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Sample records for wenzhou medical college

  1. The Revelation of Entrepreneurial Spirits on the Cultivation of College Students' Enterprise Qualities: A Case Study in Wenzhou

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Delong

    2011-01-01

    In Socialist market economy, the characteristics of economic development tend to vary in different regions. Accordingly, enterprise education on college students has to be combined with regional economic features, particularly with a profound knowledge about the characteristics of local entrepreneurs. Insufficient resources and inconvenient…

  2. Tidal characteristics in the Wenzhou offshore waters and changes resulting from the Wenzhou Shoal Reclamation Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Min; Bao, Xianwen; Yu, Huaming; Ding, Yang

    2015-12-01

    The Wenzhou Shoal Reclamation Project is the core part of Wenzhou Peninsula Engineering which is a big comprehensive development project to expand the city space. The dynamics of the surrounding area was proved to suffer little effect in response to the Lingni north dyke since it was built approximately along the current direction. Therefore, this paper focuses firstly on the tidal characteristics in the Wenzhou and Yueqing bays with the Lingni north dyke being built and then on the changes resulting from the implementation of the on-going Wenzhou Shoal Reclamation Project (WSRP) which will reclaim land from the whole Wenzhou Shoal. To simulate the tidal dynamics, a high-resolution coastal ocean model with unstructured triangular grids was set up for the Wenzhou and Yueqing Bays. The model resolved the complicated tidal dynamics with the simulated tidal elevation and current in good agreement with observations. In the study area, M2 is the predominant tidal component, which means the tide is semidiurnal. The new reclamation project hardly affects the Yueqing Bay and the open ocean, but there are concentrated effects on the mouth of the southern branch of the Oujiang River and the southwest of Wenzhou Shoal. This study provides an indicative reference to the local government and helps to weigh the advantages and disadvantages of the project.

  3. Teaching medical ethics in a medical college in India.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, G D; Kalam, T; Lewin, S; Pais, P

    1997-01-01

    To the best of our knowledge, medical ethics is not taught as a separate subject in Indian medical colleges. St John's Medical College has a programme for teaching medical ethics to its undergraduate students. We describe here the structure of our programme, the syllabus and the teaching methodology. We feel that we have an effective way of teaching medical ethics at our medical college and would encourage other medical colleges to introduce the subject in their curriculum. PMID:9481103

  4. Risk factors of neonatal tetanus in Wenzhou, China: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Hong-Ying, Shi; Yi, Xu; Cai-Song, Hu; Xiao-Ming, Zhang; Li-Na, Zhao; Zuo-Kai, Xie

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Neonatal tetanus is a major cause of neonatal mortality in many developing countries and remains a major public health problem. This study aimed to determine risk factors associated with neonatal tetanus in Wenzhou, China. Methodology Medical records of neonatal tetanus cases from 17 hospitals over a 13-year period (2000–2012) were reviewed for potential risk factors. Controls were selected from neonates with diseases other than tetanus who were admitted to the same facility during the same period. The potential risk factors of the neonatal tetanus group were compared with the control group using univariate analysis and an unconditional logistic regression model. Results A total of 246 neonates with tetanus and 257 controls were included in this study. Univariate analysis showed that having untrained birth attendants, home delivery, an unsterile method of delivery and being a migrant to Wenzhou were significantly different between the two groups (P < 0.001). Logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds of having an untrained birth attendant, home delivery and an unsterile method of delivery were significantly higher in the tetanus group than the control group (odds ratio: 1371.0; 95% confidence interval: 206.0, 9123.5). Conclusion This study identified that the main risks of neonatal tetanus in cases from Wenzhou were having an untrained birth attendant, home delivery and an unsterile method of delivery. Preventive measures directed to these risk factors may reduce the occurrence of neonatal tetanus in the studied area. PMID:26668764

  5. Courses in Physics in Medical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physics Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Provides information concerning programs in medical physics, radiation biology, and radiation physics at eight British medical colleges. Each institution is separately listed, and the provided information typically includes program descriptions, graduate programs, and main branches of research. (MLH)

  6. Association of American Medical Colleges

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Applicants Financial Aid Information Residents ERASÂź for Fellowships Debt Management Develop a Strategic Plan for Diversity Goals ... Links Medical Education Patient Care Medical Research Diversity Government Affairs Newsroom Meetings Publications Academic MedicineÂź Resources For ...

  7. American College of Medical Informatics Fellows and International Associates, 2008

    PubMed Central

    Masys, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, 11 new fellows were elected to the American College of Medical Informatics, and were inducted into the College at a ceremony held in conjunction with the American Medical Informatics Association conference in Washington, DC on Nov 9, 2008. A brief synopsis of the background and accomplishments of each of the new fellows is provided here, in alphabetical order.

  8. On the history of New York Medical College.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, S J

    1986-01-01

    The history of New York Medical College reflects three distinct trends in the development of medical education: the rise and fall of homeopathy, the input of civic leaders (in this case, William Cullen Bryant) and the uneasy relationship between medical schools and hospitals caused by the dramatic increase in the complexity and cost of hospital care. PMID:11639283

  9. Dimensions of physical wellness among medical students of public and private medical colleges in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Rakhshaan; Rehman, Rehana; Baig, Mukhtiar; Hussain, Mehwish; Khan, Mariam; Syed, Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine adherence to dimensions of physical wellness among medical students of public and private medical colleges in Pakistan. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out from January to July 2011 among 820 students of private and public medical colleges in Karachi, Pakistan. Results: Overall, medical students scored low in dimensions of physical wellness. Private medical colleges students were fond of vigorous activities such as aerobics and swimming, whereas public medical colleges students were involved in moderate intensity activities such as walking and use of stairs (p<0.0001). Private students reported to consume more fast food (p=0.0001), had less sleep (p=0.0001), but attended regular annual medical checkups (p=0.009) as compared with their public institute counterparts. Safe practices such as avoidance of tobacco were almost the same. Conclusion: Comprehensive adherence to all dimensions of physical wellness was lacking among medical students. PMID:25987122

  10. Illicit Use of Prescribed Stimulant Medication among College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Kristina M.; Irwin, Melissa M.; Bowman, Krista A.; Frankenberger, William; Jewett, David C.

    2005-01-01

    The authors investigated illicit use of stimulant medications at a midwestern university. They used a questionnaire to (a) examine the extent to which university students illicitly used stimulant medications prescribed liar attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder; (b) determine why college students abused such drugs; and (c) identify the factors…

  11. Predictors of Nonmedical ADHD Medication Use by College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabiner, David L.; Anastopoulos, Arthur D.; Costello, E. Jane; Hoyle, Rick H.; Swartzwelder, H. Scott

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To identify the predictors of nonmedical ADHD medication use by college students. Participants: A total of 843 undergraduates attending one public or one private university in southeastern United States. Method: Students completed a Web-based survey inquiring about ADHD medication use during the first semester freshman of their year and


  12. Illicit Use of Prescribed Stimulant Medication among College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Kristina M.; Irwin, Melissa M.; Bowman, Krista A.; Frankenberger, William; Jewett, David C.

    2005-01-01

    The authors investigated illicit use of stimulant medications at a midwestern university. They used a questionnaire to (a) examine the extent to which university students illicitly used stimulant medications prescribed liar attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder; (b) determine why college students abused such drugs; and (c) identify the factors


  13. Physics and the revised Medical College Admission Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilborn, Robert C.

    2014-05-01

    Physics has played an important role in the preparation of future physicians and other health professionals for more than 100 years. Almost all pre-health students take a year of college-level physics as part of their preparation for medical, dental, and pharmacy school. In particular, the widely-used Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) contains a significant number of questions that require physics knowledge and skills. This paper describes the changes in the MCAT to be implemented in 2015, the role of physics in the revised MCAT, and implications for introductory physics courses for the life sciences.

  14. Modernizing and transforming medical education at the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College.

    PubMed

    Lisasi, Esther; Kulanga, Ahaz; Muiruri, Charles; Killewo, Lucy; Fadhili, Ndimangwa; Mimano, Lucy; Kapanda, Gibson; Tibyampansha, Dativa; Ibrahim, Glory; Nyindo, Mramba; Mteta, Kien; Kessi, Egbert; Ntabaye, Moshi; Bartlett, John

    2014-08-01

    The Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University (KCMU) College and the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) are addressing the crisis in Tanzanian health care manpower by modernizing the college's medical education with new tools and techniques. With a $10 million MEPI grant and the participation of its partner, Duke University, KCMU is harnessing the power of information technology (IT) to upgrade tools for students and faculty. Initiatives in eLearning have included bringing fiber-optic connectivity to the campus, offering campus-wide wireless access, opening student and faculty computer laboratories, and providing computer tablets to all incoming medical students. Beyond IT, the college is also offering wet laboratory instruction for hands-on diagnostic skills, team-based learning, and clinical skills workshops. In addition, modern teaching tools and techniques address the challenges posed by increasing numbers of students. To provide incentives for instructors, a performance-based compensation plan and teaching awards have been established. Also for faculty, IT tools and training have been made available, and a medical education course management system is now being widely employed. Student and faculty responses have been favorable, and the rapid uptake of these interventions by students, faculty, and the college's administration suggests that the KCMU College MEPI approach has addressed unmet needs. This enabling environment has transformed the culture of learning and teaching at KCMU College, where a path to sustainability is now being pursued. PMID:25072581

  15. Information Activities in Medical Library : Tokyo Women's Medical College Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishioka, Masayuki

    The library facilities, resource materials, training of librarians and so on are described at first. The library collection is that of middle sized medical library. However, since the facilities are not enough to handle it, it is necessary for the library to be supplemented by information services. Then primary information services such as reading of materials, interlibrary loan and journal acquisition system of the recent issues for each laboratory is outlined. Secondary information services centered around on-line information retrieval service, contents sheet service and preparation of index cards are also described. What a medical library should be is considered in terms of its relation to information services.

  16. Department of Paediatrics, Nalanda Medical College, Patna.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajniti; Kumar, Ranjeet; Jaiswal, B P; Singh, Utpal Kant

    2004-06-01

    Cysticercosis is the most common parasitic disease of the central nervous system. The disease has worlwide distribution. The cysticerci might lodge in the brain parenchyma, spinal cord, eyes, ventricular system, subarachnoid space and muscle. These are most often seen in basal meninges. The presence of human lymphocyte antigen-related antigens on the surface of cysticerci has a direct relationship with microscopic signs of damage to cysticerci. The clinical manifestations depend upon number and topography of lesions, the individual immune response to the parasite and the sequelae of previous infestations. The diagnostic criteria of neurocysticercosis can be based on absolute criteria, major criteria, minor criteria and epidemiological criteria. Computerised tomography (CT) head is still most useful diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of neurocysticercosis but magnetic resonance imaging has some advantages over computerised tomography. The mainstay of therapy lies on medical and surgical intervention. Medical therapy consists of cysticidal drugs. Surgical therapy is indicated in intraventricular and subarachnoid neurocysticercosis. Steriods are used for anti-oedema measures. Anti-epileptics can also be tried. The measures for prevention of cysticercosis are proper disposal of human waste, treatment of water contaminated with human faeces before its use in irrigation of vegetable cultivation, proper cooking of pork and repeated treatment in taenia carriers. PMID:15636041

  17. Participation in medical college activities: a case study of the Australasian experience.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Nicola; Leggat, Sandra; Bartram, Timothy

    2015-11-16

    Purpose - Medical Colleges rely on the volunteer labour of their Fellows to undertake their key functions. In the Australasian context, there is anecdotal evidence to suggest that Fellow participation is declining. The purpose of this paper is to examine the main factors that influence Fellows' participation in the activities of a Medical College. Design/methodology/approach - The authors conducted three focus groups with Fellows who exhibit varying levels of participation with the Medical College in 2012. Findings - The research identified individual and organisational factors which influence the propensity of Fellows to volunteer their time to the Medical College. At an individual level, Fellows cite a number of factors which motivate them to volunteer their time to the Medical College, including: altruistic reasons; giving back to the profession and community; and the benefits that Fellow's receive from their participation in College activities, including enhancing their status within the profession. However, Fellows also report issues of work-family integration, balancing Medical College and work-related responsibilities as factors precluding them from participating in Medical College activities. Fellows also noted several factors related to the operation of the Medical College which inhibited their participation in the Medical College, including the perceived exclusivity of the Medical College, a lack of service orientation towards Fellows, a lack of recognition of the work of Fellows and a perceived lack of advocacy on the part of the Medical College. Originality/value - This paper highlights that the participation of Fellows in their Medical Colleges is essential to maintaining quality standards and the effective operation of Australasian healthcare. These preliminary results indicate that there are several factors which discourage Fellow participation in Medical College activities, suggesting a need for Medical Colleges to develop strategies to address these issues. PMID:26556154

  18. Case study: library usage at an Indian medical college.

    PubMed

    Shah, Chinmay

    2011-03-01

    This issue's feature column reports on the findings of a small survey of library users carried out in an Indian medical college with a traditional curriculum. The study found that the main reason a student visited the library was to consult text books. Although the majority of students were satisfied with the library facilities, the study suggests that more needs to be done to promote self-directed learning. JM. PMID:21314897

  19. Modernizing and Transforming Medical Education at the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College

    PubMed Central

    Lisasi, Esther; Kulanga, Ahaz; Muiruri, Charles; Killewo, Lucy; Fadhili, Ndimangwa; Mimano, Lucy; Kapanda, Gibson; Tibyampansha, Dativa; Ibrahim, Glory; Nyindo, Mramba; Mteta, Kien; Kessi, Egbert; Ntabaye, Moshi; Bartlett, John

    2014-01-01

    The Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University (KCMU) College and the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) are addressing the crisis in Tanzanian health care manpower by modernizing the college’s medical education with new tools and techniques. With a $10 million MEPI grant and the participation of its partner, Duke University, KCMU is harnessing the power of information technology (IT) to upgrade tools for students and faculty. Initiatives in eLearning have included bringing fiber-optic connectivity to the campus, offering campus-wide wireless access, opening student and faculty computer laboratories, and providing computer tablets to all incoming medical students. Beyond IT, the college is also offering wet laboratory instruction for hands-on diagnostic skills, team-based learning, and clinical skills workshops. In addition, modern teaching tools and techniques address the challenges posed by increasing numbers of students. To provide incentives for instructors, a performance-based compensation plan and teaching awards have been established. Also for faculty, IT tools and training have been made available, and a medical education course management system is now being widely employed. Student and faculty responses have been favorable, and the rapid uptake of these interventions by students, faculty, and the college’s administration suggests that the KCMU College MEPI approach has addressed unmet needs. This enabling environment has transformed the culture of learning and teaching at KCMU College, where a path to sustainability is now being pursued. PMID:25072581

  20. The American College of Medical Practice Executives' competency study.

    PubMed

    Rossiter, A M; Greene, B R; Kralewski, J E

    2000-10-01

    This article is the first of two studies conducted by the American College of Medical Practice Executives (ACMPE) that examines the perceived roles of medical practice executives. (Founded in 1956, the American College of Medical Practice Executives is the professional development and credentialing arm of the Medical Group Management Association (MGMA)). This study asked groups of physicians and nonphysician administrators to identify the competencies and associated skills and knowledge for administering group practices in today's changing environment. Those surveyed included administrators who are Fellows in ACMPE and 795 physicians who comprise the Society of Physician Administrators of the Medical Group Management Association. The responses were examined through a framework provided by the Managed Care Process Model. In this model, the focus is on the administrative and clinical processes required by different levels of managed care market penetration. The model progresses from a focus on relatively traditional practice management functions to those activities that are more complex with a greater focus on the integration of both clinical and business processes aimed at the health of populations. The analysis of the perceived competencies indicated that while both executive types perceived the importance of managing the health of populations, that task is not yet being incorporated into their professional roles. PMID:11067089

  1. The Ambulatory Experience for Junior Medical Students at the Medical College of Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fincher, Ruth-Marie E.; Albritton, T. Andrew

    1993-01-01

    The Medical College of Georgia's third-year medicine clerkship includes a one-month ambulatory care block rotation in internal medicine, medicine, and dermatology. Students present topics and participate in case discussions in daily and weekly conferences. Program success is resulting in expansion. (MSE)

  2. Money versus mission at an African-American medical school: Knoxville College Medical Department, 1895-1900.

    PubMed

    Savitt, T L

    2001-01-01

    Knoxville College Medical Department (KCMD) was, to all appearances, a missionary medical school established in 1895 by a small black Presbyterian college in the Tennessee mountains to train African-American physicians. In reality, it functioned as a proprietary medical school organized and operated by a group of local white physicians who were more interested in making money than in furthering the school's mission of educating black Christian physicians. KCMD limped along until 1900 when the college's new president reported to the trustees about the white faculty's greed, irreligious behavior, poor teaching, and bad medical reputation, and about how the presence of the medical school on campus undermined the college's overall mission. KCMD graduated two students before closing its doors in 1900. A group of faculty then reopened the school off-campus as the Knoxville Medical College. That school closed in 1910. PMID:11740123

  3. Library collaboration with medical humanities in an american medical college in qatar.

    PubMed

    Birch, Sally; Magid, Amani; Weber, Alan

    2013-11-01

    The medical humanities, a cross-disciplinary field of practice and research that includes medicine, literature, art, history, philosophy, and sociology, is being increasingly incorporated into medical school curricula internationally. Medical humanities courses in Writing, Literature, Medical Ethics and History can teach physicians-in-training communication skills, doctor-patient relations, and medical ethics, as well as empathy and cross-cultural understanding. In addition to providing educational breadth and variety, the medical humanities can also play a practical role in teaching critical/analytical skills. These skills are utilized in differential diagnosis and problem-based learning, as well as in developing written and oral communications. Communication skills are a required medical competency for passing medical board exams in the U.S., Canada, the UK and elsewhere. The medical library is an integral part of medical humanities training efforts. This contribution provides a case study of the Distributed eLibrary at the Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar in Doha, and its collaboration with the Writing Program in the Premedical Program to teach and develop the medical humanities. Programs and initiatives of the DeLib library include: developing an information literacy course, course guides for specific courses, the 100 Classic Books Project, collection development of 'doctors' stories' related to the practice of medicine (including medically-oriented movies and TV programs), and workshops to teach the analytical and critical thinking skills that form the basis of humanistic approaches to knowledge. This paper outlines a 'best practices' approach to developing the medical humanities in collaboration among the medical library, faculty and administrative stakeholders. PMID:24223240

  4. Library Collaboration with Medical Humanities in an American Medical College in Qatar

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Sally; Magid, Amani; Weber, Alan

    2013-01-01

    The medical humanities, a cross-disciplinary field of practice and research that includes medicine, literature, art, history, philosophy, and sociology, is being increasingly incorporated into medical school curricula internationally. Medical humanities courses in Writing, Literature, Medical Ethics and History can teach physicians-in-training communication skills, doctor-patient relations, and medical ethics, as well as empathy and cross-cultural understanding. In addition to providing educational breadth and variety, the medical humanities can also play a practical role in teaching critical/analytical skills. These skills are utilized in differential diagnosis and problem-based learning, as well as in developing written and oral communications. Communication skills are a required medical competency for passing medical board exams in the U.S., Canada, the UK and elsewhere. The medical library is an integral part of medical humanities training efforts. This contribution provides a case study of the Distributed eLibrary at the Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar in Doha, and its collaboration with the Writing Program in the Premedical Program to teach and develop the medical humanities. Programs and initiatives of the DeLib library include: developing an information literacy course, course guides for specific courses, the 100 Classic Books Project, collection development of ‘doctors’ stories’ related to the practice of medicine (including medically-oriented movies and TV programs), and workshops to teach the analytical and critical thinking skills that form the basis of humanistic approaches to knowledge. This paper outlines a ‘best practices’ approach to developing the medical humanities in collaboration among the medical library, faculty and administrative stakeholders. PMID:24223240

  5. Predictors of Nonmedical ADHD Medication Use by College Students

    PubMed Central

    Rabiner, David; Anastopoulos, Arthur; Costello, E. Jane; Hoyle, Rick H.; Scott Swartzwelder, H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify the predictors of nonmedical ADHD medication use by college students. Participants Eight hundred forty-three undergraduates attending one public or one private university in the southeastern US. Methods Students completed a web-based survey inquiring about ADHD medication use during the first semester freshman of their year and a second time during the second semester of their sophomore year. Results Forty-five (5.3%) reported the onset of nonmedical ADHD use between the two survey administrations. The majority of these students were high substance users as freshman. Attention difficulties also predicted the onset of nonmedical use, especially in the absence of excessive substance use. Compared to other nonmedical users of ADHD medication, those reporting attention difficulties had lower GPAs, greater academic concerns, and higher levels of depressive symptoms. Conclusion Attention difficulties contribute to the onset of nonmedical ADHD medication use in a significant minority of nonmedical users. These students may begin using ADHD medication to address attention problems they experience as undermining their academic success. PMID:19465730

  6. Predicting international medical graduate success on college certification examinations

    PubMed Central

    Schabort, Inge; Mercuri, Mathew; Grierson, Lawrence E.M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine predictors of international medical graduate (IMG) success in accordance with the priorities highlighted by the Thomson and Cohl judicial report on IMG selection. Design Retrospective assessment using regression analyses to compare the information available at the time of resident selection with those trainees’ national certification examination outcomes. Setting McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont. Participants McMaster University IMG residents who completed the program between 2005 and 2011. Main outcome measures Associations between IMG professional experience or demographic characteristics and examination outcomes. Results The analyses revealed that country of study and performance on the Medical Council of Canada Evaluating Examination are among the predictors of performance on the College of Family Physicians of Canada and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada certification examinations. Of interest, the analyses also suggest discipline-specific relationships between previous professional experience and examination success. Conclusion This work presents a useful technique for further improving our understanding of the performance of IMGs on certification examinations in North America, encourages similar interinstitutional analyses, and provides a foundation for the development of tools to assist with IMG education. PMID:25316762

  7. The new Medical College Admission Test: Implications for teaching psychology.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Karen; Lewis, Richard S; Satterfield, Jason; Hong, Barry A

    2016-01-01

    This year's applicants to medical school took a newly revised version of the Medical College Admission Test. Unlike applicants in the past, they were asked to demonstrate their knowledge and use of concepts commonly taught in introductory psychology courses. The new Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior Test asked applicants to demonstrate the ways in which psychological, social, and biological factors influence perceptions and reactions to the world; behavior and behavior change; what people think about themselves and others; the cultural and social differences that influence well-being; and the relationships among social stratification, access to resources, and well-being. Building from the classic biopsychosocial model, this article provides the rationale for testing psychology concepts in application to medical school. It describes the concepts and skills that the new exam tests and shows how they lay the foundation for learning in medical school about the behavioral and sociocultural determinants of health. This article discusses the implications of these changes for undergraduate psychology faculty and psychology curricula as well as their importance to the profession of psychology at large. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26866988

  8. Why support a women's medical college? Philadelphia's early male medical pro-feminists.

    PubMed

    Peitzman, Steven J

    2003-01-01

    The male founders and early faculty of Philadelphia's Woman's Medical College were mostly abolitionist physicians, zealous moralists for whom medical feminism formed only one of the cherished causes they could "manfully" and righteously defend. Male faculty of the late nineteenth century comprised "self-made" men, mostly new specialists, for whom strict sexism probably seemed inconsistent with progressive medicine. For some of these physicians-obviously a small minority-defending medical women and breaking the barriers of fraternity could be consistent with "manly" responsibility. The outcome of the collaboration of women and the dissident men physicians in nineteenth-century Philadelphia amounted to another seeming paradox: the majority of the male medical profession, both locally and nationally, tyrannically hindered women's entry into the profession, yet medicine opened its doors in advance of law and the clergy; and where this first occurred, such as in the community centered on Woman's Medical College, a novel gender rearrangement arose based on collaboration and friendship. PMID:14523261

  9. Psychotropic Drug Use among College Students: Patterns of Use, Misuse, and Medical Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberleitner, Lindsay M. S.; Tzilos, Golfo K.; Zumberg, Kathryn M.; Grekin, Emily R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether college students who use psychotropic drugs are (1) aware of potential side effects, (2) appropriately monitored by prescribing physicians, and (3) taking medications as prescribed. Participants: Fifty-five college students, currently taking psychotropic medications, were recruited between Summer 2008 and Fall 2009.…

  10. Psychotropic Drug Use among College Students: Patterns of Use, Misuse, and Medical Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oberleitner, Lindsay M. S.; Tzilos, Golfo K.; Zumberg, Kathryn M.; Grekin, Emily R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether college students who use psychotropic drugs are (1) aware of potential side effects, (2) appropriately monitored by prescribing physicians, and (3) taking medications as prescribed. Participants: Fifty-five college students, currently taking psychotropic medications, were recruited between Summer 2008 and Fall 2009.


  11. The community college pathway to medical school: a road less traveled.

    PubMed

    Saguil, Aaron; Kellermann, Arthur L

    2014-12-01

    Underrepresented minority and first-generation college students are more likely than white students to attend a community college before transferring to a four-year school. Talamantes and colleagues report in this issue that, according to their study of 2012 medical school applicants and matriculants, community-college-first applicants were significantly less likely to be admitted to medical school even after other important predictors, including grade point average and Medical College Admission Test scores, were taken into consideration. These findings suggest that rather than appreciating the "distance traveled" and obstacles overcome by applicants who got their start at a community college, medical school admissions committees may be consciously or subconsciously discounting their achievements. The authors of this Commentary consider the study by Talamantes and colleagues as well as other recent data related to community college graduates and emphasize that community colleges attract many high-achieving applicants who for any of several reasons-limited finances, inadequate advising, insufficient financial aid, or a need to stay close to home-choose not to enroll in a four-year college right away. They argue that if medical school leaders are serious about lowering the social, racial, and economic barriers to medical school, they must start viewing two years of premedical education at a community college as an asset rather than a liability. PMID:25076201

  12. [Pollution load and the first flush effect of phosphorus in urban runoff of Wenzhou City].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dong; Chen, Zhen-lou; Bi, Chun-juan

    2012-08-01

    Five typical rainfalls were monitored in two different research areas of Wenzhou municipality. The pH and concentrations of total phosphorus (TP), dissolved phosphorus (DP), particulate phosphorus (PP), total inorganic carbon (TIC), total organic carbon (TOC), total suspended substances (TSS), BOD5 and COD in six different kinds of urban runoff were measured. The results showed that, the concentrations of TP, DP and PP in different kinds of urban runoff of Wenzhou ranged from 0.01 to 4.32 mg x L(-1), ND to 0.88 mg x L(-1) and ND to 4.31 mg x L(-1), respectively. In the early stages of runoff process PP was dominated, while in the later, the proportion of DP in most of the runoff samples would show a rising trend, especially in roof and outlet runoff. Judged by the event mean concentration (EMC) of TP and DP in these five rainfalls, some kinds of urban runoff could cause environmental pressure to the next level receiving water bodies. Meanwhile, the differences among the TP and DP content (maximum, minimum and mean content) in various urban runoffs were significant, and so were the differences among various rainfall events. According to the M (V) curve, the first flush effect of TP in most kinds of urban runoff was common; while the first flush effect of DP was more difficult to occur comparing with TP. Not only the underlying surface types but also many physico-chemical properties of runoff could affect the concentration of TP in urban runoff. All the results also suggested that different best management plans (BMPs) should be selected for various urban runoff types for the treatment of phosphorus pollution, and reducing the concentration of TSS is considered as one of the effective ways to decrease the pollution load of phosphorus in urban runoff. PMID:23213884

  13. Predicting the Admission into Medical School of African American College Students Who Have Participated in Summer Academic Enrichment Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesser, Al; Cregler, Louis L.; Lewis, Lloyd

    1998-01-01

    A study of 309 African American college students in summer academic enrichment programs at the Medical College of Georgia from 1980-89 found the most significant predictors of medical school admission were the Scholastic Assessment Test math score, summer program grade point average, college grade point average, career aspirations, college type,…

  14. The Marei Ika Daigaku (Syonan Medical College) during the Japanese occupation of Singapore (1942-1945).

    PubMed

    Cheah, J S; Tay, G

    1997-12-01

    During the Japanese Occupation of Singapore (1942-1945), Singapore was renamed Syonan (or Syonanto). The Japanese Military Administration established The Medical College on 27 April 2603 (1943) and it was known as The Marei Ika Daigaku or Syonan Medical College. It was sited at the Tan Tock Seng Hospital (Hakua Byoin). The Ika Daigaku relocated to the General Hospital, Malacca in February 2604 (1944) where it functioned till the end of the Japanese Occupation in September 1945. About 200 students from Singapore, Malaya, Sumatra and Java attended the Syonan Medical College; the students were taught mainly Japanese language and culture. PMID:9550922

  15. Analysis of the Status Quo of Humanistic Quality-Oriented Education in Medical Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Shulei; Li, Yamin

    2012-01-01

    With transformation of contemporary modern medical educational modes and improvement of requirement upon doctors' humanistic quality, it seems quite important to strengthen humanistic quality-oriented education in medical colleges and universities. Medical humanistic quality-oriented education in China started late, which determines that there are


  16. An Investigation of Gender-Related Test Bias for the Medical College Admission Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Robert F.; Vanyur, Suzanne

    The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) was examined for sex bias. Data for student samples from two midwestern state-supported medical schools were analyzed. The criteria included average course grades in each of the first two years of medical school. Tests comparing various regression models based on male and female subgroups generally failed…

  17. Myopia and Digit Ratio in Medical College Students

    PubMed Central

    Krishnakumar, Mathangi; Atheeshwar, Shweta; Chandrasekar, Mathangi D.

    2014-01-01

    Myopia is amongst the most common refractive errors in the world. Both environmental and genetic factors are attributed to its causation, however all factors contributing to the development of myopia is yet to be found. Recent studies show presence of sex hormone receptor in the eyes. This has been shown to have a role in the development of various ocular pathologies. The second to fourth finger length ratio (2D:4D) has been hypothesised to be determined by exposure to sex steroids prenatally and thus considered a crude measure for prenatal androgen exposure. Hence this study was initiated to assess the association between myopia and 2D:4D ratio (a proxy marker to prenatal sex steroid exposure) among 100 medical college students of either sex and explore the possibility of role of prenatal sex steroids in causation of myopia. This study showed significant negative associations between myopia and digit ratio favouring a probable causal role of sex steroids on eye growth and development of myopia. PMID:24587043

  18. Culture of pathogenic campylobacter species at Mymensingh Medical College.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, S R; Hossain, M A; Paul, S K; Mahmud, M C; Ahmed, S; Ray, N C; Hoque, S M; Haq, J A; Yasmin, T

    2014-04-01

    Childhood diarrhea represents a major public health problem in developing countries, where campylobacteriosis is widespread and causes significant morbidity and mortality in infants and children. Despite the increasing importance of campylobacteriosis, most developing countries and even many developed countries do not have surveillance systems to measure the health and economic burden of human campylobacteriosis, nor detect trends in outbreaks. The present study was carried out to diagnose etiology of diarrhea caused by Campylobacter species. A total of 150 clinically diagnosed diarrheal pediatric patients were included in this study, of which 98(65.3%) were male and 52(34.6%) female from the Department of Pediatrics, Mymensingh Medical College Hospital, Mymensingh, Bangladesh from July 2011 to April 2012. Stool specimens were collected from each of the cases. The specimens were cultured in appropriate media and Campylobacters were isolated and identified by recommended tests. Among 150 cases, 17(11.3%) were culture positive for Campylobacter species, of which 15(88.2%) were C. jejuni and 02(11.7%) were C. coli. Of the cases, below 1 year of age group were 106(70.6%) cases showing 12(70.5%) positive for Campylobacters and 44(29.33%) cases were above 1 year of age group showing 05(29.41%) positive. The prevalence of Campylobacter infection found in the present study was higher below 1 year age group and was very much close to other countries of this subcontinent. PMID:24858144

  19. Discussion on evaluating the vulnerability of storm surge hazard bearing bodies in the coastal areas of Wenzhou

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuexia; Guo, Jing; Che, Zhumei

    2015-06-01

    Wenzhou is a region on the coast of China where storm surges are frequent and serious. Starting with society, economy, land utilization, and anti-disaster capability, the vulnerability of each county in the coastal region of Wenzhou was evaluated. The counties were then divided into mild, moderate, heavy, and extremely heavy fragile areas by choosing 15 factors to establish an evaluation index system, using principal component analysis to set the weight of each factor. The results show that all of the counties fit into the categories of heavy and extremely heavy fragile areas except for Pingyang county, which is mild. There is no significant difference in storm surge vulnerability among all counties in the Wenzhou coastal region, which is highly associated with the general balance of socioeconomic development in the Zhejiang coastal region and the orientation of government policies. This research provides a method for evaluating vulnerability to storm surge. Evaluation results can provide the basis for responses to storm surge, contributing to disaster prevention and mitigation planning, and regional sustainable development planning.

  20. The Impact of the College Environment on Black Students' Access to a Medical School Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Barbara Marie

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this study was to explore factors influencing the disparity in the acceptance rate for African American students into medical school as compared to their white counterparts. This study compared the college environment of Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Principally White Institutions, with respect to African American…

  1. Combining Psychotherapy and Medication for College Students with Severe Psychopathology: A Descriptive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Stewart E.; Nasr, Suhayl J.

    2006-01-01

    Given the extensive and increasing use of medications to augment psychotherapy in intervening with college students with more severe psychopathology, the absence of scholarship on this topic is surprising. This article briefly summarizes earlier published pieces on combining counseling with psychotropic treatment in college counseling center


  2. The Impact of the College Environment on Black Students' Access to a Medical School Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Barbara Marie

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this study was to explore factors influencing the disparity in the acceptance rate for African American students into medical school as compared to their white counterparts. This study compared the college environment of Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Principally White Institutions, with respect to African American


  3. Exploring the Acceptability of Online Learning for Continuous Professional Development at Kenya Medical Training Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyalo, Isaac William; Hopkins, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the acceptance of online learning (OL) for continuous professional development among lecturers at Kenya Medical Training College in 2009. The large and multi-campus College faces logistical and cost challenges in ensuring that its 700 lecturing staff have access to continuous professional development. Online learning


  4. The Medical College of Wisconsin Senior Mentor Program: Experience of a Lifetime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Tovah; Cohan, Mary; Bragg, Dawn S.; Bedinghaus, Joan

    2006-01-01

    The Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) Senior Mentor Program (SMP) has been offered to a small group of first and second year medical students as a course alternative to the traditional physician mentor program. The program links students with healthy older adult mentors and includes mentor/student visits, didactic sessions, written assignments,…

  5. Launching of an American Medical College in the Middle East: "Educational Challenges in a Multicultural Environment"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hajjar, David P.; Gotto, Antonio M., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The graduation of the first class of medical students in May 2008 from the Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar (WCMC-Q), Cornell University's branch campus in the Middle East, was the first time that an M.D. degree from an American university was awarded abroad. It marked a milestone in American higher education. The establishment of WCMC-Q is


  6. Indo-Chinese Refugee Physician ECFMG Review Course. Hahnemann Medical College & Hospital. Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahnemann Medical Coll. and Hospital, Philadelphia, PA.

    A report is presented on a special review seminar for Vietnamese physicians preparing for the July 1976 Educational Council for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) examination. The 4-month review course was offered to 73 physicians at Hahnemann Medical College & Hospital. Participants were assigned to 10 small sections for English classes, and


  7. Indo-Chinese Refugee Physician ECFMG Review Course. Hahnemann Medical College & Hospital. Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahnemann Medical Coll. and Hospital, Philadelphia, PA.

    A report is presented on a special review seminar for Vietnamese physicians preparing for the July 1976 Educational Council for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) examination. The 4-month review course was offered to 73 physicians at Hahnemann Medical College & Hospital. Participants were assigned to 10 small sections for English classes, and…

  8. Predicting Performance during Clinical Years from the New Medical College Admission Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caroline, Jan D.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The results of a predictive validity study of the new Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) using criteria from the clinical years of undergraduate medical education are discussed. The criteria included course grades and faculty ratings of clerks in internal medicine, surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, and psychiatry. (Author/MLW)

  9. The Medical College of Wisconsin Senior Mentor Program: Experience of a Lifetime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Tovah; Cohan, Mary; Bragg, Dawn S.; Bedinghaus, Joan

    2006-01-01

    The Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) Senior Mentor Program (SMP) has been offered to a small group of first and second year medical students as a course alternative to the traditional physician mentor program. The program links students with healthy older adult mentors and includes mentor/student visits, didactic sessions, written assignments,


  10. The Allied Medical Development Project, Forest Park Community College. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Louis Community Coll., MO.

    The Allied Medical Development Project was conceived to determine the role of the St. Louis-St. Louis County Junior College District in the education of personnel for allied medical careers in the St. Louis area. The underlying assumption was that the development of needed programs on a sound basis in the St. Louis area would result in general


  11. College Health Service Capacity to Support Youth With Chronic Medical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Katherine; Scherer, Emily A.; Kelemen, Skyler; Weitzman, Elissa R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Twenty percent of US youth have a chronic medical condition and many attend college. Guidelines for transition from pediatric to adult care do not address college health services, and little is known about their capacity to identify, support, and provide care for these youth. The objective of this study was to describe college health center policies, practices, and resources for youth with chronic medical conditions (YCMC). METHODS: Survey of medical directors from health centers of a representative sample of 200 4-year US colleges with ?400 enrolled undergraduate students. Patterns of identification, management, and support for youth with a general chronic medical condition and with asthma, diabetes, and depression, were investigated; ?2 and Fisher exact tests were used to ascertain differences by institutional demographics. RESULTS: Directors at 153 institutions completed the survey (76.5% response rate). Overall, 42% of schools had no system to identify YCMC. However, almost a third (31%) did identify and add to a registry of incoming YCMC on review of medical history, more likely in private (P < .001) and small (<5000 students, P = .002) colleges; 24% of health centers contacted YCMC to check-in/make initial appointments. Most institutions could manage asthma and depression (83% and 69%, respectively); 51% could manage diabetes on campus. CONCLUSIONS: Relatively few US colleges have health systems to identify and contact YCMC, although many centers have capacity to provide primary care and management of some conditions. Guidelines for transition should address policy and practices for pediatricians and colleges to enhance comanagement of affected youth. PMID:25349315

  12. Effects of Information on College Students' Perceptions of Antidepressant Medication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankenberger, Kristi A.; Frankenberger, William R.; Peden, Blaine F.; Hunt, Heather L.; Raschick, Christopher M.; Steller, Emily G.; Peterson, Jaclyn A.

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined the impact of pharmaceutical companies' advertisements on college students' perceptions of depression and concomitant treatment with antidepressants among 13 male and 31 female undergraduates from a midwestern university. The students were randomly assigned to groups that read either pharmaceutical company advertisements or


  13. Effects of Information on College Students' Perceptions of Antidepressant Medication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frankenberger, Kristi A.; Frankenberger, William R.; Peden, Blaine F.; Hunt, Heather L.; Raschick, Christopher M.; Steller, Emily G.; Peterson, Jaclyn A.

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined the impact of pharmaceutical companies' advertisements on college students' perceptions of depression and concomitant treatment with antidepressants among 13 male and 31 female undergraduates from a midwestern university. The students were randomly assigned to groups that read either pharmaceutical company advertisements or…

  14. Misuse of stimulant medication among college students: a comprehensive review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Benson, Kari; Flory, Kate; Humphreys, Kathryn L; Lee, Steve S

    2015-03-01

    The misuse of stimulant medication among college students is a prevalent and growing problem. The purpose of this review and meta-analysis is to summarize the current research on rates and demographic and psychosocial correlates of stimulant medication misuse among college students, to provide methodological guidance and other ideas for future research, and to provide some preliminary suggestions for preventing and reducing misuse on college campuses. Random-effects meta-analysis found that the rate of stimulant medication misuse among college students was estimated at 17 % (95 % CI [0.13, 0.23], p < .001) and identified several psychological variables that differentiated misusers and nonusers, including symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, problems associated with alcohol use, and marijuana use. A qualitative review of the literature also revealed that Greek organization membership, academic performance, and other substance use were associated with misuse. Students are misusing primarily for academic reasons, and the most common source for obtaining stimulant medication is peers with prescriptions. Interpretation of findings is complicated by the lack of a standard misuse definition as well as validated tools for measuring stimulant misuse. The relation between stimulant medication misuse and extra curricular participation, academic outcomes, depression, and eating disorders requires further investigation, as do the reasons why students divert or misuse and whether policies on college campuses contribute to the high rates of misuse among students. Future research should also work to develop and implement effective prevention strategies for reducing the diversion and misuse of stimulant medication on college campuses. PMID:25575768

  15. Are all patients diagnosed with tuberculosis in Indian medical colleges referred to the RNTCP?

    PubMed

    Quazi, T A; Sarkar, S; Borgohain, G; Sreenivas, A; Harries, A D; Srinath, S; Khan, K; Bishnu, B; Tapadar, S; Phukan, A C; Kabir, A; Chaddha, V; Paul, D; Dewan, P

    2012-08-01

    To assess the proportion of tuberculosis (TB) patients diagnosed in three medical colleges in the states of West Bengal and Meghalaya who benefited from the services provided under the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP), a line list of patients with reports of investigations suggesting probable or confirmed TB was prepared from the records of the pathology, radiology and microbiology departments. This was compared with another line list prepared using RNTCP records. Only 150 (36%) of 420 probable or confirmed TB patients were referred to the RNTCP services. This suggests a need for more intensive supervision and training of medical college faculty. PMID:22668522

  16. Investigating Perceived vs. Medical Weight Status Classification among College Students: Room for Improvement Exists among the Overweight and Obese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffrin, Christopher; Eakin, Angela; Bertrand, Brenda; Barber-Heidel, Kimberly; Carraway-Stage, Virginia

    2011-01-01

    The American College Health Association estimated that 31% of college students are overweight or obese. It is important that students have a correct perception of body weight status as extra weight has potential adverse health effects. This study assessed accuracy of perceived weight status versus medical classification among 102 college students.…

  17. MSU Medical Colleges Blended Learning for First Year Science Courses: Uniting Pedagogy to Maximize Experience and Real World Limitations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovell, Kathryn; Vignare, Karen

    2009-01-01

    At Michigan State University the two medical schools, College of Human Medicine (CHM; M.D. degree) and College of Osteopathic Medicine (COM; D.O. degree), have offered the same science courses to first year students for many years. Science departments report to both colleges, and the same faculty can effectively teach the content required in the


  18. Toxicity bioassays for water from black-odor rivers in Wenzhou, China.

    PubMed

    DeFu, He; RuiRui, Chen; EnHui, Zhu; Na, Chen; Bo, Yang; HuaHong, Shi; MinSheng, Huang

    2015-02-01

    Following urbanization, a large number of urban rivers were contaminated and turned to black-odor rivers. The traditional approach for detecting water quality is based on chemical or physical analysis. However, biological toxicity of black-odor water has been less addressed. As two typical black-odor rivers, Jiushanwai River (JS) and Shanxia River (SX) are tributaries of Wen-Rui Tang River in Wenzhou (south of China). The eco-safety of the urban rivers was evaluated by bioassay for water toxicity in this study. Ten and 5 sampling sites were respectively set along JS and SX. Water samples were collected monthly from October 2010 to October 2011. The general physical and chemical parameters of river water were monitored. In order to investigate the ecotoxicological effects of black-odor water, the following bioassays were used: (1) Fish acute toxicity test (Danio rerio, comprehensive toxicity), (2) luminescent bacteria bioassay (Qinghaiensis vibrio, toxicity to bacteria), and (3) tropical claw embryo assay (Xenopus tropicalis, embryo toxicity). Biotoxicity of black-odor rivers water was demonstrated by D. rerio, Q. vibrio, and X. tropicalis embryos. Toxicological effects of black-odor water were respectively shown by mortality of zebrafish, and by the relative inhibitory light rate of luminescent bacteria. However, luminescent bacteria were more sensitive to inspect biotoxicity than zebrafish. In X. tropicalis embryos test, toxicological effects of black-odor water were mostly shown by embryos' survival rate and teratogenic rate. Bioassay results showed that toxicity of SX water was higher than that of JS water, especially in summer. Statistical analysis of luminescent bacteria toxicity test showed that biotoxicity of SX and JS was high in summer, but low in winter and spring. The seasonal changes of water toxicity of the black-odor river were positively correlative with changes of water temperature (p?

