Harry E; Li, Guoan

    2013-05-31

    Achieving high flexion is an objective of contemporary total knee arthoplasty; however little is known on the knee biomechanics at high flexion under weight-bearing conditions. This study investigates the 6DOF kinematics and tibiofemoral cartilage contact biomechanics of the knee during weight-bearing flexion from full extension to maximal flexion. Eight knees from seven healthy subjects with no history of injuries or chronic pain were recruited. The knees were MRI scanned to create 3D models of the tibia and femur, including their articular cartilage surfaces. The subjects were then imaged using a dual fluoroscopic image system while performing a weight-bearing quasi-static single-legged lunge from full extension to maximal flexion. The 6DOF kinematics and the articular cartilage contact locations were measured along the flexion path of the knee. The result indicated that the internal tibial rotation increased sharply at low flexion angles (full extension to 30°), maintained a small variation in the middle range of flexion (30-120°, and then sharply increased again at high flexion angles (120° to maximal flexion). The contact point moved similarly in the medial and lateral compartments before 120° of flexion, but less on the medial compartment at high flexion angles. The results indicated that the knee motion could not be described using one character in the entire range of flexion, especially in high flexion. The knee kinematic data in the entire range of flexion of the knee could be instrumental for designing new knee prostheses to achieve physical high flexion and improving rehabilitation protocols after knee injuries. PMID:23591448

  1. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Walking Program on the Exercise Capacity and Weight Reduction for Adolescents with Severe Autism Therapeutic effects of strengthening exercise on gait function of cerebral palsy. Home About Privacy Policy Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Facebook Twitter ...

  2. Effects of feedback on activation of the quadriceps during weight-bearing tasks of the Wii

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes da Silva, Fabiano; Aparecido de Souza, Renato; Dias, Eric Fernandes; Silveira, Landulfo; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This investigation evaluated the effect of real-time feedback on electrical activation of the quadriceps during 3 weight-bearing tasks of the Wii Fit Plus. [Subjects] Thirty male healthy volunteers were recruited. [Methods] Activation of the vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, and rectus femoris muscles was recorded during virtual lunge, single leg extension, and single leg reach exercises. Each exercise was performed twice in 3 randomized experimental conditions (with visual feedback, with auditory feedback, and with no feedback). The normalized electromyographic data (using maximum voluntary isometric contraction) were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance and Tukeys test. [Results] No significant difference was found in the muscles among the feedback conditions during the 3 exercises. However, the variation in the muscle activity of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis (18.2329.20% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction) was higher (4762%) than that in the rectus femoris (7.3512.98% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction). [Conclusion] Real-time feedback did not alter quadriceps activation during the Wii tasks. Additionally, these games showed electromyographic activation levels similar to those for the same tasks outside the virtual environment. The Wii weight-bearing tasks could therefore constitute a physical activity program but without the additional benefit of feedback. PMID:26180301

  3. Non-weight-bearing neural control of a powered transfemoral prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lower limb prostheses have traditionally been mechanically passive devices without electronic control systems. Microprocessor-controlled passive and powered devices have recently received much interest from the clinical and research communities. The control systems for these devices typically use finite-state controllers to interpret data measured from mechanical sensors embedded within the prosthesis. In this paper we investigated a control system that relied on information extracted from myoelectric signals to control a lower limb prosthesis while amputee patients were seated. Sagittal plane motions of the knee and ankle can be accurately (>90%) recognized and controlled in both a virtual environment and on an actuated transfemoral prosthesis using only myoelectric signals measured from nine residual thigh muscles. Patients also demonstrated accurate (~90%) control of both the femoral and tibial rotation degrees of freedom within the virtual environment. A channel subset investigation was completed and the results showed that only five residual thigh muscles are required to achieve accurate control. This research is the first step in our long-term goal of implementing myoelectric control of lower limb prostheses during both weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing activities for individuals with transfemoral amputation. PMID:23782953

  4. Biomechanical effects of lateral and medial wedge insoles on unilateral weight bearing

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Tomonori; Kito, Nobuhiro; Yukimune, Masaki; Tokuda, Kazuki; Tanimoto, Kenji; Anan, Masaya; Takahashi, Makoto; Shinkoda, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Lateral wedge insoles reduce the peak external knee adduction moment and are advocated for patients with knee osteoarthritis. However, some patients demonstrate adverse biomechanical effects with treatment. In this study, we examined the immediate effects of lateral and medial wedge insoles under unilateral weight bearing. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy young adults participated in this study. The subjects were assessed by using the foot posture index, and were divided into three groups: normal foot, pronated foot, and supinated foot groups. The knee adduction moment and knee-ground reaction force lever arm under the studied conditions were measured by using a three-dimensional motion capture system and force plates. [Results] In the normal and pronated groups, the change in knee adduction moment significantly decreased under the lateral wedge insole condition compared with the medial wedge insole condition. In the normal group, the change in the knee-ground reaction force lever arm also significantly decreased under the lateral wedge insole condition than under the medial wedge insole condition. [Conclusion] Lateral wedge insoles significantly reduced the knee adduction moment and knee-ground reaction force lever arm during unilateral weight bearing in subjects with normal feet, and the biomechanical effects varied according to individual foot alignment. PMID:26957775

  5. Biomechanical effects of lateral and medial wedge insoles on unilateral weight bearing.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Tomonori; Kito, Nobuhiro; Yukimune, Masaki; Tokuda, Kazuki; Tanimoto, Kenji; Anan, Masaya; Takahashi, Makoto; Shinkoda, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Lateral wedge insoles reduce the peak external knee adduction moment and are advocated for patients with knee osteoarthritis. However, some patients demonstrate adverse biomechanical effects with treatment. In this study, we examined the immediate effects of lateral and medial wedge insoles under unilateral weight bearing. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy young adults participated in this study. The subjects were assessed by using the foot posture index, and were divided into three groups: normal foot, pronated foot, and supinated foot groups. The knee adduction moment and knee-ground reaction force lever arm under the studied conditions were measured by using a three-dimensional motion capture system and force plates. [Results] In the normal and pronated groups, the change in knee adduction moment significantly decreased under the lateral wedge insole condition compared with the medial wedge insole condition. In the normal group, the change in the knee-ground reaction force lever arm also significantly decreased under the lateral wedge insole condition than under the medial wedge insole condition. [Conclusion] Lateral wedge insoles significantly reduced the knee adduction moment and knee-ground reaction force lever arm during unilateral weight bearing in subjects with normal feet, and the biomechanical effects varied according to individual foot alignment. PMID:26957775

  6. Effects of immobilization on rat hind limb muscles under non-weight-bearing conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaspers, Stephen R.; Fagan, Julie M.; Satarug, Soisungwan; Cook, Paul H.; Tischler, Marc E.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of stretched and unstretched immobilization of a hind limb on the concentration and the metabolism of proteins in the hind-limb muscles of rats was investigated. The animals were divided into three groups: (1) weight-bearing controls, (2) tail-cast-suspended, and (3) suspended, with one hind limb immobilized with the ankle in dorsiflexion (30-40 deg angle) and the other freely moving. It was found that unloading the hind limbs for 6 days by tail cast suspension caused soleus to atrophy and reduced growth of the gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles; unloading resulted in a higher degradation rate and lower synthesis rate in both in vitro and in vivo. Chronic stretch of the unloaded soleus not only prevented its atrophy but led to significant hypertrophy, relative to weight-bearing controls, with increases in both the sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar protein fractions. Immobilizing one ankle in dorsiflexion prevented the inhibition of growth in the plantaris and gastrocnemius muscles due to unloading.

  7. Alterations of collagen matrix in weight-bearing bones during skeletal unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiiba, M.; Arnaud, S. B.; Tanzawa, H.; Uzawa, K.; Yamauchi, M.

    2001-01-01

    Skeletal unloading induces loss of bone mineral density in weight-bearing bones. The objectives of this study were to characterize the post-translational modifications of collagen of weight-bearing bones subjected to hindlimb unloading for 8 weeks. In unloaded bones, tibiae and femurs, while the overall amino acid composition was essentially identical in the unloaded and control tibiae and femurs, the collagen cross-link profile showed significant differences. Two major reducible cross-links (analyzed as dihydroxylysinonorleucine and hydroxylysinonorleucine) were increased in the unloaded bones. In addition, the ratios of the former to the latter as well as pyridinoline to deoxypyridinoline were significantly decreased in the unloaded bones indicating a difference in the extent of lysine hydroxylation at the cross-linking sites between these two groups. These results indicate that upon skeletal unloading the relative pool of newly synthesized collagen is increased and it is post-translationally altered. The alteration could be associated with impaired osteoblastic differentiation induced by skeletal unloading that results in a mineralization defect.

  8. Effects of feedback on activation of the quadriceps during weight-bearing tasks of the Wii.

    PubMed

    Fernandes da Silva, Fabiano; Aparecido de Souza, Renato; Dias, Eric Fernandes; Silveira, Landulfo; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This investigation evaluated the effect of real-time feedback on electrical activation of the quadriceps during 3 weight-bearing tasks of the Wii Fit Plus(). [Subjects] Thirty male healthy volunteers were recruited. [Methods] Activation of the vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, and rectus femoris muscles was recorded during virtual lunge, single leg extension, and single leg reach exercises. Each exercise was performed twice in 3 randomized experimental conditions (with visual feedback, with auditory feedback, and with no feedback). The normalized electromyographic data (using maximum voluntary isometric contraction) were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance and Tukey's test. [Results] No significant difference was found in the muscles among the feedback conditions during the 3 exercises. However, the variation in the muscle activity of the vastus medialis and vastus lateralis (18.23-29.20% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction) was higher (47-62%) than that in the rectus femoris (7.35-12.98% of maximum voluntary isometric contraction). [Conclusion] Real-time feedback did not alter quadriceps activation during the Wii tasks. Additionally, these games showed electromyographic activation levels similar to those for the same tasks outside the virtual environment. The Wii weight-bearing tasks could therefore constitute a physical activity program but without the additional benefit of feedback. PMID:26180301

  9. A Canine Non-Weight-Bearing Model with Radial Neurectomy for Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xiaoxi; Bao, Nirong; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.; Steinmann, Scott P.; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2015-01-01

    Background The major concern of using a large animal model to study rotator cuff repair is the high rate of repair retears. The purpose of this study was to test a non-weight-bearing (NWB) canine model for rotator cuff repair research. Methods First, in the in vitro study, 18 shoulders were randomized to 3 groups. 1) Full-width transections repaired with modified Mason-Allen sutures using 3-0 polyglactin suture, 2) Group 1 repaired using number 2 (#2) polyester braid and long-chain polyethylene suture, and 3) Partial-width transections leaving the superior 2 mm infraspinatus tendon intact without repair. In the in vivo study of 6 dogs, the infraspinatus tendon was partially transected as the same as the in vitro group 3. A radial neurectomy was performed to prevent weight bearing. The operated limb was slung in a custom-made jacket for 6 weeks. Results In the in vitro study, mean ultimate tensile load and stiffness in Group 2 were significantly higher than Group 1 and 3 (p<0.05). In the in vivo study, gross inspection and histology showed that the preserved superior 2-mm portion of the infraspinatus tendon remained intact with normal structure. Conclusions Based on the biomechanical and histological findings, this canine NWB model may be an appropriate and useful model for studies of rotator cuff repair. PMID:26107616

  10. [Weight-bearing early after osteosynthesis of the femoral neck by nail-plate (100 cases)].

    PubMed

    Langlais, F; Burdin, P; Bourgin, T; Sassi, N; Levasseur, M; Chagneau, F

    1987-01-01

    One hundred trochanteric or transcervical fractures, 64 of which were in patients more than 75 years old, were treated by internal fixation with a THS nail-plate. This device is characterised by a better bending strength than a one-piece nail-plate and a design which limits the risk of displacement of the screw in the head so that immediate weight-bearing can be allowed. Weight was borne on the limb in 81 cases at the tenth post-operative day. It did not improve the mortality, there being 17 deaths by the third month but it greatly helped post-operative care and rehabilitation without producing any additional complications. As a result, 43 per cent of patients could return home by the 45th post-operative day and 74 per cent had recovered their previous level of autonomy within three months of operation. There were only four mechanical complications, all in transcervical fractures: one crack fracture in the femoral head and three displacements following inadequate reduction, treated by prosthetic replacement. The follow-up of 80 patients at three months showed that consolidation always developed between the 45th and 90th day with full weight-bearing and a stable radiological picture. There was no intra-articular penetration or bending of the screw and no break-out of the implant. Whilst it is a definite advance in the treatment of trochanteric fractures, a longer follow-up is needed to determine its place compared with prostheses in transcervical fractures. PMID:3444942

  11. Soleus Fiber Force and Maximal Shortening Velocity After Non-Weight Bearing with Intermittent Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Widrick, Jeffrey J.; Bangart, Jill J.; Karhanek, Miloslav; Fitts, Robert H.

    1996-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of intermittent weight bearing (IWB) as a countermeasure to non-weight-bearing (NWB)-induced alterations in soleus type 1 fiber force (in mN), tension (P(sub o); force per fiber cross-sectional area in kN/sq m), and maximal unloaded shortening velocity (V(sub o), in fiber lengths/s). Adult rats were assigned to one of the following groups: normal weight bearing (WB), 14 days of hindlimb NWB (NWB group), and 14 days of hindlimb NWB with IWB treatments (IWB group). The IWB treatment consisted of four 10-min periods of standing WB each day. Single, chemically permeabilized soleus fiber segments were mounted between a force transducer and position motor and were studied at maximal Ca(2+) activation, after which type 1 fiber myosin heavy-chain composition was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. NWB resulted in a loss in relative soleus mass (-45%), with type 1 fibers displaying reductions in diameter (-28%) and peak isometric force (-55%) and an increase in V(sub o) (+33%). In addition, NWB induced a 16% reduction in type 1 fiber P., a 41% reduction in type 1 fiber peak elastic modulus [E(sub o), defined as ((delta)force/(delta)length x (fiber length/fiber cross-sectional area] and a significant increase in the P(sub o)/E(sub o) ratio. In contrast to NWB, IWB reduced the loss of relative soleus mass (by 22%) and attenuated alterations in type 1 fiber diameter (by 36%), peak force (by 29%), and V(sub o)(by 48%) but had no significant effect on P(sub o), E(sub o) or P(sub o)/E(sub o). These results indicate that a modest restoration of WB activity during 14 days of NWB is sufficient to attenuate type 1 fiber atrophy and to partially restore type 1 peak isometric force and V(sub o) to WB levels. However, the NWB-induced reductions in P(sub o) and E(sub o) which we hypothesize to be due to a decline in the number and stiffness of cross bridges, respectively, are considerably less responsive to this countermeasure treatment.

  12. Early weight-bearing after periacetabular osteotomy leads to a high incidence of postoperative pelvic fractures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It has not been shown whether accelerated rehabilitation following periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) is effective for early recovery. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare complication rates in patients with standard and accelerated rehabilitation protocols who underwent PAO. Methods Between January 2002 and August 2011, patients with a lateral center-edge (CE) angle of?weight-bearing with two crutches started 2months postoperatively in 73 patients (80 hips) with the standard rehabilitation protocol. In 65 patients (76 hips) with the accelerated rehabilitation protocol, postoperative strengthening of the hip, thigh and core musculature was begun on the day of surgery as tolerated. The exercise program included active hip range of motion, and gentle isometric hamstring and quadriceps muscle sets; these exercises were performed for 30minutes in the morning and 30minutes in the afternoon with a physical therapist every weekday for 6weeks. Full weight-bearing with two axillary crutches started on the day of surgery as tolerated. Complications were evaluated for 2years. Results The clinical results at the time of follow-up were similar in the two groups. The average periods between the osteotomy and full-weight-bearing walking without support were 4.2months and 6.9months in patients with the accelerated and standard rehabilitation protocols (P?

  13. Kinematic and dynamic gait compensations in a rat model of lumbar radiculopathy and the effects of tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) has received significant attention as a mediator of lumbar radiculopathy, with interest in TNF antagonism to treat radiculopathy. Prior studies have demonstrated that TNF antagonists can attenuate heightened nociception resulting from lumbar radiculopathy in the preclinical model. Less is known about the potential impact of TNF antagonism on gait compensations, despite being of clinical relevance. In this study, we expand on previous descriptions of gait compensations resulting from lumbar radiculopathy in the rat and describe the ability of local TNF antagonism to prevent the development of gait compensations, altered weight bearing, and heightened nociception. Methods Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were investigated for mechanical sensitivity, weight-bearing, and gait pre- and post-operatively. For surgery, tail nucleus pulposus (NP) tissue was collected and the right L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) was exposed (Day 0). In sham animals, NP tissue was discarded (n = 6); for experimental animals, autologous NP was placed on the DRG with or without 20 μg of soluble TNF receptor type II (sTNFRII, n = 6 per group). Spatiotemporal gait characteristics (open arena) and mechanical sensitivity (von Frey filaments) were assessed on post-operative Day 5; gait dynamics (force plate arena) and weight-bearing (incapacitance meter) were assessed on post-operative Day 6. Results High-speed gait characterization revealed animals with NP alone had a 5% decrease in stance time on their affected limbs on Day 5 (P ≤0.032). Ground reaction force analysis on Day 6 aligned with temporal changes observed on Day 5, with vertical impulse reduced in the affected limb of animals with NP alone (area under the vertical force-time curve, P <0.02). Concordant with gait, animals with NP alone also had some evidence of affected limb mechanical allodynia on Day 5 (P = 0.08) and reduced weight-bearing on the affected limb on Day 6 (P <0.05). Delivery of sTNFRII at the time of NP placement ameliorated signs of mechanical hypersensitivity, imbalanced weight distribution, and gait compensations (P <0.1). Conclusions Our data indicate gait characterization has value for describing early limb dysfunctions in pre-clinical models of lumbar radiculopathy. Furthermore, TNF antagonism prevented the development of gait compensations subsequent to lumbar radiculopathy in our model. PMID:21871102

  14. Reductions in knee joint forces with weight loss are attenuated by gait adaptations in class III obesity.

    PubMed

    DeVita, Paul; Rider, Patrick; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2016-03-01

    A consensus exists that high knee joint forces are a precursor to knee osteoarthritis and weight loss reduces these forces. Because large weight loss also leads to increased step length and walking velocity, knee contact forces may be reduced less than predicted by the magnitude of weight loss. The purpose was to determine the effects of weight loss on knee muscle and joint loads during walking in Class III obese adults. We determined through motion capture, force platform measures and biomechanical modeling the effects of weight loss produced by gastric bypass surgery over one year on knee muscle and joint loads during walking at a standard, controlled velocity and at self-selected walking velocities. Weight loss equaling 412N or 34% of initial body weight reduced maximum knee compressive force by 824N or 67% of initial body weight when walking at the controlled velocity. These changes represent a 2:1 reduction in knee force relative to weight loss when walking velocity is constrained to the baseline value. However, behavioral adaptations including increased stride length and walking velocity in the self-selected velocity condition attenuated this effect by ∼50% leading to a 392N or 32% initial body weight reduction in compressive force in the knee joint. Thus, unconstrained walking elicited approximately 1:1 ratio of reduction in knee force relative to weight loss and is more indicative of walking behavior than the standard velocity condition. In conclusion, massive weight loss produces dramatic reductions in knee forces during walking but when patients stride out and walk faster, these favorable reductions become substantially attenuated. PMID:26979878

  15. A novel tool for continuous fracture aftercare - Clinical feasibility and first results of a new telemetric gait analysis insole.

    PubMed

    Braun, Benedikt J; Bushuven, Eva; Hell, Rebecca; Veith, Nils T; Buschbaum, Jan; Holstein, Joerg H; Pohlemann, Tim

    2016-02-01

    Weight bearing after lower extremity fractures still remains a highly controversial issue. Even in ankle fractures, the most common lower extremity injury no standard aftercare protocol has been established. Average non weight bearing times range from 0 to 7 weeks, with standardised, radiological healing controls at fixed time intervals. Recent literature calls for patient-adapted aftercare protocols based on individual fracture and load scenarios. We show the clinical feasibility and first results of a new, insole embedded gait analysis tool for continuous monitoring of gait, load and activity. Ten patients were monitored with a new, independent gait analysis insole for up to 3 months postoperatively. Strict 20kg partial weight bearing was ordered for 6 weeks. Overall activity, load spectrum, ground reaction forces, clinical scoring and general health data were recorded and correlated. Statistical analysis with power analysis, t-test and Spearman correlation was performed. Only one patient completely adhered to the set weight bearing limit. Average time in minutes over the limit was 374min. Based on the parameters load, activity, gait time over 20kg weight bearing and maximum ground reaction force high and low performers were defined after 3 weeks. Significant difference in time to painless full weight bearing between high and low performers was shown. Correlation analysis revealed a significant correlation between weight bearing and clinical scoring as well as pain (American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Score rs=0.74; Olerud-Molander Score rs=0.93; VAS pain rs=-0.95). Early, continuous gait analysis is able to define aftercare performers with significant differences in time to full painless weight bearing where clinical or radiographic controls could not. Patient compliance to standardised weight bearing limits and protocols is low. Highly individual rehabilitation patterns were seen in all patients. Aftercare protocols should be adjusted to real-time patient conditions, rather than fixed intervals and limits. With a real-time measuring device high performers could be identified and influenced towards optimal healing conditions early, while low performers are recognised and missing healing influences could be corrected according to patient condition. PMID:26626806

  16. Quantitative Alterations in the Function of Bone Forming Cells Due to Reduced Weight Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, S. B.

    1985-01-01

    Rats subjected to spaceflight or suspended in a non-weight bearing position for 2 to 3 weeks, show a significant reduction in new bone formation. This reduction is associated with a decrease in akaline phosphatase activity in the differentiated osteoblast population. Those cells in the siaphyseal region of bone are more affected than the same cell type in metaphyseal bone. Measurements of alkaline phosphate activity in specific regions of bone, and the autoradiographic localization of H(3) proline in bone forming areas are described. Concomitant with decreased bone matrix synthesis, the osteoblast population also demonstrate changes in the Golgi/lysosomal complex as a result of whole animal suspension. Morphometric techniques are being applied for quantitation of the lysosomal population and the percentage of lysosomal or Golgi bodies containing acid phosphatase activity.

  17. Load Monitoring System for Partial Weight Bearing Therapy for rehabilitation of lower extremity fractures.

    PubMed

    North, Kylee; Kubiak, Erik N; Hitchcock, Robert W; Petelenz, Tomasz J

    2013-01-01

    Partial Weight Bearing Therapy (PWB) is used during in rehabilitation of lower-extremity fractures, but optimal outcomes are limited by the paucity of data supporting the current standard of care, the inability of clinicians to assess patients' compliance to the prescribed therapy, and by the patient's inability to apply clinical loading guidelines. To address these needs a Load Monitoring System (LMS) was developed using a novel long-term load measuring technology coupled with consumer electronics for storing and reporting of patient limb loading data. The project was planned as a staged effort and the results of the first stage development are presented here. During the first stage of this project, the LMS insole load sensor was developed for 6-week standalone operation. The LMS was subjected to bench-testing, demonstrating low static and dynamic drift. PMID:24109647

  18. Effects of ground semen collection on weight bearing on hindquarters, libido, and semen parameters in stallions.

    PubMed

    Burger, D; Meroni, G; Thomas, S; Sieme, H

    2015-09-15

    Collection of semen on the ground from the standing stallion represents an alternative method to dummy mount semen collection and is of increasing popularity for sport stallions, males suffering from health problems, or in studs without a dummy or suitable mare at disposal. Our aim was to collect and compare spermatological and physiological data associated with traditional and ground semen collection. Twelve of 23 Franches-Montagnes stallions were selected to carry out semen collection on a dummy and while standing in a crossed experimental protocol. Semen quantity and quality parameters, weight bearing on hindquarters, and behavioral and libido data were recorded. Ground versus dummy mount semen collection was accompanied by lower seminal volume (15.9 14.6 vs. 22.0 13.3 mL; P < 0.01) and lower total sperm count (4.913 2.721 10(9) vs. 6.544 2.856 10(9) sperm; P < 0.001). No significant differences were found concerning sperm motility and viability. Time to ejaculation was longer, and the number of attempts to ejaculation was higher (P = 0.053) in the standing position compared with the mount on the dummy. A higher (P < 0.01) amount of tail flagging was manifested by the stallions during ejaculation on the dummy compared to when standing. There was no difference in weight bearing on hindquarters when comparing dummy collection (51.2 2.5%) and standing collection (48.9 5.5%). Ground semen collection can be considered as a viable option for stallions that cannot mount a dummy or a mare. However, it requires training and may be not easily accepted by all stallions. Owners should be advised that ground semen collection is associated with significantly lower sperm numbers than with dummy mount semen collection. PMID:26050613

  19. Compensatory load redistribution of horses with induced weight-bearing forelimb lameness trotting on a treadmill.

    PubMed

    Weishaupt, Michael A; Wiestner, Thomas; Hogg, Hermann P; Jordan, Patrick; Auer, Jrg A

    2006-01-01

    The study was performed to obtain a detailed insight into the load and time shifting mechanisms of horses with unilateral weight-bearing forelimb lameness. Reversible lameness was induced in 11 clinically sound horses by applying a solar pressure model. Three degrees of lameness (subtle, mild and moderate) were induced and compared with sound control measurements. Vertical ground reaction force-time histories of all four limbs were recorded simultaneously on an instrumented treadmill. Four compensatory mechanisms could be identified that served to reduce structural stress, i.e. peak vertical force on the affected limb: (1) with increasing lameness, horses reduced the total vertical impulse per stride; (2) the diagonal impulse decreased selectively in the lame diagonal; (3) the impulse was shifted within the lame diagonal to the hindlimb and in the sound diagonal to the forelimb; (4) the rate of loading and the peak forces were reduced by prolonging the stance duration. Except in the diagonal hindlimb, where peak vertical forces increased slightly in the moderate lameness condition, no equivalent compensatory overload situation was observed in the other limbs. Specific force and time information of all four limbs allow the unequivocal identification of the affected limb. PMID:15974567

  20. Weight-Bearing Ankle Dorsiflexion Range of MotionCan Side-to-Side Symmetry Be Assumed?

    PubMed Central

    Rabin, Alon; Kozol, Zvi; Spitzer, Elad; Finestone, Aharon S.

    2015-01-01

    Context: In clinical practice, the range of motion (ROM) of the noninvolved side often serves as the reference for comparison with the injured side. Previous investigations of nonweight-bearing (NWB) ankle dorsiflexion (DF) ROM measurements have indicated bilateral symmetry for the most part. Less is known about ankle DF measured under weight-bearing (WB) conditions. Because WB and NWB ankle DF are not strongly correlated, there is a need to determine whether WB ankle DF is also symmetrical in a healthy population. Objective: To determine whether WB ankle DF is bilaterally symmetrical. A secondary goal was to further explore the correlation between WB and NWB ankle DF ROM. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Training facility of the Israeli Defense Forces. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 64 healthy males (age = 19.6 1.0 years, height = 175.0 6.4 cm, and body mass = 71.4 7.7 kg). Main Outcome Measure(s): Dorsiflexion ROM in WB was measured with an inclinometer and DF ROM in NWB was measured with a universal goniometer. All measurements were taken bilaterally by a single examiner. Results: Weight-bearing ankle DF was greater on the nondominant side compared with the dominant side (P < .001). Nonweight-bearing ankle DF was not different between sides (P = .64). The correlation between WB and NWB DF was moderate, with the NWB DF measurement accounting for 30% to 37% of the variance of the WB measurement. Conclusions: Weight-bearing ankle DF ROM should not be assumed to be bilaterally symmetrical. These findings suggest that side-to-side differences in WB DF may need to be interpreted while considering which side is dominant. The difference in bilateral symmetry between the WB and NWB measurements, as well as the only moderate level of correlation between them, suggests that both measurements should be performed routinely. PMID:25329350

  1. Benign acute childhood myositis--a rare cause of abnormal gait.

    PubMed

    Hall, Gregory; Schranz, Craig I

    2014-02-01

    Benign acute childhood myositis is a rare postviral myositis seen in school-aged children after a common upper respiratory infection (URI), most commonly caused by influenza [J Microbiol Immunol Infect 2004;37:95-98]. Predominantly seen in boys, this condition causes bilateral calf tenderness and pain with ambulation, often presenting as a refusal to bear weight. To avoid activation within the gastroc-soleus complex, the child will frequently compensate with a Frankenstein gait, described as a stiff-legged posture with shuffling gait [CMAJ 2009;181:711-713]. The child may also walk on his toes or refuse to walk at all. This refusal to bear weight can be alarming to both providers and parents, resulting in extensive workups. We present the case of a 5-year-old boy who presented to the emergency department with a chief complaint of leg pain and refusal to walk. Further history revealed a resolved URI approximately 5 days prior. He was noted to have an elevated creatinine kinase with no evidence of renal insufficiency. He had no progression or complications, and his symptoms resolved spontaneously with minimal supportive treatment. Benign acute childhood myositis should be considered within the broad differential that surrounds a limping child or one who refuses to bear weight. Having insight into the condition with its characteristic gait abnormalities and associated URI history can often prevent extensive workups and be treated supportively in the outpatient setting. PMID:24126025

  2. Coordination strategies for limb forces during weight-bearing locomotion in normal rats, and in rats spinalized as neonates

    PubMed Central

    Giszter, Simon F; Davies, Michelle R; Graziani, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    Some rats spinally transected as neonates (ST rats) achieve weight-supporting independent locomotion. The mechanisms of coordinated hindlimb weight support in such rats are not well understood. To examine these in such ST rats and normal rats, rats with better than 60% of weight supported steps on a treadmill as adults were trained to cross an instrumented runway. Ground reaction forces, coordination of hindlimb and forelimb forces and the motions of the center of pressure were assessed. Normal rats crossed the runway with a diagonal trot. On average hindlimbs bore about 80% of the vertical load carried by forelimbs, although this varied. Forelimbs and hindlimb acted synergistically to generate decelerative and propulsive rostrocaudal forces, which averaged 15% of body weight with maximums of 50% . Lateral forces were very small (<8% of body weight). Center of pressure progressed in jumps along a straight line with mean lateral deviations <1 cm. ST rats hindlimbs bore about 60% of the vertical load of forelimbs, significantly less compared to intact (p<0.05). ST rats showed similar mean rostrocaudal forces, but with significantly larger maximum fluctuations of up to 80% of body weight (p<0.05). Joint force-plate recordings showed forelimbs and hindlimb rostrocaudal forces in ST rats were opposing and significantly different from intact rats (p<0.05). Lateral forces were ~20% of body weight and significantly larger than in normal rats (p<0.05). Center of pressure zig-zagged, with mean lateral deviations of ~ 2cm and a significantly larger range (p<0.05). The haunches were also observed to roll more than normal rats. The locomotor strategy of injured rats using limbs in opposition was presumably less efficient but their complex gait was statically stable. Because forelimbs and hindlimbs acted in opposition, the trunk was held compressed. Force coordination was likely managed largely by the voluntary control in forelimbs and trunk. PMID:18612631

  3. Positional pelvic organ prolapse (POP) evaluation using open, weight-bearing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Boris; Stothers, Lynn; Lazare, Darren; Macnab, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of patients with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is completed in the supine position. Open magnetic resonance imaging (MRO) uses vertical magnets, allowing imaging in a variety of upright postures. This pilot study used MRO to evaluate the change of prolapse in different positions compared to non-prolapsed images. Methods: In total, 11 women (6 POP, 5 controls) aged 24 to 65 years had 12 MRO images (midline sagittal pelvic line) consecutively when supine, sitting and standing with a full and empty bladder. Lengths between the lowest point of the bladder to the pubococcygeal (PC) and pubopromontoreal (PP) lines in each image were compared, and the ratio of bladder area under the PC and PP lines to the total bladder area. Results: Significant elongation between the PC line and lowest point of the bladder was evident in subjects with POP comparing supine and standing images (p = 0.03), but not controls (p = 0.07). Similarly, this axis was significantly longer in cystocele subjects versus controls only in the standing position. Bladder area under the PC line was significantly increased between supine and standing positions only among subjects with cystocele (p < 0.01), and significantly larger among the study group in the standing position (p < 0.005), less significant in the supine position (p = 0.015), and not significant in the sitting position (p = 0.3). Conclusions: MRO imaging allows us to investigate the effects of upright position and weight bearing on the staging of POP. Imaging patients when sitting and standing identified that significant changes occur in the maximal descent of the bladder. PMID:26225170

  4. In vivo oxidation of gamma-barrier-sterilized ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene bearings.

    PubMed

    Currier, Barbara H; Currier, John H; Mayor, Michael B; Lyford, Kimberly A; Van Citters, Douglas W; Collier, John P

    2007-08-01

    gamma-Barrier packaging is shown to be effective in preventing oxidation of polyethylene during shelf storage and in addressing the problem of early fatigue failure seen in gamma-air-sterilized bearings with long shelf-storage before implantation. The series of gamma-barrier retrievals studied suggests that oxidation occurs in the body via the same mechanism as seen in gamma-air-sterilized bearings. A critical oxidation level is identified above which polyethylene bearings are susceptible to fatigue damage after sufficient cycles of use. Although critical oxidation was not reached in the majority of the retrieved gamma-barrier bearings studied, in vivo oxidation appears to follow an exponential increase with time. The result of in vivo oxidation is expected to be loss of mechanical properties, and susceptibility of polyethylene bearings to eventual fatigue failure. PMID:17689783

  5. Physiological responses and energy cost of walking on the Gait Trainer with and without body weight support in subacute stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Robotic-assisted walking after stroke provides intensive task-oriented training. But, despite the growing diffusion of robotic devices little information is available about cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses during electromechanically-assisted repetitive walking exercise. Aim of the study was to determine whether use of an end-effector gait training (GT) machine with body weight support (BWS) would affect physiological responses and energy cost of walking (ECW) in subacute post-stroke hemiplegic patients. Methods Participants: six patients (patient group: PG) with hemiplegia due to stroke (age: 66??15y; time since stroke: 8??3weeks; four men) and 6 healthy subjects as control group (CG: age, 76??7y; six men). Interventions: overground walking test (OWT) and GT-assisted walking with 0%, 30% and 50% BWS (GT-BWS0%, 30% and 50%). Main Outcome Measures: heart rate (HR), pulmonary ventilation, oxygen consumption, respiratory exchange ratio (RER) and ECW. Results Intervention conditions significantly affected parameter values in steady state (HR: p?=?0.005, VE: p?=?0.001, V'O2: p?

  6. Cartilage and labrum degeneration in the dysplastic hip generally originates in the anterosuperior weight-bearing area: an arthroscopic observation.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Y; Miura, H; Takasugi, S; Iwamoto, Y

    1999-01-01

    To clarify the intra-articular pathology of dysplastic osteoarthritis, we conducted 120 hip arthroscopies. Hips were classified radiologically into four stages: 41 prearthritic stage, 42 early-stage, 34 advanced-stage, and 3 end-stage. As the radiological stage progressed, articular cartilage degeneration became more extensive and severe. In the prearthritic and early stages, cartilage degeneration generally originated in the anterosuperior portion of the weight-bearing area of the femoral head and acetabulum. Cartilage degeneration of the acetabulum usually preceded that of the femoral head. Most detaching tears of the acetabular labrum originated in the anterosuperior area, too. In conclusion, cartilage and labrum degeneration in the dysplastic hip generally originates in the anterosuperior portion of weight-bearing area. PMID:10424553

  7. Design parameters dependences on contact stress distribution in gait and jogging phases after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Rixrath, E; Wendling-Mansuy, S; Flecher, X; Chabrand, P; Argenson, J N

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a mathematical model to calculate the contact stress distribution in total hip arthroplasty (THA) prosthesis between the articulating surfaces. The model uses the clearance between bearing surfaces as well as the inclination and thickness of the Ultra High Molecular Weight Poly-Ethylene (UHMWPE) cup to achieve this. We have used this mathematical model to contrast the maximal force during normal gait and during jogging. This is based on the assumption that the contact stress is proportional to the radial deformation of the cup. The results show that the magnitude of the maximal contact stress remains constant for inclination values in the range of [0-35 degrees ] and increase significantly with the cup clearance and liner thickness for inclination values in the range of [35-65 degrees ]. A major use for this model would be the calculation of spatial contact stress distribution during normal gait or jogging for different couples of bearing surfaces. PMID:18234204

  8. Synergistic ablation does not affect atrophy or altered myosin heavy chain expression in the non-weight bearing soleus muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linderman, J. K.; Talmadge, R. J.; Gosselink, K. L.; Tri, P. N.; Roy, R. R.; Grindeland, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the soleus muscle undergoes atrophy and alterations in myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition during non-weight bearing in the absence of synergists. Thirty-two female rats were randomly assigned to four groups: control (C), synergistic ablation (ABL) of the gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles to overload the soleus muscle, hindlimb suspension (HLS), or a combination of synergistic ablation and hindlimb suspension (HLS-ABL). After 28 days of hindlimb suspension, soleus atrophy was more pronounced in HLS (58%) than in HLS-ABL (43%) rats. Compared to C rats, non-weight bearing decreased mixed and myofibrillar protein contents and Type I MHC 49%, 45%, and 7%, respectively, in HLS animals. In addition, de novo expression of fast Type IIx and Type IIb MHC (5% and 2%, respectively) was observed in HLS animals. Similarly, when compared to C rats, mixed and myofibrillar protein contents and Type I MHC decreased 43%, 46%, and 4%, respectively, in HLS-ABL animals. Also, de novo expression of Type IIx (4%) and IIb (1%) MHC was observed. Collectively, these data indicate that the loss of muscle protein and Type I MHC, and the de novo expression of Type IIx and Type IIb MHC in the rat soleus occur independently of the presence of synergists during non-weight bearing. Furthermore, these results confirm the contention that soleus mass and MHC expression are highly sensitive to alterations in mechanical load.

  9. Human Muscle Protein Synthetic Responses during Weight-Bearing and Non-Weight-Bearing Exercise: A Comparative Study of Exercise Modes and Recovery Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Pasiakos, Stefan M.; McClung, Holly L.; Margolis, Lee M.; Murphy, Nancy E.; Lin, Gregory G.; Hydren, Jay R.; Young, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of conventional endurance (CE) exercise and essential amino acid (EAA) supplementation on protein turnover are well described. Protein turnover responses to weighted endurance exercise (i.e., load carriage, LC) and EAA may differ from CE, because the mechanical forces and contractile properties of LC and CE likely differ. This study examined muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and whole-body protein turnover in response to LC and CE, with and without EAA supplementation, using stable isotope amino acid tracer infusions. Forty adults (mean ± SD, 22 ± 4 y, 80 ± 10 kg, VO2peak 4.0 ± 0.5 L∙min-1) were randomly assigned to perform 90 min, absolute intensity-matched (2.2 ± 0.1 VO2 L∙m-1) LC (performed on a treadmill wearing a vest equal to 30% of individual body mass, mean ± SD load carried 24 ± 3 kg) or CE (cycle ergometry performed at the same absolute VO2 as LC) exercise, during which EAA (10 g EAA, 3.6 g leucine) or control (CON, non-nutritive) drinks were consumed. Mixed-muscle and myofibrillar MPS were higher during exercise for LC than CE (mode main effect, P < 0.05), independent of dietary treatment. EAA enhanced mixed-muscle and sarcoplasmic MPS during exercise, regardless of mode (drink main effect, P < 0.05). Mixed-muscle and sarcoplasmic MPS were higher in recovery for LC than CE (mode main effect, P < 0.05). No other differences or interactions (mode x drink) were observed. However, EAA attenuated whole-body protein breakdown, increased amino acid oxidation, and enhanced net protein balance in recovery compared to CON, regardless of exercise mode (P < 0.05). These data show that, although whole-body protein turnover responses to absolute VO2-matched LC and CE are the same, LC elicited a greater muscle protein synthetic response than CE. PMID:26474292

  10. Muscle glucose uptake in the rat after suspension with single hindlimb weight bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stump, Craig S.; Woodman, Christopher R.; Fregosi, Ralph F.; Tipton, Charles M.

    1993-01-01

    An examination is conducted of the effect of nonweight-bearing conditions, and the systemic influences of simulated microgravity on rat hindlimb muscles. The results obtained suggest that the increases in hindlimb muscle glucose uptake and extracellular space associated with simulated microgravity persist with hindlimb weightbearing, despite the prevention of muscle atrophy. The mechanism (or mechanisms) responsible for these effects are currently unknown.

  11. Bone loss during partial weight bearing (1/6th gravity) is mitigated by resistance and aerobic exercise in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreaux, R. D.; Metzger, C. E.; Macias, B. R.; Shirazi-Fard, Y.; Hogan, H. A.; Bloomfield, S. A.

    2014-06-01

    Astronauts on long duration missions continue to experience bone loss, as much as 1-2% each month, for up to 4.5 years after a mission. Mechanical loading of bone with exercise has been shown to increase bone formation, mass, and geometry. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of two exercise protocols during a period of reduced gravitational loading (1/6th body weight) in mice. Since muscle contractions via resistance exercise impart the largest physiological loads on the skeleton, we hypothesized that resistance training (via vertical tower climbing) would better protect against the deleterious musculoskeletal effects of reduced gravitational weight bearing when compared to endurance exercise (treadmill running). Young adult female BALB/cBYJ mice were randomly assigned to three groups: 1/6 g (G/6; n=6), 1/6 g with treadmill running (G/6+RUN; n=8), or 1/6 g with vertical tower climbing (G/6+CLB; n=9). Exercise was performed five times per week. Reduced weight bearing for 21 days was achieved through a novel harness suspension system. Treadmill velocity (12-20 m/min) and daily run time duration (32-51 min) increased incrementally throughout the study. Bone geometry and volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) at proximal metaphysis and mid-diaphysis tibia were assessed by in vivo peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) on days 0 and 21 and standard dynamic histomorphometry was performed on undemineralized sections of the mid-diaphysis after tissue harvest. G/6 caused a significant decrease (P<0.001) in proximal tibia metaphysis total vBMD (-9.6%). These reductions of tibia metaphyseal vBMD in G/6 mice were mitigated in both G/6+RUN and G/6+CLB groups (P<0.05). After 21 days of G/6, we saw an absolute increase in tibia mid-diaphysis vBMD and in distal metaphysis femur vBMD in both G/6+RUN and G/6+CLB mice (P<0.05). Substantial increases in endocortical and periosteal mineralizing surface (MS/BS) at mid-diaphysis tibia in G/6+CLB demonstrate that bone formation can be increased even in the presence of reduced weight bearing. These data suggest that moderately vigorous endurance exercise and resistance training, through treadmill running or climb training mitigates decrements in vBMD during 21 days of reduced weight bearing. Consistent with our hypothesis, tower climb training, most pronounced in the tibia mid-diaphysis, provides a more potent osteogenic response compared to treadmill running.

  12. Study of the Polycarbonate-Urethane/Metal Contact in Different Positions during Gait Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Antonio; Mateo, Jesús; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, a growing number of young and more active patients receive hip replacement. More strenuous activities in such patients involve higher friction and wear rates, with friction on the bearing surface being crucial to ensure arthroplasty survival in the long term. Over the last years, the polycarbonate-urethane has offered a feasible alternative to conventional bearings. A finite element model of a healthy hip joint was developed and adjusted to three gait phases (heel strike, mid-stance, and toe-off), serving as a benchmark for the assessment of the results of joint replacement model. Three equivalent models were made with the polycarbonate-urethane Tribofit system implanted, one for each of the three gait phases, after reproducing a virtual surgery over the respective healthy models. Standard body-weight loads were considered: 230% body-weight toe-off, 275% body-weight mid-stance, and 350% body-weight heel strike. Contact pressures were obtained for the different models. When comparing the results corresponding to the healthy model to polycarbonate-urethane joint, contact areas are similar and so contact pressures are within a narrower value range. In conclusion, polycarbonate-urethane characteristics are similar to those of the joint cartilage. So, it is a favorable alternative to traditional bearing surfaces in total hip arthroplasty, especially in young patients. PMID:25247180

  13. Weight-Bearing and Mobilization in the Postoperative Care of Ankle Fractures: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials and Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Smeeing, Diederik P. J.; Houwert, Roderick M.; Briet, Jan Paul; Kelder, Johannes C.; Segers, Michiel J. M.; Verleisdonk, Egbert Jan M. M.; Leenen, Luke P. H.; Hietbrink, Falco

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effectiveness and safety of interventions used for rehabilitation after open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures. Methods A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed using both randomized trials and cohort studies. The effect of mobilization, weight-bearing, and unprotected weight-bearing as tolerated on postoperative recovery was compared using the Olerud Molander score, return to work/daily activities, and the rate of complications. Results A total of 25 articles were included. Ankle exercises resulted in earlier return to work and/or daily activities compared to immobilization (mean difference (MD) -20.76 days; 95% confidence interval (CI) -40.02 to -1.50). There was no difference in the rate of complications between exercises and immobilization (risk ratio (RR) 1.22; 95% CI 0.60 to 2.45) or between early and late weight-bearing (RR 1.26; 95%CI 0.56 to 2.85). Interpretation Results of this meta-analysis show that following ankle surgery, 1) active exercises accelerate return to work and daily activities compared to immobilization, 2) early weight-bearing tends to accelerate return to work and daily activities compared to late weight-bearing. Active exercises in combination with immediate weight-bearing may be a safe option. PMID:25695796

  14. Asymmetry of Anticipatory Postural Adjustment During Gait Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Hiraoka, Koichi; Hatanaka, Ryota; Nikaido, Yasutaka; Jono, Yasutomo; Nomura, Yoshifumi; Tani, Keisuke; Chujo, Yuta

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the asymmetry of anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) during gait initiation and to determine whether the process of choosing the initial swing leg affects APA during gait initiation. The participants initiated gait with the leg indicated by a start tone or initiated gait with the leg spontaneously chosen. The dependent variables of APA were not significantly different among the condition of initiating gait with the preferred leg indicated by the start tone, the condition of initiating gait with the non-preferred leg indicated by the start tone, and the condition of initiating gait with the leg spontaneously chosen. These findings fail to support the view that the process of choosing the initial swing leg affects APA during gait initiation. The lateral displacement of the center of pressure in the period in which shifting the center of pressure to the initial swing phase before initiating gait with the left leg indicated by the external cue was significantly larger than that when initiating gait with the right leg indicated by the external cue, and significantly larger than that when initiating gait with the leg spontaneously chosen. Weight shift to the initial swing side during APA during gait initiation was found to be asymmetrical when choosing the leg in response to an external cue. PMID:25414735

  15. Combined magnetic resonance imaging approach for the assessment of in vivo knee joint kinematics under full weight-bearing conditions.

    PubMed

    Al Hares, Ghaith; Eschweiler, Jrg; Radermacher, Klaus

    2015-06-01

    The development of detailed and specific knowledge on the biomechanical behavior of loaded knee structures has received increased attention in recent years. Stress magnetic resonance imaging techniques have been introduced in previous work to study knee kinematics under load conditions. Previous studies captured the knee movement either in atypical loading supine positions, or in upright positions with help of inclined supporting backrests being insufficient for movement capture under full-body weight-bearing conditions. In this work, we used a combined magnetic resonance imaging approach for measurement and assessment in knee kinematics under full-body weight-bearing in single legged stance. The proposed method is based on registration of high-resolution static magnetic resonance imaging data acquired in supine position with low-resolution data, quasi-static upright-magnetic resonance imaging data acquired in loaded positions for different degrees of knee flexion. The proposed method was applied for the measurement of tibiofemoral kinematics in 10 healthy volunteers. The combined magnetic resonance imaging approach allows the non-invasive measurement of knee kinematics in single legged stance and under physiological loading conditions. We believe that this method can provide enhanced understanding of the loaded knee kinematics. PMID:25979443

  16. The Combination of the Tunnel View and Weight-Bearing Anteroposterior Radiographs Improves the Detection of Knee Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Babatunde, Oladapo M.; Danoff, Jonathan R.; Patrick, David A.; Lee, Jonathan H.; Kazam, Jonathan K.; Macaulay, William

    2016-01-01

    Imaging used for the evaluation of knee pain has historically included weight-bearing anteroposterior (AP), lateral, and sunrise radiographs. We wished to evaluate the utility of adding the weight-bearing (WB) posteroanterior (PA) view of the knee in flexion. We hypothesize that (1) the WB tunnel view can detect radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) not visualized on the WB AP, (2) the combination of the AP and tunnel view increases the radiographic detection of OA, and (3) this may provide additional information to the clinician evaluating knee pain. We retrospectively reviewed the WB AP and tunnel view radiographs of 100 knees (74 patients) presenting with knee pain and analyzed for evidence of arthritis. The combination of the WB tunnel view and WB AP significantly increased the detection of joint space narrowing in the lateral (p < 0.001) and medial (p = 0.006) compartments over the AP view alone. The combined views significantly improved the identification of medial subchondral cysts (p = 0.022), sclerosis of the lateral tibial plateau (p = 0.041), and moderate-to-large osteophytes in the medial compartment (p = 0.012), intercondylar notch (p < 0.001), and tibial spine (p < 0.001). The WB tunnel view is an effective tool to provide additional information on affected compartments in the painful knee, not provided by the AP image alone. PMID:26925264

  17. Effect of spaceflight on the non-weight-bearing bones of rat skeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, D. J.; Russell, J. E.; Winter, F.; Tran Van, P.; Vignery, A.; Baron, R.; Rosenberg, G. D.; Walker, W. V.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of weightlessness on the integrated growth and remodeling of nonweight-bearing bones (the mandibles, teeth, and ribs) were studied. Rats prelabeled with tetracycline to mark the surfaces of bone and tooth formation were subjected to spaceflight conditions for 18.5 days, followed by further injections of tetracycline on days 6 and 29 postflight.Results show that spaceflight conditions did not alter the rate of periosteal bone formation in the ribs and regions of the mandibles covered by masticatory muscles, although bone formation-calcification rates were found to be impaired at those sites in the jaw that had no contiguous muscle (molar region). The remodeling activity on the alveolar bone around the buccal roots of the molar teeth was found to be significantly reduced. While total Ca, P, and hydroxyproline concentrations in the jaws, incisors, and ribs were normal after spaceflight, it was determined that weightless conditions caused a delay in the maturation of bone mineral and matrix in the jaws. These anomalies were found to be corrected by 29 days postflight. These results indicate that most of the nonweight-bearing bones of the rat skeleton are at risk to the effects of weightlessness.

  18. Gait Characteristic Analysis and Identification Based on the iPhone's Accelerometer and Gyrometer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bing; Wang, Yang; Banda, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Gait identification is a valuable approach to identify humans at a distance. In this paper, gait characteristics are analyzed based on an iPhone's accelerometer and gyrometer, and a new approach is proposed for gait identification. Specifically, gait datasets are collected by the triaxial accelerometer and gyrometer embedded in an iPhone. Then, the datasets are processed to extract gait characteristic parameters which include gait frequency, symmetry coefficient, dynamic range and similarity coefficient of characteristic curves. Finally, a weighted voting scheme dependent upon the gait characteristic parameters is proposed for gait identification. Four experiments are implemented to validate the proposed scheme. The attitude and acceleration solutions are verified by simulation. Then the gait characteristics are analyzed by comparing two sets of actual data, and the performance of the weighted voting identification scheme is verified by 40 datasets of 10 subjects. PMID:25222034

  19. Variation in percentage weight bearing with changes in standing posture during water immersion: implication for clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The degree of weightlessness during water immersion is usually estimated through percentage weight bearing (PWB). However, variations in PWB in different standing postures have not been documented. The study was designed to investigate the PWB of apparently healthy individuals in four standing postures at the anterior superior iliac spine level of immersion. Methods One hundred and ninety-three consenting undergraduates were purposively enlisted in this study. Participants body weight (BW) was measured on land as well as in Erect Standing (ES), Grasp-Inclined-Prone-Standing (GIPS), Half-Grasp-Inclined-Towards-Side Standing (HGITSS) and Inclined-Standing with Head Support (ISHS) postures in hydro pool, using a specially designed water-proof weighing scale. PWB was calculated by dividing BW in water by BW on land and multiplying by 100. Data were analyzed using mean, standard deviation and ANOVA at ??=?0.05. Results The mean age and BW (on land) of the participants were 22.4years and 60.7kg respectively. Participants PWB were significantly different (p??0.05). Conclusion Changes in standing posture have significant effect on PWB in hydro pool. The finding has implication for partial weight bearing exercises in hydro pool. PMID:25091034

  20. The Independent and Interactive Effects of Navicular Drop and Quadriceps Angle on Neuromuscular Responses to a Weight-Bearing Perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Sandra J; Carcia, Christopher R; Gansneder, Bruce M; Perrin, David H

    2006-01-01

    Context: Little is known about the effects of static alignment on neuromuscular control of the knee during dynamic motion. Objective: To evaluate the isolated and combined effects of quadriceps angle (QA) and navicular drop (ND) on neuromuscular responses to a weight-bearing perturbation. Design: Mixed-model, repeated-measures design. Setting: Sports medicine and athletic training research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Seventy-nine National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I collegiate female athletes, classified with below-average ND and QA (LND-LQA); below-average ND and above-average QA (LND-HQA); above-average ND and below-average QA (HND-LQA); or above-average ND and QA (HND-HQA). Intervention(s): A lower extremity perturbation device produced a forward and either internal or external rotation of the trunk and femur on the weight-bearing tibia to evoke a reflex response. Main Outcome Measure(s): Neuromuscular responses were examined in the quadriceps, hamstrings, and gastrocnemius muscles: preperturbation amplitude 50 milliseconds before the perturbation, reflex time, and postperturbation amplitude 150 milliseconds immediately postperturbation. Results: Navicular drop had the greatest effect on preperturbation amplitude of the lateral hamstrings and postperturbation amplitude of all muscles, with greater activation amplitude noted in subjects in the HND classifications. Quadriceps angle primarily affected reflex time of the quadriceps; in subjects with LQA, reflex time was faster for internal rotation than external rotation perturbations. The interaction between ND and QA had the greatest effect on reflex time of the lateral hamstrings. For internal rotation perturbations, subjects in the LND classifications had faster reflex times in the lateral hamstrings if they had HQA values rather than LQA values. With external rotation perturbations, HND-LQA subjects had slower reflex times than those in all other alignment classifications. Conclusions: Navicular drop and QA have both independent and interactive effects on neuromuscular responses to a weight-bearing, rotational perturbation. These interactive effects highlight the importance of considering the entire lower extremity posture rather than a single alignment characteristic, given the potential for one alignment factor to compensate for or interact with another. PMID:17043692

  1. Two Patients with Osteochondral Injury of the Weight-Bearing Portion of the Lateral Femoral Condyle Associated with Lateral Dislocation of the Patella

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Atsumi, Satoru; Ichimaru, Shohei; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2014-01-01

    Complications of patellar dislocation include osteochondral injury of the lateral femoral condyle and patella. Most cases of osteochondral injury occur in the anterior region, which is the non-weight-bearing portion of the lateral femoral condyle. We describe two patients with osteochondral injury of the weight-bearing surface of the lateral femoral condyle associated with lateral dislocation of the patella. The patients were 18- and 11-year-old females. Osteochondral injury occurred on the weight-bearing surface distal to the lateral femoral condyle. The presence of a free osteochondral fragment and osteochondral injury of the lateral femoral condyle was confirmed on MRI and reconstruction CT scan. Treatment consisted of osteochondral fragment fixation or microfracture, as well as patellar stabilization. Osteochondral injury was present in the weight-bearing portion of the lateral femoral condyle in both patients, suggesting that the injury was caused by friction between the patella and lateral femoral condyle when the patella was dislocated or reduced at about 90 flexion of the knee joint. These findings indicate that patellar dislocation may occur and osteochondral injury may extend to the weight-bearing portion of the femur even in deep flexion, when the patella is stabilized on the bones of the femoral groove. PMID:25506015

  2. Pilot validation study on a quasi-static weight-bearing knee rig.

    PubMed

    Van Haver, Annemieke; De Roo, Karel; Claessens, Tom; De Beule, Matthieu; Verdonk, Peter; De Baets, Patrick

    2013-03-01

    This article presents a pilot study on a quasi-static knee rig designed to investigate the influence of pathologies and surgical interventions on the patellofemoral kinetics of cadaveric knees. The knee rig allows cadaveric knees to flex and extend under a simulated body weight by transmitting a force to the quadriceps tendon. During the squat simulation, the ground reaction force stays within physiological values. Before using this device to answer clinical questions, two knee specimens were tested to assess the repeatability of the rig. Four repeated flexion-extension cycles were performed under a simulated body weight of 700 N, with an isolated force on the quadriceps tendon up to 2700 N and with a ground reaction force close to 350 N. The resulting patellofemoral contact area shifted from distal to proximal during knee flexion. From 20 degrees to 60 degrees of knee flexion, the mean contact area and pressure increased from 80.2 +/- 3.3 to 349.5 +/- 10.1 mm2 and from 0.9 +/- 0.2 to 5.9 +/- 0.7 MPa, respectively. The transmitted force on the quadriceps tendon, the ground reaction force and the patellofemoral contact area and pressure were continuously measured and showed a relative variability of 1.6%, 2.4%, 2.8% and 3.2%, respectively. The presented knee rig shows a good repeatability that allows us to use this knee rig to quantify the influence of anatomical changes on the patellofemoral contact area and pressures during a squat simulation. PMID:23662338

  3. Normal and shear forces between surfaces bearing porcine gastric mucin, a high-molecular-weight glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Neale M; Yakubov, Gleb E; Stokes, Jason R; Klein, Jacob

    2011-04-11

    A surface force balance was used to measure the normal and shear forces between two mica surfaces each bearing an adsorbed layer of porcine gastric mucin ("Orthana" mucin), genetically similar to human MUC6. This mucin is a highly purified, 546 kDa, weakly negative, polyampholytic molecule with a "dumbbell" structure. Both bare (HP) and hydrophobized (HB) mica substrates were used, and forces were measured under 1 and 30 mg/mL mucin solutions, under pure (no-added-salt) water, and under 0.1 M aqueous Na(+) solution. Normal surface forces were monotonically repulsive in all cases, with onset of repulsion occurring at smaller surface separations, D, in the 0.1 M salt solutions (∼ 20 nm, compared with ∼40 nm for no added salt). Repulsion on HP mica was greater on surface compression than decompression, an effect, attributed to bridging and slow-relaxing additional adsorption on compression, not seen on HB mica, a difference attributed to the denser coverage of mucin hydrophobic moieties on the HB surface. Friction forces increased with compression in all cases, showing hysteretic behavior on HP but not on HB mica, commensurate with the hysteresis observed in the normal measurements. Low friction coefficients μ (= ∂F(s)/∂F(n) < 0.05) were seen up to mean pressures

    ≈ 0.5 to 1.0 MPa, attributed to low interpenetration of the opposed layers together with hydration lubrication effects, with higher μ (up to 0.4) at higher

    attributed to interlayer entanglements and to bridging (for the case of HP mica). Shear forces increased only weakly with sliding speed over the range investigated (80-820 nm s(-1)). The lower friction with HB relative to HP mica suggests a selectivity of the HB surface to the hydrophobic moieties of the mucin that in consequence exposes relatively more of the better-lubricating hydrophilic groups. This surface-selectivity effect on lubrication may have a generality extending to other biological macromolecules that contain both hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups. PMID:21341680

  4. Do external stimuli impact the gait of children with idiopathic toe walking? A study protocol for a within-subject randomised control trial

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Cylie M; Michalitsis, Joanne; Murphy, Anna; Rawicki, Barry; Haines, Terry P

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Frequently, toe walking gait is the result of disease processes, trauma or neurogenic influences. Idiopathic toe walking (ITW) is, by definition, the diagnosis of a toe walking gait adopted in the absence of one of these medical conditions. Long-term ITW has been associated with reduced ankle range of motion. Reported treatments have included serial casting, Botulinum toxin type A or surgery to improve the ankle range of motion. Investigating the impact of simple and non-invasive treatment options for ITW is important for future research and clinical outcomes. This study investigates the immediate impact of footwear, footwear with orthotics and whole body vibration on ITW to determine if any one intervention improves heel contact and spatial-temporal gait measures. This determination is important for future clinical trials into treatment effectiveness. Methods and analysis Design: this protocol describes a within-subject randomised controlled trial that measures changes in gait following changes in external stimuli. Participants: 15 children diagnosed with an ITW gait will be recruited from the Victorian Paediatric Rehabilitation Service at Monash Children's Hospital Toe Walking Clinic provided they have ITW and meet the inclusion criteria. Procedure: participants will have their gait recorded walking barefoot, in usual footwear, a custom-made, full-length carbon fibre orthotic in usual footwear and following whole body vibration. Outcome measures will include the presence of bilateral heel contact preintervention and postintervention, stride length (cm), stride width (cm), left and right stride time (s), left and right stance and swing percentage of the gait cycle, gait velocity (m/s), left and right foot toe in/toe out angle () and weight-bearing lunge pre and post each condition. Ethics and dissemination The results of this study will be published at the conclusion and have been approved by Southern Health HREC:12102B. Clinical trial registry number ACTRN12612000975897. PMID:23454667

  5. INFLUENCE OF AGE ON NEUROMUSCULAR CONTROL DURING A DYNAMIC WEIGHT BEARING TASK

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, Sangeetha; Burkart, Sarah; Baggett, Gail; Nelson, Katie; Teckenburg, Trina; Zwanziger, Mike; Shields, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    Neuromuscular control strategies may change with age and predispose elderly to knee joint injury. The purposes of this study were to determine if long latency responses (LLR), muscle activation patterns, and movement accuracy differs between the young and elderly during a novel single limb squat (SLS) task. Ten young and ten elderly subjects performed a series of resistive SLS (~0–30 degrees) while matching a computer-generated sinusoidal target. The SLS device provided a 16% body weight resistance to knee movement. Both young and elderly showed significant overshoot error when the knee was perturbed (p < 0.05). Accuracy of the tracking task was similar between the young and elderly (p=0.34), but the elderly required more muscle activity compared to the younger subjects (p < 0.05). The elderly group had larger long latency responses (LLRs) than the younger group (p < 0.05). These results support that neuromuscular control of the knee changes with age, and may contribute to injury. PMID:19799103

  6. Low-cost evaluation and real-time feedback of static and dynamic weight bearing asymmetry in patients undergoing in-patient physiotherapy rehabilitation for neurological conditions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Weight bearing asymmetry is common in patients with neurological conditions, and recent advances in gaming technology have produced force platforms that are suitable for use in a clinical setting. The aim of this research is to determine whether commercially-available Wii Balance Boards with customized software providing real-time feedback could be used in a clinical setting to evaluate and improve weight-bearing asymmetry in people with various neurological conditions. Methods Twenty participants (age?=?43.25??19.37years) receiving physiotherapy as a result of a neurological condition performed three trials each of two tasks (static standing and sit-to-stand) with and without visual feedback. Vertical forces were measured using available Wii Balance Boards coupled with customized software that displayed visual feedback in real-time. Primary outcome measures included weight-bearing asymmetry as a percentage of body mass, peak force symmetry index, and a visual analogue scale score rating self-perceived level of asymmetry. Results Weight-bearing asymmetry during the static balance task was significantly reduced (Z?=??2.912, p?=?0.004, ES?=?0.65) with visual feedback. There was no significant difference (Z?=??0.336, p?=?0.737) with visual feedback for the dynamic task, however subgroup analysis indicated that those with higher weight-bearing asymmetry responded the most to feedback. Correlation analysis revealed little or no relationship between participant perception of weight-bearing asymmetry and the results for the static or dynamic balance task (Spearmans rho: ??=?0.138, p?=?0.561 and ??=?0.018, ? =0.940 respectively). Conclusions These findings suggest that weight-bearing asymmetry can be reduced during static tasks in patients with neurological conditions using inexpensive commercially-available Wii Balance Boards coupled with customized visual feedback software. Further research is needed to determine whether real-time visual feedback is appropriate for reducing dynamic weight-bearing asymmetry, whether improvements result in improved physical function, and how cognitive and physical impairments influence the patients ability to respond to treatment. PMID:23849318

  7. Evaluation of a bisphosphonate enriched ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene for enhanced total joint replacement bearing surface functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright-Walker, Cassandra Jane

    Each year in the United States there is an increasing trend of patients receiving total joint replacement (TJR) procedures. Approximately a half million total knee replacements (TKRs) are performed annually in the United States with increasing prevalence attributed to baby-boomers, obesity, older, and younger patients. This trend is also seen for total hip replacements (THRs) as well. The use of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) inserts in TJRs results in wear particle-induced osteolysis, which is the predominant cause for prosthesis failure and revision surgery. Sub-micron size particle generation is inevitable despite the numerous efforts in improving this bearing material. Work by others has shown that the use of oral and intravenous systemic bisphosphonates (BP) can significantly minimize periprosthetic osteolysis. However, the systemic delivery and the high solubility of BPs results in a predominant portion of the drug being excreted via the kidney without reaching its target, bone. This doctoral research project is focused on the development and evaluation of a novel method to administer BPs locally using the inherent wear of UHMWPE for possible use as an anti-osteolysis treatment. For new materials to be considered, they must be mechanically and tribologically comparable to the current gold standard, UHMWPE. In order to evaluate this material, mechanical, drug elution and tribological experiments were performed to allow assessment of material properties. Tensile tests showed comparable yield stress and pin-on-disk testing showed comparable wear to standard virgin UHMWPE. Further, drug elution tests have shown that BP was released from the enriched material both in static and dynamic conditions. Additionally, an aggressive 2 million cycle total knee simulator experiment has shown statistically similar wear results for the two materials. Overall, this research has provided the groundwork for further characterization and development of a new potential material for total joint replacements as an enhancement to standard UHMWPE. This material shows significant potential as an alternative bearing material to indirectly increase TJR longevity by addressing osteolysis related issues.

