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Sample records for welded joints obtained

  1. Structure of Ti-6Al-4V nanostructured titanium alloy joint obtained by resistance spot welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenov, V. A.; Kurgan, K. A.; Chumaevskii, A. V.; Klopotov, A. A.; Gnyusov, S. F.

    2016-01-01

    The structure of weld joints of the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V in the initial ultrafine-grained state, obtained by resistance spot welding, is studied using the optical and scanning electron microscopy method and the X-ray structure analysis. The carried out studies show the relationship of the metal structure in the weld zone with main joint zones. The structure in the core zone and the heat affected zone is represented by finely dispersed grains of needle-shaped martensite, differently oriented in these zones. The change in the microhardness in the longitudinal section of the weld joint clearly correlates with structural changes during welding.

  2. Structure of welded joints obtained by contact weld in nanostructured titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenov, V. A.; Klopotov, A. A.; Gnysov, S. F.; Vlasov, V. A.; Lychagin, D. V.; Chumaevskii, A. V.

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents the research of the weld structure of two Ti specimens of the type VT6 that have nano- and submicrocrystalline structures. Electrical contact welding is used to obtain welds. The acicular structure is formed in the weld area. Two types of defects are detected, namely micropores and microcracks.

  3. Jointed Holder For Welding Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    Adjustable-angle holder enables use of standard straight electrode with custom-fabricated bent gas cup for welding in difficult-to-reach places. Electrode replaced easily, without removing cup, with aid of tool loosening miniature collet nut on holder. Consumes fewer electrodes for given amount of welding. Angle of holder continuously adjustable to fit angle of gas cup or geometry of part welded. Holder made double-jointed to accommodate gas cup having compound angles.

  4. Investigation of the structure and properties of titanium-stainless steel permanent joints obtained by laser welding with the use of intermediate inserts and nanopowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanov, A. N.; Orishich, A. M.; Pugacheva, N. B.; Shapeev, V. P.

    2015-03-01

    Results of an experimental study of the structure, the phase composition, and the mechanical properties of laser-welded joints of 3-mm thick titanium and 12Kh18N10T steel sheets obtained with the use of intermediate inserts and nanopowdered modifying additives are reported. It is shown that that such parameters as the speed of welding, the radiation power, and the laser-beam focal spot position all exert a substantial influence on the welding-bath process and on the seam structure formed. In terms of chemical composition, most uniform seams with the best mechanical strength are formed at a 1-m/min traverse speed of laser and 2.35-kW laser power, with the focus having been positioned at the lower surface of the sheets. Under all other conditions being identical, uplift of the focus to workpiece surface or to a higher position results in unsteady steel melting, in a decreased depth and reduced degree of the diffusion-induced mixing of elements, and in an interpolate connection formed according to the soldering mechanism in the root portion of the seam. The seam material is an over-saturated copper-based solid solution of alloying elements with homogeneously distributed intermetallic disperse particles (Ti(Fe, Cr)2 and TiCu3) contained in this alloy. Brittle fracture areas exhibiting cleavage and quasi-cleavage facets correspond to coarse Ti(Fe, Cr)2 intermetallic particles or to diffusion zones primarily occurring at the interface with the titanium alloy. The reported data and the conclusions drawn from the numerical calculations of the thermophysical processes of welding of 3-mm thick titanium and steel sheets through an intermediate copper insert are in qualitative agreement with the experimental data. The latter agreement points to adequacy of the numerical description of the melting processes of contacting materials versus welding conditions and focal-spot position in the system.

  5. Pyrothermal treatment of welded joints

    SciTech Connect

    Serikov, S.V.; Idiyatullin, R.S.; Myakushkin, S.N.; Yaufman, V.V.

    1992-03-01

    The results of investigation of the structure and distribution of residual stresses in welded joints in pipes after heat treatment, which includes heating of the surface being treated due to combustion of plates formed from a thermite-type material of pyrotechnic composition, placed around the perimeter of the welded joint, and also an assessment of the level of residual stresses prior to and after pyrotechnic treatment demonstrated the promising nature of the proposed method. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  6. The technology and welding joint properties of hybrid laser-tig welding on thick plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenghai, Zhang; Yifu, Shen; Huijuan, Qiu

    2013-06-01

    The technologies of autogenous laser welding and hybrid laser-TIG welding are used on thick plate of high strength lower alloy structural steel 10CrNiMnMoV in this article. The unique advantages of hybrid laser-TIG welding is summarized by comparing and analyzing the process parameters and welding joints of autogenous laser welding laser welding and hybrid laser-TIG welding. With the optimal process parameters of hybrid welding, the good welding joint without visible flaws can be obtained and its mechanical properties are tested according to industry standards. The results show that the hybrid welding technology has certain advantages and possibility in welding thick plates. It can reduce the demands of laser power, and it is significant for lowering the aspect ratio of weld during hybrid welding, so the gas in the molten pool can rise and escape easily while welding thick plates. Therefore, the pores forming tendency decreases. At the same time, hybrid welding enhances welding speed, and optimizes the energy input. The transition and grain size of the microstructure of hybrid welding joint is better and its hardness is higher than base material. Furthermore, its tensile strength and impact toughness is as good as base material. Consequently, the hybrid welding joint can meet the industry needs completely.

  7. Fracturing behavior of aluminum alloys with welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakov, V. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.; Salita, D. S.; Dmitriev, A. A.; Lependin, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, properties of aluminum-magnesium alloys with welded joints are investigated. The joints are produced by the friction stir welding under various conditions. This fact is used for studying the principles and patterns of defect structure development. Mechanical properties are evaluated by static tension tests. The impact of welding process conditions on loading curves and strength properties is analysed. Fracture surface structures for samples with and without welded joints are studied, and results are compared. It is revealed, that differences in deformation behavior and mechanical properties of aluminum-magnesium alloys produced under different welding process conditions are caused by developing of structure defects in a welded joints, mostly, nonuniformities/discontinuities of various types. The obtained results can be used for improvement and development of new welding process conditions for aluminum-magnesium alloys.

  8. Strength of Welded Aircraft Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueggeman, W C

    1937-01-01

    This investigation is a continuation of work started in 1928 and described in NACA-TR-348 which shows that the insertion of gusset plates was the most satisfactory way of strengthening a joint. Additional tests of the present series show that joints of this type could be improved by cutting out the portion of the plate between the intersecting tubes. T and lattice joints in thin-walled tubing 1 1/2 by 0.020 inch have somewhat lower strengths than joints in tubing of greater wall thickness because of failure by local buckling. In welding the thin-walled tubing, the recently developed "carburizing flux" process was found to be the only method capable of producing joints free from cracks. The "magnetic powder" inspection was used to detect cracks in the joints and flaws in the tubing.

  9. Thermal treatment of dissimilar steels' welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulina, A. A.; Denisova, A. S.; Gradusov, I. N.; Ryabinkina, P. A.; Rushkovets, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper combinations of chrome-nickel steel and high-carbon steel, produced by flash butt welding after heat treatment, are investigated. Light and electron microscopic studies show that the welded joints after heat treatment have a complex structure consisting of several phases as initial welded joints. A martensite structure in welded joints after thermal treatment at 300... 800 °C has been found.

  10. Polyimide weld bonding for titanium alloy joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Kurland, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Two weld bonding processes were developed for joining titanium alloy; one process utilizes a weld-through technique and the other a capillary-flow technique. The adhesive used for the weld-through process is similar to the P4/A5F system. A new polyimide laminating resin, BFBI/BMPM, was used in the capillary-flow process. Static property information was generated for weld-bonded joints over the temperature range of 219 K (-65 F) to 561 K (+550 F) and fatigue strength information was generated at room temperature. Significant improvement in fatigue strength was demonstrated for weld-bonded joints over spot-welded joints. A demonstration was made of the applicability of the weld-through weld-bonding process for fabricating stringer stiffened skin panels.

  11. Development of a technology for laser welding of the 1424 aluminum alloy with a high strength of the welded joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annin, B. D.; Fomin, V. M.; Karpov, E. V.; Malikov, A. G.; Orishich, A. M.; Cherepanov, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    Results of an experimental study of properties of joints obtained by using different regimes of laser welding of the 1424 alloy (Al-Mg-Li) are reported. The strength and structure of the welded joints are determined. The influence of various types of welded joint straining on its strength is studied. It is demonstrated that the joint strength increases in the case of plastic straining.

  12. Inspection of thick welded joints using laser-ultrasonic SAFT.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, D; Asaumi, Y; Lord, M; Bescond, C; Hatanaka, H; Tagami, M; Monchalin, J-P

    2016-07-01

    The detection of defects in thick butt joints in the early phase of multi-pass arc welding would be very valuable to reduce cost and time in the necessity of reworking. As a non-contact method, the laser-ultrasonic technique (LUT) has the potential for the automated inspection of welds, ultimately online during manufacturing. In this study, testing has been carried out using LUT combined with the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) on 25 and 50mm thick butt welded joints of steel both completed and partially welded. EDM slits of 2 or 3mm height were inserted at different depths in the multi-pass welding process to simulate a lack of fusion. Line scans transverse to the weld are performed with the generation and detection laser spots superimposed directly on the surface of the weld bead. A CCD line camera is used to simultaneously acquire the surface profile for correction in the SAFT processing. All artificial defects but also real defects are visualized in the investigated thick butt weld specimens, either completed or partially welded after a given number of passes. The results obtained clearly show the potential of using the LUT with SAFT for the automated inspection of arc welds or hybrid laser-arc welds during manufacturing. PMID:27062646

  13. Measurement of micro weld joint position based on magneto-optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang-Dong; Chen, Zi-Qin

    2015-01-01

    In a laser butt joint welding process, it is required that the laser beam focus should be controlled to follow the weld joint path accurately. Small focus wandering off the weld joint may result in insufficient penetration or unacceptable welds. Recognition of joint position offset, which describes the deviation between the laser beam focus and the weld joint, is important for adjusting the laser beam focus and obtaining high quality welds. A new method based on the magneto-optical (MO) imaging is applied to measure the micro weld joint whose gap is less than 0.2 mm. The weldments are excited by an external magnetic field, and an MO sensor based on principle of Faraday magneto effect is used to capture the weld joint images. A sequence of MO images which are tested under different magnetic field intensities and different weld joint widths are acquired. By analyzing the MO image characteristics and extracting the weld joint features, the influence of magnetic field intensity and weld joint width on the MO images and detection of weld joint position is observed and summarized. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51175095), the Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province, China (Grant No. 10251009001000001), the Guangdong Provincial Project of Science and Technology Innovation of Discipline Construction, China (Grant No. 2013KJCX0063), and the Science and Technology Plan Project of Guangzhou City, China (Grant No. 1563000554).

  14. Microstructure of AA 2024 fixed joints formed by friction stir welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliseev, A. A.; Kalashnikova, T. A.; Tarasov, S. Yu.; Rubtsov, V. E.; Fortuna, S. V.; Kolubaev, E. A.

    2015-10-01

    Friction stir welded butt joints on 2024T3 alloy have been obtained using different process parameters. The microstructures of all the weld joint zones have been examined and such structural parameters as grain size, particle size and volume content of particles have been determined in order to find correlations with the microhardness of the corresponding zones of the weld.

  15. Improving fatigue strength of welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamori, Hiroyuki

    One series of fatigue tests was carried out on coverplated bridge girders with small fatigue cracks that had been treated in 1976. The treatment and preconditions were reported in NCHRP Report 206. The Category E' coverplated. beams that were removed from the Yellow Mill Pond Bridge in 1997 had been retrofitted in 1976 by either air hammer peening or GTA remelting the weld toe. Most of the details had small fatigue cracks at the time the retrofit was carried out. No detectable fatigue cracking was observed at the treated coverplate ends after 20 years of service on I-95 and an estimated 56 million truck passages. All beams were tested at a stress range of 69 MPa (10 ksi). Cracks eventually developed from the root of the transverse end welds and propagated through the weld throat and from there into the beam flange via the longitudinal welds. The fatigue resistance of the treated weld toe details was improved to Category C. The one GTA remelted detail that recracked at the weld toe exceeded Category D. The second series of tests was carried out on large scale HPS-485W steel plate girders with as-welded and ultrasonic impact treated (UIT) details. The UIT treatment was applied to the weld toe of transverse stiffeners welded to the web and flanges (Category C details) and to coverplated ends (Category E' details). The as-welded details cracked as expected at their corresponding fatigue resistance. All UIT treated details were improved. The treated transverse stiffeners achieved Category B fatigue resistance. The treated coverplated details achieved Category C. The third series of tests was conducted on large scale HPS-485W steel plate girders with undermatched groove welded details at flange transition. The objectives of using undermatched weld materials compared to the base material is to reduce the potentiality of hydrogen cracking at flange groove welds and to improve the fatigue strength of the welded joints. Fatigue strength of undermatched welded joints was

  16. Welding technology transfer task/laser based weld joint tracking system for compressor girth welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Looney, Alan

    1991-01-01

    Sensors to control and monitor welding operations are currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. The laser based weld bead profiler/torch rotation sensor was modified to provide a weld joint tracking system for compressor girth welds. The tracking system features a precision laser based vision sensor, automated two-axis machine motion, and an industrial PC controller. The system benefits are elimination of weld repairs caused by joint tracking errors which reduces manufacturing costs and increases production output, simplification of tooling, and free costly manufacturing floor space.

  17. Virtual Welded-Joint Design Integrating Advanced Materials and Processing Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Z.; Dong, P.; Liu, S.; Babu, S.; Olson, G.; DebRoy, T.

    2005-04-15

    The primary goal of this project is to increase the fatigue life of a welded-joint by 10 times and to reduce energy use by 25% through product performance and productivity improvements using an integrated modeling approach. The fatigue strength of a welded-joint is currently the bottleneck to design high performance and lightweight welded structures using advanced materials such as high strength steels. In order to achieve high fatigue strength in a welded-joint it is necessary to manage the weld bead shape for lower stress concentration, produce preferable residual stress distribution, and obtain the desired microstructure for improved material toughness and strength. This is a systems challenge that requires the optimization of the welding process, the welding consumable, the base material, as well as the structure design. The concept of virtual welded-joint design has been proposed and established in this project. The goal of virtual welded-joint design is to develop a thorough procedure to predict the relationship of welding process, microstructure, property, residual stress, and the ultimate weld fatigue strength by a systematic modeling approach. The systematic approach combines five sub-models: weld thermal-fluid model, weld microstructure model, weld material property model, weld residual stress model, and weld fatigue model. The systematic approach is thus based on interdisciplinary applied sciences including heat transfer, computational fluid dynamics, materials science, engineering mechanics, and material fracture mechanics. The sub-models are based on existing models with further development. The results from modeling have been validated with critical experiments. The systematic modeling approach has been used to design high fatigue resistant welds considering the combined effects of weld bead geometry, residual stress, microstructure, and material property. In particular, a special welding wire has been developed in this project to introduce

  18. Low Distortion Welded Joints for NCSX

    SciTech Connect

    M. Denault, M Viola, W. England

    2009-02-19

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) required precise positioning of the field coils in order to generate suitable magnetic fields. A set of three modular field coils were assembled to form the Half Field-Period Assemblies (HPA). Final assembly of the HPA required a welded shear plate to join individual coils in the nose region due to the geometric limitations and the strength constraints. Each of the modular coil windings was wound on a stainless steel alloy (Stellalloy) casting. The alloy is similar to austenitic 316 stainless steel. During the initial welding trials, severe distortion, of approximately 1/16", was observed in the joint caused by weld shrinkage. The distortion was well outside the requirements of the design. Solutions were attempted through several simultaneous routes. The joint design was modified, welding processes were changed, and specialized heat reduction techniques were utilized. A final joint design was selected to reduce the amount of weld material needed to be deposited, while maintaining adequate penetration and strength. Several welding processes and techniques using Miller Axcess equipment were utilized that significantly reduced heat input. The final assembly of the HPA was successful. Distortion was controlled to 0.012", well within the acceptable design tolerance range of 0.020" over a 3.5 foot length.

  19. Advanced tests of wet welded joints

    SciTech Connect

    Pachniuk, I.; Petershagen, H.; Pohl, R.; Szelagowski, P.; Drews, O.

    1994-12-31

    Wet Welding has in former times only been applied to secondary structural components. Nowadays wet welding has become an upcoming repair process due to high process flexibility, its low investment costs and its high versatility. Even the quality of the wet welded joints has been improved remarkably due to intensive and concentrated development activities. However, especially in the North Sea regions owners of offshore structures and classifying authorities still hesitate to recognize the process as a reliable alternative to dry hyperbaric welding repair methods. It therefore requires further activities especially in the field of data development for life prediction of such repaired components. Advanced testing methods are necessary, additional design criteria are to be developed and achievable weldment quality data are to be included in acknowledged and approved standards and recommendations to improve the credibility of the process and to solve the problem of quality assurance for wet welded joints. A comprehensive project, sponsored by the European Community under the Thermie Programme, is in progress to develop new testing procedures to generate the required data and design criteria for the future application of the wet welding process to main components of offshore structures. It is the aim of the project to establish additional fitness for purpose data for this process.

  20. METHOD OF OBTAINING AN IMPROVED WELD IN INERT ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.

    1962-12-11

    A method is reported for inert arc welding. An a-c welding current is applied to the workpiece and welding electrode such that the positive portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode positive, has only sufficient energy to clean the surface of the workpiece and the negative portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode negative, contains the energy required to weld. (AEC)

  1. Failure Behavior of Three-Steel Sheets Resistance Spot Welds: Effect of Joint Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouranvari, M.; Marashi, S. P. H.

    2012-08-01

    There is a lack of comprehensive understanding concerning failure characteristics of three-steel sheet resistance spot welds. In this article, macro/microstructural characteristics and failure behavior of 1.25/1.25/1.25 mm three-sheet low carbon steel resistance spot welds are investigated. To evaluate the mechanical properties of the joint, the tensile-shear test was performed in three different joint designs. Mechanical performance of the joint was described in terms of peak load, energy absorption, and failure mode. The critical weld nugget size required to insure pullout failure mode was obtained for each joint design. It was found that the joint design significantly affects the mechanical properties and the tendency to fail in the interfacial failure mode. It was also observed that stiffer joint types exhibit higher critical weld size. Fusion zone size along sheet/sheet interface proved to be the most important controlling factor of spot weld peak load and energy absorption.

  2. Characterization of AZ31B wrought magnesium alloy joints welded by high power fiber laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zemin; Gao Ming Tang Haiguo; Zeng Xiaoyan

    2011-10-15

    A 6 kW fiber laser is used to weld AZ31B wrought magnesium alloy and the characterization of welded joints are studied by the observations of bead size, microstructure and mechanical properties. The accepted joints without macro-defects can be obtained when the laser power is in the range of 2.5 to 4.0 kW. Typical hexagonal dendrites are observed in the fusion zone, whose average semi-axis length increases with increasing heat input or decreasing welding speed. The minimum ultimate tensile strength of welded joints reaches 227 MPa, 94.6% of the base metal. And when the heat input reduces to 48 J/mm or lower, the joints are fractured in the base metal, showing stronger failure strength compared to the base metal. For the joints ruptured in the weld metal, the fracture surface is characterized by a ductile-brittle mixed pattern consisting of both dimples and cleavages. Finally, the formation mechanism of pore in the welds is discussed and summarized by the pore morphologies on the fracture surface. - Highlights: {yields} Accepted joints of AZ31B Mg alloy are produced by high power fiber laser. {yields} Optimal welding parameters are summarized by experimental observations. {yields} Obvious hexagonal dendrites are observed in the fusion zone. {yields} The joints are stronger than base metal as the heat input is lower than 48 J/mm. {yields} Pore formation mechanism of welded joints is discussed and summarized.

  3. 49 CFR 195.216 - Welding: Miter joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welding: Miter joints. 195.216 Section 195.216 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.216 Welding: Miter joints. A miter joint is not permitted (not...

  4. 49 CFR 195.216 - Welding: Miter joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding: Miter joints. 195.216 Section 195.216 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.216 Welding: Miter joints. A miter joint is not permitted (not...

  5. 49 CFR 195.216 - Welding: Miter joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding: Miter joints. 195.216 Section 195.216 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.216 Welding: Miter joints. A miter joint is not permitted (not...

  6. 49 CFR 195.216 - Welding: Miter joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding: Miter joints. 195.216 Section 195.216 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.216 Welding: Miter joints. A miter joint is not permitted (not...

  7. 49 CFR 195.216 - Welding: Miter joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welding: Miter joints. 195.216 Section 195.216 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY... PIPELINE Construction § 195.216 Welding: Miter joints. A miter joint is not permitted (not...

  8. Diffusion welding in air. [solid state welding of butt joint by fusion welding, surface cleaning, and heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. J.; Holko, K. H. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Solid state welding a butt joint by fusion welding the peripheral surfaces to form a seal is described along with, autogenetically cleaning the faying or mating surfaces of the joint by heating the abutting surfaces to 1,200 C and heating to the diffusion welding temperature in air.

  9. Effect of welding process on the microstructure and properties of dissimilar weld joints between low alloy steel and duplex stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Lu, Min-xu; Zhang, Lei; Chang, Wei; Xu, Li-ning; Hu, Li-hua

    2012-06-01

    To obtain high-quality dissimilar weld joints, the processes of metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding for duplex stainless steel (DSS) and low alloy steel were compared in this paper. The microstructure and corrosion morphology of dissimilar weld joints were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM); the chemical compositions in different zones were detected by energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS); the mechanical properties were measured by microhardness test, tensile test, and impact test; the corrosion behavior was evaluated by polarization curves. Obvious concentration gradients of Ni and Cr exist between the fusion boundary and the type II boundary, where the hardness is much higher. The impact toughness of weld metal by MIG welding is higher than that by TIG welding. The corrosion current density of TIG weld metal is higher than that of MIG weld metal in a 3.5wt% NaCl solution. Galvanic corrosion happens between low alloy steel and weld metal, revealing the weakness of low alloy steel in industrial service. The quality of joints produced by MIG welding is better than that by TIG welding in mechanical performance and corrosion resistance. MIG welding with the filler metal ER2009 is the suitable welding process for dissimilar metals jointing between UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel and low alloy steel in practical application.

  10. Influence of Protective Gas Content on Quality of Welded Joint While Welding With Impulse Supply of Electrode Wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, N. V.; Kryukov, A. V.; Zernin, E. A.; Gritsenko, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    Currently one of the advanced ways of obtaining quality welded joint while welding of medium alloy martensitic-bainitic steel is the one with impulse supply of electrode wire in gas mixture Ar(70%±3%)+C02(30%±3%). Results of experimental studies proved that application of protective gas Ar(70%±3%)+C02(30%±3%) in comparison with CO2(100%) enables to increase strength properties of the welded joint by 10-15% and enlarge the transition coefficient of chemical elements.

  11. Microstructure and mechanical properties of laser-arc hybrid welding joint of GH909 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ting; Yan, Fei; Liu, Sang; Li, Ruoyang; Wang, Chunming; Hu, Xiyuan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, laser-arc hybrid welding of 10 mm thick low-thermal-expansion superalloy GH909 components was carried out to obtain a joint with good performance. This investigation was conducted using an optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, energy diffraction spectrum and other methodologies. The results showed that weld joints with a desirable wineglass-shaped weld profile can be obtained employing appropriate process parameters. The different grains in between the upper central seam and the bottom seam were associated with the temperature gradient, the pool's flow and the welding thermal cycle. MC-type carbides and eutectic phases (γ+Laves) were produced at grain boundaries due to the component segregation during the welding process. In addition, γ‧ strengthening phase presented in the interior of grains, which kept a coherent relationship with the matrix. The lowest hardness value occurred in the weld center, which indicated that it was the weakest section in the whole joint. The average tensile strength of the joints reached to 632.90 MPa, nearly 76.84% of the base metal. The fracture analysis revealed that the fracture mode of the joint was ductile fracture and the main reason for joint failure was as a result of the occurrence of porosities produced in the weld during the welding process.

  12. "Foreign material" to verify root fusion in welded joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleint, R. E.

    1980-01-01

    Foil or thin wire at weld root is used to verify weld penetration. When weld is adequate, material mixes with weld and traces of it diffuse to weld crown. Spectroscopic analysis of samples identifies foreign material and verifies root has fused. Weld roots are usually inaccessible to visual inspection, and X-ray and ultrasonic inspection techniques are not always reliable. Good results are obtained with use of gold/nickel alloy.

  13. Virtual Welded - Joint Design Integrating Advanced Materials and Processing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhishang; Ludewig, Howard W.; Babu, S. Suresh

    2005-06-30

    Virtual Welede-Joint Design, a systematic modeling approach, has been developed in this project to predict the relationship of welding process, microstructure, properties, residual stress, and the ultimate weld fatique strength. This systematic modeling approach was applied in the welding of high strength steel. A special welding wire was developed in this project to introduce compressive residual stress at weld toe. The results from both modeling and experiments demonstrated that more than 10x fatique life improvement can be acheived in high strength steel welds by the combination of compressive residual stress from the special welding wire and the desired weld bead shape from a unique welding process. The results indicate a technology breakthrough in the design of lightweight and high fatique performance welded structures using high strength steels.

  14. Electroslag welding of the longitudinal joints of air cooler chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Khakimov, A.N.; Antonov, V.V.; Malyarevskaya, E.K.; Prygaev, A.K.

    1986-09-01

    This paper presents a method and equipment for electroslag welding with regulation of the thermal cycle. The method enables one, as the result of external action on the parameters of the welding production cycles, to provide the optimum zonal structural and mechanical uniformity, and consequently, the level of properties of the weld joint which eliminates the expensive normalizing procedure. The welding conditions for chambers of 90G2S and 16GS steels and the cooling parameters are shown. The mechanical properties of weld joints made with the method are presented.

  15. Seam-Tracking for Friction Stir Welded Lap Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Paul A.; Hendricks, Christopher E.; Cook, George E.; Wilkes, D. M.; Strauss, Alvin M.; Lammlein, David H.

    2010-11-01

    This article presents a method for automatic seam-tracking in friction stir welding (FSW) of lap joints. In this method, tracking is accomplished by weaving the FSW tool back-and-forth perpendicular to the direction of travel during welding and monitoring force and torque signals. Research demonstrates the ability of this method to automatically track weld seam positions. Additionally, tensile and S-bend test result comparisons demonstrate that weaving most likely does not reduce weld quality. Finally, benefits of this weave-based method to FSW of lap joints are discussed and methods for incorporating it into existing friction stir welding control algorithms (such as axial load control) are examined.

  16. Yield detection in aluminum welded joints using photostress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gambrell, S. C., Jr.; Kavikondala, K.

    1994-01-01

    Previous work using photostress to analyze behavior of aluminum welded joints was useful to determine mechanical properties of the weld and parent materials along the centerline of the joint. It was shown that significant differences exist in the stress-strain characteristics at points beginning at the centerline of the weld and extending for a distance of one inch to either side of the weld. Because of the highly variable behavior detected in the previous work, it was decided to extend the work to investigate behavior of joints 1/8, 1/2, and 1.40 inches thick.

  17. 78 FR 47486 - Joint Failure on Continuous Welded Rail Track

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... Federal Railroad Administration Joint Failure on Continuous Welded Rail Track AGENCY: Federal Railroad..., internal continuous welded rail (CWR) plans and properly inspecting CWR joints to identify and correct...., Washington, DC 20590, telephone (202) 493-6236; Mr. Carlo M. Patrick, Staff Director, Rail and...

  18. Using magnetic inspection for detecting local defects in welded joints

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, V.A.; Romanov, V.A.

    1994-09-01

    A highly efficient method of magnetic inspection of welded joints has been developed. The results are presented in investigations into detection of local defects by the proposed and existing methods with a one-sided approach to the welded joint. In magnetic inspection of butt welded joints local defects are detected with a considerably lower efficiency than long defects. For example, the sensitivity of inspection of welded joints in determining pores and slag inclusions is 25-30%, and other work shows it is 20% of the thickness of the inspected component. It was reported before that in inspecting butt welded joints the method does not guarantee detection of individual spherical gas pores with a relative size of less than 15% and situated at a considerable depth below the weld surface. The above studies did not take into account the effect of the geometry of the weld bead, and the sensitivity values were evidently given for the conditions in which the bead height was small. In addition, it is evident that the experimental results presented in these studies relate to detection of subsurface defects, whereas local defects, situated in the weld root are detected far less efficiently. In this work, the authors examine and compare the sensitivity of inspection of welded joints in determining local defects in conventional, one of the most efficient existing, and proposed methods of magnetic inspection. The investigations were carried out with special reference to magnetographic inspection.

  19. Investigation of Fatigue Crack Propagation in Spot-Welded Joints Based on Fracture Mechanics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanifard, S.; Bonab, M. A. Mohtadi; Jabbari, Gh.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, fatigue crack propagation life of resistance spot welds in tensile-shear specimens is investigated based on the calculation of stress intensity factors and J-integral using three-dimensional finite element method. For comparison, experimental works on 5083-O aluminum alloy spot-welded joints have been carried out to verify the numerical predictions of fatigue crack propagation of welded joints. A lot of analyses have been performed to obtain stress intensity factors and J-integral in tensile-shear specimens of spot-welded joints by using commercial software ANSYS. These gathered data have been formulated by using statistical software SPSS. The results of fatigue propagation life and predicted fatigue crack path revealed very good agreement with the experimental fatigue test data and photograph of cross-section of the fatigued spot-weld specimens.

  20. Models for selecting GMA Welding Parameters for Improving Mechanical Properties of Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasa Rao, P.; Ramachandran, Pragash; Jebaraj, S.