  19. The impact of the college environment on Black students' access to a medical school education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Barbara Marie

    2009-12-01

    The focus of this study was to explore factors influencing the disparity in the acceptance rate for African American students into medical school as compared to their white counterparts. This study compared the college environment of Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Principally White Institutions, with respect to African American students' perceptions regarding their college experiences and the extent to which they perceived that their experiences enhanced or diminished their success in gaining access to medical school. The community cultural wealth framework was used to explore whether the HBCU or the PWI is the better environment for undergraduate science majors. By use of the CCW framework the study explored which college environment nurtured students to be successful as a biology major, obtain a competitive MCAT score and ultimately secure acceptance into medical school. A qualitative research design served as the best approach to explore the object of inquiry in this study: the students' perception of their college environment, and their perceptions of their college experiences. The findings suggest that both the HBCU and the PWI reveal characteristics that enhanced and diminished the potential for success in the biology pre-med program. The results of this study specifically addressed barriers to access as factors which may be contributing to the disparities in the number of African American students admitted to medical school. These barriers are related to differences in the social dynamics of the university. In this study both groups of students perceived that there were the negative faculty attitudes, but these seemed to have little impact on access to medical school. Student motivation and identification with a supportive community seemed to have more impact on the potential for career success.

  20. Predicting First-Quarter Test Scores from the New Medical College Admission Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Thomas J.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The predictive validity of the new Medical College Admission Test as it relates to end-of-quarter examinations in anatomy, histology, physiology, biochemistry, and "ages of man" is presented. Results indicate that the Science Knowledge assessment areas of chemistry and physics and the Science Problems subtest were most useful in predicting student…

  1. Validity of the Medical College Admission Test for Predicting MD-PhD Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bills, James L.; VanHouten, Jacob; Grundy, Michelle M.; Chalkley, Roger; Dermody, Terence S.

    2016-01-01

    The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) is a quantitative metric used by MD and MD-PhD programs to evaluate applicants for admission. This study assessed the validity of the MCAT in predicting training performance measures and career outcomes for MD-PhD students at a single institution. The study population consisted of 153 graduates of the…

  2. A Needs Assessment of the Medical Laboratory Technology Students at New York City Technical College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvadurai, Ranjani

    A study examined the needs of medical laboratory technology students at New York City Technical College. The nominal group technique (which involves silent generation of ideas in writing, round-robin feedback, and individual voting on priority ideas) was used to assess the academic and personal needs of 20 students. The following seven significant…

  3. Grossmont College Conference on Bio-Medical Technology and Manpower (March 25, 1970).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Junior Colleges, Washington, DC.

    In response to a growing concern with the quality of health care in this country, this conference met to discuss: (1) the role of junior colleges in training medical technicians, (2) the importance of uniformity in the core curriculum, (3) new occupations and changing job requirements, (4) the need for cooperation and coordination between…

  4. Characteristics of College Students with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms Who Misuse Their Medications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jardin, Bianca; Looby, Alison; Earleywine, Mitch

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the current investigation is to examine the characteristics of college students with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms who misuse their prescribed psychostimulant medications. Methods and Participants: Forty-three undergraduate students with a prescription for Ritalin or Adderall completed structured…

  5. Characteristics of College Students with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms Who Misuse Their Medications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jardin, Bianca; Looby, Alison; Earleywine, Mitch

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the current investigation is to examine the characteristics of college students with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms who misuse their prescribed psychostimulant medications. Methods and Participants: Forty-three undergraduate students with a prescription for Ritalin or Adderall completed structured


  6. An Overview of the Roles and Responsibilities of Chinese Medical Colleges in Body Donation Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Luqing; Xiao, Ming; Gu, Mufeng; Zhang, Yongjie; Jin, Jianliang; Ding, Jiong

    2014-01-01

    The use of human tissue is critical for gross anatomy education in the health professions. Chinese medical colleges have faced a shortage of anatomical specimens over the past decade. While body donation plays an important role in overcoming this gap, this practice has only recently been introduced in China, and the donation rate is relatively low…

  7. Preliminary Investigation of the 1991 Medical College Admission Test Factor Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Weichang; Mitchell, Karen J.

    A substantially revised Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) was introduced in spring 1991. The new examination is designed to assess critical thinking skills, basic concepts and problem solving facility in science, and writing skills. This paper reports preliminary findings on the factor structure of the revised MCAT, which consists of four…

  8. Medical Simulation in the Community College Health Science Curriculum: A Matrix for Future Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Michael P.; Starobin, Soko S.; Laanan, Frankie Santos

    2010-01-01

    As the nation's healthcare education system struggles to keep pace with the demand for its services, educators are seeking creative and innovative solutions to meet the needs of a growing number of students. The integration of medical simulation technology into the community college health science curriculum is a creative solution that can meet…

  9. Validity of the Medical College Admission Test for Predicting MD-PhD Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bills, James L.; VanHouten, Jacob; Grundy, Michelle M.; Chalkley, Roger; Dermody, Terence S.

    2016-01-01

    The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) is a quantitative metric used by MD and MD-PhD programs to evaluate applicants for admission. This study assessed the validity of the MCAT in predicting training performance measures and career outcomes for MD-PhD students at a single institution. The study population consisted of 153 graduates of the


  10. Predicting First-Quarter Test Scores from the New Medical College Admission Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Thomas J.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The predictive validity of the new Medical College Admission Test as it relates to end-of-quarter examinations in anatomy, histology, physiology, biochemistry, and "ages of man" is presented. Results indicate that the Science Knowledge assessment areas of chemistry and physics and the Science Problems subtest were most useful in predicting student


  11. Student Peer Review of Diagnostic Tests at the Medical College of Ohio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garg, Mohan L.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    In an effort to encourage cost-conscious behavior and quality assurance, students in community medicine clerkships at the Medical College of Ohio were required to conduct retrospective reviews of their peers' laboratory usage patterns using information generated by these peers during internal medicine and pediatrics rotations. (Author/JMD)

  12. An Overview of the Roles and Responsibilities of Chinese Medical Colleges in Body Donation Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Luqing; Xiao, Ming; Gu, Mufeng; Zhang, Yongjie; Jin, Jianliang; Ding, Jiong

    2014-01-01

    The use of human tissue is critical for gross anatomy education in the health professions. Chinese medical colleges have faced a shortage of anatomical specimens over the past decade. While body donation plays an important role in overcoming this gap, this practice has only recently been introduced in China, and the donation rate is relatively low


  13. Sharing and selling of prescription medications in a college student sample

    PubMed Central

    Garnier, Laura M.; Arria, Amelia M.; Caldeira, Kimberly M.; Vincent, Kathryn B.; O’Grady, Kevin E.; Wish, Eric D.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence of prescription medication diversion among college students; to compare classes of medications with respect to the likelihood of diversion; to document the most common methods of diversion; and to examine the characteristics of students who diverted medications. Method A cross-sectional analysis of personal interview data collected between August 2006 and August 2007 as part of an ongoing longitudinal study. The cohort of students, who were between the ages 17 and 19 at study onset, attended a large public university in the mid-Atlantic region. Information was gathered regarding a wide variety of variables, including demographics, diversion of medically prescribed drugs, illicit drug use, and childhood conduct problems. Results Among 483 students prescribed a medication, 35.8% diverted a medication at least once in their lifetime. The most commonly diverted medication classes were prescription ADHD medication, with a 61.7% diversion rate, and prescription analgesics (35.1% diversion rate). Sharing was the most common method of diversion, with 33.6% of students sharing their medication(s) and 9.3% selling in their lifetime. Comparative analyses revealed that prescription medication diverters had used more illicit drugs in the past year and had more childhood conduct problems than non-diverters. Conclusions If confirmed, these findings have important clinical implications for improved physician-patient communication and vigilance regarding prescribing analgesic and stimulant medications for young adults. PMID:20331930

  14. Student feedback on the use of paintings in Sparshanam, the Medical Humanities module at KIST Medical College, Nepal

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Paintings have been used in Medical Humanities modules in Nepal at Manipal College of Medical Sciences and KIST Medical College. Detailed participant feedback about the paintings used, the activities carried out, problems with using paintings and the role of paintings in future modules has not been previously done. Hence the present study was carried out. Methods The present module for first year medical students was conducted from February to August 2010 at KIST Medical College, Nepal. Paintings used were by Western artists and obtained from the Literature, Arts and Medicine database. The activities undertaken by the students include answering the questions 'What do you see' and 'What do you feel' about the painting, creating a story of 100 words about the scene depicted, and interpreting the painting using role plays and poems/songs. Feedback was not obtained about the last two activities. In August 2010 we obtained detailed feedback about the paintings used. Results Seventy-eight of the 100 students (78%) participated. Thirty-four students (43.6%) were male. The most common overall comments about the use of paintings were "they helped me feel what I saw" (12 respondents), "enjoyed the sessions" (12 respondents), "some paintings were hard to interpret" (10 respondents) and "were in tune with module objectives" (10 respondents). Forty-eight (61.5%) felt the use of western paintings was appropriate. Suggestions to make annotations about paintings more useful were to make them shorter and more precise, simplify the language and properly introduce the artist. Forty-one students (52.6%) had difficulty with the exercise 'what do you feel'. Seventy-four students (94.9%) wanted paintings from Nepal to be included. Conclusions Participant response was positive and they were satisfied with use of paintings in the module. Use of more paintings from Nepal and South Asia can be considered. Further studies may be required to understand whether use of paintings succeeded in fulfilling module objectives. PMID:21385427

  15. Medical and Nonmedical Users of Prescription Drugs among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozenbroek, Katelyn; Rothstein, William G.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To examine medical and nonmedical users of prescription opioids, central nervous system depressants, and stimulants taken individually and in combination. Participants: Undergraduates at an urban mid-Atlantic university with 12,000 students. Methods: A questionnaire administered in classes provided 413 responses, with a usable response…

  16. Medical and Nonmedical Users of Prescription Drugs among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozenbroek, Katelyn; Rothstein, William G.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To examine medical and nonmedical users of prescription opioids, central nervous system depressants, and stimulants taken individually and in combination. Participants: Undergraduates at an urban mid-Atlantic university with 12,000 students. Methods: A questionnaire administered in classes provided 413 responses, with a usable response


  17. Portfolios in Saudi medical colleges. Why and how?

    PubMed

    Fida, Nadia M; Shamim, Muhammad S

    2016-03-01

    Over recent decades, the use of portfolios in medical education has evolved, and is being applied in undergraduate and postgraduate programs worldwide. Portfolios, as a learning process and method of documenting and assessing learning, is supported as a valuable tool by adult learning theories that stress the need for learners to be self-directed and to engage in experiential learning. Thoughtfully implemented, a portfolio provides learning experiences unequaled by any single learning tool. The credibility (validity) and dependability (reliability) of assessment through portfolios have been questioned owing to its subjective nature; however, methods to safeguard these features have been described in the literature. This paper discusses some of this literature, with particular attention to the role of portfolios in relation to self-reflective learning, provides an overview of current use of portfolios in undergraduate medical education in Saudi Arabia, and proposes research-based guidelines for its implementation and other similar contexts. PMID:26905344

  18. [Pollution load and the first flush effect of BOD5 and COD in urban runoff of Wenzhou City].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Bi, Chun-juan; Chen, Zhen-lou; Zhou, Dong

    2013-05-01

    Four typical rainfalls were monitored in two different research areas of Wenzhou Municipality. Concentrations of BOD5 and COD in six different urban runoffs were measured. In addition the event mean concentration (EMC), M (V) curve and BOD5/COD of pollutant were calculated. The results showed that concentrations of BOD5 and COD in different urban runoffs of Wenzhou ranged from ND to 69.21 mg x L(-1) and ND to 636 mg x L(-1). Concentrations of BOD5 and COD in different urban runoffs were decreasing over time, so it is greatly significant to manage the initial runoff for reducing organic pollution. Judged by EMC of BOD5 and COD in these five rainfalls, concentrations of pollutant in some urban runoffs were out of the integrated wastewater discharge standard. If these runoffs flowed into river, it would cause environmental pressure to the next level receiving water bodies. According to the M (V) curve, the first flush effect of COD in most urban runoffs was common; while the first flush effect of BOD5 was same as that of COD. The result also showed that organic pollution was serious at the beginning of runoff. The underlying surface type could affect the concentration of BOD5 and COD in urban runoff. While the results of BOD5/COD also suggested that biodegradation was considered as one of the effective ways to decrease the pollution load of organics in urban runoff, and the best management plans (BMPs) should be selected for various urban runoff types for the treatment of organic pollution. PMID:23914522

  19. [The history of the Institute of Hygiene of the Medical College of Lübeck].

    PubMed

    Preuner, R

    1986-05-01

    The "Institute of Hygiene" of the Hanseatic town of Lübeck was founded in 1946 by Prof. Dr. Franz Schültz on account of the then prevailing epidemic situation mainly caused by the rapid spread of typhoid fever. The local responsibility of the Institute extended to the town itself and to the two hospitals "South" and "East", with the latter originating from the asylum of Strecknitz after its tragic destruction. In 1950 Franz Schütz was appointed ordinary professor and director of the Institute of Hygiene of the University of Göttingen. In Lübeck he was succeeded by Prof. Dr. Hans Schubert, last senior physician of the Institute of Hygiene of the University of Königsberg. He served a very short term in Lübeck, for he died as early as 1951 after seven months' tenure. He was succeeded in office by Prof. Dr. Rudolf Preuner in 1952. During his term of office the ties with the hospitals were severed and the Institute became independent. Endeavors to found a College started in the early sixties. In November 1964 the Medical Academy of Lübeck was created as Second Medical Faculty of the University of Kiel; in 1974 it was converted into the independent Medical College of Lübeck with a presidial constitution. In 1979 Rudolf Preuner retired as professor emeritus. His successor in office was Prof. Dr. Johannes Beckert. In 1985 the College was raised to the Medical University of Lübeck. PMID:3092506

  20. Mountford Joseph Bramley: A pioneering thyroidologist and the first principal of Asia's oldest medical college

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Subhankar; Datta, Adrija; Chatterjee, Pranab

    2015-01-01

    Mountford Joseph Bramley was one of the educationists whose sincere efforts are undeniable in the making of modern India. After achieving the Member of the Royal College of Surgeons diploma, he joined the Malta Garrison as a Hospital Assistant and was soon promoted to the rank of Assistant Surgeon of the Rifle Brigade. Following his arrival in India in 1826, he held several important medical posts in the British service. He was one of the early researchers to investigate the role of iodine in the causation of goitre. He was appointed as the first Principal of the Medical College of Bengal, the oldest medical college in Asia, in 1835. Bramley was an educationist from the very core of his heart, and he always wished for the betterment of his students. He died early at the age of 34 years. His legacy as a pioneer in the fields of medical education and endocrinology, specifically thyroidology, has largely been shrouded in a miasma of time. PMID:25593846

  1. Faculty of Prehospital Care, Royal College of Surgeons Edinburgh guidance for medical provision for wilderness medicine.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Adrian; Dodds, Naomi; Joshi, Raj; Hall, John; Dhillon, Sundeep; Hollis, Sarah; Davis, Pete; Hillebrandt, David; Howard, Eva; Wilkes, Matthew; Langdana, Burjor; Lee, David; Hinson, Nigel; Williams, Thomas Harcourt; Rowles, Joe; Pynn, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    To support leaders and those involved in providing medical care on expeditions in wilderness environments, the Faculty of Pre-Hospital Care (FPHC) of The Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh convened an expert panel of leading healthcare professionals and expedition providers. The aims of this panel were to: (1) provide guidance to ensure the best possible medical care for patients within the geographical, logistical and human factor constraints of an expedition environment. (2) Give aspiring and established expedition medics a 'benchmark' of skills they should meet. (3) Facilitate expedition organisers in selecting the most appropriate medical cover and provider for their planned activity. A system of medical planning is suggested to enable expedition leaders to identify the potential medical risks and their mitigation. It was recognised that the scope of practice for wilderness medicine covers elements of primary healthcare, pre-hospital emergency medicine and preventative medicine. Some unique competencies were also identified. Further to this, the panel recommends the use of a matrix and advisory expedition medic competencies relating to the remoteness and medical threat of the expedition. This advice is aimed at all levels of expedition medic, leader and organiser who may be responsible for delivering or managing the delivery of remote medical care for participants. The expedition medic should be someone equipped with the appropriate medical competencies, scope of practice and capabilities in the expedition environment and need not necessarily be a qualified doctor. In addition to providing guidance regarding the clinical competencies required of the expedition medic, the document provides generic guidance and signposting to the more pertinent aspects of the role of expedition medic. PMID:26629337

  2. Perception of Medical Students about Communication Skills Laboratory (CSL) in a Rural Medical College of Central India

    PubMed Central

    Jagzape, Arunita Tushar; Vagha, Jayant Dattatray; Chalak, Anita; Meshram, Revatdhamma Jagdish

    2015-01-01

    Introduction “The art of medicine is intricately tied to the art of communication.” In traditional medical curriculum, communication is not taught formally and this leads to a gap in reliability and consistency of the teaching. Few studies have shown that much litigation against doctors is due to lack of communication and not because of lack of clinical expertise. Considering the importance of training in communication skills, it was included in the curriculum of students of DMIMS (DU), which has got probably the first communication skills lab in a medical college in India. Aim To study the perception of medical students about usefulness of communication skills lab. Materials and Methods This observational study was carried out at Communication Skills Lab (CSL) of Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Sawangi (M), Wardha, Maharasthra. Feedback was obtained with the help of a prevalidated questionnaire from 65 final MBBS students about their perception about utility of the module taught in the CSL including factors which helped and which hindered in learning. Descriptive statistics was used for the quantitative data and categorization for qualitative data. Results A total of 78.46% students were of the idea that CSL posting is must for all medical undergraduates. A 93.83% perceive that the module taught was very relevant and useful and were satisfied with the duration of posting (81.47%). A 78.46% students experienced improvement in their communication skills. They opined that more emphasis should be given on communication between doctor and patient (61.53%). Conclusion The students found communication skills lab very useful. They desired more emphasis on communication between doctor and patient and sought more interactivity, video demonstrations to be part of the module. PMID:26816918

  3. How are our medical students using the computer and internet? A study from a medical college of north India

    PubMed Central

    Maroof, Khan Amir; Parashar, Pawan; Bansal, Rahul

    2012-01-01

    Background: In today's world, use of Internet has become indispensable. Medical students have much to gain from the Internet technology that has revolutionized the medical field. There is a very rapid change in the way communication technology is being handled and our medical students should also be ready to embrace it. Very few studies have been done on this topic in India. The aim was to find out the knowledge, practice, and barriers of Internet use among the medical undergraduates of Subharti Medical College, Meerut. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among the MBBS students belonging to the first, second, third, and fourth years of their course during August to October 2009. A pretested questionnaire was used collecting information on their Internet usage patterns, knowledge about information technology, and barriers to using it. Data were entered in Microsoft Excel and appropriate statistical tests were applied for analysis. Results: The proportion of respondents having a laptop were more in cohort of students belonging to the admission year 2009 (65.8%) followed by 2008 (54.7%), 2007 (53.0%), and 2006 (38.0%), i.e., a gradual increase in newer cohorts. About half (57.4%) of the students had some sort of formal training in computer and Internet use. Knowledge about Internet was more among the junior cohorts compared to the senior cohorts (P<0.0001). Only about one-fifths of the respondents used Internet for searching literature for projects from medical journals on the Internet. Majority of the respondents accessed Internet for less than 3 hours per week. About one-tenth (8.0%) of the students felt that Internet is totally useless in medical field. The major barrier (54.4% of the respondents) to using Internet was lack of time. Conclusions: Further research should focus on designing and implementing computer and Internet training for medical students. PMID:23271853

  4. Prevalence and factors associated with neck, shoulder and low back pains among medical students in a Malaysian Medical College

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The main purpose of the study was to assess the prevalence, body distributions and factors associated with musculoskeletal pain (MSP) among medical students in a private Malaysian medical college. Method This cross-sectional study was conducted among 232 medical students in a private medical college using an online questionnaire. The questionnaire was a modified Standardized Nordic Questionnaire focused on neck, shoulder and low back pain in the past week and the past year. Results Two hundred and thirty two medical students responded to the questionnaire out of 642. Mean age was 20.7?±?2.1 years. The majority were female (62.9%), Malay (80.6%) and in the preclinical years (72%). One hundred and six (45.7%) of all students had at least one site of MSP in the past week and 151 (65.1%) had at least one site of MSP in the past year. MSP in the past week was associated significantly with the academic year, (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.15-3.67, P?=?0.015), history of trauma (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.2-5.3, P?=?0.011), family history of MSP (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1-3.9, P?=?0.023) and Body Mass Index (BMI) (P?=?0.028). MSP in the past year was significantly associated with computer use (P?=?0.027), daily hours of computer use (median?±?IQR (5.0 ±3.0), history of trauma (OR 7.5, 95% CI 2.24-2.56, P?medical students was relatively high, thus, further clinical assessment is needed in depth study of ergonomics. The study results indicate that medical school authorities should take measures to prevent MSP due to factors related to medical school. Students should make aware of importance of weight reduction to reduce MSP. PMID:23815853

  5. Cross sectional assessment of empathy among undergraduates from a medical college

    PubMed Central

    Shashikumar, R.; Chaudhary, Richa; Ryali, V.S.S.R.; Bhat, P.S.; Srivastava, Kalpana; Prakash, J.; Basannar, D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Empathy is essentially a desirable quality among clinicians and can be developed during medical education. Studies from outside India have shown that higher empathy is related to better competency and choice of specialty may be related to empathy levels in them. Change in empathy levels among undergraduate medical students with progressive training has been often ascribed to reasons such as curriculum content, timing of clinical rotations. Gender differences in empathy levels also vary among different countries. Since many of such factors differ in India there is a need therefore to understand empathy and its correlates among medical students in India. Method A cross sectional study was undertaken in a large medical college among the undergraduates of first, third, fifth, seventh and ninth semesters to measure their empathy levels. The evaluation was done using the Jefferson's Scale for Physician's Empathy- Student version. Results The study revealed highest empathy at entry level and a significant fall by seventh semester (p = 0.002). Female students had significantly higher empathy levels than male students (p = 0.012) across all semesters. The variance in empathy scores according specialty chosen is not statistically significant (p = 0.2468). Conclusion The progressive decline in empathy levels with years in medical college here is seen much later than in western studies. Female students are more empathetic than male students. The relation of mean empathy scores and choice of specialty is inconclusive and at variance from other studies. PMID:24843209

  6. The Escalating Use of Medications by College Students: What Are They Telling Us, What Are We Telling Them?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fromm, M. Gerard

    2007-01-01

    In 2002, the first in a series of working conferences was held as a collaboration between the counseling service of Bennington College and the Austen Riggs Center's Erikson Institute. The title of the first conference was "The Escalating Use of Medications by College Students: What Are They Telling Us, What Are We Telling Them?". It was meant to…

  7. The Malai Ika Daigaku (Syonan Medical College) in Malacca (1944 to 1945) during the Japanese occupation of Singapore and Malaya.

    PubMed

    Cheah, J S; Tay, G

    1998-01-01

    During the Japanese Occupation of Singapore and Malaya (1941-1945), Singapore was renamed Syonan (or Syonanto) and Malaya was called Malai (or Marai; Marei). On 27 April 2603 (1943) the Japanese Military Administration established. The Marai Ika Daigaku (Syonan Medical College) at the Tan Tock Seng Hospital (Hakuai Byoin), Syonan. The Medical College shifted to the General Hospital, Malacca in February 2604 (1944) where it functioned till the end of the Japanese Occupation in September 2605 (1945). PMID:9557106

  8. The impact of self-concept and college involvement on the first-year success of medical students in China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying-Xue; Ou, Chun-Quan; Zhao, Zhi-Tao; Wan, Cheng-Song; Guo, Cui; Li, Li; Chen, Ping-Yan

    2015-03-01

    Students' first-year academic success plays a critical role on their overall development in college, which implies the need to concentrate on identifying ways to improve students' first-year academic success. Different from most research on the subject, this study attempted to combine the sociological perspective of college impact with a psychological perspective to synthetically explore the causal relationship of specific types of self-concept and college involvement with academic success of medical students. A longitudinal study was conducted using 519 matriculates at a medical university in mainland China. We conducted the Cooperative Institutional Research Program freshmen survey and the Your First College Year survey to collect data of the pre-college and college academic and social self-concept, college involvement components, and some input characteristics. The academic success was measured by the first-year grade point average. A pathway analysis was conducted and showed the following results. Having high academic self-concept, being engaged in class and putting effort in homework or study directly contributes to increasing college achievement. Students' pre-college achievement and self-concept, faculty interaction, and homework involvement positively affected students' college academic self-concept development, which indirectly improved average grade point. These findings contribute to our understanding of a student's ability to interact with his or her collegiate environment and to experience academic success. PMID:24906461

  9. The Arabian Gulf University College of Medicine and Medical Sciences: a successful model of a multinational medical school.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, Hossam; Anderson, M Brownell

    2006-12-01

    In the late 1970s, leaders of the Arabian [corrected] Gulf countries proposed a novel idea of a joint educational and cultural venture: establishing a new regional university based in the Kingdom of Bahrain that would be managed as a multinational consortium of Gulf countries including Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, and Bahrain. It was intended to promote higher education and research in the Gulf region; to serve the development needs of the region; to reflect the unique economic, social, and cultural attributes of the Gulf communities and their environments; and to respond to the health care needs of the member countries. Since its inception in 1982, the College of Medicine and Medical Sciences (CMMS) at Arabian Gulf University (AGU) has adopted the educational philosophy of problem-based learning (PBL) and self-directed, student-centered education. The curriculum is integrated, with early introduction of education to foster clinical skills and professional competencies. The strategic alliance with the health care systems in Bahrain and other Gulf regions has created a successful model of efficient and effective initialization of health care resources in the community. The experience that has accumulated at the AGU-CMMS from introducing innovative medical education has allowed it to take a leadership position in medical education in the Gulf region. The original goals of this unique experiment have been realized along with unanticipated outcomes of spearheading changes in medical education in the Gulf region. Old and new medical schools have adopted several characteristics of the AGU educational program. Several elements contributed to its success: a clear vision of providing quality medical education and realizing and sustaining this vision by a supportive leadership at the university and college levels; an alliance with the regional health care systems; a dedicated faculty who have been able to work as a team while continually developing themselves; proper student selection and the creation of a culture of student/faculty partnerships in education and in building an international reputation and credibility by cooperating with reputable international universities and organizations. PMID:17122475

  10. A survey of undergraduate anesthesia rotation in medical colleges of Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Minai, Fauzia; Ul Haq, M. Irfan; Afshan, Gauhar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Student perceptions of specialties influence career choice decisions. It is important to expose undergraduates to the scope of rewarding careers in specialties like anesthesia by ensuring a good quality educational experience during anesthesia rotation. Our objective was to survey the curriculum structure and placement of the anesthesia undergraduate rotation in all the medical colleges of Pakistan recognized by the Pakistan Medical and Dental Council. Materials and Methods: A standardized survey questionnaire was distributed by direct contact, postal mail or e mail to one identified anesthetist in all recognized medical colleges with enrolment of 100 or more students. The response rate was 75%. We received responses by hand, email and postal mail. Results: We received responses from 15 out of 20 anesthetists contacted. 11 reported undergraduate anesthesia rotation while 4 reported absence of this rotation in their undergraduate curriculum. The rotation placement, duration and curriculum showed a wide variation and lack of standardization. Conclusion: Our survey indicates that the inclusion of anesthesia rotation in undergraduate medical education is not mandatory and standardized. The rotation duration, placement and curriculum need to be standardized to enhance the quality of the experience and promote the scope of the specialty for rewarding careers. PMID:24574599

  11. Parental bonding and attitudes toward suicide among medical college students in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Kojiro; Sugawara, Norio; Tanaka, Osamu; Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Yasui-Furukori, Norio

    2014-01-01

    Background Suicide is a grave public health issue that is responsible for a high mortality rate among individuals aged 15–44 years. Attitudes toward suicide among medical staff members have been associated with appropriate therapeutic responses to suicidal individuals. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of parental rearing on attitudes toward suicide among Japanese medical college students. Methods We examined the association between parental bonding and attitudes toward suicide in 160 medical college students in Japan. The Parental Bonding Instrument was used to assess the attitudes and behaviors of parents. The attitudes toward suicide were evaluated using the Japanese version of the Attitudes Toward Suicide questionnaire. Results The mean age of the subjects was 25.2±4.0 years old. The majority of the participants in our study agreed that anyone could commit suicide (88.8%) and that suicide is preventable (86.3%). After adjusting for age and sex, multivariate regression analysis revealed that maternal care approached a statistically significant association with the “right to suicide” attitude. Under the same conditions, maternal care was shown to be significantly associated with the “common occurrence” attitude. No other significant relationships were observed between parental bonding and attitudes toward suicide. Conclusion This study suggests that a higher level of maternal care ensures that children think that suicide occurs less commonly. The promotion of best practices for suicide prevention among medical students is needed. Child rearing support might be associated with suicide prevention. PMID:25364256

  12. College health services as a site for ambulatory care training of residents and medical students.

    PubMed

    Chuck, J M; Davidson, R C; Snively, S

    1990-08-01

    The education of residents and medical students in ambulatory care settings continues to play a greater role in medical education than was the case even a few years ago. This report documents the use of college health services, commonly called student health centers, at California institutions of higher education, as training sites for residents and medical students in 1988. Directors of residency programs that had used student health centers for their residents reported that they were pleased with the association. The directors of student health centers that had had residents on educational rotations also reported a high level of overall satisfaction. Student health centers represent an untapped resource, as only 20% of such centers in California were being used to train residents at the time of this study. PMID:2383336

  13. Cosmetic procedures among youths: a survey of junior college and medical students in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Jia Hui; Yeak, Seth; Phoon, Natalie; Lo, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Although cosmetic procedures have become increasingly popular among the younger population in recent years, limited research on this subject has been done in the Asian context. We aimed to explore the views and knowledge regarding cosmetic procedures among junior college (JC) and medical students in Singapore. METHODS In the first phase of the study, a cross-sectional, self-administered survey of 1,500 JC students aged 16–21 years from six JCs was conducted in 2010. The same survey was then conducted on a random sample of Year 2–5 medical students from an undergraduate medical school in 2011. RESULTS In total, 1,164 JC and 241 medical students responded to the surveys. There was an overall female to male ratio of 1.3:1. Of all the respondents, 2.5% of the JC students and 3.0% of the medical students admitted to having undergone cosmetic procedures. Among those who claimed to have never had cosmetic procedures done, 9.0% and 44.0% of the JC and medical students, respectively, responded that they would consider such procedures in the future. Those who disapproved of their peers undergoing cosmetic surgery comprised 35.0% of JC students and 56.8% of medical students. Among the JC and medical students, 52.0% and 36.1%, respectively, were unaware of any risks associated with cosmetic procedures. CONCLUSION The younger population is increasingly accepting of cosmetic procedures. However, there is a general lack of understanding of the risks associated with such procedures. Education of both the general public and medical students may help prevent potential medicolegal issues. PMID:25189303

  14. Trends in Medical Use, Diversion, and Nonmedical Use of Prescription Medications among College Students from 2003 to 2013: Connecting the Dots

    PubMed Central

    West, Brady T.; Teter, Christian J.; Boyd, Carol J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine trends in the lifetime and past-year prevalence of medical use, diversion, and nonmedical use of four prescription medication classes (i.e., sedative/anxiety, opioid, sleeping, and stimulant) among college students between 2003 and 2013; and to identify demographic and background characteristics associated with trends in past-year nonmedical use of prescription medications. Methods A self-administered, cross-sectional Web survey was conducted in 2003, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011, and 2013 at a large public four-year university in the Midwest United States. Results Approximately one in every five individuals reported nonmedical use of at least one prescription medication class in their lifetime. The past-year prevalence of medical use, diversion and nonmedical use of prescription stimulants increased significantly between 2003 and 2013 while the past-year prevalence of medical use, diversion and nonmedical use of prescription opioids decreased significantly over this same time period. The odds of past-year nonmedical use of each prescription medication class were generally greater among males, Whites, members of social fraternities and sororities, and those with a lifetime history of medical use of prescription medications or a past-year history of being approached to divert their prescription medications. Conclusions The present study represents the first investigation to demonstrate that trends in medical use of controlled medications parallel changes in diversion and nonmedical use of the same medication class among college students. The findings reinforce the importance of continued monitoring of prescription medication use at colleges to help guide prevention and intervention efforts. PMID:24727278

  15. The Curriculum Development Project for the Medical Laboratory Technology Program at Miami-Dade Junior College, Miami, Florida. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miami-Dade Junior Coll., FL. Div. of Allied Health Studies.

    During Phase I of an Allied Health Professions Basic Improvement Grant, a five-member committee developed a curriculum for a medical laboratory technology program at Miami-Dade Junior College by: (1) defining competencies which differentiate a certified laboratory assistant from a medical laboratory technician, (2) translating expected laboratory


  16. Measurement of atmospheric radon daughter concentrations at the campus of Fukushima Medical College.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Takaku, Y

    1989-06-01

    Radon daughter concentrations in outdoor and indoor air were measured at the campus of Fukushima Medical College. Radon daughters in the air were sampled with a flow rate of 20 L/min through a glass fiber filter or a membrane filter, and the decay of activity on the filter was analyzed with two types of technique, i.e., the gross-beta one-count method using a G.M. tube and the alpha spectroscopic method using a semiconductor detector. The present paper describes principles and techniques of the measurement in detail. PMID:2637220

  17. Arabicization in high education: The case of medical colleges in the Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Fadni Suliman, Issameldin

    This thesis explores language policies, language conflict and language-user attitudes toward arabicization which refers to the use of Arabic as a medium of instruction in teaching medicine in universities in the Sudan. It follows up these objectives: (1) To highlight the roots of arabicization and implemented language planning activities through document analysis. (2) To report on the advantages and disadvantages of both Arabic and English as media of instruction in teaching medicine in the Sudan. (3) To survey the attitudes of students and their instructors in the colleges of Khartoum, Omdurman and Gezira universities towards arabicization using two similar developed questionnaires and an interview for faculty members. The questionnaires were distributed to the students and faculty members in the three colleges to probe six factors: (I) The extent of use of languages of instruction (2) Readiness of the students to receive medical studies in English (3) The difficulties they face (4) English as a medium of instruction in medical colleges (5) Arabic as a medium of instruction in medical colleges (6) Students' preference of a language of instruction. The study utilized tables, charts and chi square tests to illustrate the attitudes of students and their faculty members. The study has revealed that the attitude of most of the students and their faculty members were in favor of arabicization in principle. In fact, students showed support for the pedagogical benefits of Arabic like they can prepare and study in Arabic in less time than English. They can take more notes in Arabic than in English. The study has highlighted that Arabic as a native language of the students offers them a mighty and indispensable support for the ability to convey ideas, capacity for imaginative or creative thinking than the limited capacity given by the foreign language. Notwithstanding, English is reported to be very important for students' current medical studies and future career. The study emphasized that the language shift to Arabic should not lead to marginalize English in higher education in Sudan. A realization of the need of boosting the teaching of English in case of arabicization is fully implemented was present in the participants' responses. To conclude, the study has culminated in calling for benefiting from the successes of human resource development (HRD) in leading change in organizations in language planning and language policy implementation.

  18. Technical assistance for Meharry Medical College Energy Efficiency Project. Final project status and technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-08

    This report presents the results of a program to provide technical assistance to Meharry Medical College. The purpose of the program is to facilitate Meharry`s effort to finance a campus-wide facility retrofit. The US Department of Energy (USDOE) funded the program through a grant to the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development (TECD). The University of Memphis-Technology and Energy Services (UM-TES), under contract to TECD, performed program services. The report has three sections: (1) introduction; (2) project definition, financing, and participants; and (3) opportunities for federal participation.

  19. [The Construction of the Faculty of Hamheung Medical College in North Korea, 1946-48: An Unrest Coexistence of Political Ideology and Medical Expertise].

    PubMed

    Kim, Geun Bae

    2015-12-01

    This paper aims to reveal how Hamheung Medical College in North Korea kept up its faculty with the trend of a new political system. The time period consists of three series of evaluations that occurred between the start of a reformation action in 1946 and the establishment of the regime in 1948. At the time, it was difficult to secure college faculty in the medical field, because of a serious shortage of medical personnel. Moreover, the problem in the recruitment of faculty at the medical college grew bigger since the members were required to have a high level of political consciousness. Then how did Hamheung Medical College accomplish this ideal securing of faculty that possessed political ideology and medical expertise? For the first time, a faculty evaluation at the local level was carried out and got rid of a few pro-Japanese or reactionary factions but maintained most of the faculty. Although academic background and research career of the faculty were considered, securing of the manpower in terms of number was crucial for the reconstruction of a professional school level. At the second time, as the central education bureau's intervention tightened the censorship, most of the faculty were evaluated as unqualified. Indeed, it was difficult to satisfy the standard of professionalism which emphasized a high level of academic career and political thought that included affiliation of Workers' Party of North Korea. The Medical College could not find faculty that could replace those professors and therefore, most of them maintained their faculty positions. Since then, the faculty who received excellent evaluations led the school at the very front. At the third time, the Medical College itself led the evaluations and implemented more relaxed standards of political ideology and medical expertise. Faculty who were cooperative to the reformation actions that North Korea carried forward or had working experience at the hospital and health service received a high level of recognition. Accordingly, the Medical College expanded itself by securing many professors, but also embodied a large gap of academic and ideological levels between them. Hence, the political ideology and medical expertise, which were set forth as the requirements for faculty, were constructed in the space of political ideal and social reality. Despite the high criteria the North Korean Government made, Hamheung Medical College's faculty fell below the average in terms of ideological and academic standards. As a way to compensate this, professors who greatly satisfied the both virtues were placed as leaders and, for supporting them, professors who taught the general education curriculum were recruited largely. And also, it appointed a large number of medical doctors who accumulated experiences in the field as new professors. Nevertheless, the Medical College struggled to raise the quality of medical education and was unable to prevent a part of its faculty from leaving to South Korea in the time of the Korean War. Thus, the political and academic virtues of the faculty at that time were not just simply about the professor individuals but were interrelated with the medical education and health care system in North Korea. PMID:26819438

  20. Medical Students’ Perception about the Educational Environment in Western Maharashtra in Medical College using DREEM Scale

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Educational Environment (EE) has significant impact on teaching-learning, satisfaction, performance and academic progress of students. Feedback obtained through structured questionnaire designed for them can serve as tool for identifying and solving these EE related problems. Objective To assess the perceptions of medical students concerning their educational environment (EE) using Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) scale. Materials and Methods Study involved all three years medical students; surveyed with DREEM questionnaire consisted of 50 items based on the Likert ‘s scale (scores from 0 to 200); and 5 domains namely students’ perceptions of learning (SPL), perceptions of teachers (SPT), academic self-perceptions (SAP), perceptions of atmosphere (SPA) and social self-perceptions (SSP). Results The overall total score on Likert’s scale was 136 (interpretation: predominantly positive). The scores obtained in the different domains were 35.5 in SPL (interpretation: a more positive perception); 30.9 in SPT (interpretation: moving in the right direction); 21 in SAP (interpretation: feeling more in the positive side); 29.8 in SPA (interpretation: a more positive atmosphere); and 16.1 in SSP (interpretation: satisfactory. The DREEM score assigned by female students was significantly greater (p<0.05) than male students. The second-year students were more positive in their perception of EE (p<0.05). Conclusion Overall, student’s perception about EE was satisfactory. However, the item with score <2 points i.e. authoritarian/strict teachers, factual, teacher-centred learning, inability to memorize all, poor support system for bored, tired or stressed students during their academic life were the problem areas identified need to be revisited and improvised to further improve learning experience. PMID:26674218

  1. Increasing the pool of qualified minority medical school applicants: premedical training at historically black colleges and universities.