  8. Effects of ankle strengthening exercises combined with motor imagery training on the timed up and go test score and weight bearing ratio in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Shin; Lee, Hyung Jin; You, Young Youl

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of ankle strengthening exercises combined with motor imagery training and those of ankle strengthening exercises alone in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty stroke patients were randomly assigned to one of the following two groups: experimental group (15 patients) and control group (15 patients). The experimental group underwent motor imagery training for 15 minutes and ankle joint strengthening exercises for 15 minutes, while the control group underwent only ankle joint strengthening exercises for 30 minutes. Each session and training program was implemented four times a week for 4 weeks. The timed up and go (TUG) test score, affected-side weight bearing ratio, and affected-side front/rear weight bearing ratio were assessed. [Results] Both groups demonstrated improvement on the TUG test, and in the affected-side weight bearing ratios, affected-side front/rear weight bearing ratios, and balance errors. The experimental group demonstrated greater improvement than the control group in all variables. [Conclusion] Motor imagery training is an effective treatment method for improving static balance ability in stroke patients. PMID:26311971

  9. A palmar pressure sensor for measurement of upper limb weight bearing by the hands during transfers by paraplegics.

    PubMed

    Kunju, Nissan; Ojha, Rajdeep; Devasahayam, Suresh R

    2013-10-01

    Paraplegic patients have to effect transfer from one seat to another by using their upper limbs. In this process the hands bear almost the entire weight of the body in at least some phases of the transfer. It is desirable to train patients, especially those who are elderly and otherwise weak, to distribute their weight so as to avoid large forces being sustained on any one hand for an extended period. It is also desirable to evaluate the effectiveness of assistive devices like lower limb FES in sharing the load on the hand. This study presents a simple and versatile method of measuring palmar hand force during transfers by paraplegic patients. It is important that this force sensor should not interfere with the grasping and stabilizing properties of the hands and should permit normal transferring. The force sensor comprises an air-filled pouch or pillow that can be placed on any surface. This pneumatic sensor feels like upholstery padding on the surface on which it is placed. The sensor integrates the total pressure applied to the surface of the pouch, thereby obtaining the total force exerted by the palm/hand. The fabrication of the sensor is described, as well as the associated measurement circuit. The static calibration shows that the sensor is linear up to 350?N and the dynamic calibration shows that it has a bandwidth of 13?Hz. The sensor was fabricated using an inflated inelastic airbag attached to a pressure transducer. An automatic offset correction circuit in the preamplifier module ensures that any offset due to initial pressure or sensor drift is removed and the output is zero under no load condition. The key to this sensor arrangement is the ease of fitting it into the intended location without disturbing the existing arrangement for the subject's activities of daily living (ADL). PMID:23964668

  10. Weight-bearing asymmetries during Sit-To-Stand in patients with mild-to-moderate hip osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Eitzen, Ingrid; Fernandes, Linda; Nordsletten, Lars; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn; Risberg, May Arna

    2014-02-01

    The Sit-To-Stand (STS) transition is a mechanically demanding task that may pose particular challenges for individuals with lower limb osteoarthritis (OA). Biomechanical features of STS have been investigated in patients with OA, but not in patients with early stage hip OA. The purpose of this study was to explore inter-limb weight-bearing asymmetries (WBA) and selected kinematic and kinetic variables during STS in patients with mild-to-moderate hip OA compared with healthy controls. Twenty-one hip OA patients and 23 controls were included in the study. Sagittal and frontal plane kinematic and kinetic data were collected using an eight-camera motion analysis system synchronized with two force plates embedded in the floor. There were no distinctive biomechanical alterations in sagittal or frontal plane kinematics or kinetics, movement time, or time to reach peak ground reaction force (GRF) in hip OA patients compared with controls. However, the hip OA patients revealed a distinct pattern of WBA compared with the controls, in unloading their involved limb by 18.4% at peak GRF. These findings indicate that patients with early stage hip OA are not yet forced into a stereotypical movement strategy for STS; however, the observed pattern of WBA requires clinical attention. PMID:24238750

  11. Could be the predominantly-used hemibody related to the weight bearing distribution modified by the chronic hemiparesis after stroke?

    PubMed

    Mundim, Anderson Castro; Paz, Clarissa Cardoso dos Santos Couto; Fachin-Martins, Emerson

    2015-11-01

    Since the first Broca publications issued from 1970s, lateralized functions in the human brain have urged the researchers to postulate hypothesis based in the right-left asymmetries and, according to some theories, the lateralization of the voluntary motor control could represent a solution to avoid redundant process optimizing space and time. Supported by this idea, the clinicians and researchers tend to concept that the chronic hemiplegic stroke patients learn to use predominantly the non-affected hemibody after stroke in which is more convenient to execute their daily life activities, modifying their natural preference in some cases. Although could seems reasonable conceptualize the non-affected side as the predominantly-used hemibody for motor tasks after stroke (convenience hypothesis), evidences point to exist also hemiplegic patients that developed a predominantly use of the affected side. To float an idea, in terms of weight bearing distribution during upright position, the researchers have found patients overloading the non-affected hemibody, as expected; but also patients overloading the affected hemibody, not presenting necessarily Pusher's syndrome cases. Given the evidences, we could propose a severity-modulated predominance hypothesis which complements the convenience hypothesis. According to our complementary hypothesis, the severity of the motor disability presented in the hemiparesis condition (light, moderate and heavy severity) could determine a predominant use defined by preference (light to moderate severity) or convenience (moderate to heavy severity). In this hypothesis, we postulate ideas from a rehabilitation perspective to be incorporated in treatment programs. PMID:26305448

  12. Dynamic weight bearing is an efficient and predictable method for evaluation of arthritic nociception and its pathophysiological mechanisms in mice

    PubMed Central

    Quadros, Andreza U.; Pinto, Larissa G.; Fonseca, Miriam M.; Kusuda, Ricardo; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Cunha, Thiago M.

    2015-01-01

    The assessment of articular nociception in experimental animals is a challenge because available methods are limited and subject to investigator influence. In an attempt to solve this problem, the purpose of this study was to establish the use of dynamic weight bearing (DWB) as a new device for evaluating joint nociception in an experimental model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in mice. AIA was induced in Balb/c and C57BL/6 mice, and joint nociception was evaluated by DWB. Western Blotting and real-time PCR were used to determine protein and mRNA expression, respectively. DWB detected a dose- and time-dependent increase in joint nociception during AIA and was able to detect the dose-response effects of different classes of analgesics. Using DWB, it was possible to evaluate the participation of spinal glial cells (microglia and astrocytes) and cytokines (IL-1? and TNF?) for the genesis of joint nociception during AIA. In conclusion, the present results indicated that DWB is an effective, objective and predictable test to study both the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in arthritic nociception in mice and for evaluating novel analgesic drugs against arthritis. PMID:26511791

  13. Instantaneous screws of weight-bearing knee: what can the screws tell us about the knee motion.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Alon

    2014-07-01

    There are several ways to represent a given object's motion in a 3D space having 6DOF i.e., three translations and three rotations. Some of the methods that are used are mathematical and do not provide any geometrical insight into the nature of the motion. Screw theory is a mathematical, while at the same time, geometrical method in which the 6DOF motion of an object can be represented. We describe the 6DOF motion of a weight-bearing knee by its screw parameters, that are extracted from 3D Optical Reflective motion capture data. The screw parameters which describe the transformation of the shank with respect to the thigh in each two successive frames, is represented as the instantaneous screw axis of the motion given in its Plücker line coordinate, along with its corresponding pitch and intensity values. Moreover, the Striction curve associated with the motion provides geometrical insight into the nature of the motion and its repeatability. We describe the theoretical background and demonstrate what the screw can tell us about the motion of healthy subjects' knee. PMID:24599550

  14. Phasic-to-tonic shift in trunk muscle activity relative to walking during low-impact weight bearing exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplan, Nick; Gibbon, Karl; Hibbs, Angela; Evetts, Simon; Debuse, Dorothée

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of an exercise device, designed to improve the function of lumbopelvic muscles via low-impact weight-bearing exercise, on electromyographic (EMG) activity of lumbopelvic, including abdominal muscles. Surface EMG activity was collected from lumbar multifidus (LM), erector spinae (ES), internal oblique (IO), external oblique (EO) and rectus abdominis (RA) during overground walking (OW) and exercise device (EX) conditions. During walking, most muscles showed peaks in activity which were not seen during EX. Spinal extensors (LM, ES) were more active in EX. Internal oblique and RA were less active in EX. In EX, LM and ES were active for longer than during OW. Conversely, EO and RA were active for a shorter duration in EX than OW. The exercise device showed a phasic-to-tonic shift in activation of both local and global lumbopelvic muscles and promoted increased activation of spinal extensors in relation to walking. These features could make the exercise device a useful rehabilitative tool for populations with lumbopelvic muscle atrophy and dysfunction, including those recovering from deconditioning due to long-term bed rest and microgravity in astronauts.

  15. Recognition using gait.

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Mark William

    2007-09-01

    Gait or an individual's manner of walking, is one approach for recognizing people at a distance. Studies in psychophysics and medicine indicate that humans can recognize people by their gait and have found twenty-four different components to gait that taken together make it a unique signature. Besides not requiring close sensor contact, gait also does not necessarily require a cooperative subject. Using video data of people walking in different scenarios and environmental conditions we develop and test an algorithm that uses shape and motion to identify people from their gait. The algorithm uses dynamic time warping to match stored templates against an unknown sequence of silhouettes extracted from a person walking. While results under similar constraints and conditions are very good, the algorithm quickly degrades with varying conditions such as surface and clothing.

  16. Three-Dimensional Gait Analysis Can Shed New Light on Walking in Patients with Haemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Lobet, Sbastien; Detrembleur, Christine; Massaad, Firas; Hermans, Cedric

    2013-01-01

    In patients with haemophilia (PWH) (from Greek blood love), the long-term consequences of repeated haemarthrosis include cartilage damage and irreversible arthropathy, resulting in severe impairments in locomotion. Quantifying the extent of joint damage is therefore important in order to prevent disease progression and compare the efficacy of treatment strategies. Musculoskeletal impairments in PWH may stem from structural and functional abnormalities, which have traditionally been evaluated radiologically or clinically. However, these examinations are performed in a supine position (i.e., non-weight-bearing condition). We therefore suggest three-dimensional gait analysis (3DGA) as an innovative approach designed to focus on the functional component of the joint during the act of walking. This is of the utmost importance, as pain induced by weight-bearing activities influences the functional performance of the arthropathic joints significantly. This review endeavors to improve our knowledge of the biomechanical consequences of multiple arthropathies on gait pattern in adult patients with haemophilia using 3DGA. In PWH with arthropathy, the more the joint function was altered, the more the metabolic energy was consumed. 3DGA analysis could highlight the effect of an orthopedic disorder in PWH during walking. Indeed, mechanical and metabolic impairments were correlated to the progressive loss of active mobility into the joints. PMID:23766686

  17. Effects of weight-bearing activities on bone mineral content and density in children and adolescents: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Behringer, Michael; Gruetzner, Sebastian; McCourt, Molly; Mester, Joachim

    2014-02-01

    Osteoporosis and associated fractures are a major health concern in Western industrialized nations. Exercise during growth is suggested to oppose the involutional bone loss later in life by increasing peak bone mass. The primary aim of the present meta-analysis was to provide a robust estimate of the effect of weight-bearing activities (WBAs) on bone mineral content (BMC) and areal bone mineral density (aBMD), during childhood and adolescence. To locate relevant studies up to June 2012, computerized searches of multiple bibliographic databases and hand searches of key journals and reference lists were performed. Results were extracted by two independent reviewers. The quality of the included trials was assessed via the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) score. The study group effect was defined as the difference between the standardized mean change for the treatment and control groups divided by the pooled pretest SD. From 109 potentially relevant studies, only 27 met the inclusion criteria. The analyzed training programs were capable of significantly increasing BMC and aBMD during growth. However, the weighted overall effect sizes (ESs) for changes in BMC (ES 0.17; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.05-0.29; p < 0.05) and aBMD (ES 0.26; 95% CI, 0.02-0.49) were small. Stepwise backward regression revealed that more than one-third of the observed variance (r(2)  = 0.35) between subgroups of the BMC dataset could be explained by differences in the amount of habitual calcium intake per day (beta 0.54, p < 0.01) and the maturational stage (beta -0.28, p < 0.01) at baseline. No significant moderators were identified for aBMD, possibly due to the small number of trials investigating WBAs on aBMD. The results of this meta-analysis conclude that WBAs alongside high calcium intake provide a practical, relevant method to significantly improve BMC in prepubertal children, justifying the application of this exercise form as an osteoporosis prophylaxis in this stage of maturity. PMID:23857721

  18. Analysis of trotter gait on the track by accelerometry and image analysis.

    PubMed

    Leleu, C; Gloria, E; Renault, G; Barrey, E

    2002-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the correlation between the phases of the limb cycle of trotters on the track and specific points on the acceleration curves obtained from a new gait analysis system. We compared kinematic data obtained by video image analysis and 3-dimensional acceleration recordings made on 3 French trotters in training. They trotted on a race track at speeds of 8.33, 10 and 11.66 m/s, with a final stretch at maximum speed. Their locomotion was recorded with a synchronised video camera at a frame frequency of 200 Hz and with the Equimétrix gait analysis system. The gait variables were calculated using 3-dimension acceleration data recorded at the sternum (dorso-ventral, longitudinal and lateral axes) at a sampling rate of 100 Hz. Three phases of the stride were clearly identified on the dorsoventral acceleration signal: hoof-landing, midstance phase and toe-off. Braking and propulsion phases were identified on the corresponding longitudinal acceleration signal. The weight-bearing diagonal was identified by observing the lateral signal. The stride temporal variables (stride, stance, braking and propulsion durations for both diagonals), measured by video analysis and by acceleration signal analysis, were not significantly different (P>0.05). The identification of specific points on the acceleration pattern allowed an accurate temporal analysis of the stride. Potential applications could be the determination of locomotor factors related to racing performance or assessment of locomotor disorders at high speed. PMID:12405713

  19. Multiple ligament knee reconstruction clinical follow-up and gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Hart, Joseph M; Blanchard, Berkeley F; Hart, Jennifer A; Montgomery, Scott C; Schoderbek, Robert; Miller, Mark D

    2009-03-01

    Multiple ligament knee injuries are serious and rare injures that have not been studied using advanced gait analysis techniques. The purpose of this study was to perform clinical follow-up and gait analysis on patients with multiple knee ligament reconstruction. Twenty-four patients who underwent a multi-ligament knee reconstruction by a single surgeon volunteered to participate in this study. We performed complete clinical exam including instrumented ACL exam (KT-1000), and radiological exam including weight-bearing and PCL stress radiographs (TELOS) at minimum 2 years post index surgery. In addition, we performed complete three-dimensional gait analysis on 18 patients. We used a 10-camera, high speed (120 Hz) motion analysis system in conjunction with a multi-axis strain-gage force plate which calculated knee joint kinetics and kinematics while subjects performed flat-ground walking and stair-descent tasks. Kinematic and kinetic variables were compared between reconstructed and contralateral knees and unmatched, healthy control knees. All knee joint moments were normalized to subjects' weight. Clinical: Average knee joint flexion/extension 123.6 +/- 15.5/1.7 +/- 3.5, respectively. Average KT-1000 side-to-side difference was 1.2 +/- 2.0 mm, TELOS side-to-side difference on stress radiographs was 4.0 +/- 3.1 mm. Median IKDC score was 67 (range 13-94). Fifty-three percent of patients exhibited radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis (OA) on the operative side; one patient on the contralateral knee. During gait analysis, patients exhibited significantly reduced total knee joint range of motion, and external knee flexion moment in the reconstructed knee compared to the contralateral knee and healthy control knees. The magnitude of these differences was greater while descending a step. Finally, patients who had radiographic evidence of knee joint OA had significantly lower magnitude external knee flexion moment compared to those who did not have OA at the time of follow-up. Greater than 2 years after reconstruction, patients with multi-ligament knee injuries are able to return to daily activities. Gait analysis data suggests that patients may be experiencing higher magnitude changes in sagittal plane kinematics and kinetics during demanding functional tasks (stair decent). Changes in walking gait biomechanics may help explain why this group is experiencing unilateral knee joint degeneration. PMID:19107463

  20. Symmetrical gait descriptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunajewski, Adam; Dusza, Jacek J.; Rosado Muoz, Alfredo

    2014-11-01

    The article presents a proposal for the description of human gait as a periodic and symmetric process. Firstly, the data for researches was obtained in the Laboratory of Group SATI in the School of Engineering of University of Valencia. Then, the periodical model - Mean Double Step (MDS) was made. Finally, on the basis of MDS, the symmetrical models - Left Mean Double Step and Right Mean Double Step (LMDS and RMDS) could be created. The method of various functional extensions was used. Symmetrical gait models can be used to calculate the coefficients of asymmetry at any time or phase of the gait. In this way it is possible to create asymmetry, function which better describes human gait dysfunction. The paper also describes an algorithm for calculating symmetric models, and shows exemplary results based on the experimental data.

  1. Balancing the Rates of New Bone Formation and Polymer Degradation Enhances Healing of Weight-Bearing Allograft/Polyurethane Composites in Rabbit Femoral Defects

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Jerald E.; Prieto, Edna M.; Zienkiewicz, Katarzyna J.; Guda, Teja; Wenke, Joseph C.; Bible, Jesse; Holt, Ginger E.

    2014-01-01

    There is a compelling clinical need for bone grafts with initial bone-like mechanical properties that actively remodel for repair of weight-bearing bone defects, such as fractures of the tibial plateau and vertebrae. However, there is a paucity of studies investigating remodeling of weight-bearing bone grafts in preclinical models, and consequently there is limited understanding of the mechanisms by which these grafts remodel in vivo. In this study, we investigated the effects of the rates of new bone formation, matrix resorption, and polymer degradation on healing of settable weight-bearing polyurethane/allograft composites in a rabbit femoral condyle defect model. The grafts induced progressive healing in vivo, as evidenced by an increase in new bone formation, as well as a decrease in residual allograft and polymer from 6 to 12 weeks. However, the mismatch between the rates of autocatalytic polymer degradation and zero-order (independent of time) new bone formation resulted in incomplete healing in the interior of the composite. Augmentation of the grafts with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 not only increased the rate of new bone formation, but also altered the degradation mechanism of the polymer to approximate a zero-order process. The consequent matching of the rates of new bone formation and polymer degradation resulted in more extensive healing at later time points in all regions of the graft. These observations underscore the importance of balancing the rates of new bone formation and degradation to promote healing of settable weight-bearing bone grafts that maintain bone-like strength, while actively remodeling. PMID:23941405

  2. The effects of ankle mobilization and active stretching on the difference of weight-bearing distribution, low back pain and flexibility in pronated-foots subjects

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ki-Seok; Park, Seong-Doo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was designed to analyze the effects mobilization and active stretching on the difference of weight-bearing distribution, low back pain, and flexibility in pronated-foot subjects. The subjects of this study were 16 chronic low back pain patients. They were randomly divided into the control and experimental group. The experimental group had used the model of ankle mobilization and calf muscle active stretching three times per week, for 4 weeks. The control group did same method without an ankle mobilization. The range of flexion and extension motion of the lumbar vertebrae and low back pain degree and difference of weight-bearing were measured before and after the experiment. The model of ankle mobilization and calf muscle stretching of pronated-foot significantly improved the range of flexion and extension motion of the vertebrae. And the visual analogue scale and distribution of weight-bearing were decreased in both of two groups. In other word, the exercise of this study showed that the model of ankle mobilization and calf muscle stretching of pronated-foot had positive effects on improving the range of flexion and extension motion of the vertebrae. The calf muscle stretching was easy and it is effective in therapy that patients by themselves and helped to recover the balance of the vertebrae to combine ankle mobilization and muscle stretching. PMID:24278874

  3. Gait Analysis Using Wearable Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Weijun; Liu, Tao; Zheng, Rencheng; Feng, Hutian

    2012-01-01

    Gait analysis using wearable sensors is an inexpensive, convenient, and efficient manner of providing useful information for multiple health-related applications. As a clinical tool applied in the rehabilitation and diagnosis of medical conditions and sport activities, gait analysis using wearable sensors shows great prospects. The current paper reviews available wearable sensors and ambulatory gait analysis methods based on the various wearable sensors. After an introduction of the gait phases, the principles and features of wearable sensors used in gait analysis are provided. The gait analysis methods based on wearable sensors is divided into gait kinematics, gait kinetics, and electromyography. Studies on the current methods are reviewed, and applications in sports, rehabilitation, and clinical diagnosis are summarized separately. With the development of sensor technology and the analysis method, gait analysis using wearable sensors is expected to play an increasingly important role in clinical applications. PMID:22438763

  4. Technological Advances in Interventions to Enhance Post-Stroke Gait

    PubMed Central

    Sheffler, Lynne R.; Chae, John

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis This article provides a comprehensive review of specific rehabilitation interventions used to enhance hemiparetic gait following stroke. Neurologic rehabilitation interventions may be either therapeutic resulting in enhanced motor recovery or compensatory whereby assistance or substitution for neurological deficits results in improved functional performance. Included in this review are lower extremity functional electrical stimulation (FES), body-weight supported treadmill training (BWSTT), and lower extremity robotic-assisted gait training. These post-stroke gait training therapies are predicated on activity-dependent neuroplasticity which is the concept that cortical reorganization following central nervous system injury may be induced by repetitive, skilled, and cognitively engaging active movement. All three interventions have been trialed extensively in both research and clinical settings to demonstrate a positive effect on various gait parameters and measures of walking performance. However, more evidence is necessary to determine if specific technology-enhanced gait training methods are superior to conventional gait training methods. This review provides an overview of evidence-based research which supports the efficacy of these three interventions to improve gait, as well as provide perspective on future developments to enhance post-stroke gait in neurologic rehabilitation. PMID:23598265

  5. Comparison of Upright Gait with Supine Bungee-Cord Gait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boda, Wanda L.; Hargens, Alan R.; Campbell, J. A.; Yang, C.; Holton, Emily M. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Running on a treadmill with bungee-cord resistance is currently used on the Russian space station MIR as a countermeasure for the loss of bone and muscular strength which occurs during spaceflight. However, it is unknown whether ground reaction force (GRF) at the feet using bungee-cord resistance is similar to that which occurs during upright walking and running on Earth. We hypothesized-that the DRAMs generated during upright walking and running are greater than the DRAMs generated during supine bungee-cord gait. Eleven healthy subjects walked (4.8 +/- 0.13 km/h, mean +/- SE) and ran (9.1 +/- 0.51 km/h) during upright and supine bungee-cord exercise on an active treadmill. Subjects exercised for 3 min in each condition using a resistance of 1 body weight calibrated during an initial, stationary standing position. Data were sampled at a frequency of 500Hz and the mean of 3 trials was analyzed for each condition. A repeated measures analysis of variance tested significance between the conditions. Peak DRAMs during upright walking were significantly greater (1084.9 +/- 111.4 N) than during supine bungee-cord walking (770.3 +/- 59.8 N; p less than 0.05). Peak GRFs were also significantly greater for upright running (1548.3 +/- 135.4 N) than for supine bungee-cord running (1099.5 +/- 158.46 N). Analysis of GRF curves indicated that forces decreased throughout the stance phase for bungee-cord gait but not during upright gait. These results indicate that bungee-cord exercise may not create sufficient loads at the feet to counteract the loss of bone and muscular strength that occurs during long-duration exposure to microgravity.

  6. Gait rehabilitation machines based on programmable footplates

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Henning; Werner, Cordula; Bernhardt, Rolf; Hesse, Stefan; Krger, Jrg

    2007-01-01

    Background Gait restoration is an integral part of rehabilitation of brain lesioned patients. Modern concepts favour a task-specific repetitive approach, i.e. who wants to regain walking has to walk, while tone-inhibiting and gait preparatory manoeuvres had dominated therapy before. Following the first mobilization out of the bed, the wheelchair-bound patient should have the possibility to practise complex gait cycles as soon as possible. Steps in this direction were treadmill training with partial body weight support and most recently gait machines enabling the repetitive training of even surface gait and even of stair climbing. Results With treadmill training harness-secured and partially relieved wheelchair-mobilised patients could practise up to 1000 steps per session for the first time. Controlled trials in stroke and SCI patients, however, failed to show a superior result when compared to walking exercise on the floor. Most likely explanation was the effort for the therapists, e.g. manually setting the paretic limbs during the swing phase resulting in a too little gait intensity. The next steps were gait machines, either consisting of a powered exoskeleton and a treadmill (Lokomat, AutoAmbulator) or an electromechanical solution with the harness secured patient placed on movable foot plates (Gait Trainer GT I). For the latter, a large multi-centre trial with 155 non-ambulatory stroke patients (DEGAS) revealed a superior gait ability and competence in basic activities of living in the experimental group. The HapticWalker continued the end effector concept of movable foot plates, now fully programmable and equipped with 6 DOF force sensors. This device for the first time enables training of arbitrary walking situations, hence not only the simulation of floor walking but also for example of stair climbing and perturbations. Conclusion Locomotor therapy is a fascinating new tool in rehabilitation, which is in line with modern principles of motor relearning promoting a task-specific repetitive approach. Sophisticated technical developments and positive randomized controlled trials form the basis of a growing acceptance worldwide to the benefits or our patients. PMID:17291335

  7. Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    AVCON, Inc. produces advanced magnetic bearing systems for industrial use, offering a unique technological approach based on contract work done at Marshall Space Flight Center and Lewis Research Center. Designed for the turbopump of the Space Shuttle main engine, they are now used in applications such as electric power generation, petroleum refining, machine tool operation and natural gas pipelines. Magnetic bearings support moving machinery without physical contact; AVCON's homopolar approach is a hybrid of permanent and electromagnets which are one-third the weight, smaller and more power- efficient than previous magnetic bearings.

  8. Gait Retraining: Altering the Fingerprint of Gait.

    PubMed

    Davis, Irene S; Futrell, Erin

    2016-02-01

    In terms of running, there is evidence that links mechanics with injury. This evidence provides the justification for altering these mechanics. Increased hip adduction and vertical impact loading have been most commonly associated with injury. More work is needed in order to understand the optimal way to retrain gait patterns in runners. The human body has a considerable ability to adapt. To provide individuals with the ability to alter faulty movement patterns in ways that can reduce injury risk is a powerful tool. PMID:26616188

  9. A procedure for weighted summation of the derivatives of reflection coefficients in adaptive Schur filter with application to fault detection in rolling element bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makowski, Ryszard; Zimroz, Radoslaw

    2013-07-01

    A procedure for feature extraction using adaptive Schur filter for damage detection in rolling element bearings is proposed in the paper. Damaged bearings produce impact signals (shocks) related with local change (loss) of stiffness in pairs: inner/outer race-rolling element. If significant disturbances do not occur (i.e. signal to noise ratio is sufficient), diagnostics is not very complicated and usually envelope analysis is used. Unfortunately, in most industrial examples, these impulsive contributions in vibration are completely masked by noise or other high energy sources. Moreover, impulses may have time varying amplitudes caused by transmission path, load and properties of noise changing in time. Thus, in order to extract time varying signal of interest, the solution would be an adaptive one. The proposed approach is based on the normalized exact least-square time-variant lattice filter (adaptive Schur filter). It is characterized by an extremely fast start-up performance, excellent convergence behavior, and fast parameter tracking capability, making this approach interesting. Schur adaptive filter consists of P sections, estimating, among others, time-varying reflection coefficients (RCs). In this paper it is proposed to use RCs and their derivatives as diagnostic features. However, it is not convenient to analyze simultaneously P signals for P sections, so instead of these, weighted sum of derivatives of RCs can be used. The key question is how to find these weight values for summation procedure. An original contributions are: application of Schur filter to bearings vibration processing, proposal of several features that can be used for detection and mentioned procedure of weighted summation of signal from sections of Schur filter. The method of signal processing is well-adapted for analysis of the non-stationary time-series, so it sounds very promising for diagnostics of machines working in time varying load/speed conditions.

  10. Validity Of The Nintendo Wii Balance Board To Assess Weight Bearing Asymmetry During Sit-To-Stand And Return-To-Sit Task

    PubMed Central

    Abujaber, Sumayeh; Gillispie, Gregory; Marmon, Adam; Zeni, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Weight bearing asymmetry is common in patients with unilateral lower limb musculoskeletal pathologies. The Nintendo Wii Balance Board (WBB) has been suggested as a low-cost and widely-available tool to measure weight bearing asymmetry in a clinical environment; however no study has evaluated the validity of this tool during dynamic tasks. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the concurrent validity of force measurements acquired from the WBB as compared to laboratory force plates. Thirty-five individuals before, or within 1 year of total joint arthroplasty performed a sit-to-stand and return-to-sit task in two conditions. First, subjects performed the task with both feet placed on a single WBB. Second, the task was repeated with each foot placed on an individual laboratory force plate. Peak vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) under each foot and the inter-limb symmetry ratio were calculated. Validity was examined using Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC), regression analysis, 95% limits of agreement and Bland-Altman plots. Force plates and the WBB exhibited excellent agreement for all outcome measurements (ICC =0.830.99). Bland-Altman plots showed no obvious relationship between the difference and the mean for the peak VGRF, but there was a consistent trend in which VGRF on the unaffected side was lower and VGRF on the affected side was higher when using the WBB. However, these consistent biases can be adjusted for by utilizing regression equations that estimate the force plate values based on the WBB force. The WBB may serve as a valid, suitable, and low-cost alternative to expensive, laboratory force plates for measuring weight bearing asymmetry in clinical settings. PMID:25715680

  11. Validity of the Nintendo Wii Balance Board to assess weight bearing asymmetry during sit-to-stand and return-to-sit task.

    PubMed

    Abujaber, Sumayeh; Gillispie, Gregory; Marmon, Adam; Zeni, Joseph

    2015-02-01

    Weight bearing asymmetry is common in patients with unilateral lower limb musculoskeletal pathologies. The Nintendo Wii Balance Board (WBB) has been suggested as a low-cost and widely-available tool to measure weight bearing asymmetry in a clinical environment; however no study has evaluated the validity of this tool during dynamic tasks. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the concurrent validity of force measurements acquired from the WBB as compared to laboratory force plates. Thirty-five individuals before, or within 1 year of total joint arthroplasty performed a sit-to-stand and return-to-sit task in two conditions. First, subjects performed the task with both feet placed on a single WBB. Second, the task was repeated with each foot placed on an individual laboratory force plate. Peak vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) under each foot and the inter-limb symmetry ratio were calculated. Validity was examined using Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC), regression analysis, 95% limits of agreement and Bland-Altman plots. Force plates and the WBB exhibited excellent agreement for all outcome measurements (ICC=0.83-0.99). Bland-Altman plots showed no obvious relationship between the difference and the mean for the peak VGRF, but there was a consistent trend in which VGRF on the unaffected side was lower and VGRF on the affected side was higher when using the WBB. However, these consistent biases can be adjusted for by utilizing regression equations that estimate the force plate values based on the WBB force. The WBB may serve as a valid, suitable, and low-cost alternative to expensive, laboratory force plates for measuring weight bearing asymmetry in clinical settings. PMID:25715680

  12. Predictors of Gait Speed in Patients after Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Craik, Rebecca L.; Lopopolo, Rosalie; Tomlinson, James D.; Brenneman, Susan K.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Following hip fracture, patients demonstrate greatly reduced walking speeds 1 year later compared with age-matched elders. The purpose of our study was to examine the factors that relate to gait speed in patients after hip fracture. Methods: Forty-two men and women (mean age 79 7.5 years) who sustained a hip fracture participated in this study. Linear regression analysis was used to determine a statistical model that best predicted gait speed, the dependent variable. Gait speed was measured with a computerized gait mat. The independent variables were age, sex, height, weight, time post-fracture, medications, mental status, depression, balance confidence, Medical Outcome Studies, Short Form (SF-36), balance, and lower extremity isometric force. All subjects were discharged from physical therapy services, and measurements were taken, on average, 17 weeks post-fracture. Results: Using stepwise regression, 72% of the variance in gait speed was explained by summed lower extremity strength normalized by body weight, general health (SF-36), and balance confidence (Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale). Conclusions: Impairments (summed lower extremity strength) and risk factors (perception of general health and balance confidence) are important predictors of gait speed in elders after hip fracture. PMID:20145738

  13. In vivo regulation of the beta-myosin heavy chain gene in soleus muscle of suspended and weight-bearing rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giger, J. M.; Haddad, F.; Qin, A. X.; Baldwin, K. M.

    2000-01-01

    In the weight-bearing hindlimb soleus muscle of the rat, approximately 90% of muscle fibers express the beta-myosin heavy chain (beta-MHC) isoform protein. Hindlimb suspension (HS) causes the MHC isoform population to shift from beta toward the fast MHC isoforms. Our aim was to establish a model to test the hypothesis that this shift in expression is transcriptionally regulated through specific cis elements of the beta-MHC promoter. With the use of a direct gene transfer approach, we determined the activity of different length beta-MHC promoter fragments, linked to a firefly luciferase reporter gene, in soleus muscle of control and HS rats. In weight-bearing rats, the relative luciferase activity of the longest beta-promoter fragment (-3500 bp) was threefold higher than the shorter promoter constructs, which suggests that an enhancer sequence is present in the upstream promoter region. After 1 wk of HS, the reporter activities of the -3500-, -914-, and -408-bp promoter constructs were significantly reduced ( approximately 40%), compared with the control muscles. However, using the -215-bp construct, no differences in promoter activity were observed between HS and control muscles, which indicates that the response to HS in the rodent appears to be regulated within the -408 and -215 bp of the promoter.

  14. Strength Asymmetry Increases Gait Asymmetry and Variability in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    LaRoche, Dain P.; Cook, Summer B.; Mackala, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the research was to determine how knee extensor strength asymmetry influences gait asymmetry and variability since these gait parameters have been related to mobility and falls in older adults. Methods Strength of the knee extensors was measured in 24 older women (65 80 yr). Subjects were separated into symmetrical strength (SS, n = 13) and asymmetrical strength (SA, n = 11) groups using an asymmetry cutoff of 20%. Subjects walked at a standard speed of 0.8 m s?1 and at maximal speed on an instrumented treadmill while kinetic and spatiotemporal gait variables were measured. Gait and strength asymmetry were calculated as the percent difference between legs and gait variability as the coefficient of variation over twenty sequential steps. Results SA had greater strength asymmetry (27.4 5.5%) than SS (11.7 5.4%, P < 0.001). Averaged across speeds, SA had greater single (7.1% vs. 2.5%) and double-limb support time asymmetry (7.0 vs. 4.3%) than SS and greater single-limb support time variability (9.7% vs. 6.6%, all P < 0.05). Group speed interactions occurred for weight acceptance force variability (P = 0.02) and weight acceptance force asymmetry (P = 0.017) with greater variability at the maximal speed in SA (5.0 2.4% vs. 3.7 1.2%) and greater asymmetry at the maximal speed in SA (6.4 5.3% vs. 2.5 2.3%). Conclusion Gait variability and asymmetry are greater in older women with strength asymmetry and increase when they walk near their maximal capacities. The maintenance of strength symmetry, or development of symmetry through unilateral exercise, may be beneficial in reducing gait asymmetry, gait variability, and fall risk in older adults. PMID:22617401

  15. Effective one step-iterative fiducial marker-based compensation for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm cone-beam CT scanning of knees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Maier, Andreas; Berger, Martin; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-03-01

    We previously introduced three different fiducial marker-based correction methods (2D projection shifting, 2D projection warping, and 3D image warping) for patients' involuntary motion in the lower body during weight-bearing Carm CT scanning. The 3D warping method performed better than 2D methods since it could more accurately take into account the lower body motion in 3D. However, as the 3D warping method applies different rotational and translational movement to the reconstructed image for each projection frame, distance-related weightings were slightly twisted and thus result in overlaying background noise over the entire image. In order to suppress background noise and artifacts (e.g. metallic marker-caused streaks), the 3D warping method has been improved by incorporating bilateral filtering and a Landwebertype iteration in one step. A series of projection images of five healthy volunteers standing at various flexion angles were acquired using a C-arm cone-beam CT system with a flat panel. A horizontal scanning trajectory of the C-arm was calibrated to generate projection matrices. Using the projection matrices, the static reference marker coordinates in 3D were estimated and used for the improved 3D warping method. The improved 3D warping method effectively reduced background noise down below the noise level of 2D methods and also eliminated metal-generated streaks. Thus, improved visibility of soft tissue structures (e.g. fat and muscle) was achieved while maintaining sharp edges at bone-tissue interfaces. Any high resolution weight-bearing cone-beam CT system can apply this method for motion compensation.

  16. Reliability of the measures of weight-bearing distribution obtained during quiet stance by digital scales in subjects with and without hemiparesis.

    PubMed

    de Araujo-Barbosa, Paulo Henrique Ferreira; de Menezes, Lidiane Teles; Costa, Abrao Souza; Couto Paz, Clarissa Cardoso Dos Santos; Fachin-Martins, Emerson

    2015-05-01

    Described as an alternative way of assessing weight-bearing asymmetries, the measures obtained from digital scales have been used as an index to classify weight-bearing distribution. This study aimed to describe the intra-test and the test/retest reliability of measures in subjects with and without hemiparesis during quiet stance. The percentage of body weight borne by one limb was calculated for a sample of subjects with hemiparesis and for a control group that was matched by gender and age. A two-way analysis of variance was used to verify the intra-test reliability. This analysis was calculated using the differences between the averages of the measures obtained during single, double or triple trials. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was utilized and data plotted using the Bland-Altman method. The intra-test analysis showed significant differences, only observed in the hemiparesis group, between the measures obtained by single and triple trials. Excellent and moderate ICC values (0.69-0.84) between test and retest were observed in the hemiparesis group, while for control groups ICC values (0.41-0.74) were classified as moderate, progressing from almost poor for measures obtained by a single trial to almost excellent for those obtained by triple trials. In conclusion, good reliability ranging from moderate to excellent classifications was found for participants with and without hemiparesis. Moreover, an improvement of the repeatability was observed with fewer trials for participants with hemiparesis, and with more trials for participants without hemiparesis. PMID:25541319

  17. Gait pattern in lean and obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Cimolin, Veronica; Galli, Manuela; Vismara, Luca; Albertini, Giorgio; Sartorio, Alessandro; Capodaglio, Paolo

    2015-03-01

    Obesity is the most common chronic disorder in children and adolescents. As walking is the most common daily task and is recommended for weight management, quantifying how obesity affects the biomechanics of gait provides important insight into the relationship between metabolic and mechanical energetics, mechanical loading and associated risk for musculoskeletal injury. This study quantitatively compared gait in 12 obese and 10 lean adolescents. Obese adolescents showed longer stance duration, excessive hip flexion during the whole gait cycle and an increased hip movement in the frontal plane compared with lean participants. In the obese, the knee was slightly extended in stance phase and the ankle was in a plantar flexed position at initial contact and at toe-off, with a greater ankle range of motion. Kinetic data showed higher values of maximum power generated at hip level during the stance phase; ankle power displayed a higher absorption at initial stance and higher values of power generation in the terminal stance. Because obese adolescents are encouraged to walk to increase their physical activity and energy expenditure level, injury prevention and rehabilitative programmes should take our findings into consideration and include specific strengthening of the lower limb proximal and distal muscles, together with weight loss and reconditioning interventions. PMID:25325166

  18. Does an additional load modify the Anticipatory Postural Adjustments in gait initiation?

    PubMed

    Caderby, Teddy; Dalleau, Georges; Leroyer, Pierre; Bonazzi, Bruno; Chane-Teng, Daniel; Do, Manh-Cuong

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine whether and how an additional load affects the Anticipatory Postural Adjustments (APA) in gait initiation in able-bodied individuals. Nineteen healthy participants initiated gait at a self-selected speed in two conditions: unloaded and with an overload of 15% body weight. The APA duration, the forward impulse of the APA and the duration of gait initiation increased significantly with the overload, while the other variables did not change. These results indicate that, during gait initiation with overload, able-bodied subjects modulate the APA duration to produce a higher forward impulse in order to achieve the steady-state gait at the end of the first step. These findings could have implications in clinical practice where overloading could be used to improve the gait initiation in pathologic patients. Further investigations are needed to confirm this suggestion. PMID:22796245

  19. Growth hormone, IGF-I, and exercise effects on non-weight-bearing fast muscles of hypophysectomized rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, E. J.; Grindeland, R. E.; Roy, R. R.; Talmadge, R. J.; Evans, J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of growth hormone (GH) or insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) with or without exercise (ladder climbing) in countering the effects of unweighting on fast muscles of hypophysectomized rats during 10 days of hindlimb suspension were determined. Compared with untreated suspended rats, muscle weights were 16-29% larger in GH-treated and 5-15% larger in IGF-I-treated suspended rats. Exercise alone had no effect on muscle weights. Compared with ambulatory control, the medial gastrocnemius weight in suspended, exercised rats was larger after GH treatment and maintained with IGF-I treatment. The combination of GH or IGF-I plus exercise in suspended rats resulted in an increase in size of each predominant fiber type, i.e., types I, I + IIa and IIa + IIx, in the medial gastrocnemius compared with untreated suspended rats. Normal ambulation or exercise during suspension increased the proportion of fibers expressing embryonic myosin heavy chain in hypophysectomized rats. The phenotype of the medial gastrocnemius was minimally affected by GH, IGF-I, and/or exercise. These results show that there is an IGF-I, as well as a GH, and exercise interactive effect in maintaining medial gastrocnemius fiber size in suspended hypophysectomized rats.

  20. Proteomic analysis profile of engineered articular cartilage with chondrogenic differentiated adipose tissue-derived stem cells loaded polyglycolic acid mesh for weight-bearing area defect repair.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lunli; Zhou, Xiao; Wu, Yaohao; Zhang, Yun; Wang, Chen; Zhou, Heng; Guo, Fangfang; Cui, Lei

    2014-02-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the possibility of full-thickness defects repair in porcine articular cartilage (AC) weight-bearing area using chondrogenic differentiated autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) with a follow-up of 3 and 6 months, which is successive to our previous study on nonweight-bearing area. The isolated ASCs were seeded onto the phosphoglycerate/polylactic acid (PGA/PLA) with chondrogenic induction in vitro for 2 weeks as the experimental group prior to implantation in porcine AC defects (8 mm in diameter, deep to subchondral bone), with PGA/PLA only as control. With follow-up time being 3 and 6 months, both neo-cartilages of postimplantation integrated well with the neighboring normal cartilage and subchondral bone histologically in experimental group, whereas only fibrous tissue in control group. Immunohistochemical and toluidine blue staining confirmed similar distribution of COL II and glycosaminoglycan in the regenerated cartilage to the native one. A vivid remolding process with repair time was also witnessed in the neo-cartilage as the compressive modulus significantly increased from 70% of the normal cartilage at 3 months to nearly 90% at 6 months, which is similar to our former research. Nevertheless, differences of the regenerated cartilages still could be detected from the native one. Meanwhile, the exact mechanism involved in chondrogenic differentiation from ASCs seeded on PGA/PLA is still unknown. Therefore, proteome is resorted leading to 43 proteins differentially identified from 20 chosen two-dimensional spots, which do help us further our research on some committed factors. In conclusion, the comparison via proteome provided a thorough understanding of mechanisms implicating ASC differentiation toward chondrocytes, which is further substantiated by the present study as a perfect supplement to the former one in nonweight-bearing area. PMID:24044689

  1. Proteomic Analysis Profile of Engineered Articular Cartilage with Chondrogenic Differentiated Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells Loaded Polyglycolic Acid Mesh for Weight-Bearing Area Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lunli; Zhou, Xiao; Wu, Yaohao; Zhang, Yun; Wang, Chen; Zhou, Heng; Guo, Fangfang

    2014-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the possibility of full-thickness defects repair in porcine articular cartilage (AC) weight-bearing area using chondrogenic differentiated autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) with a follow-up of 3 and 6 months, which is successive to our previous study on nonweight-bearing area. The isolated ASCs were seeded onto the phosphoglycerate/polylactic acid (PGA/PLA) with chondrogenic induction in vitro for 2 weeks as the experimental group prior to implantation in porcine AC defects (8?mm in diameter, deep to subchondral bone), with PGA/PLA only as control. With follow-up time being 3 and 6 months, both neo-cartilages of postimplantation integrated well with the neighboring normal cartilage and subchondral bone histologically in experimental group, whereas only fibrous tissue in control group. Immunohistochemical and toluidine blue staining confirmed similar distribution of COL II and glycosaminoglycan in the regenerated cartilage to the native one. A vivid remolding process with repair time was also witnessed in the neo-cartilage as the compressive modulus significantly increased from 70% of the normal cartilage at 3 months to nearly 90% at 6 months, which is similar to our former research. Nevertheless, differences of the regenerated cartilages still could be detected from the native one. Meanwhile, the exact mechanism involved in chondrogenic differentiation from ASCs seeded on PGA/PLA is still unknown. Therefore, proteome is resorted leading to 43 proteins differentially identified from 20 chosen two-dimensional spots, which do help us further our research on some committed factors. In conclusion, the comparison via proteome provided a thorough understanding of mechanisms implicating ASC differentiation toward chondrocytes, which is further substantiated by the present study as a perfect supplement to the former one in nonweight-bearing area. PMID:24044689

  2. Gait in Very Preterm School-Aged Children in Dual-Task Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Hagmann-von Arx, Priska; Manicolo, Olivia; Perkinson-Gloor, Nadine; Weber, Peter; Grob, Alexander; Lemola, Sakari

    2015-01-01

    Objective The control of gait requires executive and attentional functions. As preterm children show executive and attentional deficits compared to full-term children, performing concurrent tasks that impose additional cognitive load may lead to poorer walking performance in preterm compared to full-term children. Knowledge regarding gait in preterm children after early childhood is scarce. We examined straight walking and if it is more affected in very preterm than in full-term children in dual-task paradigms. Study design Twenty preterm children with very low birth-weight (≤ 1500 g), 24 preterm children with birth-weight > 1500 g, and 44 full-term children, born between 2001 and 2006, were investigated. Gait was assessed using an electronic walkway system (GAITRite) while walking without a concurrent task (single-task) and while performing one concurrent (dual-task) or two concurrent (triple-task) tasks. Spatio-temporal gait parameters (gait velocity, cadence, stride length, single support time, double support time), normalized gait parameters (normalized velocity, normalized cadence, normalized stride length) and gait variability parameters (stride velocity variability, stride length variability) were analyzed. Results In dual- and triple-task conditions children showed decreased gait velocity, cadence, stride length, as well as increased single support time, double support time and gait variability compared to single-task walking. Further, results showed systematic decreases in stride velocity variability from preterm children with very low birth weight (≤ 1500 g) to preterm children with birth weight > 1500 g to full-term children. There were no significant interactions between walking conditions and prematurity status. Conclusions Dual and triple tasking affects gait of preterm and full-term children, confirming previous results that walking requires executive and attentional functions. Birth-weight dependent systematic changes in stride velocity variability indicate poorer walking performance in preterm children who were less mature at birth. PMID:26641492

  3. Expressing gait-line symmetry in able-bodied gait

    PubMed Central

    Jele?, Piotr; Wit, Andrzej; Dudzi?ski, Krzysztof; Nolan, Lee

    2008-01-01

    Background Gait-lines, or the co-ordinates of the progression of the point of application of the vertical ground reaction force, are a commonly reported parameter in most in-sole measuring systems. However, little is known about what is considered a "normal" or "abnormal" gait-line pattern or level of asymmetry. Furthermore, no reference databases on healthy young populations are available for this parameter. Thus the aim of this study is to provide such reference data in order to allow this tool to be better used in gait analysis. Methods Vertical ground reaction force data during several continuous gait cycles were collected using a Computer Dyno Graphy in-sole system for 77 healthy young able-bodied subjects. A curve (termed gait-line) was obtained from the co-ordinates of the progression of the point of application of the force. An Asymmetry Coefficient Curve (AsC) was calculated between the mean gait-lines for the left and right foot for each subject. AsC limits of 1.96 and 3 standard deviations (SD) from the mean were then calculated. Gait-line data from 5 individual subjects displaying pathological gait due to disorders relating to the discopathy of the lumbar spine (three with considerable plantarflexor weakness, two with considerable dorsiflexor weakness) were compared to the AsC results from the able-bodied group. Results The 1.96 SD limit suggested that non-pathological gait falls within 1216% asymmetry for gait-lines. Those exhibiting pathological gait fell outside both the 1.96 and 3SD limits at several points during stance. The subjects exhibiting considerable plantarflexor weakness all fell outside the 1.96SD limit from 3050% of foot length to toe-off while those exhibiting considerable dorsiflexor weakness fell outside the 1.96SD limit between initial contact to 2540% of foot length, and then surpassed the 3SD limit after 5580% of foot length. Conclusion This analysis of gait-line asymmetry provides a reference database for young, healthy able-bodied subject populations for both further research and clinical gait analysis. This information is used to suggest non-pathological gait-line asymmetry pattern limits, and limits where detailed case analysis is warranted. PMID:19099568

  4. Altered Knee and Ankle Kinematics During Squatting in Those With Limited Weight-BearingLunge Ankle-Dorsiflexion Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Dill, Karli E.; Begalle, Rebecca L.; Frank, Barnett S.; Zinder, Steven M.; Padua, Darin A.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Ankle-dorsiflexion (DF) range of motion (ROM) may influence movement variables that are known to affect anterior cruciate ligament loading, such as knee valgus and knee flexion. To our knowledge, researchers have not studied individuals with limited or normal ankle DF-ROM to investigate the relationship between those factors and the lower extremity movement patterns associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury. Objective: To determine, using 2 different measurement techniques, whether knee- and ankle-joint kinematics differ between participants with limited and normal ankle DF-ROM. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Forty physically active adults (20 with limited ankle DF-ROM, 20 with normal ankle DF-ROM). Main Outcome Measure(s): Ankle DF-ROM was assessed using 2 techniques: (1) nonweight-bearing ankle DF-ROM with the knee straight, and (2) weight-bearing lunge (WBL). Knee flexion, knee valgus-varus, knee internal-external rotation, and ankle DF displacements were assessed during the overhead-squat, single-legged squat, and jump-landing tasks. Separate 1-way analyses of variance were performed to determine whether differences in knee- and ankle-joint kinematics existed between the normal and limited groups for each assessment. Results: We observed no differences between the normal and limited groups when classifying groups based on nonweight-bearing passive-ankle DF-ROM. However, individuals with greater ankle DF-ROM during the WBL displayed greater knee-flexion and ankle-DF displacement and peak knee flexion during the overhead-squat and single-legged squat tasks. In addition, those individuals also demonstrated greater knee-varus displacement during the single-legged squat. Conclusions: Greater ankle DF-ROM assessed during the WBL was associated with greater knee-flexion and ankle-DF displacement during both squatting tasks as well as greater knee-varus displacement during the single-legged squat. Assessment of ankle DF-ROM using the WBL provided important insight into compensatory movement patterns during squatting, whereas nonweight-bearing passive ankle DF-ROM did not. Improving ankle DF-ROM during the WBL may be an important intervention for altering high-risk movement patterns commonly associated with noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury. PMID:25144599

  5. Gait Recognition and Walking Exercise Intensity Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bor-Shing; Liu, Yu-Ting; Yu, Chu; Jan, Gene Eu; Hsiao, Bo-Tang

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular patients consult doctors for advice regarding regular exercise, whereas obese patients must self-manage their weight. Because a system for permanently monitoring and tracking patients’ exercise intensities and workouts is necessary, a system for recognizing gait and estimating walking exercise intensity was proposed. For gait recognition analysis, αβ filters were used to improve the recognition of athletic attitude. Furthermore, empirical mode decomposition (EMD) was used to filter the noise of patients’ attitude to acquire the Fourier transform energy spectrum. Linear discriminant analysis was then applied to this energy spectrum for training and recognition. When the gait or motion was recognized, the walking exercise intensity was estimated. In addition, this study addressed the correlation between inertia and exercise intensity by using the residual function of the EMD and quadratic approximation to filter the effect of the baseline drift integral of the acceleration sensor. The increase in the determination coefficient of the regression equation from 0.55 to 0.81 proved that the accuracy of the method for estimating walking exercise intensity proposed by Kurihara was improved in this study. PMID:24714057

  6. Biology of gait control

    PubMed Central

    Annweiler, C.; Verghese, J.; Fantino, B.; Herrmann, F.R.; Allali, G.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Adverse neuromuscular events have been described in case of low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) concentrations, suggesting that vitamin D may be involved in gait stability. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine the association between stride-to-stride variability of stride time (STV) and serum 25OHD concentration in adults aged 65 years and older. Methods: STV and 25OHD concentration were assessed in 411 community-dwelling older adults (mean age 70.4 1.8 years, 57.9% women). The following established 25OHD thresholds were used: severe 25OHD insufficiency <10 ng/mL, moderate 1030 ng/mL, and normal >30 ng/mL. Age, number of drugs used per day, use of psychoactive drugs, depressive symptoms, cognitive decline, history of falls, distance visual acuity, lower limb proprioception, center of mass (CoM) motion, and walking speed were considered as potential confounders. Results: A total of 16.6% (n = 68) of subjects had severe 25OHD insufficiency, 70.3% (n = 289) moderate insufficiency, and 13.1% (n = 54) normal concentrations. In the full adjusted and the stepwise backward linear regression models, high STV (worse performance) was associated with severe 25OHD insufficiency (p = 0.028 and p = 0.044, respectively), high CoM motion (p = 0.031 and p = 0.014, respectively), and low lower limb proprioception score (p = 0.017 and p = 0.008, respectively). The stepwise backward regression model also showed that high STV was associated with female gender (p = 0.041). Conclusions: Low serum 25OHD concentrations were associated with high STV reflecting a disturbed gait control. This association could be explained by a possible action of vitamin D on different components involved in gait control. PMID:21471466

  7. Pioglitazone Treatment Increases Survival and Prevents Body Weight Loss in Tumor–Bearing Animals: Possible Anti-Cachectic Effect

    PubMed Central

    Beluzi, Mércia; Peres, Sidney B.; Henriques, Felipe S.; Sertié, Rogério A. L.; Franco, Felipe O.; Santos, Kaltinaitis B.; Knobl, Pâmela; Andreotti, Sandra; Shida, Cláudio S.; Neves, Rodrigo X.; Farmer, Stephen R.; Seelaender, Marília; Lima, Fábio B.; Batista Jr., Miguel L.

    2015-01-01

    Cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome characterized by profound involuntary weight loss, fat depletion, skeletal muscle wasting, and asthenia; all symptoms are not entirely attributable to inadequate nutritional intake. Adipose tissue and skeletal muscle loss during cancer cachexia development has been described systematically. The former was proposed to precede and be more rapid than the latter, which presents a means for the early detection of cachexia in cancer patients. Recently, pioglitazone (PGZ) was proposed to exhibit anti-cancer properties, including a reduction in insulin resistance and adipose tissue loss; nevertheless, few studies have evaluated its effect on survival. For greater insight into a potential anti-cachectic effect due to PGZ, 8-week-old male Wistar rats were subcutaneously inoculated with 1 mL (2×107) of Walker 256 tumor cells. The animals were randomly assigned to two experimental groups: TC (tumor + saline-control) and TP5 (tumor + PGZ/5 mg). Body weight, food ingestion and tumor growth were measured at baseline and after removal of tumor on days 7, 14 and 26. Samples from different visceral adipose tissue (AT) depots were collected on days 7 and 14 and stored at -80o C (5 to 7 animals per day/group). The PGZ treatment showed an increase in the survival average of 27.3% (P< 0.01) when compared to TC. It was also associated with enhanced body mass preservation (40.7 and 56.3%, p< 0.01) on day 14 and 26 compared with the TC group. The treatment also reduced the final tumor mass (53.4%, p<0.05) and anorexia compared with the TC group during late-stage cachexia. The retroperitoneal AT (RPAT) mass was preserved on day 7 compared with the TC group during the same experimental period. Such effect also demonstrates inverse relationship with tumor growth, on day 14. Gene expression of PPAR-γ, adiponectin, LPL and C/EBP-α from cachectic rats was upregulated after PGZ. Glucose uptake from adipocyte cells (RPAT) was entirely re-established due to PGZ treatment. Taken together, the results demonstrate beneficial effects of PGZ treatment at both the early and final stages of cachexia. PMID:25807446

  8. The development of two mobile gait rehabilitation systems.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kap-Ho; Lee, Ju-Jang

    2009-04-01

    The ability to walk without the help of a caretaker enhances the quality of life for those who are bed-ridden or confined to a wheelchair. At present, most of the available gait rehabilitation robot systems have been designed to support the body weight externally. For gait training to be effective, a mobile body weight support (BWS) mechanism is needed. In mobile gait training robot systems, functions such as patient path following and constant BWS are important issues, particularly in dynamic environments. In the present study, two types of robotic systems were developed for gait rehabilitation. The first is known as the mobile manipulator type and the second the mobile vehicle type. The differences between the two systems in design and control are discussed. A control algorithm based on a neural network was used to compensate for dynamic interactions, unmodeled dynamics, and disturbances by the user on the system. Both electrical and pneumatic BWS mechanisms were built and compared. The proposed BWS systems were tested experimentally for their effectiveness in gait rehabilitation while maximizing the therapeutic outcome. PMID:19228564

  9. [Development of a gait trainer with regulated servo-drive for rehabilitation of locomotor disabled patients].