    2016-02-01

    During the process of Gas Metal Arc (GMAW) welding, the weld joints mechanical properties are influenced by the welding parameters such as welding current and arc voltage. These parameters directly will influence the quality of the weld in terms of mechanical properties. Even small variation in any of the cited parameters may have an important effect on depth of penetration and on joint strength. In this study, S45C Constructional Steel is taken as the base metal to be tested using the parameters wire feed rate, voltage and type of shielding gas. Physical properties considered in the present study are tensile strength and hardness. The testing of weld specimen is carried out as per ASTM Standards. Mathematical models to predict the tensile strength and depth of penetration of weld joint have been developed by regression analysis using the experimental results.

  1. Forming Completely Penetrated Welded T-joints when Pulsed Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krampit, N. Yu; Krampit, M. A.; Sapozhkov, A. S.

    2016-04-01

    The paper is focused on revealing the influence of welding parameters on weld formation when pulsed arc welding. As an experimental sample a T-joint over 10 mm was selected. Welding was carried out in flat position, which required no edge preparation but provided mono-directional guaranteed root penetration. The following parameters of welding were subjected to investigation: gap in the joint, wire feed rate and incline angles of the torch along and across the weld axis. Technological recommendations have been made with respect to pulsed arc welding; the cost price of product manufacturing can be reduced on their basis due to reduction of labor input required by machining, lowering consumption of welding materials and electric power.

  2. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Hybrid Welded Joints with Laser and CO2-Shielded Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahba, M.; Mizutani, M.; Katayama, S.

    2016-06-01

    With the objective of reducing the operating costs, argon-rich shielding gas was replaced by 100% CO2 gas in hybrid laser-arc welding of shipbuilding steel. The welding parameters were optimized to obtain buried-arc transfer in order to mitigate spatter formation. Sound butt joints could be successfully produced for plates of 14 and 17 mm thickness in one welding pass. Subsequently, the welded joints were subjected to different tests to evaluate the influence of CO2 shielding gas on the mechanical properties of the welded joints. All tensile-tested specimens failed in the base material, indicating the higher strength of the welded joints. The impact toughness of the welded joints, measured at -20 °C, reached approximately 76% of that of the base material, which was well above the limit set by the relevant standard. The microstructure of the fusion zone consisted of grain boundary ferrite and acicular ferrite uniformly over the plate thickness except for the joint root where the microstructure was chiefly ferrite with an aligned second phase. This resulted in higher hardness in the root region compared with the top and middle parts of the fusion zone.

  3. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Hybrid Welded Joints with Laser and CO2-Shielded Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahba, M.; Mizutani, M.; Katayama, S.

    2016-07-01

    With the objective of reducing the operating costs, argon-rich shielding gas was replaced by 100% CO2 gas in hybrid laser-arc welding of shipbuilding steel. The welding parameters were optimized to obtain buried-arc transfer in order to mitigate spatter formation. Sound butt joints could be successfully produced for plates of 14 and 17 mm thickness in one welding pass. Subsequently, the welded joints were subjected to different tests to evaluate the influence of CO2 shielding gas on the mechanical properties of the welded joints. All tensile-tested specimens failed in the base material, indicating the higher strength of the welded joints. The impact toughness of the welded joints, measured at -20 °C, reached approximately 76% of that of the base material, which was well above the limit set by the relevant standard. The microstructure of the fusion zone consisted of grain boundary ferrite and acicular ferrite uniformly over the plate thickness except for the joint root where the microstructure was chiefly ferrite with an aligned second phase. This resulted in higher hardness in the root region compared with the top and middle parts of the fusion zone.

  4. Investigation of Torsional Strength of the VT6 Weld Joint Produced by Linear Friction Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleimanova, G. R.; Kabirov, R. R.; Karavaeva, M. V.; Ershova, Yu. A.; Zhilyaev, A. P.

    2015-10-01

    Results of measurement of torsional strength of the weld joint of the VT6 titanium alloy produced by linear friction welding are presented. For a comparison, the same method was used to test monolithic specimens of the VT6 alloy. Torsional strength values of the weld joint (τUS = 861 MPa and φ = 110°) correspond to the strength of the monolithic material. In this case, the specimens fail along the base metal.

  5. Predicting Welding Distortion in a Panel Structure with Longitudinal Stiffeners Using Inherent Deformations Obtained by Inverse Analysis Method

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wei; Murakawa, Hidekazu

    2014-01-01

    Welding-induced deformation not only negatively affects dimension accuracy but also degrades the performance of product. If welding deformation can be accurately predicted beforehand, the predictions will be helpful for finding effective methods to improve manufacturing accuracy. Till now, there are two kinds of finite element method (FEM) which can be used to simulate welding deformation. One is the thermal elastic plastic FEM and the other is elastic FEM based on inherent strain theory. The former only can be used to calculate welding deformation for small or medium scale welded structures due to the limitation of computing speed. On the other hand, the latter is an effective method to estimate the total welding distortion for large and complex welded structures even though it neglects the detailed welding process. When the elastic FEM is used to calculate the welding-induced deformation for a large structure, the inherent deformations in each typical joint should be obtained beforehand. In this paper, a new method based on inverse analysis was proposed to obtain the inherent deformations for weld joints. Through introducing the inherent deformations obtained by the proposed method into the elastic FEM based on inherent strain theory, we predicted the welding deformation of a panel structure with two longitudinal stiffeners. In addition, experiments were carried out to verify the simulation results. PMID:25276856

  6. Predicting welding distortion in a panel structure with longitudinal stiffeners using inherent deformations obtained by inverse analysis method.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wei; Murakawa, Hidekazu

    2014-01-01

    Welding-induced deformation not only negatively affects dimension accuracy but also degrades the performance of product. If welding deformation can be accurately predicted beforehand, the predictions will be helpful for finding effective methods to improve manufacturing accuracy. Till now, there are two kinds of finite element method (FEM) which can be used to simulate welding deformation. One is the thermal elastic plastic FEM and the other is elastic FEM based on inherent strain theory. The former only can be used to calculate welding deformation for small or medium scale welded structures due to the limitation of computing speed. On the other hand, the latter is an effective method to estimate the total welding distortion for large and complex welded structures even though it neglects the detailed welding process. When the elastic FEM is used to calculate the welding-induced deformation for a large structure, the inherent deformations in each typical joint should be obtained beforehand. In this paper, a new method based on inverse analysis was proposed to obtain the inherent deformations for weld joints. Through introducing the inherent deformations obtained by the proposed method into the elastic FEM based on inherent strain theory, we predicted the welding deformation of a panel structure with two longitudinal stiffeners. In addition, experiments were carried out to verify the simulation results. PMID:25276856

  7. Tensile and Impact Toughness Properties of Gas Tungsten Arc Welded and Friction Stir Welded Interstitial Free Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2011-02-01

    Welded regions of interstitial free (IF) steel grades in the vicinity of weld center exhibits larger grains because of the prevailing thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often causes inferior weld mechanical properties. In the present study, tensile properties, charpy impact toughness, microhardness, microstructure, lowest hardness distribution profile, and fracture surface morphology of the gas tungsten arc welded (GTAW) and friction stir welded joints were evaluated, and the results are compared. From this investigation, it is found that friction stir welded joint of IF steel showed superior tensile and impact properties compared with GTAW joint, and this is mainly due to the formation of very fine, equiaxed microstructure in the weld zone.

  8. An inelastic analysis of a welded aluminum joint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Butt-weld joints are most commonly designed into pressure vessels which then become as reliable as the weakest increment in the weld chain. In practice, weld material properties are determined from tensile test specimen and provided to the stress analyst in the form of a stress versus strain diagram. Variations in properties through the thickness of the weld and along the width of the weld have been suspect but not explored because of inaccessibility and cost. The purpose of this study is to investigate analytical and computational methods used for analysis of welds. The weld specimens are analyzed using classical elastic and plastic theory to provide a basis for modeling the inelastic properties in a finite-element solution. The results of the analysis are compared to experimental data to determine the weld behavior and the accuracy of prediction methods. The weld considered in this study is a multiple-pass aluminum 2219-T87 butt weld with thickness of 1.40 in. The weld specimen is modeled using the finite-element code ABAQUS. The finite-element model is used to produce the stress-strain behavior in the elastic and plastic regimes and to determine Poisson's ratio in the plastic region. The value of Poisson's ratio in the plastic regime is then compared to experimental data. The results of the comparisons are used to explain multipass weld behavior and to make recommendations concerning the analysis and testing of welds.

  9. An inelastic analysis of a welded aluminum joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, R. E.

    1994-09-01

    Butt-weld joints are most commonly designed into pressure vessels which then become as reliable as the weakest increment in the weld chain. In practice, weld material properties are determined from tensile test specimen and provided to the stress analyst in the form of a stress versus strain diagram. Variations in properties through the thickness of the weld and along the width of the weld have been suspect but not explored because of inaccessibility and cost. The purpose of this study is to investigate analytical and computational methods used for analysis of welds. The weld specimens are analyzed using classical elastic and plastic theory to provide a basis for modeling the inelastic properties in a finite-element solution. The results of the analysis are compared to experimental data to determine the weld behavior and the accuracy of prediction methods. The weld considered in this study is a multiple-pass aluminum 2219-T87 butt weld with thickness of 1.40 in. The weld specimen is modeled using the finite-element code ABAQUS. The finite-element model is used to produce the stress-strain behavior in the elastic and plastic regimes and to determine Poisson's ratio in the plastic region. The value of Poisson's ratio in the plastic regime is then compared to experimental data. The results of the comparisons are used to explain multipass weld behavior and to make recommendations concerning the analysis and testing of welds.

  10. Corrosion Behavior of Aluminum-Steel Weld-Brazing Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yu; Li, Jie; Zhang, Gang; Huang, Jiankang; Gu, Yufen

    2016-05-01

    Dissimilar metals of 1060 aluminum and galvanized steel were joined with a lap joint by pulsed double-electrode gas metal arc weld brazing with aluminum-magnesium and aluminum-silicon filler metals. The corrosion behavior of the weld joints was investigated with immersion corrosion and electrochemical corrosion tests, and the corrosion morphology of the joints was analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Galvanic corrosion was found to occur when the samples were immersed in corrosive media, and the corrosion rate of joints was increased with increased heat input of the workpiece. Comparison of the corrosion properties of weld joints with different filler wires indicated that the corrosion rate of weld joints with aluminum-silicon filler wire was larger than that of weld joints with aluminum-magnesium filler wire. Results also showed that the zinc-rich zone of weld joints was prone to corrosion. The corrosion behavior of zinc-rich zone was analyzed with SEM equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis system based on the test results.

  11. Detection of micro-weld joint by magneto-optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiangdong; Liu, Yonghua; You, Deyong

    2014-10-01

    It is required that the laser beam focus should be controlled to accurately follow the weld joint center during laser butt joint welding; therefore, the weld joint position must be detected automatically in real-time. An approach for detecting the micro-weld joint (weld gap less than 0.1 mm) based on magneto-optical (MO) imaging is investigated during laser butt-joint welding of low carbon steel. Magneto-optical sensor was used to capture the dynamic images of weld joint. Weld MO image gray distribution features were analyzed to extract the transition zone of weld joint. The influences of a different magnetic field intensity and the welding speed on detecting the weld joint position were mainly studied. Under different welding conditions where welding path, weld gap or welding speed varies, it has been found that using magneto-optic imaging technology could effectively detect the position of the micro-weld joint. Different weld joint positions in MO images have been detected with various magnetic field intensities. Experimental results show that the welding speed has little influence on the detection of weld joint position.

  12. Structure and properties of fixed joints formed by ultrasonic-assisted friction-stir welding

    SciTech Connect

    Fortuna, S. V. Ivanov, K. V. Eliseev, A. A.; Tarasov, S. Yu. Ivanov, A. N. Rubtsov, V. E. Kolubaev, E. A.

    2015-10-27

    This paper deals with structure and properties of aluminum alloy 7475 and its joints obtained by friction stir welding including under ultrasonic action. Microhardness measurements show that ultrasonic action increases strength properties of the joints. Optical and transmission electron microscopy reveals that this effect is related to the precipitation of tertiary coherent S-and T-phase particles.

  13. Structure and properties of fixed joints formed by ultrasonic-assisted friction-stir welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortuna, S. V.; Ivanov, K. V.; Tarasov, S. Yu.; Eliseev, A. A.; Ivanov, A. N.; Rubtsov, V. E.; Kolubaev, E. A.

    2015-10-01

    This paper deals with structure and properties of aluminum alloy 7475 and its joints obtained by friction stir welding including under ultrasonic action. Microhardness measurements show that ultrasonic action increases strength properties of the joints. Optical and transmission electron microscopy reveals that this effect is related to the precipitation of tertiary coherent S-and T-phase particles.

  14. An inelastic analysis of a welded aluminum joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Robert E.; Schonberg, William P.

    1995-02-01

    Butt weld joints are most commonly designed into pressure vessels by using weld material properties that are determined from a tensile test. These properties are provided to the stress analyst in the form of a stress vs strain diagram. Variations in properties through the thickness of the weld and along the width of the weld have been suspect but not explored because of inaccessibility and cost. The purpose of this study is to investigate analytical and computational methods used for analysis of multiple pass aluminum 2219-T87 butt welds. The weld specimens are analyzed using classical plasticity theory to provide a basis for modeling the inelastic properties in a finite element solution. The results of the analysis are compared to experimental data to determine the weld behavior and the accuracy of currently available numerical prediction methods.

  15. Microstructural Characteristics and Mechanical Properties of 7050-T7451 Aluminum Alloy Friction Stir-Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L.; Wang, T.; Zhou, W. L.; Li, Z. Y.; Huang, Y. X.; Feng, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    The ultra-high-strength Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy, 7050-T7451, was friction stir welded at a constant tool rotation speed of 600 rpm. Defect-free welds were successfully obtained at a welding speed of 100 mm/min, but lack-of-penetration defect was formed at a welding speed of 400 mm/min. The as-received material was mainly composed of coarse-deformed grains with some fine recrystallized grains. Fine equiaxed, dynamic, recrystallized grains were developed in the stir zone, and elongated grains were formed in the thermomechanically affected zone with dynamic recovered subgrains. Grain sizes in different regions of friction stir-welded joints varied depending on the welding speed. The sizes and distributions of precipitates changed in different regions of the joint, and wider precipitation free zone was developed in the heat-affected zone compared to that in the base material. Hardness of the heat-affected zone was obviously lower than that of the base material, and the softening region width was related to the welding speed. The tensile strength of the defect-free joints increased with the increasing welding speed, while the lack-of-penetration defect greatly reduced the tensile strength. The tensile fracture path was significantly influenced by the position and orientation of lack-of-penetration defect.

  16. Reduced heat input keyhole welding through improved joint design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, John M. (Inventor); Harwig, Dennis D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An improved high energy density welding method for reducing input keyhole welding prepares the weld joint (8) between two edges (10, 14) of at least one member by separating the edges (10, 14) of the member (12, 16) with a controllable gap (22) by a projecting portion (24) selectively positioned on one edge (10, 14) of the member (12, 16). The projecting portion (24) closely abuts the other edge of the member for maintaining the controlled distance (d) of the controllable gap (22) to enhance the welding method.

  17. Apparatus for maintaining aligment of a shrinking weld joint in an electron-beam welding operation

    DOEpatents

    Trent, J.B.; Murphy, J.L.

    1980-01-03

    The invention is directed to an apparatus for automatically maintaining a shrinking weld joint in alignement with an electron beam during an electron-beam multipass-welding operation. The apparatus utilizes a bias means for continually urging a workpiece-supporting face plate away from a carriage mounted base that rotatably supports the face plate. The extent of displacement of the face plate away from the base in indicative of the shrinkage occuring in the weld joint area. This displacement is measured and is used to move the base on the carriage a distance equal to one-half the displacement for aligning the weld joint with the electron beam during each welding pass.

  18. Apparatus for maintaining alignment of a shrinking weld joint in an electron-beam welding operation

    DOEpatents

    Trent, Jett B.; Murphy, Jimmy L.

    1981-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an apparatus for automatically maintaining a shrinking weld joint in alignment with an electron beam during an electron-beam multipass-welding operation. The apparatus utilizes a biasing device for continually urging a workpiece-supporting face plate away from a carriage mounted base that rotatably supports the face plate. The extent of displacement of the face plate away from the base is indicative of the shrinkage occuring in the weld joint area. This displacement is measured and is used to move the base on the carriage a distance equal to one-half the displacement for aligning the weld joint with the electron beam during each welding pass.

  19. Effects of Welding Processes and Post-Weld Aging Treatment on Fatigue Behavior of AA2219 Aluminium Alloy Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malarvizhi, S.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2011-04-01

    AA2219 aluminium alloy square butt joints without filler metal addition were fabricated using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW), electron beam welding (EBW), and friction stir welding (FSW) processes. The fabricated joints were post-weld aged at 175 °C for 12 h. The effect of three welding processes and post-weld aging (PWA) treatment on the fatigue properties is reported. Transverse tensile properties of the welded joints were evaluated. Microstructure analysis was also carried out using optical and electron microscopes. It was found that the post-weld aged FSW joints showed superior fatigue performance compared to EBW and GTAW joints. This was mainly due to the formation of very fine, dynamically recrystallized grains and uniform distribution of fine precipitates in the weld region.

  20. Hydrogen effects in duplex stainless steel welded joints - electrochemical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalska, J.; Łabanowski, J.; Ćwiek, J.

    2012-05-01

    In this work results on the influence of hydrogen on passivity and corrosion resistance of 2205 duplex stainless steel (DSS) welded joints are described. The results were discussed by taking into account three different areas on the welded joint: weld metal (WM), heat-affected zone (HAZ) and parent metal. The corrosion resistance was qualified with the polarization curves registered in a synthetic sea water. The conclusion is that, hydrogen may seriously deteriorate the passive film stability and corrosion resistance to pitting of 2205 DSS welded joints. The presence of hydrogen in passive films increases corrosion current density and decreases the potential of the film breakdown. It was also found that degree of susceptibility to hydrogen degradation was dependent on the hydrogen charging conditions. WM region has been revealed as the most sensitive to hydrogen action.

  1. Butt Welding Joint of Aluminum Alloy by Space GHTA Welding Process in Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suita, Yoshikazu; Shinike, Shuhei; Ekuni, Tomohide; Terajima, Noboru; Tsukuda, Yoshiyuki; Imagawa, Kichiro

    Aluminum alloys have been used widely in constructing various space structures including the International Space Station (ISS) and launch vehicles. For space applications, welding experiments on aluminum alloy were performed using the GHTA (Gas Hollow Tungsten Arc) welding process using a filler wire feeder in a vacuum. We investigated the melting phenomenon of the base metal and filler wire, bead formation, and the effects of wire feed speed on melting characteristics. The melting mechanism in the base metal during the bead on a plate with wire feed was similar to that for the melt run without wire feed. We clarified the effects of wire feed speed on bead sizes and configurations. Furthermore, the butt welded joint welded using the optimum wire feed speed, and the joint tensile strengths were evaluated. The tensile strength of the square butt joint welded by the pulsed DC GHTA welding with wire feed in a vacuum is nearly equal to that of the same joint welded by conventional GTA (Gas Tungsten Arc) welding in air.

  2. Effects of laser power density on static and dynamic mechanical properties of dissimilar stainless steel welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yan-Peng; Li, Mao-Hui; Yu, Gang; Wu, Xian-Qian; Huang, Chen-Guang; Duan, Zhu-Ping

    2012-10-01

    The mechanical properties of laser welded joints under impact loadings such as explosion and car crash etc. are critical for the engineering designs. The hardness, static and dynamic mechanical properties of AISI304 and AISI316 L dissimilar stainless steel welded joints by CO2 laser were experimentally studied. The dynamic strain-stress curves at the strain rate around 103 s-1 were obtained by the split Hopkinson tensile bar (SHTB). The static mechanical properties of the welded joints have little changes with the laser power density and all fracture occurs at 316 L side. However, the strain rate sensitivity has a strong dependence on laser power density. The value of strain rate factor decreases with the increase of laser power density. The welded joint which may be applied for the impact loading can be obtained by reducing the laser power density in the case of welding quality assurance.

  3. Fracture toughness of thick section dissimilar electron beam weld joints

    SciTech Connect

    Kocak, M.; Junghans, E.

    1994-12-31

    Microstructural investigations as well as crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) fracture toughness test based on elastic-plastic fracture mechanics were performed on single pass, full penetration similar and dissimilar electron beam (EB) welds of 40 mm thick 316L type austenitic steel and high alloyed fine tempered martensitic 9Cr 1Mo Nb V (P91 -ASTM A213) steel. The latter modified steel has been developed to fill up the gap between 12Cr steel and austenitic stainless steels with respect to the high temperature properties and better weldability. Furthermore, it shows a small thermal expansion coefficient and is not susceptible to stress corrosion cracking like the austenitic steel. The weldment properties were evaluated by microstructural analysis, microhardness, Charpy V- notch impact, and by newly developed flat microtensile specimens (0.5 mm thick). The dissimilar EB weld metal and HAZ of P91 steel has been shown to be microstructurally and mechanically distinct from both austenitic and martenistic parent metals. The use of microsized rectangular tensile specimens provides unique solution to the problem of the mechanical property determination of the narrow EB weld joint. The HAZ of the 9Cr1Mo steel exhibits extremely poor CTOD toughness properties in as-welded condition at room temperature. The CTOD values obtained were believed to be represent the intrinsic property of this zone, since the distance of the crack tip to the austenitic steel part was too large to receive a stress relaxation effect from low strength side on the crack tip (by accommodating the applied strains in the high toughness, lower strength 316L plate).

  4. Creep Rupture Properties of Welded Joints of Heat Resistant Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Takashi; Hongo, Hiromichi; Tabuchi, Masaaki

    In this study, the high-temperature mechanical and creep rupture properties of Grade 91/Grade 91 (Mod. 9Cr-Mo) similar welded joints and Grade 91/Inconel 82/SUS304 dissimilar welded joints were examined. The effects of temperature and stress on the failure location in the joints were also investigated. Creep rupture tests were conducted at 823, 873, and 923 K; the applied stress ranges were 160-240, 80-160, and 40-80 MPa, respectively. The creep rupture strengths of the specimens with welded joints were lower than those of the specimens of the base metal at all temperature levels; in addition, these differences in creep strength increased with temperature. After being subjected to long-term creep rupture tests, the fracture type exhibited by the dissimilar welded joints was transformed from Types V and VII to Type IV. It was estimated that the fracture type exhibited by the dissimilar welded joints after 100,000-h rupture strength tests at 823 K and 873 K was Type IV fracture.

  5. Portable power tool machines weld joints in field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spier, R. A.

    1966-01-01

    Portable routing machine for cutting precise weld joints required by nonstandard pipe sections used in the field for transfer of cryogenic fluids. This tool is adaptable for various sizes of pipes and has a selection of router bits for different joint configurations.

  6. Strength of Welded Joints in Tubular Members for Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittemore, H L; Brueggeman, W C

    1931-01-01

    The object of this investigation is to make available to the aircraft industry authoritative information on the strength, weight, and cost of a number of types of welded joints. This information will, also, assist the aeronautics branch in its work of licensing planes by providing data from which the strength of a given joint may be estimated. As very little material on the strength of aircraft welds has been published, it is believed that such tests made by a disinterested governmental laboratory should be of considerable value to the aircraft industry. Forty joints were welded under procedure specifications and tested to determine their strengths. The weight and time required to fabricate were also measured for each joint.

  7. Characterization of Nitinol Laser-Weld Joints by Nondestructive Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlschlögel, Markus; Gläßel, Gunter; Sanchez, Daniela; Schüßler, Andreas; Dillenz, Alexander; Saal, David; Mayr, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Joining technology is an integral part of today's Nitinol medical device manufacturing. Besides crimping and riveting, laser welding is often applied to join components made from Nitinol to Nitinol, as well as Nitinol components to dissimilar materials. Other Nitinol joining techniques include adhesive bonding, soldering, and brazing. Typically, the performance of joints is assessed by destructive mechanical testing, on a process validation base. In this study, a nondestructive testing method—photothermal radiometry—is applied to characterize small Nitinol laser-weld joints used to connect two wire ends via a sleeve. Two different wire diameters are investigated. Effective joint connection cross sections are visualized using metallography techniques. Results of the nondestructive testing are correlated to data from destructive torsion testing, where the maximum torque at fracture is evaluated for the same joints and criteria for the differentiation of good and poor laser-welding quality by nondestructive testing are established.

  8. Interfacial characterization of joint between mild steel and aluminum alloy welded by resistance spot welding

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Ranfeng; Shi Hongxin; Zhang Keke; Tu Yimin; Iwamoto, Chihiro; Satonaka, Shinobu

    2010-07-15

    The interfacial characteristics of resistance spot welded steel-aluminum alloy joint have been investigated using electron microscopy. The results reveal that reaction product FeAl{sub 3} is generated in the peripheral region of the weld while a reaction layer consisting of Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} adjacent to steel and FeAl{sub 3} adjacent to aluminum alloy forms in the central region of the weld, and that the morphology and thickness of the reaction layer vary with the position at the welding interface.

  9. Automatic Evaluation of Welded Joints Using Image Processing on Radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Ch.

    2003-03-01

    Radiography is frequently used to detect discontinuities in welded joints (porosity, cracks, lack of penetration). Perfect knowledge of the geometry of these defects is an important step which is essential to appreciate the quality of the weld. Because of this, an action improving the interpretation of radiographs by image processing has been undertaken. The principle consists in making a radiograph of the welded joint and of a depth step wedge penetrameter in the material. The radiograph is then finely digitized and an automatic processing of the radiograph of the penetrameter image allows the establishment of a correspondence between grey levels and material thickness. An algorithm based on image processing is used to localize defects in the welded joints and to isolate them from the original image. First, defects detected by this method are characterized in terms of dimension and equivalent thickness. Then, from the image of the healthy welded joint (that is to say without the detected defects), characteristic values of the weld are evaluated (thickness reduction, width).

  10. Interfacial and Mechanical Behavior of AA5456 Filling Friction-Stir-Welded Lap Joints Using Similar and Dissimilar Pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behmand, Saleh Alaei; Mirsalehi, Seyyed Ehsan; Omidvar, Hamid; Safarkhanian, Mohammad Ali

    2016-06-01

    In this article, filling friction stir welding (FFSW) of the remaining exit holes of AA5456 alloy friction-stir-welded lap joints was studied. For this purpose, the influences of different rotating speeds, holding times, and pin materials, AA5456 and AA2024, on the metallurgical structure and joint strength were investigated. The observations showed that defect-free lap joints are successfully obtainable by this method using similar and dissimilar consumable pins. The results indicated that the higher rotating speed and holding time adversely affect the weld performance. The best result was achieved for 30 seconds holding time, 500 rpm rotating speed, and AA2024 consumable pin. In this condition, a lap shear strength of 10 pct higher than that of the nonfilled joint, equivalent to about 94 pct of the original defect-free FSW joint, was obtained, whereas the GTAW filled joint showed only approximately 87 pct of the continuous FSW joint strength.

  11. Effect of Peculiarities of Heat Transfer, Diffusion and Phase Transformation on Joint Formation During Welding of Dissimilar Materials by High Power Fiber Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turichin, Gleb; Klimova, Olga; Valdaytseva, Ekaterina

    The article describes mathematical models of diffusion and thermal processes for welding of dissimilar materials and kinetic model of diffusion-controlled deposition and growth of intermetallic inclusions in the weld. Developed models were combined and implemented in the model of weld joint formation for dissimilar materials. To verify a model the microstructure analysis of weld joints and elemental analysis in the diffusion zone by SEM has been made for welding of systems Fe-Cu, Al-Ti, Fe-Al. The good agreement between calculated and experimental data has been obtained. Examples of developed technologies of welding of dissimilar materials using high-power fiber lasers were discussed also.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Tension Properties for Al-Cu Alloy Friction Stir-Welded Joints with GTN Damage Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Guo-Qin; Sun, Feng-Yang; Cao, Fang-Li; Chen, Shu-Jun; Barkey, Mark E.

    2015-11-01

    The numerical simulation of tensile fracture behavior on Al-Cu alloy friction stir-welded joint was performed with the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) damage model. The parameters of the GTN model were studied in each region of the friction stir-welded joint by means of inverse identification. Based on the obtained parameters, the finite element model of the welded joint was built to predict the fracture behavior and tension properties. Good agreement can be found between the numerical and experimental results in the location of the tensile fracture and the mechanical properties.

  13. Quantitative metal magnetic memory reliability modeling for welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Haiyan; Dang, Yongbin; Wang, Ben; Leng, Jiancheng

    2016-03-01

    Metal magnetic memory(MMM) testing has been widely used to detect welded joints. However, load levels, environmental magnetic field, and measurement noises make the MMM data dispersive and bring difficulty to quantitative evaluation. In order to promote the development of quantitative MMM reliability assessment, a new MMM model is presented for welded joints. Steel Q235 welded specimens are tested along the longitudinal and horizontal lines by TSC-2M-8 instrument in the tensile fatigue experiments. The X-ray testing is carried out synchronously to verify the MMM results. It is found that MMM testing can detect the hidden crack earlier than X-ray testing. Moreover, the MMM gradient vector sum K vs is sensitive to the damage degree, especially at early and hidden damage stages. Considering the dispersion of MMM data, the K vs statistical law is investigated, which shows that K vs obeys Gaussian distribution. So K vs is the suitable MMM parameter to establish reliability model of welded joints. At last, the original quantitative MMM reliability model is first presented based on the improved stress strength interference theory. It is shown that the reliability degree R gradually decreases with the decreasing of the residual life ratio T, and the maximal error between prediction reliability degree R 1 and verification reliability degree R 2 is 9.15%. This presented method provides a novel tool of reliability testing and evaluating in practical engineering for welded joints.

  14. Design consideration for wet welded joints

    SciTech Connect

    Szelagowski, P.; Osthus, V.; Petershagen, H.; Pohl, R.; Lafaye, G.