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, D D; Spratley, E; Simpson, C E

    1994-01-01

    Historically black colleges and universities have educated significant numbers of black students preparing for careers in medicine. These institutions have the potential to make even greater contributions to the pool of black medical school applicants and ultimately to the supply of black physicians. The Division of Disadvantaged Assistance, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and Services Administration within the Public Health Service, commissioned a study of the curriculums and other factors related to premedical education. The study was conducted at the historically black colleges and universities that graduate a large number of students who gain admission to medical school, and the historically black colleges and universities whose students are less successful in gaining admission to medical school. Nine historically black colleges and universities participated in a self-assessment of their undergraduate premedical curriculums. The findings from schools with higher acceptance rates were compared with those of schools with lower acceptance rates to identify factors contributing to the production of significant numbers of successful medical school applicants. Comparisons of data on these schools revealed several important factors that may be related to differences in acceptance rates: Those schools that devoted greater effort to premedical training (for example, advising students about how to prepare for medical school, curriculum development, maintaining premedical or pre-health professions offices and clubs--the staff of these offices provide students with information on medical or other health professions schools--to identify and recruit students) tended to have higher acceptance rates.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8303019

  2. Molecular Characterization and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Nasal Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from a Chinese Medical College Campus

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jimei; Chen, Chun; Ding, Baixing; Tu, Jinjing; Qin, Zhiqiang; Parsons, Chris; Salgado, Cassandra; Cai, Qiangjun; Song, Yulong; Bao, Qiyu; Zhang, Liming; Pan, Jingye; Wang, Liangxing; Yu, Fangyou

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection occur more commonly among persons living or working in crowded conditions, but characterization of S. aureus colonization within medical communities in China is lacking. A total of 144 (15.4%, 144/935) S. aureus isolates, including 28 (3.0%, 28/935) MRSA isolates, were recovered from the nares of 935 healthy human volunteers residing on a Chinese medical college campus. All S. aureus isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, quinupristin/dalfopristin and linezolid but the majority were resistant to penicillin (96.5%), ampicillin/sulbactam (83.3%) and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (93.1%). 82%, (23/28) of the MRSA isolates and 66% (77/116) of the MSSA isolates were resistant to multiple antibiotics, and 3 MRSA isolates were resistant to mupirocin—an agent commonly used for nasal decolonization. 16 different sequence types (STs), as well as SCCmec genes II, III, IVd, and V, were represented among MRSA isolates. We also identified, for the first time, two novel STs (ST1778 and ST1779) and 5 novel spa types for MRSA. MRSA isolates were distributed in different sporadic clones, and ST59-MRSA-VId- t437 was found within 3 MRSA isolates. Moreover, one isolate with multidrug resistance belonging to ST398-MRSA-V- t571 associated with animal infections was identified, and 3 isolates distributed in three different clones harbored PVL genes. Collectively, these data indicate a high prevalence of nasal MRSA carriage and molecular heterogeneity of S. aureus isolates among persons residing on a Chinese medical college campus. Identification of epidemic MRSA clones associated with community infection supports the need for more effective infection control measures to reduce nasal carriage and prevent dissemination of MRSA to hospitalized patients and health care workers in this community. PMID:22114670

  3. Phosphorus loads from different urban storm runoff sources in southern China: a case study in Wenzhou City.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dong; Bi, Chun-Juan; Chen, Zhen-Lou; Yu, Zhong-Jie; Wang, Jun; Han, Jing-Chao

    2013-11-01

    Storm runoff from six types of underlying surface area during five rainfall events in two urban study areas of Wenzhou City, China was investigated to measure phosphorus (P) concentrations and discharge rates. The average event mean concentrations (EMCs) of total phosphorus (TP), total dissolved phosphorus (TDP), and particulate phosphorus (PP) ranged from 0.02 to 2.5 mg?·?L(-1), 0.01 to 0.48 mg?·?L(-1), and 0.02 to 2.43 mg?·?L(-1), respectively. PP was generally the dominant component of TP in storm runoff, while the major form of P varied over time, especially in roof runoff, where TDP made up the largest portion in the latter stages of runoff events. Both TP and PP concentrations were positively correlated with pH, total suspended solids (TSS), and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD)/chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentrations (p<0.01), while TDP was positively correlated with BOD/COD only (p<0.01). In addition, the EMCs of TP and PP were negatively correlated with maximum rainfall intensity (p<0.05), while the EMCs of TDP positively correlated with the antecedent dry weather period (p<0.05). The annual TP emission fluxes from the two study areas were 367.33 and 237.85 kg, respectively. Underlying surface type determined the TP and PP loadings in storm runoff, but regional environmental conditions affected the export of TDP more significantly. Our results indicate that the removal of particles from storm runoff could be an effective measure to attenuate P loadings to receiving water bodies. PMID:23690078

  4. Etiology of Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Study of 50 Cases in Mymensingh Medical College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Khan, J A; Siddque, M A; Haque, M N; Kundu, S C; Ahmed, M U; Bhuiyan, A S

    2015-07-01

    This cross sectional observational study was done in the Department of ENT & Head-Neck Surgery, Mymensingh Medical College, Bangladesh from January 2013 to July 2014. Fifty (50) cases of carcinoma larynx were purposively selected. Clinically diagnosed cases of carcinoma larynx and histologically proven squamous cell carcinoma were included. Among 50 cases age ranged from 35-75 years with an average age of 58.1 years. Maximum patients were in 5th and 6th decades with male-female ratio 16:1. Most of the patient (78%) came from rural areas and came from low socio-economic condition (58%); maximum patients were cultivator (42%) & illiterate (50%). Smoking was the commonest (64%) personal habit. The other common personal habits were chewing of Betel nut & leaf (44%) and chewing of Tobacco (36%). Most of them have more than one habit. PMID:26329945

  5. Pattern of Dermatophytes in Patients Attend in Mymensingh Medical College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Monwar, S; Hossain, M A; Mahmud, M C; Paul, S K; Nasreen, S A; Joly, S N; Begum, H; Abdullah, S A; Haque, N; Sarkar, S R

    2015-10-01

    Dermatophytosis is a common fungal disease which involves the keratinized tissue. This is an attempt to observe the spectrum of dermatophytes among the clinically suspected cases of dermatophytosis attending the outpatient department of Dermatology and Venereology, Mymensingh Medical College Hospital, Mymensingh during the period of July 2013 to December 2014. Two hundred thirty (230) clinically suspected cases of dermatophytosis were subjected in this study. Sixty three cases (27.39%) were positive for fungus in direct microscopy while 53(23.04%) were culture positive. Among the clinical types tinea unguium was the most common followed by tinea corporis. Dermatophytosis was more common in the age group of 21-30 years. The male to female ratio was 1.53:1. Trichophyton rubrum 44(83.04%) was found common etiological dermatophyte species followed by Trichophyton mentagrophytes 5(9.43%) and Epidermophyton floccosum 4(7.55%). PMID:26620004

  6. Iron deficiency anemia in Dubai Medical College for Girls: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, A I

    1995-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is still one of the major public health problems all over the world. Particularly in developing countries the complete ecological picture is not well established. All students in the first and second academic years of Dubai Medical College for Girls were included in the present study. The mean Hb was 12.83 +/- 1.49 and that for serum iron was 13.73 micromol/L +/- 4.79. Anemia was detected among 24.62% of the group among which Arab Gulf Nationalities constituted 31.25%. Egyptians showed the highest prevalence of anemia (50%). The study showed a significant effect of chronic blood loss whether menstrual or from any other cause upon the Hb level. Also living in the hostel away from parents and families was reflected upon their diet habits and had a significant reflection upon the prevalence of anemia among the studied group. PMID:17214209

  7. Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis isolated at Mymensingh Medical College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Haque, N; Bari, M S; Bilkis, L; Hossain, M A; Haque, S; Haque, N; Islam, M A; Mahmud, N U; Kalam, A; Hasan, M S; Haque, M A

    2010-04-01

    The study was done to determine the drug resistance pattern of Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) isolated from different clinical specimens at Mymensingh Medical College Hospital, Mymensingh during the period from July 2007 to June 2008. A total of 32 Staphylococcus epidermidis were isolated from 200 different clinical specimens by standard microbiological techniques. Antimicrobial susceptibility of all the isolates was carried out by disk diffusion method as per recommendation of Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute 2007. Out of 32 Staphylococcus epidermidis 18(56.25%) were detected as Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE) by disk diffusion method. In this study, Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis showed multidrug resistance. Resistant to penicillin, amoxycillin, oxacillin and cloxacillin was 100% followed by gentamycin (56%), erythromycin (50%), doxycycline (44%), cephradine (44%), ciprofloxacin (39%), fucidic acid (33%), cefuroxime (33%) and ceftriaxone (28%). All isolates of MRSE were susceptible to rifampicin and vancomycin. PMID:20395905

  8. Handedness and sex differences in intelligence: evidence from the medical college admission test.

    PubMed

    Halpern, D F; Haviland, M G; Killian, C D

    1998-10-01

    Our analysis of Medical College Admission Test subtest scores by writing hand preference and sex suggests that (a) right hemispheric dominance is associated with intellectual giftedness in verbal reasoning (left-handers obtained higher scores on the verbal reasoning test and were overrepresented in the upper tail of the distribution), (b) different patterns of brain lateralization are associated with different subcomponents of cognition (right-handers scored higher, on average, on the writing test and were overrepresented in the upper tail of the distribution), and (c) men generally score higher than women on tests of scientific knowledge (the most striking differences between men and women were on the biological and physical science tests). PMID:9735180

  9. Use of modified blood agar plate for identification of pathogenic campylobacter species at Mymensingh Medical College .

    PubMed

    Sarkar, S R; Hossain, M A; Pual, S K; Mahmud, M C; Ray, N C; Haque, N

    2014-10-01

    This cross sectional study was carried out from July 2011 to June 2012 in the Department of Microbiology, Mymensingh Medical College to diagnose etiology of diarrhea caused by Campylobacter species. A total of 200 clinically diagnosed diarrheal pediatric patients were included in this study. Among the 200 stool specimens evaluated, 23(11.5%) samples were positive for Campylobacter species, isolation rate was 15(65.2%) in upto 1 year age group and 08(34.7%) in more than 1 year age group. Among 23 positive cases, 20(86.95%) were C. jejuni and 03(13.05%) were C. coli. The prevalence of Campylobacter infection found in the present study was higher below 1 year age group and was very much close to other countries of this Sub continent. PMID:25481583

  10. Analysis of psoriatic patients registered in Asahikawa Medical College Hospital from 1983 to 2007.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Takahashi, Ichiro; Tsuji, Hitomi; Ibe, Masaki; Kinouchi, Motoshi; Hashimoto, Yoshio; Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi; Matsuo, Shinobu; Ohkuma, Noritaka; Ohkawara, Akira; Iizuka, Hajime

    2009-12-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease, which has been increasing during the last 50 years in Japan. The aim of the present study is to analyze psoriatic patients registered from 1983-2007 in Asahikawa Medical College Hospital, which is located in the northern part of Japan. A total of 607 cases were registered at the first inspection in the Department of Dermatology, Asahikawa Medical College. Men (403 cases, 66.4%) were predominant over women (204 cases, 33.6%). The clinical types of psoriasis were psoriasis vulgaris (91.5%), guttate psoriasis (4.2%), psoriasis arthropathica (2.8%), psoriatic erythroderma (0.6%), generalized pustular psoriasis (0.6%), localized pustular psoriasis (0.15%) and infantile psoriasis (0.15%). Topical corticosteroids (78.1%) and vitamin D3 (18.1%) products were the main previous topical agents. Previous systemic treatments included etretinate (7.7%), cyclosporine (1.5%) and methotrexate (0.3%). Use of topical vitamin D3 and cyclosporine therapies have been gradually increasing during the past 25 years. Regarding the previous phototherapy, topical psoralen and ultraviolet A therapy (PUVA) (4.9%) was predominant over ultraviolet B (0.9%), and systemic PUVA (0.7%). Use of ultraviolet B phototherapy has been increasing during the past 5 years. The results are essentially similar to those of a survey of psoriasis in Japan from 1982-2001. Although the incidence of psoriasis might be higher in Hokkaido Prefecture, there is essentially no variation in the disease profile of psoriatic patients. PMID:19958446

  11. Comparative study of perinatal mortality and morbidity in the community and at Medical College Hospital, Patna.

    PubMed

    Singh, U K; Srivastava, S P; Kumar, A; Thakur, A K; Prasad, R; Chakrabarti, B

    1996-12-01

    This study determines the perinatal mortality rate (PMR) among births recorded at the Women's Patna Medical College Hospital (PMCH) in India, and from other centers in the Patna district community, where the ICDS program was not implemented. Births include all infants over 28 weeks of gestational development and who weighed over 1000 g at birth. Infants were grouped by birth weights as follows: 1001-1500 g, 1501-2000 g, 2001-2500 g, 2501-3000 g, 3001-3500 g, and 3500 g. Newborns were observed for 1 week after birth, and mothers were encouraged to breast feed. Mothers of normal infants were discharged in 2-3 days and advised to attend the Well Baby Clinic in 1 week, or earlier in the case of illness. The perinatal mortality among 1000 infants included 29 stillbirths at PMCH and 39 stillbirths in the community, and 21 neonatal deaths at PMCH and 26 neonatal deaths in the community. The PMR was 50/1000 at PMCH and 65/1000 in the community. The PMR in blocks that had implemented ICDS was 35-41/1000. The lowest PMR was among infants weighing 2501-3000 g; the highest PMR was among infants weighing 1001-1500 g. The lower PMR at PMCH was attributed to better prenatal care. The leading causes of perinatal death in both groups were trauma and stress of labor. The most common illnesses were diarrhea (51.2% of cases) and conjunctivitis (51.5%). 24.4% of infants born in the community suffered from various diseases, including diarrhea (7.7%), hyperbilirubinemia (1.1%), and umbilical sepsis, respiratory distress, and hypoglycemia (0.5%). Both the Medical College Hospital and other community health centers must improve health services in order to meet the target of 30-35/1000 PMR by the year 2000. PMID:9141812

  12. Oncology knowledge gap among freshly passed interns in a Government Medical College of Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Anis; Das, Anuradha; Ghosh, Ashok; Giri, Rajsekhar; Biswas, Nilay

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: A survey was conducted among freshly passed undergraduate doctors of a medical college in Eastern India with the aim to investigate their exposure to oncology patients, their knowledge about various aspects of oncology patient management and their confidence in managing patients with cancer. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twelve newly passed interns of a Government Medical College in Kolkata were interviewed using semi-structured partly open ended and partly closed end questionnaire. The questionnaire dealt with the qualitative and quantitative aspects of knowledge and perception of the interns about the problem of cancer and its management. Results: A total of 82 interns responded to the questionnaire, with a response rate of 73.2%. About 53% of the respondents have seen less than five patients during their undergraduate ward/clinical postings. Among the respondents, 71% felt they were confident in diagnosing cancer, and about 56% were confident in counseling of patient and their relatives about cancer. About 63% were aware about the role of surgery; however, only 32% and 37.5% were aware about the role of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, respectively. A dismal 12.5% were confident of care of terminal and late stage patients. Preparedness was correlated with exposure to patients with cancer (P = 0.03). Majority (87%) felt the need for incorporating oncology training at the undergraduate level and the most frequent method (67%) suggested for doing so was having separate posting in radiotherapy department/oncology wards. Conclusion: There is glaring knowledge gap among newly passed doctors and integrated oncology postings during undergraduate training and during internship may help seal this gap. PMID:24455554

  13. Validity of the Medical College Admission Test for predicting MD-PhD student outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bills, James L; VanHouten, Jacob; Grundy, Michelle M; Chalkley, Roger; Dermody, Terence S

    2016-03-01

    The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) is a quantitative metric used by MD and MD-PhD programs to evaluate applicants for admission. This study assessed the validity of the MCAT in predicting training performance measures and career outcomes for MD-PhD students at a single institution. The study population consisted of 153 graduates of the Vanderbilt Medical Scientist Training Program (combined MD-PhD program) who matriculated between 1963 and 2003 and completed dual-degree training. This population was divided into three cohorts corresponding to the version of the MCAT taken at the time of application. Multivariable regression (logistic for binary outcomes and linear for continuous outcomes) was used to analyze factors associated with outcome measures. The MCAT score and undergraduate GPA (uGPA) were treated as independent variables; medical and graduate school grades, time-to-PhD defense, USMLE scores, publication number, and career outcome were dependent variables. For cohort 1 (1963-1977), MCAT score was not associated with any assessed outcome, although uGPA was associated with medical school preclinical GPA and graduate school GPA (gsGPA). For cohort 2 (1978-1991), MCAT score was associated with USMLE Step II score and inversely correlated with publication number, and uGPA was associated with preclinical GPA (mspGPA) and clinical GPA (mscGPA). For cohort 3 (1992-2003), the MCAT score was associated with mscGPA, and uGPA was associated with gsGPA. Overall, MCAT score and uGPA were inconsistent or weak predictors of training metrics and career outcomes for this population of MD-PhD students. PMID:25952644

  14. Combination of Didactic Lectures with Problem-Based Learning Sessions in Physiology Teaching in a Developing Medical College in Nepal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosh, Sarmishtha; Dawka, Violet

    2000-01-01

    Introduces the SPICES curriculum of the Manipal College of Medical Sciences in Nepal, which is student centered, problem based, integrated, community-based, elective oriented, and systematic. Reports that the majority of students opined that the combination of didactic lectures and problem-based learning sessions were definitely beneficial.…

  15. Health Sciences and Medical College Preadmission Criteria and Prediction of In-Course Academic Performance: A Longitudinal Cohort Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Alwan, I.; Al Kushi, M.; Tamim, H.; Magzoub, M.; Elzubeir, M.

    2013-01-01

    High School, Aptitude and Achievement Tests have been utilized since 2002 in Saudi Arabia for the purpose of student selection to health sciences and medical colleges. However, longitudinal studies determining the predictive validity of these so-called cognitive tests for in-course performance is lacking. Our aim was to assess the predictive…

  16. Continuous Practice-Based Research on the Use of Standardized Patients: Experience from Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeng, Yong; Wu, Yan; Lai, Yanni; Lu, Yingqing; Zou, Hejian; Feng, Xueshan

    2014-01-01

    In the past ten years, the objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) project team of the Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University has continuously conducted further study on the development and maintenance of standardized patients and their application in teaching. The team carried out a series of randomized controlled studies on the…

  17. Indian Middle Class Makes Mission Out of Sending Children to College: Primary Focus on Engineering, Medical Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honawar, Vaishali

    2005-01-01

    In India, putting a child through engineering or medical college is, for many middle-class families, a life's mission in a way that is almost unknown in the United States. Though middle-class families in India have long steered their children into professions like engineering and medicine, the trend has taken off over the past decade. It's been…

  18. Motives and Perceived Consequences of Nonmedical ADHD Medication Use by College Students: Are Students Treating Themselves for Attention Problems?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabiner, David L.; Anastopoulos, Arthur D.; Costello, E. Jane; Hoyle, Rick H.; McCabe, Sean Esteban; Swartzwelder, H. Scott

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study examines why college students without a prescription take ADHD medication, what they perceive the consequences of this to be, and whether attention problems are associated with this behavior. Method: More than 3,400 undergraduates attending one public and one private university in the southeastern United States completed a…

  19. Providing Medical Information to College Health Center Personnel: A Circuit Librarian Service at the University of Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stumpff, Julia C.

    2003-01-01

    College health center personnel are no different from other health practitioners in their need for medical information. To help meet this need, the McKinley Health Center, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, developed a partnership in 1997 with the Library of the Health Sciences-Urbana, a regional site library of the University of Illinois at…

  20. Motives and Perceived Consequences of Nonmedical ADHD Medication Use by College Students: Are Students Treating Themselves for Attention Problems?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabiner, David L.; Anastopoulos, Arthur D.; Costello, E. Jane; Hoyle, Rick H.; McCabe, Sean Esteban; Swartzwelder, H. Scott

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study examines why college students without a prescription take ADHD medication, what they perceive the consequences of this to be, and whether attention problems are associated with this behavior. Method: More than 3,400 undergraduates attending one public and one private university in the southeastern United States completed a


  1. Notice on Organizing College Graduates to Help in Education, Agriculture, Medical Service, and Poverty Alleviation in Rural Areas (2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinese Education and Society, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The Three Assistances and One Alleviation Plan issued in 2006 is an expansion of the Western China Program issued in 2003. Voluntary services in agricultural, educational, and medical areas by college graduates are organized through the implementation of this policy. The plan aims to recruit 20,000 graduates per year and has provided more detailed


  2. The use of energy drinks, dietary supplements, and prescription medications by United States college students to enhance athletic performance.

    PubMed

    Hoyte, Christopher O; Albert, Donald; Heard, Kennon J

    2013-06-01

    While the use of performance enhancing substances by professional, collegiate, and Olympic athletes is well described, the rate of use in the general population is not well studied. We explored the use of energy drinks, dietary supplements, and prescription medications for the enhancement of athletic performance among college students using an ongoing survey system. We conducted a multi-round online questionnaire collecting data from self-identified students at two-year colleges, four-year colleges, online courses, or technical schools at least part-time during the specified sampling period. The sample is obtained through the use of a survey panel company in which respondents voluntarily register. Survey data were collected from December, 2010 through August, 2011. Subjects who reported participating in athletics were asked if they used any of the following substances to enhance athletic performance (1) energy drinks (2) dietary supplements (3) prescription medications within the last year. Data were analyzed from October, 2011 through January, 2012. There were 462 college students who responded to the survey reporting they participate in sports at various levels. Of these, 397 (85.9 %) responded that within the last year they used energy drinks, dietary supplements, or prescription medications to enhance athletic performance. Energy drinks had the highest prevalence (80.1 %), followed by dietary supplements (64.1 %) and prescription medications (53.3 %). Use was most prevalent amongst intercollegiate athletes (89.4 %) followed by club (88.5 %) and intermural (82.1 %) participants. The vast majority of survey respondents reported using energy drinks, dietary supplements, and prescription medications within the last year for athletic performance enhancement. PMID:23371823

  3. Glaucoma Awareness and Self-Care Practices among the Health Professionals in a Medical College Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Uma D

    2015-01-01

    Background Awareness and self-care practices concerning glaucoma, the silent thief of sight, is poor. This study was conducted to assess the same among health professionals in a medical college. Materials and Methods Institutional Ethics Committee Clearance was obtained and a descriptive semi-structured-questionnaire-based study was conducted. Informed written consent was taken from 114 (convenience sampling) health professionals (doctors/paramedicals) and a questionnaire were administered. Participants were questioned about the awareness of glaucoma, what are the features of glaucoma etc. Non-medical hospital workers were excluded. Data was analysed using Microsoft excel, descriptive statistics and chi-square test. Results Respondents included clinicians, non-clinician-doctors and paramedicals (36:30:48) {mean age: 37 years, males:females::58:56}. Glaucoma awareness was statistically similar in the three study groups: high IOP (82.4%, p=0.55); optic nerve damage (32.4%, p=0.79); normal/low IOP (38.6%, p=0.2); irreversible blindness (47.1%, p=0.29); risk factors like corticosteroids (57%, p=0.11), family history of glaucoma (74.5%, p=0.17) and diabetes (77.1%, p=0.84). Over 13% thought that screening is done after 60 years. Few had undertaken screening for themselves (16.60%) and family members (21.05%). Few knew tests (41.2%, p=0.04) and treatment modalities (41.2%, p=0.0516). Conclusion The study revealed unsatisfactory awareness and self-care practices concerning glaucoma among health professionals including clinicians despite studying ophthalmology, although it is presumed and predicted to be the contrary. This alarming revelation warrants the need for enrichment of glaucoma awareness programs. PMID:26816927

  4. Evaluation of the quality of the college library websites in Iranian medical Universities based on the Stover model

    PubMed Central

    Nasajpour, Mohammad Reza; Ashrafi-rizi, Hasan; Soleymani, Mohammad Reza; Shahrzadi, Leila; Hassanzadeh, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Today, the websites of college and university libraries play an important role in providing the necessary services for clients. These websites not only allow the users to access different collections of library resources, but also provide them with the necessary guidance in order to use the information. The goal of this study is the quality evaluation of the college library websites in Iranian Medical Universities based on the Stover model. Material and Methods: This study uses an analytical survey method and is an applied study. The data gathering tool is the standard checklist provided by Stover, which was modified by the researchers for this study. The statistical population is the college library websites of the Iranian Medical Universities (146 websites) and census method was used for investigation. The data gathering method was a direct access to each website and filling of the checklist was based on the researchers’ observations. Descriptive and analytical statistics (Analysis of Variance (ANOVA)) were used for data analysis with the help of the SPSS software. Findings: The findings showed that in the dimension of the quality of contents, the highest average belonged to type one universities (46.2%) and the lowest average belonged to type three universities (24.8%). In the search and research capabilities, the highest average belonged to type one universities (48.2%) and the lowest average belonged to type three universities. In the dimension of facilities provided for the users, type one universities again had the highest average (37.2%), while type three universities had the lowest average (15%). In general the library websites of type one universities had the highest quality (44.2%), while type three universities had the lowest quality (21.1%). Also the library websites of the College of Rehabilitation and the College of Paramedics, of the Shiraz University of Medical Science, had the highest quality scores. Discussion: The results showed that there was a meaningful difference between the quality of the college library websites and the university types, resulting in college libraries of type one universities having the highest average score and the college libraries of type three universities having the lowest score. PMID:25540794

  5. Preliminary report on anaerobic culture at Mymensingh Medical College Hospital in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S; Hossain, M A; Musa, A K; Shamsuzzaman, A K; Mahmud, M C; Nahar, K; Paul, S K; Sumona, A A; Begum, Z; Zahan, N A; Huda, S N; Ahmed, M U; Khan, A H; Kalam, A; Haque, N; Nasrin, S A

    2010-01-01

    Puerperal sepsis is an important cause of maternal morbidity and mortality in developing countries. This study was undertaken to isolate and identify the anaerobic bacterial agents of puerperal sepsis among the patients admitted in Mymensingh Medical College Hospital (MMCH) during the period from July 2006 to June 2007. Endocervical swabs/secretions were collected from 50 cases of puerperal sepsis and were cultured anaerobically. Anaerobiasis was done by using gas pack (BD GAS PAK TM EZ) in anaerobic jar. Out of 50 samples, 42(84%) yielded growth in cultures. Among 42 culture positive cases, 20(40%) were Aerobic organisms and 22(44%) were mixed, i.e., Aerobic and Anaerobic bacteria. The isolated Anaerobic organisms were Peptostreptococcus 14(63.63%), Bacteroides fragilis 3(13.64%), Prevotella melaninogenica 3(13.64%) and Clostridium perfringens 2(9.09%). As a preliminary study, it was observed that anaerobic culture could be carried out with available logistic arrangement. So, it was recommended to design further study on anaerobic bacterial isolation with particular emphasis on their antimicrobial susceptibility. PMID:20046165

  6. Study of referral pattern to ophthalmology outpatient department from various departments in the medical college.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rajesh S

    2011-02-01

    The study was aimed at finding out the pattern of referrals to ophthalmology outpatient department (OPD) in a teaching hospital and to provide guidelines for the improvement. Patients referred from various departments of a medical college situated in central India for ophthalmic evaluation were scrutinised for age, sex, diagnosis and the referring OPD. Out of 730 patients referred, 350 (47.95%) were males and 380 (52.02%) were females. The highest referral was found in the age group 45-64 years (22.60%). The highest referral was from the medicine OPD (58.22%) and the lowest was from psychiatry (2.05%). Maximum patients were referred for fundus examination (27.40%). While there were 280 patients (38.36%) who had refractive error, no diagnosis was established in 147 cases (20.14%). Ophthalmic opinion definitely helped patients as well as physician in the management of the patients. The study also stresses on some areas deficient, when unnecessary referrals could be avoided by arranging short annual refreshers courses to acquire basic skills in ophthalmology like visual acuity testing, colour vision, ophthalmoscopy and the diagnosis of common ocular conditions. We believe this kind of activity will help to make our services more efficient and cost effective. PMID:21888167

  7. [Preliminary exploration on educational reform of general western medical history in medical colleges and universities under new situations and circumstances].

    PubMed

    Fu, Deming; Wang, Hongqi; Yan, Juan; He, Peifeng

    2015-03-01

    With the appearance of the "biological-psychological-social" medical model, the purpose, value and significance of medicine are reviewed and reconsidered by the people, and the history of medicine becomes one of the core subjects in the medical humanist education, along with change of the teaching of general western medical history. Medical history is no longer the accumulation of the achievements of human knowledge and medical experience, the intellectual history of theorytransformation, and the history of reformation of medical technologies, but a concrete and colorful living situation, displayed by the scientists, physicians and normal peoplecommunity during the process of their consistent recognition and transformation on medicine. Therefore, the teaching of generalwestern medical history should adjust the compilation of teaching materials, update the educational concept, change the contents, methods of teaching and examination in order to lay stress on the cultural viewpoint and the function of humanity and quality of education. PMID:26420413

  8. Journal Club presentation in research orientation at Bahria University Medical & Dental College

    PubMed Central

    Rehman, Rehana; Rehan, Rabiya; Usmani, Ambreen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine faculty perception on journal club (JC) presentation at Bahria University Medical and Dental College (BUMDC), Karachi. Pakistan. Methods: It was a cross sectional study conducted from January 2009 to December 2012 to acquire faculty member’s feedback on JC presentations in structured meeting at BUMDC. Feedback was acquired by a self-reported questionnaire on a 3-pt Likert scale with a score of 1= disagree, 2= neutral, 3 = agree. Respondents were divided into Group I; senior faculty (professors, associates and assistants) and Group II of junior faculty (lecturers). Chi square test was applied to compare categorical variables; results considered significant with p value< 0.05. Result: A total of 75JC presentations were made in study period. In Group I, response was acquired by 5 Professors, 3 Associate Professors and 7 Assistant Professors whereas 34 lecturers comprised of Group II. Both groups responded to usefulness of JC equally without any significant difference. JC encouraged literature search in 35(72%), enabled 38(78%) to recall their knowledge and 34(70%) to understand study objectives. The participants 34(70%) were able to comprehend research methodology, 19(38%) understood biostatistics and 29(59%) evaluated the paper critically. The exercise motivated 36(74%) and 30(62%) participants were able to design their research projects. Conclusions: Orientation of research at BUMDC was made possible by JC discussions which encouraged literature review from reputable journals, understanding of research methodology and critical appraisals that facilitated formulation of research plans. PMID:25878630

  9. History of neurosurgery at Christian Medical College, Vellore: A pioneer's tale.

    PubMed

    Rajshekhar, Vedantam

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Neurological Sciences at Christian Medical College (CMC), Vellore was the first department to start neurosurgical and neurological services in India. Jacob Chandy started the department in 1949 against several odds. He started a formal training program in neurosurgery in 1958, for the first time in India, and went on to qualify several neurosurgeons, who in turn pioneered neurosurgical departments all over India. After 1970, K V Mathai and Jacob Abraham guided the department through some difficult times when there was a severe shortage of personnel and no faculty in the neurology section. Through their commitment and hard work, they continued not only the neurosurgery service but also looked after patients with neurological disorders. Mathew J Chandy, son of Jacob Chandy, joined them in 1980 and introduced micro-neurosurgery and several other neurosurgical techniques. Training of residents in micro-neurosurgery began in the early 1980s. The last quarter of a century has been a period of rapid progress for neurosurgery at CMC. There has been an exponential rise in the number of surgeries, number of residents and number of publications. Research has always been an integral part of the activities of the department and several high impact articles have been published by the faculty and residents. The neurosurgical faculty at CMC has also contributed significantly to organized neurosurgery in India and internationally, with five of them serving as President of the Neurological Society of India, a society which had Jacob Chandy as its founder President. With this heritage, the neurosurgery section at CMC, Vellore is likely to continue to provide high quality ethical neurosurgical care to patients from all over India and overseas. PMID:26954810

  10. Research on the Present Status of the Five-Year Medical Training Program in Chinese Medical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Yan; Dong, Zhe; Miao, Le; Ke, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The five-year program is the main path for undergraduate medical training in China. Studies have shown that during the past eleven years, the scale of medical student enrollment increased annually with a relatively simple entrance exam. The ideas, teaching contents and methods, assessment and evaluation should be updated and improved. In general,…

  11. Socioeconomic Characteristics and Motivations for Entering a Medical College--Differences between Graduate and Undergraduate Saudi Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AL-Jahdali, Hamdan; Alqarni, Turki; AL-Jahdali, Sarah; Baharoon, Salim A.; AL-Harbi, Abdullah S.; Binsalih, Salih A.; Alshimemeri, Abdulah; Al Sayyari, Abdullah A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the reasons for and the factors associated with deciding to enter a medical school in our graduate and undergraduate medical students and whether differ between the two groups. Method: This is a cross-sectional study. The survey we developed to investigate demographic and socioeconomic data and


  12. Research on the Present Status of the Five-Year Medical Training Program in Chinese Medical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Yan; Dong, Zhe; Miao, Le; Ke, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The five-year program is the main path for undergraduate medical training in China. Studies have shown that during the past eleven years, the scale of medical student enrollment increased annually with a relatively simple entrance exam. The ideas, teaching contents and methods, assessment and evaluation should be updated and improved. In general,


  13. The Departmental Technical Curriculum Instructional Costs of Emergency Medical Technician-Paramedic Programs in Two-Year Public Colleges in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruple, Judith A.

    This dissertation surveys, analyzes and reports the comparison of direct departmental costs associated with the technical core curriculum of emergency medical technology programs at nine public two-year community colleges for the academic years of 1989-90, 1990-91, and 1991-92. Data were collected using The Emergency Medical Training Technology


  14. Clinical Analysis of 35 Inpatients with Diffuse Panbronchiolitis in Peking Union Medical College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Lou, Li-Li; Gong, Hai-Hong; Zhang, Ming-Qiang; Gao, Jin-Ming

    2015-12-25

    Objective To summarize the clinical features of diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB). Method We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 35 patients who had been admitted to Peking Union Medical College Hospital from December 1996 to July 2014 due to DPB,which was confirmed basing on the diagnostic criteria proposed in 1998 by a working group of the Ministry of Health and Welfare of Japan or histopathological examination. Results The average age of these 35 patients (20 men and 15 women,with a sex ratio of 1.33 to 1) was (42.2<15.6) years,mainly distributed in the 40-49 age group. The average clinical history was (8.4<8.5) years. The main symptoms and signs of DPB included chronic cough (n=35,100%),copious purulent sputum production (n=31,88.6%),exertional dyspnoea (n=24,68.6%),end-inspiratory crackles (n=28,80.0%). Also,26 patients (74.3%) had a history of sinusitis. Cold agglutination test in 15 out of 15 patients were negative. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Haemophilus influenza were isolated from 22 patients (73.3%,22/30),and 26 patients (83.9%,26/31) had hypoxemia. The mean values of forced expiratory volume in the first second/forced vital capacity,residua volume/total lung volume,maximum forced expiratory volume of 50% lung volume,and maximum forced expiratory volume of 25% lung volume were 60.5%,53.8%,25.9%,and 31.2%,respectively. The most common CT findings from this cohort of patients were bronchiectasis and bronchiolitis,with nodular shadows distributed in a centrilobular pattern. Finally,29 patients were misdiagnosed as other conditions such as pulmonary infection and bronchiectasis. Conclusions DPB in Chinese populations have different presentations compared to that Japanese populations:for instance,the serum cold agglutination test always shows negative results,which is often inconsistent with the pathogens in sputum. DPB usually is misdiagnosed. Clinicians should take DPB into consideration when patients had pulmonary infection and sinusitis. PMID:26725398

  15. An analysis of bibliometric indicators, National Institutes of Health funding, and faculty size at Association of American Medical Colleges medical schools, 1997–2007EC

    PubMed Central

    Hendrix, Dean

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to analyze bibliometric data from ISI, National Institutes of Health (NIH)–funding data, and faculty size information for Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) member schools during 1997 to 2007 to assess research productivity and impact. Methods: This study gathered and synthesized 10 metrics for almost all AAMC medical schools (n = 123): (1) total number of published articles per medical school, (2) total number of citations to published articles per medical school, (3) average number of citations per article, (4) institutional impact indices, (5) institutional percentages of articles with zero citations, (6) annual average number of faculty per medical school, (7) total amount of NIH funding per medical school, (8) average amount of NIH grant money awarded per faculty member, (9) average number of articles per faculty member, and (10) average number of citations per faculty member. Using principal components analysis, the author calculated the relationships between measures, if they existed. Results: Principal components analysis revealed 3 major clusters of variables that accounted for 91% of the total variance: (1) institutional research productivity, (2) research influence or impact, and (3) individual faculty research productivity. Depending on the variables in each cluster, medical school research may be appropriately evaluated in a more nuanced way. Significant correlations exist between extracted factors, indicating an interrelatedness of all variables. Total NIH funding may relate more strongly to the quality of the research than the quantity of the research. The elimination of medical schools with outliers in 1 or more indicators (n = 20) altered the analysis considerably. Conclusions: Though popular, ordinal rankings cannot adequately describe the multidimensional nature of a medical school's research productivity and impact. This study provides statistics that can be used in conjunction with other sound methodologies to provide a more authentic view of a medical school's research. The large variance of the collected data suggests that refining bibliometric data by discipline, peer groups, or journal information may provide a more precise assessment. PMID:18979684

  16. Interventional Pain Management in Rheumatological Diseases - A Three Years Physiatric Experience in a Tertiary Medical College Hospital in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Suzon Al; Das, Gautam; Khan, Amin Uddin A

    2011-01-01

    Background Interventional pain management (IPM) is a branch of medical science that deals with management of painful medical conditions using specially equipped X-ray machines and anatomical landmarks. Interventional physiatry is a branch of physical medicine and rehabilitation that treats painful conditions through intervention in peripheral joints, the spine, and soft tissues. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted using three years of hospital records (2006 to 2008) from the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department at Chittagong Medical College Hospital in Bangladesh, with a view toward highlighting current interventional pain practice in a tertiary medical college hospital. Results The maximum amount of intervention was done in degenerative peripheral joint disorders (600, 46.0%), followed by inflammatory joint diseases (300, 23.0%), soft tissue rheumatism (300, 23.0%), and radicular or referred lower back conditions (100, 8.0%). Of the peripheral joints, the knee was the most common site of intervention. Motor stimulation-guided intralesional injection of methylprednisolone into the piriformis muscle was given in 10 cases of piriformis syndrome refractory to both oral medications and therapeutic exercises. Soft tissue rheumatism of unknown etiology was most common in the form of adhesive capsulitis (90, 64.3%), and is discussed separately. Epidural steroid injection was practiced for various causes of lumbar radiculopathy, with the exception of infective discitis. Conclusions All procedures were performed using anatomical landmarks, as there were no facilities for the C-arm/diagnostic ultrasound required for accurate and safe intervention. A dedicated IPM setup should be a requirement in all PMR departments, to provide better pain management and to reduce the burden on other specialties. PMID:22220242

  17. The Declining Applicant Pool: Implications for the Selection of Medical Students Proceedings of a Conference of the Association of American Medical Colleges (Washington, D.C., June 13-14, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Medical Colleges, Washington, DC.

    The proceedings of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) conference on the declining applicant pool and implications for the selection of medical students is presented in six parts. Part 1, The Down Side of the Slope, includes four papers: "The Declining Applicant Pool: An Overview" (R. Petersdorf); "Applications: Disease or…

  18. [Becoming medical doctors in colonial Korea: focusing on the faculty of medical colleges in early north Korea].

    PubMed

    Kim, Geun Bae

    2014-12-01

    This paper traces how Koreans of north area became medical doctors in colonial Korea. Most of the past research have focused only on the well-known medical doctors, or even when they discussed a great number of doctors, many research tended to only pay attention to the explicit final results of those doctors. This research, on the other hand, includes ordinary medical doctors as well as the renowed ones, and adjusts the focus to the lifetime period of their growth and activities. As a result, the misunderstanding and obscurity about the Korean medical doctors of north area during this period have been cleared. The new characteristics of the Korean medical doctors of this period have been found, along with their embodiment of historical significance. At the time, Koreans had to get through a number of qualifications in order to become doctors. First is the unique background of origin in which the family held interest in the modern education and was capable of supporting it financially. Second is the long-term status of education that the education from elementary to high school was completed without interruption. Third is the academic qualification that among various institutions of higher education, medical science was chosen as a major. Fourth is the condition of career in which as the career as a doctor had consistently continued. Thus, in oder to become a modern medical doctor, Koreans had to properly complete these multiple steps of process. The group of Korean medical doctors in north area, which was formed after getting through these series of process, possessed a number of characteristics. Firstly, as the upper-middle classes constituted the majority of medical doctors in Korea, the societal status of doctors rose and the foundation for the career as a doctor to be persisted as the family occupation settled. Secondly, the research career and academic degree became the principal method to escape from the discrimination and hierarchy existed between doctors. A PhD degree, especially, was the significant mark for clearly displaying the abilities and outcomes of the doctors. Lastly, the research career, education experience, clinical training and such that the Korean doctors of the period had built up were weak at the time, however, they were important sources for the future medical science development. Indeed, after Liberation, the rapid settlement and growth of Korea's medical science field were largely beholden to thus. Therefore, the growth of the Koreans as doctors did not cease in colonial Korea, but instead continued onto the history of future generations. In spite of the fact that the Korean doctors's growth and activities were greatly limited under the forceful policy of colonial domination of the era, the efforts the Korean doctors had put were not in vain. Likewise, if we do not fix our attention at the dominating policy and system, but rather put together the actors' correspondence and struggles of the period, then the Korean doctors will be a part of the living history. Hereby, the clue to the paradox between the suppression of medical science in colonial Korea and its leap after Liberation can be untied. PMID:25608505

  19. The Misuse and Diversion of Prescribed ADHD Medications by College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabiner, David L.; Anastopoulos, Arthur D.; Costello, E. Jane; Hoyle, Rick H.; McCabe, Sean Esteban; Swartzwelder, H. Scott

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study assesses the misuse and diversion of prescribed attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications. Method: One hundred fifteen students, attending two universities, with prescriptions for ADHD medications completed a Web survey in spring 2007. Results: Eighty-nine of 115 students (69%) used their ADHD medications as…

  20. The Misuse and Diversion of Prescribed ADHD Medications by College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabiner, David L.; Anastopoulos, Arthur D.; Costello, E. Jane; Hoyle, Rick H.; McCabe, Sean Esteban; Swartzwelder, H. Scott

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study assesses the misuse and diversion of prescribed attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medications. Method: One hundred fifteen students, attending two universities, with prescriptions for ADHD medications completed a Web survey in spring 2007. Results: Eighty-nine of 115 students (69%) used their ADHD medications as


  1. A century after Flexner: the need for reform in medical education from college and medical school through residency training.

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, Eddie L.

