Science.gov

Sample records for western desert egypt

  1. Groundwater sapping processes, Western Desert, Egypt.

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, W.; Arvidson, R.E.; Sultan, M.; Becker, R.; Crombie, M.K.; Sturchio, N.; El Alfy, Z.; Environmental Research; Washington Univ.; Egyptian Geological Survey and Mining Authority

    1997-01-01

    Depressions of the Western Desert of Egypt (specifically, Kharga, Farafra, and Kurkur regions) are mainly occupied by shales that are impermeable, but easily erodible by rainfall and runoff, whereas the surrounding plateaus are composed of limestones that are permeable and more resistant to fluvial erosion under semiarid to arid conditions. Scallop-shaped escarpment edges and stubby-looking channels that cut into the plateau units are suggestive of slumping of limestones by ground-water sapping at the limestone-shale interfaces, removal of slump blocks by weathering and fluvial erosion, and consequent scarp retreat. Spring-derived tufa deposits found near the limestone escarpments provide additional evidence for possible ground-water sapping during previous wet periods. A computer simulation model was developed to quantify the ground-water sapping processes, using a cellular automata algorithm with coupled surface runoff and ground-water flow for a permeable, resistant layer over an impermeable, friable unit. Erosion, deposition, slumping, and generation of spring-derived tufas were parametrically modeled. Simulations using geologically reasonable parameters demonstrate that relatively rapid erosion of the shales by surface runoff, ground-water sapping, and slumping of the limestones, and detailed control by hydraulic conductivity inhomogeneities associated with structures explain the depressions, escarpments, and associated landforms and deposits. Using episodic wet pulses, keyed by {delta}{sup 18}O deep-sea core record, the model produced tufa ages that are statistically consistent with the observed U/Th tufa ages. This result supports the hypothesis that northeastern African wet periods occurred during interglacial maxima. The {delta}{sup 18}O-forced model also replicates the decrease in fluvial and sapping activity over the past million years, as northeastern Africa became hyperarid. The model thus provides a promising predictive tool for studying long-term landform evolution that involves surface and subsurface processes and climatic change.

  2. Geomorphic indicators of Holocene winds in Egypt's Western Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookes, Ian A.

    2003-11-01

    Geomorphic mapping of Egypt's Western Desert from LANDSAT-MSS images reveals oriented aeolian landforms that record, in part, Holocene winds. Wind directions reconstructed from these landforms indicate the dominance of N-S airflow from 30°N to 20°N, turning clockwise southward to NE-SW, conformable with modern circulation. A second direction appears over western Egypt, W between 30°N and 26°N, NW between 26°N and 20°N. Cross-cutting aeolian landforms show that W/NW winds are older than the N/NE winds. Geomorphic evidence, abundant south to 26°N and less abundant to 20°N, also indicates that W and NW winds were early Holocene 'palaeowesterlies'. Some evidence also indicates that they extended eastward to at least 30°E, perhaps to the Red Sea. These winds steered moist Atlantic/Mediterranean air masses to Egypt, sustaining early Holocene lakes and playas north of the limit of tropical monsoonal rainfall at 20°N. Upon aridification, beginning after 5 kyr BP, yardangs oriented west to east were eroded in early Holocene basinal sediments in western Egypt, indicating that these winds continued there for 1-2 kyr, until 3-4 kyr BP. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages of surface sand sheet in southern Egypt indicate that the present north-south winds were established ca. 3-4 kyr BP, at the same time as the northern savanna boundary was stabilized at its present position.

  3. The corrosive well waters of Egypt's western desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, Frank Eldridge

    1979-01-01

    The discovery that ground waters of Egypt's Western Desert are highly corrosive is lost in antiquity. Inhabitants of the oases have been aware of the troublesome property for many decades and early investigators mention it in their reports concerning the area. Introduction of modern well-drilling techniques and replacements of native wood casing with steel during the 20th century increased corrosion problems and, in what is called the New Valley Project, led to an intense search for causes and corrective treatments. This revealed that extreme corrosiveness results from combined effects of relatively acidic waters with significant concentrations of destructive sulfide ion; unfavorable ratios of sulfate and chloride to less aggressive ions; mineral equilibria and electrode potential which hinder formation of protective films; relative high chemical reaction rates because of abnormal temperatures, and high surface velocities related to well design. There is general agreement among investigators that conventional corrosion control methods such as coating metal surfaces, chemical treatment of the water, and electrolytic protection with impressed current and sacrificial electrodes are ineffective or impracticable for wells in the Western Desert's New Valley. Thus, control must be sought through the use of materials more resistant to corrosion than plain carbon steel wherever well screens and casings are necessary. Of the alternatives considered, stainless steel appears to. be the most promising where high strength and long-term services are required and the alloy's relatively high cost is acceptable. Epoxy resin-bonded fiberglass and wood appear to be practicable, relatively inexpensive alternatives for installations which do. not exceed their strength limitations. Other materials such as high strength aluminum and Monel Metal have shown sufficient promise to. merit their consideration in particular locations and uses. The limited experience with pumping in these desert wells leaves uncertainties concerning the durability of conventional pump designs. Egypt's New Valley Project provides an excellent opportunity for continuing study of the corrosion problems that concern ground-water developers in many parts of the world.

  4. Radiological assessment of Abu-Tartur phosphate, Western Desert Egypt.

    PubMed

    Uosif, M A M; El-Taher, A

    2008-01-01

    The contents of natural radionuclides ((226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K) were measured in sedimentary phosphate rock samples (Abu-Tartur phosphate, Western Desert Egypt) by using gamma spectrometry (NaI (Tl) 3"x 3"). Phosphate and environmental samples were collected from Abu-Tartur phosphate mine and the surrounding region. The results are discussed and compared with the levels in phosphate rocks from different countries. The activities of (226)Ra, (232)Th series and (40)K are between (14.9 +/- 0.8 and 302.4 +/- 15.2), (2.6 +/- 1.0 and 154.9 +/- 7.8) and (10.0 +/- 0.5 and 368.4 +/- 18.4) Bq kg(-1), respectively. The Abu-Tartur phosphate deposit was found to have lower activity than many others exploited phosphate sedimentary deposits, with its average total annual dose being only 114.6 microSv y(-1). This value is about 11.46% of the 1.0 mSv y(-1) recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP-60, 1990) as the maximum annual dose to members of the public. PMID:18252854

  5. Ground-water sapping processes, Western Desert, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, W.; Arvidson, R.E.; Sultan, M.; Becker, R.; Crombie, M.K.; Sturchio, N.; Alfy, Z.E.

    1997-01-01

    Depressions of the Western Desert of Egypt (specifically, Kharga, Farafra, and Kurkur regions) are mainly occupied by shales that are impermeable, but easily erodible by rainfall and runoff, whereas the surrounding plateaus are composed of limestones that are permeable and more resistant to fluvial erosion under semiarid to arid conditions. A computer simulation model was developed to quantify the ground-water sapping processes, using a cellular automata algorithm with coupled surface runoff and ground-water flow for a permeable, resistant layer over an impermeable, friable unit. Erosion, deposition, slumping, and generation of spring-derived tufas were parametrically modeled. Simulations using geologically reasonable parameters demonstrate that relatively rapid erosion of the shales by surface runoff, ground-water sapping, and slumping of the limestones, and detailed control by hydraulic conductivity inhomogeneities associated with structures explain the depressions, escarpments, and associated landforms and deposits. Using episodic wet pulses, keyed by {delta}{sup 18}O deep-sea core record, the model produced tufa ages that are statistically consistent with the observed U/Th tufa ages. This result supports the hypothesis that northeastern African wet periods occurred during interglacial maxima. This {delta}{sup 18}O-forced model also replicates the decrease in fluvial and sapping activity over the past million years. 65 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Palynology of Albian-Cenomanian strata in Mersa Matruh well, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, Ismail Z.

    Plant microfossils have been recovered from the Albian and lower Cenomanian strata encountered in Mersa Matruh well No. 1, drilled in the northern part of the Western Desert of Egypt. The microflora includes 56 miospore species belonging to 35 genera; most of them are derived from pteridophyte, gymnosperm and angiosperm vegetations. Differences in miospore assemblages of the Albian and Lower Cenomanian are described. Correlation with coeval palynofloral assemblages in West Africa and South and North America reveals that the Mersa Matruh area, Egypt belongs to the mid-Cretaceous African-South American phytogeoprovince.

  7. Volatiles in the Desert: Subtle Remote-sensing Signatures of the Dakhleh Oasis Catastrophic Event, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haldemann, A. F. C.; Kleindienst, M. R.; Churcher, C. S.; Smith, J. R.; Schwarcz, H. P.; Osinski, G.

    2005-01-01

    Over the past decade members of the Dakhleh Oasis Project have studied enigmatic signatures in the Pleistocene geologic record of portions of the Dakhleh oasis and palaeo-oasis in Egypt's Western Desert [1,2]. In particular, Si-Ca-Al rich glass melt (Dakhleh Glass, Fig. 1) points to a catastrophic event between c.100,000-200,000 years ago [3] in this well-studied African savannah and freshwater lake Middle Stone Age environment [4,5].

  8. Integrated geophysical study to delineate the subsurface structures in Siwa Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Ahmed; Abd El All, Esmat; Rabeh, Taha; Osman, Salah

    2015-04-01

    Siwa Oasis is located within the Western Desert of Egypt and is a potential candidate for the development. It represents one of the most interesting and distinct region of Egypt. The main goal of the present work is to study the subsurface structures in Siwa Oasis area, Western Desert, Egypt and to determine their effects on surface geologic structures. To achieve this, two geophysical methods (magnetic and geothermal) have been used in this study. A detailed land magnetic survey was performed. The necessary reduction concerning daily variation, the regional gradient and time variation observation were applied. The measured total magnetic field was corrected and reduced to the north magnetic pole. Data analysis was performed using trend analysis, Euler deconvolution, high pass filter, analytical signal. The results indicate that the area is affected by tectonic forces in the NE-SW, NW- SE and E-W directions. Geothermal studies in some places in Siwa Oasis were carried out using the device of thermo-physical properties (Isomet-104) for measuring the subsurface temperature contour map (30 meters below the earth's surface). This map illustrates that there are good geothermal regions have hot groundwater reservoir. The measurements of geothermal properties of some rock samples such as thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, volume capacity and thermal values gave us an indication about the geothermal of rocks in the subsurface. Also, geothermal studies gave us an idea about the heat flow and the increasing of the energy and chemical of properties of the predominant subsurface rocks in the study area.

  9. Geological heritage of the Bahariya and Farafra oases, the central Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plyusnina, Ekaterina E.; Sallam, Emad S.; Ruban, Dmitry A.

    2016-04-01

    Archaeological and cultural heritage of Egypt is world-known, but its geological heritage is yet to be revealed. Investigations in the central Western Desert of Egypt permitted finding a lot of unique features that can be assigned to this heritage. In the Bahariya Oasis, 10 geological heritage types are established, namely stratigraphical, paleontological, sedimentary, igneous, mineralogical, economical, paleogeographical, geomorphological, hydrological and hydrogeological, and pedological types. In the Farafra Oasis and vicinities, only geomorphological and hydrological and hydrogeological types are found. On the area between these oases, sedimentary, mineralogical, paleogeographical, and geomorphological features are established. Chalk and nummulitic limestones, invertebrate and dinosaur localities, paleoreefs and paleokarst, iron ore deposit, and peculiar landforms occur on the study territory. Taken together, these features constitute a highly diverse geological heritage that can be judged global (even if the rank of individual objects is often relatively low). This heritage is well suitable for the purpose of geotourism; for instance, thematic excursions explaining the geological evolution during the last 100 Ma are possible. Participants of such excursions can also see different facies. A geopark in the central Western Desert of Egypt would facilitate geoconservation and geotourism activities.

  10. Morphologic characteristics and migration rate assessment of barchan dunes in the Southeastern Western Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, M. A.; Refaat, A. A.; Abdel Wahed, M.

    2016-03-01

    This work explores the morphologic characteristics of aeolian dune sand in the southeastern part of Western Desert of Egypt. It aims to assess the movement of barchan dunes and evaluate their environmental influence on the Toshka Project. Morphometric investigation of barchan dunes in the Toshka area revealed that most barchans have high length/width (a/c) ratios (fat to pudgy), while one-fifth of the studied barchans have lower a/c ratios and so appear normal in their morphologic forms. Statistical analysis of the main parameters of barchan dunes in Toshka and other desert regions in the Kharga (Egypt), Kuwait, Southern Morocco, California and Southern Peru demonstrates that barchans of the Toshka area are distinctive in their appearance. They are characterized by distinct aspect with higher values of length and width and greater growth in height. The high-energy wind environment in addition to the large amount of drifting sand are principal factors responsible for the unique shape of Toshka barchans. The migration rate of barchan dunes in four chosen test locations, within the central and western Toshka area, ranges from about 3 to 10.82 m/year. The calculated average migration rate of these dunes is about 6 m/year in a SSW direction. Sand encroachment is more extensive in the central and western parts of the investigated Toshka area. Risk evaluation of sand dune movements in the southeastern part of the Western Desert points to medium to high sand encroachment risk values. These may represent serious hazards to the newly-established Toshka Project, threatening roads, as well as cultivated lands in the area.

  11. Mesozoic rift basins in western desert of Egypt, their southern extension and impact on future exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Taha, M.A. )

    1988-08-01

    Rift basins are a primary target of exploration in east, central, and west Africa. These intracratonic rift basins range in age from the Triassic to the Neogene and are filled with lagoonal-lacustrine sand-shale sequences. Several rift basins may be present in the Western Desert of Egypt. In the northeastern African platform, the Mesozoic Tethyan strand lines were previously interpreted to have limited southern extension onto the continent. This concept, based upon a relatively limited amount of subsurface data, has directed and focused the exploration for oil and gas to the northernmost 120 km of the Western Desert of Egypt. Recent well and geophysical data indicate a southerly extension of mesozoic rift basins several hundred kilometers inland from the Mediterranean Sea. Shushan/Faghur and Abu Gharadig/Bahrein basins may represent subparallel Mesozoic basins, trending northeast-southwest. Marine Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian sediments were recently reported from wells drilled approximately 500 km south of the present-day Mediterranean shoreline. The link of these basins with the Sirte basin to the southwest in Libya is not well understood. Exploration is needed to evaluate the hydrocarbon potential of such basins.

  12. Pitted and fluted rocks in the Western Desert of Egypt - Viking comparisons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccauley, J. F.; Breed, C. S.; Grolier, M. J.; El-Baz, F.; Whitney, M. I.; Ward, A. W.

    1979-01-01

    The Western Desert of Egypt is one of the most arid regions on earth and is probably the closest terrestrial analog to the surface of Mars. An expedition to the area in 1978 revealed an abundance of quartzite and basalt rocks that have been pitted and fluted by wind erosion and deflation of the desert surface. These pitted rocks are internally homogeneous, show no internal holes or vesicles, and are considered an important but neglected type of ventifact. They bear a striking resemblance to the pitted and fluted rocks seen by the Viking Landers, rocks that have generally been interpreted as vesicular basalts only slightly modified by wind erosion. Wind tunnel studies of the air flow over and around nonstreamlined hand specimens from the Western Desert show that windward abrasion coupled with negative flow, secondary flow, and vorticity in a unidirectional wind can explain the complex arrays of pits and flutes. These field and laboratory observations suggest that the pitted rocks at the Viking Lander sites are also ventifacts, and thus the Martian surface may be far more wind eroded than previously thought.

