Sample records for western desert egypt

  1. AEROMYCOBIOTA OF WESTERN DESERT OF EGYPT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Ismail; S. I. I. Abdel-Hafez; A. M. Moharram

    The prevalence of airborne mycobiota at six different regions of Western desert (5 regions) and Eastern desert (1) of Egypt was determined using the exposed-plate method. A total of 44 genera, 102 species and one variety in addition to some unidentified yeasts and dark sterile mycelia were collected. Of the above, only 5 species were isolated from the 15 exposures

  2. The corrosive well waters of Egypt's western desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, Frank Eldridge

    1979-01-01

    The discovery that ground waters of Egypt's Western Desert are highly corrosive is lost in antiquity. Inhabitants of the oases have been aware of the troublesome property for many decades and early investigators mention it in their reports concerning the area. Introduction of modern well-drilling techniques and replacements of native wood casing with steel during the 20th century increased corrosion problems and, in what is called the New Valley Project, led to an intense search for causes and corrective treatments. This revealed that extreme corrosiveness results from combined effects of relatively acidic waters with significant concentrations of destructive sulfide ion; unfavorable ratios of sulfate and chloride to less aggressive ions; mineral equilibria and electrode potential which hinder formation of protective films; relative high chemical reaction rates because of abnormal temperatures, and high surface velocities related to well design. There is general agreement among investigators that conventional corrosion control methods such as coating metal surfaces, chemical treatment of the water, and electrolytic protection with impressed current and sacrificial electrodes are ineffective or impracticable for wells in the Western Desert's New Valley. Thus, control must be sought through the use of materials more resistant to corrosion than plain carbon steel wherever well screens and casings are necessary. Of the alternatives considered, stainless steel appears to. be the most promising where high strength and long-term services are required and the alloy's relatively high cost is acceptable. Epoxy resin-bonded fiberglass and wood appear to be practicable, relatively inexpensive alternatives for installations which do. not exceed their strength limitations. Other materials such as high strength aluminum and Monel Metal have shown sufficient promise to. merit their consideration in particular locations and uses. The limited experience with pumping in these desert wells leaves uncertainties concerning the durability of conventional pump designs. Egypt's New Valley Project provides an excellent opportunity for continuing study of the corrosion problems that concern ground-water developers in many parts of the world.

  3. New age constraints on the Middle Stone Age occupations of Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

    E-print Network

    Asmerom, Yemane

    New age constraints on the Middle Stone Age occupations of Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt a Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Washington University, Campus Box 1169, 1 Brookings Dr., St Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, 200 Yale Blvd., NE, Albuquerque, NM

  4. Volatiles in the Desert: Subtle Remote-sensing Signatures of the Dakhleh Oasis Catastrophic Event, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haldemann, A. F. C.; Kleindienst, M. R.; Churcher, C. S.; Smith, J. R.; Schwarcz, H. P.; Osinski, G.

    2005-01-01

    Over the past decade members of the Dakhleh Oasis Project have studied enigmatic signatures in the Pleistocene geologic record of portions of the Dakhleh oasis and palaeo-oasis in Egypt's Western Desert [1,2]. In particular, Si-Ca-Al rich glass melt (Dakhleh Glass, Fig. 1) points to a catastrophic event between c.100,000-200,000 years ago [3] in this well-studied African savannah and freshwater lake Middle Stone Age environment [4,5].

  5. Integrated geophysical study to delineate the subsurface structures in Siwa Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Ahmed; Abd El All, Esmat; Rabeh, Taha; Osman, Salah

    2015-04-01

    Siwa Oasis is located within the Western Desert of Egypt and is a potential candidate for the development. It represents one of the most interesting and distinct region of Egypt. The main goal of the present work is to study the subsurface structures in Siwa Oasis area, Western Desert, Egypt and to determine their effects on surface geologic structures. To achieve this, two geophysical methods (magnetic and geothermal) have been used in this study. A detailed land magnetic survey was performed. The necessary reduction concerning daily variation, the regional gradient and time variation observation were applied. The measured total magnetic field was corrected and reduced to the north magnetic pole. Data analysis was performed using trend analysis, Euler deconvolution, high pass filter, analytical signal. The results indicate that the area is affected by tectonic forces in the NE-SW, NW- SE and E-W directions. Geothermal studies in some places in Siwa Oasis were carried out using the device of thermo-physical properties (Isomet-104) for measuring the subsurface temperature contour map (30 meters below the earth's surface). This map illustrates that there are good geothermal regions have hot groundwater reservoir. The measurements of geothermal properties of some rock samples such as thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, volume capacity and thermal values gave us an indication about the geothermal of rocks in the subsurface. Also, geothermal studies gave us an idea about the heat flow and the increasing of the energy and chemical of properties of the predominant subsurface rocks in the study area.

  6. Danian/Selandian unconformity in the central and southern Western Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farouk, Sherif; El-Sorogy, Abdelbaset

    2015-03-01

    A regional unconformity at the Danian-Selandian (D/S) boundary is recorded in Western Desert, Egypt, based upon field study, biostratigraphic analyses and paleoenvironmental parameters. This unconformity is marked by the absence of the topmost part of planktonic foraminifera Igorina albeari/Globanomalina pseudomenardii (P3b) Subzone and the uppermost part of the equivalent calcareous nannofossil Ellipsolithus macelus NP4 Zone (NTp8A-B Subzones) in all the sections studied. Furthermore, benthic foraminiferal turnover across the D/S unconformity is observed to be associated with a sharp lithological break from place to place due to submerged paleo-lows and highs. In all the studied sections, intensive reworking of older Danian faunas is recorded within the basal part of Selandian transgressive deposits.

  7. Evidence for a ˜ 200 100 ka meteorite impact in the Western Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinski, Gordon R.; Schwarcz, Henry P.; Smith, Jennifer R.; Kleindienst, Maxine R.; Haldemann, Albert F. C.; Churcher, Charles S.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we present evidence, in the form of unusual silicate glasses, for a meteorite impact event ˜ 200-100 ka in the Dakhleh Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt. These glasses, known locally as Dakhleh Glass, were derived from the shock melting of a series of unconsolidated sediments underlain by interbedded carbonates, sandstones and phosphate-rich lithologies. Hypervelocity impact in to a volatile-rich target resulted in the production of impact glasses with CaO and Al 2O 3 contents of up to ˜ 25 and 18 wt.%, respectively. Other notable properties include the presence of globules of immiscible calcite and pyrrhotite melt phases, shattered quartz grains, and fragments of silicified plant matter. Dating of geoarchaeological artefacts associated with the Dakhleh Glass support preliminary 40Ar/ 39Ar data, indicating a ˜ 200-100 ka age for the impact event. Geoarchaeological evidence indicates that archaic Homo sapiens and early modern humans continually inhabited this region of the Western Desert during this period. While it is unclear at present whether the Dakhleh Glass was formed during a cratering event or a large aerial burst, the effect on the environment and inhabitants of Dakhleh would have been catastrophic.

  8. Precipitation Source Inferred from Stable Isotopic Composition of Pleistocene Groundwater and Carbonate Deposits in the Western Desert of Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohamed Sultan; Neil Sturchio; Fekri A. Hassan; Mohamed Abdel Rahman Hamdan; Abdel Moneim Mahmood; Zeinhom El Alfy; Tom Stein

    1997-01-01

    An Atlantic source of precipitation can be inferred from stable isotopic data (H and O) for fossil groundwaters and uranium-series-dated carbonate spring deposits from oases in the Western Desert of Egypt. In the context of available stable isotopic data for fossil groundwaters throughout North Africa, the observed isotopic depletions (?D ?72 to ?81‰; ?18O ?10.6 to ?11.5‰) of fossil (?32,000

  9. Paleomagnetism of Abu Aggag and Sabaya Formations at Kalabsha, South Western Desert of Egypt.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Reem; Khashaba, Ahmed; El-Hemaly, Ibrahim; Takla, Emad; Abdel Aal, Mohamed; Odah, Hatem

    2015-04-01

    Two profiles have been sampled from the Nubia Sandstone at Aswan, south Western Desert: The 1st profile has been taken from Abu Aggag Formation and the 2nd one was from Sabaya Formation (23.25 oN, 32.75 oE). 136 oriented cores (from 9 sites) have been sampled. Abu Aggag Formation is of Late Cretaceous (Turonian) and Sabaya Formation is of Early Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian). The studied rocks are subjected to rock magnetic measurements as well as demagnetization treatment. It has been found that hematite is the main magnetic mineral in both formations. Four profile sections (normal polarity) from Abu Aggag Formation, yielded a magnetic component with D = 352.7°, I = 36.6° with ?95 = 5.2° and the corresponding pole lies at lat. = 82.8 °N and long. = 283.1 °E. Five profile sections (normal polarity) from Sabaya Formation, yielded a magnetic component with D = 348.6°, I = 33.3° with ?95 = 5.8° and the corresponding pole lies at lat. = 78.3 °N and long. = 280.4 °E. The obtained paleopole for the two formations lies at lat. = 80.5 °N and long. = 281.7 °E. The obtaind components are considered primary and the corresponding paleopole reflects the age of Nubia Sandstone when compared with the previously obtained Cretaceous poles for Egypt.

  10. Remote Sensing and Shallow Geophysical Investigations on Moghra Lake in Northeastern Qattarra Depression, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, S. D.; Fathy, M. S.; Azeem, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Western Desert of Egypt encompasses two thirds of the land area of Egypt and constitutes one of the driest regions of the Sahara. This desert has seven depressions; Siwa, Qattara, Fayium, Bahariya, Farafra, Dakhla and Kharga. These depressions may be the manifestation of old drainage basins with extensive erosion and possibly some tectonic activity. Several oases with freshwater can be found in these depressions. Geological and geophysical investigations in Qattara Depression indicate several buried fluvial channels with flow direction from highlands in southeast to northwest. Moghra Lake at the northeastern tip of Qatarra basin may be a small remnant of a larger paleo-lake including the mouth of a paleo-river. This study probed this area for presence of buried channels that may have fed the larger Moghra paleo-lake. We have used ALOS - PALSAR radar remote sensing data to identify the surface features in this region, such as channels, channel fills, and fractures. In addition, dual polarization PALSAR data (HV, HH) allowed analysis of the near surface geology and assisted in delineating areas of interest for GPR surveys. GPR data along 2D profiles were acquired using the GSSI SIR-3000 system with a 400 MHz antenna that provided images to approximately three meters in depth. All the GPS data were processed using RADAN 6.6 software. A conventional processing flow was used for data processing: The positional correction tool removed the air wave. A range-gain balanced the amplitudes and a final band-pass (50 kHz to 500 kHz) filter was applied to the data. Deconvolution was also applied for highlighting the finer details. In addition, spatial filters were used to attenuate continuous vertical noise. The migrated sections of GPR identified a major paleochannel distributary with two minor channels at the margins. The bedrock of the studied area consists of the Lower Miocene Moghra Formation (sandstone and shale intercalations). The area around the present lake is covered by about 2 m of lacustrine sediments of post-Miocene age in the east side and by recent eolian dunes in the west. These sediments are characterized by shallowing upward, horizontal to cross-bedded with an unconformity in between. The eastern end of the paleochannel surveyed by GPR is covered by recent sand dunes followed by an ephemeral stream that feeds the current lake. Field observations suggest that the movement of sand dunes in the northeast direction may have blocked the paleo-channel. A two meters deep trench was dug to confirm the GPR findings. Regional gravity mapping of this area also shows major gravity anomalies. More work is planned to carry out additional high resolution potential field surveys in conjunction with remote sensing and GPR studies to understand the paleo-drainage of this area. Identifying the exact track of the paleo-channels will help reconstructing of paleo drainage of this region and may help in mapping groundwater, this will be very important for the development of this rapidly expanding desert area.

  11. Travertine from Egypt's Western Desert: a terrestrial proxy for North African paleohydrology and paleoclimate during the Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, G.; Crossey, L. J.; Karlstrom, K. E.; Polyak, V. J.; Asmerom, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The 'Green Sahara' pluvial phases that overprinted North African aridity during the Pleistocene are well recognized in tropical and Mediterranean marine records. Comparatively few studies have investigated the terrestrial expression of these pluvials, though, in part because of the paucity of paleohydrology archives in the desert. In this study, we show that travertine in Egypt's Western Desert constitutes a unique terrestrial proxy for the North African hydrologic cycle. In the Western Desert, travertine (defined inclusively as chemically-precipitated continental carbonate) deposits in paleo-oasis springs during times of high hydrologic head. Since head increases as meteoric precipitation falls in southern groundwater recharge areas, large-scale travertine accumulations can record pluvial episode durations as well as their geochemical characteristics. We built a database of new and previously-published U/Th ages from five paleo-oasis areas spanning a north-south gradient through the Western Desert. Integrating this geochronology with stable isotope and 87Sr/86Sr geochemistry of travertine samples, we present a terrestrial record of North African pluvial periods for the last ~650 ka. We show that groundwater sources for travertine remain constant through space and time, implying hydrological similarity between pluvial periods. The timing of travertine deposition is inconsistent over shorter (~10 ka) timescales in the various paleo-oases, though, suggesting that local hydrology may obscure the travertine response to pluvials. However, we observe significant travertine deposition across several areas between approximately 100 to 300 ka, and 450 to 600 ka, with a hiatus in between; we interpret these depositional 'peaks' to correspond with maxima in the 400-ka component of eccentricity. Thus, contrary to prior literature, we find that travertine deposition in the Western Desert, and thus pluvial occurrence, responds to orbitally-paced changes in equatorial insolation, rather than correlating to glacial cycles. We also note the presence of significant deposition between 650 ka and 1 Ma (using modeled ages for travertine outside of U/Th analytical range), adding support to the notion that pluvial episodes in North Africa occurred before and during the mid-Pleistocene transition, although they are unclear in the sapropel record at this time. Finally, we suggest that decreasing travertine volume and elevation above modern base level throughout our 650 ka record, as well as the lack of travertine deposition at major oasis areas after ~70 ka, may imply declining pluvial strength through the late Pleistocene. Thus, our study shows travertine in Egypt's Western Desert to be a useful proxy for broad-scale changes in North African paleohydrology and paleoclimate, with the potential to determine the timing of wet periods as well as their moisture sources.

  12. Environmental impact and natural hazards on Kharga Oasis monumental sites, Western Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, A. B.; Howari, F. M.; El-Sankary, M. M.; Wali, A. M.; Saleh, M. M.

    2010-09-01

    Kharga Oasis monumental sites are important to the cultural heritage in the South Western Desert of Egypt. These sites are scattered on the floor of the oasis representing ancient civilizations. The studied sites include the Hibis, EI-Nadura, EI-Ghueita and El-Zayyan temples as well as El-Bagawat Cemetery. The present study found that natural hazards have remarkable impacts on these sites. The impact of weathering processes, encroachment of sand dunes, stability of foundation beds and shallow groundwater seepage were documented. The present study found that humidity, temperature, sunlight and water content conditions seem to be favorable for biodegradation as evidenced by the presence of algae, bat blood and bird excretions. The radioactivity levels at the investigated sites are also measured via gamma-ray spectrometry. Sand dunes in the area pose a serious natural threat to the monumental sites. Active sand dunes are rapidly encroaching upon the components of these monuments, partially covering some monuments such as El-Ghueita Temple. These dunes load wind storms with fine sand particles. This causes wind erosion through sand blasting of these sites. Some monuments, such as EI-Nadura, EI-Ghueita and El-Zayyan temples were constructed on a suitable hard sandstone ground, whereas others, such as the Hibis Temple, were constructed on unsuitable soft shale ground in relatively topographically low area. The impact of the unstable foundation and shallow groundwater levels have caused severe structural damage as evidenced by tilted columns, cracked walls and salt-crystal growth in the porous building stones. These destructive elements threaten some other temples in Kharga Oasis and will eventually cause total physical collapse. Although rain is rare in this area, it can form a real threat to mud brick monuments such as El-Bagawat Cemetery. The natural radioactivity sources resulted in an annual effective dose equivalent values averaging 0.20, 0.13, 0.09 and 0.07 mSv/year for the monumental sites at Hibis, El-Nadura, El-Ghueita and El-Zayyan, respectively.

  13. Eolian features in the Western Desert of Egypt and some applications to Mars.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    El-Baz, F.; Breed, C.S.; Grolier, M.J.; McCauley, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    Relations of landform types to wind regimes, bedrock composition, sediment supply, and topography are shown by field studies and satellite photographs of the Western Desert. This desert provides analogs of Martian wind-formed features and sand dunes, alternating light and dark streaks, knob 'shadows' and yardangs. Surface particles have been segregated by wind into dunes, sand sheets, and light streaks, that can be differentiated by their grain size distributions, surface shapes, and colors. Throughgoing sand of mostly fine to medium grain size is migrating S in longitudinal dune belts and barchan chains whose long axes lie parallel to the prevailing W winds, but topographic variations such as scarps and depressions strongly influence the zones of deposition and dune morphology. -from Authors

  14. Subsurface geology of Tertiary rocks of northeastern district of Western Desert, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Elzarka, M.H.; Radwan, I.A.

    1983-03-01

    The lithofacies analysis of the Tertiary rocks reveals two ancient subbasins at the north and southeast of the northeastern district, Western Desert. The lithofacies of the Paleocene and early and middle Eocene sections are mainly calcareous. Shale predominates in the late Eocene rocks. The Paleocene rocks seem to have accumulated in a lagoonal environment of epineritic depths. The Paleocene rocks of the northern subbasin indicate accumulation on an unstable shelf. The Paleocene environmental conditions seem to have prevailed during the early and middle Eocene. During the late Eocene, rocks of shallow-water and current-agitated environments accumulated. The lower clastic layers of the Oligocene, having a sand/shale ratio less than one, indicate a clastic shoreline environment-lagoonal subenvironment. The Oligocene clastics are overlain by a basaltic sheet at the eastern part of the district. The middle Miocene lithofacies indicate rock accumulation in a contemporaneously subsiding basin under lagoonal or delta-front conditions at the southern part of the district. Marine stagnant-bottom-water conditions prevailed during the accumulation of the middle Miocene rocks at the norther parts. The Pliocene rocks seem to have accumulated in lagoons, where the inflow exceeded evaporation and alternating periods of exposure and flooding by either fresh or saline water of poor circulation prevailed. The tectonic instability of the district was initiated by volcancity during the late Oligocene.

  15. Electrical and geochemical properties of tufa deposits as related to mineral composition in the South Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomaa, Mohamed M.; Abou El-Anwar, Esmat A.

    2015-06-01

    The geochemical, petrographical, and electrical properties of rocks are essential to the investigation of the properties of minerals. In this paper we will try to present a study of the A. C. electrical properties of carbonate rock samples and their relation to petrographical and geochemical properties. Samples were collected from four formations from the Bir Dungul area, in the South Western Desert, Egypt. The electrical properties of the samples were measured using a non-polarizing electrode, at room temperature (~28?°C), and at a relative atmospheric humidity of (~45%), in the frequency range from 42?Hz to 5?MHz. The changes in the electrical properties were argued to the change in mineral composition. Generally, the electrical properties of rocks are changed due to many factors e.g., grain size, mineral composition, grain shape and inter-granular relations between grains. The dielectric constant of samples decreases with frequency, and increases with conductor concentration. Also, the conductivity increases with an increase of continuous conductor paths between electrodes. The petrographical and geochemical studies reveal that the deposition of the tufa deposits occurred in shallow lakes accompanied by a high water table, an alkaline spring recharge and significant vegetation cover. Diagenetically, tufa deposits were subjected to early and late diagenesis. Petrography and geochemistry studies indicated that the area of tufa deposits was deposited under the control of bacterial activity. Geochemically, the Sr content indicates that the tufa deposits formed from dissolved bicarbonate under the control of microbes and bacterial activity.

  16. Correlation of Aerogravity and BHT Data to Develop a Geothermal Gradient Map of the Northern Western Desert of Egypt using an Artificial Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Haby S.; Abdel Zaher, Mohamed; Senosy, Mahmoud M.; Saibi, Hakim; El Nouby, Mohamed; Fairhead, J. Derek

    2015-06-01

    The northern part of the Western Desert of Egypt represents the second most promising area of hydrocarbon potential after the Gulf of Suez province. An artificial neural network (ANN) approach was used to develop a new predictive model for calculation of the geothermal gradients in this region based on gravity and corrected bottom-hole temperature (BHT) data. The best training data set was obtained with an ANN architecture composed of seven neurons in the hidden layer, which made it possible to predict the geothermal gradient with satisfactory efficiency. The BHT records of 116 deep oil wells (2,000-4,500 m) were used to evaluate the geothermal resources in the northern Western Desert. Corrections were applied to the BHT data to obtain the true formation equilibrium temperatures, which can provide useful constraints on the subsurface thermal regime. On the basis of these corrected data, the thermal gradient was computed for the linear sections of the temperature-versus-depth data at each well. The calculated geothermal gradient using temperature log data was generally 30 °C/km, with a few local high geothermal gradients in the northwestern parts of the study area explained by potential local geothermal fields. The Bouguer gravity values from the study area ranged from -60 mGal in the southern parts to 120 mGal in the northern areas, and exhibited NE-SW and E-W trends associated with geological structures. Although the northern Western Desert of Egypt has low regional temperature gradients (30 °C/km), several potential local geothermal fields were found (>40 °C/km). The heat flow at each well was also computed by combining sets of temperature gradients and thermal conductivity data. Aerogravity data were used to delineate the subsurface structures and tectonic framework of the region. The result of this study is a new geothermal gradient map of the northern Western Desert developed from gravity and BHT log data.

  17. Larger benthic foraminiferal turnover across the Eocene-Oligocene transition at Siwa Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orabi, H.; El Beshtawy, M.; Osman, R.; Gadallah, M.

    2015-05-01

    In the Eocene part of the Siwa Oasis, the larger foraminifera are represented by the genera Nummulites, Arxina, Operculina, Sphaerogypsina, Asterocyclina, Grzybowskia, Silvestriella, Gaziryina and Discocyclina in order of abundance. Operculina continues up to the early Oligocene as modern representatives in tropical regions, while the other genera became extinct. Nevertheless, the most common larger foraminiferal genus Lepidocyclina (Nephrolepidina) appears only in the lowermost Oligocene. In spite of the Eocene-Oligocene (E/O) transition is thought to have been attended by major continental cooling at northern middle and high latitudes, we discover that at the Siwa Oasis, there is a clear warming trend from the late Eocene (extinction level of Nummulites, Sphaerogypsina, Asterocyclina, Grzybowskia, Silvestriella and Discocyclina) to the early Oligocene is observed due to the high abundance of Operculina and occurrence of kaolinite and gypsiferous shale deposits in both Qatrani and El Qara formations (Oligocene) at this transition. The El Qara Formation is a new rock unit proposed herein for the Oligocene (Rupelian age) in the first time. Several episodes of volcanic activity occurred in Egypt during the Cenozoic. Mid Tertiary volcanicity was widespread and a number of successive volcanic pulses are starting in the late Eocene. The release of mantle CO2 from this very active volcanic episode may have in fact directly caused the warm Eocene-Oligocene greenhouse climate effect.

  18. Age of the Dakhleh impact event and implications for Middle Stone Age archeology in the Western Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renne, Paul R.; Schwarcz, Henry P.; Kleindienst, Maxine R.; Osinski, Gordon R.; Donovan, John J.

    2010-03-01

    Dakhleh Glass comprises a suite of chemically distinctive and heterogeneous glassy rocks that occur over an area of ca. 400 km 2 in and around the Dakhleh Oasis in central western Egypt. Previous studies establish a meteorite impact origin for the Dakhleh Glass. No impact crater has yet been found, suggesting an airburst origin. The Dakhleh Glass-forming impact event occurred during the Middle Stone Age time of occupation, but the timing of this event has not been well established. 40Ar/ 39Ar incremental heating of three aliquots from a sample of Dakhleh Glass yield data that can be ascribed to quenched glass which efficiently purged radiogenic 40Ar inherited from the target rocks. One of the aliquots yielded data suggestive of an undegassed clast of target material, but these are easily resolved. The age of the impact event is determined from a compositionally filtered subset of the data that yield an isochron age of 145 ± 19 ka.

  19. The Climate and its Impacts on deterioration and weathering rate of EI-Nadura Temple in El- Kharga Oasis, Western Desert of Egypt.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismael, Hossam

    2015-04-01

    Undoubtedly, El-Kharga Oasis monumental sites are considered an important part of our world's cultural heritage in the South Western Desert of Egypt. These sites are scattered on the floor of the oasis representing ancient civilizations. The Roman stone monuments in Kharga represent cultural heritage of an outstanding universal value. Such those monuments have suffered weathering deterioration. There are various elements which affect the weathering process of stone monuments: climate conditions, shapes of cultural heritages, exposed time periods, terrains, and vegetation around them, etc. Among these, climate conditions are the most significant factor affecting the deterioration of Archeological sites in Egypt. El- Kharga Oasis belongs administratively to the New Valley Governorate. It is located in the southern part of the western desert of Egypt, lies between latitudes 22°30'14" and 26°00'00" N, and between 30°27'00" and 30°47'00" E. The area of El Kharga Oasis covers about 7500 square kilometers. Pilot studies were carried out on the EI-Nadura Temple, composed of sandstones originating from the great sand sea. The major objective of this study is to monitor and measure the weathering features and the weathering rate affecting the building stones forming El-Nadora Roman building rocks in cubic cm. To achieve these aims, the present study used analysis of climatic data such as annual and seasonal solar radiation, Monthly average number of hours of sunshine, maximum and minimum air temperatures, wind speed, which have obtained from actual field measurements and data Meteorological Authority of El-Kharga station for the period 1977 to 2010 (33 years), and from the period 1941-2050 (110 years) as a long term of temperature data. Several samples were collected and examined by polarizing microscopy (PLM), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis system (SEM-EDX). The results were in agreement with the observed values in the study area. The deterioration of El-Nadora temple is above 45 % of original temple (138-161 BC), these deteriorations have occurred not only due to the age of the structures, but also due to the climate elements. It was found that the climate is the most important elements influencing weathering. El-Nadora temple is highly influenced by wind action because it was built on a hill top 180 meter in hyper arid climate and exposed to wind without any obstruction. Finally, El-Nadora Temple has lost about 42.46 % of its original size. And if the rate of deterioration continues, the major landmarks, symbols and inscriptions will fully disappear in 2150.

  20. ORIGINAL PAPER Neoproterozoic diamictite in the Eastern Desert of Egypt

    E-print Network

    Stern, Robert J.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Neoproterozoic diamictite in the Eastern Desert of Egypt and Northern Saudi Arabia in Wadi Kareim and Wadi Mobarak in the Eastern Desert of Egypt and the Nuwaybah formation in NW Saudi and extends from Egypt, Israel, and Jordan to Ethiopia and Yemen. The ANS (Fig. 1a) developed during

  1. Mineral evolution and processes of ferruginous microbialite accretion - an example from the Middle Eocene stromatolitic and ooidal ironstones of the Bahariya Depression, Western Desert, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Salama, W; El Aref, M M; Gaupp, R

    2013-01-01

    Peritidal ferruginous microbialites form the main bulk of the Middle Eocene ironstone deposits of the Bahariya Depression, Western Desert, Egypt. They include ferruginous stromatolites and microbially coated grains (ferruginous oncoids and ooids). Their internal structures reveal repeated cycles of microbial and Fe oxyhydroxide laminae. The microbial laminae consist of fossilised neutrophilic filamentous iron-oxidising bacteria. These bacteria oxidised the Fe(II)-rich acidic groundwater upon meeting the marine water at an approximately neutral pH. The iron oxyhydroxide laminae were initially precipitated as amorphous iron oxhydroxides and subsequently recrystallised into nanocrystalline goethite during early diagenesis. Organic remains such as proteinaceous compounds, lipids, carbohydrates and carotenoids are preserved and can be identified by Raman spectroscopy. The ferruginous microbialites were subjected to post-depositional subaerial weathering associated with sea-level retreat and subsurface alteration by continued ascent of the Fe(II)-rich acidic groundwater. At this stage, another iron-oxidising bacterial generation prevailed in the acidic environment. The acidity of the groundwater was caused by oxidation of pyrite in the underlying Cenomanian Bahariya formation. The positive iron isotopic ratios and presence of ferrous and ferric iron sulphates may result from partial iron oxidation along the redox boundary in an oxygen-depleted environment. PMID:23113844

  2. The contribution of geographic information systems and remote sensing in determining priority areas for hydrogeological development, Darb el-Arbain area, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elewa, Hossam H.; Fathy, Rafik G.; Qaddah, Atef A.

    2010-08-01

    The Darb el-Arbain study area is in the southern Western Desert of Egypt and has been attracting increasing developmental interest in the last few decades, especially since agricultural development of the southern Baris area, where the groundwater resources of the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System (NSAS) have been utilized for the cultivation of valuable lands. Due to the proven high potential of both groundwater and land resources, determining the priority areas for sustainable hydrogeological development becomes a necessity. A geographic information system, as a platform for geospatial modeling techniques, has been built, which depends on the recently collected data about the NSAS, in addition to the published databases. Certain criteria of practical value, like depth to groundwater, hydraulic conductivity, groundwater salinity, sodium adsorption ratio, and the safe yield of wells, were selected as decisive parameters for hydrogeological prioritization. The model pinpoints areas characterized by favorable hydrogeological conditions, which could be used for future development and implementation of an artificial storage and recovery (ASR) program. The designated priority areas for hydrogeological development occur at the southern, middle southern and some localized northern parts of the Darb el-Arbain area. The newly formed Tushka Lakes represent a suitable and excellent natural source of freshwater for implementing an ASR program.

  3. Evidence for Early and Mid-Cryogenian glaciation in the Northern ArabianNubian Shield (Egypt, Sudan, and western Arabia)

    E-print Network

    Stern, Robert J.

    (Egypt, Sudan, and western Arabia) ROBERT J. STERN1*, PETER R. JOHNSON2, KAMAL A. ALI1,3 & SUMIT K over broad regions of the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt, NW Arabia and possible correlative units diamictite and BIFs of the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt and the correlative Nuwaybah diamictite and BIF

  4. Substance geology of the western desert in Egypt and Sudan revealed by Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-A)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breed, C. S.; Schaber, G. G.; Mccauley, J. F.; Grolier, M. J.; Haynes, C. V.; Elachi, C.; Blom, R.; Issawi, B.; Mchugh, W. P.

    1983-01-01

    A correlation of known archaeologic sites with the mapped locations of the streamcourses is expected and may lead to new interpretations of early human history in the Sahara. The valley networks, faults, and other subjacent bedrock features mapped on the SIR-A images are promising areas for ground water and mineral exploration. Additionally, the analogies between the interplay of wind and running water in the geologic history of the Sahara and of Mars are strengthened by the SIR-A discoveries of relict drainage systems beneath the eolian veneer of Egypt and Sudan.

  5. The Dakhleh Glass: Product of an impact airburst or cratering event in the Western Desert of Egypt?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinski, G. R.; Kieniewicz, J.; Smith, J. R.; Boslough, M. B. E.; Eccleston, M.; Schwarcz, H. P.; Kleindienst, M. R.; Haldemann, A. F. C.; Churcher, C. S.

    2008-12-01

    Impact cratering is a ubiquitous geological process on the terrestrial planets. Meteorite impact craters are the most visible product of impact events, but there is a growing recognition that large aerial bursts or airbursts should occur relatively frequently throughout geological time. In this contribution, we report on an unusual impact glass—the Dakhleh Glass (DG)—which is distributed over an area of ~400 km2 of the Dakhleh Oasis, Egypt. This region preserves a rich history of habitation stretching back to over 400,000 years before the emergence of Homo sapiens. We report on observations made during recent fieldwork and subsequent analytical analyses that strengthen previous suggestions that the DG formed during an impact event. The wide distribution and large size of DG specimens (up to ~50 cm across), the chemistry (e.g., CaO and Al2O3 contents up to ~25 and ~18 wt%, respectively), the presence of lechatelierite and burnt sediments, and the inclusion of clasts and spherules in the DG is inconsistent with known terrestrial processes of glass formation. The age and other textural characteristics rule out a human origin. Instead, we draw upon recent numerical modeling of airbursts to suggest that the properties of DG, coupled with the absence of a confirmed crater, can best be explained by melting of surficial sediments as a result of a large airburst event. We suggest that glass produced by such events should, therefore, be more common in the rock record than impact craters, assuming that the glass formed in a suitable preserving environment.

  6. Tectonic and provenance history of the Neotethyan margin in NE Africa recorded by detrital zircon (U-Th)/He thermochronometry from a borehole in the Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockli, D.; Glauser, T.; Bosworth, W.; Maher, T.; Clare, A.

    2009-04-01

    The subsurface of the Western Desert of Egypt contains multiple stacked sedimentary basin deposits separated by major unconformities reflecting the long-lived tectonic evolution of the Neotethyan continental margin in eastern North Africa. In this study, zircon (U/Th)/He (ZHe) data were collected from cuttings from a ~15000 ft borehole that penetrated Tertiary and Cretaceous strata and a major erosional unconformity at 13000 ft that juxtaposes Cretaceous and Cambro-Ordovician strata. A total of 56 samples spanning the borehole from 750-15400 ft yielded >200 single-grain ZHe ages in order to elucidate the thermal evolution of the borehole and constrain the thermal history of detrital provenance. ZHe ages above the unconformity are significantly older than the depositional age, suggesting detrital ZHe ages that were not reset subsequent to deposition. ZHe ages from Cambro-Ordovician strata below the unconformity are substantially younger than the minimum depositional age suggesting major cooling and resetting of zircon (>200C) during the Hercynian orogeny. In detail, ZHe ages form Cretaceous strata above the unconformity show the following trends. (1) ZHe ages from 6000-9000 ft (Aptian-Early Cenomanian) are characterized by a ZHe age peak at ~450 Ma and a minor Albian peak, (2) samples from 9000-12000 ft (Late Hauterivian-Barremian) show two major detrital ZHe age peaks at ~450 and 350 Ma, while (3) samples from 12000-13000 ft (Early Hauterivian) exhibit three dominant ZHe age components at ~450 Ma, 350 Ma, and 170-200 Ma. Additional cuttings from an offset containing complete stratigraphy yielded ZHe ages that mainly represent a strong Hercynian input as well as Late Triassic and Early Jurassic components of Tethyan related input. These ZHe age peaks display provenance characteristics typical for cooling signatures of rocks from the eroding Arabian-Nubian Shield, a North-African Hercynian source, and eroded material from exhumed fault blocks along the Triassic-Jurassic Neotethyan rifted margin. While immediately above the unconformity Hercynian ZHe ages dominate, the occurrence of Triassic or Early Jurassic suggest the presence of eroding rapidly cooled and exhumed Tethyan normal fault blocks. At decreasing depth, first Jurassic-Triassic, and then Hercynian source input disappears and the arrival of detritus from the Arabian-Nubian Shield begins to dominate the North African passive continental margin in the Western Desert in the middle to late Cretaceous. This unique data set illustrates the power of ZHe thermochronometry as a thermochronometer in boreholes with temperatures in excess of other low-temperature dating techniques and as a detrital provenance tool, not constraining crystallization ages, but rather shedding light on the cooling and exhumation history of the source terrane and the tectonic/geological environment of the basin deposits.

  7. Neoproterozoic tectonothermal evolution of the Central Eastern Desert, Egypt: a slow velocity tectonic process

    E-print Network

    Fritz, Harald

    Neoproterozoic tectonothermal evolution of the Central Eastern Desert, Egypt: a slow velocity, University of Assiut, Egypt Received 10 January 2001; received in revised form 24 October 2001; accepted 25 in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt is constraint by 40 Ar/39 Ar ages of hornblende and muscovite from Meatiq

  8. The use of remote sensing and GIS for the estimation of water loss from Tushka lakes, southwestern desert, Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohamed A. Bastawesy; Fikry I. Khalaf; Sayed M. Arafat

    2008-01-01

    As a result of the spill-over of the excess water from lake Nasser, the great reservoir formed by the Aswan High Dam on the Nile, the Tushka lakes came into being within natural geological depressions in the southeastern part of the western desert of Egypt. By the end of 1998, the water of river Nile had entered Tushka depressions for

  9. Mineralization, origin and age classification of ferruginized sandstone in the Bahariya Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt: A contribution to the origin of red beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mücke, A.; Agthe, Ch.

    1988-09-01

    The Bahariya Oasis is a depression and the topography of it is mainly controlled by anticlines. It lies in the Egyptian Western Desert and is characterized by isolated, cone-shaped residual hills which are aligned parallel to anticline axes in the southern part of the depression. These hills are capped by ferruginized sandstone of nearly black colour with an average iron content of 20 wt.%. The existence of a humid, warm climate with heavy rainfalls and a strong influence of vegetation during the Cretaceous-Tertiary transition provided reducing and weakly acid conditions. They enabled the mobilization of Fe and Mn out of manganese-bearing ilmenite and magnetite, primarily present in the sandstone. The existence of an oxidation barrier accompanied by an increase in pH value resulted in the precipitation of these elements. There is a definite correlation between the position of iron enrichment and tectonics in that area. The fracture planes, formed in the crestal region of the anticlines, exposed the deeper parts of the sandstone. As a consequence the oxygen of the air gained access to the subjacent sandstone strata, resulting in the formation of oxidation barriers in relatively deep-seated parts of the sandstone. The enrichment of iron and manganese was furthermore controlled by: (1)The process of up-arching during the formation of the anticlines, the thick sedimentary sequences in the crestal region of the fold, thus facilitating the penetration of supergene solutions. (2)Apart from the predominant supergene nature of the iron enrichment, a lateral one, though on a subordinate scale, also took place. (3)The oxidation barrier is supposed to be coincident partly with an evaporation barrier. The iron horizons therefore constitute an epigenetically mineralized sandstone of the Bahariya Formation. The former term Radwan Formation for this type of ferruginized sandstone, now preserved in the form of residual hills, is therefore invalid.

  10. Sites with Holocene dung deposits in the Eastern Desert of Egypt: Visited by herders?

    E-print Network

    Marinova, Elena

    Sites with Holocene dung deposits in the Eastern Desert of Egypt: Visited by herders? V. Linseele a by the Belgian Middle Egypt Prehistoric Project of Leuven University under the direction of P.M. Vermeersch

  11. Precambrian Research 136 (2005) 2750 The Wadi Mubarak belt, Eastern Desert of Egypt

    E-print Network

    Fritz, Harald

    2005-01-01

    Precambrian Research 136 (2005) 27­50 The Wadi Mubarak belt, Eastern Desert of Egypt, Graz, Austria b Mansoura University, Faculty of Science, Geology Department, El Mansoura, Egypt c February 2003; accepted 3 September 2004 Abstract The Wadi Mubarak belt in Egypt strikes west­east (and

  12. Thermochronometric Investigation of Multiple Unconformities and Post-depositional Thermal History of a Fault Block in the Northern Western Desert, Egypt

    E-print Network

    Glauser, Travis Robert

    2010-12-13

    . Geological Setting 7 3.1 Proterozoic Formation of Gondwana and Proterozoic Effects of 7 Gondwanan Suture Zones 3.2 Paleozoic Evolution and Neotethys Formation 8 3.3 Mesozoic Evolution and Supercontinental Breakup 9 4. Northern Western... Sokar 1-X Paleozoic Strata 22 6.3.2 Sokar 1-X Mesozoic and Cenozoic Strata 22 6.3.3 Heqet-2 Jurassic Strata 24 7. Discussion 25 7.1 Basal Cretaceous Unconformity 25 7.2 Dominant Provenance Components 26 7.2.1 Precambrian Components...

  13. Phanerozoic tectonothermal history of the ArabianNubian shield in the Eastern Desert of Egypt: evidence from fission track

    E-print Network

    Fritz, Harald

    Phanerozoic tectonothermal history of the Arabian­Nubian shield in the Eastern Desert of Egypt were performed in the Eastern Desert of Egypt. The results provide insights into the processes driving reserved. Keywords: Phanerozoic; Fission track thermochronology; Palaeostress; Arabian­Nubien shield; Egypt

  14. Holocene freshwater carbonate structures in the hyper-arid Gebel Uweinat region of the Sahara Desert (Southwestern Egypt) q

    E-print Network

    Gilli, Adrian

    Desert (Southwestern Egypt) q Margarita M. Marinova a,b , A. Nele Meckler c , Christopher P. McKay b region of the Sahara Desert, near the triple border of Egypt, Sudan, and Libya (N22°, E25°), re- ceives- ibrated years BP; Wendorf and expedition, 1977). While some parts of southwest Egypt have been extensively

  15. Vegetation analysis in the coastal dune ecosystem of the Western Egyptian Desert

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. E. Scholten; M. W. A. C. Hukkelhoven; M. A. Ayyad; M. J. A. Werger

    1981-01-01

    In the frame work of the SAMDENE project part of the coastal dune vegetation of the Western Desert of Egypt was studied using\\u000a various field methods and multivariate analysis techniques. The results were compared with those of an earlier study carried\\u000a out three years before, predating the protective fencing of the area. In the field methods cover-abundance estimates and frequency

  16. Formation of Neoproterozoic metamorphic core complexes during oblique convergence (Eastern Desert, Egypt)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. FRITZ; E. WALLBRECHER; A. A. KHUDEIR; F. ABU EL ELA; D. R. DALLMEYER

    1996-01-01

    Major portions of the Pan-African Orogen in the Eastern Desert of Egypt were formed by island-arc accretion in the Neoproterozoic. These areas are characterized by their lack of major crustal thickening. Metamorphic core complexes occur parallel to the strike of the Eastern Desert Orogen. These domes exhibit polyphase metamorphism and deformation in contrast to the structurally overlying nappes which include

  17. Petrogenesis and tectonic setting of late Precambrian ensimatic volcanic rocks, central eastern desert of Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ROBERT JAMES STERN

    1981-01-01

    Early stages in the geologic evolution of the central eastern desert of Egypt (CED) reflect an ilatense episode of ensimatic volcanic activity similar to modern magmatism of the ocean floors and island arcs. This paper reports results from studies of the petrology and petrogenesis, and interprets the significance of these Late Precambrian volcanic rocks. A three-fold stratigraphy is preserved in

  18. Clockwise rotation of the western Mojave Desert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, Matthew P.; Brown, Laurie L.

    1988-01-01

    A study of paleomagnetic data from Miocene volcanic rocks in the western Mojave Desert, which suggests about 25 deg of clockwise rotation, is presented. A total of 166 oriented core samples of two types of basalt were taken from 19 sites in the region. After demagnetization to 40 or 60 mT, application of structural corrections, and inversion of reversed sites, the data yielded an average direction of 51.6 deg inclination and 15.6 deg declination. When compared with the expected direction for Miocene rocks for stable North America, the direction for these Mojave rocks shows a clockwise rotation of 23.8 deg + or - 11.3 deg and a flattening of about 2.1 deg, a rotation which agrees in direction with oroclinal bending of the southern Sierra Nevada due to right-lateral shear along the western margin of North America. Most of this rotation is constrained by other paleomagnetic and strucural information to have occurred soon after the sampled basalts were deposited (about 20 Ma) and before about 16 Ma. These clockwise declination anomalies indicate that any subsequent counterclockwise rotation is small and/or compensated by previous clockwise rotation.

  19. Banded Iron Formations from the Eastern Desert of Egypt: A new type of Ore? KHALIL, Khalil Isaac1 and EL-SHAZLY, Aley K.2

    E-print Network

    El-Shazly, Aley

    Banded Iron Formations from the Eastern Desert of Egypt: A new type of Ore? KHALIL, Khalil Isaac1 and EL-SHAZLY, Aley K.2 1 Department of Geology, University of Alexandria, Egypt 2 Geology Department localities in an area approximately 30,000 km2 within the eastern desert of Egypt. With the exception

  20. The El Mayah molasse basin in the Eastern Desert of Egypt A. Shalaby a,b,*, K. Stuwe a,*, H. Fritz a

    E-print Network

    Fritz, Harald

    The El Mayah molasse basin in the Eastern Desert of Egypt A. Shalaby a,b,*, K. Stu¨we a,*, H. Fritz, Austria b Department of Geology, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt Received 8 September 2004; received of kilometres of the East- ern Desert of Egypt. Its sedimentary record shows that deposition occurred in two

  1. Islamic versus Western Conceptions of Education: Reflections on Egypt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Bradley J.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the contradictions between Islamic education theory and the Western-based education systems found in most Islamically oriented countries. Uses Egypt as a case study to illustrate the complex and delicate balance policy makers must achieve in meeting the needs of economic development while also affirming their countries' Islamic cultural…

  2. Soil seed bank in different habitats of the Eastern Desert of Egypt.

    PubMed

    Gomaa, Nasr H

    2012-04-01

    The floristic composition and species diversity of the germinable soil seed bank were studied in three different habitats (desert salinized land, desert wadi, and reclaimed land) in the Eastern Desert of Egypt. Moreover, the degree of similarity between the seed bank and the above-ground vegetation was determined. The seed bank was studied in 40 stands representing the three habitats. Ten soil samples (each 25 × 20 cm and 5 cm depth) were randomly taken per stand. The seed bank was investigated by the seedling emergence method. Some 61 species belonging to 21 families and 54 genera were identified in the germinable seed bank. The recorded species include 43 annuals and 18 perennials. Ordination of stands by Detrended Correspondence Analysis (DCA) indicates that the stands of the three habitats are markedly distinguishable and show a clear pattern of segregation on the ordination planes. This indicates variations in the species composition among habitats. The results also demonstrate significant associations between the floristic composition of the seed bank and edaphic factors such as CaCO3, electrical conductivity, organic carbon and soil texture. The reclaimed land has the highest values of species richness, Shannon-index of diversity and the density of the germinable seed bank followed by the habitats of desert wadi and desert salinized land. Motyka's similarity index between the seed bank and the above-ground vegetation is significantly higher in reclaimed land (75.1%) compared to desert wadi (38.4%) and desert salinized land (36.5%). PMID:23961181

  3. Islamic Versus Western Conceptions of Education: Reflections on Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Bradley J.

    1999-05-01

    Creating an education system based on Islamic principles while also meeting the demands of a modern, technological world is a daunting, perhaps impossible task. This paper examines the contradictions between Islamic education theory and the Western-based education systems found in most Islamically oriented countries. Egypt is used as a case study to illustrate the complex and delicate balance policy makers must achieve in meeting the needs of economic development while also affirming their countries' Islamic cultural heritage.

  4. Wall rock alteration, Atud gold mine, Eastern Desert, Egypt: processes and P?T?X CO 2 conditions of metasomatism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hassan Z. Harraz

    1999-01-01

    The Atud gold mine, central Eastern Desert of Egypt, is located in an intrusive metagabbro-diorite complex that abutts the conglomerate-greywacke-slate series of the Pan-African Belt in Egypt. Gold-bearing quartz veins occur as fracture filling in the Neoproterozoic dioritic rocks and along their contacts with the metagabbro. Gold mineralisation is associated with discrete metasomatic alteration zones around shear zones and quartz-carbonate

  5. Genetic Aspects of Gold Mineralization at Some Occurrences in the Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El Monsef, M.; Slobodník, M.; Salem, I. A.

    2012-04-01

    The Eastern Desert of Egypt is well known as a gold-mining area since ancient times, there're more than 95 gold deposits and occurrences spread the whole area covered by the basement rocks of Precambrian age. The basement rocks of the Eastern Desert of Egypt constitute the Nubian Shield that has formed a continuous part of the Arabian-Nubian Shield before the opening of Red Sea (Oligocene-Early Miocene). Commonly, the system of gold-bearing quartz veins in the Eastern Desert is clearly structural controlled related to brittle-ductile shear zones that mostly developed during late deformational stages of the evolution history for basement rocks in the Eastern Desert. This running study principally aims to contribute the mineral resource potential of the gold deposits in Egypt, so particularly Fatira, Gidami and Atalla occurrences have been involved into a comprehensive study based on field, structural, mineralogical, geochemical and genetic investigations. It is intended to better understanding for the characteristics, distribution controls, conditions and age of mineralization in relation to the age of the hosting rocks intrusion to find if there're genetic links between the gold mineralization and the evolution of the host intrusive complex. Several authors suggested that the gold mineralization was related to the intrusion of the (postorogenic) Younger granites. Other authors interpret these deposits as products of hydrothermal activity induced either by metamorphism or cooling effects of early Paleozoic magmatism or as combined metamorphic/magmatic episodes. The prime focus will be directed to the ore itself and the associated hydrothermal alteration zones based on detailed maps and well-distributed samples network and geochemical anomalies distribution. The laboratory studies included microscopic examination (reflecting and transmitting microscopy) to allow for determination of the hosting rocks types and mineralogical changes related to the gold mineralization in each area and revealing the ore mineralogy and the ore textures, geochemical analyses (including rare earth elements) are to be used in order to determine the tectonic setting and magmatic evolution of the host intrusions, scanning electron microscope, microprobe analysis, stable isotopes and fluid inclusions will serve as a new part of this study in detection of the origin and the physico-chemical conditions (P-T condition) for the gold precipitation, Age dating of the host intrusion and mineralization will be based on K-Ar for dating potassium-bearing minerals in fresh host rocks and hydrothermal mineral phases.

  6. Geochemistry of the Banded Iron Formations and their Host Rocks in the Eastern Desert of Egypt BACKUS, Ethan L.1, GAGNON, Kelli E.1, EL-SHAZLY, Aley K.1, and KHALIL, Khalil Isaac2

    E-print Network

    El-Shazly, Aley

    Geochemistry of the Banded Iron Formations and their Host Rocks in the Eastern Desert of Egypt University, Egypt Sponsored by NSF-OISE-1004021 Session 92:T3. Sigma Gamma Epsilon Undergraduate Research over 30,000 km2 in the central Eastern Desert of Egypt. The deposits most resemble Algoma-type iron

  7. Lithological mapping in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt using ASTER data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amer, Reda; Kusky, Timothy; Ghulam, Abduwasit

    2010-02-01

    This study presents new methods for using Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data for lithological mapping in arid environments. Visible, near-infrared and short wave infrared reflectance data have been processed and interpreted for mapping ophiolitic and granitic rocks at Fawakhir, Central Eastern Desert of Egypt. Image spectra show that the ophiolitic lithological members (serpentinites, metagabbros, and metabasalts), grey granite, and pink granite have absorption features around spectral bands 3, 6, and 8. ASTER band ratios ((2 + 4)/3, (5 + 7)/6, (7 + 9)/8) in RGB are constructed by summing the bands representing the shoulders of absorption features as a numerator, and the band located nearest the absorption feature as a denominator to discriminate between different ophiolitic and granitic rocks. The results show that ASTER band ratios ((2 + 4)/3, (5 + 7)/6, (7 + 9)/8) in a Red-Green-Blue (RGB) color combination identifies the ophiolitic rocks (serpentinites, metagabbros, and metabasalts) much better than previously published ASTER band ratios analysis. A Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was also implemented to reduce redundant information in highly correlated bands. PCA (5, 4, 2) in RGB enabled the discrimination between ophiolitic rocks and between the grey granite and pink granite. Thus, this technique is also recommended for mapping different types of granitic rocks. A new up-to-date lithologic map of the Fawakhir area is proposed based on the interpretation of ASTER image results and field verification work. It is concluded that the proposed methods have great potential for lithological mapping in arid and semi arid regions with similar climate and rock units as the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt.

  8. Paleozoic cratonal/miogeoclinal stratigraphy in the western Mojave Desert

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M.W.; Walker, J.D. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence (United States))

    1991-02-01

    Detailed mapping of metasedimentary rocks by many workers in the western Mojave Desert, California, has revealed Paleozoic lithologies of cratonal/miogeoclinal affinity. These exposures are metamorphosed, highly strained, and dismembered, and sit as roof pendants to Mesozoic and Tertiary intrusive rocks. In most outcrops no diagnosis fossils are preserved. Age correlation of these units is based, therefore, solely on similarities to lithologic packages outside the region. Despite the complex tectonic history this area has suffered since the late Paleozoic paleogeographic elements trend southwest into the region from where they are last clearly defined near the California-Nevada border. Dolomitic and calcitic marbles, quartzites, and biotite schists make up a major part of the stratigraphy in many areas. The stratigraphy and lithology of these units strongly suggest that they are correlative with late Precambrian-Cambrian units in the Death Valley region. Possible Ordovician and Devonian marbles also are present within some sections; at least one locality contains stromatoporoids of probable Devonian age. Calcite marbles tentatively correlated with lithologically similar Permian units in the Death Valley area are also represented and appear to be depositionally overlain by Mesozoic( ) shallow-marine and are-derived clastic rocks. Although the western Mojave Desert region has experienced compressional, transcurrent, and extensional deformation since late Paleozoic, our current understanding and restoration of this deformation history does not significantly alter the general southwest Paleozoic paleogeographic trends known to exist farther east.

  9. Structural elements and incremental strain history of the basement rocks of Um Had area, central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ahmed Akawy

    2009-01-01

    The Um Had area, central Eastern Desert, Egypt shows a regional stretching in the NW–SE and a contraction in the NE–SW direction.\\u000a Major NW–SE folds, small recumbent folds, and local thrusts and reverse faults were recognized. Complicated relation between\\u000a folds and boudinage was identified. This stretching amount ranges from 1.282 to 1.309. Earlier coaxial and later non-coaxial\\u000a strains were inferred.

  10. Thrusting and multiple folding in the Neoproterozoic Pan-African basement of Wadi Hodein area, south Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. M. Abdeen; M. F. Sadek; R. O. Greiling

    2008-01-01

    Detailed field mapping and structural studies of the area around the mouth of Wadi Hodein, some 20km west of Shalatein at the Red Sea coast in the south Eastern Desert of Egypt, revealed four phases of structural deformation (D1–D4) affecting the Neoproterozoic Pan-African basement rocks. D1 is related to arc–arc collision and is represented by ENE–WSW oriented megascopic upright open

  11. High and low temperature alteration of uranium and thorium minerals, Um Ara granites, south Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hamdy H. Abd El-Naby

    2009-01-01

    The Um Ara area, in the south Eastern Desert of Egypt contains a number of uranium occurrences related to granitic rocks. U-rich thorite, thorite and zircon are the main primary uranium- and thorium-bearing minerals found in mineralized zones of the Um Ara alkali-feldspar granites; uranophane is the most common secondary uranium mineral. U-rich thorite contains blebs of galena, has rims

  12. Origin of low- 18 O metamorphic rocks from a Late Proterozoic shear zone in the Eastern Desert of Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Neil C. Sturchio; Karlis Muehlenbachs

    1985-01-01

    Anomalously low and variable 18O\\/16O ratios (whole rock d18OSMOW=-1.9 to +6.0) have been measured in several Late Proterozoic metamorphic units associated with a large scale low-angle ductile shear zone at Meatiq Dome in the central Eastern Desert of Egypt. The low-18O units consist of granite gneiss, quartzofeldspathic mylonite, and quartz phyllonite. These are intruded by syntectonic diorite-tonalite-granodiorite and post-tectonic granite,

  13. SWIR ASTER band ratios for lithological mapping and mineral exploration: a case study from El Hudi area, southeastern desert, Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. A. Madani; A. A. Emam

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to discriminate and to map the basement rocks as well as the barite mineralization exposed at El Hudi area,\\u000a Southeastern Desert, Egypt using the processed short-wave infrared bands of advanced space-borne thermal emission and reflection\\u000a radiometer (ASTER) in collaboration with the field verification and petrographic analysis. El Hudi area is covered dominantly\\u000a by the Late Precambrian high-grade

  14. Technologies Applied in the Toshka Project of Egypt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahby, Wafeek S.