    1996-12-01

    Wet welding has become a joining technique that under certain circumstances can provide results which cannot be distinguished between wet or dry production and the achievable mechanical quality is comparable to dry atmospheric welds. Wet welding is not a process which can be applied easily and which can be properly handled by untrained diver welders. Wet welding is more than any other kind of welding process or procedure a joining technique that requires the full job-concentration and -knowledge of an excellent trained and skilled diver welder throughout the whole production time, who is 100% identifying himself with his task. Furthermore he must be fully aware of the production requirements and possible metallurgical/environmental reactions and outcomes. He must be able to be fully concentrated on the process performance throughout his total work shift. In short: he must be an outstanding expert in his field. The following paper will highlight these subjects and show the necessity of their exact observation to achieve excellent quality in wet welding.

  15. Achieving High Strength Joint of Pure Copper Via Laser-Cold Metal Transfer Arc Hybrid Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yulong; Chen, Cong; Gao, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2016-06-01

    Fiber laser-cold metal transfer arc hybrid welding of pure copper was studied. Weld porosity was tested by X-ray nondestructive testing. Microstructure and fracture features were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties were evaluated by cross weld tensile test. Full penetrated and continuous welds were obtained by hybrid welding once the laser power reached 2 kW, while they could not be obtained by laser welding alone, even though the laser power reached 5 kW. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS), the yield strength (YS), and the elongation of the best hybrid weld material were up to 227, 201 MPa, and 21.5 pct, respectively. The joint efficiencies in UTS and YS of hybrid weld were up to 84 and 80 pct of the BM, respectively. The fracture location changes from the fusion zone to the heat-affected zone with the increase of laser power. Besides, the mechanisms of process stability and porosity suppression were clarified by laser-arc interaction and pool behavior. The strengthening mechanism was discussed by microstructure characteristics.

  16. Achieving High Strength Joint of Pure Copper Via Laser-Cold Metal Transfer Arc Hybrid Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yulong; Chen, Cong; Gao, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2016-04-01

    Fiber laser-cold metal transfer arc hybrid welding of pure copper was studied. Weld porosity was tested by X-ray nondestructive testing. Microstructure and fracture features were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties were evaluated by cross weld tensile test. Full penetrated and continuous welds were obtained by hybrid welding once the laser power reached 2 kW, while they could not be obtained by laser welding alone, even though the laser power reached 5 kW. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS), the yield strength (YS), and the elongation of the best hybrid weld material were up to 227, 201 MPa, and 21.5 pct, respectively. The joint efficiencies in UTS and YS of hybrid weld were up to 84 and 80 pct of the BM, respectively. The fracture location changes from the fusion zone to the heat-affected zone with the increase of laser power. Besides, the mechanisms of process stability and porosity suppression were clarified by laser-arc interaction and pool behavior. The strengthening mechanism was discussed by microstructure characteristics.

  17. Toughness evaluation of a shielded metal arc carbon-manganese steel welded joint subjected to multiple post weld heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bott, I.S.; Teixeira, J.C.G.

    1999-12-01

    This study was part of a program to investigate the influence of multiple post weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the fracture toughness and defect tolerance of a welded joint. The present work reports base metal data obtained for a quenched and tempered BS7191 Grade 450EM steel (0.10wt%C-1.08wt%Mn), weld metal data for a ferritic multipass weld obtained by shielded metal arc welding using an AWS E-9018M type electrode, and heat affected zone (HAZ) data obtained using a modified bead on groove technique for different PWHT conditions. The effect of the repeated heat treatment cycles on the mechanical properties was evaluated by hardness tests and toughness testing assessed by Charpy V-notch and crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) techniques. The characterization of the microstructure was undertaken utilizing optical and electron microscopy. As fabrication codes for new equipment do not allow more than three PWHT cycles, the application of more cycles is only justifiable for old equipment when a fitness for purpose criterion is applied and these restrictions are not applicable. The results obtained are currently applied in repair work and revamps of pressure vessels and gas storage tanks.

  18. Tensile strength of simulated and welded butt joints in W-Cu composite sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Thomas J.; Watson, Gordon K.

    1994-01-01

    The weldability of W-Cu composite sheet was investigated using simulated and welded joints. The welded joints were produced in a vacuum hot press. Tensile test results showed that simulated joints can provide strength and failure mode data which can be used in joint design for actual weldments. Although all of the welded joints had flaws, a number of these joints were as strong as the W-Cu composite base material.

  19. Explosive Welding of Tubular Configurated Joints for Critical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardwick, R.

    1985-01-01

    Explosive welding can provide the answer to problems of permanently joining metals typically used in the aerospace industry. The explosive bonding process is a solid state bonding process enabling material incompatibility problems associated with fusion welding to be overcome. In addition, heat affected zones are eliminated thus, enhancing joint strength, properties and performance. The process requires the parts being joined to be impelled, by means of explosives, to collide with each other. Certain critical collision parameters must be met and controlled and these parameters are defined. Various component geometries which satisfy the collision parameters are described. Examples of transition joints used in the aerospace industry are described and illustrated.

  20. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Erin E.; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2016-03-01

    This work focuses on the microstructural characterization of aluminum to steel friction stir welded joints. Lap weld configuration coupled with scribe technology used for the weld tool have produced joints of adequate quality, despite the significant differences in hardness and melting temperatures of the alloys. Common to friction stir processes, especially those of dissimilar alloys, are microstructural gradients including grain size, crystallographic texture, and precipitation of intermetallic compounds. Because of the significant influence that intermetallic compound formation has on mechanical and ballistic behavior, the characterization of the specific intermetallic phases and the degree to which they are formed in the weld microstructure is critical to predicting weld performance. This study used electron backscatter diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Vickers micro-hardness indentation to explore and characterize the microstructures of lap friction stir welds between an applique 6061-T6 aluminum armor plate alloy and a RHA homogeneous armor plate steel alloy. Macroscopic defects such as micro-cracks were observed in the cross-sectional samples, and binary intermetallic compound layers were found to exist at the aluminum-steel interfaces of the steel particles stirred into the aluminum weld matrix and across the interfaces of the weld joints. Energy dispersive spectroscopy chemical analysis identified the intermetallic layer as monoclinic Al3Fe. Dramatic decreases in grain size in the thermo-mechanically affected zones and weld zones that evidenced grain refinement through plastic deformation and recrystallization. Crystallographic grain orientation and texture were examined using electron backscatter diffraction. Striated regions in the orientations of the aluminum alloy were determined to be the result of the severe deformation induced by the complex weld tool geometry. Many of the textures observed in the weld

  1. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Erin E.; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2016-06-01

    This work focuses on the microstructural characterization of aluminum to steel friction stir welded joints. Lap weld configuration coupled with scribe technology used for the weld tool have produced joints of adequate quality, despite the significant differences in hardness and melting temperatures of the alloys. Common to friction stir processes, especially those of dissimilar alloys, are microstructural gradients including grain size, crystallographic texture, and precipitation of intermetallic compounds. Because of the significant influence that intermetallic compound formation has on mechanical and ballistic behavior, the characterization of the specific intermetallic phases and the degree to which they are formed in the weld microstructure is critical to predicting weld performance. This study used electron backscatter diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Vickers micro-hardness indentation to explore and characterize the microstructures of lap friction stir welds between an applique 6061-T6 aluminum armor plate alloy and a RHA homogeneous armor plate steel alloy. Macroscopic defects such as micro-cracks were observed in the cross-sectional samples, and binary intermetallic compound layers were found to exist at the aluminum-steel interfaces of the steel particles stirred into the aluminum weld matrix and across the interfaces of the weld joints. Energy dispersive spectroscopy chemical analysis identified the intermetallic layer as monoclinic Al3Fe. Dramatic decreases in grain size in the thermo-mechanically affected zones and weld zones that evidenced grain refinement through plastic deformation and recrystallization. Crystallographic grain orientation and texture were examined using electron backscatter diffraction. Striated regions in the orientations of the aluminum alloy were determined to be the result of the severe deformation induced by the complex weld tool geometry. Many of the textures observed in the weld

  2. High power laser welding of thick steel plates in a horizontal butt joint configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atabaki, M. Mazar; Yazdian, N.; Ma, J.; Kovacevic, R.

    2016-09-01

    In this investigation, two laser-based welding techniques, autogenous laser welding (ALW) and laser welding assisted with a cold wire (LWACW), were applied to join thick plates of a structural steel (A36) in a horizontal narrow gap butt joint configuration. The main practical parameters including welding method and laser power were varied to get the sound weld with a requirement to achieve a full penetration with the reinforcement at the back side of weld in just one pass. The weld-bead shape, cross-section and mechanical properties were evaluated by profilometer, micro-hardness test and optical microscope. In order to investigate the stability of laser-induced plasma plume, the emitted optical spectra was detected and analyzed by the spectroscopy analysis. It was found that at the laser power of 7 kW a fully penetrated weld with a convex back side of weld could be obtained by the LWACW. The microstructural examinations showed that for the ALW the acicular ferrite and for the LWACW the pearlite were formed in the heat affected zone (HAZ). The prediction of microstructure based on continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram and cooling curves obtained by thermocouple measurement were in good agreement with each other. According to the plasma ionization values obtained from the spectroscopy analysis the plume for both processes was recognized as dominated weakly ionized plasma including the main vaporized elemental composition. At the optimum welding condition (LWACW at the laser power of 7 kW) the fluctuation of the electron temperature was reduced. The spectroscopy analysis demonstrated that at the higher laser power more of the elemental compositions such as Mn and Fe were evaporated.

  3. 18. DETAIL VIEW OF A TYPICAL WELDED JOINT BETWEEN THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. DETAIL VIEW OF A TYPICAL WELDED JOINT BETWEEN THE MAIN GIRDER AND THE FLOOR BEAM, SHOWING THE ATTACHMENT OF A LATERAL BRACING MEMBER AT THIS POINT, SOUTH GIRDER, PANEL 5, LOOKING SOUTH-SOUTHWEST Ryan & Wieskamp - Benton Street Bridge, Spanning Iowa River at Benton Street, Iowa City, Johnson County, IA

  4. Investigation on Mechanical Properties of 9%Cr/CrMoV Dissimilar Steels Welded Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xia; Lu, Fenggui; Yang, Renjie; Wang, Peng; Xu, Xiaojin; Huo, Xin

    2015-04-01

    Advanced 9%Cr steel with good heat resistance and CrMoV with good toughness were chosen as candidate materials to fabricate combined rotor for steam turbine operating at over 620 °C. But the great difference in base metals properties presents a challenge in achieving sound defect-free joint with optimal properties in dissimilar welded rotor. In this paper, appropriate selection of filler metal, welding parameters, and post-weld heat treatment was combined to successfully weld 1100-mm-diameter 9%Cr/CrMoV dissimilar experimental rotor through ultra-narrow gap submerge arc welding. Some properties such as hardness, low-cycle fatigue (LCF), and high-cycle fatigue (HCF) combined with microstructural characterization qualify the integrity of the weld. Microstructural analysis indicated the presence of high-temperature tempered martensite as the phase responsible for the improved properties obtained in the weld. The Coffin-Manson parameters were obtained by fitting the data in LCF test, while the conditional fatigue strength was derived from the HCF test based on S-N curve. Analysis of hardness profile showed that the lowest value occurred at heat-affected zone adjacent to base metal which represents the appropriate location of fracture for the samples after LCF and HCF tests.

  5. Hybrid laser-arc welding of galvanized high-strength steels in a gap-free lap-joint configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shanglu

    ) Modeling of hybrid laser-GTAW as a preheating source welding process of galvanized steels in a gap-free lap joint configuration (Chapter 6). Experimental results demonstrated that completely defect-free lap joints in galvanized high strength steels can be obtained in a gap-free configuration by using the laser welding process with the GTAW torch preheating and hybrid laser-VPGTAW welding technique. Effects of the welding parameters on the weld quality are discussed. The mechanical properties of the welded joints are studied. A machine vision system and an acoustic emission (AE) signal acquisition system are employed to acquire the images of the molten pool and the emitted AE signals on-line. Furthermore, image processing and Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT) techniques are employed to analyze the acquired images of the molten pool and the collected AE signals. The acquisition attempts are composed of (1) monitoring the weld defects by machine vision; (2) monitoring the formation of spatters from the AE signals; (3) detecting the weld modes by the induced plume; and (4) monitoring the instability of the welding process by machine vision. In addition, the numerical results have been validated by the experimental data.

  6. A self-organizing fuzzy control approach to arc sensor for weld joint tracking in gas metal arc welding of butt joints

    SciTech Connect

    Na, S.J. ); Kim, J.W.

    1993-02-01

    For the artificial intelligence (AI) approach to automatic control, the fuzzy rule-based control schemes have been successfully applied to the control of complex processes. The arc welding process is one of the processes due to the fact that it possesses complex and nonlinear characteristics such as a moving distributed heat source, a current path and metal transfer. One possible solution to the design of an effective controller suitable for such a process is to use the fuzzy control scheme. The fuzzy rule-based control can easily realize the heuristic rules obtained from human experiences that cannot be expressed in mathematical form. In this study, an arc sensor, which utilizes the electrical signal obtained from the welding arc itself, was developed for CO[sub 2] gas metal arc welding of butt joints using the fuzzy set theory. A simple fuzzy controller without any adaptation was implemented for the weld joint tracking. A set of fixed rules, which was designed based upon the experiments, and a self-organizing fuzzy controller, which could improve the control rules automatically, were examined. Through a series of experiments, the performance and learning action of the proposed self-organizing fuzzy controller were assessed.

  7. Investigation of the Microstructure of Joints of Aluminum Alloys Produced by Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolubaev, E. A.

    2015-02-01

    Special features of the microstructure of joints of aluminum-magnesium and aluminum-copper alloys produced by friction stir welding are analyzed. It is demonstrated that a layered structure with ultradisperse grains is produced by friction stir welding at the center of the weld joint. An analogy is drawn between the microstructures of joints produced by friction stir welding and surface layer produced by sliding friction.

  8. Effects of stress concentration on the fatigue strength of 7003-T5 aluminum alloy butt joints with weld reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zongtao; Li, Yuanxing; Zhang, Mingyue; Hui, Chen

    2015-03-01

    7003-T5 Aluminum (Al) alloy plates with a thickness of 5 mm are welded by gas metal arc welding (GMAW) method in this work. In order to investigate the influence of stress concentration introduced by weld reinforcement on fatigue strength, the stress concentration factor of the butt joint is calculated. Microscopic and X-ray techniques were utilized to make sure there are no weld defects with large size in butt weld, which can induce extra stress concentration. The cyclic stress - number of cycles to failure (S-N) curves of the joints with and without the welder were obtained by fatigue testing, and the results show that the fatigue strength of 7003-T5 Al alloy butt joints with the weld reinforcement is 50 MPa, which is only 45% of the joints without the weld reinforcement. Fracture surface observation indicated that the fatigue source and propagation are dissimilar for the specimens with and without the welder due to the stress concentration at the weld root. The stress concentration with a factor of 1.7 has great effect on the fatigue strength, but little influence on the tensile strength.

  9. Influences of post-weld heat treatment on tensile properties of friction stir-welded AA6061 aluminum alloy joints

    SciTech Connect

    Elangovan, K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2008-09-15

    This paper reports on studies of the influences of various post-weld heat treatment procedures on tensile properties of friction stir-welded AA6061 aluminum alloy joints. Rolled plates of 6-mm thick AA6061 aluminum alloy were used to fabricate the joints. Solution treatment, an artificial aging treatment and a combination of both were given to the welded joints. Tensile properties such as yield strength, tensile strength, elongation and joint efficiency were evaluated. Microstructures of the welded joints were analyzed using optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. A simple artificial aging treatment was found to be more beneficial than other treatment methods to enhance the tensile properties of the friction stir-welded AA6061 aluminum alloy joints.

  10. Comparison of Tensile Damage Evolution in Ti6A14V Joints Between Laser Beam Welding and Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Lin-Jie; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Jian-Xun

    2014-12-01

    The present paper studied the evolution of tensile damage in joints welded using laser beam welding (LBW) and gas tungsten arc welding (TIG) under a uniaxial tensile load. The damage evolution in the LBW joints and TIG-welded joints was studied by using digital image correlation (DIC) technology and monitoring changes in Young's modulus during tensile testing. To study the mechanism of void nucleation and growth in the LBW joints and TIG-welded joints, test specimens with various amounts of plastic deformation were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Compared with TIG-welded joints, LBW-welded joints have a finer microstructure and higher microhardness in the fusion zone. The SEM analysis and DIC test results indicated that the critical strain of void nucleation was greater in the LBW-welded joints than in the TIG-welded joints, while the growth rate of voids was lower in the LBW-welded joints than in the TIG-welded joints. Thus, the damage ratio in the LBW joints was lower than that in the TIG-welded joints during tensile testing. This can be due to the coarser martensitic α' and the application of TC-1 welding rods in the TIG-welded joint.

  11. Comparison of Tensile Damage Evolution in Ti6A14V Joints Between Laser Beam Welding and Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Lin-Jie; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Jian-Xun

    2014-09-01

    The present paper studied the evolution of tensile damage in joints welded using laser beam welding (LBW) and gas tungsten arc welding (TIG) under a uniaxial tensile load. The damage evolution in the LBW joints and TIG-welded joints was studied by using digital image correlation (DIC) technology and monitoring changes in Young's modulus during tensile testing. To study the mechanism of void nucleation and growth in the LBW joints and TIG-welded joints, test specimens with various amounts of plastic deformation were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Compared with TIG-welded joints, LBW-welded joints have a finer microstructure and higher microhardness in the fusion zone. The SEM analysis and DIC test results indicated that the critical strain of void nucleation was greater in the LBW-welded joints than in the TIG-welded joints, while the growth rate of voids was lower in the LBW-welded joints than in the TIG-welded joints. Thus, the damage ratio in the LBW joints was lower than that in the TIG-welded joints during tensile testing. This can be due to the coarser martensitic α' and the application of TC-1 welding rods in the TIG-welded joint.

  12. Influence of control parameters on the joint tracking performance of a coaxial weld vision system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangl, K. J.; Weeks, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The first phase of a series of evaluations of a vision-based welding control sensor for the Space Shuttle Main Engine Robotic Welding System is described. The robotic welding system is presently under development at the Marshall Space Flight Center. This evaluation determines the standard control response parameters necessary for proper trajectory of the welding torch along the joint.

  13. Nondestructive Evaluation of Friction Stir-Welded Aluminum Alloy to Coated Steel Sheet Lap Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, H.; Kumar, A.; Rajkumar, K. V.; Saravanan, T.; Jayakumar, T.; Pal, Tapan Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Dissimilar lap joints of aluminum sheet (AA 6061) of 2 mm thickness and zinc-coated steel sheet of 1 mm thickness were produced by friction stir welding with different combinations of rotational speed and travel speed. Ultrasonic C- and B-scanning, and radiography have been used in a complementary manner for detection of volumetric (cavity and flash) and planar (de bond) defects as the defects are in micron level. Advanced ultrasonic C-scanning did not provide any idea about the defects, whereas B-scanning cross-sectional image showed an exclusive overview of the micron-level defects. A digital x-ray radiography methodology is proposed for quality assessment of the dissimilar welds which provide three-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio with improved defect detection sensitivity. The present study clearly shows that the weld tool rotational speed and travel speed have a decisive role on the quality of the joints obtained by the friction stir welding process. The suitability of the proposed NDE techniques to evaluate the joint integrity of dissimilar FSW joints is thus established.

  14. Correlation Between Tensile Strength and Hardness of Electron Beam Welded TC4-DT Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei; Shi, Yaowu; Li, Xiaoyan; Lei, Yongping

    2013-06-01

    Correlation between tensile strength and hardness for damage-tolerant Ti-6Al-4V (TC4-DT) alloy and its electron beam welded joints was investigated. Yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and strain hardening coefficient of base metal and weld metal were obtained using uniaxial tensile tests. Microhardness of the base metal, heat affected zone, and weld metal was measured. Then, the linear correlations among the yield strength, tensile strength, and hardness were proposed. Moreover, correlation between strain hardening coefficient and the ratio of YS to UTS (YS/UTS) was established. The results indicate that microhardness can be used to predict the YS and UTS of the TC4-DT welded joint successfully. In addition, the strain hardening coefficient can be predicted by the YS/UTS. The prediction of strength and strain hardening coefficient is in agreement with the experiments. The correlations are applicable and valuable for the strength prediction of narrow welded fusion zone and heat affected zone based on the microhardness measurement.

  15. Residual stress in laser welded dissimilar steel tube-to-tube joints

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zheng . Lab. of Production Engineering)

    1993-09-01

    Austenitic-ferritic dissimilar steel joints are widely used in power generation systems. Their utilization has proved to be efficient in terms of satisfactory properties and the economics. These types of joints have usually been produced using conventional welding processes, such as tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding. With the rapid development of high power lasers, laser welding has received considerable attention. Laser welding offers many advantages over conventional welding processes, e.g. low heat input, small heat-affected zone (HAZ), small distortion, and welding in an exact and reproducible manner. Residual stress distribution in laser welds may also differ from those made by conventional welding processes due to its special features. Residual stress, particularly tensile residual stress in the weld, can be very important factor in controlling the quality and service life of the welded structure. The formation of tensile residual stress in the weld may result in the initiation of fatigue cracking, stress corrosion cracking or other types of fractures. It is useful, therefore, to understand the distribution of residual stress in austenitic-ferritic laser welds, and thus evaluate the quality of the joints. Although residual stress distribution in the welded joints has been extensively investigated, little data are available for the residual stress distribution in laser welds. The aim of the work was to examine residual stress distribution along laser welds of dissimilar steel tube-to-tube joints, which were made by both autogeneous welding and welding with filler wire. The results were also compared with the joints made by plasma arc and TIG welding.

  16. Ultrasonic Welding of Thermoplastic Composite Coupons for Mechanical Characterization of Welded Joints through Single Lap Shear Testing.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Irene F; Palardy, Genevieve

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel straightforward method for ultrasonic welding of thermoplastic-composite coupons in optimum processing conditions. The ultrasonic welding process described in this paper is based on three main pillars. Firstly, flat energy directors are used for preferential heat generation at the joining interface during the welding process. A flat energy director is a neat thermoplastic resin film that is placed between the parts to be joined prior to the welding process and heats up preferentially owing to its lower compressive stiffness relative to the composite substrates. Consequently, flat energy directors provide a simple solution that does not require molding of resin protrusions on the surfaces of the composite substrates, as opposed to ultrasonic welding of unreinforced plastics. Secondly, the process data provided by the ultrasonic welder is used to rapidly define the optimum welding parameters for any thermoplastic composite material combination. Thirdly, displacement control is used in the welding process to ensure consistent quality of the welded joints. According to this method, thermoplastic-composite flat coupons are individually welded in a single lap configuration. Mechanical testing of the welded coupons allows determining the apparent lap shear strength of the joints, which is one of the properties most commonly used to quantify the strength of thermoplastic composite welded joints. PMID:26890931

  17. Fatigue strength improvement of MIG-welded joint by shot peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azida Che Lah, Nur; Ali, Aidy

    2011-02-01

    In this study, the effect of controlled shot peening (CSP) treatment on the fatigue strength of an ASTM A516 grade 70 carbon steel MIG-welded joint has been studied quantitatively. Metallurgical modifications, hardness, elemental compositions, and internal discontinuities, such as porosity and inclusions found in treated and untreated fusion welded joints, were characterized. The fatigue results of as-welded and peened skimmed joints were compared. It was observed that the effect of the CSP and skimming processes improved the fatigue life of the fusion weld by 63% on MIG-welded samples.

  18. Development of process to control residual stress distribution of butt weld joint of cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Nayama, Michisuke; Sakamoto, Naruo; Akitomo, Norio; Toyoda, Masao

    1995-12-31

    The authors develop new process to control residual stress distribution of butt weld joint of cylinder. This process, which is heating circularly at both side of butt weld joint and letting cool, can reduce tensile residual stress on inner surface near weld joint by operation from only outside of cylinder and its required temperature rise of this process is lower than ordinary PWHT (Post Weld Heat Treatment) process. This paper describes the procedure and conditions of the process named ``both side heating`` by authors. The appropriate range of process conditions to get sufficient effect is confirmed by FEM stress history analysis and experiment in this paper. Experiments show that the inner residual stress near weld is reduced to compression from over yield stress at as weld condition in austenitic stainless steel pipe to pipe joints, pipe to elbow joints and pipe to valve joint after application of the process.

  19. Ultrasonic spot welding of dissimilar materials: characterization of welded joints and parametric optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satpathy, M. P.; Sahoo, S. K.

    2016-02-01

    Material joining is one of the key manufacturing processes used to assemble metallic and non-metallic parts for several applications. But the industries are facing many difficulties in joining of thin sheets of dissimilar metals by the conventional welding process because of their differences in chemical composition, physical and mechanical properties. Thus, ultrasonic welding is a solid state joining process used for joining of small elements in microelectronics industries. In this process, acoustic horn and booster are the important assets. The accuracy and strength of the welding depend mainly on their geometry. This proposed work deals with the design and modelling of an acoustic stepped sonotrode with booster using finite element analysis (FEA). From this analysis, the actual length of the horn is obtained by gradually decreasing its theoretical length. The quality of the weld is reckoned by its weld strength and the combinations of different process parameters. These are examined using the principal components coupled with grey relational analysis approach which is showing good agreement between the predicted values with experimental results. Fractographic examination of weld zone and hardness are also used to explore the weld quality.

  20. Effect of a copper filler metal on the microstructure and mechanical properties of electron beam welded titanium-stainless steel joint

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ting; Zhang, Binggang; Feng, Jicai; Tang, Qi

    2012-11-15

    Cracking in an electron beam weld of titanium to stainless steel occurred during the cooling process because of internal thermal stress. Using a copper filler metal, a crack free joint was obtained, which had a tensile strength of 310 MPa. To determine the reasons for cracking in the Ti/Fe joint and the function of the copper filler metal on the improvement of the cracking resistance of the Ti/Cu/Fe joint, the microstructures of the joints were studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The cracking susceptibilities of the joints were evaluated with microhardness tests on the cross-sections. In addition, microindentation tests were used to compare the brittleness of the intermetallics in the welds. The results showed that the Ti/Fe joint was characterized by continuously distributed brittle intermetallics such as TiFe and TiFe(Cr){sub 2} with high hardness ({approx} 1200 HV). For the Ti/Cu/Fe joint, most of the weld consisted of a soft solid solution of copper with dispersed TiFe intermetallics. The transition region between the weld and the titanium alloy was made up of a relatively soft Ti-Cu intermetallic layer with a lower hardness ({approx} 500 HV). The formation of soft phases reduced the cracking susceptibility of the joint. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron beam welded Ti/Fe joint cracked for the brittleness and residual stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron beam welded Ti/Cu/Fe joint with tensile strength of 310 MPa was obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cu diluted Ti and Fe contents in weld and separated the TiFe{sub 2} into individual blocks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interfacial hard Ti-Fe compounds were replaced by soft Ti-Cu compounds in the weld. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A large amount of solid solution of copper formed in the weld.

  1. Structure and properties of joints produced by ultrasound-assisted explosive welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peev, A. P.; Kuz'min, S. V.; Lysak, V. I.; Kuz'min, E. V.; Dorodnikov, A. N.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the results of the effect of ultrasound on explosion welded materials. It has been established that simultaneous treatment with ultrasonic vibrations and explosion welding of the materials to be welded has a significant effect on the structure and properties of the heat-affected zone of formed joints.

  2. Joint properties of cast Fe-Pt magnetic alloy laser-welded to Co-Cr alloy.

    PubMed

    Baba, Naoki; Watanabe, Ikuya; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Hisatsune, Kunihiro; Atsuta, Mitsuru

    2005-12-01

    This study investigated the joint properties of Fe-Pt alloy laser-welded to Co-Cr alloy. Cast plates (0.5 x 3.0 x 10 mm) were prepared with Fe-Pt and Co-Cr alloys. Fe-Pt plates were butted against Co-Cr plates and laser-welded using Nd:YAG laser. Control and homogeneously welded specimens were also prepared. Laser welding was performed with and without argon shielding. Tensile testing was conducted, and both fracture force (Ff: N) and elongation (El: %) were recorded. There were no differences in the Ff value between the specimens with and without argon shielding for the welded Fe-Pt/Co-Cr. Lower Ff value of the welded specimen was obtained in the order of Fe-Pt alloy < Fe-Pt/Co-Cr < Co-Cr alloy. The results indicated that Fe-Pt welded to Co-Cr had Ff values between the values of homogeneously welded Fe-Pt and Co-Cr alloys. Argon shielding, on the other hand, had no effect on the weld strength between Fe-Pt and Co-Cr alloys. PMID:16445017

  3. Electron microscopy and microanalysis of steel weld joints after long time exposures at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandová, D.; Kasl, J.; Rek, A.

    2010-02-01

    The structural changes of three trial weld joints of creep resistant modified 9Cr-1Mo steels and low alloyed chromium steel after post-weld heat treatment and long-term creep tests were investigated. Smooth cross-weld specimens ruptured in different zones of the weld joints as a result of different structural changes taking place during creep exposures. The microstructure of the weld joint is heterogeneous and consequently microstructural development can be different in the weld metal, the heat affected zone, and the base material. Precipitation reactions, nucleation and growth of some particles and dissolution of others, affect the strengthening of the matrix, recovery at high temperatures, and the resulting creep resistance. Therefore, a detailed study of secondary phase's development in individual zones of weld joints can elucidate mechanism of cracks propagation in specific regions and the causes of creep failure. Type I and II fractures in the weld metal and Type IV fractures in the fine prior austenite grain heat affected zones occurred after creep tests at temperatures ranging from 525 to 625 °C and under stresses from 40 to 240 MPa. An extended metallographic study of the weld joints was carried out using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive and wave-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Carbon extraction replicas and thin foils were prepared from individual weld joint regions and quantitative evaluation of dislocation substructure and particles of secondary phases has been performed.

  4. Camera Based Closed Loop Control for Partial Penetration Welding of Overlap Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abt, F.; Heider, A.; Weber, R.; Graf, T.; Blug, A.; Carl, D.; Höfler, H.; Nicolosi, L.; Tetzlaff, R.