  13. A socio-ecological investigation of options to manage groundwater degradation in the Western Desert, Egypt.

    PubMed

    King, Caroline; Salem, Boshra

    2012-07-01

    Under increasing water scarcity, collective groundwater management is a global concern. This article presents an interdisciplinary analysis of this challenge drawing on a survey including 50 large and small farms and gardens in a village in an agricultural land reclamation area on the edge of the Western Desert of Egypt. Findings revealed that smallholders rely on a practice of shallow groundwater use, through which drainage water from adjacent irrigation areas is effectively recycled within the surface aquifer. Expanding agroindustrial activities in the surrounding area are socio-economically important, but by mining non-renewable water in the surrounding area, they set in motion a degradation process with social and ecological consequences for all users in the multi-layered aquifer system. Based on the findings of our investigation, we identify opportunities for local authorities to more systematically connect available environmental information sources and common pool resource management precedents, to counterbalance the degradation threat. PMID:22569842

  14. Age and isotopic constraints on pleistocene pluvial episodes in the Western Desert, Egypt.

    SciTech Connect

    Crombie, M. K.; Arvidson, R. E.; Sturchio, N. C.; El Alfy, Z.; Abu Zeid, K.; Environmental Research; Washington Univ.; Egyptian Geological Survey and Mining Authority

    1997-01-01

    North Africa has undergone drastic climatic changes over the past several hundred thousand years. The timing of humid intervals called pluvials was investigated by uranium-series disequilibrium dating of travertines from the Kurkur Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt. The youngest and best dated travertines (70-160 ka) are found in Wadi Kurkur and include spring and lacustrine units exposed as 2 to 3 m high terraces. Travertines having an age of approximately 191-220 ka are exposed by differential erosion as linear mounds produced by spring systems over fracture zones in ancient wadis. The oldest travertines, having ages >260 ka, are extensive, cap limestone units above the oasis, and were deposited in paludal and lacustrine environments. Oxygen isotope ratios were measured for the wadi travertines ({delta}{sup 18}O values ranging from 16.7 to 19.1{per_thousand} SMOW) and for spring mound travertines (18.5-20.5{per_thousand}). Equilibrium oxygen isotope fractionation calculations indicate that the Kurkur travertines were deposited from waters having {delta}{sup 18}O values similar to ancient Western Desert groundwaters ({approx} -11{per_thousand}). The ages of the travertines correspond to times of monsoonal maxima, eustatic sea level high stands and interglacial maxima. Rainfall producing these groundwaters (and travertines) was significantly fractionated during atmospheric transport, in contrast to modern meteoric waters (-2.09{per_thousand}), implying a distant source for the pluvial waters. Increased precipitation, recharge of Western Desert groundwaters, and resultant travertine deposition are interpreted to be consequences of Milankovitch insolation cycle forcing, through enhanced Atlantic and Indian Ocean monsoons during interglacial time periods.

  15. Evidence for a 200 100 ka meteorite impact in the Western Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinski, Gordon R.; Schwarcz, Henry P.; Smith, Jennifer R.; Kleindienst, Maxine R.; Haldemann, Albert F. C.; Churcher, Charles S.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we present evidence, in the form of unusual silicate glasses, for a meteorite impact event 200-100 ka in the Dakhleh Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt. These glasses, known locally as Dakhleh Glass, were derived from the shock melting of a series of unconsolidated sediments underlain by interbedded carbonates, sandstones and phosphate-rich lithologies. Hypervelocity impact in to a volatile-rich target resulted in the production of impact glasses with CaO and Al 2O 3 contents of up to 25 and 18 wt.%, respectively. Other notable properties include the presence of globules of immiscible calcite and pyrrhotite melt phases, shattered quartz grains, and fragments of silicified plant matter. Dating of geoarchaeological artefacts associated with the Dakhleh Glass support preliminary 40Ar/ 39Ar data, indicating a 200-100 ka age for the impact event. Geoarchaeological evidence indicates that archaic Homo sapiens and early modern humans continually inhabited this region of the Western Desert during this period. While it is unclear at present whether the Dakhleh Glass was formed during a cratering event or a large aerial burst, the effect on the environment and inhabitants of Dakhleh would have been catastrophic.

  16. Optimal well locations using genetic algorithm for Tushki Project, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalaf, S.; Gad, M. I.

    2014-10-01

    Groundwater depletion is one of the most important problems threaten the national projects in Egypt. The optimal distribution of well locations and pumping rates mitigate this problem. In this paper, a trial to mitigate this problem in Tushki National Project, south western desert, Egypt was carried out via delineating the optimal well locations and optimal pumping rates. The methodology of combination between simulation and optimization techniques was applied. A linked simulation-optimization model for obtaining the optimum management of groundwater flow is used in this research. MODFLOW packages are used to simulate the groundwater flow system. This model is integrated with an optimization model OLGA (Optimal well Location using Genetic Algorithm technique) which is based on the genetic algorithm (GA). Two management cases were considered by running the model in Abu Simbel-Tushki area with adopted steady and transit calibrated parameters. The first case (fixed well location) is found that the optimum value of the objective function (maximum pumping rate). In the second case (flexible well location with the moving well option) locations of wells are to be decided by the OLGA model itself within a user defined region of the model grid until the optimal location is reached. Also, the prediction of the future changes in both head and flow were made in steady and transient states.

  17. Remote sensing and geophysical investigations of Moghra Lake in the Qattara Depression, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shuhab D.; Fathy, Mohamed S.; Abdelazeem, Maha

    2014-02-01

    The Western Desert covers two-thirds of the land area of Egypt and occupies one of the driest regions of the Sahara. Seven depressions within the desert - Siwa, Qattara, Fayum, Bahariya, Farafra, Dakhla, and Kharga - may represent parts of old drainage systems with deflation, extensive erosion, and possibly, some tectonic activity. Oases with freshwater exist in these depressions. Geological and geophysical investigations in the Qattara Depression indicate the presence of buried fluvial channels with southeast to northwest flow directions from the highland areas. The origin of these fluvial systems, as well as the origin of the depressions themselves, is still unresolved, and many ideas have been suggested. Moghra Lake at the northeastern tip of the Qattara basin may be a remnant of a larger paleolake, including the mouth of a paleo-river. We present here the results of our recent work in this area using ALOS PALSAR radar remote sensing data, which indicated the presence of buried channels that may have fed the larger Moghra paleolake. Ground penetrating radar (GPR) data along 2D profiles were acquired; the migrated GPR sections identified a major paleochannel with numerous minor channels at its margins. GPR interpretations are verified by field observations, trenching, and stratigraphic information from outcrop data. Potential field analyses identify possible aquifers that are controlled by regional structures. Density contrasts within the sedimentary units, physical boundaries of uplifted basement blocks and depths to causative sources were also identified. This work contributes to the reconstruction of paleodrainage of this region and helps in understanding processes involved in the formation of the Qattara Depression.

  18. Paleomagnetism of Abu Aggag and Sabaya Formations at Kalabsha, South Western Desert of Egypt.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Reem; Khashaba, Ahmed; El-Hemaly, Ibrahim; Takla, Emad; Abdel Aal, Mohamed; Odah, Hatem

    2015-04-01

    Two profiles have been sampled from the Nubia Sandstone at Aswan, south Western Desert: The 1st profile has been taken from Abu Aggag Formation and the 2nd one was from Sabaya Formation (23.25 oN, 32.75 oE). 136 oriented cores (from 9 sites) have been sampled. Abu Aggag Formation is of Late Cretaceous (Turonian) and Sabaya Formation is of Early Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian). The studied rocks are subjected to rock magnetic measurements as well as demagnetization treatment. It has been found that hematite is the main magnetic mineral in both formations. Four profile sections (normal polarity) from Abu Aggag Formation, yielded a magnetic component with D = 352.7, I = 36.6 with ?95 = 5.2 and the corresponding pole lies at lat. = 82.8 N and long. = 283.1 E. Five profile sections (normal polarity) from Sabaya Formation, yielded a magnetic component with D = 348.6, I = 33.3 with ?95 = 5.8 and the corresponding pole lies at lat. = 78.3 N and long. = 280.4 E. The obtained paleopole for the two formations lies at lat. = 80.5 N and long. = 281.7 E. The obtaind components are considered primary and the corresponding paleopole reflects the age of Nubia Sandstone when compared with the previously obtained Cretaceous poles for Egypt.

  19. Reconstructing Quaternary pluvial episodes and paleohydrology using travertines from Egypt's Western Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, G.; Crossey, L. J.; Karlstrom, K. E.; Ricketts, J. W.; Tafoya, A. J.; Anan, T.; Mohammed, A.; Asmerom, Y.; Polyak, V.; Farouk, S.

    2012-12-01

    Quaternary climate in North Africa was marked by multiple wet periods overprinting extreme aridity, but pluvial drivers, as well as their timing and geographic extent, are poorly constrained. We address these factors in the first comprehensive analysis of travertine from Egypt's Western Desert, which represents a unique and under-utilized record of paleoclimate and paleohydrology. We infer large-volume travertine mound deposition along faults near the area's central limestone plateau to reflect times of high discharge (high groundwater head) from springs of the Nubian aquifer, likely associated with so-called Green Sahara pluvial episodes. Similarly, we assume that travertine platforms in depressions (oases) represent related marsh and lake deposition, including a widespread late Cenozoic dolostone of probable lacustrine origin in Farafra Oasis, which needs additional mapping. We present the results of uranium-series analysis of travertines from oasis areas spanning a north-south gradient through the Western Desert; we dated the tops and bottoms of inset deposits at different wadi (wash) elevations to resolve the inception and termination of high spring heads/pluvials as well as regional aggradation or incision patterns. Our dates, combined with published literature ages, suggest wet intervals around 100-115, 125-140, 180-200, 350-360, 450, and 600 ka. Heights of inset terrace travertines in wadis are potentially correlative between sites and are seen as approximately 5, 10, and 25 m above the modern wadi levels. Assuming that paleohydrological changes reflect paleoclimate changes, we examine correlations between times of travertine deposition, relative to glacial cycles or to more specific orbital forcings, acting on the North African summer monsoon. Initial comparison of travertine occurrence to glacial cycles shows no obvious correlation, although there are major travertine deposition episodes at important paleoclimate transitions such as MIS 6 to 5, 7 to 6, and 11 to 10. Perhaps the best preliminary association is to orbital forcing, particularly precession, consistent with the hypothesis that orbital forcing is a driver of the North African monsoon and thus pluvials.

  20. Remote Sensing and Shallow Geophysical Investigations on Moghra Lake in Northeastern Qattarra Depression, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, S. D.; Fathy, M. S.; Azeem, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Western Desert of Egypt encompasses two thirds of the land area of Egypt and constitutes one of the driest regions of the Sahara. This desert has seven depressions; Siwa, Qattara, Fayium, Bahariya, Farafra, Dakhla and Kharga. These depressions may be the manifestation of old drainage basins with extensive erosion and possibly some tectonic activity. Several oases with freshwater can be found in these depressions. Geological and geophysical investigations in Qattara Depression indicate several buried fluvial channels with flow direction from highlands in southeast to northwest. Moghra Lake at the northeastern tip of Qatarra basin may be a small remnant of a larger paleo-lake including the mouth of a paleo-river. This study probed this area for presence of buried channels that may have fed the larger Moghra paleo-lake. We have used ALOS - PALSAR radar remote sensing data to identify the surface features in this region, such as channels, channel fills, and fractures. In addition, dual polarization PALSAR data (HV, HH) allowed analysis of the near surface geology and assisted in delineating areas of interest for GPR surveys. GPR data along 2D profiles were acquired using the GSSI SIR-3000 system with a 400 MHz antenna that provided images to approximately three meters in depth. All the GPS data were processed using RADAN 6.6 software. A conventional processing flow was used for data processing: The positional correction tool removed the air wave. A range-gain balanced the amplitudes and a final band-pass (50 kHz to 500 kHz) filter was applied to the data. Deconvolution was also applied for highlighting the finer details. In addition, spatial filters were used to attenuate continuous vertical noise. The migrated sections of GPR identified a major paleochannel distributary with two minor channels at the margins. The bedrock of the studied area consists of the Lower Miocene Moghra Formation (sandstone and shale intercalations). The area around the present lake is covered by about 2 m of lacustrine sediments of post-Miocene age in the east side and by recent eolian dunes in the west. These sediments are characterized by shallowing upward, horizontal to cross-bedded with an unconformity in between. The eastern end of the paleochannel surveyed by GPR is covered by recent sand dunes followed by an ephemeral stream that feeds the current lake. Field observations suggest that the movement of sand dunes in the northeast direction may have blocked the paleo-channel. A two meters deep trench was dug to confirm the GPR findings. Regional gravity mapping of this area also shows major gravity anomalies. More work is planned to carry out additional high resolution potential field surveys in conjunction with remote sensing and GPR studies to understand the paleo-drainage of this area. Identifying the exact track of the paleo-channels will help reconstructing of paleo drainage of this region and may help in mapping groundwater, this will be very important for the development of this rapidly expanding desert area.

  1. The geochemistry of uranium and thorium isotopes in the Western Desert of Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Dabous, A.A.

    1994-11-01

    The concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 228}Th have been measured in the groundwaters of the Bahariya and Farafra oases of the Western Desert of Egypt. These waters are characterized by normal amounts of U, but unusually high concentrations of Th. The pattern of variation of the parent isotopes, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th, as well as the daughter isotopes, {sup 234}U, {sup 230}Th, and {sup 228}Th, is systematic within and between the two oases. From the unusually consistent distribution of the {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios one can conclude that the samples from both oases are representative of a two-component mixing system. One component, characterized by low U content and a high {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratio, is typical of deep artesian systems and probably represents flowthrough water derived from the Nubian highlands to the south. The second component is characterized by a greater U concentration and a low activity ratio. This signature is hypothesized as being derived by leaching of downward infiltrating water during pluvial times. The source of the U may be the uraniferous phosphate strata that overly the sandstone aquifer in both oasis areas. Higher Th values are associated with the artesian flow component of the mixing system and suggests that Th-bearing minerals may be abundant in the Nubian sandstone aquifer. The distribution of {sup 230}Th and {sup 228}Th in the water samples supports this interpretation.

  2. Origin of the gypsum-rich silica nodules, Moghra Formation, Northwest Qattara depression, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Khoriby, Essam M.