    2004-01-01

    The Toshka Project, located in Egypt, involves excavating a canal to carry about 380 billion ft[supercript 3] of water every year from Lake Nasser to the Toshka Depression, southwest of Aswan. This will eventually create a new valley to the River Nile in the western desert of Egypt in addition to the currently existing prehistoric river course.…

  15. The use of remote sensing and GIS for the estimation of water loss from Tushka lakes, southwestern desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastawesy, Mohamed A.; Khalaf, Fikry I.; Arafat, Sayed M.

    2008-10-01

    As a result of the spill-over of the excess water from lake Nasser, the great reservoir formed by the Aswan High Dam on the Nile, the Tushka lakes came into being within natural geological depressions in the southeastern part of the western desert of Egypt. By the end of 1998, the water of river Nile had entered Tushka depressions for the first time, once lake Nasser's water level had exceeded 178 m above the mean sea level. Intermittently, water continued to discharge into the depressions until the end of 2001 forming four lakes; however, the lakes began to shrink because of the inconsistency of flooding levels. The behavior of hydrological regime of these lakes during the period 2002-2006 was assessed using an integration of remote sensing and GIS techniques, which found that the total surface area of the lakes had diminished from 1591 km 2 to 937 km 2, and their water volumes reduced from 25.26 billion m 3 to 12.67 billion m 3. The study further revealed that the levels of the lakes surfaces had lowered by approximately 10 m over the course of those four years. This significant rate and volume of water loss can be attributed to both evaporation and infiltration. A comparison between the average annual evaporation rate at Tushka lakes and the calculated water loss revealed that most of Tushka lakes' water is lost through evaporation with a very limited amount being percolated to the ground water. Assuming that no further over flooding of the Nile will occur, these lakes will start to vanish in 2012 and disappear completely by 2020, which will result in significant environmental impacts.

  16. Holocene Paleoecology of the Western Tenere Desert, Niger, Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sereno, P. C.; Caran, S. C.; Housh, T. B.

    2007-12-01

    Multiple paleontological, sedimentological, and isotopic/ionic geochemical indicators permit reconstruction of the Holocene ecology of the western Tenere Desert (southern Sahara hyper-desert). Modern precipitation is highly erratic, averaging 25 mm yearly, and vegetative cover is negligible. From the early to middle Holocene, however, grassland-shrublands and seasonal to permanent lakes and wetlands predominated, supporting diverse limnic, riparian, and upland communities. Annual precipitation probably was comparable to that of the modern southern Sahel, exceeding 350 mm. Coarse-grained sediment washed into the large lacustrine basin from exposures of metamorphic, plutonic, and volcanic rocks in the nearby Air Massif highland. Lake margins fluctuated in response to runoff and limited ground-water discharge. The water was non-saline and there is no evidence of evaporite deposition. Aquatic and riparian macrophytes thrived, as did an extensive lacustrine-palustrine macrofauna. A Sahelian flora of mixed grasses, thorn shrubs, and perhaps some larger woodland species occupied the contiguous uplands, supporting resident and migratory mammalian and avian faunas. Lake levels were high until 6300 to 5200 BP, possibly as late as 4800 BP locally. Deflation of lacustrine deposits during a subsequent dry period provided finer-grained eolian sediment accreting as proximal dunes. The composition of mineral sediment within the middle to late Holocene dunes is different from, but clearly a subset of the lacustrine deposits. Organic matter reworked from the lake sediment was deposited in the dunes and oxidized in situ, generating CO2 that dissolved in soil moisture, producing bicarbonate. The bicarbonate reacted with calcium from weathered minerals, producing calcic cementation about 5100 BP. The resulting petrocalcic horizon was later exposed, weathered, and colonized by sparse terrestrial vegetation for one or more brief periods. A late phase of pedogenesis concurrent with or closely post-dating plant colonization produced secondary porosity and metallic oxide cementation. The metallic oxide cement preserved minute quantities of organic matter from the terrestrial flora and invertebrate microfauna. Regional ecology was controlled by global post-Pleistocene deglaciation, sea-level changes, and establishment of zonal weather systems. The modern Okavango Delta of Botswana is, in part, a suitable analog for the late Pleistocene to early/middle Holocene environment of the western Tenere Desert, as are smaller, lesser-known, extant wetlands in Niger.

  17. Habitat invasibility and dominance by alien annual plants in the western Mojave Desert

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew L. Brooks

    1999-01-01

    Patterns of habitat invasibility and alien dominance, respectively measured as species richness and biomass of alien annual plants, were evaluated in association with four habitat factors at the Desert Tortoise Research Natural Area (DTNA) in the western Mojave Desert, USA. Habitat factors varied in levels of disturbance outside (high) and inside (low) the DTNA, and in levels of soil nutrients

  18. Oppositely dipping thrusts and transpressional imbricate zone in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Wahed, Mohamed A.

    2014-12-01

    This paper documents the 40-60 km wide ENE-WSW trending Mubarak-Barramiya shear belt (MBSB) in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt by examining its structural styles, kinematics and geometry. Our study revealed the existence of prevalent dextral and minor sinistral conjugate shear zones. The MBSB is metamorphic belt (greenschist-amphibolite) characterized by at least three post-collisional (740-540 Ma) ductile Neoproterozoic deformation events (D1, D2 and D3) followed by a brittle neotectonic deformation (D4). D1 event produced early top-to-the-northwest thrust displacements due to NW-SE shortening. D2 produced discrete zones of NNW-trending upright folds and culminated in initiation of major NW-trending sinistral shear zones of the Najd Fault System (NFS, at c. 640-540 Ma ago) as well as steeply dipping S2 foliation, and shallowly plunging L2 lineation. NW-to NNW-trending F2 folds are open to steep and vary in plunge from horizontal to vertical. D2 deformational fabrics are strongly overprinted by D3 penetrative structures. D3 is characterized by a penetrative S3 foliation, steeply SE- to NW-plunging and shallowly NE-plunging stretching lineations (L3), asymmetric and sheath folds (F3) consistent with dextral sense of movement exhibited by delta- and sigma-type porphyroclast systems and asymmetric boudinage fabrics. D2-D3 represent a non-coaxial progressive event formed in a dextral NE- over NW-sinistral shear zone during a partitioned transpression in response to E-W-directed compression during oblique convergence between East and West Gondwana developed due to closure of the Mozambique Ocean and amalgamation of the Arabian-Nubian Shield in Cryogenian-early Ediacaran time.

  19. Deserts

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Deserts, one of the four major terrestial biomes, cover about one-fifth of Earth's land area. This interactive slide presentation shows some aspects of deserts, including dunes, desert-adapted plants, oases, and sculpted rock formations. There is also a map showing the distribution of the world's deserts. A background essay and discussion questions are included.

  20. Red Sea Rift-Related Quseir Basalts, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt: Petrogenetic and Geodynamic Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahat, Esam; Ali, Shehata; Hauzenberger, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Mineral and whole rock chemistry of Tertiary Red Sea rift-related basalts occurred in south Quseir city, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt has been presented to investigate their petrogenetic and geodynamic evolution. The South Quseir basalts (SQB) have been classified as high-Ti tholeiitic lava (TiO2 >2 wt. %) emplaced in anorogenic tectonic setting. Their Mg# varies from 48 to 53. Pearce element ratios (PER) suggest that the SQB magmas have evolved through fractional crystallization of olivine + clinopyroxene ± plagioclase assemblages, however, the absence of Eu-anomaly argues against plagioclase fractionation. The clinopyroxene compositions provide evidence for polybaric fractionation of the parental mafic magma. Estimated temperatures of crystallization range from 1143 to 1323 oC for olivines, 1031 to 1207 oC for clinopyroxenes, 600 to 900 oC for feldspars, and 638 to 787 oC for Fe-Ti oxides. Oxygen fugacity (ƒO2) values range from -15.16 to -19.5. The incompatible trace element signatures of the SQB (La/Ba = 0.08-0.10 and La/Nb = 0.89-1.04) are similar to those of ocean island basalts (OIB) generated from asthenospheric mantle source unaffected by subduction components. Modelling calculations indicate that the SQB primary magmas were derived from 4-5% partial melting of a garnet-bearing lherzolite mantle source which had a potential temperature (Tp= 1334-1432 °C; based on olivine liquid equilibria) corresponding to ambient temperature of MORB (i.e. passive rifting). This ambient mantle would have to rise to shallower depths (< 100 km) in the upper mantle to cross the dry mantle solidus and stimulate adiabatic partial melting. These estimates along with absence of HIMU (high ? refers to high 238U/204Pb) components (based on trace element data) show that the SQB volcanism isn't associated with thermally driven mantle plumes. Thus, the SQB magma generation is related to extensional regime through passive upwelling and adiabatic decompression melting of an asthenospheric mantle source associated with Red Sea rifting.

  1. The frequency distribution of lactose malabsorption among adult populations from the Eastern and Western Egyptian Deserts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laila Hussein; Ali Ezzilarab I

    1994-01-01

    The study consisted of 172 subjects belonging to ethnic groups from Sinai in the Eastern Desert and the New Valley in the\\u000a Western Desert, with respective mean ages of 36.7±2.0 and 26.6±1.0 years. Lactose absorption was assessed by measurement of\\u000a urinary galactose in pooled 2-hr urine samples following ingestion of an oral lactose dose of 40 g. Mean 2-hr excretion

  2. Habitat Invasibility and Dominance by Alien Annual Plants in the Western Mojave Desert

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew L. Brooks

    1999-01-01

    Patterns of habitat invasibility and alien dominance, respectively measured as species richness and biomass of alien annual\\u000a plants, were evaluated in association with four habitat factors at the Desert Tortoise Research Natural Area (DTNA) in the\\u000a western Mojave Desert, USA. Habitat factors varied in levels of disturbance outside (high) and inside (low) the DTNA, and\\u000a in levels of soil nutrients

  3. [Egypt].

    PubMed

    The capital of Egypt is Cairo. As of 1995, Egypt had a population of 62.9 million governed by a presidential regime. 1994 gross national product and per capita income were, respectively, $42.3 billion and $710. Per capita income grew at 1.6% per year over the period 1985-94. In 1994, Egypt owed $33.358 billion, then being serviced at $2.685 billion. For the same year, Egypt exported $15.585 billion in goods and services and imported $16.121 billion. As of 1995, the population was growing in size by 1.9% annually. In 1992-93, life expectancy at birth was 63.6 years, the infant mortality rate was 67 per 1000 births, 99% had access to health services, and 90% had access to drinkable water. Other data are presented on the country's topography, climate and vegetation, demographics, principal cities, population distribution, religions, political structure, economics and finances, foreign commerce, and transportation and communications. PMID:12347087

  4. Economics of seawater RO desalination in the Red Sea region, Egypt. Part 1. A case study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Azza Hafez; Samir El-Manharawy

    2002-01-01

    Tackling water shortage issues with desalting of seawater and salty water is common in the desert nations of the Middle East and the Mediterranean. The fast growing development in Egypt has required big movements of investments and people from the Nile Valley towards the east, with the fantastic Red Sea and Sinai coastal zones, and also towards the Western Desert

  5. Petrology and petrogenesis of the older and younger granitoids of Wadi Beizah area, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragab, A. I.; Menesy, M. Y.; Diab, M. M.

    The studied granitoids of Wadi Beizah area, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt, are represented by older arc-granitoids intruded by a post-collisional stock of younger pink granite. The arc-granitoids (I-type) cover a wide compositional spectrum from meladiorites, diorites, quartzdiorites/monzodiorites and tonalites, to leucogranodiorites. Their distribution pattern is unimodal dominated by diorites. They are of low-K calc-alkaline character and represent the plutonic rocks of the mature, ensimatic island arc stage. Three models for the geotectonic environment of the younger granites of the Eastern Desert of Egypt have been suggested: (1) Within-plate, rifting, tensional environment similar to the Oslo Rift of Norway (Greenberg, 1981) Stern et al., 1984, 1986), (2) Extensive crustal anatexis during collisional tectonics, compression, thickening of the crust and thrust imbrication (Hussein et al., 1982; Ragab, 1987b), (3) Active continental margin geotectonic environment (Abdel-Rahman and Martin, 1987). These three models are discussed in detail. The present workers believe that the Younger Granites in general are the products of extensive crustal anatexis at the culmination of the Pan-African orogenic cycle when arc-arc suturing is complete. Recent studies revealed a low-angle thrust event in the Central Eastern Desert followed the initial arc-arc collision and continued after the deposition of the molasse-type sediments (Ries et al., 1983; El-Ramly et al., 1984; Greiling et al., 1984; Habib et al., 1985; Greiling and El-Ramly, 1985) which indicate thickening of the crust and compression regime at the time of emplacement of the Younger Granites. The dominance of ?granite minimum? composition of these late orogenic granites suggests extensive crustal anatexis. Their low Nb-content (< 40 ppm) precludes within-plate hot-spot related magma, in comparison with: (1) The post-Pan-African (400-100 M.a.) granitic rocks from the NE Sudan which on a geochemical evidence are the products of within-continental plate ?hot-spot? magmatism with Nb-content of about 50-300 ppm (Gass, 1979); (2) The Oslo Rift within-plate granites with Nb-content of 226 ppm (Pearce et al., 1984). A post-collision model showing the formation of the ?petrotectonic assemblage? of this stage (molasse-type sediments deposited in fault-bounded troughs, and calc-alkaline bimodal intermediate and felsic magmas) as well as the heat sources in the geotectonic environment of thrust imbrication and the mode of formation of the Younger Granites by crustal anatexis is suggested. K/Ar dating of a younger granite sample gave an age of 584 ± 5 M.a. which is compatible with several similar ages of younger pink granites in the Eastern Desert of Egypt. An older granite sample gave an age of 591 ± 7 M.a. (K/Ar method) indicating resetting of its isotopic clocks probably as a result of the extensive crustal anatexis event.

  6. Thermal Performance of Exposed Composed Roofs in Very Hot Dry Desert Region in Egypt (Toshky)

    E-print Network

    Khalil, M. H.; Sheble, S.; Morsey, M. S.; Fakhry, S.

    2010-01-01

    is considered the major part of the building envelop which exposed to high thermal load due to the high solar intensity and high outdoor air temperature through summer season which reach to 6 months. In Egypt the thermal effect of roof is increased as one go...

  7. Thermal Performance of Exposed Composed Roofs in Very Hot Dry Desert Region in Egypt (Toshky) 

    E-print Network

    Khalil, M. H.; Sheble, S.; Morsey, M. S.; Fakhry, S.

    2010-01-01

    is considered the major part of the building envelop which exposed to high thermal load due to the high solar intensity and high outdoor air temperature through summer season which reach to 6 months. In Egypt the thermal effect of roof is increased as one go...

  8. Ground-water quality and geochemistry, Carson Desert, western Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lico, Michael S.; Seiler, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    Aquifers in the Carson Desert are the primary source of drinking water, which is highly variable in chemical composition. In the shallow basin-fill aquifers, water chemistyr varies from a dilute calcium bicarbonate-dominated water beneath the irrigated areas to a saline sodium chloride- dominated water beneath unirrigated areas. Water samples from the shallow aquifers commonly have dissolved solids, chloride, magnesium, sulfate, arsenic, and manganese concentrations that exceed State of Nevada drinking-water standards. Water in the intermediante basin-fill aquifers is a dilute sodium bicarbonate type in the Fallon area and a distinctly more saline sodium chloride type in the Soda Lake-Upsal Hogback area. Dissolved solids, chloride, arsenic, fluoride, and manganese concen- trations commonly exceed drinking-water standards. The basalt aquifer contains a dilute sodium bicarbonate chloride water. Arsenic concentrations exceed standards in all sampled wells. The concen- trations of major constituents in ground water beneath the southern Carson Desert are the result of evapotranspiration and natural geochemical reactions with minerals derived mostly from igneous rocks. Water with higher concentrations of iron and manganese is near thermodynamic equilibrium with siderite and rhodochrosite and indicates that these elements may be limited by the solubility of their respective carbonate minerals. Naturally occurring radionuclides (uranium and radon-222) are present in ground water from the Carson Desert in concen- tratons higher than proposed drinking-water standards. High uranium concentrations in the shallow aquifers may be caused by evaporative concentration and the release of uranium during dissolution of iron and manganese oxides or the oxidation of sedimentary organic matter that typically has elevated uranium concentrations. Ground water in the Carson Desert does not appear to have be contaminated by synthetic organic chemicals.

  9. Origin of wehrlite cumulates in the Moho transition zone of the Neoproterozoic Ras Salatit ophiolite, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt: crustal wehrlites with typical mantle characteristics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hisham A. Gahlan; Shoji Arai; Fawzy F. Abu El-Ela; Akihiro Tamura

    Ultramafic cumulates, mainly crustal true wehrlites, were discovered and described in the mantle–crust transition zone (MTZ)\\u000a and the extremely lower layered gabbro sequence of the Ras Salatit ophiolite, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt. They form either\\u000a boudinaged lensoidal tabular bodies or interdigitated layers often concordant with the planolinear fabrics of the Ras Salatit\\u000a ophiolite rocks. The contact between wehrlites and the

  10. Blackbrush shrublands occupy about three million acres of land in the western United States and they provide critical habitat for animals such as desert rodents, birds, and bighorn

    E-print Network

    and they provide critical habitat for animals such as desert rodents, birds, and bighorn sheep. This blackbrush in the Western U.S. Desert: Blackbrush Shrublands Respond to a Changing Climate Standing in the Mojave Desert. But with the passage of time, change is the rule in most ecosystems, and this desert is no exception. A time

  11. Petrogenetic and geotectonic significance of Neoproterozoic suprasubduction mantle as revealed by the Wizer ophiolite complex, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahat, E. S.; Hoinkes, G.; Mogessie, A.

    2011-10-01

    Ophiolite complexes, formed in a suprasubduction zone environment during Neoproterozoic time, are widely distributed in the Eastern Desert of Egypt. Their mantle sections provide important information on the origin and tectonic history of ocean basins these complexes represent. The geochemistry and mineralogy of the mantle section of the Wizer ophiolite complex, represented by serpentinites after harzburgite containing minor dunite bodies, are presented. Presence of antigorite together with the incipient alteration of chromite and absence of chlorite suggests that serpentinization occurred in the mantle wedge above a Neoproterozoic subduction zone. Wizer peridotites have a wide range of spinel compositions. Spinel Cr# [100Cr/(Cr + Al)] decrease gradually from dunite bodies (Cr# = 81-87) and their host highly depleted harzburgites (Cr# = 67-79) to the less depleted harzburgites (Cr# = 57-63). Such decreases in mantle refractory character are accompanied by higher Al and Ti contents in bulk compositions. Estimated parental melt compositions point to an equilibration with melts of boninitic composition for the dunite bodies (TiO2 = ~<0.07-0.22 wt%; Al2O3 = 9.4-10.6 wt%), boninitic-arc tholeiite for the highly depleted harzburgites (TiO2 = <0.09-0.28 wt%; Al2O3 = 11.2-14.1 wt%) and more MORB-like affinities for the less depleted harzburgites (TiO2 = ~<0.38-0.51 wt%; Al2O3 = 14.5-15.3 wt%). Estimated equilibrium melts are found in the overlying volcanic sequence, which shows a transitional MORB-island arc geochemical signature with a few boninitic samples. Enrichment of some chromites in TiO2 and identification of sulfides in highly depleted peridotites imply interaction with an impregnating melt. A two-stage partial melting/melt-rock reaction model is advocated, whereby, melting of a depleted mantle source by reaction with MORB-like melts is followed by a second stage melting by interaction with melts of IAT-boninitic affinities in a suprasubduction zone environment to generate the highly depleted harzburgites and dunite bodies. The shift from MORB to island arc/boninitic affinities within the mantle lithosphere of the Wizer ophiolite sequence suggests generation in a protoarc-forearc environment. This, together with the systematic latitudinal change in composition of ophiolitic lavas in the Central Eastern Desert (CED) of Egypt from IAT-boninitic affinities to more MORB-like signature, implies that the CED could represent a disrupted forearc-arc-backarc system above a southeast-dipping subduction zone.

  12. Natural radionuclide concentrations in granite rocks in Aswan and Central-Southern Eastern Desert, Egypt and their radiological implications.

    PubMed

    Issa, Shams A M; Uosif, M A M; Abd el-Salam, L M

    2012-07-01

    Different types of granites, used extensively in local construction, were collected from five localities in Egypt, namely: Abu Ziran (Central Eastern Desert), Gabal El Maesala (Aswan) and three areas from Wadi Allaqi, (Gabal Abu Marw, Gabal Haumor and Gabal um Shalman), in the South Eastern Desert. Granite samples were studied radiologically, petrographically and geochemically. The contents of natural radionuclides ((226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K) were measured in investigated samples by using gamma spectrometry [NaI (Tl) 3'×3']. The activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in the selected granite samples ranged from 9±0.5 to 111±7, 8±1 to 75±4 and 100±6 to 790±40 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The external hazard index (H(ex)), absorbed dose and annual effective dose rate were evaluated to assess the radiation hazard for people living in dwellings made of the materials studied. The calculated radium equivalents were lower than the values recommended for construction materials (370 Bq kg(-1)). The excess lifetime cancer risks were also calculated. Petrographically, the granites studied are varied in the form of potash-feldspar, quartz, plagioclase, mica and hornblende. The accessory minerals are zircon, apatite and allanite. Geochemically, the chemical composition of the granite is studied especially for major oxides. They are characterized to have SiO(2), K(2)O, Na(2)O and Al(2)O(3) with depletion in CaO, MgO, TiO(2) and P(2)O(5). PMID:22147926

  13. Two genetic types of volcanic-hosted massive sulfide mineralizations from the Eastern Desert of Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ahmed G. Abd Allah

    Volcanic-hosted (Cu–Zn–Pb) massive sulfide mineralizations are described from four prospects in the Eastern Desert: Helgate,\\u000a Maaqal, Derhib, and Abu Gurdi. Helgate and Maaqal prospects are hosted in island arc volcanics in a well-defined stratigraphic\\u000a level. Massive sulfides form veins and lenses. Although these veins and lenses are locally deformed, sulfides from Helgate\\u000a and Maaqal prospects show primary depositional features. They

  14. Magmatic and solid state structures of the Abu Ziran pluton: Deciphering transition from thrusting to extension in the Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, Harald; Loizenbauer, Jürgen; Wallbrecher, Eckart

    2014-11-01

    The 606 Ma old Abu Ziran granite of the Eastern Desert of Egypt intruded the southern margin of the Meatiq dome in a sinistral shear extensional setting. Its emplacement was enabled by a system of NW-trending sinistral shears, related Riedel shears and N-S extensional shear zones and faults. Magmatic flow was east-directed and controlled by Riedel shears that progressively rotated to an orientation favourable for extension. Strain markers that document magmatic flow show eastward decreasing strain together with strain increase from pluton centre to margins. This is explained by Newtonian flow between non-parallel plates and differences in flow velocities across the pluton. Solid state fabrics including shear fabrics, orientation of late magmatic dykes and quartz tension gashes, together with quartz C-axes distributions, document southward extensional shear within the solidified pluton and adjacent host rocks. Extensional shear is correlated with exhumation of the Meatiq dome coeval and soon after pluton solidification (585 Ma). Pressure temperature evolutionary paths, derived from fluid inclusions, show a clockwise path with exhumation by isothermal decompression in the Meatiq dome. By contrast, the overlying volcanosedimentary nappes experienced an anti-clockwise path released by temperature rise due to pluton emplacement followed by isobaric cooling. Quartz fabrics indicate high-temperature coaxial N-S flow in the northern Meatiq dome and lower-temperature, non-coaxial southward flow within the overlaying superficial nappe. This is explained by the exhumation process itself that progressively localised into simple shear domains when rocks approached higher crustal levels. Late extension at ca. 580 Ma was pure shear dominated and resulted in reversal of shear, now dextral, in the western Meatiq shear zone.

  15. Desert landforms of southwest Egypt: A basis for comparison with Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Baz, F. (editor); Maxwell, T. A. (editor)

    1982-01-01

    Geologic interpretations of The Gilf Kebir-Uweinat of Apollo-Soyuz photographs were verified. The photographs and LANDSAT images showed features reminiscent of those depicted by Mariner and Viking missions to Mars. These features were to better understand their morphologic analogs on Mars. It is indicated that climate change played a significant role in the formation of the eastern Sahara. It is also revealed that correlations between the eolian features in southwestern Egypt and the wind blown patterns on the surface of Mars result in a better understanding of eolian activity on both planets.

  16. The way forward in capacity building in developing countries: space research center at Minoufiyia University, Egypt, as case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosalam Shaltout, M. A.

    With the starting the year 2002 the Menoufiyia University Council taked an Issue by construction Space Research Center, as a first Center for Space Research in the Egyptian Universities (20 Universities), as a part from the Desert Environment Research Institute for temporal time, then after the growth, it will be independent center. The green area of Egypt (Nile Valley and Delta) are 4% only from the total area of Egypt, the remain 96% is desert area. The most useful thing is to study the desert from space. For that the suggested projects to be performed in this new center are: 1. Monitoring the storage tanks of the underground water in the Egyptian Desert (Sahara) by artificial satellites as GRACE of NASA and DLR. 2. Building 32 meter Radio telescope at Abu-Simbel in the South of Egypt as part of the European VLBI network (EVN) to cover the gab between the radio telescope in the western Europe and the radio telescope at Hartebessthock in South Africa. The cooperation of International interested institutions is being explored for this important project of Egypt. 3. Solar activity and the climatic changes through the 21st century as clarified by global solar radiation data at Khargha Oases at the western desert of Egypt. 4. Testing of the Martian exploration instruments for 2005 space trips to Mars in the western desert of Egypt, as it is the driest area in the world, where are similarity between the dry atmosphere of Sahara and the atmosphere of Mars, also in the soil, and dry valleys. In collaboration with NASA and ESA. 5. Studding the eastern structure, due to meteoric impact in the western desert of Egypt since 28 Million years. Also, studding the meteors chemistry, for meteors found in the Egyptian desert, and the origin of life as meteor (Nachlet) in collaboration with NASA and ESA. 6. Solar energy and humidity distribution over Sahara from artificial Satellite Meteostat observations.

  17. El-Dab'a ground water aquifer assessment, Egypt

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    elhamy Tarabees

    El-Dabaa area is an area located in the norther part of the western desert, Egypt and planed to be nuclear power point. Some vertical electrical sounding have been done there to evaluate the ground water aquifer there to monitor the effect of sea water intrusion and its effect on the fresh water aquifer

  18. Groundwater quality and management in arid and semi-arid regions: Case study, Central Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amer, Reda; Ripperdan, Robert; Wang, Tao; Encarnación, John

    2012-07-01

    This study presents a model budget for groundwater in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt. The stable isotopic composition and hydrochemistry of groundwater samples collected from different aquifers were determined to identify recharge sources and water quality. Stable isotopic values suggest that shallow alluvial and fracture zone aquifers are recharged from seasonal precipitation, while groundwater in deeper sedimentary sub-basins is paleowater that was recharged during periods of less arid regional climate. Hydrochemical analysis indicates elevated salinity in each aquifer type, which is attributed to leaching and dissolution of terrestrial salts and to mixing with marine water. Groundwater from sedimentary sub-basin aquifers can be treated and used for drinking and domestic purposes. Groundwater from shallow alluvial and fracture zone wells is suitable for animal husbandry and mineral ore dressing. A model water budget shows that approximately 4.8 × 109 m3 of recoverable groundwater is stored in sedimentary sub-basin aquifers, or approximately 550 years of water at present utilization rates.

  19. Banded iron formations of Um Nar, Eastern Desert of Egypt: P-T-X conditions of metamorphism and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Shazly, A. K.; Khalil, K. I.

    2014-05-01

    Banded iron formations (BIF) in Um Nar, central eastern desert of Egypt, occur intercalated with schists of volcaniclastic and epiclastic origins within "ophiolitic-island arc rocks" of the Arabo-Nubian Shield. The BIF and its host rocks were affected by folding, thrusting, and regional metamorphism during the Pan-African Orogeny resulting in the development of north-verging overturned folds and E-W striking, S-dipping thrusts. Following the intrusion of granitoids, the entire sequence was refolded into south-plunging folds with NW-SE trending fold axes. Peak mineral assemblages of hornblende + plagioclase, and garnet + biotite + plagioclase + quartz in the host rocks, and andradite-rich garnet + epidote + hematite + magnetite + quartz in the BIF indicate metamorphism under epidote amphibolite facies conditions. Using the multiequilibrium approach of Thermocalc, and conventional thermobarometry, peak P-T conditions of metamorphism are estimated at 520 ± 30 °C, 5 ± 2 kbar. Fluids attending peak conditions in the oxide facies layers of the BIF were characterized by XCO2 ~ 0.03 and log fO2 ~ - 40. Textural and mineral chemical criteria suggest that, following peak conditions, the rocks underwent a stage of near-isobaric cooling or cooling and compression characteristic of a counter-clockwise P-T path.

  20. Heat production rate from radioactive elements in igneous and metamorphic rocks in Eastern Desert, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abbady, Adel G E; El-Arabi, A M; Abbady, A

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive heat-production data of Igneous and Metamorphic outcrops in the Eastern Desert are presented. Samples were analysed using a low level gamma-ray spectrometer (HPGe) in the laboratory. A total of 205 rock samples were investigated, covering all major rock types of the area. The heat-production rate of igneous rocks ranges from 0.11 (basalt) to 9.53 microWm(-3) (granite). In metamorphic rocks it varies from 0.28 (serpentinite ) to 0.91 microWm(-3) (metagabbro). The contribution due to U is about 51%, as that from Th is 31% and 18% from K. The corresponding values in igneous rocks are 76%, 19% and 5%, respectively. The calculated values showed good agreement with global values except in some areas containing granites. PMID:16120480

  1. Diversity of bacteria nesting the plant cover of north Sinai deserts, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Amira L.; Youssef, Hanan H.; Amer, Wafaa M.; Monib, Mohammed; Fayez, Mohammed; Hegazi, Nabil A.

    2012-01-01

    North Sinai deserts were surveyed for the predominant plant cover and for the culturable bacteria nesting their roots and shoots. Among 43 plant species reported, 13 are perennial (e.g. Fagonia spp., Pancratium spp.) and 30 annuals (e.g. Bromus spp., Erodium spp.). Eleven species possessed rhizo-sheath, e.g. Cyperus capitatus, Panicum turgidum and Trisetaria koelerioides. Microbiological analyses demonstrated: the great diversity and richness of associated culturable bacteria, in particular nitrogen-fixing bacteria (diazotrophs); the majority of bacterial residents were of true and/or putative diazotrophic nature; the bacterial populations followed an increasing density gradient towards the root surfaces; sizeable populations were able to reside inside the root (endorhizosphere) and shoot (endophyllosphere) tissues. Three hundred bacterial isolates were secured from studied spheres. The majority of nitrogen-fixing bacilli isolates belonged to Bacillus megaterium,Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus polymexa,Bacillus macerans,Bacillus circulans and Bacillus licheniformis. The family Enterobacteriaceae represented by Enterobacter agglomerans,Enterobacter sackazakii, Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia adorifera,Serratia liquefaciens and Klebsiella oxytoca. The non-Enterobacteriaceae population was rich in Pantoae spp., Agrobacterium rdiobacter, Pseudomonas vesicularis, Pseudomonas putida, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Ochrobactrum anthropi, Sphingomonas paucimobilis and Chrysemonas luteola.Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus were reported inside root and shoot tissues of a number of tested plants. The dense bacterial populations reported speak well to the very possible significant role played by the endophytic bacterial populations in the survival, in respect of nutrition and health, of existing plants. Such groups of diazotrophs are good candidates, as bio-preparates, to support the growth of future field crops grown in deserts of north Sinai and irrigated by the water of El-Salam canal. PMID:25685397

  2. Diversity of bacteria nesting the plant cover of north Sinai deserts, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Amira L; Youssef, Hanan H; Amer, Wafaa M; Monib, Mohammed; Fayez, Mohammed; Hegazi, Nabil A

    2013-01-01

    North Sinai deserts were surveyed for the predominant plant cover and for the culturable bacteria nesting their roots and shoots. Among 43 plant species reported, 13 are perennial (e.g. Fagonia spp., Pancratium spp.) and 30 annuals (e.g. Bromus spp., Erodium spp.). Eleven species possessed rhizo-sheath, e.g. Cyperus capitatus, Panicum turgidum and Trisetaria koelerioides. Microbiological analyses demonstrated: the great diversity and richness of associated culturable bacteria, in particular nitrogen-fixing bacteria (diazotrophs); the majority of bacterial residents were of true and/or putative diazotrophic nature; the bacterial populations followed an increasing density gradient towards the root surfaces; sizeable populations were able to reside inside the root (endorhizosphere) and shoot (endophyllosphere) tissues. Three hundred bacterial isolates were secured from studied spheres. The majority of nitrogen-fixing bacilli isolates belonged to Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus polymexa, Bacillus macerans, Bacillus circulans and Bacillus licheniformis. The family Enterobacteriaceae represented by Enterobacter agglomerans, Enterobacter sackazakii, Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia adorifera, Serratia liquefaciens and Klebsiella oxytoca. The non-Enterobacteriaceae population was rich in Pantoae spp., Agrobacterium rdiobacter, Pseudomonas vesicularis, Pseudomonas putida, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Ochrobactrum anthropi, Sphingomonas paucimobilis and Chrysemonas luteola. Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus were reported inside root and shoot tissues of a number of tested plants. The dense bacterial populations reported speak well to the very possible significant role played by the endophytic bacterial populations in the survival, in respect of nutrition and health, of existing plants. Such groups of diazotrophs are good candidates, as bio-preparates, to support the growth of future field crops grown in deserts of north Sinai and irrigated by the water of El-Salam canal. PMID:25685397

  3. Remote sensing detection of gold related alteration zones in Um Rus area, Central Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amer, Reda; Kusky, Timothy; El Mezayen, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) images covering the Um Rus area in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt were evaluated for mapping geologic structure, lithology, and gold-related alteration zones. The study area is covered by Pan-African basement rocks including gabbro and granodiorite intruded into a variable mixture of metavolcanics and metasediments. The first three principal component analyses (PCA1, PCA2, PCA3) in a Red-Green-Blue (RGB) of the visible through shortwave-infrared (VNIR + SWIR) ASTER bands enabled the discrimination between lithological units. The results show that ASTER band ratios ((2 + 4)/3, (5 + 7)/6, (7 + 9)/8) in RGB identifies the lithological units and discriminates the granodiorite very well from the adjacent rock units.The granodiorites are dissected by gold-bearing quartz veins surrounded by alteration zones. The microscopic examination of samples collected from the alteration zones shows sericitic and argillic alteration zones. The Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) and Spectral Information Divergence (SID) supervised classification methods were applied using the reference spectra of the USGS spectral library. The results show that these classification methods are capable of mapping the alteration zones as indicated by field verification work. The PALSAR image was enhanced for fracture mapping using the second moment co-occurrence filter. Overlying extracted faults and alteration zone classification images show that the N30E and N-S fractures represent potential zones for gold exploration. It is concluded that the proposed methods can be used as a powerful tool for ore deposit exploration.

  4. GEOL 105, Earth Lab: SAND! A journey from mountains to beaches and western deserts Spring Term 2013 Professor David Harbor

    E-print Network

    Harbor, David

    GEOL 105, Earth Lab: SAND! A journey from mountains to beaches and western deserts Spring Term 2013 harbord@wlu.edu; 540.784.8138 cell Take a journey with sand - follow its path as it erodes from the high with sand grains through the air in western sand dunes and trace its ancient path from the Appalachians west

  5. Benefits of protective fencing to plant and rodent communities of the western Mojave Desert, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Matthew L.

    1995-01-01

    Human disturbance in the western Mojave Desert takes many forms. The most pervasive are livestock grazing and off-highway vehicle use. Over the past few decades several areas within this region have been fenced to preclude human disturbance. These areas provide opportunities to study the impact of human activities in a desert ecosystem. This paper documents the response of plant and small mammal populations to fencing constructed between 1978 and 1979 at the Desert Tortoise Research Natural Area, Kern County, California. Aboveground live annual plant biomass was generally greater inside than outside the fenced plots during April 1990, 1991, and 1992. The alien grass Schismus barbatus was a notable exception, producing more biomass in the unprotected area. Forb biomass was greater than that of alien annual grasses inside the fence during all three years of the study. Outside the fence, forb biomass was significantly higher than that of alien grasses only during spring 1992. Percent cover of perennial shrubs was higher inside the fence than outside, while no significant trend was detected in density. There was als more seed biomass inside the fence; this may have contributed to the greater diversity and density of Merriam's kangaroo rats ( Dipodomys merriami), long-tailed pocket mice ( Chaetodipus formosus), and southern grasshopper mice ( Onychomys torridus) in the protected area. These results show that protection from human disturbance has many benefits, including greater overall community biomass and diversity. The significance and generality of these results can be further tested by studying other exclosures of varying age and configurations in different desert regions of the southwestern United States.

  6. Is the Arabian Nubian Shield with Westward Subduction Polarity? Clues from Prograding Metamorphism in Mantle Peridotites, Eastern Desert of Egypt.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamal El Dien, H. M.; Abu El-Ela, A. S.; Hamdy, M.; Hassan, A.

    2014-12-01

    Neoproterozoic arc mantle beneath the Arabian Nubian Shield (ANS) in the Eastern Desert (ED) of Egypt exhumed due to intra-oceanic upthrusting are represented mainly by exposed ophiolitic peridotites serpentinized to different degree. Metamorphism is related to the Pan-African collision and the subduction of oceanic lithosphere. However, polarity of the Pan-African intra-oceanic subduction is still questionable. We here trace the variation of the degree of serpentinization and regional metamorphism of six serpentinite masses, widely distributed in the ED (from the east to the west: W (Wadi). Alam, W. Igla, W. Mubarak, G. El-Maiyit, W. Um El Saneyat and W. Atalla). This is based on their mineralogy, textures and mineral chemistry. Much difference in the degree of serpentinization is obvious among these rocks. They are mainly partly serpentinized containing primary olivine and orthopyroxene at W. Alam and W. Igla, while they are completely serpentinized in the other localities. With the increased degree of metamorphism, textures were transformed from the pseudomorphic to the non-pseudomorphic. The most common retrograde assemblage is composed of lizardite _ chrysotile_ brucite_ magnetite. The serpentine prograde textures can be viewed as a continuum from retrograde lizardite pseudomorphic textures, to very fine-grained transitional texture of lizardite and chrysotile, to chrysotile antigorite interlocking texture and finally to antigorite interpenetrating texture. These textures appear to represent successive stages in a recrystallization event. In late subduction-related metamorphism and early collisional emplacement stage, mylonitic-antigorite serpentinites formed and antigorite became the major phase in G. El-Maiyit, Um El-Saneyat andW. Atalla. Compositional zoning in spinel grains in all serpentinites reflect variation in the degree of alteration. The biggest variation of spinel compositions are among serpentinites from Um El-Saneyat and W. Atalla. The alteration zones were formed in a temperature < 400 °C to 550 °C corresponding to the low green-schist to the lower amphibolite facies. So, we propose that this is concordant with a westward polarity of the subducting oceanic lithosphere, associating the intra-oceanic arc ophiolite during the closure of the Mozambique ocean.

  7. Integrating geologic and satellite imagery data for high-resolution mapping and gold exploration targets in the South Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoheir, Basem; Emam, Ashraf

    2012-05-01

    The granitoid-greenstone belts of the Arabian-Nubian Shield are well-endowed with lode gold and massive sulfide ores. Although generally characterized by excellent outcrops and arid desert realm, poor accessibility and lack of finance have been always retardant to detailed geologic mapping of vast areas of the shield. Lack of comprehensive geological information and maps at appropriate scales would definitely hinder serious exploration programs. In this study, band ratioing, principal component analysis (PCA), false-color composition (FCC), and frequency filtering (FFT-RWT) of ASTER and ETM+ data have substantially improved visual interpretation for detailed mapping of the Gebel Egat area in South Eastern Desert of Egypt. By compiling field, petrographic and spectral data, controls on gold mineralization have been assessed in terms of association of gold lodes with particular lithological units and structures. Contacts between foliated island arc metavolcanics and ophiolites or diorite are likely to be favorable loci for auriferous quartz veins, especially where the NW-SE foliation is deflected into steeply dipping NNW-trending shear planes. High-resolution mapping of the greenstone belt, structures and alteration zones associated with gold lodes in the study area suggests that dilatation by foliation deflection was related to emplacement of the Egat granitic intrusion, attendant with a sinistral transpression regime (i.e., ˜640-550 Ma?). Gold mineralization associated with granitoid intrusions in transpression-induced pull-apart structures elsewhere in the Eastern Desert (e.g., Fawakhir, Sukari and Hangaliya mines) emphasize the reliability of this setting as a model for gold exploration targets in greenstone terrains of Egypt, and may be elsewhere in the Arabian-Nubian Shield.

  8. Bi-Static Deep Electromagnetic Soundings for Martian Subsurface Characterization: Experimental Validation in the Egyptian Western Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarletti, V.; Le Gall, A.; Berthelier, J. J.; Corbel, Ch.; Dolon, F.; Ney, R.; Reineix, A.; Guiffaud, Ch.; Clifford, S.; Heggy, E.

    2007-03-01

    A bi-static version of the HF GPR TAPIR developed for martian deep soundings has been operated in the Egyptian Western Desert. The study presented focuses on the retrieval of the direction of arrival of the observed echoes on both simulated and measured d

  9. Application and calibration of the subsurface mapping capability of SIR-B in desert regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaber, G. G.; Mccauley, J. F.; Breed, C. S.; Grolier, M. J.; Issawi, B.; Haynes, C. V.; Mchugh, W.; Walker, A. S.; Blom, R.

    1984-01-01

    The penetration capability of the shuttle imaging radar (SIR-B) sensor in desert regions is investigated. Refined models to explain this penetration capability in terms of radar physics and regional geologic conditions are devised. The sand-buried radar-rivers discovered in the Western Desert in Egypt and Sudan are defined. Results and procedures developed during previous SIR-A investigation of the same area are extrapolated.

  10. Nest site characteristics and nesting success of the Western Burrowing Owl in the eastern Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Longshore, Kathleen M.; Crowe, Dorothy E.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated nest site selection at two spatial scales (microsite, territory) and reproductive success of Western Burrowing Owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea) at three spatial scales (microsite, territory, landscape) in the eastern Mojave Desert. We used binary logistic regression within an information-theoretic approach to assess factors influencing nest site choice and nesting success. Microsite-scale variables favored by owls included burrows excavated by desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii), burrows with a large mound of excavated soil at the entrance, and a greater number of satellite burrows within 5 m of the nest burrow. At the territory scale, owls preferred patches with greater cover of creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) within 50 m of the nest burrow. An interaction between the presence or absence of a calcic soil horizon layer over the top of the burrow (microsite) and the number of burrows within 50 m (territory) influenced nest site choice. Nesting success was influenced by a greater number of burrows within 5 m of the nest burrow. Total cool season precipitation was a predictor of nesting success at the landscape scale. Conservation strategies can rely on management of habitat for favored and productive nesting sites for this declining species.

  11. Morphodynamic implications for shoreline management of the western-Mediterranean sector of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frihy, Omran E.

    2009-09-01

    Although the western-Mediterranean coast of Egypt between Sallum and Alexandria, ~550 km long, has maintained a considerable equilibrium throughout history, developers have built traditional protective structures in an effort to form sheltered recreational beaches without taking into consideration its geomorphologic characteristics, coastal processes and their harmful impact on the coastal environment and human safety. The improper practices in this environmentally valuable region have induced us to undertake an initiative to carry out a morphodynamic analysis to provide a framework for understanding the relationship between coastal morphology and the prevailing dynamic forces. Based on the degree of natural protection or wave sheltering, the study shoreline can be categorized into four distinct morphotypical stretches: (1) high-energy wave-exposed shores and the outer margins of the rocky headlands, (2) moderate to high wave-energy beaches along semi-exposed embayments and bays mostly downdrift of the rocky headlands, (3) low-wave energy at semi-exposed headland lee-sided and pocket beaches, and (4) calm wave-sheltered enclosing water basins for safe anchorages, moorings and recreation beaches. The results deducted will have practical applications for shoreline management initiatives regarding sustained sites suitable for future beachfront development such as safe swimming conditions, sport facilities, water intakes and sheltered areas for vessels. In addition, benefits realized by the understanding of the morphodynamic processes would enhance our awareness of the significance of the role of western coast morphodynamics in supporting sustainable development via shoreline management. As far as sustainability is concerned, the selection of appropriate sites would help avoiding or minimizing the formation of the hard structures needed for creating safe recreation beaches. On a national scale, results reached could provide reliable database for information that can be used in establishing a sustainable shoreline management plan, which is, in turn, an essential part when implementing an Integrated Coastal Zone Management Plan for this region of attraction.

  12. The Predynastic of Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fekri A. Hassan

    1988-01-01

    The Predynastic of Egypt, spanning an interval from ca. 4000 to 3050 B.C., was an eventful period. After the inception of food production in the Nile Valley at least a millennium before, it was the time when the identity of Egyptian society was forged. Egypt was settled by refugees from the deserts of the eastern Sahara and the southern Levant,

  13. Neoproterozoic arc-back-arc system in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt: Evidence from supra-subduction zone ophiolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahat, E. S.

    2010-12-01

    Ophiolites are widely distributed in the Central Eastern Desert (CED) of Egypt, occurring as clusters in the northern (NCEDO) and southern (SCEDO) segments. Mineralogical and geochemical data on the volcanic sections of Wizer (WZO) and Abu Meriewa (AMO) ophiolites as representatives of the NCEDO and SCEDO, respectively, are presented. The WZO volcanic sequence comprises massive metavolcanics of MORB-like compositions intruded by minor boninitic dykes and thrust over island-arc metavolcanic blocks in the mélange matrix. Such transitional MORB-IAT-boninitic magmatic affinities for the WZO metavolcanics suggest that they most likely formed in a protoarc-forearc setting. Chemical compositions of primary clinopyroxene and Cr-spinel relicts from the WZO volcanic section further confirm this interpretation. The compositional variability in the WZO volcanic sequence is comparable with the associated mantle rocks that vary from slightly depleted harzburgites to highly depleted harzburgites containing small dunite bodies, which are residues after MORB, IAT and boninite melt formation, respectively. Source characteristics of the different lava groups from the WZO indicate generation via partial melting of a MORB source which was progressively depleted by melt extraction and variably enriched by subduction zone fluids. MORB-like magma may have been derived from ~ 20% partial melting of an undepleted lherzolite source, leaving slightly depleted harzburgite as a residuum. The generation of island-arc magma can be accounted for by partial melting (~ 15%) of the latter harzburgitic mantle source, whereas boninites may have been derived from partial melting (~ 20%) of a more refractory mantle source previously depleted by melt extraction of MORB and IAT melts, leaving ultra-refractory dunite bodies as residuum. The AMO volcanic unit occurs as highly deformed pillowed metavolcanic rocks in a mélange matrix. They can be categorized geochemically into LREE-depleted (La/Yb CN = 0.41-0.50) and LREE-enriched (La/Yb CN = 4.7-4.9) lava types that show an island arc to MORB geochemical signature, respectively, signifying a back-arc basin setting. This is consistent, as well, with their mantle section. Source characteristics indicate depleted to slightly enriched mantle sources with overall slight subduction zone geochemical affinities as compared to the WZO. Generally, CED ophiolites show supra-subduction zone geochemical signature with prevalent island arc tholeiitic and minor boninitic affinities in the NCEDO and MORB/island-arc association in the SCEDO. Such differences in geochemical characteristics of the NCEDO and SCEDO, along with the abundance of mature island arc metavolcanics which are close in age (~ 750 Ma) to the ophiolitic rocks, general enrichment in HFSE of ophiolites from north to south, and lack of a crustal break and major shear zones, is best explained by a geotectonic model whereby the CED represents an arc-back-arc system above a southeast-dipping subduction zone.

  14. Magnetic fabrics and Pan-African structural evolution in the Najd Fault corridor in the Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeen, Mamdouh M.; Greiling, Reinhard O.; Sadek, Mohamed F.; Hamad, Sayed S.

    2014-11-01

    In order to assess the Pan-African structural evolution from early orogenic fabrics through Najd wrenching to the latest orogenic collapse/extension, the authors used field work, aided by aerial photographs and satellite images. This work is complemented by the study of the anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility (AMS, or magnetic fabric). The Pan-African rock associations of the Um Gheig-Kadabora area can be divided into a lower tier composed mainly of amphibolite-migmatite and granitoid gneisses, and an upper tier of ophiolitic rocks, metavolcanics and their related volcaniclastics, and molasse-type Hammamat sediments. Both these units are intruded by late orogenic granitoid plutons and dykes. The lower tier is exposed in a domal structure in the El Sibai area, the upper tier forms a series of weakly to highly deformed thrust units, called Pan-African Nappes here, which are dissected by high strain shear zones. According to their age, these rock units are divided here into early and late-orogenic. The early orogenic rock association is characterized by medium-high metamorphic grades. The late orogenic rock association is characterized by low metamorphic grade. The rocks in the upper tier form a series of low angle thrust sheets, which are bounded by NW-striking high angle shear zones related to the Najd Fault System. The early orogenic rocks show a polyphase structural evolution with early folds, thrusts, and strike-slip shear zones. The late orogenic rocks show a relatively weaker deformation. The latest intrusives studied here are the dykes dissecting the late orogenic Kadabora granite. In the present work magnetic fabric data document the deformational features in detail and assess the role of the Najd Fault System in the deformational evolution. A strong variation in volume susceptibility of various rocks, due to their variations in mineral composition, is observed. Lower values are in the range of 10-6 SI units for late-orogenic alkaline granite and the dykes dissecting it, the highest susceptibilities exceed 7 × 10-2 SI units in magnetite-bearing serpentinite. Early orogenic rocks are characterized by relatively high anisotropies (P? up to 1.7) and are deformed in numerous shear zones. Most of these shear zones can be related to the Najd Fault System. In contrast, late orogenic sediments and intrusives show mostly low anisotropies. However, magnetic lineations are still distinctly oriented parallel with the Najd Fault trend. The very latest Pan-African intrusives, the broadly N-S trending dykes crosscutting the Kadabora pluton, imply c. E-W directed extension. Such an extension is consistent with the magnetic fabric in some of the dykes. Therefore, the Kadabora dykes mark the end of Najd wrenching and a late stage of extension in this part of the Eastern Desert of Egypt. The other dykes display mostly primary fabrics, related to magma flow during their intrusion and are thus post-deformational with regard to the Pan-African orogeny.

  15. Human Impact On Landscape And The Revenue In Wadi El Rayan Western Desert Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asayed El Gammal, El

    2010-05-01

    Wadi El-Rayan depression occupy about 1800 Km2, it lies in 170 km southwest Cairo. Two lakes in El-Rayan depression initiated since 1973 in a big project when people inundate with excess agricultural sewage water. This article aim to estimate the landscape's response and it's revenue to human's intervention. Two new geomorphological maps, before and after the lakes prepared in the field to understand the landscape changes and its characteristics. Water fluctuation in El Rayan Lakes required multitemporal Landsat image. Geomorphological landforms disappeared and others initiated and neo-ecosystem had been generated. Active elongated sand dune fields covered by water and the dune pattern changed from straight-linear pattern to braided pattern and sand sheets delineating that linear dunes lost activity. Hence avoid and avert dune‘s hazards on the agriculture west of Nile Valley. Landforms and geologic heritage demonstrated that there is an old lake under El Rayan depression. The artificial lakes lead to rise the water table which may abut attempts to utilize from the underground water my stored and water from artificial lakes may infiltrate and contaminate this water. The water volume changed in the southern lake from 501,2 km³ at 1984 to 1097,4 km³ at 1999.

  16. Water Management Strategy in Assessing the Water Scarcity in Northern Western Region of Nile Delta, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabrouk, Badr; Arafa, Salah; Gemajl, Khaled

    2015-04-01

    Sustainable development in the Nile Delta of Egypt is retarded by serious environmental problems, where land-use and land-cover of the region are subjected to continuous changes; including shoreline changes either by erosion or accretion, subsidence of the delta, as well as by sea level rise due to climate change. The current research attempts to; (1) study the vulnerability of the northern western region of the Nile Delta coastal zone to climate change/sea level rise while setting basic challenges, review adaptation strategies based on adaptation policy framework, and highlight recommended programs for preparedness to climate change, (2) study the scarcity of water resources in the area of study with review of the socioeconomic impacts and the critical need of establishing desalination plants with new standards assessing the environmental situation and population clusters, and (3) monitor of the brine water extracted from the desalination plants and injected to subsurface strata. This monitoring process is divided into 3 main directions: 1) studying the chemical characteristics of water extracted from the water desalinations plants qualitatively and quantitatively. 2) mapping the subsurface of which that brine water will be injected to it and the flow directions and effects using resistivity data, and 3) using GIS and suitable numerical models in order to study the effect, volume, flow of the brine water and its long term environmental impacts on the area. The results indicate that the area is particularly vulnerable to the impact of SLR, salt water intrusion, the deterioration of coastal tourism and the impact of extreme dust storms. This in turn will directly affect the agricultural productivity and human settlements in coastal zones. The paper presents different scenarios for water management and recommends the most suitable scenarios in order to establish a core for water management strategy in the region according to existing socio-economic and environmental situations. Key words: Nile Delta, climate change, socioeconomic, sea level rise, groundwater monitoring, GIS

  17. Ecological status of the Mediterranean Juniperus phoenicea L. Relicts in the desert mountains of North Sinai, Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Magdy El-Bana; Kamal Shaltout; Ahmed Khalafallah; Hosni Mosallam

    2010-01-01

    Juniperus phoenicea L. is listed as threatened tree by IUCN Red List. In Egypt, J. phoenicea L. is the only conifer tree that is restricted to the three mountains of northern Sinai: Gabal El-Halal, Gabal El-Maghara and Gabal Yelleq. As a Mediterranean relict it has been included in a national list as target for conservation and management. To provide baseline

  18. Phylogeographic structure and historical demography of the western diamondback rattlesnake ( Crotalus atrox): A perspective on North American desert biogeography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Todd A. Castoe; Carol L. Spencer; Christopher L. Parkinson

    2007-01-01

    The western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) is a prominent member of North American desert and semi-arid ecosystems, and its importance extends from its impact on the region’s ecology and imagery, to its medical relevance as a large deadly venomous snake. We used mtDNA sequences to identify population genetic structure and historical demographic patterns across the range of this species, and

  19. A gravity study of the Great Basin-Sonoran Desert transition zone, Basin and Range province, western United States 

    E-print Network

    Brooks, Debra Ann

    1989-01-01

    ' 'I~~/ C'm Qo ('r-- -; f ) ii' 'QX -~ )l~, ' L, 'i' I, ', ':; '' K E C3 f ) C 360 PLATE 1. COMPLETE BOUGUER GRA VITY GREAT BASIN ? SONORAN DESFRT AREA BASIN AND RANGE PROVINCE, WESTERN UNITED STATES MILES '8 i +~ ~~+ ii, (, ' 0 0 40 80... /& ~~& A GRAVITY STUDY OF THE GREAT BASIN-SONORAN DESERT TRANSITION ZONE, BASIN AND RANGE PROVINCE, WESTERN UNITED STATES A Thesis by DEBRA ANN BROOKS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  20. Effects of protective fencing on birds, lizards, and black-tailed hares in the Western Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, M.