    Welding of overlap joints with partial penetration in automotive applications is a challenging process, since the laser power must be set very precisely to achieve a proper connection between the two joining partners without damaging the backside of the sheet stack. Even minor changes in welding conditions can lead to bad results. To overcome this problem a camera based closed loop control for partial penetration welding of overlap joints was developed. With this closed loop control it is possible to weld such configurations with a stable process result even under changing welding conditions.

  5. Fracture characteristics of HAZ-double edge notched weld joints with mechanical undermatching

    SciTech Connect

    Zarzour, J.F.; Kleinosky, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    Both experimental and finite element investigations were carried out on double edge notched weld joints in tension to determine the influence of material gradients across the heat affected zone (HAZ) on cracks located at three interface regions: (1) base plate and fine grain HAZ, (2) coarse grain HAZ and fine grain HAZ, (3) weld metal and coarse grain HAZ. For HY-100 steel with a 20 percent weld undermatch, it was concluded that for case (a), the different mechanical properties of both fine grain HAZ (FGHAZ) and coarse grain HAZ (CGHAZ), obtained with a novel indentation technique, greatly affect the near tip stress fields and promote yielding into the base plate. For case (b), the stress triaxiality at the crack tip is the highest and the plastic deformation is confined to the HAZ zone. Finally for case (c), the stress triaxiality is lowered by the presence of a softer weld metal. However, there is a possibility of gross section yielding through the weld area. The overall conclusion indicates that, in order to evaluate crack initiation in the HAZ, one needs to verify the relevant microstructure and determine the mechanical properties of each constituent, mainly, the CGHAZ and FGHAZ. In addition, the assumption of homogeneous HAZ properties may lead to erroneous conclusions.

  6. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy study on the corrosion of the weld zone of 3Cr steel welded joints in CO2 environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li-ning; Zhu, Jin-yang; Lu, Min-xu; Zhang, Lei; Chang, Wei

    2015-05-01

    The welded joints of 3Cr pipeline steel were fabricated with commercial welding wire using the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) technique. Potentiodynamic polarization curves, linear polarization resistance (LPR), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) were used to investigate the corrosion resistance and the growth of a corrosion film on the weld zone (WZ). The changes in electrochemical characteristics of the film were obtained through fitting of the EIS data. The results showed that the average corrosion rate of the WZ in CO2 environments first increased, then fluctuated, and finally decreased gradually. The formation of the film on the WZ was divided into three stages: dynamic adsorption, incomplete-coverage layer formation, and integral layer formation.

  7. Effect of Boric Acid Concentration on Viscosity of Slag and Property of Weld Metal Obtained from Underwater Wet Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ning; Guo, Wei; Xu, Changsheng; Du, Yongpeng; Feng, Jicai

    2015-06-01

    Underwater wet welding is a crucial repair and maintenance technology for nuclear plant. A boric acid environment raises a new challenge for the underwater welding maintenance of nuclear plant. This paper places emphasis on studying the influence of a boric acid environment in nuclear plant on the underwater welding process. Several groups of underwater wet welding experiments have been conducted in boric acid aqueous solution with different concentration (0-35000 ppm). The viscosity of the welding slag and the mechanical properties of welds, such as the hardness, strength, and elongation, have been studied. The results show that with increasing boric acid concentration, the viscosity of the slag decreases first and then increases at a lower temperature (less than 1441 °C). However, when the temperature is above 1480 °C, the differences between the viscosity measurements become less pronounced, and the viscosity tends to a constant value. The hardness and ductility of the joints can be enhanced significantly, and the maximum strength of the weld metal can be reached at 2300 ppm.

  8. Study of mechanical joint strength of aluminum alloy 7075-T6 and dual phase steel 980 welded by friction bit joining and weld-bonding under corrosion medium

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Yong Chae; Squires, Lile; Pan, Tsung-Yu; Miles, Michael; Song, Guang-Ling; Wang, Yanli; Feng, Zhili

    2014-12-30

    We have employed a unique solid-sate joining process, called friction bit joining (FBJ), to spot weld aluminum alloy (AA) 7075-T6 and dual phase (DP) 980 steel. Static joint strength was studied in the lap shear tension configuration. In addition, weld-bonding (adhesive + FBJ) joints were studied in order to evaluate the ability of adhesive to mitigate the impact of corrosion on joint properties. Accelerated laboratory cyclic corrosion tests were carried out for both FBJ only and weld-bonding joints. Furthermore, the FBJ only joints that emerged from corrosion testing had lap shear failure loads that were significantly lower than freshly prepared joints. However, weld-bonding specimens retained more than 80% of the lap shear failure load of the freshly prepared weld-bonding specimens. Moreover, examination of joint cross sections confirmed that the presence of adhesive in the weld-bonding joints mitigated the effect of the corrosion environment, compared to FBJ only joints.

  9. Grinding assembly, grinding apparatus, weld joint defect repair system, and methods

    DOEpatents

    Larsen, Eric D.; Watkins, Arthur D.; Bitsoi, Rodney J.; Pace, David P.

    2005-09-27

    A grinding assembly for grinding a weld joint of a workpiece includes a grinder apparatus, a grinder apparatus includes a grinding wheel configured to grind the weld joint, a member configured to receive the grinding wheel, the member being configured to be removably attached to the grinder apparatus, and a sensor assembly configured to detect a contact between the grinding wheel and the workpiece. The grinding assembly also includes a processing circuitry in communication with the grinder apparatus and configured to control operations of the grinder apparatus, the processing circuitry configured to receive weld defect information of the weld joint from an inspection assembly to create a contour grinding profile to grind the weld joint in a predetermined shape based on the received weld defect information, and a manipulator having an end configured to carry the grinder apparatus, the manipulator further configured to operate in multiple dimensions.

  10. High-cycle Fatigue Properties of Alloy718 Base Metal and Electron Beam Welded Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Yoshinori; Yuri, Tetsumi; Nagashima, Nobuo; Sumiyoshi, Hideshi; Ogata, Toshio; Nagao, Naoki

    High-cycle fatigue properties of Alloy 718 plate and its electron beam (EB) welded joint were investigated at 293 K and 77 K under uniaxial loading. At 293 K, the high-cycle fatigue strength of the EB welded joint with the post heat treatment exhibited somewhat lower values than that of the base metal. The fatigue strengths of both samples basically increased at 77 K. However, in longer life region, the EB welded joint fractured from a blow hole formed in the welded zone, resulting in almost the same fatigue strength at 107 cycles as that at 293 K.

  11. Type IV Creep Damage Behavior in Gr.91 Steel Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongo, Hiromichi; Tabuchi, Masaaki; Watanabe, Takashi

    2012-04-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel (ASME Grade 91 steel) is used as a key structural material for boiler components in ultra-supercritical (USC) thermal power plants at approximately 873 K (600 °C). The creep strength of welded joints of this steel decreases as a result of Type IV creep cracking that forms in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) under long-term use at high temperatures. The current article aims to elucidate the damage processes and microstructural degradations that take place in the HAZ of these welded joints. Long-term creep tests for base metal, simulated HAZ, and welded joints were conducted at 823 K, 873 K, and 923 K (550 °C, 600 °C, and 650 °C). Furthermore, creep tests of thick welded joint specimens were interrupted at several time steps at 873 K (600 °C) and 90 MPa, after which the distribution and evolution of creep damage inside the plates were measured quantitatively. It was found that creep voids are initiated in the early stages (0.2 of life) of creep rupture life, which coalesce to form a crack at a later stage (0.8 of life). In a fine-grained HAZ, creep damage is concentrated chiefly in an area approximately 20 pct below the surface of the plate. The experimental creep damage distributions coincide closely with the computed results obtained by damage mechanics analysis using the creep properties of a simulated fine-grained HAZ. Both the concentration of creep strain and the high multiaxial stress conditions in the fine-grained HAZ influence the distribution of Type IV creep damage.

  12. Metallurgical Effects of Shunting Current on Resistance Spot-Welded Joints of AA2219 Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari Vardanjani, M.; Araee, A.; Senkara, J.; Jakubowski, J.; Godek, J.

    2016-06-01

    Shunting effect is the loss of electrical current via the secondary circuit provided due to the existence of previous nugget in a series of welding spots. This phenomenon influences on metallurgical aspects of resistance spot-welded (RSW) joints in terms of quality and performance. In this paper RSW joints of AA2219 sheets with 1 mm thickness are investigated metallurgically for shunted and single spots. An electro-thermal finite element analysis is performed on the RSW process of shunted spot and temperature distribution and variation are obtained. These predictions are then compared with experimental micrographs. Three values of 5 mm, 20 mm, and infinite (i.e., single spot) are assumed for welding distance. Numerical and experimental results are matching each other in terms of nugget and HAZ geometry as increasing distance raised nugget size and symmetry of HAZ. In addition, important effect of shunting current on nugget thickness, microstructure, and Copper segregation on HAZ grain boundaries were discovered. A quantitative analysis is also performed about the influence of welding distance on important properties including ratio of nugget thickness and diameter (r t), ratio of HAZ area on shunted and free side of nugget (r HA), and ratio of equivalent segregated and total amount of Copper, measured in sample (r Cu) on HAZ. Increasing distance from 5 mm to infinite, indicated a gain of 111.04, -45.55, and -75.15% in r t, r HA, and r Cu, respectively, while obtained ratios for 20 mm welding distance was suitable compared to single spot.

  13. Effect of weld metal mismatch on joint efficiency and measured fracture toughness

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, R.; Malik, L.; Morrison, J.

    1997-12-31

    Fracture toughness tests of deep-notched and shallow-notched SENB specimens at various sub-zero temperatures were conducted to study the effect of weld metal mismatch on measured fracture toughness. Tensile tests of cross-weld tensile specimens were also conducted to study the effect of weld metal mismatch on joint efficiency. These specimens were machined from butt welds that were fabricated with the same welding consumable and welding procedure using HSLA 100 steel plates heat treated to different tensile strengths. No significant differences were found between the joint efficiencies and ductilities of the cross-weld tensile specimens with overmatching weld metal and those of specimens with up to 9% weld metal undermatch in terms of yield strength (3% in terms of ultimate tensile strength). Furthermore, 100% joint efficiency was still achieved in the cross-weld tensile specimens with intact reinforcements and 17% undermatching weld metal in terms of yield strength (9% in terms of ultimate tensile strength). No correlation was found between the degree of weld metal mismatch and the measured fracture toughness of the SENB specimens.

  14. Effect of Multipass TIG and Activated TIG Welding Process on the Thermo-Mechanical Behavior of 316LN Stainless Steel Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, K. C.; Balasubramanian, K. R.; Vasudevan, M.; Vasantharaja, P.; Chandrasekhar, N.

    2016-04-01

    The primary objective of this work was to develop a finite element model to predict the thermo-mechanical behavior of an activated tungsten inert gas (ATIG)-welded joint. The ATIG-welded joint was fabricated using 10 mm thickness of 316LN stainless steel plates in a single pass. To distinguish the merits of ATIG welding process, it was compared with manual multipass tungsten inert gas (MPTIG)-welded joint. The ATIG-welded joint was fabricated with square butt edge configuration using an activating flux developed in-house. The MPTIG-welded joint was fabricated in thirteen passes with V-groove edge configuration. The finite element model was developed to predict the transient temperature, residual stress, and distortion of the welded joints. Also, microhardness, impact toughness, tensile strength, ferrite measurement, and microstructure were characterized. Since most of the recent publications of ATIG-welded joint was focused on the molten weld pool dynamics, this research work gives an insight on the thermo-mechanical behavior of ATIG-welded joint over MPTIG-welded joint.

  15. Corrosion fracture resistance of welded joints in 16GMYuCh steel

    SciTech Connect

    Steklov, O.I.; Efimenko, L.A.; Khakimov, A.M.; Paul', A.I.; Pushkina, O.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of combined welding of thick-wall gas and oil chemical equipment consisting of welding the weld root by automatic submerged-arc welding and electrosag welding (ESW) with the control of thermal cycles (CWC) of the main joint, on the corrosion resistance of welded joints in low-alloy normalized 16GMYuCh steel 50 mm thick. The chemical composition of the steel, % 0.16 C; 1.05 Mn; 0.25 Si; 0.42 Mo; 0.14 Ni; 0.1 Cu; 0.11 Cr; 0.049 Al; 0.032 S; 0.019 P. The authors determined the effect of cooling rate in the temperature range of diffusion transformation of austenite on the corrosion resistance of the weld zone. Attention was then given to the corrosion resistance of the welded joints produced by conventional ESW welding and ESW with CWC. The investigations show that the corrosion resistance of the parent metal is lower than that of the welded joints.

  16. The Diagnostic Method of Inner Parts of Welded Joints at Nuclear Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bednarova, O.; Janovec, J.

    2010-06-22

    There is no possibility to check any inner part at real welded joint at nuclear power station (NPS) during operation because any destructive test cannot be used. In practice there is checked surface of weld. There are used four methodical instructions for the check of real welds: 1. The visual inspection, 2. The measurement of hardness, 3. The chemical composition checking and 4. The microstructure replica analysis. It is necessary to know how these information of weld surface are in accordance with characteristics of inner parts of weld. If there is not any difference between surface weld microstructure and internal weld microstructure of experimental weld it is supposed to that there is not any difference in other measured properties of welds. If is changed structural characteristics of microstructure, it is changed also hardness, chemical analysis etc. It was observed that the microstructure of real welds is almost the same with simulated weld and also the surface microstructure of experimental weld is in accordance with microstructure of inner parts of this weld. It can be supposed extension of lifetime of NPS if there is not any difference between replicas microstructure taken after six year operation of NPS and microstructure of inner parts of simulated weld is almost the same with surface microstructure.

  17. Influences of post weld heat treatment on tensile properties of friction stir welded AA2519-T87 aluminium alloy joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabari, S. Sree; Balasubramanian, V.; Malarvizhi, S.; Reddy, G. Madusudhan

    2015-12-01

    AA 2519-T87 is an aluminium alloy that principally contains Cu as an alloying element and is a new grade of Al-Cu alloy system. This material is a potential candidate for light combat military vehicles. Fusion welding of this alloy leads to hot cracking, porosity and alloy segregation in the weld metal region. Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state joining process which can overcome the above mentioned problems. However, the FSW of age hardenable aluminium alloys results in poor tensile properties in the as-welded condition (AW). Hence, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is used to enhance deteriorated tensile properties of FSW joints. In this work, the effect of PWHT, namely artificial ageing (AA) and solution treatment (ST) followed by ageing (STA) on the microstructure, tensile properties and microhardness were systematically investigated. The microstructural features of the weld joints were characterised using an optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The tensile strength and microhardness of the joints were correlated with the grain size, precipitate size, shape and its distribution. From the investigation, it was found that STA treatment is beneficial in enhancing the tensile strength of the FSW joints of AA2519-T87 alloy and this is mainly due to the presence of fine and densely distributed precipitates in the stir zone.

  18. Numerical and Experimental Evaluation on the Residual Stresses of Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Sun Chul; Park, Wonjo; Yang, Haesug; Jung, Haeyoung; Kim, Chuyoung

    Wings for the defense industry such as fighters, missiles, and rockets should show no deformation or damage on the structure. The structures of existing wings had holes for weight reduction. The plates and frames were fixed with rivets or screws, which limited the weight reduction possible. In this study, an improvement was made in jointing methods through EB welding and laser welding. Welding strength was measured through tension testing. In addition, finite element analysis was performed for the welding process so as to deduce the optimum welding condition.

  19. Effects of Initial Temper Condition and Postweld Heat Treatment on the Properties of Dissimilar Friction-Stir-Welded Joints between AA7075 and AA6061 Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    İpekoğlu, Güven; Çam, Gürel

    2014-06-01

    In this study, dissimilar AA7075-O/6061-O and AA7075-T6/6061-T6 butt joints were produced by friction stir welding (FSW), and postweld heat treatment (PWHT) was applied to the joints obtained. The effects of initial temper condition and PWHT on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the dissimilar joints were thus investigated. It was demonstrated that sound dissimilar joints can be produced for both temper conditions. A hardness increase in the joint area ( i.e., strength overmatching) was obtained in the joints produced in the O-temper condition, whereas a hardness loss was observed in the joint area of the joints obtained in the T6 temper condition. It was also well demonstrated that PWHT could be used in order to improve the joint properties for both O and T6 joints provided that the joint is defect-free prior to subsequent heat treatment.

  20. Integrity of Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) Chemically Welded Joints Examined

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Bradley A.; Thesken, John C.; Bunnell, Charles T.; Kurta, Carol E.; Sydenstricker, Mike

    2005-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center s Capillary Flow Experiments (CFE) program is developing experiment payloads to explore fluid interfaces in microgravity on the International Space Station. The information to be gained from the CFE is relevant to the design of fluid-bearing systems in which capillary forces predominate, for example in the passive positioning of liquids in spacecraft fuel tanks. To achieve the science goals of CFE, Glenn researchers constructed several types of experiment vessels. One type of vessel, known as the interior corner flow (ICF), will be used to determine important transients for low-gravity liquid management in a two-phase system. Each vessel has a cylindrical fluid reservoir connected to each end of the test chamber by internal transport tubes, each with a quarter-turn shutoff valve (see the following photograph). These multipiece vessels are made from polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) because of its excellent optical properties (i.e., the fluids can be observed easily in the vessel). Because of the complexity of certain vessels, the test chamber had to be manufactured in pieces and welded chemically. Some past experience with adhesive bonded plastic showed that the experiment fluid degraded the adhesive to the point of failure. Therefore, it was necessary to see if the fluid also degraded the chemically welded PMMA joints.

  1. Effects of Sealing Run Welding with Defocused Laser Beam on the Quality of T-joint Fillet Weld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unt, Anna; Poutiainen, Ilkka; Salminen, Antti

    Fillet weld is the predominant weld type used for connecting different elements e.g. in shipbuilding, offshore and bridge structures. One of prevalent research questions is the structural integrity of the welded joint. Post weld improvement techniques are being actively researched, as high stress areas like an incomplete penetration on the root side or fluctuations in penetration depth cannot be avoided. Development of laser and laser-arc hybrid welding processes have greatly contributed to increase of production capacity and reduction of heat-induced distortions by producing single pass full penetration welds in thin- and medium thickness structural steel parts. Present study addresses the issue of how to improve the quality of the fillet welds by welding the sealing run on the root side with defocused laser beam. Welds having incomplete or excessive penetration were produced with several beam angles and laser beam spot sizes on surface. As a conclusion, significant decrease or even complete elimination of the seam irregularities, which act as the failure starting points during service, is achieved.

  2. Qualification of electron-beam welded joints between copper and stainless steel for cryogenic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusch, C.; Borsch, M.; Heidt, C.; Magginetti, N.; Sas, J.; Weiss, K.-P.; Grohmann, S.

    2015-12-01

    Joints between copper and stainless steel are commonly applied in cryogenic systems. A relatively new and increasingly important method to combine these materials is electron-beam (EB) welding. Typically, welds in cryogenic applications need to withstand a temperature range from 300K down to 4K, and pressures of several MPa. However, few data are available for classifying EB welds between OFHC copper and 316L stainless steel. A broad test program was conducted in order to qualify this kind of weld. The experiments started with the measurement of the hardness in the weld area. To verify the leak-tightness of the joints, integral helium leak tests at operating pressures of 16 MPa were carried out at room- and at liquid nitrogen temperature. The tests were followed by destructive tensile tests at room temperature, at liquid nitrogen and at liquid helium temperatures, yielding information on the yield strength and the ultimate tensile strength of the welds at these temperatures. Moreover, nondestructive tensile tests up to the yield strength, i.e. the range in which the weld can be stressed during operation, were performed. Also, the behavior of the weld upon temperature fluctuations between room- and liquid nitrogen temperature was tested. The results of the qualification indicate that EB welded joints between OFHC copper and 316L stainless steel are reliable and present an interesting alternative to other technologies such as vacuum brazing or friction welding.

  3. A Study on the compensation margin on butt welding joint of Large Steel plates during Shipbuilding construction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Jeong, H.; Ji, M.; Jeong, K.; Yun, C.; Lee, J.; Chung, H.

    2015-09-01

    This paper examines the characteristics of butt welding joint shrinkage for shipbuilding and marine structures main plate. The shrinkage strain of butt welding joint which is caused by the process of heat input and cooling, results in the difference between dimensions of the actual parent metal and the dimensions of design. This, in turn, leads to poor quality in the production of ship blocks and reworking through period of correction brings about impediment on improvement of productivity. Through experiments on butt welding joint's shrinkage strain on large structures main plate, the deformation of welding residual stress in the form of I, Y, V was obtained. In addition, the results of experiments indicate that there is limited range of shrinkage in the range of 1 ∼ 2 mm in 11t ∼ 21.5t thickness and the effect of heat transfer of weld appears to be limited within 1000 mm based on one side of seam line so there was limited impact of weight of parent metal on the shrinkage. Finally, it has been learned that Shrinkage margin needs to be applied differently based on groove phenomenon in the design phase in order to minimize shrinkage.

  4. Evaluation of High Temperature Properties and Microstructural Characterization of Resistance Spot Welded Steel Lap Shear Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R. K.; Anil Kumar, V.; Panicker, Paul G.

    2016-02-01

    Joining of thin sheets (0.5 mm) of stainless steel 304 and 17-4PH through resistance spot welding is highly challenging especially when joint is used for high temperature applications. Various combinations of stainless steel sheets of thickness 0.5 mm are spot welded and tested at room temperature as well as at high temperatures (800 K, 1,000 K, 1,200 K). Parent metal as well as spot welded joints are tested and characterized. It is observed that joint strength of 17-4PH steel is highest and then dissimilar steel joint of 17-4PH with SS-304 is moderate and of SS-304 is lowest at all the temperatures. Joint strength of 17-4PH steel is found to be >80% of parent metal properties up to 1,000 K then drastic reduction in strength is noted at 1,200 K. Gradual reduction in strength of SS-304 joint with increase in temperature from 800 to 1,200 K is noted. At 1,200 K, joint strength of all combinations of joints is found to be nearly same. Microstructural evaluation of weld nugget after testing at different temperatures shows presence of tempered martensite in 17-4PH containing welds and homogenized structure in stainless steel 304 weld.

  5. Precipitation of Niobium Boride Phases at the Base Metal/Weld Metal Interface in Dissimilar Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Výrostková, Anna; Kepič, Ján; Homolová, Viera; Falat, Ladislav

    2015-07-01

    In this work, the analysis of failure mechanism in the heat affected zone is described in dissimilar weld joints between advanced martensitic steel T92 and Ni-base weld metal. The joints were treated with two different post-weld heat treatments and tested. For the creep, tensile, and Charpy impact tests, the samples with interfacially located notch were used. Moreover long term aging at 625 °C was applied before the tensile and notch toughness tests. Decohesion fractures ran along carbides at the T92 BM/WM interfaces in case of the modified PWHT, whereas type IV cracking was the prevailing failure mechanism after the classical PWHT in the creep test. In the notch tensile and Charpy impact tests, with the notch at T92 base metal/weld metal interface, fractures ran along the interface with a hard phase on the fracture surface along with the ductile dimple and brittle quasi-cleavage fracture. The phase identified as niobium boride (either NbB and/or Nb3B2) was produced during welding at the end of the solidification process. It was found in the welds regardless of the post-weld heat treatment and long-term aging.

  6. Ultrasonic Impact Treatment to Improve Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Welded Joints of Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Gou, G.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.; Chen, H.; Yang, Y. P.

    2016-06-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the major issues for welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy in high-speed trains. High residual stress in the welded joints under corrosion results in stress corrosion cracking. Ultrasonic impact treatment was used to control the residual stress of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy. Experimental tests show that ultrasonic impact treatment can induce compressive longitudinal and transverse residual stress in the welded joint, harden the surface, and increase the tensile strength of welded joints. Salt-fog corrosion tests were conducted for both an as-welded sample and an ultrasonic impact-treated sample. The surface of the treated sample had far fewer corrosion pits than that of the untreated sample. The treated sample has higher strength and lower tensile residual stress than the untreated sample during corrosion. Therefore, ultrasonic impact treatment is an effective technique to improve the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy.

  7. Ultrasonic Impact Treatment to Improve Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Welded Joints of Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Gou, G.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.; Chen, H.; Yang, Y. P.

    2016-07-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the major issues for welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy in high-speed trains. High residual stress in the welded joints under corrosion results in stress corrosion cracking. Ultrasonic impact treatment was used to control the residual stress of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy. Experimental tests show that ultrasonic impact treatment can induce compressive longitudinal and transverse residual stress in the welded joint, harden the surface, and increase the tensile strength of welded joints. Salt-fog corrosion tests were conducted for both an as-welded sample and an ultrasonic impact-treated sample. The surface of the treated sample had far fewer corrosion pits than that of the untreated sample. The treated sample has higher strength and lower tensile residual stress than the untreated sample during corrosion. Therefore, ultrasonic impact treatment is an effective technique to improve the stress corrosion cracking resistance of the welded joints of 6005A-T6 aluminum alloy.

  8. Microstructure of Aluminum/Glass Joint Bonded by Ultrasonic Wire Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Chihiro

    2013-11-01

    An Al/glass joint created by using ultrasonic welding was analyzed by means of multiscale observation techniques. A cross-sectional analysis of the microstructure revealed that a directly joined interface without reaction phases formed at the periphery of a round joined region. The size of Al grains markedly decreased after ultrasonic welding and some subgrains were observed along the interface. The finer Al grains observed around the periphery of the joined interface showed active plastic flow that promoted welding.

  9. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of 316L Stainless Steel Filling Friction Stir-Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L.; Nakata, K.; Tsumura, T.; Fujii, H.; Ikeuchi, K.; Michishita, Y.; Fujiya, Y.; Morimoto, M.

    2014-10-01

    Keyhole left at 316L stainless steel friction stir welding/friction stir processing seam was repaired by filling friction stir welding (FFSW). Both metallurgical and mechanical bonding characteristics were obtained by the combined plastic deformation and flow between the consumable filling tool and the wall of the keyhole. Two ways based on the original conical and modified spherical keyholes, together with corresponding filling tools and process parameters were investigated. Microstructure and mechanical properties of 316L stainless steel FFSW joints were evaluated. The results showed that void defects existed at the bottom of the refilled original conical keyhole, while excellent bonding interface was obtained on the refilled modified spherical keyhole. The FFSW joint with defect-free interface obtained on the modified spherical keyhole fractured at the base metal side during the tensile test due to microstructural refinement and hardness increase in the refilled keyhole. Moreover, no σ phase but few Cr carbides were formed in the refilled zone, which would not result in obvious corrosion resistance degradation of 316L stainless steel.

  10. Electrical resistance determination of actual contact area of cold welded metal joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hordon, M. J.

    1970-01-01

    Method measures the area of the bonded zone of a compression weld by observing the electrical resistance of the weld zone while the load changes from full compression until the joint ruptures under tension. The ratio of bonding force to maximum tensile load varies considerably.

  11. Effects of activating fluxes on the weld penetration and corrosion resistant property of laser welded joint of ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yonghui; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi

    2015-10-01

    This study was based on the ferritic stainless steel SUS430. Under the parallel welding conditions, the critical penetration power values (CPPV) of 3mm steel plates with different surface-coating activating fluxes were tested. Results showed that, after coating with activating fluxes, such as ZrO2, CaCO3, CaF2 and CaO, the CPPV could reduce 100~250 W, which indicating the increases of the weld penetrations (WP). Nevertheless, the variation range of WP with or without activating fluxes was less than 16.7%. Compared with single-component ones, a multi-component activating flux composed of 50% ZrO2, 12.09% CaCO3, 10.43% CaO, and 27.49% MgO was testified to be much more efficient, the WP of which was about 2.3-fold of that without any activating fluxes. Furthermore, a FeCl3 spot corrosion experiment was carried out with samples cut from weld zone to test the effects of different activating fluxes on the corrosion resistant (CR) property of the laser welded joints. It was found that all kinds of activating fluxes could improve the CR of the welded joints. And, it was interesting to find that the effect of the mixed activating fluxes was inferior to those single-component ones. Among all the activating fluxes, the single-component of CaCO3 seemed to be the best in resisting corrosion. By means of Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) testing, it was found that the use of activating fluxes could effectively restrain the loss of Cr element of weld zone in the process of laser welding, thus greatly improving the CR of welded joints.

  12. Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Gas Metal Arc Welded AISI 409 Grade Ferritic Stainless Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Shanmugam, K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2009-10-01

    The effect of filler metals such as austenitic stainless steel, ferritic stainless steel, and duplex stainless steel on fatigue crack growth behavior of the gas metal arc welded ferritic stainless steel joints was investigated. Rolled plates of 4 mm thickness were used as the base material for preparing single ‘V’ butt welded joints. Center cracked tensile specimens were prepared to evaluate fatigue crack growth behavior. Servo hydraulic controlled fatigue testing machine with a capacity of 100 kN was used to evaluate the fatigue crack growth behavior of the welded joints. From this investigation, it was found that the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal showed superior fatigue crack growth resistance compared to the joints fabricated by austenitic and ferritic stainless steel filler metals. Higher yield strength and relatively higher toughness may be the reasons for superior fatigue performance of the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal.