    PubMed

    Uhlenbrock, D; Sarkodie-Gyan, T; Reiter, F; Konrad, M; Hesse, S

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a new gait trainer for the rehabilitation of non-ambulatory patients. For the simulation of the gait phase, we used a commercially available fitness trainer (Fast Track) with two foot plates moving in an alternating fashion and connected to a servo-controlled propulsion system providing the necessary support for the movement depending on the patient's impairment level. To compensate deficient equilibrium reflexes, the patient was suspended in a harness capable of supporting some of his/her weight. Video analysis of gait and the kinesiological EMG were used to assess the pattern of movement and the corresponding muscle activity, which were then evaluated in healthy subjects, spinal cord injured and stroke patients and compared with walking on the flat or on a treadmill. Walking on the gait trainer was characterised by a symmetrical, sinusoidal movement of lower amplitude than in normal gait. The EMG showed a low activity of the tibialis anterior muscle, while the antigravity muscles were clearly activated by the gait trainer during the stance phase. In summary, the new gait trainer generates a symmetrical gait-like movement, promoting weight acceptance in the stance phase, which is important for the restoration of walking ability. PMID:9376497

  10. The relationship between spatiotemporal gait asymmetry and balance in individuals with chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Lewek, Michael D; Bradley, Claire E; Wutzke, Clinton J; Zinder, Steven M

    2014-02-01

    Falls are common after stroke and often attributed to poor balance. Falls often occur during walking, suggesting that walking patterns may induce a loss of balance. Gait after stroke is frequently spatiotemporally asymmetric, which may decrease balance. The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between spatiotemporal gait asymmetry and balance control. Thirty-nine individuals with chronic stroke walked at comfortable and fast speeds to calculate asymmetry ratios for step length, stance time, and swing time. Balance measures included the Berg Balance Scale, step width during gait, and the weight distribution between legs during standing. Correlational analyses determined the relationships between balance and gait asymmetry. At comfortable and fast gait speeds, step width was correlated with stance time and swing time asymmetries (r = 0.39-0.54). Berg scores were correlated with step length and swing time asymmetries (r = -0.36 to -0.63). During fast walking, the weight distribution between limbs was correlated with stance time asymmetry (r = -0.41). Spatiotemporal gait asymmetry was more closely related to balance measures involving dynamic tasks than static tasks, suggesting that gait asymmetry may be related to the high number of falls poststroke. Further study to determine if rehabilitation that improves gait asymmetry has a similar influence on balance is warranted. PMID:23677889

  11. Effects of a lower-body exoskeleton device on metabolic cost and gait biomechanics during load carriage.

    PubMed

    Gregorczyk, Karen N; Hasselquist, Leif; Schiffman, Jeffrey M; Bensel, Carolyn K; Obusek, John P; Gutekunst, David J

    2010-10-01

    This study investigated the effects on metabolic cost and gait biomechanics of using a prototype lower-body exoskeleton (EXO) to carry loads. Nine US Army participants walked at 1.34 m/s on a 0% grade for 8 min carrying military loads of 20 kg, 40 kg and 55 kg with and without the EXO. Mean oxygen consumption (VO(2)) scaled to body mass and scaled to total mass were significantly higher, by 60% and 41% respectively, when the EXO was worn, compared with the control condition. Mean VO(2) and mean VO(2) scaled to body mass significantly increased with load. The kinematic and kinetic data revealed significant differences between EXO and control conditions, such as walking with a more flexed posture and braking with higher ground reaction force at heel strike when wearing the EXO. Study findings demonstrate that the EXO increased users' metabolic cost while carrying various loads and altered their gait biomechanics compared with conventional load carriage. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: An EXO designed to assist in load bearing was found to raise energy expenditure substantially when tested by soldiers carrying military loads. EXO weight, weight distribution and design elements that altered users' walking biomechanics contributed to the high energy cost. To realise the potential of EXOs, focus on the user must accompany engineering advances. PMID:20865609

  12. Fiducial marker-based correction for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm CT scanning of knees. II. Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Maier, Andreas; Keil, Andreas; Pal, Saikat; McWalter, Emily J.; Beaupr, Gary S.; Gold, Garry E.; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A C-arm CT system has been shown to be capable of scanning a single cadaver leg under loaded conditions by virtue of its highly flexible acquisition trajectories. In Part I of this study, using the 4D XCAT-based numerical simulation, the authors predicted that the involuntary motion in the lower body of subjects in weight-bearing positions would seriously degrade image quality and the authors suggested three motion compensation methods by which the reconstructions could be corrected to provide diagnostic image quality. Here, the authors demonstrate that a flat-panel angiography system is appropriate for scanning both legs of subjects in vivo under weight-bearing conditions and further evaluate the three motion-correction algorithms using in vivo data. Methods: The geometry of a C-arm CT system for a horizontal scan trajectory was calibrated using the PDS-2 phantom. The authors acquired images of two healthy volunteers while lying supine on a table, standing, and squatting at several knee flexion angles. In order to identify the involuntary motion of the lower body, nine 1-mm-diameter tantalum fiducial markers were attached around the knee. The static mean marker position in 3D, a reference for motion compensation, was estimated by back-projecting detected markers in multiple projections using calibrated projection matrices and identifying the intersection points in 3D of the back-projected rays. Motion was corrected using three different methods (described in detail previously): (1) 2D projection shifting, (2) 2D deformable projection warping, and (3) 3D rigid body warping. For quantitative image quality analysis, SSIM indices for the three methods were compared using the supine data as a ground truth. Results: A 2D Euclidean distance-based metric of subjects motion ranged from 0.85 mm (0.49 mm) to 3.82 mm (2.91 mm) (corresponding to 2.76 to 12.41 pixels) resulting in severe motion artifacts in 3D reconstructions. Shifting in 2D, 2D warping, and 3D warping improved the SSIM in the central slice by 20.22%, 16.83%, and 25.77% in the data with the largest motion among the five datasets (SCAN5); improvement in off-center slices was 18.94%, 29.14%, and 36.08%, respectively. Conclusions: The authors showed that C-arm CT control can be implemented for nonstandard horizontal trajectories which enabled us to scan and successfully reconstruct both legs of volunteers in weight-bearing positions. As predicted using theoretical models, the proposed motion correction methods improved image quality by reducing motion artifacts in reconstructions; 3D warping performed better than the 2D methods, especially in off-center slices. PMID:24877813

  13. Fiducial marker-based correction for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm CT scanning of knees. II. Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jang-Hwan; Maier, Andreas; Keil, Andreas; McWalter, Emily J.; Gold, Garry E.; Fahrig, Rebecca; Pal, Saikat; Beaupré, Gary S.

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A C-arm CT system has been shown to be capable of scanning a single cadaver leg under loaded conditions by virtue of its highly flexible acquisition trajectories. In Part I of this study, using the 4D XCAT-based numerical simulation, the authors predicted that the involuntary motion in the lower body of subjects in weight-bearing positions would seriously degrade image quality and the authors suggested three motion compensation methods by which the reconstructions could be corrected to provide diagnostic image quality. Here, the authors demonstrate that a flat-panel angiography system is appropriate for scanning both legs of subjectsin vivo under weight-bearing conditions and further evaluate the three motion-correction algorithms using in vivo data. Methods: The geometry of a C-arm CT system for a horizontal scan trajectory was calibrated using the PDS-2 phantom. The authors acquired images of two healthy volunteers while lying supine on a table, standing, and squatting at several knee flexion angles. In order to identify the involuntary motion of the lower body, nine 1-mm-diameter tantalum fiducial markers were attached around the knee. The static mean marker position in 3D, a reference for motion compensation, was estimated by back-projecting detected markers in multiple projections using calibrated projection matrices and identifying the intersection points in 3D of the back-projected rays. Motion was corrected using three different methods (described in detail previously): (1) 2D projection shifting, (2) 2D deformable projection warping, and (3) 3D rigid body warping. For quantitative image quality analysis, SSIM indices for the three methods were compared using the supine data as a ground truth. Results: A 2D Euclidean distance-based metric of subjects’ motion ranged from 0.85 mm (±0.49 mm) to 3.82 mm (±2.91 mm) (corresponding to 2.76 to 12.41 pixels) resulting in severe motion artifacts in 3D reconstructions. Shifting in 2D, 2D warping, and 3D warping improved the SSIM in the central slice by 20.22%, 16.83%, and 25.77% in the data with the largest motion among the five datasets (SCAN5); improvement in off-center slices was 18.94%, 29.14%, and 36.08%, respectively. Conclusions: The authors showed that C-arm CT control can be implemented for nonstandard horizontal trajectories which enabled us to scan and successfully reconstruct both legs of volunteers in weight-bearing positions. As predicted using theoretical models, the proposed motion correction methods improved image quality by reducing motion artifacts in reconstructions; 3D warping performed better than the 2D methods, especially in off-center slices.

  14. Terminology and forensic gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Birch, Ivan; Vernon, Wesley; Walker, Jeremy; Young, Maria

    2015-07-01

    The use of appropriate terminology is a fundamental aspect of forensic gait analysis. The language used in forensic gait analysis is an amalgam of that used in clinical practice, podiatric biomechanics and the wider field of biomechanics. The result can often be a lack of consistency in the language used, the definitions used and the clarity of the message given. Examples include the use of 'gait' and 'walking' as synonymous terms, confusion between 'step' and 'stride', the mixing of anatomical, positional and pathological descriptors, and inability to describe appropriately movements of major body segments such as the torso. The purpose of this paper is to share the well-established definitions of the fundamental parameters of gait, common to all professions, and advocate their use in forensic gait analysis to establish commonality. The paper provides guidance on the selection and use of appropriate terminology in the description of gait in the forensic context. This paper considers the established definitions of the terms commonly used, identifies those terms which have the potential to confuse readers, and suggests a framework of terminology which should be utilised in forensic gait analysis. PMID:26087876

  15. Postural stability in symmetrical gaits.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Teresa; Trojnacki, Maciej

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the method of stability analysis of dynamic symmetrical gaits is discussed. The problem of dynamic postural equilibrium, taking into account the role of compliant feet, is solved. The equilibrium conditions are split between the foot attachment points and the points within the foot-end area. The present method is useful for motion synthesis, taking into account robot parameters. It also helps in the robot foot design. As an illustrative example a four-legged diagonal gait is considered. The theoretical results were verified by implementing and observing the diagonal gait in four-legged machine with and without feet. PMID:19839558

  16. Diagnosing fatigue in gait patterns by support vector machines and self-organizing maps.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Daniel; Schllhorn, Wolfgang I; Newell, Karl M; Jger, Jrg M; Rost, Franz; Vehof, Katrin

    2011-10-01

    The aim of the study was to train and test support vector machines (SVM) and self-organizing maps (SOM) to correctly classify gait patterns before, during and after complete leg exhaustion by isokinetic leg exercises. Ground reaction forces were derived for 18 gait cycles on 9 adult participants. Immediately before the trials 7-12, participants were required to completely exhaust their calves with the aid of additional weights (44.48.8kg). Data were analyzed using: (a) the time courses directly and (b) only the deviations from each individual's calculated average gait pattern. On an inter-individual level the person recognition of the gait patterns was 100% realizable. Fatigue recognition was also highly probable at 98.1%. Additionally, applied SOMs allowed an alternative visualization of the development of fatigue in the gait patterns over the progressive fatiguing exercise regimen. PMID:21195495

  17. Image-based compensation for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm cone-beam CT scanning of knees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unberath, Mathias; Choi, Jang-Hwan; Berger, Martin; Maier, Andreas; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-03-01

    We previously introduced four fiducial marker-based strategies to compensate for involuntary knee-joint motion during weight-bearing C-arm CT scanning of the lower body. 2D methods showed significant reduction of motion- related artifacts, but 3D methods worked best. However, previous methods led to increased examination times and patient discomfort caused by the marker attachment process. Moreover, sub-optimal marker placement may lead to decreased marker detectability and therefore unstable motion estimates. In order to reduce overall patient discomfort, we developed a new image-based 2D projection shifting method. A C-arm cone-beam CT system was used to acquire projection images of five healthy volunteers at various flexion angles. Projection matrices for the horizontal scanning trajectory were calibrated using the Siemens standard PDS-2 phantom. The initial reconstruction was forward projected using maximum-intensity projections (MIP), yielding an estimate of a static scan. This estimate was then used to obtain the 2D projection shifts via registration. For the scan with the most motion, the proposed method reproduced the marker-based results with a mean error of 2.90 mm +/- 1.43 mm (compared to a mean error of 4.10 mm +/- 3.03 mm in the uncorrected case). Bone contour surrounding modeling clay layer was improved. The proposed method is a first step towards automatic image-based, marker-free motion-compensation.

  18. Pedicle digital pad transfer and negative pressure wound therapy for reconstruction of the weight-bearing surface after complete digital loss in a dog.

    PubMed

    Or, M; Van Goethem, B; Polis, I; Spillebeen, A; Vandekerckhove, P; Saunders, J; de Rooster, H

    2015-01-01

    A young Labrador Retriever was presented for treatment of severe distal hindlimb necrosis caused by bandage ischemia. During digit amputation at the metatarsophalangeal joints, the third and fourth digital pads were salvaged and transferred to the metatarsal stump to create a weight-bearing surface. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) was utilized for flap immobilization and to promote granulation tissue in the remaining wound defect. Sturdy adherence of the digital pads was achieved after only four days. The skin defect healed completely by second intention and the stump was epithelialized with a thin pad after three months. At the nine month follow-up examination, the stump had a thick hyperkeratinized pad. The dog walked and ran without any apparent signs of discomfort and compensated for the loss of limb length by extending the stifle and tarsocrural joints. Despite a challenging wound in a difficult anatomical location, digital pad flap transfer and NPWT proved successful in restoring long-term ambulation in an active large breed dog. PMID:25449188

  19. A pilot study of a plantar sensory evaluation system for early screening of diabetic neuropathy in a weight-bearing position.

    PubMed

    Ino, Shuichi; Chikai, Manabu; Takahashi, Noriyo; Ohnishi, Tadasuke; Doi, Kohki; Nunokawa, Kiyohiko

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop smart equipment to quantify plantar tactile sensibility for the early diagnosis and tracking of peripheral neuropathy caused by diabetes mellitus. In this paper, we offer a new testing system that is composed of a plantar tactile stimulation platform with a small moving contactor to stretch the skin tangentially, a response switch for each tactile stimulus, a motor control box, and a personal computer (PC) for psychophysical data processing. This quantitative sensory testing system has detailed measurements available and is easy to use compared with the conventional testing devices, such as von Frey monofilaments, pin-prick testing devices, and current perception threshold testers. When using our testing system in a weight-bearing position, we observed that the plantar tactile thresholds for the tangential stretching stimulus on the plantar surface of the foot ranged from approximately 10 um to 30 um for healthy subjects. However, the threshold for a subject with diabetes was nearly three times higher than that for healthy subjects. The significant difference between these values suggests that the plantar sensory evaluation system using the lateral skin stretch stimulation can be used for early diagnosis, for the accurate staging of diabetic neuropathy, and for evaluating its progression noninvasively in a clinic and at home. PMID:25570747

  20. Effect of load carriage on gait due to firefighting air bottle configuration.

    PubMed

    Park, Kiwon; Hur, Pilwon; Rosengren, Karl S; Horn, Gavin P; Hsiao-Wecksler, Elizabeth T

    2010-07-01

    The air bottle configuration (mass and size) used with a firefighter's self-contained breathing apparatus may affect functional gait performance and slip/trip/fall risk, contributing to one of the most common and costly fire ground injuries to this population. To examine the potential effect of bottle mass and size on firefighter gait performance, four 30-min air bottle configurations were tested. To quantify biomechanical gait performance, kinetic and kinematic gait data were collected on 24 male firefighters while walking at normal and fast speeds during three conditions (no obstacle, 10 cm or 30 cm stationary obstacle). Bottle mass, obstacle height and walking speed - but not bottle size - were found to significantly impact gait parameters. Ten subjects (42%) contacted the taller obstacle while wearing heavier bottles, suggesting greater risk for tripping. Heavier bottles also resulted in larger forces by the trailing leg in both the anterior-posterior and vertical directions, suggesting greater risk for slipping. These results suggest that increased bottle weight may result in a decrease in gait performance and an increase in fall risk. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Occupations, such as firefighting, often require use of a self-contained breathing apparatus that includes a pressurised air bottle. No systematic assessment has investigated how modest changes in load carriage due to bottle configuration (mass and size) might affect gait behaviour, especially when crossing obstacles. Bottle mass, but not size, was found to decrease gait performance and increase fall risk. PMID:20582769

  1. Muscle Activity of the Gluteus Medius at Different Gait Speeds

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su-Kyoung; Lee, Sang-Yeol; Jung, Jae-Min

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study aimed to determine the changes in the muscle activities of the gluteus medius, latissimus dorsi, and gluteus maximus at different gait speeds, to collect basic data for the study of the gluteus medius. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 18 young and healthy male adults whose mean age, height, and weight were 26.4?years, 173.37?cm, and 72.5?kg, respectively. Electromyograpy was used to measure the maximum voluntary isometric contraction of each muscle three times and the values averaged. Then, the subjects walked on a treadmill at gait speeds of 1.5 m/s, 2.5 m/s, and 3.5 m/s and the muscle activity of each muscle was measured. [Results] The gluteus medius showed no significant difference in muscle activity among the different gait speeds. [Conclusion] For selectively strengthening the gluteus medius, to establish the external stability of the pelvis during walking, weight loading or sloped treadmills are effective interventions. However, different gait speeds exert no significant effect on the selective strengthening of the gluteus medius. PMID:25540497

  2. Normalisation method can affect gluteus medius electromyography results during weight bearing exercises in people with hip osteoarthritis (OA): a case control study.

    PubMed

    French, Helen P; Huang, Xiaoli; Cummiskey, Andrew; Meldrum, Dara; Malone, Ailish

    2015-02-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) is used to assess muscle activation during therapeutic exercise, but data are significantly affected by inter-individual variability and requires normalisation of the sEMG signal to enable comparison between individuals. The purpose of this study was to compare two normalisation methods, a maximal method (maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC)) and non-maximal peak dynamic method (PDM), on gluteus medius (GMed) activation using sEMG during three weight-bearing exercises in people with hip osteoarthritis (OA) and healthy controls. Thirteen people with hip OA and 20 controls performed three exercises (Squat, Step-Up, Step-Down). Average root-mean squared EMG amplitude based on MVIC and PDM normalisation was compared between groups for both involved and uninvolved hips using Mann-Whitney tests. Using MVIC normalisation, significantly higher normalised GMed EMG amplitudes were found in the OA group during all Step-up and down exercises on the involved side (p=0.02-0.001) and most of the Step exercises on the uninvolved side (p=0.03-0.04), but not the Squat (p>0.05), compared to controls. Using PDM normalisation, significant between-group differences occurred only for Ascending Squat (p=0.03) on the involved side. MVIC normalisation demonstrated higher inter-trial relative reliability (ICCs=0.78-0.99) than PDM (ICCs=0.37-0.84), but poorer absolute reliability using Standard Error of Measurement. Normalisation method can significantly affect interpretation of EMG amplitudes. Although MVIC-normalised amplitudes were more sensitive to differences between groups, there was greater variability using this method, which raises concerns regarding validity. Interpretation of EMG data is strongly influenced by the normalisation method used, and this should be considered when applying EMG results to clinical populations. PMID:25600175

  3. Weight-Bearing MR Imaging as an Option in the Study of Gravitational Effects on the Vocal Tract of Untrained Subjects in Singing Phonation

    PubMed Central

    Traser, Louisa; Burdumy, Michael; Richter, Bernhard; Vicari, Marco; Echternach, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of subjects in a supine position can be used to evaluate the configuration of the vocal tract during phonation. However, studies of speech phonation have shown that gravity can affect vocal tract shape and bias measurements. This is one of the reasons that MRI studies of singing phonation have used professionally trained singers as subjects, because they are generally considered to be less affected by the supine body position and environmental distractions. A study of untrained singers might not only contribute to the understanding of intuitive singing function and aid the evaluation of potential hazards for vocal health, but also provide insights into the effect of the supine position on singers in general. In the present study, an open configuration 0.25 T MRI system with a rotatable examination bed was used to study the effect of body position in 20 vocally untrained subjects. The subjects were asked to sing sustained tones in both supine and upright body positions on different pitches and in different register conditions. Morphometric measurements were taken from the acquired images of a sagittal slice depicting the vocal tract. The analysis concerning the vocal tract configuration in the two body positions revealed differences in 5 out of 10 measured articulatory parameters. In the upright position the jaw was less protruded, the uvula was elongated, the larynx more tilted and the tongue was positioned more to the front of the mouth than in the supine position. The findings presented are in agreement with several studies on gravitational effects in speech phonation, but contrast with the results of a previous study on professional singers of our group where only minor differences between upright and supine body posture were observed. The present study demonstrates that imaging of the vocal tract using weight-bearing MR imaging is a feasible tool for the study of sustained phonation in singing for vocally untrained subjects. PMID:25379885

  4. High frequency circular translation pin-on-disk method for accelerated wear testing of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene as a bearing material in total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Saikko, Vesa

    2015-01-21

    The temporal change of the direction of sliding relative to the ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) component of prosthetic joints is known to be of crucial importance with respect to wear. One complete revolution of the resultant friction vector is commonly called a wear cycle. It was hypothesized that in order to accelerate the wear test, the cycle frequency may be substantially increased if the circumference of the slide track is reduced in proportion, and still the wear mechanisms remain realistic and no overheating takes place. This requires an additional slow motion mechanism with which the lubrication of the contact is maintained and wear particles are conveyed away from the contact. A three-station, dual motion high frequency circular translation pin-on-disk (HF-CTPOD) device with a relative cycle frequency of 25.3 Hz and an average sliding velocity of 27.4 mm/s was designed. The pins circularly translated at high frequency (1.0 mm per cycle, 24.8 Hz, clockwise), and the disks at low frequency (31.4mm per cycle, 0.5 Hz, counter-clockwise). In a 22 million cycle (10 day) test, the wear rate of conventional gamma-sterilized UHMWPE pins against polished CoCr disks in diluted serum was 1.8 mg per 24 h, which was six times higher than that in the established 1 Hz CTPOD device. The wear mechanisms were similar. Burnishing of the pin was the predominant feature. No overheating took place. With the dual motion HF-CTPOD method, the wear testing of UHMWPE as a bearing material in total hip arthroplasty can be substantially accelerated without concerns of the validity of the wear simulation. PMID:25498368

  5. Simulations of skin and subcutaneous tissue loading in the buttocks while regaining weight-bearing after a push-up in wheelchair users.

    PubMed

    Levy, Ayelet; Kopplin, Kara; Gefen, Amit

    2013-12-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) are common in patients who chronically depend on a wheelchair for mobility, such as those with a spinal cord injury (SCI). In attempt to prevent the formation of PUs, pressure relieving maneuvers, such as push-ups, are commonly recommended for individuals with SCI. However, very little is known about skin and subcutaneous fat tissue load distributions during sitting and in particular their development during the process of regaining weight-bearing after a push-up. Knowledge on how these loads evolve during sitting-down is critical for understanding the susceptibility of skin to PUs. Considering the potential practical implications on guidelines for wheelchair users, we studied herein the build-up of shear loads in skin and subcutaneous fat using a model of the buttocks of a single SCI subject. Using 12 variants of our finite element (FE) model, we determined the shear loads in skin and subcutaneous fat tissues under the ischial tuberosities when sitting down on foam cushions with different stiffness properties, in healthy skin and scarred skin conditions, focusing on the time course of the build-up of tissue loads. We found substantial differences between the loading curves of skin and fat: While the fat was loaded at a nearly constant rate, skin loads increased nonlinearly - with a greater load/time slope at early skin-support contact. In the context of tissue health and prevention of PUs, this indicates that the more sensitive period with respect to skin integrity is at initial skin-support contact. We further found that the edges of a pre-existing scar are more susceptible to injury, and the greater risk for that is when a hypertrophic scar is present. Despite that this is a theoretical modeling study with associated limitations, we believe that it is already appropriate to recommend to patients to reposition themselves gradually and gently, and not to "fall" back into the wheelchair after finishing a push-up maneuver. PMID:23706990

  6. Hindlimb Skeletal Muscle Function and Skeletal Quality and Strength in +/G610C Mice With and Without Weight-Bearing Exercise.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Youngjae; Carleton, Stephanie M; Gentry, Bettina A; Yao, Xiaomei; Ferreira, J Andries; Salamango, Daniel J; Weis, MaryAnn; Oestreich, Arin K; Williams, Ashlee M; McCray, Marcus G; Eyre, David R; Brown, Marybeth; Wang, Yong; Phillips, Charlotte L

    2015-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a heterogeneous heritable connective tissue disorder associated with reduced bone mineral density and skeletal fragility. Bone is inherently mechanosensitive, with bone strength being proportional to muscle mass and strength. Physically active healthy children accrue more bone than inactive children. Children with type I OI exhibit decreased exercise capacity and muscle strength compared with healthy peers. It is unknown whether this muscle weakness reflects decreased physical activity or a muscle pathology. In this study, we used heterozygous G610C OI model mice (+/G610C), which model both the genotype and phenotype of a large Amish OI kindred, to evaluate hindlimb muscle function and physical activity levels before evaluating the ability of +/G610C mice to undergo a treadmill exercise regimen. We found +/G610C mice hindlimb muscles do not exhibit compromised muscle function, and their activity levels were not reduced relative to wild-type mice. The +/G610C mice were also able to complete an 8-week treadmill regimen. Biomechanical integrity of control and exercised wild-type and +/G610C femora were analyzed by torsional loading to failure. The greatest skeletal gains in response to exercise were observed in stiffness and the shear modulus of elasticity with alterations in collagen content. Analysis of tibial cortical bone by Raman spectroscopy demonstrated similar crystallinity and mineral/matrix ratios regardless of sex, exercise, and genotype. Together, these findings demonstrate +/G610C OI mice have equivalent muscle function, activity levels, and ability to complete a weight-bearing exercise regimen as wild-type mice. The +/G610C mice exhibited increased femoral stiffness and decreased hydroxyproline with exercise, whereas other biomechanical parameters remain unaffected, suggesting a more rigorous exercise regimen or another exercise modality may be required to improve bone quality of OI mice. PMID:25829218

  7. Effects of spaceflight on the murine mandible: Possible factors mediating skeletal changes in non-weight bearing bones of the head.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Payal; Stabley, John N; Behnke, Bradley J; Allen, Matthew R; Delp, Michael D

    2016-02-01

    Spaceflight-induced remodeling of the skull is characterized by greater bone volume, mineral density, and mineral content. To further investigate the effects of spaceflight on other non-weight bearing bones of the head, as well as to gain insight into potential factors mediating the remodeling of the skull, the purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of spaceflight on mandibular bone properties. Female C57BL/6 mice were flown 15d on the STS-131 Space Shuttle mission (n=8) and 13d on the STS-135 mission (n=5) or remained as ground controls (GC). Upon landing, mandibles were collected and analyzed via micro-computed tomography for tissue mineralization, bone volume (BV/TV), and distance from the cemento-enamel junction to the alveolar crest (CEJ-AC). Mandibular mineralization was not different between spaceflight (SF) and GC mice for either the STS-131 or STS-135 missions. Mandibular BV/TV (combined cortical and trabecular bone) was lower in mandibles from SF mice on the STS-131 mission (80.7±0.8%) relative to that of GC (n=8) animals (84.2±1.2%), whereas BV/TV from STS-135 mice was not different from GC animals (n=7). The CEJ-AC distance was shorter in mandibles from STS-131 mice (0.217±0.004mm) compared to GC animals (0.283±0.009mm), indicating an anabolic (or anti-catabolic) effect of spaceflight, while CEJ-AC distance was similar between STS-135 and GC mice. These findings demonstrate that mandibular bones undergo skeletal changes during spaceflight and are susceptible to the effects of weightlessness. However, adaptation of the mandible to spaceflight is dissimilar to that of the cranium, at least in terms of changes in BV/TV. PMID:26545335

  8. Bearing system

    DOEpatents

    Kapich, Davorin D. (Carlsbad, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A bearing system includes backup bearings for supporting a rotating shaft upon failure of primary bearings. In the preferred embodiment, the backup bearings are rolling element bearings having their rolling elements disposed out of contact with their associated respective inner races during normal functioning of the primary bearings. Displacement detection sensors are provided for detecting displacement of the shaft upon failure of the primary bearings. Upon detection of the failure of the primary bearings, the rolling elements and inner races of the backup bearings are brought into mutual contact by axial displacement of the shaft.

  9. The influence of gait cadence on the ground reaction forces and plantar pressures during load carriage of young adults.

    PubMed

    Castro, Marcelo P; Figueiredo, Maria Cristina; Abreu, Sofia; Sousa, Helena; Machado, Leandro; Santos, Rubim; Vilas-Boas, Joo Paulo

    2015-07-01

    Biomechanical gait parameters--ground reaction forces (GRFs) and plantar pressures--during load carriage of young adults were compared at a low gait cadence and a high gait cadence. Differences between load carriage and normal walking during both gait cadences were also assessed. A force plate and an in-shoe plantar pressure system were used to assess 60 adults while they were walking either normally (unloaded condition) or wearing a backpack (loaded condition) at low (70 steps per minute) and high gait cadences (120 steps per minute). GRF and plantar pressure peaks were scaled to body weight (or body weight plus backpack weight). With medium to high effect sizes we found greater anterior-posterior and vertical GRFs and greater plantar pressure peaks in the rearfoot, forefoot and hallux when the participants walked carrying a backpack at high gait cadences compared to walking at low gait cadences. Differences between loaded and unloaded conditions in both gait cadences were also observed. PMID:25766421

  10. Gait analysis in forensic medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Peter K.; Simonsen, Erik B.; Lynnerup, Niels

    2007-01-01

    We have combined the basic human ability to recognize other individuals with functional anatomical and biomechanical knowledge, in order to analyze the gait of perpetrators as recorded on surveillance video. The perpetrators are then compared with similar analyses of suspects. At present we give a statement to the police as to whether the perpetrator has a characteristic gait pattern compared to normal gait, and if a suspect has a comparable gait pattern. We have found agreements such as: limping, varus instability in the knee at heel strike, larger lateral flexion of the spinal column to one side than the other, inverted ankle during stance, pronounced sagittal head-movements, and marked head-shoulder posture. Based on these characteristic features, we state whether suspect and perpetrator could have the same identity but it is not possible to positively identify the perpetrator. Nevertheless, we have been involved in several cases where the court has found that this type of gait analysis, especially combined with photogrammetry, was a valuable tool. The primary requisites are surveillance cameras recording with sufficient frequency, ideally about 15 Hz, which are positioned in frontal and preferably also in profile view.

  11. Safety concept for robotic gait trainers.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, H; Hesse, S; Bernhardt, R

    2004-01-01

    The work presents a newly developed safety concept for application of robotic walking simulators based on the principle of programmable footplates in gait rehabilitation. Unlike robotic hand devices or exoskeleton robots for gait training on treadmills, which can be built relatively lightweight and require only small drives which can hardly do harm to the patient, a programmable footplate walking simulator with permanent foot fixture essentially needs to have powerful drives in order to carry and move the full body weight of the patient. The developed safety concept comprises several redundant algorithms and devices in the real-time robot control software, electrical emergency stop circuitry and machine mechanics. The mechanical core is a machine design offering maximum passive security by covering all moving parts (i.e. robot drives and linkages) and a newly developed foot safety release binding, which is mounted on each footplate. The release binding allows a safe release from the footplate in all directions in any degree of freedom in the sagittal plane. It is combined with an ankle goniometer which is equipped with adjustable emergency stop limit switches, thus ensuring that the allowed ankle range-of-motion is not exceeded. PMID:17270834

  12. Gait Stability in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Millard, Matthew; van Gestel, Leen; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Desloovere, Kaat

    2013-01-01

    Children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP) have several gait impairments, amongst which impaired gait stability may be one. We tested whether a newly developed stability measure (the foot placement estimator, FPE) which does not require long data series, can be used to asses gait stability in typically developing (TD) children as well as

  13. Gait Stability in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Millard, Matthew; van Gestel, Leen; Meyns, Pieter; Jonkers, Ilse; Desloovere, Kaat

    2013-01-01

    Children with unilateral Cerebral Palsy (CP) have several gait impairments, amongst which impaired gait stability may be one. We tested whether a newly developed stability measure (the foot placement estimator, FPE) which does not require long data series, can be used to asses gait stability in typically developing (TD) children as well as…

  14. A mechanical energy analysis of gait initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. A.; Verstraete, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of gait initiation (the transient state between standing and walking) is an important diagnostic tool to study pathologic gait and to evaluate prosthetic devices. While past studies have quantified mechanical energy of the body during steady-state gait, to date no one has computed the mechanical energy of the body during gait initiation. In this study, gait initiation in seven normal male subjects was studied using a mechanical energy analysis to compute total body energy. The data showed three separate states: quiet standing, gait initiation, and steady-state gait. During gait initiation, the trends in the energy data for the individual segments were similar to those seen during steady-state gait (and in Winter DA, Quanbury AO, Reimer GD. Analysis of instantaneous energy of normal gait. J Biochem 1976;9:253-257), but diminished in amplitude. However, these amplitudes increased to those seen in steady-state during the gait initiation event (GIE), with the greatest increase occurring in the second step due to the push-off of the foundation leg. The baseline level of mechanical energy was due to the potential energy of the individual segments, while the cyclic nature of the data was indicative of the kinetic energy of the particular leg in swing phase during that step. The data presented showed differences in energy trends during gait initiation from those of steady state, thereby demonstrating the importance of this event in the study of locomotion.

  15. Biomechanics of Gait during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Filomena

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. During pregnancy women experience several changes in the body's physiology, morphology, and hormonal system. These changes may affect the balance and body stability and can cause discomfort and pain. The adaptations of the musculoskeletal system due to morphological changes during pregnancy are not fully understood. Few studies clarify the biomechanical changes of gait that occur during pregnancy and in postpartum period. Purposes. The purpose of this review was to analyze the available evidence on the biomechanical adaptations of gait that occur throughout pregnancy and in postpartum period, specifically with regard to the temporal, spatial, kinematic, and kinetic parameters of gait. Methods. Three databases were searched and 9 studies with a follow-up design were retrieved for analysis. Results. Most studies performed temporal, spatial, and kinematic analysis. Only three studies performed kinetic analysis. Conclusion. The adaptation strategies to the anatomical and physiological changes throughout pregnancy are still unclear, particularly in a longitudinal perspective and regarding kinetic parameters. PMID:25587566

  16. Gait-Based Person Identification Robust to Changes in Appearance

    PubMed Central

    Iwashita, Yumi; Uchino, Koji; Kurazume, Ryo

    2013-01-01

    The identification of a person from gait images is generally sensitive to appearance changes, such as variations of clothes and belongings. One possibility to deal with this problem is to collect possible subjects' appearance changes in a database. However, it is almost impossible to predict all appearance changes in advance. In this paper, we propose a novel method, which allows robustly identifying people in spite of changes in appearance, without using a database of predicted appearance changes. In the proposed method, firstly, the human body image is divided into multiple areas, and features for each area are extracted. Next, a matching weight for each area is estimated based on the similarity between the extracted features and those in the database for standard clothes. Finally, the subject is identified by weighted integration of similarities in all areas. Experiments using the gait database CASIA show the best correct classification rate compared with conventional methods experiments. PMID:23783739

  17. Association between bone stiffness and nutritional biomarkers combined with weight-bearing exercise, physical activity, and sedentary time in preadolescent children. A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Diana; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Gianfagna, Francesco; Konstabel, Kenn; Lissner, Lauren; Mrild, Staffan; Molnar, Dnes; Moreno, Luis A; Siani, Alfonso; Sioen, Isabelle; Veidebaum, Toomas; Ahrens, Wolfgang

    2015-09-01

    Physical activity (PA) and micronutrients such as calcium (Ca), vitamin D (25OHD), and phosphate (PO) are important determinants of skeletal development. This case-control study examined the association of these nutritional biomarkers and different PA behaviours, such as habitual PA, weight-bearing exercise (WBE) and sedentary time (SED) with bone stiffness (SI) in 1819 2-9-year-old children from the IDEFICS study (2007-2008). SI was measured on the calcaneus using quantitative ultrasound. Serum and urine Ca and PO and serum 25OHD were determined. Children's sports activities were reported by parents using a standardised questionnaire. A subsample of 1089 children had accelerometer-based PA data (counts per minute, cpm). Moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) and SED were estimated. Children with poor SI (below the 15th age-/sex-/height-specific percentile) were defined as cases (N=603). Randomly selected controls (N=1216) were matched by age, sex, and country. Odds ratios (OR) for poor SI were calculated by conditional logistic regression for all biomarkers and PA behaviour variables separately and combined (expressed as tertiles and dichotomised variables, respectively). ORs were adjusted for fat-free mass, dairy product consumption, and daylight duration. We observed increased ORs for no sports (OR=1.39, p<0.05), PA levels below 524 cpm (OR=1.85, p<0.05) and MVPA below 4.2% a day (OR=1.69, p<0.05) compared to WBE, high PA levels (<688 cpm) and high MVPA (6.7%), respectively. SED was not associated with SI. ORs were moderately elevated for low serum Ca and 25OHD. However, biomarkers were not statistically significantly associated with SI and did not modify the association between PA behaviours and SI. Although nutritional biomarkers appear to play a minor role compared to the osteogenic effect of PA and WBE, it is noteworthy that the highest risk for poor SI was observed for no sports or low MVPA combined with lower serum Ca (<2.5 mmol/l) or lower 25OHD (<43.0 nmol/l). PMID:25952968

  18. Pneumatic interactive gait rehabilitation orthosis: design and preliminary testing.

    PubMed

    Belforte, G; Eula, G; Appendino, S; Sirolli, S

    2011-02-01

    Motor rehabilitation techniques based on passive movement of the lower limbs have been developed over the past 15 years. Gait training automation is the latest innovation in these techniques. This paper describes the design and development of a pneumatic interactive gait rehabilitation orthosis (PIGRO), as well as the first experimental results obtained with healthy subjects. PIGRO consists of a modular and size-adaptable exoskeleton, pneumatic actuation systems for the six actuated degrees of freedom (DoF), and a control unit. The foot orthosis and ankle actuation can be removed and/or replaced with orthopaedic shoes so as to permit gait rehabilitation while advancing between parallel bars with ground contact and partial body weight support (i.e. not walking in place). Control logic provides closed-loop position control independently on each joint, with position feedback for each joint in real time. Imposed curves are physiological joint angles: it is also possible to choose between activating one or both legs and to modify curves to obtain different gait patterns if required. The paper concludes with a presentation of experimental results for the device's performance. PMID:21428150

  19. Association between linear measurements of corpus callosum and gait in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Brodoefel, Harald; Ramachandran, Ramesh; Pantol, Gustavo; Bergethon, Peter; Qiu, Wei Qiao; Scott, Tammy; Rojas, Rafael; Horger, Marius; Rosenberg, Irwin; Bhadelia, Rafeeque A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Segmentation and diffusion-tensor-imaging of the corpus callosum (CC) have been linked to gait impairment. However, such measurements are impracticable in clinical routine. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between simple linear measurements of CC thickness with gait. Methods Two hundred and seventy-two community-dwelling subjects underwent neurological assessment and brain MRI. Mid-sagittal reformats of T1-weighted images were used to determine CC thickness. The association of measurements with clinical evaluation of gait was assessed by multivariate regression, controlling for numerous clinical and imaging confounders. Differences in CC thickness were, moreover, compared between subgroups with no, moderate or severe impairment of gait. Results In univariate analyses, thickness of the genu and body of CC but not the splenium were associated with postural stability (P<0.01). Multivariate regression revealed thickness of CC genu as the only imaging variable independently associated with gait (P=0.01). Genu thickness was significantly different between subjects with high and low (P=0.0003) or high and moderate (P=0.001) risk of fall. Conclusion Atrophy of the CC genu is an imaging marker of gait impairment in the elderly suggesting higher risk of fall. Simple linear measurements of CC can help in MRI evaluation of patients with gait impairment. PMID:23512195

  20. Gait characterization for osteoarthritis patients using wearable gait sensors (H-Gait systems).

    PubMed

    Tadano, Shigeru; Takeda, Ryo; Sasaki, Keita; Fujisawa, Tadashi; Tohyama, Harukazu

    2016-03-21

    The objective of this work was to investigate the possibilities of using the wearable sensors-based H-Gait system in an actual clinical trial and proposes new gait parameters for characterizing OA gait. Seven H-Gait sensors, consisting of tri-axial inertial sensors, were attached to seven lower limb body segments (pelvis, both thighs, both shanks and both feet). The acceleration and angular velocity data measured were used to estimate three-dimensional kinematic parameters of patients during level walking. Three new parameters were proposed to assess the severity of OA based on the characteristics of these joint center trajectories in addition to conventional gait spatio-temporal parameters. The experiment was conducted on ten subjects with knee OA. The kinematic results obtained (hip, knee and ankle joint angles, joint trajectory in the horizontal and sagittal planes) were compared with those from a reference healthy (control) group. As a result, the angle between the right and left knee trajectories along with that of the ankle joint trajectories were almost twice as large (21.3° vs. 11.6° and 14.9° vs. 7.8°) compared to those of the healthy subjects. In conclusion, it was found that the ankle joints during stance abduct less to avoid adduction at the knee as the severity of OA increases and lead to more acute angles (less parallel) between the right and left knee/ankle joints in the horizontal plane. This method was capable to provide quantitative information about the gait of OA patients and has the advantage to allow for out-of-laboratory monitoring. PMID:26947036

  1. Quantitative assessment of gait bradykinesia in Parkinson's disease using a portable gait rhythmogram.

    PubMed

    Utsumi, Hiroya; Terashi, Hiroo; Ishimura, Yohei; Takazawa, Tomoko; Hayashi, Akito; Mochizuki, Hideki; Okuma, Yasuyuki; Orimo, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kazushi; Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Mitoma, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    To quantify gait bradykinesia during daily activity in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), we measured movement-induced accelerations over more than 24h in 50 patients with PD and 17 age-matched normal controls, using a new device, the portable gait rhythmogram. Acceleration values induced by various movements, averaged each 10 min, exhibited a gamma distribution. The mean value of the distribution curve was used as an index of the "amount of overall movement per 24h". Characteristic changes were observed in both the gait cycle and gait acceleration. During hypokinesia, the gait cycle became either faster or slower. A number of patients with marked akinesia/bradykinesia showed a reduced and narrow range of gait acceleration, i.e., a range of floor reaction forces. The results suggest that assessment of the combination of changes in gait cycle and gait acceleration can quantitatively define the severity of gait bradykinesia. PMID:22358137

  2. Bear Scratch

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    When looking for a place to set up a trapping location, scientists look for existing bear sign such as scratches on trees and bear scat. Sometimes traps are set in areas that have no obvious bear sign to determine if indeed bears are present....

  3. Footwear and Foam Surface Alter Gait Initiation of Typical Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Marcus Fraga; Sacco, Isabel de Camargo Neves; Nora, Fernanda Grazielle da Silva Azevedo; Rosenbaum, Dieter; Lobo da Costa, Paula Hentschel

    2015-01-01

    Gait initiation is the task commonly used to investigate the anticipatory postural adjustments necessary to begin a new gait cycle from the standing position. In this study, we analyzed whether and how foot-floor interface characteristics influence the gait initiation process. For this purpose, 25 undergraduate students were evaluated while performing a gait initiation task in three experimental conditions: barefoot on a hard surface (barefoot condition), barefoot on a soft surface (foam condition), and shod on a hard surface (shod condition). Two force plates were used to acquire ground reaction forces and moments for each foot separately. A statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis was performed in COP time series. We compared the anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) resultant center of pressure (COP) paths and average velocities, the force peaks under the right and left foot, and the COP integral x force impulse for three different phases: the anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) phase (Phase 1), the swing-foot unloading phase (Phase 2), and the support-foot unloading phase (Phase 3). In Phase 1, significantly smaller ML COP paths and velocities were found for the shod condition compared to the barefoot and foam conditions. Significantly smaller ML COP paths were also found in Phase 2 for the shod condition compared to the barefoot and foam conditions. In Phase 3, increased AP COP velocities were found for the shod condition compared to the barefoot and foam conditions. SPM analysis revealed significant differences for vector COP time series in the shod condition compared to the barefoot and foam conditions. The foam condition limited the impulse-generating capacity of COP shift and produced smaller ML force peaks, resulting in limitations to body-weight transfer from the swing to the support foot. The results suggest that footwear and a soft surface affect COP and impose certain features of gait initiation, especially in the ML direction of Phase 1. PMID:26270323

  4. Genetic feature selection for gait recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafazzoli, Faezeh; Bebis, George; Louis, Sushil; Hussain, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Many research studies have demonstrated that gait can serve as a useful biometric modality for human identification at a distance. Traditional gait recognition systems, however, have mostly been evaluated without explicitly considering the most relevant gait features, which might have compromised performance. We investigate the problem of selecting a subset of the most relevant gait features for improving gait recognition performance. This is achieved by discarding redundant and irrelevant gait features while preserving the most informative ones. Motivated by our previous work on feature subset selection using genetic algorithms (GAs), we propose using GAs to select an optimal subset of gait features. First, features are extracted using kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) on spatiotemporal projections of gait silhouettes. Then, GA is applied to select a subset of eigenvectors in KPCA space that best represents a subject's identity. Each gait pattern is then represented by projecting it only on the eigenvectors selected by the GA. To evaluate the effectiveness of the selected features, we have experimented with two different classifiers: k nearest-neighbor and Naïve Bayes classifier. We report considerable gait recognition performance improvements on the Georgia Tech and CASIA databases.

  5. Support vector machines for automated gait classification.

    PubMed

    Begg, Rezaul K; Palaniswami, Marimuthu; Owen, Brendan

    2005-05-01

    Ageing influences gait patterns causing constant threats to control of locomotor balance. Automated recognition of gait changes has many advantages including, early identification of at-risk gait and monitoring the progress of treatment outcomes. In this paper, we apply an artificial intelligence technique [support vector machines (SVM)] for the automatic recognition of young-old gait types from their respective gait-patterns. Minimum foot clearance (MFC) data of 30 young and 28 elderly participants were analyzed using a PEAK-2D motion analysis system during a 20-min continuous walk on a treadmill at self-selected walking speed. Gait features extracted from individual MFC histogram-plot and Poincar-plot images were used to train the SVM. Cross-validation test results indicate that the generalization performance of the SVM was on average 83.3% (+/-2.9) to recognize young and elderly gait patterns, compared to a neural network's accuracy of 75.0+/-5.0%. A "hill-climbing" feature selection algorithm demonstrated that a small subset (3-5) of gait features extracted from MFC plots could differentiate the gait patterns with 90% accuracy. Performance of the gait classifier was evaluated using areas under the receiver operating characteristic plots. Improved performance of the classifier was evident when trained with reduced number of selected good features and with radial basis function kernel. These results suggest that SVMs can function as an efficient gait classifier for recognition of young and elderly gait patterns, and has the potential for wider applications in gait identification for falls-risk minimization in the elderly. PMID:15887532

  6. 49 CFR 229.69 - Side bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Side bearings. 229.69 Section 229.69....69 Side bearings. (a) Friction side bearings with springs designed to carry weight may not have more than 25 percent of the springs in any one nest broken. (b) Friction side bearings may not be run...

  7. 49 CFR 229.69 - Side bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Side bearings. 229.69 Section 229.69....69 Side bearings. (a) Friction side bearings with springs designed to carry weight may not have more than 25 percent of the springs in any one nest broken. (b) Friction side bearings may not be run...

  8. 49 CFR 229.69 - Side bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Side bearings. 229.69 Section 229.69....69 Side bearings. (a) Friction side bearings with springs designed to carry weight may not have more than 25 percent of the springs in any one nest broken. (b) Friction side bearings may not be run...

  9. 49 CFR 229.69 - Side bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Side bearings. 229.69 Section 229.69....69 Side bearings. (a) Friction side bearings with springs designed to carry weight may not have more than 25 percent of the springs in any one nest broken. (b) Friction side bearings may not be run...

  10. 49 CFR 229.69 - Side bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Side bearings. 229.69 Section 229.69....69 Side bearings. (a) Friction side bearings with springs designed to carry weight may not have more than 25 percent of the springs in any one nest broken. (b) Friction side bearings may not be run...

  11. Neuromuscular adjustments of gait associated with unstable conditions.

    PubMed

    Martino, G; Ivanenko, Y P; d'Avella, A; Serrao, M; Ranavolo, A; Draicchio, F; Cappellini, G; Casali, C; Lacquaniti, F

    2015-11-15

    A compact description of coordinated muscle activity is provided by the factorization of electromyographic (EMG) signals. With the use of this approach, it has consistently been shown that multimuscle activity during human locomotion can be accounted for by four to five modules, each one comprised of a basic pattern timed at a different phase of gait cycle and the weighting coefficients of synergistic muscle activations. These modules are flexible, in so far as the timing of patterns and the amplitude of weightings can change as a function of gait speed and mode. Here we consider the adjustments of the locomotor modules related to unstable walking conditions. We compared three different conditions, i.e., locomotion of healthy subjects on slippery ground (SL) and on narrow beam (NB) and of cerebellar ataxic (CA) patients on normal ground. Motor modules were computed from the EMG signals of 12 muscles of the right lower limb using non-negative matrix factorization. The unstable gait of SL, NB, and CA showed significant changes compared with controls in the stride length, stride width, range of angular motion, and trunk oscillations. In most subjects of all three unstable conditions, >70% of the overall variation of EMG waveforms was accounted for by four modules that were characterized by a widening of muscle activity patterns. This suggests that the nervous system adopts the strategy of prolonging the duration of basic muscle activity patterns to cope with unstable conditions resulting from either slippery ground, reduced support surface, or pathology. PMID:26378199

  12. Cerebral Palsy Gait, Clinical Importance

    PubMed Central

    TUGUI, Raluca Dana; ANTONESCU, Dinu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cerebral palsy refers to a lesion on an immature brain, that determines permanent neurological disorders. Knowing the exact cause of the disease does not alter the treatment management. The etiology is 2-2.5/1000 births and the rate is constant in the last 40-50 years because advances in medical technologies have permitted the survival of smaller and premature new born children. Gait analysis has four directions: kinematics (represents body movements analysis without calculating the forces), kinetics (represents body moments and forces), energy consumption (measured by oximetry), and neuromuscular activity (measured by EMG). Gait analysis can observe specific deviations in a patient, allowing us to be more accurate in motor diagnoses and treatment solutions: surgery intervention, botulinum toxin injection, use of orthosis, physical kinetic therapy, oral medications, baclofen pump. PMID:24790675

  13. Compliant gait assistance triggered by user intention.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Vijaykumar; Aranda, Joan; Casals, Alicia

    2015-08-01

    An automatic gait initialization strategy based on user intention sensing in the context of rehabilitation with a lower-limb wearable robot is proposed and evaluated. The proposed strategy involves monitoring the human-orthosis interaction torques and initial position deviation to determine the gait initiation instant and to modify orthosis operation for gait assistance, when needed. During gait, the compliant control algorithm relies on the adaptation of the joints' stiffness in function of their interaction torques and their deviation from the desired trajectories, while maintaining the dynamic stability. As a reference input, the average of a set of recorded gaits obtained from healthy subjects is used. The algorithm has been tested with five healthy subjects showing its efficient behavior in initiating the gait and maintaining the equilibrium while walking in presence of external forces. The work is performed as a preliminary study to assist patients suffering from incomplete Spinal cord injury and Stroke. PMID:26737142

  14. Gait Analysis in Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Kenji; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Tanaka, Hidetoshi; Shishido, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Kengo

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Gait analysis of patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) by using a sheet-type gait analysis system. Purpose The aim of this study was to compare the gait patterns of patients with CSM, evaluated by the Nurick grades, and to determine the threshold values of gait parameters predicting the occurrence of a fall by using a gait recorder. Overview of Literature Gait disorder due to CSM may progress to severe paraplegia, following even a minor trauma such as a fall. The indications for the surgery of CSM without severe paralysis remain controversial. The quantitative gait analysis and the decision for decompressive surgery in patients with CSM are important in order to prevent severe paraplegia from a fall. Methods One hundred thirty-two subjects (normal, 34; CSM, 98) underwent gait analysis by using a sensor sheet. Measurements of gait cycle parameters included the step and stride length, step width, foot angle, swing phase, and stance phase. CSM was assessed by Nurick grade. Results Although the clinical symptoms were lacking, Nurick grade 1 had significant abnormalities in the parameters of velocity, step length, and step angle (p<0.05). Regarding the Nurick grade and walking phase, the length of the stance phase was increased to more than 70% of the entire walking cycle in Nurick grade 4. Conclusions Gait analysis was an objective tool for evaluating the gait stability. Our results suggested that when the percentage of the stance phase in the gait cycle increases to above 70%, the CSM patients have an increased fall risk. PMID:26097646

  15. Gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A gear bearing having a first gear and a second gear, each having a plurality of teeth. Each gear operates on two non-parallel surfaces of the opposing gear teeth to perform both gear and bearing functions simultaneously. The gears are moving at substantially the same speed at their contact points. The gears may be roller gear bearings or phase-shifted gear bearings, and may be arranged in a planet/sun system or used as a transmission.

  16. The Latest Lessons Learned from Retrieval Analyses of Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene, Metal-on-Metal, and Alternative Bearing Total Disc Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Steven M.; Toth, Jeffrey M.; Siskey, Ryan; Ciccarelli, Lauren; MacDonald, Dan; Isaza, Jorge; Lanman, Todd; Punt, Ilona; Steinbeck, Marla; Goffin, Jan; van Ooij, Andr

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge regarding the in vivo performance and periposthetic tissue response of cervical and lumbar total disc replacements (TDRs) continues to expand. This review addresses the following four main questions: 1) What are the latest lessons learned from polyethylene in large joints and how are they relevant to current TDRs? 2) What are the latest lessons learned regarding adverse local tissue reactions from metal-on-metal, CoCr bearings in large joints and how are they relevant to current TDRs? 3) What advancements have been made in understanding the in vivo performance of alternative biomaterials, such as stainless steel and polycarbonate urethane, for TDRs in the past five years? 4) How has retrieval analysis of all these various artificial disc bearing technologies advanced the state of the art in preclinical testing of TDRs? The study of explanted artificial discs and their associated tissues can help inform bearing selection as well as the design of future generations of disc arthroplasty. Analyzing retrieved artificial discs is also essential for validating preclinical test methods. PMID:22904606

  17. Mixed gaits in small avian terrestrial locomotion.

    PubMed

    Andrada, Emanuel; Haase, Daniel; Sutedja, Yefta; Nyakatura, John A; Kilbourne, Brandon M; Denzler, Joachim; Fischer, Martin S; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Scientists have historically categorized gaits discretely (e.g. regular gaits such as walking, running). However, previous results suggest that animals such as birds might mix or regularly or stochastically switch between gaits while maintaining a steady locomotor speed. Here, we combined a novel and completely automated large-scale study (over one million frames) on motions of the center of mass in several bird species (quail, oystercatcher, northern lapwing, pigeon, and avocet) with numerical simulations. The birds studied do not strictly prefer walking mechanics at lower speeds or running mechanics at higher speeds. Moreover, our results clearly display that the birds in our study employ mixed gaits (such as one step walking followed by one step using running mechanics) more often than walking and, surprisingly, maybe as often as grounded running. Using a bio-inspired model based on parameters obtained from real quails, we found two types of stable mixed gaits. In the first, both legs exhibit different gait mechanics, whereas in the second, legs gradually alternate from one gait mechanics into the other. Interestingly, mixed gaits parameters mostly overlap those of grounded running. Thus, perturbations or changes in the state induce a switch from grounded running to mixed gaits or vice versa. PMID:26333477

  18. Optics in gait analysis and anthropometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva Moreno, Alejandra Alicia

    2013-11-01

    Since antiquity, human gait has been studied to understand human movement, the kind of gait, in some cases, can cause musculoskeletal disorders or other health problems; in addition, also from antiquity, anthropometry has been important for the design of human items such as workspaces, tools, garments, among others. Nowadays, thanks to the development of optics and electronics, more accurate studies of gait and anthropometry can be developed. This work will describe the most important parameters for gait analysis, anthropometry and the optical systems used.

  19. Mixed gaits in small avian terrestrial locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Andrada, Emanuel; Haase, Daniel; Sutedja, Yefta; Nyakatura, John A.; M. Kilbourne, Brandon; Denzler, Joachim; Fischer, Martin S.; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Scientists have historically categorized gaits discretely (e.g. regular gaits such as walking, running). However, previous results suggest that animals such as birds might mix or regularly or stochastically switch between gaits while maintaining a steady locomotor speed. Here, we combined a novel and completely automated large-scale study (over one million frames) on motions of the center of mass in several bird species (quail, oystercatcher, northern lapwing, pigeon, and avocet) with numerical simulations. The birds studied do not strictly prefer walking mechanics at lower speeds or running mechanics at higher speeds. Moreover, our results clearly display that the birds in our study employ mixed gaits (such as one step walking followed by one step using running mechanics) more often than walking and, surprisingly, maybe as often as grounded running. Using a bio-inspired model based on parameters obtained from real quails, we found two types of stable mixed gaits. In the first, both legs exhibit different gait mechanics, whereas in the second, legs gradually alternate from one gait mechanics into the other. Interestingly, mixed gaits parameters mostly overlap those of grounded running. Thus, perturbations or changes in the state induce a switch from grounded running to mixed gaits or vice versa. PMID:26333477

  20. Single-trial classification of gait and point movement preparation from human EEG

    PubMed Central

    Velu, Priya D.; de Sa, Virginia R.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies provide evidence of cortical involvement immediately before and during gait and during gait-related behaviors such as stepping in place or motor imagery of gait. Here we attempt to perform single-trial classification of gait intent from another movement plan (point intent) or from standing in place. Subjects walked naturally from a starting position to a designated ending position, pointed at a designated position from the starting position, or remained standing at the starting position. The 700 ms of recorded electroencephalography (EEG) before movement onset was used for single-trial classification of trials based on action type and direction (left walk, forward walk, right walk, left point, right point, and stand) as well as action type regardless of direction (stand, walk, point). Classification using regularized LDA was performed on a principal components analysis (PCA) reduced feature space composed of coefficients from levels 1 to 9 of a discrete wavelet decomposition using the Daubechies 4 wavelet. We achieved significant classification for all conditions, with errors as low as 17% when averaged across nine subjects. LDA and PCA highly weighted frequency ranges that included movement related potentials (MRPs), with smaller contributions from frequency ranges that included mu and beta idle motor rhythms. Additionally, error patterns suggested a spatial structure to the EEG signal. Future applications of the cortical gait intent signal may include an additional dimension of control for prosthetics, preemptive corrective feedback for gait disturbances, or human computer interfaces (HCI). PMID:23781166

  1. Residual Elimination Algorithm Enhancements to Improve Foot Motion Tracking During Forward Dynamic Simulations of Gait.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jennifer N; Hass, Chris J; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2015-11-01

    Patient-specific gait optimizations capable of predicting post-treatment changes in joint motions and loads could improve treatment design for gait-related disorders. To maximize potential clinical utility, such optimizations should utilize full-body three-dimensional patient-specific musculoskeletal models, generate dynamically consistent gait motions that reproduce pretreatment marker measurements closely, and achieve accurate foot motion tracking to permit deformable foot-ground contact modeling. This study enhances an existing residual elimination algorithm (REA) Remy, C. D., and Thelen, D. G., 2009, “Optimal Estimation of Dynamically Consistent Kinematics and Kinetics for Forward Dynamic Simulation of Gait,” ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 131(3), p. 031005) to achieve all three requirements within a single gait optimization framework. We investigated four primary enhancements to the original REA: (1) manual modification of tracked marker weights, (2) automatic modification of tracked joint acceleration curves, (3) automatic modification of algorithm feedback gains, and (4) automatic calibration of model joint and inertial parameter values. We evaluated the enhanced REA using a full-body three-dimensional dynamic skeletal model and movement data collected from a subject who performed four distinct gait patterns: walking, marching, running, and bounding. When all four enhancements were implemented together, the enhanced REA achieved dynamic consistency with lower marker tracking errors for all segments, especially the feet (mean root-mean-square (RMS) errors of 3.1 versus 18.4 mm), compared to the original REA. When the enhancements were implemented separately and in combinations, the most important one was automatic modification of tracked joint acceleration curves, while the least important enhancement was automatic modification of algorithm feedback gains. The enhanced REA provides a framework for future gait optimization studies that seek to predict subject-specific post-treatment gait patterns involving large changes in foot-ground contact patterns made possible through deformable foot-ground contact models. PMID:26299394

  2. Application of the Gillette Gait Index, Gait Deviation Index and Gait Profile Score to multiple clinical pediatric populations.