    2005-06-01

    Gypsum rich-silica nodules appear in two shale horizons of the Moghra Formation (early Miocene) northwestern Qattara Depression, Western Desert, Egypt. These nodules are gray to milky white in colour, mostly botroidal and rose-like in shape and range in diameter from 2 to 7.5 cm. The silica nodule-bearing shale is composed mainly of smectite with a little minor kaolinite. The silica nodules consist mainly of quartz and are composed of gypsum-free matrix and gypsum-rich megacrystalline quartz. The matrix consists of microflamboyant quartz (less than 36 μm in diameter) and chalcedony. The megacrystalline quartz occurs as lenticular and prismatic forms (length: 90-250 μm; width: 30-90 μm). The microprobe, petrographic and SEM examinations confirmed the occurrence of gypsum relics (diameter; 2-16 μm) within the megacrystalline quartz. The chalcedony and mosaic microcrystalline quartz occurs as pore-lining and pore-filling cements. The structure of the silica nodules begins with quartzine in its outer rim, then gypsum-free microcrystalline quartz in the middle part and ends with gypsum-rich lenticular to prismatic megaquartz in the center. Field study, petrographic examination and microprobe analysis reveal that the silica nodules were formed by silicification of precursor gypsum nodules deposited in a marginal sabkha environment under an arid climate. The silicification selectively affected the gypsum nodules rather than the surrounding shale and occurred both through gypsum replacement and void filling. Transformation of isopachous chalcedony into mosaic microcrystalline quartz also occurred. The texture of the silica minerals reflects the different physico-chemical conditions under which they crystallized. Spherical nodules grew chiefly by the diffusive supply of the silica, and elongated ones grew by pore water advection. The integrated effect of climate, pH, salinity, crack systems within the sediment and oscillation in the groundwater level and its chemical composition contributed to the formation of the nodules.

  3. Diagenetic origin of ironstone crusts in the Lower Cenomanian Bahariya Formation, Bahariya Depression, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afify, A. M.; Sanz-Montero, M. E.; Calvo, J. P.; Wanas, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new interpretation of the ironstone crusts of the Bahariya Formation as late diagenetic products is provided. The siliciclastic Lower Cenomanian Bahariya Formation outcropping in the northern part of the Bahariya Depression (Western Desert, Egypt) is subdivided into three informal units that are mainly composed of thinly laminated siltstone, cross-bedded and massive sandstone, fossiliferous sandstone/sandy limestone and variegated shale. Abundant ironstone crusts occur preferentially within its lower and upper units but are absent in the middle unit. The ironstone crusts show selective replacement of carbonate components, including calcretes, by iron oxyhydroxides. More permeable parts of the terrigenous beds such as burrow traces, subaerial exposure surfaces, concretionary features and soft-sediment deformation structures led to heterogeneous distribution of the iron oxyhydroxides. A variety of diagenetic minerals, where goethite and hematite are the main end-products, were characterized by mineralogical analysis (XRD), petrography and SEM observation, and geochemical determinations (EMPA). Other diagenetic minerals include Fe-dolomite/ankerite, siderite, manganese minerals, barite, silica, illite/smectite mixed-layer, and bitumen. These minerals are interpreted to be formed in different diagenetic stages. Some minerals, especially those formed during eodiagenesis, show features indicative of biogenic activity. During burial, dolomite and ankerite replaced preferentially the depositional carbonates and infilled secondary porosity as well. Also during mesodiagenesis, the decomposition of organic matter resulted in the formation of bitumen and created reducing conditions favorable for the mobilization of iron-rich fluids in divalent stage. Telodiagenesis of the Cenomanian Bahariya deposits took place during the Turonian-Santonian uplift of the region. This resulted in partial or total dissolution of Fe-dolomite and ankerite which was concomitant to iron oxyhydroxide precipitation upon mixing with shallow oxygenated water. Circulation of reducing iron-rich fluids through fractures and inter and intrastratal discontinuities is proposed as an alternative model to explain the controversial source of iron for the ironstone crusts of the Bahariya Formation. The origin of iron-rich fluids is probably related to the basement rocks. The provided model relates the fluid movements through fractures and discontinuities with the preferential replacement of carbonates. This combination of processes is consistent with the heterogeneous geometries and the wide distribution of the ironstones.

  4. Environmental impact and natural hazards on Kharga Oasis monumental sites, Western Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, A. B.; Howari, F. M.; El-Sankary, M. M.; Wali, A. M.; Saleh, M. M.

    2010-09-01

    Kharga Oasis monumental sites are important to the cultural heritage in the South Western Desert of Egypt. These sites are scattered on the floor of the oasis representing ancient civilizations. The studied sites include the Hibis, EI-Nadura, EI-Ghueita and El-Zayyan temples as well as El-Bagawat Cemetery. The present study found that natural hazards have remarkable impacts on these sites. The impact of weathering processes, encroachment of sand dunes, stability of foundation beds and shallow groundwater seepage were documented. The present study found that humidity, temperature, sunlight and water content conditions seem to be favorable for biodegradation as evidenced by the presence of algae, bat blood and bird excretions. The radioactivity levels at the investigated sites are also measured via gamma-ray spectrometry. Sand dunes in the area pose a serious natural threat to the monumental sites. Active sand dunes are rapidly encroaching upon the components of these monuments, partially covering some monuments such as El-Ghueita Temple. These dunes load wind storms with fine sand particles. This causes wind erosion through sand blasting of these sites. Some monuments, such as EI-Nadura, EI-Ghueita and El-Zayyan temples were constructed on a suitable hard sandstone ground, whereas others, such as the Hibis Temple, were constructed on unsuitable soft shale ground in relatively topographically low area. The impact of the unstable foundation and shallow groundwater levels have caused severe structural damage as evidenced by tilted columns, cracked walls and salt-crystal growth in the porous building stones. These destructive elements threaten some other temples in Kharga Oasis and will eventually cause total physical collapse. Although rain is rare in this area, it can form a real threat to mud brick monuments such as El-Bagawat Cemetery. The natural radioactivity sources resulted in an annual effective dose equivalent values averaging 0.20, 0.13, 0.09 and 0.07 mSv/year for the monumental sites at Hibis, El-Nadura, El-Ghueita and El-Zayyan, respectively.

  5. Eolian features in the Western Desert of Egypt and some applications to Mars.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    El-Baz, F.; Breed, C.S.; Grolier, M.J.; McCauley, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    Relations of landform types to wind regimes, bedrock composition, sediment supply, and topography are shown by field studies and satellite photographs of the Western Desert. This desert provides analogs of Martian wind-formed features and sand dunes, alternating light and dark streaks, knob 'shadows' and yardangs. Surface particles have been segregated by wind into dunes, sand sheets, and light streaks, that can be differentiated by their grain size distributions, surface shapes, and colors. Throughgoing sand of mostly fine to medium grain size is migrating S in longitudinal dune belts and barchan chains whose long axes lie parallel to the prevailing W winds, but topographic variations such as scarps and depressions strongly influence the zones of deposition and dune morphology. -from Authors

  6. Sedimentary cover in the South Western Desert of Egypt as deduced from Bouguer gravity and drill-hole data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senosy, M. M.; Youssef, M. M.; Abdel Zaher, M.

    2013-06-01

    The Western Desert, Egypt includes the major groundwater aquifer in the country. It is apart from the Major Sahara Nubian Aquifer which is present in Sudan, Chad, Egypt and Libya. Thickness of this aquifer is changed laterally from south to north and also from west to east. The changes may structurally or litheologicalley control. The present study is focused on using of Bouguer gravity anomaly mapped at a scale of 1:500,000 and the lithological logs of about 120 deep wells used to determine the thickness of the sedimentary sequence containing the main Nubian sandstone water aquifer in important area of Egypt. The area is located in the southern part of the Western Desert bounded by the latitudes 2200'-2630'N, and longitudes 2830'-3300'E. The predominant structures affecting the basement rocks and the sedimentary cover were traced and analyzed. The gravity stripping approach was applied to eliminate the gravity effects caused by sedimentary sequence and to separate density anomalies within the sedimentary fill from the influence of rocks at deeper levels in the crystalline crust. The study indicated that the surface of the basement rocks is highly rugged and mostly controlled by structures which have a direct effect on thickness variation of the sedimentary cover all over the area. Regionally the area is characterized by two major intracratonic basins (the Dahkla Basin and the Nile valley Basin) separated by a NE-SW trending swell of the Kharga uplift and bounded at the south by the Oweinat-Bir Safsaf-Aswan uplift. These major tectonic units are controlled by fault structures trending in N-S, E-W, NE-SW, NW-SE, which cut the basement rocks and extend upward in the sedimentary cover. The maximum thickness of sandstone formations is recorded at west Oweinat, west Kurkur, southwest of Aswan, Gramashin, Dakhla oasis and some localities west of Sohag and Qena towns. At these localities the thickness ranges between 600 and 900 m. As this formation is the main water aquifer in the study area, therefore these localities are characterized by the presence of big amount of ground water. Accordingly, these areas must take the priority in the sustainable development programs of southern Egypt.

  7. The history and fate of the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer springs in the oasis depressions of the Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Owen; Fensham, Rod

    2015-11-01

    Extraction of groundwater for agriculture has resulted in the loss of springs across arid regions of the globe. The history and fate are recorded of the artesian springs of Egypt's Western Desert, from ancient times to the present, spanning the rise and fall of the great civilisations from the Pharoanic dynasties to Persian, Greek and Roman conquests. The study area includes oases Kharga, Dakhla, Bahriya, Farafra and Siwa, and several outer and small oases around Siwa and the edge of the Qattara Depression. The region is hyper-arid, receiving 10 mm or less average annual precipitation and evaporation rates are in the vicinity of 3,000 mm/a. Groundwater in the oases is largely derived from bores discharging from the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer. Based on an extensive survey, conducted for the first time, attention is drawn to the rapid demise of springs as a result of modern irrigation schemes which continue to deplete groundwater supplies.

  8. The history and fate of the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer springs in the oasis depressions of the Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Owen; Fensham, Rod

    2016-03-01

    Extraction of groundwater for agriculture has resulted in the loss of springs across arid regions of the globe. The history and fate are recorded of the artesian springs of Egypt's Western Desert, from ancient times to the present, spanning the rise and fall of the great civilisations from the Pharoanic dynasties to Persian, Greek and Roman conquests. The study area includes oases Kharga, Dakhla, Bahriya, Farafra and Siwa, and several outer and small oases around Siwa and the edge of the Qattara Depression. The region is hyper-arid, receiving 10 mm or less average annual precipitation and evaporation rates are in the vicinity of 3,000 mm/a. Groundwater in the oases is largely derived from bores discharging from the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer. Based on an extensive survey, conducted for the first time, attention is drawn to the rapid demise of springs as a result of modern irrigation schemes which continue to deplete groundwater supplies.

  9. The role of salt weathering in the origin of the Qattara Depression, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aref, M. A. M.; El-Khoriby, E.; Hamdan, M. A.

    2002-06-01

    Field studies and petrographic examinations of core samples and of the bedrock of the floor of the Qattara Depression, Egypt, indicate that salt weathering predominates in its western part in marked contrast to its eastern part. The eastern part of the depression is covered with more than 120-cm-thick, moist sands with sporadic occurrence of halite and gypsum due to the low salinity of the groundwater table. At the western part of the depression, the strongly saline, sodium chloride nature of the groundwater table favors crystallization of halite (and sometimes gypsum) at or near the surface of the outcropping bedrock of the Moghra clastics and/or Dabaa shale. Crystallization of halite and/or gypsum generates increased pressure that leads to mechanical disintegration of the bedrock into fine-grained debris. Features related to disintegration include blistering of the rock surface, splitting, spalling and/or granular disintegration. Alternation of dry and wet cycles favor halite crystallization, mechanical disintegration of the outcropping bedrock and dissolution of the halite cement, which exposes fine-grained debris to wind deflation. Removal of the debris from the floor of the depression leads to the accumulation of lunettes and other dunes in the downwind direction. Therefore, salt weathering provides fine-grained debris that are easily removed by deflation, which accounts for the topographically lower level of the western part of the depression (134 m below sea level (b.s.l.)). In contrast, the presence of moist sediments at the eastern part of the depression inhibits deflation and encourages sedimentation by adhesion of wind-blown sand to the damp surface of the sabkha at an elevation of 45 m below sea level. The disintegration of the bedrock of the Qattara Depression by salt weathering has been in effect since the onset of aridity in northern Egypt in Quaternary time. Whereas the initial excavation of the depression started in Late Miocene or Pliocene time by fluvial erosion, karstic process, mass-wasting and wind deflation.

  10. Geoenvironmental assessment of the SIWIA area Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt, using geographical and hydrological information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faid, A.; Ismail, E.; Birk, S.

    2012-04-01

    Overpopulation of Egypt has put pressure on the government for horizontal expansion for food security. Therefore, horizontal expansion in the desert for agricultural purposes is one of the solutions. Groundwater represents the main source of water supply in Siwa Oasis. The sedimentary succession comprises different water bearing formations. These aquifers bear groundwater ranging in its salinity from fresh water to brine one. These aquifers are the Quaternary deposits, the Miocene carbonate, the Eocene carbonate, the Upper Cretaceous, the Cretaceous Nubian sandstone beside Carboniferous, Devonian, Silurian and Cambrian-Ordovicean sandstone aquifers. The Paleozoic sandstone has brine water but the Mesozoic one (Cretaceous Nubian sandstone) has fresh one. The Cretaceous Nubian sandstone represents the source of exploited water in the area, where it recharges the overlying carbonate aquifers. Fifty seven wells are included in the present study to reveal the hydrogeologic conditions of the oasis. The fractured carbonate aquifers represent the main exploitable aquifers due to their availability for the farmers in spite the low water quality. The water of this aquifer has a wide range of salinity ranging from 2377 ppm to > 17000 ppm depending on the depth of aquifer and the nature of facies and fracturing of the rock. The Nubian sandstone aquifers represent the main source of water in the area where it bears fresh water (< 1000 ppm). The flow within the Nubian sandstone is directed to the area of high discharge, i.e. to the west. The groundwater of the Quaternary and the fractured carbonates reflects leaching processes (secondary salinity) and that of the Nubian sandstone reflects meteoric origin and recharge during the pluvial period. The groundwater resources are evaluated with respect to their suitability for different purposes. Depending on the present geomorphological and hydrogeological studies and the previous pedological studies a landuse map was constructed.

  11. Characteristics of NORM in the oil industry from eastern and western deserts of Egypt.

    PubMed

    Shawky, S; Amer, H; Nada, A A; El-Maksoud, T M; Ibrahiem, N M

    2001-07-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides (NORs) from the 232Th- and 238U-series, which are omnipresent in the earth's crust, can be concentrated by technical activities, particularly those involving natural resources. Although, a great deal of work has been done in the field of radiation protection and remedial action on uranium and other mines, recent concern has been devoted to the hazard arising from naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in oil and gas facilities. NORM wastes associated with oil and gas operations from scale deposits, separated sludge and water at different oil fields in the eastern and western deserts were investigated. Concentrations of the uranium, thorium, and potassium (40K) series have been determined from high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. Total uranium content of samples was determined using laser fluorimetry. The levels of radioactivity were mainly due to enhanced levels of dissolved radium ions. Only minute quantities of uranium and thorium were present. The disequilibrium factor for 238U/226Ra has been determined. PMID:11339530

  12. Subsurface geology of Tertiary rocks of northeastern district of Western Desert, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Elzarka, M.H.; Radwan, I.A.

    1983-03-01

    The lithofacies analysis of the Tertiary rocks reveals two ancient subbasins at the north and southeast of the northeastern district, Western Desert. The lithofacies of the Paleocene and early and middle Eocene sections are mainly calcareous. Shale predominates in the late Eocene rocks. The Paleocene rocks seem to have accumulated in a lagoonal environment of epineritic depths. The Paleocene rocks of the northern subbasin indicate accumulation on an unstable shelf. The Paleocene environmental conditions seem to have prevailed during the early and middle Eocene. During the late Eocene, rocks of shallow-water and current-agitated environments accumulated. The lower clastic layers of the Oligocene, having a sand/shale ratio less than one, indicate a clastic shoreline environment-lagoonal subenvironment. The Oligocene clastics are overlain by a basaltic sheet at the eastern part of the district. The middle Miocene lithofacies indicate rock accumulation in a contemporaneously subsiding basin under lagoonal or delta-front conditions at the southern part of the district. Marine stagnant-bottom-water conditions prevailed during the accumulation of the middle Miocene rocks at the norther parts. The Pliocene rocks seem to have accumulated in lagoons, where the inflow exceeded evaporation and alternating periods of exposure and flooding by either fresh or saline water of poor circulation prevailed. The tectonic instability of the district was initiated by volcancity during the late Oligocene.