  13. Experiments and simulation for 6061-T6 aluminum alloy resistance spot welded lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florea, Radu Stefanel

    This comprehensive study is the first to quantify the fatigue performance, failure loads, and microstructure of resistance spot welding (RSW) in 6061-T6 aluminum (Al) alloy according to welding parameters and process sensitivity. The extensive experimental, theoretical and simulated analyses will provide a framework to optimize the welding of lightweight structures for more fuel-efficient automotive and military applications. The research was executed in four primary components. The first section involved using electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) scanning, tensile testing, laser beam profilometry (LBP) measurements, and optical microscopy(OM) images to experimentally investigate failure loads and deformation of the Al-alloy resistance spot welded joints. Three welding conditions, as well as nugget and microstructure characteristics, were quantified according to predefined process parameters. Quasi-static tensile tests were used to characterize the failure loads in specimens based upon these same process parameters. Profilometer results showed that increasing the applied welding current deepened the weld imprints. The EBSD scans revealed the strong dependency between the grain sizes and orientation function on the process parameters. For the second section, the fatigue behavior of the RSW'ed joints was experimentally investigated. The process optimization included consideration of the forces, currents, and times for both the main weld and post-heating. Load control cyclic tests were conducted on single weld lap-shear joint coupons to characterize the fatigue behavior in spot welded specimens. Results demonstrate that welding parameters do indeed significantly affect the microstructure and fatigue performance for these welds. The third section comprised residual strains of resistance spot welded joints measured in three different directions, denoted as in-plane longitudinal, in-plane transversal, and normal, and captured on the fusion zone, heat affected zone

  14. Influence of Welding With Two-Jet Gas Shielding On the Shaping of a Welding Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinakhov, D. A.; Chinakhova, E. D.; Grichin, S. V.; Gotovschik, Y. M.

    2016-04-01

    The author considers gas-dynamic influence upon microhardness and weld configuration of single-pass welds from steel 30HGSA when welding with consumable electrode under double-jet shielding. The relations to the chosen controlled welding parameters (Q, L, I) are developed and the controlling influence of the gas-dynamic affect of dynamic shield gas jet over formation of welds from alloy-treated steel 30HGSA is determined.

  15. Microstructural evolution under dual ion irradiation and in-reactor creep of type 316 stainless steel welded joints*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohyama, A.; Kohno, Y.; Hishinuma, A.

    1994-09-01

    Electron beam (EB) welding was applied to 316SS and the titanium modified 316SS (JPCA). For the prospective improvement of swelling in welded joints, modified TIG or EB welding procedures utilizing titanium or nickel foil insertion were employed. For the case of EB welding of 15 mm thickness I-butt joint, the higher weld heat input showed better swelling resistance in the joints. The in-reactor creep results suggest that irradiation creep in welded joints may not be a big concern, as far as swelling resistance is maintained. So, Ni addition, stress relief treatment and high heat input for EB welding with optimization of welding condition are recommended for suppressing irradiation creep and swelling.

  16. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Dissimilar Welded Ti3Al/Ni-Based Superalloy Joint Using a Ni-Cu Filler Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bing-Qing; Xiong, Hua-Ping; Guo, Shao-Qing; Sun, Bing-Bing; Chen, Bo; Tang, Si-Yi

    2015-02-01

    Dissimilar welding of a Ti3Al-based alloy and a Ni-based superalloy (Inconel 718) was successfully carried out using gas tungsten arc welding technology in this study. With a Ni-Cu alloy as filler material, sound joints have been obtained. The microstructure evolution along the cross section of the dissimilar joint has been revealed based on the results of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy as well as X-ray diffractometer. It is found that the weld/Ti3Al interface is composed of Ti2AlNb matrix dissolved with Ni and Cu, Al(Cu, Ni)2Ti, (Cu, Ni)2Ti, (Nb, Ti) solid solution, and so on. The weld and In718/weld interface mainly consist of (Cu, Ni) solid solutions. The weld exhibits higher microhardness than the two base materials. The average room-temperature tensile strength of the joints reaches 242 MPa and up to 73.6 pct of the value can be maintained at 873 K (600 °C). The brittle intermetallic phase of Ti2AlNb matrix dissolved with Ni and Cu at the weld/Ti3Al interface is the weak link of the joint.

  17. Structure and mechanical properties of the welded joints of large-diameter pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khotinov, V. A.; Arabei, A. B.; Pyshmintsev, I. Yu.; Farber, V. M.

    2013-05-01

    The structure and mechanical properties of the technological welded joints of large-diameter pipes of strength class K60 produced by two companies are studied. Along with standard mechanical properties (σ0.2, σu, δ, ψ), specific work of deformation a (tensile toughness) and true rupture strength S f are estimated from an analysis of the stress-strain diagrams constructed in true coordinates. The mechanical behavior is found to be different for samples cut from different zones of a welded joint (central weld, heat-affected zone, and base metal). The mutual correlation between parameters a, S f, and impact toughness KCV is considered.

  18. Joint strength in high speed friction stir spot welded DP 980 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, Nathan; Miles, Michael; Hartman, Trent; Hovanski, Yuri; Hong, Sung Tae; Steel, Russell

    2014-05-01

    High speed friction stir spot welding was applied to 1.2 mm thick DP 980 steel sheets under different welding conditions, using PCBN tools. The range of vertical feed rates used during welding was 2.5 mm – 102 mm per minute, while the range of spindle speeds was 2500 – 6000 rpm. Extended testing was carried out for five different sets of welding conditions, until tool failure. These welding conditions resulted in vertical welding loads of 3.6 – 8.2 kN and lap shear tension failure loads of 8.9 – 11.1 kN. PCBN tools were shown, in the best case, to provide lap shear tension fracture loads at or above 9 kN for 900 spot welds, after which tool failure caused a rapid drop in joint strength. Joint strength was shown to be strongly correlated to bond area, which was measured from weld cross sections. Failure modes of the tested joints were a function of bond area and softening that occurred in the heat-affected zone.

  19. Radiation resistance of weld joints of type 316 stainless steel containing about 10 appm He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabritsiev, S. A.; Pokrovsky, A. S.

    2000-12-01

    Welding is supposed to be an important method for making joints in the pipes conducting the heat agent when replacing divertor and first wall elements. Embrittlement through helium accumulation within the ITER components repaired by welding during maintenance is one of the factors limiting the materials lifetime. To investigate this problem, a set of the 316 RF type steel specimens was saturated by He up to 50 appm at 80°C. Another part was irradiated in the SM-2 reactor up to 0.1 dpa at 80°C. Afterwards, they were subjected to e-beam welding and arc welding, respectively. A part of each specimen underwent LCF bending; another part was tested to tension. These tensile and LCF tests of the specimens showed that neutron irradiation of the weld joints leads to their embrittlement and rapidly reduces the number of cycles to failure.

  20. Influence of the method of protection on the cyclic strength and character of fracture of titanium alloy weld joints

    SciTech Connect

    Mozeiko, B.Y.; Yakovleva, T.Y.

    1985-10-01

    In the argon-arc welding of titanium assemblies of complex spatial configuration done outside controlled atmosphere chambers it is often difficult to provide reliable protection of the root side of the joint with known gas protection equipment. The necessary reliability in protection is provided by a special, technologically stable two-layer coating applied to the reverse side of the edges being welded. The inner forming layer of the coating is a powder mixture of halides of alkali and alkaline-earth metals thinned to a pasty state with an ethanol-acetone solvent. The outer reinforcing layer is a solution of BMK5 acrylic resin in ethanol-acetone solvent. For a comparative evaluation of the cyclic strength of weld joints obtained with two methods of protection of the reverse side of the joint (protective coating and highest purity argon), two lots of specimens were tested in alternating-sign symmetric bending. Flat weld specimens of 2-mm-thick VT20 titanium sheet were tested.

  1. TEM Observation of Martensite Layer at the Weld Interface of an A508III to Inconel 82 Dissimilar Metal Weld Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z. R.; Lu, Y. H.

    2015-12-01

    A lenticular martensite layer at the weld interface in an A508III/Inconel 82 dissimilar metal weld (DMW) joint was studied by TEM. The martensite/weld metal boundary was observed as the fusion boundary. There was a K-S orientation relationship between martensite and weld metal. The formation of the martensite was mainly determined by the distribution of alloy elements. The martensite was responsible for the hardness peak in the DMW.

  2. Improved TIG weld joint strength in aluminum alloy 2219-T87 by filler metal substitution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poorman, R. M.; Lovoy, C. V.

    1972-01-01

    The results of an investigation on weld joint characteristics of aluminum alloy 2219-T87 are given. Five different alloys were utilized as filler material. The mechanical properties of the joints were determined at ambient and cryogenic temperatures for weldments in the as-welded condition and also, for weldments after elevated temperature exposures. Other evaluations included hardness surveys, stress corrosion susceptibility, and to a limited extent, the internal metallurgical weld structures. The overall results indicate that M-943 filler weldments are superior in strength to weldments containing either the standard 2319 filler or fillers 2014, 2020, and a dual wire feed consisting of three parts 2319 and one part 5652. In addition, no deficiencies were evident in M-934 filler weldments with regard to ductility, joint strength after elevated temperature exposure, weld hardness, metallographic structures, or stress corrosion susceptibility.

  3. Microstructure of friction stir welded joints of 2017A aluminium alloy sheets.

    PubMed

    Mroczka, K; Dutkiewicz, J; Pietras, A

    2010-03-01

    The present study examines a friction stir welded 2017A aluminium alloy. Transmission electron microscope investigations of the weld nugget revealed the average grain size of 5 microm, moderate density of dislocations as well as the presence of nanometric precipitates located mostly in grains interiors. Scanning electron microscope observations of fractures showed the presence of ductile fracture in the region of the weld nugget with brittle precipitates in the lower part. The microhardness analysis performed on the cross-section of the joints showed fairly small changes; however, after the artificial ageing process an increase in hardness was observed. The change of the joint hardness subject to the ageing process indicates partial supersaturation in the material during friction stir welding and higher precipitation hardening of the joint. PMID:20500429

  4. Relation between hardness and ultrasonic velocity on pipeline steel welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreón, H.; Barrera, G.; Natividad, C.; Salazar, M.; Contreras, A.

    2016-04-01

    In general, the ultrasonic techniques have been used to determine the mechanical properties of materials based on their relationship with metallurgical characteristics. In this research work, the relationship between ultrasonic wave velocity, hardness and the microstructure of steel pipeline welded joints is investigated. Measurements of ultrasonic wave velocity were made as a function of the location across the weld. Hardness measurements were performed in an attempt to correlate with ultrasonic response. In addition, the coarse and dendritic grain structure of the weld material is extreme and unpredictably anisotropic. Thus, due to the acoustic anisotropy of the crystal, weld material of studied joints is anisotropic too. Such structure is no longer direction-independent to the ultrasonic wave propagation; therefore, the ultrasonic beam deflects and redirects and the wave front becomes distorted. Thus, the use of conventional ultrasonic testing techniques using fixed beam angles is very limited and the application of conventional ultrasonic phased array techniques becomes desirable. This technique is proposed to assist pipeline operators in estimating the hardness through ultrasonic measures to evaluate the susceptibility to stress sulphide cracking and hydrogen-induced cracking due to hard spots in steel pipeline welded joints in service. Sound wave velocity and hardness measurements have been carried out on a steel welded joint. For each section of the welding, weld bead, fusion zone, heat affected zone and base metal were found to correspond particular values of the ultrasound velocity. These results were correlated with electron microscopy observations of the microstructure and sectorial scan view of welded joints by ultrasonic phased array.

  5. Comparison of joint designs for laser welding of cast metal plates and wrought wires.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yasuko; Nomoto, Rie; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Ohkubo, Chikahiro

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare joint designs for the laser welding of cast metal plates and wrought wire, and to evaluate the welded area internally using X-ray micro-focus computerized tomography (micro-CT). Cast metal plates (Ti, Co-Cr) and wrought wires (Ti, Co-Cr) were welded using similar metals. The specimens were welded using four joint designs in which the wrought wires and the parent metals were welded directly (two designs) or the wrought wires were welded to the groove of the parent metal from one or both sides (n = 5). The porosity and gap in the welded area were evaluated by micro-CT, and the maximum tensile load of the welded specimens was measured with a universal testing machine. An element analysis was conducted using an electron probe X-ray microanalyzer. The statistical analysis of the results was performed using Bonferroni's multiple comparisons (α = 0.05). The results included that all the specimens fractured at the wrought wire when subjected to tensile testing, although there were specimens that exhibited gaps due to the joint design. The wrought wires were affected by laser irradiation and observed to melt together and onto the filler metal. Both Mo and Sn elements found in the wrought wire were detected in the filler metal of the Ti specimens, and Ni was detected in the filler metal of the Co-Cr specimens. The four joint designs simulating the designs used clinically were confirmed to have adequate joint strength provided by laser welding. PMID:22080283

  6. A Study of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Grade 91 Steel A-TIG Weld Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arivazhagan, B.; Vasudevan, M.

    2013-12-01

    In the present study, A-TIG welding was carried out on grade 91 steel plates of size 220 × 110 × 10 mm using the in-house developed activated flux to produce butt-joints. The room-temperature impact toughness of the A-TIG as-welded joint was low due to the presence of untempered martensite matrix despite the low microinclusion density caused by activated flux and also low δ-ferrite (<0.5 %) content. Toughness after postweld heat treatment (PWHT) at 760 °C-2 h was 20 J as against the required value of 47 J as per the specification EN: 1557:1997. However, there was a significant improvement in impact toughness after PWHT at 760 °C for 3 h. The improvement in toughness was attributed to softening of martensite matrix caused by precipitation of carbides due to tempering reactions. The precipitates are of type M23C6, and they are observed at grain boundary as well as within the grains. The A-TIG-processed grade 91 steel weld joint was found to meet the toughness requirements after PWHT at 760 °C-3 h. Observations of fracture surfaces using SEM revealed that the as-welded joint failed by brittle fracture, whereas post-weld heat-treated weld joints failed by decohesive rupture mode.

  7. Design of a welded joint for robotic, on-orbit assembly of space trusses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rule, William K.

    1992-12-01

    In the future, some spacecraft will be so large that they must be assembled on-orbit. These spacecraft will be used for such tasks as manned missions to Mars or used as orbiting platforms for monitoring the Earth or observing the universe. Some large spacecraft will probably consist of planar truss structures to which will be attached special purpose, self-contained modules. The modules will most likely be taken to orbit fully outfitted and ready for use in heavy-lift launch vehicles. The truss members will also similarly be taken to orbit, but most unassembled. The truss structures will need to be assembled robotically because of the high costs and risks of extra-vehicular activities. Some missions will involve very large loads. To date, very few structures of any kind have been constructed in space. Two relatively simple trusses were assembled in the Space Shuttle bay in late 1985. Here the development of a design of a welded joint for on-orbit, robotic truss assembly is described. Mechanical joints for this application have been considered previously. Welded joints have the advantage of allowing the truss members to carry fluids for active cooling or other purposes. In addition, welded joints can be made more efficient structurally than mechanical joints. Also, welded joints require little maintenance (will not shake loose), and have no slop which would cause the structure to shudder under load reversal. The disadvantages of welded joints are that a more sophisticated assembly robot is required, weld flaws may be difficult to detect on-orbit, the welding process is hazardous, and welding introduces contamination to the environment. In addition, welded joints provide less structural damping than do mechanical joints. Welding on-orbit was first investigated aboard a Soyuz-6 mission in 1969 and then during a Skylab electron beam welding experiment in 1973. A hand held electron beam welding apparatus is currently being prepared for use on the MIR space station

  8. Design of a welded joint for robotic, on-orbit assembly of space trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rule, William K.

    1992-01-01

    In the future, some spacecraft will be so large that they must be assembled on-orbit. These spacecraft will be used for such tasks as manned missions to Mars or used as orbiting platforms for monitoring the Earth or observing the universe. Some large spacecraft will probably consist of planar truss structures to which will be attached special purpose, self-contained modules. The modules will most likely be taken to orbit fully outfitted and ready for use in heavy-lift launch vehicles. The truss members will also similarly be taken to orbit, but most unassembled. The truss structures will need to be assembled robotically because of the high costs and risks of extra-vehicular activities. Some missions will involve very large loads. To date, very few structures of any kind have been constructed in space. Two relatively simple trusses were assembled in the Space Shuttle bay in late 1985. Here the development of a design of a welded joint for on-orbit, robotic truss assembly is described. Mechanical joints for this application have been considered previously. Welded joints have the advantage of allowing the truss members to carry fluids for active cooling or other purposes. In addition, welded joints can be made more efficient structurally than mechanical joints. Also, welded joints require little maintenance (will not shake loose), and have no slop which would cause the structure to shudder under load reversal. The disadvantages of welded joints are that a more sophisticated assembly robot is required, weld flaws may be difficult to detect on-orbit, the welding process is hazardous, and welding introduces contamination to the environment. In addition, welded joints provide less structural damping than do mechanical joints. Welding on-orbit was first investigated aboard a Soyuz-6 mission in 1969 and then during a Skylab electron beam welding experiment in 1973. A hand held electron beam welding apparatus is currently being prepared for use on the MIR space station

  9. Effect of post-weld heat treatment on the mechanical properties of electron beam welded joints for CLAM steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qingsheng; Zheng, Shuhui; Liu, Shaojun; Li, Chunjing; Huang, Qunying

    2013-11-01

    In this paper the microstructure and mechanical properties of electron beam weld (EBW) joints for China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel, which underwent a series of different post weld heat treatments (PWHTs) were studied. The aim of the study was to identify suitable PWHTs that give a good balance between strength and toughness of the EBW joints. The microstructural analyses were performed by means of optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The mechanical properties were determined via tensile tests and Charpy impact tests. The results showed that the tensile strength of the as-weld joint (i.e. without any PWHT) were close to that of the base metal, but the impact toughness was only 13% of that of the base metal due to the existence of a delta-ferrite microstructure. To achieve a significant improvement in toughness a PWHT needs to be performed. If a one-step PWHT is applied tempering at 760 °C for 2 h gives EBW joints with high strength at a still acceptable toughness level. If a two-step PWHT is applied, a process involving quenching at 980 °C for 0.5 h followed by tempering at 740 °C or 760 °C for 2 h gives EBW joints with high strength and toughness properties. Whenever possible a two-step PWHT should be applied in favor of a one-step process, because of higher resulting strength and toughness properties.

  10. Investigation of aluminum-steel joint formed by explosion welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs-Coskun, T.; Volgyi, B.; Sikari-Nagl, I.

    2015-04-01

    Explosion welding is a solid state welding process that is used for the metallurgical joining of metals. Explosion cladding can be used to join a wide variety of dissimilar or similar metals [1]. This process uses the controlled detonation of explosives to accelerate one or both of the constituent metals into each other in such a manner as to cause the collision to fuse them together [2]. In this study, bonding ability of aluminum and steel with explosion welding was investigated. Experimental studies, microscopy, microhardness, tensile and bend test showed out that, aluminum and steel could be bonded with a good quality of bonding properties with explosion welding.

  11. Effects of weld defects at root on rotating bending fatigue strength of small diameter socket welded pipe joints

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Makoto; Nakagawa, Akira; Chujo, Noriyuki; Iida, Kunihiro; Matsuda, Fukuhisa; Sato, Masanobu

    1996-12-01

    Rotating bending fatigue tests were conducted on socket welded joints of a nominal diameter 20 mm, and effects of root defect and other various factors, including post-weld heat treatment (PWHT), pipe wall thickness, and socket wall thickness, were investigated. The socket joints exhibited, in the rotating bending fatigue mode, fatigue strengths that were markedly lower than the same 20 mm diameter joints in four-point bending fatigue. Also, where the latter specimens failed always at the toe, root-failures occurred in rotating bending fatigue. When PWHT`d, however, the fatigue strength showed a remarkable improvement, while the failure site reverted to toe. Thicker pipe walls and socket walls gave rise to higher fatigue strength. A formula relating the size of root defects to the fatigue strength reduction has been proposed.

  12. A portable ultrasonic phased array device for tabular joint weld inspection of offshore platform structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Baohua; Li, Jingan; Duan, Zhongdong; Ou, Jinping; Shen, Wei

    2012-05-01

    To meet the inspection need for complex tabular joints weld of offshore platform structures, a portable ultrasonic phased array inspection device is developed. The integrated device is small and portable. As designed, the device can implement different algorithm of the ultrasonic phased array inspection technology. With proposed inspection plan, the experiment of Y tubular joint model was performed in lab. Experiment results indicate that the possible ultrasonic phased array inspection device can detect and visualize the flaws on Y tubular joint weld, which are nearly consistent with the actual condition.

  13. Design of a welded joint for robotic, on-orbit assembly of space trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rule, W. K.; Thomas, F. P.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary design for a weldable truss joint for on-orbit assembly of large space structures is described. The joint was designed for ease of assembly, for structural efficiency, and to allow passage of fluid (for active cooling or other purposes) along the member through the joint. The truss members were assumed to consist of graphite/epoxy tubes to which were bonded 2219-T87 aluminum alloy end fittings for welding on-orbit to truss nodes of the same alloy. A modified form of gas tungsten arc welding was assumed to be the welding process. The joint was designed to withstand the thermal and structural loading associated with a 120-ft diameter tetrahedral truss intended as an aerobrake for a mission to Mars.

  14. Design of a welded joint for robotic, on-orbit assembly of space trusses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rule, W. K.; Thomas, F. P.

    1992-10-01

    A preliminary design for a weldable truss joint for on-orbit assembly of large space structures is described. The joint was designed for ease of assembly, for structural efficiency, and to allow passage of fluid (for active cooling or other purposes) along the member through the joint. The truss members were assumed to consist of graphite/epoxy tubes to which were bonded 2219-T87 aluminum alloy end fittings for welding on-orbit to truss nodes of the same alloy. A modified form of gas tungsten arc welding was assumed to be the welding process. The joint was designed to withstand the thermal and structural loading associated with a 120-ft diameter tetrahedral truss intended as an aerobrake for a mission to Mars.

  15. Analysis and Comparison of Aluminum Alloy Welded Joints Between Metal Inert Gas Welding and Tungsten Inert Gas Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei; Guan, Yingchun; Wang, Qiang; Cong, Baoqiang; Qi, Bojin

    2015-09-01

    Surface contamination usually occurs during welding processing and it affects the welds quality largely. However, the formation of such contaminants has seldom been studied. Effort was made to study the contaminants caused by metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes of aluminum alloy, respectively. SEM, FTIR and XPS analysis was carried out to investigate the microstructure as well as surface chemistry. These contaminants were found to be mainly consisting of Al2O3, MgO, carbide and chromium complexes. The difference of contaminants between MIG and TIG welds was further examined. In addition, method to minimize these contaminants was proposed.

  16. Effect of Activated Flux on the Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, and Residual Stresses of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maduraimuthu, V.; Vasudevan, M.; Muthupandi, V.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2012-02-01

    A novel variant of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding called activated-TIG (A-TIG) welding, which uses a thin layer of activated flux coating applied on the joint area prior to welding, is known to enhance the depth of penetration during autogenous TIG welding and overcomes the limitation associated with TIG welding of modified 9Cr-1Mo steels. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a specific activated flux for enhancing the depth of penetration during autogeneous TIG welding of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. In the current work, activated flux composition is optimized to achieve 6 mm depth of penetration in single-pass TIG welding at minimum heat input possible. Then square butt weld joints are made for 6-mm-thick and 10-mm-thick plates using the optimized flux. The effect of flux on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and residual stresses of the A-TIG weld joint is studied by comparing it with that of the weld joints made by conventional multipass TIG welding process using matching filler wire. Welded microstructure in the A-TIG weld joint is coarser because of the higher peak temperature in A-TIG welding process compared with that of multipass TIG weld joint made by a conventional TIG welding process. Transverse strength properties of the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel weld produced by A-TIG welding exceeded the minimum specified strength values of the base materials. The average toughness values of A-TIG weld joints are lower compared with that of the base metal and multipass weld joints due to the presence of δ-ferrite and inclusions in the weld metal caused by the flux. Compressive residual stresses are observed in the fusion zone of A-TIG weld joint, whereas tensile residual stresses are observed in the multipass TIG weld joint.

  17. Effect of Welding Current and Time on the Microstructure, Mechanical Characterizations, and Fracture Studies of Resistance Spot Welding Joints of AISI 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kianersi, Danial; Mostafaei, Amir; Mohammadi, Javad

    2014-09-01

    This article aims at investigating the effect of welding parameters, namely, welding current and welding time, on resistance spot welding (RSW) of the AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel sheets. The influence of welding current and welding time on the weld properties including the weld nugget diameter or fusion zone, tensile-shear load-bearing capacity of welded materials, failure modes, energy absorption, and microstructure of welded nuggets was precisely considered. Microstructural studies and mechanical properties showed that the region between interfacial to pullout mode transition and expulsion limit is defined as the optimum welding condition. Electron microscopic studies indicated different types of delta ferrite in welded nuggets including skeletal, acicular, and lathy delta ferrite morphologies as a result of nonequilibrium phases, which can be attributed to a fast cooling rate in the RSW process. These morphologies were explained based on Shaeffler, WRC-1992, and pseudo-binary phase diagrams. The optimum microstructure and mechanical properties were achieved with 8-kA welding current and 4-cycle welding time in which maximum tensile-shear load-bearing capacity or peak load of the welded materials was obtained at 8070 N, and the failure mode took place as button pullout with tearing from the base metal. Finally, fracture surface studies indicated that elongated dimples appeared on the surface as a result of ductile fracture in the sample welded in the optimum welding condition.

  18. Laser Beam Oscillation Strategies for Fillet Welds in Lap Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Alexander; Goecke, Sven-F.; Sievi, Pravin; Albert, Florian; Rethmeier, Michael

    Laser beam oscillation opens up new possibilities of influencing the welding process in terms of compensation of tolerances and reduction of process emissions that occur in industrial applications, such as in body-in-white manufacturing. The approaches are to adapt the melt pool width in order to generate sufficient melt volume or to influence melt pool dynamics, e.g. for a better degassing. Welding results are highly dependent on the natural frequency of the melt pool, the used spot diameter and the oscillation speed of the laser beam. The conducted investigations with an oscillated 300 μm laser spot show that oscillation strategies, which are adjusted to the joining situation improve welding result for zero-gap welding as well as for bridging gaps to approximately 0.8 mm. However, a complex set of parameters has to be considered in order to generate proper welding results. This work puts emphasize on introducing them.

  19. Influence of Cu-Interlayer Thickness on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of MIG-Welded Mg-Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. Y.; Sun, D. Q.; Sun, Y.

    2016-03-01

    The joining of AZ31B Mg alloy to Q235 steel was realized by metal inert-gas arc welding using Cu-interlayer. Microstructure characteristics and mechanical properties of Mg-steel joints with Cu-interlayer of different thicknesses were investigated. The results indicated that acceptable joints with sound appearance could be obtained by adjusting the thickness to the range of 0.1-0.2 mm. In particular, at the thickness of 0.15 mm, the average tensile strength reached a maximum of 190 MPa, representing a 79% joint efficiency relative to the Mg base metal. Further increasing the thickness would cause more formation of coarse and thick Mg-Cu eutectic structure and Mg-Al-Cu ternary phase, which resulted in the decrease of joint strength. Therefore, the best thickness of Cu-interlayer to obtain high strength of Mg-steel MIG-welded joint was in the range of 0.1-0.15 mm. The average microhardness reached the maximum value in the reaction layer because of the presence of FeAl intermetallic compounds.

  20. Statistical analysis of the results of tests of weld joints of petroleum apparatus made by electroslag welding with control of the thermal cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Khakimov, A.N.; Agafonov, V.V.; Efimenko, L.A.; Zakharov, V.A.

    1984-01-01

    Electroslag welding with control of the thermal cycles provides weld joints with the required mechanical properties, reduces the labor requirements and saves on costs. A statistical analysis of the results of sample compounds of weld joints of apparatus from specified sources derives strength indices, and the mechanical test results are treated by the methods of mathematical statistics with the use of a computer. It is found that electroslag welding can be used in the production of apparatus of 20K, 20 YuCh, 09G2S, and 16GS steels.

  1. Microstructural Characterization of Internal Welding Defects and Their Effect on the Tensile Behavior of FSW Joints of AA2198 Al-Cu-Li Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Jolu, Thomas; Morgeneyer, Thilo F.; Denquin, Anne; Sennour, Mohamed; Laurent, Anne; Besson, Jacques; Gourgues-Lorenzon, Anne-Françoise

    2014-11-01

    Internal features and defects such as joint line remnant, kissing bond, and those induced by an initial gap between the two parent sheets were investigated in AA2198-T851 friction stir welded joints. They were compared with the parent material and to defect-free welds obtained using a seamless sheet. The cross-weld tensile strength was reduced by the defects by less than 6 pct. The fracture elongation was not significantly affected in view of experimental scatter. Fracture location, however, changed from the thermomechanically affected zone (retreating side) to the defect in the weld nugget for the welds bearing a kissing bond and for some of the gap welds. The kissing bond was shown by EBSD to be an intergranular feature; it fractured under a normal engineering stress close to 260 MPa during an in situ SEM tensile test. Synchrotron tomography after interrupted tensile testing confirmed opening of the kissing bond. For an initial gap of 23 pct of the sheet thickness, intergranular fracture of copper-enriched or oxide-bearing grain boundaries close to the nugget root was evidenced. The stress and strain state of cross-weld specimens loaded under uniaxial tension was assessed using a 3D finite element, multi-material model, determined on the basis of experimental data obtained on the same specimens using digital image correlation.

  2. Microstructural Characterization of Internal Welding Defects and Their Effect on the Tensile Behavior of FSW Joints of AA2198 Al-Cu-Li Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Jolu, Thomas; Morgeneyer, Thilo F.; Denquin, Anne; Sennour, Mohamed; Laurent, Anne; Besson, Jacques; Gourgues-Lorenzon, Anne-Françoise

    2014-09-01

    Internal features and defects such as joint line remnant, kissing bond, and those induced by an initial gap between the two parent sheets were investigated in AA2198-T851 friction stir welded joints. They were compared with the parent material and to defect-free welds obtained using a seamless sheet. The cross-weld tensile strength was reduced by the defects by less than 6 pct. The fracture elongation was not significantly affected in view of experimental scatter. Fracture location, however, changed from the thermomechanically affected zone (retreating side) to the defect in the weld nugget for the welds bearing a kissing bond and for some of the gap welds. The kissing bond was shown by EBSD to be an intergranular feature; it fractured under a normal engineering stress close to 260 MPa during an in situ SEM tensile test. Synchrotron tomography after interrupted tensile testing confirmed opening of the kissing bond. For an initial gap of 23 pct of the sheet thickness, intergranular fracture of copper-enriched or oxide-bearing grain boundaries close to the nugget root was evidenced. The stress and strain state of cross-weld specimens loaded under uniaxial tension was assessed using a 3D finite element, multi-material model, determined on the basis of experimental data obtained on the same specimens using digital image correlation.