    PubMed

    McMulkin, Mark L; MacWilliams, Bruce A

    2015-02-01

    Gait indices are now commonly used to assess overall pathology and outcomes from studies with instrumented gait analyses. There are differences in how these indices are calculated and therefore inherent differences in their sensitivities to detect changes or differences between groups. The purpose of the current study was to examine the three most commonly used gait indices, Gillette Gait Index (GGI), Gait Deviation Index (GDI), and Gait Profile Score (GPS), comparing the statistical sensitivity and the ability to make meaningful interpretations of the clinical results. In addition, the GDI*, a log transformed and scaled version of the GPS score which closely matches the GDI was examined. For seven previous or ongoing studies representing varying gait pathologies seen in clinical laboratories, the GGI, GDI, and GPS/GDI* were calculated retrospectively. The GDI and GPS/GDI* proved to be the most sensitive measures in assessing differences pre/post-treatment or from a control population. A power analysis revealed the GDI and GDI* to be the most sensitive statistical measures (lowest sample sizes required). Subjectively, the GDI and GDI* interpretation seemed to be the most intuitive measure for assessing clinical changes. However, the gait variable sub-scores of the GPS determined several statistical differences which were not previously noted and was the only index tool for quantifying the relative contributions of specific joints or planes of motion. The GGI did not offer any advantages over the other two indices. PMID:25623856

  3. The Gait Disorder in Downbeat Nystagmus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schniepp, Roman; Wuehr, Max; Huth, Sabrina; Pradhan, Cauchy; Schlick, Cornelia; Brandt, Thomas; Jahn, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background Downbeat nystagmus (DBN) is a common form of acquired fixation nystagmus with key symptoms of oscillopsia and gait disturbance. Gait disturbance could be a result of impaired visual feedback due to the involuntary ocular oscillations. Alternatively, a malfunction of cerebellar locomotor control might be involved, since DBN is considered a vestibulocerebellar disorder. Methods Investigation of walking in 50 DBN patients (age 7211 years, 23 females) and 50 healthy controls (HS) (age 7011 years, 23 females) using a pressure sensitive carpet (GAITRite). The patient cohort comprised subjects with only ocular motor signs (DBN) and subjects with an additional limb ataxia (DBNCA). Gait investigation comprised different walking speeds and walking with eyes closed. Results In DBN, gait velocity was reduced (p<0.001) with a reduced stride length (p<0.001), increased base of support (p<0.050), and increased double support (p<0.001). Walking with eyes closed led to significant gait changes in both HS and DBN. These changes were more pronounced in DBN patients (p<0.001). Speed-dependency of gait variability revealed significant differences between the subgroups of DBN and DBNCA (p<0.050). Conclusions (I) Impaired visual control caused by involuntary ocular oscillations cannot sufficiently explain the gait disorder. (II) The gait of patients with DBN is impaired in a speed dependent manner. (III) Analysis of gait variability allows distinguishing DBN from DBNCA: Patients with pure DBN show a speed dependency of gait variability similar to that of patients with afferent vestibular deficits. In DBNCA, gait variability resembles the pattern found in cerebellar ataxia. PMID:25140517

  4. Botulinum Toxin Type A Injection for Spastic Equinovarus Foot in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy: Effects on Gait and Foot Pressure Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ja Young; Jung, Soojin; Rha, Dong-wook

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of intramuscular Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) injection on gait and dynamic foot pressure distribution in children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) with dynamic equinovarus foot. Materials and Methods Twenty-five legs of 25 children with CP were investigated in this study. BoNT-A was injected into the gastrocnemius (GCM) and tibialis posterior (TP) muscles under the guidance of ultrasonography. The effects of the toxin were clinically assessed using the modified Ashworth scale (MAS) and modified Tardieu scale (MTS), and a computerized gait analysis and dynamic foot pressure measurements using the F-scan system were also performed before injection and at 1 and 4 months after injection. Results Spasticity of the ankle plantar-flexor in both the MAS and MTS was significantly reduced at both 1 and 4 months after injection. On dynamic foot pressure measurements, the center of pressure index and coronal index, which represent the asymmetrical weight-bearing of the medial and lateral columns of the foot, significantly improved at both 1 and 4 months after injection. The dynamic foot pressure index, total contact area, contact length and hind foot contact width all increased at 1 month after injection, suggesting better heel contact. Ankle kinematic data were significantly improved at both 1 and 4 months after injection, and ankle power generation was significantly increased at 4 months after injection compared to baseline data. Conclusion Using a computerized gait analysis and foot scan, this study revealed significant benefits of BoNT-A injection into the GCM and TP muscles for dynamic equinovarus foot in children with spastic CP. PMID:26847306

  5. Developing a portable gait cycle detection system using an inertial sensor and evaluating the accuracy of the gait cycle detection.

    PubMed

    Park, Min-Hwa; Kwak, Ki-Young; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Although researches had analyzed gait using small sensors, they analyzed only normal gaits. Thus, a research that can overcome the spatial limitations of the existing motion analyses and diagnose abnormal gaits for medical treatment is needed. Accordingly, this research developed the portable gait detection system that can detect gait using a gyroscope, and evaluated the accuracy of the system. The results showed an average recognition error rate of 1.7% for the normal and abnormal gaits, and confirmed that the gait cycle was detected with a high degree of accuracy. Using these characteristics, we could distinguish or diagnose, and treat, an abnormal gait. PMID:26409541

  6. Gait patterns in Prader-Willi and Down syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Prader-Willi (PWS) and Down Syndrome (DS) are two genetic disorders characterised by some common clinical and functional features. A quantitative description and comparison of their patterns would contribute to a deeper understanding of the determinants of motor disability in these two syndromes. The aim of this study was to measure gait pattern in PWS and DS in order to provide data for developing evidence-based deficit-specific or common rehabilitation strategies. Methods 19 PWS patients (17.7-40 yr) and 21 DS patients (18-39 yr) were evaluated with an optoelectronic system and force platforms for measuring kinematic and kinetic parameters during walking. The results were compared with those obtained in a group of normal-weight controls (Control Group: CG; 33.4 + 9.6 yr). Results and Discussion The results show that PWS and DS are characterised by different gait strategies. Spatio-temporal parameters indicated a cautious, abnormal gait in both groups, but DS walked with a less stable strategy than PWS. As for kinematics, DS showed a significantly reduced hip and knee flexion, especially at initial contact and ankle range of motion than PWS. DS were characterised by lower ranges of motion (p < 0.05) in all joints than CG and PWS. As for ankle kinetics, both PWS and DS showed a significantly lower push-off during terminal stance than CG, with DS yielding the lowest values. Stiffness at hip and ankle level was increased in DS. PWS showed hip stiffness values close to normal. At ankle level, stiffness was significantly decreased in both groups. Conclusions Our data show that DS walk with a less physiological gait pattern than PWS. Based on our results, PWS and DS patients need targeted rehabilitation and exercise prescription. Common to both groups is the aim to improve hypotonia, muscle strength and motor control during gait. In DS, improving pelvis and hip range of motion should represent a major specific goal to optimize gait pattern. PMID:20565926

  7. Variability and similarity of gait as evaluated by joint angles: implications for forensic gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sylvia X M; Larsen, Peter K; Alkjr, Tine; Simonsen, Erik B; Lynnerup, Niels

    2014-03-01

    Closed-circuit television (CCTV) footage is used in criminal investigations to compare perpetrators with suspects. Usually, incomplete gait cycles are collected, making evidential gait analysis challenging. This study aimed to analyze the discriminatory power of joint angles throughout a gait cycle. Six sets from 12 men were collected. For each man, a variability range VR (mean 1SD) of a specific joint angle at a specific time point (a gait cycle was 100 time points) was calculated. In turn, each individual was compared with the 11 others, and whenever 1 of these 11 had a value within this individuals VR, it counted as positive. By adding the positives throughout the gait cycle, we created simple bar graphs; tall bars indicated a small discriminatory power, short bars indicated a larger one. The highest discriminatory power was at time points 6080 in the gait cycle. We show how our data can assess gait data from an actual case. PMID:24745080

  8. Testing and Lubrication for Single Race Bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, R.G.

    1998-03-04

    Three ES and H-compatible lubricants (Environment, Safety and Health) for single race bearing applications and one hybrid-material single race bearings were evaluated and compared against single race bearings with trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon) deposition of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) bearing lubricant extracted from Vydax{trademark}. Vydax is a product manufactured by DuPont consisting of various molecular weights of PTFE suspended in trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon), which is an ozone-depleting solvent. Vydax has been used as a bearing lubricant in stronglink mechanisms since 1974. Hybrid bearings with silicon nitride balls and molded glass-nylon-Teflon retainers, bearings lubricated with titanium carbide (TiC) on the balls, bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on races and retainers, and bearings lubricated with electrophoretically deposited MoS{sub 2} were evaluated. The bearings were maintained in a preloaded state in bearing cartridges during cycling and vibration tests. Bearings with electrophoretically deposited MoS{sub 2} performed as well as bearings lubricated with Vydax and were the best performing candidate. All candidates were suitable for low preload applications. Bearings with TiC coated balls and bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers performed well at high preloads, though not as well as bearings lubricated with electrophoretic deposition of MoS{sub 2}. Bearings with silicon nitride balls were not suitable for high preload applications.

  9. Bearing system

    SciTech Connect

    Kapich, D.D.

    1987-02-10

    A bearing system is described for supporting a rotating shaft on a housing, the bearing system comprising: a pair of primary bearings and a pair of backup bearings, each backup bearing comprising an outer race supported on the housing, an inner race on the shaft, rolling elements disposed between the races, and a retainer ring for constraining the rolling elements; the primary bearing being operative to support the shaft during normal operation in a first predetermined position such that in each of the backup bearings the rolling elements contact only one of the races; the backup bearings being configured so that upon axial displacement of the shaft in a predetermined direction form the first predetermined position to a second predetermined position the rolling elements in each bearing contact both races and the shaft is supported by the backup bearings; and shaft displacement means for selectively applying axial force to the shaft to displaced the shaft from the first predetermined position to the second predetermined position while the shaft rotates relative to the housing, the shaft displacement means including a chamber defined by surfaces on the housing and the shaft and means for introducing high pressure fluid into the chamber.

  10. Optimal Synchronizability of Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arajo, N. A. M.; Seybold, H.; Baram, R. M.; Herrmann, H. J.; Andrade, J. S., Jr.

    2013-02-01

    Bearings are mechanical dissipative systems that, when perturbed, relax toward a synchronized (bearing) state. Here we find that bearings can be perceived as physical realizations of complex networks of oscillators with asymmetrically weighted couplings. Accordingly, these networks can exhibit optimal synchronization properties through fine-tuning of the local interaction strength as a function of node degree [Motter, Zhou, and Kurths, Phys. Rev. E 71, 016116 (2005)PLEEE81539-3755]. We show that, in analogy, the synchronizability of bearings can be maximized by counterbalancing the number of contacts and the inertia of their constituting rotor disks through the mass-radius relation, mr?, with an optimal exponent ?=? which converges to unity for a large number of rotors. Under this condition, and regardless of the presence of a long-tailed distribution of disk radii composing the mechanical system, the average participation per disk is maximized and the energy dissipation rate is homogeneously distributed among elementary rotors.

  11. Gait Analysis by High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heck, Andre; van Dongen, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    Human walking is a complicated motion. Movement scientists have developed various research methods to study gait. This article describes how a high school student collected and analysed high quality gait data in much the same way that movement scientists do, via the recording and measurement of motions with a video analysis tool and via

  12. Motor programmes for the termination of gait in humans: organisation and velocity-dependent adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Crenna, Paolo; Cuong, Do Manh; Brnire, Yvon

    2001-01-01

    The organisation of the muscular activities responsible for the termination of gait, their modulation as a function of the rate of progression and the associated mechanical effects were investigated in normal adults, using EMG, force plate and kinematic recordings. In particular, the braking actions in reaction to a visual cue presented at the instant of heel-strike were analysed quantitatively, with a focus on representative leg and thigh muscles of the weight-supporting (stance) and oscillating (swing) limb, during walk-and-stop trials performed at three different velocities. In the stance limb, the EMG associated with braking started approximately 150 ms after the stop signal and, on average, displayed a distal-to-proximal activation sequence that primarily involved the posterior muscle groups (soleus, SOL, and hamstring, HAM). With the exception of SOL, which showed a single EMG burst, EMG patterns consisted of two or three progressively larger components occurring reciprocally in antagonistic muscles. Increasing walking speed yielded a significant reduction of the activity in distal muscles, and a simultaneous increment in proximal muscles. The mechanical effect of the earlier braking actions, estimated from the backward-directed wave of the horizontal ground reaction force, decreased in a velocity-dependent manner. In the swing limb the braking activities began approximately 330 ms after the stop signal and, on average, revealed a proximal-to-distal activation sequence with the extensor groups (quadriceps, QUAD, and SOL) playing a prominent role. They always consisted of single EMG bursts, largely co-activated in the antagonist muscles. The onset latencies of the individual components showed a close correlation, and the spatio-temporal parameters were always scaled in parallel. Unlike the stance limb, the mechanical braking action associated with the final contact of the swing limb increased with walking speed. The results indicate that the muscle synergies responsible for the rapid termination of gait in response to a ground-contact visual cue are produced by a relatively flexible set of motor commands modulated according to different velocity-dependent strategies in the weight-bearing limb, and by a single, fairly robust motor programme in the swing limb. Mechanical constraints related to the relative position of the centre of foot pressure and centre of body mass at the time the braking commands begin to affect external forces, may condition the difference between the two sides of the body. PMID:11744777

  13. Research on gait-based human identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Youguo

    Gait recognition refers to automatic identification of individual based on his/her style of walking. This paper proposes a gait recognition method based on Continuous Hidden Markov Model with Mixture of Gaussians(G-CHMM). First, we initialize a Gaussian mix model for training image sequence with K-means algorithm, then train the HMM parameters using a Baum-Welch algorithm. These gait feature sequences can be trained and obtain a Continuous HMM for every person, therefore, the 7 key frames and the obtained HMM can represent each person's gait sequence. Finally, the recognition is achieved by Front algorithm. The experiments made on CASIA gait databases obtain comparatively high correction identification ratio and comparatively strong robustness for variety of bodily angle.

  14. Dynamic knee loads during gait predict proximal tibial bone distribution.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, D E; Sumner, D R; Andriacchi, T P; Sugar, D A

    1998-05-01

    This study tested the validity of the prediction of dynamic knee loads based on gait measurements. The relationship between the predicted loads at the knee and the distribution of bone between the medial and lateral sides of the tibia was examined. The motion and external forces and moments at the knee were measured during gait and a statically determinate muscle model was used to predict the corresponding forces on the medial and lateral tibial plateaus. In particular, the relationship between the knee adduction moment during gait and the ratio or distribution of medial to lateral tibial bone mineral content was studied. Bone mineral content was measured with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in four regions, two proximal regions 20 mm in height, one medial and one lateral and two distal regions 20 mm in height, one medial and one lateral. The best single predictor of the medial lateral ratio of proximal bone mineral content (bone distribution) was the adduction moment (R2=0.31, p=0.003). Adding weight (negative coefficient. p=0.0004) and the ratio of the average predicted peak force on the medial plateau to the predicted peak force on the lateral plateau (positive coefficient, p=0.0033) to the regression model significantly increased the ability to predict the proximal medial lateral bone distribution (R2=0.72, p=0.0001). Distally neither the subject characteristics nor the gait moments and predicted forces were significant predictors of the bone distribution. The lack of a correlation distally may be reflective of the forces being more evenly distributed further from the tibial plateau. While it has long been suggested that the adduction moment is the primary determinate of the distribution of load between the medial and lateral plateaus, this is the first evidence of its relationship to the underlying bone distribution. PMID:9727339

  15. Grizzly bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwartz, C.C.; Miller, S.D.; Haroldson, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    The grizzly bear inspires fear, awe, and respect in humans to a degree unmatched by any other North American wild mammal. Like other bear species, it can inflict serious injury and death on humans and sometimes does. Unlike the polar bear (Ursus maritimus) of the sparsely inhabited northern arctic, however, grizzly bears still live in areas visited by crowds of people, where presence of the grizzly remains physically real and emotionally dominant. A hike in the wilderness that includes grizzly bears is different from a stroll in a forest from which grizzly bears have been purged; nighttime conversations around the campfire and dreams in the tent reflect the presence of the great bear. Contributing to the aura of the grizzly bear is the mixture of myth and reality about its ferocity. unpredictable disposition, large size, strength, huge canines, long claws, keen senses, swiftness, and playfulness. They share characteristics with humans such as generalist life history strategies. extended periods of maternal care, and omnivorous diets. These factors capture the human imagination in ways distinct from other North American mammals. Precontact Native American legends reflected the same fascination with the grizzly bear as modern stories and legends (Rockwell 1991).

  16. Thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A gas lubricated thrust bearing is described which employs relatively rigid inwardly cantilevered spokes carrying a relatively resilient annular member or annulus. This annulus acts as a beam on which are mounted bearing pads. The resilience of the beam mount causes the pads to accept the load and, with proper design, responds to a rotating thrust-transmitting collar by creating a gas film between the pads and the thrust collar. The bearing may be arranged for load equalization thereby avoiding the necessity of gimbal mounts or the like for the bearing. It may also be arranged to respond to rotation in one or both directions.

  17. Aerospace applications of magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downer, James; Goldie, James; Gondhalekar, Vijay; Hockney, Richard

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic bearings have traditionally been considered for use in aerospace applications only where performance advantages have been the primary, if not only, consideration. Conventional wisdom has been that magnetic bearings have certain performance advantages which must be traded off against increased weight, volume, electric power consumption, and system complexity. These perceptions have hampered the use of magnetic bearings in many aerospace applications because weight, volume, and power are almost always primary considerations. This paper will review progress on several active aerospace magnetic bearings programs at SatCon Technology Corporation. The magnetic bearing programs at SatCon cover a broad spectrum of applications including: a magnetically-suspended spacecraft integrated power and attitude control system (IPACS), a magnetically-suspended momentum wheel, magnetic bearings for the gas generator rotor of a turboshaft engine, a vibration-attenuating magnetic bearing system for an airborne telescope, and magnetic bearings for the compressor of a space-rated heat pump system. The emphasis of these programs is to develop magnetic bearing technologies to the point where magnetic bearings can be truly useful, reliable, and well tested components for the aerospace community.

  18. Does walking in a virtual environment induce unstable gait? An examination of vertical ground reaction forces.

    PubMed

    Hollman, John H; Brey, Robert H; Bang, Tami J; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2007-07-01

    Virtual reality (VR) can induce postural instability in standing and walking, as quantified with kinematic parameters. This study examines the effect of a VR environment on kinetic gait parameters. Ten healthy volunteers walked on an instrumented treadmill in a VR environment and a non-VR environment. In the VR environment, a corridor with colored vertical stripes comprising the walls was projected onto a concave screen placed in front of the treadmill. The speed of the moving image was perceptually equivalent to the speed of the treadmill, creating an illusion that subjects walked through the corridor. Vertical ground reaction forces were sampled. Kinetic parameters that reflect gait stability (weight acceptance peak force, weight acceptance rate, push-off peak force and push-off rate) were compared between the VR and non-VR environments. Subjects walked in the VR environment with increased magnitudes and rates of weight acceptance force and with increased rates of push-off force. Variability in weight acceptance rates and peak forces, and variability in push-off peak forces, were also increased in the VR environment. The gait deviations reflect a compensatory response to visual stimulation that occurs in the VR environment, suggesting that walking in a VR environment may induce gait instability in healthy subjects. PMID:17056258

  19. Effect of a robotic restraint gait training versus robotic conventional gait training on gait parameters in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Bonnyaud, Cline; Zory, Raphael; Boudarham, Julien; Pradon, Didier; Bensmail, Djamel; Roche, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Kinematic and kinetic gait parameters have never been assessed following robotic-assisted gait training in hemiparetic patients. Previous studies suggest that restraint of the non-paretic lower limb during gait training could be a useful rehabilitation approach for hemiparetic patients. The aim of this study is to compare a new Lokomat() asymmetrical restraint paradigm (with a negative kinematic constraint on the non-paretic limb and a positive kinematic constraint on the paretic limb) with a conventional symmetrical Lokomat() training in hemiparetic subjects. We hypothesized that hip and knee kinematics on paretic side would be more improved after the asymmetrical Lokomat() training than after the conventional training. In a prospective observational controlled study, 26 hemiparetic subjects were randomized to one of the two groups Lokomat() experimental gait training (LE) or Lokomat() conventional gait training (LC). They were assessed using 3D gait analysis before, immediately after the 20 min of gait training and following a 20-min rest period. There was a greater increase in peak knee flexion on the paretic side following LE than LC (p = 0.04), and each type of training induced different changes in vertical GRF during single-support phase on the paretic side. Several other spatiotemporal, kinematic and kinetic gait parameters were similarly improved after both types of training. Lokomat() restrained gait training with a negative kinematic constraint on the non-paretic limb and a positive kinematic constraint on the paretic limb appears to be an effective approach to specifically improve knee flexion in the paretic lower limb in hemiparetic patients. This study also highlights spatiotemporal, kinematic and kinetic improvements after Lokomat() training, in hemiparetic subjects, rarely investigated before. PMID:24212255

  20. Gait function in high-functioning autism and Asperger's disorder : evidence for basal-ganglia and cerebellar involvement?

    PubMed

    Rinehart, Nicole J; Tonge, Bruce J; Bradshaw, John L; Iansek, Robert; Enticott, Peter G; McGinley, Jenny

    2006-08-01

    Gait abnormalities have been widely reported in individuals with autism and Asperger's disorder. There is controversy as to whether the cerebellum or the basal-ganglia frontostriatal regions underpin these abnormalities. This is the first direct comparison of gait and upper-body postural features in autism and Asperger's disorder. Clinical and control groups were matched according to age, height, weight, performance, and full scale IQ. Consistent with Hallet's (1993) cerebellar-gait hypothesis, the autistic group showed significantly increased stride-length variability in their gait in comparison to control and Asperger's disorder participants. No quantitative gait deficits were found for the Asperger's disorder group. In support of Damasio and Maurer's (1982) basal-ganglia frontostriatal-gait hypothesis, both clinical groups were rated as showing abnormal arm posturing, however, only the Asperger's group were rated as significantly different from controls in terms of head and trunk posturing. While DSM-IV-TR suggests that Asperger's disorder, but not autism, is associated with motoric clumsiness, our data suggest that both clinical groups are uncoordinated and lacking in motor smoothness. Gait differences in autism and Asperger's disorder were suggested to reflect differential involvement of the cerebellum, with commonalities reflecting similar involvement of the basal-ganglia frontostriatal region. PMID:16554961

  1. [Hearing loss and gait ataxia without dizziness. Hemosiderosis].

    PubMed

    Albrecht, L; Gabriel, S; Packebusch, A; Roth, M; Beine, K H; Faltraco, F

    2009-12-01

    Superficial cerebral hemosiderosis is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, gait ataxia and pyramidal signs with irreversible myelopathy. It is caused by chronic hemorrhage into the subarachnoid space with hemosiderin deposition in the subpial, leptomeningeal and subependymal layers. Imaging of the entire neuroaxis is indicated to localize a source of bleeding, including cerebral and spinal angiography when necessary. Taking into account clinical signs and symptoms the interpretation of T2*-weighted images allows the radiologist to set the course for the optimal therapeutic regimen. PMID:19787328

  2. Polar Bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, S.D.; DeMaster

    1988-01-01

    Polar bears are long-lived, late-maturing carnivores that have relatively low rates of reproduction and natural mortality. Their populations are susceptible to disturbance from human activities, such as the exploration and development of mineral resources or hunting. Polar bear populations have been an important renewable resource available to coastal communities throughout the Arctic for thousands of years.

  3. Bearing monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Roger; Stevenson, Mark W.; Kwan, Chi-Man; Haynes, Leonard S.

    2001-07-01

    At Ford Motor Company, thrust bearing in drill motors is often damaged by metal chips. Since the vibration frequency is several Hz only, it is very difficult to use accelerometers to pick up the vibration signals. Under the support of Ford and NASA, we propose to use a piezo film as a sensor to pick up the slow vibrations of the bearing. Then a neural net based fault detection algorithm is applied to differentiate normal bearing from bad bearing. The first step involves a Fast Fourier Transform which essentially extracts the significant frequency components in the sensor. Then Principal Component Analysis is used to further reduce the dimension of the frequency components by extracting the principal features inside the frequency components. The features can then be used to indicate the status of bearing. Experimental results are very encouraging.

  4. Gait Dysfunction in Mild Cognitive Impairment Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Joe; Robbins, Matthew; Holtzer, Roee; Zimmerman, Molly; Wang, Cuiling; Xue, Xiaonan; Lipton, Richard B.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To conduct a systematic clinical and quantitative assessment of gait in older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) syndromes. DESIGN Cross-sectional. SETTING Einstein Aging Study, a community-based longitudinal aging study. PARTICIPANTS Fifty-four individuals with amnestic MCI (a-MCI), 62 with nonamnestic-MCI (na-MCI), and 295 healthy controls identified from the Einstein Aging Study participants. MEASUREMENTS Comparison of clinical and quantitative gait performance in subjects with MCI subtypes with that of cognitively normal older adults. RESULTS Neurological gaits were more common in a-MCI (31.5%, P = .008) but not in na-MCI (19.4%, P = .55), than in controls (16.3%). Quantitative gait in multiple parameters was worse in both MCI subtypes than in controls. Factor analysis revealed three independent factors representing pace, rhythm, and variability. Subjects with a-MCI had worse rhythm and variability scores than those with na-MCI and controls. Subjects with na-MCI had worse performance on the pace domain than the other two groups. Subjects with MCI and gait abnormalities had higher disability scores than subjects with MCI without gait abnormalities. CONCLUSION Gait dysfunction is common in older individuals with amnestic and nonamnestic subtypes of MCI. PMID:18482293

  5. Gait transitions in simulated reduced gravity.

    PubMed

    Ivanenko, Yuri P; Labini, Francesca Sylos; Cappellini, Germana; Macellari, Velio; McIntyre, Joseph; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2011-03-01

    Gravity has a strong effect on gait and the speed of gait transitions. A gait has been defined as a pattern of locomotion that changes discontinuously at the transition to another gait. On Earth, during gradual speed changes, humans exhibit a sudden discontinuous switch from walking to running at a specific speed. To study the effects of altered gravity on both the stance and swing legs, we developed a novel unloading exoskeleton that allows a person to step in simulated reduced gravity by tilting the body relative to the vertical. Using different simulation techniques, we confirmed that at lower gravity levels the transition speed is slower (in accordance with the previously reported Froude number ?0.5). Surprisingly, however, we found that at lower levels of simulated gravity the transition between walking and running was generally gradual, without any noticeable abrupt change in gait parameters. This was associated with a significant prolongation of the swing phase, whose duration became virtually equal to that of stance in the vicinity of the walk-run transition speed, and with a gradual shift from inverted-pendulum gait (walking) to bouncing gait (running). PMID:21212248

  6. Deficits in Scaling of Gait Force and Cycle in Parkinsonian Gait Identified by Long-Term Monitoring of Acceleration with the Portable Gait Rhythmogram

    PubMed Central

    Terashi, Hiroo; Utsumi, Hiroya; Ishimura, Yohei; Takazawa, Tomoko; Okuma, Yasuyuki; Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Mitoma, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    To examine the range of gait acceleration and cycle in daily walking of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), we compared the gait of 40 patients with PD and 17 normal controls by using a newly developed long-term monitoring device that extracts gait-related accelerations from overall movements-related accelerations. The range of change in gait acceleration, relative to the control, was less than 75% in 12 patients. The range of change in gait cycle was less than 75% in 8 patients. The range of changes in both parameters was less than 75% in 4 patients. The results suggest narrow changes in gait parameters in PD. PMID:23119183

  7. Deficits in scaling of gait force and cycle in parkinsonian gait identified by long-term monitoring of acceleration with the portable gait rhythmogram.

    PubMed

    Terashi, Hiroo; Utsumi, Hiroya; Ishimura, Yohei; Takazawa, Tomoko; Okuma, Yasuyuki; Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Mitoma, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    To examine the range of gait acceleration and cycle in daily walking of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), we compared the gait of 40 patients with PD and 17 normal controls by using a newly developed long-term monitoring device that extracts gait-related accelerations from overall movements-related accelerations. The range of change in gait acceleration, relative to the control, was less than 75% in 12 patients. The range of change in gait cycle was less than 75% in 8 patients. The range of changes in both parameters was less than 75% in 4 patients. The results suggest narrow changes in gait parameters in PD. PMID:23119183

  8. Gait variability: methods, modeling and meaning

    PubMed Central

    Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

    2005-01-01

    The study of gait variability, the stride-to-stride fluctuations in walking, offers a complementary way of quantifying locomotion and its changes with aging and disease as well as a means of monitoring the effects of therapeutic interventions and rehabilitation. Previous work has suggested that measures of gait variability may be more closely related to falls, a serious consequence of many gait disorders, than are measures based on the mean values of other walking parameters. The Current JNER series presents nine reports on the results of recent investigations into gait variability. One novel method for collecting unconstrained, ambulatory data is reviewed, and a primer on analysis methods is presented along with a heuristic approach to summarizing variability measures. In addition, the first studies of gait variability in animal models of neurodegenerative disease are described, as is a mathematical model of human walking that characterizes certain complex (multifractal) features of the motor control's pattern generator. Another investigation demonstrates that, whereas both healthy older controls and patients with a higher-level gait disorder walk more slowly in reduced lighting, only the latter's stride variability increases. Studies of the effects of dual tasks suggest that the regulation of the stride-to-stride fluctuations in stride width and stride time may be influenced by attention loading and may require cognitive input. Finally, a report of gait variability in over 500 subjects, probably the largest study of this kind, suggests how step width variability may relate to fall risk. Together, these studies provide new insights into the factors that regulate the stride-to-stride fluctuations in walking and pave the way for expanded research into the control of gait and the practical application of measures of gait variability in the clinical setting. PMID:16033650

  9. A longitudinal study of gait function and characteristics of gait disturbance in individuals with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Cedervall, Ylva; Halvorsen, Kjartan; Aberg, Anna Cristina

    2014-04-01

    Walking in daily life places high demands on the interplay between cognitive and motor functions. A well-functioning dual-tasking ability is thus essential for walking safely. The aims were to study longitudinal changes in gait function during single- and dual-tasking over a period of two years among people with initially mild AD (n=21). Data were collected on three occasions, twelve months apart. An optical motion capture system was used for three-dimensional gait analysis. Gait parameters were examined at comfortable gait speed during single-tasking, dual-tasking naming names, and naming animals. The dual-task cost for gait speed was pronounced at baseline (names 26%, animals 35%), and remained so during the study period. A significant (p<0.05) longitudinal decline in gait speed and step length during single- and dual-tasking was observed, whereas double support time, step width and step height showed inconsistent results. Systematic visual examination of the motion capture files revealed that dual-tasking frequently resulted in gait disturbances. Three main characteristics of such disturbances were identified: Temporal disturbance, Spatial disturbance and Instability in single stance. These aberrant gait performances may affect gait stability and increase the risk of falling. Furthermore, the observed gait disturbances can contribute to understanding and explaining previous reported gait variability among individuals with AD. However, the role that dual-task testing and aberrant dual-task gait performance play in the identification of individuals with early signs of cognitive impairment and in predicting fall risk in AD remains to be studied. PMID:24491520

  10. Variations in Kinematics during Clinical Gait Analysis in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boudarham, Julien; Roche, Nicolas; Pradon, Didier; Bonnyaud, Cline; Bensmail, Djamel; Zory, Raphael

    2013-01-01

    In addition to changes in spatio-temporal and kinematic parameters, patients with stroke exhibit fear of falling as well as fatigability during gait. These changes could compromise interpretation of data from gait analysis. The aim of this study was to determine if the gait of hemiplegic patients changes significantly over successive gait trials. Forty two stroke patients and twenty healthy subjects performed 9 gait trials during a gait analysis session. The mean and variability of spatio-temporal and kinematic joint parameters were analyzed during 3 groups of consecutive gait trials (13, 46 and 79). Principal component analysis was used to reduce the number of variables from the joint kinematic waveforms and to identify the parts of the gait cycle which changed during the gait analysis session. The results showed that i) spontaneous gait velocity and the other spatio-temporal parameters significantly increased, and ii) gait variability decreased, over the last 6 gait trials compared to the first 3, for hemiplegic patients but not healthy subjects. Principal component analysis revealed changes in the sagittal waveforms of the hip, knee and ankle for hemiplegic patients after the first 3 gait trials. These results suggest that at the beginning of the gait analysis session, stroke patients exhibited phase of adaptation,characterized by a cautious gait but no fatigue was observed. PMID:23799100

  11. Cryogenic Magnetic Bearing Test Facility (CMBTF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Cryogenic Magnetic Bearing Test Facility (CMBTF) was designed and built to evaluate compact, lightweight magnetic bearings for use in the SSME's (space shuttle main engine) liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen turbopumps. State of the art and tradeoff studies were conducted which indicated that a hybrid permanent magnet bias homopolar magnetic bearing design would be smaller, lighter, and much more efficient than conventional industrial bearings. A test bearing of this type was designed for the test rig for use at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature (-320 F). The bearing was fabricated from state-of-the-art materials and incorporated into the CMBTF. Testing at room temperature was accomplished at Avcon's facility. These preliminary tests indicated that this magnetic bearing is a feasible alternative to older bearing technologies. Analyses showed that the hybrid magnetic bearing is one-third the weight, considerably smaller, and uses less power than previous generations of magnetic bearings.

  12. Gait recognition based on Gabor wavelets and modified gait energy image for human identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Deng-Yuan; Lin, Ta-Wei; Hu, Wu-Chih; Cheng, Chih-Hsiang

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a method for recognizing human identity using gait features based on Gabor wavelets and modified gait energy images (GEIs). Identity recognition by gait generally involves gait representation, extraction, and classification. In this work, a modified GEI convolved with an ensemble of Gabor wavelets is proposed as a gait feature. Principal component analysis is then used to project the Gabor-wavelet-based gait features into a lower-dimension feature space for subsequent classification. Finally, support vector machine classifiers based on a radial basis function kernel are trained and utilized to recognize human identity. The major contributions of this paper are as follows: (1) the consideration of the shadow effect to yield a more complete segmentation of gait silhouettes; (2) the utilization of motion estimation to track people when walkers overlap; and (3) the derivation of modified GEIs to extract more useful gait information. Extensive performance evaluation shows a great improvement of recognition accuracy due to the use of shadow removal, motion estimation, and gait representation using the modified GEIs and Gabor wavelets.

  13. The connection between anthropometry and gait harmony unveiled through the lens of the golden ratio.

    PubMed

    Iosa, Marco; Morone, Giovanni; Bini, Fabiano; Fusco, Augusto; Paolucci, Stefano; Marinozzi, Franco

    2016-01-26

    In nature, many systems have a harmonic organization due to their fractal structure related to an irrational number called golden ratio. That is a constant proportion found in phases of human gait cycle, and is also found in the lengths of human body segments. In this study we tested if artificial alterations in anthropometric proportions may alter gait proportions. Twenty healthy subjects (29.15±5.66years) were enrolled in this study and asked to walk normally and with special shoes altering their anthropometric proportions. Further, to test if the relationship between gait phases and anthropometry could be due to the pendular mechanism of walking, subjects were also asked to walk with extra masses located on their shanks. Results showed that the artificial alteration of body segment proportions affected the gait ratio based on the proportion of time between stance and swing (p=0.015). Conversely, no changes occurred during walking in weighted condition (p=0.394). These results confirm the connection between anthropometric proportions and gait ratio, and suggest the idea that humans may have evolved into the actual anthropometric proportions for favoring a walking having a golden ratio based harmony, but research is required to verify this hypothesis. PMID:26700875

  14. Adaptive method for real-time gait phase detection based on ground contact forces.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lie; Zheng, Jianbin; Wang, Yang; Song, Zhengge; Zhan, Enqi

    2015-01-01

    A novel method is presented to detect real-time gait phases based on ground contact forces (GCFs) measured by force sensitive resistors (FSRs). The traditional threshold method (TM) sets a threshold to divide the GCFs into on-ground and off-ground statuses. However, TM is neither an adaptive nor real-time method. The threshold setting is based on body weight or the maximum and minimum GCFs in the gait cycles, resulting in different thresholds needed for different walking conditions. Additionally, the maximum and minimum GCFs are only obtainable after data processing. Therefore, this paper proposes a proportion method (PM) that calculates the sums and proportions of GCFs wherein the GCFs are obtained from FSRs. A gait analysis is then implemented by the proposed gait phase detection algorithm (GPDA). Finally, the PM reliability is determined by comparing the detection results between PM and TM. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed PM is highly reliable in all walking conditions. In addition, PM could be utilized to analyze gait phases in real time. Finally, PM exhibits strong adaptability to different walking conditions. PMID:25468687

  15. Gait analysis in normal and spinal contused mice using the TreadScan system.

    PubMed

    Beare, Jason E; Morehouse, Johnny R; DeVries, William H; Enzmann, Gaby U; Burke, Darlene A; Magnuson, David S K; Whittemore, Scott R

    2009-11-01

    Advances in spinal cord injury (SCI) research are dependent on quality animal models, which in turn rely on sensitive outcome measures able to detect functional differences in animals following injury. To date, most measurements of dysfunction following SCI rely either on the subjective rating of observers or the slow throughput of manual gait assessment. The present study compares the gait of normal and contusion-injured mice using the TreadScan system. TreadScan utilizes a transparent treadmill belt and a high-speed camera to capture the footprints of animals and automatically analyze gait characteristics. Adult female C57Bl/6 mice were introduced to the treadmill prior to receiving either a standardized mild, moderate, or sham contusion spinal cord injury. TreadScan gait analyses were performed weekly for 10 weeks and compared with scores on the Basso Mouse Scale (BMS). Results indicate that this software successfully differentiates sham animals from injured animals on a number of gait characteristics, including hindlimb swing time, stride length, toe spread, and track width. Differences were found between mild and moderate contusion injuries, indicating a high degree of sensitivity within the system. Rear track width, a measure of the animal's hindlimb base of support, correlated strongly both with spared white matter percentage and with terminal BMS. TreadScan allows for an objective and rapid behavioral assessment of locomotor function following mild-moderate contusive SCI, where the majority of mice still exhibit hindlimb weight support and plantar paw placement during stepping. PMID:19886808

  16. Idiopathic Toe Walking: A Gait Laboratory Review.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, R; O'Brien, T

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic toe walking (ITW) is defined as one who is neurologically normal but demonstrates a preference for walking on the toes. It is a diagnosis of exclusion so differential diagnoses such as cerebral palsy, neuropathy or myopathy must be ruled out. A review of 102 patients attending a gait laboratory with a presumptive diagnosis of ITW found that gait analysis data agreed with this diagnosis in 81 (79.4%) of cases while the remaining 21 (20.6%) were not typical of this diagnosis. The features found to be significantly different between the groups were Babinski response, fast stretch of the gastrocnemius, knee flexion at initial contact and asymmetry at the ankles during gait. This study highlights that clinical gait analysis can be a useful, non-invasive means of diagnosing idiopathic toe walking and recommending appropriate intervention based on clinical and dynamic assessment of calf tightness. PMID:26349353

  17. Foil bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1993-11-01

    The rolling element bearings (REB's) which support many turbomachinery rotors offer high load capacity, low power requirements, and durability. Two disadvantages of REB's are: (1) rolling or sliding contact within the bearing has life-limiting consequences; and (2) REB's provide essentially no damping. The REB's in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps must sustain high static and dynamic loads, at high speeds, with a cryogenic fluid as lubricant and coolant. The pump end ball bearings limit the life of the SSME high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). Compliant foil bearing (CFB) manufacturers have proposed replacing turbopump REB's with CFB's CFB's work well in aircraft air cycle machines, auxiliary power units, and refrigeration compressors. In a CFB, the rotor only contracts the foil support structure during start up and shut down. CFB damping is higher than REB damping. However, the load capacity of the CFB is low, compared to a REB. Furthermore, little stiffness and damping data exists for the CFB. A rotordynamic analysis for turbomachinery critical speeds and stability requires the input of bearing stiffness and damping coefficients. The two basic types of CFB are the tension-dominated bearing and the bending-dominated bearing. Many investigators have analyzed and measured characteristics of tension-dominated foil bearings, which are applied principally in magnetic tape recording. The bending-dominated CFB is used more in rotating machinery. This report describes the first phase of a structural analysis of a bending-dominated, multileaf CFB. A brief discussion of CFB literature is followed by a description and results of the present analysis.

  18. Foil bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1993-01-01

    The rolling element bearings (REB's) which support many turbomachinery rotors offer high load capacity, low power requirements, and durability. Two disadvantages of REB's are: (1) rolling or sliding contact within the bearing has life-limiting consequences; and (2) REB's provide essentially no damping. The REB's in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps must sustain high static and dynamic loads, at high speeds, with a cryogenic fluid as lubricant and coolant. The pump end ball bearings limit the life of the SSME high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). Compliant foil bearing (CFB) manufacturers have proposed replacing turbopump REB's with CFB's CFB's work well in aircraft air cycle machines, auxiliary power units, and refrigeration compressors. In a CFB, the rotor only contracts the foil support structure during start up and shut down. CFB damping is higher than REB damping. However, the load capacity of the CFB is low, compared to a REB. Furthermore, little stiffness and damping data exists for the CFB. A rotordynamic analysis for turbomachinery critical speeds and stability requires the input of bearing stiffness and damping coefficients. The two basic types of CFB are the tension-dominated bearing and the bending-dominated bearing. Many investigators have analyzed and measured characteristics of tension-dominated foil bearings, which are applied principally in magnetic tape recording. The bending-dominated CFB is used more in rotating machinery. This report describes the first phase of a structural analysis of a bending-dominated, multileaf CFB. A brief discussion of CFB literature is followed by a description and results of the present analysis.

  19. Agency, gait and self-consciousness.

    PubMed

    Kannape, O A; Blanke, O

    2012-02-01

    Agency is an important aspect of bodily self-consciousness, allowing us to separate own movements from those induced by the environment and to distinguish own movements from those of other agents. Unsurprisingly, theoretical frameworks for agency such as central monitoring are closely tied to computational models of sensorimotor control. Until recently agency research has largely focussed on goal-directed movements of the upper limbs. In particular, the influence of performance-related sensory cues and the relevance of prediction signals for agency judgements have been studied through a variety of spatio-temporal mismatches between movement and the sensory consequences of movement. However, agents often perform a different type of movement; highly automated movements that involve the entire body such as walking, cycling, and swimming with potentially different agency mechanisms. Here, we review recent work about agency for full-body movements such as gait, highlighting the effects of performance-related visual and auditory cues on gait agency. Gait movements differ from upper limb actions. Gait is cyclic, more rarely immediately goal-directed, and is generally considered one of the most automatic and unconscious actions. We discuss such movement differences with respect to the functional mechanisms of full-body agency and body-part agency by linking these gait agency paradigms to computational models of motor control. This is followed by a selective review of gait control, locomotion, and models of motor control relying on prediction signals and underlining their relevance for full-body agency. PMID:22226801

  20. Gait Partitioning Methods: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Taborri, Juri; Palermo, Eduardo; Rossi, Stefano; Cappa, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, gait phase partitioning has come to be a challenging research topic due to its impact on several applications related to gait technologies. A variety of sensors can be used to feed algorithms for gait phase partitioning, mainly classifiable as wearable or non-wearable. Among wearable sensors, footswitches or foot pressure insoles are generally considered as the gold standard; however, to overcome some inherent limitations of the former, inertial measurement units have become popular in recent decades. Valuable results have been achieved also though electromyography, electroneurography, and ultrasonic sensors. Non-wearable sensors, such as opto-electronic systems along with force platforms, remain the most accurate system to perform gait analysis in an indoor environment. In the present paper we identify, select, and categorize the available methodologies for gait phase detection, analyzing advantages and disadvantages of each solution. Finally, we comparatively examine the obtainable gait phase granularities, the usable computational methodologies and the optimal sensor placements on the targeted body segments. PMID:26751449

  1. Gait Partitioning Methods: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Taborri, Juri; Palermo, Eduardo; Rossi, Stefano; Cappa, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, gait phase partitioning has come to be a challenging research topic due to its impact on several applications related to gait technologies. A variety of sensors can be used to feed algorithms for gait phase partitioning, mainly classifiable as wearable or non-wearable. Among wearable sensors, footswitches or foot pressure insoles are generally considered as the gold standard; however, to overcome some inherent limitations of the former, inertial measurement units have become popular in recent decades. Valuable results have been achieved also though electromyography, electroneurography, and ultrasonic sensors. Non-wearable sensors, such as opto-electronic systems along with force platforms, remain the most accurate system to perform gait analysis in an indoor environment. In the present paper we identify, select, and categorize the available methodologies for gait phase detection, analyzing advantages and disadvantages of each solution. Finally, we comparatively examine the obtainable gait phase granularities, the usable computational methodologies and the optimal sensor placements on the targeted body segments. PMID:26751449

  2. PAGAS: Portable and Accurate Gait Analysis System.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Rojay; Ganz, Aura

    2012-01-01

    Gait analysis systems are powerful tools in the monitoring and rehabilitation of many health conditions which result in an altered gait (such as Parkinson's disease and rheumatoid arthritis), along with the injury of lower limbs. However, current systems that provide accurate gait monitoring and analysis are large and expensive, and therefore are available only in professional settings. The goal of this research is to develop and test a Portable and Accurate Gait Analysis System, denoted PAGAS, which enables patients to monitor their own gait and track their progress and improvement over time. Moreover, PAGAS will enable therapists to follow the progress of their patients over time without the need for multiple visits required at a rehabilitation facility, thus saving significant healthcare costs. PAGAS includes footswitches and a micro-controller, which connects to an Android Smart-phone using Bluetooth communication. An application on the Smartphone analyzes the raw data to produce temporal gait parameters that are displayed to the user on a graphical user interface. PMID:23365885

  3. Gait Recognition Using Wearable Motion Recording Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gafurov, Davrondzhon; Snekkenes, Einar

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents an alternative approach, where gait is collected by the sensors attached to the person's body. Such wearable sensors record motion (e.g. acceleration) of the body parts during walking. The recorded motion signals are then investigated for person recognition purposes. We analyzed acceleration signals from the foot, hip, pocket and arm. Applying various methods, the best EER obtained for foot-, pocket-, arm- and hip- based user authentication were 5%, 7%, 10% and 13%, respectively. Furthermore, we present the results of our analysis on security assessment of gait. Studying gait-based user authentication (in case of hip motion) under three attack scenarios, we revealed that a minimal effort mimicking does not help to improve the acceptance chances of impostors. However, impostors who know their closest person in the database or the genders of the users can be a threat to gait-based authentication. We also provide some new insights toward the uniqueness of gait in case of foot motion. In particular, we revealed the following: a sideway motion of the foot provides the most discrimination, compared to an up-down or forward-backward directions; and different segments of the gait cycle provide different level of discrimination.

  4. Quantitative gait disturbances in older adults with cognitive impairments.

    PubMed

    Bridenbaugh, Stephanie A; Kressig, Reto W

    2014-01-01

    Gait is a complex motor task, initiated and governed by different areas of the brain. Studies have shown a clear association between gait and cognition. Impairments in both gait and cognition are prevalent in older adults. Older adults with gait impairment have an increased risk of developing cognitive impairments. Those with cognitive impairment often have gait impairments and more falls than cognitively healthy older adults. Recent studies have shown that quantitative gait analysis, particularly performed during dual task conditions, can detect gait deficits that cannot yet be seen by the naked eye, even to a trained specialist. Some studies have shown that such gait disturbances were measurable years before mild cognitive impairment or dementia or walking difficulties were clinically manifest. Quantitative gait analysis can provide early detection of gait and cognitive impairments as well as fall risk. Future quantitative gait studies may help distinguish dementia subtypes in early stages of the diseases. Early detection of gait and cognitive impairments would provide a better understanding of disease pathophysiology and progression. Early detection also allows the timely implementation of interventions with the ultimate goal of improving or maintaining mobility and functional independence for as long as possible. Quantitative gait analysis should be viewed as a clinical tool to aid diagnoses and treatment planning. This review examines the current literature on quantitatively measured gait impairment in older adults with mild cognitive impairment or a dementia subtype. PMID:24050167

  5. A study of passive weight-bearing lower limb exercise effects on local muscles and whole body oxidative metabolism: a comparison with simulated horse riding, bicycle, and walking exercise

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background We have developed an exercise machine prototype for increasing exercise intensity by means of passively exercising lower limb muscles. The purpose of the present study was to compare the passive exercise intensity of our newly-developed machine with the intensities of different types of exercises. We also attempted to measure muscle activity to study how these forms of exercise affected individual parts of the body. Methods Subjects were 14 healthy men with the following demographics: age 30 years, height 171.5 cm, weight 68.3 kg. They performed 4 types of exercise: Passive weight-bearing lower limb exercise (PWLLE), Simulated horse riding exercise (SHRE), Bicycle exercise, and Walking exercise, as described below at an interval of one week or longer. Oxygen uptake, blood pressure, heart rate, and electromyogram (EMG) were measured or recorded during exercise. At rest prior to exercise and immediately after the end of each exercise intensity, the oxygenated hemoglobin levels of the lower limb muscles were measured by near-infrared spectroscopy to calculate the rate of decline. This rate of decline was obtained immediately after exercise as well as at rest to calculate oxygen consumption of the lower limb muscles as expressed as a ratio of a post-exercise rate of decline to a resting one. Results The heart rate and oxygen uptake observed in PWLLE during maximal intensity were comparable to that of a 20-watt bicycle exercise or 2 km/hr walking exercise. Maximal intensity PWLLE was found to provoke muscle activity comparable to an 80-watt bicycle or 6 km/hr walking exercise. As was the case with the EMG results, during maximal intensity PWLLE, the rectus femoris muscle consumed oxygen in amounts identical to that of an 80-watt bicycle or a 6 km/hr walking exercise. Conclusion Passive weight-bearing lower limb exercise using our trial machine could provide approximately 3 MET of exercise and the thigh exhibited muscle activity equivalent to that of 80-watt bicycle or 6 km/hr walking exercise. Namely, given the same oxygen uptake, PWLLE exceeded bicycle or walking exercise in muscle activity, thus PWLLE is believed to strengthen muscle power while reducing the load imposed on the cardiopulmonary system. PMID:19900292

  6. Gait training facilitates central drive to ankle dorsiflexors in children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Willerslev-Olsen, Maria; Petersen, Tue Hvass; Farmer, Simon Francis; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2015-03-01

    Foot drop and toe walking are frequent concerns in children with cerebral palsy. The main underlying cause of these problems is early damage and lack of maturation of the corticospinal tract. In the present study we investigated whether 4 weeks of daily treadmill training with an incline may facilitate corticospinal transmission and improve the control of the ankle joint in children with cerebral palsy. Sixteen children with cerebral palsy (Gross Motor Classification System I:6, II:6, III:4) aged 5-14 years old, were recruited for the study. Evaluation of gait ability and intramuscular coherence was made twice before and twice after training with an interval of 1 month. Gait kinematics were recorded by 3D video analysis during treadmill walking with a velocity chosen by the child at the first evaluation. Foot pressure was measured by force sensitive foot soles during treadmill and over ground walking. EMG-EMG coherence was calculated from two separate electrode recordings placed over the tibialis anterior muscle. Training involved 30 min of walking daily on a treadmill with an incline for 30 days. Gait training was accompanied by significant increases in gait speed, incline on the treadmill, the maximal voluntary dorsiflexion torque, the number and amplitude of toe lifts late in the swing phase during gait and the weight exerted on the heel during the early stance phase of the gait cycle. EMG-EMG coherence in the beta and gamma frequency bands recorded from tibialis anterior muscle increased significantly when compared to coherence before training. The largest changes in coherence with training were observed for children <10 years of age. Importantly, in contrast to training-induced EMG increases, the increase in coherence was maintained at the follow-up measurement 1 month after training. Changes in the strength of coherence in the beta and gamma band were positively correlated with improvements in the subjects' ability to lift the toes in the swing phase. These data show that daily intensive gait training increases beta and gamma oscillatory drive to ankle dorsiflexor motor neurons and that it improves toe lift and heel strike in children with cerebral palsy. We propose that intensive gait training may produce plastic changes in the corticospinal tract, which are responsible for improvements in gait function. PMID:25623137

  7. Gait training facilitates central drive to ankle dorsiflexors in children with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Tue Hvass; Farmer, Simon Francis; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2015-01-01

    Foot drop and toe walking are frequent concerns in children with cerebral palsy. The main underlying cause of these problems is early damage and lack of maturation of the corticospinal tract. In the present study we investigated whether 4 weeks of daily treadmill training with an incline may facilitate corticospinal transmission and improve the control of the ankle joint in children with cerebral palsy. Sixteen children with cerebral palsy (Gross Motor Classification System I:6, II:6, III:4) aged 5–14 years old, were recruited for the study. Evaluation of gait ability and intramuscular coherence was made twice before and twice after training with an interval of 1 month. Gait kinematics were recorded by 3D video analysis during treadmill walking with a velocity chosen by the child at the first evaluation. Foot pressure was measured by force sensitive foot soles during treadmill and over ground walking. EMG-EMG coherence was calculated from two separate electrode recordings placed over the tibialis anterior muscle. Training involved 30 min of walking daily on a treadmill with an incline for 30 days. Gait training was accompanied by significant increases in gait speed, incline on the treadmill, the maximal voluntary dorsiflexion torque, the number and amplitude of toe lifts late in the swing phase during gait and the weight exerted on the heel during the early stance phase of the gait cycle. EMG-EMG coherence in the beta and gamma frequency bands recorded from tibialis anterior muscle increased significantly when compared to coherence before training. The largest changes in coherence with training were observed for children <10 years of age. Importantly, in contrast to training-induced EMG increases, the increase in coherence was maintained at the follow-up measurement 1 month after training. Changes in the strength of coherence in the beta and gamma band were positively correlated with improvements in the subjects’ ability to lift the toes in the swing phase. These data show that daily intensive gait training increases beta and gamma oscillatory drive to ankle dorsiflexor motor neurons and that it improves toe lift and heel strike in children with cerebral palsy. We propose that intensive gait training may produce plastic changes in the corticospinal tract, which are responsible for improvements in gait function. PMID:25623137

  8. Gait dynamics in Parkinson's disease: common and distinct behavior among stride length, gait variability, and fractal-like scaling.

    PubMed

    Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

    2009-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common, debilitating neurodegenerative disease. Gait disturbances are a frequent cause of disability and impairment for patients with PD. This article provides a brief introduction to PD and describes the gait changes typically seen in patients with this disease. A major focus of this report is an update on the study of the fractal properties of gait in PD, the relationship between this feature of gait and stride length and gait variability, and the effects of different experimental conditions on these three gait properties. Implications of these findings are also briefly described. This update highlights the idea that while stride length, gait variability, and fractal scaling of gait are all impaired in PD, distinct mechanisms likely contribute to and are responsible for the regulation of these disparate gait properties. PMID:19566273

  9. Gait dynamics in Parkinson's disease: Common and distinct behavior among stride length, gait variability, and fractal-like scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.

    2009-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common, debilitating neurodegenerative disease. Gait disturbances are a frequent cause of disability and impairment for patients with PD. This article provides a brief introduction to PD and describes the gait changes typically seen in patients with this disease. A major focus of this report is an update on the study of the fractal properties of gait in PD, the relationship between this feature of gait and stride length and gait variability, and the effects of different experimental conditions on these three gait properties. Implications of these findings are also briefly described. This update highlights the idea that while stride length, gait variability, and fractal scaling of gait are all impaired in PD, distinct mechanisms likely contribute to and are responsible for the regulation of these disparate gait properties.

  10. Classification of gait quality for biofeedback to improve heel-to-toe gait.

    PubMed

    Vadnerkar, Abhishek; Figueiredo, Sabrina; Mayo, Nancy E; Kearney, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    A feature of healthy gait is a clearly defined heel strike upon initial contact of the foot with the ground. However, a common consequence of ageing is deterioration of the heel first nature of gait towards a shuffling gait (flat foot at contact). Physiotherapy can be effective in correcting this but is costly and labour intensive. Gait rehabilitation could be accelerated with home exercise, guided by a biofeedback device that distinguishes between heel first and shuffling gait. This paper describes an algorithm that distinguishes between heel-to-toe gait and shuffling gait on the basis of angular velocity of the foot, using an inertial measurement unit. Measurements were made of normal and abnormal gait and used to develop an algorithm that distinguishes between good and bad steps. Results demonstrate very good algorithm performance, with a classification accuracy at the accuracy-optimal threshold of 92.7% when compared with physiotherapist labels. The sensitivity and specificity at this threshold are 84.4% and 97.5% respectively. These performance metrics suggest that this algorithm is usable in a biofeedback device. PMID:25570776

  11. Lack of maintenance of gait pattern as measured by instrumental methods suggests psychogenic gait

    PubMed Central

    Merello, Marcelo; Ballesteros, Diego; Rossi, Malco; Arena, Julieta; Crespo, Marcos; Cervio, Andres; Oderiz, Carolina Cuello; Rivero, Alberto; Cerquetti, Daniel; Risk, Marcelo; Balej, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Summary Fluctuation is a common feature of all psychogenic gait disorder (PGD) patterns. Whether this fluctuation involves only the degree of impairment or whether it affects the gait pattern itself remains an interesting question. We hypothesize that, on repeated measurements, both normal and abnormal gait may present quantitative differences while maintaining their basic underlying pattern; conversely, in psychogenic gait, the basic pattern appears not to be preserved. Using an optoelectronic system, data acquired from 19 normal subjects and 66 patients were applied to train a neural network (NN) and subsequently classify gait patterns into four different groups (normal, ataxic, spastic-paraparetic and parkinsonian). Five patients who fulfilled clinical criteria for psychogenic gait and six controls were then prospectively evaluated on two separate occasions, three months apart. Normal controls and ataxic, parkinsonian or spastic patients were correctly identified by the NN, and categorized within the corresponding groups at baseline as well as at a three-month follow-up evaluation. NN analysis showed that after three months, no PGD patient preserved the gait pattern detected at baseline, even though this finding was not clinically apparent. Modification of gait pattern detected by repeated kinematic measurement and NN analysis could suggest the presence of PGD, particularly in difficult-to-diagnose cases. PMID:23597435

  12. Lack of maintenance of gait pattern as measured by instrumental methods suggests psychogenic gait.

    PubMed

    Merello, Marcelo; Ballesteros, Diego; Rossi, Malco; Arena, Julieta; Crespo, Marcos; Cervio, Andres; Cuello Oderiz, Carolina; Rivero, Alberto; Cerquetti, Daniel; Risk, Marcelo; Balej, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Fluctuation is a common feature of all psychogenic gait disorder (PGD) patterns. Whether this fluctuation involves only the degree of impairment or whether it affects the gait pattern itself remains an interesting question. We hypothesize that, on repeated measurements, both normal and abnormal gait may present quantitative differences while maintaining their basic underlying pattern; conversely, in psychogenic gait, the basic pattern appears not to be preserved. Using an optoelectronic system, data acquired from 19 normal subjects and 66 patients were applied to train a neural network (NN) and subsequently classify gait patterns into four different groups (normal, ataxic, spastic-paraparetic and parkinsonian). Five patients who fulfilled clinical criteria for psychogenic gait and six controls were then prospectively evaluated on two separate occasions, three months apart. Normal controls and ataxic, parkinsonian or spastic patients were correctly identified by the NN, and categorized within the corresponding groups at baseline as well as at a three-month follow-up evaluation. NN analysis showed that after three months, no PGD patient preserved the gait pattern detected at baseline, even though this finding was not clinically apparent. Modification of gait pattern detected by repeated kinematic measurement and NN analysis could suggest the presence of PGD, particularly in difficult-to-diagnose cases. PMID:23597435

  13. Reduction in bearing size due to superconductors in magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Dantam K.; Lewis, Paul; Dill, James F.

    1991-01-01

    A design concept that reduces the size of magnetic bearings is assessed. The small size will enable magnetic bearings to fit into limited available bearing volume of cryogenic machinery. The design concept, called SUPERC, uses (high Tc) superconductors or high-purity aluminum conductors in windings instead of copper. The relatively high-current density of these conductors reduces the slot radial thickness for windings, which reduces the size of the bearings. MTI developed a sizing program called SUPERC that translates the high-current density of these conductors into smaller sized bearings. This program was used to size a superconducting bearing to carry a 500 lb. load. The sizes of magnetic bearings needed by various design concepts are as follows: SUPERC design concept = 3.75 in.; magnet-bias design concept = 5.25 in.; and all electromagnet design concept = 7.0 in. These results indicate that the SUPERC design concept can significantly reduce the size of the bearing. This reduction, in turn, reduces the weight and yields a lighter bearing. Since the superconductors have inherently near-zero resistance, they are also expected to save power needed for operation considerably.

  14. Modulation of gait coordination by subthalamic stimulation improves freezing of gait.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Alfonso; Herzog, Jan; Seifert, Elena; Stolze, Henning; Falk, Daniela; Reese, Ren; Volkmann, Jens; Deuschl, Gnther

    2011-04-01

    The effect of subthalamic deep brain stimulation on gait coordination and freezing of gait in patients with Parkinson's disease is incompletely understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which modulation of symmetry and coordination between legs by subthalamic deep brain stimulation alters the frequency and duration of freezing of gait in patients with Parkinson's disease. We recruited 13 post-subthalamic deep brain stimulation patients with Parkinson's disease with off freezing of gait and evaluated them in the following 4 conditions: subthalamic deep brain stimulation on (ON) and stimulation off (OFF), 50% reduction of stimulation voltage for the leg with shorter step length (worse side reduction) and for the leg with longer step length (better side reduction). Gait analysis was performed on a treadmill and recorded by an optoelectronic analysis system. We measured frequency and duration of freezing of gait episodes. Bilateral coordination of gait was assessed by the Phase Coordination Index, quantifying the ability to generate antiphase stepping. From the OFF to the ON state, freezing of gait improved in frequency (2.0 0.4 to 1.4 0.5 episodes) and duration (12.2 2.6 to 2.6 0.8 seconds; P = .005). Compared with the ON state, only better side reduction further reduced freezing of gait frequency (0.2 0.2) and duration of episodes (0.2 0.2 seconds; P = .03); worse side reduction did not change frequency (1.3 0.4) but increased freezing of gait duration (5.2 2.1 seconds). The better side reduction-associated improvements were accompanied by normalization of gait coordination, as measured by phase coordination index (16.5% 6.0%), which was significantly lower than in the other 3 conditions. Reduction of stimulation voltage in the side contralateral to the leg with longer step length improves frequency and duration of freezing of gait through normalization of gait symmetry and coordination in subthalamic deep brain stimulation patients with Parkinson's disease. This identifies poor leg coordination as a risk factor for causing freezing of gait. PMID:21370271

  15. Effects of obesity on gait pattern in young individuals with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Rigoldi, Chiara; Condoluci, Claudia; Albertini, Giorgio

    2015-03-01

    In individuals with Down syndrome (DS), the prevalence of obesity is widespread; despite this, there are no experimental studies on the effect of obesity on gait strategy in DS individuals. The aim of this study is to assess the clinical gait analysis of a group of obese individuals with DS and a group of nonobese individuals with DS to determine whether obesity produces a different gait pattern in these participants. In addition, although females and males share a similar mass, they are characterized by different fat distribution and/or accumulation; thus, the presence of differences between females and males within the two DS groups was investigated. Gait analysis data of a group of 78 young individuals with DS and 20 normal-weight participants in the 5-18-year age range were considered. Among DS individuals, 40 were classified as obese (obese DS group), whereas 38 were classified as normal weight (nonobese groups). A three-dimensional gait analysis was carried out using an optoelectronic system, force platforms and video recording. Spatiotemporal, kinematic and kinetic parameters were identified and calculated for each participant. Our results show that most of the parameters were similar in the two groups of DS participants; the only differences were in terms of stance duration, longer in the obese DS group and dorsiflexion ability during the swing phase, which was limited in the obese DS group. The two DS groups were significantly different in terms of ankle stiffness (Ka index): both groups were characterized by reduced values compared with the control group, but the obese group presented lower values with respect to nonobese participants. The data showed that females were characterized by significant modifications of gait pattern compared with males in both groups, in particular, at proximal levels, such as the hip and the pelvis. Our findings indicate that the presence of obesity exerts effects on gait pattern in DS individuals and in particular on ankle joint stiffness. These results may have special clinical relevance; the biomechanical comparison of gait in young obese and nonobese DS individuals may provide a basis for developing either specific or common rehabilitative strategies. PMID:25419690

  16. Effects of Spaceflight and Hindlimb Suspension on the Posture and Gait of Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, R. A.; Corcoran, M.; Daunton, N. G.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1994-01-01

    Instability of posture and gait in astronauts following spaceflight (SF) is thought to result from muscle atrophy and from changes in sensory-motor integration in the CNS (central nervous system) that occur during adaptation to microgravity (micro-G). Individuals are thought to have developed, during SF, adaptive changes for the processing of proprioceptive, vestibular and visual sensory inputs with reduced weighting of gravity-based signals and increased weighting of visual and tactile cues. This sensory-motor rearrangement in the CNS apparently occurs to optimize neuromuscular system function for effective movement and postural control in micro-G. However, these adaptive changes are inappropriate for the 1 g environment and lead to disruptions in posture and gait on return to Earth. Few reports are available on the effects of SF on the motor behavior of animals. Rats studied following 18.5 - 19.5 days of SF in the COSMOS program were described as being ..'inert, apathetic, slow'.. and generally unstable. The hindlimbs of these rats were ..'thrust out from the body with fingers pulled apart and the shin unnaturally pronated'. On the 6th postflight day motor behavior was described as similar to that observed in preflight observations. Improved understanding of the mechanisms leading to these changes can be obtained in animal models through detailed analysis of neural and molecular mechanisms related to gait. To begin this process the posture and gait of rats were examined following exposure to either SF or hindlimb suspension (HLS), and during recovery from these conditions.