    1999-01-01

    Effects of protective fencing on birds, lizards, black-tailed hares (Lepus californicus), perennial plant cover, and structural diversity of perennial plants were evaluated from spring 1994 through winter 1995 at the Desert Tortoise Research Natural Area (DTNA), in the Mojave Desert, California. Abundance and species richness of birds were higher inside than outside the DTNA, and effects were larger during breeding than wintering seasons and during a high than a low rainfall year. Ash-throated flycatchers (Myiarchus cinerascens), cactus wrens (Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus), LeConte's thrashers (Toxostoma lecontei), loggerhead shrikes (Lanius ludovicianus), sage sparrows (Amphispiza belli), and verdins (Auriparus flaviceps) were more abundant inside than outside the DTNA. Nesting activity was also more frequent inside. Total abundance and species richness of lizards and individual abundances of western whiptail lizards (Cnemidophorous tigris) and desert spiny lizards (Sceloporus magister) were higher inside than outside. In contrast, abundance of black-tailed hares was lower inside. Structural diversity of the perennial plant community did not differ due to protection, but cover was 50% higher in protected areas. Black-tailed hares generally prefer areas of low perennial plant cover, which may explain why they were more abundant outside than inside the DTNA. Habitat structure may not affect bird and lizard communities as much as availability of food at this desert site, and the greater abundance and species richness of vertebrates inside than outside the DTNA may correlate with abundances of seeds and invertebrate prey.

  1. Recharge to the inter-dune lakes and Holocene climatic changes in the Badain Jaran Desert, western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoping; Ma, Nina; Dong, Jufeng; Zhu, Bingqi; Xu, Bing; Ma, Zhibang; Liu, Jiaqi

    2010-01-01

    We present new estimates on evaporation and groundwater recharge in the Badain Jaran Desert, western Inner Mongolia of northwestern China, based on a modified Penman Equation suitable for lakes in China. Geochemical data and water balance calculations suggest that local rainfall makes a significant contribution to groundwater recharge and that past lake-level variations in this desert environment should reflect palaeoclimatic changes. The chronology of lake-level change, established by radiocarbon and U-series disequilibrium dating methods, indicates high lake levels and a wetter climate beginning at ca. 10 ka and lasting until the late mid-Holocene in the Badain Jaran Desert. The greatest extension of lakes in the inter-dune depressions indicates that the water availability was greatest during the mid-Holocene. Relicts of Neolithic tools and pottery of Qijia Culture (2400-1900 BC) suggest relatively intensive human activity in the Badain Jaran Desert during the early and middle Holocene, supporting our interpretation of a less harsh environment. Wetter climates during the Holocene were likely triggered by an intensified East Asian summer monsoon associated with strong insolation.

  2. Zr-Y-Nb-REE mineralization associated with microgranite and basic dykes at EL Sela shear zone, South Eastern Desert, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Shahin, Hassan Abd El-Razek Aly

    2014-01-01

    El Sela shear zone occurs in the younger granite rock of Gabal El Sela area, south Eastern Desert, Egypt near the Sudan Frontier. It comprises lines-arranged intrusions trending ENE-WSW and extend for about 1.5 km in length and reach up to 40 meters in width. These lines-arranged intrusions include multi-phase quartz veins, altered microgranite and altered basic dykes. These dykes hosting or acting as a source for uranium, rare metals (Zr, Y, Nb and Ga) and light rare earths (La, Ce, Sm and Nd) mineralizations. They show highly alteration, uranium enrichment and a strong enrichment in some rare metals and light rare earths contents (Zr?=?644, Y?=?133, Nb?=?136, Ga =184, La?=?50.19, Ce?=?105.47, Sm?=?24.81, Nd?=?78.91 ppm and and ? LREEs?=?259.38.). The chondrite normalised rare earth elements trends indicate strongly fractionated rare earth elements pattern with significant enriched of LREE according to HREE in both altered microgranite and altered basic dykes. Field radiometric measurements of the studied altered microgranite dyke revealed that eU reach up to 359 ppm with an average 78 ppm, while in the altered basic dyke reach up to 1625 ppm with an average 144 ppm. PMID:25332873

  3. Structural influence on the evolution of the pre-Eonile drainage system of southern Egypt: Insights from magnetotelluric and gravity data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeff Roden; Mohamed G. Abdelsalam; Estella Atekwana; Gad El-Qady; Elhamy Aly Tarabees

    2011-01-01

    The Wadi Kubbaniya in the Western Desert of Egypt north of the City of Aswan has been interpreted as the downstream continuation of the Wadi Abu Subeira, comprising an ancient W- and NW-flowing river system originating from the Precambrian crystalline rocks of the Red Sea Hills which were uplifted during the Miocene in association with the opening of the Red

  4. Bistatic GPR Measurements in the Egyptian Western Desert - Measured and Simulated data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarletti, V.; Le Gall, A.; Berthelier, J.; Ney, R.; Corbel, C.; Dolon, F.

    2006-12-01

    The TAPIR (Terrestrial And Planetary Investigation Radar) instrument has been designed at CETP (Centre d'etude des Environnements Terrestre et Planetaires) to explore the deep Martian subsurface (down to a few kilometers) and to detect liquid water reservoirs. TAPIR is an impulse ground penetrating radar operating at central frequencies ranging from 2 to 4 MHz operating from the surface. In November 2005, an updated version of the instrument working either in monostatic or in bi-static mode was tested in the Egyptian Western Desert. The work presented here focuses on the bi-static measurements performed on the Abou Saied plateau which shows a horizontally layered sub-surface. The electromagnetic signal was transmitted using one of the two orthogonal 70 m loaded electrical dipole antennas of the transmitting GPR. A second GPR, 50 or 100 meters apart, was dedicated to the signal reception. The received waves were characterized by a set of 5 measurements performed on the receiving GPR : the two horizontal components of the electric field and the three composants of the magnetic field. They were used to compute the direction of arrival of the incoming waves and to retrieve more accurately their propagation path and especially to discriminate between waves due to some sub-surface reflecting structure and those due to interaction with the surface clutter. A very efficient synchronization between the two radars enabled us to perform coherent additions up to 2^{31} which improves dramatically the obtained signal to noise ratio. Complementary electromagnetic measurements were conducted on the same site by the LPI (Lunar and Planetary Institute) and the SwRI (Southwest Research Institute). They provided independent information which helped the interpretation of the TAPIR data. Accurate simulations obtained by FDTD taking into account the information available are presented and used for both the interpretation of the measured data and the validation of the instrument.

  5. Effects of Protective Fencing on Birds, Lizards, and Black-Tailed Hares in the Western Mojave Desert.

    PubMed

    BROOKS

    1999-04-01

    / Effects of protective fencing on birds, lizards, black-tailed hares (Lepus californicus), perennial plant cover, and structural diversity of perennial plants were evaluated from spring 1994 through winter 1995 at the Desert Tortoise Research Natural Area (DTNA), in the Mojave Desert, California. Abundance and species richness of birds were higher inside than outside the DTNA, and effects were larger during breeding than wintering seasons and during a high than a low rainfall year. Ash-throated flycatchers (Myiarchus cinerascens), cactus wrens (Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus), LeConte's thrashers (Toxostoma lecontei), loggerhead shrikes (Lanius ludovicianus), sage sparrows (Amphispiza belli), and verdins (Auriparus flaviceps) were more abundant inside than outside the DTNA. Nesting activity was also more frequent inside. Total abundance and species richness of lizards and individual abundances of western whiptail lizards (Cnemidophorous tigris) and desert spiny lizards (Sceloporus magister) were higher inside than outside. In contrast, abundance of black-tailed hares was lower inside. Structural diversity of the perennial plant community did not differ due to protection, but cover was 50% higher in protected areas. Black-tailed hares generally prefer areas of low perennial plant cover, which may explain why they were more abundant outside than inside the DTNA. Habitat structure may not affect bird and lizard communities as much as availability of food at this desert site, and the greater abundance and species richness of vertebrates inside than outside the DTNA may correlate with abundances of seeds and invertebrate prey. KEY WORDS: Birds; Fenced protection; Lepus californicus, Lizards; Mojave Desert; Off-highway vehicles; Protected area management; Sheep grazing PMID:9950700

  6. Bionomics of malaria vectors in two physiographically different areas of the epidemic-prone Thar Desert, north-western Rajasthan (India)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. K Tyagi; S. P Yadav

    2001-01-01

    Entomological and parasitological investigations were carried out on malaria vectors and disease prevalence in two sets of villages, the highly irrigated Indira Gandhi Nahar Pariyojana (IGNP) command-area villages (Madassar and Awai), and the truly desertic non-command (unirrigated) area villages (Kanasar and Khetusar), located in different ecological conditions in the Thar Desert, north-western Rajasthan (India). Malaria prevalence, as determined through sustained

  7. Mesozoic evolution of northeast African shelf margin, Libya and Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Aadland, R.K.; Schamel, S.

    1989-03-01

    The present tectonic features of the northeast African shelf margin between the Nile delta and the Gulf of Sirte are products of (1) precursory late Paleozoic basement arches, (2) early Mesozoic rifting and plate separation, and (3) Late Cretaceous structural inversion. The 250 km-wide and highly differentiated Mesozoic passive margin in the Western Desert region of Egypt is developed above a broad northwest-trending Late Carboniferous basement arch. In northeastern Libya, in contrast, the passive margin is restricted to just the northernmost Cyrenaica platform, where subsidence was extremely rapid in the Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. The boundary between the Western Desert basin and the Cyrenaica platform is controlled by the western flank of the basement arch. In the middle Cretaceous (100-90 Ma), subsidence accelerated over large areas of the Western desert, further enhancing a pattern of east-west-trending subbasins. This phase of rapid subsidence was abruptly ended about 80 Ma by the onset of structural inversion that uplifted the northern Cyrenaica shelf margin and further differentiated the Western Desert subbasin along a northeasterly trend.

  8. Unique chemistry of a diamond-bearing pebble from the Libyan Desert Glass strewnfield, SW Egypt: Evidence for a shocked comet fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramers, Jan D.; Andreoli, Marco A. G.; Atanasova, Maria; Belyanin, Georgy A.; Block, David L.; Franklyn, Chris; Harris, Chris; Lekgoathi, Mpho; Montross, Charles S.; Ntsoane, Tshepo; Pischedda, Vittoria; Segonyane, Patience; Viljoen, K. S. (Fanus); Westraadt, Johan E.

    2013-11-01

    We have studied a small, very unusual stone, here named “Hypatia”, found in the area of southwest Egypt where an extreme surface heating event produced the Libyan Desert Glass 28.5 million years ago. It is angular, black, shiny, extremely hard and intensely fractured. We report on exploratory work including X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with EDS analysis, deuteron nuclear reaction analysis, C-isotope and noble gas analyses. Carbon is the dominant element in Hypatia, with heterogeneous O/C and N/C ratios ranging from 0.3 to 0.5 and from 0.007 to 0.02, respectively. The major cations of silicates add up to less than 5%. The stone consists chiefly of apparently amorphous, but very hard carbonaceous matter, in which patches of sub-?m diamonds occur. ?13C values (ca. 0‰) exclude an origin from shocked terrestrial coal or any variety of terrestrial diamond. They are also higher than the values for carbonaceous chondrites but fall within the wide range for interplanetary dust particles and comet 81P/Wild2 dust. In step heating, 40Ar/36Ar ratios vary from 40 to the air value (298), interpreted as a variable mixture of extraterrestrial and atmospheric Ar. Isotope data of Ne, Kr and Xe reveal the exotic noble gas components G and P3 that are normally hosted in presolar SiC and nanodiamonds, while the most common trapped noble gas component of chondritic meteorites, Q, appears to be absent. An origin remote from the asteroid belt can account for these features. We propose that the Hypatia stone is a remnant of a cometary nucleus fragment that impacted after incorporating gases from the atmosphere. Its co-occurrence with Libyan Desert Glass suggests that this fragment could have been part of a bolide that broke up and exploded in the airburst that formed the Glass. Its extraordinary preservation would be due to its shock-transformation into a weathering-resistant assemblage.

  9. Chromium, chromium isotopes and selected trace elements, western Mojave Desert, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izbicki, J.A.; Ball, J.W.; Bullen, T.D.; Sutley, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    Chromium(VI) concentrations in excess of the California Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 50 ??g/L occur naturally in alkaline, oxic ground-water in alluvial aquifers in the western Mojave Desert, southern California. The highest concentrations were measured in aquifers eroded from mafic rock, but Cr(VI) as high as 27 ??g/L was measured in aquifers eroded from granitic rock. Chromium(VI) concentrations did not exceed 5 ??g/L at pH < 7.5 regardless of geology. ??53Cr values in native ground-water ranged from 0.7 to 5.1??? and values were fractionated relative to the average ??53Cr composition of 0??? in the earth's crust. Positive ??53Cr values of 1.2 and 2.3??? were measured in ground-water recharge areas having low Cr concentrations, consistent with the addition of Cr(VI) that was fractionated on mineral surfaces prior to entering solution. ??53Cr values, although variable, did not consistently increase or decrease with increasing Cr concentrations as ground-water flowed down gradient through more oxic portions of the aquifer. However, increasing ??53Cr values were observed as dissolved O2 concentrations decreased, and Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III), and subsequently removed from solution. As a result, the highest ??53Cr values were measured in water from deep wells, and wells in discharge areas near dry lakes at the downgradient end of long flow paths through alluvial aquifers. ??53Cr values at an industrial site overlying mafic alluvium having high natural background Cr(VI) concentrations ranged from -0.1 to 3.2???. Near zero ??53Cr values at the site were the result of anthropogenic Cr. However, mixing with native ground-water and fractionation of Cr within the plume increased ??53Cr values at the site. Although ??53Cr was not necessarily diagnostic of anthropogenic Cr, it was possible to identify the extent of anthropogenic Cr at the site on the basis of the ??53Cr values in conjunction with major-ion data, and the ??18O and ??D composition of water from wells.

  10. Phylogeographic structure and historical demography of the western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox): A perspective on North American desert biogeography.

    PubMed

    Castoe, Todd A; Spencer, Carol L; Parkinson, Christopher L

    2007-01-01

    The western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) is a prominent member of North American desert and semi-arid ecosystems, and its importance extends from its impact on the region's ecology and imagery, to its medical relevance as a large deadly venomous snake. We used mtDNA sequences to identify population genetic structure and historical demographic patterns across the range of this species, and relate these to broader patterns of historical biogeography of desert and semi-arid regions of the southwestern USA and adjacent Mexico. We inferred a Late Pliocene divergence between peninsular and continental lineages of Crotalus, followed by an Early Mid Pleistocene divergence across the continental divide within C. atrox. Within desert regions (Sonoran and Chihuahuan Deserts, Southern Plains, and Tamaulipan Plain) we observed population structure indicating isolation of populations in multiple Pleistocene refugia on either side of the continental divide, which we attempt to identify. Evidence of post-glacial population growth and range expansion was inferred, particularly in populations east of the continental divide. We observed clear evidence of (probably recent) gene flow across the continental divide and secondary contact of haplotype lineages. This recent gene flow appears to be particularly strong in the West-to-East direction. Our results also suggest that Crotalus tortugensis (Tortuga Island rattlesnake) and a population of 'C. atrox' inhabiting Santa Cruz Island (in the Gulf of California) previously suggested to be an unnamed species, are in fact deeply phylogenetically nested within continental lineages of C. atrox. Accordingly, we suggest C. tortugensis and 'C. atrox' from Santa Cruz Island be placed in the synonymy of C. atrox. PMID:16934495

  11. Multi-stage emerald formation during Pan-African regional metamorphism: The Zabara, Sikait, Umm Kabo deposits, South Eastern desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundmann, G.; Morteani, G.

    2008-02-01

    The genesis of gem-quality deep green emeralds of Zabara, Sikait and Umm Kabo (South Eastern Desert, Egypt) is to date a controversial topic. The emerald-bearing biotite schists and quartz lenses are interpreted alternatively as a product of (i) thrust-fault-shear zone - controlled large scale alkali-metasomatism driven by post-magmatic fluid flow or of (ii) a large scale interaction between syntectonic pegmatitic magma or hydrothermal fluids with pre-existing basic to ultrabasic rocks, or of (iii) a syn- to post-tectonic regional metamorphism and small scale blackwall metasomatism. Detailed microstructural and chemical analyses of the Egyptian emeralds and their host rocks show that three generations of beryl can be distinguished: a colourless pegmatitic beryl; a pale green Cr-poor beryl crystallized from pegmatite-related hydrothermal fluids; and a deep green Cr- and Mg-rich emerald. The crystallization of the Cr- and Mg-rich emerald was controlled by the very local availability of Cr, Mg and Be-rich metamorphic fluids during the Pan-African tectono-thermal event. Emerald-rich quartz lenses demonstrate that those fluids locally did mobilize quartz, too. The pale green emeralds found within the pegmatites in association with colourless beryl are the product of a mobilization of colourless pegmatitic beryl and/or phenakite by late pegmatitic fluids slightly enriched in Cr by an interaction with the Cr-rich country rocks. The late pegmatitic fluids are typically Na-rich as is demonstrated by the pervasive albitization of the pegmatites. The complex interplay of magmatic and regional metamorphic events during the genesis of the Egyptian emeralds/beryls makes it impossible through stable oxygen isotope data to relate their genesis to the one or the other event.

  12. Silicification and dolomitization of the Lower Eocene carbonates in the Eastern Desert between Sohag and Qena, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keheila, E. A.; El-Ayyat, A.

    1992-04-01

    The Lower Eocene carbonates in the Eastern Desert between Sohag and Qena show remarkable diagenetic silicification and dolomitization beside other minor features of solution, cementation, syntaxial rim cement, compaction, recrystallisation and authigenic gypsum, anhydrite and halite formation. Two stages of silicification are recorded in the studied sequence, namely the syngenetic stage and the replacement stage. The first one is confined to the studied sequence, namely the syngenetic stage and the replacement stage. The in the open shelf lagoon facies as hard, dark silicified limestone concretions. The very early diagenetic chert formation was interrupted by the introduction of dolomite suggesting that dolomization postdates silification. The mode of occurrence of the syngenetic chert in the study area seems to be controlled by: the volume of the influx of hydrous silica in the interstitial water and the rate of lime mud deposition. Dolomites which are recorded here for the first time, represent about 40-60% of the carbonates and are confined mainly to the lime muds of the tidal flats and oyster bioclastic nearshore facies. The dolomitization phenomenon is considered to be of late diagenetic stage. Small elongate evaporite laths are scattered in the dolomitic lime mudstones. These authigenic evaporates associating the dolomitic facies of the tidal flats may suggest that hypersaline brines, rich in magnesium, were probably adjacent to these carbonates.

  13. The VLF EM Method Used for Verification of Fracture/ Shear Zone Aquifers in the Hyper-arid Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauck, W. A.; Sultan, M.; Wagdy, A.; Roouf, O. A.

    2007-05-01

    An integrated program using Landsat remote sensing and ground follow-up with the Very Low Frequency (VLF) geophysical method was applied to the basement rocks of the Red Sea Hills (Eastern Desert) to locate fracture and shear-system aquifers. This part of the Nubian Shield was formed by accretion of a complex of ensimatic and ensialic island arcs and interleaving oceanic basins that were later accreted against the old African continent. Hence, melange and ophiolite sequences are common. This basement complex was intensely fractured (630- 530 Mybp) by the Najd transcurrent shear system (NSS) along a NW-SE trend that is up to 350 km wide, and finally the ocean-arc complex was intruded (~550 Mybp) by anorogenic K-granites. A false-color composite image was created, from Landsat thematic mapper band ratio images that are sensitive to the Fe-bearing aluminosilicate, hydroxyl, and opaque phase content of rocks. On these images mafic rocks (e.g., gabbro and mafic volcanics) rich in Fe-bearing aluminosilicates appear in shades of blue, ultramafics (e.g., serpentinites) rich in hydroxyl-bearing phases and opaque phases appear in shades of red, and granitoid rock units poor in the above phases show as green areas. Using this base map (effectively a pseudo geologic map) and a co-registered DEM, locations of potential shallow water occurrence were plotted based on the following criteria: 1) intersection of the NSS system with transverse faults defining wadis, 2) intersection of two or more fault zones, 3) within highly deformed melange units, especially their internal lithologic contacts and their crossings of wadis, 4) relatively unfractured younger dikes and their intersections with wadis. The VLF instrument was first used to make profiles at a number of existing water wells located at the structural intersections described above, to verify that sub-vertical sheet-like electrical conductors (water-filled fissures) could be successfully located with this instrument. Then, other sites that had been marked as having high potential for water using one or more of the above criteria were visited and profiled with the VLF. Many (but not all) of these sites gave anomalies characteristic of conductive fissures. Finally, several sites not chosen by the GIS interpreters were selected at random and profiled with the VLF. One of these (albeit adjacent to a melange area) did show a good conductor. Field navigation was directly on the scrolling false-color image on a laptop computer, linked to an active GPS receiver. VLF transmitters used were mainly those in Europe. Fourteen sites were visited in five days and nineteen total profiles were surveyed, ranging from 160 to 1200 meters in length. In summary, this methodology, beginning with satellite imagery and GIS, and ending with transects on foot with a VLF, proved to be a useful technique in such desert landscapes where fractured bedrock aquifers occur and the discovery of even a low-yield local aquifer is very important.

  14. Bacterial diversity of Drass, cold desert in Western Himalaya, and its comparison with Antarctic and Arctic.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Puja; Sangwan, Naseer; Lal, Rup; Vakhlu, Jyoti

    2015-08-01

    Drass is the coldest inhabited place in India and the second coldest, inhabited place in the world, after Siberia. Using the 16SrDNA amplicon pyrosequencing, bacterial diversity patterns were cataloged across the Drass cold desert. In order to identify the ecotype abundance across cold desert environment, bacterial diversity patterns of Drass were further compared with the bacterial diversity of two other cold deserts, i.e., Antarctic and Arctic. Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria and Gemmatimonadetes were among the highly abundant taxonomic groups present across all the three cold deserts and were designated as the core phyla. However, Firmicutes, Nitrospirae, Armatimonadetes (former candidate division OP10), Planctomycetes, TM7, Chloroflexi, Deinococcus-Thermus, Tenericutes and candidate phyla WS3 were identified as rare phyla in Drass, Antarctic and Arctic samples. Differential abundance patterns were also computed across all the three samples, i.e., Acidobacteria (32.1 %) were dominant in Drass and Firmicutes (52.9 ± 17.6 %) and Proteobacteria (42 ± 1.3 %) were dominant in Antarctic and Arctic reference samples, respectively. Alpha diversity values Shannon's (H) and Simpson's (1-D) diversity indices were highest for Antarctic samples, whereas richness estimators (ACE and Chao1) were maximum for Drass soil suggesting greater species richness in bacterial communities in Drass than the Antarctic and Arctic samples. PMID:26055487

  15. Geologic Setting and Preliminary Analysis of the Desert Peak-Brady Geothermal Field, Western Nevada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James E. Faulds; Larry J. Garside; Gary L. Johnson; Jessica Muehlberg; Gary L. Oppliger

    2002-01-01

    A broad heat-flow anomaly (Battle Mountain heat-flow high) parallels the northeast-trending Humboldt structural zone in northern Nevada. The Humboldt zone contains subparallel northeast-striking left-lateral and normal faults, as well as northeast-trending folds. Several major geothermal fields, including Desert Peak-Brady, Steamboat, Soda Lake, Rye Patch, Dixie Valley, and Beowawe, lie within the Humboldt structural zone. Although the northeast-striking faults are thought

  16. Structural controls on Neoproterozoic mineralization in the South Eastern Desert, Egypt: an integrated field, Landsat TM, and SIR-C/X SAR approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusky, Timothy M.; Ramadan, Talaat M.

    2002-07-01

    The Arabian-Nubian Shield represents a complex amalgam of arcs and microcontinents assembled during Neoproterozoic closure of the Mozambique Ocean. The 750-720 Ma Allaqi suture is an arc/arc collision zone, formed when the Gerf terrane in the north overrode the circa 830-720 Ma Gabgaba terrane in the south, prior to closure of the Mozambique Ocean. Neoproterozoic rocks include ophiolitic ultramafic-mafic rocks, metasediments, intermediate metavolcanic rocks, intrusive gabbro-diorite rocks, granodiorites, biotite granites, and leucocratic granites. High-pressure/low-temperature metamorphism has been documented in rocks of the suture zone. Mineral deposits include nickel-copper-platinum and podiform chromite in ultramafic rocks, marble, gold-bearing quartz-veins in D 2 and D 3 shear zones, and radioactive mineralization associated with late leucocratic granitic rocks. Integrated field mapping and remote sensing techniques are used to distinguish and map the relationships between rock units, structures, and alteration zones associated with mineral deposits along the Allaqi suture of Egypt's SE Desert. Landsat TM images processed using a band ratioing technique show different rock types remarkably well, and are able to distinguish between alteration zones associated with ultramafic rocks (listwaenites) and those associated with leucocratic granitic rocks (greisenization, silicification and albitization). Black and white L-band SIR-C/X SAR images outline foliations, faults and folds that control mineralization at several deposits in the area, whereas color composite multiband Chh-Lhh-Lhv SIR-C/X SAR images reveal some elliptical granitic bodies that host radioactive mineralization. E-trending, tight to isoclinal, gently dipping folds, thrust faults and subvertical shear zones related to the Allaqi suture are overprinted by N-oriented structures related to the Wadi Ungate shear zone, formed during collision of east and west Gondwana during closure of the Mozambique Ocean. The location of the Wadi Ungate shear zone in the Wadi Shellman area was previously unknown due to burial of basement rocks beneath thin dry sands. A new structural map was prepared using Landsat TM ratio images and SIR-C/X SAR imagery. SIR-C/X SAR data conveys considerably more information about rocks and structures beneath the thin sand cover than discernible from aerial photographs or Landsat TM images.

  17. Petrogenesis of carbonated meta-ultramafic lenses from the Neoproterozoic Heiani ophiolite, South Eastern Desert, Egypt: A natural analogue to CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gahlan, Hisham A.; Arai, Shoji; Almadani, Sattam A.

    2015-02-01

    Among a set of peculiar meta-ultramafics, carbonate-orthopyroxenites are observed for the first time in the Heiani ophiolite belt, South Eastern Desert, Egypt. They form massive lensoidal masses up to 50 m long and 20 m wide. The lenses show a marked structural concordance with their neighboring country rocks. The typical country rocks are represented by the following high-grade metamorphic rocks: kyanite-muscovite schists, amphibolites, kyanite-bearing biotite gneisses, migmatites, granite gneisses and mobilizates. The studied carbonate-orthopyroxenites consist mainly of metamorphic orthopyroxene + magnesite, among other metamorphic, relict primary and retrograde secondary minerals. According to primary chromian spinel (Cr#, 0.7-0.84) chemistry and morphology, absence of clinopyroxene and presence of primary mantle olivine (Fo89-91) as relicts in the metamorphic orthopyroxene, the Heiani carbonate-orthopyroxenites seem to have formed from a highly depleted mantle peridotite precursor. At a late collisional stage during the Pan-Africa terrane accretion and the E-W crustal shortening (ca. 650-620 Ma), high-grade (upper amphibolite facies) low-P/high-T regional metamorphism (ca. 660 Ma) accompanied by CO2-metasomatism resulted in formation of the Heiani carbonate-orthopyroxenites. Mostly the carbonate-bearing shelf sediments beneath and/or in juxtaposition with the Heiani ophiolite are considered to be the proven source of the CO2-rich fluids. Although, a mixed sedimentary-mantle C source is not unlikely. A mineral paragenetic correlation with experimental data for the system MgO-SiO2-H2O-CO2 suggests metamorphic conditions consistent with those of the high-grade country rocks; i.e. 630-650 °C, 6-7 kbar (20-23 km depth) and high-XCO2 (0.6-0.7). The CO2-bearing fluids discharging along faults gave rise to regionally widespread carbonate-bearing assemblages. Accordingly, the Heiani carbonate-orthopyroxenites are considered the by-products of natural carbon sequestration by an ultramafic rock.

  18. Slipped deformation bands: A new type of cataclastic deformation bands in Western Sinai, Suez rift, Egypt

    E-print Network

    Fossen, Haakon

    is described. Slip surface development is normally constrained to the eventual brittle failure of a deformationSlipped deformation bands: A new type of cataclastic deformation bands in Western Sinai, Suez rift August 2008 Keywords: Deformation bands Cataclasis Fault Porous sandstone a b s t r a c t A type

  19. Preliminary crustal deformation model deduced from GPS and earthquakes’ data at Abu-Dabbab area, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Abdel-Monem S.; Hosny, A.; Abou-Aly, N.; Saleh, M.; Rayan, A.

    2013-06-01

    A local geodetic network consisting of eleven benchmarks has been established to study the recent crustal deformation in the Abu-Dabbab area. Seven campaigns of GPS measurements have been collected started from October 2008 and ended in March 2012. The collected data were processed using Bernese version 5.0, and the result values were adjusted to get the more accurate positions of the GPS stations. The magnitudes of horizontal displacements are variable from one epoch to another and in the range of 1-3 (±0.2) mm/yr. Due to the differences in rates of the horizontal displacement; the area is divided into two main blocks. The first one, moves to the east direction of about 3 mm/yr, while the second block, moves to the SW direction of about 6 mm/yr. According to the strain fields that were calculated for the different epochs of measurement, the main force is compression force and is taken the NW-SE to NWW-SEE direction. This force could be because of local and regional tectonic processes affecting on the study area. The maximum values of compression stress are found in the southern central and western part of study area. Estimated accumulation of this strain energy may be considered as an indicator of the possibility of earthquake occurrence. From the seismic tomography study, the 3D Vp and Vp/Vs crustal models indicate high Vp/Vs values forms an elongated anomaly, in the central part of the study area, that extends from a depth of 12 km to about 1-2 km of depth is obtained. By using this crustal model in relocations all seismicity informed that most of the seismicity strongly tend to occur in a cluster manner exactly above the southern part of the study area. Based on the conducted source mechanism study, it is noticed that shallow earthquakes are associated by a high CLVD ratio (up to 40%). Furthermore, initiation of a high level seismic activity, without a large seismic main shock is observed in the Abu-Dabbab area. The distribution of micro-earthquakes tends to align in an ENE-WSW direction marking a zone of activity verse the Red Sea. The nucleation of the seismic activity beneath the southern part of the Abu-Dabbab crust is more consistent with the obtained crustal deformation result by increasing the crustal movement in the south part than the northern part. Then, based on the obtained results of the above mentioned studies; seismic tomography; source mechanisms, and crustal deformation we conclude that these seismic activities that are associated by crustal deformation are owing to some magma activity beneath the crust of the Abu-Dabbab area.

  20. The use of multifrequency and polarimetric SIR-C\\/X-SAR data in geologic studies of Bir Safsaf, Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerald G. Schaber; John F. McCauley; Carol S. Breed

    1997-01-01

    Bir Safsaf, within the hyperarid “core” of the Sahara in the Western Desert of Egypt, was recognized following the SIR-A and SIR-B missions in the 1980s as one of the key localities in northeast Africa, where penetration of dry sand by radar signals delineates previously unknown, sand-buried paleodrainage valleys (“radar-rivers”) of middle Tertiary to Quaternary age. The Bir Safsaf area

  1. Determination of persistent organic pollutants in sediment and fish of the western coast of Alexandria, Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tarek O. Said

    2007-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) were recorded in sediment and fish samples collected from the western coast of Alexandria. Total hydrocarbons (aliphatic+PAHs ) in sediment ranged from 683.8 to 34670.1 ng g with an average of 9286.9 ng g . The sum of C16–C34 of aliphatic fractions was<4000?ng g;, indicating the presence of a fresh petroleum source. For all sediments, the anthracene\\/phenanthrene ratio was>0.1, suggesting the

  2. Paleomagnetism of middle Miocene volcanic rocks in the Mojave-Sonora desert region of western Arizona and southeastern California

    SciTech Connect

    Calderone, G.J. (Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ (United States)); Butler, R.F.; Acton, G.D. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (United States))

    1990-01-10

    Paleomagnetic directions have been obtained from 190 early to middle Miocene (12-20 Ma) mafic volcanic flows in 16 mountain ranges in the Mojave-Sonora desert region of western Arizona and southeastern California. These flows generally postdate early Miocene tectonic deformation accommodated by low-angle normal faults but predate high-angle normal faulting in the region. After detailed demagnetization experiments, 179 flows yielded characteristic directions interpreted as original thermal remanent magnetizations (TRM). Because of the episodic nature of basaltic volcanism in this region, the 179 flows yielded only 65 time-distinct virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs). The paleomagnetic pole calculated from the 65 cooling unit VGPs is located at 85.5{degree}N, 108.9{degree}E within a 4.4{degree} circle of 95% confidence. This pole is statistically indistinguishable (at 95% confidence) from reference poles calculated from rocks of similar age in stable North America and from a paleomagnetic pole calculated from rocks of similar age in Baja California. The coincidence of paleomagnetic poles from the Mojave-Sonora desert region with reference poles from the stable continental interior indicates that (1) significant vertical axis net tectonic rotations have not accompanied post-middle Miocene high-angle normal faulting in this region; (2) there has been no detectable post-middle Miocene latitudinal transport of the region; and (3) long-term nondipole components of the middle Miocene geomagnetic field probably were no larger than those of the recent (0-5 Ma) geomagnetic field. In contrast, paleomagnetic data indicate vertical axis rotations of similar age rocks in the Transverse Ranges, the Eastern Transverse Ranges, and the Mojave Block.

  3. Optical characteristics of biomass burning and desert dust over the Western Mediterranean during summer: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basart, Sara; Sicart, Michaël; María Baldasano, José; Lane, Diego; Comerón, Adolfo

    2013-04-01

    The present contribution reports on the aerosol vertical distributions in Barcelona (Spain) which were obtained when very high aerosol concentrations were observed on summer 2012. An EARLINET lidar system and AERONET sunphotometer located in Barcelona performed intensive measurements in the framework of the ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research InfraStructure Network) project. The data that were collected allow the characterization of the optical properties of the aerosols in this region, benefiting from the synergy of various remote sensing instruments. Due to its location in the Mediterranean basin, Barcelona metropolitan area is influenced by two major aerosol source regions: Europe and the Western Mediterranean Basin, as a major source of anthropogenic pollutants, and North Africa, as a principal source of natural dust. As a result, the composition of atmospheric aerosols in Barcelona station is a mixing of aerosols. During the period between 1 - 2 July, AOD reached high values (~ 0.5). In addition to anthropogenic local contributions, other aerosols long-range transported were also detected. Between 1 - 3 July, strong forest fires occurred in Alicante where advected to Barcelona area. On the other hand, between 28th June and 1st July, the northeastern Iberian Peninsula was affected by the intrusion of Saharan dust. The presence of Saharan dust was successfully forecasted by the BSC-DREAM8b dust regional model. MODIS and AERONET data, as well as air-mass backward trajectories confirmed the existence of biomass burning and desert dust in the case examined. Desert dust was detected between 2 and 4 km (above sea level, a.s.l) with maximum dust concentrations at ~ 4 km a.s.l on 1st June. On the other hand, favourable meteorological conditions made possible that biomass burning from Alicante was southern advected to Barcelona during the study period.

  4. Morphologic-anthropological investigations in tomb K93.12 at Dra' Abu el-Naga (Western Thebes, Egypt).

    PubMed

    Lösch, Sandra; Moghaddam, Negahnaz; Paladin, Alice; Rummel, Ute; Hower-Tilmann, Estelle; Zink, Albert

    2014-01-01

    In this study we present the analysis of the human remains from tomb K93.12 in the Ancient Egyptian necropolis of Dra' Abu el-Naga, located opposite the modern city of Luxor in Upper Egypt on the western bank of the Nile. Archaeological findings indicate that the rock tomb was originally built in the early 18th dynasty. Remains of two tomb-temples of the 20th dynasty and the looted burial of the High Priest of Amun Amenhotep have been identified. After the New Kingdom the tomb was reused as a burial place until the 26th dynasty. The skeletal and mummified material of the different tomb areas underwent a detailed anthropological and paleopathological analysis. The human remains were mostly damaged and scattered due to extensive grave robberies. In total, 79 individuals could be partly reconstructed and investigated. The age and sex distribution revealed a male predominance and a high percentage of young children (< 6 years) and adults in the range of 20 to 40 years. The paleopathological analysis showed a high prevalence of stress markers such as cribra orbitalia in the younger individuals, and other pathological conditions such as dental diseases, degenerative diseases and a possible case of ankylosing spondylitis. Additionally, 13 mummies of an intrusive waste pit could be attributed to three different groups belonging to earlier time periods based on their style of mummification and materials used. The study revealed important information on the age and sex distribution and diseases of the individuals buried in tomb K93.12. PMID:24818442

  5. Westward prograding metamorphism in mantle peridotites from the Eastern Desert of Egypt: clues to the subduction polarity of the Arabian Nubian Shield intra-oceanic arc ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam Abu El-Ela, Abdel; Hamdy, Mohamed; Abu-Alam, Tamer; Hassan, Adel; Gamal El Dien, Hamed

    2013-04-01

    Neoproterozoic arc mantle beneath the Arabian Nubian Shield (ANS) in the Eastern Desert (ED) of Egypt exhumed due to intra-oceanic upthrusting are represented mainly by exposed ophiolitic peridotites serpentinized to different degree. Metamorphism is related to the Pan-African collision and the subduction of oceanic lithosphere. However, polarity of the Pan-African intra-oceanic subduction is still questionable. We here trace the variation of the degree of serpentinization and regional metamorphism of six serpentinite masses, widely distributed in the ED (from the east to the west: W (Wadi). Alam, W. Igla, W. Mubarak, G. El-Maiyit, W. Um El Saneyat and W. Atalla). This is based on their mineralogy, textures and mineral chemistry. The studied rocks have harzburgite composition and they all formed in oceanic mantle wedge in the fore-arc setting, except those from W. Atalla that formed in MOR-arc transition setting. Much difference in the degree of serpentinization is obvious among these rocks. They are mainly partly serpentinized containing primary olivine and orthopyroxene at W. Alam and W. Igla, while they are completely serpentinized in the other localities. With the increased degree of metamorphism, textures were transformed from the pseudomorphic to the non-pseudomorphic. The most common retrograde assemblage is composed of lizardite ± chrysotile± brucite± magnetite. The serpentine prograde textures can be viewed as a continuum from retrograde lizardite pseudomorphic textures, to very fine-grained transitional texture of lizardite and chrysotile, to chrysotile-antigorite interlocking texture and finally to antigorite interpenetrating texture. These textures appear to represent successive stages in a recrystallization event. In late subduction-related metamorphism and early collisional emplacement stage, mylonitic-antigorite serpentinites formed and antigorite became the major phase in G. El-Maiyit, Um El-Saneyat and W. Atalla. The polygonal units of the hourglass texture and the penetrative fabric of the serrate veins in all serpentinized peridotites indicate that fracturing of these rocks was developed in a dynamic regime. The late emplacement of veins of brucite, carbonates and oxides were most probably formed during the final stage of exhumation and under a stress regime in the brittle-ductile transition. As the grade of metamorphism increases Fe released from olivine and orthopyroxene and Cr released from chromite are accommodating in antigorite-rich serpentinites. Serpentine in veins also tends to have less substitutions, which is consistent with the fact that Al, Cr and Ni are relatively immobile during alteration and therefore remain in their original microstructural site. Compositional zoning in spinel grains in all serpentinites reflect variation in the degree of alteration. The biggest variation of spinel compositions are among serpentinites from Um El-Saneyat and W. Atalla. With increasing the degree of alteration, size of the aluminian chromite core decreases while width of the intermediate Fe3+-rich aluminian chromite to ferrian-chromite zone and the outer Cr-magnetite to magnetite zones increase. The alteration zones were formed in a temperature < 400 ° C to 550 ° C corresponding to the low green-schist to the lower amphibolite facies. We propose that this is concordant with a westward polarity of the subducting oceanic lithosphere, associating the intra-oceanic arc ophiolite during the closure of the Mozambique ocean.

  6. Multiprocess evolution of landforms in the Kharga Region, Egypt: Applications to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breed, C. S.; Mccauley, J. F.; Grolier, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    In order to understand better the polygenetic evolution of landforms on the martian surface, field studies were conducted in and around the Kharga Depression, Egypt. The Kharga region, on the eastern edge of Egypt's Western Desert, was subject to erosion under mostly hyperarid climatic conditions, punctuated by brief pluvial episodes of lesser aridity, since early Pleistocene time. The region contains numerous landforms analogous to features on the martian surface: yardangs carved in layered surficial deposits and in bedrock, invasive dune trains, wind-modified channels and interfluves, and depressions bounded by steep scarps. Like many of the topographic depresions on Mars, the Kharga Depression was invaded by crescentic dunes. In Egypt, stratigraphic relations between dunes, yardangs, mass-wasting debris, and wind-eroded flash-flood deposits record shifts in the relative effectiveness of wind, water, and mass-wasting processes as a function of climate change.

  7. Geomicrobiological Changes in Two Ephemeral Desert Playa Lakes in the Western United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kyle C. Costa; Joy Hallmark; Jason B. Navarro; Brian P. Hedlund; Duane P. Moser; Stephanie Labahn; Debbie Soukup

    2008-01-01

    The geochemistry and microbiology of two ephemeral playa lakes in the Western United States, Surprise Valley Alkali Lake (SVAL) and Eldorado Playa (EP), were examined over one wetting cycle, revealing dramatic temporal changes in suspended mineralogy, aqueous chemistry, and bacterial populations. In SVAL the predominant suspended mineral changed from smectite to vermiculite and clinoptilolite, which led to a depletion of

  8. Reproductive Ecology of Western Diamond-Backed Rattlesnakes (Crotalus atrox) in the Sonoran Desert

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emily N. Taylor; Dale F. DeNardo

    2005-01-01

    We studied the reproductive ecology of a population of Western Diamond-Backed Rattlesnakes (Crotalus atrox) in south-central Arizona for four active seasons using radiotelemetry and portable ultrasonography. Snakes mate in the spring and fall, and females undergo vitellogenesis exclusively in the spring, ovulate in the early summer, and give birth in the late summer. Although parturition occurs at the same time

  9. Effects of Protective Fencing on Birds, Lizards, and Black-Tailed Hares in the Western Mojave Desert

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MATTHEW BROOKS

    1999-01-01

    Effects of protective fencing on birds, lizards, black-tailed hares (Lepus californicus), perennial plant cover, and structural diversity of perennial plants were evalu- ated from spring 1994 through winter 1995 at the Desert Tor- toise Research Natural Area (DTNA), in the Mojave Desert, California. Abundance and species richness of birds were higher inside than outside the DTNA, and effects were larger

  10. Methanogens at the top of the world: occurrence and potential activity of methanogens in newly deglaciated soils in high-altitude cold deserts in the Western Himalayas

    PubMed Central

    Aschenbach, Katrin; Conrad, Ralf; ?eháková, Klára; Doležal, Ji?í; Janatková, Kate?ina; Angel, Roey

    2013-01-01

    Methanogens typically occur in reduced anoxic environments. However, in recent studies it has been shown that many aerated upland soils, including desert soils also host active methanogens. Here we show that soil samples from high-altitude cold deserts in the western Himalayas (Ladakh, India) produce CH4 after incubation as slurry under anoxic conditions at rates comparable to those of hot desert soils. Samples of matured soil from three different vegetation belts (arid, steppe, and subnival) were compared with younger soils originating from frontal and lateral moraines of receding glaciers. While methanogenic rates were higher in the samples from matured soils, CH4 was also produced in the samples from the recently deglaciated moraines. In both young and matured soils, those covered by a biological soil crust (biocrust) were more active than their bare counterparts. Isotopic analysis showed that in both cases CH4 was initially produced from H2/CO2 but later mostly from acetate. Analysis of the archaeal community in the in situ soil samples revealed a clear dominance of sequences related to Thaumarchaeota, while the methanogenic community comprised only a minor fraction of the archaeal community. Similar to other aerated soils, the methanogenic community was comprised almost solely of the genera Methanosarcina and Methanocella, and possibly also Methanobacterium in some cases. Nevertheless, ~103 gdw?1 soil methanogens were already present in the young moraine soil together with cyanobacteria. Our results demonstrate that Methanosarcina and Methanocella not only tolerate atmospheric oxygen but are also able to survive in these harsh cold environments. Their occurrence in newly deglaciated soils shows that they are early colonizers of desert soils, similar to cyanobacteria, and may play a role in the development of desert biocrusts. PMID:24348469

  11. Effects of Protective Fencing on Birds, Lizards, and Black-Tailed Hares in the Western Mojave Desert

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MATTHEW BROOKS

    1999-01-01

    Lepus californicus  ), perennial plant cover, and structural diversity of perennial plants were evaluated from spring 1994 through winter 1995\\u000a at the Desert Tortoise Research Natural Area (DTNA), in the Mojave Desert, California. Abundance and species richness of birds\\u000a were higher inside than outside the DTNA, and effects were larger during breeding than wintering seasons and during a high\\u000a than a

  12. Three-dimensional structure of Conrad and Moho discontinuities in Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelwahed, Mohamed F.; El-Khrepy, Sami; Qaddah, Atef

    2013-09-01

    The three-dimensional structures of Conrad and Moho discontinuities beneath Egypt are investigated by local earthquake travel time inversion. A number of 2513 events with 24,696 arrival time data recorded by the Egyptian National Seismic Network (ENSN) are used. The station corrections of P- and S-waves and the hypocentral parameters are simultaneously estimated with the Conrad and Moho depths. The results of this study show that the discontinuities form patterns of shallow and deep structures getting shallow toward the northern and eastern coast, and deeper toward western Desert and northeastern Sinai. The Conrad and Moho discontinuities are located within the depth range 9-17 km and 27-41 km, respectively. The depth ranges of Conrad and Moho discontinuities are respectively: 15-16 km and 31-33 km in greater Cairo and Dahshour; 15-18 km and 32-35 km in Sinai; 16-17 and 33-35 km along the Nile River; 9 and 30 km near the Red Sea coast; 15 and 39 km toward the western desert. The comprehensive comparison with previous crustal studies suggests that the main patterns of Moho undulations and the range of Moho depths are in good agreement with the previous crustal models in Egypt, as well as with the Bouguer gravity anomalies that well explain the Nile River sediments, Red Sea mountain belts and Western Desert depression and Oasis. The model of the Moho and Conrad discontinuities improves knowledge of the three dimensional structure of the crust beneath Egypt in wide areas where geophysical data is sparse.

  13. U.S. in the World: Arizona/Egypt

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Population Reference Bureau

    Residents of Arizona and Egypt face a daily challenge: living in increasing numbers and concentrations in desert ecosystems. Read about how both face surprisingly similar conflicts and issues over water, land and industry.

  14. Nile River, Lake Nasser, Aswan Dam, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Egypt's High Aswan Dam on the Nile River at the first cataracts, Nile River, (24.0N, 33.0E) was completed in 1971 to provide cheap hydroelectric power and to regulate the historically uneven flow of the Nile River. The contrast between the largely base rock desert east of the Nile versus the sand covered desert west of the river and the ancient irrigated floodplain downstream from the damsite is clearly shown.

  15. Thermodynamic modelling of Sol Hamed serpentinite, South Eastern Desert of Egypt: Implication for fluid interaction in the Arabian-Nubian Shield ophiolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Alam, Tamer S.; Hamdy, Mohamed M.

    2014-11-01

    The Arabian-Nubian Shield is the largest tract of juvenile continental crust of the Neoproterozoic. This juvenile crust is composed of intra-oceanic island arc/back arc basin complexes and micro-continents welded together along sutures as the Mozambique Ocean was closed. Some of these sutures are marked by ophiolite decorated linear belts. The Sol Hamed ophiolite (808 ± 14 Ma) in southeastern Egypt at the Allaqi-Heiani-Onib-Sol Hamed-Yanbu arc-arc suture represents an uncommon example of rocks that might be less deformed than other ophiolites in the Arabian-Nubian Shield. In order to understand fluid-rock interactions before and during arc-arc collision, petrological, mineral chemistry, whole-rock chemistry and thermodynamic studies were applied to the Sol Hamed serpentinized ophiolitic mantle fragment. These studies reveal that the protolith had a harzburgite composition that probably originated as forearc mantle in the subducted oceanic slab. We propose that these rocks interacted with Ti-rich melts (boninite) in suprasubduction zone, which latter formed the Sol Hamed cumulates. Spinel's Cr# associated with the whole rock V-MgO composition suggest that the harzburgites are highly refractory residues after partial melting up to 29%. The melt extraction mostly occurred under reducing conditions, similar to peridotites recovered from the subducted lithosphere. Protolith alteration resulted from two stages of fluid-rock interaction. The first stage occurred as a result of infiltration of concentrated CO2-rich fluid released from carbonate-bearing sediments and altered basalt at the subduction zone. The alteration occurred during isobaric cooling at a pressure of 1 kbar. The fluid composition during the isobaric cooling was buffered by the metamorphic reactions. The second stage of fluid-rock interactions took place through prograde metamorphism. The increase in pressure during this stage occurred as a result of thrusting within the oceanic crust. In this process the forearc crust was loaded by roughly 20-30 km of overthrust rocks.

  16. The Formation of the Patterns of Desert Shrub Communities on the Western Ordos Plateau, China: The Roles of Seed Dispersal and Sand Burial

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yange; Yang, Xiaohui; Shi, Zhongjie

    2013-01-01

    The western Ordos Plateau is a key area of shrub diversity and a National Nature Reserve of endangered shrub species in north-west China. Desert expansion is becoming the most important threat to these endangered species. However, little is known about the effects of sand burial on the dynamics of the shrub community. This study aims to investigate how the shrubs as a community and as different individual shrubs respond to the disturbances caused by the desert expansion. The approach used by this study is to separate the seed-dispersal strategy from the sand-burial forces that are involved in structuring the shrub communities at different disturbance stages. Four communities for different disturbance stages were surveyed by using 50×50 m plots. The individual shrubs were classified into coloniser and successor groups at the seed-dispersal stage and strong and weak sand-burial tolerance groups at the sand-expansion stage. We employed spatial point pattern analysis with null models for each community to examine the seed-dispersal strategy and sand-burial forces affecting community distribution patterns. At the seed-dispersal stage, the interactions between the colonisers and the successors showed significant positive correlation at a scale of 0–1 m and significant negative correlation at a scale of 2 m; significant negative correlations between the groups with strong and weak sand-burial tolerance in the early stage of sand expansion at scales of 3–6 m, and significant positive correlation in the later stage of sand expansion at a scale of 13 m, were found. Seed-dispersal strategy is a reasonable mechanism to explain the shrub community pattern formation in the earlier stages, whereas sand burial is the primary reason for the disappearance of shrubs with weak sand-burial tolerance, this irreversible disturbance causes homogenisation of the community structure and produces aging populations of shrub species. This has an important influence on the succession direction of desert shrub communities. PMID:23922877

  17. AIRSAR Data for Geological and Geomorphological Mapping in the Great Sandy Desert and Pilbara Regions of Western Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapley, Ian J.

    1996-01-01

    Enhancements of AIRSAR data have demonstrated the benefits of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for revealing an additional and mich higher level of information about the composition of the terrain than enhancements f either SPOT-PAN or Landsat TM data. With appropriate image processing techniques, surface and near surface geological structures, hydrological systems (both current and ancient) and landform features, have been evidenced in a diverse range of landscapes. In the Great Sandy Desert region where spectral variability is minimal, radar's sensitivity to the micromorphology of sparse exposures of subcrop and lag gravels has provided a new insight into the region's geological framework, its landforms, and their evolution. In the Pilbara region, advanced processing of AIRSAR data to unmix the backscatter between and within the three frequencies of data has highlighted subsurface extensions of greenstone lithologies below sand cover and morphological evidence of past flow conditions under former climate regimes. On the basis of these observations, it is recommend that radar remote sensing technology involving the use of high resolution, polarimetric data be seriously considered as a viable tool for exploration in erosional and depositional environments located within Australia's mineral and oil-prospective provinces.

  18. Applications of remote sensing, GIS, and groundwater flow modeling in evaluating groundwater resources: Two case studies; East Nile Delta, Egypt and Gold Valley, California, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abdulaziz Mohamed Abdelaziz Ali Ismael

    2007-01-01

    Quaternary aquifer, East Nile Delta, Egypt. Due to the progressive increase in the development of desert land in Egypt, the demand for efficient water resources management and accurate land cover change information is increasing. In this study, we introduce a methodology to map and monitor land cover change patterns related to agricultural development and urban expansion in the desert fringes

  19. Ancient Egypt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evers, Virginia

    This four-week fourth grade social studies unit dealing with religious dimensions in ancient Egyptian culture was developed by the Public Education Religion Studies Center at Wright State University. It seeks to help students understand ancient Egypt by looking at the people, the culture, and the people's world view. The unit begins with outlines…

  20. Current status of phytoparasitic nematodes and their host plants in Egypt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Egypt many phytoparasitic nematodes constitute a major constraint to agricultural production, especially in sandy soil and reclaimed desert lands. Nematological surveys were conducted to determine the genera and species of phytoparasitic nematodes on associated host plants in Egypt. The results i...

  1. Eternal Egypt

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Available in English, French, and Arabic, Eternal Egypt is a website with a wealth of information on "the artifacts, characters, and places that together comprise the wonder that is Eternal Egypt." The website is organized so visitors can choose between a guided tour, begin with one of the cultural highlights (such as The Temple of Luxor or Part of a Wall of a Tomb), or simply explore and discover. A key feature of the website is the context provided in relation to various topics, so that a visitor can learn about the artifacts, but also how they connect to other people, places and artifacts, and where they fit in terms of an overall timeline and on a multimedia map of Egypt. Topics include: Arts and Crafts (Libraries, Architecture, Paintings and Relief, Sculpture, Humanities, Crafts), Science (Archaeology, Mathematics, Astronomy, Medicine, Social Science, Engineering), Agriculture (Irrigation, Herding, Farming, Crops), Commerce and Trade (Transportation), Government (Leaders, Seats of Power, Theocracy, Military), and Society and Culture (Family, Food and Drinks, Clothing, Sports and Entertainment, Religion and Spirituality).

  2. Whole-Genome Optical Mapping and Finished Genome Sequence of Sphingobacterium deserti sp. nov., a New Species Isolated from the Western Desert of China

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, István; Li, Xinna; Tang, Ran; Chen, Ming; Wang, Lin; Su, Shiyou; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Min

    2015-01-01

    A novel Gram-negative bacterium, designated ZWT, was isolated from a soil sample of the Western Desert of China, and its phenotypic properties and phylogenetic position were investigated using a polyphasic approach. Growth occurred on TGY medium at 5–42°C with an optimum of 30°C, and at pH 7.0–11.0 with an optimum of pH 9.0. The predominant cellular fatty acids were summed feature 3 (C16:1?7c/C16:1?6c or C16:1?6c/C16:1?7c) (39.22%), iso-C15:0 (27.91%), iso-C17:0 3OH (15.21%), C16:0 (4.98%), iso-C15:0 3OH (3.03%), C16:0 3OH (5.39%) and C14:0 (1.74%). The major polar lipid of strain ZWT is phosphatidylethanolamine. The only menaquinone observed was MK-7. The GC content of the DNA of strain ZWT is 44.9 mol%. rDNA phylogeny, genome relatedness and chemotaxonomic characteristics all indicate that strain ZWT represents a novel species of the genus Sphingobacterium. We propose the name S. deserti sp. nov., with ZWT (= KCTC 32092T = ACCC 05744T) as the type strain. Whole genome optical mapping and next-generation sequencing was used to derive a finished genome sequence for strain ZWT, consisting of a circular chromosome of 4,615,818 bp in size. The genome of strain ZWT features 3,391 protein-encoding and 48 tRNA-encoding genes. Comparison of the predicted proteome of ZWT with those of other sphingobacteria identified 925 species-unique proteins that may contribute to the adaptation of ZWT to its native, extremely arid and inhospitable environment. As the first finished genome sequence for any Sphingobacterium, our work will serve as a useful reference for subsequent sequencing and mapping efforts for additional strains and species within this genus. PMID:25830331

  3. Management of Egypt's Surface and Groundwater Resources: Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, M.; Ahmed, M.; Yan, E.; Milewski, A.; Mohamed, L.; Farag, A. Z. A.