  3. Microstructure evolution of electron beam welded Ti{sub 3}Al-Nb joint

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Jicai; Wu Huiqiang . E-mail: huiqiang_wu@hit.edu.cn; He Jingshan; Zhang Bingang

    2005-02-15

    The microstructure evolution characterization in high containing Nb, low Al titanium aluminide alloy of electron beam welded joints was investigated by means of OM, SEM, XRD, TEM and microhardness analysis. The results indicated that the microstructure of the weld metal made with electron beam under the welding conditions employed in this work was predominantly metastable, retaining ordered {beta} phase (namely B2 phase), and was independent of the welding parameters but independent of the size and the orientation of the weld solidification structures. As the heat input is decreased, the cellular structure zone is significantly reduced, and then the crystallizing morphology of fusion zone presented dendritically columnar structure. There existed grain growth coarsening in heat affected zone (HAZ) for insufficient polygonization. Both fusion zone (FZ) and the HAZ had higher microhardness than the base metal.

  4. Study of mechanical joint strength of aluminum alloy 7075-T6 and dual phase steel 980 welded by friction bit joining and weld-bonding under corrosion medium

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lim, Yong Chae; Squires, Lile; Pan, Tsung-Yu; Miles, Michael; Song, Guang-Ling; Wang, Yanli; Feng, Zhili

    2014-12-30

    We have employed a unique solid-sate joining process, called friction bit joining (FBJ), to spot weld aluminum alloy (AA) 7075-T6 and dual phase (DP) 980 steel. Static joint strength was studied in the lap shear tension configuration. In addition, weld-bonding (adhesive + FBJ) joints were studied in order to evaluate the ability of adhesive to mitigate the impact of corrosion on joint properties. Accelerated laboratory cyclic corrosion tests were carried out for both FBJ only and weld-bonding joints. Furthermore, the FBJ only joints that emerged from corrosion testing had lap shear failure loads that were significantly lower than freshly preparedmore » joints. However, weld-bonding specimens retained more than 80% of the lap shear failure load of the freshly prepared weld-bonding specimens. Moreover, examination of joint cross sections confirmed that the presence of adhesive in the weld-bonding joints mitigated the effect of the corrosion environment, compared to FBJ only joints.« less

  5. Eutectic structures in friction spot welding joint of aluminum alloy to copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Junjun; Suhuddin, Uceu F. H.; Cardillo, Maria E. B.; dos Santos, Jorge F.

    2014-05-01

    A dissimilar joint of AA5083 Al alloy and copper was produced by friction spot welding. The Al-MgCuAl2 eutectic in both coupled and divorced manners were found in the weld. At a relatively high temperature, mass transport of Cu due to plastic deformation, material flow, and atomic diffusion, combined with the alloy system of AA5083 are responsible for the ternary eutectic melting.

  6. Eutectic structures in friction spot welding joint of aluminum alloy to copper

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Junjun Suhuddin, Uceu F. H.; Cardillo, Maria E. B.; Santos, Jorge F. dos

    2014-05-12

    A dissimilar joint of AA5083 Al alloy and copper was produced by friction spot welding. The Al-MgCuAl{sub 2} eutectic in both coupled and divorced manners were found in the weld. At a relatively high temperature, mass transport of Cu due to plastic deformation, material flow, and atomic diffusion, combined with the alloy system of AA5083 are responsible for the ternary eutectic melting.

  7. Fatigue testing welded joints for P/M Al-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrigan, William C.

    1994-07-01

    To meet their need for high stiffness, many bicycles currently rely on aluminum-matrix composites. The highest strength and highest stiffness form of these material, 6092/B4C/15p, is produced by powder metallurgy techniques. The bicycles are tungsten inert-gas welded and fully heat treated after welding. A test technique has been developed to assess the static and fatigue properties of welded joints. This test technique has revealed the increased stiffness and strength of a 6092/B4C/15p-T6P composite tube joint as compared with a 6061-T6 aluminum one. This test technique is currently being used to identify fatigue properties for both tube joints.

  8. Fracture Behaviour of Nickel-Titanium Laser Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maletta, C.; Falvo, A.; Furgiuele, F.; Barbieri, G.; Brandizzi, M.

    2009-08-01

    In this study, the effects of Nd:YAG laser welding on the fracture behavior of Ni-rich nickel-titanium sheets are analyzed by experimental investigations. The welding was carried out in open air conditions by using a special shielding/clamping system to avoid the chemical contamination of the molten zone and the formation of hot cracks. Mechanical tests of standard dog bone-shaped and single edge crack specimens were carried out to measure the stress-strain response and the fracture resistance of both the base and the welded materials. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy observations of the fracture surfaces were carried out in order to better understand the failure mechanisms. Finally, systematic comparative studies between base and laser-welded materials were carried out.

  9. The effect of postprocessing on tensile property and microstructure evolution of friction stir welding aluminum alloy joint

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Z.L.; Wang, X.S.; Pang, Q.; Huang, F.; Qin, X.P.; Hua, L.

    2015-01-15

    Friction stir welding is an efficient manufacturing method for joining aluminum alloy and can dramatically reduce grain size conferring excellent plastic deformation properties. Consequently, friction stir welding is used to manufacture tailor welded blanks to optimize weight or performance in the final component. In the study, the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of friction stir welding joint during plastic forming and subsequent heat treatment were investigated. The microstructural characteristics of the friction stir welding joints were studied by Electron Backscattered Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The mechanical properties were evaluated by tensile and microhardness tests. It is found that the tensile and yield strengths of friction stir welding joints are significantly improved after severe plastic deformation due to the grain refinement. Following heat treatment, the strength of the friction stir welding joints significantly decrease due to the obvious abnormal grain growth. Careful attention must be given to the processing route of any friction stir welding joint intended for plastic forming, especially the annealing between forming passes. Severe plastic deforming of the friction stir welding joint leads to a high level of stored energy/dislocation density, which causes the abnormal grain growth during subsequent heat treatment, and consequently reduce the mechanical properties of the friction stir welding joint. - Highlights: • Great changes are observed in the microstructure of FSW joint after postprocessing. • Postprocessing shows great effect on the microstructure stability of FSW joint. • The weld shows more significant decrease in strength than the BM due to the AGG. • Attention must be given to the processing route of FSW joint for plastic forming.

  10. 46 CFR 56.30-5 - Welded joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... types of butt welding end preparations are shown in ASME B16.25 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR...) Each socket weld must conform to ASME B16.11 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2), to applicable standards listed in 46 CFR 56.60-1, table 56.60-1(b), and to Figure 127.4.4C in ASME...

  11. 46 CFR 56.30-5 - Welded joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... types of butt welding end preparations are shown in ASME B16.25 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR...) Each socket weld must conform to ASME B16.11 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2), to applicable standards listed in 46 CFR 56.60-1, Table 56.60-1(b), and to Figure 127.4.4C in ASME...

  12. 46 CFR 56.30-5 - Welded joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... types of butt welding end preparations are shown in ASME B16.25 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR...) Each socket weld must conform to ASME B16.11 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2), to applicable standards listed in 46 CFR 56.60-1, Table 56.60-1(b), and to Figure 127.4.4C in ASME...

  13. 46 CFR 56.30-5 - Welded joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... types of butt welding end preparations are shown in ASME B16.25 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR...) Each socket weld must conform to ASME B16.11 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2), to applicable standards listed in 46 CFR 56.60-1, Table 56.60-1(b), and to Figure 127.4.4C in ASME...

  14. 46 CFR 56.30-5 - Welded joints.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... types of butt welding end preparations are shown in ASME B16.25 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR...) Each socket weld must conform to ASME B16.11 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2), to applicable standards listed in 46 CFR 56.60-1, table 56.60-1(b), and to Figure 127.4.4C in ASME...

  15. Creep Strength of Dissimilar Welded Joints Using High B-9Cr Steel for Advanced USC Boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabuchi, Masaaki; Hongo, Hiromichi; Abe, Fujio

    2014-10-01

    The commercialization of a 973 K (700 °C) class pulverized coal power system, advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) pressure power generation, is the target of an ongoing research project initiated in Japan in 2008. In the A-USC boiler, Ni or Ni-Fe base alloys are used for high-temperature parts at 923 K to 973 K (650 °C to 700 °C), and advanced high-Cr ferritic steels are planned to be used at temperatures lower than 923 K (650 °C). In the dissimilar welds between Ni base alloys and high-Cr ferritic steels, Type IV failure in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) is a concern. Thus, the high B-9Cr steel developed at the National Institute for Materials Science, which has improved creep strength in weldments, is a candidate material for the Japanese A-USC boiler. In the present study, creep tests were conducted on the dissimilar welded joints between Ni base alloys and high B-9Cr steels. Microstructures and creep damage in the dissimilar welded joints were investigated. In the HAZ of the high B-9Cr steels, fine-grained microstructures were not formed and the grain size of the base metal was retained. Consequently, the creep rupture life of the dissimilar welded joints using high B-9Cr steel was 5 to 10 times longer than that of the conventional 9Cr steel welded joints at 923 K (650 °C).

  16. Type IV Cracking Susceptibility in Weld Joints of Different Grades of Cr-Mo Ferritic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.

    2009-02-01

    Relative type-IV cracking susceptibility in 2.25Cr-1Mo, 9Cr-1Mo, and 9Cr-1MoVNb ferritic steel weld joint has been assessed. The type-IV cracking was manifested as preferential accumulation of creep deformation and cavitation in the relatively soft intercritical region of heat affected zone of the weld joint. The type-IV cracking susceptibility has been defined as the reduction in creep-rupture strength of weld joint compared to its base metal. The 2.25Cr-1Mo steel exhibited more susceptibility to type-IV cracking at relatively lower temperatures; whereas, at higher temperatures, 9Cr-1MoVNb steel was more susceptible. The relative susceptibility to type-IV cracking in the weld joint of the Cr-Mo steels has been rationalized on the basis of creep-strengthening mechanisms operating in the steels and their venerability to change on intercritical heating during weld thermal cycle, subsequent postweld heat treatment, and creep exposure.

  17. Effect of Postweld Aging Treatment on Fatigue Behavior of Pulsed Current Welded AA7075 Aluminum Alloy Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, V.; Ravisankar, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2008-04-01

    This article reports the effect of postweld aging treatment on fatigue behavior of pulsed current welded AA 7075 aluminum alloy joints. AA7075 aluminum alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy) has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring high strength-to weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers, and railway transport systems. The preferred welding processes of AA7075 aluminum alloy are frequently gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process due to their comparatively easier applicability and better economy. Weld fusion zones typically exhibit coarse columnar grains because of the prevailing thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often results inferior weld mechanical properties and poor resistance to hot cracking. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to refine the fusion zone grains by applying pulsed current welding technique. Rolled plates of 10 mm thickness have been used as the base material for preparing multipass welded joints. Single V butt joint configuration has been prepared for joining the plates. The filler metal used for joining the plates is AA 5356 (Al-5Mg (wt.%)) grade aluminum alloy. Four different welding techniques have been used to fabricate the joints and they are: (i) continuous current GTAW (CCGTAW), (ii) pulsed current GTAW (PCGTAW), (iii) continuous current GMAW (CCGMAW), and (iv) pulsed current GMAW (PCGMAW) processes. Argon (99.99% pure) has been used as the shielding gas. Rotary bending fatigue testing machine has been used to evaluate fatigue behavior of the welded joints. Current pulsing leads to relatively finer and more equi-axed grain structure in GTA and GMA welds. Grain refinement is accompanied by an increase in fatigue life and endurance limit. Simple postweld aging treatment applied to the joints is found to be beneficial to enhance the fatigue performance of the welded joints.

  18. Structural health monitoring of multi-spot welded joints using a lead zirconate titanate based active sensing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Ping; Kong, Qingzhao; Xu, Kai; Jiang, Tianyong; Huo, Lin-sheng; Song, Gangbing

    2016-01-01

    Failures of spot welded joints directly reduce the load capacity of adjacent structures. Due to their complexity and invisibility, real-time health monitoring of spot welded joints is still a challenge. In this paper, a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) based active sensing approach was proposed to monitor the structural health of multi-spot welded joints in real time. In the active sensing approach, one PZT transducer was used as an actuator to generate a guided stress wave, while another one, as a sensor, detected the wave response. Failure of a spot welded joint reduces the stress wave paths and attenuates the wave propagation energy from the actuator to the sensor. A total of four specimens made of dual phase steel with spot welds, including two specimens with 20 mm intervals of spot welded joints and two with 25 mm intervals, were designed and fabricated for this research. Under tensile tests, the spot welded joints successively failed, resulting in the PZT sensor reporting decreased received energy. The energy attenuations due to the failures of joints were clearly observed by the PZT sensor signal in both the time domain and frequency domain. In addition, a wavelet packet-based spot-weld failure indicator was developed to quantitatively evaluate the failure condition corresponding to the number of failed joints.

  19. Strength analysis of laser welded lap joint for ultra high strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Young Cheol; Kim, Cheol Hee; Cho, Young Tae; Jung, Yoon Gyo

    2013-12-01

    Several industries including the automotive industry have recently applied the process of welding high strength steel. High strength steel is steel that is harder than normal high strength steel, making it much stronger and stiffer. HSS can be formed in pieces that can be up to 10 to 15 percent thinner than normal steel without sacrificing strength, which enables weight reduction and improved fuel economy. Furthermore, HSS can be formed into complex shapes that can be welded into structural areas. This study is based on previous experiments and is aimed at establishing the stress distribution for laser welded high strength steel. Research on the stress distribution for laser welded high strength steel is conducted by using Solid Works, a program that analyzes the stress of a virtual model. In conclusion, we found that the stress distribution is changed depending on the shape of welded lap joint. In addition, the Influence of the stress distribution on welded high strength steel can be used to standard for high energy welding of high strength steel, and we can also predict the region in welded high strength steel that may cracked.

  20. Modeling and analysis of novel laser weld joint designs using optical ray tracing.

    SciTech Connect

    Milewski, J. O.

    2002-01-01

    Reflection of laser energy presents challenges in material processing that can lead to process inefficiency or process instability. Understanding the fundamentals of non-imaging optics and the reflective propagation of laser energy can allow process and weld joint designs to take advantage of these reflections to enhance process efficiency or mitigate detrimental effects. Optical ray tracing may be used within a 3D computer model to evaluate novel joint and fixture designs for laser welding that take advantage of the reflective propagation of laser energy. This modeling work extends that of previous studies by the author and provides comparison with experimental studies performed on highly reflective metals. Practical examples are discussed.

  1. Effect of Welding Parameters on Microstructure, Thermal, and Mechanical Properties of Friction-Stir Welded Joints of AA7075-T6 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfi, Amir Hossein; Nourouzi, Salman

    2014-06-01

    A high-strength Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy AA7075-T6 was friction-stir welded with various process parameter combinations incorporating the design of the experiment to investigate the effect of welding parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties. A three-factors, five-level central composition design (CCD) has been used to minimize the number of experimental conditions. The friction-stir welding parameters have significant influence on the heat input and temperature profile, which in turn regulates the microstructural and mechanical properties of the joints. The weld thermal cycles and transverse distribution of microhardness of the weld joints were measured, and the tensile properties were tested. The fracture surfaces of tensile specimens were observed by a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the formation of friction-stir processing zone has been analyzed macroscopically. Also, an equation was derived to predict the final microhardness and tensile properties of the joints, and statistical tools are used to develop the relationships. The results show that the peak temperature during welding of all the joints was up to 713 K (440 °C), which indicates the key role of the tool shoulder diameter in deciding the maximum temperature. From this investigation, it was found that the joint fabricated at a rotational speed of 1050 rpm, welding speed of 100 mm/min, and shoulder diameter of 14 mm exhibited higher mechanical properties compared to the other fabricated joints.

  2. Experimental study of steel welded joints localization with using fiber Bragg grating strain sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harasim, Damian

    2015-12-01

    Optical sensing systems has a not weakening research and development in recent years. Because of its unique properties of being unsusceptible to electromagnetic interference, having wide range of operational temperature and having extreme small physical dimensions, optical fiber sensors has increasing acceptance. Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBG) is the most frequently used type of optical sensor types because of its huge multiplexing potential and potentiality of being embedded into composite material (e.g. in structural health monitoring) or attached into measured structure. Embedding or attaching FBG into an inhomogeneous environment, spectral characteristic of the sensing grating do not retain full symmetry, which is due to related differences in the distribution of the axial stress of the grating. When periodicity of the grating is constant, the peak of FBG reflection spectrum should be narrow and sharp. An inhomogeneous axial strain distribution will cause a distorsion in measured transmission or reflection spectrum. This paper shows an distorsions in FBG reflection spectrum measured from sensor attached on surface with welded joint. The sensor strain-to-wavelength shift processing characteristics obtained for homogeneous and welded steel samples were compared.

  3. Stress Intensity Factors For Toe Cracks In Fillet Welded Joints - Finite Element Modelling And Thermoelastic Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, S. W.; Oakley, Philip J.

    1989-07-01

    The application of fracture mechanics methods for assessing the significance of defects in welded structures or components may require accurate determination of stress intensity solution for typical joint configurations (1). At present, numerical methods such as finite element analysis are most widely used (2). Thermoelastic technique (SPATE) is a new experimental technique based on the measurement of infra-red radiant flux emitting from the surface of a body under cyclic stress. It has been shown from Refs. 3 and 4 that accurate stress intensity solutions can be derived from SPATE results obtained by scanning a cracked body with simple geometry under mode I and mode II loading. Hence the SPATE method offers an attractive alternative to numerical analysis, or a means of validating the numerical methods. In addition, it is anticipated that the new technique could be used for analysing a cracked body with complex geometries not easily analysed by numerical methods, for example semi-elliptical surface cracks in plates and cylinders, or tubular connections with weld toe cracks.

  4. Simulation of the elastic deformation of laser-welded joints of an austenitic corrosion-resistant steel and a titanium alloy with an intermediate copper insert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugacheva, N. B.; Myasnikova, M. V.; Michurov, N. S.

    2016-02-01

    The macro- and microstructures and the distribution of elements and of the values of the microhardness and contact modulus of elasticity along the height and width of the weld metal and heat-affected zone of austenitic corrosion-resistant 12Kh18N10T steel (Russian analog of AISI 321) and titanium alloy VT1-0 (Grade 2) with an intermediate copper insert have been studied after laser welding under different conditions. The structural inhomogeneity of the joint obtained according to one of the regimes selected has been shown: the material of the welded joint represents a supersaturated solid solution of Fe, Ni, Cr, and Ti in the crystal lattice of copper with a uniformly distributed particles of intermetallic compounds Ti(Fe,Cr) and TiCu3. At the boundaries with steel and with the titanium alloy, diffusion zones with thicknesses of 0.1-0.2 mm are formed that represent supersaturated solid solutions based on iron and titanium. The strength of such a joint was 474 MPa, which corresponds to the level of strength of the titanium alloy. A numerical simulation of the mechanical behavior of welded joints upon the elastic tension-compression has been performed taking into account their structural state, which makes it possible to determine the amplitude values of the deformations of the material of the weld.

  5. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Laser-Welded Joints of Ti-22Al-25Nb/TA15 Dissimilar Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dalong; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi; Zhang, Hao; Bu, Xianzheng

    2016-05-01

    Laser beam welding (LBW) was applied to join 1-mm-thick dissimilar titanium alloys, Ti-22Al-25Nb (at.%) and TA15, and the microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded joints were systematically analyzed. Defect-free joints were obtained, and the fusion zone mainly consisted of B2 and martensitic α' phases because of the uneven distribution of the β phase stabilizer and rapid cooling rate of LBW. The phase compositions of the heat-affected zone varied with the different thermal cycles during the welding process. The different microstructures of the dissimilar titanium alloys led to an unsymmetrical hardness profile, with the welded seam exhibiting the lowest value of 271 HV. In room-temperature tensile tests, the fractures all occurred preferentially in the fusion zone. The strengths of the joints were close to those of the base metal but with prominently decreasing ductility. In tensile tests performed at 550 °C, all the joints fractured in the TA15 base metal, and the strength and plasticity of the welds were equivalent to those of the TA15 base metal.

  6. Microstructural investigation of hardfacing weld deposit obtained from CrB paste

    SciTech Connect

    Kr. Ray, S.; Sarker, B.; Kr. Bhattacharya, S. )

    1989-05-01

    Hardfacing weld deposits are used as a protective layer on engineering components and tools subjected to different modes of wear. Cheaper iron-based alloys with chromium and carbon or relatively expensive alloys with some niobium or titanium have long been used as standard hardfacing materials. In recent years boron has substituted the costlier alloying elements and the newly developed Fe-B-C alloys have shown encouraging results. The microstructure of the welded hardfacing deposit is one of the most important factors that determine its performance. The amount, size, distribution and hardness of the individual constituents play important roles in imparting the desired properties. Recently Colomonoy sweat on paste containing fine CrB particles (of about 12 {mu}m average size) suspended in an organic binder has been marketed as the new generation hardfacing material. A thin coating of the paste is applied on the component surface, allowed to dry and welded. The welded deposit has been found to offer good wear resistance in many industrial applications. This paper reports the microstructural investigation of the welded deposit obtained from this paste.

  7. The microstructure of aluminum A5083 butt joint by friction stir welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasri, M. A. H. M.; Afendi, M.; Ismail, A.; Ishak, M.

    2015-05-01

    This study presents the microstructure of the aluminum A5083 butt joint surface after it has been joined by friction stir welding (FSW) process. The FSW process is a unique welding method because it will not change the chemical properties of the welded metals. In this study, MILKO 37 milling machine was modified to run FSW process on 4 mm plate of aluminum A5083 butt joint. For the experiment, variables of travel speed and tool rotational speed based on capability of machine were used to run FSW process. The concentrated heat from the tool to the aluminum plate changes the plate form from solid to plastic state. Two aluminum plates is merged to become one plate during plastic state and return to solid when concentrated heat is gradually further away. After that, the surface and cross section of the welded aluminum were investigated with a microscope by 400 x multiplication zoom. The welding defect in the FSW aluminum was identified. Then, the result was compared to the American Welding Society (AWS) FSW standard to decide whether the plate can be accepted or rejected.

  8. The microstructure of aluminum A5083 butt joint by friction stir welding

    SciTech Connect

    Jasri, M. A. H. M.; Afendi, M.; Ismail, A.; Ishak, M.

    2015-05-15

    This study presents the microstructure of the aluminum A5083 butt joint surface after it has been joined by friction stir welding (FSW) process. The FSW process is a unique welding method because it will not change the chemical properties of the welded metals. In this study, MILKO 37 milling machine was modified to run FSW process on 4 mm plate of aluminum A5083 butt joint. For the experiment, variables of travel speed and tool rotational speed based on capability of machine were used to run FSW process. The concentrated heat from the tool to the aluminum plate changes the plate form from solid to plastic state. Two aluminum plates is merged to become one plate during plastic state and return to solid when concentrated heat is gradually further away. After that, the surface and cross section of the welded aluminum were investigated with a microscope by 400 x multiplication zoom. The welding defect in the FSW aluminum was identified. Then, the result was compared to the American Welding Society (AWS) FSW standard to decide whether the plate can be accepted or rejected.

  9. Structure and microhardness of cu-ta joints produced by explosive welding.

    PubMed

    Maliutina, Iu N; Mali, V I; Bataev, I A; Bataev, A A; Esikov, M A; Smirnov, A I; Skorokhod, K A

    2013-01-01

    The structure and microhardness of Cu-Ta joints produced by explosive welding were studied. It was found that, during explosive welding, an intermediate layer 20⋯40  μ m thick with a finely dispersed heterophase structure, formed between the welded copper and tantalum plates. The structure of the layer was studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Microvolumes with tantalum particles distributed in a copper matrix and microvolumes of copper particles in a tantalum matrix were detected. The tantalum particles in copper have a size of 5⋯500 nm, with a predominance of 5⋯50 nm particles. A mechanism for the formation of the finely dispersed heterophase structure in explosive welding is proposed. The microhardness of interlayers with the heterophase structure reaches 280 HV, which far exceeds the microhardness of copper (~130 HV) and tantalum (~160 HV). Many twins of deformation origin were found in the structure of the copper plate. The effect of heating temperature in the range from 100 to 900°C on the microhardness of copper, tantalum, and the Cu-Ta welded joint was studied. Upon heating to 900°C, the microhardness of the intermediate layer decreases from 280 to 150 HV. The reduction in the strength properties of the weld material is mainly due to structural transformations in copper. PMID:24453818

  10. Structure and Microhardness of Cu-Ta Joints Produced by Explosive Welding

    PubMed Central

    Maliutina, Iu. N.; Mali, V. I.; Bataev, I. A.; Bataev, A. A.; Esikov, M. A.; Smirnov, A. I.; Skorokhod, K. A.

    2013-01-01

    The structure and microhardness of Cu-Ta joints produced by explosive welding were studied. It was found that, during explosive welding, an intermediate layer 20⋯40 μm thick with a finely dispersed heterophase structure, formed between the welded copper and tantalum plates. The structure of the layer was studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Microvolumes with tantalum particles distributed in a copper matrix and microvolumes of copper particles in a tantalum matrix were detected. The tantalum particles in copper have a size of 5⋯500 nm, with a predominance of 5⋯50 nm particles. A mechanism for the formation of the finely dispersed heterophase structure in explosive welding is proposed. The microhardness of interlayers with the heterophase structure reaches 280 HV, which far exceeds the microhardness of copper (~130 HV) and tantalum (~160 HV). Many twins of deformation origin were found in the structure of the copper plate. The effect of heating temperature in the range from 100 to 900°C on the microhardness of copper, tantalum, and the Cu-Ta welded joint was studied. Upon heating to 900°C, the microhardness of the intermediate layer decreases from 280 to 150 HV. The reduction in the strength properties of the weld material is mainly due to structural transformations in copper. PMID:24453818

  11. Weld Bead Size, Microstructure and Corrosion Behavior of Zirconium Alloys Joints Welded by Pulsed Laser Spot Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chuang; Li, Liqun; Tao, Wang; Peng, Genchen; Wang, Xian

    2016-07-01

    Pulsed laser spot welding of intersection points of zirconium alloys straps was performed. Weld bead size, microstructure and the corrosion behavior of weld bead were investigated. With the increasing laser peak power or number of shots, the weld width of the beads increased, the protrusion decreased and the dimple increased with further increase in heat input. The fusion zone consisted of a mixture of αZr and residual βZr phases. After annealing treatment, βNb and Zr(Fe, Nb)2 second phase particles were precipitated inter- and intragranular of αZr grains adequately. The oxide thickness of annealed weld bead was about 3.90 μm, decreased by about 18.1% relative to the 4.76 μm of as-welded specimen corroded at 400 °C and 10.3 MPa for 20 days. The corrosion resistance of annealed specimen was better than that of as-welded specimen, since the second phase particles exerted better corrosion resistance, and the content of Nb in βZr and the fraction of βZr decreased after the annealing treatment.

  12. Structure and ductility of the heat-affected zone of welded joints of a high-strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatchikova, T. I.; Nosov, A. D.; Goncharov, S. N.; Gudnev, N. Z.; Delgado Reina, S. Yu.; Yakovleva, I. L.

    2014-12-01

    Methods of optical microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy have been used to study the structure of welded joints of a high-strength structural steel with different types of the weld metal. The impact toughness of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) has been determined at temperatures of +20 and -40°C. Based on the fractograph investigations of the character of the fracture of the welded joints after tests for impact bending, the regions that are the most dangerous for crack initiation have been determined. Structural factors that affect the brittleness of the near-weld zone of welded joints with the austenite metal of the weld are indicated, including the existence of an austenite-bainite structure and coarse carbides, as well as the specific distribution of hydrogen.

  13. Joints, fissures, and voids in rhyolite welded ash-flow tuff at Teton damsite, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prostka, Harold J.

    1977-01-01

    Several kinds of joints, fissures, and voids are present in densely welded rhyolite ash-flow tuff at Teton damsite. Older fissures and voids probably were formed in the ash-flow sheet during secondary flowage, which probably was caused by differential compaction or settling over irregular topography. The younger, more abundant fissures are mostly steep cooling joints that probably have been opened farther by horizontal tectonic extension and gravitational creep, perhaps aided by lateral stress relief.

  14. Metallurgical and Corrosion Characterization of POST Weld Heat Treated Duplex Stainless Steel (uns S31803) Joints by Friction Welding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asif M., Mohammed; Shrikrishna, Kulkarni Anup; Sathiya, P.

    2016-02-01

    The present study focuses on the metallurgical and corrosion characterization of post weld heat treated duplex stainless steel joints. After friction welding, it was confirmed that there is an increase in ferrite content at weld interface due to dynamic recrystallization. This caused the weldments prone to pitting corrosion attack. Hence the post weld heat treatments were performed at three temperatures 1080∘C, 1150∘C and 1200∘C with 15min of aging time. This was followed by water and oil quenching. The volume fraction of ferrite to austenite ratio was balanced and highest pit nucleation resistance were achieved after PWHT at 1080∘C followed by water quench and at 1150∘C followed by oil quench. This had happened exactly at parameter set containing heating pressure (HP):40 heating time (HT):4 upsetting pressure (UP):80 upsetting time (UP):2 (experiment no. 5). Dual phase presence and absence of precipitates were conformed through TEM which follow Kurdjumov-Sachs relationship. PREN of ferrite was decreasing with increase in temperature and that of austenite increased. The equilibrium temperature for water quenching was around 1100∘C and that for oil quenching was around 1140∘C. The pit depths were found to be in the range of 100nm and width of 1.5-2μm.