    2005-01-01

    The last major change in medical education occurred almost 100 years ago following an independent investigation conducted by Dr. Abraham Flexner in 1910. Although individual institutions have implemented drastic changes in their own curriculum and the accrediting agencies have mandated other initiatives intended to maintain medical education at the cutting edge of science and technology, many facets of medical education, from the premedical requirements through medical school and residency training, have not changed in nearly half a century. There are areas that are completely lacking in the process of training physicians, and perhaps the assumption was that physicians were intelligent enough to figure this out on their own. While that may have been true in the past when things were less complicated, this approach offers too many opportunities for misadventure, ultimately to the detriment of physicians and patients. Perhaps what is needed is a more rigorous, didactic training program and more thought put into areas where judgment, morality and ethics converge to create potential hazards that can defeat the finest training, equipment and intent. Although American residency programs produce physicians fully capable of independent practice after their prescribed periods of training, there are elements of these training programs that are outdated, costly and perhaps not the best way to get to the desired endpoint. Perhaps these can be revised to more accurately reflect the changing times. This manuscript addresses some of these issues at all levels of training with recommendations for corrective action. PMID:16296214

  2. The pitfalls of deducing ethics from behavioral economics: why the Association of American Medical Colleges is wrong about pharmaceutical detailing.

    PubMed

    Huddle, Thomas S

    2010-01-01

    The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) is urging academic medical centers to ban pharmaceutical detailing. This policy followed from a consideration of behavioral and neuroeconomics research. I argue that this research did not warrant the conclusions drawn from it. Pharmaceutical detailing carries risks of cognitive error for physicians, as do other forms of information exchange. Physicians may overcome such risks; those determined to do so may ethically engage in pharmaceutical detailing. Whether or not they should do so is a prudential judgment about which reasonable people may disagree. The AAMC's ethical condemnation of detailing is unwarranted and will subvert efforts to maintain a realm of physician discretion in clinical work that is increasingly threatened in our present practice environment. PMID:20077321

  3. Perceptions, barriers, and practices of medical research among students at Taibah College of Medicine, Madinah, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Noorelahi, Muatasim M; Soubhanneyaz, Abdulrahman A; Kasim, Khaled A

    2015-01-01

    Background Research is an extremely crucial element in the advancement and improvement of health care services provided to the public. Aim To assess perceptions, barriers, and practices of medical research among students at Taibah College of Medicine, Madinah, Saudi Arabia. Methods A cross-sectional, self-administered, validated, pretested, and structured questionnaire was completed by 233 medical students (third, fourth, and fifth study year). The questionnaire consisted of demographic data, students’ attitude, practices, and barriers. The collected data were analyzed using appropriate statistical methods including predictive logistic regression models. The level of statistical significance was defined as P#0.05. Results The overall response rate was 64.7% (233/360). The mean age of the studied students was 22.6±1.1 years, of them 50.1% were males and 48.9% were females. The average attitude score was significantly higher among fourth- and fifth-year medical students compared with that of the third-year students. There has been a statistically significant difference between male and female students regarding their practice of medical research where the higher percent of students reported participation in previous medical research was among female students (79%). The most important obstacle predictors implicated in not conducting research among all the studied students were inadequate facility for research, lack of interest by faculty or guide, and unavailability of the samples or patients. Conclusion The students in the study showed a moderately high positive attitude toward medical research. Addressing and solving perceived students’ barriers by faculty staff and administrators are essential in order to ensure an improvement in research activities among medical students. PMID:26185479

  4. Understanding the interrelationship of instructional technology use and organizational culture: a case study of a veterinary medical college.

    PubMed

    Stansberry, Susan L; Harris, Edward L

    2005-01-01

    Many predicted that in the latter part of the twentieth century modern technology would revolutionize higher education and "create a second Renaissance" (Sculley J. The relationship between business and higher education: A perspective on the 21st century. Commun ACM32:1056-1061, 1989 p1061). However, as the reality of the twenty-first century has set in, it is apparent that these revolutionary prophecies have fallen short. Using the lens of Douglas's Typology of Grid and Group, this case study examines (1) the organizational context of a veterinary medical college at a large Midwestern university; (2) individual faculty members' preferences toward instructional technology use; and (3) the interrelationship of culture and the decision process to implement instructional technology use in curricula. The study has several implications for instructional technology use in veterinary medical educational settings that help explain how cultural context can guide leadership decisions as well as influence faculty motivation and preference. The findings suggest that a key mitigating factor to instructional technology implementation is conflict or concord between the cultural biases of faculty members and actual cultural identity of the college (Stansberry S, Harris EL. Understanding why faculty use (or don't use) IT: Implementation of instructional technology from an organizational culture perspective. In Simonson M, Crawford M, eds. 25th Annual Proceedings: Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the 2002 National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology, vol. 1. North Miami Beach, FL: Nova Southeastern University:viii, 507). PMID:15834818

  5. Pattern and Trend of Morbidity in the Infectious Disease Ward of North Bengal Medical College and Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Basak, Moumita; Chaudhuri, Sudip Banik; Ishore, Kaushik; Das, Dilip Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background In spite of experiencing a large decline in the spread and burden of infectious diseases, the Global Burden of Disease Project suggests that about 30% of the disease burden in India is attributable to infections. The hospital data constitute a basic and primary source of information for continuous follow up of this changing pattern of morbidity and mortality. Aim To identify the pattern and trend of different infectious diseases among admissions in the Infectious Disease ward of North Bengal Medical College and Hospital. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of inpatient hospital database over 5 years period (January 2008 – December 2012) of Infectious Disease ward of North Bengal Medical College & Hospital. Results Among 3277 admissions in the Infectious Disease ward during 2008-12, diarrhoeal diseases (84.3%) were most common. The highest mortality was recorded for rabies cases (83.9%), followed by tetanus (32.6%) and diphtheria (27.3%). The majority cases of diphtheria (78.9%) and measles (53.1%) belonged to below 9 years age. Except the year 2010, there was a gradual rise in admissions from 2008 to 2012. Conclusion Review of hospital records provided information regarding the pattern of diseases but no definite trend among admissions in the infectious diseases ward. PMID:26674374

  6. Information Literacy among Medical Students in the College of Health Sciences in Niger Delta University, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baro, Emmanuel E.; Endouware, Benake-ebide C.; Ubogu, Janet O.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to investigate whether undergraduate students in the College of Health Sciences in Niger Delta University are information literate, and to determine whether they are aware of and use different information resources including electronic ones, and to assess their ability to evaluate information before use.…

  7. Illicit Use of Prescription ADHD Medications on a College Campus: A Multimethodological Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSantis, Alan D.; Webb, Elizabeth M.; Noar, Seth M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors used quantitative and qualitative methodologies to investigate college students' perceptions and use of illegal Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) stimulants during spring and summer 2006. Participants: From fall 2005 through fall 2006, the authors studied 1,811 undergraduates at a large, public, southeastern


  8. Psychological Needs of Engineering, Pre-law, Pre-Medical, and Undecided College Freshmen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohn, Martin J., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    It can be concluded that psychological needs are related to the expressed probable careers of college men, although the role of these needs is still unclear. Of the three occupations in this study, the needs of students preparing for law were the most distinctive. (Author)

  9. Information Literacy among Medical Students in the College of Health Sciences in Niger Delta University, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baro, Emmanuel E.; Endouware, Benake-ebide C.; Ubogu, Janet O.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to investigate whether undergraduate students in the College of Health Sciences in Niger Delta University are information literate, and to determine whether they are aware of and use different information resources including electronic ones, and to assess their ability to evaluate information before use.


  10. Illicit Use of Prescription ADHD Medications on a College Campus: A Multimethodological Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSantis, Alan D.; Webb, Elizabeth M.; Noar, Seth M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors used quantitative and qualitative methodologies to investigate college students' perceptions and use of illegal Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) stimulants during spring and summer 2006. Participants: From fall 2005 through fall 2006, the authors studied 1,811 undergraduates at a large, public, southeastern…

  11. Acceptability of Male Circumcision among College Students in Medical Universities in Western China: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaobo; Huang, Mingbo; Deng, Wei; Huang, Jiegang; Liang, Bingyu; Qin, Bo; Upur, Halmurat; Zhong, Chaohui; Wang, Qianqiu; Wang, Qian; Ruan, Yuhua; Ye, Li; Liang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Background Male circumcision (MC) has been shown to reduce the risk of female to male transmission of HIV. The goal of this survey was to explore MC’s acceptability and the factors associated with MC among college students in medical universities in western China. Methods A cross-sectional study was carried out in three provinces in western China (Guangxi, Chongqing and Xinjiang) to assess the acceptability of MC as well as to discover factors associated with the acceptability among college students in medical universities. A total of 1,790 uncircumcised male students from three medical universities were enrolled in this study. In addition, 150 students who had undergone MC were also enrolled in the survey, and they participated in in-depth interviews. Results Of all the uncircumcised participants (n = 1,790), 55.2% (n = 988) were willing to accept MC. Among those who accepted MC, 67.3% thought that MC could improve their sexual partners’ hygiene, 46.3% believed that HIV and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) could be partially prevented by MC. The multivariable logistic regression indicates that MC’s acceptability was associated with three factors: the redundant foreskin (OR = 10.171, 95% CI = 7.629–13.559), knowing the hazard of having a redundant foreskin (OR = 1.597, 95% CI = 1.097–2.323), and enhancing sexual pleasure (OR = 1.628, 95% CI = 1.312–2.021). The in-depth interviews for subjects who had undergone MC showed that the major reason for having MC was the redundant foreskin (87.3%), followed by the benefits and the fewer complications of having MC done. In addition, most of these participants (65.3%) said that the MC could enhance sexual satisfaction. Conclusions MC’s acceptance among college students in medical universities is higher than it is among other populations in western China. An implementation of an MC programme among this population is feasible in the future. PMID:26390212

  12. Attitude of Medical and Dental First Year Students Towards Teaching Methods in a Medical College of Northern India.

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ramta; Singh, KD; Kumar, Avnish

    2014-01-01

    Background: Teaching in most Asian countries is still dominated by teacher-centered classrooms in which students passively receive information from the teacher. Studies have shown that students’ inactivity in traditional teacher-centered classes makes them bored that consequently decrease their concentration and learning. To counter these problems active learning methods are being promoted to enhance their interest in studying. This present study was done to explore effective teaching system from a student’s perspective. The aim of the study was to examine the attitude of medical and dental first year students towards teaching methods. Materials and Methods: The study was undertaken at on 150 Medical and Dental first year students. The study was conducted using general questionnaires along with feedback form to know their opinion about different teaching methodology. Results: A 94.67% of the students were unsatisfied with traditional Lecture teaching. 89.33% favoured combination of traditional lectures and active learning techniques, 74.67% students find active learning methods to be interesting, 77.33% found them as attention seekers, 89.33% are motivated for in-depth study and 85.33% students are motivated for independents learning. 100% students agreed that active learning methods provide opportunities of student interaction while 86.67% students are happy with the teacher–student interaction it provides. Audio-visual aids are the most favoured (94.67%) and test questions are most criticized active teaching method. Conclusion: Our study disclosed that the majority of student’s positively believe in using different active learning techniques for classroom activities. PMID:25654017

  13. Stress and Its Effects on Medical Students: A Cross-sectional Study at a College of Medicine in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    AlKanhal, Abdulaziz A.; Mahmoud, Ebrahim S.; Ponnamperuma, Gominda G.; Alfaris, Eiad A.

    2011-01-01

    Medical education is perceived as being stressful, and a high level of stress may have a negative effect on cognitive functioning and learning of students in a medical school. This cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence of stress among medical students and to observe an association between the levels of stress and their academic performance, including the sources of their stress. All the medical students from year one to year five levels from the College of Medicine, King Saud University, were enrolled in the study. The study was conducted using Kessler10 psychological distress (K10) inventory, which measures the level of stress according to none, mild, moderate, and severe categories. The prevalence of stress was measured and compared with the five study variables, such as gender, academic year, academic grades, regularity to course attendance, and perceived physical problems. The response rate among the study subjects was 87% (n=892). The total prevalence of stress was 63%, and the prevalence of severe stress was 25%. The prevalence of stress was higher (p<0.5) among females (75.7%) than among males (57%) (odds ratio=2.3, χ2=27.2, p<0.0001). The stress significantly decreased as the year of study increased, except for the final year. The study variables, including being female (p<0.0001), year of study (p<0.001), and presence of perceived physical problems (p<0.0001), were found as independent significant risk factors for the outcome variables of stress. Students' grade point average (academic score) or regularity to attend classes was not significantly associated with the stress level. The prevalence of stress was higher during the initial three years of study and among the female students. Physical problems are associated with high stress levels. Preventive mental health services, therefore, could be made an integral part of routine clinical services for medical students, especially in the initial academic years, to prevent such occurrence. PMID:22106758

  14. Curriculum design of emergency medical services program at the College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Alanazi, Abdullah Foraih

    2012-01-01

    Background The emergency medical services program at the College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, was adapted from the integrated problem-based learning curriculum of Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia. Purpose The purpose of this article is to discuss the major adaptations required for adoption of the full-fledged PBL curriculum, use of sequential blocks, and multilayer alignment of the curriculum. Methods A logical model and step-by-step approach were used to design the curriculum. Several studies using Delphi methods, focus group interviews, and expert opinions were performed to identify the priority health problems; related competencies, learning objectives, and learning strategies; the web-based curriculum for delivery; student assessment; and program evaluation. Results Sixty priority health problems were identified for inclusion in different blocks of the curriculum. Identified competencies matched the satisfaction of different stakeholders, and ascertained learning objectives and strategies were aligned with the competencies. A full-fledged web-based curriculum was designed and an assessment was created that aligned with a blueprint of the objectives and the mode of delivery. Conclusion Step-by-step design ensures the multilayer alignment of the curriculum, including priority health problems, competencies, objectives, student assessment, and program evaluation. PMID:23761998

  15. Curricular Reform of the 4th Year of Medical School: The Colleges Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Stuart J.; Wilkes, Michael S.; Usatine, Richard P.; Hoffman, Jerome R.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the evolution of the fourth year of medical school in the United States, current strengths and weaknesses of the fourth year program, and a major curricular reform initiative at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. (SLD)

  16. Assessment of risk factors associated with hypertension among undergraduate medical students in a medical college in Odisha

    PubMed Central

    Patnaik, Archana; Choudhury, Kailash Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is a non communicable disease of major public health problem resulting increased morbidity and mortality among population. Prehypertension in adolescents and young adults again an important risk factor for developing hypertension in future. So the present study was carried out among medical students with the objectives of (1) to find out the risk factors associated with prehypertension and hypertension, (2) to suggest measures to decrease risk factors. Materials and Methods: It was a cross-sectional study and study duration was from september 2011 to November 2011. The sample size was 200 and the study subjects was selected by systematic random sampling method. A predesigned pretested schedule was used to collect data. Blood pressure (BP) was measured in sitting posture using a standard sphygmomanometer on two different settings and the average was taken for analysis. Results: All the participants were between 18-21 years. Out of 200 study subjects,112 were males and 88 were females. The prehypertension and hypertension percentage was 67% among study subjects. Statistical analysis done was percentage, Chi-square test. Conclusion: Health-care providers should recognize the increased CVD risk of prehypertension and should seek to identify and treat the modifiable risk factors in these persons. PMID:25789264

  17. Synopsis of Diet in Dermatology: A one day CME conducted by the Department of Dermatology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal, March 3, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Smitha S; Nayak, Sudhir UK; Shenoi, Shrutakirthi Damodar; Pai, Sathish Ballambat

    2013-01-01

    Food is intricately related to mind and body and is one of the elements sustaining life, in disease as well as in health. There are many myths and misgivings regarding partake of food and its medicinal properties. The Department of Dermatology, Kasturba Medical College (KMC), Manipal organized a continuing medical education (CME) on Diet in Dermatology on 3rd March 2013 focusing on pertinent issues regarding diet and medicinal use of food. PMID:24350027

  18. Are computer-based educational materials recognized as publications? An analysis of promotion documents at American medical colleges.

    PubMed Central

    Bader, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    A generalized perception exists that faculty will not be properly rewarded for efforts in developing computer-based educational materials. Faculty governed by traditional promotion and tenure systems thus may be reluctant to devote energies towards development of these materials. Recent national panels on educational reform have called for a reexamination of academic reward structures to insure that faculty receive appropriate scholarly recognition for materials developed in these new formats. A study of policy documents from accredited medical colleges in the United States was conducted to determine the extent to which academic health science institutions have adopted policies to grant recognition of computer-based materials equivalent to that accorded traditional print publications. Results revealed that while some progress has been made by leading-edge institutions, in three-quarters of the institutions, development of computer-based educational materials is considered evidence in support of teaching, not the more highly rewarded research or scholarly activity. PMID:8130576

  19. Providing medical information to college health center personnel: a circuit Librarian Service at the University of Illinois.

    PubMed

    Stumpff, Julia C

    2003-01-01

    College health center personnel are no different from other health practitioners in their need for medical information. To help meet this need, the McKinley Health Center, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, developed a partnership in 1997 with the Library of the Health Sciences-Urbana, a regional site library of the University of Illinois at Chicago campus. This partnership led to the adoption of circuit librarianship, a dynamic outreach model, to enhance access to health information for McKinley Health Center personnel. A circuit librarian consults with health center personnel during regularly scheduled on-site visits to the center and its satellite office. Upon returning to the resource library, the circuit librarian conducts research for clinical information on behalf of the center's personnel, then sees that articles, books, and relevant Web sites are identified and delivered to assist in answering questions regarding disease management, drug therapy, wellness, and health administration. PMID:14765763

  20. Cigarette smoking among female students in five medical and nonmedical colleges

    PubMed Central

    Abdulghani, Hamza M; Alrowais, Norah A; Alhaqwi, Ali I; Alrasheedi, Ahmed; Al-Zahir, Mohammed; Al-Madani, Ahmed; Al-Eissa, Abdulaziz; Al-Hakmi, Bader; Takroni, Redwan; Ahmad, Farah

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of smoking, knowledge about the ill effects of smoking on health, and the influence of family members’ smoking habits among Saudi female students. Methods This is a type of cross-sectional study. A sample of 1,070 female students was selected by a nonrandom and convenient sampling method from five colleges (Medicine, Business and Administration, Computer Sciences, Education, and Languages and Translation) of King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A self-administrated questionnaire was used to determine the personal, social, and educational characteristics of the respondents. In addition, questions about their smoking types, status, duration of smoking, knowledge about the ill effects of smoking, daily cigarette consumption, and reasons for quitting smoking were included. Results The students’ response rate was 85%. The prevalence of current smoking was 4.3% and 5.6% for cigarettes and water-pipes, respectively, whereas 3.9% of the participants were ex-smokers. The prevalence of current smoking was highest in the College of Business and Administration (10.81%) and lowest in the College of Medicine (0.86%). The majority (77%) of the smokers’ parents (current and ex-smokers) were also smokers. More than half (54%) of the smokers started their smoking habit for entertainment, and 44.4% of the participants did not know that smoking causes serious health problems. The most common factors for quitting smoking were health concerns (54%), religious beliefs (29%), and parent’s advice (17%). Conclusion The study concludes that the prevalence of smoking varies in different subject streams and that family and friends have a great influence on individuals starting or stopping smoking. Extensive health education programs are needed to educate young women on the health hazards of smoking and help stop them from smoking. PMID:23986648

  1. A Changing Tide: What the New ‘Foundations of Behavior’ Section of the 2015 Medical College Admissions Test¼ Might Mean for Undergraduate Neuroscience Programs

    PubMed Central

    Roxanne Prichard, J.

    2015-01-01

    Each year over 50,000 college students and alumni take the Medical College Admissions Test¼ (MCAT) and apply for admissions to medical school. After an extensive review process, the MCAT has undergone a major revision in form and content in order to better reflect the competencies medical students will need to be successful in their training and practice. Starting in April 2015, for the first time since the test’s inception, the MCAT will include social and behavioral sciences content. The new section of the MCAT exam titled “The Psychological, Social and Biological Foundations of Behavior” will test pre-health competencies that combine content knowledge with scientific inquiry and reasoning skills. Anticipating growing interest in curriculum related to the new competency based content on the exam, the AAMC (Association of American Medical Colleges) established the Pre-health Collection within MedEdPORTAL’s iCollaborative, a free repository of teaching resources. This online space gives faculty members the opportunity to share access to instructional resources in order to prepare or revise courses to include pre-health competencies. As a result of the increased content related to mind-body connections, undergraduate pre-medical students will be more likely to enroll in neuroscience courses to learn these competencies, or declare neuroscience majors, as the typical neuroscience major course requirements now meet most of the suggested pre-requisite competencies for medical school. PMID:25838809

  2. A changing tide: what the new 'foundations of behavior' section of the 2015 medical college admissions testź might mean for undergraduate neuroscience programs.

    PubMed

    Roxanne Prichard, J

    2015-01-01

    Each year over 50,000 college students and alumni take the Medical College Admissions Testź (MCAT) and apply for admissions to medical school. After an extensive review process, the MCAT has undergone a major revision in form and content in order to better reflect the competencies medical students will need to be successful in their training and practice. Starting in April 2015, for the first time since the test's inception, the MCAT will include social and behavioral sciences content. The new section of the MCAT exam titled "The Psychological, Social and Biological Foundations of Behavior" will test pre-health competencies that combine content knowledge with scientific inquiry and reasoning skills. Anticipating growing interest in curriculum related to the new competency based content on the exam, the AAMC (Association of American Medical Colleges) established the Pre-health Collection within MedEdPORTAL's iCollaborative, a free repository of teaching resources. This online space gives faculty members the opportunity to share access to instructional resources in order to prepare or revise courses to include pre-health competencies. As a result of the increased content related to mind-body connections, undergraduate pre-medical students will be more likely to enroll in neuroscience courses to learn these competencies, or declare neuroscience majors, as the typical neuroscience major course requirements now meet most of the suggested pre-requisite competencies for medical school. PMID:25838809

  3. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice of Medical Students Regarding Occupational Risks of Hepatitis B Virus in College of Medicine, Aljouf University

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hazmi, AH

    2015-01-01

    Background: Medical students represent a population that is at high-risk group for acquiring and spreading hepatitis B infection (HBV). Aim: This study was designed to evaluate the knowledge and attitudes among male student regarding occupational risks of HBV infection. Subjects and Methods: During March 2013, a descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on medical students of AlJouf University College of Medicine. Structured questionnaires of 16 different statements concerning knowledge base of HBV, attitudes as well as practices toward occupational risks of hepatitis B were distributed to 120 students. Results: Response rate of 76.7% (92/120) yielded 92 questionnaires for analysis. Majority of the students surveyed 62.0% (57/92) perceived that they are at high risk of contracting and spreading HBV. The rate of this perception among students who had a history of training on universal precautions was more than that found among those who did not have (70.8% vs. 58.8%; P < 0.01). Most of the students surveyed 63.0% (58/92) considered vaccine is safe and more than half 52.2% (48/92) were vaccinated against HBV. There were a very strong agreement about needlestick 92.4% (85/92) and blood 87.0% (80/92) as efficient modes of HBV transmission. Seventy-two percent of the participants did not have any knowledge about post-exposure prophylaxis for hepatitis B. A significant relationship was found between students who had a history of training on universal precautions and knowledge about post needlestick injury (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Infectious occupational risk of hepatitis B remains a challenge for medical students and the foundations of the medical institutes. Students must complete an infection control training before they start their clinical education. PMID:25745570

  4. What Role Does Schema Play in Preparing Minority Postbaccalaureate Students for the Reading Comprehension Section of the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT)?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Gina; Verhulst, Steve

    2007-01-01

    Problem: Minority students often score lower than majority students on the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) Verbal Reasoning section. Method: To determine what role schema plays in reading comprehension in 64 adult minority students, the Treatment group viewed a slide presentation regarding a topic that both groups would be tested on in a


  5. The Impact of an Online Educational Video and a Medical Amnesty Policy on College Students' Intentions to Seek Help in the Presence of Alcohol Poisoning Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oster-Aaland, Laura; Thompson, Kevin; Eighmy, Myron

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed the impact of a medical amnesty policy and an online alcohol poisoning video on college students' intentions to seek help when witnessing alcohol poisoning symptoms. Students were randomly assigned to receive an amnesty policy, alcohol poisoning video, or both. The group that received both treatments was most likely to seek…

  6. Over-the-Counter Medication and Herbal or Dietary Supplement Use in College: Dose Frequency and Relationship to Self-Reported Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stasio, Michael J.; Curry, Kim; Sutton-Skinner, Kelly M.; Glassman, Destinee M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: A growing number of researchers have examined the use of over-the-counter (OTC) medications and herbal or dietary supplements among college students. There is concern about the efficacy and safety of these products, particularly because students appear to use them at a higher rate than does the general public. Participants and Methods:


  7. The Impact of an Online Educational Video and a Medical Amnesty Policy on College Students' Intentions to Seek Help in the Presence of Alcohol Poisoning Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oster-Aaland, Laura; Thompson, Kevin; Eighmy, Myron

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed the impact of a medical amnesty policy and an online alcohol poisoning video on college students' intentions to seek help when witnessing alcohol poisoning symptoms. Students were randomly assigned to receive an amnesty policy, alcohol poisoning video, or both. The group that received both treatments was most likely to seek


  8. Over-the-Counter Medication and Herbal or Dietary Supplement Use in College: Dose Frequency and Relationship to Self-Reported Distress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stasio, Michael J.; Curry, Kim; Sutton-Skinner, Kelly M.; Glassman, Destinee M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: A growing number of researchers have examined the use of over-the-counter (OTC) medications and herbal or dietary supplements among college students. There is concern about the efficacy and safety of these products, particularly because students appear to use them at a higher rate than does the general public. Participants and Methods:…

  9. An evaluation of the performance in the UK Royal College of Anaesthetists primary examination by UK medical school and gender

    PubMed Central

    Bowhay, Andrew R; Watmough, Simon D

    2009-01-01

    Background There has been comparatively little consideration of the impact that the changes to undergraduate curricula might have on postgraduate academic performance. This study compares the performance of graduates by UK medical school and gender in the Multiple Choice Question (MCQ) section of the first part of the Fellowship of the Royal College of Anaesthetists (FRCA) examination. Methods Data from each sitting of the MCQ section of the primary FRCA examination from June 1999 to May 2008 were analysed for performance by medical school and gender. Results There were 4983 attempts at the MCQ part of the examination by 3303 graduates from the 19 United Kingdom medical schools. Using the standardised overall mark minus the pass mark graduates from five medical schools performed significantly better than the mean for the group and five schools performed significantly worse than the mean for the group. Males performed significantly better than females in all aspects of the MCQ – physiology, mean difference = 3.0% (95% CI 2.3, 3.7), p < 0.001; pharmacology, mean difference = 1.7% (95% CI 1.0, 2.3), p < 0.001; physics with clinical measurement, mean difference = 3.5% (95% CI 2.8, 4.1), p < 0.001; overall mark, mean difference = 2.7% (95% CI 2.1, 3.3), p < 0.001; and standardised overall mark minus the pass mark, mean difference = 2.5% (95% CI 1.9, 3.1), p < 0.001. Graduates from three medical schools that have undergone the change from Traditional to Problem Based Learning curricula did not show any change in performance in any aspects of the MCQ pre and post curriculum change. Conclusion Graduates from each of the medical schools in the UK do show differences in performance in the MCQ section of the primary FRCA, but significant curriculum change does not lead to deterioration in post graduate examination performance. Whilst females now outnumber males taking the MCQ, they are not performing as well as the males. PMID:19563655

  10. Analytical Chemistry for Premedical Students: Views of College Teachers and Medical School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickral, George M.

    1976-01-01

    Presents the results of a questionnaire sent to analytical chemistry instructors and medical, dental, and osteopathic school instructors requesting them to rate in order of importance a list of topics for an analytical chemistry course for premedical and health science students. (MLH)

  11. Improving educational environment in medical colleges through transactional analysis practice of teachers

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Marina

    2012-01-01

    Context: A FAIMER (Foundation for Advancement in International Medical Education and Research) fellow organized a comprehensive faculty development program to improve faculty awareness resulting in changed teaching practices and better teacher student relationships using Transactional Analysis (TA). Practicing TA tools help development of ‘awareness’ about intrapersonal and interpersonal processes. Objectives: To improve self-awareness among medical educators.To bring about self-directed change in practices among medical educators.To assess usefulness of TA tools for the same. Methods: An experienced trainer conducted a basic course (12 hours) in TA for faculty members. The PAC model of personality structure, functional fluency model of personal functioning, stroke theory on motivation, passivity and script theories of adult functional styles were taught experientially with examples from the Medical Education Scenario. Self-reported improvement in awareness and changes in practices were assessed immediately after, at three months, and one year after training. Findings: The mean improvement in self-'awareness' is 13.3% (95% C.I 9.3-17.2) among nineteen participants. This persists one year after training. Changes in practices within a year include, collecting feedback, new teaching styles and better relationship with students. Discussion and Conclusions: These findings demonstrate sustainable and measurable improvement in self-awareness by practice of TA tools. Improvement in self-'awareness' of faculty resulted in self-directed changes in teaching practices. Medical faculty has judged the TA tools effective for improving self-awareness leading to self-directed changes. PMID:24358808

  12. Introduction of Team-Based Learning (TBL) at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College: Experience with the Ectoparasites Module

    PubMed Central

    Nyindo, Mramba; Kitau, Jovin; Lisasi, Esther; Kapanda, Gibson; Matowo, Johnston; Francis, Patrick; Bartlett, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Contemporary teaching in sub-Saharan African medical schools is largely through didactic and problem-based approaches. These schools face challenges from burgeoning student numbers, severe faculty shortages, faculty without instruction in teaching methods, and severe infrastructure inadequacies. Team-based learning (TBL) is a pedagogy which may be attractive because it spares faculty time. TBL was piloted in a module on ectoparasites at the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College (KCMU Co). Methods TBL orientation began 6 weeks before starting the module. Students were issued background readings and individual and group readiness assessment tests, followed by module application, discussion, and evaluation. At completion, student perceptions of TBL were assessed using a 5-point Likert scale evaluating 6 domains, with a score of 5 being most favorable. Strength of consensus measures (sCns) were applied. Final examination scores were compiled for 2011 (didactic) and 2012 (TBL). Results 158 students participated in the module. The mean student scores across the 6 domains ranged from 4.2–4.5, with a high degree of consensus (range 85–90%). The final examination scores improved between 2011 and 2012 Conclusions KCMU Co student perceptions of TBL were very positive, and final exam grades improved. These observations suggest future promise for TBL applications at KCMU Co and potentially other schools. PMID:24491164

  13. Assessment of a Group Activity Based Educational Method to Teach Research Methodology to Undergraduate Medical Students of a Rural Medical College in Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Uday Shankar; Solanki, Rajanikant

    2015-01-01

    Context Early undergraduate exposure to research helps in producing physicians who are better equipped to meet their professional needs especially the analytical skills. Aim To assess the effectiveness and acceptability of small group method in teaching research methodology. Setting Sixth semester medical undergraduates (III MBBS-part1) of a self-financed rural medical college. Materials and Methods The workshop was of two full days duration consisting of daily two sessions by faculty for 30 minutes, followed by group activity of about four hours and presentation by students at the end of the day. A simple 8 steps approach was used. These steps are Identify a Problem, Refine the Problem, Determine a Solution, Frame the Question, Develop a Protocol, Take Action, Write the Report and Share your Experience. A Pre-test and post-test assessment was carried out using a questionnaire followed by anonymous feedback at the end of the workshop. The responses were evaluated by blinded evaluator. Results There were 95 (94.8%) valid responses out of the 99 students, who attended the workshop. The mean Pre-test and post-test scores were 4.21 and 10.37 respectively and the differences were found to be significant using Wilcoxon Sign Rank test (p<0.001). The median feedback score regarding relevance, skill learning, quality of facilitation, gain in knowledge was four and that of experience of group learning was 5 on a Likert scale of 1-5.There were no significant differences between male and female students in terms of Pre-test, post-test scores and overall gain in scores. Conclusion Participatory research methodology workshop can play a significant role in teaching research to undergraduate students in an interesting manner. However, the long term effect of such workshops needs to be evaluated. PMID:26393146

  14. Biomedical engineering: Baylor Medical College-preparing for the space age, 1956-1974.

    PubMed

    Geddes, L A

    1991-01-01

    The establishment of a six-week summer program entitled ;Classical Physiology with Modern Instrumentation', and its contents are described. The program was designed to train physicians and basic life scientists in the fundamentals of electronics and to train engineers of all specialities in basic medical physiology. During the period 1957-1974, over 1000 trainees from all over the world completed the course. PMID:18238383

  15. Medical student in the family health strategy on the first years of college: perception of graduates.

    PubMed

    Ricardo, Maria Paula Ferreira; Marin, Maria José Sanches; Otani, Marcia Aparecida Padovan; Marin, Marina Sanches

    2014-12-01

    There is a lack of knowledge about the effective value of the experience gained by medical students who participate in the Family Health Strategy (Estratégia Saúde da Família (ESF)) during the early stages of their medical training. This teaching strategy is based on learning by experiencing the problems that exist in real life. This study proposed to understand the value of this teaching strategy from the viewpoint of the students who had participated, after their graduation. The method adopted was a qualitative study conducted through interviews with students who graduated in the years 2009, 2010 and 2011. The data analysis used the hermeneutic dialectic technique as its model. The graduates considered that this experience enabled them to understand the organization and functioning of the health service and the context of the daily life of the users. This experience facilitated the doctor patient relationship, the development of clinical reasoning and the bond with the user. However the students emphasized that a lack of maturity prevented them gaining a higher level of benefit from the experience. Therefore, although the structure of the course is permeated by advances and challenges, it was concluded that this experience contributed to the student's learning of certain essential elements of medical training. PMID:25830753

  16. Learning approach among health sciences students in a medical college in Nepal: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dev Kumar; Yadav, Ram Lochan; Sharma, Deepak; Yadav, Prakash Kumar; Sapkota, Niraj Khatri; Jha, Rajesh Kumar; Islam, Md Nazrul

    2016-01-01

    Background Many factors shape the quality of learning. The intrinsically motivated students adopt a deep approach to learning, while students who fear failure in assessments adopt a surface approach to learning. In the area of health science education in Nepal, there is still a lack of studies on learning approach that can be used to transform the students to become better learners and improve the effectiveness of teaching. Therefore, we aimed to explore the learning approaches among medical, dental, and nursing students of Chitwan Medical College, Nepal using Biggs’s Revised Two-Factor Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F) after testing its reliability. Methods R-SPQ-2F containing 20 items represented two main scales of learning approaches, deep and surface, with four subscales: deep motive, deep strategy, surface motive, and surface strategy. Each subscale had five items and each item was rated on a 5-point Likert scale. The data were analyzed using Student’s t-test and analysis of variance. Reliability of the administered questionnaire was checked using Cronbach’s alpha. Results The Cronbach’s alpha value (0.6) for 20 items of R-SPQ-2F was found to be acceptable for its use. The participants predominantly had a deep approach to learning regardless of their age and sex (deep: 32.62±6.33 versus surface: 25.14±6.81, P<0.001). The level of deep approach among medical students (33.26±6.40) was significantly higher than among dental (31.71±6.51) and nursing (31.36±4.72) students. In comparison to first-year students, deep approach among second-year medical (34.63±6.51 to 31.73±5.93; P<0.001) and dental (33.47±6.73 to 29.09±5.62; P=0.002) students was found to be significantly decreased. On the other hand, surface approach significantly increased (25.55±8.19 to 29.34±6.25; P=0.023) among second-year dental students compared to first-year dental students. Conclusion Medical students were found to adopt a deeper approach to learning than dental and nursing students. However, irrespective of disciplines and personal characteristics of participants, the primarily deep learning approach was found to be shifting progressively toward a surface approach after completion of an academic year, which should be avoided.

  17. Obstetric Acute Kidney Injury; A Three Year Experience at a Medical College Hospital in North Karnataka, India

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, K.S.; Gorikhan, Gousia; M.M., Umadi; S.T., Kalsad; M.P., Madhavaranga; Dambal, Amrut; Padaki, Samata

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acute kidney injury is a rare and sometimes fatal complication of pregnancy, the incidence of which has been declining worldwide, though still high in developing countries. There are recent observations of increasing incidence in some developed countries attributed to hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Materials and Methods: In this study, we have analysed the records of all patients referred to the dialysis unit of a medical college hospital in Karnataka for acute kidney injury related to pregnancy. AKIN (Acute Kidney Injury Network) criteria for the diagnosis of acute kidney injury were adapted. Age, parity, gestational age, causative factors for acute kidney injury, mode of delivery, access to antenatal care, operative procedures, blood component transfusions, number of haemodialysis, time for initiation of haemodialysis, duration of hospital stay and mortality were analysed by finding mean, standard deviation and standard error. Results: Fifteen patients out of 21563 who delivered in our hospital developed acute kidney injury. These (n=15) were out of 149 patients of acute kidney injury of various aetiologies who underwent haemodialysis between 2012 and 2014. Of these two were unregistered for antenatal care. Ten were multiparous, Eleven were from rural background, one had home delivery, six had vaginal delivery, seven had caesarean section and two had second trimester abortion. Placental abruption with intrauterine death was the commonest Cause in 9 out of 15 cases. All had severe anaemia. Patients received a mean of 3.9 (SD+/- 2.4) sessions of haemodialysis. Eleven patients recovered completely, two died and two left against medical advice. Conclusion: Obstetric acute kidney injury is associated with poor access to antenatal care, multiparity and rural background. Placental abruption is the commonest cause of obstetric acute kidney injury. Blood component transfusions, avoidance of nephrotoxic drugs and early initiation of haemodialysis are associated with better outcome. PMID:25954645

  18. Intern doctors’ views on the current and future antibiotic resistance situation of Chattagram Maa O Shishu Hospital Medical College, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Hoque, Rozina; Mostafa, Asma; Haque, Mainul

    2015-01-01

    Background Bacterial resistance due to antibiotic misuse is reported every day. Such threat calls for a consensus to develop new strategies to prevent the development of antibiotic resistance of bacteria. Medical doctors must play a pivotal role to control and prevent the misuse of antibiotics. There were complaints that prescribers are lacking behind in updates and advancement in the field. To address such knowledge gap, a study was conducted to know the views of interns on the current antibiotic resistance situation in a teaching hospital in Bangladesh. Methods This study was a cross-sectional, randomized, and questionnaire-based survey. Interns of the medicine, gynecology, and surgery departments of Chattagram Maa O Shishu Hospital Medical College were the study population. Results Out of 50 respondents, 98% would like more education on antibiotic selection. All respondents believed that prescribing inappropriate or unnecessary antibiotics was professionally unethical. Ninety percent of the participants were confident in making an accurate diagnosis of infection. Eighty-four percent of them were confident about dosage schedule. In all, 98% participants thought that antibiotic resistance is a national problem and 64% of the respondents thought that same problem also existed in their hospital. Study participants were of the view that 41%–60% of antibiotic usages are irrational in Bangladesh. Fifty-eight percent of the study population thought that antimicrobial resistance (AR) would be a greater problem in the future. Conclusion The interns believe that there is a knowledge gap on AR. More emphasis should be given to AR and its implications in the undergraduate curriculum. Latest national and international guidelines for antimicrobial therapy and resistance should be made available to the interns. PMID:26316762

  19. Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine: an innovative approach to medical education and the training of physician investigators.

    PubMed

    Fishleder, Andrew J; Henson, Lindsey C; Hull, Alan L

    2007-04-01

    Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine (CCLCM) is an innovative, five-year medical education track within Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine (Case) with a focused mission to attract and educate a limited number of highly qualified persons who seek to become physician investigators. CCLCM curriculum governance, faculty appointments and promotions, and admissions committees are integrated with respective Case committees. The CCLCM curriculum is based on faculty-defined professional attributes that graduates are expected to develop. These attributes were used to create curricular and assessment principles that guided the development of an integrated basic science, clinical science, and research curriculum, conducted in an active learning environment. An organ-system approach is used to solidify an understanding of basic science discipline threads in the context of relevant clinical problems presented in PBL and case-based discussion formats. Clinical skills are introduced in the first year as part of the two-year longitudinal experience with a family practice or internal medicine physician. The research program provides all students with opportunities to learn and experience basic and translational research and clinical research before selecting a research topic for their 12- to 15-month master-level thesis project. All Case students participate in required and elective clinical curriculum after the second year, but CCLCM students return to the Cleveland Clinic on selected Friday afternoons for program-specific research and professionalism-learning activities. A unique portfolio-based assessment system is used to assess student achievements in nine competency areas, seven of which reflect the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies. PMID:17414197

  20. [The involvement of the apothecaries of Nancy in the medical consultation of the Royal College of Medicine, from 1764 to 1793].

    PubMed

    Labrude, Pierre; Meunier, Marie

    2009-02-01

    A medical consultation reserved to poor sick persons of countries around Nancy was organized by the Royal College of Medicine from 1752. Concerning the drugs, the College thout first to use an apothecary companion, then it agreed, in 1764, with the proposal of the apothecaries of the city to distribute them free of charge, each in turn for two months, one in winter and one in summer. In 1788, the apothecaries complained from the abuses committed in the writing of the consultation tickets. The gardener had to furnish plants, gratuitously or not, in order the consultants to prepare drugs at home. These practices lasted until the extreme end of year 1793 where the College was cancelled. PMID:19579646

  1. Reactions of Nepali Adults to Warning Labels on Cigarette Packages: A Survey with Employee and Medical Students of a Tertiary Care Medical College of Western Region of Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Paudel, Badri; Paudel, Klara; Timilsina, Deepa

    2013-01-01

    Background: For the past 30 years, there have been no changes in the text-only cigarette warning labels in Nepal. During this same time period, other countries placed large graphic warning labels on cigarette packages. The purpose of the current study was primarily to compare the differences in reactions to different types of warning labels on cigarette packages, with a specific focus on whether the new warning label adopted by WHO FCTC was better than the text only label used by Nepal. Material and Methods: This study was conducted in Gandaki Medical College Teaching Hospital (GMCTH) in 2012, in a tertiary care hospital located in the western region of Nepal. Eligible study participants included in this survey were those aged 18 years and over and those who are studying MBBS/Nursing or who were employees of GMCTH. 500 participants finished the survey. Participants were shown nine types of warning labels found on cigarette packages.They comprised one text only warning label used within Nepalese market and eight foreign brand labels. Participants were asked about the impact of the warning labels on: their knowledge of harm from smoking, giving cigarettes as a gift, and quitting smoking. Results: On comparing the Nepalese warning label with other foreign labels with regards to providing knowledge of harm warning, impact of quitting smoking and giving cigarettes as a gift, the overseas labels were found to be more effective. Both smokers and non–smokers thought that warning labels with text plus graphics were substantially more of a deterrent than text-only labels. Conclusion: The findings from this study support previous research that has found that text-plus graphic warning labels were more salient and potentially more effective than text-only labels.Warning labels are one of the component of comprehensive tobacco control and smoking cessation efforts. Stronger warnings on cigarette packages need to be part of a larger Nepalese public health educational efforts. PMID:24298480

  2. [Oral health state in dentistry students of Medical College, Jagiellonian University in Cracow].