    2014-12-01

    The River Nile is the main source of fresh water in Egypt. Most of Egypt's River Nile water (>85%) originates as precipitation over the Ethiopian highlands and is channeled by the Blue Nile. The construction (years: 2011 to 2017) of the Renaissance Dam (reservoir capacity: 70 x 109m3) on the Blue Nile poses an extreme threat to Egypt's population. If the reservoir was to be filled in 7 years, Egypt will lose (during each of 7 years following dam completion) a minimum of 15 x 109m3 of its annual allocation (55 x 109m3) to reservoir filling (10 x 109m3), evaporation (3.5 x 109m3), and infiltration (1.5 x 109m3). Three solutions are proposed: Solution I takes advantage of the cyclicity of Nile floods and is based on findings from a calibrated (against temporal head data) unconfined 2-dimensional transient groundwater flow model for Lake Nasser and surroundings and a calibrated (against lake levels) surface water model. Models show with time: (1) losses to infiltration will decrease (1975-193: 58.4 109m3; 1993-2001: 43.6 x 109m3) due to silting of Lake bottom and encroachment of excess Lake Nasser water will increase (e.g., 1975-1993: none; 1993-2001: 17 x 109m3). We propose to develop sustainable agricultural in the Western Desert: (1) In high flood years, excess Lake Nasser water (e.g., 1993-2001: 17 x 109m3) is channeled across the plateau bounding (from west) the River Nile valley to artificially recharge the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System (NSAS) that crops out west of the plateau and, (2) in low flood years, we extract the recharged groundwater. Solution II calls on mining the NSAS at reasonable rates. Using temporal (January 2003 - September 2012) Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data we estimate the annual depletion rates at 2 x 109m3 due to artificial extraction (1.5 x 109m3) and natural discharge (0.5 x 109m3). Assuming current GRACE depletion rates, the recoverable groundwater (5,180 x 109m3) will last for 2500 years; if we were to quadruple the artificial extraction rates (6 x 109m3), the reservoir will last for some 800 years. Solution III calls on the sustainable utilization of the NSAS groundwater in Sinai that receives an estimated minimum annual modern recharge of 13 x 106m3. Currently, these waters are lost as discharge in water bodies and/or diverted across political boundaries by major NE trending fault systems.

  4. Ancient Egypt

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Drawing on its superb collection of materials from archaeological excavations, the British Museum presents this extensive learning resource on Ancient Egypt. The site features texts, images, and interactive elements detailing Egyptian daily life, mythology, timekeeping, geography, architecture, governance, business, writing, and rituals of death. The material is clearly and simply written so that the site would be useful for primary school students, but it is informative and substantial enough to be of interest to college students and curious adults as well. Thoroughly hyperlinked and replete with images that can be enlarged for detailed perusal, the site goes beyond the typical teaser Websites so often posted by lesser museums.

  5. Desert Graphics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this lesson plan students will learn about how climates differ, in particular, how desert climates compare to climates in other areas. They will also learn how meteorologists collect all kinds of weather data, including daily high and low temperatures and average monthly rainfall, from all over the world. Students will use similar weather data to create a graph comparing three climates.

  6. Hepatitis C antibody prevalence in blood donors in different governorates in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Arthur, R R; Hassan, N F; Abdallah, M Y; el-Sharkawy, M S; Saad, M D; Hackbart, B G; Imam, I Z

    1997-01-01

    Markers of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections were sought in serum samples from 2644 blood donors in 24 of Egypt's 26 governorates. Of the 2644 samples, 656 (24.8%) were shown to contain anti-HCV immunoglobulin G antibody by Abbott second generation enzyme immunoassays (EIA). Of 85 EIA-positive samples tested by recombinant immunoblot assay, 72 (85%) were positive. HCV seroprevalence in the governorates ranged from zero to 38%; 15 governorates (62%) had an HCV antibody prevalence greater than 20%, and 6 (25%) greater than 30%. Governorates with higher sero-prevalences were located in the central and north-eastern Nile river delta, and south of Cairo in the Nile river valley. Subjects from areas in and adjoining the Sinai peninsula, in the eastern and western desert, and in southernmost Egypt, had the lowest prevalence of HCV antibody. The large urban governorates of Cairo and Alexandria had antibody prevalences of 19% and 11%, respectively. A total of 39.4% subjects had evidence of HBV infection (and-HBV core antigen total antibody). HCV infections were detected more frequently in donors with markers for HBV infections than in uninfected subjects (36% versus 18%, P < 0.001). PMID:9231192

  7. Types of Deserts

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Deserts are classified by their location and dominant weather pattern into several types: trade wind, midlatitude, rain shadow, coastal, monsoon, or polar deserts. Former desert areas presently in nonarid environments are paleodeserts, and extraterrestrial deserts exist on other planets. This site, produced by the U.S. Geological Survey, describes each type of desert using text and photographs.

  8. Studies on the nutritional status of children aged 0–5 years in a drought-affected desert area of western Rajasthan, India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Madhu B Singh; Ranjana Fotedar; J Lakshminarayana; PK Anand

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The present study was undertaken to assess the impact of drought on the nutritional status of pre-school children aged 0-5 years from a rural population in a desert area facing drought conditions very frequently. Design: The sampling design for assessment was the three-stage sampling technique. Setting: The study was carried out in 24 villages belonging to six tehsils (sub-units

  9. Desert USA: Desert Animals and Wildlife

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This great educational website about Desert Animals and Wildlife was created by DesertUSA, a publication designed to explore and educate about "the beauty, life, and culture of North American deserts." The Desert Animals and Wildlife homepage contains extensive lists of links to sites for different Mammals, Birds and Fish, Reptiles and Amphibians, and Insects and Spiders. The animal link selections include the Mexican Gray Wolf, Desert Pupfish, Desert Iguana, and Finback Whale just to name a few. The specific animal pages include photos and information categorized in areas such as Distribution, Habitat, Description, and Life Cycle. There is a feature link to a webpage on Desert Animal Survival, a list of links to relevant DesertUSA Articles and Information, and links to websites dedicated to other DesertUSA subjects such as Plants / Wildflowers, and Peoples and Cultures.

  10. Lake Nasser and Toshka Lakes, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Lake Nasser (center) and the Toshka Lakes (center left) glow emerald green and black in this MODIS true-color image acquired March 8, 2002. Located on and near the border of Egypt and Norther Sudan, these lakes are an oasis of water in between the Nubian (lower right) and Libyan Deserts (upper left). Also visible are the Red Sea (in the upper right) and the Nile River (running north from Lake Nasser). Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  11. Dust Plume off the Coast of Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Dwarfing the Nile, a river of dust flowed out of the deserts of northern Egypt on May 19, 2007. As the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead at 12:05 p.m. local time in Cairo, the sensor captured this image of the dust spreading northward over the Mediterranean Sea from the sandy deserts that span the country. At the margins of the plume, ribbons and ripples of dust are translucent, allowing a glimpse of the desert and water beneath, but in the center, the cloud is opaque, revealing nothing of the surface below. The part of north-central Egypt hidden by the dust plume is the Qattara Depression, the country's lowest point. Dipping down to 133 meters below sea level (436 feet), the depression is home to sandy deserts and dry lake beds that occasionally flood. The sand and fine, lake bed sediments are easily lofted into the air by strong winds that scour the area in late winter and early spring. In the eastern (right-hand) part of the image, the Nile River is lined by narrow ribbons of dull green vegetation. The fan-shaped delta is dotted with tan-colored spots, marking the location of cities and towns. The Nile Valley and Delta make up only a small fraction of the country's total land area, yet they support almost the entire population. The large image provided above has a spatial resolution (level of detail) of 250 meters per pixel. The MODIS Rapid Response Team provides this image in additional resolutions. The Earth Observatory also provides a 250-meter-resolution KMZ file of this image for use with Google Earth.

  12. What Makes a Desert a Desert?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NatureScope, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents background information and activities which focus on definition of a desert, locations of deserts, and factors influencing locations. Activities include objective(s), recommended age level(s), subject area(s), list of materials needed, and procedures. Two ready-to-copy pages with desert landforms and temperature/rainfall data are…

  13. Life in Egypt!

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. Pendleton

    2011-04-07

    What is the difference between life in the United States and life in Egypt? Use this fact chart to record your findings! Where is Egypt? Sightseeing in Egypt Use this time to record your findings in the "places" section of your fact chart and complete any other section you can with the information you have learned! Facts about Egypt Language (with audio) A Day in the Life Use this time to record your findings in the "people" section of your fact chart and complete ...

  14. Ancient Egypt: the Mythology

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Website, "dedicated to supplying information about the religious beliefs of ancient Egypt," offers internally linked essays and descriptions from scholarly sources detailing the relationship between the land and ancient beliefs; glossaries with healthy descriptions of the deities and symbols; and eighteen prominent mythological stories of Ancient Egypt. An annotated list of about a dozen other pertinent sites is also posted. A simple search engine is provided and can be accessed by going to the incongruously titled "Egypt" page, which offers users an opportunity to search the site, sign the guestbook, or email the author -- a college instructor -- questions about Egyptian mythology, but which offers no additional information on Egypt itself.

  15. Geography of Ancient Egypt

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mr. Myers

    2010-09-30

    This activity focuses on the importance of geographic features and the abundance of natural resources that helped ancient Egypt become the world's first superpower. Students will learn about the geography and resources available to the ancient Egyptians. Read each question below carefully. Using the following maps: modern political map geographical features map natural resources map archaeological sites map And the following features on the Egypt's Golden Empire website: natural resources farming Answer each question below using as much detail as possible. What countries border modern-day Egypt? (modern political map) Name the major bodies of water that surround an are a part of Egypt. (modern political map) What ...

  16. Geochemical and hydrological processes controlling groundwater quality in Assiut Governorate, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, R. G.; Tempel, R.; Gomaa, M.; Korany, E.

    2011-12-01

    Groundwater in Assiut area, Egypt, is an important source of fresh water for human consumption, agriculture, and domestic and industrial purposes. Due to a growing population and expansion of agricultural reclamation projects in the desert fringes of the Nile Valley, there is an increasing water demand in this arid region. This study has investigated the geochemical and hydrological processes that control groundwater quality within the Pleistocene, Plio-Pleistocene, and Eocene aquifers in Assiut, in addition to the hydraulic relationships between surface and groundwater systems and the relations among the defined groundwater aquifers. A total of 28 surface and 160 groundwater samples were collected for geochemical analysis (major and minor element chemistry, and stable isotope analyses). Total dissolved solids = 182 to 5657 mg/L, water-delta 18O = -7.5 to +6.5%, and water-delta D = -55 to +32%. Geochemical and stable isotope data indicate that the principal source of recharge to the Pleistocene and Plio-Pleistocene aquifers is the surface water system (irrigation canals), while the prevalence of Na-Cl type waters in the Eocene aquifer indicates recharge by upward leakage from the underlying Nubian sandstone aquifer which contains the same Na-Cl water type. Evaporation prior to infiltration, mixing, and mineral equilibria (dissolution and precipitation) are the main factors that affect water quality. Ion exchange plays a secondary role in controlling the water chemistry of the Pleistocene aquifer, but is more effective in controlling water quality within the Plio-Pleistocene and Eocene aquifers due to the prevalence of clay minerals within the matrices. The fresh water exploited from the Eocene aquifer may be of great importance for land reclamation projects not only at the western desert fringes, but also at the eastern desert fringes of Assiut and similar settings around the River Nile south of Assiut Governorate. Results of this study will be helpful for sustainable development, and raising the standard of living of people in the Assiut area, which is one of the poorest regions of Egypt.

  17. Desert Test Site Uniformity Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerola, Dana X.; Bruegge, Carol J.

    2009-01-01

    Desert test sites such as Railroad Valley (RRV) Nevada, Egypt-1, and Libya-4 are commonly targeted to assess the on-orbit radiometric performance of sensors. Railroad Valley is used for vicarious calibration experiments, where a field-team makes ground measurements to produce accurate estimates of top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances. The Sahara desert test sites are not instrumented, but provide a stable target that can be used for sensor cross-comparisons, or for stability monitoring of a single sensor. These sites are of interest to NASA's Atmospheric Carbon Observation from Space (ACOS) and JAXA's Greenhouse Gas Observation SATellite (GOSAT) programs. This study assesses the utility of these three test sites to the ACOS and GOSAT calibration teams. To simulate errors in sensor-measured radiance with pointing errors, simulated data have been created using MODIS Aqua data. MODIS data are further utilized to validate the campaign data acquired from June 22 through July 5, 2009. The first GOSAT vicarious calibration experiment was conducted during this timeframe.

  18. Evaluation of a Translocated Population of Desert Mule Deer in the Chihuahuan Desert of Northern Coahuila, Mexico 

    E-print Network

    Ortega-Sanchez, Alfonso

    2013-12-10

    Mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) are large (30–150 kg) ungulates that occur from southern Alaska to the desert mountains, grasslands, and coastal regions of northern and western Mexico. In Mexico, conservation efforts have taken place to reestablish...

  19. Napoleon in Egypt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Brian

    1989-01-01

    Recounts the 1798 Egyptian campaign of Napoleon Bonaparte, whose Scientific and Artistic Commission documented and described the glories of ancient Egypt. The expedition was a disaster by military standards, but the cultural legacies included the Rosetta Stone, and a chronicle entitled "Description de L'Egypte," which did much to popularize…

  20. Desert Voices: Southwestern Children's Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polette, Keith

    1997-01-01

    Examines three books with different ways of writing about the desert. Discusses: "Here Is the Southwestern Desert" by Madeline Dunphy, "The Desert Is My Mother" by Pat Mora, and "The Desert Mermaid" by Alberto Blanco. (PA)

  1. Phytomonitoring the unique colonization of oil-contaminated saline environment by Limoniastrum monopetalum (L.) Boiss in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Hussein S; Terry, Norman

    2002-04-01

    A site that covers over 20 acres of coastal saline depression in the western Mediterranean coastal desert of Egypt (El-Hammra station, the main crude oil pipeline terminal in Al-Alamein) is contaminated with crude oil spill as a result of activities from refineries, oilfield blowouts, tanker and pipeline break-ups. This area, prior to contamination, was dominated by different common halophytes. However, Limoniastrum monopetalum is now the only species found growing in the oil-contaminated soil. A specific question addressed in the present study was: what are the biochemical changes occurring in a desert plant growing in oil-contaminated soils? Major metabolites such as proline, betaine, free amino acids, fatty acid esters and mineral elements were studied. The plant samples were collected from the oil-contaminated, as well as noncontaminated, sites. The higher concentration in the selected organic metabolites in the plants growing in the contaminated site compared to those in noncontaminated site may be due to differences in a number of receptors. The sensitivity of such receptors for the environmental signal that cause differences in genetic expression leads to differences in physiological processes. The change in the landscape of the contaminated area and the elimination of the natural vegetation, except L. monopetalum, may explain the competitive balance toward the oil-resistant species. PMID:12046949

  2. Field and ASTER imagery data for the setting of gold mineralization in Western Allaqi-Heiani belt, Egypt: A case study from the Haimur deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoheir, Basem; Emam, Ashraf

    2014-11-01

    Although associated with carbonatized/listvenitized ophiolites and thrust structures, the morphology and internal structures of the auriferous quartz veins in the Haimur deposit suggest mineralization concurrent with NE-SW dextral brittle-ductile shear zones. The latter are attributed to intense transpression regime and are associated with (N)NE-trending tight to isoclinals folds that deform the early accretionary structures. Image processing techniques applicable to the Advanced Space-borne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data are used for mapping structures and hydrothermal alteration associated with the Haimur deposit. The automated lineament extraction by LINE module on high resolution ASTER imagery provides efficient data for potential dilation loci. Emphasis is placed on reliability of mineral indices extracted from the ASTER band ratios for identification of possibly mineralized alteration zones associated with NE-trending shear zones. Field and remote sensing data, together with the structural fabrics along the lode-associated shear zones clearly constrain on the genetic relationship between the Haimur gold deposit and post-accretionary transpression/shearing. We conclude that hydrothermal alteration zones that are confined to tightly enfolded ophiolites and transpressive shear zones along the Western Allaqi-Heiani belt are most potential targets for new exploration plans.

  3. Geology and origin of Meatiq Dome, Egypt: A Precambrian metamorphic core complex?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Neil C. Sturchio; Mohamed Sultan; Rodey Batiza

    1983-01-01

    Meatiq Dome, a metamorphic complex in the Precambrian basement of the Eastern Desert of Egypt, exhibits many of the essential features of Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes. It is an antiformal structure with low-dipping foliation and unidirectional mineral-slickenside lineation. The core consists of granite gneiss and is conformably overlain by a heterogeneous, isoclinally folded, mylonitic carapace. The carapace grades upward into

  4. ECOLOGY OF DESERT SYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventional wisdom considers deserts stark, harsh regions that support few living things. Most people also believe that water alone makes the desert bloom. Ecology of Desert Systems challenges these conventional views. This volume explores a broad range of topics of interest to ecosystem, popula...

  5. Where Deserts Form

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Most of Earth's deserts can be found in dry areas created by global circulation patterns. The deserts of our world are not restricted by latitude, longitude, or elevation. This site, produced by the U.S. Geological Survey, uses text and pictures to describe how atmospheric circulation patterns influence the locations of deserts on Earth and possibly on other terrestrial planets as well.

  6. The Politics of Educational Transfer and Policymaking in Egypt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Ali S.

    2010-01-01

    For the past two centuries, western modern education has informed education policies and practices in Egypt. However, few researchers have analyzed the historical or current politics of educational transfer in this country. This article investigates the ways in which foreign transfer has influenced Egyptian education, both historically and…

  7. SHUTTLE IMAGING RADAR PROVIDES FRAMEWORK FOR SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC EXPLORATION IN EGYPT AND SUDAN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breed, Carol S.; McCauley, John F.; Schaber, Gerald G.

    1984-01-01

    Shuttle Imaging Radar provides a pictorial framework to guide exploration for mineral resources (potential placers), groundwater sources, and prehistoric archaeological sites in the Western Desert of Egypt and Sudan. Documented penetration by the SIR-A signal of dry surficial sediment to depths of a meter or more revealed bedrock geologic features and networks of former stream valleys otherwise concealed beneath windblown sand, alluvium, and colluvial deposits. 'Radar units' mapped on SIR-A images according to relative brightness and degree of mottling correspond to subsurface geologic and topographic features identified in more than 50 test pits. Petrologic examination of pit samples confirms that a variety of depositional environments existed in this now hyper-arid region before it was mantled by windblown sand sheets and dunes. Wet sand was discovered in two buried valleys shown on the radar images and located in the field with the aid of co-registered maps and Landsat images, and a satellite navigation device. Buried valleys whose streams once traversed mineralized zones are potential sites of placers (gold, tin).

  8. Egypt's next steps Ahmed Zewail

    E-print Network

    Zewail, Ahmed

    1 Egypt's next steps Ahmed Zewail 3 Feb 2011 Mubarak must step down, a new constitution must change, writes Ahmed Zewail. CAIRO The revolt that has erupted across Egypt is in many ways historic than a better future for Egypt and its people. In this difficult time, the military has earned

  9. Animal brucellosis in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Wareth, Gamal; Hikal, Ahmed; Refai, Mohamed; Melzer, Falk; Roesler, Uwe; Neubauer, Heinrich

    2014-11-01

    Brucellosis is a highly contagious zoonosis that affects the public health and economic performance of endemic as well as non-endemic countries. In developing nations, brucellosis is often a very common but neglected disease. The purpose of this review is to provide insight about brucellosis in animal populations in Egypt and help to understand the situation from 1986 to 2013. A total of 67 national and international scientific publications on serological investigations, isolation, and biotyping studies from 1986 to 2013 were reviewed to verify the current status of brucellosis in animal populations in Egypt. Serological investigations within the national surveillance program give indirect proof for the presence of brucellosis in cattle, buffaloes, sheep, goats, and camels in Egypt. Serologic testing for brucellosis is a well-established procedure in Egypt, but most of the corresponding studies do not follow the scientific standards. B. melitensis biovar (bv) 3, B. abortus bv 1, and B. suis bv 1 have been isolated from farm animals and Nile catfish. Brucellosis is prevalent nationwide in many farm animal species. There is an obvious discrepancy between official seroprevalence data and data from scientific publications. The need for a nationwide survey to genotype circulating Brucellae is obvious. The epidemiologic situation of brucellosis in Egypt is unresolved and needs clarification. PMID:25390047

  10. What's It Like Where You Live? Desert

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2002-01-01

    This site provides excellent background information on deserts. Large print and superb pictures make this site very appealing to younger students. Topics include: What is a Desert Like?, Types of Deserts, What causes Deserts?, Deserts of the World, Desert Plants, Desert Animals, and links to other desert sites.

  11. Atacama Desert Soil Microbiology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benito Gómez-Silva; Fred A. Rainey; Kimberley A. Warren-Rhodes; Christopher P. McKay; Rafael Navarro-González

    The Atacama Desert is an ancient temperate desert (mean annual temperature of 14–16°C) that extends across 1,000 km from 30°S\\u000a to 20°S along the Pacific coast of South America (McKay et al. 2003; Fig. 6.1). As discussed by Rundel et al. (1991) and Miller\\u000a (1976) the desert owes its extreme aridity to the climatic regime dominated by a constant temperature

  12. Egypt's disarmament initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Fahmy, M.N. (United Nations, New York, NY (UN))

    1990-11-01

    On April 16, 1990, President Mubarak of Egypt proposed to the UN that all weapons of mass destruction be prohibited in the Middle East. The proposal arises from a conviction that the very presence of such weapons in the region is a security threat not only to the Middle East but also to international peace and security one which exacerbates an already tenuous and unstable situation. Egypt believes that creating an effective zone would reduce tension and generate impetus to resolving political conflict in the region, because it would exemplify the readiness of all countries to take into account the security concerns of others. Egypt's leaders are well aware that as long as political strife prevails in the Middle East, the obstacles to concrete disarmament measures are daunting. However, the potentially catastrophic consequence of yet another outbreak of hostilities drove them to seize the initiative.

  13. Egypt Daily.com

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Part of the World News network, Egypt Daily.com provides a wealth of links to frequently updated news stories dealing primarily with Egypt. From the homepage, users can click on any number of recent items gathered from a variety of different sources, including the BBC, ABC News, Arabic News, and CNN. The archive of news items stretches back several weeks, and news items are also arranged thematically into sections dealing with the economy, tourism, and technology on the site's main page. The site also features a number of helpful links, such as those leading to English-language news resources for the Arabic-speaking world and to online newspapers in Arabic. The site is rounded out by a list of online travel guides for those seeking to plan a trip to Egypt or other parts of North Africa.

  14. Why Are Deserts Dry?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The deserts of the world today are not the deserts of the planet's past. Fossilized hippopotamus and elephant bones tell us that the Sahara, for instance, was a much moister and more hospitable environment 8,000 years ago than it is now. Each of the Earth's modern deserts are a consequence of one of the following mechanisms: air mass subsidence, rain shadows, distant moisture sources, or cold offshore temperatures at the sea's surface. This site uses text and scientific illustrations to describe how each of these mechanisms results in the occurrence of deserts.

  15. Desert Water Keepers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-07

    In this outdoor, sunny day activity, learners experiment with paper leaf models to discover how some desert plants conserve water. Learners explore adaptations of various desert plants such as waxy coatings, thick stems, and spines and fine hairs to see which characteristics best help a plant hold water. Learners compare their model leaves to real desert leaves if they are available. Even in a nondesert region, the activity can be done at a local botanical garden that may include a desert plant collection or in any hot, dry area.

  16. Nile River Delta, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The Nile River Delta of Egypt (30.0N, 31.0E) irrigated by the Nile River and its many distributaries, is some of the richest farm land in the world and home to some 45 million people, over half of Egypt's population. The capital city of Cairo is at the apex of the delta. Just across the river from Cairo can be seen the ancient three big pyramids and sphinx at Giza and the Suez Canal is just to the right of the delta.

  17. Nile Delta, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Nile Delta of Egypt (30.0N, 31.0E) irrigated by the Nile River and its many distributaries, is some of the richest farm land in the world and home to some 45 million people, over half of Egypt's population of 57 million. The capital city of Cairo is at the apex of the delta in the middle of the scene. Across the river from Cairo can be seen the three big pyramids and sphinx at Giza and the Suez Canal is just to the right of the delta.

  18. Reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert.

    PubMed

    Sabo, John L; Sinha, Tushar; Bowling, Laura C; Schoups, Gerrit H W; Wallender, Wesley W; Campana, Michael E; Cherkauer, Keith A; Fuller, Pam L; Graf, William L; Hopmans, Jan W; Kominoski, John S; Taylor, Carissa; Trimble, Stanley W; Webb, Robert H; Wohl, Ellen E

    2010-12-14

    Increasing human appropriation of freshwater resources presents a tangible limit to the sustainability of cities, agriculture, and ecosystems in the western United States. Marc Reisner tackles this theme in his 1986 classic Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water. Reisner's analysis paints a portrait of region-wide hydrologic dysfunction in the western United States, suggesting that the storage capacity of reservoirs will be impaired by sediment infilling, croplands will be rendered infertile by salt, and water scarcity will pit growing desert cities against agribusiness in the face of dwindling water resources. Here we evaluate these claims using the best available data and scientific tools. Our analysis provides strong scientific support for many of Reisner's claims, except the notion that reservoir storage is imminently threatened by sediment. More broadly, we estimate that the equivalent of nearly 76% of streamflow in the Cadillac Desert region is currently appropriated by humans, and this figure could rise to nearly 86% under a doubling of the region's population. Thus, Reisner's incisive journalism led him to the same conclusions as those rendered by copious data, modern scientific tools, and the application of a more genuine scientific method. We close with a prospectus for reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert, including a suite of recommendations for reducing region-wide human appropriation of streamflow to a target level of 60%. PMID:21149727

  19. Reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sabo, John L.; Sinha, Tushar; Bowling, Laura C.; Schoups, Gerrit H.W.; Wallender, Wesley W.; Campana, Michael E.; Cherkauer, Keith A.; Fuller, Pam L.; Graf, William L.; Hopmans, Jan W.; Kominoski, John S.; Taylor, Carissa; Trimble, Stanley W.; Webb, Robert H.; Wohl, Ellen E.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing human appropriation of freshwater resources presents a tangible limit to the sustainability of cities, agriculture, and ecosystems in the western United States. Marc Reisner tackles this theme in his 1986 classic Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water. Reisner's analysis paints a portrait of region-wide hydrologic dysfunction in the western United States, suggesting that the storage capacity of reservoirs will be impaired by sediment infilling, croplands will be rendered infertile by salt, and water scarcity will pit growing desert cities against agribusiness in the face of dwindling water resources. Here we evaluate these claims using the best available data and scientific tools. Our analysis provides strong scientific support for many of Reisner's claims, except the notion that reservoir storage is imminently threatened by sediment. More broadly, we estimate that the equivalent of nearly 76% of streamflow in the Cadillac Desert region is currently appropriated by humans, and this figure could rise to nearly 86% under a doubling of the region's population. Thus, Reisner's incisive journalism led him to the same conclusions as those rendered by copious data, modern scientific tools, and the application of a more genuine scientific method. We close with a prospectus for reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert, including a suite of recommendations for reducing region-wide human appropriation of streamflow to a target level of 60%.

  20. The status of agricultural lands in Egypt: The use of multitemporal NDVI features derived from landsat TM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary Pax Lenney; Curtis E. Woodcock; John B. Collins; Hassan Hamdi

    1996-01-01

    Agricultural production in Egypt is limited by soil salinity and by the encroachment of urban settlements onto previously cultivated lands. In contrast, reclamation efforts in the desert and coastal areas increase the amount of land cultivated. In this study, field-calibrated, multi-temporal NDVI features derived from 10 Landsat TM images dating from 1984 to 1993 were used to assess the status

  1. The city of el?Amarna as a source for the study of urban society in ancient Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barry J. Kemp

    1977-01-01

    King Akhenaten's short?lived capital of el?Amarna still seems to offer the least fragmentary example of a city layout from New Kingdom Egypt. Although often regarded as of unusual spaciousness, taking advantage of the ready availability of building land on a desert site, there are strong grounds for arguing that, at the least, its range of housing reflects a mature, developed

  2. Negev: Land, Water, and Life in a Desert Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, William

    In view of the continuing increased concern about the extreme fragility of deserts and desert margins, Negev provides a timely discussion of land-use practices compatible with the often conflicting goals of preservation and development. The success o f agricultural and hydrologic experiments in the Negev desert of Israel offers hope to the large percentage of the world's population that lives with an unacceptably low quality of life in desert margins. Deserts are the one remaining type of open space that, with proper use, has the potential for alleviating the misery often associated with expanding population.In addition to the science in the book, the author repeatedly reinforces the concept that “western civilization is inextricably bound to the Negev and its environs, from which it has drawn, via its desert-born religions—Judasium, Christianity, and Islam—many of the mores and concepts, and much of the imagery and love of the desert, including man's relation to nature and to ‘God’.” Deserts often are erroneously perceived to be areas of no water: In reality, these are areas in which a little rainfall occurs sporadically and unpredictably over time. This meager water supply can be meticulously garnered to produce nutritious crops and forage.

  3. Deserts and Wind

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Timothy Heaton

    This site contains 20 questions on the topic of deserts and wind, which covers dunes, desert location and formation, and particle transportation. This is part of the Principles of Earth Science course at the University of South Dakota. Users submit their answers and are provided immediate feedback.

  4. Egypt's National Education Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Bradley James

    2000-01-01

    Examines the vigorous dialectic occurring among intellectuals, religious leaders, and politicians trying to define the appropriate role of Islam in Egyptian education. Discusses the call for the Islamization of education in contemporary Egypt, aspects of Islamic law, the position of the state on religious education, and the influence of a small…

  5. The Regional Environmental Impacts of Atmospheric Aerosols over Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakey, Ashraf; Ibrahim, Alaa

    2015-04-01

    Identifying the origin (natural versus anthropogenic) and the dynamics of aerosols over Egypt at varying temporal and spatial scales provide valuable knowledge on the regional climate impacts of aerosols and their ultimate connections to the Earth's regional climate system at the MENA region. At regional scale, Egypt is exposed to air pollution with levels exceeding typical air-quality standards. This is particularly true for the Nile Delta region, being at the crossroads of different aerosol species originating from local urban-industrial and biomass-burning activities, regional dust sources, and European pollution from the north. The Environmental Climate Model (EnvClimA) is used to investigate both of the biogenic and anthropogenic aerosols over Egypt. The dominant natural aerosols over Egypt are due to the sand and dust storms, which frequently occur during the transitional seasons (spring and autumn). In winter, the maximum frequency reaches 2 to 3 per day in the north, which decreases gradually southward with a frequency of 0.5-1 per day. Monitoring one of the most basic aerosol parameters, the aerosol optical depth (AOD), is a main experimental and modeling task in aerosol studies. We used the aerosol optical depth to quantify the amount and variability of aerosol loading in the atmospheric column over a certain areas. The aerosols optical depth from the model is higher in spring season due to the impacts of dust activity over Egypt as results of the westerly wind, which carries more dust particles from the Libyan Desert. The model result shows that the mass load of fine aerosols has a longer life-time than the coarse aerosols. In autumn season, the modelled aerosol optical depth tends to increase due to the biomass burning in the delta of Egypt. Natural aerosol from the model tends to scatter the solar radiation while most of the anthropogenic aerosols tend to absorb the longwave solar radiation. The overall results indicate that the AOD is lowest in winter due to airborne particles washed out by rain events. Conversely, the AOD increases in summer because particle accumulation is favored by the absence of precipitation during this season. Moreover, in summer, photochemical processes in the atmosphere lead to slight increases in the values of aerosol optical characteristics, despite lower wind speeds [hence less wind-blown dust] relative to other seasons. This study has been conducted under the PEER 2-239 research project titled "the Impact of Biogenic and Anthropogenic Atmospheric Aerosols to Climate in Egypt". Project website: CleanAirEgypt.org

  6. New paleocene sepiid coleoids (cephalopoda) from Egypt: evolutionary significance and origin of the sepiid 'rostrum'.

    PubMed

    Koš?ák, Martin; Jagt, John W M; Speijer, Robert P; Stassen, Peter; Steurbaut, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    New coleoid cephalopods, assignable to the order Sepiida, are recorded from the Selandian/Thanetian boundary interval (Middle to Upper Paleocene transition, c. 59.2 Ma) along the southeastern margin (Toshka Lakes) of the Western Desert in Egypt. The two genera recognised, Aegyptosaepia n. gen. and ?Anomalosaepia Weaver and Ciampaglio, are placed in the families Belosaepiidae and ?Anomalosaepiidae, respectively. They constitute the oldest record to date of sepiids with a 'rostrum-like' prong. In addition, a third, generically and specifically indeterminate coleoid is represented by a single rostrum-like find. The taxonomic assignment of the material is based on apical parts (as preserved), i.e., guard, apical prong (or 'rostrum-like' structure), phragmocone and (remains of) protoconch, plus shell mineralogy. We here confirm the shell of early sepiids to have been bimineralic, i.e., composed of both calcite and aragonite. Aegyptosaepia lugeri n. gen., n. sp. reveals some similarities to later species of Belosaepia, in particular the possession of a distinct prong. General features of the phragmocone and protoconch of the new form are similar to both Belocurta (Middle Danian [Lower Paleocene]) and Belosaepia (Eocene). However, breviconic coiling and the presence of a longer ventral conotheca indicate closer ties with late Maastrichtian-Middle Danian Ceratisepia. In this respect, Aegyptosaepia n. gen. constitutes a link between Ceratisepia and the Eocene Belosaepia. The occurrence of the new genus near the Selandian/Thanetian boundary suggests an earlier origin of belosaepiids, during the early to Middle Paleocene. These earliest known belosaepiids may have originated in the Tethyan Realm. From northeast Africa, they subsequently spread to western India, the Arabian Plate and, probably via the Mediterranean region, to Europe and North America. PMID:24348918

  7. A Desert Adventure

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ms. C. Christensen

    2005-10-25

    I hope you\\'re wearing either sunscreen or a winter coat and brought plenty of water with you, because we\\'re about to begin an adventure in the desert! I\\'ll bet you\\'re thinking that a desert is hot with lots of sand, but did you know that it can even snow in some deserts? In this adventure you\\'ll be learning more interesting facts about deserts and especially about the animals that live there. You will be tracking a desert animal on your journey and following its path. What does it do to survive in the environment of the desert? But be careful! Some of these animals can be dangerous... And most important, remember to HAVE FUN! TASK: After a day of following in the footsteps (or tracks) of your animal, you will be able to present the information to the other desert researchers in our class (thats everybody) and give them hints on the best ways to survive according to your animal. ...

  8. New Lakes in the Egyptian Desert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Four lakes formed recently in southern Egypt in an area that was previously desert. Fed by unusually high levels of rainfall and water overflowing from the Aswan High Dam on the Nile River, the first lake appeared in 1998. The Aswan's overflowing waters are channeled through an arroyo into a reservoir, as expected, but as the high rains have continued, so has the overflow. Consequently, the reservoir has grown in size and three more lakes have formed. Authorities in Egypt estimate that, together, the lakes now hold about 700 billion cubic feet of water--one quarter the Nile's total water supply. Scientist don't know whether or not the lakes will remain, or will dry up within a few years. In this true-color image acquired by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), on October 10, 2000, the lakes are the areas of dark pixels located about 50 km west of Lake Nasser. Image by Robert Simmon Reto Stockli, and Brian Montgomery, NASA GSFC

  9. Mesozoic carbonate-siliciclastic platform to basin systems of a South Tethyan margin (Egypt, East Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassy, Aurélie; Crouzy, Emmanuel; Gorini, Christian; Rubino, Jean-Loup

    2015-04-01

    The Mesozoïc Egyptian margin is the south margin of a remnant of the Neo-Tethys Ocean, at the African northern plate boundary. East Mediterranean basin developed during the late Triassic-Early Jurassic rifting with a NW-SE opening direction (Frizon de Lamotte et al., 2011). During Mesozoïc, Egypt margin was a transform margin with a NW-SE orientation of transform faults. In the Eastern Mediterranean basin, Mesozoïc margins are characterized by mixed carbonate-siliciclastics platforms where subsidence and eustacy are the main parameters controlling the facies distribution and geometries of the platform-to-basin transition. Geometries and facies on the platform-slope-basin system, today well constrained on the Levant area, where still poorly known on the Egyptian margin. Geometries and stratigraphic architecture of the Egyptian margin are revealed, thanks to a regional seismic and well data-base provided by an industrial-academic group (GRI, Total). The objective is to understand the sismostratigraphic architecture of the platform-slope-basin system in a key area from Western Desert to Nile delta and Levant margin. Mapping of the top Jurassic and top Cretaceous show seismic geomorphology of the margin, with the cartography of the hinge line from Western Desert to Sinaï. During the Jurassic, carbonate platform show a prograding profile and a distally thickening of the external platform, non-abrupt slope profiles, and palaeovalleys incisions. Since the Cretaceous, the aggrading and retrograding mixed carbonate-siliciclastic platform show an alternation of steep NW-SE oblique segments and distally steepened segments. These structures of the platform edge are strongly controlled by the inherited tethyan transform directions. Along the hinge line, embayments are interpreted as megaslides. The basin infilling is characterised by an alternation of chaotic seismic facies and high amplitude reflectors onlaping the paleoslopes. MTC deposits can mobilize thick sedimentary series (up to 3500 m) as a mixed combination of debris flows, internal preserved blocks, and/or compressively-deformed distal allochthonous masses. Transported material have proceeded from the dismantling of the Mesozoic mixed carbonate-siliciclastic platform. They can spread down slope over areas as large as 70000 of km2. According to stratigraphic correlations with global sea-level positions, platform instability would have been triggered by the gravitational collapse of the carbonate-siliciclastic platform under its own weight after successive subaerial exposures which were able to generate karstification processes. Seismic interpretation is constrained by a detailed assessment of the Egyptian margin paleogeography supported by wells. This margin segment is briefly compared to the outcropping Apulian margin in Italy.

  10. Atmospheric Environment 40 (2006) 38813897 Field measurements of desert dust deposition in Libya

    E-print Network

    Clarke, Michèle

    2006-01-01

    significant sources being the Libyan Desert; the playa lakes of western Tunisian and northern Algeria; Mali- graphic, geological and climatic data suggests that local emissions in the coastal regions of Libya

  11. Geological And Structural Setting Of Wadi Hodein Area South Eastern Egypt With Application Of Remote Sensing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. M. Abdeen; M. F. Sadek; R. O. Greiling

    Detailed field mapping and structural studies of the area around the mouth of Wadi Hodein, some 20 km west of Shalatin at the Red Sea coast in the south Eastern Desert of Egypt, revealed four phases of structural deformation (from oldest to youngest; D1, D2, D3 and D4) affecting the Neoproterozoic Pan-African basement rocks. D1 is represented by ENE-WSW oriented

  12. The Desert Blooms!

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-04-30

    This activity attempts to clear up the common misconception that deserts are always hot, totally dry, and uninhabitable. Learners listen to poetry and use picture books and other resources to discover that the desert is actually full of life! Learners develop group and individual poems. This activity is featured on pp.27-29 of the "One With the Earth: Native Americans and the Natural World" multidisciplinary unit of study for kindergarten through third grade.

  13. Depositional environments and sequence architecture of the Raha and Abu Qada formations (Cenomanian-Turonian), west central Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anan, Tarek I.; El-Shahat, Adam; Genedi, Adel; Grammer, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Cenomanian-Turonian deposits are important reservoirs for many oil fields in the Western Desert and the Gulf of Suez region of Egypt. Study of the Raha and Abu Qada formations (Cenomanian-Turonian), from five dip-oriented outcrop locations in west central Sinai; indicates deposition of a mixed siliciclastic-carbonate system on a ramp setting. The inner ramp facies (bivalve and benthonic foraminiferal wackestone) grades northward to the mid ramp facies (echinoderm calcisphere packstone, and oyster floatstone), and outer ramp facies (planktonic foraminiferal wackestone and calcisphere wackestone). The two studied formations comprise one second-order depositional sequence (duration of approximately 10 Million years). This large scale sequence includes four third-order depositional sequences, three of which are observed in the Raha Formation, with the other one recorded in the Abu Qada Formation. Because west central Sinai was tectonically stable during the Cenomanian and Turonian, the main factor controlling the lateral and vertical distribution of facies tracts is likely due to changes in the relative sea level. The Cenomanian-Turonian boundary event is known as the largest oceanic anoxic event during the Cretaceous. This global event has been documented in three of the studied sections. The recorded ?13C excursions range from +3.04‰ to +5.24‰. These high positive excursions in ?13C are associated with highly negative values of ?18O (values range from -6.01‰ to -1.38‰).

  14. New insights into microbially induced sedimentary structures in alkaline hypersaline El Beida Lake, Wadi El Natrun, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taher, Amany G.; Abdel-Motelib, Ali

    2015-05-01

    Microbially induced sedimentary structures (MISS) were studied in detail in the alkaline hypersaline El Beida Lake of Wadi El Natrun in the western desert sector of Egypt, based on field observations and sampling performed in 2013 and 2014. Geomorphologically, the lake can be subdivided into three zones, each with characteristic sedimentary and biosedimentary structures. The marginal elevated zone that borders the lake is characterized by thick blocky crusts devoid of microbial mats. The middle-lower supratidal zone has luxuriant microbial mats associated with knotty surfaces, mat cracks and wrinkle structures. A zone of ephemeral shallow pools and channels is characterized by reticulate surfaces, pinnacle mats, sieve-like surfaces, gas domes and mat chips. In the microbial mats, authigenic minerals include thenardite Na2SO4, trona Na3(CO3)(HCO3)•2H2O and halite NaCl. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses revealed that the minerals are closely associated with the MISS, suggesting some influence of microorganisms on mineral precipitation. Complex interactions between regional hydrological cycles and diagenetic processes imply low preservation potential. MISS signatures of such saline lakes can serve as key analogues for interpreting the geologic record.

  15. Calcareous benthonic foraminifera across the Cretaceous/Paleocene transition of Gebel Um El-Ghanayem, Kharga Oasis, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orabi, Orabi H.; Khalil, Hamza M.

    2014-08-01

    The studies of benthic calcareous foraminifera of the Maastrichtian-early Paleocene Dakhla Formation in Gebel Um El-Ghanayem (Western Desert, Egypt), improve reconstruction of depositional environments of these successions. In total, 68 taxa of benthic foraminifera were identified in the studied succession. The late Maastrichtian assemblages (Zone CF3) are dominated by calcareous foraminifera with tapered tests, this tapered taxon Loxostomum applinae, Lox. tegulatum various dentalinid taxa, and Buliminella cushmani dominate in CF3 Biozone. We thus interpret these faunas as being dominated by infaunal morphogroups, suggesting a moderately eutrophic environment. Danian assemblages are characterized by abundant epifaunal trochospiral species, such as Cibicidoides abudurbensis, Cibicidoides farafraensis, and Gyroidinoides girardanus. The infaunal morphogroups make up 25-47% of fauna in the Danian, in contrast to 62-76% in the Upper Maastrichtian. This dominance of the Danian benthic foraminiferal assemblages by epifaunal or mixed epifaunal/infaunal morphogroups suggests that the food supply to the benthos was less abundant than in the latest Cretaceous. The Cretaceous/Paleocene boundary (K/Pg) is within the upper unit of the Lower Kharga Member and marked by a hiatus in at least the top of CF3 Zone of the Upper Maastrichtian to the Lower Paleocene (base Plc Zone).

  16. Sonoran Desert: Fragile Land of Extremes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Produced and Directed by Wessells, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    'Sonoran Desert: Fragile Land of Extremes' shows how biologists with the U.S. Geological Survey work with other scientists in an effort to better understand native plants and animals such as desert tortoises, saguaro cacti, and Gila monsters. Much of the program was shot in and around Saguaro National Park near Tucson, Arizona. Genetic detective work, using DNA, focuses on understanding the lives of tortoises. Studies of saguaros over many decades clarify how these amazing plants reproduce and thrive in the desert. Threats from fire, diseases in tortoises, and a growing human population motivate the scientists. Their work to identify how these organisms live and survive is a crucial step for the sound management of biological resources on public lands. This 28-minute program, USGS Open-File Report 03-305, was shot entirely in high definition video and produced by the USGS Western Ecological Research Center and Southwest Biological Science Center; produced and directed by Stephen Wessells, Western Region Office of Communications.

  17. Modern Egypt: A Development Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Rosalind; And Others

    Egypt is a culture which combines the traditional with the modern. This text aims to foster an appreciation of Egypt as a changing culture facing the challenges of development. Topics included are: (1) Village Life; (2) Urban Life; (3) Nile; (4) Government; (5) Agriculture; (6) Economy; (7) Health/Games; (8) Education; (9) Religion; (10)…

  18. Published: 3 January 2013 Egypt's New Year

    E-print Network

    Zewail, Ahmed

    1 Published: 3 January 2013 Egypt's New Year Resolution Op-Ed by Ahmed H. Zewail CAIRO -- Egypt, is one of Egypt's largest extremist organizations. "Only when he changes his mind from being a Gamaa Brother to a national leader can we have real progress in Egypt," Mostafa said, adding: "For now

  19. Water Resources Center, Desert Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    to promote shorebird reproductive success will have to ensure birds at hypersaline wetlands have access Title Salinity Management in Western Wetlands:colon;colon; Effects of Irrigated Agriculture Project Category #1 Wetlands Focus Category #2 None Focus Category #3 None Lead Institution Desert Research

  20. EVOLUTION AFTER THE FLOOD: PHYLOGEOGRAPHY OF THE DESERT FISH

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JERALD B. JOHNSON

    The Bonneville Basin and upper Snake River drainage of western North America underwent extensive hydrological changes during the late Pleistocene, potentially influencing the geographic distribution and evolutionary trajectories of aquatic species that occupied this region. To test this hypothesis, I reconstructed the phylogeographic history of the desert fish Utah chub (Gila atraria) by examining 16 populations that span the natural

  1. [Sexuality in Ancient Egypt].

    PubMed

    Androutsos, G; Marketos, S

    1994-10-01

    The present article explores the sexuality in ancient Egypt. In particular in this article are presented the ways of concubinage (marriage, concubinage, adultery), the incest, loves of the pharaohs and of the common people, the freedom of choice in garments, the status of the hetairas and of the whores, the sexual perversions (male and female homosexuality, necrophilia, sodomism, bestiality, rape, masturbation, exhibitionism), the operations of the genitals (circumcision, excision, castration) and finally the level of knowledge in gynaecology, fertility, contraception and obstetrics that even today demands our admiration. PMID:7858632

  2. Egypt at the crossroads.

    PubMed

    Hinrichsen, D

    1992-01-01

    Egypt is the location of the 1994 International Population and Development Conference. Conditions in Egypt due to expected population growth rates are anticipated as headed for "ecological breakdown." There is loss of prime agricultural land to urban expansion and difficulties in providing employment and vital services. The fertility decline to 4 children/family is still inadequate to meet resource needs; a 2-child family norm must be adopted because the country can barely meet the needs of 90 million people. Cairo is becoming a mega-city of squatter settlements and slums. Population densities approach 140,000/sq. kilometers. The family planning (FP) program receives top political support. The contraceptive prevalence rate has risen to just over 50%, a 10% increase since 1988. Egypt is the first Muslim country to surpass the 50% mark. Credit for this accomplishment is given to public information and education campaigns to reduce family size, expansion of maternal and child health services and FP, the cooperation of Muslim clerics, and better educated women. Nongovernmental organizations have played an active role in FP. The future challenge is to improve services and outreach and keep up with demand. Attitudes in rural areas have changed, so that desiring children to help with farm work is the exception. Progress on arresting environmental destruction has not been as successful. There are still poor irrigation practices. The breadbasket the Nile River sustained no longer exists; Egypt is a net importer of food. Water shortages and water quality limit productivity. 57.2 billion cu. meters out of 58.4 billion cu. meters of freshwater available from the Nile River are used primarily for irrigation of the 17.6 million hectares of agricultural land along the river and its delta. Salts have polluted the river from fertilizers and pesticides and municipal and industrial wastes. Industrial dumping is illegal, but continues. Treatment plants are inadequate and water pipes are in need of repair. In order to meet water needs in the year 2000, irrigation water needs to be reclaimed. There is a race against time toe correct mismanagement. PMID:12344703

  3. The Nubian Aquifer in Southwest Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, C. A.; Werwer, A.; El-Baz, F.; El-Shazly, M.; Fritch, T.; Kusky, T.

    2007-02-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images, and topographic and groundwater data are used to understand heterogeneities of the Nubian Aquifer between 20 24.5°N and 25 32°E in southwest Egypt. New fluvial and structural interpretations emphasize that the desert landscape was produced by fluvial action, including newly mapped alluvial fans. In central locations, braided channels are spatially aligned with a NE structural trend, suggesting preferential water flow paths that are consistent with the local direction of groundwater flow. The alluvial fans and structurally enclosed channels coincide with gentle slopes and optimal recharge conditions (1 5%) derived from the new Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) slope map, indicating that these areas have high groundwater potential. The SAR interpretations are correlated with anomalies observed in groundwater data from 383 wells. Results suggest a relationship between the spatial organization of fluvial and structural features and the occurrence of low-salinity groundwater. Low-salinity water exists adjacent to the alluvial fans and in SW reaches of the structurally enclosed channels. Wells in the vicinity of structures contain low-salinity water, emphasizing that knowledge of structural features is essential to understand groundwater flow paths. The new approach is cost effective and noninvasive and can be applied throughout the eastern Sahara to assist in resource management decisions and support the much needed agricultural expansion.

  4. The use of multifrequency and polarimetric SIR-C/X-SAR data in geologic studies of Bir Safsaf, Egypt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaber, G.G.; McCauley, J.F.; Breed, C.S.

    1997-01-01

    Bir Safsaf, within the hyperarid 'core' of the Sahara in the Western Desert of Egypt, was recognized following the SIR-A and SIR-B missions in the 1980s as one of the key localities in northeast Africa, where penetration of dry sand by radar signals delineates previously unknown, sand-buried paleodrainage valleys ('radar-rivers') of middle Tertiary to Quaternary age. The Bir Safsaf area was targeted as a focal point for further research in sand penetration and geologic mapping using the multifrequency and polarimetric SIR-C/X-SAR sensors. Analysis of the SIR-C/X-SAR data from Bir Safsaf provides important new information on the roles of multiple SAR frequency and polarimetry in portraying specific types of geologic units, materials, and structures mostly hidden from view on the ground and on Landsat TM images by a relatively thin, but extensive blanket of blow sand. Basement rock units (granitoids and gneisses) and the fractures associated with them at Bir Safsaf are shown here for the first time to be clearly delineated using C- and L-band SAR images. The detectability of most geologic features is dependent primarily on radar frequency, as shown for wind erosion patterns in bedrock at X-band (3 cm wavelength), and for geologic units and sand and clay-filled fractures in weathered crystal-line basement rocks at C-band (6 cm) and L-band (24 cm). By contrast, Quaternary paleodrainage channels are detectable at all three radar frequencies owing, among other things, to an usually thin cover of blow sand. The SIR-C/X-SAR data investigated to date enable us to make specific recommendations about the utility of certain radar sensor configurations for geologic and paleoenvironmental reconnaissance in desert regions.Analysis of the shuttle imaging radar-C/X-synthetic aperture radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) data from Bir Safsaf provides important new information on the roles of multiple SAR frequency and polarimetry in portraying specific types of geologic units, materials, and structures mostly hidden from view on the ground and on Landsat images by a relatively thin, but extensive blanket of blow sand. Basement rock units and associated fractures at the Bir Safsaf are clearly delineated using C- and L-band SAR images. The detectability of most geologic features depend primarily on radar frequency. The SIR-C/X-SAR data also provide recommendations about the utility of certain radar configurations for geologic and paleoenvironmental reconnaissance in deserts.

  5. Comparison of Growth and Stress in Resident Redband Trout Held in Laboratory Simulations of Montane and Desert Summer Temperature Cycles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John D. Cassinelli; Christine M. Moffitt

    2010-01-01

    Within their native range in western North America, resident redband trout Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri occupy stream habitat from high mountains to low desert. To better understand the temperature tolerance, growth, and stress physiology of native redband trout populations and compare the resilience and responses to reciprocal environments of stocks adapted to desert or montane conditions, we conducted controlled laboratory trials.

  6. How desert varnish forms?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Randall S.; Kolb, Vera M.; Lynne, Bridget Y.; Sephton, Mark A.; Mcloughlin, Nicola; Engel, Michael H.; Olendzenski, Lorraine; Brasier, Martin; Staley, James T., Jr.

    2005-09-01

    Desert varnish is a black, manganese-rich rock coating that is widespread on Earth. The mechanism underlying its formation, however, has remained unresolved. We present here new data and an associated model for how desert varnish forms, which substantively challenges previously accepted models. We tested both inorganic processes (e.g. clays and oxides cementing coatings) and microbial methods of formation. Techniques used in this preliminary study include SEM-EDAX with backscatter, HRTEM of focused ion beam prepared (FIB) wafers and several other methods including XRPD, Raman spectroscopy, XPS and Tof-SIMS. The only hypothesis capable of explaining a high water content, the presence of organic compounds, an amorphous silica phase (opal-A) and lesser quantities of clays than previously reported, is a mechanism involving the mobilization and redistribution of silica. The discovery of silica in desert varnish suggests labile organics are preserved by interaction with condensing silicic acid. Organisms are not needed for desert varnish formation but Bacteria, Archaea, Eukarya, and other organic compounds are passively incorporated and preserved as organominerals. The rock coatings thus provide useful records of past environments on Earth and possibly other planets. Additionally this model also helps to explain the origin of key varnish and rock glaze features, including their hardness, the nature of the "glue" that binds heterogeneous components together, its layered botryoidal morphology, and its slow rate of formation.

  7. Wind modeling of Chihuahuan Desert dust outbreaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Rivera, Nancy I.; Gill, Thomas E.; Gebhart, Kristi A.; Hand, Jennifer L.; Bleiweiss, Max P.; Fitzgerald, Rosa M.

    The Chihuahuan Desert region of North America is a significant source of mineral aerosols in the Western Hemisphere, and Chihuahuan Desert dust storms frequently impact the Paso del Norte (El Paso, USA/Ciudad Juarez, Mexico) metropolitan area. A statistical analysis of HYSPLIT back trajectory residence times evaluated airflow into El Paso on all days and on days with synoptic (non-convective) dust events in 2001-2005. The incremental probability—a measure of the areas most likely to have been traversed by air masses arriving at El Paso during dusty days—was only strongly positively associated with the region west-southwest of the city, a zone of known dust source areas. Focused case studies were made of major dust events on 15 April and 15 December 2003. Trajectories approached the surface and MM5 (NCAR/Penn State Mesoscale Model) wind speeds increased at locations consistent with dust sources observed in satellite imagery on those dates. Back trajectory and model analyses suggested that surface cyclones adjacent to the Chihuahuan Desert were associated with the extreme dust events, consistent with previous studies of dust storms in the Southern High Plains to the northeast. The recognition of these meteorological patterns serves as a forecast aid for prediction of dust events likely to impact the Paso del Norte.