  15. A Study on Tooling and Its Effect on Heat Generation and Mechanical Properties of Welded Joints in Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikader, Sujoy; Biswas, Pankaj; Puri, Asit Baran

    2016-06-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has been the most attracting solid state welding process as it serves numerous advantages like good mechanical, metallurgical properties etc. Non weldable aluminium alloys like 5XXX, 7XXX series can be simply joined by this process. In this present study a mathematical model has been developed and experiments were successfully performed to evaluate mechanical properties of FSW on similar aluminium alloys i.e. AA1100 for different process parameters and mainly two kind of tool geometry (straight cylindrical and conical or cylindrical tapered shaped pin with flat shoulder). Tensile strength and micro hardness for different process parameters are reported of the welded plate sample. It was noticed that in FSW of similar alloy with tool made of SS-310 tool steel, friction is the major contributor for the heat generation. It was seen that tool geometry, tool rotational speed, plunging force by the tool and traverse speed have significant effect on tensile strength and hardness of friction stir welded joints.

  16. A Combined Experimental/Computational Analysis of the Butt-Friction-Stir-Welded AA2139-T8 Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.; Yen, C.-F.

    2016-07-01

    Combined experimental and computational investigations are carried out of the mechanical properties of materials residing in different weld zones of friction stir-welded (FSW) joints of thick plates of AA2139-T8. The experimental portion of the work comprised (a) identification of the weld zones within the FSW joints, through the use of optical-microscopy characterization of a transverse section; (b) validation of the weld zones identified in (a) via the generation of a micro-hardness field over the same transverse section; (c) extracting and subsequently testing miniature tensile specimens from different weld zones; and (d) extracting and testing a larger-size tensile specimen spanning transversely the FSW weld. The computational portion of the work comprised (i) validation of the mechanical properties, as determined experimentally using the miniature tensile specimens, of the material residing within different zones of the FSW joint; and (ii) clarification of the benefits yielded by the knowledge of the local material properties within the FSW joint. These benefits arise from the fact that (a) joint mechanical properties are generally inferior to those of the base metal; (b) the width of the weld in thick metallic-armor is often comparable to the armor thickness, and therefore may represent a significant portion of the armor exposed-surface area; and (c) modeling of the weld-material structural response under loading requires the availability of high-fidelity/validated material constitutive models, and the development of such models requires knowledge of the local weld-material mechanical properties.

  17. A Combined Experimental/Computational Analysis of the Butt-Friction-Stir-Welded AA2139-T8 Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.; Yen, C.-F.

    2016-05-01

    Combined experimental and computational investigations are carried out of the mechanical properties of materials residing in different weld zones of friction stir-welded (FSW) joints of thick plates of AA2139-T8. The experimental portion of the work comprised (a) identification of the weld zones within the FSW joints, through the use of optical-microscopy characterization of a transverse section; (b) validation of the weld zones identified in (a) via the generation of a micro-hardness field over the same transverse section; (c) extracting and subsequently testing miniature tensile specimens from different weld zones; and (d) extracting and testing a larger-size tensile specimen spanning transversely the FSW weld. The computational portion of the work comprised (i) validation of the mechanical properties, as determined experimentally using the miniature tensile specimens, of the material residing within different zones of the FSW joint; and (ii) clarification of the benefits yielded by the knowledge of the local material properties within the FSW joint. These benefits arise from the fact that (a) joint mechanical properties are generally inferior to those of the base metal; (b) the width of the weld in thick metallic-armor is often comparable to the armor thickness, and therefore may represent a significant portion of the armor exposed-surface area; and (c) modeling of the weld-material structural response under loading requires the availability of high-fidelity/validated material constitutive models, and the development of such models requires knowledge of the local weld-material mechanical properties.

  18. Analysis of factors responsible for the accelerated creep rupture of 12% Cr martensitic steel weld joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, A. S.; Okhapkin, K. A.; Mikhailov, M. S.; Skutin, V. S.; Zubova, G. E.; Fedotov, B. V.

    2016-06-01

    In the process of the investigation of the heat resistance of a 0.07C-12Cr-Ni-Mo-V-Nb steel of the martensitic-ferritic class, a reduction was revealed in the long-term strength of its welded joints to below the level of the strength of the base metal. To establish the causes for the accelerated failure of the welded joints, an imitation of the thermal cycles was carried out that produce the structure of the heataffected zone using a dilatometer. In the samples with the structure that corresponds to that of the heataffected zone, a local zone of softening was revealed. The investigations of the metal structure using transmission electron microscopy have shown that the reduction in the creep rupture strength was caused by structural changes under the conditions of the thermal cycle of welding upon the staying of the steel in the temperature range between the Ac 1 and Ac 3 points.

  19. Structural Performance Evaluation of Composite-To-Steel Weld Bonded Joint

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Bhavesh; Frame, Barbara J; Dove, Caroline; Fuchs, Hannes

    2010-01-01

    The Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC), a collaboration of Chrysler, Ford, General Motors, and the US Department of Energy is conducting a focal project to demonstrate the use of composite materials in high volume structural applications such as an underbody capable of carrying crash loads. One of the critical challenges is to attach the composite part to the steel structure in a high-volume automotive manufacturing environment and meet the complex requirements for crash. Weld-bonding, a combination of adhesive bonding and spot welding, was selected as the primary joining method. A novel concept of bonding doubler steel strips to composite enabled the spot welding to the steel structure, ensuring the compability with the OEM assembly processes. The structural performance of the joint, including durability, was assessed via analytical and physical testing under quasi-static loading at various temperatures. This paper discusses the results of the experiments designed to generate key modeling parameters for Finite Element Analysis of the joint.

  20. Ultrasonic examination of welded joints of great thickness in mechanical equipment under pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emil, N.

    1974-01-01

    The requirements involved in choosing ultrasonic devices, the factors that affect testing, and recommended calibration methods are discussed. The ultrasonic testing method is the only method that up to now permits detection of defects in welded joints of great thickness. The results are conditioned by the performances of the devices employed as well as by the degree of instruction of the personnel.

  1. Microstructure and Properties of TIG/FSW Welded Joints of a New Al-Zn-Mg-Sc-Zr Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Xuefeng; Deng, Ying; Peng, Yongyi; Yin, Zhimin; Xu, Guofu

    2013-09-01

    A new Al-Zn-Mg-Sc-Zr alloy with low Sc content was welded by tungsten inert gas (TIG) and friction stir welding (FSW) techniques. The microstructure and properties of those two welded joints were investigated by property tests and microstructural observations. The results show that the new Al-Zn-Mg-Sc-Zr alloy has desirable welding property. The ultimate tensile strength and welding coefficient of the TIG joint reach 405 MPa and 76.7%, respectively, and in FSW joint those property values reach 490 MPa and 92.6%, respectively. The studied base metal has a deformed fibrous subgrains structure, many nano-scaled Al3(Sc,Zr) particles, and very fine aging precipitates. In the TIG joint, the fusion zone consists of coarsened dendritic grains and the heat-affected zone (HAZ) has fibrous micro-scaled subgrains. The FSW welded joint is characterized by a weld nugget zone, thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ), and HAZ. Due to plastic deformation around the rotating pin and anti-recrystallized effectiveness of Al3(Sc,Zr) particles, the weld nugget zone has a very fine subgrain structure. The TMAZ experiences some dissolution of aging precipitates. Coarsening of aging precipitates was observed in the HAZ. The better mechanical properties of the FSW joint are derived from a fine subgrain structure and homogeneous chemical compositions.

  2. T-joints of Ti alloys with hybrid laser-MIG welding: macro-graphic and micro-hardness analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, R.; Sorgente, D.; Palumbo, G.; Scintilla, L. D.; Brandizzi, M.; Satriano, A. A.; Tricarico, L.

    2012-03-01

    Titanium alloys are characterized by high mechanical properties and elevated corrosion resistance. The combination of laser welding with MIG/GMAW has proven to improve beneficial effects of both processes (keyhole, gap-bridging ability) while limiting their drawbacks (high thermal gradient, low mechanical resistance) In this paper, the hybrid Laser-GMAW welding of Ti-6Al-4V 3-mm thick sheets is investigated using a specific designed trailing shield. The joint geometry was the double fillet welded T-joint. Bead morphologies, microstructures and mechanical properties (micro-hardness) of welds were evaluated and compared to those achieved for the base metals.

  3. Radiographic inspection of porosity in Ti-6Al-4V laser-welded joints.

    PubMed

    Nuñez-Pantoja, Juliana Maria Costa; Takahashi, Jessica Mie Ferreira Koyama; Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio de Arruda; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz

    2011-01-01

    Widely used in dentistry, Ti-6Al-4V alloy is difficult to cast and solder, as it frequently exhibits pores inside the structure. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of joint openings and diameters of laser-welded joints executed in Ti-6Al-4V structures on the presence of pores as checked by radiographic procedures. Sixty dumbbell rods with central diameters of 1.5, 2.0 and 3.5 mm were created from Ti-6Al-4V-wrought bars. Specimens were sectioned and welded using two joint openings (0.0 and 0.6 mm). The combination of variables created six groups (n = 10). Laser welding was executed using 360V/8ms (1.5 and 2.0 mm) and 380V/9ms (3.5 mm), with the focus and frequency set to zero. The joints were finished, polished and submitted to radiographic examination. The radiographs were visually examined for the presence of pores in the joints, qualitatively. The percentage of radiographic presence of pores was calculated without counting pores per joint. Data were analyzed using a chi-square test (α = 0.05). For the 1.5-mm specimens, the incidence of pore presence was significantly higher (p = 0.0001) when using 0.6-mm joint openings (40%) compared to 0.0-mm openings (0%). For the 2.0-mm specimens, there was no significant difference between groups (p = 0.2008). However, for the 3.5-mm specimens, the incidence of pore presence was lower (p = 0.0061) for 0.6-mm openings (50%) compared to 0.0-mm openings (70%). Therefore, laser welding of Ti-6Al-4V structures with thin diameters provides the best condition for the juxtaposition of the parts. PMID:21359490

  4. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of shielded metal arc-welded dissimilar joints comprising duplex stainless steel and low alloy steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, P. Bala; Muthupandi, V.; Sivan, V.; Srinivasan, P. Bala; Dietzel, W.

    2006-12-01

    This work describes the results of an investigation on a dissimilar weld joint comprising a boiler-grade low alloy steel and duplex stainless steel (DSS). Welds produced by shielded metal arc-welding with two different electrodes (an austenitic and a duplex grade) were examined for their microstructural features and properties. The welds were found to have overmatching mechanical properties. Although the general corrosion resistance of the weld metals was good, their pitting resistance was found to be inferior when compared with the DSS base material.

  5. Corrosion resistance of GTAW and EBW welded joints of DIN W. Nr. 1.4462 (UNS S31803): Effect of post-weld-heat-treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Brandi, S.D.; Padilha, A.F.; Wolynec, S.

    1996-12-01

    The duplex stainless steels present better corrosion behavior than the conventional stainless steels. This is due to their chemical composition (Cr, Ni, Mo, N) and a balanced microstructure (50% ferrite). It might be an increase on the volumetric fraction of ferrite, depending on the cooling rate after welding. In the same way the chemical composition can be altered by a loss of the alloying elements during welding, such as N. Both phenomena will decrease the corrosion resistance of the weldment. Autogenous GTAW and EBW were used to join the plates. Several corrosion tests were used to evaluate the behavior of the joints in as-welded (AW) and post-welded-heat-treated (PWHT) conditions. The results were analyzed and correlated to the microstructure of the welded joints. The main conclusion of this work is that corrosion resistance of both joint processes (EBW and GTAW) in as-welded condition is inadequate. PWHT (post-weld-heat-treatment) dissolved the chromium-rich precipitates, restored the equilibrium amount of austenite in the joints and recovered their corrosion resistance.

  6. A study on an efficient prediction of welding deformation for T-joint laser welding of sandwich panel PART I : Proposal of a heat source model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae Woong; Jang, Beom Seon; Kim, Yong Tai; Chun, Kwang San

    2013-09-01

    The use of I-Core sandwich panel has increased in cruise ship deck structure since it can provide similar bending strength with conventional stiffened plate while keeping lighter weight and lower web height. However, due to its thin plate thickness, i.e. about 4~6 mm at most, it is assembled by high power CO2 laser welding to minimize the welding deformation. This research proposes a volumetric heat source model for T-joint of the I-Core sandwich panel and a method to use shell element model for a thermal elasto-plastic analysis to predict welding deformation. This paper, Part I, focuses on the heat source model. A circular cone type heat source model is newly suggested in heat transfer analysis to realize similar melting zone with that observed in experiment. An additional suggestion is made to consider negative defocus, which is commonly applied in T-joint laser welding since it can provide deeper penetration than zero defocus. The proposed heat source is also verified through 3D thermal elasto-plastic analysis to compare welding deformation with experimental results. A parametric study for different welding speeds, defocus values, and welding powers is performed to investigate the effect on the melting zone and welding deformation. In Part II, focuses on the proposed method to employ shell element model to predict welding deformation in thermal elasto-plastic analysis instead of solid element model.

  7. Experimental and numerical studies on the issues in laser welding of light-weight alloys in a zero-gap lap joint configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harooni, Masoud

    It is advantageous for the transportation industry to use lightweight components in the structure in order to save mass and reduce CO2 emissions. One of the lightest structural metals, magnesium, fulfills the need for mass reduction within the automotive industry. Many of the body structure components in the automotive industry are assembled using joining processes such as fusion welding. Furthermore, laser welding offers a low heat impact, high process rate, joining method which is becoming increasingly popular as the cost for laser systems continues to decrease. However, there is a limited body of work investigating the laser welding of magnesium and therefore, in the current study, different techniques and methods for laser welding of magnesium alloys are numerically and experimentally studied in order to optimize process parameters to achieve high quality welds. A feasibility study was designed in order to study the effect of various laser welding process parameters (such as laser power levels and welding speeds) on weld quality. Three regression models were developed to find the best fit model that relates process parameters to the shear load of the weld. Furthermore, to understand the effect of laser welding parameters on temperature distribution in laser welding of AZ31B magnesium alloy, a numerical model was developed. A rotary Gaussian volumetric body heat source was applied in this study to obtain the temperature history during the laser welding process. Cross-sectional views of the weld beads, temperature history recorded by thermocouples, and temperature history recorded by infrared camera were used to validate the numerical model. In order to study the real-time dynamic behavior of the molten pool and the keyhole during the welding process, a high speed charge-coupled device (CCD) assisted with a green laser as an illumination source was used. In order to observe the presence of pores, prior studies destructively evaluated the weld bead however; in the

  8. Robotic gas metal arc welding of small diameter saddle type joints using multi-stripe structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonser, Gary R.; Parker, Graham A.

    1999-11-01

    Single-stripe structured light sensors are widely used in conjunction with arc welding robots for seam-tracking purposes. The interaction of the projected light with the weld joint and component surfaces produces characteristic line shapes with feature points that can be recognized at high speed by an underlying vision system. Unfortunately they are suitable only for the major classes of weld joint typically encountered within industry--long, straight, or gently curving fillet or butt joints. We present a multistripe structured light sensor that detects and measures the position of the saddle type weld joint formed by two small (< 50-mm)-diameter intersecting tubes. The underlying image processing algorithms detect the weld feature points from each stripe along with four calibration points to generate the entire weld path in the robot workcell base coordinate system before welding commences. The system is validated within an existing welding application; detecting 93% of the weld feature points within +/- 0.4 mm when used on 30-mm-diam tubes.

  9. Microstructure evolution of Al/Mg butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc with Zn filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Fei; Zhang Zhaodong; Liu Liming

    2012-07-15

    Based on the idea of alloying welding seam, Gas tungsten arc welding method with pure Zn filler metal was chosen to join Mg alloy and Al alloy. The microstructures, phases, element distribution and fracture morphology of welding seams were examined. The results indicate that there was a transitional zone in the width of 80-100 {mu}m between the Mg alloy substrate and fusion zone. The fusion zone was mainly composed of MgZn{sub 2}, Zn-based solid solution and Al-based solid solution. The welding seam presented distinct morphology in different location owning to the quite high cooling rate of the molten pool. The addition of Zn metal could prevent the formation of Mg-Al intermetallics and form the alloyed welding seam during welding. Therefore, the tensile strengths of joints have been significantly improved compared with those of gas tungsten arc welded joints without Zn metal added. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are welded successfully. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc wire is employed as a filler metal to form the alloyed welding seam. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An alloyed welding seam is benefit for improving of the joint tensile strength.

  10. Experimental and numerical evaluation of the fatigue behaviour in a welded joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaguer, P.; Estrada, R.

    2014-07-01

    Welded joints are an important part in structures. For this reason, it is always necessary to know the behaviour of them under cyclic loads. In this paper a S - N curve of a butt welded joint of the AISI 1015 steel and Cuban manufacturing E6013 electrode is showed. Fatigue tests were made in an universal testing machine MTS810. The stress ratio used in the test was 0,1. Flaws in the fatigue specimens were characterized by means of optical and scanning electron microscopy. SolidWorks 2013 software was used to modeling the specimens geometry, while to simulate the fatigue behaviour Simulation was used. The joint fatigue limit is 178 MPa, and a cut point at 2 039 093 cycles. Some points of the simulations are inside of the 95% confidence band.

  11. Development of phased array ultrasonic testing in lieu of radiography for testing complete joint penetration (CJP) welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldipur, P.; Boone, Shane D.

    2014-04-01

    The past decade has seen new, emerging innovation of Ultrasonic Testing (UT). Specifically, multiple manufacturers have produced Phased Array Ultrasonic Testing (PAUT) systems. The PAUT systems embed a matrix of multiple (some up to 128) single transducers into one probe used for scanning elastic materials. Simultaneously exciting multiple transducers offers distinct advantages; depending on the sequencing of transducer excitation, the ultrasonic beam could be steered within the material and multiple beams help develop extra dimensional data to assist with visualization of possible flaws including the discontinuity size, shape and location. Unfortunately, there has not been broad acceptance of PAUT in the bridge fabrication industry because it is currently not a recognized inspection technology in AWS D1.5. One situation in which the technology would excel would be inspection of Complete Joint Penetration (CJP) butt welds. Currently, AWS D1.5 required CJP welds subjected to tensile or reversal stresses only be inspected by Radiographic Testing (RT). However, discontinuities normally seen by RT can also be seen with PAUT. Until specification language is adopted into D1.5, there will continue to be hesitancy to use PAUT for the inspection of CJP butt welds. Developmental work must first be performed to develop the acceptance criteria and the specification language. The developmental work from the inspections carried out on butt-weld specimens and transition butt-weld specimens are presented in this paper. Specific scan plans were developed using the ES-Beam simulation software for each of the test specimens. In depth analysis of PAUT data obtained to determine exact location and sizing information of the defects was performed. The results also present the comparison of results from PAUT to those obtained using conventional UT and radiography.

  12. Estimate of the allowable dimensions of diagnosed defects in category III and IV welded pipeline joints{sup 1}

    SciTech Connect

    Grin', E. A.; Bochkarev, V. I.

    2013-01-15

    An approach for estimating the permissible dimensions of technological defects in butt welded joints in category III and IV pipelines is described. The allowable size of a welding defect is determined from the condition of compliance with the specifications on strength for a reference cross section (damaged joint) of the pipeline taking into account its weakening by a given defect.With regard to the fairly widespread discovery of technological defects in butt welded joints during diagnostics of auxiliary pipelines for thermal electric power plants, the proposed approach can be used in practice by repair and consulting organizations.

  13. Integrity assessment of the ferritic / austenitic dissimilar weld joint between intermediate heat exchanger and steam generator in fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakumar, T.; Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, S.; Kumar, J. G.; Mathew, M. D.

    2012-07-01

    Integrity of the modified 9Cr-1Mo / alloy 800 dissimilar joint welded with Inconel 182 electrodes has been assessed under creep condition based on the detailed analysis of microstructure and stress distribution across the joint by finite element analysis. A hardness peak at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface and a hardness trough at the inter-critical heat affected zone (HAZ) in ferritic base metal developed. Un-tempered martensite was found at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface to impart high hardness in it; whereas annealing of martensitic structure of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel by inter-critical heating during welding thermal cycle resulted in hardness tough in the inter-critical HAZ. Creep tests were carried out on the joint and ferritic steel base metal at 823 K over a stress range of 160-320 MPa. The joint possessed lower creep rupture strength than its ferritic steel base metal. Failure of the joint at relatively lower stresses occurred at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface; whereas it occurred at inter-critical region of HAZ at moderate stresses. Cavity nucleation associated with the weld interface particles led to premature failure of the joint. Finite element analysis of stress distribution across the weld joint considering the micro-mechanical strength inhomogeneity across it revealed higher von-Mises and principal stresses at the weld interface. These stresses induced preferential creep cavitation at the weld interface. Role of precipitate in enhancing creep cavitation at the weld interface has been elucidated based on the FE analysis of stress distribution across it. (authors)

  14. Synchrotron X-ray CT characterization of friction-welded joints in tial turbocharger components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J. G.; Kropf, A. J.; Vissers, D. R.; Sun, W. M.; Katsoudas, J.; Yang, N.; Fei, D.

    2012-05-01

    Titanium aluminide (TiAl) is an advanced intermetallic material and is being investigated for application in turbocharger components for diesel engines. A TiAl turbocharger rotor consists of a cast TiAl turbine wheel and a Ti-alloy shaft that are joined by friction welding. Although friction welding is an established industrial process, it is still challenging to join dissimilar materials especially for brittle intermetallics. These joints are therefore required to be inspected using a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method. In this study, synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (CT) developed at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory was used for NDE characterization of friction-welded joint in three TiAl turbocharger rotors. The filtered synchrotron X-ray source has high peak energies to penetrate thick metallic materials, and the detector (imager) has high spatial resolutions to resolve small flaws. The CT inspections revealed detailed 3D crack distributions within poorly welded joints. The crack detection sensitivity and resolution was calibrated and found to be correlated well with destructive examination.

  15. Laser-assisted friction stir welding of aluminum alloy lap joints: microstructural and microhardness characterizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalino, Giuseppe; Campanelli, Sabina L.; Contuzzi, Nicola; Angelastro, Andrea; Ludovico, Antonio D.

    2014-02-01

    Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state joining process; i.e., no melting occurs. The welding process is promoted by the rotation and translation of an axis-symmetric non-consumable tool along the weld centerline. Thus, the FSW process is performed at much lower temperatures than conventional fusion welding, nevertheless it has some disadvantages. The laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding (LAFSW) combines a Friction Stir Welding machine and a laser system. Laser power is used to preheat and to plasticize the volume of the workpiece ahead of the rotating tool; the workpiece is then joined in the same way as in the conventional FSW process. In this work an Ytterbium fiber laser with maximum power of 4 kW and a commercial FSW machine were coupled. Both FSW and LAFSW tests were conducted on 3 mm thick 5754H111 aluminum alloy plates in lap joint configuration with a constant tool rotation rate and with different feed rates. The two processes were compared and evaluated in terms of differences in the microstructure and in the micro-hardness profile.

  16. Effect of friction stir welding parameters on defect formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, S. Yu.; Rubtsov, V. E.; Eliseev, A. A.; Kolubaev, E. A.; Filippov, A. V.; Ivanov, A. N.

    2015-10-01

    Friction stir welding is a perspective method for manufacturing automotive parts, aviation and space technology. One of the major problems is the formation of welding defects and weld around the welding zone. The formation of defect is the main reason failure of the joint. A possible way to obtain defect-free welded joints is the selection of the correct welding parameters. Experimental results describing the effect of friction stir welding process parameters on the defects of welded joints on aluminum alloy AMg5M have been shown. The weld joint defects have been characterized using the non-destructive radioscopic and ultrasound phase array methods. It was shown how the type and size of defects determine the welded joint strength.

  17. Mechanical characteristics and microstructure of weld joint of high-temperature martensitic steel containing 9% Cr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhova, Ya. E.; Belyakov, A. N.; Kaibyshev, R. O.

    2016-04-01

    The structure and mechanical characteristics of a weld joint of 10Kh9K3V2MFBR steel (0.097 C, 0.17.Si, 0.54 Mn, 8.75 Cr, 0.21 Ni, 0.51 Mo, 0.07 Nb, 0.23 V, 0.004 N, 0.003 B, 1.6 W, 0.15 Cu, and Fe for balance, wt %) have been studied; the joint was produced by hand welding in an argon atmosphere using 03Kh20N45M7G6B welding wire (0.3 C, 20 Cr, 45 Ni, 7 Mo, 6 Mn, and 1 Nb, wt %). The weld joint is divided into the zone of the base metal, a thermal effect zone, which consists of zones that contain fine and coarse original austenitic grains, and the zone of seam metal. It has been shown that the weld joint of 10Kh9K3V2MFBR steel possesses high strength characteristics at the room temperature under static loading and a satisfactorily impact toughness, which has the minimum value of 30 J/cm2 in the zone of the seam metal and does not depend on the temperature. With a decrease in the temperature from the room temperature to 253 K, a ductile-brittle transition occurs in the thermal effect zone. Creep tests carried out at the temperature of 923 K have shown that the long-term strength of the weld seam is lower than that of the base material in the entire stress range being tested. At stresses of 140 MPa or higher, the acceleration of creep in the weld seam is observed, while at low stresses of about 120 MPa, the rates of creep in the weld seam and in the base metal remain similar until the transition to the stage of accelerated fracture occurs. The difference in the values of the long-term strength is due to premature fracture, which occurs in the thermal effect zone with the finegrained structure.

  18. Numerical investigation on friction welding of alumina / AA 6063 T6 joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynes, N. Rajesh Jesudoss; Velu, P. Shenbaga; Tharmaraj, R.; Kumar, R.

    2016-05-01

    Friction welding is the most suitable candidate for joining the dissimilar materials such as AA 6063 T6 alloy/Alumina for critical situations in high temperature and high corrosion resistance applications. In the present work, the numerical simulation was carried out to understand the mechanism of joining of AA 6063 T6 alloy/ Alumina rod by friction welding process. The developed thermo mechanical model is a highly nonlinear due to the interaction between the temperature fields and time dependent of the material properties. The developed numerical tool could be used to predict the temperature distribution, stress, strain and deformation of the dissimilar joints.

  19. Evaluation of Bending Strength in Friction Welded Alumina/mild Steel Joints by Applying Factorial Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesudoss Hynes, N. Rajesh; Nagaraj, P.; Vivek Prabhu, M.

    Joining of metal with ceramics has become significant in many applications, because they combine properties like ductility with high hardness and wear resistance. By friction welding technique, alumina can be joined to mild steel with AA1100 sheet of 1mm thickness as interlayer. In the present work, investigation of the effect of friction time on interlayer thickness reduction and bending strength is carried out by factorial design. By using ANOVA, a statistical tool, regression modeling is done. The regression model predicts the bending strength of welded ceramic/metal joints accurately with ± 2% deviation from the experimental values.

  20. Microstructure- and Strain Rate-Dependent Tensile Behavior of Fiber Laser-Welded DP980 Steel Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qiang; Guo, Wei; Peng, Peng; Li, Minggao; Zhu, Ying; Zou, Guisheng

    2016-02-01

    DP980 steels were butt-welded by fiber laser welding. The microstructures, microhardness distribution, and tensile behavior of the joint were investigated. The results showed that the fusion zone (FZ) consisted of fully martensite with higher hardness compared to the base metal (BM). A softened zone (20 HV0.2 drop) was produced in heat-affected zone due to martensite tempering during the laser welding. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and yield strength (YS) of the laser-welded joint were not degraded compared to BM with the existence of softened zone. The UTS and YS of the welded joint increased with the increase of tensile strain rate. The work hardening exponents of the BM and welded joint showed weak positive strain rate dependence. The deformation of softened zone was restrained by the hardened FZ during loading, resulting in a higher work hardening rate of softened zone than that of BM. The failure of welded joint occurred in the BM instead of softened zone. The fracture surfaces of the joint exhibited typical ductile fracture over strain rate from 0.0001 to 0.1 s-1.

  1. Numerical and experimental study of the weld joints formation in welding foam materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bezginov, Roman O. E-mail: rakrekt@mail.ru; Krektuleva, Raisa A. E-mail: rakrekt@mail.ru; Mishin, Mikhail A. E-mail: rakrekt@mail.ru; Cherepanov, Oleg I. Cherepanov, Roman O.

    2014-11-14

    A numerical analysis of fusion welding of steel- and aluminum-based foam materials is carried out. The schemes of the structured and stochastic pore distribution are considered. The research results were used to conduct the experiments which confirmed the reliability of the numerical calculations.

  2. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  3. Friction stir welding joint of dissimilar materials between AZ31B magnesium and 6061 aluminum alloys: Microstructure studies and mechanical characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammadi, J.; Behnamian, Y.; Mostafaei, A.; Izadi, H.; Saeid, T.; Kokabi, A.H.; Gerlich, A.P.