    PubMed

    StypuƂkowska, Jadwiga; Ɓyszczarz, Robert; WichliƄski, JarosƂaw; PawƂowska, Katarzyna; Solska-Kuczerek, Aleksandra

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the oral health status of the fourth and fifth year dentistry students of Collegium Medicum of the Jagiellonian University in Cracow. The data were collected using the anonymous questionnaire concerning the general health, using medications, dietary habits, smoking and drinking alcohol, present and previous oral complaints and selected health behaviour patterns (follow-up examination of oral cavity, teeth brushing and other hygienic procedures, using dental floss). The oral cavity status was estimated by clinical examination conducted with the use of artificial lighting and basic diagnostic set: dental probe and dental mirror. The data for 120 persons were analysed: 75 (62.5%) fourth year students and 45 (37.5%) fifth year students aged 21-27 years (mean age 23.2). Among the examined persons 84.2% descended from cities and 15.8% from the villages. During the medical review it was stated that among chronic diseases allergies (27.5%) were on the first position, cardio-vascular diseases (8.33%) were on the second and respiratory system diseases were on the third position. The review about smoking and drinking alcohol stated that 71.7% never smoked cigarettes, 10% gave up smoking and 18.3% were daily smokers, 81.7% of students occasionally drink alcohol, mainly beer. The dental history stated that all of examined students (100%) were subjected to teeth caries treatment, 48.7% had endodontic treatment, 38.1% extraction (mainly for orthodontic reasons), 5.9% prosthetic, 3.9% apicoectomy, 0.8% had dental implant. The estimation of oral cavity hygiene (API index) and frequency of decay (DMF index-Decayed Missing Filling) was included in the examination. The mean value of DMF was 13.56, API 22.51 in the whole examined group. The assessment of periodontal tissues was made with the support of treatment needs: 60.0% of examined persons don't need any periodontal treatment, 14.17% need to improve their oral cavity hygiene and 25.83% require the dental calculus removal. The study revealed that 39.1% suffer from temporo-mandibular arthropathies. Normal occlusion is characteristic for 45.69% of examined students, small abnormalities for 48.28 and 6.03% have advanced malocclusion. The presented results are a part of examination performed in four Polish academic centres that estimates oral health status of students of dentistry in our country. PMID:15106475

  3. Clinicopathological pattern of cranial unifocal Langerhans cell histiocytosis: A study at medical college hospital

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Salma; Nazir, Parvez; Bashir, Humaira; Reshi, Ruby; Sheikh, Sheema; Wani, Rohi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Eosinophilic granuloma (EG) of bone refers to a generally benign form of Langerhans cell histiocytosis localized to the bone. Patients may present with a solitary lesion (monostotic) or multiple sites of involvement (polyostotic). Materials and Methods: This study was done to evaluate the clinicopathological pattern of 6 cases of EGs of the skull diagnosed at a tertiary care hospital. All patients of EG were included with the help of medical records over a 5-year period that is, November 2009 to November 2014. They all had been preoperatively evaluated by skull X-ray and computed tomography. To rule out a multifocal disease scintigraphy was performed in all cases preoperatively. Surgical excision was performed, and EG was diagnosed on histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Results: There was a male predominance. Parietal bone was the most common affected bone. Total excision of the lesion was performed in all cases. No patient received postoperative radiotherapy. The follow-up period ranged from 6 months to 3 years. No tumor recurrence was noted. Conclusion: With an unknown etiology, nonspecific clinical and radiological findings with diagnosis possible only on histopathological examination, EG needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis as a skull mass, especially in children.

  4. Specialization training in Malawi: a qualitative study on the perspectives of medical students graduating from the University of Malawi College of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a critical shortage of healthcare workers in sub-Saharan Africa, and Malawi has one of the lowest physician densities in the region. One of the reasons for this shortage is inadequate retention of medical school graduates, partly due to the desire for specialization training. The University of Malawi College of Medicine has developed specialty training programs, but medical school graduates continue to report a desire to leave the country for specialization training. To understand this desire, we studied medical students’ perspectives on specialization training in Malawi. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews of medical students in the final year of their degree program. We developed an interview guide through an iterative process, and recorded and transcribed all interviews for analysis. Two independent coders coded the manuscripts and assessed inter-coder reliability, and the authors used an “editing approach” to qualitative analysis to identify and categorize themes relating to the research aim. The University of Pittsburgh Institutional Review Board and the University of Malawi College of Medicine Research and Ethics Committee approved this study and authors obtained written informed consent from all participants. Results We interviewed 21 medical students. All students reported a desire for specialization training, with 12 (57%) students interested in specialties not currently offered in Malawi. Students discussed reasons for pursuing specialization training, impressions of specialization training in Malawi, reasons for staying or leaving Malawi to pursue specialization training and recommendations to improve training. Conclusions Graduating medical students in Malawi have mixed views of specialization training in their own country and still desire to leave Malawi to pursue further training. Training institutions in sub-Saharan Africa need to understand the needs of the country’s healthcare workforce and the needs of their graduating medical students to be able to match opportunities and retain graduating students. PMID:24393278

  5. Level of awareness about legalization of abortion in Nepal: a study at Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Tuladhar, H; Risal, A

    2010-06-01

    World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that about 25.0% of all pregnancies worldwide end in induced abortion, approximately 50 million each year. More than half of these abortions are performed under unsafe conditions resulting in high maternal mortality ratio specially in developing countries like Nepal. Abortion was legalized under specified conditions in March 2002 in Nepal. But still a large proportion of population are unaware of the legalization and the conditions under which it is permitted. Legal reform alone cannot reduce abortion related deaths in our country. This study was undertaken with the main objective to study the level of awareness about legalization of abortion in women attending gyne out patients department of Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital (NMCTH), which will give a baseline knowledge for further dissemination and advocacy about abortion law. Total 200 women participated in the study. Overall 133 (66.5%) women said they were aware of legalization of abortion in Nepal. Women of age group 20-34 years, urban residents, service holders, Brahmin/Chhetri caste and with higher education were more aware about it. Majority (92.0%) of the women received information from the media. Detail knowledge about legal conditions under which abortion can be performed specially in second trimester was found to be poor. Large proportion (71.0%) of the women were still unaware of the availability of comprehensive abortion care services at our hospital, which is being provided since last seven years. Public education and advocacy campaigns are crucial to create awareness about the new legislation and availability of services. Unless the advocacy and awareness campaign reaches women, they are not likely to benefit from the legal reform and services. PMID:21222401

  6. Pattern of Pulmonary Involvement and Outcome of Aspiration Pneumonia in Patients with Altered Consciousness Admitted in Dhaka Medical College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, R A; Azad, A K; Sardar, H; Siddiqui, M R; Saad, S; Rahman, S; Sikder, A S

    2016-01-01

    Aspiration is well recognized as a cause of pulmonary disease and is not uncommon in patients with altered consciousness.The mortality rate of aspiration pneumonia is approximately 1% in outpatient setting and upto 25% in those requiring hospitalization. This study was done to see the pattern of pulmonary involvement and outcome of aspiration pneumonia in patients with altered consciousness admitted in medicine department of a tertiary care hospital in our country. This was a prospective observational study conducted among the 52 adult patients of aspiration pneumonia with altered consciousness admitted in the medicine department of Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH), during June 2010 to December 2010. Aspiration pneumonia was confirmed by clinical examination and laboratory investigations. Hematologic measurements (TC of WBC, Hb%, ESR, platelet count), chest X-ray, blood gas analysis, blood urea, creatinine and random blood sugar, sputum for Gram staining, sputum for culture sensitivity and blood culture were done in all patients.Assessment of altered conscious patient was done by application of the Glasgow Coma Scale. Case record forms with appropriate questionnaire were filled for all patients. The mean±SD age was 57.42±13.63 years with ranged from 25 to 90 years. Out of 52 patients, 37(71.15%) patients were male and 15(28.85%) patients were female. Following aspiration 76.92% patients developed pneumonitis, 13.46% patients developed lung abscess and only 9.62% patients developed ARDS. Most (33) of the patients had opacity in right lower zone and 13 patients had opacity in the left lower zone, 6 patients had opacity in right mid zone. Only 10 patients had opacity in both lower zones. In this study overall mortality rate was 23%. If only one lobe was involved radiologically, mortality was 8.33%. If two or more lobes on one or both sides were involved, mortality was in the range of 25-91%. PMID:26931262

  7. Identifying the Factors Causing Delayed Presentation of Cancer Patients to a Government Medical College of Central India

    PubMed Central

    Yogi, Veenita; Ghori, Hameed Uzzafar; Singh, Om Prakash; Peepre, Karan; Yadav, Suresh; Mohare, Chaitlal

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of cancer is increasing throughout the world. One of the prime aims of its management is early diagnosis and therapeutic intervention. Factors causing delay to either of these goals should be identified and rectified. Aim To identify the factors causing delayed initial diagnosis and subsequent management in patients presenting to the Oncology department. Materials and Methods Three hundred proven cancer patients were prospectively evaluated for the pattern of presentation to the outpatient Department of Radiation Oncology of a Government Medical College (MC) in Central India. Results The mean age of presentation was 51.05 years (range 7 months-77 years). The number of male patients was 168 while females were 132. The duration of symptoms ranged from 20 days to 3 years. The number of patients with little/no education presented mainly in advanced stages as compared to their educated counterpart and this difference was statistically significant (p<0.001). The number of patients presenting directly to the department was 108, those diagnosed outside and referred to us was 84 while those diagnosed and received some form of oncologic treatment outside and referred thereafter was 108. The difference in the primary delay between patients presenting directly to the MC versus those diagnosed outside was significant (p=0.0126). The mean duration of starting definitive treatment after presentation to the outpatient was 4.68 days (range 0-22 days) and was very significantly (p< 0.001) less than the secondary delays caused to the other two subsets of patients. Conclusion Factors causing delayed presentation are both patient and system related. It is imperative to educate the common people regarding the early signs and symptoms of cancer. At the same time, the system needs to overhaul its efficiency to avoid secondary delays that adversely affect the treatment outcome. An upgradation of the existing oncology facilities in the public sector can achieve this target efficiently. PMID:26500996

  8. Compliance to Anti-Diabetic Drugs: Observations from the Diabetic Clinic of a Medical College in Kolkata, India

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Shuvankar; Sharmasarkar, Biswanath; Das, Kaushik Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Agnihotri; Deb, Animesh

    2013-01-01

    Background: The poor glycaemic control among the patients with type 2 diabetes constitutes a major public health problem and a major risk factor for the development of diabetes complications. Aim of the Study: To study the compliance rate of the patients with type 2 diabetes to the prescribed medications, to find out its correlation with different socio-demographic factors and other patient characteristics and to find out the reasons behind the non-compliance, if any. Settings and Design: This cross sectional study was conducted on the patients with type 2 diabetes, who Attended the Diabetic Clinic of a Medical College in Kolkata, India. Methods and Material: The patients of type 2 diabetes who attended the diabetes clinic between April to August 2012 were recruited in the study by systematic random sampling and they were interviewed by using the help of a structured interview schedule. The patients who reported taking less than 80% of their prescribed anti-diabetes medicines in the preceding week and had HbA1C of < 7% were considered to be non-compliant. Statistical Analysis Used: The data was analyzed by using the SPSS software. The Chi-square test was used to assess the association of the compliance with the different study variables. A binary logistic regression analysis helped in identifying the factors which contributed to the non-compliance. Results: The compliance rate to the anti-diabetic drugs was found to be 57.7%. A univariate analysis showed that it decreased significantly with increasing age and that it was also significantly lower among males, illiterates, those with a poor per capita monthly income and those who had a longer duration of diabetes. It varied significantly with the type of drugs, being lowest with an oral drug and insulin combination (43.4%). No knowledge on the complications of diabetes was significantly associated with a lower compliance. The binary logistic regression also helped in identifying these as the significant contributory factors. The common reasons behind the non-compliance were forgetfulness (44.7%) and financial constraints (32.7%). Conclusion: It can be concluded that the compliance to anti-diabetic drugs was quite poor among the participants. Increasing age, the male sex, illiteracy, a low monthly income and a longer duration of diabetes were significantly associated with the non compliance. A more concerning fact was the significant association of the non-compliance with the types of drug regimens and a lack of knowledge on the complications of diabetes, which emphasized the role of a repeated patient education regarding the basic aspects of diabetes. PMID:23730641

  9. Drug use evaluation of cefepime in the first affiliated hospital of Bengbu medical college: a retrospective and prospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cefepime is a fourth generation cephalosporin antimicrobial. Its extended antimicrobial activity and infrequent tendency to engender resistance make it popular for the treatment of infections. However, proper use of cefepime has not been studied adequately. In this study, we used a retrospective cohort and a prospective cohort to evaluate the usage pattern, adverse effects and cost-effectiveness of cefepime by conducting a drug use evaluation (DUE) program in the First Affiliated Hospital of Bengbu Medical College, Anhui, China. Methods The DUE criteria for cefepime were established by applying literature review and expert consultation, an effective method to promote interventions that will improve patient outcomes and the cost-effectiveness of drug therapy. According to the criteria, we performed a cross-sectional retrospective (cycle A) study on 96 hospitalized patients who received cefepime treatment and a prospective (cycle B) study on 111 hospitalized patients with cefepime treatment intervention. After identifying problems with usage and completing a cefepime use evaluation for cycle A, 2 months of educational intervention among professionals were given and a more effective and rational system of cefepime use was set up. During the 2 months, the lectures were arranged and attendance of prescribers was required. Results The data from cycle A showed that the biggest problem was irrational prescription of cefepime; bacterial culture and drug sensitivity tests for cefepime were also not carried out. Following 2 months of educational intervention among professionals, the results for cycle B showed that the correct indication rate was 94.59%, compared with 84.38% in cycle A. Use of bacterial culture and sensitivity tests also improved, by 88.29% in cycle B compared with 65.22% in cycle A. Compared with cycle A, the significantly improved items (P?medication combinations. Conclusions Cefepime can be used appropriately for the right indications and in a cost-effective way for the majority of patients through educational intervention, including the special precautions that must be followed for appropriate dosing frequency and duration. DUE programs will become one model of hospital pharmacy care and part of the plan for continuous improvements to the quality of health care in China. PMID:23551828

  10. The Impact of Self-Concept and College Involvement on the First-Year Success of Medical Students in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Ying-Xue; Ou, Chun-Quan; Zhao, Zhi-Tao; Wan, Cheng-Song; Guo, Cui; Li, Li; Chen, Ping-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Students' first-year academic success plays a critical role on their overall development in college, which implies the need to concentrate on identifying ways to improve students' first-year academic success. Different from most research on the subject, this study attempted to combine the sociological perspective of college impact with a


  11. The Impact of Self-Concept and College Involvement on the First-Year Success of Medical Students in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Ying-Xue; Ou, Chun-Quan; Zhao, Zhi-Tao; Wan, Cheng-Song; Guo, Cui; Li, Li; Chen, Ping-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Students' first-year academic success plays a critical role on their overall development in college, which implies the need to concentrate on identifying ways to improve students' first-year academic success. Different from most research on the subject, this study attempted to combine the sociological perspective of college impact with a…

  12. Medical College of Wisconsin

    Cancer.gov

    The overall goal is to develop and validate both standard and novel perfusion-weighted MRI (PWI) and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) biomarkers to monitor treatment response for both therapeutic clinical trials and standard of care treatment plans for patients with brain tumors. This goal addresses an urgent need for better ways to monitor targeted therapies, for which standard measures of enhancing tumor volumes are no longer sufficient.

  13. Sewer pipe, wire, epoxy, and finger tapping: The start of fMRI at the Medical College of Wisconsin

    PubMed Central

    Bandettini, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    In 1991, the Biophysics Research Institute at the Medical College of Wisconsin was among the first groups to develop functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Our story is unique on a few levels: We didn’t have knowledge of the ability to image human brain activation with MRI using blood oxygenation dependent (BOLD) contrast until early August of 1991 when we attended the Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (SMRM) meeting in San Francisco, yet we produced our first BOLD-based maps of motor cortex activation about a month later. The effort started with two graduate students, Eric Wong and myself. Only a few days prior to that extremely important SMRM meeting, we had developed human echo planar imaging (EPI) capability in-house. Wong designed, built, and interfaced a head gradient coil made out of sewer pipe, wire, and epoxy to a standard GE 1.5 T MRI scanner. Also, a few months prior to building this human head gradient coil he developed the EPI pulse sequences and image reconstruction. All of these efforts were towards a different goal – for demonstration of Wong’s novel approach to perfusion imaging in the human brain. Following SMRM, where a plenary lecture by Tom Brady from MGH opened our eyes to human brain activation imaging using BOLD contrast, and where we learned that EPI was extremely helpful if not critical to its success, we worked quickly to achieve our first results on September 14, 1991. The story is also unique in that Jim Hyde had set up the Biophysics Research Institute to be optimal for just this type of rapidly advancing basic technology research. It was well equipped for hardware development, had open and dynamic collaborative relationships with other departments, hospitals on campus, and GE, and had a relatively flat hierarchy and relaxed, flexible, collegial atmosphere internally. Since these first brain activation results, MCW Biophysics has continued to be at the forefront of functional MRI innovation, having helped to pioneer real time fMRI, high-resolution fMRI, and functional connectivity mapping. PMID:22044784

  14. Improving the quality of discharge summaries: implementing updated Academy of Medical Royal Colleges standards at a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    May-Miller, Hannah; Hayter, Joanne; Loewenthal, Lola; Hall, Louis; Hilbert, Rebecca; Quinn, Michael; Pearson, Nicola; Patel, Alisha; Law, Rebekah

    2015-01-01

    Quality of documentation is harder to quantify and incentivise, but it has a significant impact on patient care. Good discharge summaries facilitate continuity between secondary and primary care. The junior doctors' forum led this project to improve the quality of electronic discharge summaries (eDS). Baseline measurement revealed significant room for improvement. We measured the quality of 10 summaries per month (across all inpatient specialties), against 23 indicators from the revised Academy of Medical Royal Colleges (AoMRC) standards (2013) that were prioritised by GPs as a "minimum dataset". Junior doctors felt that the Trust's dual eDS systems were responsible for great variation in quality. This was confirmed by the results of a comparison audit of the systems in April 2014: one system greatly outperformed the other (57% mean compliance with iSoft clinical management (iCM) based system vs. 77% with InfoPath-based system). We recommended that the Trust move to a single eDS system, decommissioning the iCM-based system, and this proposal was approved by several Trust committees. We worked with information services, junior doctors, general practitioners and hospital physicians to develop and implement a generic template to further improve compliance with AoMRC standards. In August 2014, the iCM-based system was withdrawn, the new template went live, and training was delivered, coinciding with the changeover of junior doctors to minimise disruption. Median compliance increased from 66.7% to 77.8%. Quality of discharge summaries had improved across the specialties. There was a reduction in the number of complaints and positive qualitative feedback from general practitioners and junior doctors. Completion of discharge summaries within 24 hours was not affected by this change. There is still more to be done to improve quality; average compliance with the full AoMRC standards (39 indicators) is 59.5%. With the approval of the Trust executive committee further plan, do, study, act (PDSA) cycles are underway, working to improve the remaining specialty-specific templates. PMID:26734325

  15. Subject preferences of first- and second-year medical students for their future specialization at Chitwan Medical College and Teaching Hospital, Chitwan, Nepal – a questionnaire-based study

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Rajesh K; Paudel, Keshab R; Shah, Dev K; Sah, Ajit K; Basnet, Sangharshila; Sah, Phoolgen; Adhikari, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The selection of a discipline for future specialization may be an important factor for the medical students’ future career, and it is influenced by multiple factors. The interest of students in the early stages can be improved in subjects related to public health or of academic importance, as per need. Methods A questionnaire-based study was conducted among 265 first- and second-year medical students of Chitwan Medical College, Nepal to find out their subject of preference for postgraduation and the factors affecting their selection along with their interesting basic science subject. Only the responses from 232 completely filled questionnaires were analyzed. Results The preference of the students for clinical surgical (50.9%), clinical medical (45.3%), and basic medical (3.9%) sciences for postgraduation were in descending order. The most preferred specialty among male students was clinical surgical sciences (56.3%), and among female students, it was clinical medical sciences (53.6%). Although all the students responded to their preferred specialty, only 178 students specified the subject of their interest. General surgery (23.4%), pediatrics (23.4%), and anatomy (2.4%) were the most favored subjects for postgraduation among clinical surgical, clinical medical, and basic medical sciences specialties, respectively. More common reasons for selection of specific subject for future career were found to be: personal interests, good income, intellectual challenge, and others. Conclusion Many students preferred clinical surgical sciences for their future specialization. Among the reasons for the selection of the specialty for postgraduation, no significant reason could be elicited from the present study. PMID:26635491

  16. Analysis of Forensic Autopsy in 120 Cases of Medical Disputes Among Different Levels of Institutional Settings.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin-Sheng; Ye, Guang-Hua; Fan, Yan-Yan; Li, Xing-Biao; Feng, Xiang-Ping; Han, Jun-Ge; Lin, Ke-Zhi; Deng, Miao-Wu; Li, Feng

    2015-09-01

    Despite advances in medical science, the causes of death can sometimes only be determined by pathologists after a complete autopsy. Few studies have investigated the importance of forensic autopsy in medically disputed cases among different levels of institutional settings. Our study aimed to analyze forensic autopsy in 120 cases of medical disputes among five levels of institutional settings between 2001 and 2012 in Wenzhou, China. The results showed an overall concordance rate of 55%. Of the 39% of clinically missed diagnosis, cardiovascular pathology comprises 55.32%, while respiratory pathology accounts for the remaining 44. 68%. Factors that increase the likelihood of missed diagnoses were private clinics, community settings, and county hospitals. These results support that autopsy remains an important tool in establishing causes of death in medically disputed case, which may directly determine or exclude the fault of medical care and therefore in helping in resolving these cases. PMID:25929602

  17. Charles Edouard Brown-SĂ©quard's departure from the Medical College of Virginia: incompatible science or incompatible social views in pre-Civil War southern United States.

    PubMed

    Watson, Joseph C; Ho, Stephen V

    2011-01-01

    Charles Edouard Brown-SĂ©quard was one of the most colorful characters in modern physiology. His scientific methods of self-experimentation and animal vivisection led to many great observations, including the eponymous syndrome of hemisection of the spinal cord. Despite his renown, he stayed but one year in his first major academic post. Details of his sojourn at the Medical College of Virginia (now part of Virginia Commonwealth University) in Richmond were divined from perusal of archival material, letters, and from the available literature. His notoriety in the field of physiology landed him a post at the Medical College of Virginia in 1854 as the chair of physiology. During a brief time here, he was able to publish his landmark monograph of 1855 on the pathways of the spinal cord "Experimental and Clinical Researches on the Physiology and Pathology of the Spinal Cord." He had a near-death experience while experimenting on himself to determine the function of the skin. It was rumored that his English was poor, his lectures unintelligible, and his scientific methods disturbing to the neighbors and that for those reasons he was asked to vacate his post. Personal communications and other accounts indicate a different view: his mixed-blood heritage and his views on slavery were unpopular in the pre-Civil War southern United States. These disparate viewpoints lend an insight into the life and career of this pioneer in modern medicine and experimental design and to the clash of science and social views. PMID:21704947

  18. Cultural competence springs up in the desert: the story of the center for cultural competence in health care at Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Elnashar, Maha; Abdelrahim, Huda; Fetters, Michael D

    2012-06-01

    The authors describe the factors that led Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar (WCMC-Q) to establish the Center for Cultural Competence in Health Care from the ground up, and they explore challenges and successes in implementing cultural competence training.Qatar's capital, Doha, is an extremely high-density multicultural setting. When WCMC-Q's first class of medical students began their clinical clerkships at the affiliated teaching hospital Hamad Medical Corporation in 2006, the complicated nature of training in a multicultural and multilingual setting became apparent immediately. In response, initiatives to improve students' cultural competence were undertaken. Initiatives included launching a medical interpretation program in 2007; surveying the patients' spoken languages, examining the effect of an orientation program on interpretation requests, and surveying faculty using the Tool for Assessing Cultural Competence Training in 2008; implementing cultural competence training for students and securing research funding in 2009; and expanding awareness to the Qatar community in 2010. These types of initiatives, which are generally highly valued in U.S. and Canadian settings, are also apropos in the Arabian Gulf region.The authors report on their initial efforts, which can serve as a resource for other programs in the Arabian Gulf region. PMID:22534600

  19. Changes in Chemistry and Biochemistry Education: Creative Responses to Medical College Admissions Test Revisions in the Age of the Genome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brenner, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Approximately two million students matriculate into American colleges and universities per year. Almost 20% of these students begin taking a series of courses specified by advisers of health preprofessionals. The single most important influence on health profession advisers and on course selection for this huge population of learners is the


  20. Changes in Chemistry and Biochemistry Education: Creative Responses to Medical College Admissions Test Revisions in the Age of the Genome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brenner, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Approximately two million students matriculate into American colleges and universities per year. Almost 20% of these students begin taking a series of courses specified by advisers of health preprofessionals. The single most important influence on health profession advisers and on course selection for this huge population of learners is the…

  1. College Students with and without ADHD: Comparison of Self-Report of Medication Usage, Study Habits, and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advokat, Claire; Lane, Sean M.; Luo, Chunqiao

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between ADHD medications, study habits, and academic achievement of ADHD-diagnosed undergraduates. Method: A total of 92 students with a self-reported ADHD diagnosis and a current prescription for ADHD medication were compared with 143 control students in a survey of academic performance. Results: Most ADHD…

  2. College Students with and without ADHD: Comparison of Self-Report of Medication Usage, Study Habits, and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Advokat, Claire; Lane, Sean M.; Luo, Chunqiao

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between ADHD medications, study habits, and academic achievement of ADHD-diagnosed undergraduates. Method: A total of 92 students with a self-reported ADHD diagnosis and a current prescription for ADHD medication were compared with 143 control students in a survey of academic performance. Results: Most ADHD


  3. Medical Terminology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer County Community Coll., Trenton, NJ.

    This document is one of a series of student workbooks developed for workplace skill development courses or workshops by Mercer County Community College (New Jersey) and its partners. Designed to help employees of medical establishments learn medical terminology, this course provides information on basic word structure, body parts, suffixes and…

  4. Standards and guidelines for the interpretation of sequence variants: a joint consensus recommendation of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics and the Association for Molecular Pathology.

    PubMed

    Richards, Sue; Aziz, Nazneen; Bale, Sherri; Bick, David; Das, Soma; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Grody, Wayne W; Hegde, Madhuri; Lyon, Elaine; Spector, Elaine; Voelkerding, Karl; Rehm, Heidi L

    2015-05-01

    The American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) previously developed guidance for the interpretation of sequence variants.(1) In the past decade, sequencing technology has evolved rapidly with the advent of high-throughput next-generation sequencing. By adopting and leveraging next-generation sequencing, clinical laboratories are now performing an ever-increasing catalogue of genetic testing spanning genotyping, single genes, gene panels, exomes, genomes, transcriptomes, and epigenetic assays for genetic disorders. By virtue of increased complexity, this shift in genetic testing has been accompanied by new challenges in sequence interpretation. In this context the ACMG convened a workgroup in 2013 comprising representatives from the ACMG, the Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP), and the College of American Pathologists to revisit and revise the standards and guidelines for the interpretation of sequence variants. The group consisted of clinical laboratory directors and clinicians. This report represents expert opinion of the workgroup with input from ACMG, AMP, and College of American Pathologists stakeholders. These recommendations primarily apply to the breadth of genetic tests used in clinical laboratories, including genotyping, single genes, panels, exomes, and genomes. This report recommends the use of specific standard terminology-"pathogenic," "likely pathogenic," "uncertain significance," "likely benign," and "benign"-to describe variants identified in genes that cause Mendelian disorders. Moreover, this recommendation describes a process for classifying variants into these five categories based on criteria using typical types of variant evidence (e.g., population data, computational data, functional data, segregation data). Because of the increased complexity of analysis and interpretation of clinical genetic testing described in this report, the ACMG strongly recommends that clinical molecular genetic testing should be performed in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-approved laboratory, with results interpreted by a board-certified clinical molecular geneticist or molecular genetic pathologist or the equivalent. PMID:25741868

  5. Effects of passive smoking on students at College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh

    PubMed Central

    Alanazi, Abdullah; Al Enezi, Farhan; Alqahtani, Mohammd Mesfer; Alshammari, Turki Faleh; Ansari, Mumtaz Ahmed; Al-Oraibi, Saleh; Qureshi, Shoeb

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the recent campaigns to eliminate smoking, the rates are still increasing world-wide. Exposure to passive smoking (PS) is associated with morbidity and mortality from awful diseases. Although many college students smoke, little is known about their exposure to PS, common places and sources of exposures in Saudi Arabia. Aim: The aim of the following study is to identify prevalence and magnitude of PS among college students, exposure time, locations, sources of exposure, investigate the effects and make recommendations. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed to identify factors associated with PS exposure among students of College of Applied Medical Sciences, Riyadh. Results: Out of 61 students included in the study, 91.8% were found exposed to PS. Exposure in Hospitality venues (Estirah) was the most common followed by other areas. Among the sources of exposure, the highest was among friends and the least were parents and guests. The frequency of highest exposure per month was >15 times and the lowest was 10-15 times. Levels of annoyance varied between 18% and 37.7%, respectively. Since the values obtained for different markers in the pulmonary function test are more than the predicted values, the observed spirometry is normal. The percent oxygen saturation in hemoglobin and blood pressure of PS were in normal range. Conclusion: Since the properties of mainstream smoke and environmental tobacco smoke are quite different, risk extrapolation from active to PS is uncertain, especially during a short period. Nevertheless, it can be deteriorating during a longer duration, hence; the administrators, policy makers and tobacco control advocates may endorse policies to restrict smoking in shared areas, particularly working environment. PMID:25810644

  6. Training the Next Generation of Informaticians: The Impact of “BISTI” and Bioinformatics—A Report from the American College of Medical Informatics

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Charles P.; Altman, Russ B.; Kohane, Isaac S.; McCormick, Kathleen A.; Miller, Perry L.; Ozbolt, Judy G.; Shortliffe, Edward H.; Stormo, Gary D.; Szczepaniak, M. Cleat; Tuck, David; Williamson, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    In 2002–2003, the American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI) undertook a study of the future of informatics training. This project capitalized on the rapidly expanding interest in the role of computation in basic biological research, well characterized in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Biomedical Information Science and Technology Initiative (BISTI) report. The defining activity of the project was the three-day 2002 Annual Symposium of the College. A committee, comprised of the authors of this report, subsequently carried out activities, including interviews with a broader informatics and biological sciences constituency, collation and categorization of observations, and generation of recommendations. The committee viewed biomedical informatics as an interdisciplinary field, combining basic informational and computational sciences with application domains, including health care, biological research, and education. Consequently, effective training in informatics, viewed from a national perspective, should encompass four key elements: (1) curricula that integrate experiences in the computational sciences and application domains rather than just concatenating them; (2) diversity among trainees, with individualized, interdisciplinary cross-training allowing each trainee to develop key competencies that he or she does not initially possess; (3) direct immersion in research and development activities; and (4) exposure across the wide range of basic informational and computational sciences. Informatics training programs that implement these features, irrespective of their funding sources, will meet and exceed the challenges raised by the BISTI report, and optimally prepare their trainees for careers in a field that continues to evolve. PMID:14764617

  7. Producing "science/fictions" about the rural and urban poor: Community-based learning at a medical college in South India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arur, Aditi Ashok

    This dissertation is an ethnographic case study of a community-based teaching program (CBTP) in public health at a medical college in South India that explored how the CBTP produced particular ways of seeing and understanding rural and urban poor communities. Drawing from critical, feminist, and postcolonial scholars, I suggest that the knowledge produced in the CBTP can be understood as "science/fictions", that is, as cultural texts shaped by transnational development discourses as well as medical teachers' and students' sociospatial imaginations of the rural and urban poor. I explored how these science/fictions mediated medical students' performative actions and interactions with a rural and an urban poor community in the context of the CBTP. At the same time, I also examined how knowledge produced in students' encounters with these communities disrupted their naturalized understandings about these communities, and how it was taken up to renarrativize science/fictions anew. Data collection and analyses procedures were informed by critical ethnographic and critical discourse analysis approaches. Data sources includes field notes constructed from observations of the CBTP, interviews with medical teachers and students, and curricular texts including the standardized national textbook of public health. The findings of this study illustrate how the CBTP staged the government and technology as central actors in the production of healthy bodies, communities, and environments, and implicitly positioned medical teachers and students as productive citizens of a modern nation while rural and urban poor communities were characterized sometimes as empowered, and at other times as not-yet-modern and in need of reform. However, the community also constituted an alternate pedagogical site of engagement in that students' encounters with community members disrupted students' assumptions about these communities to an extent. Nevertheless, institutionalized practices of assessment, and epistemological and ontological understandings of the nature of science tended to privilege the standardized curriculum and popular cultural stereotypes as scientific knowledge thereby excluding the place-based narratives of local communities, medical students, and teachers. This study, therefore, argues that interactions with local communities in community-based education and development programs cannot democratize knowledge production in medical education without a simultaneous engagement with post-foundational epistemologies in the social sciences and humanities.

  8. Academic Staff Perspectives Towards Adoption of E-learning at Melaka Manipal Medical College: Has E-learning Redefined our Teaching Model?

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, A; Nagandla, K; Swe, K Mm; Abas, A Bl

    2015-01-01

    Background E-learning is the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to provide online education and learning. E- Learning has now been integrated into the traditional teaching as the concept of 'blended learning' that combines digital learning with the existing traditional teaching methods to address the various challenges in the field of medical education. Structured e-learning activities were started in Melaka Manipal Medical College in 2009 via e-learning platform (MOODLE-Modular Object-Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment). Objectives The objective of the present study is to investigate the faculty opinions toward the existing e-learning activities, and to analyse the extent of adopting and integration of e-learning into their traditional teaching methods. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted among faculties of Medicine and Dentistry using pre-tested questionnaires. The data was analyzed by using the statistical package for social science, SPSS, version 16.0. Results The result of our survey indicates that majority of our faculty (65.4%) held positive opinion towards e-learning. Among the few, who demonstrated reservations, it is attributed to their average level of skills and aptitude in the use of computers that was statistically significant (p<0.05). Conclusion Our study brings to light the need for formal training as perquisite to support e-learning that enables smooth transition of the faculty from their traditional teaching methods into blended approach. Our results are anticipated to strengthen the existing e-learning activities of our college and other universities and convincingly adopt e-learning as a viable teaching and learning strategy. PMID:26620743

  9. Prevalence, impacts and medical managements of premenstrual syndrome among female students: cross-sectional study in college of health sciences, Mekelle University, Mekelle, Northern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is used to describe physical, cognitive, affective, and behavioral symptoms that occur cyclically during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle and resolve quickly at or within a few days of the onset of menstruation. The primary aim of the study was to assess the prevalence, impacts and medical managements of PMS on female medical students of Mekelle University College of Health Sciences. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among systematically selected female students of Mekelle University College of Health Sciences, Mekelle town, northern Ethiopia from March to April 2013. A structured and pretested self-administered questionnaire was employed for data collection. The collected data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL (SPSS version 16). The criteria proposed by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition, text revision (DSM-IV TR) were used to diagnose PMS. Result From the total population size of 608; a sample size of 258 was drawn. Age of the study participants ranged from 18 to 25 years, with mean age of 20.86 ± 1.913 years. Among the participants, 144(83.2%) have had at least one PM symptoms with their menstrual period. The prevalence of PMS according to DSM-IV was 37.0%. About 49(28.3%) reported frequent class missing, 17(9.8%) exam missing, 14(8.1%) low grade scoring and 3(1.7%) of them reported withdrawal from their learning associated with their PMS. Only 83(48.0%) participants sought medical treatment for their PMS. The treatment modalities used were pain killers, 63(36.4%), hot drinks like coffee and tea, 13(7.5%), and massage therapy and exercise, 7(4.0%). Binary logistic regression analysis revealed average length of one cycle of menstruation (COR = 0.20(0.070-0.569) and academic performance impairment (AOR = 0.345(0.183-0.653) were significantly associated with the diagnosis of PMS and use of PMS treatments respectively. Conclusions Our study revealed a high prevalence and negative impact of PMS on students of Mekelle University. Therefore, health education, appropriate medical treatment and counseling services, as part of the overall health service, should be availed and provided to affected women. PMID:24678964

  10. Challenges of Conducting Problem-Based Learning in a Large Class: A Study at Shantou University Medical College in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Ting; Qin, Danian

    2014-01-01

    One major challenge of developing problem-based learning (PBL) curricula in medical schools in China is to meet the requirements of sufficient qualified PBL tutors. Since 2011, we have developed a modified group teaching approach where an experienced faculty tutor facilitates several small PBL student groups in a large class. Although our study…

  11. Collegiate-Based Emergency Medical Service: Impact on Alcohol-Related Emergency Department Transports at a Small Liberal Arts College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Joshua B.; Olson, Mark H.; Kelly, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined the impact of a collegiate-based emergency medical service (CBEMS) on the frequency of emergency department (ED) transports. Participants: Students transported to the ED for acute alcohol intoxication during the Fall 2008 and the Fall 2009 semesters (N = 50). Methods: The frequency of students receiving


  12. Assessment and determinants of emotional intelligence and perceived stress among students of a medical college in south India.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Nitin; Joseph, Nita; Panicker, Vishakha; Nelliyanil, Maria; Jindal, Ashok; Viveki, Raj

    2015-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is the ability to identify, assess, and control the emotions of oneself, of others, and of groups. Stress resulting from having to meet professional demands is common in the medical student's life. The perceived stress (PS) can be either an input or an outflow of EI or the lack thereof. This study was done to assess EI levels and to find out its association with sociodemographic variables and PS among medical students. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire from 198 first-year and 208 second-year medical students. EI scores were found to increase with age (r = 0.169, P = 0.004). PS scores were found to be higher among first-year students (P = 0.05). PS scores were found to decrease with increase in EI scores (r = -0.226, P < 0.001). Hence, if sufficient measures to improve EI are provided in the beginning, it would make students more stress-free during their training years at medical schools. PMID:26584173

  13. Collegiate-Based Emergency Medical Service: Impact on Alcohol-Related Emergency Department Transports at a Small Liberal Arts College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Joshua B.; Olson, Mark H.; Kelly, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined the impact of a collegiate-based emergency medical service (CBEMS) on the frequency of emergency department (ED) transports. Participants: Students transported to the ED for acute alcohol intoxication during the Fall 2008 and the Fall 2009 semesters (N = 50). Methods: The frequency of students receiving…

  14. The future of continuing medical education: effectiveness of continuing medical education: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Educational Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Mary Martin; Aparicio, Alejandro; Galbraith, Robert; Dorman, Todd; Dellert, Edwin

    2009-03-01

    To ensure that continuing medical education (CME) continues to evolve so that it offers educational activities that are relevant to physicians in keeping with the definition of CME, CME providers must respond to and prepare for emerging expectations. This article puts into context the impact of the current emphasis on lifelong learning in medicine, particularly the requirement for maintenance of certification and licensure, on CME. Further, the effect of changing needs assessments and the impact of the integration of new technology in CME is included. Finally, a discussion of the emerging unique needs of CME providers and organizations related to these changes are addressed in the following four broad categories: CME as a value center, resources in support of CME, research to further advance the field, and leadership to guide the profession. PMID:19265079

  15. A Study on the Performance of Medical Students in Internal Assessment and its Correlates to Final Examinations of 2nd MBBS Pharmacology Curriculum in a Medical College of Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Pramanik, Sushobhan; Mandal, Ananya; Sengupta, Parama; Das, Nina; Raychaudhuri, Patralekha

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The present study was undertaken to assess whether performance in the continuous assessment method as determined by internal assessment, correlates to the final summative evaluation in 2nd professional MBBS students in Pharmacology for the last four years (2009-2012). Materials and Methods: This study was conducted over a period of three months at Nilratan Sircar Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata (West Bengal, India). It was a retrospective non-interventional record-based study based on the students’ score sheets of 2nd MBBS Pharmacology examinations. Results: The strength of correlation between internal assessment marks and total summative examination was fond to be highly significant at p < 0.0001, thereby implying that continuous assessment plays a vital role in influencing the overall performance of the undergraduate medical students. Conclusion: This study revealed that performance in the internal assessment and final examination have a direct correlation although not completely linear, thereby indicating that other possible variables would have influenced the final result of the 2nd MBBS Pharmacology curriculum. PMID:25653964

  16. Knowledge of First Aid Skills Among Students of a Medical College in Mangalore City of South India

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, N; Kumar, GS; Babu, YPR; Nelliyanil, M; Bhaskaran, U

    2014-01-01

    Background: The adequate knowledge required for handling an emergency without hospital setting at the site of the accident or emergency may not be sufficient as most medical schools do not have formal first aid training in the teaching curriculum. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess the level of knowledge of medical students in providing first aid care. Subjects and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted during May 2011 among 152 medical students. Data was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Based on the scores obtained in each condition requiring first aid, the overall knowledge was graded as good, moderate and poor. Results: Only 11.2% (17/152) of the total student participants had previous exposure to first aid training. Good knowledge about first aid was observed in 13.8% (21/152), moderate knowledge in 68.4% (104/152) and poor knowledge in 17.8% (27/152) participants. Analysis of knowledge about first aid management in select conditions found that 21% (32/152) had poor knowledge regarding first aid management for shock and for gastro esophageal reflux disease and 20.4% (31/152) for epistaxis and foreign body in eyes. All students felt that first aid skills need to be taught from the school level onwards and all of them were willing to enroll in any formal first aid training sessions. Conclusion: The level of knowledge about first aid was not good among majority of the students. The study also identified the key areas in which first aid knowledge was lacking. There is thus a need for formal first aid training to be introduced in the medical curriculum. PMID:24761231

  17. Community College Partnership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Marjorie

    Community colleges must assume a proactive leadership role to develop strategies that establish and maintain partnerships with business and other community organizations. San Juan College (SJC) has forged partnerships with a variety of local organizations, including governmental, civic, business, educational, medical, and cultural groups.