  13. Subsurface brine injection: Proactive approach to close the produced water loop in the western desert of Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Farid, E.E.; Nour, M.H.

    1996-11-01

    In 1988 a major onshore production facility was producing oil from eight formations in six oil fields located in the western desert of Egypt. Two of these formations include active water drive reservoirs, in addition; three reservoirs at that date were receiving water injection to enhance oil recovery. To handle the increasing volumes of the produced water (which is contaminated with oil, production chemicals and other pollutants), three alternatives were investigated: (1) Injection into disposal wells. (2) Dumping in surface disposal pits. (3) Re-injection to waterflood some oil reservoirs. The investigation revealed that the first two options are technically unfavorable, also they are conventional Waste Management Technologies (WMT) which provide short-term remedial solution. In contrast, Produced Water Re-Injection (PWRI) is an Environmental Control Technology (ECT) which minimize the environmental impact through process improvements. A state -of-the-art re-injection process was utilized using chemical treatment, gas liberation, settling, filtration and injection. This process represents a combination of two (ECT) methods: Reuse (for water flooding) and Recycling (when brine is redisposed underground). This process reduce the overall volumes of produced water to be disposed, increase the oil reserves, reservoir pressure and oil production and converse the underground water reserve.

  14. Precipitation source inferred from stable isotopic composition of Pleistocene groundwater and carbonate deposits in the western desert of Egypt.

    SciTech Connect

    Sultan, M.; Sturchio, N.; Hassan, F. A.; Abdel, M.; Hamdan, R.; Mahmood, A. M.; Alfy, Z. E.; Stein, T.; Environmental Research; Univ. Coll. London; Cairo Univ.; Ain Shams Univ.; Egyptian Geological survey and Mining Authority; Washington Univ.

    1997-01-01

    An Atlantic source of precipitation can be inferred from stable isotopic data (H and O) for fossil groundwaters and uranium-series-dated carbonate spring deposits from oases in the Western Desert of Egypt. In the context of available stable isotopic data for fossil groundwaters throughout North Africa, the observed isotopic depletions ({delta}D -72 to -81{per_thousand}; {delta}{sup 18}O -10.6 to -11.5{per_thousand}) of fossil ({ge}32,000 yr B.P.) groundwaters from the Nubian aquifer are best explained by progressive condensation of water vapor from paleowesterly wet oceanic air masses that traveled across North Africa and operated at least as far back as 450,000 yr before the present. The values of {delta}{sup 18}O (17.1 to 25.9{per_thousand}) for 45,000- to >450,000-yr-old tufas and vein-filling calcite deposits from the Kharga and Farafra Oases are consistent with deposition from groundwaters having oxygen isotopic compositions similar to those of fossil groundwaters sampled recently at these locations.

  15. Modeling of gas generation from the Alam El-Bueib formation in the Shoushan Basin, northern Western Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalaby, Mohamed Ragab; Hakimi, Mohammed Hail; Abdullah, Wan Hasiah

    2013-01-01

    The Shoushan Basin is an important hydrocarbon province in the northern Western Desert, Egypt, but the burial/thermal histories for most of the source rocks in the basin have not been assigned yet. In this study, subsurface samples from selected wells were collected to characterize the source rocks of Alam El-Bueib Formation and to study thermal history in the Shoushan Basin. The Lower Cretaceous Alam El-Bueib Formation is widespread in the Shoushan Basin, which is composed mainly of shales and sandstones with minor carbonate rocks deposited in a marine environment. The gas generative potential of the Lower Cretaceous Alam El-Bueib Formation in the Shoushan Basin was evaluated by Rock-Eval pyrolysis. Most samples contain sufficient type III organic matter to be considered gas prone. Vitrinite reflectance was measured at eight stratigraphic levels (Jurassic-Cretaceous). Vitrinite reflectance profiles show a general increase of vitrinite reflectance with depth. Vitrinite reflectance values of Alam El-Bueib Formation range between 0.70 and 0.87 VRr %, indicating a thermal maturity level sufficient for hydrocarbon generation. Thermal maturity and burial histories models predict that the Alam El-Bueib source rock entered the mid-mature stage for hydrocarbon generation in the Tertiary. These models indicate that the onset of gas generation from the Alam El-Bueib source rock began in the Paleocene (60 Ma), and the maximum volume of gas generation occurred during the Pliocene (3-2 Ma).

  16. 3D slicing of radiogenic heat production in Bahariya Formation, Tut oil field, North-Western Desert, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Al-Alfy, I M; Nabih, M A

    2013-03-01

    A 3D block of radiogenic heat production was constructed from the subsurface total gamma ray logs of Bahariya Formation, Western Desert, Egypt. The studied rocks possess a range of radiogenic heat production varying from 0.21 μWm(-3) to 2.2 μWm(-3). Sandstone rocks of Bahariya Formation have higher radiogenic heat production than the average for crustal sedimentary rocks. The high values of density log of Bahariya Formation indicate the presence of iron oxides which contribute the uranium radioactive ores that increase the radiogenic heat production of these rocks. The average radiogenic heat production produced from the study area is calculated as 6.3 kW. The histogram and cumulative frequency analyses illustrate that the range from 0.8 to 1.2 μWm(-3) is about 45.3% of radiogenic heat production values. The 3D slicing of the reservoir shows that the southeastern and northeastern parts of the study area have higher radiogenic heat production than other parts. PMID:23291561

  17. Electrical and geochemical properties of tufa deposits as related to mineral composition in the South Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomaa, Mohamed M.; Abou El-Anwar, Esmat A.

    2015-06-01

    The geochemical, petrographical, and electrical properties of rocks are essential to the investigation of the properties of minerals. In this paper we will try to present a study of the A. C. electrical properties of carbonate rock samples and their relation to petrographical and geochemical properties. Samples were collected from four formations from the Bir Dungul area, in the South Western Desert, Egypt. The electrical properties of the samples were measured using a non-polarizing electrode, at room temperature (~28?C), and at a relative atmospheric humidity of (~45%), in the frequency range from 42?Hz to 5?MHz. The changes in the electrical properties were argued to the change in mineral composition. Generally, the electrical properties of rocks are changed due to many factors e.g., grain size, mineral composition, grain shape and inter-granular relations between grains. The dielectric constant of samples decreases with frequency, and increases with conductor concentration. Also, the conductivity increases with an increase of continuous conductor paths between electrodes. The petrographical and geochemical studies reveal that the deposition of the tufa deposits occurred in shallow lakes accompanied by a high water table, an alkaline spring recharge and significant vegetation cover. Diagenetically, tufa deposits were subjected to early and late diagenesis. Petrography and geochemistry studies indicated that the area of tufa deposits was deposited under the control of bacterial activity. Geochemically, the Sr content indicates that the tufa deposits formed from dissolved bicarbonate under the control of microbes and bacterial activity.

  18. Assessment of waterlogging in agricultural megaprojects in the closed drainage basins of the Western Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Bastawesy, M.; Ramadan Ali, R.; Faid, A.; El Osta, M.

    2013-04-01

    This paper investigates the development of waterlogging in the cultivated and arable areas within typical dryland closed drainage basins (e.g. the Farafra and Baharia Oases), which are located in the Western Desert of Egypt. Multi-temporal remote sensing data of the Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) were collected and processed to detect the land cover changes; cultivations, and the extent of water ponds and seepage channels. The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital elevation model (DEM) has been processed to delineate the catchment morphometrical parameters (i.e. drainage networks, catchment divides and surface areas of different basins) and to examine the spatial distribution of cultivated fields and their relation to the extracted drainage networks. The soil of these closed drainage basins is mainly shallow and lithic with high calcium carbonate content; therefore, the downward percolation of excess irrigation water is limited by the development of subsurface hardpan, which also saturates the upper layer of soil with water. The subsurface seepage from the newly cultivated areas in the Farafra Oasis has revealed the pattern of buried alluvial channels, which are waterlogged and outlined by the growth of diagnostic saline shrubs. Furthermore, the courses of these waterlogged channels are coinciding with their counterparts of the SRTM DEM, and the recent satellite images show that the surface playas in the downstream of these channels are partially occupied by water ponds. On the other hand, a large water pond has occupied the main playa and submerged the surrounding fields, as a large area has been cultivated within a relatively small closed drainage basin in the Baharia Oasis. The geomorphology of closed drainage basins has to be considered when planning for a new cultivation in dryland catchments to better control waterlogging hazards. The "dry-drainage" concept can be implemented as the drainage and seepage water can be conveyed through the inactive alluvial channels into certain abandoned playas for evaporation.

  19. Correlation of Aerogravity and BHT Data to Develop a Geothermal Gradient Map of the Northern Western Desert of Egypt using an Artificial Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Haby S.; Abdel Zaher, Mohamed; Senosy, Mahmoud M.; Saibi, Hakim; El Nouby, Mohamed; Fairhead, J. Derek

    2015-06-01

    The northern part of the Western Desert of Egypt represents the second most promising area of hydrocarbon potential after the Gulf of Suez province. An artificial neural network (ANN) approach was used to develop a new predictive model for calculation of the geothermal gradients in this region based on gravity and corrected bottom-hole temperature (BHT) data. The best training data set was obtained with an ANN architecture composed of seven neurons in the hidden layer, which made it possible to predict the geothermal gradient with satisfactory efficiency. The BHT records of 116 deep oil wells (2,000-4,500 m) were used to evaluate the geothermal resources in the northern Western Desert. Corrections were applied to the BHT data to obtain the true formation equilibrium temperatures, which can provide useful constraints on the subsurface thermal regime. On the basis of these corrected data, the thermal gradient was computed for the linear sections of the temperature-versus-depth data at each well. The calculated geothermal gradient using temperature log data was generally 30 C/km, with a few local high geothermal gradients in the northwestern parts of the study area explained by potential local geothermal fields. The Bouguer gravity values from the study area ranged from -60 mGal in the southern parts to 120 mGal in the northern areas, and exhibited NE-SW and E-W trends associated with geological structures. Although the northern Western Desert of Egypt has low regional temperature gradients (30 C/km), several potential local geothermal fields were found (>40 C/km). The heat flow at each well was also computed by combining sets of temperature gradients and thermal conductivity data. Aerogravity data were used to delineate the subsurface structures and tectonic framework of the region. The result of this study is a new geothermal gradient map of the northern Western Desert developed from gravity and BHT log data.

  20. Larger benthic foraminiferal turnover across the Eocene-Oligocene transition at Siwa Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orabi, H.; El Beshtawy, M.; Osman, R.; Gadallah, M.

    2015-05-01

    In the Eocene part of the Siwa Oasis, the larger foraminifera are represented by the genera Nummulites, Arxina, Operculina, Sphaerogypsina, Asterocyclina, Grzybowskia, Silvestriella, Gaziryina and Discocyclina in order of abundance. Operculina continues up to the early Oligocene as modern representatives in tropical regions, while the other genera became extinct. Nevertheless, the most common larger foraminiferal genus Lepidocyclina (Nephrolepidina) appears only in the lowermost Oligocene. In spite of the Eocene-Oligocene (E/O) transition is thought to have been attended by major continental cooling at northern middle and high latitudes, we discover that at the Siwa Oasis, there is a clear warming trend from the late Eocene (extinction level of Nummulites, Sphaerogypsina, Asterocyclina, Grzybowskia, Silvestriella and Discocyclina) to the early Oligocene is observed due to the high abundance of Operculina and occurrence of kaolinite and gypsiferous shale deposits in both Qatrani and El Qara formations (Oligocene) at this transition. The El Qara Formation is a new rock unit proposed herein for the Oligocene (Rupelian age) in the first time. Several episodes of volcanic activity occurred in Egypt during the Cenozoic. Mid Tertiary volcanicity was widespread and a number of successive volcanic pulses are starting in the late Eocene. The release of mantle CO2 from this very active volcanic episode may have in fact directly caused the warm Eocene-Oligocene greenhouse climate effect.

  1. Palaeoenvironment and Holocene land use of Djara, Western Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindermann, Karin; Bubenzer, Olaf; Nussbaum, Stefanie; Riemer, Heiko; Darius, Frank; Pöllath, Nadja; Smettan, Ursula

    2006-07-01

    The results of the interdisciplinary project ACACIA support the assumption of a more humid climate at Djara, on the Egyptian Limestone Plateau, which is a hyper-arid desert today, during the early and mid-Holocene. The ancient plant and animal inventories give new impetus for the suggestion of an interfingering of two climatic regimes, the winter rains from the north and west and the summer monsoonal rains from the south, on the latitude of Djara. A playa sediment sequence, the composition of plant and animal taxa as well as the reconstructed settlement patterns indicate a semi-arid climate with alternating more humid and drier conditions. The concentration of prehistoric sites in the Djara depression points to locally favourable conditions in contrast to the surrounding plateau surface. The widespread catchment and a distinct system of palaeochannels offered fresh water over a period of time due to the run-off from the plateau surface after rain events. Although the ecological conditions were better during the Holocene humid phase than they are today, a sedentary way of life was improbable. The hydrological constraints require altogether highly mobile subsistence strategies. Shells of the Nile bivalve Aspatharia sp. ( Spathopsis sp.) give evidence for contacts between Djara and the Nile Valley, which remains beside the Egyptian oases an important retreat area with perennially available water. The decrease of radiocarbon dates and related archaeological sites around 6300 BP (c. 5300 cal BC) indicate the depopulation of the Djara region as a consequence of the drying trend. While the drop off of the 14C-dates can also be observed in other desert research areas of the ACACIA-project, we date the end of the Holocene humid phase about 300 years earlier than previously suggested.

  2. A Study of Hydrogeological Conditions of the Nubian Sandstone Aguifer in the Area between Abu Simbel and Toschka, Western Desert, Egypt.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahab, K. A.; Ebraheem, A. M.; El Sayed, E. A.

    2001-05-01

    A Study of Hydrogeological Conditions of the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer in the Area between Abu Simbel and Toschka, Western Desert, Egypt. By K. A. Dahab*, A. M. Ebraheem**, and E. El Sayed*** *Geology Department, Faculty of Science, Menofia University, Shibin El Kom, Egypt. ** Geology Department, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, Assiut, Egypt. *** Geology Department, Faculty of Science, Minia University, Minia, Egypt. The Nubian Sandstone Aquifer in the area between Toschka and Abu Simbil is small portion of the very well known Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System in the Eastern Sahara, which covers the entire area of southwest Egypt, southeast Libya, northeast Chad, and northern Sudan. Toscha area is currently the site of intensive drilling and development for a huge land reclamation project. The drilling information was used to study the hydrogeological setting of the Nubian Sandstone aquifer in the area. The obtained results indicate that the lithological characteristics and tectonic setting is strongly affecting the groundwater flow pattern as well as the aquifer potentiality of the nubian sandstone aquifer in the area. The aquifer potentiality in this area is low if compared to that of east Oweinat or Dakhla areas. The aquifer is mainly composed of hard ferruginous sandstone with great shale and clay intercalation with a thickness ranging from 140 to 230 meters. Groundwater in this aquifer belongs to fresh to slightly brackish type (salinity is ranging from 240 to 1300 ppm). Ion dominance ordering reveals that sodium cation is mostly predominating over calcium and magnesium whereas chloride is predominant over sulfate and bicarbonate. The groundwater is related to meteoric origin. The high concentration of sodium, chloride, and sulfates reflect leaching and dissolution processes of gypsiferous shales and clay as well as long residence time of water.