  17. Changes in plantar load distribution and gait pattern following foot drop correction in leprosy affected patients.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Mrinmoy; Joshua, Jerry; Mahato, Nidhu

    2015-09-01

    This study was done to compare the changes in plantar load (weight distribution) and gait patterns before and after tibialis posterior transfer surgery in people affected by leprosy. Changes in gait patterns were observed and proportionate changes in plantar load were quantified using data captured by a baropodometer. All the eight patients who underwent tibialis posterior transfer surgery in 2013 in our hospital were included in the study. In addition to the regular pre-operative and post-operative assessments, the patients also underwent baropodometric evaluation. There was a significant change in plantar load at the heel, lateral border and forefoot. Using the foot pressure scan, it was noted that the progression of the centre of mass (displayed graphically as 'the gait line') was also affected by the altered pattern of weight distribution. This study reiterates the importance of tibialis posterior transfer because: it restores the normal gait pattern of 1, 2, 3 (where 1 is heel strike, 2 is mid foot contact and 3 is forefoot contact) and provides a more uniform distribution of planter load. PMID:26665356

  18. Correlation between balance and gait according to pelvic displacement in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Seon Woong; Jeong, Yeon Woo; Kim, Jin Young

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlations of balance and gait according to pelvic displacement in stroke patients. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 58 stroke patients who had been admitted to a hospital. [Methods] A Global Postural System was used to measure pelvic displacement. To measure the balance ability, a Tetrax balance system was used to measure the weight distribution index and stability index. Gait ability was measured during the 10-Meter Walking Test and Figure-of-8 Walk Test. [Results] The results of this study showed that was significant positive correlation between the anterior superior iliac spine height difference in pelvic displacement and the weight distribution index and significant positive correlation between the posterior superior iliac spine height difference and the stability index in the normal position with the eyes closed. Statistically significant positive correlation also was found between the anterior superior iliac spine height difference and the straight and curved gait ability. [Conclusion] The increased pelvic displacement in stroke patients results in a decrease in balance ability and gait speed. This suggests that control of pelvic displacement is necessary before functional training for patients with stroke. PMID:26311948

  19. A Validated Smartphone-Based Assessment of Gait and Gait Variability in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Robert J.; Ng, Yee Sien; Zhu, Shenggao; Tan, Dawn M.; Anderson, Boyd; Schlaug, Gottfried; Wang, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Background A well-established connection exists between increased gait variability and greater fall likelihood in Parkinson’s disease (PD); however, a portable, validated means of quantifying gait variability (and testing the efficacy of any intervention) remains lacking. Furthermore, although rhythmic auditory cueing continues to receive attention as a promising gait therapy for PD, its widespread delivery remains bottlenecked. The present paper describes a smartphone-based mobile application (“SmartMOVE”) to address both needs. Methods The accuracy of smartphone-based gait analysis (utilizing the smartphone’s built-in tri-axial accelerometer and gyroscope to calculate successive step times and step lengths) was validated against two heel contact–based measurement devices: heel-mounted footswitch sensors (to capture step times) and an instrumented pressure sensor mat (to capture step lengths). 12 PD patients and 12 age-matched healthy controls walked along a 26-m path during self-paced and metronome-cued conditions, with all three devices recording simultaneously. Results Four outcome measures of gait and gait variability were calculated. Mixed-factorial analysis of variance revealed several instances in which between-group differences (e.g., increased gait variability in PD patients relative to healthy controls) yielded medium-to-large effect sizes (eta-squared values), and cueing-mediated changes (e.g., decreased gait variability when PD patients walked with auditory cues) yielded small-to-medium effect sizes—while at the same time, device-related measurement error yielded small-to-negligible effect sizes. Conclusion These findings highlight specific opportunities for smartphone-based gait analysis to serve as an alternative to conventional gait analysis methods (e.g., footswitch systems or sensor-embedded walkways), particularly when those methods are cost-prohibitive, cumbersome, or inconvenient. PMID:26517720

  20. Gait Initiation in Children with Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Isaias, Ioannis Ugo; Dipaola, Mariangela; Michi, Marlies; Marzegan, Alberto; Volkmann, Jens; Rodocanachi Roidi, Marina L.; Frigo, Carlo Albino; Cavallari, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome is an X-linked neurodevelopmental condition mainly characterized by loss of spoken language and a regression of purposeful hand use, with the development of distinctive hand stereotypies, and gait abnormalities. Gait initiation is the transition from quiet stance to steady-state condition of walking. The associated motor program seems to be centrally mediated and includes preparatory adjustments prior to any apparent voluntary movement of the lower limbs. Anticipatory postural adjustments contribute to postural stability and to create the propulsive forces necessary to reach steady-state gait at a predefined velocity and may be indicative of the effectiveness of the feedforward control of gait. In this study, we examined anticipatory postural adjustments associated with gait initiation in eleven girls with Rett syndrome and ten healthy subjects. Muscle activity (tibialis anterior and soleus muscles), ground reaction forces and body kinematic were recorded. Children with Rett syndrome showed a distinctive impairment in temporal organization of all phases of the anticipatory postural adjustments. The lack of appropriate temporal scaling resulted in a diminished impulse to move forward, documented by an impairment in several parameters describing the efficiency of gait start: length and velocity of the first step, magnitude and orientation of centre of pressure-centre of mass vector at the instant of (swing-)toe off. These findings were related to an abnormal muscular activation pattern mainly characterized by a disruption of the synergistic activity of antagonistic pairs of postural muscles. This study showed that girls with Rett syndrome lack accurate tuning of feedforward control of gait. PMID:24743294

  1. Foot pressure analysis of adults with flat and normal feet at different gait speeds on an ascending slope

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to determine the difference in foot pressures between flat and normal feet at different gait speeds on an ascending slope. [Subjects] This study enrolled 30 adults with normal (n=15) and flat feet (n=15), with ages from 21 to 30?years old, who had no history of neurological disorders or gait problems. A treadmill was used for the analysis of kinematic features during gait, using a slope of 10%, and gait velocities of slow, normal, and fast. [Methods] A foot pressure analyzer was used to measure changes in foot pressure. [Results] Compared to the normal subjects, the foot pressure of the flatfoot subjects showed a significant increase in the 23rd metatarsal region with increasing gait speed, whereas there were significant decreases in the 1st toe and 1st metatarsal regions with increasing gait speed. [Conclusion] The body weight of adults with flatfoot was concentrated on the 23rd metatarsal region during the stance phase and increased with walking speed on the ascending slope due to weakening of function of the medial longitudinal arch. PMID:26834348

  2. Dynamic stability and phase resetting during biped gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Taishin; Kawa, Kazuyoshi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Nakanishi, Masao; Yamasaki, Taiga

    2009-06-01

    Dynamic stability during periodic biped gait in humans and in a humanoid robot is considered. Here gait systems of human neuromusculoskeletal system and a humanoid are simply modeled while keeping their mechanical properties plausible. We prescribe periodic gait trajectories in terms of joint angles of the models as a function of time. The equations of motion of the models are then constrained by one of the prescribed gait trajectories to obtain types of periodically forced nonlinear dynamical systems. Simulated gait of the models may or may not fall down during gait, since the constraints are made only for joint angles of limbs but not for the motion of the body trunk. The equations of motion can exhibit a limit cycle solution (or an oscillatory solution that can be considered as a limit cycle practically) for each selected gait trajectory, if an initial condition is set appropriately. We analyze the stability of the limit cycle in terms of Poincar maps and the basin of attraction of the limit cycle in order to examine how the stability depends on the prescribed trajectory. Moreover, the phase resetting of gait rhythm in response to external force perturbation is modeled. Since we always prescribe a gait trajectory in this study, reacting gait trajectories during the phase resetting are also prescribed. We show that an optimally prescribed reacting gait trajectory with an appropriate amount of the phase resetting can increase the gait stability. Neural mechanisms for generation and modulation of the gait trajectories are discussed.

  3. Modeling and simulation of normal and hemiparetic gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luengas, Lely A.; Camargo, Esperanza; Sanchez, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    Gait is the collective term for the two types of bipedal locomotion, walking and running. This paper is focused on walking. The analysis of human gait is of interest to many different disciplines, including biomechanics, human-movement science, rehabilitation and medicine in general. Here we present a new model that is capable of reproducing the properties of walking, normal and pathological. The aim of this paper is to establish the biomechanical principles that underlie human walking by using Lagrange method. The constraint forces of Rayleigh dissipation function, through which to consider the effect on the tissues in the gait, are included. Depending on the value of the factor present in the Rayleigh dissipation function, both normal and pathological gait can be simulated. First of all, we apply it in the normal gait and then in the permanent hemiparetic gait. Anthropometric data of adult person are used by simulation, and it is possible to use anthropometric data for children but is necessary to consider existing table of anthropometric data. Validation of these models includes simulations of passive dynamic gait that walk on level ground. The dynamic walking approach provides a new perspective of gait analysis, focusing on the kinematics and kinetics of gait. There have been studies and simulations to show normal human gait, but few of them have focused on abnormal, especially hemiparetic gait. Quantitative comparisons of the model predictions with gait measurements show that the model can reproduce the significant characteristics of normal gait.

  4. Neuroimaging of Freezing of Gait.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Alfonso; Herman, Talia; Tessitore, Alessandro; Strafella, Antonio P; Bohnen, Nicolaas I

    2015-01-01

    Functional brain imaging techniques appear ideally suited to explore the pathophysiology of freezing of gait (FOG). In the last two decades, techniques based on magnetic resonance or nuclear medicine imaging have found a number of structural changes and functional disconnections between subcortical and cortical regions of the locomotor network in patients with FOG. FOG seems to be related in part to disruptions in the "executive-attention" network along with regional tissue loss including the premotor area, inferior frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, the parietal and occipital areas involved in visuospatial functions of the right hemisphere. Several subcortical structures have been also involved in the etiology of FOG, principally the caudate nucleus and the locomotor centers in the brainstem. Maladaptive neural compensation may present transiently in the presence of acute conflicting motor, cognitive or emotional stimulus processing, thus causing acute network overload and resulting in episodic impairment of stepping.In this review we will summarize the state of the art of neuroimaging research for FOG. We will also discuss the limitations of current approaches and delineate the next steps of neuroimaging research to unravel the pathophysiology of this mysterious motor phenomenon. PMID:25757831

  5. Gait synchronization in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jinzhou; Raizen, David M.; Bau, Haim H.

    2014-01-01

    Collective motion is observed in swarms of swimmers of various sizes, ranging from self-propelled nanoparticles to fish. The mechanisms that govern interactions among individuals are debated, and vary from one species to another. Although the interactions among relatively large animals, such as fish, are controlled by their nervous systems, the interactions among microorganisms, which lack nervous systems, are controlled through physical and chemical pathways. Little is known, however, regarding the mechanism of collective movements in microscopic organisms with nervous systems. To attempt to remedy this, we studied collective swimming behavior in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a microorganism with a compact nervous system. We evaluated the contributions of hydrodynamic forces, contact forces, and mechanosensory input to the interactions among individuals. We devised an experiment to examine pair interactions as a function of the distance between the animals and observed that gait synchronization occurred only when the animals were in close proximity, independent of genes required for mechanosensation. Our measurements and simulations indicate that steric hindrance is the dominant factor responsible for motion synchronization in C. elegans, and that hydrodynamic interactions and genotype do not play a significant role. We infer that a similar mechanism may apply to other microscopic swimming organisms and self-propelled particles. PMID:24778261

  6. Ergometric evaluation of pathological gait.

    PubMed

    Cavagna, G A; Tesio, L; Fuchimoto, T; Heglund, N C

    1983-08-01

    At each step of walking, the center of gravity of the body moves up and down and accelerates and decelerates forward with a combined movement that allows an appreciable transfer (R) between gravitational potential energy and kinetic energy, as occurs in a pendulum. The positive work and power to lift the center of gravity, to accelerate it forward, and to maintain its motion in a sagittal plane, the amount of R, the maximal height reached during each step by the center of gravity, and the step length and frequency are all determined by a microcomputer a few minutes after a subject walks on a force platform. This method is applied to the analysis of pathological gait in the attempt to measure quantitatively the alteration of the normal locomotory movement of the center of gravity. The strides of the patient are compared with the strides of normal subjects; in addition, the movement of the center of gravity of the patient during the stance on the affected limb is compared with the movement of the center of gravity during the stance on the unaffected limb, thus giving an index of the asymmetry of locomotion. PMID:6618953

  7. Black Bear

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The Oklahoma Unit has been studying population expansion and genetics of black bear in southeastern Oklahoma since 2001. Live capture and hair snares have been used to collect samples; from left to right: field technician, JD Davis and M.S. candidates, Angie Brown and Meredith Magnuson....

  8. Scrunching: a novel escape gait in planarians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Mickolajczyk, Keith J.; Collins, Eva-Maria S.

    2015-10-01

    The ability to escape a predator or other life-threatening situations is central to animal survival. Different species have evolved unique strategies under anatomical and environmental constraints. In this study, we describe a novel musculature-driven escape gait in planarians, ‘scrunching’, which is quantitatively different from other planarian gaits, such as gliding and peristalsis. We show that scrunching is a conserved gait among different flatworm species, underlying its importance as an escape mechanism. We further demonstrate that it can be induced by a variety of physical stimuli, including amputation, high temperature, electric shock and low pH. We discuss the functional basis for scrunching as the preferential gait when gliding is impaired due to a disruption of mucus production. Finally, we show that the key mechanical features of scrunching are adequately captured by a simple biomechanical model that is solely based on experimental data from traction force microscopy and tissue rheology without fit parameters. Together, our results form a complete description of this novel form of planarian locomotion. Because scrunching has distinct dynamics, this gait can serve as a robust behavioral readout for studies of motor neuron and muscular functions in planarians and in particular the restoration of these functions during regeneration.

  9. The asymmetric gait toenail unit sign.

    PubMed

    Zaias, Nardo; Rebell, Gerbert; Casal, German; Appel, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to resolve a diagnostic problem and report toenail unit changes attributable to shoe friction that resemble onychomycosis, but that are fungus-negative, and identify common skeletal causes in patients with an asymmetric walking gait. X-ray and clinical feet inspections were performed to evaluate skeletal components that change normal foot biodynamics. Forty-nine patients, all dermatophyte-negative, were reviewed. All patients were those seen in our private practice who demonstrated skeletal and toenail unit abnormalities such as onycholysis, nail bed keratosis resembling distal subungual onychomycosis, nail plate surface abnormalities, distal toe skin keratosis, a diagnostic nail plate shape, as well as several skeletal abnormalities. The clinical abnormalities of the asymmetric gait syndrome include onycholysis, nail bed keratosis, nail plate surface abnormalities, and a diagnostic nail plate shape. By the patient's history, the skeletal findings that were present worsened with age and, in many patients, they were familial. Onychomycosis does not lead to an asymmetric gait nail problem, asymmetric gait toenail does not favor dermatophyte infection, and not all nail dystrophies are the result of an asymmetric walking gait. PMID:23008938

  10. Sporadic hyperekplexia presenting with an ataxic gait.

    PubMed

    Rouco, Idoia; Bilbao, Iker; Losada, Jose; Maestro, Iratxe; Zarranz, Juan Jose

    2014-02-01

    We describe a 62-year-old man with a sporadic form of hyperekplexia who presented with an unsteady gait, present since the age of 47. His clinical examination revealed an insecure broad-based gait and difficulty with tandem walking but no other abnormalities. For nearly a decade the patient was misdiagnosed with an idiopathic ataxia. A video electroencephalogram combined with an electromyogram during sudden auditory stimulus demonstrated an excessive startle response. An extensive work-up ruled out all the known causes of symptomatic hyperekplexia including anti-glycine receptor antibodies. Treatment with clonazepam markedly reduced the threshold and intensity of the startle response, enabling him to recover independence. Hyperekplexia is frequently associated with an awkward and hesitating gait, but these gait abnormalities might be confused with other causes of gait disorders if one is not aware of this disease. We report this patient to highlight that a correct diagnosis of hyperekplexia is crucial, because its treatment may change quality of life. PMID:24054400

  11. Development and Decline of Upright Gait Stability

    PubMed Central

    Iosa, Marco; Fusco, Augusto; Morone, Giovanni; Paolucci, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Upright gait is a peculiar characteristic of humans that requires the ability to manage upper body dynamic balance while walking, despite the perturbations that are generated by movements of the lower limbs. Most of the studies on upright gait stability have compared young adults and the elderly to determine the effects of aging. In other studies, the comparison was between healthy subjects and patients to examine specific pathologies. Fewer researches have also investigated the development of upright gait stability in children. This review discusses these studies in order to provide an overview of this relevant aspect of human locomotion. A clear trend from development to decline of upright gait stability has been depicted across the entire lifespan, from toddlers at first steps to elderly. In old individuals, even if healthy, the deterioration of skeletal muscle, combined with sensorial and cognitive performance, reduces the ability to maintain an upright trunk during walking, increasing the instability and the risk of falls. Further, the pathological causes of altered development or of a sudden loss of gait stability, as well as the environmental influence are investigated. The last part of this review is focused on the control of upper body accelerations during walking, a particularly interesting topic for the recent development of low-cost wearable accelerometers. PMID:24550829

  12. Recognition of affect based on gait patterns.

    PubMed

    Karg, Michelle; Kühnlenz, Kolja; Buss, Martin

    2010-08-01

    To provide a means for recognition of affect from a distance, this paper analyzes the capability of gait to reveal a person's affective state. We address interindividual versus person-dependent recognition, recognition based on discrete affective states versus recognition based on affective dimensions, and efficient feature extraction with respect to affect. Principal component analysis (PCA), kernel PCA, linear discriminant analysis, and general discriminant analysis are compared to either reduce temporal information in gait or extract relevant features for classification. Although expression of affect in gait is covered by the primary task of locomotion, person-dependent recognition of motion capture data reaches 95% accuracy based on the observation of a single stride. In particular, different levels of arousal and dominance are suitable for being recognized in gait. It is concluded that gait can be used as an additional modality for the recognition of affect. Application scenarios include monitoring in high-security areas, human-robot interaction, and cognitive home environments. PMID:20350859

  13. Scrunching: a novel escape gait in planarians.

    PubMed

    Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Mickolajczyk, Keith J; Collins, Eva-Maria S

    2015-10-01

    The ability to escape a predator or other life-threatening situations is central to animal survival. Different species have evolved unique strategies under anatomical and environmental constraints. In this study, we describe a novel musculature-driven escape gait in planarians, 'scrunching', which is quantitatively different from other planarian gaits, such as gliding and peristalsis. We show that scrunching is a conserved gait among different flatworm species, underlying its importance as an escape mechanism. We further demonstrate that it can be induced by a variety of physical stimuli, including amputation, high temperature, electric shock and low pH. We discuss the functional basis for scrunching as the preferential gait when gliding is impaired due to a disruption of mucus production. Finally, we show that the key mechanical features of scrunching are adequately captured by a simple biomechanical model that is solely based on experimental data from traction force microscopy and tissue rheology without fit parameters. Together, our results form a complete description of this novel form of planarian locomotion. Because scrunching has distinct dynamics, this gait can serve as a robust behavioral readout for studies of motor neuron and muscular functions in planarians and in particular the restoration of these functions during regeneration. PMID:26356147

  14. Quantitative evaluation of gait ataxia by accelerometers.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Shinichi; Yabe, Ichiro; Matsushima, Masaaki; Ito, Yoichi M; Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Sasaki, Hidenao

    2015-11-15

    An appropriate biomarker for spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) has not been identified. Here, we performed gait analysis on patients with pure cerebellar type SCD and assessed whether the obtained data could be used as a neurophysiological biomarker for cerebellar ataxia. We analyzed 25 SCD patients, 25 patients with Parkinson's disease as a disease control, and 25 healthy control individuals. Acceleration signals during 6min of walking and 1min of standing were measured by two sets of triaxial accelerometers that were secured with a fixation vest to the middle of the lower and upper back of each subject. We extracted two gait parameters, the average and the coefficient of variation of motion trajectory amplitude, from each acceleration component. Then, each component was analyzed by correlation with the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) and the Berg Balance Scale (BBS). Compared with the gait control of healthy subjects and concerning correlation with severity and disease specificity, our results suggest that the average amplitude of medial-lateral (upper back) of straight gait is a physiological biomarker for cerebellar ataxia. Our results suggest that gait analysis is a quantitative and concise evaluation scale for the severity of cerebellar ataxia. PMID:26362336

  15. Lubrication for high load duplex bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, R.G.

    1997-08-01

    Three ES and H-compatible lubricants (Environment, Safety and Health) for high load duplex bearing applications were evaluated and compared against trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon) deposition of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) bearing lubricant extracted from Vydax{trademark}. Vydax is a product manufactured by DuPont consisting of various molecular weights of PTFE suspended in trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon) which is an ozone-depleting solvent. Bearings with Supercritical CO{sub 2} deposition of PTFE extracted from Vydax AR/IPA, bearings with titanium carbide coated balls, and bearings with diamond-like carbon races and retainers were evaluated. Bearings with Supercritical CO{sub 2} deposition of PTFE from Vydax AR/IPA performed as well as bearings with Freon deposition of PTFE from Freon-based Vydax.

  16. Metatarsal Loading During Gait-A Musculoskeletal Analysis.

    PubMed

    Al-Munajjed, Amir A; Bischoff, Jeffrey E; Dharia, Mehul A; Telfer, Scott; Woodburn, James; Carbes, Sylvain

    2016-03-01

    Detailed knowledge of the loading conditions within the human body is essential for the development and optimization of treatments for disorders and injuries of the musculoskeletal system. While loads in the major joints of the lower limb have been the subject of extensive study, relatively little is known about the forces applied to the individual bones of the foot. The objective of this study was to use a detailed musculoskeletal model to compute the loads applied to the metatarsal bones during gait across several healthy subjects. Motion-captured gait trials and computed tomography (CT) foot scans from four healthy subjects were used as the inputs to inverse dynamic simulations that allowed the computation of loads at the metatarsal joints. Low loads in the metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint were predicted before terminal stance, however, increased to an average peak of 1.9 times body weight (BW) before toe-off in the first metatarsal. At the first tarsometatarsal (TMT) joint, loads of up to 1.0 times BW were seen during the early part of stance, reflecting tension in the ligaments and muscles. These loads subsequently increased to an average peak of 3.0 times BW. Loads in the first ray were higher compared to rays 2-5. The joints were primarily loaded in the longitudinal direction of the bone. PMID:26719905

  17. Robotic-assessment of walking in individuals with gait disorders.

    PubMed

    Hidler, J

    2004-01-01

    Walking deficits are a common bi-product of numerous neurological injuries, such as stroke and spinal cord injury. A number of new therapeutic interventions, such as body-weight supported locomotor training and robotic technologies aim to improve walking function and reduce co-morbidities. Currently, there is no way to determine what the optimal set of training parameters are for maximizing step performance. This paper presents a technique for estimating the walking performance of individuals with gait disorders using a robotic-orthosis. The device, called the Lokomat is coupled to the subject through instrumented leg cuffs, while the split-belt treadmill on which the subject walks is instrumented with piezo-electric force sensors allowing for the calculation of ground reaction forces and center of pressure. Using this data, a real-time inverse dynamics approach can be used to estimate the kinetics and kinematics of the subject, and when combined with electromyographic (EMG) data, the set of training conditions through which the subject generates the most appropriate EMG patterns and joint moments can be identified. The proposed technique will for the first time provide clinicians a way of determining the optimal gait training parameters for each individual, and also track their functional recovery throughout their neurorehabilitation program. It is postulated that training at the conditions that maximizes stepping performance will lead to higher gains in over-ground walking ability. PMID:17271392

  18. ZeroG: overground gait and balance training system.

    PubMed

    Hidler, Joseph; Brennan, David; Black, Iian; Nichols, Diane; Brady, Kathy; Nef, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    A new overground body-weight support system called ZeroG has been developed that allows patients with severe gait impairments to practice gait and balance activities in a safe, controlled manner. The unloading system is capable of providing up to 300 lb of static support and 150 lb of dynamic (or constant force) support using a custom-series elastic actuator. The unloading system is mounted to a driven trolley, which rides along an overhead rail. We evaluated the performance of ZeroG's unloading system, as well as the trolley tracking system, using benchtop and human-subject testing. Average root-mean-square and peak errors in unloading were 2.2 and 7.2 percent, respectively, over the range of forces tested while trolley tracking errors were less than 3 degrees, indicating the system was able to maintain its position above the subject. We believe training with ZeroG will allow patients to practice activities that are critical to achieving functional independence at home and in the community. PMID:21674384

  19. Human Odometry Verifies the Symmetry Perspective on Bipedal Gaits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turvey, M. T.; Harrison, Steven J.; Frank, Till D.; Carello, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Bipedal gaits have been classified on the basis of the group symmetry of the minimal network of identical differential equations (alias "cells") required to model them. Primary gaits are characterized by dihedral symmetry, whereas secondary gaits are characterized by a lower, cyclic symmetry. This fact was used in a test of human odometry. Results

  20. Footwear Decreases Gait Asymmetry during Running

    PubMed Central

    Hoerzer, Stefan; Federolf, Peter A.; Maurer, Christian; Baltich, Jennifer; Nigg, Benno M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research on elderly people has suggested that footwear may improve neuromuscular control of motion. If footwear does in fact improve neuromuscular control, then such an influence might already be present in young, healthy adults. A feature that is often used to assess neuromuscular control of motion is the level of gait asymmetry. The objectives of the study were (a) to develop a comprehensive asymmetry index (CAI) that is capable of detecting gait asymmetry changes caused by external boundary conditions such as footwear, and (b) to use the CAI to investigate whether footwear influences gait asymmetry during running in a healthy, young cohort. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected for both legs of 15 subjects performing five barefoot and five shod over-ground running trials. Thirty continuous gait variables including ground reaction forces and variables of the hip, knee, and ankle joints were computed for each leg. For each individual, the differences between the variables for the right and left leg were calculated. Using this data, a principal component analysis was conducted to obtain the CAI. This study had two main outcomes. First, a sensitivity analysis suggested that the CAI had an improved sensitivity for detecting changes in gait asymmetry caused by external boundary conditions. The CAI may, therefore, have important clinical applications such as monitoring the progress of neuromuscular diseases (e.g. stroke or cerebral palsy). Second, the mean CAI for shod running (131.2 ± 48.5; mean ± standard deviation) was significantly lower (p = 0.041) than the CAI for barefoot running (155.7 ± 39.5). This finding suggests that in healthy, young adults gait asymmetry is reduced when running in shoes compared to running barefoot, which may be a result of improved neuromuscular control caused by changes in the afferent sensory feedback. PMID:26488484

  1. Periodic gaits for the CMU ambler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahalingam, Swaminathan; Dwivedi, Suren N.

    1989-01-01

    The configuration of the Carnegie Mellon University Ambler, a six legged autonomous walking vehicle for exploring Mars, enables the recovery of a trailing leg past the leading leg to reduce the energy expenditure in terrain interactions. Gaits developed for this unprecedented configuration are described. A stability criterion was developed which ensures stability of the vehicle in the event of failure of any one of the supporting legs. Periodic gaits developed for the Ambler utilize the Ambler's unique abilities, and continuously satisfy the stability criterion.

  2. Acoustically-observable properties of adult gait.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Marshall; Sabatier, James M

    2012-03-01

    An approach has been developed for extracting human gait parameters from micro Doppler sonar grams. Key parameters include average speed of walking, torso velocity, walk cycle time, and peak leg velocity. The approach is a modification of a technique previously used in radar data analysis. It has been adapted because of differences between sonar and radar micro Doppler grams. The approach has been applied to an acoustic data set of 16 female and 60 male walkers. Statistics have been tabulated that illustrate the similarities and dissimilarities between female and male gait. Males tend to walk with larger walk cycle times and peak leg velocities than females. PMID:22423810

  3. Predictive simulation of gait in rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Marko; van den Bogert, Antonie J

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims at demonstrating the capabilities of predictive, computational simulations of gait in clinical applications. In particular, the gait with bilateral and unilateral Ankle Foot-Orthoses (AFO's) is investigated. The problem is formulated in an optimal control framework where optimal motion and neural excitations to the muscles are computed solely on the basis of an assumed optimality criterion and periodicity constraints. The enormous potential of the approach as well as some of the current limitations are discussed on the light of simulation results. PMID:21096280

  4. MRI of Weight-bearing and Movement

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Lauren M.; Gold, Garry E.

    2011-01-01

    Conventional, static magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is able to provide a vast amount of information regarding the anatomy and pathology of the musculoskeletal system. However, patients, especially those whose pain is position dependent or elucidated by movement, may benefit from more advanced imaging techniques that allow for the acquisition of functional information. This manuscript reviews a variety of advancements in magnetic resonance imaging techniques that are used to image the musculoskeletal system dynamically, while in motion or under load. The methodologies, advantages and drawbacks of Stress MRI, Cine PC MRI and Real-Time MRI are discussed as each has helped to advance the field by providing a scientific basis for understanding normal and pathological musculoskeletal anatomy and function. Advancements in dynamic MR imaging will certainly lead to improvements in the understanding, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal disorders. It is difficult to anticipate that dynamic MRI will replace conventional MRI, however, dynamic MRI may provide additional valuable information to findings of conventional MRI. PMID:22138286

  5. Preliminary investigation of effects of a quasi-passive knee exoskeleton on gait energetics.

    PubMed

    Shamaei, Kamran; Adams, Albert A; Cenciarini, Massimo; Gregorczyk, Karen N; Dollar, Aaron M

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we explain that the human knee behavior in the weight acceptance phase of gait (first ~40% of gait cycle) resembles that of a linear torsional spring. This led us to study the effects of the assistance provided by a pair of quasi-passive knee exoskeletons, which implement springs in parallel with the knee joints in the weight acceptance phase. Using the exoskeletons in a series of experiments on seven participants, we found that the exoskeleton mildly but non-significantly reduces the metabolic power of walking. We also found that the metabolic power of walking is significantly correlated with both the positive rate of moment generation and positive mechanical power of the lower extremity joints. This suggests that augmenting exoskeletons can aim to reduce both the muscle force and work generation to reduce the metabolic cost of walking. PMID:25570637

  6. Tooling Converts Stock Bearings To Custom Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleenor, E. N., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Technique for reworking stock bearings saves time and produces helicopter-rotor bearings ground more precisely. Split tapered ring at one end of threaded bolt expands to hold inside of inner race bearing assembly; nut, at other end of bolt, adjusts amount of spring tension. Piece of hardware grasps bearing firmly without interfering with grinding operation. Operation produces bearing of higher quality than commercially available bearings.

  7. The relationship between 2D static features and 2D dynamic features used in gait recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alawar, Hamad M.; Ugail, Hassan; Kamala, Mumtaz; Connah, David

    2013-05-01

    In most gait recognition techniques, both static and dynamic features are used to define a subject's gait signature. In this study, the existence of a relationship between static and dynamic features was investigated. The correlation coefficient was used to analyse the relationship between the features extracted from the "University of Bradford Multi-Modal Gait Database". This study includes two dimensional dynamic and static features from 19 subjects. The dynamic features were compromised of Phase-Weighted Magnitudes driven by a Fourier Transform of the temporal rotational data of a subject's joints (knee, thigh, shoulder, and elbow). The results concluded that there are eleven pairs of features that are considered significantly correlated with (p<0.05). This result indicates the existence of a statistical relationship between static and dynamics features, which challenges the results of several similar studies. These results bare great potential for further research into the area, and would potentially contribute to the creation of a gait signature using latent data.

  8. Gait identification from invisible shadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwashita, Yumi; Uchino, Koji; Kurazume, Ryo; Stoica, Adrian

    2012-06-01

    This paper introduces a person identification system that uses as input the shadow images of a walking person, as projected by multiple lights(in this application invisible/infrared lights); the system uses a database of examples of shadows images of a number of people who walk. While it is accepted that personal identification has a higher correct classification rate if views from multiple cameras are used, most systems use only one camera, mainly because (i) Installation in real-world environments is easier, less cameras and no need to synchronize cameras, (ii) Computational cost is reduced. In the proposed system, we obtain the advantages of multiple viewpoints with a single camera and additional light sources. More specific, we install multiple infrared lights to project shadows of a subject on the ground and a camera with an infrared transmitting filter mounted in the ceiling inside of a building. Shadow areas, which are projections of one's body on the ground by multiple lights, can be considered as body areas captured from different viewpoints; thus, the proposed system is able to capture multiple projections of the body from a single camera. We explored in other papers the use of sunproduced shadow for identification of people walking freely in the outdoor. In this paper the application scenario is a system installed at the airport in the areas that precedes the immigration checkpoint. Japan already has health monitoring cameras focused on approaching individuals, to determine their health condition; the here described system would also be installed in such a controlled area with restricted walk corridors of walk and controlled lighting. Gait is a remote biometrics and can provide early warning; on another hand it can be used as corroborating evidence in a multi-modal biometrics system. A database of images including shadows for a set of 28 walking people was collected, and the features extracted from shadow areas by affine moment invariants, after which identification of the subject followed. The experiments using the database show the effectiveness of the proposed method and further prove the superiority of using multiple viewpoints compared to a single viewpoint.

  9. Basic gait analysis based on continuous wave radar.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun

    2012-09-01

    A gait analysis method based on continuous wave (CW) radar is proposed in this paper. Time-frequency analysis is used to analyze the radar micro-Doppler echo from walking humans, and the relationships between the time-frequency spectrogram and human biological gait are discussed. The methods for extracting the gait parameters from the spectrogram are studied in depth and experiments on more than twenty subjects have been performed to acquire the radar gait data. The gait parameters are calculated and compared. The gait difference between men and women are presented based on the experimental data and extracted features. Gait analysis based on CW radar will provide a new method for clinical diagnosis and therapy. PMID:22951210

  10. Multilayer Joint Gait-Pose Manifolds for Human Gait Motion Modeling.

    PubMed

    Ding, Meng; Fan, Guolian

    2015-11-01

    We present new multilayer joint gait-pose manifolds (multilayer JGPMs) for complex human gait motion modeling, where three latent variables are defined jointly in a low-dimensional manifold to represent a variety of body configurations. Specifically, the pose variable (along the pose manifold) denotes a specific stage in a walking cycle; the gait variable (along the gait manifold) represents different walking styles; and the linear scale variable characterizes the maximum stride in a walking cycle. We discuss two kinds of topological priors for coupling the pose and gait manifolds, i.e., cylindrical and toroidal, to examine their effectiveness and suitability for motion modeling. We resort to a topologically-constrained Gaussian process (GP) latent variable model to learn the multilayer JGPMs where two new techniques are introduced to facilitate model learning under limited training data. First is training data diversification that creates a set of simulated motion data with different strides. Second is the topology-aware local learning to speed up model learning by taking advantage of the local topological structure. The experimental results on the Carnegie Mellon University motion capture data demonstrate the advantages of our proposed multilayer models over several existing GP-based motion models in terms of the overall performance of human gait motion modeling. PMID:25532201

  11. Neuroimaging as a window into gait disturbances and freezing of gait in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Herman, Talia; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

    2013-12-01

    Neuroimaging has been applied to better understand the neural mechanisms underlying gait disturbances in Parkinson's disease (PD). In the present paper, we review studies that used neuroimaging methods to investigate mobility, walking and freezing of gait (FOG) in PD, focusing on the recent literature. Examination of these studies suggests that gait changes in PD are due to widespread alterations in the structure and function of the brain that go beyond the basal ganglia. For example, cortical structures including the frontal and parietal lobes, the mesencephalic locomotor region and specifically, the pedunculopontine nucleus, all apparently play important roles in the control of gait in PD. Nonetheless, there are some significant inconsistencies across the different studies and many questions remain regarding the precise pathological processes that contribute to gait disturbances, in general, and to FOG, more specifically. A discussion of new insights into the neural mechanisms underlying gait disturbances are presented along with a summary of the disadvantages and limitations of the existing techniques and suggestions for future directions. PMID:24136458

  12. Neurological update: emerging issues in gait disorders.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Simon J G

    2015-06-01

    Gait disorders represent a common and diverse challenge in Neurological practice. The literature on this field is expanding and is seeking to address mainstream clinical issues as well as a greater understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms. This update will introduce a range of these concepts. PMID:25736555

  13. Intersegmental coordination of gait after hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Chow, John W; Stokic, Dobrivoje S

    2015-01-01

    We compared gait using the planar law of intersegmental coordination between 14 hemorrhagic stroke subjects walking at a self-selected normal speed (56 ± 21 cm/s) and 15 age-matched healthy controls walking at a very slow speed (56 ± 19 cm/s). Sagittal plane elevation angles of the thigh, shank, and foot segments were submitted to principal component analysis. Additional outcome measures included the range of elevation angle and timing of peak elevation angle of the thigh, shank, and foot segments. The range of elevation angles at the shank and foot was significantly smaller in the paretic leg than non-paretic and control legs. Also, the peak elevation angle at the thigh occurred significantly later in the gait cycle in the paretic than control leg. Gait of both stroke and control subjects followed the planar law with the first two principal components explaining approximately 99% of the variance. However, the three-dimensional trajectory of elevation angles (gait loop) in stroke subjects deviated from the typical teardrop shape bilaterally, which was more exaggerated in the paretic leg. Compared to the non-paretic and control legs, the paretic leg showed significantly increased absolute loading of the thigh elevation angle and decreased absolute loadings of the shank and foot elevation angles on the first principal component, whereas the opposite was observed for the second principal component. Despite following the planar law, the gait of chronic stroke subjects is characterized by atypical timing of the thigh motion and disrupted intersegmental coordination of both legs. PMID:25224705

  14. Gait recognition based on Kinect sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mohammed; Al-Jawad, Naseer; Sabir, Azhin T.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents gait recognition based on human skeleton and trajectory of joint points captured by Microsoft Kinect sensor. In this paper Two sets of dynamic features are extracted during one gait cycle: the first is Horizontal Distance Features (HDF) that is based on the distances between (Ankles, knees, hands, shoulders), the second set is the Vertical Distance Features (VDF) that provide significant information of human gait extracted from the height to the ground of (hand, shoulder, and ankles) during one gait cycle. Extracting these two sets of feature are difficult and not accurate based on using traditional camera, therefore the Kinect sensor is used in this paper to determine the precise measurements. The two sets of feature are separately tested and then fused to create one feature vector. A database has been created in house to perform our experiments. This database consists of sixteen males and four females. For each individual, 10 videos have been recorded, each record includes in average two gait cycles. The Kinect sensor is used here to extract all the skeleton points, and these points are used to build up the feature vectors mentioned above. K-nearest neighbor is used as the classification method based on Cityblock distance function. Based on the experimental result the proposed method provides 56% as a recognition rate using HDF, while VDF provided 83.5% recognition accuracy. When fusing both of the HDF and VDF as one feature vector, the recognition rate increased to 92%, the experimental result shows that our method provides significant result compared to the existence methods.

  15. Effectiveness of elastic band-type ankle–foot orthoses on postural control in poststroke elderly patients as determined using combined measurement of the stability index and body weight-bearing ratio

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Hyun; Sim, Woo Sang; Won, Byeong Hee

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Poor recovery of postural stability poststroke is the primary cause of impairment in activities and social participation in elderly stroke survivors. The purpose of our study was to experimentally evaluate the effectiveness of our new elastic ankle–foot orthosis (AFO), compared to a traditional AFO fabricated with hard plastic, in improving postural stability in elderly chronic stroke survivors. Patients and methods Postural stability was evaluated in ten chronic stroke patients, 55.7±8.43 years old. Postural stability was evaluated using the standardized methods of the Biodex Balance System combined with a foot pressure system, under three experimental conditions, no AFO, rigid plastic AFO, and elastic AFO (E-AFO). The following dependent variables of postural stability were analyzed: plantar pressure under the paretic and nonparetic foot, area of the center of balance (COB) and % time spent in each location, distance traveled by the COB away from the body center, distance traveled by the center of pressure, and calculated index of overall stability, as well as indices anterior–posterior and medial–lateral stability. Results Both AFO designs improved all indices of postural stability. Compared to the rigid plastic AFO, the E-AFO produced additional positive effects in controlling anterior–posterior body sway, equalizing weight bearing through the paretic and nonparetic limbs, and restraining the displacement of the center of pressure and of the COB. Conclusion Based on our outcomes, we recommend the prescription of E-AFOs as part of a physiotherapy rehabilitation program to promote recovery of postural stability poststroke. When possible, therapeutic outcomes should be documented using the Biodex Balance System and foot pressure system, as used in our study, to provide evidence needed to support the development of a larger controlled trial to generate high-quality evidence on the effectiveness of E-AFOs. PMID:26622174

  16. Comparison of Gait Aspects According to FES Stimulation Position Applied to Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Byeong-mu; Kim, Tae-ho; Lee, Jin-hwan; Lim, Jin-youg; Seo, Dong-kwon; Lee, Dong-jin

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study sought to identify the gait aspects according to the FES stimulation position in stroke patients during gait training. [Subjects and Methods] To perform gait analysis, ten stroke patients were grouped based on 4 types of gait conditions: gait without FES stimulation (non-FES), gait with FES stimulation on the tibialis anterior (Ta), gait with FES stimulation on the tibialis anterior and quadriceps (TaQ), and gait with FES stimulation on the tibialis anterior and gluteus medius (TaGm). [Results] Based on repeated measures analysis of variance of measurements of gait aspects comprised of gait speed, gait cycle, and step length according to the FES stimulation position, the FES stimulation significantly affected gait aspects. [Conclusion] In conclusion, stimulating the tibialis anterior and quadriceps and stimulating the tibialis anterior and gluteus medius are much more effective than stimulating only the tibialis anterior during gait training in stroke patients using FES. PMID:24764634

  17. Effects of frontal and sagittal thorax attitudes in gait on trunk and pelvis three-dimensional kinematics.

    PubMed

    Begon, Mickal; Leardini, Alberto; Belvedere, Claudio; Farahpour, Nader; Allard, Paul

    2015-10-01

    While sagittal trunk inclinations alter upper body biomechanics, little is known about the extent of frontal trunk bending on upper body and pelvis kinematics in adults during gait and its relation to sagittal trunk inclinations. The objective was to determine the effect of the mean lateral trunk attitude on upper body and pelvis three-dimensional kinematics during gait in asymptomatic subjects. Three gait cycles were collected in 30 subjects using a motion analysis system (Vicon 612) and an established protocol. Sub-groups were formed based on the mean thorax lateral bending angle, bending side, and also sagittal tilt. These were compared based on 38 peak angles identified on pelvis, thorax and shoulder kinematics using MANOVAs. A main effect for bending side (p = 0.038) was found, especially for thorax peak angles. Statistics revealed also a significant interaction (p = 0.04993) between bending side and tilt for the thorax sagittal inclination during body-weight transfer. These results reinforce the existence of different gait patterns, which correlate upper body and pelvis motion measures. The results also suggest that frontal and sagittal trunk attitude should be considered carefully when treating a patient with impaired gait. PMID:26337553

  18. Kinematic Analysis Quantifies Gait Abnormalities Associated with Lameness in Broiler Chickens and Identifies Evolutionary Gait Differences

    PubMed Central

    Caplen, Gina; Hothersall, Becky; Murrell, Joanna C.; Nicol, Christine J.; Waterman-Pearson, Avril E.; Weeks, Claire A.; Colborne, G. Robert

    2012-01-01

    This is the first time that gait characteristics of broiler (meat) chickens have been compared with their progenitor, jungle fowl, and the first kinematic study to report a link between broiler gait parameters and defined lameness scores. A commercial motion-capturing system recorded three-dimensional temporospatial information during walking. The hypothesis was that the gait characteristics of non-lame broilers (n = 10) would be intermediate to those of lame broilers (n = 12) and jungle fowl (n = 10, tested at two ages: immature and adult). Data analysed using multi-level models, to define an extensive range of baseline gait parameters, revealed inter-group similarities and differences. Natural selection is likely to have made jungle fowl walking gait highly efficient. Modern broiler chickens possess an unbalanced body conformation due to intense genetic selection for additional breast muscle (pectoral hypertrophy) and whole body mass. Together with rapid growth, this promotes compensatory gait adaptations to minimise energy expenditure and triggers high lameness prevalence within commercial flocks; lameness creating further disruption to the gait cycle and being an important welfare issue. Clear differences were observed between the two lines (short stance phase, little double-support, low leg lift, and little back displacement in adult jungle fowl; much double-support, high leg lift, and substantial vertical back movement in sound broilers) presumably related to mass and body conformation. Similarities included stride length and duration. Additional modifications were also identified in lame broilers (short stride length and duration, substantial lateral back movement, reduced velocity) presumably linked to musculo-skeletal abnormalities. Reduced walking velocity suggests an attempt to minimise skeletal stress and/or discomfort, while a shorter stride length and time, together with longer stance and double-support phases, are associated with instability. We envisage a key future role for this highly quantitative methodology in pain assessment (associated with broiler lameness) including experimental examination of therapeutic agent efficacy. PMID:22815823

  19. Kinematic analysis quantifies gait abnormalities associated with lameness in broiler chickens and identifies evolutionary gait differences.

    PubMed

    Caplen, Gina; Hothersall, Becky; Murrell, Joanna C; Nicol, Christine J; Waterman-Pearson, Avril E; Weeks, Claire A; Colborne, G Robert

    2012-01-01

    This is the first time that gait characteristics of broiler (meat) chickens have been compared with their progenitor, jungle fowl, and the first kinematic study to report a link between broiler gait parameters and defined lameness scores. A commercial motion-capturing system recorded three-dimensional temporospatial information during walking. The hypothesis was that the gait characteristics of non-lame broilers (n?=?10) would be intermediate to those of lame broilers (n?=?12) and jungle fowl (n?=?10, tested at two ages: immature and adult). Data analysed using multi-level models, to define an extensive range of baseline gait parameters, revealed inter-group similarities and differences. Natural selection is likely to have made jungle fowl walking gait highly efficient. Modern broiler chickens possess an unbalanced body conformation due to intense genetic selection for additional breast muscle (pectoral hypertrophy) and whole body mass. Together with rapid growth, this promotes compensatory gait adaptations to minimise energy expenditure and triggers high lameness prevalence within commercial flocks; lameness creating further disruption to the gait cycle and being an important welfare issue. Clear differences were observed between the two lines (short stance phase, little double-support, low leg lift, and little back displacement in adult jungle fowl; much double-support, high leg lift, and substantial vertical back movement in sound broilers) presumably related to mass and body conformation. Similarities included stride length and duration. Additional modifications were also identified in lame broilers (short stride length and duration, substantial lateral back movement, reduced velocity) presumably linked to musculo-skeletal abnormalities. Reduced walking velocity suggests an attempt to minimise skeletal stress and/or discomfort, while a shorter stride length and time, together with longer stance and double-support phases, are associated with instability. We envisage a key future role for this highly quantitative methodology in pain assessment (associated with broiler lameness) including experimental examination of therapeutic agent efficacy. PMID:22815823

  20. Gait and upper limb variability in Parkinson's disease patients with and without freezing of gait.

    PubMed

    Barbe, Michael T; Amarell, Martin; Snijders, Anke H; Florin, Esther; Quatuor, Eva-Lotte; Schnau, Eckhard; Fink, Gereon R; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Timmermann, Lars

    2014-02-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and freezing of gait (FOG) (freezers) demonstrate high gait variability. The objective of this study was to determine whether freezers display a higher variability of upper limb movements and elucidate if these changes correlate with gait. We were the first group to compare directly objectively measured gait and upper limb movement variability of freezers between freezing episodes. Patients with objectively verified FOG (n=11) and PD patients without FOG (non-freezers) (n=11) in a non-randomized medication condition (OFF/ON) were analyzed. Uncued antiphasic finger tapping and forearm diadochokinetic movements were analyzed via three-dimensional ultrasound kinematic measurements. Gait variability of straight gait was assessed using ground reaction forces. Freezers had shorter stride length (p=0.004) and higher stride length variability (p=0.005) in the medication OFF condition. Movement variability was not different during finger tapping or diadochokinesia between the groups. There was a trend towards more freezing of the upper limb during finger tapping for the freezers (p=0.07). Variability in stride length generation and stride timing was not associated with variability of upper limb movement in freezers. Our findings demonstrate that: (1) freezers have a higher spatial gait variability between freezing episodes; (2) freezing-like episodes of the upper limb occur in PD patients, and tend to be more pronounced among freezers than non-freezers for finger tapping; (3) spatial and temporal upper extremity variability is equally affected in freezers and non-freezers in an uncued task. Upper limb freezing is not correlated to lower limb freezing, implicating a different pathophysiology. PMID:24305993

  1. Gait, cost and time implications for changing from PTB to ICEX sockets.

    PubMed

    Datta, D; Harris, I; Heller, B; Howitt, J; Martin, R

    2004-08-01

    The ICEX system (Ossur, Iceland), allows a socket to be manufactured directly onto the stump and is thought to provide improved comfort due to better pressure distribution whilst being easier to fit and manufacture. The aims of this project were to a) compare gait performance by measuring several gait characteristics, b) compare production and fitting times, c) investigate financial implications and d) attempt to gauge the amputees' subjective opinions of socket comfort. A randomised, controlled trial was conducted on 27 trans-tibial amputees with an existing patellar tendon bearing (PTB) socket on the Endolite system (Chas A. Blatchford, UK). Twenty one (21) subjects completed the study. Of these, 10 in the control group received new PTB sockets while 11 in the experimental group received ICEX. Gait analysis wearing existing sockets was performed and kinetic data obtained from a force plate. This was repeated with the new sockets after a 6 week period of adjustment. Mann-Whitney tests were used in statistical evaluations with a significance level of 5%. Subjects were asked to score their prosthesis for comfort using the Socket Comfort Score (Hanspal et al., 2003) and the frequency of visits for socket adjustments over a three-month period post-delivery of the sockets was recorded. This study demonstrates no significant difference in any of the gait parameters measured. Though the time required to manufacture a PTB prosthesis was found to be considerably longer than the ICEX, the overall cost for producing the ICEX was significantly greater. Subjects showed only minor comfort preference for the ICEX design and there was no significant difference in the mean number of visits for socket adjustments. In view of the considerable additional cost of providing ICEX and the lack of evidence of improvement in any parameter tested, the routine provision of ICEX prostheses to unselected trans-tibial amputees cannot be recommended. PMID:15382805

  2. Estimates of circulation and gait change based on a three-dimensional kinematic analysis of flight in cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) and ringed turtle-doves (Streptopelia risoria).

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Tyson L; Tobalske, Bret W; Biewener, Andrew A

    2002-05-01

    Birds and bats are known to employ two different gaits in flapping flight, a vortex-ring gait in slow flight and a continuous-vortex gait in fast flight. We studied the use of these gaits over a wide range of speeds (1-17 ms(-1)) and transitions between gaits in cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) and ringed turtle-doves (Streptopelia risoria) trained to fly in a recently built, variable-speed wind tunnel. Gait use was investigated via a combination of three-dimensional kinematics and quasi-steady aerodynamic modeling of bound circulation on the distal and proximal portions of the wing. Estimates of lift from our circulation model were sufficient to support body weight at all but the slowest speeds (1 and 3 ms(-1)). From comparisons of aerodynamic impulse derived from our circulation analysis with the impulse estimated from whole-body acceleration, it appeared that our quasi-steady aerodynamic analysis was most accurate at intermediate speeds (5-11 ms(-1)). Despite differences in wing shape and wing loading, both species shifted from a vortex-ring to a continuous-vortex gait at 7 ms(-1). We found that the shift from a vortex-ring to a continuous-vortex gait (i) was associated with a phase delay in the peak angle of attack of the proximal wing section from downstroke into upstroke and (ii) depended on sufficient forward velocity to provide airflow over the wing during the upstroke similar to that during the downstroke. Our kinematic estimates indicated significant variation in the magnitude of circulation over the course the wingbeat cycle when either species used a continuous-vortex gait. This variation was great enough to suggest that both species shifted to a ladder-wake gait as they approached the maximum flight speed (cockatiels 15 ms(-1), doves 17 ms(-1)) that they would sustain in the wind tunnel. This shift in flight gait appeared to reflect the need to minimize drag and produce forward thrust in order to fly at high speed. The ladder-wake gait was also employed in forward and vertical acceleration at medium and fast flight speeds. PMID:11976351

  3. The Golden Ratio of Gait Harmony: Repetitive Proportions of Repetitive Gait Phases

    PubMed Central

    Iosa, Marco; Marchetti, Fabio; Morone, Giovanni; Caltagirone, Carlo; Paolucci, Stefano; Peppe, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    In nature, many physical and biological systems have structures showing harmonic properties. Some of them were found related to the irrational number ? known as the golden ratio that has important symmetric and harmonic properties. In this study, the spatiotemporal gait parameters of 25 healthy subjects were analyzed using a stereophotogrammetric system with 25 retroreflective markers located on their skin. The proportions of gait phases were compared with ?, the value of which is about 1.6180. The ratio between the entire gait cycle and stance phase resulted in 1.620??0.058, that between stance and the swing phase was 1.629??0.173, and that between swing and the double support phase was 1.684??0.357. All these ratios did not differ significantly from each other (F = 0.870, P = 0.422, repeated measure analysis of variance) or from ? (P = 0.670, 0.820, 0.422, resp., t-tests). The repetitive gait phases of physiological walking were found in turn in repetitive proportions with each other, revealing an intrinsic harmonic structure. Harmony could be the key for facilitating the control of repetitive walking. Harmony is a powerful unifying factor between seemingly disparate fields of nature, including human gait. PMID:23862161

  4. Treatment of Gait Ignition Failure with Ropinirole

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Oram, Alexis N.; Stewart, Jonathan T.; Bero, Kim; Hoffmann, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Gait ignition failure (GIF) is a syndrome characterized by hesitation or inability to initiate gait from a static position. It may occur in a variety of conditions, including normal pressure hydrocephalus, subcortical vascular disease, parkinsonian syndromes and a variety of focal lesions. Previous information on the treatment of GIF has been primarily anecdotal, but there have been a few reports of response to dopamine agonists. We report a 63-year-old man with anoxic encephalopathy who developed GIF nine years after the initial anoxic insult. The patient’s GIF responded robustly, albeit transiently, to ropinirole. MRI was unrevealing, but a positron emission tomography scan showed hypometabolism in the deep frontal ACA/MCA watershed area; this may have disconnected the basal ganglia from the motor cortex and/or interrupted dopaminergic mesocortical transmission. Our understanding of the pathophysiology and the treatment of GIF remains limited, but there may be at least a limited therapeutic role for dopamine agonists. PMID:25360234

  5. Kinematic gait analysis in equine carpal lameness.

    PubMed

    Back, W; Barneveld, A; van Weeren, P R; van den Bogert, A J

    1993-01-01

    Gait analysis plays a major role in the clinical evaluation of equine lameness. It is generally accepted that the clinician expresses the grade of lameness as a subjective score. In this study lameness was objectively assessed using a standardized transient lameness model, in which lameness was induced by intra-articular injection of bacterial endotoxin into the radiocarpal joint of ponies. Lameness was scored by an experienced clinician, and locomotion was recorded simultaneously using a CODA-3 apparatus. The obtained kinematic gait parameters correlated well with the clinical lameness score and also provided possibilities to objectively study the locomotor disturbances of the lame limb in more detail at the walk and trot. PMID:8470470

  6. An efficient robotic tendon for gait assistance.

    PubMed

    Hollander, Kevin W; Ilg, Robert; Sugar, Thomas G; Herring, Donald

    2006-10-01

    A robotic tendon is a spring based, linear actuator in which the stiffness of the spring is crucial for its successful use in a lightweight, energy efficient, powered ankle orthosis. Like its human analog, the robotic tendon uses its inherent elastic nature to reduce both peak power and energy requirements for its motor. In the ideal example, peak power required of the motor for ankle gait is reduced from 250 W to just 77 W. In addition, ideal energy requirements are reduced from nearly 36 J to just 21 J. Using this approach, an initial prototype has provided 100% of the power and energy necessary for ankle gait in a compact 0.95 kg package, seven times less than an equivalent motor/gearbox system. PMID:16995768

  7. Gait attentional load at different walking speeds.

    PubMed

    Nascimbeni, Alberto; Minchillo, Marco; Salatino, Adriana; Morabito, Ursula; Ricci, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Gait is an attention-demanding task even in healthy young adults. However, scant evidence exists about the attentional load required at various walking speeds. The aim of this study was to investigate motor-cognitive interference while walking at spontaneous, slow and very slow speed on a treadmill while carrying out a backward counting task, in a group (n = 22) of healthy young participants. Cognitive performance was also assessed while sitting. Higher DT cost on the cognitive task was found at spontaneous and very slow walking speed, while at slow walking speed the cognitive task was prioritized with higher DT cost on the motor task. The attentional allocation during DT depends on walking speed with gait prioritization at spontaneous and very slow speed that likely represent more challenging motor conditions. PMID:25270327

  8. [Freezing and gait disorders in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Giovanna; Pereira, João

    2013-06-01

    More than one third of patients with Parkinson disease experience freezing. It is characterized by the feeling that one's feet are "glued to the floor", and it is more common in the later stages of the disease. The causes of this gait disorder are not yet fully established, but it may lead patients to suffer falls and lose their independence. As a consequence, the development of therapeutic measures which can overcome freezing is of fundamental important for the autonomy of such individuals. There is no consensus in the literature on the most recommended therapeutic measures for the prevention or attenuation of freezing in gait. What seems to be defined are the phenomenological aspects of the disorder and good therapy, represented by the association between drug therapy and sensorial stimuli or motor coordination training geared towards the specificities to avoid motor difficulties of freezing, when triggering factors are present. PMID:24121579

  9. Effects of orthosis on balance and gait in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung-Joon; Choi, Yeong-Deok; Lee, Jung-Ho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study evaluated the effects of an oral orthosis that can change body alignment on the balance ability and gait of healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 21 University students. A gait analyzer was used to analyze the subjects’ balance ability and gait quality. Two walking speeds were used: 2 km/h, a comfortable speed, and 4 km/h, a slightly faster walking speed. [Results] The step length, and base of gait at 2 km/h differed significantly after the intervention. The total step time and step length increased significantly after the intervention. Furthermore, the total base of gait decreased significantly after the intervention. The step times of the left lower limb at 4 km/h differed significantly after the intervention. [Conclusion] The oral orthosis tested positively affects the balance ability and gait of healthy adults. PMID:26180365

  10. RELATIONSHIP OF GAIT AND COGNITION IN THE ELDERLY

    PubMed Central

    Parihar, Raminder; Mahoney, Jeannette R.; Verghese, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Gait and cognitive impairments in older adults mostly reflect the co-occurrence of two geriatric syndromes linked by common underlying brain substrates and pathologies. Gait control is predominately mediated by frontal subcortical circuits, which overlap with circuits controlling executive control and attention functions. These circuits are vulnerable to multiple age-related pathologies such as ischemia, inflammation, and neurodegeneration, which could ultimately cause cognitive, gait, or combined cognitive and gait impairments. The following review aims to describe various gait and cognitive classifications, gait based phenotypes, common underlying pathological processes, and provide a link between motor and cognitive impairments in an effort to predict the risk of dementia, as well as remediate impairments by applying appropriate interventions. PMID:24349877

  11. Clinical Gait assessment of older adults using open platform tools.

    PubMed

    Scanaill, Cliodhna Ni; Greene, Barry R; Doheny, Emer P; O'Donovan, Karol; O'Shea, Terrance; O'Donovan, Alan D; Foran, Tim; Cunningham, Clodagh; Kenny, Rose Anne

    2011-01-01

    Gait impairment is associated with increased falls risk. The gait of 321 community dwelling elderly adults was assessed using the TRIL Gait Analysis Platform (GAP), which was specially designed for ease of use in a research clinic setting by non-experts. The GAP featured body-worn kinematic sensors, a pressure sensitive electronic walkway, and two orthogonally mounted web cameras, and was developed using open platform tools. This flexible platform was applied to objectively measure gait parameters in different gait assessments. The results from the 6 meter walk assessment are presented here. In this assessment, participants were categorized by clinical falls history as 'fallers' or 'non-fallers'. Temporal and spatial gait parameters were examined. Significant differences in spatial parameters were observed when fallers and non-fallers were compared. Temporal parameters were found to differ, though not significantly. PMID:22254348

  12. Experimentally Derived Kinetic Model for Sensor-Based Gait Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Ketema, Yohannes; Gebre-Egziabher, Demoz

    2016-01-01

    A method for estimating gait parameters (shank, thigh, and stance leg angles) from a single, in situ, scalar acceleration measurement is presented. A method for minimizing the impact of errors due to unpredictable variations in muscle actuation and acceleration measurement biases is developed. This is done by determining the most probable gait progression by minimization of a cost function that reflects the size of errors in the gait parameters. In addition, a model for gait patterns that takes into account their variations due to walking speed is introduced and used. The approach is tested on data collected from subjects in a gait study. The approach can estimate limb angles with errors less than 6 deg (one standard deviation) and, thus, is suitable for many envisioned gait monitoring applications in nonlaboratory settings. PMID:26593150

  13. Autonomous Evolution of Dynamic Gaits with Two Quadruped Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornby, Gregory S.; Takamura, Seichi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Fujita, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    A challenging task that must be accomplished for every legged robot is creating the walking and running behaviors needed for it to move. In this paper we describe our system for autonomously evolving dynamic gaits on two of Sony's quadruped robots. Our evolutionary algorithm runs on board the robot and uses the robot's sensors to compute the quality of a gait without assistance from the experimenter. First we show the evolution of a pace and trot gait on the OPEN-R prototype robot. With the fastest gait, the robot moves at over 10/min/min., which is more than forty body-lengths/min. While these first gaits are somewhat sensitive to the robot and environment in which they are evolved, we then show the evolution of robust dynamic gaits, one of which is used on the ERS-110, the first consumer version of AIBO.