  18. Standards and Guidelines for the Interpretation of Sequence Variants: A Joint Consensus Recommendation of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics and the Association for Molecular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Sue; Aziz, Nazneen; Bale, Sherri; Bick, David; Das, Soma; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Grody, Wayne W.; Hegde, Madhuri; Lyon, Elaine; Spector, Elaine; Voelkerding, Karl; Rehm, Heidi L.

    2015-01-01

    The American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) previously developed guidance for the interpretation of sequence variants.1 In the past decade, sequencing technology has evolved rapidly with the advent of high-throughput next generation sequencing. By adopting and leveraging next generation sequencing, clinical laboratories are now performing an ever increasing catalogue of genetic testing spanning genotyping, single genes, gene panels, exomes, genomes, transcriptomes and epigenetic assays for genetic disorders. By virtue of increased complexity, this paradigm shift in genetic testing has been accompanied by new challenges in sequence interpretation. In this context, the ACMG convened a workgroup in 2013 comprised of representatives from the ACMG, the Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP) and the College of American Pathologists (CAP) to revisit and revise the standards and guidelines for the interpretation of sequence variants. The group consisted of clinical laboratory directors and clinicians. This report represents expert opinion of the workgroup with input from ACMG, AMP and CAP stakeholders. These recommendations primarily apply to the breadth of genetic tests used in clinical laboratories including genotyping, single genes, panels, exomes and genomes. This report recommends the use of specific standard terminology: ‘pathogenic’, ‘likely pathogenic’, ‘uncertain significance’, ‘likely benign’, and ‘benign’ to describe variants identified in Mendelian disorders. Moreover, this recommendation describes a process for classification of variants into these five categories based on criteria using typical types of variant evidence (e.g. population data, computational data, functional data, segregation data, etc.). Because of the increased complexity of analysis and interpretation of clinical genetic testing described in this report, the ACMG strongly recommends that clinical molecular genetic testing should be performed in a CLIA-approved laboratory with results interpreted by a board-certified clinical molecular geneticist or molecular genetic pathologist or equivalent. PMID:25741868

  19. Is it time for integration of surgical skills simulation into the United Kingdom undergraduate medical curriculum? A perspective from King’s College London School of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Changes in undergraduate medical curricula, combined with reforms in postgraduate education, have training implications for surgical skills acquisition in a climate of reduced clinical exposure. Confidence and prior experience influences the educational impact of learning. Currently there is no basic surgical skills (BSS) programme integrated into undergraduate curricula in the United Kingdom. We explored the role of a dedicated BSS programme for undergraduates in improving confidence and influencing careers in King’s College London School of Medicine, and the programme was evaluated. Methods: A programme was designed in-line with the established Royal College of Surgeons course. Undergraduates were taught four key skills over four weeks: knot-tying, basic-suturing, tying-at-depth and chest-drain insertion, using low-fidelity bench-top models. A Likert-style questionnaire was designed to determine educational value and influence on career choice. Qualitative data was collected. Results: Only 29% and 42% of students had undertaken previous practice in knot-tying and basic suturing, respectively. 96% agreed that skills exposure prior to starting surgical rotations was essential and felt a dedicated course would augment undergraduate training. There was a significant increase in confidence in the practice and knowledge of all skills taught (p<0.01), with a greater motivation to be actively involved in the surgical firm and theatres. Conclusion: A simple, structured BSS programme can increase the confidence and motivation of students. Early surgical skills targeting is valuable for students entering surgical, related allied, and even traditionally non-surgical specialties such as general practice. Such experience can increase the confidence of future junior doctors and trainees. We advocate the introduction of a BSS programme into United Kingdom undergraduate curricula. PMID:24498471

  20. The clinical application of genome-wide sequencing for monogenic diseases in Canada: Position Statement of the Canadian College of Medical Geneticists

    PubMed Central

    Boycott, Kym; Hartley, Taila; Adam, Shelin; Bernier, Francois; Chong, Karen; Fernandez, Bridget A; Friedman, Jan M; Geraghty, Michael T; Hume, Stacey; Knoppers, Bartha M; Laberge, Anne-Marie; Majewski, Jacek; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Meyn, M Stephen; Michaud, Jacques L; Nelson, Tanya N; Richer, Julie; Sadikovic, Bekim; Skidmore, David L; Stockley, Tracy; Taylor, Sherry; van Karnebeek, Clara; Zawati, Ma'n H; Lauzon, Julie; Armour, Christine M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose and scope The aim of this Position Statement is to provide recommendations for Canadian medical geneticists, clinical laboratory geneticists, genetic counsellors and other physicians regarding the use of genome-wide sequencing of germline DNA in the context of clinical genetic diagnosis. This statement has been developed to facilitate the clinical translation and development of best practices for clinical genome-wide sequencing for genetic diagnosis of monogenic diseases in Canada; it does not address the clinical application of this technology in other fields such as molecular investigation of cancer or for population screening of healthy individuals. Methods of statement development Two multidisciplinary groups consisting of medical geneticists, clinical laboratory geneticists, genetic counsellors, ethicists, lawyers and genetic researchers were assembled to review existing literature and guidelines on genome-wide sequencing for clinical genetic diagnosis in the context of monogenic diseases, and to make recommendations relevant to the Canadian context. The statement was circulated for comment to the Canadian College of Medical Geneticists (CCMG) membership-at-large and, following incorporation of feedback, approved by the CCMG Board of Directors. The CCMG is a Canadian organisation responsible for certifying medical geneticists and clinical laboratory geneticists, and for establishing professional and ethical standards for clinical genetics services in Canada. Results and conclusions Recommendations include (1) clinical genome-wide sequencing is an appropriate approach in the diagnostic assessment of a patient for whom there is suspicion of a significant monogenic disease that is associated with a high degree of genetic heterogeneity, or where specific genetic tests have failed to provide a diagnosis; (2) until the benefits of reporting incidental findings are established, we do not endorse the intentional clinical analysis of disease-associated genes other than those linked to the primary indication; and (3) clinicians should provide genetic counselling and obtain informed consent prior to undertaking clinical genome-wide sequencing. Counselling should include discussion of the limitations of testing, likelihood and implications of diagnosis and incidental findings, and the potential need for further analysis to facilitate clinical interpretation, including studies performed in a research setting. These recommendations will be routinely re-evaluated as knowledge of diagnostic and clinical utility of clinical genome-wide sequencing improves. While the document was developed to direct practice in Canada, the applicability of the statement is broader and will be of interest to clinicians and health jurisdictions internationally. PMID:25951830

  1. Awareness of palliative care among doctors of various departments in all four teaching medical colleges in a metropolitan city in Eastern India: A survey

    PubMed Central

    Bhadra, Kallol; Manir, Kazi S.; Adhikary, Arnab; Kumar, Gaurav; Manna, Amitabha; Sarkar, Shyamal K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To enquire about the level of awareness regarding various important aspects of palliative medicine among doctors of various departments in four Medical Colleges in Kolkata through a questionnaire. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire was developed by few members of Indian Association of Palliative Care. It was distributed, to a convenience sample of doctors who worked at various departments in all four teaching hospitals in Kolkata. The distribution and collection of questionnaires was carried out within four months. Results: The results suggested that 85% of the doctors felt that cancer was the commonest reason for the palliative care teams to be involved. Seventy four percent of the doctors mentioned that pain control was their prime job; 53% said that they are enjoying their encounter with palliative care, so far; 77% of the doctors thought breaking bad news is necessary in further decision making process; only 22% of the doctors reported the WHO ladder of pain control sequentially, 35% of the doctors believed other forms of therapies are useful in relieving pain, 35% of the doctors thought that they gave enough importance and time for pain control; 77% said that they had heard about a hospice, among them still 61% of the doctors thought that the patients should spend last days of their life at home. Thinking of the future, 92% of the doctors think that more and more people will need palliative care in the coming days. Conclusion: Amongst the doctors of various departments, there is a lack of training and awareness in palliative care. Almost all the doctors are interested and they are willing to have more training in pain control, breaking bad news, communication skills and terminal care. PMID:25861665

  2. A Study on Clinico-Mycological Profile, Aetiological Agents and Diagnosis of Onychomycosis at a Government Medical College Hospital in Kashmir

    PubMed Central

    Lone, Rubeena; Bashir, Deeba; Ahmad, Shabir; Syed, Arshi; Khurshid, Syed

    2013-01-01

    Background: Onychomycosis is a major public health problem with a high incidence, associated morbidity and a long lasting treatment with anti-fungal agents. This study was carried out to know the clinico-mycological pattern of onychomycosis, which could help in the control of this infection. Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of various causative agents of onychomycosis and to study the clinical and mycological patterns of onychomycosis. Material and Methods: This was a prospective study which was carried over a period of one year, from 1st February 2011 to 31st January 2012 on samples from 150 patients with clinically suspected nail infections, who attended the Dermatology Department of SKIMS Medical college, Kashmir, India. The nails were evaluated clinically and the nail samples were subjected to direct microscopy and culture. Results: 60% samples were found to be positive by direct microscopy and culture. Males were infected more than females. The commonest age group which was infected was the 21-30 years age group. Finger nails were affected more frequently than toe nails and distolateral subungal onychomycosis was the most common clinical type of infection which was seen in 64.44% patients. The aetiological agents were dermatophytes (61.66%), Non–Dermatophyte Moulds (NDM) (31.66%) and yeasts (6.66%). Among dermatophytes, T. rubrum was the commonest aetiological agent. Conclusion: Although dermatophytes were the main causative agents, NDM and yeasts were also not uncommon aetiological agents of onychomycosis. This study also emphasized the need of performing both a direct examination and culture to improve sensitivity. Since onychomycosis can cause physical, psycological and occupational problems, the clinico-epidemiological data can be helpful in development of preventive and diagnostic strategies. PMID:24179915

  3. Nepal's noble echocardiography-database with video clips and color still images: a single individual's 6 years' experience at the Echocardiography Lab of Nepal Medical College, Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, B

    2012-09-01

    Echocardiographic reporting system is very poor in Nepal. No long-term feasibility and efficacy data about the echocardiography database with video clips has been studied. Snazzi Movie Studio S4 was used to convert analog video signals into MPEG2 and color photographs were converted into JPEG format for storage and use for the database. All together 2272 patients' echocardiography were performed by one individual prospectively at the Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital from 10th January 2007 to 9th January 2012. Echocardiographic findings of these patients were evaluated. Mean age +/- SD were 44.4 +/- 28.7 years. Male female ratio was 0.8:1. Brahman/Chhetri were the usual ethnic group to undergo echocardiography (943, 41.5%), followed byjanajati (631, 27.8%) and newar (496, 21.8%). Age group of 60-69 years was the most common echo users (519, 22.8%). Total time for echocardiography/report writing with database compared to non database was 13.9 +/- 2.4 minutes vs. 12.3 +/- 0.8 minutes, p = 0.51. Out of all lesions, valvular lesions were the most common lesions detected (4885, 215%). Mild tricuspid regurgitation (1213, 53.4%) was the most common valvular lesion followed by mild mitral regurgitation (742, 32.7%). Patent foramen ovale was the most common congenital heart disease (32, 45.7%) followed by atrial septal defect (12, 17.1%). About one seventh of the total patients (318, 13.9%) had systolic dysfunction. Out of total chronic cor pulmonale (383, 16.9%), severe Pulmonary arterial dysfulction (PAH) was noted in more than one third of the patients (169, 44.1%). PMID:24047011

  4. A retrospective study of cases presenting with chilblains (Perniosis) in Out Patient Department Of Dermatology, Nepal Medical College and Teaching Hospital (NMCTH).

    PubMed

    Pramanik, T; Jha, A K; Ghimire, A

    2011-09-01

    Chilblains (Perniosis/Pernio) is characterized by painful red-to-purple papular lesions involving the fingers or toes due to non-freezing damp cold that resolves with symptomatic treatment. As in winters, cold is moderate to severe in Kathmandu, this retrospective study was undertaken to find out the incidence of chilblains cases, seeking health care in the Out Patient Department of Dermatology, Nepal Medical College and Teaching Hospital. Cases of chilblains were noted in the months of October to December 2009, January to March 2010, October to December 2010 and January to March 2011. Out of total 49 cases maximum patients (n=25; male 10, female 15) were in the age group of 7-20 years. Rest of them (n=18; male 7, female 11) were in the age group of 21-40 years and only 6 (male 2, female 4) were in the age group of 41-65 years. Amongst all the cases 30 patients were females (61.2%) and 19 were males (38.8%). Most of (79.6%) the chilblain victims sought health care during the months of December to February -- coldest time of the years. The patients were advised to protect their acral parts from cold exposure as far as practicable by wearing shocks and gloves. They were advised not to warm their extremities all on a sudden, after exposure to cold, as this causes vasospasm and makes the condition worse. Extremities should be warmed gradually. Assessing the severity of the condition topical allocation of steroid ointment and/or anti allergic drugs was prescribed, when felt needed. PMID:22808813

  5. American College of Medical Toxicology

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Agents of Opportunity: TICs and TIMs Seminars in Forensic Toxicology Clandestine Meth Labs Courses Opioid Academy International ... Natural Toxins Academy 2014 FIT Open Mic 2013 Forensic Conference 2012 Chelation Course 2012 Prescription Opioid Misuse ...

  6. Recent outbreak of cutaneous anthrax in Bangladesh: clinico-demographic profile and treatment outcome of cases attended at Rajshahi Medical College Hospital

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Human cutaneous anthrax results from skin exposure to B. anthracis, primarily due to occupational exposure. Bangladesh has experienced a number of outbreaks of cutaneous anthrax in recent years. The last episode occurred from April to August, 2011 and created mass havoc due to its dreadful clinical outcome and socio-cultural consequences. We report here the clinico-demographic profile and treatment outcome of 15 cutaneous anthrax cases attended at the Dermatology Outpatient Department of Rajshahi Medical College Hospital, Bangladesh between April and August, 2011 with an aim to create awareness for early case detection and management. Findings Anthrax was suspected primarily based on cutaneous manifestations of typical non-tender ulcer with black eschar, with or without oedema, and a history of butchering, or dressing/washing of cattle/goat or their meat. Diagnosis was established by demonstration of large gram-positive rods, typically resembling B. anthracis under light microscope where possible and also by ascertaining therapeutic success. The mean age of cases was 21.4 years (ranging from 3 to 46 years), 7 (46.7%) being males and 8 (53.3%) females. The majority of cases were from lower middle socioeconomic status. Types of exposures included butchering (20%), contact with raw meat (46.7%), and live animals (33.3%). Malignant pustule was present in upper extremity, both extremities, face, and trunk at frequencies of 11 (73.3%), 2 (13.3%), 1 (6.7%) and 1 (6.7%) respectively. Eight (53.3%) patients presented with fever, 7 (46.7%) had localized oedema and 5 (33.3%) had regional lymphadenopathy. Anthrax was confirmed in 13 (86.7%) cases by demonstration of gram-positive rods. All cases were cured with 2 months oral ciprofloxacin combined with flucoxacillin for 2 weeks. Conclusions We present the findings from this series of cases to reinforce the criteria for clinical diagnosis and to urge prompt therapeutic measures to treat cutaneous anthrax successfully to eliminate the unnecessary panic of anthrax. PMID:22929128

  7. College Eating and Fitness 101

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Clinicians About Us Donate General Health Sexual Health Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health College Health: ... and Young Adult Medicine and the Division of Gynecology at Boston Children’s Hospital. The Center is an ...

  8. Women in the C-Suite: A Study of How Succession Planning May Best Be Utilized for Career Advancement of Medical College Executives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Yvette E.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated and analyzed medical school executives' perceptions of the low level of advancement of women into the healthcare c-suite. As well, medical school executives' recommendations for increasing the number of women entering and experiencing sustained success in executive positions were assessed. Related to these observations were…

  9. [The pattern of poisonings with chemical compounds in Krakow inhabitants hospitalized at the Department of Clinical Toxicology of the Jagiellonian University Medical College in 1997-2001 in relation to age].

    PubMed

    Targosz, Dorota; Szkolnicka, Beata; Morawska, Jowanka; Pach, Janusz; Groszek, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    The pattern of poisonings in patients hospitalised in the Department of Clinical Toxicology Jagiellonian University Medical College in 1997-2001 was presented in the study. The analysis includes 17,931 patients: 6,016 (33.5%) women and 11,915 (66.4%) men. The rate of patients between 20-39 years old was highest in all the analysed year, however downward trend was noticed. The upward tendency was noted in older group of poisoned patients. A suicidal poisonings were mostly common in 1998 and 1999 in the youngest and oldest groups: 37.1%, 37% in 1998, and 25.5%, 22.2% in 1999 respectively. The medication drugs were the most common cause of acute poisoning only in the group of adolescent patients. Ethyl alcohol was the common cause of poisoning in adult groups. The highest rate of ethanol intoxication was noted in patients between 40 to 59 years old. A 89 lethal intoxication were noted in analysed period. The average mortality rate was low (0.5). A medication drugs (30.4%) followed by ethanol (17.4%), carbon monoxide (13%) and solvents (13%) were involved in lethal poisonings in the oldest group of patients. PMID:12183998

  10. College Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapa, Marisa; Galvan-De Leon, Vanessa; Solis, Judith; Mundy, Marie-Anne

    2014-01-01

    During the 79th Texas Legislature, the bill "Advancement of College Readiness in Curriculum" was passed (THECB). As a response to this, high schools and colleges have combined forming an early college high school. The result of this union was a program that condensed the time it took to complete both the high school diploma and up to two


  11. College Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Kimberly Kappler; Scalzo, Mary Jo

    2012-01-01

    This article describes Oakwood City School District's College Connection Study, which is now in its eighth year. The purpose of the study is to help the educators in the district learn how to effectively prepare students for success in the colleges of their choice. Teachers, administrators, and other staff members travel to colleges to conduct…

  12. Medical Physics Panel Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guèye, Paul; Avery, Steven; Baird, Richard; Soares, Christopher; Amols, Howard; Tripuraneni, Prabhakar; Majewski, Stan; Weisenberger, Drew

    2006-03-01

    The panel discussion will explore opportunities and vistas in medical physics research and practice, medical imaging, teaching medical physics to undergraduates, and medical physics curricula as a recruiting tool for physics departments. Panel members consist of representatives from NSBP (Paul Guèye and Steven Avery), NIH/NIBIB (Richard Baird), NIST (Christopher Soares), AAPM (Howard Amols), ASTRO (Prabhakar Tripuraneni), and Jefferson Lab (Stan Majewski and Drew Weisenberger). Medical Physicists are part of Departments of Radiation Oncology at hospitals and medical centers. The field of medical physics includes radiation therapy physics, medical diagnostic and imaging physics, nuclear medicine physics, and medical radiation safety. It also ranges from basic researcher (at college institutions, industries, and laboratories) to applications in clinical environments.

  13. The Medical Interpreter Training Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Maria-Paz Beltran

    The Medical Interpreter Training Project, created as a collaborative effort of Northern Essex Community College (Massachusetts), private businesses, and medical care providers in Massachusetts, developed a 28-credit, competency-based certificate program to prepare bilingual adults to work as medical interpreters in a range of health care settings.…

  14. Preventing Misuse and Diversion of Medication

    MedlinePLUS

    ... school and college students. About 1 in 10 adolescents report trading, selling, or giving away medication that had been prescribed for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), pain, sleep, or anxiety. These medications often come from friends ...

  15. Improvement of Faculty's Qualities in Medical Colleges and the Construction of a "Five-in-One" Cultivation System under the Pattern of PBL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Qin; Li, Hang; Zeng, Fancai; Zeng, Xiaorong; Zheng, Lige; Li, Xiang

    2009-01-01

    The instructional pattern of Problem-based Learning, which requires teachers to be "organizers, guides and cooperators" of their students' learning, is now becoming a trend in the development of medical education around the world. In order to be competent in all the above mentioned roles, teachers need to be equipped with corresponding…

  16. Clinical pharmacists as key members of the patient-centered medical home: an opinion statement of the Ambulatory Care Practice and Research Network of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Nigro, Stefanie C; Garwood, Candice L; Berlie, Helen; Irons, Brian; Longyhore, Daniel; McFarland, Michael S; Saseen, Joseph J; Trewet, Coralynn B

    2014-01-01

    The American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) Ambulatory Care Practice Research Network (PRN) considers the role of clinical pharmacists to be fundamental to the success of the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) model. Within the PCMH, pharmacists can improve the health of populations by participating in activities that optimize medication management. Multiple published articles support clinical pharmacist involvement in the PCMH with regard to promotion of team-based care, enhanced access, care coordination, and improved quality and safety of care. A survey of clinical pharmacist members of ACCP who operate in such a model depict a variety of activities, with some members pioneering new and innovative ways to practice clinical pharmacy. Although this is a significant opportunity for pharmacists in the primary care setting, a unified vision of pharmacy services is needed. It is our hope that with continued efforts focused on obtaining national provider status, clinical pharmacy can use the PCMH model to solidify the future of primary care pharmacy. The following is an opinion statement of the ACCP Ambulatory Care PRN regarding the vital role of clinical pharmacists in the PCMH. PMID:24122857

  17. Is the college an Asklepieion?

    PubMed

    Smith, D Emslie

    2008-04-01

    After an annual introduction of new Fellows one of them viewed the neckties on display and, referring to their sagittary motif, was heard to say, 'I suppose it is the College crest.' Of course, it is precisely not that. The only crest the College has is that of its arms, which is completely different. However, one can sympathise with the new Fellow, for in the College he was surrounded by confusing reminders of the medical mythology of ancient Greece. This account is offered as a refresher course on the dramatis personae of the pantheon and some of their activities and attributes. PMID:19069043

  18. Care of the college student.

    PubMed

    Unwin, Brian K; Goodie, Jeffrey; Reamy, Brian V; Quinlan, Jeffrey

    2013-11-01

    There are approximately 20 million students in U.S. colleges and universities. Although this population is characterized as having good health, 600,000 students report some form of disability or some type of medical problem, including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, learning disabilities, psychiatric disorders, and chronic illnesses, among others. Physicians can enhance youth transition to an adult model of health care; the use of self-care skills checklists is one recommended method to assist with the transition. Stimulant medications are effective for treating adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, but physicians should use caution when prescribing stimulants to college students because of the high rates of medication diversion in this population. Depression, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, sleep problems, and eating disorders are common in college students and can significantly impact performance. Emphasis on immunization of students for influenza, meningococcus, and pertussis is necessary because of the low rates of compliance. Screening and interventions for obesity, tobacco use, and substance abuse are important because of the high prevalence of these problems in college students. Screening for alcohol abuse facilitates identification of students with problem drinking behaviors. Students who are war veterans should be monitored for suicidal ideation and posttraumatic stress disorder. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning students are at risk of harassment and discrimination. Caution should be exercised when prescribing medications to college athletes to avoid violation of National Collegiate Athletic Association eligibility rules. PMID:24364636

  19. Prevalence of stress in junior doctors during their internship training: a cross-sectional study of three Saudi medical colleges’ hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Abdulghani, Hamza Mohammad; Irshad, Mohammad; Al Zunitan, Mohammed A; Al Sulihem, Ali A; Al Dehaim, Muhammed A; Al Esefir, Waleed A; Al Rabiah, Abdulaziz M; Kameshki, Rashid N; Alrowais, Nourah Abdullah; Sebiany, Abdulaziz; Haque, Shafiul

    2014-01-01

    Background Medical science is perceived as a stressful educational career, and medical students experience monstrous stress during their undergraduate studies, internship, and residency training, which affects their cognitive function, practical life, and patient care. In the present study, an assessment of the prevalence of self-perceived stress among new medical graduates during their internship training has been performed, and correlations of self-perceived stress with sex, marital status, and clinical rotations have been evaluated. Patients and methods Interns of the King Khalid, King Abdulaziz, and King Fahd University hospitals in Saudi Arabia were invited to complete a stress inventory known as the Kessler 10, which is used for stress measurement. Apart from stress evaluation, the questionnaire collected personal data, such as age, sex, and marital status, in addition to information relevant to hospital training, assigned duties, and clinical training rotations. Results Our results showed that nearly 73.0% of interns were under stressed conditions. Most of the interns were affected by a severe level of stress (34.9%), followed by mild (19.3%) and moderate (18.8%) levels of stress. The stress level was significantly higher (84.0%) among female interns in comparison with male interns (66.5%) (odds ratio =2.64; confidence interval =1.59–4.39; P<0.0002). There were statistically significant differences between the percentages of male and female interns (P?0.047) at mild, moderate, and severe stress levels. Marital status had no role in causing stress. The highest stress level was reported by interns during the clinical rotations of medicine (78.8%), followed by surgery (74.7%), pediatrics (72.4%), obstetrics and gynecology (70.1%), and emergency (58.3%). The prevalence of stress among the interns and their corresponding clinical rotations in all three hospitals had significant linear correlations (r?0.829, P?0.041). Conclusion We found a significantly high level of stress among the medical interns. High stress may have negative effects on cognitive functioning, learning, and patient care. Hence, medical interns need support and subsequent interventions to cope with stress. PMID:25328389

  20. Current Issues and the Veterinary Medical Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nault, Andre J.

    2010-01-01

    Veterinary medical libraries and librarians are unique. There are now 33 veterinary colleges in North America, and in accordance with American Veterinary Medical Association accreditation, each has a library managed by an accredited librarian. Colleges with veterinary programs often maintain specialized branch libraries to support the degree,…

  1. College Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauls, Samuel J.

    As with commercial stations, the underlying premise of the college radio station is to serve the community, whether it be the campus community or the community at large, but in unique ways often geared to underserved niches of the population. Much of college radio's charm lies in its unpredictable nature and constant mutations. The stations give


  2. Navigating College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arum, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Students moving from high school to college in the United States typically confront a bewildering set of largely unstructured options. In the absence of clear signals about how to get the most out of college, they often choose pathways that involve limited academic rigor and engagement. In this article, Richard Arum describes a study that followed


  3. Alverno College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Virginia

    2009-01-01

    Alverno College is a private, liberal arts college located in a residential neighborhood on the southwest side of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. In fall 2008, the student body numbered 2,783, and there were 231 resident students. The student body is highly diverse (34% minority), and most students commute to campus for their classes. The culture at Alverno


  4. Electoral College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Joel K.

    1996-01-01

    Examines one of the least understood institutions of U.S. politics, the Electoral College. Discusses the historical circumstances resulting in its creation as well as the current structure and membership. Provides arguments for and against continuation of the Electoral College. (MJP)

  5. Philadelphia's Medical Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Whitten, Nancy E.

    1965-01-01

    Philadelphia medical libraries embrace the past, the present, and the future. Typifying the expansion in medical communications, area libraries cover the broad spectrum of medical and paramedical fields. Serving workers in these fields are the College of Physicians Library, the five medical school libraries, and a host of hospital and special libraries. Many of these libraries date from the early years of this country. Pharmaceutical firms and governmental institutions in the city, as well as medical libraries in neighboring states, contribute to the area's rich resources. The cooperative efforts and outlook of all these libraries are reflected in the strength of the Regional Group of the Medical Library Association and the plans being made for the future of medical libraries in the Philadelphia area. PMID:14271118

  6. Whither medical humanities?

    PubMed

    Singh, Navjeevan

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the medical humanities (MH) and their role in medical education is in its infancy in India. Students are initiated into professional (medical) education too early in life, usually at the expense of a basic grounding in the humanities, resulting in warped intellectual growth. The author, arguing against the wholesale import of foreign systems, advocates free inquiry by medical educators to evolve a humanities programme for medical students derived from our own cultural context. This essay describes the early experiences of efforts to make a beginning at the University College of Medical Sciences, Delhi. The author reviews the various strategies used and the challenges of introducing the subject to the current generation of medical students. PMID:22864074

  7. Analysis of characteristics of paratyphoid A in 157 Chinese inpatients between 1998 and 2009.

    PubMed

    Yu, F; Fan, S; Fan, X; Dong, P; Wang, X; Chen, Y; Li, J

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to understand the epidemic rules, clinical characteristics, and drug resistance of paratyphoid A by analyzing 157 cases in the Wenzhou area of China during a 12-year period. The subjects included in the present study were patients with paratyphoid A who were admitted to the First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College (Wenzhou, ZJ, China) between 1998 and 2009. The disease mainly occurred in persons aged 20 to 50 years. The peak incidence was between 2001 and 2003 (n = 85). Paratyphoid A was more likely to occur in winter and spring in this area. In many cases (33.8%), the condition was complicated by underlying diseases. The length of hospital stay was relatively long, averaging 17.68 days. The white blood cell (WBC) count was 2-8 × 10(9)/L in 88.5% of cases. Eosinophils disappeared in 51.7% of cases. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was not significant and lower than 60 mm/h in 88.5% of cases. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was ≀3-fold greater than the normal value in 84.3% of cases. The Widal test was positive in only 7.7% of our cases. The sensitivity of many antibiotics was over 90%. Paratyphoid A in the Wenzhou area has unique epidemic rules, clinical characteristics, and drug resistance. The results of our retrospective analysis are instructive for the early diagnosis and rational treatment of paratyphoid A. PMID:20827496

  8. Status of Requirements for Medical Technology Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becan-McBride, K.; And Others

    In order to determine if major differences exist in 1980 in medical technology programs, a nationwide survey was conducted to review course requirements of medical technology programs. A letter written on the American Society for Medical Technology stationery was mailed to 634 medical technology programs requesting a brochure or college catalog.


  9. Status of Requirements for Medical Technology Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becan-McBride, K.; And Others

    In order to determine if major differences exist in 1980 in medical technology programs, a nationwide survey was conducted to review course requirements of medical technology programs. A letter written on the American Society for Medical Technology stationery was mailed to 634 medical technology programs requesting a brochure or college catalog.…

  10. American Medical Education: Institutions, Programs, and Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Robert F.

    This report presents information about the academic medical centers belonging to the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and profiles American medical education generally. Following a brief introduction, a section on institutions and resources offers information on medical schools' financial support, faculties, and faculty practice


  11. Adjustment to College in Students with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabiner, David L.; Anastopoulos, Arthur D.; Costello, Jane; Hoyle, Rick H.; Swartzwelder, H. Scott

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine college adjustment in students reporting an ADHD diagnosis and the effect of medication treatment on students' adjustment. Method: 1,648 first-semester freshmen attending a public and a private university completed a Web-based survey to examine their adjustment to college. Results: Compared with 200 randomly selected control


  12. College Health: Sexual Health, Relationships, and Resources

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Clinicians About Us Donate General Health Sexual Health Gynecology Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health College Health: ... and Young Adult Medicine and the Division of Gynecology at Boston Children’s Hospital. The Center is an ...

  13. Get the Facts: Prescription Drug Abuse on College Campuses

    MedlinePLUS

    ... behaviors. l Most college students (90%) who used Adderall (a medication used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity ... as likely as those who had not used Adderall non-medically to have used marijuana in the ...

  14. Is Community College Really College?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenship, Mark

    2011-01-01

    There are a lot of misconceptions when it comes to community college. The general population appears to believe that because the tuition per credit hour is incredibly cheaper than that of the average university, students are receiving a "discounted," "cheap," "rip-off" education. Top community college students struggle against the mistaken…

  15. Standards for Medical Library Technicians, Medical Library Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medical Library Association, Chicago, IL.

    A medical library technician is a semiprofessional library employee whose duties require knowledge and skill based on a minimum of two years' general college education that includes library instruction beyond the clerical level. The medical library technician must have a practical knowledge of library functions and services, an understanding of…

  16. Mental Health Issues among College Students: Who Gets Referred for Psychopharmacology Evaluation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirsch, Daniel J.; Doerfler, Leonard A.; Truong, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe diagnostic and psychotropic medication prescription characteristics among college students referred by college counseling centers for psychopharmacologic evaluation. Participants: Participants were 540 college students referred by 6 college counseling centers in Massachusetts between November 2005 and May 2011. Methods:


  17. Mental Health Issues among College Students: Who Gets Referred for Psychopharmacology Evaluation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirsch, Daniel J.; Doerfler, Leonard A.; Truong, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe diagnostic and psychotropic medication prescription characteristics among college students referred by college counseling centers for psychopharmacologic evaluation. Participants: Participants were 540 college students referred by 6 college counseling centers in Massachusetts between November 2005 and May 2011. Methods:…

  18. College education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, David R.

    1990-01-01

    Space Grant Colleges and Universities must build the space curriculum of the future on the firm basis of deep knowledge of an involvement with the present operating programs of the nation and an on-going and extensive program of leading edge research in the aerospace sciences and engineering, management, law, finance, and the other arts that are integral to our planetary society. The Space Grant College and Fellowship Program must create new academic fields of enquiry, which is a long and difficult process that will require deeper and broader interaction between NASA and academia than has previously existed.

  19. Medical Office Assistants' Handbook. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Dept. of Education, Victoria.

    This handbook is intended both as a text for use in medical office assistant (MOA) training programs in colleges and as a handbook for people working in medical offices. Addressed in the individual sections of the manual are the following topics: responsibilities of the medical office assistant, office organization, appointments and the waiting…

  20. A Couples Group of Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Kenneth; And Others

    1976-01-01

    An experiment at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine with a short-term medical student couples' workshop designed to foster increased sensitivity between medical students and their partners resulted in recommendation that such workshops be offered to medical students. (JT)

  1. College Studying.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nist, Sherrie L.; Simpson, Michele

    2002-01-01

    Notes that many students enter postsecondary institutions unprepared to meet the studying demands placed on them. Examines models and taxonomies that have guided researchers as they have investigated studying. Reviews research factors related to studying at the college level: course characteristics, learner characteristics, and learning…

  2. College Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... pressures related to food, drink, appearance, drugs, and sexual activity. There are steps you can take to stay healthy and safe while you're in college: Eat a balanced diet Get enough sleep Get regular physical activity Maintain your health with checkups and vaccinations If you decide to ...

  3. An Introduction to Emergency Medical Services (EMS). Pre-Hospital Phase. Emergency Medical Services Orientation, Lesson Plan No. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Derrick P.

    Designed for use with interested students at high schools, community colleges, and four-year colleges, this lesson plan was developed to provide an introduction to the pre-hospital phase of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and to serve as a recruitment tool for the EMS Program at Kapiolani Community College (KCC) in Hawaii. The objectives of the…

  4. Two Reports of the AAMC Committee on AIDS and the Academic Medical Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Medicine, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Association of American Medical Colleges' reports concerning Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome include "Policy Guidelines for Addressing HIV [human immunodeficiency virus] Infection in the Academic Medical Community" and "The HIV Epidemic and Medical Education." (MSE)

  5. The Community College Option

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbaum, James E.; Ahearn, Caitlin; Rosenbaum, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Efforts to promote college for all for all has opened college doors to a broad range of students. But college--and career success after college--doesn't have to mean a bachelor's degree. Community college credentials, such as associate's degrees and one-year certificates, can lead to further degrees or jobs that offer more benefits than students


  6. Making Room for Tradition: Tribal Colleges Blend the Wisdom of Traditional Healers with the Science of Western Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambler, Marjane

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the efforts of tribally controlled colleges to integrate traditional American Indian healing techniques with Western medical practices, indicating that the colleges often find themselves acting as liaisons between the two approaches. Describes approaches of the colleges' medical programs to promote understanding of Indian patients and


  7. The College of Physicians in the nineteenth century.

    PubMed

    Cook, G C

    2001-01-01

    For much of the nineteenth century (during which there were 16 Presidents) events within the College were dominated by widespread demands for medical reform, culminating in the great Medical Reform Act of 1858. This led to major changes within the College, including an overhaul of the system(s) of elections; the old licentiates disappeared (to be replaced by the new licentiates), whilst introduction of the membership (by examination) was instituted. The style of Presidential elections was also changed. Internal College activities centred on the Library and on the London Pharmacopoeia. Early in the century, the College once again moved geographically, this time from the City to the West End of London. Regarding contemporary issues, including medical advances (notably introduction of the 'germ-theory' of disease causation) and important social changes (dominated by Poor Law reform), the College's input proved minimal. PMID:11446623

  8. Orientation of International Medical Graduates to Canadian Medical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenerson, Heather J.; Davis, Penny M.; Labash, Andrea M.; Procyshyn, Mavis M.

    2009-01-01

    The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Saskatchewan tracked a cohort of 39 international medical graduates (IMGs) in rural Saskatchewan and discovered that 51% left the province within five years (personal communication). A study by Basky, Mathew, Edwards, and Rourke (2007) found that half a cohort of IMGs in rural Newfoundland and Labrador


  9. Orientation of International Medical Graduates to Canadian Medical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenerson, Heather J.; Davis, Penny M.; Labash, Andrea M.; Procyshyn, Mavis M.

    2009-01-01

    The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Saskatchewan tracked a cohort of 39 international medical graduates (IMGs) in rural Saskatchewan and discovered that 51% left the province within five years (personal communication). A study by Basky, Mathew, Edwards, and Rourke (2007) found that half a cohort of IMGs in rural Newfoundland and Labrador…

  10. The Role of a Psychiatric Pharmacist in College Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caley, Charles F.; Webber, Donna; Kurland, Michael; Holmes, Paula

    2010-01-01

    Published evidence indicates there is a growing prevalence of psychiatric illnesses on college campuses, and that approximately one quarter of students may be taking psychotropic medications. But attracting and retaining experienced mental health care professionals to college health settings is a challenging task. The psychiatric pharmacist is one…

  11. AIDS on Campus: Emerging Issues for College and University Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinbach, Sheldon Elliot

    Legal information concerning Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) that college presidents may find helpful in establishing policies and procedures is provided in a paper by the general counsel of the American Council on Education. Sources of medical information, including the American College Health Association, hotlines, and federal…

  12. The Case for Continuing Education in Veterinary Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, David E.

    2003-01-01

    Explores why continuing veterinary medical education (CVME) programs can play a vital role in supporting the overall strategy of a veterinary college. Discusses the current and future market for CVME programs and strategies for sustainability and synergy. (EV)

  13. Modeling Relationships between Traditional Preadmission Measures and Clinical Skills Performance on a Medical Licensure Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, William L.; Pugliano, Gina; Langenau, Erik; Boulet, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Medical schools employ a variety of preadmission measures to select students most likely to succeed in the program. The Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) and the undergraduate college grade point average (uGPA) are two academic measures typically used to select students in medical school. The assumption that presently used preadmission…

  14. Use of MCAT Data in Admissions. A Guide for Medical School Admissions Officers and Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Karen J.

    A description of the standardized, multiple-choice Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) and how to use it is offered. Medical school admissions officers medical educators, college faculty members, and practicing physicians are active participants in selecting content, drafting test specifications, and authoring questions for the exam. The MCAT is


  15. Understanding the Experience of College Graduates during Their First Year of Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polach, Janet L.

    2004-01-01

    A company's college recruitment practices, as well as its socialization processes for graduates once they have joined the organization, can be improved when there is understanding of college graduates' experience during the first year of employment. This study recorded the experiences of eight college graduates who were employed by a medical…

  16. You Can Survive College - We Did: A Guide for Kids and Their Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faaborg, Beverly Parks; Faaborg, Tony

    This book presents practical ideas related to the college experience for college-bound students and their parents. The first chapter discusses tying up loose ends. College applications, starting a file, doing laundry, taking care of medical needs, and graduation gift ideas are included. The second chapter discusses insurance needs, and the third…

  17. Medical marijuana

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Possession of marijuana is illegal under federal law. Medical marijuana refers to using marijuana to treat certain medical ... Medical marijuana may be: Smoked Vaporized Eaten Taken as a liquid extract Marijuana leaves and buds contain substances ...

  18. College Environmental Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Gary Shelton

    Ways to study and evaluate different types of college environments are discussed, and sources of practical information about specific types of colleges are presented. Three main types of approaches used to measure college environments concern student behaviors (amount of time spent studying), student perceptions (the college is highly


  19. College Student Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Deborah J.; Thompson, Jalonda

    2013-01-01

    Suicide is the second-leading cause of death among college students, and it is estimated that 1,088 college students die by suicide each year (National Mental Health Association and the Jed Foundation, 2002). This chapter presents the context of college student mental health within which the problem of college student suicide is situated. Because


  20. Surviving Math, Surviving College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2009-01-01

    According to a 2000 community college study by Miami Dade College (FL) President Emeritus Robert McCabe, 41 percent of students entering community colleges are underprepared in at least one basic skill area. A three-year study of community college students, published in 2009 by the National Center for Education Statistics, reported that 41 percent…

  1. College Students Helping America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dote, Lillian; Cramer, Kevin; Dietz, Nathan; Grimm, Robert, Jr.