    2015-03-15

    Friction stir welding is an efficient manufacturing method for joining dissimilar alloys, which can dramatically reduce grain sizes and offer high mechanical joint efficiency. Lap FSW joints between dissimilar AZ31B and Al 6061 alloy sheets were made at various tool rotation and travel speeds. Rotation and travel speeds varied between 560–1400 r/min and 16–40 mm/min respectively, where the ratio between these parameters was such that nearly constant pitch distances were applied during welding. X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD), optical microscopy images (OM), electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) were used to investigate the microstructures of the joints welded. Intermetallic phases including Al{sub 12}Mg{sub 17} (γ) and Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 2} (β) were detected in the weld zone (WZ). For different tool rotation speeds, the morphology of the microstructure in the stir zone changed significantly with travel speed. Lap shear tensile test results indicated that by simultaneously increasing the tool rotation and travel speeds to 1400 r/min and 40 mm/min, the joint tensile strength and ductility reached a maximum. Microhardness measurements and tensile stress–strain curves indicated that mechanical properties were affected by FSW parameters and mainly depended on the formation of intermetallic compounds in the weld zone. In addition, a debonding failure mode in the Al/Mg dissimilar weld nugget was investigated by SEM and surface fracture studies indicated that the presence of intermetallic compounds in the weld zone controlled the failure mode. XRD analysis of the fracture surface indicated the presence of brittle intermetallic compounds including Al{sub 12}Mg{sub 17} (γ) and Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 2} (β). - Highlights: • Dissimilar Al/Mg joint was obtained by lap friction stir welding technique. • Effect of rotation and travel speeds on the formation of intermetallic

  4. High-temperature strength analysis of welded joint of RAFs by small punch test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Taichiro; Komazaki, Shin-ichi; Kohno, Yutaka; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Kohyama, Akira

    2009-04-01

    Type IV creep damage has recently been a worldwide issue for high Cr ferritic steels. The small punch (SP) creep test has been successfully applied to evaluate this damage of low alloy ferritic steel by the author's group. However, the heat affected zone (HAZ) of fusion reactor material welded by electron-beam (EB) welding is so thin that it is not easy to evaluate its mechanical properties by the conventional SP test. In this study, the SP test using a further miniaturized specimen was applied to the EB welded joint of reduced activation ferritic steel (RAFs), for evaluating high-temperature tensile properties of the HAZs. As the result, the σy and σB of the tempered HAZ at 873 K were estimated to be as low as 275-300 MPa and 325-340 MPa, respectively.

  5. Site-Dependent Tension Properties of Inertia Friction-Welded Joints Made From Dissimilar Ni-based Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senkov, O. N.; Mahaffey, D. W.; Semiatin, S. L.; Woodward, C.

    2015-03-01

    Microstructure, tensile properties, and fracture behavior of the inertia friction weld joints of dissimilar superalloys, cast Mar-M247 and wrought LSHR, were studied to assess the weld quality. Tensile tests were conducted at 23 and 704 °C on the samples containing different areas of the weld interface of the same welded material. The stress-strain curves were registered at different axial distances from the weld interface. In all tested samples, plastic deformation was localized on Mar-M247 side, outside the heat-affected zone (HAZ), and the resistance to plastic deformation of Mar-M247 increased with a decrease in the distance from the weld interface inside HAZ. Only elastic deformation occurred on the LSHR side. Fracture occurred on the Mar-M247 side, outside HAZ, or at the weld interface. In the latter case, welding defects in the form of clusters of nanometer-sized oxide and carbide particles were observed at the fracture surfaces. These results revealed that the IFW process is capable of producing the weld joints between Mar-M247 and LSHR with the fracture strength higher than that of Mar-M247. However, optimization of the IFW processing parameters is required to minimize clustering of oxide/carbide particles at the weld interface in this alloy pair.

  6. Mechanical and interfacial characterization of laser welded Co-Cr alloy with different joint configurations

    PubMed Central

    Kokolis, John; Chakmakchi, Makdad; Theocharopoulos, Antonios; Prombonas, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The mechanical and interfacial characterization of laser welded Co-Cr alloy with two different joint designs. MATERIALS AND METHODS Dumbbell cast specimens (n=30) were divided into 3 groups (R, I, K, n=10). Group R consisted of intact specimens, group I of specimens sectioned with a straight cut, and group K of specimens with a 45° bevel made at the one welding edge. The microstructure and the elemental distributions of alloy and welding regions were examined by an SEM/EDX analysis and then specimens were loaded in tension up to fracture. The tensile strength (TS) and elongation (ε) were determined and statistically compared among groups employing 1-way ANOVA, SNK multiple comparison test (α=.05) and Weibull analysis where Weibull modulus m and characteristic strength σο were identified. Fractured surfaces were imaged by a SEM. RESULTS SEM/EDX analysis showed that cast alloy consists of two phases with differences in mean atomic number contrast, while no mean atomic number was identified for welded regions. EDX analysis revealed an increased Cr and Mo content at the alloy-joint interface. All mechanical properties of group I (TS, ε, m and σο) were found inferior to R while group K showed intermediated values without significant differences to R and I, apart from elongation with group R. The fractured surfaces of all groups showed extensive dendritic pattern although with a finer structure in the case of welded groups. CONCLUSION The K shape joint configuration should be preferred over the I, as it demonstrates improved mechanical strength and survival probability. PMID:25722836

  7. Combination Effects of Nocolok Flux with Ni Powder on Properties and Microstructures of Aluminum-Stainless Steel TIG Welding-Brazing Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Huan; Lin, Sanbao; Yang, Chunli; Fan, Chenglei; Chen, Zhe

    2013-11-01

    A flux consisting of Nocolok and nickel powder was first applied for TIG welding-brazing of aluminum-stainless steel. Results of tensile and impact tests illustrated that a significant improvement in mechanical properties of the butt joint was obtained with the flux, tensile strength increased from 116 to 158 MPa, and impact energy increased from 3.2 to 6.7 J. Investigation results on microstructures of interfaces and seams suggested that Ni addition significantly decreased the thickness of intermetallic compound (IMC) layer on the interfaces, but did not change the phase structure of Al13Fe4. Furthermore, precipitate phase in the welded seams changed from Al6Fe to Al9FeNi, and the quantity of precipitate phases decreased from 12 to 9% approximately. Finally, effect of Ni powder's addition on the joint was analyzed and discussed. The reduction in the thickness of IMC and quantity of precipitate phases are beneficial to joint properties.

  8. Evaluation of near-surface stress distributions in dissimilar welded joint by scanning acoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Dong Ryul; Yoshida, Sanichiro; Sasaki, Tomohiro; Todd, Judith A; Park, Ik Keun

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the results from a set of experiments designed to ultrasonically measure the near surface stresses distributed within a dissimilar metal welded plate. A scanning acoustic microscope (SAM), with a tone-burst ultrasonic wave frequency of 200 MHz, was used for the measurement of near surface stresses in the dissimilar welded plate between 304 stainless steel and low carbon steel. For quantitative data acquisition such as leaky surface acoustic wave (leaky SAW) velocity measurement, a point focus acoustic lens of frequency 200 MHz was used and the leaky SAW velocities within the specimen were precisely measured. The distributions of the surface acoustic wave velocities change according to the near-surface stresses within the joint. A three dimensional (3D) finite element simulation was carried out to predict numerically the stress distributions and compare with the experimental results. The experiment and FE simulation results for the dissimilar welded plate showed good agreement. This research demonstrates that a combination of FE simulation and ultrasonic stress measurements using SAW velocity distributions appear promising for determining welding residual stresses in dissimilar material joints. PMID:26773788

  9. Evaluation of fatigue properties of 316FR stainless steel welded joints at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kaguchi, Hitoshi; Koto, Hiroyuki; Fujioka, Terutaka; Taguchi, Kosei; Sukekawa, Masayuki

    1996-12-01

    316FR is an improved version of type 316 stainless steel for elevated temperature use with lower carbon content than conventional type 316 stainless steel. Fatigue properties of GTAW joints of 316FR stainless steel have been investigated. Heat affected zone (HAZ) of 316FR becomes harder than base metal. A method based on the stress-strain relationship of three elements, which are base metal, HAZ and weld portions, has been proposed and applied to the evaluations of fatigue tests. The tri-metal analysis model gives good agreements between experimental results and predicted fatigue lives of the 316FR welded joints. This material is to be used in the DFBR reactor in Japan.

  10. Electron-microscopic examination of the transition zone of aluminum-tantalum bimetallic joints (explosion welding)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkova, A. Yu.; Greenberg, B. A.; Ivanov, M. A.; Elkina, O. A.; Inozemtsev, A. V.; Plotnikov, A. V.; Patselov, A. M.; Kozhevnikov, V. E.

    2014-04-01

    A study of the structure of an aluminum-tantalum joint and a comparison of this structure with the structures of iron-silver and copper-tantalum joints have revealed the following processes of the interpenetration of the materials that occur during explosion welding: the formation of protrusions, the injection of particles of one material into the other, and the formation of zones of local melting. Regardless of the mutual solubility of the metals being welded, two types of fragmentation occur, i.e., (1) a granulating fragmentation (GF), which includes the formation, explosion-governed (EG) dispersion, and partial consolidation of particles, and (2) the fragmentation that is usually observed during severe plastic deformation. It is important that this traditional fragmentation is not accompanied by the formation and EG dispersion of particles. This feature allows one to easily distinguish these types of fragmentation (traditional and GF fragmentation).

  11. Comparative analysis of the friction stir welded aluminum-magnesium alloy joint grain structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaikina, A. A.; Sizova, O. V.; Novitskaya, O. S.

    2015-10-01

    A comparative test of the friction stir welded aluminum-magnesium alloy joint microstructure for plates of a different thickness was carried out. Finding out the structuring regularities in the weld nugget zone, that is the strongest zone of the weld, the effects of temperature-deformational conditions on the promotion of a metal structure refinement mechanism under friction stir welding can be determined. In this research friction stir welded rolled plates of an AMg5M alloy; 5 and 8 mm thick were investigated. Material fine structure pictures of the nugget zone were used to identify and measure subgrain and to define a second phase location. By means of optical microscopy it was shown that the fine-grained structure developed in the nugget zone. The grain size was 5 flm despite the thickness of the plates. In the sample 5.0 mm thick grains were coaxial, while in the sample 8.0 mm thick grains were elongate at a certain angle to the tool travel direction.

  12. Uniaxial Tensile and Simple Shear Behavior of Resistance Spot-Welded Dual-Phase Steel Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Hong; Tong, Wei; Hector, Louis G.; Zavattieri, Pablo D.

    2008-08-01

    Small test coupons were machined from single spot welds in a dual-phase steel (DP600) to investigate deformation and failure of weld joints in both tension and shear. Quasi-static ( ifmmodeexpandafterdotelseexpandafter\\.fi{\\upvarepsilon } ˜ 10^{{ - 4}} 1/{text{s}} ) testing was conducted in a miniature tensile stage with a custom image acquisition system. Strain accumulation in each weld was analyzed where fracture occurred, which was typically outside the fusion zone. A few shear test coupons that failed in the fusion zone were found to have the same spheroidal defects noted in previous work, and thus, severely limited weld strength and ductility. A novel strain mapping method based upon digital image correlation was employed to generate two-dimensional deformation maps, from which local stress-strain curves to failure were computed. As an important first step toward incorporation of material models into weld simulations, a preliminary finite element analysis of a tension test successfully reproduced the experimental results with material models for the base, heat-affected, and fusion zone materials generated from prior work.

  13. Creep modeling of welded joints using the theta projection concept and finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Law, M.; Payten, W.; Snowden, K.

    2000-02-01

    Modeling of welded joints under creep conditions with element analysis was undertaken using the theta projection method. The results were compared to modeling based on a simple Norton law. Theta projection data extends the accuracy and predictive capability of finite element modeling of critical structures operating at high temperature and pressure. In some cases analyzed, it was found that the results diverged from those gained using a Norton law creep model.

  14. Distributed strain measurement of welded tubular joint with long gauge FBG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murayama, H.; Kageyama, K.; Ohara, K.; Uzawa, K.; Kanai, M.; Igawa, H.

    2008-04-01

    Strain along a welded joint submitted to a load can fluctuate because of inhomogeneity in thickness or residual stress distributions and defects. Inversely, strain fluctuation may represent such inhomogeneities or defects. We applied the distributed strain sensing technique with a long gauge FBG to monitoring strain distributions along a welded tubular joint of a steel pipe. By using this sensing technique, we can measure a strain distribution at an arbitrary position along a FBG with the high spatial resolution less than 1 mm. In the tensile test of the steel pipe, we could successfully measure the strain distribution along the weld line of about 100 mm in length. We also observed the strain fluctuating sharply in some areas and acoustic emissions were simultaneously detected by the other sensors. In some areas where sharp fluctuations occurred, defects were observed by also computer tomography carried out after the tensile test. Applications for the sensing technique include health monitoring for other joint configurations, such as fastening and bonding.

  15. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Laser Welding Joint of a CLAM Steel with Revised Chemical Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuhai; Huang, Jihua; Lu, Qi; Zhao, Xingke

    2016-03-01

    To suppress the tendency to form delta ferrite in weld metal (WM) of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel joint, a CLAM steel with revised chemical compositions was designed. Laser welding of the CLAM steel was investigated. The microstructures of the WM and heat-affected zone were analyzed. The impact toughness of the WM was evaluated by a Charpy impact test method with three V notches. The influence of temper temperature on mechanical properties was analyzed. It was found that the delta ferrite was eliminated almost completely in laser WM of CLAM steel with revised chemical compositions which has lower tendency to form delta ferrite than original chemical compositions. The joint has higher tensile strength than the parent metal. With increasing the heat input, the impact toughness of the joint is approximatively equal with that of parent metal first and then decreases obviously. Temper treatment could effectively improve mechanical property of the joint. When the temper temperature exceeds 600 °C, the impact toughness of the joint is higher than that of the parent metal.

  16. Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Laser Welding Joint of a CLAM Steel with Revised Chemical Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuhai; Huang, Jihua; Lu, Qi; Zhao, Xingke

    2016-05-01

    To suppress the tendency to form delta ferrite in weld metal (WM) of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel joint, a CLAM steel with revised chemical compositions was designed. Laser welding of the CLAM steel was investigated. The microstructures of the WM and heat-affected zone were analyzed. The impact toughness of the WM was evaluated by a Charpy impact test method with three V notches. The influence of temper temperature on mechanical properties was analyzed. It was found that the delta ferrite was eliminated almost completely in laser WM of CLAM steel with revised chemical compositions which has lower tendency to form delta ferrite than original chemical compositions. The joint has higher tensile strength than the parent metal. With increasing the heat input, the impact toughness of the joint is approximatively equal with that of parent metal first and then decreases obviously. Temper treatment could effectively improve mechanical property of the joint. When the temper temperature exceeds 600 °C, the impact toughness of the joint is higher than that of the parent metal.

  17. Weld line detection and process control for welding automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sang-Min; Cho, Man-Ho; Lee, Ho-Young; Cho, Taik-Dong

    2007-03-01

    Welding has been widely used as a process to join metallic parts. But because of hazardous working conditions, workers tend to avoid this task. Techniques to achieve the automation are the recognition of joint line and process control. A CCD (charge coupled device) camera with a laser stripe was applied to enhance the automatic weld seam tracking in GMAW (gas metal arc welding). The adaptive Hough transformation having an on-line processing ability was used to extract laser stripes and to obtain specific weld points. The three-dimensional information obtained from the vision system made it possible to generate the weld torch path and to obtain information such as the width and depth of the weld line. In this study, a neural network based on the generalized delta rule algorithm was adapted to control the process of GMAW, such as welding speed, arc voltage and wire feeding speed. The width and depth of the weld joint have been selected as neurons in the input layer of the neural-network algorithm. The input variables, the width and depth of the weld joint, are determined by image information. The voltage, weld speed and wire feed rate are represented as the neurons in the output layer. The results of the neural-network learning applied to the welding are as follows: learning ratio 0.5, momentum ratio 0.7, the number of hidden layers 2 and the number of hidden units 8. They have significant influence on the weld quality.

  18. Microstructure and creep characteristics of dissimilar T91/TP316H martensitic/austenitic welded joint with Ni-based weld metal

    SciTech Connect

    Falat, Ladislav; Svoboda, Milan; Vyrostkova, Anna; Petryshynets, Ivan; Sopko, Martin

    2012-10-15

    This paper deals with characterization of microstructure and creep behavior of dissimilar weldment between the tempered martensitic steel T91 and the non-stabilized austenitic steel TP316H with Ni-based weld metal (Ni WM). Microstructure analyses were performed using light microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The martensitic part of the welded joint exhibited a wide heat-affected zone (HAZ) with typical microstructural gradient from its coarse-grained to the fine-grained/intercritical region. In contrast, the HAZ of austenitic steel was limited to only a narrow region with coarsened polygonal grains. The microstructure of Ni WM was found to be very heterogeneous with respect to the size, morphology and distribution of grain boundaries and MC-type precipitates as a result of strong weld metal dilution effects and fast non-equilibrium solidification. Cross-weld creep tests were carried out in a temperature range from 600 to 650 Degree-Sign C at applied stresses from 60 to 140 MPa. The obtained values of apparent stress exponents and creep activation energies indicate thermally activated dislocation glide to be the governing creep deformation mechanism within the range of used testing conditions. The creep samples ruptured in the T91 intercritical HAZ region by the 'type IV cracking' failure mode and the creep fracture mechanism was identified to be the intergranular dimple tearing by microvoid coalescence at grain boundaries. The TEM observations revealed pronounced microstructural differences between the critical HAZ region and the T91 base material before as well as after the creep exposure. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phase transformations affect the microstructures of T91 and TP316H HAZ regions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High weld metal dilution results in heterogeneous microstructure with MC carbides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Creep behavior of the studied weldment is controlled

  19. EB welding of launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, Attila

    While large structural components can be electron beam (EB) welded, equipment and operating costs increase with the requisite vacuum chamber's size. Attention is presently given to cost-effective ways of EB welding launch-vehicle assemblies without compromise of weld quality in such alloys as 2219, 2090, Weldalite, and HP9-4-30/20. Weld strengths at both room and cryogenic temperatures that were 50 percent higher than those obtainable for such materials with arc welding have been demonstrated. Fracture toughnesses were also 40-50 percent higher than arc-welded values. Attention is given to EB joint fit-up allowables for 2219-T87 Al alloy.

  20. Creep Deformation and Rupture Behavior of Single- and Dual-Pass 316LN Stainless-Steel-Activated TIG Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayanand, V. D.; Vasudevan, M.; Ganesan, V.; Parameswaran, P.; Laha, K.; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2016-03-01

    Creep deformation and rupture behavior of single-pass and dual-pass 316LN stainless steel (SS) weld joints fabricated by an autogenous activated tungsten inert gas welding process have been assessed by performing metallography, hardness, and conventional and impression creep tests. The fusion zone of the single-pass joint consisted of columnar zones adjacent to base metals with a central equiaxed zone, which have been modified extensively by the thermal cycle of the second pass in the dual-pass joint. The equiaxed zone in the single-pass joint, as well as in the second pass of the dual-pass joint, displayed the lowest hardness in the joints. In the dual-pass joint, the equiaxed zone of the first pass had hardness comparable to the columnar zone. The hardness variations in the joints influenced the creep deformation. The equiaxed and columnar zone in the first pass of the dual-pass joint was more creep resistant than that of the second pass. Both joints possessed lower creep rupture life than the base metal. However, the creep rupture life of the dual-pass joint was about twofolds more than that of the single-pass joint. Creep failure in the single-pass joint occurred in the central equiaxed fusion zone, whereas creep cavitation that originated in the second pass was blocked at the weld pass interface. The additional interface and strength variation between two passes in the dual-pass joint provides more restraint to creep deformation and crack propagation in the fusion zone, resulting in an increase in the creep rupture life of the dual-pass joint over the single-pass joint. Furthermore, the differences in content, morphology, and distribution of delta ferrite in the fusion zone of the joints favors more creep cavitation resistance in the dual-pass joint over the single-pass joint with the enhancement of creep rupture life.

  1. Creep Deformation and Rupture Behavior of Single- and Dual-Pass 316LN Stainless-Steel-Activated TIG Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayanand, V. D.; Vasudevan, M.; Ganesan, V.; Parameswaran, P.; Laha, K.; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2016-06-01

    Creep deformation and rupture behavior of single-pass and dual-pass 316LN stainless steel (SS) weld joints fabricated by an autogenous activated tungsten inert gas welding process have been assessed by performing metallography, hardness, and conventional and impression creep tests. The fusion zone of the single-pass joint consisted of columnar zones adjacent to base metals with a central equiaxed zone, which have been modified extensively by the thermal cycle of the second pass in the dual-pass joint. The equiaxed zone in the single-pass joint, as well as in the second pass of the dual-pass joint, displayed the lowest hardness in the joints. In the dual-pass joint, the equiaxed zone of the first pass had hardness comparable to the columnar zone. The hardness variations in the joints influenced the creep deformation. The equiaxed and columnar zone in the first pass of the dual-pass joint was more creep resistant than that of the second pass. Both joints possessed lower creep rupture life than the base metal. However, the creep rupture life of the dual-pass joint was about twofolds more than that of the single-pass joint. Creep failure in the single-pass joint occurred in the central equiaxed fusion zone, whereas creep cavitation that originated in the second pass was blocked at the weld pass interface. The additional interface and strength variation between two passes in the dual-pass joint provides more restraint to creep deformation and crack propagation in the fusion zone, resulting in an increase in the creep rupture life of the dual-pass joint over the single-pass joint. Furthermore, the differences in content, morphology, and distribution of delta ferrite in the fusion zone of the joints favors more creep cavitation resistance in the dual-pass joint over the single-pass joint with the enhancement of creep rupture life.

  2. Experimental and numerical studies on the issues in laser welding of light-weight alloys in a zero-gap lap joint configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harooni, Masoud

    It is advantageous for the transportation industry to use lightweight components in the structure in order to save mass and reduce CO2 emissions. One of the lightest structural metals, magnesium, fulfills the need for mass reduction within the automotive industry. Many of the body structure components in the automotive industry are assembled using joining processes such as fusion welding. Furthermore, laser welding offers a low heat impact, high process rate, joining method which is becoming increasingly popular as the cost for laser systems continues to decrease. However, there is a limited body of work investigating the laser welding of magnesium and therefore, in the current study, different techniques and methods for laser welding of magnesium alloys are numerically and experimentally studied in order to optimize process parameters to achieve high quality welds. A feasibility study was designed in order to study the effect of various laser welding process parameters (such as laser power levels and welding speeds) on weld quality. Three regression models were developed to find the best fit model that relates process parameters to the shear load of the weld. Furthermore, to understand the effect of laser welding parameters on temperature distribution in laser welding of AZ31B magnesium alloy, a numerical model was developed. A rotary Gaussian volumetric body heat source was applied in this study to obtain the temperature history during the laser welding process. Cross-sectional views of the weld beads, temperature history recorded by thermocouples, and temperature history recorded by infrared camera were used to validate the numerical model. In order to study the real-time dynamic behavior of the molten pool and the keyhole during the welding process, a high speed charge-coupled device (CCD) assisted with a green laser as an illumination source was used. In order to observe the presence of pores, prior studies destructively evaluated the weld bead however; in the

  3. Physical Nature of the Processes in Structure Forming, Phase and Chemical Composition of pipe Permanent Joints when MMA Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il’yaschenko, D. P.; Chinakhov, D. A.; Danilov, V. I.; Sadykov, I. D.

    2016-04-01

    The paper outlines peculiarities of structure formation, phase and chemical composition in regard to heat content in molten electrode metal beads when pipe steel (steel 09G2S) welding using power sources with various energy characteristics. Mathematical calculations indicate an inverter power source provides minor heat content into the bead of electrode metal when welding. Experimental research has pointed at 4-9 % increase in impact strength of joints produced using an inverter power source in comparison with samples produced applying a diode rectifier. The following factors can possibly give rise to the increasing impact strength: difference in microstructures of weld joints, up to 50% shortening ferritic plates in metal of weld joint, change in dimensions of ferritic grains in the heat-affected zone by as much as 17.5 %, and decrease in the extent of heat-affected zone by 50%.

  4. Improvement of ultrasonic characteristics in butt-welded joint of austenitic stainless steel using magnetic stirring method

    SciTech Connect

    Tanosaki, M.; Yoshikawa, K.; Arakawa, T.

    1995-08-01

    Magnetic Stirring Method of Tungsten Inert Gas(TIG) Welding are applied to butt-welded joint of austenitic stainless steel. The purpose of this method is to refine the welded structure and to improve the ultrasonic characteristics. In the conventional method of ultrasonic test in austenitic stainless steel weldments, dendritic solidification structure of weldment prevents smooth ultrasonic beam transmission. The tests are performed in three welding conditions; One is conventional TIG welding (without magnetic stirring), the other two are TIG welding using magnetic stirring method. Each test piece is evaluated by observing macro structure of cross section and by several ultrasonic tests examining pulse amplitudes, beam path length and proceeding beam direction. The detectability of artificial notches in weldment is also investigated and compared.

  5. Tensile properties of austenitic stainless steels and their weld joints after irradiation by the ORR-spectrally-tailoring experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jitsukawa, S.; Maziasz, P. J.; Ishiyama, T.; Gibson, L. T.; Hishinuma, A.

    1992-09-01

    Tensile specimens of the Japanese heat of PCA (JPCA) and type 316 stainless steels were irradiated in spectrally tailored capsules in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) to a peak dose of 7.4 dpa and a peak helium level of 105 appm in the temperature range between 328 and 673 K. Specimens of type 316 steel with weld joints produced by tungsten inert gas (TIG) and electron beam (EB) welding techniques were also included. Irradiation caused both increases in flow stress and decreases in elongation. Weld joint specimens exhibited both lower strength and elongation after irradiation. The reduction of area (RA) for the TIG weld joint specimens decreased by a factor of 5 compared to unirradiated base metal specimens, however, they still fractured in a ductile mode. The EB weld joints maintained RA levels similar to that of the unirradiated base metal specimens. Post-radiation ductilities of weld joints and base metal specimens of these steels should be adequate for their application to next generation fusion experimental devices, such as the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER).

  6. Mechanical and microstructural characterization of single and double pass Aluminum AA6061 friction stir weld joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, N. H.; Shah, L. H.; Ishak, M.

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on the effect of single pass (SP), double sided pass (DSP) and normal double pass (NDP) method on friction stir welding of aluminum AA6061. Two pieces of AA6061 alloy with thickness of 6 mm were friction stir welded by using conventional milling machine. The rotational speeds that were used in this study were 800 rpm, 1000 rpm and 1200 rpm, respectively. The welding speed is fixed to 100 mm/min. Microstructure observation of welded area was studied by using optical microscope. Tensile test and Vickers hardness test were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of this specimen. Mechanical property analysis results indicate that at low rotational speeds, defects such as surface lack of fill and tunneling in the welded area can be observed. Vickers hardness of specimens however did not vary much when rotational speed is varied. Welded specimens using single pass method shows higher tensile strength and hardness value compared to both double pass methods up to 180.61 MPa. Moreover, DSP showed better tensile test and hardness test compared to NDP method. The optimum parameters were found to be single pass method with 1200 rpm of rotational speed. Therefore economically sound to only perform SP method to obtain maximum tensile strength for AA6061 FSW with thickness of 6 mm.

  7. The susceptibility of low carbon steel welded joint to sulphide stress cracking (SSC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshwigi, Mohamed A. M.; Musa, Salem. M.; Basir, Ali

    2013-12-01

    The resistance of low carbon steel pipes API 5L GR.B as welded joints to sulphide stress cracking SSC was tested using NACE Standard test method TM 0177_Method (C). Two stress levels of the material's yield strength were applied, 75 % σy and 100 % σy in three different conditions; as received, as welded, and stress relieved samples. Total of seventeen samples were tested; two as received samples without any welding process, six samples as heat treated, and nine samples as welded. The effect of hardness level on material's susceptibility to sulphide stress cracking was examined. Raw Natural Gas was used as a source of Hydrogen Sulphide (H2S) in the test, which represents the real environment that the material was exposed to. Results show that samples with high hardness (higher than 22 HRC) were failed the test which was expected as in the NACE Standard MR175. Samples with low hardness (lower than 22 HRC) were passed the test which was expected as in the NACE Standard MR175. The received samples of low hardness failed the test which was not expected.

  8. The use of ion beam cleaning to obtain high quality cold welds with minimal deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sater, B. L.; Moore, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    A variation of cold welding is described which utilizes an ion beam to clean mating surfaces prior to joining in a vacuum environment. High quality solid state welds were produced with minimal deformation.

  9. Sensitization of 21% Cr Ferritic Stainless Steel Weld Joints Fabricated With/Without Austenitic Steel Foil as Interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wenyong; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi; Ma, Li; Han, Jian

    2015-04-01

    The effects of sensitization heat treatment on the microstructure and electrochemical behavior of 21% Cr ferritic stainless steel weld joints with or without 309L austenite stainless steel as an interlayer were investigated. The joints were processed by pulsed gas tungsten arc welding. With the interlayer, grains in weld bead were refined, and almost fully ferrite. When the joints with the interlayer were maintained at 500 °C for 1 and 4 h, no microstructure changes occurred, whereas Widmanstatten austenite and needle-like austenite formed in the weld bead after sensitization at 815 °C for 1 h. In general, sensitization treatment worsens the corrosion resistance of welds, but the resistance of samples with the 4-h treatment at 500 °C recovered in part compared to those subjected to sensitization at 500 °C for 1 h. This could be due to Cr diffusion from the ferrite that heals the chromium-depletion zone along the grain boundary. However, an increase in temperature does not have the same effect. The corrosion morphology of samples in the weld bead is different from those in base metal after heat treatment at 500 °C for 1 h; in base metal, pitting corrosion occurs, whereas grain boundary corrosion occurs in the weld bead. Corrosion morphology is closely associated with precipitation and segregation along the grain boundary.

  10. Impact of tool wear on joint strength in friction stir spot welding of DP 980 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Michael; Ridges, Chris; Hovanski, Yuri; Peterson, Jeremy; Santella, M. L.; Steel, Russel

    2011-09-14

    Friction stir spot welding has been shown to be a viable method of joining ultra high strength steel (UHSS), both in terms of joint strength and process cycle time. However, the cost of tooling must be reasonable in order for this method to be adopted as an industrial process. Recently a new tool alloy has been developed, using a blend of PCBN and tungsten rhenium (W-Re) in order to improve the toughness of the tool. Wear testing results are presented for two of these alloys: one with a composition of 60% PCBN and 40% W-Re, and one with 70% PCBN and 30% W-Re. The sheet material used for all wear testing was 1.4 mm DP 980. Lap shear testing was used to show the relationship between tool wear and joint strength. The Q70 tool provided the best combination of wear resistance and joint strength.