  14. Gait kinematic analysis evaluates hindlimb revascularization.

    PubMed

    Ros, Amelia; Delgado, Alexandra; Escalante, Bruno; Santana, Jess

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral arterial occlusive disease is described as vascular disorders associated with ischemia and may be the result of an obstructive vascular process or a lost revascularization response. We have shown that gait locomotion analysis by video filming represents an integrative model for the evaluation of mechanisms involved in the process of ischemia-induced revascularization. However, analysis by this method can be subjective and perception errors may be occurring. We present the optimization of a quantifiable, noninvasive, reproducible method that analyzes ankle kinematics in rats using a two-dimensional digital video system. Gait dynamics were filmed in hindlimb ischemic rats with a high speed digital video camera. Images were collected and analyzed at 125 frames per second. An algorithm using interactive data language (IDL) was devised to assess different parameters. In ischemic rats, stride time and knee joint angle remained altered 10 days post-surgery compared with sham animals. Gait kinematics were outlined in a highly reliable way by this computational analysis and corroborated the notion of hindlimb movement recovery associated with the revascularization process. PMID:22423574

  15. Evaluating alternative gait strategies using evolutionary robotics

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, William I; Dennis, Louise A; Wang, W -J; Crompton, Robin H

    2004-01-01

    Evolutionary robotics is a branch of artificial intelligence concerned with the automatic generation of autonomous robots. Usually the form of the robot is predefined and various computational techniques are used to control the machine's behaviour. One aspect is the spontaneous generation of walking in legged robots and this can be used to investigate the mechanical requirements for efficient walking in bipeds. This paper demonstrates a bipedal simulator that spontaneously generates walking and running gaits. The model can be customized to represent a range of hominoid morphologies and used to predict performance parameters such as preferred speed and metabolic energy cost. Because it does not require any motion capture data it is particularly suitable for investigating locomotion in fossil animals. The predictions for modern humans are highly accurate in terms of energy cost for a given speed and thus the values predicted for other bipeds are likely to be good estimates. To illustrate this the cost of transport is calculated for Australopithecus afarensis. The model allows the degree of maximum extension at the knee to be varied causing the model to adopt walking gaits varying from chimpanzee-like to human-like. The energy costs associated with these gait choices can thus be calculated and this information used to evaluate possible locomotor strategies in early hominids. PMID:15198699

  16. Gait Signal Analysis with Similarity Measure

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seungsoo

    2014-01-01

    Human gait decision was carried out with the help of similarity measure design. Gait signal was selected through hardware implementation including all in one sensor, control unit, and notebook with connector. Each gait signal was considered as high dimensional data. Therefore, high dimensional data analysis was considered via heuristic technique such as the similarity measure. Each human pattern such as walking, sitting, standing, and stepping up was obtained through experiment. By the results of the analysis, we also identified the overlapped and nonoverlapped data relation, and similarity measure analysis was also illustrated, and comparison with conventional similarity measure was also carried out. Hence, nonoverlapped data similarity analysis provided the clue to solve the similarity of high dimensional data. Considered high dimensional data analysis was designed with consideration of neighborhood information. Proposed similarity measure was applied to identify the behavior patterns of different persons, and different behaviours of the same person. Obtained analysis can be extended to organize health monitoring system for specially elderly persons. PMID:25110724

  17. Recovery of gait after quadriceps muscle fatigue.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Fabio Augusto; Beretta, Stephannie Spiandor; Pereira, Vinicius A I; Simieli, Lucas; Orcioli-Silva, Diego; Dos Santos, Paulo Cezar Rocha; van Dien, Jaap H; Gobbi, Lilian Teresa Bucken

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of recovery time after quadriceps muscle fatigue on gait in young adults. Forty young adults (20-40 years old) performed three 8-m gait trials at preferred velocity before and after muscle fatigue, and after 5, 10 and 20min of passive rest. In addition, at each time point, two maximal isometric voluntary contractions were preformed. Muscle fatigue was induced by repeated sit-to-stand transfers until task failure. Spatio-temporal, kinetic and muscle activity parameters, measured in the central stride of each trial, were analyzed. Data were compared between before and after the muscle fatigue protocol and after the recovery periods by one-way repeated measures ANOVA. The voluntary force was decreased after the fatigue protocol (p<0.001) and after 5, 10 and 20min of recovery compared to before the fatigue protocol. Step width (p<0.001) and RMS of biceps femoris (p<0.05) were increased immediately after the fatigue protocol and remained increased after the recovery periods. In addition, stride duration was decreased immediately after the fatigue protocol compared to before and to after 10 and 20min of rest (p<0.001). The anterior-posterior propulsive impulse was also decreased after the fatigue protocol (p<0.001) and remained low after 5, 10 and 20min of rest. We conclude that 20min is not enough to see full recovery of gait after exhaustive quadriceps muscle fatigue. PMID:26531768

  18. Gait patterns for crime fighting: statistical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulovská, Kateřina; Bělašková, Silvie; Adámek, Milan

    2013-10-01

    The criminality is omnipresent during the human history. Modern technology brings novel opportunities for identification of a perpetrator. One of these opportunities is an analysis of video recordings, which may be taken during the crime itself or before/after the crime. The video analysis can be classed as identification analyses, respectively identification of a person via externals. The bipedal locomotion focuses on human movement on the basis of their anatomical-physiological features. Nowadays, the human gait is tested by many laboratories to learn whether the identification via bipedal locomotion is possible or not. The aim of our study is to use 2D components out of 3D data from the VICON Mocap system for deep statistical analyses. This paper introduces recent results of a fundamental study focused on various gait patterns during different conditions. The study contains data from 12 participants. Curves obtained from these measurements were sorted, averaged and statistically tested to estimate the stability and distinctiveness of this biometrics. Results show satisfactory distinctness of some chosen points, while some do not embody significant difference. However, results presented in this paper are of initial phase of further deeper and more exacting analyses of gait patterns under different conditions.

  19. Gait patterns after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bulgheroni, P; Bulgheroni, M V; Andrini, L; Guffanti, P; Giughello, A

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse the changes in select gait parameters following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The study was performed on 15 subjects who underwent ACL reconstruction by the bone-patellar tendon-bone technique. Gait analysis was performed using the Elite three-dimensional (3D) optoelectronic system (BTS), a Kistler force platform and the Telemg telemetric electromyograph (BTS). Kinematic data were recorded for the principal lower limb joints (hip, knee and ankle). The examined muscles include vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, biceps femoris and semitendinosus. The results obtained from the operated subjects were compared with those of 10 untreated subjects and 5 subjects without ACL damage. In the operated subjects the knee joint angular values regained a normal flexion pattern for the injured limb during the stance phase. The analysis of joint moments shows: (a) sagittal plane: recovery of the knee flexion moment at loading response and during preswing; (b) frontal plane: recovery of the normal patterns for both hip and knee adduction-abduction moments during the entire stance phase. The examination of ground reaction forces reveals the recovery of frontal component features. The EMG traces show the normal biphasic pattern for the operated subjects as compared to the untreated subjects. The results suggest that the gait parameters shift towards normal value patterns. PMID:9127848

  20. Delayed gait recovery in a stroke patient☆

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jeong Pyo; Lee, Mi Young; Kwon, Yong Hyun; Jang, Sung Ho

    2013-01-01

    We report on a stroke patient who showed delayed gait recovery between 8 and 11 months after the onset of intracerebral hemorrhage. This 32-year-old female patient underwent craniotomy and drainage for right intracerebral hemorrhage due to rupture of an arteriovenous malformation. Brain MR images revealed a large leukomalactic lesion in the right fronto-parietal cortex. Diffusion tensor tractography at 8 months after onset revealed that the right corticospinal tract was severely injured. At this time, the patient could not stand or walk despite undergoing rehabilitation from 2 months after onset. It was believed that severe spasticity of the left leg and right ankle was largely responsible, and thus, antispastic drugs, antispastic procedures (alcohol neurolysis of the motor branch of the tibial nerve and an intramuscular alcohol wash of both tibialis posterior muscles) and physical therapy were tried to control the spasticity. These measures relieved the severe spasticity, with the result that the patient was able to stand at 3 months. In addition, the improvements in sensorimotor function, visuospatial function, and cognition also seemed to contribute to gait recovery. As a result, she gained the ability to walk independently on even floor with a left ankle foot orthosis at 11 months after onset. This case illustrates that clinicians should attempt to find the cause of gait inability and to initiate intensive rehabilitation in stroke patients who cannot walk at 3–6 months after onset. PMID:25206447

  1. Identifying clinically meaningful benchmarks for gait improvement after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Foucher, Kharma C

    2016-01-01

    There are no established benchmarks for gait mechanics after total hip arthroplasty (THA). This study sought to identify minimum clinically important postoperative (MCIP) or minimum clinically important improvement (MCII) values for self-selected walking speed, sagittal plane dynamic hip range of motion (HROM) (peak flexion-peak extension) and peak hip adduction moments measured during quantitative gait analysis. Preoperative and 1-year postoperative data collected during quantitative gait analysis, along with Harris Hip Scores (HHS), for 145 subjects were collected from a motion analysis data repository. The MCIP (or MCII) was defined as the 75th percentile mark on a plot of the cumulative percent of subjects with HHS ? 80 versus the postoperative value (or change) in the respective variable. 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Logistic regression was used to test the association of age, sex, BMI, and preoperative HHS with benchmarks. The MCIP of speed was 1.34?m/s (95%CI 1.30, 1.37); MCII was 0.32 (0.30, 0.35) m/s. The HROM MCIP was 30.0 (29.4, 30.7); MCII was 13.3 (12.1, 14.8). The adduction moment MCIP was 4.2% Body Weight Height (4.0, 4.4); MCII was 0.87 (0.57, 1.17) % Body Weight Height. Women were more likely to achieve MCII for HROM and MCIP for adduction moment (ORs 2.4-11.6, p???0.031). Lower BMI predicted HROM and adduction moment MCIPs (ORs 0.85-0.88, p???0.015). Lower preoperative HHS predicted speed, HROM and adduction moment MCIIs (ORs 0.95-0.97, p???0.012). With further validation, clinically-relevant gait benchmarks can enhance efforts to improve THA outcomes. 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:88-96, 2016. PMID:26218738

  2. Gait analysis of a radial symmetrical hexapod robot based on parallel mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Kun; Ding, Xilun

    2014-09-01

    Most gait studies of multi-legged robots in past neglected the dexterity of robot body and the relationship between stride length and body height. This paper investigates the performance of a radial symmetrical hexapod robot based on the dexterity of parallel mechanism. Assuming the constraints between the supporting feet and the ground with hinges, the supporting legs and the hexapod body are taken as a parallel mechanism, and each swing leg is regarded as a serial manipulator. The hexapod robot can be considered as a series of hybrid serial-parallel mechanisms while walking on the ground. Locomotion performance can be got by analyzing these equivalent mechanisms. The kinematics of the whole robotic system is established, and the influence of foothold position on the workspace of robot body is analyzed. A new method to calculate the stride length of multi-legged robots is proposed by analyzing the relationship between the workspaces of two adjacent equivalent parallel mechanisms in one gait cycle. Referring to service region and service sphere, weight service sphere and weight service region are put forward to evaluate the dexterity of robot body. The dexterity of single point in workspace and the dexterity distribution in vertical and horizontal projection plane are demonstrated. Simulation shows when the foothold offset goes up to 174 mm, the dexterity of robot body achieves its maximum value 0.1644 in mixed gait. The proposed methods based on parallel mechanisms can be used to calculate the stride length and the dexterity of multi-legged robot, and provide new approach to determine the stride length, body height, footholds in gait planning of multi-legged robot.

  3. Enhanced data consistency of a portable gait measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsien-I.; Chiang, Y. P.

    2013-11-01

    A gait measurement system is a useful tool for rehabilitation applications. Such a system is used to conduct gait experiments in large workplaces such as laboratories where gait measurement equipment can be permanently installed. However, a gait measurement system should be portable if it is to be used in clinics or community centers for aged people. In a portable gait measurement system, the workspace is limited and landmarks on a subject may not be visible to the cameras during experiments. Thus, we propose a virtual-marker function to obtain positions of unseen landmarks for maintaining data consistency. This work develops a portable clinical gait measurement system consisting of lightweight motion capture devices, force plates, and a walkway assembled from plywood boards. We evaluated the portable clinic gait system with 11 normal subjects in three consecutive days in a limited experimental space. Results of gait analysis based on the verification of within-day and between-day coefficients of multiple correlations show that the proposed portable gait system is reliable.

  4. Influence of gait speed on the control of mediolateral dynamic stability during gait initiation.

    PubMed

    Caderby, Teddy; Yiou, Eric; Peyrot, Nicolas; Begon, Mickal; Dalleau, Georges

    2014-01-22

    This study investigated the influence of gait speed on the control of mediolateral dynamic stability during gait initiation. Thirteen healthy young adults initiated gait at three self-selected speeds: Slow, Normal and Fast. The results indicated that the duration of anticipatory postural adjustments (APA) decreased from Slow to Fast, i.e. the time allocated to propel the centre of mass (COM) towards the stance-leg side was shortened. Likely as an attempt at compensation, the peak of the anticipatory centre of pressure (COP) shift increased. However, COP compensation was not fully efficient since the results indicated that the mediolateral COM shift towards the stance-leg side at swing foot-off decreased with gait speed. Consequently, the COM shift towards the swing-leg side at swing heel-contact increased from Slow to Fast, indicating that the mediolateral COM fall during step execution increased as gait speed rose. However, this increased COM fall was compensated by greater step width so that the margin of stability (the distance between the base-of-support boundary and the mediolateral component of the "extrapolated centre of mass") at heel-contact remained unchanged across the speed conditions. Furthermore, a positive correlation between the mediolateral extrapolated COM position at heel-contact and step width was found, indicating that the greater the mediolateral COM fall, the greater the step width. Globally, these results suggest that mediolateral APA and step width are modulated with gait speed so as to maintain equivalent mediolateral dynamical stability at the time of swing heel-contact. PMID:24290175

  5. Bearing Remover And Presser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Rex A.

    1995-01-01

    Document describes simple bearing-servicing tool consisting of only three parts capable of removing and replacing rotary bearing within race. Threaded drive operates between guide and pressure plate for dislodging bearing from race.

  6. Investigating Science through Bears (and Teddy Bears).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Karlene Ray

    1997-01-01

    Presents cooperative classroom projects using science as the initial basis for the study of bears. These projects may also involve other areas of the curriculum such as mathematics, art, and music. "Black Bear" activities include following a park ranger to study our National Parks and researching and building a full-sized brown bear habitat. (AIM)

  7. A portable system with sample rate of 250Hz for characterization of knee and hip angles in the sagittal plane during gait

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gait analysis and research have been developed to obtain characteristics of movement patterns of people while walking. However, traditional measuring systems present different drawbacks that reduce their use and application. Among those drawbacks one can find: high price, low sampling frequency and limiting number of steps to be analyzed. Traditional measuring gait systems carry out their measurement at frequencies oscillating between 60 to 100Hz. It can be argued about the need of higher sampling rates for gait measurements. However small displacements of the knee or hip for example, cannot be seen with low frequencies required a more detailed sampling and higher frequency sampling. Bearing this in mind, in this paper is presented a 250Hz system based on accelerometers for gait measurement, and the particularities of knee and hip angles during gait are highlighted. Methods The system was designed with a PCI data acquisition card instrumented with an FPGA to achieve a rate sample of 250Hz. The accelerometers were placed in thighs and legs to calculate the joint angles of hip and knee in the sagittal plane. The angles were estimated using the acceleration polygon method without integrating the acceleration and without filters. Results The gait of thirty healthy people of Mexican phenotype was analyzed over a flat floor free of obstacles. The results showed the gait phases and particularities associated with the walking style and people's laterality; the movement patterns were similar in the thirty persons. Based on the results, the particularities as the maximum amplitude in the angles and the shape in the movement patterns were related to the anthropometry and people phenotype. Conclusions The sampling frequency was essential to record 340 samples in single gait cycle and so registering the gait cycle with its particularities. In this work were recorded an average of 8 to 10 gait cycles, and the results showed variation regarding works carried out in biomechanics laboratories; this variation was related to the method and reference frame used to obtain the joint angles and the accuracy of measurement system. PMID:24684720

  8. A mobile gait monitoring system for abnormal gait diagnosis and rehabilitation: a pilot study for Parkinson disease patients.

    PubMed

    Bae, Joonbum; Kong, Kyoungchul; Byl, Nancy; Tomizuka, Masayoshi

    2011-04-01

    Conventional gait rehabilitation treatment does not provide quantitative information on abnormal gait kinematics, and the match of the intervention strategy to the underlying clinical presentation may be limited by clinical expertise and experience. Also the effect of rehabilitation treatment may be reduced as the rehabilitation treatment is achieved only in a clinical setting. In this paper, a mobile gait monitoring system (MGMS) is proposed for the diagnosis of abnormal gait and rehabilitation. The proposed MGMS consists of Smart Shoes and a microsignal processor with a touch screen display. It monitors patients' gait by observing the ground reaction force (GRF) and the center of GRF, and analyzes the gait abnormality. Since visual feedback about patients' GRFs and normal GRF patterns are provided by the MGMS, patients can practice the rehabilitation treatment by trying to follow the normal GRF patterns without restriction of time and place. The gait abnormality proposed in this paper is defined by the deviation between the patient's GRFs and normal GRF patterns, which are constructed as GRF bands. The effectiveness of the proposed gait analysis methods with the MGMS has been verified by preliminary trials with patients suffering from gait disorders. PMID:21428679

  9. ES and H-compatible lubrication for duplex bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, R.G.

    1997-10-01

    Two ES and H-compatible lubricants (environment, safety, and health) for duplex bearing applications and one hybrid material duplex bearing were evaluated and compared against duplex bearings with trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon) deposition of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) bearing lubricant extracted from Vydax{trademark}. Vydax is a product manufactured by DuPont consisting of various molecular weights of PTFE suspended in trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon), which is an ozone-depleting solvent. Vydax has been used as a bearing lubricant in strong link mechanisms since 1974. Hybrid duplex bearings with silicon nitride balls and molded glass-nylon-Teflon retainers, duplex bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on races and retainers, and duplex bearings lubricated with electrophoretic deposited MoS{sub 2} were evaluated. Bearings with electrophoretic deposited MoS{sub 2} performed as well as bearings with Freon deposition of PTFE from Freon-based Vydax. Hybrid bearings with silicon nitride balls performed worse than bearings lubricated with Vydax, but their performance would still be acceptable for most applications. Bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers had varying amounts of film on the bearings. This affected the performance of the bearings. Bearings with a uniform coating performed to acceptable levels, but bearings with no visible MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers did not perform as well as bearings with the other coatings. Unless process controls are incorporated in the sputtering process or the bearings are screened, they do not appear to be acceptable for duplex bearing applications.

  10. Gait pattern of heifers before and after claw trimming: a high-speed cinematographic study on a treadmill.

    PubMed

    Meyer, S W; Weishaupt, M A; Nuss, K A

    2007-02-01

    The manner in which the claws contacted the ground at the walk was evaluated in 18 healthy heifers. The animals were filmed before and after claw trimming while walking on a treadmill using high-speed cinematography (500 frames/s). For each limb, 4 consecutive steps were recorded from a side and a frontal plane. The objectives of the study were to evaluate 1) the order of claw contact with the treadmill surface, 2) the initial claw contact area, and 3) the effect of trimming on claw contact patterns. The heifers placed their front feet on the ground in a plane sagittal to the shoulders, whereas the hind feet were advanced more toward the median plane. Before trimming, the lateral claws contacted the ground before the medial in 83% of front and 100% of hind limbs. Trimming changed the percentage to 92% in the front and to 97% in the hind limbs. The percentage with which the heel of the lateral claws became the region of initial contact with the ground increased from 47 to 64% in the front feet and from 50 to 78% in the hind feet. In the medial claws of the forelimbs, claw trimming shifted the region of initial contact from the toe to the abaxial wall and heel. In the hind limbs, the main region of initial contact of the medial claws became the abaxial wall. Weight bearing by the medial claw became visibly apparent only during the midstance, propulsion, and push-off phases. "Heel first" contact of the lateral claws in the front and hind limbs may be the normal gait pattern in cattle. On hard surfaces, this pattern may lead to overload and predispose to disease, especially in the hind limbs. PMID:17235142

  11. Patient-cooperative control increases active participation of individuals with SCI during robot-aided gait training

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Manual body weight supported treadmill training and robot-aided treadmill training are frequently used techniques for the gait rehabilitation of individuals after stroke and spinal cord injury. Current evidence suggests that robot-aided gait training may be improved by making robotic behavior more patient-cooperative. In this study, we have investigated the immediate effects of patient-cooperative versus non-cooperative robot-aided gait training on individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). Methods Eleven patients with iSCI participated in a single training session with the gait rehabilitation robot Lokomat. The patients were exposed to four different training modes in random order: During both non-cooperative position control and compliant impedance control, fixed timing of movements was provided. During two variants of the patient-cooperative path control approach, free timing of movements was enabled and the robot provided only spatial guidance. The two variants of the path control approach differed in the amount of additional support, which was either individually adjusted or exaggerated. Joint angles and torques of the robot as well as muscle activity and heart rate of the patients were recorded. Kinematic variability, interaction torques, heart rate and muscle activity were compared between the different conditions. Results Patients showed more spatial and temporal kinematic variability, reduced interaction torques, a higher increase of heart rate and more muscle activity in the patient-cooperative path control mode with individually adjusted support than in the non-cooperative position control mode. In the compliant impedance control mode, spatial kinematic variability was increased and interaction torques were reduced, but temporal kinematic variability, heart rate and muscle activity were not significantly higher than in the position control mode. Conclusions Patient-cooperative robot-aided gait training with free timing of movements made individuals with iSCI participate more actively and with larger kinematic variability than non-cooperative, position-controlled robot-aided gait training. PMID:20828422

  12. A simulator study of adverse wear with metal and cement debris contamination in metal-on-metal hip bearings

    PubMed Central

    Halim, T.; Clarke, I. C.; Burgett-Moreno, M. D.; Donaldson, T. K.; Savisaar, C.; Bowsher, J. G.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Third-body wear is believed to be one trigger for adverse results with metal-on-metal (MOM) bearings. Impingement and subluxation may release metal particles from MOM replacements. We therefore challenged MOM bearings with relevant debris types of cobalt–chrome alloy (CoCr), titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) and polymethylmethacrylate bone cement (PMMA). Methods Cement flakes (PMMA), CoCr and Ti6Al4V particles (size range 5 µm to 400 µm) were run in a MOM wear simulation. Debris allotments (5 mg) were inserted at ten intervals during the five million cycle (5 Mc) test. Results In a clean test phase (0 Mc to 0.8 Mc), lubricants retained their yellow colour. Addition of metal particles at 0.8 Mc turned lubricants black within the first hour of the test and remained so for the duration, while PMMA particles did not change the colour of the lubricant. Rates of wear with PMMA, CoCr and Ti6Al4V debris averaged 0.3 mm3/Mc, 4.1 mm3/Mc and 6.4 mm3/Mc, respectively. Conclusions Metal particles turned simulator lubricants black with rates of wear of MOM bearings an order of magnitude higher than with control PMMA particles. This appeared to model the findings of black, periarticular joint tissues and high CoCr wear in failed MOM replacements. The amount of wear debris produced during a 500 000-cycle interval of gait was 30 to 50 times greater than the weight of triggering particle allotment, indicating that MOM bearings were extremely sensitive to third-body wear. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:29–37. PMID:25736072

  13. Lubricant replacement in rolling element bearings for weapon surety devices

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, R.; Dugger, M.T.; Varga, K.S.

    1996-05-01

    Stronglink switches are a weapon surety device that is critical to the nuclear safety theme in modem nuclear weapons. These stronglink switches use rolling element bearings which contain a lubricant consisting of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) fragments. Ozone-depleting solvents are used in both the manufacture and application of this lubricant. An alternate bearing lubrication for stronglink switches is needed that will provide long-term chemical stability, low migration and consistent performance. Candidates that were evaluated include bearings with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers, bearings with TiC-coated balls, and bearings with Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls and steel races. These candidates were compared to the lubricants currently used which are bearings lubricated with PTFE fragments of low molecular weight in a fluorocarbon solvent. The candidates were also compared to bearings lubricated with a diester oil which is representative of bearing lubricants used in industrial applications. Evaluation consisted of cycling preloaded bearings and subjecting them to 23 gRMS random vibration. All of the candidates are viable substitutes for low load application where bearing preload is approximately 1 pound. For high load applications where the bearing preload is approximately 10 pounds, bearings with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers appear to be the best substitutes. Bearings with TiC-coated balls also appear to be a viable candidate but these bearings did not perform as well as the sputtered MoS{sub 2}.

  14. Quantitative Gait Measurement With Pulse-Doppler Radar for Passive In-Home Gait Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Skubic, Marjorie; Rantz, Marilyn; Cuddihy, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a pulse-Doppler radar system for in-home gait assessment of older adults. A methodology has been developed to extract gait parameters including walking speed and step time using Doppler radar. The gait parameters have been validated with a Vicon motion capture system in the lab with 13 participants and 158 test runs. The study revealed that for an optimal step recognition and walking speed estimation, a dual radar set up with one radar placed at foot level and the other at torso level is necessary. An excellent absolute agreement with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.97 was found for step time estimation with the foot level radar. For walking speed, although both radars show excellent consistency they all have a system offset compared to the ground truth due to walking direction with respect to the radar beam. The torso level radar has a better performance (9% offset on average) in the speed estimation compared to the foot level radar (13%–18% offset). Quantitative analysis has been performed to compute the angles causing the systematic error. These lab results demonstrate the capability of the system to be used as a daily gait assessment tool in home environments, useful for fall risk assessment and other health care applications. The system is currently being tested in an unstructured home environment. PMID:24771566

  15. Quantitative gait measurement with pulse-Doppler radar for passive in-home gait assessment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang; Skubic, Marjorie; Rantz, Marilyn; Cuddihy, Paul E

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a pulse-Doppler radar system for in-home gait assessment of older adults. A methodology has been developed to extract gait parameters including walking speed and step time using Doppler radar. The gait parameters have been validated with a Vicon motion capture system in the lab with 13 participants and 158 test runs. The study revealed that for an optimal step recognition and walking speed estimation, a dual radar set up with one radar placed at foot level and the other at torso level is necessary. An excellent absolute agreement with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.97 was found for step time estimation with the foot level radar. For walking speed, although both radars show excellent consistency they all have a system offset compared to the ground truth due to walking direction with respect to the radar beam. The torso level radar has a better performance (9% offset on average) in the speed estimation compared to the foot level radar (13%-18% offset). Quantitative analysis has been performed to compute the angles causing the systematic error. These lab results demonstrate the capability of the system to be used as a daily gait assessment tool in home environments, useful for fall risk assessment and other health care applications. The system is currently being tested in an unstructured home environment. PMID:24771566

  16. Development of abnormal gait detection and vibratory stimulation system on lower limbs to improve gait stability.

    PubMed

    Yu, Mi; Piao, Yong-Jun; Eun, Hye-in; Kim, Dong-Wook; Ryu, Mun-ho; Kim, Nam-Gyun

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an abnormal gait detection algorithm and a vibratory stimulation system on a lower limb to improve gait stability and prevent falls. The system consists of a gait measurement module, an abnormal gait detection module, and a vibratory stimulation module. The gait measurement module measures the vertical acceleration of the ankle during walking using an accelerometer. The measured acceleration values are sent to a portable microcontroller, which controls vibratory stimulations to the ankles based on an algorithm that detects the peak acceleration values. If the acceleration peaks are found to occur irregularly, the abnormal gait detection algorithm activates the vibratory stimulation module. To determine the effect of vibratory stimulations under dynamic condition, this study investigated the contribution of ankle muscle proprioception on the control of dynamic stability and lower limb kinematics while walking using vibratory stimulation to alter the muscle spindle output of individuals' left lower limb. Vibrators were attached to the left ankle joint (tibialis anterior, triceps surae). Participants were required to walk along a travel path and step over an obstacle placed in their way. There were four task conditions; an obstacle (10%, 20%, and 30% of the participants' height) was positioned at the midpoint of the walkway, or the participants' walking path remained clear. For each obstacle condition, participants experienced either no vibration, or vibration of the tibialis anterior muscle and the triceps surae muscle of the left lower limb. Vibration began upon detection of an abnormal gait and continued for one second. Vibrating the ankle muscles of the left lower limb while stepping over an obstacle resulted in significant changes in COM behavior on both the anterior/posterior (A/P) and medial/lateral (M/L) planes. The results provide strong evidence that the primary endings of the ankle muscle spindles play a significant role in the control of posture and balance during the swing phase of locomotion by providing information on the movement of the body's COM with respect to the support foot. PMID:20703630

  17. Totally frictionless magnetic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodakian, Wayne; Bulman, John

    2000-11-01

    A totally frictionless magnetic bearing has been developed which supports a rotor in a contactless manner. The rotor is held in a magnetic potential well via repulsive forces only. Vertical and lateral restoring forces are provided to the rotor passively via permanent magnets in such an arrangement so as to support the weight of the rotor and provide it with a high degree of lateral stability. Axial stability of the rotor is provided by the use of an electromagnet which is controlled by a PID control loop. Information on the axial position of the rotor is provided to the circuit by use of an infrared LED and IR phototransistor. To prevent unwanted oscillations of the rotors axial position from occurring, an oscillation sensor in the form of an inductive pick-up coil of high impedance provides signals to the oscillation sensing portion of the circuit, which in turn feeds the oscillation dampening circuit. The use of only repulsive forces in stabilizing the rotor means that there will be no eddy current losses or hysterisis losses. Such a frictionless magnetic bearing can, for example be used in rotational oscillation experiments and ultra low loss watt-hour meters, which are of great importance to utility companies. When properly tuned, the total power requirements of the circuit is a mere 40mW, which is less than the 80 mW used by present day watt-hour meters.

  18. Inertial Sensor-Based Gait Recognition: A Review.

    PubMed

    Sprager, Sebastijan; Juric, Matjaz B

    2015-01-01

    With the recent development of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), inertial sensors have become widely used in the research of wearable gait analysis due to several factors, such as being easy-to-use and low-cost. Considering the fact that each individual has a unique way of walking, inertial sensors can be applied to the problem of gait recognition where assessed gait can be interpreted as a biometric trait. Thus, inertial sensor-based gait recognition has a great potential to play an important role in many security-related applications. Since inertial sensors are included in smart devices that are nowadays present at every step, inertial sensor-based gait recognition has become very attractive and emerging field of research that has provided many interesting discoveries recently. This paper provides a thorough and systematic review of current state-of-the-art in this field of research. Review procedure has revealed that the latest advanced inertial sensor-based gait recognition approaches are able to sufficiently recognise the users when relying on inertial data obtained during gait by single commercially available smart device in controlled circumstances, including fixed placement and small variations in gait. Furthermore, these approaches have also revealed considerable breakthrough by realistic use in uncontrolled circumstances, showing great potential for their further development and wide applicability. PMID:26340634

  19. Instrumenting gait with an accelerometer: a system and algorithm examination.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, A; Del Din, S; Barry, G; Mathers, J C; Rochester, L

    2015-04-01

    Gait is an important clinical assessment tool since changes in gait may reflect changes in general health. Measurement of gait is a complex process which has been restricted to the laboratory until relatively recently. The application of an inexpensive body worn sensor with appropriate gait algorithms (BWM) is an attractive alternative and offers the potential to assess gait in any setting. In this study we investigated the use of a low-cost BWM, compared to laboratory reference using a robust testing protocol in both younger and older adults. We observed that the BWM is a valid tool for estimating total step count and mean spatio-temporal gait characteristics however agreement for variability and asymmetry results was poor. We conducted a detailed investigation to explain the poor agreement between systems and determined it was due to inherent differences between the systems rather than inability of the sensor to measure the gait characteristics. The results highlight caution in the choice of reference system for validation studies. The BWM used in this study has the potential to gather longitudinal (real-world) spatio-temporal gait data that could be readily used in large lifestyle-based intervention studies, but further refinement of the algorithm(s) is required. PMID:25749552

  20. Inertial Sensor-Based Gait Recognition: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Sprager, Sebastijan; Juric, Matjaz B.

    2015-01-01

    With the recent development of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), inertial sensors have become widely used in the research of wearable gait analysis due to several factors, such as being easy-to-use and low-cost. Considering the fact that each individual has a unique way of walking, inertial sensors can be applied to the problem of gait recognition where assessed gait can be interpreted as a biometric trait. Thus, inertial sensor-based gait recognition has a great potential to play an important role in many security-related applications. Since inertial sensors are included in smart devices that are nowadays present at every step, inertial sensor-based gait recognition has become very attractive and emerging field of research that has provided many interesting discoveries recently. This paper provides a thorough and systematic review of current state-of-the-art in this field of research. Review procedure has revealed that the latest advanced inertial sensor-based gait recognition approaches are able to sufficiently recognise the users when relying on inertial data obtained during gait by single commercially available smart device in controlled circumstances, including fixed placement and small variations in gait. Furthermore, these approaches have also revealed considerable breakthrough by realistic use in uncontrolled circumstances, showing great potential for their further development and wide applicability. PMID:26340634

  1. Carmen Martn Gaite and the Writing of History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herzberger, David K.

    2015-01-01

    In this brief article, David Herzberger begins by describing how, with the help of Juan Benet as her interlocutor in 1966, renowned Spanish author Carmen Martn Gaite found her historiographic voice. Herzberger goes on to examine how this relates to Martn Gaite's legacy in historiography and her understanding of the Franco regime and the Spanish

  2. The Role of Executive Function and Attention in Gait

    PubMed Central

    Yogev, Galit; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.; Giladi, Nir

    2008-01-01

    Until recently, gait was generally viewed as a largely automated motor task, requiring minimal higher-level cognitive input. Increasing evidence, however, links alterations in executive function and attention to gait disturbances. This review discusses the role of executive function and of attention in healthy walking and gait disorders while summarizing the relevant, recent literature. We describe the variety of gait disorders that may be associated with different aspects of executive function, and discuss the changes occurring in executive function as a result of aging and disease as well the potential impact of these changes on gait. The attentional demands of gait are often tested using dual tasking methodologies. Relevant studies in healthy adults and patients are presented, as are the possible mechanisms responsible for the deterioration of gait during dual tasking. Lastly, we suggest how assessments of executive function and attention could be applied in the clinical setting as part of the process of identifying and understanding gait disorders and fall risk. PMID:18058946

  3. Biomechanical analysis of gait adaptation in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Fang-Yen, Christopher; Wyart, Matthieu; Xie, Julie; Kawai, Risa; Kodger, Tom; Chen, Sway; Wen, Quan; Samuel, Aravinthan D T

    2010-11-23

    To navigate different environments, an animal must be able to adapt its locomotory gait to its physical surroundings. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, between swimming in water and crawling on surfaces, adapts its locomotory gait to surroundings that impose approximately 10,000-fold differences in mechanical resistance. Here we investigate this feat by studying the undulatory movements of C. elegans in Newtonian fluids spanning nearly five orders of magnitude in viscosity. In these fluids, the worm undulatory gait varies continuously with changes in external load: As load increases, both wavelength and frequency of undulation decrease. We also quantify the internal viscoelastic properties of the worm's body and their role in locomotory dynamics. We incorporate muscle activity, internal load, and external load into a biomechanical model of locomotion and show that (i) muscle power is nearly constant across changes in locomotory gait, and (ii) the onset of gait adaptation occurs as external load becomes comparable to internal load. During the swimming gait, which is evoked by small external loads, muscle power is primarily devoted to bending the worm's elastic body. During the crawling gait, evoked by large external loads, comparable muscle power is used to drive the external load and the elastic body. Our results suggest that C. elegans locomotory gait continuously adapts to external mechanical load in order to maintain propulsive thrust. PMID:21048086

  4. Gait freezing and speech disturbance in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee Kyung; Yoo, Jong Yoon; Kwon, Miseon; Lee, Jae-Hong; Lee, Sook Joung; Kim, Sung Reul; Kim, Mi Jung; Lee, Myoung C; Lee, Sang Min; Chung, Sun Ju

    2014-03-01

    Gait freezing and speech disturbance are disabling axial features of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the pathogenesis of these features remains unclear. We investigated the relation between changes in gait freezing and speech disturbance using visual and auditory cues in PD. 18 PD patients, comprising of 9 patients with freezing (PDGF) and 9 without gait freezing were studied. Patients performed a 7-m back-and-forth walk in a baseline state and with visual and auditory cues. Gait velocity, stride length and cadence were evaluated using a three-dimensional gait analysis system. For speech evaluation, patients read ten sentences in a baseline state and with visual and auditory cues. The time delay of speech initiation, speech rate and the number of repetitions per sentence were quantified. In PDGF patients, the increase in gait velocity positively correlated with the decrease in the time delay of the speech initiation. Also, the increase in the gait velocity and cadence positively correlated with the decrease in the number of repetitions per sentence. The increase in the stride length positively correlated with the increase in speech rate. Lastly, the increase in stride length positively correlated with the decrease in the number of repetitions per sentence. These findings suggest that there is a common pathomechanism of gait freezing and speech disturbance in PD. PMID:23975521

  5. Design and test of a magnetic thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allaire, P. E.; Mikula, A.; Banerjee, B.; Lewis, D. W.; Imlach, J.

    1993-01-01

    A magnetic thrust bearing can be employed to take thrust loads in rotating machinery. The design and construction of a prototype magnetic thrust bearing for a high load per weight application is described. The theory for the bearing is developed. Fixtures were designed and the bearing was tested for load capacity using a universal testing machine. Various shims were employed to have known gap thicknesses. A comparison of the theory and measured results is presented.

  6. Effects of Nordic walking and walking on spatiotemporal gait parameters and ground reaction force

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung Kyu; Yang, Dae Jung; Kang, Yang Hun; Kim, Je Ho; Uhm, Yo Han; Lee, Yong Seon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Nordic walking and walking on spatiotemporal gait parameters and ground reaction force. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 30 young adult males, who were divided into a Nordic walking group of 15 subjects and a walking group of 15 subjects. [Methods] To analyze the spatiotemporal parameters and ground reaction force during walking in the two groups, the six-camera Vicon MX motion analysis system was used. The subjects were asked to walk 12 meters using the more comfortable walking method for them between Nordic walking and walking. After they walked 12 meters more than 10 times, their most natural walking patterns were chosen three times and analyzed. To determine the pole for Nordic walking, each subjects height was multiplied by 0.68. We then measured the spatiotemporal gait parameters and ground reaction force. [Results] Compared with the walking group, the Nordic walking group showed an increase in cadence, stride length, and step length, and a decrease in stride time, step time, and vertical ground reaction force. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that Nordic walking increases the stride and can be considered as helping patients with diseases affecting their gait. This demonstrates that Nordic walking is more effective in improving functional capabilities by promoting effective energy use and reducing the lower limb load, because the weight of the upper and lower limbs is dispersed during Nordic walking. PMID:26504319

  7. Effects of Nordic walking and walking on spatiotemporal gait parameters and ground reaction force.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung Kyu; Yang, Dae Jung; Kang, Yang Hun; Kim, Je Ho; Uhm, Yo Han; Lee, Yong Seon

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Nordic walking and walking on spatiotemporal gait parameters and ground reaction force. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 30 young adult males, who were divided into a Nordic walking group of 15 subjects and a walking group of 15 subjects. [Methods] To analyze the spatiotemporal parameters and ground reaction force during walking in the two groups, the six-camera Vicon MX motion analysis system was used. The subjects were asked to walk 12 meters using the more comfortable walking method for them between Nordic walking and walking. After they walked 12 meters more than 10 times, their most natural walking patterns were chosen three times and analyzed. To determine the pole for Nordic walking, each subject's height was multiplied by 0.68. We then measured the spatiotemporal gait parameters and ground reaction force. [Results] Compared with the walking group, the Nordic walking group showed an increase in cadence, stride length, and step length, and a decrease in stride time, step time, and vertical ground reaction force. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that Nordic walking increases the stride and can be considered as helping patients with diseases affecting their gait. This demonstrates that Nordic walking is more effective in improving functional capabilities by promoting effective energy use and reducing the lower limb load, because the weight of the upper and lower limbs is dispersed during Nordic walking. PMID:26504319

  8. Novel actuation design of a gait trainer with shadow leg approach.

    PubMed

    Meuleman, Jos; Meuleman, Jos; van Asseldonk, Edwin H F; van der Kooij, Herman

    2013-06-01

    Robotic gait training has developed since the end of the 20(th) century, yet there is much room for improvement in the design of the robots. With the conventional exoskeleton structures, donning of patients in a gait trainer usually is a cumbersome process due to the need of joint alignments and normal walking is often hindered due to obstructed arm swing. Our goal was to design a gait training robots that overcomes these limitations. We propose a novel design in which these drawbacks are reduced to a great amount. By using a parallel structure behind the patient (shadow leg) that is connected to the patient joints with rods, little alignment is needed, the area lateral to the hip is left free, and thus arm swing is not obstructed. The construction is lightweight, because the actuators are mounted on a fixed base and the transmission of power is executed with light weight rods. An end stop in the shadow leg prevents hyper extension of the patient's knee. The relationship between motor displacement and human joint rotations is nonlinear. In this paper we derive the nonlinear relationships between motors and patient joints and verify these. calculations with a measurement. The device has been built, now tests with subjects are required to assess if subjects can indeed walk normally in the robot. PMID:24187188

  9. Effects of military load carriage on kinematics of gait.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Deepti; Pal, Madhu Sudan; Majumdar, Dhurjati

    2010-06-01

    Manual load carriage is a universal activity and an inevitable part of the daily schedule of a soldier. Indian Infantry soldiers carry loads on the waist, back, shoulders and in the hands for a marching order. There is no reported study on the effects of load on gait in this population. It is important to evaluate their kinematic responses to existing load carriage operations and to provide guidelines towards the future design of heavy military backpacks (BPs) for optimising soldiers' performance. Kinematic changes of gait parameters in healthy male infantry soldiers whilst carrying no load (NL) and military loads of 4.2-17.5 kg (6.5-27.2% body weight) were investigated. All comparisons were conducted at a self-selected speed. Soldier characteristics were: mean (SD) age 23.3 (2.6) years; height 172.0 (3.8) cm; weight 64.3 (7.4) kg. Walk trials were collected using a 3-D Motion Analysis System. Results were subjected to one-way ANOVA followed by Dunnett post hoc test. There were increases in step length, stride length, cadence and midstance with the addition of a load compared to NL. These findings were resultant of an adaptive phenomenon within the individual to counterbalance load effect along with changes in speed. Ankle and hip ranges of motion (ROM) were significant. The ankle was more dorsiflexed, the knee and hip were more flexed during foot strike and helped in absorption of the load. The trunk showed more forward leaning with the addition of a load to adjust the centre of mass of the body and BP system back to the NL condition. Significant increases in ankle and hip ROM and trunk forward inclination (> or =10 degrees ) with lighter loads, such as a BP (10.7 kg), BP with rifle (14.9 kg) and BP with a light machine gun (17.5 kg), may cause joint injuries. It is concluded that the existing BP needs design improvisation specifically for use in low intensity conflict environments. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: The present study evaluates spatial, temporal and angular changes at trunk and limb joints during military load carriage of relatively lighter magnitude. Studies on similar aspects on the specific population are limited. These data can be used for optimising load carriage and designing ensembles, especially a heavy BP, for military operations. PMID:20496244

  10. Is adult gait less susceptible than paediatric gait to hip joint centre regression equation error?

    PubMed

    Kiernan, D; Hosking, J; O'Brien, T

    2016-03-01

    Hip joint centre (HJC) regression equation error during paediatric gait has recently been shown to have clinical significance. In relation to adult gait, it has been inferred that comparable errors with children in absolute HJC position may in fact result in less significant kinematic and kinetic error. This study investigated the clinical agreement of three commonly used regression equation sets (Bell et al., Davis et al. and Orthotrak) for adult subjects against the equations of Harrington et al. The relationship between HJC position error and subject size was also investigated for the Davis et al. set. Full 3-dimensional gait analysis was performed on 12 healthy adult subjects with data for each set compared to Harrington et al. The Gait Profile Score, Gait Variable Score and GDI-kinetic were used to assess clinical significance while differences in HJC position between the Davis and Harrington sets were compared to leg length and subject height using regression analysis. A number of statistically significant differences were present in absolute HJC position. However, all sets fell below the clinically significant thresholds (GPS <1.6°, GDI-Kinetic <3.6 points). Linear regression revealed a statistically significant relationship for both increasing leg length and increasing subject height with decreasing error in anterior/posterior and superior/inferior directions. Results confirm a negligible clinical error for adult subjects suggesting that any of the examined sets could be used interchangeably. Decreasing error with both increasing leg length and increasing subject height suggests that the Davis set should be used cautiously on smaller subjects. PMID:26979895

  11. Comparative gait analysis between children with autism and age-matched controls: analysis with temporal-spatial and foot pressure variables

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Bee-Oh; O’Sullivan, David; Choi, Bum-Gwon; Kim, Mi-Young

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the gait pattern of children with autism by using a gait analysis system. [Subjects] Thirty children were selected for this study: 15 with autism (age, 11.2 ± 2.8 years; weight, 48.1 ± 14.1 kg; height, 1.51 ± 0.11 m) and 15 healthy age-matched controls (age, 11.0 ± 2.9 years; weight, 43.6 ± 10 kg; height, 1.51 ± 0.011 m). [Methods] All participants walked three times on the GAITRite® system while their plantar pressure was being recorded. [Results] The results showed a reduction in cadence, gait velocity, and step length, and an increase in step width in children with autism. Plantar pressure variables highlight the differences between the active pressure areas, especially in the hindfoot of children with autism. [Conclusion] The results suggest that children with autism have an abnormal gait compared with that of age-matched controls, and thus they need extra attention to correct these abnormal gait patterns. PMID:26957776

  12. Powered lower limb orthoses for gait rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Daniel P.; Sawicki, Gregory S.; Domingo, Antoinette

    2006-01-01

    Bodyweight supported treadmill training has become a prominent gait rehabilitation method in leading rehabilitation centers. This type of locomotor training has many functional benefits but the labor costs are considerable. To reduce therapist effort, several groups have developed large robotic devices for assisting treadmill stepping. A complementary approach that has not been adequately explored is to use powered lower limb orthoses for locomotor training. Recent advances in robotic technology have made lightweight powered orthoses feasible and practical. An advantage to using powered orthoses as rehabilitation aids is they allow practice starting, turning, stopping, and avoiding obstacles during overground walking. PMID:16568153

  13. A Grassmann graph embedding framework for gait analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connie, Tee; Goh, Michael Kah Ong; Teoh, Andrew Beng Jin

    2014-12-01

    Gait recognition is important in a wide range of monitoring and surveillance applications. Gait information has often been used as evidence when other biometrics is indiscernible in the surveillance footage. Building on recent advances of the subspace-based approaches, we consider the problem of gait recognition on the Grassmann manifold. We show that by embedding the manifold into reproducing kernel Hilbert space and applying the mechanics of graph embedding on such manifold, significant performance improvement can be obtained. In this work, the gait recognition problem is studied in a unified way applicable for both supervised and unsupervised configurations. Sparse representation is further incorporated in the learning mechanism to adaptively harness the local structure of the data. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed method can tolerate variations in appearance for gait identification effectively.

  14. Optimality Principles for Model-Based Prediction of Human Gait

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Marko; van den Bogert, Antonie J.

    2010-01-01

    Although humans have a large repertoire of potential movements, gait patterns tend to be stereotypical and appear to be selected according to optimality principles such as minimal energy. When applied to dynamic musculoskeletal models such optimality principles might be used to predict how a patient’s gait adapts to mechanical interventions such as prosthetic devices or surgery. In this paper we study the effects of different performance criteria on predicted gait patterns using a 2D musculoskeletal model. The associated optimal control problem for a family of different cost functions was solved utilizing the direct collocation method. It was found that fatigue-like cost functions produced realistic gait, with stance phase knee flexion, as opposed to energy-related cost functions which avoided knee flexion during the stance phase. We conclude that fatigue minimization may be one of the primary optimality principles governing human gait. PMID:20074736

  15. Optimality principles for model-based prediction of human gait.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Marko; van den Bogert, Antonie J

    2010-04-19

    Although humans have a large repertoire of potential movements, gait patterns tend to be stereotypical and appear to be selected according to optimality principles such as minimal energy. When applied to dynamic musculoskeletal models such optimality principles might be used to predict how a patient's gait adapts to mechanical interventions such as prosthetic devices or surgery. In this paper we study the effects of different performance criteria on predicted gait patterns using a 2D musculoskeletal model. The associated optimal control problem for a family of different cost functions was solved utilizing the direct collocation method. It was found that fatigue-like cost functions produced realistic gait, with stance phase knee flexion, as opposed to energy-related cost functions which avoided knee flexion during the stance phase. We conclude that fatigue minimization may be one of the primary optimality principles governing human gait. PMID:20074736

  16. Passive magnetic bearing configurations

    DOEpatents

    Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2011-01-25

    A journal bearing provides vertical and radial stability to a rotor of a passive magnetic bearing system when the rotor is not rotating and when it is rotating. In the passive magnetic bearing system, the rotor has a vertical axis of rotation. Without the journal bearing, the rotor is vertically and radially unstable when stationary, and is vertically stable and radially unstable when rotating.

  17. Abnormal joint torque patterns exhibited by chronic stroke subjects while walking with a prescribed physiological gait pattern

    PubMed Central

    Neckel, Nathan D; Blonien, Natalie; Nichols, Diane; Hidler, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Background It is well documented that individuals with chronic stroke often exhibit considerable gait impairments that significantly impact their quality of life. While stroke subjects often walk asymmetrically, we sought to investigate whether prescribing near normal physiological gait patterns with the use of the Lokomat robotic gait-orthosis could help ameliorate asymmetries in gait, specifically, promote similar ankle, knee, and hip joint torques in both lower extremities. We hypothesized that hemiparetic stroke subjects would demonstrate significant differences in total joint torques in both the frontal and sagittal planes compared to non-disabled subjects despite walking under normal gait kinematic trajectories. Methods A motion analysis system was used to track the kinematic patterns of the pelvis and legs of 10 chronic hemiparetic stroke subjects and 5 age matched controls as they walked in the Lokomat. The subject's legs were attached to the Lokomat using instrumented shank and thigh cuffs while instrumented footlifters were applied to the impaired foot of stroke subjects to aid with foot clearance during swing. With minimal body-weight support, subjects walked at 2.5 km/hr on an instrumented treadmill capable of measuring ground reaction forces. Through a custom inverse dynamics model, the ankle, knee, and hip joint torques were calculated in both the frontal and sagittal planes. A single factor ANOVA was used to investigate differences in joint torques between control, unimpaired, and impaired legs at various points in the gait cycle. Results While the kinematic patterns of the stroke subjects were quite similar to those of the control subjects, the kinetic patterns were very different. During stance phase, the unimpaired limb of stroke subjects produced greater hip extension and knee flexion torques than the control group. At pre-swing, stroke subjects inappropriately extended their impaired knee, while during swing they tended to abduct their impaired leg, both being typical abnormal torque synergy patterns common to stroke gait. Conclusion Despite the Lokomat guiding stroke subjects through physiologically symmetric kinematic gait patterns, abnormal asymmetric joint torque patterns are still generated. These differences from the control group are characteristic of the hip hike and circumduction strategy employed by stroke subjects. PMID:18761735

  18. Rolling-Element Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Anderson, W. J.

    1983-01-01

    Rolling element bearings are a precision, yet simple, machine element of great utility. A brief history of rolling element bearings is reviewed and the type of rolling element bearings, their geometry and kinematics, as well as the materials they are made from and the manufacturing processes they involve are described. Unloaded and unlubricated rolling element bearings, loaded but unlubricated rolling element bearings and loaded and lubricated rolling element bearings are considered. The recognition and understanding of elastohydrodynamic lubrication covered, represents one of the major development in rolling element bearings.

  19. Gait Transitions in Human Infants: Coping with Extremes of Treadmill Speed

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Erin V.; Patrick, Susan K.; Yang, Jaynie F.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal pattern generators in quadrupedal animals can coordinate different forms of locomotion, like trotting or galloping, by altering coordination between the limbs (interlimb coordination). In the human system, infants have been used to study the subcortical control of gait, since the cerebral cortex and corticospinal tract are immature early in life. Like other animals, human infants can modify interlimb coordination to jump or step. Do human infants possess functional neuronal circuitry necessary to modify coordination within a limb (intralimb coordination) in order to generate distinct forms of alternating bipedal gait, such as walking and running? We monitored twenty-eight infants (7–12 months) stepping on a treadmill at speeds ranging between 0.06–2.36 m/s, and seventeen adults (22–47 years) walking or running at speeds spanning the walk-to-run transition. Six of the adults were tested with body weight support to mimic the conditions of infant stepping. We found that infants could accommodate a wide range of speeds by altering stride length and frequency, similar to adults. Moreover, as the treadmill speed increased, we observed periods of flight during which neither foot was in ground contact in infants and in adults. However, while adults modified other aspects of intralimb coordination and the mechanics of progression to transition to a running gait, infants did not make comparable changes. The lack of evidence for distinct walking and running patterns in infants suggests that the expression of different functional, alternating gait patterns in humans may require neuromuscular maturation and a period of learning post-independent walking. PMID:26828941

  20. A novel shear reduction insole effect on the thermal response to walking stress, balance, and gait.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, James S; Ammanath, Peethambaran; Le, Tima; Luring, Christopher; Wensman, Jeffrey; Grewal, Gurtej S; Najafi, Bijan; Pop-Busui, Rodica

    2014-11-01

    Shear stresses have been implicated in the formation of diabetes-related foot ulcers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a novel shear-reducing insole on the thermal response to walking, balance, and gait. Twenty-seven diabetes peripheral neuropathy patients were enrolled and asked to take 200 steps in both intervention and standard insoles. Thermal foot images of the feet were taken at baseline (1) following a 5-minute temperature acclimatization and (2) after walking. Testing order was randomized, and a 5-minute washout period was used between testing each insole condition. Sudomotor function was also assessed. Gait and balance were measured under single and dual task conditions using a validated body worn sensor system. The mean age was 65.1 years, height was 67.3 inches, weight was 218 pounds, and body mass index was 33.9, 48% were female, and 82% had type 2 diabetes. After walking in both insole conditions, foot temperatures increased significantly in standard insoles. The intervention insole significantly reduced forefoot and midfoot temperature increases (64.1%, P = .008; 48%, P = .046) compared to standard insoles. There were significant negative correlations with sudomotor function and baseline temperatures (r = .53-.57). The intervention demonstrated 10.4% less gait initiation double support time compared to standard insoles (P = .05). There were no differences in static balance measures. We found significantly lower forefoot and midfoot temperature increases following walking with shear-reducing insoles compared to standard insoles. We also found improvements in gait. These findings merit future study for the prevention of foot ulcer. PMID:25107709

  1. Gait Transitions in Human Infants: Coping with Extremes of Treadmill Speed.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Erin V; Patrick, Susan K; Yang, Jaynie F

    2016-01-01

    Spinal pattern generators in quadrupedal animals can coordinate different forms of locomotion, like trotting or galloping, by altering coordination between the limbs (interlimb coordination). In the human system, infants have been used to study the subcortical control of gait, since the cerebral cortex and corticospinal tract are immature early in life. Like other animals, human infants can modify interlimb coordination to jump or step. Do human infants possess functional neuronal circuitry necessary to modify coordination within a limb (intralimb coordination) in order to generate distinct forms of alternating bipedal gait, such as walking and running? We monitored twenty-eight infants (7-12 months) stepping on a treadmill at speeds ranging between 0.06-2.36 m/s, and seventeen adults (22-47 years) walking or running at speeds spanning the walk-to-run transition. Six of the adults were tested with body weight support to mimic the conditions of infant stepping. We found that infants could accommodate a wide range of speeds by altering stride length and frequency, similar to adults. Moreover, as the treadmill speed increased, we observed periods of flight during which neither foot was in ground contact in infants and in adults. However, while adults modified other aspects of intralimb coordination and the mechanics of progression to transition to a running gait, infants did not make comparable changes. The lack of evidence for distinct walking and running patterns in infants suggests that the expression of different functional, alternating gait patterns in humans may require neuromuscular maturation and a period of learning post-independent walking. PMID:26828941

  2. A Novel Shear Reduction Insole Effect on the Thermal Response to Walking Stress, Balance, and Gait

    PubMed Central

    Ammanath, Peethambaran; Le, Tima; Luring, Christopher; Wensman, Jeffrey; Grewal, Gurtej S.; Najafi, Bijan; Pop-Busui, Rodica

    2014-01-01

    Shear stresses have been implicated in the formation of diabetes-related foot ulcers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a novel shear-reducing insole on the thermal response to walking, balance, and gait. Twenty-seven diabetes peripheral neuropathy patients were enrolled and asked to take 200 steps in both intervention and standard insoles. Thermal foot images of the feet were taken at baseline (1) following a 5-minute temperature acclimatization and (2) after walking. Testing order was randomized, and a 5-minute washout period was used between testing each insole condition. Sudomotor function was also assessed. Gait and balance were measured under single and dual task conditions using a validated body worn sensor system. The mean age was 65.1 years, height was 67.3 inches, weight was 218 pounds, and body mass index was 33.9, 48% were female, and 82% had type 2 diabetes. After walking in both insole conditions, foot temperatures increased significantly in standard insoles. The intervention insole significantly reduced forefoot and midfoot temperature increases (64.1%, P = .008; 48%, P = .046) compared to standard insoles. There were significant negative correlations with sudomotor function and baseline temperatures (r = .53-.57). The intervention demonstrated 10.4% less gait initiation double support time compared to standard insoles (P = .05). There were no differences in static balance measures. We found significantly lower forefoot and midfoot temperature increases following walking with shear-reducing insoles compared to standard insoles. We also found improvements in gait. These findings merit future study for the prevention of foot ulcer. PMID:25107709

  3. Introduction to ball bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of a ball bearing is to provide a relative positioning and rotational freedom while transmitting a load between two structures, usually a shaft and a housing. For high rotational speeds (e.g., in gyroscope ball bearings) the purpose can be expanded to include rotational freedom with practically no wear in the bearing. This condition can be achieved by separating the bearing parts with a coherent film of fluid known as an elastohydrodynamic film. This film can be maintained not only when the bearing carries the load on a shaft, but also when the bearing is preloaded to position the shaft to within micro- or nano-inch accuracy and stability. Background information on ball bearings is provided, different types of ball bearings and their geometry and kinematics are defined, bearing materials, manufacturing processes, and separators are discussed. It is assumed, for the purposes of analysis, that the bearing carries no load.