  3. Age of the Dakhleh impact event and implications for Middle Stone Age archeology in the Western Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renne, Paul R.; Schwarcz, Henry P.; Kleindienst, Maxine R.; Osinski, Gordon R.; Donovan, John J.

    2010-03-01

    Dakhleh Glass comprises a suite of chemically distinctive and heterogeneous glassy rocks that occur over an area of ca. 400 km 2 in and around the Dakhleh Oasis in central western Egypt. Previous studies establish a meteorite impact origin for the Dakhleh Glass. No impact crater has yet been found, suggesting an airburst origin. The Dakhleh Glass-forming impact event occurred during the Middle Stone Age time of occupation, but the timing of this event has not been well established. 40Ar/ 39Ar incremental heating of three aliquots from a sample of Dakhleh Glass yield data that can be ascribed to quenched glass which efficiently purged radiogenic 40Ar inherited from the target rocks. One of the aliquots yielded data suggestive of an undegassed clast of target material, but these are easily resolved. The age of the impact event is determined from a compositionally filtered subset of the data that yield an isochron age of 145 19 ka.

  4. The Climate and its Impacts on deterioration and weathering rate of EI-Nadura Temple in El- Kharga Oasis, Western Desert of Egypt.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismael, Hossam

    2015-04-01

    Undoubtedly, El-Kharga Oasis monumental sites are considered an important part of our world's cultural heritage in the South Western Desert of Egypt. These sites are scattered on the floor of the oasis representing ancient civilizations. The Roman stone monuments in Kharga represent cultural heritage of an outstanding universal value. Such those monuments have suffered weathering deterioration. There are various elements which affect the weathering process of stone monuments: climate conditions, shapes of cultural heritages, exposed time periods, terrains, and vegetation around them, etc. Among these, climate conditions are the most significant factor affecting the deterioration of Archeological sites in Egypt. El- Kharga Oasis belongs administratively to the New Valley Governorate. It is located in the southern part of the western desert of Egypt, lies between latitudes 22°30'14" and 26°00'00" N, and between 30°27'00" and 30°47'00" E. The area of El Kharga Oasis covers about 7500 square kilometers. Pilot studies were carried out on the EI-Nadura Temple, composed of sandstones originating from the great sand sea. The major objective of this study is to monitor and measure the weathering features and the weathering rate affecting the building stones forming El-Nadora Roman building rocks in cubic cm. To achieve these aims, the present study used analysis of climatic data such as annual and seasonal solar radiation, Monthly average number of hours of sunshine, maximum and minimum air temperatures, wind speed, which have obtained from actual field measurements and data Meteorological Authority of El-Kharga station for the period 1977 to 2010 (33 years), and from the period 1941-2050 (110 years) as a long term of temperature data. Several samples were collected and examined by polarizing microscopy (PLM), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis system (SEM-EDX). The results were in agreement with the observed values in the study area. The deterioration of El-Nadora temple is above 45 % of original temple (138-161 BC), these deteriorations have occurred not only due to the age of the structures, but also due to the climate elements. It was found that the climate is the most important elements influencing weathering. El-Nadora temple is highly influenced by wind action because it was built on a hill top 180 meter in hyper arid climate and exposed to wind without any obstruction. Finally, El-Nadora Temple has lost about 42.46 % of its original size. And if the rate of deterioration continues, the major landmarks, symbols and inscriptions will fully disappear in 2150.

  5. The bivalve Placuna (Indoplacuna) miocenica from the Middle Miocene of Siwa Oasis, Western Desert of Egypt: Systematic paleontology, paleoecology, and taphonomic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sabbagh, Ahmed M.; El Hedeny, Magdy M.; Rashwan, Mohammed A.; Abdel Aal, Abdel Aal A.

    2016-04-01

    The present study investigated the epifaunal, free lying bivalve Placuna (Indoplacuna) miocenica (Fuchs, 1883) encountered in the Middle Miocene Marmarica Formation of Siwa Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt, in terms of systematic paleontology, paleoecology and taphonomy. Well to moderately preserved shells of this species were collected from three sections. They have been found embedded in sandy, marly and chalky limestones. Although they are extremely thin and fragile, they occurred as complete disarticulated and articulated valves. Specimens of P. (I.) miocenica are highly accumulated in the north Siwa section forming a coquinoid band (30 cm thick). In addition, they are generally distributed sporadically in different stratigraphic levels within the three studied sequences. Taphonomic observations indicated that these shells were affected by encrustation, bioerosion, disarticulation, fragmentation and abrasion. Moreover, valves of this species suffered minor chipping along their fragile margins. The occurrence of the studied species associated with oysters and other benthic faunal assemblages within carbonate sediments revealed shallow, low energy, warm and intertidal environments with periods of relatively agitated conditions.

  6. The contribution of geographic information systems and remote sensing in determining priority areas for hydrogeological development, Darb el-Arbain area, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elewa, Hossam H.; Fathy, Rafik G.; Qaddah, Atef A.

    2010-08-01

    The Darb el-Arbain study area is in the southern Western Desert of Egypt and has been attracting increasing developmental interest in the last few decades, especially since agricultural development of the southern Baris area, where the groundwater resources of the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System (NSAS) have been utilized for the cultivation of valuable lands. Due to the proven high potential of both groundwater and land resources, determining the priority areas for sustainable hydrogeological development becomes a necessity. A geographic information system, as a platform for geospatial modeling techniques, has been built, which depends on the recently collected data about the NSAS, in addition to the published databases. Certain criteria of practical value, like depth to groundwater, hydraulic conductivity, groundwater salinity, sodium adsorption ratio, and the safe yield of wells, were selected as decisive parameters for hydrogeological prioritization. The model pinpoints areas characterized by favorable hydrogeological conditions, which could be used for future development and implementation of an artificial storage and recovery (ASR) program. The designated priority areas for hydrogeological development occur at the southern, middle southern and some localized northern parts of the Darb el-Arbain area. The newly formed Tushka Lakes represent a suitable and excellent natural source of freshwater for implementing an ASR program.

  7. Characterization of magnetic spherical fractions in sand deposits for interpretation of environmental change around the El- Zayyan temple, Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Makiko; Koizumi, Natsuko; Kato, Sayuri; Kikuchi, Ryohei; Kamei, Hiroyuki

    2014-05-01

    Desertification in North Africa has rapidly advanced over the last 6,000 years. Such environmental changes began in the Early Dynastic Period of Egypt (4200 - 3150 BC), and the occupation of Achaemenid Persian and Roman cultures in Egypt occurred under even drier climates. Kharga is the largest oasis of the five oases, located in the western desert of Egypt that contains a treasure trove of archaeological resources. This oasis has been highlighted to promote resource exploration and development of archaeological tourism since the 1980's. The El-Zayyan temple is located 27 km south of the central Kharga oasis. Zayyan was once called 'Tchonemyris', which has connection with the means of 'huge well' in Greek. Although major portions of the temple were rebuilt in 140 AD during the rule of the Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius, this temple is considered to be originally built in the Ptolemaic period (4c-1c BC). It is likely that the area had a sufficient water supply in the past as the El-Zayyan temple stands at the lowest point (-18 m a.s.l.) in the Kharga oasis. Furthermore, the El-Ghueita temple that stands on a hill top at 68.5 m a.s.l., 4 km northward from the El-Zayyan temple, has given name that means 'beautiful garden' in Greek. From these facts, we can imagine that the past landscape of this area contained green surroundings. The El-Ghueita temple was well known as a production centre of high quality wine since the mid-Dynastic age (2050 -1786 BC). As this area is currently arid, it is expected that there were irrigation facilities to maintain the vast farm land during the ancient period. To deepen our knowledge of how people developed their technologies and conducted their life within the natural environment of a drastic drying period, understanding the process of environmental change on a region scale is necessary. The aim of this study was to extract proxies from sand deposits in the western desert area to estimate the change in the environment. We examined the sand layers with a focus on the spherical magnetic fractions having relations with accumulation of free iron oxides, condition of water and microbial activities. The study sites were located west of the El-Zayyan temple, and six and seven samples were collected every 10 cm from the two sand profiles, Zy-R and Zy-6, respectively. AMS 14C dating was conducted using fine fractions of an organo-mineral complex; date ranges 5,000-8,400 yBP and 5,500-7,800 yBP were assigned to Zy-R and Zy-6, respectively. Spherical fractions, separated into six colored-types, were extracted using a neodymium magnet, and then characterized by SEM observation, EDX elemental analysis (FE-SEM S4700, Hitachi, Genesis, EDAX), and X-ray micro-crystal structural analysis (D8-Discover, Bruker axs) to discuss their origins. The vertical change in the density of each fraction by weight and counts in sand revealed the environmental change.

  8. Hydrogeological aspects and environmental concerns of the New Valley Project, Western Desert, Egypt, with special emphasis on the southern area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assaad, Fakhry A.

    1988-12-01

    The New Valley Project has been given much attention in the past 20 years especially from the hydrogeological point of view concerning groundwater utilization for the reclamation of a large area of the Western Desert. Lithological, petrophysical, and petrographical studies were conducted on four wells south of Beris Oasis, namely Beris 20, Beris 15, Beris 14, and Beris 13, and are defined by latitudes 24°25'E and 24°35'E and longitudes 30°30'N and 30°46'N. The Nubian sedimentation is of Posttectonic deposition that took place over the uplifted Precambrian granitic basement and is Lower Cretaceous, whereas the upper most variegated shales of the cap rock are Upper Cretaceous. The Nubian sandstones in the area south of Beris Oasis contain hematitic stains and/or fine granular authigenic hematite, thin laminae of brown ferruginous quartzite is also recorded denoting oxidizing conditions in the basin of deposition. Thin streaks of carbonaceous shales are met with in different depths to the south of Beris area, may be taken to denote oscillations in the sea level and accordingly its depths, and are responsible for the change in the oxidation-reduction potential during the deposition of the corresponding beds. Lithologic logs were interpreted together with the electric and micro-logs for adjustment of the shale breaks and showed that there are five water-bearing zones, named from bottom to top: A, B, C, D, and E, and are mainly unfossiliferous orthoquartzites, separated from each other by impervious beds of siltstones, shales, and clays of varying thicknesses. This zoning had been found valid in other parts of the Kharga Oases and could be applied locally in the Kharga Oases area. Mechanical analysis was performed mainly on 39 samples, of which 18 were core samples and 21 were cuttings, that were raised from four wells dug in the area south of Beris Oasis, Kharga Oases. Porosity and permeability tests were carried out on the 18 core samples only. The implication of these data on the environment of deposition of the Nubia Sandstone is discussed. Petrographic examination of a thin section of the subsurface Nubia sandstones in the South of Beris Oasis showed that the lithified rocks fall into three types depending on the nature of cement being, silicious or ferruginous, and on the amount of primary matrix, which at present is reorganized into iron oxides, microquartz, and muscovite flakes, thus reaching the phyllomorphic stage of diagensis. Rounding of the quartz grains shows that transportation had a minor effect on the grain morphology and favor a fluviatile transporting agent.

  9. Geophysical contribution to evaluate the subsurface structural setting using magnetic and geothermal data in El-Bahariya Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El All, Esmat Abd; Khalil, Ahmed; Rabeh, Taha; Osman, Salah

    2015-12-01

    The future development of agriculture, industry, and civil activity is planned to be in the Western Desert, Egypt. El-Bahariya Oasis is located in the heart of the Western Desert at a distance of about 370 km to the southwest of Cairo. The area under investigation is located between latitudes 28°06‧N & 28°16‧N and longitudes 28°54‧E & 29°04. The Bahariya depression comprises a total area of approximately 2250 km2. The main target of the present study is to delineate the shallow and deep subsurface structures of the study area. To achieve this, two geophysical methods (magnetic and geothermal) have been used. A detailed land magnetic survey has been acquired. Fifty three land magnetic stations have been measured in a mesh like area with 500 m spacing interval. The necessary corrections concerning daily variation, the regional gradient and time variations have been applied. Then, the total magnetic intensity anomaly map (TMI) has been constructed and reduced to the pole magnetic map (RTP). The Euler deconvolution has been applied to the TMI anomaly data as well as the analytical signal technique. Also, the magnetic interpretation has been carried out using the high-pass filtering technique and spectral frequency analysis. The analysis of the magnetic data shows that the dominant tectonic trends are NW-SE and E-W. The results show that, the average calculated depth ranges between 0.1 km and 0.32 km, while the depth to the basement intrusion is 0.4 km, below the measuring level. The geothermal studies in EL Bahariya-Oasis comprise subsurface temperature contour map which illustrates that the study area has geothermal groundwater reservoirs. The measurements of the geothermal properties for measured rock samples show that the rocks of the study area have moderate values of geothermal properties. This may be due to the seasonal variation in soil temperatures. These soil thermal properties depend on soil porosity and moisture content.

  10. Substance geology of the western desert in Egypt and Sudan revealed by Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-A)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breed, C. S.; Schaber, G. G.; McCauley, J. F.; Grolier, M. J.; Haynes, C. V.; Elachi, C.; Blom, R.; Issawi, B.; McHugh, W. P.

    1983-07-01

    A correlation of known archaeologic sites with the mapped locations of the streamcourses is expected and may lead to new interpretations of early human history in the Sahara. The valley networks, faults, and other subjacent bedrock features mapped on the SIR-A images are promising areas for ground water and mineral exploration. Additionally, the analogies between the interplay of wind and running water in the geologic history of the Sahara and of Mars are strengthened by the SIR-A discoveries of relict drainage systems beneath the eolian veneer of Egypt and Sudan.

  11. Substance geology of the western desert in Egypt and Sudan revealed by Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-A)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breed, C. S.; Schaber, G. G.; Mccauley, J. F.; Grolier, M. J.; Haynes, C. V.; Elachi, C.; Blom, R.; Issawi, B.; Mchugh, W. P.

    1983-01-01

    A correlation of known archaeologic sites with the mapped locations of the streamcourses is expected and may lead to new interpretations of early human history in the Sahara. The valley networks, faults, and other subjacent bedrock features mapped on the SIR-A images are promising areas for ground water and mineral exploration. Additionally, the analogies between the interplay of wind and running water in the geologic history of the Sahara and of Mars are strengthened by the SIR-A discoveries of relict drainage systems beneath the eolian veneer of Egypt and Sudan.

  12. The uppermost deposits of the stratigraphic succession of the Farafra Depression (Western Desert, Egypt): Evolution to a Post-Eocene continental event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Montero, M. E.; Wanas, H.; Muoz-Garca, M. B.; Gonzlez-Acebrn, L.; Lpez, M. V.