    2006-01-01

    To identify key trends in college student volunteering and to understand their implications for growing volunteering among college students, the Corporation has produced a new report, titled "College Students Helping America," the most comprehensive national report ever conducted on college student volunteering in the United States. The report…

  2. Planning Makes College Possible.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belmont, Jean

    Written by a college financial aid administrator, this booklet is intended to help parents of younger children plan and prepare for the financial aspects of college education. After an introductory chapter, Chapter II lists current and projected (year 2000) costs at the most expensive colleges and at New York City colleges. Chapter III presents…

  3. College Student Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Deborah J.; Thompson, Jalonda

    2013-01-01

    Suicide is the second-leading cause of death among college students, and it is estimated that 1,088 college students die by suicide each year (National Mental Health Association and the Jed Foundation, 2002). This chapter presents the context of college student mental health within which the problem of college student suicide is situated. Because…

  4. Small Colleges, Big Missions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, W. A., Jr., Ed.

    This monograph by the members of the American Association of Community Colleges' Commission on Small and/or Rural Community Colleges shares small and rural community college experiences. In "Leaders through Community Service," Jacqueline D. Taylor provides a model for how small and rural community colleges can be involved in building leaders…

  5. Five Colleges: Five Histories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Story, Ronald, Ed.

    This book presents essays on the histories of five Massachusetts schools of higher education (Amherst College, Mount Holyoke College, the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Smith College, Hampshire College) who together have had a successful consortia lasting for 25 years. The first essay, by Theodore P. Greene, depicts the temper of Amherst


  6. Beacon College Project Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Lynn, Ed.

    The American Association of Community Colleges' Beacon College Project (BCP) uses funds from the Kellogg Foundation to award two-year grants to "Beacon" community colleges to form consortia with at least five associate colleges, designed to improve a specific aspect of institutional life. A total of 26 projects, many involving community…

  7. Canadian medical schools before ACMC.

    PubMed Central

    McPhedran, N T

    1993-01-01

    The earliest medical schools were established to supplement apprenticeship, the only route to practice available in colonial Canada. By 1885, eight medical schools were trying to accommodate the volume of new scientific information flowing from Europe. In 1910, when Flexner evaluated the schools against the Johns Hopkins model, some were woefully deficient, but by 1928 all had achieved Class A rating. The 1921 discovery of insulin in Toronto gave impetus to scientific research and, possibly, influenced the formation and funding of the National Research Council in 1934. Clinical specialization expanded, leading in 1929 to the establishment of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada to accredit training and certify graduates. The Association of Canadian Medical Colleges was formed at a meeting of deans to discuss a federal offer of funding and to accelerate the graduation of physicians for the war effort. PMID:8477375

  8. More Colleges Counsel Women Athletes on Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Gaynelle

    1986-01-01

    Increasingly, institutions are offering counseling on contraception, pregnancy, and other sex-related issues because of concern about a number of legal, medical, and ethical issues arising from student athlete pregnancy such as the safety, injury, privacy, and the college's responsibility to the student. (MSE)

  9. College Psychiatry 2006: Challenges and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadison, Richard

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses some of the dramatic changes seen in college mental health issues over the past 2 decades. These modifications are a consequence of many factors: changes in our health care system (managed care), new effective biological treatments (medications), the focus of psychiatric training (biologic focus), technology advances…

  10. College Psychiatry 2006: Challenges and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadison, Richard

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses some of the dramatic changes seen in college mental health issues over the past 2 decades. These modifications are a consequence of many factors: changes in our health care system (managed care), new effective biological treatments (medications), the focus of psychiatric training (biologic focus), technology advances


  11. MEDICAL "DEPRIVATION."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SUCHMAN, EDWARD A.

    THE SOCIAL AND MEDICAL PROBLEM TODAY HAS SHIFTED FROM PROVIDING FOR THE EMERGENCY MEDICAL NEEDS OF THE INDIGENT SICK TO RAISING THE LEVEL OF LOWER CLASS PARTICIPATION IN THE BENEFITS OF MODERN MEDICINE. GREATER ATTENTION IS BEING FOCUSED ON MEDICAL DEPRIVATION SUFFERED BY LARGE SEGMENTS OF THE POPULATION WHO DO NOT SHARE EQUALLY IN MEDICAL…

  12. Medical humanities in Nepal--snakes and ladders.

    PubMed

    Shankar, P Ravi; Piryani, R M; Morgan, Huw; Thapa, T P

    2010-03-01

    In the last decade there has been a quantitative growth in medical schools in Nepal, a developing country in South Asia. Medical Humanities (MH) uses disciplines traditionally termed as the humanities in the pursuit of medical educational goals. The subject is slowly developing in Nepal. Sessions have been conducted at Manipal College of Medical Sciences, Pokhara and KIST Medical College, Lalitpur. In this article the authors examine inhibitory factors (snakes) and facilitating factors (ladders) for the development of the subject in Nepal. PMID:20392392

  13. Air ambulance medical transport advertising and marketing.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The National Association of EMS Physicians (NAEMSP), the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP), the Air Medical Physician Association (AMPA), the Association of Air Medical Services (AAMS), and the National Association of State EMS Officials (NASEMSO) believe that patient care and outcomes are optimized by using air medical transport services that are licensed air ambulance providers with robust physician medical director oversight and ongoing quality assessment and review. Only air ambulance medical transport services with these credentials should advertise/market themselves as air ambulance services. PMID:21226561

  14. Adapting an embedded model of librarianship, college by college.

    PubMed

    Blake, Lindsay; Mears, Kim; Davies, Kathy; Ballance, Darra; Shipman, Peter; Connolly-Brown, Maryska; Gaines, Julie K

    2014-01-01

    Librarians are increasingly moving out of the library and into the wider university setting as patrons spend more time seeking information online and less time visiting the library. The move to embed librarians in colleges, departments, or customer groups has been going on for some time but has recently received more attention as libraries work to find new ways to reach patrons that no longer need to come to the physical library. Few universities have attempted to embed all their librarians. This case study describes how one group of health sciences librarians dispersed its professional staff throughout its campuses and medical centers. PMID:25023014

  15. Medical women of the West.

    PubMed Central

    Scully, A L

    1988-01-01

    The presence in the West of women physicians with degrees from regular medical schools spans a period of approximately 130 years. Women's Medical College of Pennsylvania graduated many of these early women physicians. The first woman medical graduate of a western school was Lucy M. Field Wanzer, who finished in 1876 at the Department of Medicine, University of California in San Francisco. Soon thereafter, schools that would become Stanford University and the Oregon Health Sciences University schools of medicine, as well as the newly founded University of Southern California, were contributing to the pool of women physicians. The University of Michigan Medical School, the first coeducational state medical school, also educated some of the western women physicians, who by 1910 numbered about 155. This regional account of the progress of women physicians as they strove to become an integral part of the profession emphasizes the familiar themes of altruism, ingenuity, and perseverance that characterized their efforts. Images PMID:3074578

  16. Willingness of Medical Students for Hepatitis B & C Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Iftikhar; Mahsud, Muhammad Amin Jan; Hussain, Javed; Khan, Muhammad Hussain; Khan, Habibullah; Noman, Nargis; Rabi, Fazle, Din, Siraj ud

    2010-01-01

    Background: Health care workers including medical students are vulnerable to hepatitis B & C virus infections. The objective of this study was to determine the level of willingness for screening among medical students. Methodology: This cross-sectional survey was carried out at Gomal Medical College, Dera Ismail Khan from 1st April 2010 to 15 June…

  17. Preserving Medical Schools' Academic Mission in a Competitive Marketplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogelman, Alan M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents the findings of the Association of American Medical Colleges' Working Group on Preserving Medical Schools' Academic Mission in a Competitive Marketplace. Concludes that medical schools will take a variety of approaches to define and preserve their missions and that the importance of the core mission of education and research is likely to…

  18. Four Models of Medical Education about Elder Mistreatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, John M.; Dyer, Carmel B.; Kerzner, Lawrence J.; Mosqueda, Laura; Murphy, Carole

    2002-01-01

    Describe four models of incorporating elder-mistreatment curriculum and collaboration with adult protective services into geriatrics medical education. Draws on efforts at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey--Robert Wood Johnson Medical School; the University of California, Irvine College of Medicine; Hennepin County Medical…

  19. Opinions of Veterinary Medical Educators Towards the Problems and Needs of Veterinary Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisk, Dudley B.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Members of the American Association of Veterinary Medical Colleges-Council of Educators were surveyed in an attempt to measure their opinions and feelings towards veterinary medical education. Their opinions on such topics as relationships between students, faculty, the curriculum, and the identity of veterinary medicine are reported. (LBH)

  20. Principles of Pedagogy in Teaching in a Diverse Medical School: The University of Capetown South Africa Medical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothenberg, Julia Johnson; Holland, Errol

    This paper describes a 2-month project developed by the Sage Colleges (New York) and the University of Capetown Medical School in South Africa to help the medical faculty at the Capetown Medical School teach its newly diverse student body. The program is intended to improve student retention and it emphasizes the need for faculty to assure


  1. Anatomy Education in a Changing Medical Curriculum in India: Medical Student Feedback on Duration and Emphasis of Gross Anatomy Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holla, Sunil Jonathan; Ramachandran, Kalpana; Isaac, Bina; Koshy, Shajan

    2009-01-01

    Authors report here a survey of medical student feedback on the effectiveness of two different anatomy curricula at Christian Medical College, Vellore, India. Undergraduate medical students seeking the Bachelor in Medicine and Bachelor in Surgery (M.B.B.S.) degrees were divided into two groups by the duration of their respective anatomy


  2. Anatomy Education in a Changing Medical Curriculum in India: Medical Student Feedback on Duration and Emphasis of Gross Anatomy Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holla, Sunil Jonathan; Ramachandran, Kalpana; Isaac, Bina; Koshy, Shajan

    2009-01-01

    Authors report here a survey of medical student feedback on the effectiveness of two different anatomy curricula at Christian Medical College, Vellore, India. Undergraduate medical students seeking the Bachelor in Medicine and Bachelor in Surgery (M.B.B.S.) degrees were divided into two groups by the duration of their respective anatomy…

  3. Contemporary Issues in Medicine--Medical Informatics and Population Health: Report II of the Medical School Objectives Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Medicine, 1999

    1999-01-01

    The report of the Association of American Medical Colleges' Medical School Objectives Program presents the work of two expert panels. One, on medical informatics, identified five important physician roles: lifelong learner, clinician, educator, researcher, and manager. Another panel established a definition for "population health perspective"…

  4. Contemporary Issues in Medicine--Medical Informatics and Population Health: Report II of the Medical School Objectives Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Medicine, 1999

    1999-01-01

    The report of the Association of American Medical Colleges' Medical School Objectives Program presents the work of two expert panels. One, on medical informatics, identified five important physician roles: lifelong learner, clinician, educator, researcher, and manager. Another panel established a definition for "population health perspective"


  5. College Health and Safety

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Don't Drink and Drive Widgets Healthy People College Students Families with Special Needs Kids and Teens Express ... your next health care appointment. Vaccines and Immunizations: College Students and Young Adults Vaccines for Preteens and Teens ...

  6. College Students as Babysitters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaBarbera, J. D.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The current study sought to determine whether the attitudes and experiences of college student babysitters parallel those of younger sitters. Results imply that by college age babysitting no longer provides an important arena for the development of parenting skills. (Author)

  7. Depression and College Students

    MedlinePLUS

    ... depression and other mental health issues? Reference Share Depression and College Students Download PDF Download ePub Order ... Answers to college students’ frequently asked questions about depression Feeling moody, sad, or grouchy? Who doesn’t ...

  8. College Transition Programs for Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haugen, Douglas E.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past four decades the number of students enrolling in colleges and universities requiring at least one pre-college level course has been about one-third of all students. Underprepared students are as likely to complete their academic goals as their prepared counterparts if they are able to complete their remedial course work. This study


  9. College Transition Programs for Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haugen, Douglas E.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past four decades the number of students enrolling in colleges and universities requiring at least one pre-college level course has been about one-third of all students. Underprepared students are as likely to complete their academic goals as their prepared counterparts if they are able to complete their remedial course work. This study…

  10. State College Readiness Initiatives and Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spence, David

    2009-01-01

    Greater attention to the college and career readiness problem by state leaders and policymakers could drastically boost the numbers and percentages of students who graduate from high school ready for college and career study. This chapter traces the author's work in developing California State University's Early Assessment Program, an initiative…

  11. College Affordability: Implications for College Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perna, Laura W.; Li, Chunyan

    2006-01-01

    By examining trends in college affordability, this article explores the extent to which the public perception that college is not affordable is justified. First, the article describes trends in national indicators that contribute to ability to pay, including income growth, health care costs, debt burden, and personal savings rates. Trends in


  12. Medical Management

    MedlinePLUS

    ... form Search Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) Medical Management Although there’s no cure for CMT, there are ... individualized physical therapy program. For more on medical management of CMT, see Surgery Sometimes, Bracing Often, Caution ...

  13. Special Report: College Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Responses of chief housing officers of 118 4-year colleges and universities to a survey focusing on costs, security, policies, and preferences provide a picture of college housing. More than 67% of respondents say that their colleges are planning to build more residential space. (SLD)

  14. College Access Marketing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremblay, Christopher W.

    2011-01-01

    College Access Marketing (CAM) is a relatively new phenomenon that seeks to positively influence the college-going rate. This report defines CAM, describes CAM examples, and discusses how CAM seeks to counter barriers to college. It explores four main elements of CAM: information, marketing, advocacy, and social mobilization. Further, it…

  15. Early College High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2011-01-01

    For at-risk students who stand little chance of going to college, or even finishing high school, a growing number of districts have found a solution: Give them an early start in college while they still are in high school. The early college high school (ECHS) movement that began with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation 10 years ago


  16. Internationalizing the Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatton, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the objectives of internationalizing the community college, reviewing such activities as curriculum development, visiting faculty, study abroad, recruiting foreign students, and providing technical assistance. Describes the technical assistance efforts of the Association of Canadian Community Colleges and the Canadian College Partnership…

  17. Leasing the College Store.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Richard M.

    1986-01-01

    A survey of college administrators responsible for supervising college stores found that three factors are strongly considered in deciding whether to lease the college store: available management skills, service orientation, and financial resources. It also found that private and public institutions and large and small institutions rank the…

  18. The College Handbook 1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Board, New York, NY.

    This directory is intended to provide students and their advisors with authoritative information on 3,171 colleges and universities in the United States as well as supplementary information. The information was gathered in the winter and spring of 1992 through the College Board's Annual Survey of Colleges with descriptions subsequently verified…

  19. Community Colleges Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Corinne; Persaud, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Presently, community colleges are bursting at the seams. In 2011, community colleges turned away more than 400,000 prospective students. In the next six years, 63 percent of all U.S. jobs will require postsecondary education. Twenty two million new workers with postsecondary degrees will be needed by 2018. Community colleges are turning…

  20. What Is College for?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delbanco, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    What is college for? There are basically three prevailing answers to this question. The most common answer is an economic one, though it is really two linked answers: first, that providing more people with a college education is good for the economic health of the nation; and second, that going to college is good for the economic competitiveness


  1. Paradise Valley Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Paradise Valley Community College (PVCC), located in Phoenix, Arizona, is part of the Maricopa County Community College District (MCCCD). PVCC was founded in 1987 and in the fall of 2007 served 8,739 students in credit courses. Since 1997, PVCC has been on a quest to become a "more learning centered" college. As a result of placing student…

  2. THE JUNIOR COLLEGE CURRICULUM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    COHEN, ARTHUR M.

    THE "JUNIOR COLLEGE CURRICULUM" COURSE AT UCLA IS DESIGNED AS A PART OF THE STUDIES BASIC TO A DOCTORAL PROGRAM AND AS PREPARATION FOR JUNIOR COLLEGE TEACHING. STUDENTS ARE EXPECTED TO LEARN (1) TO BUILD AND SUPERVISE COURSES WHICH FIT INTO THE TOTAL CURRICULAR PATTERN OF THE JUNIOR COLLEGE, AND (2) TO TRANSLATE THEIR COURSES TO THEIR STUDENTS IN…

  3. The College Promise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2009-01-01

    College fees and tuition are rising--430 percent since 1982. Student borrowing for college has more than doubled since 1998, and about 50 percent of lower-income students head to college following high school, compared to 80 percent of high-income students, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. Various public school districts…

  4. Planning for College Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PEPNet, 2009

    2009-01-01

    "Planning for College Success" (PCS) is a curriculum model designed by Sharon Downs, M.S., for a course intended to assist deaf and hard of hearing students during their initial introduction to college life. This program allows students to work one-on-one with a counselor to plan for their college success. The program includes short-term goals and…

  5. COMPREHENSIVE JUNIOR COLLEGES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NIKITAS, CHRISTUS M.; AND OTHERS

    TO MEET THE STATE'S HIGHER EDUCATION NEEDS, THE NEW HAMPSHIRE JUNIOR COLLEGE COMMISSION DEVELOPED A PLAN OF (1) GRADUAL AND SELECTIVE CONVERSION OF THE STATE'S TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS TO COMPREHENSIVE JUNIOR COLLEGES, (2) SELECTIVE ADDITION OF 2-YEAR PROGRAMS AT THE STATE COLLEGES AND INSTITUTES, AND (3) ESTABLISHMENT OF A STATE…

  6. Predicting Rural College Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roweton, William E.; Bare, Charles

    This paper identified significant precollege predictors of retention in two freshman classes of a rural college. The subjects of the study were the 1987 and 1988 freshman classes (with 256 and 302 students, respectively) of Chadron State College (Nebraska), a rural college of over 3,000 students. Thirty-three student background variables were…

  7. Early College High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2011-01-01

    For at-risk students who stand little chance of going to college, or even finishing high school, a growing number of districts have found a solution: Give them an early start in college while they still are in high school. The early college high school (ECHS) movement that began with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation 10 years ago…

  8. Student academic achievement in college chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabibzadeh, Kiana S.

    General Chemistry is required for variety of baccalaureate degrees, including all medical related fields, engineering, and science majors. Depending on the institution, the prerequisite requirement for college level General Chemistry varies. The success rate for this course is low. The purpose of this study is to examine the factors influencing student academic achievement and retention in General Chemistry at the college level. In this study student achievement is defined by those students who earned grades of "C" or better. The dissertation contains in-depth studies on influence of Intermediate Algebra as a prerequisite compared to Fundamental Chemistry for student academic achievement and student retention in college General Chemistry. In addition the study examined the extent and manner in which student self-efficacy influences student academic achievement in college level General Chemistry. The sample for this part of the study is 144 students enrolled in first semester college level General Chemistry. Student surveys determined student self-efficacy level. The statistical analyses of study demonstrated that Fundamental Chemistry is a better prerequisite for student academic achievement and student retention. The study also found that student self-efficacy has no influence on student academic achievement. The significance of this study will be to provide data for the purpose of establishing a uniform and most suitable prerequisite for college level General Chemistry. Finally the variables identified to influence student academic achievement and enhance student retention will support educators' mission to maximize the students' ability to complete their educational goal at institutions of higher education.

  9. A Performance-Based Method for Early Identification of Medical Students at Risk of Developing Academic Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croen, Lila G.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A study at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (NY) found that performance on examinations during the third month of medical school was highly predictive of performance during the first two years of medical school. This predictor was more powerful than Medical College Admission Test scores and/or undergraduate grade point averages in


  10. A Performance-Based Method for Early Identification of Medical Students at Risk of Developing Academic Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croen, Lila G.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A study at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (NY) found that performance on examinations during the third month of medical school was highly predictive of performance during the first two years of medical school. This predictor was more powerful than Medical College Admission Test scores and/or undergraduate grade point averages in…

  11. Perceptions of Racism by Black Medical Students Attending White Medical Schools

    PubMed Central

    Bullock, Samuel C.; Houston, Earline

    1987-01-01

    Thirty-one black medical students attending five white medical schools were seen in individual interviews of one to two hours to evaluate their perceptions of racism in their medical school education. The interviews focused on racism experienced in high school, college, and medical school. Over one half of the population experienced racism during their high school and college education, while 30 of 31 subjects reported racist experiences in their medical school education. The students reported a variety of methods of coping with racist experiences and emphasized the importance of fellow minority students, faculty, and the minority office in coping with the stresses of racist experiences. Those offering counseling services to minority students should recognize the reality of racist experiences in medical education. PMID:3612829

  12. Peer Influence: Use of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Prescription Medications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varela, Alberto; Pritchard, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Risk-taking behavior (eg, alcohol abuse, tobacco usage, misuse of prescription medications) among college students is a widespread problem. This study focused not only on the frequency of risky health behaviors in college students, but also the companions with whom they engaged in such behaviors. Methods: Three hundred and twelve…

  13. Peer Influence: Use of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Prescription Medications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varela, Alberto; Pritchard, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Risk-taking behavior (eg, alcohol abuse, tobacco usage, misuse of prescription medications) among college students is a widespread problem. This study focused not only on the frequency of risky health behaviors in college students, but also the companions with whom they engaged in such behaviors. Methods: Three hundred and twelve


  14. Interdisciplinary workshop in the philosophy of medicine: medical knowledge, medical duties.

    PubMed

    Bullock, Emma; Kingma, Elselijn

    2014-12-01

    On 27 September 2013, the Centre for the Humanities and Health (CHH) at King's College London hosted a 1-day workshop on 'Medical knowledge, Medical Duties'. This workshop was the fifth in a series of five workshops whose aim is to provide a new model for high-quality, open interdisciplinary engagement between medical professionals and philosophers. This report identifies the key points of discussion raised throughout the day and the methodology employed. PMID:25470528

  15. Retaining Medical Graduates in Texas.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Texas ranks 43rd in the country in ratio of physicians to patients. Recruiting and encouraging in-migration of physicians, although strengthened by the 2003 liability reforms and streamlining of the licensing process, remain inadequate in keeping up with the state's continuing population growth. Identifying effective mechanisms to retain the young men and women who graduate from medical school in Texas for their graduate medical education (GME) is an important goal. To meet its physician workforce needs, the state must provide adequate opportunities for college graduates to enter medical school, enough GME positions for any medical graduate who chooses to remain in the state for graduate training, and adequate numbers of fellowship programs. PMID:26859378

  16. Nutrition and Hypertension in Blacks and Other Minorities. Proceedings of the Meharry Medical College Annual Nutrition Workshop (2nd, Nashville, Tennessee, October 26-28, 1988). Annual Nutrition Workshop Series, Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enwonwu, Cyril O., Ed.

    During this 3-day workshop with 138 registered participants, invited medical experts deliberated extensively on the physiological regulation of blood pressure, the unique biological characteristics and dietary patterns of Blacks and other minorities, the prevalence of hypertension in U.S. Blacks and Native Americans, the roles of specific macro-…

  17. Impact of Nutrition on Health and Disease in Blacks and Other Minorities. Proceedings of the Meharry Medical College Annual Nutrition Workshop (1st, Nashville, Tennessee, October 28-30, 1987). Annual Nutrition Workshop Series, Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enwonwu, Cyril O., Ed.

    Participants in this workshop were scientists from various disciplines, including public health, oncology, nutrition, epidemiology, biochemistry, immunology, pharmacology, pediatrics, geriatric medicine, and the behavioral sciences. The workshop featured deliberations by medical experts on the dimensions and demographics of hunger in America. The


  18. Impact of Nutrition on Health and Disease in Blacks and Other Minorities. Proceedings of the Meharry Medical College Annual Nutrition Workshop (1st, Nashville, Tennessee, October 28-30, 1987). Annual Nutrition Workshop Series, Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enwonwu, Cyril O., Ed.

    Participants in this workshop were scientists from various disciplines, including public health, oncology, nutrition, epidemiology, biochemistry, immunology, pharmacology, pediatrics, geriatric medicine, and the behavioral sciences. The workshop featured deliberations by medical experts on the dimensions and demographics of hunger in America. The…

  19. Interactions of a Developing Medical School and an Urban Community. Paper Presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (Boston, Massachusetts, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinard, Francis P.

    This report traces the evolution of a medical school from its beginnings as a private college affiliation, through its transformation into a state supported College of Medicine and Dentistry, to its emergence in Newark as the College of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, N.J. Medical School. The school has survived the Newark riots, political…

  20. The Development and Implementation of a New Medical Biology Major Including Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Barbara E.; Koster, Karen L.; Swanson, David L.

    2015-01-01

    In response to the Howard Hughes Medical Institute/Association of American Medical Colleges Scientific Foundations for Future Physicians (SFFP) report and a concern for better preparing undergraduates for future doctoral programs in the health professions, the deans of the College of Arts and Sciences and Division of Basic Biomedical Sciences of…

  1. The Development and Implementation of a New Medical Biology Major Including Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Barbara E.; Koster, Karen L.; Swanson, David L.

    2015-01-01

    In response to the Howard Hughes Medical Institute/Association of American Medical Colleges Scientific Foundations for Future Physicians (SFFP) report and a concern for better preparing undergraduates for future doctoral programs in the health professions, the deans of the College of Arts and Sciences and Division of Basic Biomedical Sciences of


  2. Public versus Private Colleges: Political Participation of College Graduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Joe L., II.; Hernandez, Jose; King, Joe P.; Brown, Tiffany; Fajardo, Ismael

    2013-01-01

    Using data from the Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study (B&B:93/03) of College Graduates, we use structural equation modeling to model the relationships between college major, values held in college, collegiate community service participation, and the post-college political participation of college graduates by public versus private…

  3. Medical criminalistics.

    PubMed

    Pollak, S

    2007-01-17

    Medical criminalistics is an essential part of legal/forensic medicine. It includes the clinical examination of surviving victims and suspects, the inspection of the scene in suspicious deaths with subsequent performance of medico-legal autopsies, the assessment of (biological) traces and the reconstruction of criminal events under medical aspects. Just as the circumstances of life and the manifestations of crime are changing with time, there is a permanent alteration regarding the issues of medical criminalistics. Legal/forensic medicine is a university subject in most countries and therefore, research work is one of the main tasks also in medical criminalistics. In contrast to clinical medicine and basic research, some common study designs are not suitable for the special needs of medical criminalistics, whereas other types are more appropriate like epidemiological evaluations, cross-sectional studies and (retrospective) observation studies. Moreover, experimental model tests and case reports also rate high in medical criminalistics. PMID:16822631

  4. Correlation between MCAT Biology Content Specifications and Topic Scope and Sequence of General Education College Biology Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rissing, Steven W.

    2013-01-01

    Most American colleges and universities offer gateway biology courses to meet the needs of three undergraduate audiences: biology and related science majors, many of whom will become biomedical researchers; premedical students meeting medical school requirements and preparing for the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT); and students completing…

  5. The Impact of an Oncology Course on Attitudes of Freshman Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appel, Marilyn H.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A course in oncology for freshman medical students at the Medical College of Pennsylvania is discussed. It is thought that appropriate training of medical students appears to lead to more positive attitudes toward cancer, but many of these efforts have been directed to groups at later stages of medical education. (MLW)

  6. Prevalence of ADHD Diagnosis and Nonmedical Prescription Stimulant Use in Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, Jeffrey P.; Scheurich, Neil E.; Ranseen, John

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors aimed to determine the prevalence of ADHD diagnosis and the prevalence of nonmedical prescription stimulant use among a sample of medical students. Methods: An anonymous survey was administered to 388 medical students (84.0% return rate) across all 4 years of education at a public medical college. Results: Eighteen medical…

  7. Joining the Conversation: Predictors of Success on the United States Medical Licensing Examinations (USMLE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gohara, Sabry; Shapiro, Joseph I.; Jacob, Adam N.; Khuder, Sadik A.; Gandy, Robyn A.; Metting, Patricia J.; Gold, Jeffrey; Kleshinski, James; and James Kleshinski

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether models based on pre-admission testing, including performance on the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), performance on required courses in the medical school curriculum, or a combination of both could accurately predict performance of medical students on the United States Medical Licensing


  8. Converting Work into College Credits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Joseph A.

    1976-01-01

    The Cooperative Education Program conducted by the New Jersey Department of Labor and Industry and Thomas A. Edison College enables State labor department employees to work toward college degrees by attending free classes, taking college-level examinations for college credit, and converting work and life experiences into college credits.…

  9. Integrated medical informatics with small group teaching in medical education.

    PubMed

    Chen, H S; Guo, F R; Liu, C T; Lee, Y J; Chen, J H; Lin, C C; Hou, S M; Hsieh, B S

    1998-06-01

    National Taiwan University College of Medicine (NTUCM) introduced small groups of teaching and basic-clinical integrated courses for medical students in 1992. By using computer network and multimedia techniques, this study tried to overcome barriers to learning in small group teaching. The Department of Medical Informatics of NTUCM established campus networking and computer classrooms and provided Internet and intranet network services including mail, netnews, bulletin board systems (BBS), world wide web (WWW), gopher, ftp and local file servers. To implement an interactive learning environment, the authors first tried mail lists, newsgroups and BBS. Next an integrated learning system prototype on the WWW was developed to provide functions including online syllabus, discussion boards simulated to BBS, online talk, interactive case studies, virtual classroom with video on demand (VOD) and Internet medical resources. The results showed that after the medical students completed the required course of medical informatics and had good network access using a network to communicate with each other became a daily practice. In the future, the system will extend to the tutoring of clinical practice and continuing medical education. The authors expect a national medical education network and more international cooperation and exchange. PMID:9726493

  10. Adderall abuse on college campuses: a comprehensive literature review.

    PubMed

    Varga, Matthew D

    2012-01-01

    Prescription stimulant abuse has dramatically increased over the past 10 years, but the amount of research regarding college students and illicit prescription stimulant use is still very limited. This has important implications for college mental health professionals and higher education administrators. In this comprehensive literature review the author explores factors contributing to illicit use, self-medication, and recreational use of controlled prescription stimulants; discusses the potential consequences for those students abusing stimulants; and provides recommendations for educating, combating, and assisting students who illicitly use prescriptions stimulants on college campuses. PMID:22694135

  11. Adderall abuse on college campuses: a comprehensive literature review.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Varga MD

    2012-01-01

    Prescription stimulant abuse has dramatically increased over the past 10 years, but the amount of research regarding college students and illicit prescription stimulant use is still very limited. This has important implications for college mental health professionals and higher education administrators. In this comprehensive literature review the author explores factors contributing to illicit use, self-medication, and recreational use of controlled prescription stimulants; discusses the potential consequences for those students abusing stimulants; and provides recommendations for educating, combating, and assisting students who illicitly use prescriptions stimulants on college campuses.

  12. Contractual relationships between colleges of pharmacy and university hospitals.

    PubMed

    Gourley, D R; Fine, D J

    1982-12-01

    The relationships that exist between colleges of pharmacy and university hospitals located in academic medical centers were investigated, and the types of pharmaceutical services that are being offered by these institutions were profiled. Questionnaires were mailed to 35 directors of pharmaceutical services located in academic medical centers. Of the 30 institutions represented by respondents, 27 had a college of pharmacy on the same campus, and 13 had a formal agreement between the hospital and the college. Ninety-seven percent of the hospitals surveyed had unit-dose or partial unit-dose programs, and all of the hospitals had i.v. admixture services. Nine of the 13 hospitals with formal agreements and 13 of the 17 hospitals without formal agreements had decentralized pharmaceutical services. The staffing patterns in these institutions showed that only 10.3% of the pharmacist FTE positions were funded by the college of pharmacy. There was no difference in trends as related to faculty appointment, title, or tenure between directors in hospitals with and without affiliation agreements. Seven of the directors of pharmacy were in tenure-track positions, and the director's reporting mechanism in the college was either to the dean or the chairman of pharmacy practice. No differences were found between the pharmaceutical services offered, staffing patterns, or status of the director of pharmacy in hospitals with or without formal agreements with colleges of pharmacy. These authors believe that a firm relationship between the college and hospital might prove advantageous to both parties. PMID:7180859

  13. Recycling College Presidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenna, David L.

    1972-01-01

    College presidents should not be squandered by reckless exploitation but conserved and developed through judicious selection, frequent evaluation, regenerative opportunities and preservation of professional ethics. (Editor)

  14. Approach to outcome measurement in the prevention of thrombosis in surgical and medical patients: Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Guyatt, Gordon H; Eikelboom, John W; Gould, Michael K; Garcia, David A; Crowther, Mark; Murad, M Hassan; Kahn, Susan R; Falck-Ytter, Yngve; Francis, Charles W; Lansberg, Maarten G; Akl, Elie A; Hirsh, Jack

    2012-02-01

    This article provides the rationale for the approach to making recommendations primarily used in four articles of the Antithrombotic Therapy and Prevention of Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines: orthopedic surgery, nonorthopedic surgery, nonsurgical patients, and stroke. Some of the early clinical trials of antithrombotic prophylaxis with a placebo or no treatment group used symptomatic VTE and fatal PE to measure efficacy of the treatment. These trials suggest a benefit of thromboprophylaxis in reducing fatal PE. In contrast, most of the recent clinical trials comparing the efficacy of alternative anticoagulants used a surrogate outcome, asymptomatic DVT detected at mandatory venography. This outcome is fundamentally unsatisfactory because it does not allow a trade-off with serious bleeding; that trade-off requires knowledge of the number of symptomatic events that thromboprophylaxis prevents. In this article, we review the merits and limitations of four approaches to estimating reduction in symptomatic thrombosis: (1) direct measurement of symptomatic thrombosis, (2) use of asymptomatic events for relative risks and symptomatic events from randomized controlled trials for baseline risk, (3) use of baseline risk estimates from studies that did not perform surveillance and relative effect from asymptomatic events in randomized controlled trials, and (4) use of available data to estimate the proportion of asymptomatic events that will become symptomatic. All approaches have their limitations. The optimal choice of approach depends on the nature of the evidence available. PMID:22315260

  15. Health Care for College Students

    MedlinePLUS

    ... t exercise or play through pain. Mononucleosis ("Mono") College students often worry about a disease called " mono "—also ... Additional Information: Meningococcal Disease: Information for Teens and College Students Healthy Tips for College Freshman Encouraging Teens to ...

  16. College Health for Young Women

    MedlinePLUS

    ... important for me to know about before I go to college? Filling out your college enrollment health ... this information with other important papers when you go to college. Your immunizations must be up-to- ...

  17. College Drinking - Changing the Culture

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this Page Welcome to College Drinking: Changing the Culture, created by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse ... Drinking Research A Call to Action: Changing the Culture of Drinking at U.S. Colleges Panel Reports College ...

  18. Self-Medication Practice and Perceptions Among Undergraduate Medical Students: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    S. H., Vardhamane; B.V., Patil; Santoshkumar, Jeevangi; Binjawadgi, Ashok S; Kanaki, Anand R

    2014-01-01

    Background: Self-medication practice is widespread in many countries and the irrational use of drugs is a cause of concern.It assumes a special significance among medical students as they are exposed to knowledge about diseases and drugs. Aim: To assess practice and perception of self medication among undergraduate medical students. Materials and Methods: It is a cross-sectional study in which study population consisted of undergraduate medical students of Mahadevappa Rampure Medical College Gulbarga, Karnataka, India. This study was conducted from March to April 2014. Total 448 students were taken. Out of which 8 incomplete questionnaires were excluded and 440 were analysed. The students who took self-medication during last six months were included. Written informed consent was obtained from each volunteer prior to the study. Students were given a questionnaire that include both open and close ended questions about self-medication practice. Ethical Approval: Ethics Committee approval was obtained from the Institutional Ethics Committee of Mahadevappa Rampure Medical College, Gulbarga, India, prior to the commencement of the study. Statistical Analysis: Data was analysed and presented as counts and percentages. Results: It was found that 388 (88.18%) students practiced self medication. The principal morbidity for seeking self medication was cold and cough as reported by 304 (78.35%) students. Antibiotics were most commonly self medicated as reported by 248 (63.91%) students, out of which only 92 (37.1%) students completed the full course of antibiotic regimen. Only 176 (40%) students opined that self medication is part of self care. Conclusion: Self-medication is widely practiced among undergraduate medical students. In this situation, we should educate the students about advantages and disadvantages of self medication. PMID:25653969

  19. Medical Amnesty Policies: Research is Needed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oster-Aaland, Laura; Eighmy, Myron A.

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the issues surrounding medical amnesty policies in higher education beginning with the background of such policies, a summary of the current debate regarding the policies, and a discussion of research related to helping behaviors among college students. Due to the negative consequences of alcohol misuse, many student affairs…

  20. Medical Office Laboratory Procedures: Course Proposal. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Eleanor

    A proposal is presented for a Community College of Philadelphia course, entitled "Medical Office Laboratory Procedures," which provides a laboratory introduction to microscopic and chemical analysis of blood and urine as performed in the physician's office. Following a standard cover form, a statement of the purpose of the course discusses course


  1. Outcomes Assessment in Veterinary Medical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Leslie S.; Turnwald, Grant H.; Meldrum, James B.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine's use of outcomes assessment (OA) as part of the accreditation review process for the American Veterinary Medical Association. Discusses its nine OA survey instruments and use of resulting data during accreditation. (EV)

  2. Medical Office Laboratory Procedures: Course Proposal. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Eleanor

    A proposal is presented for a Community College of Philadelphia course, entitled "Medical Office Laboratory Procedures," which provides a laboratory introduction to microscopic and chemical analysis of blood and urine as performed in the physician's office. Following a standard cover form, a statement of the purpose of the course discusses course…

  3. The Computer Screening of Medical School Applicants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrosino, Robert J.; Brading, Paul L.

    This document reports the test of an experimental procedure designed by the Albany Medical College (AMC) to systematically reduce a large pool of applicants to one of manageable proportions for interviewing purposes. Data on nine predictor variables were coded and keypunched on 80-column cards for each applicant to September 1972 and 1973


  4. Patients' Views of the Medical Education Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasser, Michael; Bazuin, Charles H.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a survey of patients at three community health centers operated by the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford are presented and discussed. The research was designed to obtain a better understanding of the patient's views on the quality of care and medical students. (Author/MLW)

  5. Medical School Programs Resources and Financing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Joseph

    The current efforts of the Association of American Medical Colleges to test the feasibility of broadening the application, utility, and scope of the cost-finding studies conducted by many academic health centers and individual schools of the health professions are examined. The current effort is an outgrowth of the existing foundations of cost…

  6. Innovative Ideas in College Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cogan, Max

    1973-01-01

    Seven examples of adaptation and new developments are described: Graceland College, Manchester College, Plymouth State College, U.S. Coast Guard Academy, Colorado State College, North Carolina State University, and Brookdale Community College. (Editors/JA)

  7. For-Profit Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deming, David; Goldin, Claudia; Katz, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    For-profit, or proprietary, colleges are the fastest-growing postsecondary schools in the nation, enrolling a disproportionately high share of disadvantaged and minority students and those ill-prepared for college. Because these schools, many of them big national chains, derive most of their revenue from taxpayer-funded student financial aid, they


  8. Latino College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivas, Michael A., Ed.

    The condition of higher education for Hispanic Americans and Latin Americans is addressed in 12 papers from the 1983 Conference on Latino College Students. Attention is directed to the transition from high school to college, Hispanic student achievement, and economics and stratification. In addition to forewords by Gregory R. Anrig and Arturo…

  9. Examining College Writing Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncheon, Julia C.; Tierney, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing postsecondary access depends in large part on enhancing underrepresented students' writing ability, or college writing readiness. However, what exactly constitutes college-level writing is not clear-cut, complicating efforts to improve secondary preparation. This article examines recent efforts to define postsecondary writing,


  10. Getting Exercise in College

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cafeterias, and libraries have in common? That's where college students spend so much of their time in sedentary ... can be a great place to work off stress from the pressures of school. And if ... other options at your college gym, such a pool or yoga classes. Exercise ...

  11. Going to College

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Text Size What's in this article? Taking the Stress Out of College Meeting Roommates & Making Friends Staying Healthy Away From Home Insurance Plans Emergency Care Prevention Tips First-Year Food First-Year Fitness A popular student in her small high school, Katie started college ...

  12. "Is College Worth It?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adam, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    The Pew Research Center asked an important question earlier this year when it embarked on an ambitious project called Is College Worth It?: College Presidents, Public Assess Value, Quality and Mission of Higher Education. While most today believe that getting a good education is key to success in the society, this report revealed surprising issues


  13. Latino College Completion: Vermont

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  14. Technology Middle College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pianelli, Mary Ann

    To ensure that tech prep reaches at-risk students at the earliest possible stages, the Houston Community College System and the Houston Independent School District have designed a Tech Prep Middle College (TPMC) providing high school students with a 6-year program of study beginning in 9th grade and leading to an Associate in Applied Science…

  15. College Careers Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Curtis; Dentler, Robert A.

    An evaluation by the Center for Urban Education of the College Careers Program (CCP), operated by the College Careers Fund of Westchester, Inc., CCP is designed to identify, recruit, motivate, and place educationally "disadvantaged" young adults in carefully selected institutions of higher learning and to provide them with all necessary support,…

  16. Community College Faculty Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Ann; Karvonen, Meagan; Ulrich, Jana; Davis, Tanya; Wade, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Much has been written about the characteristics of effective college teachers. However, skill sets have not yet been defined with any level of specificity. Also, instructors at community colleges have unique working conditions and challenges that influence how they teach. This paper illustrates the use of three studies conducted to build and…

  17. Coaching and College Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richman, Erica Lynn; Rademacher, Kristen N.; Maitland, Theresa Laurie

    2014-01-01

    Students with learning disabilities (LD) and Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) represent the largest segment of college students with documented disabilities. Despite enhanced access to accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Amendments Act, this growing population continues to take longer to complete a college education…

  18. Julie Goes to College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morfee, Pat; Morfee, Tom

    1987-01-01

    Parents describe how the Disabled Students' Program at the University of California-Berkeley supported their daughter with cerebral palsy in pursuing an independent college career. Two vignettes describing college students' (with muscular dystrophy and physical disabilities) adjustment at Boston University are presented. (CB)

  19. Latino College Completion: Kentucky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  20. Latino College Completion: California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  1. Latino College Completion: Delaware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each


  2. College Readiness for All?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Frederick M.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, American education has enthusiastically adopted the mantra of "college readiness for all." What's not to like about that? Frederick Hess says that although he considers college readiness an admirable goal, he has serious reservations about advocates, funders, and policymakers imposing this norm across all schools. His


  3. Latino College Completion: Washington

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  4. Latino College Completion: Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  5. College and Career Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ICF International (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Graduating high school students must be adequately prepared to enter post-secondary training or employment, without the need for remediation, in order to take their places as independent adults and informed citizens. College and career readiness has taken the forefront of national and state education policy. ICF's information brief on college and…

  6. College Profs Go Urban.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, James W.

    1983-01-01

    Provides an overview of the "mini-CUTE" (Cooperative Urban Teacher Education) Project at Rockhurst College -- a 7-day course for college professors in self-, cultural, and urban awareness of the psychological and economic implications of being culturally different in a city. (DMM)

  7. THE COLLEGE COMMISSIONS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FOOKS, JOYCE LANE

    THE HISTORIES, ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURES, MODES OF OPERATION, GOALS, AND SPECIFIC ACTIVITIES OF EIGHT COLLEGE SCIENCE COMMISSIONS ARE PRESENTED. THE GOAL OF THE EIGHT COLLEGE SCIENCE COMMISSIONS IS TO BRING UNDERGRADUATE SCIENCE INSTRUCTION CLOSER TO THE RESEARCH FRONTIER, UPDATE COURSES, AND FOSTER THE SPIRIT OF INQUIRY. INTERCOMMISSION


  8. STRENGTHENING THE COLLEGE LIBRARY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JACOBS, KARL J.; TANIS, NORMAN E.