  4. Predictors of gait velocity among community-dwelling stroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    Taylor-Piliae, Ruth E.; Latt, L. Daniel; Hepworth, Joseph T.; Coull, Bruce M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gait velocity is an objective, fundamental indicator of post-stroke walking ability. Most stroke survivors have diminished aerobic endurance or paretic leg strength affecting their walking ability. Other reported underlying factors affecting gait velocity include functional disability, balance, cognitive impairment, or the distance they are required to walk. Objective To examine the relationship between gait velocity and measures of physical and cognitive functioning in chronic stroke. Methods Cross-sectional design using baseline data from community-dwelling stroke survivors enrolled in an exercise intervention study. Functional disability (modified Rankin Scale), aerobic endurance (2-min step-test), leg strength (timed 5-chair stand test), balance (single-leg stance) and cognitive impairment (Mini-Mental Status Exam) were assessed. Gait velocity was assessed using a timed 4-m walk test. Multiple linear regression was used to explore potential independent predictors of gait velocity. Results Subjects had an average gait velocity of 0.75 0.23 m/s, categorized as limited community walkers. Approximately 37% of the variance in gait velocity, could be explained by the 5 independent variables, functional disability, aerobic endurance, leg strength, balance, and cognitive impairment (R2 = 0.37, F5, 74 = 8.64, p < 0.01). Aerobic endurance (t1,74 = 3.41, p < 0.01) and leg strength (t1,74 = ?2.23, p = 0.03) contributed significantly to gait velocity. Conclusion Diminished aerobic endurance and leg strength are major contributors to slow gait velocity in chronic stroke. Long term rehabilitation efforts are needed to improve gait velocity in chronic stroke, and may need to incorporate multifaceted strategies concurrently, focusing on aerobic endurance and leg strength, to maximize community ambulation and reintegration. PMID:22119886

  5. Overground robot assisted gait trainer for the treatment of drug-resistant freezing of gait in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Pilleri, Manuela; Weis, Luca; Zabeo, Letizia; Koutsikos, Konstantinos; Biundo, Roberta; Facchini, Silvia; Rossi, Simonetta; Masiero, Stefano; Antonini, Angelo

    2015-08-15

    Freezing of Gait (FOG) is a frequent and disabling feature of Parkinson disease (PD). Gait rehabilitation assisted by electromechanical devices, such as training on treadmill associated with sensory cues or assisted by gait orthosis have been shown to improve FOG. Overground robot assisted gait training (RGT) has been recently tested in patients with PD with improvement of several gait parameters. We here evaluated the effectiveness of RGT on FOG severity and gait abnormalities in PD patients. Eighteen patients with FOG resistant to dopaminergic medications were treated with 15 sessions of RGT and underwent an extensive clinical evaluation before and after treatment. The main outcome measures were FOG questionnaire (FOGQ) global score and specific tasks for gait assessment, namely 10 meter walking test (10 MWT), Timed Up and Go test (TUG) and 360 narrow turns (360 NT). Balance was also evaluated through Fear of Falling Efficacy Scale (FFES), assessing self perceived stability and Berg Balance Scale (BBS), for objective examination. After treatment, FOGQ score was significantly reduced (P=0.023). We also found a significant reduction of time needed to complete TUG, 10 MWT, and 360 NT (P=0.009, 0.004 and 0.04, respectively). By contrast the number of steps and the number of freezing episodes recorded at each gait task did not change. FFES and BBS scores also improved, with positive repercussions on performance on daily activity and quality of life. Our results indicate that RGT is a useful strategy for the treatment of drug refractory FOG. PMID:26048047

  6. High efficiency magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, Philip A.; Jayaraman, Chaitanya P.; Anand, Davinder K.; Kirk, James A.

    1993-01-01

    Research activities concerning high efficiency permanent magnet plus electromagnet (PM/EM) pancake magnetic bearings at the University of Maryland are reported. A description of the construction and working of the magnetic bearing is provided. Next, parameters needed to describe the bearing are explained. Then, methods developed for the design and testing of magnetic bearings are summarized. Finally, a new magnetic bearing which allows active torque control in the off axes directions is discussed.

  7. A collisional perspective on quadrupedal gait dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, David V.; Bertram, John E. A.; Anttonen, Jennifer T.; Ros, Ivo G.; Harris, Sarah L.; Biewener, Andrew A.

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of terrestrial locomotion over the past half century has focused largely on strategies of mechanical energy recovery used during walking and running. In contrast, we describe the underlying mechanics of legged locomotion as a collision-like interaction that redirects the centre of mass (CoM). We introduce the collision angle, determined by the angle between the CoM force and velocity vectors, and show by computing the collision fraction, a ratio of actual to potential collision, that the quadrupedal walk and gallop employ collision-reduction strategies while the trot permits greater collisions. We provide the first experimental evidence that a collision-based approach can differentiate quadrupedal gaits and quantify interspecific differences. Furthermore, we show that this approach explains the physical basis of a commonly used locomotion metric, the mechanical cost of transport. Collision angle and collision fraction provide a unifying analysis of legged locomotion which can be applied broadly across animal size, leg number and gait. PMID:21471189

  8. A synergetic model for human gait transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolvahab, Mohammad

    2015-09-01

    Gait transitions have been considered as bifurcations between states (e.g. walking or running modes) of a nonlinear dynamical system. A top-down synergetic approach to model gait transitions has been adapted from Frank et al. (2009) and applied to two sets of empirical observations. In this approach, it is assumed that the amplitudes of the spatio-temporal modes of locomotion satisfy a generic form of evolution equations that are known to hold for animate and inanimate self-organizing systems. The presented experimental results focus on hysteresis in human walk-to-run and run-to-walk transitions on a treadmill as a function of treadmill inclination and acceleration, the rate at which speed was increased or decreased during experimental trials. The bi-stability in the synergetic model is assumed to account for the hysteretic transitions. Accordingly, the relevant parameters of the model were estimated from the empirical data and the model's efficacy in predicting the observed hysteresis effects was evaluated.

  9. Gait Patterns in Hemiplegic Children with Cerebral Palsy: Comparison of Right and Left Hemiplegia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Rigoldi, Chiara; Tenore, Nunzio; Albertini, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study are to compare quantitatively the gait strategy of the right and left hemiplegic children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) using gait analysis. The gait strategy of 28 right hemiparetic CP (RHG) and 23 left hemiparetic CP (LHG) was compared using gait analysis (spatio-temporal and kinematic parameters) and considering the hemiplegic…

  10. Probabilistic Gait Classification in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Bayesian Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Gestel, Leen; De Laet, Tinne; Di Lello, Enrico; Bruyninckx, Herman; Molenaers, Guy; Van Campenhout, Anja; Aertbelien, Erwin; Schwartz, Mike; Wambacq, Hans; De Cock, Paul; Desloovere, Kaat

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional gait analysis (3DGA) generates a wealth of highly variable data. Gait classifications help to reduce, simplify and interpret this vast amount of 3DGA data and thereby assist and facilitate clinical decision making in the treatment of CP. CP gait is often a mix of several clinically accepted distinct gait patterns. Therefore,…

  11. Gait Patterns in Twins with Cerebral Palsy: Similarities and Development over Time after Multilevel Surgery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Drongelen, Stefan; Dreher, Thomas; Heitzmann, Daniel W. W.; Wolf, Sebastian I.

    2013-01-01

    To examine gait patterns and gait quality, 7 twins with cerebral palsy were measured preoperatively and after surgical intervention. The aim was to study differences and/or similarities in gait between twins, the influence of personal characteristics and birth conditions, and to describe the development of gait over time after single event…

  12. Probabilistic Gait Classification in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Bayesian Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Gestel, Leen; De Laet, Tinne; Di Lello, Enrico; Bruyninckx, Herman; Molenaers, Guy; Van Campenhout, Anja; Aertbelien, Erwin; Schwartz, Mike; Wambacq, Hans; De Cock, Paul; Desloovere, Kaat

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional gait analysis (3DGA) generates a wealth of highly variable data. Gait classifications help to reduce, simplify and interpret this vast amount of 3DGA data and thereby assist and facilitate clinical decision making in the treatment of CP. CP gait is often a mix of several clinically accepted distinct gait patterns. Therefore,

  13. Gait Patterns in Hemiplegic Children with Cerebral Palsy: Comparison of Right and Left Hemiplegia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galli, Manuela; Cimolin, Veronica; Rigoldi, Chiara; Tenore, Nunzio; Albertini, Giorgio

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study are to compare quantitatively the gait strategy of the right and left hemiplegic children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) using gait analysis. The gait strategy of 28 right hemiparetic CP (RHG) and 23 left hemiparetic CP (LHG) was compared using gait analysis (spatio-temporal and kinematic parameters) and considering the hemiplegic

  14. Gait Patterns in Twins with Cerebral Palsy: Similarities and Development over Time after Multilevel Surgery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Drongelen, Stefan; Dreher, Thomas; Heitzmann, Daniel W. W.; Wolf, Sebastian I.

    2013-01-01

    To examine gait patterns and gait quality, 7 twins with cerebral palsy were measured preoperatively and after surgical intervention. The aim was to study differences and/or similarities in gait between twins, the influence of personal characteristics and birth conditions, and to describe the development of gait over time after single event

  15. A review of analytical techniques for gait data. Part 2: neural network and wavelet methods.

    PubMed

    Chau, T

    2001-04-01

    Multivariate gait data have traditionally been challenging to analyze. Part 1 of this review explored applications of fuzzy, multivariate statistical and fractal methods to gait data analysis. Part 2 extends this critical review to the applications of artificial neural networks and wavelets to gait data analysis. The review concludes with a practical guide to the selection of alternative gait data analysis methods. Neural networks are found to be the most prevalent non-traditional methodology for gait data analysis in the last 10 years. Interpretation of multiple gait signal interactions and quantitative comparisons of gait waveforms are identified as important data analysis topics in need of further research. PMID:11240358

  16. Gait analysis parameters of healthy human subjects with asymmetric loads.

    PubMed

    Berceanu, C; Marghitu, D B; Gudavalli, M R; Raju, P K; Vikas, Y

    2016-06-01

    This article focuses on the analysis of gait parameters, ground reaction forces (GRF), and motion signals, for the various asymmetric loads carried by healthy human subjects during walking. Eight asymptomatic human volunteers were enrolled in this study. They were asked to walk, at self-selected pace, with various weights ranging from 0 to 11.33 kg (25 lbs) in 2.26 kg (5 lbs) increments, in one hand on a wooden area equipped with a force platform. Moreover, motion data were recorded from lumbar L1 vertebrae at a frequency of 120 Hz. Three trials of data have been recorded for each subject. In order to quantify the effect of increasing loads on the GRF we define the compression area, restitution area, and coefficient of restitution (COR) for GRF curves. We observe an increase in the compression area with respect to the load and almost constant values for the COR. For motion signals analysis we employ wavelet theory. The signals obtained from the lumbar L1 sensor of the spine vertebrae show a decrease in the wavelet detail energy, for the levels 3, 4, and 5, with respect to increasing loads. PMID:26274771

  17. Assessment of gait after bilateral hip replacement. Case study.

    PubMed

    Winiarski, Sławomir; Aleksandrowicz, Krzysztof; Jarząb, Sławomir; Pozowski, Andrzej; Rutkowska-Kucharska, Alicja

    2014-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is one of the most effective methods of treatment of severe hip osteoarthritis (HOA). In many cases pathological gait patterns persist despite properly conducted surgery and disturb the normal wear of the artificial joint surfaces. The aim of the study was to conduct functional and biomechanical assessment of gait in a patient after bilateral THA due to severe degenerative changes in the hip. The assessment focused on the gait parameters which significantly deviate from a normal gait pattern at various stages of treatment. Physiotherapeutic assessment of the patient included measurements of the range of motion in lower limb joints, the Timed Up and Go test, and pain assessment. Biomechanical assessment involved measurements of spatiotemporal gait parameters and the dynamic range of motion using BTS Smart-E motion analysis system. Although clinical examinations after both the first and second procedure suggested recovery of the patient's physical function, biomechanical assessment of her gait after the second procedure indicated the presence of deviations from a normal gait pattern. Secondary to a limited range of internal/external hip rotation, extension, and abduction, corresponding indices were still in the pathological range. PMID:25041890

  18. Quantitative video-based gait pattern analysis for hemiparkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsiao-Yu; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsun; Liang, Jen-I; Yeh, Ming-Long; Chen, Jia-Jin J

    2012-09-01

    Gait disturbances are common in the rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD) by administrating 6-hydroxydopamine. However, few studies have simultaneously assessed spatiotemporal gait indices and the kinematic information of PD rats during overground locomotion. This study utilized a simple, accurate, and reproducible method for quantifying the spatiotemporal and kinematic changes of gait patterns in hemiparkinsonian rats. A transparent walkway with a tilted mirror was set to capture underview footprints and lateral joint ankle images using a high-speed and high-resolution digital camera. The footprint images were semi-automatically processed with a threshold setting to identify the boundaries of soles and the critical points of each hindlimb for deriving the spatiotemporal and kinematic indices of gait. Following PD lesion, asymmetrical gait patterns including a significant decrease in the step/stride length and increases in the base of support and ankle joint angle were found. The increased footprint length, toe spread, and intermediary toe spread were found, indicating a compensatory gait pattern for impaired locomotor function. The temporal indices showed a significant decrease in the walking speed with increased durations of the stance/swing phase and double support time, which was more evident in the affected hindlimb. Furthermore, the ankle kinematic data showed that the joint angle decreased at the toe contact stage. We conclude that the proposed gait analysis method can be used to precisely detect locomotor function changes in PD rats, which is useful for objective assessments of investigating novel treatments for PD animal model. PMID:22707230

  19. Understanding gait control in post-stroke: implications for management.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh; Arya, Kamal Narayan; Sharma, Pawan; Garg, R K

    2012-01-01

    The role of the brain in post-stroke gait is not understood properly, although the ability to walk becomes impaired in more than 80% of post-stroke patients. Most, however, regain some ability to walk with either limited mobility or inefficient, asymmetrical or unsafe gait. Conventional intervention focuses on support of weak muscles or body part by use of foot orthosis and walking aids. This review provides an overview of available evidence of neuro-kinesiology & neurophysiology of normal and post-stroke gait. The role of the spinal cord has been explored, more in animals than humans. Mammalian locomotion is based on a rhythmic, "pacemaker" activity of the spinal stepping generators. Bipedal human locomotion is different from quadripedal animal locomotion. However, knowledge derived from the spinal cord investigation of animals, is being applied for management of human gait dysfunction. The potential role of the brain is now recognized in the independent activation of muscles during walking. The brain modifies the gait pattern during the complex demands of daily activities. Though the exact role of the motor cortex in control of gait is unclear, available evidence may be applied to gait rehabilitation of post-stroke patients. PMID:22196422

  20. Gait biometrics under spoofing attacks: an experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadid, Abdenour; Ghahramani, Mohammad; Kellokumpu, Vili; Feng, Xiaoyi; Bustard, John; Nixon, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Gait is a relatively biometric modality which has a precious advantage over other modalities, such as iris and voice, in that it can be easily captured from a distance. Although it has recently become a topic of great interest in biometric research, there has been little investigation into gait spoofing attacks where a person tries to imitate the clothing or walking style of someone else. We recently analyzed for the first time the effects of spoofing attacks on silhouette-based gait biometric systems and showed that it was indeed possible to spoof gait biometric systems by clothing impersonation and the deliberate selection of a target that has a similar build to the attacker. To gain deeper insight into the performance of current gait biometric systems under spoofing attacks, we provide a thorough investigation on how clothing can be used to spoof a target and evaluate the performance of two state-of-the-art recognition methods on a gait spoofing database recorded at the University of Southampton. Furthermore, we describe and evaluate an initial solution coping with gait spoofing attacks. The obtained results are very promising and point out interesting findings which can be used for future investigations.

  1. Observational gait assessment tools in paediatrics--a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rathinam, Chandrasekar; Bateman, Andrew; Peirson, Janet; Skinner, Jane

    2014-06-01

    Instrumented gait analysis (IGA) is an expensive technique used to objectively detect gait abnormalities in children. Observational gait assessment is considered as a cost effective alternate for IGA in regular clinical practice. This article is aimed at systematically reviewing the available paediatric gait analysis tools and examines their reliability and validity compared to IGA. This review also examines the structure of these tools, their clinical use and limitations. Articles were searched from PubMed, CINHL, AMED, BNI, EMBASE, PEDro and Cochrane library from the earliest record on the database to December 2012. Hand searches were carried out in a few journals. Studies that examined children's gait using a structured assessment tool were included and analysed for their quality, reliability and validity. Pre-established criteria were used to judge the quality of methodology and reliability and validity. Five observational gait tools for children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) and one for children with Downs Syndrome were identified. Nine studies related to children with CP were enrolled for this review. None of the tools have accomplished the level of IGA's consistency. Edinburgh Visual Gait Score (EVGS) was found to have better reliability and validity than the other tools. Very limited studies were available for most of the gait assessment tools therefore their clinical use cannot be judged based on the existing evidence. EVGS was found to have better concurrent validity and reliability and it should be considered to assess CP gait in regular practice. Future work to investigate the use of low cost technology to improve observers' accuracy of EVGS is suggested. PMID:24798609

  2. Gait variability and basal ganglia disorders: stride-to-stride variations of gait cycle timing in Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hausdorff, J. M.; Cudkowicz, M. E.; Firtion, R.; Wei, J. Y.; Goldberger, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    The basal ganglia are thought to play an important role in regulating motor programs involved in gait and in the fluidity and sequencing of movement. We postulated that the ability to maintain a steady gait, with low stride-to-stride variability of gait cycle timing and its subphases, would be diminished with both Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD). To test this hypothesis, we obtained quantitative measures of stride-to-stride variability of gait cycle timing in subjects with PD (n = 15), HD (n = 20), and disease-free controls (n = 16). All measures of gait variability were significantly increased in PD and HD. In subjects with PD and HD, gait variability measures were two and three times that observed in control subjects, respectively. The degree of gait variability correlated with disease severity. In contrast, gait speed was significantly lower in PD, but not in HD, and average gait cycle duration and the time spent in many subphases of the gait cycle were similar in control subjects, HD subjects, and PD subjects. These findings are consistent with a differential control of gait variability, speed, and average gait cycle timing that may have implications for understanding the role of the basal ganglia in locomotor control and for quantitatively assessing gait in clinical settings.

  3. Effects of Aging on Arm Swing during Gait: The Role of Gait Speed and Dual Tasking

    PubMed Central

    Mirelman, Anat; Bernad-Elazari, Hagar; Nobel, Tomer; Thaler, Avner; Peruzzi, Agnese; Plotnik, Meir; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Healthy walking is characterized by pronounced arm swing and axial rotation. Aging effects on gait speed, stride length and stride time variability have been previously reported, however, less is known about aging effects on arm swing and axial rotation and their relationship to age-associated gait changes during usual walking and during more challenging conditions like dual tasking. Sixty healthy adults between the ages of 3077 were included in this study designed to address this gap. Lightweight body fixed sensors were placed on each wrist and lower back. Participants walked under 3 walking conditions each of 1 minute: 1) comfortable speed, 2) walking while serially subtracting 3s (Dual Task), 3) walking at fast speed. Aging effects on arm swing amplitude, range, symmetry, jerk and axial rotation amplitude and jerk were compared between decades of age (3040; 4150; 5160; 6177 years). As expected, older adults walked slower (p = 0.03) and with increased stride variability (p = 0.02). Arm swing amplitude decreased with age under all conditions (p = 0.04). In the oldest group, arm swing decreased during dual task and increased during the fast walking condition (p<0.0001). Similarly, arm swing asymmetry increased during the dual task in the older groups (p<0.004), but not in the younger groups (p = 0.67). Significant differences between groups and within conditions were observed in arm swing jerk (p<0.02), axial rotation amplitude (p<0.02) and axial jerk (p<0.001). Gait speed, arm swing amplitude of the dominant arm, arm swing asymmetry and axial rotation jerk were all independent predictors of age in a multivariate model. These findings suggest that the effects of gait speed and dual tasking on arm swing and axial rotation during walking are altered among healthy older adults. Follow-up work is needed to examine if these effects contribute to reduced stability in aging. PMID:26305896

  4. Clinical signs in functional (psychogenic) gait disorders: a brief survey.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Leonard L; Espay, Alberto J

    2016-01-01

    Clinical signs are critical in ascertaining the functional nature of a gait disorder. Four signs of gait impairment have been documented in the course of examining patients with clinically definite functional (psychogenic) movement disorders: "huffing and puffing" during standing and walking, manipulation-resistance dorsiflexion of the first toe, fixed plantar flexion and inversion, and marked discrepancy between ambulation with and without swivel chair assistance. While large studies are needed to ascertain their prevalence, sensitivity, and specificity, the identification of these signs may help elevate the diagnostic certainty of functional gait disorders. PMID:26877882

  5. Motion based markerless gait analysis using standard events of gait and ensemble Kalman filtering.

    PubMed

    Vishnoi, Nalini; Mitra, Anish; Duric, Zoran; Gerber, Naomi Lynn

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel approach to gait analysis using ensemble Kalman filtering which permits markerless determination of segmental movement. We use image flow analysis to reliably compute temporal and kinematic measures including the translational velocity of the torso and rotational velocities of the lower leg segments. Detecting the instances where velocity changes direction also determines the standard events of a gait cycle (double-support, toe-off, mid-swing and heel-strike). In order to determine the kinematics of lower limbs, we model the synergies between the lower limb motions (thigh-shank, shank-foot) by building a nonlinear dynamical system using CMUs 3D motion capture database. This information is fed into the ensemble Kalman Filter framework to estimate the unobserved limb (upper leg and foot) motion from the measured lower leg rotational velocity. Our approach does not require calibrated cameras or special markers to capture movement. We have tested our method on different gait sequences collected from the sagttal plane and presented the estimated kinematics overlaid on the original image frames. We have also validated our approach by manually labeling the videos and comparing our results against them. PMID:25570501

  6. The Effect of Tai Chi Exercise on Gait Initiation and Gait Performance in Persons with Parkinsons Disease

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Shinichi; Nocera, Joe R.; Vallabhajosula, Srikant; Juncos, Jorge L.; Gregor, Robert J.; Waddell, Dwight E.; Wolf, Steven L.; Hass, Chris J.

    2013-01-01

    Gait dysfunction and postural instability are two debilitating symptoms in persons with Parkinsons disease (PD). Tai Chi exercise has recently gained attention as an attractive intervention for persons with PD because of its known potential to reduce falls and improve postural control, walking abilities, and safety at a low cost. The purpose of this report is to investigate the effect of Tai Chi exercise on dynamic postural control during gait initiation and gait performance in persons with idiopathic PD, and to determine whether these benefits could be replicated in two different environments, as complementary projects. In these two separate projects, a total of 45 participants with PD were randomly assigned to either a Tai Chi group or a control group. The Tai Chi groups in both projects completed a 16-week Tai Chi exercise session, while the control groups consisted of either a placebo (i.e., Qi-Gong) or non-exercise group. Tai Chi did not significantly improve Unified Parkinsons Disease Rating Scale Part III score, selected gait initiation parameters or gait performance in either project. Combined results from both projects suggest that 16 weeks of class-based Tai Chi were ineffective in improving either gait initiation, gait performance, or reducing parkinsonian disability in this subset of persons with PD. Thus the use of short-term Tai Chi exercise should require further study before being considered a valuable therapeutic intervention for these domains in PD. PMID:23835431

  7. The effect of gait training with shoe inserts on the improvement of pain and gait in sacroiliac joint patients

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Byung-Yun; Yoon, Jung-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the current research was to identify how gait training with shoe inserts affects the pain and gait of sacroiliac joint dysfunction patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty subjects were randomly selected and assigned to be either the experimental group (gait training with shoe insert group) or control group. Each group consisted of 15 patients. Pain was measured by Visual Analogue Scale, and foot pressure in a standing position and during gait was measured with a Gateview AFA-50 system (Alpus, Seoul, Republic of Korea). A paired sample t-test was used to compare the pain and gait of the sacroiliac joint before and after the intervention. Correlation between pain and walking after gait training with shoe inserts was examined by Pearson test. The level of significance was set at ?=0.05. [Results] It was found that application of the intervention to the experimental group resulted in a significant decrease in sacroiliac joint pain. It was also found that there was a significant correlation between Visual Analogue Scale score and dynamic asymmetric index (r= 0.796) and that there was a negative correlation between Visual Analogue Scale score and forefoot/rear foot peak pressure ratio (r=-0.728). [Conclusion] The results of our analysis lead us to conclude that the intervention with shoe inserts had a significant influence on the pain and gait of sacroiliac joint patients. PMID:26357428

  8. The effect of gait training with shoe inserts on the improvement of pain and gait in sacroiliac joint patients.

    PubMed

    Cho, Byung-Yun; Yoon, Jung-Gyu

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the current research was to identify how gait training with shoe inserts affects the pain and gait of sacroiliac joint dysfunction patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty subjects were randomly selected and assigned to be either the experimental group (gait training with shoe insert group) or control group. Each group consisted of 15 patients. Pain was measured by Visual Analogue Scale, and foot pressure in a standing position and during gait was measured with a Gateview AFA-50 system (Alpus, Seoul, Republic of Korea). A paired sample t-test was used to compare the pain and gait of the sacroiliac joint before and after the intervention. Correlation between pain and walking after gait training with shoe inserts was examined by Pearson test. The level of significance was set at ?=0.05. [Results] It was found that application of the intervention to the experimental group resulted in a significant decrease in sacroiliac joint pain. It was also found that there was a significant correlation between Visual Analogue Scale score and dynamic asymmetric index (r= 0.796) and that there was a negative correlation between Visual Analogue Scale score and forefoot/rear foot peak pressure ratio (r=-0.728). [Conclusion] The results of our analysis lead us to conclude that the intervention with shoe inserts had a significant influence on the pain and gait of sacroiliac joint patients. PMID:26357428

  9. A robust real-time gait event detection using wireless gyroscope and its application on normal and altered gaits.

    PubMed

    Gouwanda, Darwin; Gopalai, Alpha Agape

    2015-02-01

    Gait events detection allows clinicians and biomechanics researchers to determine timing of gait events, to estimate duration of stance phase and swing phase and to segment gait data. It also aids biomedical engineers to improve the design of orthoses and FES (functional electrical stimulation) systems. In recent years, researchers have resorted to using gyroscopes to determine heel-strike (HS) and toe-off (TO) events in gait cycles. However, these methods are subjected to significant delays when implemented in real-time gait monitoring devices, orthoses, and FES systems. Therefore, the work presented in this paper proposes a method that addresses these delays, to ensure real-time gait event detection. The proposed algorithm combines the use of heuristics and zero-crossing method to identify HS and TO. Experiments involving: (1) normal walking; (2) walking with knee brace; and (3) walking with ankle brace for overground walking and treadmill walking were designed to verify and validate the identified HS and TO. The performance of the proposed method was compared against the established gait detection algorithms. It was observed that the proposed method produced detection rate that was comparable to earlier reported methods and recorded reduced time delays, at an average of 100 ms. PMID:25619613

  10. Losses of Superconductor Journal Bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Y. H.; Hull, J. R.; Han, S. C.; Jeong, N. H.; Oh, J. M.; Sung, T. H.

    2004-06-01

    A high-temperature superconductor (HTS) journal bearing was studied for rotational loss. Two HTS bearings support the rotor at top and bottom. The rotor weight is 4 kg and the length is about 300 mm. Both the top and bottom bearings have two permanent magnet (PM) rings with an iron pole piece separating them. Each HTS journal bearing is composed of six pieces of superconductor blocks of size 352510 mm. The HTS blocks are encased in a cryochamber through which liquid nitrogen flows. The inner spool of the cryochamber is made from G-10 to reduce eddy current loss, and the rest of the cryochamber is stainless steel. The magnetic field from the PM rings is < 10 mT on the stainless part. The rotational drag was measured over the same speed range at several chamber pressures. Results indicate that a chamber pressure of 0.4 mtorr is sufficiently low to minimize windage loss, and the 10 mT design criterion for the magnetic field on the stainless part of the cryochamber is too high.

  11. Experiments with needle bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferretti, Pericle

    1933-01-01

    Experiments and results are presented in testing needle bearings, especially in comparison with roller bearings. Reduction in coefficient of friction is discussed as well as experimental methods and recording devices.

  12. Mechanical spin bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spin bearing assembly including, a pair of mutually opposing complementary bearing support members having mutually spaced apart bearing support surfaces which may be, for example, bearing races and a set of spin bearings located therebetween. Each spin bearing includes a pair of end faces, a central rotational axis passing through the end faces, a waist region substantially mid-way between the end faces and having a first thickness dimension, and discrete side surface regions located between the waist region and the end faces and having a second thickness dimension different from the first thickness dimension of the waist region and wherein the side surface regions further have respective curvilinear contact surfaces adapted to provide a plurality of bearing contact points on the bearing support members.

  13. Fractal and Multifractal Analysis of Human Gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Diosdado, A.; del Río Correa, J. L.; Angulo-Brown, F.

    2003-09-01

    We carried out a fractal and multifractal analysis of human gait time series of young and old individuals, and adults with three illnesses that affect the march: The Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases and the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We obtained cumulative plots of events, the correlation function, the Hurst exponent and the Higuchi's fractal dimension of these time series and found that these fractal markers could be a factor to characterize the march, since we obtained different values of these quantities for youths and adults and they are different also for healthy and ill persons and the most anomalous values belong to ill persons. In other physiological signals there is complexity lost related with the age and the illness, in the case of the march the opposite occurs. The multifractal analysis could be also a useful tool to understand the dynamics of these and other complex systems.

  14. Understanding the complexity of human gait dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, Nicola; Marchi, Damiano; West, Bruce J.

    2009-06-01

    Time series of human gait stride intervals exhibit fractal and multifractal properties under several conditions. Records from subjects walking at normal, slow, and fast pace speed are analyzed to determine changes in the fractal scalings as a function of the stress condition of the system. Records from subjects with different age from children to elderly and patients suffering from neurodegenerative disease are analyzed to determine changes in the fractal scalings as a function of the physical maturation or degeneration of the system. A supercentral pattern generator model is presented to simulate the above two properties that are typically found in dynamical network performance: that is, how a dynamical network responds to stress and to evolution.

  15. On using gait in forensic biometrics.

    PubMed

    Bouchrika, Imed; Goffredo, Michaela; Carter, John; Nixon, Mark

    2011-07-01

    Given the continuing advances in gait biometrics, it appears prudent to investigate the translation of these techniques for forensic use. We address the question as to the confidence that might be given between any two such measurements. We use the locations of ankle, knee, and hip to derive a measure of the match between walking subjects in image sequences. The Instantaneous Posture Match algorithm, using Harr templates, kinematics, and anthropomorphic knowledge is used to determine their location. This is demonstrated using real CCTV recorded at Gatwick International Airport, laboratory images from the multiview CASIA-B data set, and an example of real scene of crime video. To access the measurement confidence, we study the mean intra- and inter-match scores as a function of database size. These measures converge to constant and separate values, indicating that the match measure derived from individual comparisons is considerably smaller than the average match measure from a population. PMID:21554307

  16. Concurrent prediction of muscle and tibiofemoral contact forces during treadmill gait.

    PubMed

    Guess, Trent M; Stylianou, Antonis P; Kia, Mohammad

    2014-02-01

    Detailed knowledge of knee kinematics and dynamic loading is essential for improving the design and outcomes of surgical procedures, tissue engineering applications, prosthetics design, and rehabilitation. This study used publicly available data provided by the "Grand Challenge Competition to Predict in-vivo Knee Loads" for the 2013 American Society of Mechanical Engineers Summer Bioengineering Conference (Fregly et al., 2012, "Grand Challenge Competition to Predict in vivo Knee Loads," J. Orthop. Res., 30, pp. 503-513) to develop a full body, musculoskeletal model with subject specific right leg geometries that can concurrently predict muscle forces, ligament forces, and knee and ground contact forces. The model includes representation of foot/floor interactions and predicted tibiofemoral joint loads were compared to measured tibial loads for two different cycles of treadmill gait. The model used anthropometric data (height and weight) to scale the joint center locations and mass properties of a generic model and then used subject bone geometries to more accurately position the hip and ankle. The musculoskeletal model included 44 muscles on the right leg, and subject specific geometries were used to create a 12 degrees-of-freedom anatomical right knee that included both patellofemoral and tibiofemoral articulations. Tibiofemoral motion was constrained by deformable contacts defined between the tibial insert and femoral component geometries and by ligaments. Patellofemoral motion was constrained by contact between the patellar button and femoral component geometries and the patellar tendon. Shoe geometries were added to the feet, and shoe motion was constrained by contact between three shoe segments per foot and the treadmill surface. Six-axis springs constrained motion between the feet and shoe segments. Experimental motion capture data provided input to an inverse kinematics stage, and the final forward dynamics simulations tracked joint angle errors for the left leg and upper body and tracked muscle length errors for the right leg. The one cycle RMS errors between the predicted and measured tibia contact were 178?N and 168?N for the medial and lateral sides for the first gait cycle and 209?N and 228?N for the medial and lateral sides for the faster second gait cycle. One cycle RMS errors between predicted and measured ground reaction forces were 12?N, 13?N, and 65?N in the anterior-posterior, medial-lateral, and vertical directions for the first gait cycle and 43?N, 15?N, and 96?N in the anterior-posterior, medial-lateral, and vertical directions for the second gait cycle. PMID:24389997

  17. Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2008-01-01

    Axial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control.

  18. Rolling element bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Foszcz, J.L.

    1995-08-07

    At first glance, there seems to be a bewildering array of rolling element bearings available. Understanding the differences between then can help in properly applying the right bearing or replacing one that is misapplied. The author explains the differences in rolling element bearings, how to recognize them, where they are best used, and where to find them.

  19. Supertough Stainless Bearing Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Gregory B.

    1995-01-01

    Composition and processing of supertough stainless bearing steel designed with help of computer-aided thermodynamic modeling. Fracture toughness and hardness of steel exceeds those of other bearing steels like 440C stainless bearing steel. Developed for service in fuel and oxidizer turbopumps on Space Shuttle main engine. Because of strength and toughness, also proves useful in other applications like gears and surgical knives.

  20. Tracking Polar Bears

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Movements of 9 satellite-collared adult female polar bears were tracked in February, 2010 by satellite telemetry. Bears were collared in 2007, 2008, and 2009 on the spring-time sea ice of the southern Beaufort Sea or on the autumn pack ice in 2009. Polar bear satellite telemetry data are shown with ...

  1. A wireless gait analysis system by digital textile sensors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chang-Ming; Chou, Chun-Mei; Hu, Jwu-Sheng; Hung, Shu-Hui; Yang, Chang-Hwa; Wu, Chih-Chung; Hsu, Ming-Yang; Yang, Tsi-Lin

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the feasibility of spatio-temporal gait analysis based upon digital textile sensors. Digitized legs and feet patterns of healthy subjects and their relations with spatio-temporal gait parameters were analyzed. In the first experiment, spatio-temporal gait parameters were determined during over ground walking. In the second experiment, predicted running, backward walking, walking up stairs and walking down stairs parameters were determined. From the results of the experiments, it is concluded that, for healthy subjects, the duration of subsequent stride cycles and left/right steps, the estimations of step length, cadence, walking speed, central of pressure and central of mass trajectory, can be obtained by analyzing the digital signals from the textile sensors on pants and socks. These parameters are easily displayed in several different graphs allowing the user to view the parameters during gait. Finally, the digital data are easily to analyze the feature of activity recognition. PMID:19965098

  2. Effect of visual perceptual disturbance on gait and balance

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Hyolyun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine whether or not problems with gait and balance occur when incorrect information is given visually. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty healthy adults wore goggles that caused visual distortion and viewing angle reduction, and their balance and gait velocities were measured in an upright position. The goggles could be set to three different levels of visual distortion and viewing angle reduction. [Results] Gait velocity slowed more as the degree of visual distortion and viewing angle reduction became more severe. Visual perception disturbance and gait velocities were found to be correlated, but no significant differences were found in balance among the visual disturbance conditions. [Conclusion] The level of visual perception disturbance did not affect control in the standing position, but it increasingly influenced the level of dynamic postural control as visual perception disturbance became more severe. PMID:26644655

  3. Interpolation function for approximating knee joint behavior in human gait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth-Ta?c?u, Mirela; Pater, Flavius; Stoia, Dan Ioan

    2013-10-01

    Starting from the importance of analyzing the kinematic data of the lower limb in gait movement, especially the angular variation of the knee joint, the paper propose an approximation function that can be used for processing the correlation among a multitude of knee cycles. The approximation of the raw knee data was done by Lagrange polynomial interpolation on a signal acquired using Zebris Gait Analysis System. The signal used in approximation belongs to a typical subject extracted from a lot of ten investigated subjects, but the function domain of definition belongs to the entire group. The study of the knee joint kinematics plays an important role in understanding the kinematics of the gait, this articulation having the largest range of motion in whole joints, in gait. The study does not propose to find an approximation function for the adduction-abduction movement of the knee, this being considered a residual movement comparing to the flexion-extension.

  4. Effect of gait on formation of thermal environment inside footwear.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Yasuhiro; Murata, Masaaki

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the relationship between the gait condition and foot temperature distributions inside footwear was investigated using subject experiments. Mechanical, physical, and physiological variables such as the foot contact force, landing speed, and metabolic heat generation were also measured. Gait motion measurements showed that a large contact force was concentrated in the small area of the heel at the initial contact and later at the forefoot. A faster gait produced a larger contact force, higher landing velocity, higher skin temperature, and larger metabolism during gait. The temperature at the bottom of the foot increased, and the temperature on the upper side decreased. The metabolic heat generation had a basic impact on the temperature profile, and skin temperatures tended to increase gradually. In addition, high-temperature-elevation regions such as the big toe and heel coincided with regions with high-contact loads, which suggested a relationship between the temperature elevation and contact load. PMID:25766423

  5. [Spastic gait analysis. Contribution of the motion lab].

    PubMed

    Rmy-Nris, O; Bouilland, S; Bussel, B

    2003-05-01

    Etienne-Jules Marey introduced gait motion analysis at the end of the XIXth century. It was rapidly adopted by clinicians and Charcot used it at the beginning of the XXth century in La Salptrire. Motion analysis was widely used after the first optoelectronic system was built by Furn in 1968. The optoelectronic system calculates the orientation of each body segment in the space after the determination of the space co-ordinates of cutaneous markers placed over them. It is particularly useful for spastic gait. Many disturbances of kinematics and kinetics have been described during spastic gait. They are the consequences of spasticity and other motor and sensory deficits of central nervous system lesions. Motion analysis must be coupled with electromyographic recording of spastic muscles activity which, with kinetic analysis, enables distinguishing the mechanisms underlying gait disturbances. Motion analysis provides clinicians with an indispensable tool for understanding spasticity and evaluating therapeutic efficacy. PMID:12746696

  6. Low Power Shoe Integrated Intelligent Wireless Gait Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, Y.; Mazalan, M.; Bakar, N. A.; Anuar, A. F.; Zainol, M. Z.; Hamzah, F.

    2014-04-01

    Gait analysis measurement is a method to assess and identify gait events and the measurements of dynamic, motion and pressure parameters involving the lowest part of the body. This significant analysis is widely used in sports, rehabilitation as well as other health diagnostic towards improving the quality of life. This paper presents a new system empowered by Inertia Measurement Unit (IMU), ultrasonic sensors, piezoceramic sensors array, XBee wireless modules and Arduino processing unit. This research focuses on the design and development of a low power ultra-portable shoe integrated wireless intelligent gait measurement using MEMS and recent microelectronic devices for foot clearance, orientation, error correction, gait events and pressure measurement system. It is developed to be cheap, low power, wireless, real time and suitable for real life in-door and out-door environment.

  7. Freezing of gait associated with a corpus callosum lesion.

    PubMed

    Dale, Marian L; Mancini, Martina; Curtze, Carolin; Horak, Fay B; Fling, Brett W

    2016-01-01

    Freezing of gait (FoG) is a debilitating feature of Parkinson's disease and other parkinsonian disorders. This case demonstrates a variant of freezing of gait in a non-parkinsonian patient with a lesion of the anterior corpus callosum. The freezing improved with increased upper extremity sensory input, suggesting that compensatory circuits for use of somatosensory inputs from the arms to postural and locomotor centers were intact. PMID:26835154

  8. Gait Using Pneumatic Brace for End-Stage Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Cherian, Jeffrey Jai; Starr, Roland; Chughtai, Morad; Mont, Michael A; Harwin, Steven F; Bhave, Anil

    2016-04-01

    More than 20 million individuals in the United States are affected by knee osteoarthritis (OA), which can lead to altered biomechanics and excessive joint loading. The use of an unloader pneumatic brace with extension assist has been proposed as a nonoperative treatment modality that may improve gait mechanics and correct knee malalignment. We assessed the following parameters in patients who have knee OA treated with and without a brace: (1) changes in temporospatial parameters in gait; (2) knee range of motion, knee extension at heel strike, and foot placement; (3) knee joint moments and impulse; and (4) changes in dynamic stiffness and rate of change of knee flexion during midstance to terminal stance. This 2:1 prospective, randomized, single-blinded trial evaluated 36 patients (24 brace and 12 matching). OA knee patients were randomized to receive either a pneumatic unloader brace or a standard nonoperative treatment regimen as the matching cohort for a 3-month period. They underwent evaluation of gait parameters using a three-dimensional gait analysis system at their initial appointment and at 3 months follow-up. All the testing, pre- and postbracing were performed without wearing the brace to examine for retained effects. Treatment with the brace led to significant improvements versus standard treatment in various gait parameters. Patients in the brace group had improvements in walking speed, knee extension at heel strike, total range of motion, knee joint forces, and rate of knee flexion from midstance to terminal stance when compared with the matching cohort. Knee OA patients who used a pneumatic unloader brace for 3 months for at least 3 hours per day had significant improvements various gait parameters when compared with a standard nonoperative therapy cohort. Braced patients demonstrated gait-modifying affects when not wearing the brace. These results are encouraging and suggest that this device represents a promising treatment modality for knee OA that may improve gait, knee pain, and strength in knee OA patients. PMID:26963073

  9. Cryogenic Hybrid Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeks, Crawford R.; Dirusso, Eliseo; Brown, Gerald V.

    1994-01-01

    Cryogenic hybrid magnetic bearing is example of class of magnetic bearings in which permanent magnets and electromagnets used to suspend shafts. Electromagnets provide active control of position of shaft. Bearing operates at temperatures from -320 degrees F (-196 degrees C) to 650 degrees F (343 degrees C); designed for possible use in rocket-engine turbopumps, where effects of cryogenic environment and fluid severely limit lubrication of conventional ball bearings. This and similar bearings also suitable for terrestrial rotating machinery; for example, gas-turbine engines, high-vacuum pumps, canned pumps, precise gimbals that suspend sensors, and pumps that handle corrosive or gritty fluids.

  10. User Identification Using Gait Patterns on UbiFloorII

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jaeseok

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a system of identifying individuals by their gait patterns. We take into account various distinguishable features that can be extracted from a user’s gait and then divide them into two classes: walking pattern and stepping pattern. The conditions we assume are that our target environments are domestic areas, the number of users is smaller than 10, and all users ambulate with bare feet considering the everyday lifestyle of the Korean home. Under these conditions, we have developed a system that identifies individuals’ gait patterns using our biometric sensor, UbiFloorII. We have created UbiFloorII to collect walking samples and created software modules to extract the user’s gait pattern. To identify the users based on the gait patterns extracted from walking samples over UbiFloorII, we have deployed multilayer perceptron network, a feedforward artificial neural network model. The results show that both walking pattern and stepping pattern extracted from users’ gait over the UbiFloorII are distinguishable enough to identify the users and that fusing two classifiers at the matching score level improves the recognition accuracy. Therefore, our proposed system may provide unobtrusive and automatic user identification methods in ubiquitous computing environments, particularly in domestic areas. PMID:22163758

  11. Changes in In Vivo Knee Contact Forces through Gait Modification

    PubMed Central

    Kinney, Allison L.; Besier, Thor F.; Silder, Amy; Delp, Scott L.; D’Lima, Darryl D.; Fregly, Benjamin J.

    2012-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis commonly occurs in the medial compartment of the knee and has been linked to overloading of the medial articular cartilage. Gait modification represents a non-invasive treatment strategy for reducing medial compartment knee force. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a variety of gait modifications that were expected to alter medial contact force. A single subject implanted with a force-measuring knee replacement walked using nine modified gait patterns, four of which involved different hiking pole configurations. Medial and lateral contact force at 25%, 50%, and 75% of stance phase, and the average value over all of stance phase (0-100%), were determined for each gait pattern. Changes in medial and lateral contact force values relative to the subject’s normal gait pattern were determined by a Kruskal-Wallis test. Apart from early stance (25% of stance), medial contact force was most effectively reduced by walking with long hiking poles and wide pole placement, which significantly reduced medial and lateral contact force during stance phase by up to 34% (at 75% of stance) and 26% (at 50% of stance), respectively. Although this study is based on data from a single subject, the results provide important insight into changes in medial and lateral contact forces through gait modification. The results of this study suggest that an optimal configuration of bilateral hiking poles may significantly reduce both medial and lateral compartment knee forces in individuals with medial knee osteoarthritis. PMID:23027590

  12. Validity of the Kinect for Gait Assessment: A Focused Review

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Shmuel; Yogev Seligmann, Galit

    2016-01-01

    Gait analysis may enhance clinical practice. However, its use is limited due to the need for expensive equipment which is not always available in clinical settings. Recent evidence suggests that Microsoft Kinect may provide a low cost gait analysis method. The purpose of this report is to critically evaluate the literature describing the concurrent validity of using the Kinect as a gait analysis instrument. An online search of PubMed, CINAHL, and ProQuest databases was performed. Included were studies in which walking was assessed with the Kinect and another gold standard device, and consisted of at least one numerical finding of spatiotemporal or kinematic measures. Our search identified 366 papers, from which 12 relevant studies were retrieved. The results demonstrate that the Kinect is valid only for some spatiotemporal gait parameters. Although the kinematic parameters measured by the Kinect followed the trend of the joint trajectories, they showed poor validity and large errors. In conclusion, the Kinect may have the potential to be used as a tool for measuring spatiotemporal aspects of gait, yet standardized methods should be established, and future examinations with both healthy subjects and clinical participants are required in order to integrate the Kinect as a clinical gait analysis tool. PMID:26861323

  13. A reinforcement learning approach to gait training improves retention

    PubMed Central

    Hasson, Christopher J.; Manczurowsky, Julia; Yen, Sheng-Che

    2015-01-01

    Many gait training programs are based on supervised learning principles: an individual is guided towards a desired gait pattern with directional error feedback. While this results in rapid adaptation, improvements quickly disappear. This study tested the hypothesis that a reinforcement learning approach improves retention and transfer of a new gait pattern. The results of a pilot study and larger experiment are presented. Healthy subjects were randomly assigned to either a supervised group, who received explicit instructions and directional error feedback while they learned a new gait pattern on a treadmill, or a reinforcement group, who was only shown whether they were close to or far from the desired gait. Subjects practiced for 10 min, followed by immediate and overnight retention and over-ground transfer tests. The pilot study showed that subjects could learn a new gait pattern under a reinforcement learning paradigm. The larger experiment, which had twice as many subjects (16 in each group) showed that the reinforcement group had better overnight retention than the supervised group (a 32% vs. 120% error increase, respectively), but there were no differences for over-ground transfer. These results suggest that encouraging participants to find rewarding actions through self-guided exploration is beneficial for retention. PMID:26379524

  14. Gait Deviations in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kindregan, Deirdre; Gallagher, Louise; Gormley, John

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, it has become clear that children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have difficulty with gross motor function and coordination, factors which influence gait. Knowledge of gait abnormalities may be useful for assessment and treatment planning. This paper reviews the literature assessing gait deviations in children with ASD. Five online databases were searched using keywords “gait” and “autism,” and 11 studies were found which examined gait in childhood ASD. Children with ASD tend to augment their walking stability with a reduced stride length, increased step width and therefore wider base of support, and increased time in the stance phase. Children with ASD have reduced range of motion at the ankle and knee during gait, with increased hip flexion. Decreased peak hip flexor and ankle plantar flexor moments in children with ASD may imply weakness around these joints, which is further exhibited by a reduction in ground reaction forces at toe-off in children with ASD. Children with ASD have altered gait patterns to healthy controls, widened base of support, and reduced range of motion. Several studies refer to cerebellar and basal ganglia involvement as the patterns described suggest alterations in those areas of the brain. Further research should compare children with ASD to other clinical groups to improve assessment and treatment planning. PMID:25922766

  15. Spatiotemporal gait deviations in a virtual reality environment.

    PubMed

    Hollman, John H; Brey, Robert H; Robb, Richard A; Bang, Tami J; Kaufman, Kenton R

    2006-06-01

    Previous research suggests that postural sway in standing increases in virtual reality (VR) environments. This study was conducted to examine whether gait instability is prevalent when people walk in a VR environment. Ten healthy adults participated in the study. Subjects walked on a treadmill in a VR environment and a non-VR environment at each of three walking speeds: 0.9, 1.1, and 1.3 m/s. In the VR environment, an endless corridor with colored vertical stripes comprising the walls was projected onto a hemispherical screen placed in front of the treadmill. The speed of the moving corridor image was matched to the speed of the treadmill to create the illusion that subjects were walking through the endless corridor. Spatiotemporal data during gait were collected with an instrumented treadmill housing two piezoelectric force platforms. Gait parameters reflective of gait instability (stride length, step width, variability in stride velocity, and variability in step width) were compared between the VR and non-VR environments. Subjects walked in the VR environment with reduced stride lengths (p = 0.001), increased step widths (p = 0.001), and with increased variability in stride velocity (p < 0.001) and step width (p = 0.002). The gait deviations suggest that walking in a VR environment may induce gait instability in healthy subjects. PMID:16095905

  16. Automatic identification of gait events using an instrumented sock

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Textile-based transducers are an emerging technology in which piezo-resistive properties of materials are used to measure an applied strain. By incorporating these sensors into a sock, this technology offers the potential to detect critical events during the stance phase of the gait cycle. This could prove useful in several applications, such as functional electrical stimulation (FES) systems to assist gait. Methods We investigated the output of a knitted resistive strain sensor during walking and sought to determine the degree of similarity between the sensor output and the ankle angle in the sagittal plane. In addition, we investigated whether it would be possible to predict three key gait events, heel strike, heel lift and toe off, with a relatively straight-forward algorithm. This worked by predicting gait events to occur at fixed time offsets from specific peaks in the sensor signal. Results Our results showed that, for all subjects, the sensor output exhibited the same general characteristics as the ankle joint angle. However, there were large between-subjects differences in the degree of similarity between the two curves. Despite this variability, it was possible to accurately predict gait events using a simple algorithm. This algorithm displayed high levels of trial-to-trial repeatability. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential of using textile-based transducers in future devices that provide active gait assistance. PMID:21619570

  17. [Gait analysis and tailored exercise prescription in older adults].

    PubMed

    Kressig, R W; Beauchet, O

    2004-02-01

    Examining gait characteristics in older adults enhances our understanding of movement control in this population and helps to better target preventive interventions. Walking is a highly automated, regular motor behavior that is mostly controlled by subcortical locomotor brain regions. With increasing age, walking requires higher levels of attention and thus more cortical involvement in motor control. This can affect gait regularity by increasing stride-to-stride variability that is characteristically high among fallers. A growing number of clinical gait analysis systems is now available to determine gait variability and thus the falling risk in older adults. Interventions targeting high gait variability in older adults need to consider basic principles of motor learning. Previously common and automatic gait patterns have to be relearned and again brought up to a highly automated level of motor control. Regular walking exercise, and particularly T'ai Chi with its emphasis on sequenced, slow, and highly controlled movements, might be helpful in this relearning process. Further research is needed to explore other interventions that could favorably affect stride-to-stride variability of older adults. PMID:14991291

  18. Adaptive changes in spatiotemporal gait characteristics in women during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    B?aszczyk, Janusz W; Opala-Berdzik, Agnieszka; Plewa, Micha?

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal gait cycle characteristics were assessed at early (P1), and late (P2) pregnancy, as well as at 2 months (PP1) and 6 months (PP2) postpartum. A substantial decrease in walking speed was observed throughout the pregnancy, with the slowest speed (10.2m/s) being during the third trimester. Walking at slower velocity resulted in complex adaptive adjustments to their spatiotemporal gait pattern, including a shorter step length and an increased duration of both their stance and double-support phases. Duration of the swing phase remained the least susceptible to changes. Habitual walking velocity (1.130.2m/s) and the optimal gait pattern were fully recovered 6 months after childbirth. Documented here adaptive changes in the preferred gait pattern seem to result mainly from the altered body anthropometry leading to temporary balance impairments. All the observed changes within stride cycle aimed to improve gait safety by focusing on its dynamic stability. The pregnant women preferred to walk at a slower velocity which allowed them to spend more time in double-support compared with their habitual pattern. Such changes provided pregnant women with a safer and more tentative ambulation that reduced the single-support period and, hence, the possibility of instability. As pregnancy progressed a significant increase in stance width and a decrease in step length was observed. Both factors allow also for gait stability improvement. PMID:26480840

  19. Temporal and spatial organization of gait-related electrocortical potentials.

    PubMed

    Knaepen, Kristel; Mierau, Andreas; Tellez, Helio Fernandez; Lefeber, Dirk; Meeusen, Romain

    2015-07-10

    To advance gait rehabilitation research it is of great importance to understand the supraspinal control of walking. In this study, the temporal and spatial characteristics of averaged electrocortical activity during treadmill walking in healthy subjects was assessed. Electroencephalography data were recorded from 32 scalp locations, averaged across trials, and related to phases of the gait cycle based on the detection of left heel strike. A characteristic temporal pattern of positive and negative potentials, similar to movement-related cortical potentials, and related to the gait cycle was observed over the cortical leg representation area. Source localization analysis revealed that mainly the primary somatosensory, somatosensory association, primary motor and cingulate cortex were activated during walking. The negative peaks of the gait-related cortical potential were associated with activity predominantly in the cingulate and prefrontal cortex, while the primary motor, primary somatosensory and somatosensory association cortex were mainly active during the positive peaks. This study identified gait-related cortical potentials during walking. The results indicate a widely distributed cortical network involved in gait control. PMID:26003448

  20. FreeWalker: a smart insole for longitudinal gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Baitong Wang; Rajput, Kuldeep Singh; Wing-Kin Tam; Tung, Anthony K H; Zhi Yang

    2015-08-01

    Gait analysis is an important diagnostic measure to investigate the pattern of walking. Traditional gait analysis is generally carried out in a gait lab, with equipped force and body tracking sensors, which needs a trained medical professional to interpret the results. This procedure is tedious, expensive, and unreliable and makes it difficult to track the progress across multiple visits. In this paper, we present a smart insole called FreeWalker, which provides quantitative gait analysis outside the confinement of traditional lab, at low- cost. The insole consists of eight pressure sensors and two motion tracking sensors, i.e. 3-axis accelerometer and 3-axis gyroscope. This enables measurement of under-foot pressure distribution and motion sequences in real-time. The insole is enabled with onboard SD card as well as wireless data transmission, which help in continuous gait-cycle analysis. The data is then sent to a gateway, for analysis and interpretation of data, using a user interface where gait features are graphically displayed. We also present validation result of a subject's left foot, who was asked to perform a specific task. Experiment results show that we could achieve a data-sampling rate of over 1 KHz, transmitting data up to a distance of 20 meter and maintain a battery life of around 24 hours. Taking advantage of these features, FreeWalker can be used in various applications, like medical diagnosis, rehabilitation, sports and entertainment. PMID:26737102

  1. Gait characteristics of persons with bilateral transtibial amputations.

    PubMed

    Su, Po-Fu; Gard, Steven A; Lipschutz, Robert D; Kuiken, Todd A

    2007-01-01

    The gait characteristics of persons with unilateral transtibial amputations are fairly well documented in the literature. However, much less is known about the gait of persons with bilateral transtibial amputations. This study used quantitative gait analysis to investigate the gait characteristics of 19 persons with bilateral transtibial amputations. To reduce variability between subjects, we fitted all subjects with Seattle Lightfoot II feet 2 weeks before their gait analyses. The data indicated that subjects walked with symmetrical temporospatial, kinematic, and kinetic parameters. Compared with nondisabled controls, the subjects with amputations walked with slower speeds and lower cadences, had shorter step lengths and wider step widths, and displayed hip hiking during swing phase. Additionally, compared with the nondisabled controls walking at comparable speeds, the subjects with amputations demonstrated reduced ankle dorsiflexion and knee flexion in stance phase, reduced peak ankle plantar flexor moment, reduced positive ankle power (i.e., energy return) in late stance, and increased positive and negative hip power. These results demonstrate the deficiencies in current prosthetic componentry and suggest that further research is needed to enhance prosthesis function and improve gait in persons with amputations. PMID:18247246

  2. Wire Weight

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Wire weight is lowered to water surface to measure stage at a site. Levels are made to the wire weights elevation from known benchmarks to ensure correct readings. This wire weight is located along the Missouri River in Bismarck, ND....

  3. Influence of unilateral weight on bilateral cyclograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellicer Costa, Juan José; Dusza, Jacek J.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents the results of gait parameters as a function of unilateral weight. The object of the research was a woman walking on a stationary surface and carrying in his hand weights from 0 to 15 kg. Her movement was recorded by 6 cameras recording the location of 34 markers placed at appropriate points in the body. 3D reconstruction was performed for each of the reflecting markers. Tested signals were changes in the value the joint angles of ankle, knee and hip. On the basis of about 6 cycles of movement of each load, a model for the average gait cycle was developed. The result of the experiments are graphs of changes the joint angles as a function of time, bilateral cyclograms, synchronized bilateral cyclograms and regression lines. The conclusion of the study is to determine how one-sided load affects gait asymmetry. Simple and easy to interpret method of presentation of results were also shown. Studies were conducted using VICON system.

  4. Gait analysis and the cumulative gait index (CGI): Translational tools to assess impairments exhibited by rats with olivocerebellar ataxia.

    PubMed

    Lambert, C S; Philpot, R M; Engberg, M E; Johns, B E; Kim, S H; Wecker, L

    2014-11-01

    Deviations from 'normal' locomotion exhibited by humans and laboratory animals may be determined using automated systems that capture both temporal and spatial gait parameters. Although many measures generated by these systems are unrelated and independent, some may be related and dependent, representing redundant assessments of function. To investigate this possibility, a treadmill-based system was used to capture gait parameters from normal and ataxic rats, and a multivariate analysis was conducted to determine deviations from normal. Rats were trained on the treadmill at two speeds, and gait parameters were generated prior to and following lesions of the olivocerebellar pathway. Control (non-lesioned) animals exhibited stable hindlimb gait parameters across assessments at each speed. Lesioned animals exhibited alterations in multiple hindlimb gait parameters, characterized by significant increases in stride frequency, braking duration, stance width, step angle, and paw angle and decreases in stride, stance, swing and propulsion durations, stride length and paw area. A principal component analysis of initial hindlimb measures indicated three uncorrelated factors mediating performance, termed Rhythmicity, Thrust and Contact. Deviation in the performance of each animal from the group mean was determined for each factor and values summed to yield the cumulative gait index (CGI), a single value reflecting variation within the group. The CGI for lesioned animals increased 2.3-fold relative to unlesioned animals. This study characterizes gait alterations in laboratory rats rendered ataxic by destruction of the climbing fiber pathway innervating Purkinje cells and demonstrates that a single index can be used to describe overall gait impairments. PMID:25116252

  5. Gait Analysis and the Cumulative Gait Index (CGI): Translational Tools to Assess Impairments Exhibited by Rats with Olivocerebellar Ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, C.S.; Philpot, R.M.; Engberg, M.E.; Johns, B.E.; Kim, S.H.; Wecker, L.

    2014-01-01

    Deviations from normal locomotion exhibited by humans and laboratory animals may be determined using automated systems that capture both temporal and spatial gait parameters. Although many measures generated by these systems are unrelated and independent, some may be related and dependent, representing redundant assessments of function. To investigate this possibility, a treadmill-based system was used to capture gait parameters from normal and ataxic rats, and a multivariate analysis was conducted to determine deviations from normal. Rats were trained on the treadmill at two speeds, and gait parameters were generated prior to and following lesions of the olivocerebellar pathway. Control (non-lesioned) animals exhibited stable hindlimb gait parameters across assessments at each speed. Lesioned animals exhibited alterations in multiple hindlimb gait parameters, characterized by significant increases in stride frequency, braking duration, stance width, step angle, and paw angle and decreases in stride, stance, swing and propulsion durations, stride length and paw area. A principal component analysis of initial hindlimb measures indicated 3 uncorrelated factors mediating performance, termed rhythmicity, thrust and contact. Deviation in the performance of each animal from the group mean was determined for each factor and values summed to yield the Cumulative Gait Index (CGI), a single value reflecting variation within the group. The CGI for lesioned animals increased 2.3-fold relative to unlesioned animals. This study characterizes gait alterations in laboratory rats rendered ataxic by destruction of the climbing fiber pathway innervating Purkinje cells and demonstrates that a single index can be used to describe overall gait impairments. PMID:25116252

  6. Novel characterization of gait impairments in people with multiple sclerosis by means of the gait profile score.

    PubMed

    Pau, Massimiliano; Coghe, Giancarlo; Atzeni, Claudia; Corona, Federica; Pilloni, Giuseppina; Marrosu, Maria Giovanna; Cocco, Eleonora; Galli, Manuela

    2014-10-15

    The assessment of gait abnormalities in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) represents a key factor in evaluating the effectiveness of rehabilitation treatments. Despite the availability of sophisticated equipment to objectively evaluate the kinematic aspects of gait, there are still some difficulties in processing the large and complex amount of data they produce in the daily clinical routine. On the basis of the above-mentioned considerations we propose a novel characterization of gait kinematics in individuals with MS, based on a single measure (gait profile score, GPS) obtained from a quantitative three-dimensional analysis of gait performed using an opto-electronic system. We also investigated the correlation between GPS and the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) values. Thirty-four patients suffering from relapsing-remitting MS (13 female, 21 male, mean age 46.7 years) with an EDSS score of ≤6 underwent a gait analysis from which the GPS index was calculated. Their results were compared with those of a control group of healthy age- and gender-matched subjects. The GPS of individuals with MS was found significantly higher with respect to controls (9.12° vs. 5.67°, p<0.001) as the result of kinematic differences in gait patterns referring to pelvic tilt and rotation, hip flexion-extension and rotation, knee flexion-extension and ankle dorsi- and plantar-flexion. A moderate correlation was also found between the EDSS score of the participants and their GPS values (r = 0.63, p < 0.001). The GPS index thus appears suitable to represent gait deviations from physiological patterns in individuals affected by MS and potentially useful in assessing the outcomes related both to rehabilitation programs and pharmacologic/physical therapies. PMID:25073571

  7. Extraction of human gait signatures: an inverse kinematic approach using Groebner basis theory applied to gait cycle analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barki, Anum; Kendricks, Kimberly; Tuttle, Ronald F.; Bunker, David J.; Borel, Christoph C.