    2013-11-01

    This paper gives insight into continental sedimentary deposits that occur at the uppermost part of the stratigraphic succession present in the north-eastern sector of the Farafra Depression (Western Desert, Egypt). Using space imagery to complete the field work, the geology of the area has been mapped and the presence of a N-S oriented fault system is documented. The analysis of the morphotectonic features related to this fault system allows reconstructing the structural and sedimentological evolution of the area. The study indicates that the continental deposits were accumulated in alluvial systems that unconformably overlie shale and evaporitic rocks attributable to the Paleocene-Eocene Esna Formation. The deposits of the Esna Formation show soft-sediment deformation features, which include slump associated to dish and pillar sedimentary structures and provide evidence of syndepositional tectonic activity during the sedimentation of this unit. The outcrops are preserved in two areas on separated fault-bounded blocks. Proximal alluvial fan facies crop out in a dowthrown block close to the depression boundary. The proximal facies are made up mostly by polymictic conglomerates which occasionally contain boulders. The conglomerate clasts are mainly quartz, carbonate, anhydrite satin spar vein, mudrock, ironstone and nummulite fossils. The mid-fan facies consist of trough cross-bedded, rippled and cross-laminated quartzarenites with reworked glauconite grains and carbonate rock fragments, interpreted as deposited by distributary streams. The distal alluvial fan deposits consist of sandy marls that evolve toward the top of the sections into root-bioturbated lacustrine limestone beds that are locally silicified. The limestones are biomicrites containing characea, ostracods and gastropods with fenestral porosity. A number of features, including clast provenance (mainly from marine Paleocene and Eocene rocks), the observed fractural pattern (N-S direction related to the opening of the Red Sea), and the sedimentary relationships, suggests that the continental deposits were accumulated during the Oligocene-Miocene interval.

  13. The Dakhleh Glass: Product of an impact airburst or cratering event in the Western Desert of Egypt?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinski, G. R.; Kieniewicz, J.; Smith, J. R.; Boslough, M. B. E.; Eccleston, M.; Schwarcz, H. P.; Kleindienst, M. R.; Haldemann, A. F. C.; Churcher, C. S.

    2008-12-01

    Impact cratering is a ubiquitous geological process on the terrestrial planets. Meteorite impact craters are the most visible product of impact events, but there is a growing recognition that large aerial bursts or airbursts should occur relatively frequently throughout geological time. In this contribution, we report on an unusual impact glassthe Dakhleh Glass (DG)which is distributed over an area of ~400 km2 of the Dakhleh Oasis, Egypt. This region preserves a rich history of habitation stretching back to over 400,000 years before the emergence of Homo sapiens. We report on observations made during recent fieldwork and subsequent analytical analyses that strengthen previous suggestions that the DG formed during an impact event. The wide distribution and large size of DG specimens (up to ~50 cm across), the chemistry (e.g., CaO and Al2O3 contents up to ~25 and ~18 wt%, respectively), the presence of lechatelierite and burnt sediments, and the inclusion of clasts and spherules in the DG is inconsistent with known terrestrial processes of glass formation. The age and other textural characteristics rule out a human origin. Instead, we draw upon recent numerical modeling of airbursts to suggest that the properties of DG, coupled with the absence of a confirmed crater, can best be explained by melting of surficial sediments as a result of a large airburst event. We suggest that glass produced by such events should, therefore, be more common in the rock record than impact craters, assuming that the glass formed in a suitable preserving environment.

  14. Pseudospherulitic fibrous calcite from the Quaternary shallow lacustrine carbonates of the Farafra Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt: A primary precipitate with possible bacterial influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanas, H. A.

    2012-04-01

    Pseudospherulitic fibrous calcite (PFC) has been found as a major constituent (85-90%) within thin massive limestone beds of the Quaternary mudflat-shallow lacustrine facies association (1.5-2 m thick) that forms part of combined facies associations of the Quaternary clastic-carbonate unit (25-30 m thick) at Bir-Karawein area in the Farafra Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt. The thin massive limestone beds (2-5 cm thick) are devoid of pedogenic features and marine fossils. They form a rhythmic cyclic succession with thin massive mudrocks (5-10 cm thick). The mudflat-shallow lacustrine facies association herein occurs within a depositional sequence of distal alluvial-floodplain (6-12 m thick) and palustrine (1.5-4.5 m thick) facies associations. The PFC is a composed of loosely packed rounded to sub-rounded single low-Mg-calcite crystals (150-250 ?m-sized) with intracrystalline fibrous microfabric marked by fibers (150-250 ?m long and 10-20 ?m wide) radiating from the center of the individual crystals and displaying irregular internal growth with lobate pattern. The PFC crystals show non-planar to highly irregular intercrystalline boundaries. Under SEM, the individual crystal fibers group of PFC form ellipsoid to sub-globular bodies. Each PFC crystal exhibits successive zones of thick non-luminescence and thin brightly orange to dull luminescence. The matrix (10-15%) between the PFC crystals is mainly a honeycomb-like smectite. The PFC is postulated to be a primary precipitate. This concept is reached because the PFC: (i) does not display the criteria of typical Microcodium structures, root-calcification, speleothem structures, calcite spherulites of laminar calcretes, and calcitization of precursor dolomite or aragonite, (ii) possesses homogenous compositional and textural characteristics, and (iii) occurs within limestone beds that lie in between impermeable massive mudrock beds that dampen diagenesis. A role for possible bacterial contribution in crystallization of the PFC is assumed in the view of its internal microfabric characteristics (pseudospherulitic and lobate internal growth patterns), and morphological features (ellipsoidal to subglobular appearance), in addition to its slightly negative values of ?13C (-0.51 to -2.19). The low concentration of Na (0.11-0.20%), Sr (70-110 ppm) and Mn (0.04-0.31%), in addition to the negative values of ?18O (-4.65 to -5.96) in the PFC reflect its deposition from oxygenated freshwater. In addition, the absence of covariance between ?13C and ?18O values (r = -0.202) of the PFC indicates precipitation in a hydrologically-open, short-lived lake setting. In summary, the PFC is of low-Mg type and formed in a hydrologically-open, short-lived, freshwater lake as a primary precipitate with possible bacterial contribution.

  15. Application of multivariate statistical analyses in the interpretation of geochemical behaviour of uranium in phosphatic rocks in the Red Sea, Nile Valley and Western Desert, Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Arabi, Abd El-Gabar M; Khalifa, Ibrahim H

    2002-01-01

    Factor and cluster analyses as well as the Pearson correlation coefficient have been applied to geochemical data obtained from phosphorite and phosphatic rocks of Duwi Formation exposed at the Red Sea coast. Nile Valley and Western Desert. Sixty-six samples from a total of 71 collected samples were analysed for SiO2, TiO2, Al203, Fe2O3, CaO, MgO, Na2O, K2O, P2O5, Sr, U and Pb by XRF and their mineral constituents were determined by the use of XRD techniques. In addition, the natural radioactivity of the phosphatic samples due to their uranium, thorium and potassium contents was measured by gamma-spectrometry. The uranium content in the phosphate rocks with P2O5 > 15% (average of 106.6 ppm) is higher than in rocks with P2O5 < 15% (average of 35.5 ppm). Uranium distribution is essentially controlled by the variations of P2O5 and CaO, whereas it is not related to changes in SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, MgO, Na2O and K2O concentrations.-Factor analysis and the Pearson correlation coefficient revealed that uranium belaves geochemically in different ways in the phosphatic sediments and phosphorites in the Red Sea, Nile Valley and Western Desert. In the Red Sea and Western Desert phosphorites, uranium occurs mainly in oxidized U6+ state where it seems to be fixed by the phosphate ion, forming secondary uranium phosphate minerals such as phosphuranylite. In the Nile Valley phosphorites, ionic substitution of Ca2+ by U4 is the main controlling factor in the concentration of uranium in phosphate rocks. Moreover, fixation of U6- by phosphate ion and adsorption of uranium on phosphate minerals play subordinate roles. PMID:12066979

  16. Another approaching storm on the desert. Egypt.

    PubMed

    Werner, D

    1991-01-01

    Examining Egypt's health care crisis, this article discusses the political factors that have led to such a state. Although Egypt possesses considerable resources and receives vast amounts of US foreign aid, the health status of its people is poor. Infant mortality rate stands at 67/1000 live births; the poor nutritional status of children has not improved over the past 10 years; 1/3 of all children are moderately to severely stunted in growth. The author attributes these woeful conditions to the country's political and economic policies. At one time or another, Egypt has allied itself with USSR or the US, and has generally retained only the worst features of socialism and the free market. While operating as a police state, Egypt has moved towards a free market that has led to the concentration of wealth. The author points out how medical care and medical school reflect the political and economic system. The government guarantees free health care for all and a job to all medical school graduates. But doctors now have to wait 7 years to obtain a post. Many have begun practicing private medicine, and many have become corrupt. The author also singles out the country's diarrhea control program as an indication of the impending health care disaster. Though hailed as high successful, the cost has been exceptionally high, and USAID funding will soon cease. Furthermore, mothers have not been taught self-reliance, but have been made to depend on commercially produced oral rehydration packets. Despite the severity of the social problems, Egypt's security forces have so far succeeded in suppressing popular opposition. But the author does detect hopeful signs in the many active progressive groups, and in particular, in the great social accomplishments of the governor of the providence of Ismailia. PMID:12159260

  17. Epidemiology and clinical presentation of stroke in Upper Egypt (desert area)

    PubMed Central

    El Tallawy, Hamdy N; Farghaly, Wafaa M; Badry, Reda; Hamdy, Nermin A; Shehata, Ghaydaa A; Rageh, Tarek A; Metwally, Nabil A; Hassan, Enas M; Elsayed, Sayed S; Yehia, Mohamed A; Soliman, Wael T

    2015-01-01

    Background Stroke is a common cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Four out of five strokes occur in the low- and middle-income countries. This study aims to find lifetime prevalence of stroke in Upper Egypt and to identify clinical presentations and possible risk factors of stroke in this population. Methods This is a door-to-door (every door) study conducted on all inhabitants in Al Kharga district (representative of western desert) and Al Quseir city (representative of eastern desert). The study was conducted in two stages, and every stage consisted of three phases (screening, diagnostic, and investigatory). Results The total lifetime prevalence of stroke was 8.5/1,000 in the population aged 20 years and more. It increased with advancing age and was higher among males than females among all age groups except in the childbearing period (20 years to <40 years of age). Lifetime prevalence of ischemic stroke (7.2/1,000) was higher than hemorrhagic stroke (1.1/1,000). Hemiparesis and hemiplegia were the commonest presentation of stroke. Headache, vomiting, and vertigo were found to be significantly more common accompaniments of hemorrhagic stroke. The most common risk factor was hypertension, followed by hyperlipidemia and diabetes mellitus. Conclusion The total lifetime prevalence of stroke in the population aged 20 years and more in Upper Egypt (desert area) lies within the range that is recorded in developing countries. Clinical presentation and risk factors are similar to those recorded from developing and developed countries. PMID:26346729

  18. Basin deconstruction-construction: Seeking thermal-tectonic consistency through the integration of geochemical thermal indicators and seismic fault mechanical stratigraphy ​- Example from Faras Field, North Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigott, John D.; Abouelresh, Mohamed O.

    2016-02-01

    To construct a model of a sedimentary basin's thermal tectonic history is first to deconstruct it: taking apart its geological elements, searching for its initial conditions, and then to reassemble the elements in the temporal order that the basin is assumed to have evolved. Two inherent difficulties implicit to the analysis are that most organic thermal indicators are cumulative, irreversible and a function of both temperature and time and the non-uniqueness of crustal strain histories which complicates tectonic interpretations. If the initial conditions (e.g. starting maturity of the reactants and initial crustal temperature) can be specified and the boundary conditions incrementally designated from changes in the lithospheric heat engine owing to stratigraphic structural constraints, then the number of pathways for the temporal evolution of a basin is greatly reduced. For this investigation, model input uncertainties are reduced through seeking a solution that iteratively integrates the geologically constrained tectonic subsidence, geochemically constrained thermal indicators, and geophysically constrained fault mechanical stratigraphy. The Faras oilfield in the Abu Gharadig Basin, North Western Desert, Egypt, provides an investigative example of such a basin's deconstructive procedure. Multiple episodes of crustal extension and shortening are apparent in the tectonic subsidence analyses which are constrained from the fault mechanical stratigraphy interpreted from reflection seismic profiles. The model was iterated with different thermal boundary conditions until outputs best fit the geochemical observations. In so doing, the thermal iterations demonstrate that general relationship that basin heat flow increases decrease vertical model maturity gradients, increases in surface temperatures shift vertical maturity gradients linearly to higher values, increases in sediment conductivities lower vertical maturities with depth, and the addition of "ghost" layers (those layers removed) prior to the erosional event increase maturities beneath, and conversely. These integrated constraints upon the basin evolution model indicate that the principal source rocks, Khatatba and the lowest part of the Alam El Bueib formations, entered the oil window at approximately 95 Ma and the gas window at approximately 25 Ma. The upper part of the Alam El Bueib Formation is within the oil window at the present day. Establishing initial and boundary value conditions for a basin's thermal evolution when geovalidated by the integration of seismic fault mechanical stratigraphy, tectonic subsidence analysis, and organic geochemical maturity indicators provides a powerful tool for optimizing petroleum exploration in both mature and frontier basins.

  19. Tectonic Evolution of the Meatiq Infrastructure, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Mohamed E.; Ahmed, A. A.; El Nady, Osman M.

    1985-12-01

    The Pan-African basement exposed in the Meatiq area, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt, was found to possess tectonic styles belonging to infrastructure, transition and super-structure levels. Tectonic style of the infrastructure was developed during an old orogeny in the Lower Pan-African, and overprinted by those of the transition and superstructure levels of a younger orogeny in the Middle and Upper Pan-African, respectively. In the Lower Pan-African, old sequences of sediments and volcanics, together with ophiolitic rocks, were intensely deformed and regionally highly metamorphosed into gneisses and amphibolites. In the infrastructure level such rocks were migmatized, plastically deformed and intruded by synkinematic granitoid (diorite to alkali granite) lenses, sheets and plutons which were probably crystallized as amphibolite-facies gneisses. Later on, these infrastructural rocks were cut by mafic to intermediate dykes and sills, isostically uplifted and cratonized. Parts were exposed to erosion. In the Middle Pan-African the cratonized rocks sank into a transition tectonic level where they underwent large-scale thrusting, varying degrees of cataclasis and mylonitization, and low- to medium-grade regional metamorphism. An episode of plutonism guided by thrusts followed, mainly in the form of synkinematic intrusion of tonalite, granodiorite and quartz monzodiorite. In the Upper Pan-African, isostatic uplift occurred and the mylonitic rocks attained the superstructure level. There they were subjected to two main phases of folding resulting in the major Meatiq domal structure. Subsequently, the folded rocks were intruded by a postkinematic quartz monzonite pluton.

  20. Aeolian erosional lineations in the Libyan Desert, Dakhla Region, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookes, Ian A.