    A COMMITTEE AT HENRY FORD COMMUNITY COLLEGE WAS ESTABLISHED TO STUDY THE LIBRARY, FORMULATE AN EVALUATION, AND DEVELOP A SERIES OF RECOMMENDATIONS ISSUING OUT OF AND BASED ON THE STUDY. THE COMMITTEE USED THE JUNIOR COLLEGE LIBRARY STANDARDS AS THE INSTRUMENT FOR JUDGING THE LIBRARY PROGRAM. FROM EACH OF THE EIGHT SECTIONS OF THE STANDARDS, THEY…

  9. Examining Latina College Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Amanda R.

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this qualitative narrative study were to explore the potential areas of conflict Latina college students experience between their educational goals and traditional cultural gender roles and expectations. Participants were selected utilizing purposeful sampling methods. All participants were first-generation college students.…

  10. Planning Junior College Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaddy, Dale

    1969-01-01

    To provide suitable future facilities, junior college personnel and architects need to increase research efforts in space use, site selection and development, the kind and number of facilities needed for the average college, evaluation of existing facilities, plant management and maintenance, and ways of incorporating innovative educational…

  11. Latino College Completion: Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  12. Community Colleges 2005.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Chuck

    Prepared to help develop a vision for California's community colleges into the 21st century, this report presents data on the colleges' performance up to 1996 and estimations of trends up to 2005. Data presented focus on the issues of student access, outcomes, and funding. Selected findings include the following: (1) participation rates peaked in…

  13. The Entrepreneurial Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roueche, John E., Ed.; Jones, Barbara R., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    Environmental factors currently affecting today's community colleges either will cause irreparable damage to their fiscal health and organizational structure or contribute to their rebirth--transforming systems and processes to meet current and future challenges successfully. Community colleges are facing challenges on many levels: (1) In 2003,…

  14. Marketing the College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theodossin, Ernest

    This document is one of three texts which comprise the written components of The Responsive College Programme dissemination materials. The program is designed to help colleges in the United Kingdom market themselves and their courses effectively, and this volume, which is freestanding and directed at both the general reader and the specialist,


  15. The Future Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsner, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    Community colleges have encountered many factors that may reshape their future. Environmental imperatives weigh heavily on community colleges, as does the new integration of the sciences, such as breakthroughs in the biochemical sciences, such as the human genome project. It is also important to pay attention to the forms in which knowledge is…

  16. Examining College Writing Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncheon, Julia C.; Tierney, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing postsecondary access depends in large part on enhancing underrepresented students' writing ability, or college writing readiness. However, what exactly constitutes college-level writing is not clear-cut, complicating efforts to improve secondary preparation. This article examines recent efforts to define postsecondary writing,…

  17. Community Colleges Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Corinne; Jervis, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Dr. Jill Biden, Vice President Joe Biden's wife, has been teaching in community colleges for the past 18 years. Dr. Biden believes that community colleges are "
uniquely American institutions where anyone who walks through the door is one step closer to realizing the American dream." This is an inspiring sentiment. However, of all the


  18. Community Colleges in Shanghai.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benyi, Tao

    This report offers a commentary on the recent development of community colleges in Shanghai (China). The seven institutions were established in the early 1990s to provide community education to local residents in hopes of facilitating mass higher education in China. The report describes important characteristics the colleges seek to impart…

  19. Latino College Completion: Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  20. College Preparation Checklist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Student Aid, US Department of Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Why go to college? A higher education introduces students to new people and new experiences, and usually leads to a higher salary and lower chance of unemployment. This checklist will tell you how to get ready for college--and how the government will help you pay for it.

  1. Expanding College Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoxby, Caroline; Turner, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    For this study, the authors designed an experiment to test whether some high-achieving, low-income students would change their behavior if they knew more about colleges and, more importantly, whether a cost-effective way to help such students realize their full array of college opportunities can be implemented. This was done by randomly assigning…

  2. Latino College Completion: Alaska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each


  3. College Admissions: A Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrone, Vito

    The author presents his view that the public has not been well informed about the limitations of college entrance examinations. Several educational trends are discussed: (1) since World War II, college admissions testing has underscored the classic American tension between egalitarianism and meritocracy; (2) more students have aspired to attend…

  4. Latino College Completion: Nevada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  5. Databook: Maryland Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Board for Community Colleges, Annapolis.

    Designed to provide information about the current status and future direction of Maryland's community college system, this report offers a summary and overview of all aspects of community college functioning in the state. Section I provides an organizational chart of higher education in Maryland; and data on undergraduate credit enrollments, and


  6. Washington Community Colleges Factbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Terre

    The 109 tables and graphs in this six-chapter factbook present a statistical profile of the Washington Community College System for Fall 1979. Chapter I presents background information on the history and organization of the 27 state-supported colleges. Chapter II outlines data on annual and quarterly enrollments from 1969 through 1979; student…

  7. Washington Community Colleges Factbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Terre; Story, Sherie

    Detailed information on the 27 state-supported community colleges in Washington is presented in six sections. The first section, containing general information, describes the state system organization, lists the individual colleges, and reviews the roles of state agencies and presents a history of the system. A section on student information…

  8. College Student Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Lisa J.; Friedman, Howard A.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the topic of college student suicide. Empirical and theoretical studies are reviewed. The research is presented in distinct sections. First, we present background information on college student suicide emphasized in a select number of cited literature reviews, followed by a review of a select number of key quantitative studies


  9. Black College Enterprise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    1999-01-01

    Under the leadership of President David H. Swinton, Benedict College (North Carolina) has provided leadership and support for local economic development, benefitting both the community and the school. Trustees invested college endowment funds to help save the sole black-owned banking institution in the state, which now promises to become a…

  10. Latino College Completion: Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  11. IT Assessment: Floyd College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lord, Joan; Bishop, Jack

    2001-01-01

    Discusses Floyd College's (Georgia) Information Technology Project (ITP), which began in 1997. Reports that every student and faculty member at the college is given a laptop, network connections have been implemented all over campus, and a help desk service provides technical support. The project has been successful, but student headcount fell…

  12. Drinking among College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabow, Jerome; Duncan-Schill, Marilyn

    1995-01-01

    Reports the results of a study on the ways in which alcohol is built into the social role and social life of college students. Provides direct support for the idea that the patterns of drinking alcoholic beverages are integral to social and structural aspects of college. (LKS)

  13. College Readiness for All?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Frederick M.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, American education has enthusiastically adopted the mantra of "college readiness for all." What's not to like about that? Frederick Hess says that although he considers college readiness an admirable goal, he has serious reservations about advocates, funders, and policymakers imposing this norm across all schools. His…

  14. Improving College Freshman Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Winnie Y.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, access to higher education was greatly improved through public funding. This improvement is not matched by a similar increase in graduation rate. The purpose of this study is to examine what postsecondary institutions can do to improve college freshman retention. The conceptual framework was based on research on college student


  15. Latino College Completion: Michigan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each


  16. College Student Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Lisa J.; Friedman, Howard A.

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the topic of college student suicide. Empirical and theoretical studies are reviewed. The research is presented in distinct sections. First, we present background information on college student suicide emphasized in a select number of cited literature reviews, followed by a review of a select number of key quantitative studies…

  17. Bard College Shines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klier, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    With its park-like campus location overlooking the Hudson River and Catskills Mountains in New York's Hudson Valley, it's no wonder that Bard College is committed to being green. At the liberal arts college in Annandale-on-Hudson, students learn and live in 25 geothermal buildings on campus that don't burn fossil fuels on site. Instead of driving


  18. Ms. Goes to College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Jean Glidden; Henderson, Algo D.

    This book provides informative, factual, and valuable information for college women covering the personal areas of sex, alcohol, drugs, and identity, and the academic area--the disciplines, the curriculum. They discuss traditional subjects, modern subjects, vocations, and educational decisions for the female college student. (MJM)

  19. Getting Exercise in College

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Getting Exercise in College KidsHealth > For Teens > Getting Exercise in College Print A A A Text Size ... energy, both your body and mind need physical exercise to function at their peak. But with high ...

  20. Norway's Regional College System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanisch, Thor Einar

    1981-01-01

    Examines the structure of Norway's short-cycle educational system. Describes how the district colleges function individually as units and collectively within a regional system to provide comprehensive, community-based educational opportunities. Discusses the incorporation of a variety of colleges into the regional system and encourages increased


  1. Latino College Completion: Montana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  2. Avant Garde Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Stuart A.

    2005-01-01

    Community colleges have become many things to many people over their century-long transformation from junior colleges into comprehensive learning environments. They have been able and willing to take on missions and serve people that other sectors of education could not or would not. Today they have become well known for their efforts in…

  3. IMPROVING COLLEGE TEACHING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LEE, CALVIN B.T., ED.

    FORTY-NINE ESSAYS ON CURRENT ISSUES AND PROBLEMS IN COLLEGE TEACHING ARE INCLUDED. THE SIX MAJOR TOPIC DIVISIONS ARE THE ACADEMIC COMMUNITY, THE ACADEMIC MAN, THE QUANTITY AND QUALITY OF COLLEGE TEACHERS, TEACHING AND LEARNING, THE EVALUATION OF TEACHING PERFORMANCE, AND CURRICULUM REFORM. THE AUTHORS--ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATORS, PROFESSORS,…

  4. Latino College Completion: Maine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each


  5. What Is College for?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Phyllis M.; Martin, Carolyn A.; Kinbrough, Walter M.; Hitt, John C.; Urgo, Joseph R.; Lief, Charles G.; Drake, Michael V.; Hellyer, Brenda; Pepicello, William

    2013-01-01

    Lately there has been a great deal of discussion about the importance of measuring a college's "return on investment." Is the point of a college education quantifiable results or personal and intellectual growth? In pursuit of answers, "The Chronicle" asked a selection of higher-education leaders. Phyllis M. Wise, Chancellor of the University of…

  6. Community College No Longer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pluviose, David

    2008-01-01

    Community colleges have long been the destination of choice for immigrants seeking English-language skills, older nontraditional students seeking flexible class schedules, and students needing remediation to fill the gaps left by substandard K-12 schools. Nevertheless, many community colleges have expanded transfer-focused offerings in recent…

  7. Latino College Completion: Missouri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  8. Challenge College, Bradford

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flecknoe, Mervyn

    2004-01-01

    What can you expect from a school in an area of high crime where 50 percent of the pupils take free school meals and which operates on a site that cannot be accessed from its main catchment area? In this article, the author shares his experience when he visited Challenge College. A low wall separates Challenge College from the area where most of…

  9. Latino College Completion: Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  10. The Entrepreneurial Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roueche, John E., Ed.; Jones, Barbara R., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    Environmental factors currently affecting today's community colleges either will cause irreparable damage to their fiscal health and organizational structure or contribute to their rebirth--transforming systems and processes to meet current and future challenges successfully. Community colleges are facing challenges on many levels: (1) In 2003,


  11. The Future Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsner, Paul A.

    2003-01-01

    Community colleges have encountered many factors that may reshape their future. Environmental imperatives weigh heavily on community colleges, as does the new integration of the sciences, such as breakthroughs in the biochemical sciences, such as the human genome project. It is also important to pay attention to the forms in which knowledge is


  12. Latino College Completion: Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each


  13. "Is College Worth It?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adam, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    The Pew Research Center asked an important question earlier this year when it embarked on an ambitious project called Is College Worth It?: College Presidents, Public Assess Value, Quality and Mission of Higher Education. While most today believe that getting a good education is key to success in the society, this report revealed surprising issues…

  14. Challenge College, Bradford

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flecknoe, Mervyn

    2004-01-01

    What can you expect from a school in an area of high crime where 50 percent of the pupils take free school meals and which operates on a site that cannot be accessed from its main catchment area? In this article, the author shares his experience when he visited Challenge College. A low wall separates Challenge College from the area where most of


  15. Community College Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    This report explores the demographics of community college students and how they compare to those in other sectors of higher education. Next, it reviews the common reasons undergraduate students stop their studies or drop out. The report then examines technology-enhanced education in community colleges and presents several case studies showing how


  16. Latino College Completion: Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  17. Cabrillo College Transportation Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Terrence

    This report provides results of the survey and other sources of information which have been used to develop a transportation management plan at Cabrillo College (California). In 2000, Cabrillo College organized a Transportation Management Committee to review the existing transportation situation and develop and implement a plan with the goal of


  18. Latino College Completion: Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each


  19. Medical Scientists

    MedlinePLUS

    ... scientists typically have a Ph.D., usually in biology or a related life science. Some medical scientists ... specialize in this field seek to understand the biology of aging and investigate ways to improve the ...

  20. Medication Guide

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to the disease. Read more » Alternative Medicine Eye Drop Tips Financial Assistance Find a Doctor Glaucoma Surgery Living With Glaucoma Low Vision Resources Medication Guide Resources on the Web » See All Articles Help the Cause Glaucoma affects ...

  1. Taking Medication

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Tracker App Tip Sheets and Handouts AADE7 Self-Care Behaviors Healthy Eating Being Active Monitoring Taking Medication ... Legislative Action Center Federal Legislation State Legislation Affordable Care Act Information Advocacy Tools and Resources Cart Search ...

  2. Medication Errors

    MedlinePLUS

    ... regulators to address broader product safety issues. Relevant FDA Drug Safety Communications for Drug Products Associated with ... OTC) Dosage Delivery Devices Avoiding Medication Mistakes Contact FDA Toll Free (855) 543-3784, or (301) 796- ...

  3. Medical Marijuana.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Teri

    2016-01-01

    The use of medicinal marijuana is increasing. Marijuana has been shown to have therapeutic effects in certain patients, but further research is needed regarding the safety and efficacy of marijuana as a medical treatment for various conditions. A growing body of research validates the use of marijuana for a variety of healthcare problems, but there are many issues surrounding the use of this substance. This article discusses the use of medical marijuana and provides implications for home care clinicians. PMID:26645838

  4. Measuring Contributions to the Research Mission of Medical Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Edward W.; Burks, Thomas F.; Dzau, Victor; Hindery, Michael A.; Jones, Robert F.; Kaye, Celia I.; Korn, David; Limbird, Lee E.; Marchase, Richard B.; Perlmutter, Roger; Sanfilippo, Fred; Strom, Brian L.

    2000-01-01

    Members of a research panel of the Association of American Medical Colleges offer guidelines for the development and use of measures to assess contributions of faculty, departments, and institutions to the research mission of medical schools. Reviews measures most commonly used and concludes that quantitative information can help institutional…

  5. Teaching Biotechnology to Medical Students: Is There an Easy Way?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steggles, Allen W.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the teaching of biotechnology to medical students, undergraduate students and high school seniors. Suggests changes in how the basic sciences are taught in medical schools. Reviews the effects of teaching biotechnology at Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine (NEOUCOM). (CW)

  6. Four Models of Medical Education about Elder Mistreatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, John M.; Dyer, Carmel B.; Kerzner, Lawrence J.; Mosqueda, Laura; Murphy, Carole

    2002-01-01

    Describe four models of incorporating elder-mistreatment curriculum and collaboration with adult protective services into geriatrics medical education. Draws on efforts at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey--Robert Wood Johnson Medical School; the University of California, Irvine College of Medicine; Hennepin County Medical


  7. Evaluation of a Rural Clinic Rotation for Medical Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Crandall, Lee A.

    1978-01-01

    Medical students, nursing students, and residents from the University of Florida College of Medicine live and work for several weeks in a rural county health center, providing a wide range of primary care and emergency medical services. Retrospective evaluations by participants are reported. (LBH)

  8. CurrMIT: A Tool for Managing Medical School Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salas, Albert A.; Anderson, M. Brownell; LaCourse, Lisa; Allen, Robert; Candler, Chris S.; Cameron, Terri; Lafferty, Debra

    2003-01-01

    The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Curriculum Management & Information Tool (CurrMIT) is a relational database containing curriculum information from medical schools throughout the United States and Canada. This article gives an overview of the technology upon which the system is built and the training materials and workshops that…

  9. Hughes Plans $30-Million for Undergraduate Science; 94 Colleges Invited to Apply.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Liz

    1987-01-01

    Undergraduate science education at liberal arts colleges and historically Black institutions will be the focus of a program of grants given by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Colleges were invited to submit proposals to strengthen their biology, chemistry, mathematics, and physics programs. (MLW)

  10. Using the Health Belief Model to Predict Bystander Behavior among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blavos, Alexis A.; Glassman, Tavis; Sheu, Jiunn-Jye; Diehr, Aaron; Deakins, Bethany

    2014-01-01

    This investigation used the Health Belief Model (HBM) to examine perceived barriers and benefits college students hold concerning medical amnesty. Researchers employed a cross-sectional research design with 369 students completing the survey (97% response rate). A path analysis revealed that college students are more likely to seek help during an


  11. College and Community Partnerships: Extending the Benefits of Therapeutic Recreation to Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Steven J.; Cannella, Lee grace; Pisano, Susan

    2014-01-01

    In fall 2010, St. Joseph's College initiated a partnership between the college, Northport VA Medical Center, and Long Island State Veterans Home that provides a therapeutic platform for the integration of the three communities through sustainable and mutually beneficial curricular and co-curricular service and experiential learning programs.…

  12. Development of a College Student's Mistrust of Health Care Organizations Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, James H.; Kirchofer, Gregg M.; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Kleinfelder, JoAnn; Bryant, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop a College Student's Mistrust of Health Care Organizations (CSMHCO) scale and determine the relationship between medical mistrust with the use of a variety of health care services. Methods: A convenience sample of college students (n = 545) at 2 universities in the United States was recruited in


  13. Using the Health Belief Model to Predict Bystander Behavior among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blavos, Alexis A.; Glassman, Tavis; Sheu, Jiunn-Jye; Diehr, Aaron; Deakins, Bethany

    2014-01-01

    This investigation used the Health Belief Model (HBM) to examine perceived barriers and benefits college students hold concerning medical amnesty. Researchers employed a cross-sectional research design with 369 students completing the survey (97% response rate). A path analysis revealed that college students are more likely to seek help during an…

  14. Development of a College Student's Mistrust of Health Care Organizations Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, James H.; Kirchofer, Gregg M.; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Kleinfelder, JoAnn; Bryant, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop a College Student's Mistrust of Health Care Organizations (CSMHCO) scale and determine the relationship between medical mistrust with the use of a variety of health care services. Methods: A convenience sample of college students (n = 545) at 2 universities in the United States was recruited in…

  15. COMMUNITY COLLEGE HEALTH CAREERS PROJECT PHASE II--TEACHER PREPARATION. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RATNER, MURIEL

    THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK AT BUFFALO AND CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK COOPERATED WITH THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE HEALTH CAREERS PROJECT BY ESTABLISHING PROGRAMS TO PREPARE PRACTITIONERS TO TEACH IN COMMUNITY COLLEGE PROGRAMS IN (1) OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTING, (2) DENTAL ASSISTING, (3) OPHTHALMIC DISPENSING, AND (4) MEDICAL RECORD,


  16. What They Earned in 1995-96: The Data on Private-College Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lively, Kit

    1997-01-01

    Data on 1995-96 private college faculty and administrator compensation, based on tax returns of 477 colleges, reveals half the presidents received raises outpacing inflation. Fifty received no raise. Overall, the highest paid were medical faculty, although 47 coaches and athletic directors were among the highest paid at their institutions.…

  17. Immigrants in community colleges.

    PubMed

    Teranishi, Robert T; SuĂĄrez-Orozco, Carola; SuĂĄrez-Orozco, Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    Immigrant youth and children of immigrants make up a large and increasing share of the nation's population, and over the next few decades they will constitute a significant portion of the U.S. workforce. Robert Teranishi, Carola SuĂĄrez-Orozco, and Marcelo SuĂĄrez-Orozco argue that increasing their educational attainment, economic productivity, and civic engagement should thus be a national priority. Community colleges offer one particularly important venue for achieving this objective. Because they are conveniently located, cost much less than four-year colleges, feature open admissions, and accommodate students who work or have family responsibilities, community colleges are well suited to meet the educational needs of immigrants who want to obtain an affordable postsecondary education, learn English-language skills, and prepare for the labor market. The authors explore how community colleges can serve immigrant students more effectively. Already, more immigrant students attend community colleges than any other type of post-secondary institution. But community colleges could attract even more immigrant students through outreach programs that help them to apply and to navigate the financial aid system. Federal reforms should also allow financial aid to cover tuition for English as a Second Language courses. Community colleges themselves could raise funds to provide scholarships for immigrants and undocumented students. Although there are many good ideas for interventions that can boost enrollment and improve the performance of immigrant students in community colleges, rigorous research on effective programs is scant. The research community and community colleges need to work together closely to evaluate these programs with a view toward what works and why. Without such research, policy makers will find it difficult to improve the role of community colleges in increasing the educational achievement of immigrant students. PMID:21465859

  18. The impact of a developmental science course on college success for underprepared health science students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Candace A.

    Developmental education for the academically underprepared college student has been aimed at helping students succeed in college. However, developmental education courses have traditionally focused on reading, writing and math. This quantitative study examined the relationship between a developmental science course for underprepared health science students on grades achieved in college level medical terminology courses. The effect was measured by analyzing student grades retrieved from a college database of official school records through the use of correlation research methodology during a previous 2-year academic period at a selected independent 4-year right-to-try college. The results yielded a weakly positive correlation, but not statistically significant coefficient of 0.325 between grades for students who successfully completed the developmental science course and their subsequent success in a college-level science course. The study added to the gap in knowledge in terms of the effect a developmental science course has on grades in college-level science courses.

  19. The international effort: building the bridge for Translational Medicine: Report of the 1st International Conference of Translational Medicine (ICTM)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Supported by the International Society for Translational Medicine (ISTM), Wenzhou Medical College and the First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College, the International Conference on Translational Medicine (ICTM) was held on October 22–23, 2011 in Wenzhou, China. Nearly 800 registrants attended the meeting, primarily representing institutes and hospitals in Europe, The United States of America, And Asia, and China. The meeting was chaired and organized by Dr. Xiangdong Wang, Xiaoming Chen, Richard Coico, Jeffrey M. Drazen, Richard Horton, Francesco M. Marincola, Laurentiu M. Popescu, Jia Qu and Aamir Shahzad. Findings The meeting focused on the communication of the need to foster translational medicine (TM) by building and broadening bridges between basic research and clinical studies at the international level. The meeting included distinguished TM experts from academia, the pharmaceutical and diagnostics industries, government agencies, regulators, and clinicians and provided the opportunity to identify shared interests and efforts for collaborative approaches utilizing cutting edge technologies, innovative approaches and novel therapeutic interventions. The meeting defined the concept of TM in its two-way operational scheme and emphasized the need for bed to bench efforts based directly on clinical observation. Conclusions It was the meeting participants’ realization that the shared main goals of TM include breaking the separation between clinic practice and basic research, establishing positive feedback by understanding the basis of expected and unexpected clinical outcomes and accelerating basic research relevant to human suffering. The primary objectives of the meeting were two-fold: to accelerate the two-way translation by informing the participants representing the different disciplines about the state of art activities around TM approaches; and to identify areas that need to be supported by redirecting limited resources as well as identifying new sources of funding. This report summarizes key concepts presented during the meeting representing the state-of-art translational research and salient aspects of the ensuing discussions. PMID:23369397

  20. The Early College Challenge: Navigating Disadvantaged Students' Transition to College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbaum, James E.; Becker, Kelly Iwanaga

    2011-01-01

    Successful early college high schools (ECHSs) are formed through partnerships between high schools and colleges (usually community colleges). Think of it as preparation through acceleration. ECHSs enroll disadvantaged students who have not excelled with ordinary grade-level academic content and have them take college courses while still in high…

  1. First Generation College Students: Indicators of College Persistence and Graduation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Angelica

    2013-01-01

    First generation college students are accessing colleges and universities at an increased rate. However, first generation college students, which include a disproportionate number of minorities and low income populations, continue to lag behind their counterparts in graduating from college. More prevalent in the research are factors that cause


  2. Dating Violence among College Students: Key Issues for College Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Christine E.; Kardatzke, Kerrie N.

    2007-01-01

    The authors present a review of literature examining dating violence among college students. They describe 6 key issues related to dating violence among college students that affect college counselors' work. These key issues relate to the incidence and prevalence of physical, sexual, and psychological violence in college students' dating…

  3. First Generation College Students: Indicators of College Persistence and Graduation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Angelica

    2013-01-01

    First generation college students are accessing colleges and universities at an increased rate. However, first generation college students, which include a disproportionate number of minorities and low income populations, continue to lag behind their counterparts in graduating from college. More prevalent in the research are factors that cause…

  4. Building learning communities: evolution of the colleges at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Amy; Cutrer, William; Moutsios, Sandi; Heavrin, Benjamin; Pilla, Michael; Eichbaum, Quentin; Rodgers, Scott

    2013-09-01

    Learning communities, which are an emerging trend in medical education, create a foundation for professional and academic development through the establishment of longitudinal relationships between students and faculty. In this article, the authors describe the robust learning community system at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, which encompasses wellness, career planning, professional development, and academics.The Vanderbilt Advisory Colleges Program introduced in 2006 initially focused on two goals: promoting wellness and providing career advising. In the 2011-2012 academic year, the focus of the colleges expanded to incorporate an enhanced level of personal career advising and an academic component. In the four-year College Colloquium course, faculty selected as college mentors teach the medical humanities and lead sessions dedicated to student professional development in the areas of leadership, research, and service-learning. This academic and professional development program builds on the existing strengths of the colleges and has transformed the colleges into learning communities.The authors reflect on lessons learned and discuss future plans. They report that internal data and data from the Association of American Medical Colleges Medical School Graduation Questionnaire support consistently high and increasing satisfaction among Vanderbilt medical students, across the metrics of personal counseling, faculty mentoring, and career planning. PMID:23887019

  5. Medical Transcriptionists: Making Medical Histories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shniper, Lynn

    2001-01-01

    Medical transcriptionists are experts in the language of medicine. Describes what they do and what their working conditions, earnings, employment prospects, and training requirements are. Includes sources of additional information. (Author)

  6. Bradford College: Requiem for a College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    Bradford College, located 35 miles north of Boston in Haverhill, Massachusetts, was exactly the type of institution in greatest jeopardy of closing. It was too small, with an enrollment that never exceeded five hundred students. Such institutions tend to have high attrition rates because they have limited numbers of courses, majors, facilities,


  7. Bradford College: Requiem for a College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    Bradford College, located 35 miles north of Boston in Haverhill, Massachusetts, was exactly the type of institution in greatest jeopardy of closing. It was too small, with an enrollment that never exceeded five hundred students. Such institutions tend to have high attrition rates because they have limited numbers of courses, majors, facilities,…

  8. Regenerative Studies: College Community and Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woltz, Mary G.

    This case study applies principles derived from the Center for Regenerative Studies (CRS) to a community college in North Carolina. CRS, on the campus of California State Polytechnic Institute (California), is dedicated to the education, demonstration, and research of degenerative systems in the areas of shelter, food production, energy, water and


  9. Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Crossover Study of the Efficacy and Safety of Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate in College Students with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPaul, George J.; Weyandt, Lisa L.; Rossi, Joseph S.; Vilardo, Brigid A.; O'Dell, Sean M.; Carson, Kristen M.; Verdi, Genevieve; Swentosky, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate stimulant medication on symptoms and functioning for college students with ADHD using double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design. Method: Participants included 24 college students with ADHD and 26 college students without psychopathology. Lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) was examined for ADHD participants over five…

  10. Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Crossover Study of the Efficacy and Safety of Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate in College Students with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPaul, George J.; Weyandt, Lisa L.; Rossi, Joseph S.; Vilardo, Brigid A.; O'Dell, Sean M.; Carson, Kristen M.; Verdi, Genevieve; Swentosky, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate stimulant medication on symptoms and functioning for college students with ADHD using double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design. Method: Participants included 24 college students with ADHD and 26 college students without psychopathology. Lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) was examined for ADHD participants over five


  11. Medical Information & Technology: Rapidly Expanding Vast Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahni, Anil K.

    2012-12-01

    During ÑMedical Council Of India?, Platinum Jubilee Year (1933-2008) Celebrations, In Year 2008, Several Scientific Meeting/Seminar/Symposium, On Various Topics Of Contemporary Importance And Relevance In The Field Of ÑMedical Education And Ethics?, Were Organized, By Different Medical Colleges At Various Local, State, National Levels. The Present Discussion, Is An Comprehensive Summary Of Various Different Aspects of ìMedical Information Communication Technologyü, Especially UseFul For The Audience Stratum Group Of Those Amateur Medical & Paramedical Staff, With No Previous Work Experience Knowledge Of Computronics Applications. Outlining The, i.Administration Applications: Medical Records Etc, ii. Clinical Applications: Pros pective Scope Of TeleMedicine Applicabilities Etc iii. Other Applications: Efforts To Augment Improvement Of Medical Education, Medical Presentations, Medical Education And Research Etc. ÑMedical Trancription? & Related Recent Study Fields e.g ÑModern Pharmaceuticals?,ÑBio-Engineering?, ÑBio-Mechanics?, ÑBio-Technology? Etc., Along With Important Aspects Of Computers-General Considerations, Computer Ergonomics Assembled To Summarize, The AwareNess Regarding Basic Fundamentals Of Medical Computronics & Its Practically SuccessFul Utilities.

  12. Competency-based medical education in two Sub-Saharan African medical schools

    PubMed Central

    Kiguli-Malwadde, Elsie; Olapade-Olaopa, E Oluwabunmi; Kiguli, Sarah; Chen, Candice; Sewankambo, Nelson K; Ogunniyi, Adesola O; Mukwaya, Solome; Omaswa, Francis

    2014-01-01

    Background Relatively little has been written on Medical Education in Sub-Saharan Africa, although there are over 170 medical schools in the region. A number of initiatives have been started to support medical education in the region to improve quality and quantity of medical graduates. These initiatives have led to curricular changes in the region, one of which is the introduction of Competency-Based Medical Education (CBME). Institutional reviews This paper presents two medical schools, Makerere University College of Health Sciences and College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, which successfully implemented CBME. The processes of curriculum revision are described and common themes are highlighted. Both schools used similar processes in developing their CBME curricula, with early and significant stakeholder involvement. Competencies were determined taking into consideration each country’s health and education systems. Final competency domains were similar between the two schools. Both schools established medical education departments to support their new curricula. New teaching methodologies and assessment methods were needed to support CBME, requiring investments in faculty training. Both schools received external funding to support CBME development and implementation. Conclusion CBME has emerged as an important change in medical education in Sub-Saharan Africa with schools adopting it as an approach to transformative medical education. Makerere University and the University of Ibadan have successfully adopted CBME and show that CBME can be implemented even for the low-resourced countries in Africa, supported by external investments to address the human resources gap. PMID:25525404

  13. Medical Renaissance.

    PubMed

    Toledo-Pereyra, Luis H

    2015-06-01

    The Medical Renaissance started as the regular Renaissance did in the early 1400s and ended in the late 1600s. During this time great medical personalities and scholar humanists made unique advances to medicine and surgery. Linacre, Erasmus, Leonicello and Sylvius will be considered first, because they fit the early classic Renaissance period. Andreas Vesalius and Ambroise Paré followed thereafter, making outstanding anatomical contributions with the publication of the "Human Factory" (1543) by Vesalius, and describing unique surgical developments with the publication of the "The Apologie and Treatise of Ambroise Paré." At the end of the Renaissance and beginning of the New Science, William Harvey, noted British medical doctor and cardiovascular researcher, discovered the general circulation. He published his findings in "The Motu Cordis" in 1628 (Figure 1). The Medical Renaissance, in summary, included a great number of accomplished physicians and surgeons who made especial contributions to human anatomy; Vesalius assembled detailed anatomical information; Paré advanced surgical techniques; and Harvey, a medical genius, detailed the circulatory anatomy and physiology. PMID:26065591

  14. Sir Harry Sinderson Pasha and Iraq's first medical school.

    PubMed

    Al-Fattal, Sa'ad

    2013-08-01

    During the early twentieth century, the medical status of Mesopotamia, later Iraq, was very bad due to the lack of sanitation and recurrent epidemics and it was rife with endemic diseases including bilharziasis, tuberculosis and malaria. Medical care was poor, with few hospitals and doctors. The condition improved slowly with the return of a few Iraqi doctors who trained outside Iraq, in Turkey, Syria and Lebanon, and with the arrival of British Medical personnel, during and after the First World War, principally Sir Harry Sinderson who was one of the most influential figures in recent Iraqi medical and political history. He had the distinctive role of being one of the founders and the Dean of the first Iraqi medical college. During his service until his retirement in 1946 he achieved, with tireless effort, exceptionally high standards and brought fame and prestige to the new medical college in record time. He attained his goal of training at least 500 local doctors. PMID:24585764

  15. Problem Gambling on College Campuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McComb, Jennifer L.; Hanson, William E.

    2009-01-01

    The vast majority of college students gamble, with some doing so problematically. This article discusses gambling and problem gambling among college students, framing it as an emerging health issue on college campuses nationwide. Given that 4 out of 5 college students admit to gambling, and that approximately 8% gamble problematically, it is


  16. Problem Gambling on College Campuses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McComb, Jennifer L.; Hanson, William E.

    2009-01-01

    The vast majority of college students gamble, with some doing so problematically. This article discusses gambling and problem gambling among college students, framing it as an emerging health issue on college campuses nationwide. Given that 4 out of 5 college students admit to gambling, and that approximately 8% gamble problematically, it is…

  17. College Advanced Placement Policies, 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Entrance Examination Board, New York, NY.

    The Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board provides a practical way for schools and colleges to create and use common definitions of college-level courses, which, when completed in secondary school, prepare students for advanced study at college. In each field committees of examiners write course descriptions and…

  18. COMMUNITY COLLEGES IN URBAN SETTINGS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MAYHEW, LEWIS B.

    A CONFERENCE OF ARCHITECTS, URBAN PLANNERS, COMMUNITY COLLEGE PRESIDENTS, AND EDUCATIONAL THEORISTS MET TO DISCUSS THE POSSIBILITY OF LOCATING JUNIOR COLLEGES IN CENTRAL CITIES. THE JUNIOR COLLEGE CAN MEET URBAN NEEDS FOR RETRAINING, FOR ADULT EDUCATION, FOR TRANSFER, AND FOR CREATING AN INFORMED ELECTORATE. THE COLLEGE LOCATION SHOULD ASSIST IT


  19. The Evolution of Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurgens, Jill C.

    2010-01-01

    The community college has survived and thrived since its early inception in the 1800s and has become the center of educational opportunity providing access to all. Today, the influence of the community college system in the United States is impressive with 46% of all undergraduates attending community college. Although the community college boom


  20. Yavapai College Community Benefits Statements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Robert O.; Wing, Barbara; Fairchilds, Angie; Quinley, John W.

    The Yavapai College Districts Board and members of Yavapai College administration and staff developed this report. It contains 12 statements that compromise the core outcomes of the Yavapai College Mission. The extent to which each college addresses these outcomes is then reflected in a series of indicators that are tied to the individual…

  1. Trends in College Pricing, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Board, Washington, DC. Washington Office.

    This report presents data on college costs from the College Board's Annual Survey of Colleges for the 2001-2002 academic year, as well as trends in costs for the past 30 years and analyses of college prices in relation to family income and available financial aid. Data include: (1) average fixed charges for undergraduates (tuition and fees and…

  2. Building a Bridge to College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Carl

    1990-01-01

    Describes Woodlands Mountain Institute's leadership program, which helps exceptional West Virginia high school students get into good colleges and serve home communities after finishing college. Describes cases of low-income students assisted by program in college selection and financial aid. Describes colleges' cooperation, peer-counseling…

  3. Priorities Statements of Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Community Coll. Board, Springfield.

    Each year since 1994, the 52 community colleges in Illinois prepare priority statements detailing specific college objectives for the current fiscal year (FY). This report provides the third update of the colleges' statements, covering FY 1998. Brief statements, from one to four pages, are provided for the following colleges: Belleville Area


  4. Medical Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    For more than two decades, Biotechnology and Bioengineering has documented research focused on natural and engineered microbial biofilms within aquatic and subterranean ecosystems, wastewater and waste-gas treatment systems, marine vessels and structures, and industrial bioprocesses. Compared to suspended culture systems, intentionally engineered biofilms are heterogeneous reaction systems that can increase reactor productivity, system stability, and provide inherent cell: product separation. Unwanted biofilms can create enormous increases in fluid frictional resistances, unacceptable reductions in heat transfer efficiency, product contamination, enhanced material deterioration, and accelerated corrosion. Missing from B&B has been an equivalent research dialogue regarding the basic molecular microbiology, immunology, and biotechnological aspects of medical biofilms. Presented here are the current problems related to medical biofilms; current concepts of biofilm formation, persistence, and interactions with the host immune system; and emerging technologies for controlling medical biofilms. PMID:18366134

  5. Medical leasing.

    PubMed

    Holden, Elizabeth A

    2012-01-01

    Leases for medical space can have far-reaching (and sometimes unintentional) consequences for the future of the practice and the costs of the business. In order to prevent hardship and expense down the line, it is especially important to review the lease to make sure that it reflects the practice's goals, needs, and structure. This article provides a number of provisions that are especially crucial to review and negotiate when leasing medical space, including use restrictions, assignment and subleasing clauses, build-out terms, and legal compliance requirements. PMID:22594070

  6. Medical genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Jorde, L.B.; Carey, J.C.; White, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    This book on the subject of medical genetics is a textbook aimed at a very broad audience: principally, medical students, nursing students, graduate, and undergraduate students. The book is actually a primer of general genetics as applied to humans and provides a well-balanced introduction to the scientific and clinical basis of human genetics. The twelve chapters include: Introduction, Basic Cell Biology, Genetic Variation, Autosomal Dominant and Recessive Inheritance, Sex-linked and Mitochondrial Inheritance, Clinical Cytogenetics, Gene Mapping, Immunogenetics, Cancer Genetics, Multifactorial Inheritance and Common Disease, Genetic Screening, Genetic Diagnosis and Gene Therapy, and Clinical Genetics and Genetic Counseling.

  7. Let's Keep the College in Our Community Colleges: Mathematics for College Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curnutt, Larry

    Preparing students for transfer to four-year colleges remains a significant part of the mission of most community college mathematicians. For some 30 years, calculus has been synonymous with entry-level college mathematics. Recent educational and technological changes, however, demand that the definition of college-level work in mathematics be…

  8. Berkeley College, Yale University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, James S.

    2000-01-01

    Examines the controversial architectural technique of combining contemporary features with traditional designs at Yale University's Berkeley College, and discusses whether there is a place for this type of juxtaposition in architectural design. Photos and diagrams are included. (GR)

  9. College Without a Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyne, John

    1973-01-01

    Campus Free College (CFC) is a nontraditional, nonresidential educational experience that employs program advisors to work with students to utilize all learning resources available for an individually-designed curricula. (Author/PG)

  10. College/University Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Athletic Business, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the building designs of 117 state-of-the-art of college athletic and recreational facilities, including the educational contexts and design goals. Includes information on architects and designers, construction cost, size, and occupancy date. Also provides photographs. (EV)

  11. Effective College Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caraway, James E.

    1978-01-01

    The author discusses other writings on effective college teaching and then presents his list of necessary characteristics for the effective teacher, stressing the interpersonal dimension of the teaching-learning situation. (MF)

  12. Ohio Community College Portraits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides information on student characteristics, success and progress rates, cost of attendance, degrees awarded, class size, faculty characteristics, and employment outcomes at each of Ohio's twenty-three community college.

  13. American College Health Association

    MedlinePLUS

    ... News, Programs, and Services Vote in the ACHA Leadership Election: March 18–April 18, 2016 Your vote ... help ACHA expand its position as the principal leadership organization for advancing the health of college students ...

  14. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Medical Assisting Technology Programs (CIP: 51.0801--Medical Assistant). Postsecondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the medical assisting technology program. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies, and…

  15. What Predicts Adjustment among College Students? A Longitudinal Panel Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Mary E.; Wilson, Gregory S.; Yamnitz, Ben

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Researchers have previously reported that law students and medical students experience significant distress during their first year. The authors suspected that freshmen undergraduates might experience similar distress in their transition to college. Participants: They surveyed 242 undergraduate freshmen at the beginning and end of their…

  16. Montgomery Junior College Technical and Semi-Professional Employment Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhns, Eileen P.; Deyo, Donald E.

    A survey of technical and semiprofessional occupational needs in the Washington, D.C. area was conducted by Montgomery Junior College in an effort to devise suitable curriculums in such areas as medical auxiliary technologies, applied science technologies, and public service at the institution's proposed second campus in Rockville, Maryland.…

  17. Rush Health Systems and Meridian Community College: People Serving People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Jean H.

    2007-01-01

    Meridian Community College and Rush Health Systems are partners in delivering training focused on Rush's mission statement of hospital-wide commitment to "excellence in service management." Rush and MCC have delivered customized classes in the following areas: medical billing, leadership management, computer training, admissions clerk, and…

  18. Colleges and Employees Explore Ways to Provide for Healthy Retirements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dotinga, Randy

    2008-01-01

    Faculty members and administrators should not assume that their colleges will pick up their medical bills during their retirement. Medicare benefits are not guaranteed that they will remain the same. Experts believe that the Medicare trust fund that pays for retiree hospital care will go bankrupt by 2019. As such, insurance experts are now urging…

  19. Descriptions of Selected Career-Related College Language Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knodel, Arthur J.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Seven courses or programs at different colleges emphasizing specific career applications of languages are described. They include: Technical French; Spanish for Law Enforcement and Correctional Personnel; Executive German; Proyecto Desarrollo Economico; Spanish for Medical Professions; Elements of Foreign Language, and Business French and Business


  20. A Comparative Study of Perceived Stress among Female Medical and Non-Medical University Students in Dammam, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dabal, Badria K; Koura, Manal R; Rasheed, Parveen; Al-Sowielem, Latifa; Makki, Suhair M

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to investigate any differences between female undergraduate medical and non-medical students for: 1) prevalence and causes of perceived academic stress, and 2) changes in physical, mental, psychological and emotional health as well as life-style since starting college studies. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at Dammam University, Dammam, Saudi Arabia, in January 2008. All 319 pre-clinical female medical students were included in the study and 297 non-medical students from the College of Applied Studies and Community Services (CASCS) were selected by stratified random sampling. The study instrument was a questionnaire on the “Influence of Studying on Students’ Health”. Results More medical students (48.6%) reported being frequently stressed due to studies than CASCS students (38.7%, P <0.01). Unsuitable teaching methods, an unsatisfactory study environment, and fear of failure in examinations were more frequently mentioned by medical than non-medical students (P <0.05). While underlying social problems were significantly more common in medical students, economic problems were more prevalent among CASCS students (P <0.05, P <0.05). More medical than non-medical students reported a worse status of physical and mental health, anxiety and depression and negative life-style changes since initiation of the college programme. Conclusion Medical students were at higher risk of physical and mental health problems than non-medical students due to academic stress. Since a substantial proportion of CASCS students also experienced academic stress, we recommend that a student support committee be established for both colleges to provide counselling and guidance in healthy ways to cope with stress. PMID:21509235