  8. Snow, the Great River, and the Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rango, A.

    2005-12-01

    While many major rivers around the world originate from alpine snowpacks in mountain regions, some experience the extreme contrast of flowing through harsh desert environments downriver. One such stream is the Rio Grande which rises in the San Juan and the Sangre de Christo mountains of southern Colorado and northern New Mexico. Eventually, the snow fed Rio Grande flows through North America's largest desert, the Chihuahuan Desert in New Mexico, Texas, and Mexico, and simultaneously becomes part of the border between the United States and Mexico. As is often true, urban areas develop along the river corridors rather than in more inaccessible mountain regions. This demographic preference tends to isolate the vast majority of population in the Rio Grande, who are dependent on water for their livelihoods, from the mountain snowpacks where the flow is generated. Ironically then, snow is seldom viewed as the source of the much needed water flowing through the desert by the majority of the basin's population. In arid regions of the western U.S., water demand far exceeds the water supply, and water use is apportioned under the doctrine of prior appropriation with the oldest right getting the first use of water. The increasing population in urban areas does not usually have a right to use the water flowing through the desert unless water rights have been purchased by municipalities from the major category of water user in these basins, namely, irrigated agriculture. In the entire Rio Grande basin, irrigation makes up 80% of the consumptive use of water. Additionally, basin compacts and international treaties apportion water between states and countries. Because these formal agreements were based on above average runoff years, there is little flexibility in changing the use of water, particularly in dry to normal runoff years. Most of the older water rights in the Rio Grande, especially the upper basin, are supplied by snowmelt. This leaves the lower basin to depend upon rainfall-produced runoff occurring mostly during the sporadic summer monsoon season. Water harvesting techniques which promote heterogeneous water accumulation or production can effectively make more water available in certain areas at the expense the expense of nearby areas. The use of water ponding dikes on arid rangeland can promote increased native vegetation productivity through increases in soil moisture. Stock tanks lined with impervious material are also used to collect whatever runoff that is generated for later use. Desert dwellers living along rivers must rely on conservation measures and ingenuity in order to come up with a very limited water resource to survive. This survival is continually in doubt because population(and consequently water demand) continues to grow in these arid regions while the water supply remains relatively constant.

  9. Auditors and IT Support in Egypt Mohamed A. Wahdan, Faculty of Commerce, Menoufia University, Egypt

    E-print Network

    Spronck, Pieter

    and IT Support in Egypt Mohamed A. Wahdan, Faculty of Commerce, Menoufia University, Egypt Pieter Spronck, MICC ____________________________________________________________________________________ The paper aims at establishing the present status of the auditing profession in Egypt. The research framework in Egypt and to investigate the challenges and the possibilities of support by information

  10. Southwestern desert resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halvorson, William L.; van Riper, Charles, III; Schwalbe, Cecil R.

    2010-01-01

    The southwestern deserts stretch from southeastern California to west Texas and then south to central Mexico. The landscape of this region is known as basin and range topography featuring to "sky islands" of forest rising from the desert lowlands which creates a uniquely diverse ecology. The region is further complicated by an international border, where governments have caused difficulties for many animal populations. This book puts a spotlight on individual research projects which are specific examples of work being done in the area and when they are all brought together, to shed a general light of understanding the biological and cultural resources of this vast region so that those same resources can be managed as effectively and efficiently as possible. The intent is to show that collaborative efforts among federal, state agency, university, and private sector researchers working with land managers, provides better science and better management than when scientists and land managers work independently.

  11. Deserts of China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, Alta S.

    1982-01-01

    Improving arid land quality requires an understanding of the original state of the land and its relationship to wind, water, and plant regimes, as well as understanding of interactions within the present ecosystem.  Chinese scientists and local residents have made significant advances in improving arid environments in gobi and sandy deserts and in less arid sandy lands.  Wind patterns are being changed by planting forest belts to protect oases and sandy lands, and on a smaller scale by planting grasses and shrubs or constructing straw grids.  Research on reclamation of deserts is now focusing on how sand-fixing plants may be adapted to local environments, and how the resources of grazing land and water may be effectively exploited without being overused.

  12. Analysis of groundwater flow in arid areas with limited hydrogeological data using the Grey Model: a case study of the Nubian Sandstone, Kharga Oasis, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmod, Wael Elham; Watanabe, Kunio; Zahr-Eldeen, Ashraf A.

    2013-08-01

    Management of groundwater resources can be enhanced by using numerical models to improve development strategies. However, the lack of basic data often limits the implementation of these models. The Kharga Oasis in the western desert of Egypt is an arid area that mainly depends on groundwater from the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System (NSAS), for which the hydrogeological data needed for groundwater simulation are lacking, thereby introducing a problem for model calibration and validation. The Grey Model (GM) was adopted to analyze groundwater flow. This model combines a finite element method (FEM) with a linear regression model to try to obtain the best-fit piezometric-level trends compared to observations. The GM simulation results clearly show that the future water table in the northeastern part of the study area will face a severe drawdown compared with that in the southwestern part and that the hydraulic head difference between these parts will reach 140 m by 2060. Given the uncertainty and limitation of available data, the GM produced more realistic results compared with those obtained from a FEM alone. The GM could be applied to other cases with similar data limitations.

  13. Factors influencing the rates, processes and magnitude of accumulation of carbon in desert soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfadden, Leslie D.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes research funded through NASA's Soil Landscape Climate Program which includes studies of the systematics of carbon storage and flux in the terrestrial environment, specifically terrestrial soils. Efforts focussed on the nature of carbon behavior in arid environments, where the majority of the carbon is present as inorganic carbon stored as pedogenic carbonate in desert calcic soils. Studies were supported of soils in two areas of western North America's major deserts: the Mojave Desert and the Chihuahuan Desert. Part 1 of this report summarizes the results of research conducted in the area of the Providence Mountains, California in the eastern Mojave Desert. Part 2 of this report summarizes the results of research in the Sevilleta Wildlife Refuge in central New Mexico, one of the sites of the UMN Biology Department's Long Term Ecological Research.

  14. Unchanging Desert Sand Dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadhiraju, S.; Banerjee, B.; Buddhiraju, K.; Shah, V.

    2013-12-01

    Deserts are one of the major landforms on earth. They occupy nearly 20% of the total land area but are relatively less studied. With the rise in human population, desert regions are being gradually occupied for settlement posing a management challenge to the concerned authorities. Unrestrained erosion is generally a feature of bare dunes. Stabilized dunes, on the other hand, do not undergo major changes in textures, and can thus facilitate the growth of vegetation. Keeping in view of the above factors, better mapping and monitoring of deserts and particularly of sand dunes is needed. Mapping dunes using field instruments is very arduous and they generate relatively sparse data. In this communication, we present a method of clustering and monitoring sand dunes through imagery captured by remote sensing sensors. Initially Radon spectrum of an area is obtained by decomposition of the image into various projections sampled at finer angular directions. Statistical features such as mode, entropy and standard deviation of Radon spectrum are used in delineation and clustering of regions with different dune orientations. These clustered boundaries are used to detect if there are any changes occurring in the dune regions. In the experiment's, remote sensing data covering various dune regions of the world are observed for possible changes in dune orientations. In all the cases, it is seen that there are no major changes in desert dune orientations. While these findings have implications for understanding of dune geomorphology and changes occurring in dune directions, they also highlight the importance of a wider study of dunes and their evolution both at regional and global scales. Results for Dataset 1 & Dataset 2 Results for Dataset 3

  15. February 2, 2011 Egypt's Next Steps

    E-print Network

    Zewail, Ahmed

    1 February 2, 2011 Egypt's Next Steps By AHMED ZEWAIL CAIRO -- The revolt that has erupted across Egypt is in many ways historic and should take the nation into a hopeful future. What's unexpected, even, with no religious or ideological agenda other than a better future for Egypt and its people. In this difficult time

  16. Workshop on Extraterrestrial Materials from Cold and Hot Deserts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Ludolf (Editor); Franchi, Ian A. (Editor); Reid, Arch M. (Editor); Zolensky, Michael E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    Since 1969 expeditions from Japan, the United States, and European countries have recovered more than 20,000 meteorite specimens from remote ice fields of Antarctica. They represent approximately 4000-6000 distinct falls, more than all non-Antarctic meteorite falls and finds combined. Recently many meteorite specimens of a new "population" have become available: meteorites from hot deserts. It turned out that suitable surfaces in hot deserts, like the Sahara in Africa, the Nullarbor Plain in Western and South Australia, or desert high plains of the U.S. (e.g., Roosevelt County, New Mexico), contain relatively high meteorite concentrations. For example, the 1985 Catalog of Meteorites of the British Museum lists 20 meteorites from Algeria and Libya. Today, 1246 meteorites finds from these two countries have been published in MetBase 4.0. Four workshops in 1982, 1985, 1988, and 1989 have discussed the connections between Antarctic glaciology and Antarctic meteorites, and the differences between Antarctic meteorites and modern falls. In 1995, a workshop addressed differences between meteorites from Antarctica, hot deserts, and modem falls, and the implications of possible different parent populations, infall rates, and weathering processes. Since 1995 many more meteorites have been recovered from new areas of Antarctica and hot deserts around the world. Among these finds are several unusual and interesting specimens like lunar meteorites or SNCs of probable martian origin. The Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society took place in 1999 in Johannesburg, South Africa. As most of the recent desert finds originate from the Sahara, a special workshop was planned prior to this meeting in Africa. Topics discussed included micrometeorites, which have been collected in polar regions as well as directly in the upper atmosphere. The title "Workshop on Extraterrestrial Materials from Cold and Hot Deserts" was chosen and the following points were emphasized: (1) weathering processes, (2) terrestrial ages, (3) investigations of "unusual" meteorites, and (4) collection and curation.

  17. Workshop on Extraterrestrial Materials from Cold and Hot Deserts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Ludolf (Editor); Franchi, Ian A. (Editor); Reid, Arch M. (Editor); Zolensky, Michael E. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    Since 1969 expeditions from Japan, the United States, and European countries have recovered more than 20,000 meteorite specimens from remote ice fields of Antarctica. They represent approximately 4000-6000 distinct falls, more than all non-Antarctic meteorite falls and finds combined. Recently many meteorite specimens of a new "population" have become available: meteorites from hot deserts. It turned out that suitable surfaces in hot deserts, like the Sahara in Africa, the Nullarbor Plain in Western and South Australia, or desert high plains of the U.S. (e.g., Roosevelt County, New Mexico), contain relatively high meteorite concentrations. For example, the 1985 Catalogue of Meteorites of the British Museum lists 20 meteorites from Algeria and Libya. Today, 1246 meteorites finds from these two countries have been published in MetBase 4.0. Four workshops in 1982, 1985, 1988, and 1989 have discussed the connections between Antarctic glaciology and Antarctic meteorites, and the differences between Antarctic meteorites and modem falls. In 1995, a workshop addressed differences between meteorites from Antarctica, hot deserts, and modem falls, and the implications of possible different parent populations, infall rates, and weathering processes. Since 1995 many more meteorites have been recovered from new areas of Antarctica and hot deserts around the world. Among these finds are several unusual and interesting specimens like lunar meteorites or SNCs of probable martian origin. The Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society took place in 1999 in Johannesburg, South Africa. As most of the recent desert finds originate from the Sahara, a special workshop was planned prior to this meeting in Africa. Topics discussed included micrometeorites, which have been collected in polar regions as well as directly in the upper atmosphere. The title "Workshop on Extraterrestrial Materials from Cold and Hot Deserts" was chosen and the following points were emphasized: (1) weathering processes, (2) terrestrial ages, (3) investigations of "unusual" meteorites, and (4) collection and curation.

  18. Aspects of Mycorrhizae in Desert Plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martha E. Apple

    \\u000a Mycorrhizal symbioses are critical to desert plants since they face the challenges of scarce, sporadic precipitation, nutrient\\u000a deficiencies, intense solar radiation, and the high temperatures found in hot deserts. Deserts are covering increasingly more\\u000a of the Earth's surface area as desertification increases globally. Mycorrhizal desert plants have a greater chance of survival\\u000a in the harsh desert environment. Desert plants form

  19. Iron ixidation state in the Fe-rich layer and silica matrix of Libyan Desert Glass: A high-resolution XANES study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuli, G.; Paris, E.; Pratesi, G.; Koeberl, C.; Cipriani, C.

    2003-08-01

    Libyan Desert Glass (LDG) is an enigmatic type of glass that occurs in western Egypt in the Libyan Desert. Fairly convincing evidence exists to show that it formed by impact, although the source crater is currently unknown. Some rare samples present dark-colored streaks with variable amounts of Fe, and they are supposed to contain a meteoritic component. We have studied the iron local environment in an LDG sample by means of Fe K-edge high- resolution X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy to obtain quantitative data on the Fe oxidation state and coordination number in both the Fe-poor matrix and Fe-rich layers. The pre-edge peak of the high-resolution XANES spectra of the sample studied displays small but reproducible variations between Fe-poor matrix and Fe-rich layers, which is indicative of significant changes in the Fe oxidation state and coordination number. Comparison with previously obtained data for a very low-Fe sample shows that, while iron is virtually all trivalent and in tetrahedral coordination ([4]Fe3+) in the low-Fe sample, the sample containing the Fe-rich layers display a mixture of tetra-coordinated trivalent iron ([4]Fe3+) and penta-coordinated divalent iron ([5]Fe2+), with the Fe in the Fe-rich layer being more reduced than the matrix. From these data, we conclude the following: a) the significant differences in the Fe oxidation state between LDG and tektites, together with the wide intra-sample variations in the Fe-oxidation state, confirm that LDG is an impact glass and not a tektite-like glass; b) the higher Fe content, coupled with the more reduced state of the Fe, in the Fe-rich layers suggests that some or most of the Fe in these layers may be directly derived from the meteoritic projectile and that it is not of terrestrial origin.

  20. Estimating aquifier parameters from analysis of forced fluctuations in well level: An example from the Nubian formation near Aswan, Egypt 1. Hydrogeological background and large-scale permeability estimates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keith Evans; John Beavan; David Simpson

    1991-01-01

    This is the first of three papers concerning the extraction of aquifer parameters through the application of time series analysis to water level data from boreholes. The analysis is performed on data from six wells located in the Nubian desert near the shores of Lake Nasser, Egypt. These wells are ideally suited to this study since they are remote from

  1. Alexandria (Al Iskandariya), Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This image of Alexandria was taken by astronauts on board the International Space Station in December 2000 using an Electronic Still Camera. A wider-angle view (STS088-739-90) taken from the Space Shuttle in December 1998 is available for context. Alexandria (Al Iskandariya) occupies a T-shaped peninsula and strip of land separating the Mediterranean from Lake Mariout. Originally the town was built upon a mole (stone breakwater) called Heptastadium, which joined the island of Pharos (see referenced website, below) to the mainland. Since then sedimentary deposits have widened the mole. Since 1905, when the 370,000 Alexandrians lived in an area of about 4 sq km between the two harbors, the city (population 4 million; see referenced website, below) has grown beyond its medieval walls and now occupies an area of about 300 sq km. The Mahmudiya Canal, connecting Alexandria with the Nile, runs to the south of the city and, by a series of locks, enters the harbor of the principal port of Egypt (note ships). The reddish and ochre polygons west of Lake Mariout are salt-evaporation, chemical-storage, and water-treatment ponds within the coastal lagoon. Reference Youssef Halim and Fatma Abou Shouk, 2000, Human impacts on Alexandria's marine environment: UNESCO, Coastal Regions and Small Islands Unit (CSI), Coastal Management Sourcebooks 2 (accessed December 20, 2000) Additional photographs taken by astronauts can be viewed at NASA-JSC's Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth. Image ISS001-ESC-5025 provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory, Johnson Space Center.

  2. Tectonic framework of northeast Egypt and its bearing on hydrocarbon exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, M. [Gulf of Suez Petroleum Company, Cairo (Egypt); Moustafa, A.R.

    1995-08-01

    Detailed structural study of northern and central Sinai, the northern Eastern Desert, and the northern Gulf of Suez clarified the tectonic framework of northeast Egypt. This framework is related to the movements between the African Plate and the Eurasian and Arabian Plates. Late Cretaceous folding and thrusting in response to oblique convergence between the African and Eurasian Plates formed NE-ENE oriented, doubly plunging, en echelon folds of the northern Egypt fold belt. This fold belt is well exposed in northern Sinai and a few other places but is concealed under younger sediments in the other parts of northern Egypt. Younger folding of local importance is related to dextral slip on the Themed Fault (Central Sinai) in post Middle Eocene-pre Miocene time. Early Miocene rifting of the Afro-Arabian Plate led to the opening of the Suez rift and deposition of significant syn-rift facies. Half grabens and tilted fault blocks dominate the rift. Slightly tilted fault blocks characterize the competent Middle Eocene limestones of the Eastern Desert south of the Cairo-Suez road but north of this road, Middle Eocene rocks are locally dragged on nearby E-W and NW-SE oriented faults forming fault-drag folds. Ductile Upper Eocene and Miocene rocks are also folded about gentle NW-SE oriented doubly plunging folds. The different stages of tectonic activity in northern Egypt contributed to the development of different types of structural traps as well as different source, reservoir, and cap rocks. The sedimentary history of the region indicates well developed marine sediments of Jurassic, Cretaceous, Eocene, and Miocene ages. Basin development in structurally low areas provided good sites for hydrocarbon generation and maturation.

  3. The chronology of ancient Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. A. Kitchen

    1991-01-01

    The chronology of ancient Egypt can only be recovered (and then, inexactly) by combining several approaches. These include the sequences of kings and reigns, grouped into dynasties and larger periods. Original documents and interstate synchronisms (plus genealogical data) permit considerable control. To some extent, if their ambiguities can be overcome, lunar and ‘Sothic’ dates from astronomy can help. Other science?based

  4. Myotonic Dystrophy in Ancient Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Giacomo Cattaino; Laura Vicario

    1999-01-01

    Amenhotep IV, better known as Akhenaton, the heretical pharaoh, was a king of the New Kingdom of Ancient Egypt. Statues and reliefs of him show an unhealthy man whose body has abnormal features. By studying the pictures of Akhenaton (the mummy has not yet been found), we conclude that he may have been affected by myotonic dystrophy (MD). Moreover, the

  5. Desert landscape irrigation

    SciTech Connect

    Quinones, R.

    1995-06-01

    Industrialization can take place in an arid environment if a long term, overall water management program is developed. The general rule to follow is that recharge must equal or exceed use. The main problem encountered in landscape projects is that everyone wants a lush jungle setting, tall shade trees, ferns, with a variety of floral arrangements mixed in. What we want, what we can afford, and what we get are not always the same. Vegetation that requires large quantities of water are not native to any desert. Surprisingly; there are various types of fruit trees, and vegetables that will thrive in the desert. Peaches, plums, nut trees, do well with drip irrigation as well as tomatoes. Shaded berry plans will also do well, the strawberry being one. In summary; if we match our landscape to our area, we can then design our irrigation system to maintain our landscape and grow a variety of vegetation in any arid or semiarid environment. The application of science and economics to landscaping has now come of age.

  6. Supersymmetry without the Desert

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Yasunori; Poland, David

    2006-09-26

    Naturalness of electroweak symmetry breaking in weak scale supersymmetric theories may suggest the absence of the conventional supersymmetric desert. We present a simple, realistic framework for supersymmetry in which (most of) the virtues of the supersymmetric desert are naturally reproduced without having a large energy interval above the weak scale. The successful supersymmetric prediction for the low-energy gauge couplings is reproduced due to a gauged R symmetry present in the effective theory at the weak scale. The observable sector superpotential naturally takes the form of the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model, but without being subject to the Landau pole constraints up to the conventional unification scale. Supersymmetry breaking masses are generated by the F-term and D-term VEVs of singlet and U(1){sub R} gauge fields, as well as by anomaly mediation, at a scale not far above the weak scale. We study the resulting pattern of supersymmetry breaking masses in detail, and find that it can be quite distinct. We construct classes of explicit models within this framework, based on higher dimensional unified theories with TeV-sized extra dimensions. A similar model based on a non-R symmetry is also presented. These models have a rich phenomenology at the TeV scale, and allow for detailed analyses of, e.g., electroweak symmetry breaking.

  7. Palynology and Stratigraphy of the Nubian Sandstone in Libya and Comparison with Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekbali, Ali; Hlal, Osama

    2013-04-01

    The so-called "Nubian Sandstone" outcrops along a wide area from Algeria to the Red Sea, forming two regressive phases. The lower phase is represented in Egypt by the Basal Clastic Unit, the Desert Rose Unit, the Abu Ballas Formation and the Matruh Shale. In Libya it is represented by the Mesak Sandstone, Sarir Sandstone, Cabao Sandstone and Kiklah Formation. In both countries, these successions are covered by a carbonate sequence, resulting from the Tethyan transgression during the Cenomanian. In Egypt however, the upper regressive phase is represented by the Taref Sandstone which was deposited during a brief period of active progradation, following the Tethyan incursion. This is not observed in Libya. Comparison of palynological studies in Libya with those documented by several authors in Egypt reveals that the "Nubian" facies in Libya were deposited before equivalent facies in Egypt. The Basal Clastic Unit, dated as Hautrauvian-Barremian, may be equivalent, at least to a part of the Neocomian Cabao Sandstone in NW Libya. Jarmah Member of the Mesak Formation in Libya was dated as Berriasian on the basis of Pilosisporites and Trilobosporites. This makes it older than any "Nubian" unit in Egypt. The Matruh Shale was assigned to the Aptian on the basis of Tricolpites, and the Abu Balls Formation 34 as Aptian-Albian on the basis of Tricolpites and Rousisporites radiatus. Whereas, there is no equivalent to the Aptian in NW Libya, the Aptian-Albian of Egypt is similar to Zone 1 of the Kiklah Formation and As Sarir Sandstone, which were dated as early Albian on the basis of Afropollis spp., and Perotriletes pannuceus, an Albian element not recorded in Egypt. The Plant Beds in southwestern Egypt were dated as Cenomanian on the basis of advanced angiosperm pollen. In Libya, equivalent bodies were considered Vraconian, representing the uppermost Albian, because it lacks Cenomanian pollen (e.g. Tricolpites mutabilis). Comparison of local sea-level changes with global sea-level curves is used to reconstruct paleogeography. Integration of palynology with geological data and tectonic implications indicates that, despite similarity in paleogeographic processes of the Nubian Sandstone, geological and structural settings remain different. The "Nubian Sandstone" provides a typical succession that can be studied in the light of sequence stratigraphy.

  8. Livestock grazing and the desert tortoise in the Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oldemeyer, John L.

    1994-01-01

    A large part of the Mojave Desert is not in pristine condition, and some current conditions can be related to past grazing-management practices. No information could be found on densities of the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) or on vegetative conditions of areas that had not been grazed to allow managers a comparison of range conditions with data on tortoises. Experimental information to assess the effect of livestock grazing on tortoises is lacking, and researchers have not yet examined whether the forage that remains after grazing is sufficient to meet the nutritional needs of desert tortoises.

  9. Inclusiveness in higher education in Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emily Cupito; Ray Langsten

    2011-01-01

    In Egypt, before 1952, education, especially higher education, was the province of a privileged few. After the 1952 Revolution,\\u000a in pursuit of social justice and economic development, Egypt’s leaders eliminated fees, instituted a universal admission examination,\\u000a promised government employment to all graduates of higher education, and expanded the number of places. Officials expected\\u000a these policies to increase inclusiveness as enrollments

  10. Egypt in the framework of global tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Paul

    1990-01-01

    An overview is presented to explicitly describe the role of global tectonics in the tectonic and geologic history of Egypt. The major global tectonic events that have directly or indirectly affected the geology of Egypt are summarized and those events are described chronologically, emphasizing the regional geological implications of each event. It is shown that the analysis of Egyptian geological history within the framework of global tectonics suggests that most of the major geological features of Egypt can be explained in terms of the interaction of global tectonics. Finally, it appears that Egypt is entering a new phase of the Wilson cycle of opening and closing of oceans.

  11. Regional geothermal exploration in Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.; Boulos, F. K.; Swanberg, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    A study is presented of the evaluation of the potential geothermal resources of Egypt using a thermal gradient/heat flow technique and a groundwater temperature/chemistry technique. Existing oil well bottom-hole temperature data, as well as subsurface temperature measurements in existing boreholes, were employed for the thermal gradient/heat flow investigation before special thermal gradient holes were drilled. The geographic range of the direct subsurface thermal measurements was extended by employing groundwater temperature and chemistry data. Results show the presence of a regional thermal high along the eastern margin of Egypt with a local thermal anomaly in this zone. It is suggested that the sandstones of the Nubian Formation may be a suitable reservoir for geothermal fluids. These findings indicate that temperatures of 150 C or higher may be found in this reservoir in the Gulf of Suez and Red Sea coastal zones where it lies at a depth of 4 km and deeper.

  12. Cataract surgery in ancient Egypt.

    PubMed

    Blomstedt, Patric

    2014-03-01

    Ophthalmology was one of the most important specialties in Egyptian medicine, and more specialists are known in this field than in any other. This specialization seems, however, to have been of a purely noninvasive nature. Even though it has been claimed that cataract surgery was performed in pharaonic Egypt, careful analysis of the sources does not support the claim. No example of cataract surgery or of any other invasive ophthalmologic procedure can be found in the original sources. PMID:24485861

  13. Orthopedic surgery in ancient Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Blomstedt, Patric

    2014-01-01

    Background — Ancient Egypt might be considered the cradle of medicine. The modern literature is, however, sometimes rather too enthusiastic regarding the procedures that are attributed an Egyptian origin. I briefly present and analyze the claims regarding orthopedic surgery in Egypt, what was actually done by the Egyptians, and what may have been incorrectly ascribed to them. Methods — I reviewed the original sources and also the modern literature regarding surgery in ancient Egypt, concentrating especially on orthopedic surgery. Results — As is well known, both literary sources and the archaeological/osteological material bear witness to treatment of various fractures. The Egyptian painting, often claimed to depict the reduction of a dislocated shoulder according to Kocher’s method, is, however, open to interpretation. Therapeutic amputations are never depicted or mentioned in the literary sources, while the specimens suggested to demonstrate such amputations are not convincing. Interpretation — The ancient Egyptians certainly treated fractures of various kinds, and with varying degrees of success. Concerning the reductions of dislocated joints and therapeutic amputations, there is no clear evidence for the existence of such procedures. It would, however, be surprising if dislocations were not treated, even though they have not left traces in the surviving sources. Concerning amputations, the general level of Egyptian surgery makes it unlikely that limb amputations were done, even if they may possibly have been performed under extraordinary circumstances. PMID:25140982

  14. 76 FR 50493 - Notice of Availability of the Record of Decision for the Desert Sunlight Holdings, LLC, Desert...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ...Availability of the Record of Decision for the Desert Sunlight Holdings, LLC, Desert Sunlight Solar Farm (DSSF) and California Desert Conservation...blm.gov. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Desert Sunlight Holdings, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary...

  15. Tree establishment along an ENSO experimental gradient in the Atacama desert

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francisco A. Squeo; Milena Holmgren; L. Jimenez; L. Alban; José Reyes; J. R. Gutierrez

    2007-01-01

    Questions: (1) What are the roles of regional climate and plant growth rate for seedling establishment during ENSO rainy pulses along the western coast of South America? (2) What is the water threshold for tree seedling establishment in these arid ecosystems? Location: Atacama Desert, western South America: Piura (5°10' S, 80°37' W), Mejia (17°00' S, 71°59' W), Fray Jorge (30°41'

  16. Inclusiveness in Higher Education in Egypt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cupito, Emily; Langsten, Ray

    2011-01-01

    In Egypt, before 1952, education, especially higher education, was the province of a privileged few. After the 1952 Revolution, in pursuit of social justice and economic development, Egypt's leaders eliminated fees, instituted a universal admission examination, promised government employment to all graduates of higher education, and expanded the…

  17. Consuming Bodies: Cultural Fantasies of Ancient Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    LYNN MESKELL

    1998-01-01

    This article explores the legacy of ancient Egypt in popular culture, from the 19th century onwards - through the theme of consumption. A range of media is covered including literature, film and performance. I argue that Egypt has been a constant mirror for contemporary culture in terms of the body, sexuality and the Orient. In the West, Egyptian bodies have

  18. Electricity end use demand study for Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Turiel; B. Lebot; S. Nadel; J. Pietsch; L. Wethje

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the results of a study undertaken by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to develop an approach for reducing electricity demand in the residential sector in Egypt. A team with expertise in appliance energy usage, appliance manufacturing, appliance testing, and energy analysis was assembled to work on this project. The team visited Egypt during the month of March 1990.

  19. Benchmarking performance: Environmental impact statements in Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    El-Sayed A. Badr; Ashraf A. Zahran; Matthew Cashmore

    2011-01-01

    Environmental impact assessment (EIA) was formally introduced in Egypt in 1994. This short paper evaluates “how well” the EIA process is working in practice in Egypt, by reviewing the quality of 45 environmental impact statements (EISs) produced between 2000 and 2007 for a variety of project types. The Lee and Colley review package was used to assess the quality of

  20. Sphinx and Great Pyramid of Giza, Egypt

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The Spinx and the Great Pyramid of Giza, Egypt are pictured here. USGS and University of Pennsylvania research shows that ancient pollen and charcoal preserved in deeply buried sediments in Egypt's Nile Delta document the region’s ancient droughts and fires, including a huge drought 4,200...

  1. Original sounding and drifting balloon-borne measurements in the western Mediterranean with the aerosol counter/sizer LOAC during summer ChArMEx campaigns, with a focus on desert dust events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Dulac, François; Vignelles, Damien; Jeannot, Matthieu; Verdier, Nicolas; Chazette, Patrick; Crenn, Vincent; Sciare, Jean; Totems, Julien; Durand, Pierre; Barret, Brice; Jambert, Corinne; Mallet, Marc; Menut, Laurent; Mailler, Sylvain; Basart, Sara; Baldasano, José Maria

    2015-04-01

    LOAC (Light Optical Aerosol Counter) is a new small optical particle counter/sizer of ~250 grams designed to fly under all kinds of balloons. The measurements are conducted at two scattering angles (12° and 60°), allowing the determination of the aerosol particle concentrations in 19 size classes within a diameter range of ~0.2-100 µm and some identification of the nature of particles dominating different size classes. Following laboratory calibration, the sensor particularly discriminates wet or liquid particles, mineral dust, soot carbon particles and salts. Comparisons with other in situ sensors at the surface and with remote sensing measurements on the vertical were performed to give confidence in measurements. The instrument has been operated at the surface, under all kinds of balloons up to more than 35 km in altitude, including tethered, sounding, open stratospheric and new boundary-layer pressurized drifting balloons (BLPB) from CNES, and was tested on board a small UAV. Operations encompass a variety of environments including the Arctic (Reykjavik, Island, and Kiruna, Sweden), Brazil (Sao Paolo), the western Mediterranean Basin, southwestern France, peri-urban (Ile de France) and urban areas (Paris and Vienna). Presented results are focused on the LOAC balloon-borne measurements performed in the western Mediterranean basin during MISTRALS/ChArMEx campaigns (Mediterranean Integrated Studies aT Regional And Local Scales/the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment; http://www.mistrals-hjome.org; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr), with a focus on African dust events. Two test flights with a first version of LOAC under sounding balloons were first successfully performed in late June 2012 near Marseille during an intense dust event. In 2013, 19 LOAC flights have been performed under meteorological balloons and 12 under low altitude drifting balloons, most of them from Minorca Island (Spain) in June and early July and others from Levant Island (south of France) in late July and early August . A number of the 2013 flights were coupled with ozone concentration measurements (see presentation of Gheusi et al. in the same session). LOAC balloons were especially, but not only, dedicated to study the various Saharan dust events that occurred during the campaign. In particular, a series of flights were conducted every 12 hours during the 15-19 June dust event. Forest fire smoke from North America was also sampled in late June over Minorca, as well as anthropogenic polluted layers in various occasions. LOAC data (available from ChArMEx database http://mistrals.sedoo.fr/ChArMEx) are interpreted with the help of coincident lidar, sun photometer remote sensing measurements available in Menorca, and satellite products and air mass trajectories. The sounding flights allow us to determine the vertical extent of the various aerosol layers, and to follow the particle size distribution and the concentration evolution along the vertical. The low altitude drifting balloons, which stayed roughly at constant altitude between 350 and 3330 m up to more than 25 h, allow us to study the time-evolution of the aerosol concentrations in the same air mass. Under both balloon types, LOAC has detected larges particles up to ~30 µm in diameter. The flights drifting within dust layers indicate that there is a relatively stable particle size distribution during transport over the sea, with no clear sedimentation loss of large particles. Aerosol simulations with the CHIMERE and NMMB/§BSC chemistry-transport models are compared to LOAC measurements. Acknowledgements: LOAC was developed with support of the French ANR. Balloon operations were performed by CNES and special acknowledgements are addressed to Gilles Dupouy, Françoise Douchin and collaborators for field operations. Alexis Doerenbacher from Météo-France and Claude Basdevant from Ecole Polytechnique are also acknowledged for their helpful contribution in providing balloon-related forecasts, quicklooks and data (http://www.lmd.polytechnique.fr/BAMED/index.html). The LOAC balloon campaigns wer

  2. Meta-analysis indicates lack of local adaptation of Schistosoma mansoni to Biomphalaria alexandrina in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abou-El-Naga, Iman Fathy

    2014-03-01

    In Egypt, reclaiming portions of the desert using water from the Nile has resulted in large-scale invasion of Biomphalaria alexandrina in these regions. Studies exploring the local adaptation of Schistosoma mansoni to its snail host have been carried out to predict the extension of schistosomiasis to newly reclaimed areas. A meta-analysis of the relevant reports was conducted to compare the different biological characteristics of sympatric and allopatric Schistosoma mansoni and Biomphalaria alexandrina using different experimental designs. The results showed that there were no significant differences in the biological characteristics of sympatric and allopatric populations. The experimental design of some of the studies analyzed was found to affect the total cercarial production. The distance between the origin of the parasite and that of the snail did not affect any of the biological characteristics. The results showed that there is no evidence of local adaptation between Schistosoma mansoni and Biomphalaria alexandrina; however, the parasite is adapted to its intermediate host throughout the water bodies located in Egypt. The absence of local adaptation between Schistosoma mansoni and Biomphalaria alexandrina is likely of critical importance in predicting public health risks engendered by future reclaimed agriculture projects. Indeed, these results could assist in determining the appropriate balance between the development of water resource projects and schistosomiasis control in Egypt. PMID:24442240

  3. Native Perennial Grass Communities of the Carson Desert of Northwestern Nevada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James A. Young; Charlie D. Clements

    1999-01-01

    Ahstract-A generalized distribution of the perennial grasses in the western Great Basin reveals an inter-mixing of species of the two grass Tribes Hordeae and Agrostideae (following the nomencla­ ture of Hitchcock 1950). The dominant genera are Agropyron and Achnatherum -Hesperostipa. In the Lahontan trough of the Carson Desert, a third Tribe of grasses, Zoysieae, is represented by Hilaria jamesii. The

  4. In Texas, the distributions of desert mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus eremicus) and

    E-print Network

    McIntyre, Nancy E.

    In Texas, the distributions of desert mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus eremicus) and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) over- lap in portions of the Trans-Pecos region, the western edge concerned in recent decades as white-tailed deer have become more abundant in areas previously considered

  5. Dispersal of Two Species of Trichoptera from Desert Springs: Conservation Implications for Isolated vs Connected Populations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marilyn J. Myers; F. A. H. Sperling; V. H. Resh

    2001-01-01

    During the Pleistocene, when the climate was wetter and cooler, aquatic habitats in the Great Basin of western North America were much more extensive and connected. As the climate warmed over the last 10?000 years, many of these habitats dried but others remained as isolated springs and inland lakes. The isolation of desert springs and lack of dispersal between populations

  6. The Rise of Egypt: New Beginnings or Same Old Story

    E-print Network

    Thompson, Michael

    The Rise of Egypt: New Beginnings or Same Old Story Monday March 28th - 2011 Course # 846A, Tuition dramatic than the change in government in Egypt. What does this mean for the workers of Egypt in this transition? Will the revolution in Egypt take the path of the failed revolutions in Iran or are we witnessing

  7. Published: 23 June 2011 Another Revolution Afoot in Egypt

    E-print Network

    Zewail, Ahmed

    1 Published: 23 June 2011 Another Revolution Afoot in Egypt: Top-Notch Science Egypt has launched way to cure fanaticism. Op-Ed by Ahmed H. Zewail Cairo -- Nearly 100 days after the revolution, Egypt say hawa gadid -- a new air. The big question is how to channel this energy to forge a new Egypt

  8. Space Radar Image of Giza Egypt - with enlargement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This radar image shows the area west of the Nile River near Cairo, Egypt. The Nile River is the dark band along the right side of the image and it flows approximately due North from the bottom to the right. The boundary between dense urbanization and the desert can be clearly seen between the bright and dark areas in the center of the image. This boundary represents the approximate extent of yearly Nile flooding which played an important part in determining where people lived in ancient Egypt. This land usage pattern persists to this day. The pyramids at Giza appear as three bright triangles aligned with the image top just at the boundary of the urbanized area. They are also shown enlarged in the inset box in the top left of the image. The Great Pyramid of Khufu (Cheops in Greek) is the northern most of the three Giza pyramids. The side-looking radar illuminates the scene from the top, the two sides of the pyramids facing the radar reflect most of the energy back to the antenna and appear radar bright; the two sides away from the radar reflect less energy back and appear dark Two additional pyramids can be seen left of center in the lower portion of the image. The modern development in the desert on the left side of the image is the Sixth of October City, an area of factories and residences started by Anwar Sadat to relieve urban crowding. The image was taken on April 19, 1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the shuttle Endeavour. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and the United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The image is centered on latitude 29.72 degrees North latitude and 30.83 degrees East longitude. The area shown is approximately 20 kilometers by 30 kilometers. The colors in the image are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band horizontally transmitted, horizontally received; green is C-band horizontally transmitted, horizontally received; blue is C-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received.

  9. Space Radar Image of Nile River Delta, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This spaceborne radar image shows the area just north of the city of Cairo, Egypt, where the Nile River splits into two main branches. The Rosetta Branch is the curving dark line in the center of the image and the Damietta Branch is the curving dark line in the lower right of the image. The light blue area on the right half of the image is a portion of the Nile River Delta. The thinner, straighter lines and the small network of gold lines are irrigation canals. There are more than 10,000 kilometers of canals throughout the Nile Delta. A transition zone of irrigated fields is shown in blue and yellow between the irrigated delta and the surrounding desert. The desert is the dark blue area on the left side of the image lacking the pattern of irrigated fields. This image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) on October 4, 1994, onboardthe space shuttle Endeavour. The image is 75 kilometers by 60 kilometers (46 miles by 37 miles) and is centered at 30.2 degreesnorth latitude, 31.1 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper right. The colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and received; green is C-band, horizontally transmitted and received; and blue is the ratio of C-band and L-band, horizontally transmitted and received. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to PlanetEarth program.

  10. The Kamil Crater in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Folco, Luigi; Di Martino, Mario; El Barkooky, Ahmed; D'Orazio, Massimo; Lethy, Ahmed; Urbini, Stefano; Nicolosi, Iacopo; Hafez, Mahfooz; Cordier, Carole; van Ginneken, Matthias; Zeoli, Antonio; Radwan, Ali M; El Khrepy, Sami; El Gabry, Mohamed; Gomaa, Mahomoud; Barakat, Aly A; Serra, Romano; El Sharkawi, Mohamed

    2010-08-13

    We report on the detection in southern Egypt of an impact crater 45 meters in diameter with a pristine rayed structure. Such pristine structures are typically observed on atmosphereless rocky or icy planetary bodies in the solar system. This feature and the association with an iron meteorite impactor and shock metamorphism provides a unique picture of small-scale hypervelocity impacts on Earth's crust. Contrary to current geophysical models, ground data indicate that iron meteorites with masses of the order of tens of tons can penetrate the atmosphere without substantial fragmentation. PMID:20651117

  11. Phytoremediation for Oily Desert Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radwan, Samir

    This chapter deals with strategies for cleaning oily desert soils through rhizosphere technology. Bioremediation involves two major approaches; seeding with suitable microorganisms and fertilization with microbial growth enhancing materials. Raising suitable crops in oil-polluted desert soils fulfills both objectives. The rhizosphere of many legume and non-legume plants is richer in oil-utilizing micro-organisms than non-vegetated soils. Furthermore, these rhizospheres also harbour symbiotic and asymbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria, and are rich in simple organic compounds exuded by plant roots. Those exudates are excellent nutrients for oil-utilizing microorganisms. Since many rhizospheric bacteria have the combined activities of hydrocarbon-utilization and nitrogen fixation, phytoremediation provides a feasible and environmentally friendly biotechnology for cleaning oil-polluted soils, especially nitrogen-poor desert soils.

  12. Desert-Adapted Crocs Found in Africa

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Hillary Mayell

    This National Geographic site details the discovery of several small communities of crocodiles living on the southern edge of Africa's Sahara in desert conditions. The desert crocodiles have apparently adapted to the changing environment in northern Africa; 8,000 to 10,000 years ago, what is now desert was probably lush savannah and grasslands.

  13. Impact of highway geometry and posted speed on operating speed at multi-lane highways in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Semeida, Ahmed M

    2013-11-01

    The paper presents an analysis of roadway factors and posted speed limits that affect the operating speed at multi-lane highways in Egypt. Field data on multi-lane highways in Egypt are used in this investigation. The analysis considers two categories of highways. The first consists of two desert roads (Cairo-Alexandria and Cairo-Ismailia desert roads) and the second consists of two agricultural roads (Cairo-Alexandria and Tanta-Damietta agricultural roads). The paper includes three separate relevant analyses. The first analysis uses the regression models to investigate the relationships between operating speed (V 85) as dependent variable, and roadway factors and posted speed as independent variables. The road factors are lane width, shoulder width, pavement width, median width, number of lanes in each direction, and existence of side access along each section. The second analysis uses the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to explore the previous relationships while the third one examines the suitability of the posted speed limits on the roads under study. It is found that the ANN modeling gives the best model for predicting the operating speed and the most influential variables on V 85 are the pavement width, followed by the median width and the existence of side access along section. It is also found that the posted speed limit has a very small effect on the operating speed due to the bad behavior of drivers in Egypt. These results are so important for controlling V 85 on multi-lane rural highways in Egypt. PMID:25685460

  14. Orbital and Ground-penetrating Radar Studies of Mars-analog Terrain in Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, T. A.; Grant, J. A.; Campbell, B. A.

    2007-05-01

    Several study groups have endorsed the concept of flying an imaging synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in orbit that would penetrate areas of thin surface cover revealing underlying terrain and providing additional information on surface roughness, physical properties and composition. Egypt provides many excellent terrestrial field sites to study both the processes that we expect to be revealed in a Mars SAR Mission, as well as the stratigraphic setting of past depositional environments that are similar to those seen in southern Egypt. We have used terrestrial orbital radar data for southern Egypt, comparing geologic materials and boundaries mapped in the field and with visible wavelengths (from Landsat) to those discerned via Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR) -C, and field checking key sites to determine the depth, physical characteristics and types of geologic boundaries that contribute to the radar returns. In addition to stratigraphic mapping of the thickness and extent of near-surface units in the field, we have used ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to determine the lateral extent and depth of subsurface interfaces. In this manner, we expect to learn more about the capabilities and limitations of orbital and ground-based systems, the trade-offs between frequency, polarization and resolution in Mars-like terrain for detecting buried interfaces and structures, and more about the geologic history of southern Egypt. Several studies have concentrated on one of the areas of prominent radar-detected channels near Bir Safsaf in the southwest desert, we have concentrated on the Bir Kiseiba region, an area where the mixture of gravel spreads, buried paleochannels, and alluvium creates a setting that may mimic outflow deposit locations on Mars. While bedrock incised channels may stand out in SAR images because of a near-surface, sharp dielectric interface (such as those at Safsaf and in northern Sudan), the more complex problem of distinguishing fluvial patterns in Mars-like alluvial environments requires additional study.

  15. Desert isotope hydrology: Water sources of the Sinai Desert

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joel R. Gat; Arie Issar

    1974-01-01

    The isotopic composition of groundwater sources of the Sinai Desert was surveyed. The results are characterized by a large spread in the oxygen-18 and deuterium abundances, compared to equivalent systems from less arid climates. The variability reflects differences in the altitude at which precipitation occurred, the evaporation from stagnant surface waters prior to their infiltration into the ground and admixtures

  16. Modeling Soil Moisture in the Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, David M.; Hughson, Debra; Schmidt, Kevin M.

    2008-01-01

    The Mojave Desert is an arid region of southeastern California and parts of Nevada, Arizona, and Utah; the desert occupies more than 25,000 square miles (fig. 1). Ranging from below sea level to over 5,000 feet (1,524 m) in elevation, the Mojave Desert is considered a ?high desert.? On the west and southwest it is bounded by the Sierra Nevada, the San Gabriel, and the San Bernardino Mountains. These imposing mountains intercept moisture traveling inland from the Pacific Ocean, producing arid conditions characterized by extreme fluctuations in daily temperatures, strong seasonal winds, and an average annual precipitation of less than six inches. The Mojave Desert lies farther south and at a lower elevation than the cooler Great Basin Desert and grades southward into the even lower and hotter Sonoran Desert.

  17. Desert Babies Face Harsh Childhood

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The phenomenon is the relationships between the animals and plants that inhabit the Sonoran Desert. The video shows a wide variety of animals raising their young, feeding, sheltering and protecting them. The video includes numerous examples of interactions between living things in this environment.

  18. Alternate Energy from the Desert

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Malek

    2003-01-01

    Due to rapid growth of the world's population and more demands for energy, and due to limited amount of fossil fuels (which provide 95 % of the world's energy needs), harnessing of alternate energy sources such as solar and wind power should be considered. In addition to the mountain passes with usually high wind, vast and flat desert areas could

  19. Phylogeography of Beck's Desert Scorpion, Paruroctonus becki, reveals Pliocene diversification in the Eastern California Shear Zone and postglacial expansion in the Great Basin Desert.

    PubMed

    Graham, Matthew R; Jaeger, Jef R; Prendini, Lorenzo; Riddle, Brett R

    2013-12-01

    The distribution of Beck's Desert Scorpion, Paruroctonus becki (Gertsch and Allred, 1965), spans the 'warm' Mojave Desert and the western portion of the 'cold' Great Basin Desert. We used genetic analyses and species distribution modeling to test whether P. becki persisted in the Great Basin Desert during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), or colonized the area as glacial conditions retreated and the climate warmed. Phylogenetic and network analyses of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 (cox1), 16S rDNA, and nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) DNA sequences uncovered five geographically-structured groups in P. becki with varying degrees of statistical support. Molecular clock estimates and the geographical arrangement of three of the groups suggested that Pliocene geological events in the tectonically dynamic Eastern California Shear Zone may have driven diversification by vicariance. Diversification was estimated to have continued through the Pleistocene, during which a group endemic to the western Great Basin diverged from a related group in the eastern Mojave Desert and western Colorado Plateau. Demographic and network analyses suggested that P. becki underwent a recent expansion in the Great Basin. According to a landscape interpolation of genetic distances, this expansion appears to have occurred from the northwest, implying that P. becki may have persisted in part of the Great Basin during the LGM. This prediction is supported by species distribution models which suggest that climate was unsuitable throughout most of the Great Basin during the LGM, but that small patches of suitable climate may have remained in areas of the Lahontan Trough. PMID:23933071

  20. Using C-14 and C-14 - Be-10 for Terrestrial Ages of Desert Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jull, A. J. T.; Bland, P. A.; Klandrud, S. E.; McHargue, L. R.; Bevan, A. W. R.; Kring, D. A.; Wlotzka, F.

    2000-01-01

    The arid regions of the world appear to be great storage locations for meteorites, where they can survive for long periods of time in such environments. Large numbers of meteorites have been recovered from diverse areas of and and semi-arid regions of North Africa, Arabia, North America and Western Australia. The cold desert of Antarctica is a further storehouse of meteorites. One of the first recognized areas for collections of meteorites was Roosevelt County, New Mexico. The Nullarbor region of Australia and the northern Sahara Desert in Africa are also prolific sources of meteorites.

  1. USGS Scientists in Wadi Degla, Northern Egypt

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    USGS scientists looking at Eocene sandstones and limestones in Wadi Degla, northern Egypt. This area was studied to understand the Levant Basin Province, as both regions have similar rock formations....

  2. Desert Pathfinder at Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-09-01

    The Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) project celebrates the inauguration of its outstanding 12-m telescope, located on the 5100m high Chajnantor plateau in the Atacama Desert (Chile). The APEX telescope, designed to work at sub-millimetre wavelengths, in the 0.2 to 1.5 mm range, passed successfully its Science Verification phase in July, and since then is performing regular science observations. This new front-line facility provides access to the "Cold Universe" with unprecedented sensitivity and image quality. After months of careful efforts to set up the telescope to work at the best possible technical level, those involved in the project are looking with satisfaction at the fruit of their labour: APEX is not only fully operational, it has already provided important scientific results. "The superb sensitivity of our detectors together with the excellence of the site allow fantastic observations that would not be possible with any other telescope in the world," said Karl Menten, Director of the group for Millimeter and Sub-Millimeter Astronomy at the Max-Planck-Institute for Radio Astronomy (MPIfR) and Principal Investigator of the APEX project. ESO PR Photo 30/05 ESO PR Photo 30/05 Sub-Millimetre Image of a Stellar Cradle [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 627 pix - 200k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 1254 pix - 503k] [Full Res - JPEG: 1539 x 2413 pix - 1.3M] Caption: ESO PR Photo 30/05 is an image of the giant molecular cloud G327 taken with APEX. More than 5000 spectra were taken in the J=3-2 line of the carbon monoxide molecule (CO), one of the best tracers of molecular clouds, in which star formation takes place. The bright peak in the north of the cloud is an evolved star forming region, where the gas is heated by a cluster of new stars. The most interesting region in the image is totally inconspicuous in CO: the G327 hot core, as seen in methanol contours. It is a truly exceptional source, and is one of the richest sources of emission from complex organic molecules in the Galaxy (see spectrum at bottom). Credit: Wyrowski et al. (map), Bisschop et al. (spectrum). Millimetre and sub-millimetre astronomy opens exciting new possibility in the study of the first galaxies to have formed in the Universe and of the formation processes of stars and planets. In particular, APEX allows astronomers to study the chemistry and physical conditions of molecular clouds, that is, dense regions of gas and dust in which new stars are forming. Among the first studies made with APEX, astronomers took a first glimpse deep into cradles of massive stars, observing for example the molecular cloud G327 and measuring significant emission in carbon monoxide and complex organic molecules (see ESO PR Photo 30/05). The official inauguration of the APEX telescope will start in San Pedro de Atacama on September, 25th. The Ambassadors in Chile of some of ESO's member states, the Intendente of the Chilean Region II, the Mayor of San Pedro, the Executive Director of the Chilean Science Agency (CONICYT), the Presidents of the Communities of Sequitor and Toconao, as well as representatives of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Universities in Chile, will join ESO's Director General, Dr. Catherine Cesarsky, the Chairman of the APEX Board and MPIfR director, Prof. Karl Menten, and the Director of the Onsala Space Observatory, Prof. Roy Booth, in a celebration that will be held in San Pedro de Atacama. The next day, the delegation will visit the APEX base camp in Sequitor, near San Pedro, from where the telescope is operated, as well as the APEX site on the 5100m high Llano de Chajnantor.

  3. The boatbuilding industry of New Kingdom Egypt

    E-print Network

    Monroe, Christopher Mountfort

    1990-01-01

    THE BOATBUiLDING INDUSTRY OF NEW KIN DOM EGYPT A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER MOUNTFORT MONROE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A@M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS August... 1990 Major Subject: Anthropology THE BOATBUILDING INDUSTRY OF NEW KINGDOM EGYPT A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER MOUNTFORT MONROE Approved as to style and content by: George . Bass (Chair of Committee) Vaughn Bryant (Head of Department) , !q; Fredeg...

  4. Sustainable development approach to the ecotourism of Iran desert lands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hamideh Beigi; Ali Zangiabadi

    2010-01-01

    The term “desert” always reminds “nonexistence”; while the patient and hard-working people and the resistant plants live and grow in the deserts. One who is interested in the deserts for the first time, never desist it. Desert has a lot of hidden tourism attractions which are not considered yet. In fact, the deserts are so beautiful the same as forest,

  5. Distribution of desert varnish in Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvidge, Christopher D.

    1989-01-01

    Desert varnish is the dark coat of clay and ferromanganese oxides developed on exposed rock surfaces in arid regions. It forms from the accretion of material from windblown dust. The distribution of desert varnish was mapped in Arizona. It was discovered that desert varnish could be mapped on a regional scale. Well developed desert varnish is common on stable rock surfaces in areas having alkaline soils and less than about 25 cm of annual precipitation. Rock surfaces in areas having more than 40 cm of annual precipitation are generally devoid of desert varnish. An experiment was conducted with varnished desert pavement stone. The stones were broken in half and half was set on a roof in central Illinois from April until October. Removed from the alkaline desert environment, it only took seven months for the varnish to develop an eroded appearance. This experiment graphically illustrates the dependency of desert varnish on alkalinity. In this context, the zones of eroded desert varnish in Arizona indicate that the area of active desert varnish formation has fluctuated, expanding in drier times and contracting/eroding in wetter times.

  6. Mortality, Recruitment and Change of Desert Tree Populations in a Hyper-Arid Environment

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Gidske L.; Krzywinski, Knut

    2007-01-01

    Background Long-term vegetation changes in hyper-arid areas have long been neglected. Mortality, recruitment and change in populations of the ecologically and culturally important and drought persistent Acacia tortilis and Balanites aegyptiaca are therefore estimated in the Eastern Desert of Egypt, and are related to the primary agents of change, water conditions and human intervention. Methodology A change analysis using high-resolution Corona images (1965) in combination with field data (2003) is the basis for recruitment, mortality and change estimates. For assessing the influence of water conditions on patterns in recruitment and survival, different types of generalized linear models are tested. Conclusions The overall trend in population size in that part of the Eastern Desert studied here is negative. At some sites this negative trend is alarming, because the reduction in mature trees is substantial (>50%) at the same time as recruitment is nearly absent. At a few sites there is a positive trend and better recruitment. Frequent observations of sprouting in saplings indicate that this is an important mechanism to increase their persistence. It is the establishment itself that seems to be the main challenge in the recruitment process. There are indications that hydrological variables and surface water in particular can explain some of the observed pattern in mortality, but our results indicate that direct human intervention, i.e., charcoal production, is the main cause of tree mortality in the Eastern Desert. PMID:17299588

  7. Egypt's population policies and family planning program: a critical examination 

    E-print Network

    Carr, Aline B.

    1996-01-01

    in rural Egypt are using a birth control method calls into question the "success" of Egypt's population program as a national endeavor and reveals a distinct disparity between contraceptive prevalence in rural areas as opposed to urban areas. This thesis...

  8. Desert Potholes: Ephemeral Aquatic Microsystems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marjorie A. Chan; Katrina Moser; Jim M. Davis; Gordon Southam; Kebbi Hughes; Tim Graham

    2005-01-01

    An enigma of the Colorado Plateau high desert is the “pothole”, which ranges from shallow ephemeral puddles to deeply carved\\u000a pools. The existence of prokaryotic to eukaryotic organisms within these pools is largely controlled by the presence of collected\\u000a rainwater. Multivariate statistical analysis of physical and chemical limnologic data variables measured from potholes indicates\\u000a spatial and temporal variations, particularly in

  9. Water Resources Center, Desert Research Institute Annual Technical Report

    E-print Network

    Water Resources Center, Desert Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 1998 Introduction Focus Category #3 Climatological Processes Lead Institution Desert Research Institute Principal Desert Research Institute 01 Victor R. Baker Professor University of Arizona 02 Stephen G. Wells

  10. 75 FR 52776 - Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Desert Sunlight...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ...Environmental Impact Statement for the Desert Sunlight Holdings, LLC Desert Sunlight Solar Farm Project and Possible California Desert...Conservation Area (CDCA) Plan Amendment for the Desert Sunlight Holdings, LLC Desert Sunlight Solar Farm...