    2001-08-01

    This paper presents results of a study of aeolian erosion at the landscape scale. There have been few such studies in desert geomorphology compared to those focused on individual landforms and on rock surface sculpture. The present study area lies in the southern part of the Libyan Desert in south-central Egypt, between 25 and 27N, 29 and 30E. Bedrock comprises Paleogene limestone of various lithologies. Climate is hyperarid. The following topics are treated. (i) Correspondences between rock outcrop belts and belts of terrain lineated by aeolian erosion and unlineated terrain. (ii) The effect of lithology on aeolian lineation, which works through the presence or absence of chert in the limestones. Lineation is produced by aeolian erosion in chert-free/poor rocks, whereas erosion of chert-rich rocks produces a desert pavement that armors the surface, suppressing erosion. (iii) The effect of large valleys eroded upwind of lineated terrain, which deflect winds and trap sand, ending erosion, so that downwind lineations are reduced and finally erased by weathering. (iv) Sample lineated landscapes in the area show stages of evolution, arranged in the time domain into a proposed cycle of aeolian erosion; the cycle progresses from initial smooth plain to grooves separating long, blade-shaped ridges, to segmentation of ridges into shorter blades along diagonal joints, to streamlining of shorter blades and size reduction, to final planation. In any one wind-parallel swath of lineated terrain, stages in the cycle progress downwind in the space domain, so that upwind landscapes are more advanced in the cycle. (v) The structure of air flow responsible for lineation is still uncertain, but initial grooving may respond to stable longitudinal horseshoe vortices, or self-organized regularity of erosion by random vortices; subsequently, the erosion pattern is fixed by evolving relief. (vi) Large, smooth basins within the lineated terrain were carved by aeolian erosion before Oxygen Isotope Stage (OIS) 5 (70-130 ka), as were similar basins along the Dakhla piedmont below the scarp; little geomorphic change has occurred since, so in this field of aeolian erosional lineations (AELs) the aeolian erosion cycle may have occupied 10 times as long. Since continental scale aridity set in at ca. 2.4 Ma, there have been only two cycles in this area. A completed cycle earlier than the current incomplete one is indicated by rare small yardangs riding 'piggyback' on larger ones.

  1. Carrion insects of the Egyptian western desert.

    PubMed

    Hegazi, E M; Shaaban, M A; Sabry, E

    1991-09-01

    A general survey was made on the zoosaprophagous insects and their associates in a natural ecosystem in the Egyptian western desert (80 km west of Alexandria, 12 km from the Mediterranean Sea shore). Two types of traps were used, one for flying insects and the other for soil-burrowing insects. Two types of decaying media were used as baits: the common freshwater fish (Tilapia zilii Gerv.) and the desert snail (Eremina desertorum). More than 30 insect species were trapped. The following orders and families were represented: Diptera (Calliphoridae, Sarcophagidae, Muscidae); Coleoptera (Histeridae, Scarabaeidae, Dermestidae, Tenebrionidae); Hymenoptera (Chalcididae, Pteromalidae, Eulophidae, Formicidae). Monthly totals of numbers trapped in each of these groups are presented. PMID:1941945

  2. Islamic Versus Western Conceptions of Education: Reflections on Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Bradley J.

    1999-05-01

    Creating an education system based on Islamic principles while also meeting the demands of a modern, technological world is a daunting, perhaps impossible task. This paper examines the contradictions between Islamic education theory and the Western-based education systems found in most Islamically oriented countries. Egypt is used as a case study to illustrate the complex and delicate balance policy makers must achieve in meeting the needs of economic development while also affirming their countries' Islamic cultural heritage.

  3. Soil seed bank in different habitats of the Eastern Desert of Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Gomaa, Nasr H.

    2012-01-01

    The floristic composition and species diversity of the germinable soil seed bank were studied in three different habitats (desert salinized land, desert wadi, and reclaimed land) in the Eastern Desert of Egypt. Moreover, the degree of similarity between the seed bank and the above-ground vegetation was determined. The seed bank was studied in 40 stands representing the three habitats. Ten soil samples (each 25 × 20 cm and 5 cm depth) were randomly taken per stand. The seed bank was investigated by the seedling emergence method. Some 61 species belonging to 21 families and 54 genera were identified in the germinable seed bank. The recorded species include 43 annuals and 18 perennials. Ordination of stands by Detrended Correspondence Analysis (DCA) indicates that the stands of the three habitats are markedly distinguishable and show a clear pattern of segregation on the ordination planes. This indicates variations in the species composition among habitats. The results also demonstrate significant associations between the floristic composition of the seed bank and edaphic factors such as CaCO3, electrical conductivity, organic carbon and soil texture. The reclaimed land has the highest values of species richness, Shannon-index of diversity and the density of the germinable seed bank followed by the habitats of desert wadi and desert salinized land. Motyka’s similarity index between the seed bank and the above-ground vegetation is significantly higher in reclaimed land (75.1%) compared to desert wadi (38.4%) and desert salinized land (36.5%). PMID:23961181

  4. Neoproterozoic post-collisional granitoids in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt: Petrological and geochemical constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, Ali F.; El Kalioubi, Baher A.

    2014-11-01

    The Um Had and Um Effein (UHUE), Central Eastern Desert of Egypt, are elliptical and circular bodies of monzogranite to syenogranite with subordinate alkali feldspar granite. The UHUE granites are quite evolved (SiO2 = 67-74 wt.%), and have characteristics of high-K calc-alkaline peraluminous rocks. They are relatively enriched in K, Ba, La, Rb, Zr and total REEs, while are depleted in Sr, Y, Ti, HREE. The rocks have LREE-enriched patterns with significant negative Eu anamolies suggesting post-collision granites. The gradual increase of Rb/Sr and Rb/Ba ratios from the monzogranite to the alkali feldspar granites indicates that these granites are genetically related. The various geochemical discrimination diagrams strongly suggest that the studied granitoids were generated from crustal sources through fractional crystallization with some crustal contamination which have played a major role during the magmatic evolution of the plutons. These granites display transitional character from orogenic calc-alkaline arc-type up to subsequent anorogenic within-plate environments, suggesting continuous crystallization of magma in a transitional “post-collision” tectonic setting. This transition from compression to extension was controlled mainly by lithospheric delamination following continental collision in the Eastern Desert of Egypt.

  5. Genetic Aspects of Gold Mineralization at Some Occurrences in the Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El Monsef, M.; Slobodník, M.; Salem, I. A.

    2012-04-01

    The Eastern Desert of Egypt is well known as a gold-mining area since ancient times, there're more than 95 gold deposits and occurrences spread the whole area covered by the basement rocks of Precambrian age. The basement rocks of the Eastern Desert of Egypt constitute the Nubian Shield that has formed a continuous part of the Arabian-Nubian Shield before the opening of Red Sea (Oligocene-Early Miocene). Commonly, the system of gold-bearing quartz veins in the Eastern Desert is clearly structural controlled related to brittle-ductile shear zones that mostly developed during late deformational stages of the evolution history for basement rocks in the Eastern Desert. This running study principally aims to contribute the mineral resource potential of the gold deposits in Egypt, so particularly Fatira, Gidami and Atalla occurrences have been involved into a comprehensive study based on field, structural, mineralogical, geochemical and genetic investigations. It is intended to better understanding for the characteristics, distribution controls, conditions and age of mineralization in relation to the age of the hosting rocks intrusion to find if there're genetic links between the gold mineralization and the evolution of the host intrusive complex. Several authors suggested that the gold mineralization was related to the intrusion of the (postorogenic) Younger granites. Other authors interpret these deposits as products of hydrothermal activity induced either by metamorphism or cooling effects of early Paleozoic magmatism or as combined metamorphic/magmatic episodes. The prime focus will be directed to the ore itself and the associated hydrothermal alteration zones based on detailed maps and well-distributed samples network and geochemical anomalies distribution. The laboratory studies included microscopic examination (reflecting and transmitting microscopy) to allow for determination of the hosting rocks types and mineralogical changes related to the gold mineralization in each area and revealing the ore mineralogy and the ore textures, geochemical analyses (including rare earth elements) are to be used in order to determine the tectonic setting and magmatic evolution of the host intrusions, scanning electron microscope, microprobe analysis, stable isotopes and fluid inclusions will serve as a new part of this study in detection of the origin and the physico-chemical conditions (P-T condition) for the gold precipitation, Age dating of the host intrusion and mineralization will be based on K-Ar for dating potassium-bearing minerals in fresh host rocks and hydrothermal mineral phases.

  6. Microfacies analysis of foraminifera rich sedimentary rocks from the Desert Plateau, central Egypt.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnitschar, C.; Briguglio, A.; Hohenegger, J.

    2012-04-01

    Microfacies analysis on some samples from the Thebes Group have been carried on by means of thin sections. The study area is included in the Libyan Desert Plateau (central Egypt) at following coordinates N27° 36'30.58" E29° 44'58.34", near the biggest dune of Egypt, the Ghard Abu Muharik. Because of the round shape of the rocks and the desert patina on the surface they could easily be classified as the so called "Melonstones", which are located more southwards and mainly composed by stromatolites. On the contrary, the investigated samples show a completely different fauna and therefore have been separated from the "Melonstones". Even if shape and size are very similar and the desert patina covers all surfaces the same way the differences are impressive. To investigate the samples, two thin-sections have been prepared and analyzed at the microscope. The observed fauna is composed by: agglutinated benthic foraminifera (e.g., Dictyoconus egypticus), complex larger miliolids (e.g., Pseudolacazina cf. danatae, Fabularia sp.), alveolinids (Alveolina vredenburgi), green algae (Dasycladaceae), echinoids and corals. Because of the presence of symbionts bearing larger benthic foraminifera, which need light to feed photosymbionts, the rock was formed in a shallow water environment. With the abundant rock-building benthic foraminifera and calcareous algae the limestone shows a tendency to the packstone/wackestone facies. Based on the presence of Alveolina vredenburgi, the age of the samples can be estimate as lowermost Eocene belonging to the shallow benthic zone 5 (sensu Serra-Kiel et al., 1998). According the obtained data on stratigraphy and palaeoecology, a partial palaeoenvironmental reconstruction is possible for the Libyan Desert Plateau where outcrops are largely missing. Because of the round shape of the samples and the patina which covers them all around it can be assumed that they have been transported from longer distance. According to the geological map of the area and to the fauna observed in the sections, the source of the samples can be related to the Farafra Formation, which is characterized by white to grey alveolinid shallow water limestone. The closest outcrop belonging to this formation can be found around 50 kilometers westwards from the location where the samples were taken. Serra-Kiel J., Hottinger L., Caus E., Drobne K., Ferrà Ndez C., Jauhria.K., Less G., Pavlovec R., Pignatti J., Samsó J.M., Schaub H., Sirel E., Strougo A., Tambareau Y., Tosquella J., ZAKREVSKAYA E., 1998 - Larger Foraminiferal Biostratigraphy Of The Tethyan Paleocene And Eocene. Bull. Soc. géol. France, 169 (2): 281-299.

  7. Natural radioactivity and rare earth elements in feldspar samples, Central Eastern desert, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Walley El-Dine, Nadia; El-Shershaby, Amal; Afifi, Sofia; Sroor, Amany; Samir, Eman

    2011-05-01

    The pegmatite bodies of the Eastern Desert of Egypt are widely distributed especially along the Marsa-Alam-Idfu road. The Abu Dob area covers about 150km(2) of the Arabian Nubian shield at the central part of the Eastern Desert of Egypt. Most of the pegmatite is zoned; the zonation starts with milky quartz at the core followed by alkali feldspar at the margins. The feldspars vary in color from rose to milky and in composition from K-feldspar to Na-feldspar, sometimes interactions of both types are encountered. Thirteen feldspar samples were collected from different locations in the Abu Dob area for measuring the natural radioactivity of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K using an HPGe detector. The variation in concentration of radionuclides for the area under investigation can be classified into regions of high, medium and low natural radioactivity. The average concentration in BqKg(-1) has been observed to be from 9.5 to 183675.7BqKg(-1) for (238)U, between 6.1 and 94,314.2BqKg(-1) for (232)Th and from 0 to 7894.6BqKg(-1) for (40)K. Radium equivalent activities (Ra(eq)), dose rate (D(R)) and external hazard (H(ex)) have also been determined. In the present work, the concentration of rare earth elements are measured for two feldspar samples using two techniques, Environmental Scanning Electron microscope XIL 30 ESEM, Philips, and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS). The existence of rare earth elements in this area are very high and can be used in different important industries. PMID:21324705

  8. Extensional collapse along the Sevier Desert reflection, northern Sevier Desert basin, western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coogan, James C.; Decelles, Peter G.

    1996-10-01

    Newly released and previously published seismic reflection data from the northern Sevier Desert basin provide a complete seismic transect between the tilted western margin of the basin and the eastern breakaway zone. When tied to well and surface age data, the transect delineates a continuum of extensional fault and basin fill geometries that developed between late Oligocene and Pleistocene time across the basin. A minimum of 18 km of top-to-the-west normal displacement is estimated across the Sevier Desert from only the most conspicuous growth geometries and offsets across listric normal faults that sole downward into the Sevier Desert reflection (SDR). The SDR clearly marks a normal fault zone beneath the entire basin, where stratal truncations are imaged for 50% of the 39 km length of the reflection east of the Cricket Mountains block. Restoration of extensional displacement along this entire 39 km fault length is necessary to reconstruct the pre-Oligocene configuration and erosion level of Sevier thrust sheets across the Sevier Desert area. The SDR normal fault zone underlies the former topographic crest of the Sevier orogenic belt, where it accommodated extensional collapse after cessation of regional contractile tectonism.

  9. Holocene environmental changes in the Gebel Umm Hammad, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeyersons, Jan; Vermeersch, Pierre M.; Beeckman, Hans; Van Peer, Philip

    1999-01-01

    Gebel Umm Hammad in the Red Sea Mountains east of Quseir, Egypt, today enjoys small but irregular amounts of winter rain, enabling the widening of joint controlled openings in the Thebes Limestone. Cavities are especially affected by flaking, while rock fragmentation is more active on the outside. The sedimentological and botanical study of fan deposits at the outlet of a karstic shaft in the Tree Shelter showed the local Holocene environmental evolution. Three periods of different degree of aridity can be considered: (i) Before 8120±45 BP (UtC-5389), bedload aggradation points to rare but occasionally heavy rains, lasting for several hours, attaining intensities of more than 76 mm/h and covering some 20 km 2. Wadi flash floods occasionally attained bankfull stage. (ii) Since 8120±45 BP (UtC-5389), such heavy rains have not occurred in the Egyptian Red Sea Mountains. Instead, a more moderate but maybe wetter precipitation regime was established. The karstic shafts were active, and there was water and life in the desert. Two humid pulses can be distinguished within this period. The first occurs at ±8000 BP, the second between 6630±45 (GrN-22560) and 6770±60 BP (GrN-22562). (iii) After the last wet culmination, there was a gradual shift to drier conditions. Shortly after ±5000 BP, modern climatic conditions are believed to have been attained. Today, the occasional rain storms are less heavy than before ±8000 BP. Bankfull stage river floods do not occur. Instead, secondary channels are eroded in the wadi beds. The general arid character during the whole period and the inherent local and temporal variations in precipitation patterns might explain apparent aberrations between the palaeoenvironmental evolution of the Tree Shelter site and other remote study areas in Egypt and Sudan.

  10. Technologies Applied in the Toshka Project of Egypt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahby, Wafeek S.