    2013-05-01

    This research highlights the results obtained from applying the method of inverse kinematics, using Groebner basis theory, to the human gait cycle to extract and identify lower extremity gait signatures. The increased threat from suicide bombers and the force protection issues of today have motivated a team at Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) to research pattern recognition in the human gait cycle. The purpose of this research is to identify gait signatures of human subjects and distinguish between subjects carrying a load to those subjects without a load. These signatures were investigated via a model of the lower extremities based on motion capture observations, in particular, foot placement and the joint angles for subjects affected by carrying extra load on the body. The human gait cycle was captured and analyzed using a developed toolkit consisting of an inverse kinematic motion model of the lower extremity and a graphical user interface. Hip, knee, and ankle angles were analyzed to identify gait angle variance and range of motion. Female subjects exhibited the most knee angle variance and produced a proportional correlation between knee flexion and load carriage.

  8. A Novel HMM Distributed Classifier for the Detection of Gait Phases by Means of a Wearable Inertial Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Taborri, Juri; Rossi, Stefano; Palermo, Eduardo; Patanè, Fabrizio; Cappa, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we decided to apply a hierarchical weighted decision, proposed and used in other research fields, for the recognition of gait phases. The developed and validated novel distributed classifier is based on hierarchical weighted decision from outputs of scalar Hidden Markov Models (HMM) applied to angular velocities of foot, shank, and thigh. The angular velocities of ten healthy subjects were acquired via three uni-axial gyroscopes embedded in inertial measurement units (IMUs) during one walking task, repeated three times, on a treadmill. After validating the novel distributed classifier and scalar and vectorial classifiers-already proposed in the literature, with a cross-validation, classifiers were compared for sensitivity, specificity, and computational load for all combinations of the three targeted anatomical segments. Moreover, the performance of the novel distributed classifier in the estimation of gait variability in terms of mean time and coefficient of variation was evaluated. The highest values of specificity and sensitivity (>0.98) for the three classifiers examined here were obtained when the angular velocity of the foot was processed. Distributed and vectorial classifiers reached acceptable values (>0.95) when the angular velocity of shank and thigh were analyzed. Distributed and scalar classifiers showed values of computational load about 100 times lower than the one obtained with the vectorial classifier. In addition, distributed classifiers showed an excellent reliability for the evaluation of mean time and a good/excellent reliability for the coefficient of variation. In conclusion, due to the better performance and the small value of computational load, the here proposed novel distributed classifier can be implemented in the real-time application of gait phases recognition, such as to evaluate gait variability in patients or to control active orthoses for the recovery of mobility of lower limb joints. PMID:25184488

  9. Quantitative Gait Analysis Detects Significant Differences in Movement between Osteoarthritic and Nonosteoarthritic Guinea Pig Strains before and after Treatment with Flunixin Meglumine

    PubMed Central

    Santangelo, K. S.; Kaeding, A. C.; Baker, S. A.; Bertone, A. L.

    2014-01-01

    A computer-aided gait analysis system was used to contrast two guinea pig strains with differing propensity for osteoarthritis (OA), with/without administration of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Walking speed and static/dynamic gait parameters were determined at baseline. Flunixin meglumine was given and animals were evaluated 4, 24, and 72 hours after treatment. Body weight was compared using unpaired t-tests. Knee joints were histologically evaluated using species-specific criteria; indices were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis test, followed by Dunn's multiple comparisons. A generalized linear model followed by Tukey's posttests juxtaposed gait parameters; walking speed was a covariate for other outcome measures. Body weight was not different between strains; OA-prone animals demonstrated more progressive chondropathy. At baseline, OA-prone animals had slower walking speeds, narrower hind limb bases of support, shorter stride lengths, and slower limb swing speeds relative to OA-resistant animals. These differences were not detected 4 or 24 hours after treatment. By 72 hours, OA-prone animals had returned to baseline values. These findings indicate a distinct voluntary gait pattern in a rodent model of bilateral primary OA, modification of which may allow rapid screening of novel therapies. Flunixin meglumine temporarily permitted OA-prone animals to move in a manner that was analogous to OA-resistant animals. PMID:24963402

  10. Coordination dynamics of (a)symmetrically loaded gait.

    PubMed

    Russell, Daniel M; Haworth, Joshua L; Martinez-Garza, Cesar

    2016-03-01

    Asymmetries in the resonant frequency of limbs/effectors lead to changes in coordination dynamics, including deviations in relative phase at ϕ = 0 or π rad and reduced stability. These effects have been successfully modeled by the extended Haken-Kelso-Bunz (HKB) coupled oscillator model (Kelso et al. in Attention and performance XIII. Erlbaum, Hillsdale, pp 139-169, 1990), and supported in laboratory tasks of rhythmic limb motions. Efforts to apply the HKB model to walking have supported the predicted deviations in phase, but not the expected decreases in coordination stability. The lack of stability effects arising from asymmetries may be due to the stabilizing influence of a treadmill or may be obscured by the balance requirements and ground impacts in gait. This study examined these possibilities by investigating walking overground with ankle weights of 3 or 6 kg to create asymmetries between the legs, as well as symmetrical loads. Participants walked without a metronome and separately with a metronome to control speed and cadence. Coordination dynamics between the legs were quantified through mean and standard deviation (SD) of ϕ, while individual leg local dynamic stability was calculated as maximum Lyapunov exponent (λ (MAX)). Irrespective of the condition, asymmetrical loads led to deviations in phase from antiphase with the loaded leg lagging behind the other, and both SDϕ and λ (MAX) increased (i.e., stability decreased). Symmetrical loads had no effect on phase deviations, but decreased stability. Overall, these findings indicate that the HKB model captures coordination dynamics in walking, but also highlights limitations in modeling the influence of loads on an individual limb. PMID:26661338

  11. Does Anxiety Cause Freezing of Gait in Parkinson's Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Ehgoetz Martens, Kaylena A.; Ellard, Colin G.; Almeida, Quincy J.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) commonly experience freezing of gait under time constraints, in narrow spaces, and in the dark. One commonality between these different situations is that they may all provoke anxiety, yet anxiety has never been directly examined as a cause of FOG. In this study, virtual reality was used to induce anxiety and evaluate whether it directly causes FOG. Fourteen patients with PD and freezing of gait (Freezers) and 17 PD without freezing of gait (Non-Freezers) were instructed to walk in two virtual environments: (i) across a plank that was located on the ground (LOW), (ii) across a plank above a deep pit (HIGH). Multiple synchronized motion capture cameras updated participants' movement through the virtual environment in real-time, while their gait was recorded. Anxiety levels were evaluated after each trial using self-assessment manikins. Freezers performed the experiment on two separate occasions (in their ON and OFF state). Freezers reported higher levels of anxiety compared to Non-Freezers (p<0.001) and all patients reported greater levels of anxiety when walking across the HIGH plank compared to the LOW (p<0.001). Freezers experienced significantly more freezing of gait episodes (p?=?0.013) and spent a significantly greater percentage of each trial frozen (p?=?0.005) when crossing the HIGH plank. This finding was even more pronounced when comparing Freezers in their OFF state. Freezers also had greater step length variability in the HIGH compared to the LOW condition, while the step length variability in Non-Freezers did not change. In conclusion, this was the first study to directly compare freezing of gait in anxious and non-anxious situations. These results present strong evidence that anxiety is an important mechanism underlying freezing of gait and supports the notion that the limbic system may have a profound contribution to freezing in PD. PMID:25250691

  12. Effects of obesity and chronic low back pain on gait

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Obesity is often associated with low back pain (LBP). Despite empirical evidence that LBP induces gait abnormalities, there is a lack of quantitative analysis of the combined effect of obesity and LBP on gait. The aim of our study was to quantify the gait pattern of obese subjects with and without LBP and normal-mass controls by using Gait Analysis (GA), in order to investigate the cumulative effects of obesity and LBP on gait. Methods Eight obese females with chronic LBP (OLG; age: 40.5 10.1 years; BMI: 42.39 5.47 Kg/m2), 10 obese females (OG; age: 33.6 5.2 years; BMI: 39.26 2.39 Kg/m2) and 10 healthy female subjects (CG; age: 33.4 9.6 years; BMI: 22.8 3.2 Kg/m2), were enrolled in this study and assessed with video recording and GA. Results and Discussion OLG showed longer stance duration and shorter step length when compared to OG and CG. They also had a low pelvis and hip ROM on the frontal plane, a low knee flexion in the swing phase and knee range of motion, a low dorsiflexion in stance and swing as compared to OG. No statistically significant differences were found in ankle power generation at push-off between OLG and OG, which appeared lower if compared to CG. At hip level, both OLG and OG exhibited high power generation levels during stance, with OLG showing the highest values. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that the association of obesity and LBP affects more the gait pattern than obesity alone. OLG were in fact characterised by an altered knee and ankle strategy during gait as compared to OG and CG. These elements may help optimizing rehabilitation planning and treatment in these patients. PMID:21943156

  13. Does anxiety cause freezing of gait in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Ehgoetz Martens, Kaylena A; Ellard, Colin G; Almeida, Quincy J

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) commonly experience freezing of gait under time constraints, in narrow spaces, and in the dark. One commonality between these different situations is that they may all provoke anxiety, yet anxiety has never been directly examined as a cause of FOG. In this study, virtual reality was used to induce anxiety and evaluate whether it directly causes FOG. Fourteen patients with PD and freezing of gait (Freezers) and 17 PD without freezing of gait (Non-Freezers) were instructed to walk in two virtual environments: (i) across a plank that was located on the ground (LOW), (ii) across a plank above a deep pit (HIGH). Multiple synchronized motion capture cameras updated participants' movement through the virtual environment in real-time, while their gait was recorded. Anxiety levels were evaluated after each trial using self-assessment manikins. Freezers performed the experiment on two separate occasions (in their ON and OFF state). Freezers reported higher levels of anxiety compared to Non-Freezers (p < 0.001) and all patients reported greater levels of anxiety when walking across the HIGH plank compared to the LOW (p < 0.001). Freezers experienced significantly more freezing of gait episodes (p = 0.013) and spent a significantly greater percentage of each trial frozen (p = 0.005) when crossing the HIGH plank. This finding was even more pronounced when comparing Freezers in their OFF state. Freezers also had greater step length variability in the HIGH compared to the LOW condition, while the step length variability in Non-Freezers did not change. In conclusion, this was the first study to directly compare freezing of gait in anxious and non-anxious situations. These results present strong evidence that anxiety is an important mechanism underlying freezing of gait and supports the notion that the limbic system may have a profound contribution to freezing in PD. PMID:25250691

  14. General tensor discriminant analysis and gabor features for gait recognition.

    PubMed

    Tao, Dacheng; Li, Xuelong; Wu, Xindong; Maybank, Stephen J

    2007-10-01

    The traditional image representations are not suited to conventional classification methods, such as the linear discriminant analysis (LDA), because of the under sample problem (USP): the dimensionality of the feature space is much higher than the number of training samples. Motivated by the successes of the two dimensional LDA (2DLDA) for face recognition, we develop a general tensor discriminant analysis (GTDA) as a preprocessing step for LDA. The benefits of GTDA compared with existing preprocessing methods, e.g., principal component analysis (PCA) and 2DLDA, include 1) the USP is reduced in subsequent classification by, for example, LDA; 2) the discriminative information in the training tensors is preserved; and 3) GTDA provides stable recognition rates because the alternating projection optimization algorithm to obtain a solution of GTDA converges, while that of 2DLDA does not. We use human gait recognition to validate the proposed GTDA. The averaged gait images are utilized for gait representation. Given the popularity of Gabor function based image decompositions for image understanding and object recognition, we develop three different Gabor function based image representations: 1) the GaborD representation is the sum of Gabor filter responses over directions, 2) GaborS is the sum of Gabor filter responses over scales, and 3) GaborSD is the sum of Gabor filter responses over scales and directions. The GaborD, GaborS and GaborSD representations are applied to the problem of recognizing people from their averaged gait images.A large number of experiments were carried out to evaluate the effectiveness (recognition rate) of gait recognition based on first obtaining a Gabor, GaborD, GaborS or GaborSD image representation, then using GDTA to extract features and finally using LDA for classification. The proposed methods achieved good performance for gait recognition based on image sequences from the USF HumanID Database. Experimental comparisons are made with nine state of the art classification methods in gait recognition. PMID:17699917

  15. Automated quantitative gait analysis in animal models of movement disorders

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Accurate and reproducible behavioral tests in animal models are of major importance in the development and evaluation of new therapies for central nervous system disease. In this study we investigated for the first time gait parameters of rat models for Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease (HD) and stroke using the Catwalk method, a novel automated gait analysis test. Static and dynamic gait parameters were measured in all animal models, and these data were compared to readouts of established behavioral tests, such as the cylinder test in the PD and stroke rats and the rotarod tests for the HD group. Results Hemiparkinsonian rats were generated by unilateral injection of the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine in the striatum or in the medial forebrain bundle. For Huntington's disease, a transgenic rat model expressing a truncated huntingtin fragment with multiple CAG repeats was used. Thirdly, a stroke model was generated by a photothrombotic induced infarct in the right sensorimotor cortex. We found that multiple gait parameters were significantly altered in all three disease models compared to their respective controls. Behavioural deficits could be efficiently measured using the cylinder test in the PD and stroke animals, and in the case of the PD model, the deficits in gait essentially confirmed results obtained by the cylinder test. However, in the HD model and the stroke model the Catwalk analysis proved more sensitive than the rotarod test and also added new and more detailed information on specific gait parameters. Conclusion The automated quantitative gait analysis test may be a useful tool to study both motor impairment and recovery associated with various neurological motor disorders. PMID:20691122

  16. The mental representation of the human gait in young and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Stöckel, Tino; Jacksteit, Robert; Behrens, Martin; Skripitz, Ralf; Bader, Rainer; Mau-Moeller, Anett

    2015-01-01

    The link between mental representation (MREP) structures and motor performance has been evidenced for a great variety of movement skills, but not for the human gait. Therefore the present study sought to investigate the cognitive memory structures underlying the human gait in young and older adults. In a first experiment, gait parameters at comfortable gait speed (OptoGait) were compared with gait-specific MREPs (structural dimensional analysis of MREP; SDA-M) in 36 young adults. Participants were divided into a slow- and fast-walking group. The proven relationship between gait speed and executive functions such as working memory led to the hypothesis that gait pattern and MREP differ between slow- and fast-walking adults. In a second experiment, gait performance and MREPs were compared between 24 young (27.9 years) and 24 elderly (60.1 years) participants. As age-related declines in gait performance occur from the seventh decade of life onward, we hypothesized that gait parameters would not be affected until the age of 60 years accompanied by unchanged MREP. Data of experiment one revealed that gait parameters and MREPs differed significantly between slow and fast walkers. Notably, eleven previously incurred musculoskeletal injuries were documented for the slow walkers but only two injuries and one disorder for fast walkers. Experiment two revealed no age-related differences in gait parameters or MREPs between healthy young and older adults. In conclusion, the differences in gait parameters associated with lower comfortable gait speeds are reflected by differences in MREPs, whereby SDA-M data indicate that the single limb support phase may serve as a critical functional period. These differences probably resulted from previously incurred musculoskeletal injuries. Our data further indicate that the human gait and its MREP are stable until the age of 60. SDA-M may be considered as a valuable clinical tool for diagnosis of gait abnormalities and monitoring of therapeutic effectiveness. PMID:26236249

  17. Laboratory review: the role of gait analysis in seniors' mobility and fall prevention.

    PubMed

    Bridenbaugh, Stephanie A; Kressig, Reto W

    2011-01-01

    Walking is a complex motor task generally performed automatically by healthy adults. Yet, by the elderly, walking is often no longer performed automatically. Older adults require more attention for motor control while walking than younger adults. Falls, often with serious consequences, can be the result. Gait impairments are one of the biggest risk factors for falls. Several studies have identified changes in certain gait parameters as independent predictors of fall risk. Such gait changes are often too discrete to be detected by clinical observation alone. At the Basel Mobility Center, we employ the GAITRite electronic walkway system for spatial-temporal gait analysis. Although we have a large range of indications for gait analyses and several areas of clinical research, our focus is on the association between gait and cognition. Gait analysis with walking as a single-task condition alone is often insufficient to reveal underlying gait disorders present during normal, everyday activities. We use a dual-task paradigm, walking while simultaneously performing a second cognitive task, to assess the effects of divided attention on motor performance and gait control. Objective quantification of such clinically relevant gait changes is necessary to determine fall risk. Early detection of gait disorders and fall risk permits early intervention and, in the best-case scenario, fall prevention. We and others have shown that rhythmic movement training such as Jaques-Dalcroze eurhythmics, tai chi and social dancing can improve gait regularity and automaticity, thus increasing gait safety and reducing fall risk. PMID:20980732

  18. Bearings: Technology and needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    A brief status report on bearing technology and present and near-term future problems that warrant research support is presented. For rolling element bearings a material with improved fracture toughness, life data in the low Lambda region, a comprehensive failure theory verified by life data and incorporated into dynamic analyses, and an improved corrosion resistant alloy are perceived as important needs. For hydrodynamic bearings better definition of cavitation boundaries and pressure distributions for squeeze film dampers, and geometry optimization for minimum power loss in turbulent film bearings are needed. For gas film bearings, foil bearing geometries that form more nearly optimum film shapes for maximum load capacity, and more effective surface protective coatings for high temperature operation are needed.

  19. Gait Alterations During Constant Pace Treadmill Racewalking.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Brian

    2015-08-01

    Racewalking is an Olympic event requiring great endurance, and racewalkers often use treadmills in training because of the benefits of having a flat unchanging surface where pace judgment can be learned and because inclement weather can be avoided. The effects of fatigue associated with racewalking on a treadmill have not been studied and could be informative with regard to the maintenance of legal technique. The aim of this study was to measure key gait variables during a physically demanding treadmill racewalk. Fourteen international racewalkers completed 10 km on an instrumented treadmill at a pace equivalent to 103% of their recent best time. Spatiotemporal and ground reaction force data were recorded at 4 distances. High-speed videography data were simultaneously recorded to analyze changes in knee angle between the early and late stages. Increases in step length and corresponding decreases in cadence were found, although the small changes were not considered meaningful. There was also a small increase in flight time and a small decrease in push-off force. There were no other significant changes for any other variables (including knee angles). The increase in flight time might be important given that racewalkers are not permitted a visible loss of contact and suggests that fatiguing sessions on a treadmill can lead to the adoption of nonlegal technique. However, this disadvantage of treadmill training can be negated if the coach scrutinizes athletes throughout the session, and overall the consistent technique used is of benefit with regard to learning correct form and pacing ability. PMID:25647657

  20. Contributions to the understanding of gait control.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Erik Bruun

    2014-04-01

    This thesis is based on ten published articles. The experimental work was carried out at the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen. The aim was to investigate and describe a number of basic mechanical and physiological mechanisms behind human walking. The methodologies used were biomechanical movement analysis and electrophysiology. The walking experiments were carried out in a gait lab, where the subjects were video recorded while they walked across two force platforms, which measured the ground reaction forces. Net joint moments about the hip-, knee- and ankle joint were calculated by combining the movement data and the external reaction forces (inverse dynamics). Muscle activity and sensory input to the spinal cord were measured by electromyography (EMG) and electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves. The results showed that the gait pattern varies to a great degree between individuals. Some people choose to exert the highest forces about the ankle joint while others prefer to use the knee joint. By use of a cluster analysis, fifteen healthy subjects could be divided into two groups. The extensor moment about the knee joint was the main factor for separating the two gait patterns, but the group with the highest extensor moments about the knee joint also walked with more flexed knee joints, higher EMG activity in the quadriceps muscle and higher bone-on-bone forces. This may lead to development of osteoarthritis over the years. Walking on high-heeled shoes reduced the ankle joint moment significantly either because of reduced muscle fiber length and/or increased co-contraction about the joint. On the contrary, the extensor moment about the knee joint was almost doubled in the high-heeled condition compared to bare footed walking at the same velocity. Also the EMG activity increased in the leg muscles. This could be an explanation pertaining to the higher incidence of osteoarthritis in women than in men. Patients with a drop-foot cannot put the foot to the ground with the heel first. Moreover, they have to increase flexion of the hip joint during the swing phase because the foot hangs in a plantar flexed position. It was shown that the ankle joint plantar flexor moment increased in the healthy leg and that the knee joint extensor moment increased significantly in both the affected and the healthy leg. The latter is most likely due to the patients trying to avoid an asymmetrical gait pattern. It is recommended to use an orthosis with drop-foot patients in order to keep the ankle joint dorsiflexed prior to touchdown, otherwise bone-on-bone forces in both knee joints will increase and probably lead to osteoarthritis. The hip joint moment varies less between individuals. However, both during walking and running an unexplained hip joint flexor moment is present during the last half of the stance phase. The moment appears to oppose the speed of progression and it has been suggested that it serves to balance the upper body. This was investigated in a group of healthy subjects who were asked to walk with their upper body in a reclined, inclined and normal position, respectively. It was shown that the hip joint flexor moment was similar in the reclined and the normal position but lower when walking in the inclined position and it can be concluded that the upper body is not balanced by hip joint flexor muscles but rather by accelerations of the pelvis and activity in abdominal and back muscles. These experiments also showed that the trailing leg is brought forward during the swing phase without activity in the flexor muscles about the hip joint. This was verified by the absence of EMG activity in the iliacus muscle measured by intramuscular wire electrodes. Instead the strong ligaments restricting hip joint extension are stretched during the first half of the swing phase thereby storing elastic energy, which is released during the last half of the stance phase and accelerating the leg into the swing phase. This is considered an important energy conserving feature of human walking. The gating of sensory input to th

  1. Bear Spray Safety Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blome, C.D.; Kuzniar, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    A bear spray safety program for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was officially initiated by the Firearms Safety Committee to address accident prevention and to promote personnel training in bear spray and its transportation, storage, and use for defense against wild animals. Used as part of a system including firearms, or used alone for those who choose not to carry a firearm, bear spray is recognized as an effective tool that can prevent injury in a wild animal attack.

  2. Linear magnetic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A. (inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A linear magnetic bearing system having electromagnetic vernier flux paths in shunt relation with permanent magnets, so that the vernier flux does not traverse the permanent magnet, is described. Novelty is believed to reside in providing a linear magnetic bearing having electromagnetic flux paths that bypass high reluctance permanent magnets. Particular novelty is believed to reside in providing a linear magnetic bearing with a pair of axially spaced elements having electromagnets for establishing vernier x and y axis control. The magnetic bearing system has possible use in connection with a long life reciprocating cryogenic refrigerator that may be used on the space shuttle.

  3. Bearing restoration by grinding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanau, H.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Chen, S. M.; Bull, H. L.

    1976-01-01

    A joint program was undertaken by the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Army Aviation Systems Command to restore by grinding those rolling-element bearings which are currently being discarded at aircraft engine and transmission overhaul. Three bearing types were selected from the UH-1 helicopter engine (T-53) and transmission for the pilot program. No bearing failures occurred related to the restoration by grinding process. The risk and cost of a bearing restoration by grinding programs was analyzed. A microeconomic impact analysis was performed.

  4. Effect of Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation on Gait in Parkinsonian Patients with and without Freezing of Gait

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Pablo; Cudeiro, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Freezing of gait (FOG) in Parkinson's disease (PD) rises in prevalence when the effect of medications decays. It is known that auditory rhythmic stimulation improves gait in patients without FOG (PD-FOG), but its putative effect on patients with FOG (PD+FOG) at the end of dose has not been evaluated yet. This work evaluates the effect of auditory rhythmic stimulation on PD+FOG at the end of dose. 10 PD+FOG and 9 PD-FOG patients both at the end of dose periods, and 10 healthy controls were asked to perform several walking tasks. Tasks were performed in the presence and absence of auditory sensory stimulation. All PD+FOG suffered FOG during the task. The presence of auditory rhythmic stimulation (10% above preferred walking cadence) led PD+FOG to significantly reduce FOG. Velocity and cadence were increased, and turn time reduced in all groups. We conclude that auditory stimulation at the frequency proposed may be useful to avoid freezing episodes in PD+FOG. PMID:20339591

  5. Principal Component Analysis of gait in Parkinson's disease: relevance of gait velocity.

    PubMed

    Dillmann, Ulrich; Holzhoffer, Claudia; Johann, Yvonne; Bechtel, Sabrina; Gräber, Stefan; Massing, Christoph; Spiegel, Jörg; Behnke, Stefanie; Bürmann, Jan; Louis, Alfred K

    2014-03-01

    Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is a method to estimate the relation between data points. We used PCA to analyse movements of the upper and lower extremities during treadmill walking in healthy subjects and two groups of Parkinsonian patients. Healthy subjects (n=35) showed a typical pattern with high values of PC1 and low values in a descending order of PC2-PC4. Increase of speed resulted in a significant increase of PC1 and a significant decrease of the following PC's. In more severely affected patients (n=19, UPDRS>20), PC1 was significantly decreased and PC2-PC4 were significantly increased compared to healthy subjects. Speed could be increased only within a small range without corresponding changes of the PC's. In less severely affected patients (n=17), significant differences of the PC's were only found with fast pace. Separate analysis of arms and legs revealed that these changes are only due to altered movements of the arm. Analysis of the pattern of PC's in response to changes of gait velocities reveal alterations even in less severely affected Parkinsonian patients. The changes of the PC's with higher gait velocities in healthy subjects are suggestive of an increase of intersegmental coordination. This is impaired even in less severely affected Parkinsonian patients. PMID:24374062

  6. Direct Comparison of Measured and Calculated Total Knee Replacement Force Envelopes during Walking in the Presence of Normal and Abnormal Gait Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Hannah J.; Foucher, Kharma C.; Andriacchi, Thomas P.; Wimmer, Markus A.

    2012-01-01

    Knee joint forces measured from instrumented implants provide important information for testing the validity of computational models that predict knee joint forces. The purpose of this study was to validate a parametric numerical model for predicting knee joint contact forces against measurements from four subjects with instrumented TKRs during the stance phase of gait. Model sensitivity to abnormal gait patterns was also investigated. The results demonstrated good agreement for three subjects with relatively normal gait patterns, where the difference between the mean measured and calculated forces ranged from 0.05 to 0.45 body weights, and the envelopes of measured and calculated forces (from three walking trials) overlapped. The fourth subject, who had a quadriceps avoidance external moment pattern, initially had little overlap between the measured and calculated force envelopes. When additional constraints were added, tailored to the subjects gait pattern, the model predictions improved to complete force envelope overlap. Coefficient of multiple determination analysis indicated that the shape of the measured and calculated force waveforms were similar for all subjects (adjusted coefficient of multiple correlation values between 0.88 and 0.92). The parametric model was accurate in predicting both the magnitude and waveform of the contact force, and the accuracy of model predictions was affected by deviations from normal gait patterns. Equally important, the envelope of forces generated by the range of solutions substantially overlapped with the corresponding measured envelope from multiple gait trials for a given subject, suggesting that the variable strategic processes of in vivo force generation are covered by the solution range of this parametric model. PMID:22284431

  7. An electric motor with magnetic bearings: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A.

    1973-01-01

    Because same magnetic flux is used to control rotor as to drive it, size, weight, and power required are minimized. Constant total current keeps motor torque invarient, and absence of mechanical bearings eliminates wear and reduces frictional power loss.

  8. Dynamic markers of altered gait rhythm in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hausdorff, J. M.; Lertratanakul, A.; Cudkowicz, M. E.; Peterson, A. L.; Kaliton, D.; Goldberger, A. L.

    2000-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a disorder marked by loss of motoneurons. We hypothesized that subjects with ALS would have an altered gait rhythm, with an increase in both the magnitude of the stride-to-stride fluctuations and perturbations in the fluctuation dynamics. To test for this locomotor instability, we quantitatively compared the gait rhythm of subjects with ALS with that of normal controls and with that of subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD), pathologies of the basal ganglia. Subjects walked for 5 min at their usual pace wearing an ankle-worn recorder that enabled determination of the duration of each stride and of stride-to-stride fluctuations. We found that the gait of patients with ALS is less steady and more temporally disorganized compared with that of healthy controls. In addition, advanced ALS, HD, and PD were associated with certain common, as well as apparently distinct, features of altered stride dynamics. Thus stride-to-stride control of gait rhythm is apparently compromised with ALS. Moreover, a matrix of markers based on gait dynamics may be useful in characterizing certain pathologies of motor control and, possibly, in quantitatively monitoring disease progression and evaluating therapeutic interventions.

  9. Gait-based gender classification using mixed conditional random field.

    PubMed

    Hu, Maodi; Wang, Yunhong; Zhang, Zhaoxiang; Zhang, De

    2011-10-01

    This paper proposes a supervised modeling approach for gait-based gender classification. Different from traditional temporal modeling methods, male and female gait traits are competitively learned by the addition of gender labels. Shape appearance and temporal dynamics of both genders are integrated into a sequential model called mixed conditional random field (CRF) (MCRF), which provides an open framework applicable to various spatiotemporal features. In this paper, for the spatial part, pyramids of fitting coefficients are used to generate the gait shape descriptors; for the temporal part, neighborhood-preserving embeddings are clustered to allocate the stance indexes over gait cycles. During these processes, we employ evaluation functions like the partition index and Xie and Beni's index to improve the feature sparseness. By fusion of shape descriptors and stance indexes, the MCRF is constructed in coordination with intra- and intergender temporary Markov properties. Analogous to the maximum likelihood decision used in hidden Markov models (HMMs), several classification strategies on the MCRF are discussed. We use CASIA (Data set B) and IRIP Gait Databases for the experiments. The results show the superior performance of the MCRF over HMMs and separately trained CRFs. PMID:21622075

  10. Rhythmic auditory stimulation in gait training for Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Thaut, M H; McIntosh, G C; Rice, R R; Miller, R A; Rathbun, J; Brault, J M

    1996-03-01

    Rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) was used as a pacemaker during a 3-week home-based gait-training program for Parkinson's disease (PD) patients (n = 15). Electromyogram (EMG) patterns and stride parameters were assessed before and after the test without RAS to evaluate changes in gait patterns. Data were compared with those of two control groups (n = 11), who either did not participate in any gait training or who participated in an internally self-paced training program. RAS consisted of audiotapes with metronome-pulse patterns embedded into the on/off beat structure of rhythmically accentuated instrumental music. Patients who trained with RAS significantly (p < 0.05) improved their gait velocity by 25%, stride length by 12%, and step cadence by 10% more than self-paced subjects who improved their velocity by 7% and no-training subjects whose velocity decreased by 7%. In the RAS-group, timing of EMG patterns changed significantly (p < 0.05) in the anterior tibialis and vastus lateralis muscles. Evidence for rhythmic entrainment of gait patterns was shown by the ability of the RAS group to reproduce the speed of the last training tape within a 2% margin of error without RAS. PMID:8684391

  11. A comparative collision-based analysis of human gait

    PubMed Central

    Lee, David V.; Comanescu, Tudor N.; Butcher, Michael T.; Bertram, John E. A.

    2013-01-01

    This study compares human walking and running, and places them within the context of other mammalian gaits. We use a collision-based approach to analyse the fundamental dynamics of the centre of mass (CoM) according to three angles derived from the instantaneous force and velocity vectors. These dimensionless angles permit comparisons across gait, species and size. The collision angle ?, which is equivalent to the dimensionless mechanical cost of transport CoTmech, is found to be three times greater during running than walking of humans. This threefold difference is consistent with previous studies of walking versus trotting of quadrupeds, albeit tends to be greater in the gaits of humans and hopping bipeds than in quadrupeds. Plotting the collision angle ? together with the angles of the CoM force vector ? and velocity vector ? results in the functional grouping of bipedal and quadrupedal gaits according to their CoM dynamicswalking, galloping and ambling are distinguished as separate gaits that employ collision reduction, whereas trotting, running and hopping employ little collision reduction and represent more of a continuum that is influenced by dimensionless speed. Comparable with quadrupedal mammals, collision fraction (the ratio of actual to potential collision) is 0.51 during walking and 0.89 during running, indicating substantial collision reduction during walking, but not running, of humans. PMID:24089334

  12. Gait alterations to effectively reduce hip contact forces.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Mariska; de Groote, Friedl; Meyer, Christophe; Corten, Kristoff; Simon, Jean-Pierre; Desloovere, Kaat; Jonkers, Ilse

    2015-07-01

    Patients with hip pathology present alterations in gait which have an effect on joint moments and loading. In knee osteoarthritic patients, the relation between medial knee contact forces and the knee adduction moment are currently being exploited to define gait retraining strategies to effectively reduce pain and disease progression. However, the relation between hip contact forces and joint moments has not been clearly established. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the effect of changes in hip and pelvis kinematics during gait on internal hip moments and contact forces which is calculated using muscle driven simulations. The results showed that frontal plane kinetics have the largest effect on hip contact forces. Given the high correlation between the change in hip adduction moment and contact force at initial stance (R(2) ?=?0.87), this parameter can be used to alter kinematics and predict changes in contact force. At terminal stance the hip adduction and flexion moment can be used to predict changes in contact force (R(2) ?=?0.76). Therefore, gait training that focuses on decreasing hip adduction moments, a wide base gait pattern, has the largest potential to reduce hip contact forces. PMID:25676535

  13. Automatic detection of gait events using kinematic data.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Ciara M; Thorpe, Susannah K; O'Malley, Mark J; Vaughan, Christopher L

    2007-03-01

    The timing of heel strike (HS) and toe off (TO), the events that mark the transitions between stance and swing phase of gait, is essential when analysing gait. Force plate recordings are routinely used to identify these events. Additional instrumentation, such as force sensitive resistors, can also been used. These approaches, however, include restrictions on the number of steps that can be analyzed and further encumbrance of the subject. We developed an algorithm which automatically determines these times from kinematic data recorded by a motion capture system, which is routinely used in gait analysis laboratories. The foot velocity algorithm (FVA) uses data from the heel and toe markers and identifies features in the vertical velocity of the foot which correspond to the gait events. We verified the performance of the FVA using a large data set of 54 normal children that contained both force plate recordings and kinematic data and found errors of (mean+/-standard deviation) 16+/-15 ms for HS and 9+/-15 ms for TO. The algorithm also worked well when tested on a small number of children with spastic diplegia. We compared the performance of the FVA with another kinematic method previously described. Our foot velocity algorithm offered more accurate results and was easier to implement than the previously described one, and should be applicable in a variety of gait analysis settings. PMID:16876414

  14. Secure and privacy enhanced gait authentication on smart phone.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Thang; Choi, Deokjai

    2014-01-01

    Smart environments established by the development of mobile technology have brought vast benefits to human being. However, authentication mechanisms on portable smart devices, particularly conventional biometric based approaches, still remain security and privacy concerns. These traditional systems are mostly based on pattern recognition and machine learning algorithms, wherein original biometric templates or extracted features are stored under unconcealed form for performing matching with a new biometric sample in the authentication phase. In this paper, we propose a novel gait based authentication using biometric cryptosystem to enhance the system security and user privacy on the smart phone. Extracted gait features are merely used to biometrically encrypt a cryptographic key which is acted as the authentication factor. Gait signals are acquired by using an inertial sensor named accelerometer in the mobile device and error correcting codes are adopted to deal with the natural variation of gait measurements. We evaluate our proposed system on a dataset consisting of gait samples of 34 volunteers. We achieved the lowest false acceptance rate (FAR) and false rejection rate (FRR) of 3.92% and 11.76%, respectively, in terms of key length of 50 bits. PMID:24955403

  15. Perception of gait patterns that deviate from normal and symmetric biped locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Handžić, Ismet; Reed, Kyle B.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the range of gait patterns that are perceived as healthy and human-like with the goal of understanding how much asymmetry is allowable in a gait pattern before other people start to notice a gait impairment. Specifically, this study explores if certain abnormal walking patterns can be dismissed as unimpaired or not uncanny. Altering gait biomechanics is generally done in the fields of prosthetics and rehabilitation, however the perception of gait is often neglected. Although a certain gait can be functional, it may not be considered as normal by observers. On the other hand, an abnormally perceived gait may be more practical or necessary in some situations, such as limping after an injury or stroke and when wearing a prosthesis. This research will help to find the balance between the form and function of gait. Gait patterns are synthetically created using a passive dynamic walker (PDW) model that allows gait patterns to be systematically changed without the confounding influence from human sensorimotor feedback during walking. This standardized method allows the perception of specific changes in gait to be studied. The PDW model was used to produce walking patterns that showed a degree of abnormality in gait cadence, knee height, step length, and swing time created by changing the foot roll-over-shape, knee damping, knee location, and leg masses. The gait patterns were shown to participants who rated them according to separate scales of impairment and uncanniness. The results indicate that some pathological and asymmetric gait patterns are perceived as unimpaired and normal. Step time and step length asymmetries less than 5%, small knee location differences, and gait cadence changes of 25% do not result in a change in perception. The results also show that the parameters of a pathologically or uncanny perceived gait can be beneficially altered by increasing other independent parameters, in some sense masking the initial pathology. PMID:25774144

  16. Perception of gait patterns that deviate from normal and symmetric biped locomotion.

    PubMed

    Handi?, Ismet; Reed, Kyle B

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the range of gait patterns that are perceived as healthy and human-like with the goal of understanding how much asymmetry is allowable in a gait pattern before other people start to notice a gait impairment. Specifically, this study explores if certain abnormal walking patterns can be dismissed as unimpaired or not uncanny. Altering gait biomechanics is generally done in the fields of prosthetics and rehabilitation, however the perception of gait is often neglected. Although a certain gait can be functional, it may not be considered as normal by observers. On the other hand, an abnormally perceived gait may be more practical or necessary in some situations, such as limping after an injury or stroke and when wearing a prosthesis. This research will help to find the balance between the form and function of gait. Gait patterns are synthetically created using a passive dynamic walker (PDW) model that allows gait patterns to be systematically changed without the confounding influence from human sensorimotor feedback during walking. This standardized method allows the perception of specific changes in gait to be studied. The PDW model was used to produce walking patterns that showed a degree of abnormality in gait cadence, knee height, step length, and swing time created by changing the foot roll-over-shape, knee damping, knee location, and leg masses. The gait patterns were shown to participants who rated them according to separate scales of impairment and uncanniness. The results indicate that some pathological and asymmetric gait patterns are perceived as unimpaired and normal. Step time and step length asymmetries less than 5%, small knee location differences, and gait cadence changes of 25% do not result in a change in perception. The results also show that the parameters of a pathologically or uncanny perceived gait can be beneficially altered by increasing other independent parameters, in some sense masking the initial pathology. PMID:25774144

  17. Effect of virtual reality games on stroke patients' balance, gait, depression, and interpersonal relationships.

    PubMed

    Song, Gui Bin; Park, Eun Cho

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of training using virtual reality games on balance and gait ability, as well as the psychological characteristics of stroke patients, such as depression and interpersonal relationships, by comparing them with the effects of ergometer training. [Subjects] Forty stroke patients were randomly divided into a virtual reality group (VRG, N = 20) and an ergometer training group (ETG, N = 20). [Methods] VRG performed training using the Xbox Kinect. ETG performed training using an ergometer bicycle. Both groups received training 30 min per day, five times per week, for eight weeks. [Results] Both the VRG and ETG subjects exhibited a significant difference in weight distribution ratio on the paralyzed side and balance ability. Both the VRG and ETG patients showed significant improvement in psychological measures BDI and RCS, after the intervention, and the VRG sowed a more significant increase in BDI than the ETG. [Conclusion] According to the result of this study, virtual reality training and ergometer training were both effective at improving balance, gait abilities, depression, and interpersonal relationships among stroke patients. PMID:26311925

  18. Effect of virtual reality games on stroke patients balance, gait, depression, and interpersonal relationships

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gui bin; Park, Eun cho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of training using virtual reality games on balance and gait ability, as well as the psychological characteristics of stroke patients, such as depression and interpersonal relationships, by comparing them with the effects of ergometer training. [Subjects] Forty stroke patients were randomly divided into a virtual reality group (VRG, N = 20) and an ergometer training group (ETG, N = 20). [Methods] VRG performed training using the Xbox Kinect. ETG performed training using an ergometer bicycle. Both groups received training 30 min per day, five times per week, for eight weeks. [Results] Both the VRG and ETG subjects exhibited a significant difference in weight distribution ratio on the paralyzed side and balance ability. Both the VRG and ETG patients showed significant improvement in psychological measures BDI and RCS, after the intervention, and the VRG sowed a more significant increase in BDI than the ETG. [Conclusion] According to the result of this study, virtual reality training and ergometer training were both effective at improving balance, gait abilities, depression, and interpersonal relationships among stroke patients. PMID:26311925

  19. Hollow rolling element bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J. (inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A low mass rolling element with a lightweight core and hollow center was developed for use in bearings. The core is plated so as to provide a hard surface and increase the life and reliability of the high speed ball bearings.

  20. Damper bearing rotordynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, David A.

    1990-01-01

    High side loads reduce the life of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump (HPOTP) bearings. High stiffness damper seals were recommended to reduce the loads on the pump and turbine end bearings in the HPOTP. The seals designed for use on the pump end are expected to adequately reduce the bearing loads; the predicted performance of the planned turbine end seal is marginal. An alternative to the suggested turbine end seal design is a damper bearing with radial holes from the pressurized center of the turbopump rotor, feeding a smooth land region between two rough-stator/smooth-rotor annular seals. An analysis was prepared to predict the leakage and rotor dynamic coefficients (stiffness, damping, and added mass) of the damper bearing. Governing equations of the seal analysis modified to model the damper bearing; differences between the upstream conditions of the damper bearing and a typical annular seal; prediction of the damper bearing analysis; and assumptions of the analysis which require further investigation are described.

  1. Bearing servicing tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyce, Rex A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A tool for removing and/or replacing bearings in situ is presented. The tool is comprised of a brace having a first end adapted to engage a first end of the bearing housing, and a second end adapted to engage a second end of the bearing housing. If the two ends of the bearing housing are different in configuration, then the respective ends of the brace are configured accordingly. An elongate guide member integral with the brace has two parts, each projecting endwise from a respective end of the brace. A removable pressure plate can be mounted on either part of the guide member for longitudinal movement therealong and has first and second ends of different configurations adapted to engage the first and second ends of the bearing. A threaded-type drive is cooperative between the guide and the pressure plate to move the pressure plate longitudinally along the guide and apply a force to the bearing, either to remove the bearing from its housing, or to emplace a new bearing in the housing.

  2. Bearing fatigue investigation 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahm, A. H.; Bamberger, E. N.; Signer, H. R.

    1982-01-01

    The operating characteristics of large diameter rolling-element bearings in the ultra high speed regimes expected in advanced turbine engines for high performance aircraft were investigated. A high temperature lubricant, DuPont Krytox 143 AC, was evaluated at bearing speeds to 3 million DN. Compared to the results of earlier, similar tests using a MIL-L-23699 (Type II) lubricant, bearings lubricated with the high density Krytox fluid showed significantly higher power requirements. Additionally, short bearing lives were observed when this fluid was used with AISI M50 bearings in an air atmosphere. The primary mode of failure was corrosion initiated surface distress (fatigue) on the raceways. The potential of a case-carburized bearing to sustain a combination of high-tangential and hertzian stresses without experiencing race fracture was also investigated. Limited full scale bearing tests of a 120 mm bore ball bearing at a speed of 25,000 rpm (3 million DN) indicated that a carburized material could sustain spalling fatigue without subsequent propagation to fracture. Planned life tests of the carburized material had to be aborted, however, because of apparent processing-induced material defects.

  3. Proprioceptive perturbations of stability during gait.

    PubMed

    Duysens, J; Beerepoot, V P; Veltink, P H; Weerdesteyn, V; Smits-Engelsman, B C M

    2008-12-01

    Through recent studies, the role of proprioceptors in reactions to perturbations during gait has been finally somewhat better understood. The input from spindle afferents has been investigated with tendon taps, vibration and other forms of muscle stretches, including some resembling natural perturbations (stumbling, slips, and ankle inversions). It was found that activation of spindle afferents produces short-latency response (SLR), consistent with a fast spinal pathway. These reflexes induce relatively minor activation in the stretched muscles. A central question is whether stretch reflexes can occur for stimuli that are quite remote. Thus, a new study was made to examine whether foot sole vibration is able to elicit reflex responses in upper-leg muscles, for example by conduction of vibrations throughout the whole leg. SLR responses were indeed found not only in lower- but also in upper-leg muscles. Similarly during stumbling, SLR are observed throughout the whole limb, although the primary perturbation occurs at foot level. After the SLR, much stronger activations usually occur, with latencies (85 or 120ms) well below those seen in voluntary contractions. These late responses are much more selective and presumably linked to the maintenance of stability. The role of the I(b) afferents from the Golgi tendon organs (GTO) is less clear. From animal work, it is known that these afferents are very sensitive to active muscle contraction and that they play a role in providing reinforcing feedback to extensors during the stance phase. The available evidence supports this notion in humans but lack of selective activation methods precludes more conclusive confirmation. PMID:19026960

  4. Inhibition, Executive Function, and Freezing of Gait

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Rajal G.; Klein, Krystal A.; Nomura, Mariko; Fleming, Michael; Mancini, Martina; Giladi, Nir; Nutt, John G.; Horak, Fay B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies suggest that freezing of gait (FoG) in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) is associated with declines in executive function (EF). However, EF is multi-faceted, including three dissociable components: inhibiting prepotent responses, switching between task sets, and updating working memory. Objective This study investigated which aspect of EF is most strongly associated with FoG in PD. Method Three groups were studied: adults with PD (with and without FoG) and age-matched, healthy adults. All participants completed a battery of cognitive tasks previously shown to discriminate among the three EF components. Participants also completed a turning-in-place task that was scored for FoG by neurologists blind to subjects’ self-reported FoG. Results Compared to both other groups, participants with FoG showed significant performance deficits in tasks associated with inhibitory control, even after accounting for differences in disease severity, but no significant deficits in task-switching or updating working memory. Surprisingly, the strongest effect was an intermittent tendency of participants with FoG to hesitate, and thus miss the response window, on go trials in the Go-Nogo task. The FoG group also made slower responses in the conflict condition of the Stroop task. Physician-rated FoG scores were correlated both with failures to respond on go trials and with failures to inhibit responses on nogo trials in the Go-Nogo task. Conclusion These results suggest that FoG is associated with a specific inability to appropriately engage and release inhibition, rather than with a general executive deficit. PMID:24496099

  5. Effect of Task Specific Exercises, Gait Training, and Visual Biofeedback on Equinovarus Gait among Individuals with Stroke: Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Khallaf, Mohamed Elsayed; Gabr, Ahmed Maher; Fayed, Eman Elsayed

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Equinovarus foot is a common sign after stroke. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of task specific exercises, gait training, and visual biofeedback on correcting equinovarus gait among individuals with stroke. Subjects and Methods. Sixteen subjects with ischemic stroke were randomly assigned to two equal groups (G1 and G2). All the patients were at stage 4 of motor recovery of foot according to Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment without any cognitive dysfunction. E-med pedography was used to measure contact time, as well as force underneath hind and forefoot during walking. Outcome measures were collected before randomization, one week after the last session, and four weeks later. Participants in G1 received task specific exercises, gait training, and visual biofeedback and a traditional physical therapy program was applied for participants in G2 for 8 weeks. Results. Significant improvement was observed among G1 patients (P ≤ 0.05) which lasts one month after therapy termination. On the other hand, there were no significant differences between measurements of the participants in G2. Between groups comparison also revealed a significant improvement in G1 with long lasting effect. Conclusion. The results of this study showed a positive long lasting effect of the task specific exercises, gait training, and visual biofeedback on equinovarus gait pattern among individuals with stroke. PMID:25538853

  6. Effect of Task Specific Exercises, Gait Training, and Visual Biofeedback on Equinovarus Gait among Individuals with Stroke: Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Khallaf, Mohamed Elsayed; Gabr, Ahmed Maher; Fayed, Eman Elsayed

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Equinovarus foot is a common sign after stroke. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of task specific exercises, gait training, and visual biofeedback on correcting equinovarus gait among individuals with stroke. Subjects and Methods. Sixteen subjects with ischemic stroke were randomly assigned to two equal groups (G1 and G2). All the patients were at stage 4 of motor recovery of foot according to Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment without any cognitive dysfunction. E-med pedography was used to measure contact time, as well as force underneath hind and forefoot during walking. Outcome measures were collected before randomization, one week after the last session, and four weeks later. Participants in G1 received task specific exercises, gait training, and visual biofeedback and a traditional physical therapy program was applied for participants in G2 for 8 weeks. Results. Significant improvement was observed among G1 patients (P ? 0.05) which lasts one month after therapy termination. On the other hand, there were no significant differences between measurements of the participants in G2. Between groups comparison also revealed a significant improvement in G1 with long lasting effect. Conclusion. The results of this study showed a positive long lasting effect of the task specific exercises, gait training, and visual biofeedback on equinovarus gait pattern among individuals with stroke. PMID:25538853

  7. The relationship between bilateral knee muscle strength and gait performance after stroke: the predictive value for gait performance

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Makoto; Suzuki, Makoto; Sugimura, Yuko; Kawaguchi, Takayuki; Watanabe, Aki; Shibata, Kazuhiko; Fukuda, Michinari

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to assess the relationships between bilateral knee extension strengths and gait performance in subjects with poststroke hemiparesis and to predict gait performance by the paretic and nonparetic knee extension strength. [Subjects and Methods] This was a correlational study in which 238 consecutive inpatients with poststroke hemiparesis were enrolled. Knee extensor muscle strengths in paretic and nonparetic lower limbs were measured with a handheld dynamometer, and the presence or absence of impaired gait was also determined. [Results] The mean strength in the paretic lower limb was 0.90 Nm/kg, and that in the nonparetic lower limb was 1.24 Nm/kg. Discriminant analysis classified the difference between the possibility and impossibility of gait by knee extensor muscle strength (standardized discriminant coefficient: paretic, 1.32; nonparetic, 0.55). Thus, paretic and nonparetic knee extension strengths were integrated in the strength index. A threshold level of 2.0 provided the best balance between positive and negative predictive values for the strength index. [Conclusion] The results indicated that both paretic and nonparetic knee extension strengths were related to gait performance. The strength index deduced from bilateral knee extension strengths may serve as a clinically meaningful index for rehabilitation assessment and training. PMID:26644680

  8. Mistaken diagnosis of psychogenic gait disorder in a man with status cataplecticus ("limp man syndrome").

    PubMed

    Simon, David K; Nishino, Seiji; Scammell, Thomas E

    2004-07-01

    We report on a 45-year-old man with a history of multiple psychiatric admissions for a gait disorder and episodic weakness thought to be psychogenic who was subsequently diagnosed with status cataplecticus due to narcolepsy. The gait difficulties resolved with venlafaxine. This case demonstrates that status cataplecticus can be misdiagnosed as a psychogenic gait disorder. PMID:15254948

  9. A Review of Balance and Gait Capacities in Relation to Falls in Persons with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enkelaar, Lotte; Smulders, Ellen; van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, Henny; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Weerdesteyn, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    Limitations in mobility are common in persons with intellectual disabilities (ID). As balance and gait capacities are key aspects of mobility, the prevalence of balance and gait problems is also expected to be high in this population. The objective of this study was to critically review the available literature on balance and gait characteristics

  10. A Review of Balance and Gait Capacities in Relation to Falls in Persons with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enkelaar, Lotte; Smulders, Ellen; van Schrojenstein Lantman-de Valk, Henny; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Weerdesteyn, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    Limitations in mobility are common in persons with intellectual disabilities (ID). As balance and gait capacities are key aspects of mobility, the prevalence of balance and gait problems is also expected to be high in this population. The objective of this study was to critically review the available literature on balance and gait characteristics…

  11. A wearable walking monitoring system for gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Tsung-Han; Tsai, An-Chih; Chang, Cha-Wei; Ho, Ka-Hou; Hsu, Wei-Li; Lin, Ta-Te

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, both hardware and software design to develop a wearable walking monitoring system for gait analysis are presented. For hardware, the mechanism proposed is adaptive to different individuals to wear, and the portability of the design makes it easy to perform outdoor experiments. Four force sensors and two angle displacement sensors were used to measure plantar force distribution and the angles of hip and knee joints. For software design, a novel algorithm was developed to detect different gait phases and the four gait periods during the stance phase. Furthermore, the center of ground contact force was calculated based on the relationships of the force sensors. The results were compared with the VICON motion capture system and a force plate for validation. Experiments showed the behavior of the joint angles are similar to VICON system, and the average error in foot strike time is less than 90 ms. PMID:23367484

  12. Design of active orthoses for a robotic gait rehabilitation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa-Parra, A. C.; Broche, L.; Delisle-Rodríguez, D.; Sagaró, R.; Bastos, T.; Frizera-Neto, A.

    2015-09-01

    An active orthosis (AO) is a robotic device that assists both human gait and rehabilitation therapy. This work proposes portable AOs, one for the knee joint and another for the ankle joint. Both AOs will be used to complete a robotic system that improves gait rehabilitation. The requirements for actuator selection, the biomechanical considerations during the AO design, the finite element method, and a control approach based on electroencephalographic and surface electromyographic signals are reviewed. This work contributes to the design of AOs for users with foot drop and knee flexion impairment. However, the potential of the proposed AOs to be part of a robotic gait rehabilitation system that improves the quality of life of stroke survivors requires further investigation.

  13. Gait analysis and estimation of changes in fall risk factors.

    PubMed

    Simila, Heidi; Immonen, Milla; Merilahti, Juho; Petakoski-Hult, Tuula

    2015-08-01

    Falls are a major problem for older adults. A continuous gait monitoring that provides fall risk assessment would allow timely interventions aiming for preventing falls. The objective of this work was to find out whether gait variables calculated from the acceleration signal measured during walk task in the baseline assessment can predict changes in commonly used fall risk assessment scales after 12 months follow-up. Forty two subjects were measured during walk test with a triaxial acceleration sensor worn on a waist belt at the lower back near the centre of mass. The fall risk was assessed using a test protocol, which included several assessment methods. Gait analysis was able to predict a decline in ABC, BBS and GDS total scores and slower time in STS-5 after twelve-months follow-up. A subsequent study is needed to confirm the model's suitability for data recorded in everyday lives. PMID:26737888

  14. Weight Control

    MedlinePLUS

    ... weight, the calories you eat must equal the energy you burn. To lose weight, you must use more calories than you eat. A weight-control strategy might include Choosing low-fat, low-calorie foods Eating smaller portions Drinking water instead of sugary ...

  15. Arcturus and the Bears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonello, E.

    2009-08-01

    Arcturus is the brightest star in Bootes. The ancient Greek name Arktouros means Bear Guard. The star, however, is not close to Ursa Maior (Big She-Bear) and Ursa Minor (Little She-Bear), as the name would suggest. This curious discrepancy could be explained by the star proper motion, assuming the name Bear Guard is a remote cultural heritage. The proper motion analysis could allow us to get an insight also into an ancient myth regarding Ursa Maior. Though we cannot explain scientifically such a myth, some interesting suggestions can be obtained about its possible origin, in the context of the present knowledge of the importance of the cult of the bear both during the Palaeolithic times and for several primitive populations of modern times, as shown by the ethnological studies.

  16. OTV bearing deflection investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, B. L.; Diepenbrock, R. T.; Millis, M. G.

    1993-04-01

    The primary goal of the Bearing Deflectometer Investigation was to gain experience in the use of fiber optic displacement probe technology for bearing health monitoring in a liquid hydrogen turbo pump. The work specified in this Task Order was conducted in conjunction with Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory Contract F04611-86-C-0010. APD conducted the analysis and design coordination to provide a displacement probe design compatible with the XLR-134 liquid hydrogen turbo pump assembly (TPA). Specifications and requirements of the bearing deflectometer were established working with Mechanical Technology Instruments, Inc. (MTI). The TPA design accommodated positioning of the probe to measure outer race cyclic deflections of the pump inlet bearing. The fiber optic sensor was installed as required in the TPA and sensor output was recorded during the TPA testing. Data review indicated that no bearing deflection signature could be differentiated from the inherent system noise. Alternate sensor installations were not investigated, but might yield different results.

  17. Gait speed and related factors in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Paker, Nurdan; Bugdayci, Derya; Goksenoglu, Goksen; Demircioğlu, Demet Tekdöş; Kesiktas, Nur; Ince, Nurhan

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between gait speed and various factors in ambulatory patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease. [Subjects] Fifty ambulatory patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease who were admitted to an outpatient clinic were included in this cross-sectional study. [Methods] The Hoehn and Yahr Scale was used for measurement of the disease severity. Gait speed was measured by the 10-Meter Walk Test. Mobility status was assessed by Timed Up and Go Test. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was used for evaluation of emotional state. Cognitive status was examined with the Mini-Mental State Examination. The Downton Index was used for fall risk assessment. Balance was evaluated with the Berg Balance Scale. Comorbidity was measured with the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale. The 36-Item Short Form Health Survey was completed for measurement of quality of life. [Results] The mean age was 66.7 (47-83) years. Twenty-eight (56%) patients were men. Gait speed was correlated positively with height, male gender, Mini-Mental Examination score, Berg Balance Scale score and physical summary scores of the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey. On the other hand, there was a negative correlation between gait speed and age, disease severity, TUG time, Downton Index, fear of falling, previous falls and the anxiety and depression scores of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. There was no correlation between gait speed and comorbidity. [Conclusion] The factors related with the slower gait speed are, elder age, clinically advanced disease, poor mobility, fear of falling, falling history, higher falling risk, and mood disorder. PMID:26834330

  18. Gait planning for a quadruped robot with one faulty actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xianbao; Gao, Feng; Qi, Chenkun; Tian, Xinghua

    2015-01-01

    Fault tolerance is essential for quadruped robots when they work in remote areas or hazardous environments. Many fault-tolerant gaits planning method proposed in the past decade constrained more degrees of freedom(DOFs) of a robot than necessary. Thus a novel method to realize the fault-tolerant walking is proposed. The mobility of the robot is analyzed first by using the screw theory. The result shows that the translation of the center of body(CoB) can be kept with one faulty actuator if the rotations of the body are controlled. Thus the DOFs of the robot body are divided into two parts: the translation of the CoB and the rotation of the body. The kinematic model of the whole robot is built, the algorithm is developed to actively control the body orientations at the velocity level so that the planned CoB trajectory can be realized in spite of the constraint of the faulty actuator. This gait has a similar generation sequence with the normal gait and can be applied to the robot at any position. Simulations and experiments of the fault-tolerant gait with one faulty actuator are carried out. The CoB errors and the body rotation angles are measured. Comparing to the traditional fault-tolerant gait they can be reduced by at least 50%. A fault-tolerant gait planning algorithm is presented, which not only realizes the walking of a quadruped robot with a faulty actuator, but also efficiently improves the walking performances by taking full advantage of the remaining operational actuators according to the results of the simulations and experiments.

  19. Effect of Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation on Hemiplegic Gait Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Yoon-Kyum; Chong, Hyun Ju

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of our study was to investigate the effect of gait training with rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) on both kinematic and temporospatial gait patterns in patients with hemiplegia. Materials and Methods Eighteen hemiplegic patients diagnosed with either cerebral palsy or stroke participated in this study. All participants underwent the 4-week gait training with RAS. The treatment was performed for 30 minutes per each session, three sessions per week. RAS was provided with rhythmic beats using a chord progression on a keyboard. Kinematic and temporospatial data were collected and analyzed using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Results Gait training with RAS significantly improved both proximal and distal joint kinematic patterns in hip adduction, knee flexion, and ankle plantar flexion, enhancing the gait deviation index (GDI) as well as ameliorating temporal asymmetry of the stance and swing phases in patients with hemiplegia. Stroke patients with previous walking experience demonstrated significant kinematic improvement in knee flexion in mid-swing and ankle dorsiflexion in terminal stance. Among stroke patients, subacute patients showed a significantly increased GDI score compared with chronic patients. In addition, household ambulators showed a significant effect on reducing anterior tilt of the pelvis with an enhanced GDI score, while community ambulators significantly increased knee flexion in mid-swing phase and ankle dorsiflexion in terminal stance phase. Conclusion Gait training with RAS has beneficial effects on both kinematic and temporospatial patterns in patients with hemiplegia, providing not only clinical implications of locomotor rehabilitation with goal-oriented external feedback using RAS but also differential effects according to ambulatory function. PMID:26446657

  20. Amantadine improves gait in PD patients with STN stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chan, Hiu-Fai; Kukkle, Prashanth L; Merello, Marcelo; Lim, Shen-Yang; Poon, Yu-Yan; Moro, Elena

    2013-03-01

    In advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), axial symptoms such as speech, gait, and balance impairment often become levodopa-unresponsive and they are difficult to manage, even in patients with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS). We anecdotally observed that oral administration of amantadine was very effective in treating both residual and stimulation-induced axial symptoms after bilateral STN-DBS in one PD patient. Therefore, we conducted a prospective multicenter observational study to evaluate the effects of amantadine on speech, gait and balance in PD patients with STN-DBS and incomplete axial benefit. Primary outcomes were changes in speech (UPDRS III, item 18), gait (item 29) and postural stability (item 30) with amantadine treatment compared to baseline. Secondary outcome was the patients' subjective scoring of axial symptoms with amantadine compared to baseline. Forty-six PD patients with STN-DBS were enrolled in the study and followed for 10.35 8.21 months (median: 9.00; range: 1-31). The mean daily dose of amantadine was 273.44 47.49 mg. Gait scores significantly improved (from 1.51 0.89 to 1.11 0.92, P = 0.015) with amantadine treatment, whereas postural stability and speech scores were similar before and after treatment. Thirty-five (76.1%) patients reported subjective improvement in speech, gait or balance with amantadine, whereas thirty (65.2%) patients reported improvement in gait and balance. In conclusion, our data suggest that amantadine may have new beneficial effects on axial symptoms in PD patients with STN-DBS. PMID:23218842

  1. Subtle gait abnormalities in Nedd4 heterozygous mice.

    PubMed

    Camera, Daria; Boase, Natasha A; Kumar, Sharad; Pow, David V; Poronnik, Philip

    2014-03-01

    Nedd4 is a widely expressed ubiquitin ligase that is necessary for normal neuronal development and function. However, largely due to the lethality of Nedd4 homozygous knockout mice, little is known about the physiological roles of Nedd4 in the adult brain. In this study we used Nedd4 heterozygous mice, which are viable and live to maturity, to assess for motor function and