  11. Alternate Energy from the Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malek, E.

    2003-12-01

    Due to rapid growth of the world's population and more demands for energy, and due to limited amount of fossil fuels (which provide 95 % of the world's energy needs), harnessing of alternate energy sources such as solar and wind power should be considered. In addition to the mountain passes with usually high wind, vast and flat desert areas could be good candidates for harvesting both solar and wind power. We set up a weather station in the middle of a desert, approximately 65 km east-west by 130 km north-south, located at Dugway (40\\deg 08' N, 113\\deg 27' W, 1124 m above mean sea level) in northwestern Utah, USA, in 1999. This station measured the incoming (Rsi) and outgoing (Rso) solar or shortwave radiation using two CM21 Kipp & Zonen pyranometers (one inverted), the incoming (Rli or atmospheric) and outgoing (Rlo or terrestrial) longwave radiation, using two CG1 Kipp & Zonen pyrgeometers (one inverted), and the net (Rn) radiation using a Q*7 net radiometer (Radiation Energy Balance System, REBS). We also measured the 3-m wind speed (U3) and direction (R.M. Young wind monitor) and precipitation (Campbell Sci., Inc.) and some other weather parameters. The measurements were taken every two seconds, and averaged into 20-min, continuously, throughout the year. The two-year (January 2000 - December 2001) period comparisons of global or solar radiation and windiness with two other stations in central (Hunter) and northern (Logan) Utah, indicate higher average solar radiation [Rsi,Dugway = 601 MJ / (m2-month) vs. Rsi, Hunter = 5371 MJ /(m2-month) and Rsi, Logan = 516 MJ /(m2-month)] and much higher 10-m average wind (UDugway = 478 km/d vs. UHunter = 323 km/d and ULogan = 275 km/d) throughout the period over the desert. These data reveal the possibility of simultaneously harvesting these two sources of clean energies at this vast and uniform desert area. Keywords: Desert, energy, radiation balance, solar and wind energies, windiness.

  12. THE EGYPT LABOR MARKET PANEL SURVEY: INTRODUCING THE 2012 ROUND

    E-print Network

    Levinson, David M.

    #12;THE EGYPT LABOR MARKET PANEL SURVEY: INTRODUCING THE 2012 ROUND Ragui Assaad and Caroline Egypt www.erf.org.eg Copyright © The Economic Research Forum, 2013 All rights reserved. No part our data to other statistical sources for Egypt to evaluate the representativeness of the sample

  13. SIX NEW SPECIES OF ANTS (INSECTA: HYMENOPTERA: FORMICIDAE) FROM EGYPT

    E-print Network

    Villemant, Claire

    SIX NEW SPECIES OF ANTS (INSECTA: HYMENOPTERA: FORMICIDAE) FROM EGYPT HASSAN H. FADL, REDA F. BAKR, RAWDA M. BADAWY AND MOSTAFA R. SHARAF Entomology Dept., Fac. Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt. ABSTRACT Six new ant species from Egypt Cerapachys collingwoodi, Cataglyphis agostii, Messor eglalae

  14. Archaeological Institute of America-Milwaukee Society Napoleon in Egypt

    E-print Network

    Saldin, Dilano

    Archaeological Institute of America-Milwaukee Society Presents Napoleon in Egypt The Beginning Egypt in 1798, along with his army he brought 150 artists, linguists, and scientists of all kinds to describe Egypt. Together they conducted the first ethnographic study of its kind but also laid

  15. 77 FR 71777 - Trade Mission to Egypt and Kuwait

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-04

    ...International Trade Administration Trade Mission to Egypt and Kuwait AGENCY: International Trade...the Notice regarding the Trade Mission to Egypt and Kuwait March 10-14, 2013, published...participation in the U.S. Trade Mission to Egypt and Kuwait March 10-14, 2013,...

  16. Demographic Surprises Foreshadow Change in Neoliberal Egypt Eric Denis, CNRS

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Demographic Surprises Foreshadow Change in Neoliberal Egypt Eric Denis, CNRS Eric.denis@univ-paris-diderot.fr Final Draft, Middle East Report, Spring 2008, Number 246 In the Egypt of 2008, half the population has. These demographic surprises have important implications for the stability of Egypt and the regimes economic

  17. WIND ATLAS FOR EGYPT: MEASUREMENTS, MICRO-AND MESOSCALE MODELLING

    E-print Network

    WIND ATLAS FOR EGYPT: MEASUREMENTS, MICRO- AND MESOSCALE MODELLING Niels G. Mortensen1 , Jens Energy Authority, Cairo, Egypt Ahmed El Sayed Yousef, Adel Mahmoud Awad, Mahmoud Abd-El Raheem Ahmed Meteorological Authority, Cairo, Egypt ABSTRACT The results of a comprehensive, 8-year wind resource assessment

  18. The Effect of Child Work on Schooling: Evidence from Egypt

    E-print Network

    Levinson, David M.

    The Effect of Child Work on Schooling: Evidence from Egypt Ragui Assaad Humphrey Institute of Minnesota Nadia Zibani Centre d'Etudes et de Documentation Economiques et Juridiques Cairo, Egypt Revised Growth (ICEG) through its Economic Policy Initiative Consortium project in Egypt, which is funded

  19. Post-Mubarak Egypt: The Dark Side of Islamic Utopia

    E-print Network

    Anat, Maril,

    23 Post-Mubarak Egypt: The Dark Side of Islamic Utopia Robert S. Wistrich Robert S. Wistrich victor in the first two rounds of the democratic elections currently taking place in post-Mubarak Egypt. Though they did not initiate the wider popular movement toward democracy, the Islamist forces in Egypt

  20. Proefschrift: Occidentalisms. Images of `the West' in Egypt Robbert Woltering

    E-print Network

    van den Brink, Jeroen

    Proefschrift: Occidentalisms. Images of `the West' in Egypt Robbert Woltering Nederlandse onderzoek naar Occidentalisme in hedendaags Egypte. In het bijzonder is onderzocht welke beelden van het) en tientallen boeken, waarin de relatie van Egypte (of breder: de Arabische wereld, of zelfs `de

  1. Published: 14 October 2013 The Revolution Egypt Needs

    E-print Network

    Zewail, Ahmed

    1 Published: 14 October 2013 The Revolution Egypt Needs Op-Ed by Ahmed H. Zewail Pasadena, California -- When I was a boy in Desuq, Egypt, a city on the Rosetta branch of the Nile, about 50 miles east was in the fabric of our culture and religion. I left Egypt in 1969 for graduate school at the University

  2. Profil de poste Reprsentant de l'IRD en Egypte

    E-print Network

    Profil de poste N°3999 Représentant de l'IRD en Egypte Catégorie A - Directeur de recherche détachement sur un emploi de chercheur1 AFFECTATION STRUCTURELLE Le représentant de l'IRD en Egypte est déléguées. AFFECTATION GEOGRAPHIQUE Le représentant de l'IRD en Egypte sera affecté au Caire à compter du 1

  3. Experience Ancient Egypt Uncover the secrets of the ancient world...

    E-print Network

    Travis, Adrian

    Experience Ancient Egypt Uncover the secrets of the ancient world... A day event for Children in Care in school years 7 - 9 Discover the secrets of Ancient Egypt at this FREE taster day. Explore the incredible Ancient Egypt Gallery at the Fitzwilliam Museum and create some Egyptian artwork. Plus enjoy

  4. Published: 6 October 2011 As Elections Loom, Egypt Must Unify

    E-print Network

    Zewail, Ahmed

    1 Published: 6 October 2011 As Elections Loom, Egypt Must Unify Op-Ed by Ahmed H. Zewail "Where is Egypt going?" a driver named Mohamed asked me recently. It is the question on everyone's mind and the building of the new City of Science and Technology. At last, it was felt, Egypt would be rejoining

  5. We must unleash the power of Egypt's youth

    E-print Network

    Zewail, Ahmed

    1 We must unleash the power of Egypt's youth This was an ideology-free revolution. Politics must progress--not least in reintroducing Egypt's leadership of the Arab world. For democracy actually of the Constitution. Using Egypt's respected judicial system, a new constitution will be written to incorporate

  6. PHYLOGEOGRAPHY OF BUFO PUNCTATUS: LONG TERM EVOLUTION WITHIN THE WARM DESERTS OF NORTH AMERICA AND LATE QUATERNARY RANGE SHIFTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bufo punctatus, the red-spotted toad, is a widespread anuran of the warm-desert regions of western North America. This distribution makes this species ideal for evaluating biotic response to geotectonically and climatically mediated episodes of landscape transformation (e.g., ear...

  7. Radiation, multiple dispersal and parallelism in the skinks, Chalcides and Sphenops (Squamata: Scincidae), with comments on Scincus and Scincopus and the age of the Sahara Desert.

    PubMed

    Carranza, S; Arnold, E N; Geniez, Ph; Roca, J; Mateo, J A

    2008-03-01

    Phylogenetic analysis using up to 1325 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA from 179 specimens and 30 species of Chalcides, Sphenops, Eumeces, Scincopus and Scincus indicates that Sphenops arose twice independently within Chalcides. It is consequently synonymized with that genus. Chalcides in this broader sense originated in Morocco, diversifying into four main clades about 10 Ma, after which some of its lineages dispersed widely to cover an area 40 times as large. Two separate lineages invaded the Canary Islands and at least five main lineages colonized southern Europe. At least five more spread across northern Africa, one extending into southwest Asia. Elongate bodies with reduced limbs have evolved at least four times in Chalcides, mesic 'grass-swimmers' being produced in one case and extensive adaptation to life in loose desert sand in two others. In clade, Chalcides striatus colonized SW Europe from NW Africa 2.6 Ma and C. chalcides mainland Italy 1.4 Ma, both invasions being across water, while C. c. vittatus reached Sardinia more recently, perhaps anthropogenically, and C. guentheri spread 1200km further east to Israel. C. minutus is a composite, with individuals from the type locality forming a long independent lineage and the remaining ones investigated being most closely related to C. mertensi. In the Northern clade, C. boulengeri and C. sepsoides spread east through sandy habitats north of the Sahara about 5 Ma, the latter reaching Egypt. C. bedriagai invaded Spain around the same time, perhaps during the Messinian period when the Mediterranean was dry, and shows considerable diversification. Although it is currently recognized as one species, the C. ocellatus clade exhibits as much phylogenetic depth as the other main clades of Chalcides, having at least six main lineages. These have independently invaded Malta and Sardinia from Tunisia and also southwest Arabia C. o. humilis appears to have spread over 4000 km through the Sahel, south of the Sahara quite recently, perhaps in the Pleistocene. In the Western clade of Chalcides, C. delislei appears to have dispersed in a similar way. There were also two invasions of the Canary Islands: one around 5 Ma by C. simonyi, and the other about 7 Ma by the ancestor of C. viridanus+C. sexlineatus. C. montanus was believed to be related to C. lanzai of the Northern clade, but in the mtDNA tree it is placed within C. polylepis of the Western clade, although this may possibly be an artifact of introgression. The Eumeces schneideri group, Scincopus and Scincus form a clade separate from Chalcides. Within this clade, the geographically disjunct E. schneideri group is paraphyletic. One of its members, E. algeriensis is the sister taxon to Scincopus, and Scincus may also be related to these taxa. The phylogeny suggests Scincopus entered desert conditions in Africa, up to 9.6 Ma and the same may have been true of Scincus up to 11.7 Ma. Scincus appears to have diversified and spread into Arabia around 6 Ma. Dates of origin and divergence of these skinks, desert Chalcides and other squamates agree with recent geological evidence that the Sahara is at least 5-7 My old. The subspecies Chalcides viridanus coeruleopunctatus is upgraded to the species level as C. coeruleopunctatus stat nov., on the basis of its large genetic divergence from C. v. viridanus. PMID:18276164

  8. Egypt Centre and The Department of History and Classics Swansea Experiment and Experience: Ancient Egypt in the Present

    E-print Network

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Egypt Centre and The Department of History and Classics Swansea University Experiment and Experience: Ancient Egypt in the Present Monday 10th-Wednesday 12th May 2010 Early bookings (pre 15th are included in the price. Tickets are available from Carolyn Graves-Brown at, The Egypt Centre, Swansea

  9. Information Herodotus called by many "The Father of History" traveled to Egypt around 450 BC to study Egypt.

    E-print Network

    Bardsley, John

    © 2012 Information Age Herodotus called by many "The Father of History" traveled to Egypt around 450 BC to study Egypt. Herodotus indicated that each of the four "perfectly triangle faces in 24 BC wrote forty-seven books about the History of Egypt. Unfortunately, most of his work was lost

  10. Spectral reflectance of biogenic crust developed on desert dune sand along the Israel-Egypt border

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Karnieli; H. Tsoar

    1995-01-01

    The effect of biogenic crust on imagery acquired by spaceborne sensors is demonstrated. The crust consists mostly of microphytes such as cyanobacteria. The macrophytes (higher vegetation) on the sand dunes are sparse and have a relatively low spectra! reflectance response. However, since a considerable ponton of the ground is covered by this biogenic crust, (which has a different spectral reflectance

  11. Geometry and texture of quartz veins in Wadi Atalla area, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akawy, Ahmed

    2007-02-01

    Several quartz vein sets with varying orientation, geometry and internal structure were recognized in the Atalla area. The veins were associated with the deformation phases affecting the area. En echelon and extensional veins are the main geometrical types. Syn-kinematic veins associated with the major northeast-over-southwest thrust faults were later boudinaged, folded and re-folded. En echelon veins, fibrous veins, and extensional veins are associated with the NNW-SSE faults. Other veins are associated with the NW-SE, N-S, NE-SW and E-W faults. Veins are concentrated at the intersection zones between faults. The internal structure of the veins comprises syntaxial, antitaxial, and composite types and reflects a change from a compressive stress regime to an extensional one. Chocolate-tablet structures and synchronous and co-genetic vein networks indicate later multi-directional extension of the area. Interaction between cracking and sealing of fractures is a common feature in the study area indicating that it was easy for the pore pressure to open pre-existing fractures instead of creating new ones. The reopening of pre-existing fractures rather than creating new ones is also indicated by the scattering of vein data around ?3. There is an alteration and change in characteristics of the wall rock due to increase in fluid flow rate. Fault-valving probably is also a cause of the complex geometry of some veins.

  12. Source parameters and ground motion of the Suez-Cairo shear zone earthquakes, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. M. Abou Elenean; Adel M. E. Mohamed; H. M. Hussein

    2010-01-01

    Three felt earthquakes with local magnitudes 4.0 (June 29th, 2000), 4.2 (July 07th, 2005) and 3.7 (October 30th, 2007) occurred\\u000a to the southeast of Cairo along the Suez-Cairo shear zone. Being the most well recorded events by the Egyptian National Seismic\\u000a Network (ENSN) in this area, they provide us an excellent opportunity to study the tectonics, the stress field, the

  13. Thermal Performance of Building Envelope in Very Hot Dry Desert Region in Egypt (Toshky) 

    E-print Network

    Khalil, M. H.; Sheble, S. S.; Helal, M. A.; El-Demirdash, M.

    2010-01-01

    to above 40 C for about 6 hours, large diurnal temperature variation, low relative humidity, and high solar radiation reaches to about 1100W/m2 on horizontal surfaces. In such climate thermal human comfort is crucial to provide the reasonable environment...

  14. Mineralogy and radioactivity of pegmatites from South Wadi Khuda area, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohamed F. Raslan; Mohamed A. Ali; Mohamed G. El-Feky

    2010-01-01

    Radioactive minerals in pegmatites associated with granitic rocks are commonly encountered in the south of the Wadi Khuda\\u000a area and found as dyke-like and small bodies. They are observed within garnet-muscovite granites near the contact with older\\u000a granitoids. Field surveys indicated that the studied pegmatites vary in dimensions ranging from 2 to 10 m in width and from\\u000a 10 to

  15. Prehistoric occupation of the eastern desert, Egypt: a key to landform analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gawarecki, S.L.; Hoffman, M.A.; Perry, S.K.

    1985-01-01

    Surface scatters of lithic artifacts on Quaternary faulted relict surfaces and terrace flights represent the first Prehistoric sites reported from the west bank, Gulf of Suez. These aid in analyzing the geomorphifc history of the Gulf, a Neogene rift valley. Diagnostic artifacts include Lower Palaeolithic choppers and Acheulean hand axes; Middle Palaeolithic Levallois flakes and points, denticulate scrapers, and a discoidal core; Late Palaeolithic blade and scrapers and blades; and a Neolithic tanged point, side scraper, and chipped axe. Tectonic and climatic changes are indicated by vertical distribution of Prehistoric sites. Similar artifact assemblages at different relative elevations on bedrock horsts imply laterally varying tectonic uplift rates. Large elevation differences between Middle and Late Palaeolithic-bearing alluvial terraces indicate rapid erosional landscape change. This allows tentative correlation of widely separated terrace flights and indicates the latest possible age of drainage abandonment. Considerable climatic amelioration would have been required for Prehistoric occupation of this arid region. Sites were probably situated above then-active drainages. Additionally, today's limited rainfall cannot account for the amount of erosion since Prehistoric occupation. Therefore, at least three pluvials, corresponding to the Lower, Middle, and Late Palaeolithic, are postulated; these apparently controlled both landscape development and human occupation of this marginal ecosystem. Archaeological analysis can thus be useful as a tool for semiquantitative evaluation of erosion cycles and uplift rates.

  16. Paleoclimatic and Tectonic History of the Eastern Desert, Egypt and Surroundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, Raymond E.

    1997-01-01

    This report covers work for the Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program, which has focused on three areas: analysis of the tectonics and paleoclimatic conditions in north eastern Africa, analysis of surficial geology and damage associated with the 1993 Missouri River floods and rates of lava flow degradation at Lunar Crater volcanic field in Nevada. Work has resulted in several dozen abstracts, several dissertations and a number of papers.

  17. Effect of salinity shock on some desert species native to the northern part of Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Masarrat. M. Migahid

    2003-01-01

    Eight perennial plant species were selected representing succulent leaved plants, Euphorbia paralias, Zygophylum album, and Gymnocarpos decandrum, shrubs Atriplex halimus, and Lygos raetam, a woody evergreen sub-shrub Ononis vaginalis and the perennial herbs Plantago albicans andAsphodelus microcarpus . These life-forms characterizing a gradient from non-saline to saline habitats, which are influenced by their distance from the Mediterranean sea coast of

  18. Mineral chemistry of albite-enriched granitoids at Um Ara, Southeastern Desert, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Abdalla, Hamdy; Matsueda, Hiroharu; Ishihara, Shunso [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan)] [and others

    1994-11-01

    Mineral chemistry and typomorphic characteristics are used to monitor the physicochemical evolution of late-magmatic to postmagmatic alteration processes that resulted in the development of a radioactive and albite-enriched microgranite shock. The mineral paragenesis indicates that postmagmatic fluids were enriched in Nb, Zn, U, Th, Zr, and Y, in addition to Rb, Li, and F. Manganocolumbite with extremely high Nb/(Nb+Ta) (0.99), Mn/(Mn+Fe) (0.82), and zircon with high Zr/(Zr+Hf) (0.97) indicate crystallization under alkaline, relatively high-temperature conditions (>425{degrees}C). The close association of manganocolumbite, Nb-Mn-Zn-rich ilmenite (with 1.2 to 14.5 wt% ZnO), spessartine garnet (with 68.2-89.4 mol% spessartine), zircon, xenotime, zinnwaldite mica (up to 5.98 wt% F), and fluorite indicates the strong affinity of the elements of Nb, Y, Zr, Mn, and Zn for stable complexing by K{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Li{sup +}, and F{sup -}-rich supercritical fluids during the course of extraction and transportation. The enrichment of the interacting fluid in U and Th is depicted by the presence of up to 1.6% UO{sub 2} in manganocolumbite and Hf-bearing zircon, and up to 10.5% ThO{sub 2} in monazite, in addition to locally abundant thorite and uranophane. It is suggested that the uranium mineralization, mainly as fracture fillings, formed during the waning stage of hydrothermal activity. 30 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. On carbon sequestration in desert ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlesinger, W.H.; Belnap, J.; Marion, G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent reports of net ecosysytem production >100 g C m-2 yr-1 in deserts are incompatible with existing measurements of net primary production and carbon pools in deserts. The comparisions suggest that gas exchange measurements should be used with caution and better validation if they are expected to indicate the magnitude of carbon sink in these ecosysytems. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing.

  20. Magnetic Analysis Techniques Applied to Desert Varnish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidgall, E. R.; Moskowitz, B. M.; Dahlberg, E. D.; Kuhlman, K. R.

    2003-01-01

    Desert varnish is a black or reddish coating commonly found on rock samples from arid regions. Typically, the coating is very thin, less than half a millimeter thick. Previous research has shown that the primary components of desert varnish are silicon oxide clay minerals (60%), manganese and iron oxides (20-30%), and trace amounts of other compounds [1]. Desert varnish is thought to originate when windborne particles containing iron and manganese oxides are deposited onto rock surfaces where manganese oxidizing bacteria concentrate the manganese and form the varnish [4,5]. If desert varnish is indeed biogenic, then the presence of desert varnish on rock surfaces could serve as a biomarker, indicating the presence of microorganisms. This idea has considerable appeal, especially for Martian exploration [6]. Magnetic analysis techniques have not been extensively applied to desert varnish. The only previous magnetic study reported that based on room temperature demagnetization experiments, there were noticeable differences in magnetic properties between a sample of desert varnish and the substrate sandstone [7]. Based upon the results of the demagnetization experiments, the authors concluded that the primary magnetic component of desert varnish was either magnetite (Fe3O4) or maghemite ( Fe2O3).

  1. Desert Amplification of Greenhouse Gas Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, K. H.

    2013-12-01

    Surface temperatures over the Sahara and Arabian Deserts are increasing at a rate that is 3.5 times that of the global mean. These regions have warmed by 1.4 K between 1980 and 2012. In the tropical (and global) mean, added energy incident at the surface due to increased concentrations of greenhouse gases is used partly to increase the surface temperature, and partly to evaporate water. The resulting atmospheric water vapor anomaly is effectively mixed vertically and horizontally throughout the tropics on annual time scales, and amplifies the greenhouse effect (increased longwave back radiation to the surface) everywhere, including over the deserts. But, on the desert surface, evaporative cooling is disabled and the enhanced longwave energy incident on the surface serves only to increase surface temperature. Despite the fact that this desert amplification mechanism should operate over any dry surface, the other deserts of the world are not exhibiting accelerated warming. Each of these deserts is smaller than the Sahara/Arabian Desert area, and various regional processes dominate over the desert amplification mechanism.

  2. Computational intelligence approach to load forecasting - a practical application for the desert of Saudi Arabia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suman Ahmmed; D. M. F. Rahman; M. K. Hasan; Ahmed Yousuf Saber; Mohammad Zahidur Rahman

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the development of an Artificial Neural Networks and Particle Swarm Optimization (ANN-PSO) based short-term load forecasting model with improved generalization technique for the Regional Power Control Center of Saudi Electricity Company, Western Operation Area (SEC-WOA). Weather, load demand, wind speed, wind direction, heat, sunlight, etc. are quite different in a desert land than other places. Thus this

  3. EVOLUTION AFTER THE FLOOD: PHYLOGEOGRAPHY OF THE DESERT FISH UTAH CHUB

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jerald B. Johnson

    2002-01-01

    Abstract. The Bonneville Basin and upper,Snake River drainage,of western,North America,underwent,extensive hydrological changes during the late Pleistocene, potentially influencing the geographic distribution and evolutionary trajectories of aquatic species that occupied this region. To test this hypothesis, I reconstructed the phylogeographic history of the desert fish Utah chub (Gila atraria) by examining,16 populations,that span the natural distribution of this species across the

  4. Rhipicephalus sanguineus : Observations on the parasitic stage on dogs in the Negev Desert of Israel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Y. Mumcuoglu; I. Burgan; I. Ioffe-Uspensky; O. Manor

    1993-01-01

    Sixteen dogs were studied for infestation with R. sanguineus in Kibbutz Ze'elim in the north-western part of the Negev Desert over a period of one year. The mean number of ticks per dog per month was 16.4. The majority of the ticks were adults: males (48.6%) and females (34.4%). The cars and abdomen of the dog were the predilection sites

  5. Desert Dust Kills Florida Fish

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) article discusses the connection between dust storms in Africa, and red tides along the Florida coast. Red tides are blooms of toxic algae that kill fish, birds, and mammals, as well as cause health problems in humans. Storm activity in the Sahara Desert region kicks up topsoil that winds transport into the Gulf of Mexico. These clouds fertilize the water with iron, which bacteria named Trichodesmium use to create nitrogen. The nitrogen makes the water a friendly environment for the toxic algae. This article discusses this process and research that is going on to help solve the problem. Audio version is available as well.

  6. Journey to Egypt: A Board Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvidge, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    This author describes how her elementary students first became interested in studying ancient Egypt. Her students' interest in the ancient Egyptian studies began when a student checked out a library book on Egyptology that contained colorful images and was soon swarmed by interested classmates. Many of her students began practicing writing…

  7. Censorship and Security Agents Pervade Egypt's Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    This article offers a glimpse into one of the many ways in which the Egyptian government and the campus administrators it appoints are slowly and persistently squeezing the life out of universities in Cairo, Egypt. Classroom discussions are monitored, faculty appointments and academic research are scrutinized, and faculty participation in outside…

  8. Detection of Strawberry Viruses in Egypt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of a USAID-MERC funded project, ‘Disease-indexing and mass propagation of superior strawberry cultivars’, an effort was made to evaluate the virus status of strawberries in Egypt. Diagnostic reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) tests for Strawberry mottle, Strawberry cri...

  9. Women's perceptions of abortion in Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dale Huntington; Laila Nawar; Dalia Abdel-Hady

    1997-01-01

    A rapidly implemented qualitative study was conducted to investigate the perceptions of women about abortion in Egypt using in-depth interviews with hospitalised patients and focus group discussions with family planning clients and non-contracepting women. The most salient issue confronting the patients (whether the abortion had been spontaneous or induced) was their physical survival. The necessity to return immediately to their

  10. Women's "Justification" of Domestic Violence in Egypt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yount, Kathryn M.; Li, Li

    2009-01-01

    We explored the influences of women's social learning, marital resources and constraints, and exposure to norms about women's family roles on their views about wife hitting or beating among 5,450 participants in the 2005 Egypt Demographic and Health Survey. One half justified wife hitting or beating for some reason. Women from rural areas who were…

  11. Video Usage in Egypt: Limits and Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Fawal, Nagwa Amin

    A review of research conducted in Egypt to assess the impact of videocassette recorders (VCRs) on society and on other communication media indicates that the use of VCRs--a new phenomenon in mass communication in that country--has been accelerating over the past five years as more people have been gradually exposed to the advantages of unlimited…

  12. Reading Habits of Adults in Egypt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scales, Alice M.; Zikri, Lawrence B.

    Investigating the reading habits of adults in Egypt, East Africa, a study examined 294 Egyptians (233 males and 61 females) in post-secondary education in Cairo, and in the industrial cities of Shopra El-Khema, and Impapa, El-Giza. Marital status, sex, and occupation were used to group the subjects. Subjects completed a 29-item questionnaire…

  13. Renewable energy and sustainable developments in Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elham Mahmoud; Hoseen el Nather

    2003-01-01

    This paper considers the economics of using photovoltaic (PV) technology for developing remote areas. “East Owienat” in Upper Egypt is the chosen region: there, the feasibility of using PV systems for the pumping of ground water in comparison with using diesel units, taking into consideration the different parameters affecting the costs and the present value of both systems, is considered.

  14. Thermal and water relations of desert beetles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloudsley-Thompson, J.

    2001-11-01

    The physical problems that living organisms have to contend with in hot deserts are primarily extremes of temperature, low humidity, shortage or absence of free water, and the environmental factors that accentuate these - such as strong winds, sand-storms, lack of shade, rocky and impenetrable soils. Climatic factors are particularly important to smaller animals such as arthropods on account of their relatively enormous surface to volume ratios. Nevertheless, beetles (especially Tenebrionidae and, to a lesser extent, Chrysomelidae) are among the most successful animals of the desert, and are often the only ones to be seen abroad during the day. Similar physical problems are experienced by insects in all terrestrial biomes, but they are much enhanced in the desert. Although climatic extremes are often avoided by burrowing habits coupled with circadian and seasonal activity rhythms, as well as reproductive phenology, several species of desert beetle are nevertheless able to withstand thermal extremes that would rapidly cause the death of most other arthropods including insects. The reactions of desert beetles to heat are largely behavioural whilst their responses to water shortage are primarily physiological. The effects of coloration are not discussed. In addition to markedly low rates of transpiration, desert beetles can also withstand a considerable reduction in the water content of their tissues. The study of desert beetles is important because it illustrates many of the solutions evolved by arthropods to the problems engendered, in an extreme form, by life in all terrestrial environments.

  15. Western Skink

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The Western skink (Plestiodon skiltonianus) is a relatively common and widespread lizard in Southern California. It is more secretive and prefers more grassy habitat than the Western fence lizard or the side-blotched lizard, yet USGS and National Park Service biologists are finding signs of genetic ...

  16. Microphytic crusts: 'topsoil' of the desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, Jayne

    1990-01-01

    Deserts throughout the world are the home of microphytic, or cryptogamic, crusts. These crusts are dominated by cyanobacteria, previously called blue-green algae, and also include lichens, mosses, green algae, microfungi and bacteria. They are critical components of desert ecosystems, significantly modifying the surfaces on which they occur. In the cold deserts of the Colorado Plateau (including parts of Utah, Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico), these crusts are extraordinarily well-developed, and may represent 70-80% of the living ground cover.

  17. Last date modified 1/15/13 Location and Institution EGYPT -CAIRO

    E-print Network

    Galles, David

    Last date modified 1/15/13 Location and Institution EGYPT - CAIRO AMERICA trips through Egypt, service learning activities, and/or Scholarships forums will need a student visa to enter and study in Egypt. You must apply as soon

  18. Last date modified 7/9/13 Location and Institution EGYPT -CAIRO

    E-print Network

    Galles, David

    Last date modified 7/9/13 Location and Institution EGYPT - CAIRO AMERICA trips through Egypt, service learning activities, and/or Scholarships forums will need a student visa to enter and study in Egypt. You must apply as soon

  19. 78 FR 26682 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Hall of Ancient Egypt

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ...Exhibition Determinations: ``Hall of Ancient Egypt'' AGENCY: Department of State. ACTION...pertaining to the exhibition ``Hall of Ancient Egypt.'' The referenced notice is corrected...included in the exhibition ``Hall of Ancient Egypt,'' imported from abroad for...

  20. DR. MELINDA HARTWIG A Lecture by the American Research Center in Egypt Northwest Chapter

    E-print Network

    Hochberg, Michael

    . MELINDA HARTWIG A Lecture by the American Research Center in Egypt of ancient Egypt and the ancient Mediterranean basin. She received her Ph chapel of Menna (TT 69) is one of the finest painted tombs in Egypt

  1. Department of Pharmacognosy1 , Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Alexandria, Alexandria, Egypt; Department of Pharma-

    E-print Network

    Department of Pharmacognosy1 , Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Alexandria, Alexandria, Egypt Ela, Pharmacognosy Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, Alexandria University, 21521 Alexandria, Egypt of air-dried powdered roots of Artemisia monosperma growing in Egypt afforded two new compounds; 6

  2. Desert potholes: Ephemeral aquatic microsystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chan, M.A.; Moser, K.; Davis, J.M.; Southam, G.; Hughes, K.; Graham, T.

    2005-01-01

    An enigma of the Colorado Plateau high desert is the "pothole", which ranges from shallow ephemeral puddles to deeply carved pools. The existence of prokaryotic to eukaryotic organisms within these pools is largely controlled by the presence of collected rainwater. Multivariate statistical analysis of physical and chemical limnologic data variables measured from potholes indicates spatial and temporal variations, particularly in water depth, manganese, iron, nitrate and sulfate concentrations and salinity. Variation in water depth and salinity are likely related to the amount of time since the last precipitation, whereas the other variables may be related to redox potential. The spatial and temporal variations in water chemistry affect the distribution of organisms, which must adapt to daily and seasonal extremes of fluctuating temperature (0-60 ??C), pH changes of as much as 5 units over 12 days, and desiccation. For example, many species become dormant when potholes dry, in order to endure intense heat, UV radiation, desiccation and freezing, only to flourish again upon rehydration. But the pothole organisms also have a profound impact on the potholes. Through photosynthesis and respiration, pothole organisms affect redox potential, and indirectly alter the water chemistry. Laboratory examination of dried biofilm from the potholes revealed that within 2 weeks of hydration, the surface of the desiccated, black biofilm became green from cyanobacterial growth, which supported significant growth in heterotrophic bacterial populations. This complex biofilm is persumably responsible for dissolving the cement between the sandstone grains, allowing the potholes to enlarge, and for sealing the potholes, enabling them to retain water longer than the surrounding sandstone. Despite the remarkable ability of life in potholes to persist, desert potholes may be extremely sensitive to anthropogenic effects. The unique limnology and ecology of Utah potholes holds great scientific value for understanding water-rock-biological interactions with possible applications to life on other planetary bodies. ?? Springer 2005.

  3. Desert Dust Satellite Retrieval Intercomparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carboni, E.; Thomas, G. E.; Sayer, A. M.; Siddans, R.; Poulsen, C. A.; Grainger, R. G.; Ahn, C.; Antoine, D.; Bevan, S.; Braak, R.; Brindley, H.; DeSouza-Mchado, S.; Deuze, J. L.; Diner, D.; Ducos, F.; Grey, W.; Hsu, C.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Kahn, R.; North, P. R. J.; Salustro, C.; Smith, A.; Tanre, D.; Torres, O.; Veihelmann, B.

    2012-01-01

    This work provides a comparison of satellite retrievals of Saharan desert dust aerosol optical depth (AOD) during a strong dust event through March 2006. In this event, a large dust plume was transported over desert, vegetated, and ocean surfaces. The aim is to identify and understand the differences between current algorithms, and hence improve future retrieval algorithms. The satellite instruments considered are AATSR, AIRS, MERIS, MISR, MODIS, OMI, POLDER, and SEVIRI. An interesting aspect is that the different algorithms make use of different instrument characteristics to obtain retrievals over bright surfaces. These include multi-angle approaches (MISR, AATSR), polarisation measurements (POLDER), single-view approaches using solar wavelengths (OMI, MODIS), and the thermal infrared spectral region (SEVIRI, AIRS). Differences between instruments, together with the comparison of different retrieval algorithms applied to measurements from the same instrument, provide a unique insight into the performance and characteristics of the various techniques employed. As well as the intercomparison between different satellite products, the AODs have also been compared to co-located AERONET data. Despite the fact that the agreement between satellite and AERONET AODs is reasonably good for all of the datasets, there are significant differences between them when compared to each other, especially over land. These differences are partially due to differences in the algorithms, such as as20 sumptions about aerosol model and surface properties. However, in this comparison of spatially and temporally averaged data, at least as significant as these differences are sampling issues related to the actual footprint of each instrument on the heterogeneous aerosol field, cloud identification and the quality control flags of each dataset.

  4. Brief communication: Y-chromosome haplotypes in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Lucotte, G; Mercier, G

    2003-05-01

    We analyzed Y-chromosome haplotypes in the Nile River Valley in Egypt in 274 unrelated males, using the p49a,f TaqI polymorphism. These individuals were born in three regions along the river: in Alexandria (the Delta and Lower Egypt), in Upper Egypt, and in Lower Nubia. Fifteen different p49a,f TaqI haplotypes are present in Egypt, the three most common being haplotype V (39.4%), haplotype XI (18.9%), and haplotype IV (13.9%). Haplotype V is a characteristic Arab haplotype, with a northern geographic distribution in Egypt in the Nile River Valley. Haplotype IV, characteristic of sub-Saharan populations, shows a southern geographic distribution in Egypt. PMID:12687584

  5. Genetic linkage between the Yellow River, the Mu Us desert and the Chinese Loess Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, T.; Carter, A.; Watson, T. P.; Vermeesch, P.; Andò, S.; Bird, A. F.; Lu, H.; Garzanti, E.; Cottam, M. A.; Sevastjanova, I.

    2013-10-01

    Arid and semi arid northern China holds some of the world's most significant sand sea and loess deposits. In particular, arguably the most important late Cenozoic wind-blown dust archives on land are exposed on the Chinese Loess Plateau. The origin of this loess-forming dust and its relationship to adjacent sand seas is unclear and has been the subject of considerable debate. Polarization of opinion over the sources of loess also reflects uncertainty over its relationship to large river systems and to the sources of proximal desert sands. It is critical to resolve this in order to elucidate the origins of sand seas, to determine the activity of past dust emitting regions and to fully exploit loess climate archives. Here we combine zircon U-Pb, fission-track and double dating with heavy mineral analysis to test the role of proximal deserts and rivers in contributing dust to the Loess Plateau. We focus on the Mu Us desert to test hypotheses over its sediment sources and because previous studies have often presented contrasting interpretations over its importance as a loess source. Spatial complexity of zircon ages and heavy mineral assemblages in Mu Us sand rules out significant aeolian mixing and shows that grains originating in northern Tibet dominate in the western Mu Us, with local sources dominating in the east of the desert. The western Mu Us far-travelled grains are shown to be delivered by the Yellow River and associated systems. Crucially, the western Mu Us grains and Yellow River grains show U-Pb age distributions and heavy mineral assemblages virtually identical to those of the Quaternary loess. Thus, our results demonstrate that the Yellow River and associated systems transports large quantities of sediment from northern Tibet to the Mu Us desert and further suggest that the river contributes a significant volume of material to the Loess Plateau. This provides the first evidence of a genetic link between the Yellow River and formation of the Chinese Loess Plateau and suggests a greater role for fluvial activity in past dust and desert sand sea formation.

  6. Linking Populus euphratica Hydraulic Redistribution to Diversity Assembly in the Arid Desert Zone of Xinjiang, China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xue-Ni; Lv, Guang-Hui; Ali, Arshad

    2014-01-01

    The hydraulic redistribution (HR) of deep-rooted plants significantly improves the survival of shallow-rooted shrubs and herbs in arid deserts, which subsequently maintain species diversity. This study was conducted in the Ebinur desert located in the western margin of the Gurbantonggut Desert. Isotope tracing, community investigation and comparison analysis were employed to validate the HR of Populus euphratica and to explore its effects on species richness and abundance. The results showed that, P. euphratica has HR. Shrubs and herbs that grew under the P. euphratica canopy (under community: UC) showed better growth than the ones growing outside (Outside community: OC), exhibiting significantly higher species richness and abundance in UC than OC (p<0.05) along the plant growing season. Species richness and abundance were significantly logarithmically correlated with the P. euphratica crown area in UC (R2?=?0.51 and 0.84, p<0.001). In conclusion, P. euphratica HR significantly ameliorates the water conditions of the shallow soil, which then influences the diversity assembly in arid desert communities. PMID:25275494

  7. African Historical Religions: A Conceptual and Ethnical Foundation for "Western Religions."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, E. Curtis

    This paper attempts to set the record straight with regard to the following assumptions: (1) the Africans of the antiquities of Ethiopia and Egypt were black people; and (2) the same black people developed the foundation that provides the basis for the so-called major Western religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. There are two parts to…

  8. Management of Disused Radioactive Sealed Sources in Egypt - 13512

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, Y.T.; Hasan, M.A.; Lasheen, Y.F. [Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center, Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, 11787, Cairo (Egypt)] [Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center, Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, 11787, Cairo (Egypt)

    2013-07-01

    The future safe development of nuclear energy and progressive increasing use of sealed sources in medicine, research, industry and other fields in Egypt depends on the safe and secure management of disused radioactive sealed sources. In the past years have determined the necessity to formulate and apply the integrated management program for radioactive sealed sources to assure harmless and ecological rational management of disused sealed sources in Egypt. The waste management system in Egypt comprises operational and regulatory capabilities. Both of these activities are performed under legislations. The Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center HLWMC, is considered as a centralized radioactive waste management facility in Egypt by law 7/2010. (authors)

  9. Libyan Desert Glass: New field and Fourier transform infrared data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröhlich, F.; Poupeau, G.; Badou, A.; Le Bourdonnec, F. X.; Sacquin, Y.; Dubernet, S.; Bardintzeff, J. M.; Véran, M.; Smith, D. C.; Diemer, E.

    2013-12-01

    Results are presented of new geological observations and laboratory analyses on Libyan Desert Glass (LDG), a unique kind of impact glass found in Egypt, probably 28.5-29.4 million years in age. A new LDG occurrence has been discovered some 50 km southward of the main LDG occurrences in the Great Sand Sea. From Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis, the molecular structure of LDG is refined and significant differences are shown between LDG specimens and other pure silica glasses (fulgurite, industrial fused quartz, and amorphous biogenic silica) that are related to differences in their structures. The slight variations observed here for the mean Si-O-Si angle between the different glasses are attributed to their thermal histories. With regard to the other glasses analyzed, the LDG infrared spectral parameters point to a higher ratio of discontinuities and defects in the tetrahedral (SiO4) network. The quantitative mineralogical constitutions of sandstones and quartzites from the LDG geological setting were analyzed by FTIR. Cretaceous sandstones have a specific composition (about 90 wt% quartz, 10% dickite), clearly different from the Paleozoic ones (about 90 wt% quartz, but ?7% kaolinite). It is shown that the reddish silts bearing the LDG are constituted mainly of microquartz enriched with dickite, whose particle size distribution is characteristic of fluvio-lacustrine deposits, probably Oligocene to Miocene in age. The target rocks, most probably quartz sand, resulted from the weathering (loss of the cementing microquartz) of the Cretaceous sandstones from the Gilf Khebir Plateau with deposition in a high-energy environment.

  10. Benchmarking performance: Environmental impact statements in Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Badr, El-Sayed A., E-mail: ebadr@mans.edu.e [Environmental Sciences Department, Faculty of Science at Damietta, Mansoura University, New Damietta City, PO Box 103 (Egypt); Zahran, Ashraf A., E-mail: ashraf_zahran@yahoo.co [Environmental Studies and Research Institute, Minufiya University, Sadat City, Sixth Zone, PO 32897 (Egypt); Cashmore, Matthew, E-mail: m.cashmore@uea.ac.u [InteREAM, School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, Norfolk, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    Environmental impact assessment (EIA) was formally introduced in Egypt in 1994. This short paper evaluates 'how well' the EIA process is working in practice in Egypt, by reviewing the quality of 45 environmental impact statements (EISs) produced between 2000 and 2007 for a variety of project types. The Lee and Colley review package was used to assess the quality of the selected EISs. About 69% of the EISs sampled were found to be of a satisfactory quality. An assessment of the performance of different elements of the EIA process indicates that descriptive tasks tend to be performed better than scientific tasks. The quality of core elements of EIA (e.g., impact prediction, significance evaluation, scoping and consideration of alternatives) appears to be particularly problematic. Variables that influence the quality of EISs are identified and a number of broad recommendations are made for improving the effectiveness of the EIA system.

  11. Ostrich (Struthio camelus) production in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Cooper, R G; Mahrose, K M A; El-Shafei, M; Marai, I F M

    2008-06-01

    This review discusses the historical, developmental and practices of ostrich farming in Egypt. In the early 20th century, ostrich farming was very important for production of ostrich feathers and documents were produced to perfect the art of procuring the plumes from the birds and subsequently processing them. Pharaohs used ostrich feathers for adornment. Of 43 provinces, 12 were featured in 2003-2004 as farming ostriches: Alexandria, Al-Behera, Al-Dakahlia, Al-Wadi Al-Gadid, Aswan, Cairo, El-Sharkia, Geiza, Ismailia, Kafr-El-Sheikh, Matrouh and Nubaria. Abattoirs and tanneries specialising in ostrich handling are limited to two. Egypt has numerous strengths and opportunities to develop its ostrich sector. Rising meat prices suggest that fresh ostrich meat is unaffordable to many locals. Funds may be allocated to local advertising campaigns to promote ostrich meat; provision of incentives to farmers; and improving the capacity of abattoirs. PMID:18509943

  12. Anthropogenic enhancement of Egypt's Mediterranean fishery.

    PubMed

    Oczkowski, Autumn J; Nixon, Scott W; Granger, Stephen L; El-Sayed, Abdel-Fattah M; McKinney, Richard A

    2009-02-01

    The highly productive coastal Mediterranean fishery off the Nile River delta collapsed after the completion of the Aswan High Dam in 1965. But the fishery has been recovering dramatically since the mid-1980s, coincident with large increases in fertilizer application and sewage discharge in Egypt. We use stable isotopes of nitrogen (delta(15)N) to demonstrate that 60%-100% of the current fishery production may be from primary production stimulated by nutrients from fertilizer and sewage runoff. Although the establishment of the dam put Egypt in an ideal position to observe the impact of rapid increases in nutrient loading on coastal productivity in an extremely oligotrophic sea, the Egyptian situation is not unique. Such anthropogenically enhanced fisheries also may occur along the northern rim of the Mediterranean and offshore of some rapidly developing tropical countries, where nutrient concentrations in the coastal waters were previously very low. PMID:19164510

  13. Regional and Seasonal Diet of the Western Burrowing Owl in South-Central Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Derek B. Hall, Paul D. Greger, Jeffrey R. Rosier

    2009-04-01

    We examined diets of Western Burrowing Owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea) based on contents of pellets and large prey remains collected year-round at burrows in each of the 3 regions in south central Nevada (Mojave Desert, Great Basin Desert, and Transition region). The most common prey items, based on percent frequency of occurrence, were crickets and grasshoppers, beetles, rodents, sun spiders, and scorpions. The most common vertebrate prey was kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spp.). True bugs (Hemiptera), scorpions, and western harvest mice (Reithrodontomys megalotis) occurred most frequently in pellets from the Great Basin Desert region. Kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spp.) and pocket mice (Perognathinae) were the most important vertebrate prey items in the Transition and Mojave Desert regions, respectively. Frequency of occurrence of any invertebrate prey was high (>80%) in samples year-round but dropped in winter samples, with scorpions and sun spiders exhibiting the steepest declines. Frequency of occurrence of any vertebrate prey peaked in spring samples, was intermediate for winter and summer samples, and was lowest in fall samples. With the possible exception of selecting for western harvest mice in the Great Basin Desert region, Western Burrowing Owls in our study appeared to be opportunistic foragers with a generalist feeding strategy.

  14. Household income and child survival in Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John B. Casterline; Elizabeth C. Cooksey; Abdel Fattah E. Ismail

    1989-01-01

    This article uses household-level economic and fertility survey data to examine the relationship between household income\\u000a and child survival in Egypt. Income has little effect on infant mortality but is inversely related to mortality in early childhood.\\u000a The relationship persists with other associated socioeconomic variables controlled. The mechanisms underlying the income effects\\u000a are not evident from this analysis: income differentials

  15. Pediatric eye injuries in upper Egypt

    PubMed Central

    El-Sebaity, Dalia M; Soliman, Wael; Soliman, Asmaa MA; Fathalla, Ahmed M

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the patterns, causes, and outcome of pediatric ocular trauma at Assiut University Hospital in Upper Egypt (South of Egypt). Methods All ocular trauma patients aged 16 years or younger admitted to the emergency unit of Ophthalmology Department of Assiut University between July 2009 and July 2010 were included in the study. The demographic data of all patients and characteristics of the injury events were determined. The initial visual acuity and final visual acuity after 3 months follow-up were recorded. Results One hundred and fifty patients were included. The majority of injuries occurred in children aged 2–7 years (50.7%). There were 106 (70.7%) boys and 44 (29.3%) girls. The highest proportion of injuries occurred in the street (54.7%) followed by the home (32.7%). Open globe injuries accounted for 67.3% of injuries, closed globe for 30.7%, and chemical injuries for 2%. The most common causes were wood, stones, missiles, and glass. LogMar best corrected visual acuity at 3 months follow-up was: 0–1 in 13.3%; <1–1.3 in 27.3%; <1.3–perception of light (PL) in 56%; and no perception of light (NPL) in 3.3%. Conclusions Pediatric ocular trauma among patients referred to our tertiary ophthalmology referral center in Upper Egypt over a period of 1 year was 3.7%. Of these, 67.3% of cases had open globe injury, 30.7% had closed injury, and only 2% had chemical injury. In Upper Egypt, socioeconomic and sociocultural status, family negligence, and lack of supervision are important factors in pediatric eye injuries, as 92% of children were without adult supervision when the ocular trauma occurred. Nearly 86.6% of children with ocular trauma end up legally blind. Modification of these environmental risk factors is needed to decrease pediatric ocular morbidity. PMID:22034563

  16. Murder or Not and other Egypt Stuff

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Niebergall

    2007-11-06

    The students will discover information about Egypt and decide if the, boy king, Tutankhamun, was murdered or died of natural causes. The first two sites will lead the students to discover all about: *Geography *Egyptian People and their Life Styles *Death and Burial *Egyptian Mythology *Pyramids *Temples and the Pharaohs *Egyptian Writing On the third site the students will learn all about King Tut and write a persuasive essay; taking a stand on if he was murdered or not. The ...

  17. MERS Coronaviruses in Dromedary Camels, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Daniel K.W.; Poon, Leo L.M.; Gomaa, Mokhtar M.; Shehata, Mahmoud M.; Perera, Ranawaka A.P.M.; Abu Zeid, Dina; El Rifay, Amira S.; Siu, Lewis Y.; Guan, Yi; Webby, Richard J.; Ali, Mohamed A.

    2014-01-01

    We identified the near-full-genome sequence (29,908 nt, >99%) of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) from a nasal swab specimen from a dromedary camel in Egypt. We found that viruses genetically very similar to human MERS-CoV are infecting dromedaries beyond the Arabian Peninsula, where human MERS-CoV infections have not yet been detected. PMID:24856660

  18. The boatbuilding industry of New Kingdom Egypt 

    E-print Network

    Monroe, Christopher Mountfort

    1990-01-01

    , or context. Archaeologists interpret the material culture of ancient Egypt in the context of the environment of the Nile valley and how humans applied technology to this environment for their own benefit. Following that model, this thesis interprets... Burun, Turkey, is frequently compared to the Egyptian material. Four areas are examined independently: first, the personnel, tools and techniques of timber collection are studied via ancient texts; secondly, the workplace, viz. the dockyard workshop...

  19. MERS coronaviruses in dromedary camels, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Chu, Daniel K W; Poon, Leo L M; Gomaa, Mokhtar M; Shehata, Mahmoud M; Perera, Ranawaka A P M; Abu Zeid, Dina; El Rifay, Amira S; Siu, Lewis Y; Guan, Yi; Webby, Richard J; Ali, Mohamed A; Peiris, Malik; Kayali, Ghazi

    2014-06-01

    We identified the near-full-genome sequence (29,908 nt, >99%) of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) from a nasal swab specimen from a dromedary camel in Egypt. We found that viruses genetically very similar to human MERS-CoV are infecting dromedaries beyond the Arabian Peninsula, where human MERS-CoV infections have not yet been detected. PMID:24856660

  20. A genetic assessment of the recovery units for the mojave population of the desert tortoise, Gopherus agassizii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, R.W.; Berry, K.H.; Edwards, T.; McLuckie, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    In the 1994 Recovery Plan for the Mojave population of the desert tortoise, Gopherus agassizii, the US Fish and Wildlife Service established 6 recovery units by using the best available data on habitat use, behavior, morphology, and genetics. To further assess the validity of the recovery units, we analyzed genetic data by using mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid (mtDNA) sequences and nuclear DNA microsatellites. In total, 125 desert tortoises were sampled for mtDNA and 628 for microsatellites from 31 study sites, representing all recovery units and desert regions throughout the Mojave Desert in California and Utah, and the Colorado Desert of California. The mtDNA revealed a great divergence between the Mojave populations west of the Colorado River and those occurring east of the river in the Sonoran Desert of Arizona. Some divergence also occurred between northern and southern populations within the Mojave population. The microsatellites indicated a low frequency of private alleles and a significant correlation between genetic and geographic distance among 31 sample sites, which was consistent with an isolation-by-distance population structure. Regional genetic differentiation was complementary to the recovery units in the Recovery Plan. Most allelic frequencies in the recovery units differed. An assignment test correctly placed most individuals to their recovery unit of origin. Of the 6 recovery units, the Northeastern and the Upper Virgin River units showed the greatest differentiation; these units may have been relatively more isolated than other areas and should be managed accordingly. The Western Mojave Recovery Unit, by using the new genetic data, was redefined along regional boundaries into the Western Mojave, Central Mojave, and Southern Mojave recovery units. Large-scale translocations of tortoises and habitat disturbance throughout the 20th century may have contributed to the observed patterns of regional similarity. ?? 2007 Chelonian Research Foundation.

  1. 76 FR 21402 - Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Desert Sunlight...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ...Environmental Impact Statement for the Desert Sunlight Holdings, LLC, Desert Sunlight Solar Farm and Proposed California Desert Conservation...Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Desert Sunlight Solar Farm (DSSF) project and by this...

  2. HIGH FOLIAR NITROGEN IN DESERT SHRUBS: AN IMPORTANT ECOSYSTEM TRAIT OR DEFECTIVE DESERT DOCTRINE?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen concentrations in green and senesced leaves of perennial desert shrubs were compiled from a worldwide literature search to test the validity of the doctrine that desert shrubs produce foliage and leaf litter much richer in nitrogen than that in the foliage of plants from...

  3. Micromorphology of takyrs and the desert ``papyrus'' of Southwestern Turkmenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedeva-Verba, M. P.; Gerasimova, M. I.

    2010-11-01

    The perception of takyrs as clayey mineral soils extremely poor in humus and occurring in deserts was supported by micromorphological studies with the first ones being performed by I.I. Feofarova for the takyrs in Western Turkmenia. However, in the fundamental monograph of 1956, there were abundant data on the contribution of biota (primarily of algae and invertebrates) to the takyr formation. The importance of the biota was emphasized by N.I. Bazilevich, who was an active participant in terrain and analytical investigations of Western Turkmenia takyrs. The micromorphological analysis, along with the studies of the chemical and mineralogical properties of the algal takyr on the Kopet-Dag piedmont plain, made it possible to introduce some corrections to the concepts concerning the mechanisms of takyr development; the contribution of bluegreen algae, microorganisms, and zooplankton was shown to be prominent. The available information on the properties and ecology of blue-green algae enabled the authors to interpret both their own data and the micromorphological descriptions made by I.I. Feofarova in the 1950s. The uppermost subhorizons are proposed to be regarded as the soil miniprofiles, whose properties are strongly affected by the activity of aquatic and terrestrial microorganisms, rather than the sedimentation strata.

  4. Power and Gender in Ancient Egypt: The Case of Hatshepsut

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilliard, Kristina; Wurtzel, Kate

    2009-01-01

    Hatshepsut (1479-1458 B.C.E) ruled New Kingdom Egypt for roughly 20 years as one of the few female pharaohs in the history of ancient Egypt. Her rule began when her husband died and her stepson was too young to be pharaoh. To legitimize her role as pharaoh, Hatshepsut began a significant building campaign by constructing numerous images, temples,…

  5. ACCOUNTING, CONTROL AND ACCOUNTABILITY: PRELIMINARY EVIDENCE FROM ANCIENT EGYPT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mahmoud Ezzamel

    1997-01-01

    Drawing on evidence from the New Kingdom (1552–1069 BC) in ancient Egypt, this paper provides some preliminary findings relating to the functioning of accounting particularly as it relates to control and accountability. Ancient Egypt evolved a redistributive economic system which remained prevalent for most of her long history. The political and economic domains were coordinated by a powerful bureaucracy in

  6. A SURVEY OF CYST NEMATODES (HETERODERA SPP.) IN NORTHERN EGYPT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Information concerning the occurrence and distribution of cyst nematodes (Heterodera spp.) in Egypt is important to assess their potential to cause economic damage to crop plants. A nematode survey was conducted in Alexandria and El-Behera Governorates in northern Egypt to identify the species of cy...

  7. WIND ATLAS FOR EGYPT: MEASUREMENTS, MICRO AND MESOSCALE MODELLING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Niels G. Mortensen; Jens Carsten Hansen; Jake Badger; Bo H. Jørgensen; Charlotte B. Hasager; Uwe S. Paulsen; Ole F. Hansen; Karen Enevoldsen

    The results of a comprehensive, 8-year wind resource assessment programme in Egypt are presented. The objective has been to provide reliable and accurate wind atlas data sets for evaluating the potential wind power output from large electricity-producing wind turbine installations. The regional wind climates of Egypt have been determined by two independent methods: a traditional wind atlas based on observations

  8. Resource Unit on Egypt for the Intermediate Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Husbands, Kenneth; Taylor, Bob

    Resources for teaching about modern and ancient Egypt are provided in this guide for intermediate grade social studies teachers. Material includes: a detailed outline for a unit on Egypt which contains a geographic overview followed by sections on the Nile River Valley, agriculture, the pharaohs, religion, architecture, science, hieroglyphics,…

  9. Separate but Equal: Segregated Religious Education in Egypt's Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaac, John

    2012-01-01

    The Arab Spring exposed the hidden secrets of Egyptian society to the global community. In spite of the insatiable media attention paid to the Mubarak regime and the toll it took on the entire country, Egypt's education system received little attention. For decades, Egypt's public schools have forced students to attend segregated classes, based on…

  10. Isolation of biologically active constituents from Moringa peregrina (Forssk.) Fiori. (family: Moringaceae) growing in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    El-Alfy, Taha S.; Ezzat, Shahira M.; Hegazy, Ahmed K.; Amer, Aziza M. M.; Kamel, Gehan M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Moringa peregrina is a wild plant that grown in the eastern desert mountains in Egypt. Although, this plant is native to Egypt, no details studies were traced on its chemical composition and biological activity. Materials and Methods: The different fractions of the ethanolic extract of the dried aerial parts of the plants were subjected to fractionation and purification on various silica and sephadex columns for the isolation of the major compounds which were tested for there anticancer activity. The aqueous and ethanolic extract as well as its different fractions were tested for antihyperglycemic effect on Streptozitocin-induced diabetes in rats. Results: Investigation of the different fractions of the ethanolic extract of the aerial parts of M. peregrina yielded lupeol acetate (1), ?-amyrin (2), ?-amyrin (3), ?-sitosterol (4), ?-sitosterol-3-O-glucoside (5), apigenin (6), rhamnetin (7), neochlorogenic acid (10), rhamnetin-3-O-rutinoside (12), and 6-methoxy-acacetin-8-C-?-glucoside (13) which were isolated for the first time from the plant. Compound (13) was isolated for the first time from genus Moringa. In addition, quercetin (8), chryseriol-7-O-rhamnoside (9) and quercetin-3-O-rutinoside (11) were also isolated. Identification has been established by spectral data (UV, MS, IR, 1H, 1H -1H COSY, and 13C-NMR). The major isolated compounds were found to have valuable cytotoxic activities against breast (MCF 7) and colon (HCT 116) cancer cell lines and their activities were comparable to the reference drug doxorubicin. On the other hand, the aqueous and ethanolic extracts as well as the n-hexane fraction were found to have potent antihyperglycemic effect on Streptozitocin-induced diabetes in rats. Conclusion: The Egyptian plant M. peregrina is rich in biologically active ingredients which showed potent cytotoxic activity and also its ethanolic extraxt exert a significant antihyperglycemic effect. PMID:21716619

  11. NASA Desert RATS 2011 Education Pilot Project and Classroom Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruener, J. E.; McGlone, M.; Allen, J.; Tobola, K.; Graff, P.

    2012-03-01

    For the 2011 NASA Desert RATS analog activities, NASA HQ provided support to develop an education pilot project with student activities to parallel the Desert RATS mission planning and exploration activities in the classroom, as well as educator training.

  12. Thyroid function in the desert tortoise, Gopherus agassizii 

    E-print Network

    Kohel, Kathryn Anne

    1994-01-01

    To characterize seasonal changes in thyroid function in a terrestrial reptile, thyroid hormones were measured over a period of two years in desert tortoises, Gopherus agassizii, maintained at the Desert Tortoise Conservation ...

  13. Lut Desert (Iran): A High - Potential Area for Finding Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourkhorsandi, H.; Mirnejad, H.

    2013-09-01

    Field trips to the Lut desert in recent years have led to the discovery of several fragments of meteorites. Climate and surface conditions in Lut desert makes it a high-potential region for preserving large concentrations of meteorites.

  14. Egypt's Bounty via the Humble Potstand Maria A. Gutierrez, McNair Scholar, Pennsylvania State University

    E-print Network

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    120 Egypt's Bounty via the Humble Potstand Maria A. Gutierrez, McNair Scholar, Pennsylvania State thing in Upper Egypt, in Lower Egypt, all life, stability and power..." Sesostris I pavilion at Karnak to their king Sesostris (fig. 1) the bounty of Egypt as also connoting the best in life. In looking at various

  15. Education, Social Mobility and Religious Movements: A Theory of the Islamic Revival in Egypt

    E-print Network

    Brody, James P.

    Education, Social Mobility and Religious Movements: A Theory of the Islamic Revival in Egypt on changes to Egypt's educational system over the past half-century as well as about the employment guarantee century must be viewed against Egypt's high population growth. Egypt's population increased from 22

  16. Published: 3 November 2014 Don't Cut Aid to Egypt: The Hopeful Case for

    E-print Network

    Zewail, Ahmed

    1 Published: 3 November 2014 Don't Cut Aid to Egypt: The Hopeful Case for Supporting Egyptian President Sisi Today, the U.S. needs Egypt's partnership more than ever. Op-Ed by Ahmed H. Zewail Some support him. And I believe that cutting foreign aid to Egypt at this point would harm the U.S.-Egypt

  17. Concentration, size-distribution and deposition of mineral aerosol over Chinese desert regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao Y.; Arimoto, R.; Zhu, G. H.; Chen, T.; Zhang, G. Y.

    1998-09-01

    The mass-particle size distributions (MSDs) of 9 elements in ground-based aerosol samples from dust storm (DS) and non-dust storm (N-DS) periods were determined for 12 sites in 9 major desert regions in northern China. The masses of the 9 elements (Al, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Sc, Si, Sr and Ti) in the atmosphere were dominated by local mineral dust that averaged 270?g m-3, and the MSDs for the elements were approximately log-normal. On the basis of Al data, the<10?m particles account for ~84% of the total dust mass over the deserts. Model-calculated ("100-step" method) dry deposition velocities (Vd) for the 9 dust-derived elements during N-DS periods ranged from 4.4 to 6.8cms-1, with a median value of 5.6cms-1. On the basis of a statistical relationship between D99% (the dust particle diameter corresponding to the uppermost 1% of the cumulative mass distribution) and Vd, one can also predict dry velocities, especially when D99% ranges from 30 to 70?m. This provides a simple way to reconstruct Vd for dust deposits (like aeolian loess sediments in the Loess Plateau). The estimated daily dry deposition fluxes were higher during DS vs. N-DS periods, but in most cases, the monthly averaged fluxes were mainly attributable to N-DS dust. Two regions with high dust loading and fluxes are identified: the "Western High-Dust Desert" and the "Northern High-Dust Desert", with Taklimakan Desert and Badain Juran Desert as their respective centers. These are energetic regions in which desert-air is actively exchanged, and these apparently are the major source areas for Asian dust.

  18. What is the Effect of Educational Decentralization on Student Outcomes in Egypt? An Analysis of Egypt's Education Reform Program

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nadia Nasser-Ghodsi

    This paper provides estimates of the effect of educational decentralization on student outcomes in Egypt. With the support of the United States, two types of decentralization programs have been implemented in Egypt since 2000: Parent-Teacher Councils and Boards of Tru stees of Parents and Teachers. While Parent-Teacher Councils have not decentralized their local governorates' education systems to the same degree

  19. Desert basins of the Southwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leake, Stanley A.; Konieczki, Alice D.; Rees, Julie A.H.

    2000-01-01

    Ground water is among the Nation’s most important natural resources. It provides drinking water to urban and rural communities, supports irrigation and industry, sustains the flow of streams and rivers, and maintains riparian and wetland ecosystems. In many areas of the Nation, the future sustainability of ground-water resources is at risk from overuse and contamination. Because ground-water systems typically respond slowly to human actions, a long-term perspective is needed to manage this valuable resource. This publication is one in a series of fact sheets that describe ground-water-resource issues across the United States, as well as some of the activities of the U.S. Geological Survey that provide information to help others develop, manage, and protect ground-water resources in a sustainable manner. Ground-water resources in the Southwest are among the most overused in the United States. Natural recharge to aquifers is low and pumping in many areas has resulted in lowering of water tables. The consequences of large-scale removal of water from storage are becoming increasingly evident. These consequences include land subsidence; loss of springs, streams, wetlands and associated habitat; and degradation of water quality. Water managers are now seeking better ways of managing ground-water resources while looking for supplemental sources of water. This fact sheet reviews basic information on ground water in the desert basins of the Southwest. Also described are some activities of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) that are providing scientific information for sustainable management of ground-water resources in the Southwest. Ground-water sustainability is defined as developing and using ground water in a way that can be maintained for an indefinite time without causing unacceptable environmental, economic, or social consequences.

  20. Structure and function of C 3and C 4Chihuahuan Desert plant communities. Standing crop and leaf area index

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert P. Gibbens; Ralph A. Hicks; William A. Dugas

    1996-01-01

    During the past 150 years, native C3shrubs have invaded and dominated extensive areas of former C4grasslands in deserts of the south-western United States. This vegetation shift has caused large changes in several aspects of the structure and function of these plant communities. To examine structural changes, we measured the standing crop of green herbaceous plants and live shrubs, leaf area

  1. Western Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. W. Hay; D. C. Robertson

    1981-01-01

    In 1980, a third successive all-time drilling record was set in western Canada, with 8865 wells being drilled, up 20% since 1979. Exploratory drilling increased 30%, to 3744 wells, and development drilling increased 14%, to 5121 wells. The exploratory success rate increased to 66% in 1980, based on 1017 oil discoveries and 1463 gas discoveries. The development success rate increased

  2. Effects of fire on belowground biomass in Chihuahuan desert grassland

    E-print Network

    Effects of fire on belowground biomass in Chihuahuan desert grassland SHAYLA A. BURNETT,1 on belowground biomass in Chihuahuan desert grassland. Ecosphere 3(11):107. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ES12-00248.1 Abstract. Grasslands occupy large areas in the northern Chihuahaun Desert. These grasslands, dominated

  3. An Economic View of Food Deserts in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitler, Marianne; Haider, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Considerable policy and academic attention has been focused on the topic of food deserts. We consider this topic from an economic perspective. First, we consider how the components of a standard economic analysis apply to the study of food deserts. Second, using this economic lens, we revisit the empirical literature on food deserts to assess the…

  4. Role of pioneer species in revegetation of disturbed desert areas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Wallace; E. M. Romney

    1980-01-01

    The northern Mojave Desert, as are many deserts, is characterized in part by small fertile islands in which exist individual shrub clumps each containing two or more plants. These fertile sites promote characteristic organization of both plant and animal activity in the desert. Destruction of these fertile sites make revegetation extremely difficult because most seedlings germinate in these sites. Some

  5. POLICIES GOVERNING RESEARCH AT THE SODA SPRINGS DESERT STUDIES CENTER

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    POLICIES GOVERNING RESEARCH AT THE SODA SPRINGS DESERT STUDIES CENTER Introduction. It is the policy of the Board of Governors of the California Desert Studies Consortium to encourage and facilitate research and research- related activities at the Desert Studies Center. In doing so, the Board implicitly

  6. Density currents as a desert dust mobilization mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomos, S.; Kallos, G.; Mavromatidis, E.; Kushta, J.

    2012-11-01

    The formation and propagation of density currents are well studied processes in fluid dynamics with many applications in other science fields. In the atmosphere, density currents are usually meso-?/? phenomena and are often associated with storm downdrafts. These storms are responsible for the formation of severe dust episodes (haboobs) over desert areas. In the present study, the formation of a convective cool pool and the associated dust mobilization are examined for a representative event over the western part of Sahara desert. The physical processes involved in the mobilization of dust are described with the use of the integrated atmospheric-air quality RAMS/ICLAMS model. Dust is effectively produced due to the development of near surface vortices and increased turbulent mixing along the frontal line. Increased dust emissions and recirculation of the elevated particles inside the head of the density current result in the formation of a moving "dust wall". Transport of the dust particles in higher layers - outside of the density current - occurs mainly in three ways: (1) Uplifting of preexisting dust over the frontal line with the aid of the strong updraft (2) Entrainment at the upper part of the density current head due to turbulent mixing (3) Vertical mixing after the dilution of the system. The role of the dust in the associated convective cloud system was found to be limited. Proper representation of convective processes and dust mobilization requires the use of high resolution (cloud resolving) model configuration and online parameterization of dust production. Haboob-type dust storms are effective dust sources and should be treated accordingly in dust modeling applications.

  7. Density currents as a desert dust mobilization mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomos, S.; Kallos, G.; Mavromatidis, E.; Kushta, J.

    2012-08-01

    The formation and propagation of density currents are well studied processes in fluid dynamics with many applications to other science fields. In the atmosphere, density currents are usually meso-?/? mechanisms and are often associated with storm downdrafts. These storms are responsible for the formation of severe dust episodes (haboobs) over desert areas. In the present study, the formation of a convective cool pool and the associated dust mobilization is examined for a representative event over the western part of Sahara desert. The physical processes involved in the mobilization of dust are described in the framework of the integrated atmospheric-air quality RAMS/ICLAMS model. Dust is effectively produced due to the development of near surface vortices and increased turbulence mixing along the frontal line. Increased dust emissions and recirculation of the elevated particles inside the density current head result in the formation of a moving "dust wall". Transport of the uplifted dust in higher layers - outside of the density current - occurs mainly in three ways: (1) uplifting of preexisting dust over the frontal line with the aid of the strong updraft (2) entrainment at the upper part of the density current head due to turbulent mixing (3) vertical mixing after the dilution of the system. The role of the produced dust in the associated convective cloud system was found to be limited. Proper representation of convective processes and dust fluxes requires the use of high resolution (cloud resolving) model configuration and online parameterization of dust production. Haboob-type of dust storms are effective dust sources and should be treated accordingly in dust modeling applications.

  8. Controls on sediment production in two U.S. deserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belnap, Jayne; Walker, Beau J.; Munson, Seth M.; Gill, Richard A.

    2014-09-01

    Much of the world’s airborne sediment originates from dryland regions. Soil surface disturbances in these regions are ever-increasing due to human activities such as energy and mineral exploration and development, recreation, suburbanization, livestock grazing and cropping. Sediment production can have significant impacts to human health with particles potentially carrying viruses such as Valley Fever or causing asthma or other respiratory diseases. Dust storms can cause decreased visibility at the ground level, resulting in highway accidents, and reduced visual quality in park and wildland airsheds. Sediment production and deposition is also detrimental to ecosystem health, as production reduces soil fertility at its source and can bury plants and other organisms where it is deposited. Therefore, it is important to understand how we can predict what areas are prone to producing sediment emissions both before and after soil surface disturbance. We visited 87 sites in two deserts of the western U.S. that represented a range of soil texture and surface cover types. We used a portable wind tunnel to estimate the threshold friction velocity (TFV) required to initiate sediment transport and the amount of sediment produced by the tunnel at a set wind speed. Wind tunnel runs were done before and after soil surface disturbance with a four-wheel drive vehicle. Results show that most undisturbed desert soils are very stable, especially if covered by rocks or well-developed biological soil crusts, which make them virtually wind-erosion proof. Particles at disturbed sites, in contrast, moved at relatively low wind speeds and produced high amounts of sediment. Silt was an important predictor of TFV and sediment production across all sites, whereas the influence of rock cover and biological soil crusts was site-dependent. Understanding the vulnerability of a site after disturbance is important information for land managers as they plan land use activities and attempt to mitigate the harmful effects that sediment production can have on both human and ecosystem health.

  9. Women in Egypt: new roles and realities.

    PubMed

    Lesch, A M; Sullivan, E L

    1986-01-01

    This is an extensive background presentation on the recent changes in Egyptian society, followed by results of a survey of attitudes toward family planning and the role of women. There have been remarkable social changes in Egypt recently, accompanied by rapid growth of the densely packed population. Virtually all of Egypt's 50 million people live on the banks of the Nile, 12 million of them in Cairo. Family planning has been government policy since 1981; the IUD and the pill are commonly used; but sterilization and abortion are illegal except for certain medical indications. Family subsidies and many public services have been eliminated, and even the lower classes are feeling the pinch of high cost of living, to the extent of desiring to balance their family size with their income. The survey was conducted by 35 students of the American University in Cairo, targeting middle and upper class adults, middle and upper class students, and lower class workers and domestics. The subjects were selected to be known to the interviewers to increase reliability of the data. This design created bias in the results, a preponderance of urban, student, single, childless and upper class subjects relative to the general population. The most common trend in the survey results was a conservatism among men, the lower class or less educated, or the rural lower classes. For example most women wanted 2 children, while those with traditional views valued male children and questioned the rights of women to be educated, to work outside the home, and to use contraception. The survey found that few people knew much about Egypt's Personal Status Law of 1979, which specifies women's rights regarding divorce, alimony, child support, and male polygamy. Women faced with divorce, however, rapidly learn their rights. This study revealed a consensus toward egalitarian values, along with distinct discord between the classes and sexes, and conflict between modern development and traditional roles for women. PMID:12315070

  10. Health effects of particulate air pollution and airborne desert dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelieveld, J.; Pozzer, A.; Giannadaki, D.; Fnais, M.

    2013-12-01

    Air pollution by fine particulate matter (PM2.5) has increased strongly with industrialization and urbanization. In the past decades this increase has taken place at a particularly high pace in South and East Asia. We estimate the premature mortality and the years of human life lost (YLL) caused by anthropogenic PM2.5 and airborne desert dust (DU2.5) on regional and national scales (Giannadaki et al., 2013; Lelieveld et al., 2013). This is based on high-resolution global model calculations that resolve urban and industrial regions in relatively great detail. We apply an epidemiological health impact function and find that especially in large countries with extensive suburban and rural populations, air pollution-induced mortality rates have been underestimated given that previous studies largely focused on the urban environment. We calculate a global premature mortality by anthropogenic aerosols of 2.2 million/year (YLL ? 16 million/year) due to lung cancer and cardiopulmonary disease. High mortality rates by PM2.5 are found in China, India, Bangladesh, Pakistan and Indonesia. Desert dust DU2.5 aerosols add about 0.4 million/year (YLL ? 3.6 million/year). Particularly significant mortality rates by DU2.5 occur in Pakistan, China and India. The estimated global mean per capita mortality caused by airborne particulates is about 0.1%/year (about two thirds of that caused by tobacco smoking). We show that the highest premature mortality rates are found in the Southeast Asia and Western Pacific regions (about 25% and 46% of the global rate, respectively) where more than a dozen of the most highly polluted megacities are located. References: Giannadaki, D., A. Pozzer, and J. Lelieveld, Modeled global effects of airborne desert dust on air quality and premature mortality, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss. (submitted), 2013. Lelieveld, J., C. Barlas, D. Giannadaki, and A. Pozzer, Model calculated global, regional and megacity premature mortality due to air pollution by ozone and fine particulate matter, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13, 7023-7037, 2013.

  11. A Reservoir of Nitrate Beneath Desert Soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walvoord, M.A.; Phillips, F.M.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Evans, R.D.; Hartsough, P.C.; Newman, B.D.; Striegl, R.G.

    2003-01-01

    A large reservoir of bioavailable nitrogen (upto ???104 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare, as nitrate) has been previously overlooked in studies of global nitrogen distribution. The reservoir has been accumulating in subsoil zones of and regions throughout the Holocene. Consideration of the subsoil reservoir raises estimates of vadose-zone nitrogen inventories by 14 to 71% for warm deserts and arid shrublands worldwide and by 3 to 16% globally. Subsoil nitrate accumulation indicates long-term leaching from desert soils, impelling further evaluation of nutrient dynamics in xeric ecosystems. Evidence that subsoil accumulations are readily mobilized raises concern about groundwater contamination after land-use or climate change.

  12. Spider mites of Egypt (Acari: Tetranychidae)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. A. Zaher; E. A. Gomaa; M. A. El-Enany

    1982-01-01

    Twelve genera and thirty-three species of the family Tetranychidae are collected from Egypt. Of these, a new genus and twelve new species are described. These are Septobia g.n., Bryobia meyerus sp.n., Septobia bakeri sp.n., S.aegyptiacus sp.n., Petrobia (Mesotetranychus) lycopersici sp.n., Langella summersi sp.n., Aponychus solimani sp.n., Eotetranychus zaheri sp.n., Schizotetranychus tuttleii sp.n., Tetranychus (Tetranychus) attiahi sp.n., T. (Armenychus) ehari sp.n.,

  13. Distribution, habitat and habits of the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) in the eastern Mojave Desert

    SciTech Connect

    Esque, T.C.; Bury, R.B. (National Ecology Research Center, Fort Collins, CO (USA)); Medica, P.A. (Reynolds Electrical and Engineering Co., Inc., Mercury, NV (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The desert tortoise is widely distributed across most of southern Nevada below 1500 meters elevation and then ranges northeast into the Arizona Strip and southwestern Utah. There are several large populations, but also many isolated groups of desert tortoises due to the rugged topography and, possibly, unsuitable soils. We suggest that the greatest threats to tortoises in the eastern Mojave Desert are with peripheral populations. Tortoises in the eastern Mojave Desert occupy a wide variety of habitats from flats and bajadas in lower elevation to rocky slopes bordering on blackbrush and juniper woodland. In winter they use shallow burrows near Las Vegas but frequent deep caves in the northeast edge of their range. Tortoises in all areas may occur in steep, rocky habitats. Climatic extremes are frequent in this region and rainfall can be spotty due to several major mountain ranges that cause rain shadows. Forage is highly variable and this species can be an opportunistic herbivore. 11 refs., 13 figs.

  14. Ophthalmic medicolegal cases in Upper Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Wasfy, Ismail A; Wasfy, Ehab IA; Aly, Tarek A; Abd-Elsayed, Alaa A

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To describe the pattern of ophthalmic medicolegal cases with emphasis on cases of assault, and to acquaint ophthalmologists with rules pertaining to expert testimony and medical reports. Methods A retrospective study was carried out to review files of 247 medicolegal cases from Upper Egypt seen by the senior author in 8 years. These were classified categorically and were analyzed from various characteristics and aspects. The scheme for examination of subjects and for formulating the medicolegal report is described. Results The different categories were assault in 224 cases (90.5%), military recruitment evasion in 8 cases (3.25%), occupational disability claims in 8 cases (3.25%) and medical malpractice in 7 cases (3%). Thirty two cases (13%) presented with alleged functional visual loss, of them 25 cases (10%) were malingering. Traumatic lens subluxation or dislocation was seen in 37 (13.5%) cases and phthisis and atrophia bulbi was the presenting sign in 55 (22.3%) cases. Twenty percent of assault cases were females. There were no differences in incidence between the provinces in Upper Egypt. Assault tools inflicted injuries are described, as well as the outcome of these cases. Claims against military recruits could not be substantiated. Occupational claims for damages were false. Alleged medical negligence cases were rejected based on accepted standards of care and not on unexpected complications. Conclusion Medical reports have to be structured, detailed, accurate and unbiased. Data in this work are useful for statistical and planning purposes in the medicolegal domain. PMID:19121208

  15. Desert Gardening 101: Steps to Starting a

    E-print Network

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Desert Gardening 101: Steps to Starting a Vegetable Garden Tuesday, September 27, 2011 9:00 ­ 10 Gardener Trish Yasolsky was certified a Master Gardener in 2009 and finished the Valley Permaculture plants, and vegetable gardening in Arizona. This class will give you the basic steps to begin a vegetable

  16. Creosote Bush Shrubland in the Sonoran Desert

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Creosote bush shrublands are one of the driest Sonoran Desert plant communities; the creosote bush and white ratany are the dominant plants; a USGS study showed that their coverage is likely to decrease with forecasted climate change because of less winter precipitation and more ...

  17. Path Integration in Desert Ants, Cataglyphis fortis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Muller; Rudiger Wehner

    1988-01-01

    Foraging desert ants, Cataglyphis fortis, continually keep track of their own positions relative to home--i.e., integrate their tortuous outbound routes and return home along straight (inbound) routes. By experimentally manipulating the ants' outbound trajectories we show that the ants solve this path integration problem not by performing a true vector summation (as a human navigator does) but by employing a

  18. Belowground productivity of two cool desert communities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. M. Caldwell; L. B. Camp

    1974-01-01

    A new technique based upon the dilution of C14\\/C12 ratios in structural carbon of root systems during the course of the growing season was used to evaluate belowground turnover or productivity of two cool desert communities in northern Utah, USA. This technique provides a measure of turnover of the root system of established perennial plant communities avoiding many of the

  19. Desert Conditions and Goat Milk Production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Shkolnik; E. Maltz; S. Gordin

    1980-01-01

    Adaptation of the small Black Bedouin goat breed to arid desert conditions is discussed. They are watered only once in 2 to 4 days which increases their foraging range greatly. During water deprivation for 4 days, they lose 25 to 30% of body weight from reduction of total body water and blood plasma volume. Neverthe- less, these goats are relatively

  20. Microflora in soils of desert regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, R. E.

    1970-01-01

    Desert soil samples, collected using aseptic techniques, are low in organic matter and cation exchange capacity. Aerobic and microaerophilic bacteria are most abundant, next are algae and molds. Chemical and physical properties are determined by standard procedures, including the Kjeldahl method and the use of Munsell soil color charts.

  1. Extrafloral nectar fuels ant life in deserts

    PubMed Central

    Aranda-Rickert, Adriana; Diez, Patricia; Marazzi, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Interactions mediated by extrafloral nectary (EFN)-bearing plants that reward ants with a sweet liquid secretion are well documented in temperate and tropical habitats. However, their distribution and abundance in deserts are poorly known. In this study, we test the predictions that biotic interactions between EFN plants and ants are abundant and common also in arid communities and that EFNs are only functional when new vegetative and reproductive structures are developing. In a seasonal desert of northwestern Argentina, we surveyed the richness and phenology of EFN plants and their associated ants and examined the patterns in ant–plant interaction networks. We found that 25 ant species and 11 EFN-bearing plant species were linked together through 96 pairs of associations. Plants bearing EFNs were abundant, representing ca. 19 % of the species encountered in transects and 24 % of the plant cover. Most ant species sampled (ca. 77 %) fed on EF nectar. Interactions showed a marked seasonal pattern: EFN secretion was directly related to plant phenology and correlated with the time of highest ant ground activity. Our results reveal that EFN-mediated interactions are ecologically relevant components of deserts, and that EFN-bearing plants are crucial for the survival of desert ant communities. PMID:25381258

  2. The volatiles of desert truffle: Tirmania nivea.

    PubMed

    Omer, E A; Smith, D L; Wood, K V; el-Menshawi, B S

    1994-04-01

    The volatile constituents of Tirmania nivea (white desert truffle) have been analysed, using gas chromatography/mass spectrometric technique. 11 compounds have been identified in the ascocarp volatiles. The major components were found to be unsaturated fatty acids; whereas hexadecanoic [correction of haxadecanoic] acid represented 49% of the volatiles isolate. PMID:8052580

  3. Gopherus agassizii (desert tortoise). Burrow collapse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loughran, Caleb L.; Ennen, Joshua; Lovich, Jeffrey E.

    2011-01-01

    In the deserts of the southwestern U.S., burrows are utilized by the Desert Tortoise to escape environmental extremes (reviewed by Ernst and Lovich 2009. Turtles of the United States and Canada. 2nd ed. Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, Baltimore, Maryland. 827 pp.). However, the potential for mortality through burrow collapse and entrapment is poorly documented. Nicholson and Humphreys (1981. Proceedings of the Desert Tortoise Council, pp. 163?194) suggested that collapse due to livestock trampling may cause mortality. In addition, Lovich et al. (2011. Chelon. Cons. Biol. 10[1]:124–129) documented a Desert Tortoise that used a steel culvert as a burrow surrogate. The culvert filled completely with sediment following a significant rain event, entombing the animal and ultimately resulting in its death. We note that this mortality was associated with an anthropogenic structure; because tortoises are prodigious diggers, one might hypothesize that they have the ability to dig out of collapsed natural burrows in most situations. Circumstances described here presented us with an opportunity to test this hypothesis.

  4. Today's Vibrant, Far from Deserted, Academic Libraries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lynn Scott Cochrane

    2002-01-01

    The inflammatory title, if not the text, of Scott Carlson's November, 2001 article in The Chronicle of Higher Education, “The Deserted Library: As Students Work Online, Reading Rooms Empty Out-Leading Some Campuses to Add Starbucks,” presented a misleading view of today's college and undergraduate libraries. This guest editorial rebuts Carlson's argument and cites evidence to support a different view of

  5. Desert pavement study at Amboy, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, S.; Greeley, R.

    1984-01-01

    Desert pavement is a general term describing a surface that typically consists of a thin layer of cm-sized rock fragments set on top of a layer of finer material in which no fragments are found. An understanding of desert pavement is important to planetary geology because they may play a major role in the formation and visibility of various aeolian features such as wind streaks, which are important on Mars and may be important on Venus. A field study was conducted in Amboy, California to determine the formation mechanism of desert pavements. The probable sequence of events for the formation and evolution of a typical desert pavement surface, based on this experiment and the work of others, is as follows. Starting with a layer of surface material consisting of both fine particles and rock fragments, aeolian deflation will rapidly erode the surface until an armored lag is developed, after which aeolian processes become less important. The concentration of fragments then slowly increases as new fragments are brought to the surface from the subsurface and as fragments move downslope by sheet wash. Sheet wash would be responsible for removing very fine particles from the surface and for moving the fragments relative to one another, forming interlocks.

  6. Combating desertification: building on traditional knowledge systems of the Thar Desert communities.

    PubMed

    Gaur, Mahesh K; Gaur, Hemlata

    2004-12-01

    The Thar Desert of western India is known for its rich and ancient culture system and traditions. The communities have long been part of the Thar Desert ecosystem and have evolved specific strategies to live in harmony with its hostile environment. This culture has provided several miracle plants of immense food and medicinal value to modern civilisation. The ancient rural livelihood knowledge system reflects time-tested techno-scientific knowledge with a proven track record of sustainability, especially during natural hazards like drought and famines. In addition, several of the traditional skills of local communities in arts and crafts, music and instruments have made modern man aware of the art and techniques of sustainably utilising local biological resources and preserving their biodiversity along with using waste products of the forests, without harming the desert ecosystem. Traditional cultural and socio-religious values are fast dwindling under the impact of materialistic approach, industrialisation and development. This paper endeavours to illustrate the need to assist and propagate indigenous rural livelihood systems rather than mindlessly replace or abandon them as a result of state bureaucracies. PMID:15641373

  7. Opportunities for woody crop production using treated wastewater in Egypt. II. Irrigation strategies.

    PubMed

    Evett, Steven R; Zalesny, Ronald S; Kandil, Nabil F; Stanturf, John A; Soriano, Chris

    2011-01-01

    An Egyptian national program targets annual reuse of 2.4 billion m3 of treated wastewater (TWW) to irrigate 84,000 ha of manmade forests in areas close to treatment plants and in the desert. To evaluate the feasibility of such afforestation efforts, we describe information about TWW irrigation strategies based on (1) water use of different tree species, (2) weather conditions in different climate zones of Egypt, (3) soil types and available irrigation systems, and (4) the requirement to avoid deep percolation losses that could lead to groundwater contamination. We conclude that drip irrigation systems are preferred, that they should in most cases use multiple emitters per tree in order to increase wetted area and decrease depth of water penetration, that deep rooting should be encouraged, and that in most situations irrigation system automation is desirable to achieve several small irrigations per day in order to avoid deep percolation losses. We describe directed research necessary to fill knowledge gaps about depth of rooting of different species in sandy Egyptian soils and environments, tree crop coefficients needed for rational irrigation scheduling, and depth of water penetration under different irrigation system designs. A companion paper addresses recommendations for afforestation strategies (see Zalesny et al. 2011, this issue). PMID:22046755

  8. Proc. ICCS-X, Cairo, Egypt December 20-23, 2009, Vol. 18, pp. xx-xx ASTROCLADISTICS

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Proc. ICCS-X, Cairo, Egypt December 20-23, 2009, Vol. 18, pp. xx-xx ASTROCLADISTICS: MULTIVARIATE on Statistical Sciences, Cairo : Egypt (2009)" #12;Proc. ICCS-X, Cairo, Egypt December 20-23, 2009, Vol. 18, pp

  9. Western Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, P.W. (Canadian Stratigraphic Service Ltd., Calgary, Alberta); Robertson, D.C.

    1981-10-01

    In 1980, a third successive all-time drilling record was set in western Canada, with 8865 wells being drilled, up 20% since 1979. Exploratory drilling increased 30%, to 3744 wells, and development drilling increased 14%, to 5121 wells. The exploratory success rate increased to 66% in 1980, based on 1017 oil discoveries and 1463 gas discoveries. The development success rate increased marginally to 89%, with 1774 oil discoveries and 2778 gas discoveries. Average well depth increased in all four western provinces, and total land sales reached the record $1 billion mark in Alberta and a record $78 million in Saskatchewan. British Columbia land sales declined slightly to $181 million. Alberta drilling activity continued in the deeper portions of the Alberta basin and foothills, with major gas discoveries at Hanlan, Big Mountain, Blackstone, and Elmworth. Significant oil discoveries were made in the West Pembina Nisku pinnacle reefs, in the Upper Devonian at Del Bonita and Eaglesham, and in the Lower Cretaceous glauconite river channels in southern Alberta between Countess and Grand Forks. British Columbia successes occurred as the Elmworth Deep Basin play spilled over into British Columbia with gas discoveries at Tupper and Steeprock. Gas finds were also made at West Sierra and Murray. The Arctic Islands continued to yield the largest discoveries. Two major successes occurred in the Beaufort Sea, in an oil and gas discovery by Esso at Issungnak and a reentry oil discovery by Dome at Tarsuit. However, 1980 will especially be remembered for the introduction of the federal government's National Energy Program during October, with new taxes on revenue, lower than expected wellhead price increases, and major emphasis on increasing Canadian ownership and self-sufficiency. Industry and provincial government reaction was highly critical, and a major downturn in exploration is expected in western Canada in 1981. 3 figures, 8 tables.

  10. 78 FR 7752 - Trade Mission to Egypt and Kuwait

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ...infrastructure, building products and design and construction...increasing U.S. exports to Egypt. Participating...the fourth largest export market for U.S. products and services in the...2 billion. The gross domestic product (GDP)...

  11. Mitigation options for the industrial sector in Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Gelil, I.A.; El-Touny, S.; Korkor, H. [Organization for Energy Conservation and Planning (OECP), Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-12-31

    Though its contribution to the global Greenhouse gases emission is relatively small, Egypt has signed and ratified the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UN FCCC) and has been playing an active role in the international efforts to deal with such environmental challenges. Energy efficiency has been one of the main strategies that Egypt has adopted to improve environmental quality and enhance economic competitiveness. This paper highlights three initiatives currently underway to improve energy efficiency of the Egyptian industry. The first is a project that has been recently completed by OECP to assess potential GHG mitigation options available in Egypt`s oil refineries. The second initiative is an assessment of GHG mitigation potential in the Small and Medium size Enterprises (SME) in the Mediterranean city of Alexandria. The third one focuses on identifying demand side management options in some industrial electricity consumers in the same city.

  12. 75 FR 58353 - Business Development Mission to Egypt and Morocco

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ...2009 to 2010. The financial sector escaped...impacts of the global financial crisis, due to Egypt's...infrastructure in 2008, $1.4 billion...effective May 1, 2008 (for additional...Anne Novak, Global Trade...

  13. Dust storm over the Black Rock Desert: Larger-scale dynamic signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, John M.; Kaplan, Michael L.; Vellore, Ramesh; Rabin, Robert M.; Hallett, John; Cohn, Stephen A.

    2011-03-01

    A dust storm that originated over the Black Rock Desert (BRD) of northwestern Nevada is investigated. Our primary goal is to more clearly understand the sequence of dynamical processes that generate surface winds responsible for entraining dust from this desert. In addition to reliance on conventional surface and upper-air observations, we make use of reanalysis data sets (NCAR/NCEP and NARR)—blends of primitive equation model forecasts and observations. From these data sets, we obtain the evolution of vertical motion patterns and ageostrophic motions associated with the event. In contrast to earlier studies that have emphasized the importance of indirect transverse circulations about an upper-level jet streak, our results indicate that in this case the transition from an indirect to a direct circulation pattern across the exit region of upper-level jet streak is central to creation of low-level winds that ablate dust from the desert. It is further argued that the transition of vertical circulation patterns is in response to adjustments to geostrophic imbalance—an adjustment time scale of 6-9 h. Although unproven, we suggest that antecedent rainfall over the alkali desert 2 weeks prior to the event was instrumental in lowering the bulk density of sediments and thereby improved the chances for dust ablation by the atmospheric disturbance. We comprehensively compare/contrast our results with those of earlier investigators, and we present an alternative view of key dynamical signatures in atmospheric flow that portend the likelihood of dust storms over the western United States.

  14. Estimates of density, detection probability, and factors influencing detection of burrowing owls in the Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowe, D.E.; Longshore, K.M.

    2010-01-01

    We estimated relative abundance and density of Western Burrowing Owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea) at two sites in the Mojave Desert (200304). We made modifications to previously established Burrowing Owl survey techniques for use in desert shrublands and evaluated several factors that might influence the detection of owls. We tested the effectiveness of the call-broadcast technique for surveying this species, the efficiency of this technique at early and late breeding stages, and the effectiveness of various numbers of vocalization intervals during broadcasting sessions. Only 1 (3) of 31 initial (new) owl responses was detected during passive-listening sessions. We found that surveying early in the nesting season was more likely to produce new owl detections compared to surveying later in the nesting season. New owls detected during each of the three vocalization intervals (each consisting of 30 sec of vocalizations followed by 30 sec of silence) of our broadcasting session were similar (37, 40, and 23; n 30). We used a combination of detection trials (sighting probability) and double-observer method to estimate the components of detection probability, i.e., availability and perception. Availability for all sites and years, as determined by detection trials, ranged from 46.158.2. Relative abundance, measured as frequency of occurrence and defined as the proportion of surveys with at least one owl, ranged from 19.232.0 for both sites and years. Density at our eastern Mojave Desert site was estimated at 0.09 ?? 0.01 (SE) owl territories/km2 and 0.16 ?? 0.02 (SE) owl territories/km2 during 2003 and 2004, respectively. In our southern Mojave Desert site, density estimates were 0.09 ?? 0.02 (SE) owl territories/km2 and 0.08 ?? 0.02 (SE) owl territories/km 2 during 2004 and 2005, respectively. ?? 2010 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.

  15. Nationwide Desert Highway Assessment: A Case Study in China

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xuesong; Wang, Fuchun; Wang, Binggang

    2011-01-01

    The natural environment affects the construction of desert highways. Conversely, highway construction affects the natural environment and puts the ecological environment at a disadvantage. To satisfy the variety and hierarchy of desert highway construction and discover the spatio-temporal distribution of the natural environment and its effect on highway construction engineering, an assessment of the natural regional divisions of desert highways in China is carried out for the first time. Based on the general principles and method for the natural region division, the principles, method and index system for desert highway assessment is put forward by combining the desert highway construction features and the azonal differentiation law. The index system combines the dominant indicator and four auxiliary indicators. The dominant indicator is defined by the desert’s comprehensive state index and the auxiliary indicators include the sand dune height, the blown sand strength, the vegetation coverage ratio and the annual average temperature difference. First the region is divided according to the dominant indicator. Then the region boundaries are amended according to the four auxiliary indicators. Finally the natural region division map for desert highway assessment is presented. The Chinese desert highways can be divided into three sections: the east medium effect region, the middle medium-severe effect region, and the west slight-medium effect region. The natural region division map effectively paves the way for the route planning, design, construction, maintenance and ongoing management of desert highways, and further helps environmental protection. PMID:21845155

  16. Estimating the completeness of under-5 death registration in Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stan Becker; Youssef Waheeb; Bothaina EL-Deeb; Nagwa Khallaf; Robert Black

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the completeness of registration of infant and child deaths in Egypt, reinterviews were conducted with families\\u000a who had reported a death of a child under age 5 in the five years before the survey for two national surveys recently conducted\\u000a in Egypt: the United Nations PAPCHILD survey of1990-1991 and the Egyptian Demographic and Health Survey (EDHS) of 1992.

  17. Lettuce and the Sycomore: sex and romance in ancient Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jack R. Harlan

    1986-01-01

    In ancient Egypt, lettuce was considered an aphrodisiac and was featured in the yearly festival of Min, an ithyphallic god\\u000a of fertility and procreation. The Greeks considered it an antiaphrodisiac and its use as a soporific continued into this century.\\u000a The sycomore fig has a highly specialized fertilization biology, but does not produce seed in Egypt for want of the

  18. Nile River, Lake Nasser, Aswan High Dam, Egypt, Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Lake Nasser, (24.0N, 33.0E) at the Aswan High Dam on the Nile River, in Egypt is the world's second largest artificial lake, extending 500 km, in length and about 5000 sq. km. in area. The lake has a storage capacity sufficient to irrigate farms in Egypt and Sudan year round allowing up to three harvests per year. Other benefits include year round river navagation, hydroelectric power, more fish harvests, reduced flooding and more industrial employment. opportunites.

  19. Childhood unintentional injuries surveillance in Ismailia governorate, Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H El-Sayed; A Hyder; O Zekry; D Sugerman; S Abdel-Hamid; H Abbas; P Puvanachandra

    2010-01-01

    ObjectiveTo determine the epidemiology and risk factors of childhood injuries in Ismailia governorate Egypt.MethodsThis is the Egyptian chapter of the Global Childhood Unintentional Injury Surveillance study, which employed quota sampling of children 0–11 years old presenting to the Emergency Department. This surveillance was conducted in the University Hospital of Suez Canal University Egypt, for selected months in 2007. Children with

  20. Geometeorological data collected by the USGS Desert Winds Project at Desert Wells, Sonoran Desert, central-west Arizona, 1981 - 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Helm, Paula J.; Breed, Carol S.; Tigges, Richard; Creighton, Shawn

    1998-01-01

    The data in this report were obtained by instruments deployed on a GOES-satellite data collection station operated by the U.S. Geological Survey Desert Winds Project at Desert Wells (latitude 33° 42' 08" N, longitude 113° 48' 40" W), La Paz County, west-central Arizona. The elevation is 344 m (1,130 ft). From January 9, 1981 through May 31, 1995 the station recorded eight parameters: wind direction, wind speed, peak gust, air temperature, precipitation, humidity, barometric pressure, and soil temperature. On June 1, 1995, the station was upgraded by adding a SENSIT sand-flux sensor, which records grain impacts concurrently with wind speed and wind direction measurements. Included with the data is descriptive text on the geology, soils, climate, vegetation, and land use at the site, as well as text on data format, date retrieval software and instructions, and metadata

  1. Impacts of off-road vehicles on nitrogen cycles in biological soil crusts: Resistance in different U.S. deserts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, J.

    2002-01-01

    Biological soil crusts are an important component of desert ecosystems, as they influence soil stability and fertility. This study examined and compared the short-term vehicular impacts on lichen cover and nitrogenase activity (NA) of biological soil crusts. Experimental disturbance was applied to different types of soil in regions throughout the western U.S. (Great Basin, Colorado Plateau, Sonoran, Chihuahuan, and Mojave deserts). Results show that pre-disturbance cover of soil lichens is significantly correlated with the silt content of soils, and negatively correlated with sand and clay. While disturbance appeared to reduce NA at all sites, differences were statistically significant at only 12 of the 26 sites. Cool desert sites showed a greater decline than hot desert sites, which may indicate non-heterocystic cyanobacterial species are more susceptible to disturbance than non-heterocystic species. Sandy soils showed greater reduction of NA as sand content increased, while fine-textured soils showed a greater decline as sand content increased. At all sites, higher NA before the disturbance resulted in less impact to NA post-disturbance. These results may be useful in predicting the impacts of off-road vehicles in different regions and different soils. ?? 2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  2. Math Around the World (Part 1): Egypt

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mr. Hoskins

    2005-11-20

    Throughout the week, we will be studying Math in different cultures around the world incuding African, Indian, Babylonian, Mayan and others. Our first area of study will be Egypt, home to some of the greatest mathematical-based structures in the world. Any guesses to what those might be? _ _ R _ _ _ D S Today\\'s lesson will focus on several aspects of Egyptian Math. First, let\\'s learn where Math came from. After reading the information from the link below, please write down your opinion and reasoning on a separate sheet of paper. Was Mathematics Invented or Discovered? Now let\\'s read about the History of Egyptian Math: History of Egyptian Math Overview of Egyptian Math For the rest of today\\'s ...

  3. Egypt: Secrets of an Ancient World

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2002-01-01

    While ancient Egyptian civilization has captured the public interest and imagination in recent decades, this well-designed site from the National Geographic Society places its focus on the pyramids created several millennia ago. In the site's most compelling feature, titled Explore the Pyramids, visitors can scroll across the different pyramids, revealing their interior organization and a number of facts about their construction and so on. A brief timeline also gives some information about each of the different Egyptian dynasties. Educators will find much to enjoy here, as the site provides different lesson plans for students, complete with critical questions for discussion and lesson objectives. Finally, there is an online journal written by National Geographic reporter Nancy Gupton that documents her own personal experiences traveling around the pyramids of Egypt.

  4. Geodiversity assessment of the Sinai Peninsula, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torab, Magdy; Farghaly, Enas

    2015-04-01

    The Sinai Peninsula is a triangular plateau lies in NE corner of Egypt, its head in the south at Ras Mohammed and its other sides between the Gulf of Aqaba and Gulf of Suez and the triangle base on the Mediterranean Sea. Sinai Peninsula is the most attractive region from the geological, geomorphological and environmental stand points of view because it displays a variety of simple and complex structural and landforms, (Abu Al-Izz,1971). In general, Sinai Peninsula reflects all geologic column of Egypt. Geomorphologically, Sinai Peninsula comprises many geomorphologic units such as mountains blocks, cliffs, isolated hills, wadies, hogbacks, questas, sand ridges, muddy and marshy lands, lakes and shorelines. This paper aims to define and measure geodiversity assessment index of the Sinai Peninsula as the quantitative variety of geological, topographical, geomorphological, hydrological and soil features. Some geodiversity indices maps for the above features produced for Sinai Peninsula were based on the methodology presented by (Pereira et al, 2012), it depends upon calculate of some geodiversity elements for overlay grid of the study area, which divided topographic, geological maps of the Sinai Peninsula with scale 1:500000 and satellite image (landsat 8, 27th October 2014, 12 bands, 30m). It divided into 743 squares (10x10 km), and some partial geodiversity indices such as geological, topographical, geomorphological, hydrological and soil indices were calculated by counting the number of each element inside each square, then the overall geodiversity index map produced by calculate the total number of all indices inside each square, the geodiversity index map were classified into some gradual categories by using isolines: very low, low, medium, high and very high.

  5. Sonoran Desert: 5000 Square Miles of Silence

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Last mentioned in the May 5, 2000 Scout Report for their virtual trip to Georgia, OneWorld Journeys.com is on a trip to the Sonoran Desert in the American southwest. Photographer Jack Dykinga, writers Charles Bowden and Bill Broyles, digital photographer and producer Russell Sparkman, along with a team of Web designers and technicians present this online account of the expedition. The site features daily journal entries that can be viewed either as consecutive pages of images and text, or in separate windows as animated excerpts. There is also a time line of Sonoran history. Spectacular photography, coupled with poetic writing, evokes the beauty and harshness of the area and advocates strongly for the creation of the proposed Sonoran Desert National Park.

  6. Organic chemicals from the Chihuahuan desert

    SciTech Connect

    Campos-Lopez, E.; Roman-Alemany, A.

    1980-03-01

    A consideration of social, economic, political, and technological factors in the search for new renewable sources of raw materials suggests the exploitation and development of the resources of marginal land regions. Desert regions on the North American continent, which cannot be used for food production, nonetheless, grow a variety of indigenous floral species which offer, in their chemical composition, possibilities for agroindustrial development. Prospects for utilization of the resources of the Chihuahuan Desert for the production of organic raw materials are presented. Research and development projects presently underway in Mexico for the commercialization of plants such as Guayule (Parthenium argentatum), Creosote Bush (Larrea tridentata), Candelilla (Euphorbia antisyphilitica), and Palma (Yucca filiera), among others, are documented. Raw materials obtained from such plants are characterized, with emphasis on the identification of components of industrial interest. Current bench and pilot plant activities, as well as process and product development requirements, are detailed.

  7. High performance robotic traverse of desert terrain.

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, William (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA)

    2004-09-01

    This report presents tentative innovations to enable unmanned vehicle guidance for a class of off-road traverse at sustained speeds greater than 30 miles per hour. Analyses and field trials suggest that even greater navigation speeds might be achieved. The performance calls for innovation in mapping, perception, planning and inertial-referenced stabilization of components, hosted aboard capable locomotion. The innovations are motivated by the challenge of autonomous ground vehicle traverse of 250 miles of desert terrain in less than 10 hours, averaging 30 miles per hour. GPS coverage is assumed to be available with localized blackouts. Terrain and vegetation are assumed to be akin to that of the Mojave Desert. This terrain is interlaced with networks of unimproved roads and trails, which are a key to achieving the high performance mapping, planning and navigation that is presented here.

  8. The Frog Man of the Sonoran Desert

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This radio broadcast features an interview with a herpetologist who studies the native toads of the Sonoran Desert and an invasive species from the east, the American bull frog. The herpetologist, Dr. Cecil Schwalbe, describes the mating cycle of the native toads, which is connected to the yearly monsoon rains that wet the Sonoran Desert, as well as the impacts of the American bullfrog, a voracious predator with no natural enemies in the Sonoran ecosystem. He also points out that frogs and toads are regarded as sentinel species whose numbers are falling around the world. Users can hear recordings of toad calls and view a slide show of some of the toads. The broadcast is 8 minutes and 45 seconds in length.

  9. Assessment and management of water resources in Egypt to face drought and water scarcity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolters, Wouter; El Guindy, Samia; Salah El Deen, Magdy; Roest, Koen; Smit, Robert; Froebrich, Jochen

    2013-04-01

    Egypt is one of the countries hardest hit by global and climate change. Challenges include population growth; increased demands for food, water, and energy; as well as changing land use patterns and urbanization. Egypt's part of the Mediterranean is characterized by a very complex hydrological system, as it lacks rainfall (Cairo average 30 mm/year) and it is completely dependent on the Nile river flow. The growth of the Egyptian population and its economy in the near future leads to an increase in the demand for water and the overall water allocation priority basically is: first drinking water, then industry, and whatever is remaining will be available for agriculture and nature. Because the agricultural sector uses more than 80 per cent of available water, the main option available to reduce water scarcity in the priority sectors of the economy is to allocate less to the agriculture sector. Scientifically based advances in facing future drought and water scarcity through innovations increasing yields and food security by measures leading to "more crop per drop" are required. New and modern large- and medium-scale agriculture is being developed in desert areas with participation of the private sector for investments. To prepare the farming community and others elsewhere, for the future situation of water shortages, a paradigm shift is needed. New farming systems under tight water supply conditions are in development to prepare for a future with less water. Egyptian farming systems need a major transition to prevent further marginalization of agriculture, which would also have a major impact on food security. Central to this transition should be the increase of value generated per volume available water, also referred to as "more crop per drop" or "more cash per splash". There is room for the urgently required improvement: the present return on water in agriculture in Egypt is about US 0.25 /m3, where values of over US 1 /m3 are "easily" reached elsewhere. Moreover, innovations on resource efficiency enabling use of rest and by-products of one agricultural activity as an input for another one will be profitable for the food producers and will also be better for the environment. The creative design process to reach the required technological and policy innovations contributes to the developed adaptation strategy to face drought and water scarcity. Results will incorporate some previously un-thought of options. The issues of water scarcity and drought have consequences and implications that can no longer be adequately addressed by any one of the Ministries alone. Many other government departments and agencies must be involved and decisions will have to be made at the highest political level. All policies in Egypt must be conscious of the limitations in water availability, and water policies need to address technological developments as well as the full range of other issues, including: macro-economic factors, economic issues that influence farm-level decisions, development of human capital, governance, and financial risk management.

  10. Photosynthesis of C 4 Desert Plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peixi Su

    \\u000a There are more than 40 species of C4 woody plants (including semi-woody) in the deserts of China. These plants are exclusively members of Chenopodiaceae and Polygonaceae;\\u000a members of other families have not been found. This chapter introduces some of their characteristics, e.g., photosynthetic\\u000a structure, carbon isotope composition, gas exchange properties, chlorophyll fluorescence, and CO2 response. Haloxylon ammodendron of Chenopodiaceae and

  11. Consumption of atmospheric methane by desert soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Striegl, R.G.; McConnaughey, T.A.; Thorstenson, D.C.; Weeks, E.P.; Woodward, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    ATMOSPHERIC concentrations of methane, a greenhouse gas, are increasing at a rate of about 1% yr-1 (refs 1-4). Oxidation by methylotrophic bacteria in soil is the largest terrestrial sink for atmospheric CH4, and is estimated to consume about 30?? 1012 g CH4 yr-1 (refs 4-6). Spatial and temporal variability in the rate of soil CH4 consumption are incompletely understood6-19, as are the apparent inhibitory12,13,18 or enhancing20 effects of changes in land use. Dry deserts, which constitute 20% of total land surface, are not currently included in global soil uptake estimates. Here we describe measurements of the rate of uptake of atmospheric CH4 by undisturbed desert soils. We observed rates as great as 4.38 mg CH4 m-2 day-1; 50% of the measured rates were between 0.24 and 0.92 mg CH4 m2 d-1. Uptake of CH4 by desert soil is enhanced by rainfall after an initial soil-drainage period - opposite to the response of temperate forest soils12. Methane is consumed to a depth of about 2 m, allowing for deep removal of atmospheric CH4 if near-surface conditions are unfavourable for consumption. On the basis of an annual average CH4 consumption rate of 0.66 mg CH4 m-2 d-1, we estimate that the global CH4 sink term needs to be increased by about 7 ?? 1012 g yr-1 to account for the contribution of desert soils.

  12. Water capture by a desert beetle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Andrew R.; Lawrence, Chris R.

    2001-11-01

    Some beetles in the Namib Desert collect drinking water from fog-laden wind on their backs. We show here that these large droplets form by virtue of the insect's bumpy surface, which consists of alternating hydrophobic, wax-coated and hydrophilic, non-waxy regions. The design of this fog-collecting structure can be reproduced cheaply on a commercial scale and may find application in water-trapping tent and building coverings, for example, or in water condensers and engines.

  13. Desert Plant Communities Threatened by Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Through a series of chemical and ecological processes, new research shows that climate change will likely result in detrimental shifts in desert plant communities. The process through which desert plant communities will shift is complex, involving increased atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and precipitation -- two fundamental ingredients of photosynthesis. Due to human industrial activity, concentrations of carbon dioxide have increased markedly in the atmosphere, and are expected to double relative to pre-industrial times by the year 2050. Increased atmospheric carbon dioxide helps plants use water more efficiently. Simultaneously, climate change models predict a higher frequency of extreme weather events, such as the powerful El Nino of 1998. Through a series of experiments, ecologist Stanley Smith of the University of Nevada and colleagues have demonstrated that plant species respond differently to the combination of wet weather and high carbon dioxide concentrations. Their results, published in the November 2 issue of Nature, show that invasive species benefit more from these conditions, thus unsettling the balance by out-competing native desert plants. Additionally, the increase in plant matter boosts the amount of fuel for fires, an effect which could magnify over time since exotic species tend to recover faster than native species, after a blaze. This week's In The News describes the new findings and offers links to several educational and research Websites.

  14. Desert Truffles of the African Kalahari: Ecology, Ethnomycology, and Taxonomy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James M. Trappe; Andrew W. Claridge; David Arora; W. Adriaan Smit

    2008-01-01

    Desert Truffles of the African Kalahari: Ecology, Ethnomycology, and Taxonomy. The Khoisan people of the Kalahari Desert have used truffles for centuries. The extreme conditions in which desert truffles\\u000a grow means that they fruit only sporadically when adequate and properly distributed rainfall occurs, and then only where suitable\\u000a soil and mycorrhizal hosts occur. Truffles are hunted in the Kalahari by

  15. An experimental analysis of granivory in desert ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    In our studies of desert granivore ecology, we have outlined the network of interaction pathways linking granivore and resource species in a Chihuahuan Desert Ecosystem. Here, a major fraction of the primary productivity takes the form of the seeds of annual plants. These seeds support two major resident taxa of desert granivores, ants and rodents. Population responses to removal of various taxa of granivores or seasonal classes of resource species are described.

  16. 76 FR 45606 - Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan, Habitat Conservation Plan and Possible Land Use Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ...80221-1112-80221-F2] Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan, Habitat...amended, for the proposed Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan (DRECP...NEPA for the proposed Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan...

  17. 77 FR 65133 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Mojave Desert Air Quality Management District

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-25

    ...Implementation Plan, Mojave Desert Air Quality Management District AGENCY: Environmental...revisions to the Mojave Desert Air Quality Management District (MDAQMD) portion...E) Mojave Desert Air Quality Management District. (1) Rule...

  18. Remote sensing approaches for reconstructing fire perimeters and burn severity mosaics in desert spring ecosystems

    E-print Network

    Weisberg, Peter J.

    Remote sensing approaches for reconstructing fire perimeters and burn severity mosaics in desert ratio Spectral mixture analysis Desert spring ecosystems provide water resources essential for sustaining wildlife, plants, and humans inhabiting arid regions of the world. Disturbance processes in desert

  19. Wintertime in the Western U.S.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On Thursday (Feb. 14, 2002), the cloud cover that often overshadows the western United States this time of year broke to provide those at the Olympic Games with a beautiful day. The nearly cloud-free day was captured by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. A thick layer of snow blankets northernmost Nevada, northern Utah, most of Idaho and western Wyoming. The snow surrounds and highlights Utah's Great Salt Lake. Just south of the lake, clouds can be seen hovering over southern Utah. (In general, clouds appear streaky and uneven on a satellite image, and snow cover appears solid with definable borders.) North of the Great Salt Lake, one can clearly discern the light gray Northern Rocky Mountains cutting through Idaho and up into Canada. Moving southwest, the spine-like Sierra Nevada mountains separate the greenery of Southern California from the brown deserts of Arizona and Nevada. For an interesting contrast, compare this MODIS image to the MISR mosaic image of the Western United States during the summer (See Western United States Beyond the Four Corners). To access this image at a resolution of 500 meters per pixel, click on the image above. To access a full-resolution image at 250 meters per pixel, visit the MODIS Rapidfire Image Gallery. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  20. Origin of desert loess from some experimental observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalley, W. B.; Smith, B. J.; Marshall, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    The aeolian attrition of angular quartz grains previously produced by weathering in deserts has been simulated, yielding abrasion products which show that both coarse and fine silt sizes are produced by this process. These results suggest that desert aeolian processes can produce loess, and it is speculated that while much of this material from many deserts has been deposited in the sea, the Chinese loess could have been produced in the Gobi desert. The finest of the particles produced by such attrition may serve as a source of silica for silcrete formation.

  1. Atmospheric transport of mold spores in clouds of desert dust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinn, E.A.; Griffin, Dale W.; Seba, D.B.

    2003-01-01

    Fungal spores can be transported globally in clouds of desert dust. Many species of fungi (commonly known as molds) and bacteria--including some that are human pathogens--have characteristics suited to long-range atmospheric transport. Dust from the African desert can affect air quality in Africa, Europe, the Middle East, and the Americas. Asian desert dust can affect air quality in Asia, the Arctic, North America, and Europe. Atmospheric exposure to mold-carrying desert dust may affect human health directly through allergic induction of respiratory stress. In addition, mold spores within these dust clouds may seed downwind ecosystems in both outdoor and indoor environments.

  2. 78 FR 45285 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Egypt's Mysterious Book...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ...Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Egypt's Mysterious Book of the Faiyum'' SUMMARY: Notice is hereby...determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Egypt's Mysterious Book of the Faiyum,'' imported from...

  3. 76 FR 73759 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Ancient Egypt-Art and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ...Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Ancient Egypt--Art and Magic: Treasures From the Foundation Gandur pour...that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Ancient Egypt--Art and Magic: Treasures from the Foundation Gandur...

  4. 78 FR 20372 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Hall of Ancient Egypt

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ...Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Hall of Ancient Egypt'' SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the following determinations...objects to be included in the exhibition ``Hall of Ancient Egypt,'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition within...

  5. February 18th -19th 2013 Technische Universitt Berlin, Campus El Gouna, Egypt

    E-print Network

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    1 February 18th -19th 2013 Technische Universität Berlin, Campus El Gouna, Egypt Meteorological of the Art in Egypt Dust transportation and statistical analysis Dr. A.S.A. Khalil, General Manager Envi

  6. 78 FR 50023 - Importation of Fresh Oranges and Tangerines From Egypt Into the United States

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ...Importation of Fresh Oranges and Tangerines From Egypt Into the United States AGENCY: Animal...importation of oranges and tangerines from Egypt. Based on the findings of a pest list...and tangerines [[Page 50024

  7. Environmental processes and spectral reflectance characteristics associated with soil erosion in desert fringe regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobberger, P. A.

    1986-01-01

    Two Thematic Mapper (TM) scenes were acquired. A scene was acquired for the Bahariya, Egypt field area, and one was acquired covering the Okavango Delta site. Investigations at the northwest Botswana study sites have concentrated upon a system of large linear (alab) dunes possessing an average wavelength of 2 kilometers and an east-west orientation. These dunes exist to the north and west of the Okavango Swamp, the pseudodeltaic end-sink of the internal Okavango-Cubango-Cuito drainage network. One archival scene and two TM acquisitions are on order, but at present no TM data were acquired for the Tombouctou/Azaouad Dunes, Mali. The three areas taken together comprise an environmental series ranging from hyperarid to semi-arid, with desertization processes operational or incipient in each. The long range goal is to predict normal seasonal variations, so that aperiodic spectral changes resulting from soil erosion, vegetation damage, and associated surface processes would be distinguishable as departures from the norm.

  8. Andean uplift and Neogene climate change in the Atacama Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rech, J. A.; Currie, B. S.; Jordan, T. E.

    2006-12-01

    Today the Andean Cordillera and Altiplano provide a major obstacle to atmospheric circulation over South America. The Altiplano Plateau prevents moist air masses from the Amazon Basin from reaching the Atacama Desert, causing the Atacama to be one of the driest places on Earth. Although Neogene sedimentary records from the western flank of the Andes should record the dramatic shift to hyperaridity that resulted from the growth of the Altiplano Plateau, the climatic implications of many sedimentary sequences have been difficult to decipher. The causes of the difficulties are complex, such as the relative influences of tectonics and active volcanism versus climate, and the roles of local as well as regional precipitation on groundwater and on the deposition of paludal sediments in basin centers. Over the last few years our research group has focused on using paleosols and the isotopic composition of palustrine carbonates in the Calama Basin (22°S) to try to identify a local precipitation signal and determine the onset of extreme hyperaridity as a consequence of the growth of the Altiplano. We have determined the soil morphological characteristics, salt chemistry, and mass independent fractionation anomalies (?17O values) in dated paleosols to reconstruct a Middle Miocene climatic transition from semi-aridity to extreme hyperaridity in the Atacama Desert. Paleosols along the southeastern margin of the Calama Basin change from calcic Vertisols with root traces, slickensides, and gleyed horizons to an extremely mature salic Gypsisol with pedogenic nitrate. We interpret this transition, which occurred between 19 and 13 Ma, to represent a change in precipitation from >200 mm/yr to <20mm/yr. The isotopic composition of palustrine carbonates in the Calama Basin also show a marked change during this time period. ?13C values of palustrine carbonates increase from -7 to +7? VPDB and ?18O values increases from -7 to +1? VPDB over the late to Middle Miocene time. This major trend towards more positive values is likely the result of several factors, including the transition from a largely vegetated to unvegetated landscape (?13C) and the extreme evaporitve enrichment of soil waters (?18O). Currently our results are limited to one isolated study area, the Calama Basin. Over the next few years we plan to extend our study area to the north or south to determine if these dramatic climate changes are truly regional in scale, as one would predict if they are a consequence of the growth of the Altiplano Plateau.

  9. A review on fascioliasis in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Haseeb, Ahmad N; el-Shazly, Atef M; Arafa, Magdy A S; Morsy, Ayman T A

    2002-04-01

    Fascioliasis, caused by Fasciola species, is a disease of herbivorous animals. It has a worldwide distribution in a large variety of grass-grazing animals as sheep, goats, cattle, buffaloes, horses and rabbits. In Egypt, donkeys and camels as well, are hosts for F. gigantica. Fascioliasis may occasionally affect man. Human infection causes serious hepatic pathological sequences that add to the already known threats to the liver of the Egyptian population. Two clinical stages are recognized in human fascioliasis. An acute stage coincides with the larval migration and worm maturation in the hepatic tissue, and a chronic stage coincides with the persistence of Fasciola worms in the bile ducts. Human infection with fascioliasis was very sporadic until the last three decades where clinical cases and outbreaks were reported. The estimated the number of people currently having fascioliasis to be 360,000 in Bolivia, 20,000 in Ecuador, 830,000 in Egypt, 10,000 in Islamic Republic of Iran, 742,000 in Peru, and 37,000 in Yemen. The total estimated number of people infected is 2.4 million in 61 countries and that the number at risk is more than 180 million throughout the world. Human fascioliasis has to be differentially diagnosed from some diseases as acute hepatitis, infection with other liver flukes as schistosomiasis, visceral toxocariasis, biliary tract diseases and hepatic amoebiasis. The parasitological diagnosis is based on identification of eggs in stool, duodenal contents or bile, also by the recovery of adult worm during surgical exploration, after treatment or at autopsy. However, the eggs may be present in very small number at irregular intervals, hence difficult to be found. Besides, the eggs may be transiently present in stool after ingestion of raw or undercooked liver from infected animals. The direct methods of diagnosing the egg are usually unsatisfactory. The symptoms may be present for several weeks before eggs are recovered in stool. Thus, the serologic tests are the alternative method of confirming early and extrabiliary human fascioliasis. However, cross-reactions with other helminthic antigen may confuse the interpretation of the results. PMID:12049266

  10. Published: 11 July 2013 Healing Egypt: Three Steps to Unify a Divided

    E-print Network

    Zewail, Ahmed

    1 Published: 11 July 2013 Healing Egypt: Three Steps to Unify a Divided Nation The uprising of millions of Egyptians since June 30 has led to sharp polarization. Growing up in Egypt, I never saw the military should be punished by stopping US aid to Egypt. The picture is not this simple, and the current

  11. Education, Social Mobility and Religious Movements: A Theory of the Islamic Revival in Egypt

    E-print Network

    Brody, James P.

    Education, Social Mobility and Religious Movements: A Theory of the Islamic Revival in Egypt a theory of the Islamic revival in Egypt--the epicenter of the movement in the Arab world. We begin, social movements, Egypt JEL classification: D10; D63; I24; J24; J62; O10; Z12; Z13; Carvalho

  12. Women in Physics in Egypt and the Arab World Karimat ElSayed

    E-print Network

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Women in Physics in Egypt and the Arab World Karimat ElSayed Physics Department, Faculty of Science into different disciplines. The first woman named in the history of science was Merit Ptah (2700 BC) in Egypt's Valley of the Kings. In the new Egypt, the first girl's school started in Cairo in 1873 and the first

  13. ATTACHMENT TO FORM 8233 (For use by students of Egypt who are claiming Tax Treaty exemption).

    E-print Network

    Daly, Samantha

    ATTACHMENT TO FORM 8233 (For use by students of Egypt who are claiming Tax Treaty exemption). 1. I was a resident of Egypt on the date of my arrival in the United States. I am not a United States citizen. I have the United States and Egypt in an amount not in excess of $3000 for any taxable year. I have not previously

  14. AIN Melaha 2010, Session 5B, Cairo, Egypt 3-5 May 2010

    E-print Network

    Calgary, University of

    AIN Melaha 2010, Session 5B, Cairo, Egypt 3-5 May 2010 Use of GNSS for Vehicle, Cairo, Egypt 3-5 May 2010 Use of GNSS for Vehicle-Pedestrian and Vehicle-Cyclist Crash Avoidance/V2C scenarios, are only made #12;AIN Melaha 2010, Session 5B, Cairo, Egypt 3-5 May 2010 for vehicle

  15. A fossil primate of uncertain affinities from the earliest late Eocene of Egypt

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Doug M.

    A fossil primate of uncertain affinities from the earliest late Eocene of Egypt Erik R. Seifferta,1- mate from the earliest late Eocene (37 Ma) of northern Egypt, Nos- mipsaenigmaticus, whosephylogenetic of fossil primates from the Eocene of Algeria (1) and Egypt (2­4), Africa's role in the early evolution

  16. Published: 22 June 2011 A Compass of Hope for Egypt: The New "City for

    E-print Network

    Zewail, Ahmed

    1 Published: 22 June 2011 A Compass of Hope for Egypt: The New "City for Science & Technology, Egypt is very different from the country I experienced when millions were on the streets calling, as the Egyptians say "hawa gadid" -- a new air. The big question is how to channel this energy to forge a new Egypt

  17. 78 FR 23208 - Importation of Fresh Oranges and Tangerines From Egypt Into the United States

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-18

    ...Importation of Fresh Oranges and Tangerines From Egypt Into the United States AGENCY: Animal...associated with oranges and tangerines from Egypt that identifies pests of concern. Subsequently...fruit fly in oranges and tangerines from Egypt. Based on that evaluation, we have...

  18. Astragalar Morphology of Afradapis, a Large Adapiform Primate From the Earliest Late Eocene of Egypt

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Doug M.

    of Egypt Doug M. Boyer,1 * Erik R. Seiffert,2 and Elwyn L. Simons3 1 Department of Anthropology of Egypt's Fayum Depression, yields evidence for a diverse primate fauna, including the earliest known from the Fayum Depression of northern Egypt have long figured promi- nently in debates surrounding

  19. Mercedes Volait, InVisu (CNRS/INHA) Egypt (1914-1954): Global architecture before globalization

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Mercedes Volait, InVisu (CNRS/INHA) Egypt (1914-1954): Global architecture before globalization by Egypt's rulers and its ever growing state apparatus in the wake of the Ottoman reforms of the 1830s The British occupation of Egypt from 1882 to 1922 (with Protectorate status from 1914 to 1922) did not alter

  20. Auditing in Egypt: Diagnoses and Remedies by Two Groups Mohamed A. Wahdan

    E-print Network

    Spronck, Pieter

    Auditing in Egypt: Diagnoses and Remedies by Two Groups Mohamed A. Wahdan Menoufia University, Egypt - Maastricht School of Management, The Netherlands Pieter Spronck IKAT, Faculty of Liberal Arts Abstract The purpose of the paper is to diagnose the present status of the auditing profession in Egypt

  1. Published as Feature Article: 12 July 2013 Healing Egypt: Three Steps to Unify the Nation

    E-print Network

    Zewail, Ahmed

    1 Published as Feature Article: 12 July 2013 Healing Egypt: Three Steps to Unify the Nation Op by stopping U.S. aid to Egypt. The picture is not this simple, and the current situation is more than a coup troubled Middle East. The real question is: What can be done for Egypt in its democratic transition

  2. Auditing in Egypt: A study of the legal Framework and professional standards

    E-print Network

    Spronck, Pieter

    Auditing in Egypt: A study of the legal Framework and professional standards Mohamed A. Wahdan the auditing profession in Egypt, and the problems faced by the profession. The basic Company Law of 1951 on the practice of auditing in Egypt. The combined set of laws represents the legal framework for the auditing

  3. Wind Atlas for Egypt A national database for wind resource assessment and

    E-print Network

    Wind Atlas for Egypt A national database for wind resource assessment and wind power planning Niels G. Mortensen Wind Energy Department Risø National Laboratory MENAREC 3, Cairo, Egypt 12 June 2006 #12;Acknowledgements The "Wind Atlas for Egypt" is the result of a comprehensive team effort! · New

  4. L'IDENTIT AU MIROIR DU DROIT LE STATUT DES PERSONNES EN EGYPTE,

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    L'IDENTITÉ AU MIROIR DU DROIT LE STATUT DES PERSONNES EN EGYPTE, FIN DU XIXe - MILIEU DU XXe SIÈCLE sur les statuts et les identités en Egypte, à l'époque où l'ordre ottoman, fondé sur l'abolition des capitulations (1937), privilèges conférés aux étrangers et devenus insupportables à l'Egypte

  5. High-stress paleoenvironment during the late Maastrichtian to early Paleocene in Central Egypt

    E-print Network

    Keller, Gerta

    High-stress paleoenvironment during the late Maastrichtian to early Paleocene in Central Egypt 01003, USA d Department of Geology, Faculty of Science, South Valley University, Aswan 81528, Egypt of central Egypt indicate a depositional environment interrupted by periods of erosion due to local tectonic

  6. Bayesian modelling of an absolute chronology for Egypt's 18th Dynasty by astrophysical and radiocarbon methods

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Bayesian modelling of an absolute chronology for Egypt's 18th Dynasty by astrophysical Egyptology, the establishment of an absolute chronology for Ancient Egypt has been an ambition which has contained lists of the kings who reigned in Egypt. The Palermo Stone, the Abydos reliefs and the Turin Canon

  7. THE EFFECT OF DOMESTIC WORK ON GIRLS' SCHOOLING: EVIDENCE FROM EGYPT

    E-print Network

    Levinson, David M.

    1 THE EFFECT OF DOMESTIC WORK ON GIRLS' SCHOOLING: EVIDENCE FROM EGYPT Ragui Assaad, Deborah Levison, and Nadia Zibani forthcoming in Feminist Economics (2010) ABSTRACT In Egypt, girls' work to ban labor force work of children will have practically no effect on girls' education in Egypt, while

  8. Israel must pursue peace urgently as Egypt unravels, former U.S. Rep. Wexler says

    E-print Network

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Israel must pursue peace urgently as Egypt unravels, former U.S. Rep. Wexler says By Ana M. Valdes turned upside down." For decades, Egypt has been Israel's closest ally in the Middle East, particularly peace in their nation, should heed Egypt's crisis. "Israel ought to seek to resolve its issues

  9. AN EXTENDED FIELD OF CRATER STRUCTURES IN EGYPT: OBSERVATIONS AND HYPOTHESES. Ph. Pail-, B. Reynard2

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    AN EXTENDED FIELD OF CRATER STRUCTURES IN EGYPT: OBSERVATIONS AND HYPOTHESES. Ph. Pail- lou1 , B Analysis: Having initially located a possible crater field in southwestern Egypt using JERS- 1 radar images, 225 × 215 km in size, is located in Southwest Egypt, in the vicinity of the Gilf Kebir plateau (Figure

  10. USE OF ACM IN REHABILITATION PROJECTS IN EGYPT Amr Abdelrahman, Mohamed Mohamadien,

    E-print Network

    USE OF ACM IN REHABILITATION PROJECTS IN EGYPT Amr Abdelrahman, Mohamed Mohamadien, Sami Rizkalla is the prime application of ACM in Egypt. FRP laminates are applied for strengthening reinforced concrete slabs introduces selected projects to demonstrate the current practice of FRP in Egypt. In the first application

  11. Tips on Studying Abroad at the American University in Cairo in Egypt

    E-print Network

    Li, Mo

    Tips on Studying Abroad at the American University in Cairo in Egypt Want to know what it's like pounds and another for American dollars. Egyptian pounds are more or less worthless outside of Egypt so of Egypt as many countries request payment of their visas in dollars. It worked out great for me. Finances

  12. Global Studies Center -University of Pittsburgh Speaking the Culture of Egypt: Experiential Learning Program

    E-print Network

    Sibille, Etienne

    Global Studies Center - University of Pittsburgh Speaking the Culture of Egypt: Experiential TO CHANGE Six Week In-country Study Tour in Egypt Date Daily Itinerary WEEK 1 ­ 2: CAIRO ­ History Ancient of the Antiquities of Egypt at the Egyptian Supreme Council for Antiquities - 8 PM: Walking Tour of Downtown

  13. Experiment and Experience: Ancient Egypt In the Present Provisional Timetable 10th

    E-print Network

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Experiment and Experience: Ancient Egypt In the Present Provisional Timetable 10th -12th May 2010 Are you interested in ancient Egypt? Are you interested in ancient technology or crafts? We have Egypt or in technology can meet and share their common enthusiasm. All ages and abilities are welcome

  14. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminars Abroad Program 1989. Egypt: Transition to the Modern World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of International Education (ED), Washington, DC.

    This document consists of four papers on various aspects of development in Egypt prepared by participants in the Fulbright-Hays Seminars Abroad Program in Egypt in 1989. Four of the papers are descriptive, one is a lesson plan. The papers included are: (1) "Egypt: Transition to Modern Times" (Katherine Jensen) focuses on the role of women in…

  15. Views of Ancient Egypt. Teacher's Guide. School Arts: Looking/Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, Linda; Brenner, Carla

    This teaching guide discusses ancient Egyptian culture, the lithographs made by Napoleon's scientists in 1798-99 to study and record every aspect of Egypt, the world's subsequent fascination with Egypt, ancient Egyptian architecture, Egyptian writing, and archeologists' illustrations of Egypt. The guide suggests activities for elementary school,…

  16. Opportunities for woody crop production using treated wastewater in Egypt, I. Afforestation strategies.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Nile River provides nearly 97% of Egypt's freshwater supply. Egypt's share of Nile waters is allocated according to international treaty obligations and is fixed at 55.5 billion cubic meters annually. As a result, Egypt will not be able to meet increasing water demand using freshwater from the ...

  17. Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Diversity in Cephalosporium maydis from Egypt.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Amgad A; Zeller, Kurt A; Ismael, Abou-Serie M; Fahmy, Zeinab M; El-Assiuty, Elhamy M; Leslie, John F

    2003-07-01

    ABSTRACT Cephalosporium maydis, the causal agent of late wilt of maize, was first described in Egypt in the 1960s, where it can cause yield losses of up to 40% in susceptible plantings. We characterized 866 isolates of C. maydis collected from 14 governates in Egypt, 7 in the Nile River Delta and 7 in southern (Middle and Upper) Egypt, with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. The four AFLP primer-pair combinations generated 68 bands, 25 of which were polymorphic, resulting in 52 clonal haplotypes that clustered the 866 isolates into four phylogenetic lineages. Three lineages were found in both the Nile River Delta and southern Egypt. Lineage IV, the most diverse group (20 haplotypes), was recovered only from governates in the Nile River Delta. In some locations, one lineage dominated (up to 98% of the isolates recovered) and, from some fields, only a single haplotype was recovered. Under field conditions in Egypt, there is no evidence that C. maydis reproduces sexually. The nonuniform geographic distribution of the pathogen lineages within the country could be due to differences in climate or in the farming system, because host material differs in susceptibility and C. maydis lineages differ in pathogenicity. PMID:18943166

  18. Modeling mineral dust emissions from the Sahara desert using new surface properties and soil database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, B.; Marticorena, B.; Bergametti, G.; LéOn, J. F.; Mahowald, N. M.

    2008-07-01

    The present study investigates the mineral dust emissions and the occurrence of dust emission events over the Sahara desert from 1996 to 2001. Mineral dust emissions are simulated over a region extending from 16°N to 38°N and from 19°W to 40°E with a ?° × ?° spatial resolution. The input parameters required by the dust emission model are surface features data (aerodynamic roughness length, dry soil size distribution and texture for erodible soils), and meteorological surface data (mainly surface wind velocity and soil moisture). A map of the aerodynamic roughness lengths is established based on a composition of protrusion coefficients derived from the POLDER-1 surface products. Soil dry size distribution and texture are derived from measurements performed on soil samples from desert areas, and from a soil map derived from a geomorphologic analysis of desert landscapes. Surface re-analyzed meteorological databases (ERA-40) of the European Centre for Medium range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) are used. The influence of soil moisture on simulated dust emissions is quantified. The main Saharan dust sources identified during the 6-year simulated period are in agreement with the previous studies based on in situ or satellite observations. The relevance of the simulated large dust sources and point sources ("hot spots") is tested using aerosol indexes derived from satellite observations (TOMS Absorbing Aerosol Index and Infrared Dust Difference Index Meteosat). The Saharan dust emissions simulated from 1996 to 2001 range from 585 to 759 Tg a-1. The simulations show marked seasonal cycles with a maximum in summer for the western Sahara and in spring for the eastern Sahara. The interannual variability of dust emissions is pronounced in the eastern part of the Sahara while the emissions from the western Sahara are more regular over the studied period. The soil moisture does not noticeably affect the Saharan dust emissions, their seasonal cycle or their interannual variability, but it can partly control and limit the dust emissions in some parts of the northern desert margin, where the precipitation rates are higher. Our simulations also tend to confirm that the Sahara is the major terrestrial source of mineral dust.

  19. Assessment of the long-term hydrologic impacts of Lake Nasser and related irrigation projects in southwestern Egypt.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.; Sultan, M.; Environmental Research

    2002-05-10

    A two-dimensional groundwater flow model was constructed to investigate the long-term hydrologic impacts of Lake Nasser and the major land reclamation projects that use excess lake water in southwest Egypt. Egypt constructed (1964-1971) the Aswan High Dam, creating the Lake Nasser reservoir (length: 500 km; average width: 12 km) and is constructing the Tushka Canal to channel 5.0x10{sup 9} m{sup 3}/yr of Lake Nasser water to reclaim 0.5x10{sup 6} acres of desert lands. The model, constrained by regional-scale groundwater flow and near-lake head data, was successfully calibrated to temporal-observation heads from 1970 to 2000 that reflect variations in lake levels. Predictive analyses for the subsequent 50-yr period were conducted by employing the calibrated model. Simulations of long-term effects, beyond year 2000, of Lake Nasser on recharge and temporal groundwater head (base case scenario) show that recharge from the lake will continue at a much slower rate than during the 30-yr period of 1970-2000 (with approximately 86% reduction in 30-yr recharge). The modest projected pumping and injection activities in the study area are not expected to cause major deviation in the overall head distribution compared to the base case scenario. The investigation of effects of the new irrigation land development on the Nubian aquifer indicated that many of the proposed irrigation areas, especially those with small aquifer thickness, will become fully saturated with introduced water, resulting in potential flooding and salinization.

  20. Occult hepatitis B virus infection in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Elbahrawy, Ashraf; Alaboudy, Alshimaa; El Moghazy, Walid; Elwassief, Ahmed; Alashker, Ahmed; Abdallah, Abdallah Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    The emerging evidence of the potentially clinical importance of occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (OBI) increases the interest in this topic. OBI may impact in several clinical contexts, which include the possible transmission of the infection, the contribution to liver disease progression, the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, and the risk of reactivation. There are several articles that have published on OBI in Egyptian populations. A review of MEDLINE database was undertaken for relevant articles to clarify the epidemiology of OBI in Egypt. HBV genotype D is the only detectable genotype among Egyptian OBI patients. Higher rates of OBI reported among Egyptian chronic HCV, hemodialysis, children with malignant disorders, and cryptogenic liver disease patients. There is an evidence of OBI reactivation after treatment with chemotherapy. The available data suggested that screening for OBI must be a routine practice in these groups of patients. Further studies needed for better understand of the epidemiology of OBI among Egyptian young generations after the era of hepatitis B vaccination.

  1. Safe transport of radioactive materials in Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Shinawy, Rifaat M. K.

    1994-07-01

    In Egypt the national regulations for safe transport of radioactive materials (RAM) are based on the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) regulations. In addition, regulations for the safe transport of these materials through the Suez Canal (SC) were laid down by the Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority (EAEA) and the Suez Canal Authority (SCA). They are continuously updated to meet the increased knowledge and the gained experience. The technical and protective measures taken during transport of RAM through SC are mentioned. Assessment of the impact of transporting radioactive materials through the Suez Canal using the INTERTRAN computer code was carried out in cooperation with IAEA. The transported activities and empty containers, the number of vessels carrying RAM through the canal from 1963 to 1991 and their nationalities are also discussed. The protective measures are mentioned.A review of the present situation of the radioactive wastes storage facilities at the Atomic Energy site at Inshas is given along with the regulation for safe transportation and disposal of radioactive wastes

  2. Limitations of navigation through Nubaria canal, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Magdy G

    2014-03-01

    Alexandria port is the main Egyptian port at the Mediterranean Sea. It is connected to the Nile River through Nubaria canal, which is a main irrigation canal. The canal was designed to irrigate eight hundred thousand acres of agricultural lands, along its course which extends 100 km. The canal has three barrages and four locks to control the flow and allow light navigation by some small barges. Recently, it was decided to improve the locks located on the canal. More than 40 million US$ was invested in these projects. This decision was taken to allow larger barges and increase the transported capacity through the canal. On the other hand, navigation through canals and restricted shallow waterways is affected by several parameters related to both the channel and the vessel. Navigation lane width as well as vessel speed and maneuverability are affected by both the channel and vessel dimensions. Moreover, vessel dimensions and speed will affect the canal stability. In Egypt, there are no guide rules for navigation through narrow and shallow canals such Nubaria. This situation threatens the canal stability and safety of navigation through it. This paper discussed the characteristics of Nubaria canal and the guide rules for navigation in shallow restricted water ways. Dimensions limitation for barges navigating through Nubaria canal is presented. New safe operation rules for navigation in Nubaria canal are also presented. Moreover, the implication of navigation through locks on canal discharge is estimated. PMID:25685482

  3. Depositional styles of Early Ediacaran terrestrial volcanosedimentary succession in Gebel El Urf area, North Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliwa, Hassan; Breitkreuz, Christoph; Khalaf, Ibrahim; Gameel, Khaled El

    2010-06-01

    Located 100 km northwest of Hurghada, the volcanosedimentary successions of Gebel El Urf is exposed between latitude 27° 45' 30? and 27° 51' 00? N and longitude 32° 49' 00? and 32° 59' 00? E. The volcanosedimentary successions of Gebel El Urf crop out in an area dominated by different Late Proterozoic plutonic complexes. Both, erosional and intrusive contacts with different granitoid units have been identified. Two SHRIMP ages have been obtained from crystal-rich and lithic-poor ignimbrites yielding 615 ± 4 and 616.0 ± 5.4 Ma placing the evolution of the inter-montane basins, described here, into the Early Ediacaran. In the Gebel El Urf area, a southeastward dipping succession (Gebel El Urf Succession, GUS) of ca. 2000 m thickness rests on coarse-grained granite with an erosional unconformity. Another succession present in the area (Wadi Kefri Succession, WKS) represents volcanogenic sediments which exhibit degrees of metamorphic overprint. In places, it is presumed to be older than GUS. For the GUS, 14 lithofacies types have been differentiated and grouped to seven lithofacies associations. Subdivided into four depositional phases, GUS starts with a thick, massive and clast-supported conglomerate of alluvial fan facies (well-rounded clasts up to 100 cm). GUS continues with pelitic to sandy-turbiditic lacustrine and sandy braided river deposits with occasional volcanic glassy fragments (now illite) (Phase 2). The upper half of the GUS is dominated by volcanic deposits, starting with a 50 m thick package of alternating ignimbrites and synvolcanic sedimentary mass flow deposits, the latter related to phreatomagmatic vents (Phase 3). A thick succession of welded to non-welded ignimbrites follows, with one 20 m intercalation of coarse well-rounded conglomerates (Phase 4). Numerous SiO 2-rich and - poor dykes and sills emplaced into GUS. The GUS development displays a cycle from high to low energy sedimentation and back, under humid climatic conditions. Phase 2 was characterized by extension and down faulting of basin shoulders. Tectonic activity presumably also led to damming of the river creating a sweat water lake. Volcanism commenced with small vents during Phase 2 and terminated with voluminous eruptions in Phase 4.

  4. Egyptian Journal of Biology, 2005, Vol. 7, pp 55-66 Printed in Egypt. Egyptian British Biological Society (EBB Soc)

    E-print Network

    Nottingham, University of

    Egyptian Journal of Biology, 2005, Vol. 7, pp 55-66 © Printed in Egypt. Egyptian British Biological) _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________ * Address For Correspondence Vegetation and Grazing in the St. Katherine Protectorate, South Sinai, Egypt Wallacea in Egypt 1. Operation Wallacea in Egypt & University of California, Berkeley, USA 2. School

  5. Food Deserts and Overweight Schoolchildren: Evidence from Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafft, Kai A.; Jensen, Eric B.; Hinrichs, C. Clare

    2009-01-01

    The concept of the "food desert", an area with limited access to retail food stores, has increasingly been used within social scientific and public health research to explore the dimensions of spatial inequality and community well-being. While research has demonstrated that food deserts are frequently characterized by higher levels of poverty and…

  6. WIND CHARACTERISTICS OF MESQUITE STREETS IN THE NORTHERN CHIHUAHUAN DESERT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Past research has shown that the most important areas for active sand movement in the northern part of the Chihuahuan Desert are mesquite-dominated desert ecosystems possessing sandy soil texture. The most active sand movement in the mesquite-dominated ecosystems has been shown to take place on elon...

  7. Decision Support Tool for Desert Tortoises Near Solar Installations

    E-print Network

    Decision Support Tool for Desert Tortoises Near Solar Installations ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH Information Systems (GIS)based decision support system that models the interrelationships among threats manner. The proposed work would expand and modify the desert tortoise spatial decision support system

  8. Atacama Desert Trek: A Planetary Analog Field Experiment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deepak Bapna; Eric Rollins; Mark W. Maimone; William Red Whittaker

    1997-01-01

    Nomad, a planetary-relevant mobile robot, is chartered totraverse 200 kilometers across the Atacama Desert inChile, exploring a landscape analogous to the surfaces ofthe Moon and Mars. Operating both autonomously andunder the control of operators thousands of kilometersaway, Nomad and the Desert Trek address issues ofrobotic configuration, communications, positionestimation and navigation in rugged, natural terrain. Thefield experiment also serves as a

  9. Evaluation of Factors Potentially Influencing a Desert Bighorn Sheep Population

    Microsoft Academic Search

    TED McKINNEY; THORRY W. SMITH; JAMES C. deVOS

    2006-01-01

    We studied a desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) population in the Mazatzal Mountains (primary study area) in central Arizona and population indices on reference areas between 1989 and 2003. We evaluated disease exposure and nutritional status of desert bighorn sheep, vegetation parameters, predator diets, and mountain lion (Puma concolor) harvest and abundance (1999-2003) and mountain lion predation (1995-2003) as factors

  10. Developing lifecycle models for sustainable investment in desert communities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew Parnell; Kurt W Seemann

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on the outcomes of The Lifecycles Project, a scoping project investigating housing and infrastructure lifecycles in remote desert communities for the Desert Knowledge Cooperative Research Centre (DK-CRC). The project aims to extend the life of community housing and infrastructure through research and development of innovative intervention strategies, with particular focus on indigenous settlements, using a total capital

  11. JiTT - Life in the Sahara Desert

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Laura Guertin

    1) What the Sahara always a desert? How do we know? (*NOTE: for this question, I want you to focus on the physical environment) 2) What modern-day animals can be found in the desert? How do they survive? 3) Why ...

  12. The Western Viceroy butterfly (Nymphalidae: Limenitis archippus obsoleta): an indicator for riparian restoration in the arid southwestern United States?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Mark Nelson

    2003-01-01

    Life history characteristics of the Western Viceroy (Limenitis archippus obsoleta), an obligate riparian nymphalid butterfly in the desert southwestern United States, are described and related to Colorado River riparian restoration efforts. Riverine disturbance regimes and associated fluvial and hydrological dynamics may provide resources critical to this butterfly. Puddling by adult butterflies may require flood-cleared surfaces and an obligate riparian plant,

  13. NASA Desert RATS 2011 Education Pilot Project and Classroom Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruener, J. E.; McGlone, M.; Allen, J.; Tobola, K.; Graff, P.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) is a multi-year series of tests of hardware and operations carried out annually in the high desert of Arizona, as an analog to future exploration activities beyond low Earth orbit [1]. For the past several years, these tests have occurred in the San Francisco Volcanic Field, north of Flagstaff. For the 2011 Desert RATS season, the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) at NASA headquarters provided support to develop an education pilot project that would include student activities to parallel the Desert RATS mission planning and exploration activities in the classroom, and educator training sessions. The development of the pilot project was a joint effort between the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Directorate and the Aerospace Education Services Project (AESP), managed at Penn State University.

  14. Biomphalaria alexandrina in Egypt: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Abou-El-Naga, Iman F

    2013-09-01

    The African species of Biomphalaria appeared as a result of the relatively recent west-to-east trans-Atlantic dispersal of the Biomphalaria glabrata-like taxon. In Egypt, Biomphalaria alexandrina is the intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni. Biomphalaria alexandrina originated in the area between Alexandria and Rosetta and has historically been confined to the Nile Delta. Schistosoma mansoni reached Egypt via infected slaves and baboons from the Land of Punt through migrations that occurred as early as the Vth Dynasty. The suggestion of the presence of Schistosoma mansoni infection in Lower Egypt during Pharaonic times is discussed despite the fact that that there is no evidence of such infection in Egyptian mummies. It is only recently that Biomphalaria alexandrina colonized the Egyptian Nile from the Delta to Lake Nasser. This change was likely due to the construction of huge water projects, the development of new water resources essential for land reclamation projects and the movement of refugees from the Suez Canal zone to the Delta and vice versa. The situation with respect to Biomphalaria in Egypt has become complicated in recent years by the detection of Biomphalaria glabrata and a hybrid between both species; however, follow-up studies have demonstrated the disappearance of such species within Egypt. The National Schistosoma Control Program has made great strides with respect to the eradication of schistosoma; however, there has unfortunately been a reemergence of Schistosoma mansoni resistant to praziquantel. There are numerous factors that may influence the prevalence of snails in Egypt, including the construction of water projects, the increase in reclaimed areas, global climate change and pollution. Thus, continued field studies in addition to the cooperation of several scientists are needed to obtain an accurate representation of the status of this species. In addition, the determination of the genome sequence for Biomphalaria alexandrina and the use of modern technology will allow for the study of the host-parasite relationship at a molecular level. PMID:23938396

  15. Western Meridiani

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 22 January 2004

    Long before the MER landers were named or launched, the two orbiters at Mars were asked to examine landing sites. Both the Odyssey and Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft have been collecting landing site data for the past two years. The MGS and ODY data were used as part of the decision making process in the final selection of the two landing sites. The types of data collected by the two orbiters included not only images of the surface but also thermal data about the surface composition, atmospheric data about the climate at each location, and the tracking of major dust storms in the region prior to landing. The presence of, and data collected by, the MGS and ODY orbiters have proven invaluable in MER mission planning.

    This image, collected on 16 January 2003, covers an area in Western Meridiani.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 1.9, Longitude 354.7 East (5.3 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  16. Western Gusev

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 7 January 2004

    Long before the MER landers were named or launched, the two orbiters at Mars were asked to examine landing sites. Both the Odyssey and Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft have been collecting landing site data for the past two years. The MGS and ODY data were used as part of the decision making process in the final selection of the two landing sites. The types of data collected by the two orbiters included not only images of the surface but also thermal data about the surface composition, atmospheric data about the climate at each location, and the tracking of major dust storms in the region prior to landing. The presence of, and data collected by, the MGS and ODY orbiters have proven invaluable in MER mission planning.

    This image shows some of the far-western areas of Gusev Crater, and was captured on 27 June 2003, while Spirit was en-route to Mars.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -14, Longitude 174.8 East (185.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  17. Western United States beyond the Four Corners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The breathtaking beauty of the western United States is apparent in this image from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer on NASA's Terra spacecraft. Data from 16 different swaths acquired between April 2000 and September 2001by MISR's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera were used to create this cloud-free natural-color image mosaic. The image is draped over a 100-meter (328-foot)shaded relief Digital Terrain Elevation Model from the United States Geological Survey.

    Among the prominent features are the snow-capped Rocky Mountains traversing Montana, Wyoming, Colorado and New Mexico. In the northern portion of the image, the Columbia Plateau stretches across Washington, Oregon and Idaho. Many major rivers originate in this region, including the Missouri to the east of the Continental Divide, the Snake to the west, and the Colorado which wends across Utah and Arizona. The Colorado Plateau and vibrant red-colored rocks of the Painted Desert extend south from Utah into Arizona. In the southwestern portion of the image, California's San Joaquin Valley and the Mojave Desert of California and Nevada give way to the Los Angeles basin and the Pacific Ocean.

    The Terra spacecraft is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

  18. Desert Affairs Program: An initiative on integrating research, education and application for sustainable development in arid and semi-arid lands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Qian; Glantz, Michael H.; Pan, Xiaoling; Gao, Wei; Ma, Yingjun

    2003-07-01

    By recognizing the issues related with drought, desertification, diversity and development (i.e., the 4Ds) in arid and semi-arid lands in Central and Western Asia, The need of developing an interdisciplinary and environment-oriented education and training program, named "Desert Affairs Program", is discussed. Its aim is to train present and future researchers, policymakers and educators for dealing with issues related to environmental science, impacts, policy, economy and ethics in arid and semi-arid lands in Central and Western Asia.

  19. Dew condensation on desert beetle skin.

    PubMed

    Guadarrama-Cetina, J; Mongruel, A; Medici, M-G; Baquero, E; Parker, A R; Milimouk-Melnytchuk, I; González-Viñas, W; Beysens, D

    2014-11-01

    Some tenebrionind beetles inhabiting the Namib desert are known for using their body to collect water droplets from wind-blown fogs. We aim to determine whether dew water collection is also possible for desert insects. For this purpose, we investigated the infra-red emissivity, and the wetting and structural properties, of the surface of the elytra of a preserved specimen of Physasterna cribripes (Tenebrionidæ) beetle, where the macro-structure appears as a series of "bumps", with "valleys" between them. Dew formation experiments were carried out in a condensation chamber. The surface properties (infra-red emissivity, wetting properties) were dominated by the wax at the elytra surface and, to a lower extent, its micro-structure. We performed scanning electron microscope on histological sections and determined the infra-red emissivity using a scanning pyrometer. The emissivity measured (0.95±0.07 between 8-14 ?m) was close to the black body value. Dew formation occurred on the insect's elytra, which can be explained by these surface properties. From the surface coverage of the condensed drops it was found that dew forms primarily in the valleys between the bumps. The difference in droplet nucleation rate between bumps and valleys can be attributed to the hexagonal microstructure on the surface of the valleys, whereas the surface of the bumps is smooth. The drops can slide when they reach a critical size, and be collected at the insect's mouth. PMID:25403836

  20. Adaptive responses reveal contemporary and future ecotypes in a desert shrub

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richardson, Bryce A.; Kitchen, Stanley G.; Pendleton, Rosemary L.; Pendleton, Burton K.; Germino, Matthew J.; Rehfeldt, Gerald E.; Meyer, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Interacting threats to ecosystem function, including climate change, wildfire, and invasive species necessitate native plant restoration in desert ecosystems. However, native plant restoration efforts often remain unguided by ecological genetic information. Given that many ecosystems are in flux from climate change, restoration plans need to account for both contemporary and future climates when choosing seed sources. In this study we analyze vegetative responses, including mortality, growth, and carbon isotope ratios in two blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima) common gardens that included 26 populations from a range-wide collection. This shrub occupies ecotones between the warm and cold deserts of Mojave and Colorado Plateau ecoregions in western North America. The variation observed in the vegetative responses of blackbrush populations was principally explained by grouping populations by ecoregions and by regression with site-specific climate variables. Aridity weighted by winter minimum temperatures best explained vegetative responses; Colorado Plateau sites were usually colder and drier than Mojave sites. The relationship between climate and vegetative response was mapped within the boundaries of the species–climate space projected for the contemporary climate and for the decade surrounding 2060. The mapped ecological genetic pattern showed that genetic variation could be classified into cool-adapted and warm-adapted ecotypes, with populations often separated by steep clines. These transitions are predicted to occur in both the Mojave Desert and Colorado Plateau ecoregions. While under contemporary conditions the warm-adapted ecotype occupies the majority of climate space, climate projections predict that the cool-adapted ecotype could prevail as the dominant ecotype as the climate space of blackbrush expands into higher elevations and latitudes. This study provides the framework for delineating climate change-responsive seed transfer guidelines, which are needed to inform restoration and management planning. We propose four transfer zones in blackbrush that correspond to areas currently dominated by cool-adapted and warm-adapted ecotypes in each of the two ecoregions.

  1. Gopherus agassizii (Desert Tortoise). Non-native seed dispersal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ennen, J.R.; Loughran, Caleb L.; Lovich, Jeffrey E.

    2011-01-01

    Sahara Mustard (Brassica tournefortii) is a non-native, highly invasive weed species of southwestern U.S. deserts. Sahara Mustard is a hardy species, which flourishes under many conditions including drought and in both disturbed and undisturbed habitats (West and Nabhan 2002. In B. Tellman [ed.], Invasive Plants: Their Occurrence and Possible Impact on the Central Gulf Coast of Sonora and the Midriff Islands in the Sea of Cortes, pp. 91–111. University of Arizona Press, Tucson). Because of this species’ ability to thrive in these habitats, B. tournefortii has been able to propagate throughout the southwestern United States establishing itself in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts in Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah. Unfortunately, naturally disturbed areas created by native species, such as the Desert Tortoise (Gopherus agassizii), within these deserts could have facilitated the propagation of B. tournefortii. (Lovich 1998. In R. G. Westbrooks [ed.], Invasive Plants, Changing the Landscape of America: Fact Book, p. 77. Federal Interagency Committee for the Management of Noxious and Exotic Weeds [FICMNEW], Washington, DC). However, Desert Tortoises have never been directly observed dispersing Sahara Mustard seeds. Here we present observations of two Desert Tortoises dispersing Sahara Mustard seeds at the interface between the Mojave and Sonoran deserts in California.

  2. Evolution and Functional Classification of Vertebrate Gene Deserts

    SciTech Connect

    Ovcharenko, I; Loots, G; Nobrega, M; Hardison, R; Miller, W; Stubbs, L

    2004-07-14

    Gene deserts, long stretches of DNA sequence devoid of protein coding genes, span approximately one quarter of the human genome. Through human-chicken genome comparisons we were able to characterized one third of human gene deserts as evolutionarily stable - they are highly conserved in vertebrates, resist chromosomal rearrangements, and contain multiple conserved non-coding elements physically linked to their neighboring genes. A linear relationship was observed between human and chicken orthologous stable gene deserts, where the human deserts appear to have expanded homogeneously by a uniform accumulation of repetitive elements. Stable gene deserts are associated with key vertebrate genes that construct the framework of vertebrate development; many of which encode transcription factors. We show that the regulatory machinery governing genes associated with stable gene deserts operates differently from other regions in the human genome and relies heavily on distant regulatory elements. The regulation guided by these elements is independent of the distance between the gene and its distant regulatory element, or the distance between two distant regulatory cassettes. The location of gene deserts and their associated genes in the genome is independent of chromosomal length or content presenting these regions as well-bounded regions evolving separately from the rest of the genome.

  3. Under-canopy microclimate within sand dunes in the Negev Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidron, Giora J.

    2010-10-01

    SummaryScattered shrubs are a common phenomenon in many arid landscapes. Once established, shrubs are known to create "islands of fertility", i.e., preferential habitats for annuals and animals. In an attempt to characterize the physical conditions prevailing under the shrub, radiation, temperatures and soil moisture (0-40 cm) following rain were measured during 1993-1995 at the shaded under-canopy (UC) and at the exposed inter-shrub habitat (EXP) of two pairs of shrubs located at the north- and south-facing slopes of dunes in the Nizzana research site, western Negev Desert, Israel. In addition, the soil organic matter (SOM) and the fine (silt and clay) content (FC) were also measured. Whereas the differences in the amounts of SOM and FC were small, daylight temperatures at UC were substantially lower (6-15 °C), subsequently resulting in extended time during which the UC habitat remained wet. Moisture was retained for up to 10.5-42.6% longer at UC in comparison to EXP, mainly explained by the shading effect. SOM was found to explain only 8.6-19.6% of the results. By shading, shrubs in the Negev Desert may thus provide relatively wetter conditions for annuals, rendering them an advantage over inter-shrub habitats at this harsh arid environment.

  4. African Refugees in Egypt: Trauma, Loss, and Cultural Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Hani M.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the influence of pre-immigration trauma on the acculturation process of refugees, as reflected in the manifestations of their continuing bonds with native cultures. Six African refugees who sought refuge in Egypt because of wars and political persecution were interviewed about the circumstances of their departure from their…

  5. The decline of female circumcision in Egypt: evidence and interpretation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Omaima El-Gibaly; Barbara Ibrahim; Barbara S. Mensch; Wesley H. Clark

    2002-01-01

    Female circumcision is widespread in Egypt. Research suggests that the practice persists because of a belief that circumcision will moderate female sexuality, that it will assure a girl's marriagability, and that it is sanctioned by Islam. Using data from a nationally representative survey of adolescents, this paper investigates the prevalence and social correlates of circumcision among girls aged 10–19, the

  6. The Great Pyramid Builders: An Integrated Theme on Ancient Egypt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Brian

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a themed classroom project designed to teach about the culture and civilization of ancient Egypt. In preparing the project, it is noted that teachers should remember that different learning styles, including activities that provide meaningful experiences, are appropriate in accommodating the various ways children learn.…

  7. MULTIPLE WATER REUSE IN POULTRY PROCESSING: CASE STUDY IN EGYPT

    EPA Science Inventory

    An industrial-scale multiple water reuse system was under investigation for a period of four years at a modern poultry processing plant in Alexandria, Egypt. The system involved: chlorination of cooling water from the compressor; reuse of this water in the chiller; successive tra...

  8. Using Social Studies Themes to Investigate Modern Egypt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Janie

    2010-01-01

    Many elementary teachers explore the marvels of ancient Egypt with their students, as evidenced by the numerous available websites on this topic for teaching elementary history. The drama and mystery of ancient civilizations with treasures such as mummies, King Tut, and the Giza Pyramids are intriguing to children, yet there is another layer of…

  9. Urban economy or environmental policy? The case of Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roger Zetter; Al-Moataz Hassan

    2002-01-01

    This paper shows how prevailing economic development paradigms over the last five decades have favoured an urban-based model of economic development at the expense of environmental considerations in developing countries. How the disjuncture between these competing agendas has been experienced in Egypt forms the focus of the paper. Tension between environmental and development\\/urbanization policies reflects their political encoding aimed at

  10. Women's Family Power and Gender Preference in Minya, Egypt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yount, Kathryn M.

    2005-01-01

    Structural and ideational theories are adapted to explore the influence of women's resources and ideational exposures on their family power and gender preferences in Minya, Egypt. Data from a household survey of 2,226 married women aged 15-54 years show that residence with marital kin decreases women's family power. Women in endogamous marriages…

  11. Design a Book: A Quest in Ancient Egypt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, David

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a classroom project that combines creative writing, basic book design, and social studies content. During this project, the authors' seventh grade students research a variety of ancient Egyptian archaeological sites while reviewing course material from a unit of study on ancient Egypt, practice project management skills…

  12. A technological study of ancient faience from Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. S. Tite; P. Manti; A. J. Shortland

    2007-01-01

    The chemical compositions and microstructures of some 35 faience objects from Egypt spanning the period from the Middle Kingdom through to the 22nd dynasty are determined using analytical scanning electron microscopy. Replicate faience beads glazed in the laboratory using the efflorescence and cementation methods are similarly investigated. In efflorescence glazing, there appears to be preferential efflorescence of soda over potash,

  13. Accounting and accountability in ancient civilizations: Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Salvador Carmona; Mahmoud Ezzamel

    2007-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to analyze and critique the growing literature on record-keeping practices in Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt with a particular focus on processes of ancient accountability, and provide a research agenda for future work. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Analyzes the contributions of accounting historians in this area as well as the research conducted by Assyriologists and

  14. Agriculture and the Origins of the State in Ancient Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert C. Allen

    1997-01-01

    In Egypt, state formation occurred much more rapidly after the adoption of farming than in many other parts of the ancient Near East. Furthermore, the Egyptian state lasted longer and was more stable than most Empires established elsewhere. This paper argues that successful states in the ancient world depended on the ability of elites to extract a surplus from farmers

  15. Beliefs about Mental Illness among University Students in Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hani Hamed Dessoki

    Objective: To detect differences in attitudes towards psychiatric illness, regarding its nature, cause, different ways of therapy, possibility of cure and the effect on the society in two areas from different socioeconomic classes in Egypt. Method: A survey study using self administered questionnaire, to detect culture differences between students of Cairo and Beni Suef universities \\

  16. Identity, Culture and Democratization: The Case of Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicola Pratt

    2005-01-01

    This article seeks to present an alternative approach to understanding the failure of democratization in the Arab world by locating the problem of democracy-building within the logic of the process of reproducing national identity and culture. The conceptual framework draws on the writings of Antonio Gramsci and postcolonial theorists such as Edward Said. Taking Egypt as a case study, I

  17. Molecular Detection of Some Strawberry Viruses in Egypt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strawberry plants exhibiting distinct virus-like symptoms (stunting, mottling, yellowing, vein clearing, vein necrosis and vein banding) were collected from strawberry production fields and nurseries in Qalubia Governorate, Egypt (about 20 km north of Cairo). Plants of 'Festival' and 'Sweet Charlie'...

  18. Does Gender Predict Medical Students' Stress in Mansoura, Egypt?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mostafa Amr; Abdel Hady El Gilany; Aly El-Hawary

    2008-01-01

    Background: Medical education is perceived as being stressful with negative effects on students' mental health. However, few studies have addressed the influence of gender on stress in medical students. Aim: To compare male and female medical students in Egypt on sources of stress, perception of stress, anxiety, depression, physical symptomatology, and personality profile. Methods: Data were collected through an anonymous

  19. MODELING OF TRIHALOMETHANES IN BENHA WATER SUPPLY NETWORK, EGYPT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. E. Basiouny; T. A. Elmitwalli; M. R. Ghazy

    Six sampling points located at different distances from the main water reservoirs, were selected in Benha Water Supply Network (BWSN), Egypt, in order to follow the evolution of total trihalomethane (THMs). The gained information from the monthly sampling and laboratory analysis program was used to formulate relationship of total trihalomethanes (THMs) concentration in terms of initial chlorine dose, total organic

  20. A new classification of the gold deposits of Egypt

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nagy Shawky Botros

    2004-01-01

    Gold deposits and occurrences located in the Nubian Shield have been known in Egypt since Predynastic times. Despite the fact that these deposits were long under exploitation and investigated many times, they are still insufficiently classified in harmony with the crustal evolution models suggested for the evolution of the Nubian Shield. Several plate tectonic models were proposed for the development