    2004-01-01

    The Toshka Project, located in Egypt, involves excavating a canal to carry about 380 billion ft[supercript 3] of water every year from Lake Nasser to the Toshka Depression, southwest of Aswan. This will eventually create a new valley to the River Nile in the western desert of Egypt in addition to the currently existing prehistoric river course.…

  11. Paleozoic cratonal/miogeoclinal stratigraphy in the western Mojave Desert

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M.W.; Walker, J.D. )

    1991-02-01

    Detailed mapping of metasedimentary rocks by many workers in the western Mojave Desert, California, has revealed Paleozoic lithologies of cratonal/miogeoclinal affinity. These exposures are metamorphosed, highly strained, and dismembered, and sit as roof pendants to Mesozoic and Tertiary intrusive rocks. In most outcrops no diagnosis fossils are preserved. Age correlation of these units is based, therefore, solely on similarities to lithologic packages outside the region. Despite the complex tectonic history this area has suffered since the late Paleozoic paleogeographic elements trend southwest into the region from where they are last clearly defined near the California-Nevada border. Dolomitic and calcitic marbles, quartzites, and biotite schists make up a major part of the stratigraphy in many areas. The stratigraphy and lithology of these units strongly suggest that they are correlative with late Precambrian-Cambrian units in the Death Valley region. Possible Ordovician and Devonian marbles also are present within some sections; at least one locality contains stromatoporoids of probable Devonian age. Calcite marbles tentatively correlated with lithologically similar Permian units in the Death Valley area are also represented and appear to be depositionally overlain by Mesozoic( ) shallow-marine and are-derived clastic rocks. Although the western Mojave Desert region has experienced compressional, transcurrent, and extensional deformation since late Paleozoic, our current understanding and restoration of this deformation history does not significantly alter the general southwest Paleozoic paleogeographic trends known to exist farther east.

  12. Petrogenesis of selected A-type granitic intrusions from Central Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Tharwat; Asran, Asran; Amron, Taha; Hauzenberger, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    The Pan-African orogeny in the Arabian-Nubian Shield was terminated by intrusion of A-type granites (~ 595 Ma; Greenberg, 1981) and its volcanic equivalents. Subsequent to the intrusions of these granitic bodies the shield was exhumed. Eroded A-type granite pebbles were found in the molasse sediments that were deposited in intermountain basins. Therefore the A-type granites provide information about the last stage of the Pan-African geochemical system. Preliminary whole-rock geochemical data of three granitic intrusions (Kadabora, Um Naggat and El shiekh Salem) from the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt; indicate that all of them are peraluminous and with A-type characteristics. These intrusions show low CaO content (average 0.43 %wt), high FeOT/MgO ratio (10.46-121.88), high Na2O+K2O (average 8.04 %wt), marked enrichment of high field strength elements (Y, Nb and Ga except Zr), depletion in MgO (0.01-0.11 %wt) and with low concentration of Sr and Ba. The studied granitoids were emplaced in within plate tectonic regime. References: Greenberg, J.K. (1981): Characteristic and origin of Egyptian younger granites. Bull. Geol. Soc. Am. Part 1, v.92: 224-232.

  13. Egypt.

    PubMed

    1987-12-01

    Attention in this discussion of Egypt is directed to the following: geography; the people; history; government and political conditions; the economy; defense; foreign relations; and relations between Egypt and the US. The population totaled 50.5 million in 1986 with an annual growth rate of 2.8%. The infant mortality rate is 102/1000 (1986), and life expectancy is 58.3 years. Located in the northeastern corner of Africa, Egypt has a land area of about 1 million square kilometers and is bounded by the Mediterranean Sea, Libya, Sudan, the Red Sea, the Gulf of Aqaba, and Israel. Egypt is the most populous country in the Arab world. Egyptians are a fairly homogenous people of Hamitic origin. Mediterranean and Arab influences appear in the north, and there is some mixing in the south with the Nubians of northern Sudan. Egypt has been a unified state for over 5000 years, and archeological evidence indicates that a developed Egyptian society has existed for considerably longer. The constitution of Egypt provides for a strong executive with authority vested in an elected president who can appoint 1 or more vice presidents, a prime minister, and a cabinet. Egypt's legislative body has 458 members -- 448 popularly elected and 10 appointed by the president. Power is concentrated in the hands of the president and the National Democratic Party's majority in the People's Assembly, but opposition parties organize, publish their views, and represent their followers at various levels in the political system. The process of gradual political liberalization begun by Sadat has continued under Mubarak. In fiscal year 1987 the gross domestic product (GDP) reached about US$30 billion. Agriculture and services each contribute about 1/3 of GDP; the remainder comes from industry, petroleum, mining, electricity, and construction. At this time, the Egyptian economy faces several challenges. In 1986 the government of Egypt initiated a major review of economic policy and initiated an economic reform program aimed at simplifying the exchange rate system and introducing a greater reliance on market forces and an expanded role for the private sector. President Mubarak has reaffirmed and built upon Sadat's policies, placing heavy emphasis on negotiated solutions to the Arab-Israeli dispute, peace with Israel, and close ties with the US. In fiscal year 1987 US economic and military aid to Egypt reached a level of $2305 million. The aid is designed to assist Egypt's economic development and support US-Egyptian cooperation. PMID:12178008

  14. Holocene Paleoecology of the Western Tenere Desert, Niger, Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sereno, P. C.; Caran, S. C.; Housh, T. B.

    2007-12-01

    Multiple paleontological, sedimentological, and isotopic/ionic geochemical indicators permit reconstruction of the Holocene ecology of the western Tenere Desert (southern Sahara hyper-desert). Modern precipitation is highly erratic, averaging 25 mm yearly, and vegetative cover is negligible. From the early to middle Holocene, however, grassland-shrublands and seasonal to permanent lakes and wetlands predominated, supporting diverse limnic, riparian, and upland communities. Annual precipitation probably was comparable to that of the modern southern Sahel, exceeding 350 mm. Coarse-grained sediment washed into the large lacustrine basin from exposures of metamorphic, plutonic, and volcanic rocks in the nearby Air Massif highland. Lake margins fluctuated in response to runoff and limited ground-water discharge. The water was non-saline and there is no evidence of evaporite deposition. Aquatic and riparian macrophytes thrived, as did an extensive lacustrine-palustrine macrofauna. A Sahelian flora of mixed grasses, thorn shrubs, and perhaps some larger woodland species occupied the contiguous uplands, supporting resident and migratory mammalian and avian faunas. Lake levels were high until 6300 to 5200 BP, possibly as late as 4800 BP locally. Deflation of lacustrine deposits during a subsequent dry period provided finer-grained eolian sediment accreting as proximal dunes. The composition of mineral sediment within the middle to late Holocene dunes is different from, but clearly a subset of the lacustrine deposits. Organic matter reworked from the lake sediment was deposited in the dunes and oxidized in situ, generating CO2 that dissolved in soil moisture, producing bicarbonate. The bicarbonate reacted with calcium from weathered minerals, producing calcic cementation about 5100 BP. The resulting petrocalcic horizon was later exposed, weathered, and colonized by sparse terrestrial vegetation for one or more brief periods. A late phase of pedogenesis concurrent with or closely post-dating plant colonization produced secondary porosity and metallic oxide cementation. The metallic oxide cement preserved minute quantities of organic matter from the terrestrial flora and invertebrate microfauna. Regional ecology was controlled by global post-Pleistocene deglaciation, sea-level changes, and establishment of zonal weather systems. The modern Okavango Delta of Botswana is, in part, a suitable analog for the late Pleistocene to early/middle Holocene environment of the western Tenere Desert, as are smaller, lesser-known, extant wetlands in Niger.

  15. Oppositely dipping thrusts and transpressional imbricate zone in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Wahed, Mohamed A.

    2014-12-01

    This paper documents the 40-60 km wide ENE-WSW trending Mubarak-Barramiya shear belt (MBSB) in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt by examining its structural styles, kinematics and geometry. Our study revealed the existence of prevalent dextral and minor sinistral conjugate shear zones. The MBSB is metamorphic belt (greenschist-amphibolite) characterized by at least three post-collisional (740-540 Ma) ductile Neoproterozoic deformation events (D1, D2 and D3) followed by a brittle neotectonic deformation (D4). D1 event produced early top-to-the-northwest thrust displacements due to NW-SE shortening. D2 produced discrete zones of NNW-trending upright folds and culminated in initiation of major NW-trending sinistral shear zones of the Najd Fault System (NFS, at c. 640-540 Ma ago) as well as steeply dipping S2 foliation, and shallowly plunging L2 lineation. NW-to NNW-trending F2 folds are open to steep and vary in plunge from horizontal to vertical. D2 deformational fabrics are strongly overprinted by D3 penetrative structures. D3 is characterized by a penetrative S3 foliation, steeply SE- to NW-plunging and shallowly NE-plunging stretching lineations (L3), asymmetric and sheath folds (F3) consistent with dextral sense of movement exhibited by delta- and sigma-type porphyroclast systems and asymmetric boudinage fabrics. D2-D3 represent a non-coaxial progressive event formed in a dextral NE- over NW-sinistral shear zone during a partitioned transpression in response to E-W-directed compression during oblique convergence between East and West Gondwana developed due to closure of the Mozambique Ocean and amalgamation of the Arabian-Nubian Shield in Cryogenian-early Ediacaran time.

  16. Geological and structural interpretation of airborne surveys and its significance for mineralization, South Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazala, H. H.

    1993-04-01

    Interpretation of aeromagnetic and radiometric geophysical data is carried out in an area of the Precambrian basement rocks of the south Eastern Desert of Egypt. The area is delimited by lat. 24°00' and 25°00'N and long. 34°00' and 35°00'E. Aeromagnetic anomalies in the area reflect important features on basement tectonics, on deep-seated structures and on detailed geological mapping. Major faults and shear zones, which play an important role in the emplacement of mineralized bodies, have been interpreted and two tectonic blocks are suggested. The statistical analysis of the basement fractures and aeromagnetic lineaments shows major NNW, NW and ENE trends with intersections indicating locations of magmatic intrusions and alkaline ring complexes. The depth computations indicate shallow to near surface magnetic sources as well as deeper ones. The constructed residual, second- derivative, upward-downward continuations and regional maps respectively emphasize these features. The surface rocks of basic -ultrabasic affinity are reflected on the magnetic map. Other rock units give low magnetic effects that indicate variations in lithological composition and/or the degree of metamorphism. The total count-radiometric map shows a close relationship between the alkaline rocks (e.g. ring complexes) and younger granites as well as strong radioactive indications of uranium and/or thorium mineralization (e.g. G. Abu Khurq and G. Kahfa). The linear radiometric anomalies indicate locations of fault lines which are mineralized with radioactive minerals, such as at G. Hafafit area. These faults are also interpreted from the magnetic map. Additional locations are recommended for further ground geophysical and geological explorations.

  17. Geochemistry and Petrogenesis of the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Mansouri Ring Complex, Southeastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-nisr, S. A.; Saleh, G. M.

    2001-01-01

    The Mansouri Ring Complex is an eccentric mass (9 6 km) located in the extreme southwestern part of the Eastern Desert of Egypt. The complex exhibits a poorly defined ring structure and a limited variety of rock types: trachytes, alkali feldspar syenites and rhyolitic dykes. The rocks are hypersolvus, porphyritic and less commonly show trachytic textures. The complex has a high fracture density consisting of two dominant fault systems trending west-northwest and east-west. The rocks are silica-oversaturated; trachytes and syenites are mildly metaluminous to peralkaline, while rhyolites are mainly peraluminous due to the relative loss of a peralkaline fluid phase. The rocks are enriched in high field strength elements (Nb, Zr, Y) reflecting a within-plate tectonic setting. The curvilinear trends defined by some major and trace element variations, together with the decrease in the K/Rb ratio and concomitant increase in Rb/Ba and Rb/Sr ratios, indicate the important role of feldspar fractionation during the evolution of the Mansouri Complex. In some Mansouri rocks, radioactive anomalies are mainly associated with shear zones aligned along the east-west direction and characterised by abnormal accumulations of U- and Th-bearing accessory minerals like monazite, allanite, apatite and titanite. The Mansouri Ring has carbonatite rocks of calcitic, calcitic-dolomitic and dolomitic varieties; the latter is widely abundant. Apatite, monazite, pyrochlore, sphalerite, pyrrohotite and magnetite are the common accessory minerals associated with the Mansouri carbonatites. The U and Th contents of the carbonatites range from 10-25 ppm and 40-250 ppm, respectively. The U and Th contents of the alkali feldspar syenites range from 1-9 ppm and 3-10 ppm, respectively. The low Y/Nb ratios (< 0.6), together with the relatively low initial 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio (0.705) of the Mansouri rocks, substantiates the dominant role of mantle-derived magma in their genesis.

  18. Stability of remanence and paleomagnetic studies of some chromite ores from Barramiya and Allawi occurrences, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refai, E.; Wassif, Nadia A.; Shoaib, A.

    1989-08-01

    Rock magnetic investigations were carried out on natural Precambrian chromite ore at two occurrences in the Eastern Desert, Egypt. A medium/high coercivity component of remanence of reversed polarity can be defined. The mean direction of the five sites studied is D = 198°, I = -44°, with k = 55 and α 95 = 10° . Ore microscopic and magnetic examinations indicate the absence of magnetite and it is shown that the chromite mineral (ferrimagnetic phase) could be the carriers of the high stable NRM. The result of paleopole position of these Precambrian chromites are presented and discussed in the context of its age and the apparent polar wander path (APWP) of Africa.

  19. Red Sea Rift-Related Quseir Basalts, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt: Petrogenetic and Geodynamic Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahat, Esam; Ali, Shehata; Hauzenberger, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Mineral and whole rock chemistry of Tertiary Red Sea rift-related basalts occurred in south Quseir city, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt has been presented to investigate their petrogenetic and geodynamic evolution. The South Quseir basalts (SQB) have been classified as high-Ti tholeiitic lava (TiO2 >2 wt. %) emplaced in anorogenic tectonic setting. Their Mg# varies from 48 to 53. Pearce element ratios (PER) suggest that the SQB magmas have evolved through fractional crystallization of olivine + clinopyroxene plagioclase assemblages, however, the absence of Eu-anomaly argues against plagioclase fractionation. The clinopyroxene compositions provide evidence for polybaric fractionation of the parental mafic magma. Estimated temperatures of crystallization range from 1143 to 1323 oC for olivines, 1031 to 1207 oC for clinopyroxenes, 600 to 900 oC for feldspars, and 638 to 787 oC for Fe-Ti oxides. Oxygen fugacity (O2) values range from -15.16 to -19.5. The incompatible trace element signatures of the SQB (La/Ba = 0.08-0.10 and La/Nb = 0.89-1.04) are similar to those of ocean island basalts (OIB) generated from asthenospheric mantle source unaffected by subduction components. Modelling calculations indicate that the SQB primary magmas were derived from 4-5% partial melting of a garnet-bearing lherzolite mantle source which had a potential temperature (Tp= 1334-1432 C; based on olivine liquid equilibria) corresponding to ambient temperature of MORB (i.e. passive rifting). This ambient mantle would have to rise to shallower depths (< 100 km) in the upper mantle to cross the dry mantle solidus and stimulate adiabatic partial melting. These estimates along with absence of HIMU (high ? refers to high 238U/204Pb) components (based on trace element data) show that the SQB volcanism isn't associated with thermally driven mantle plumes. Thus, the SQB magma generation is related to extensional regime through passive upwelling and adiabatic decompression melting of an asthenospheric mantle source associated with Red Sea rifting.

  20. Genesis of the Abu Marawat gold deposit, central Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoheir, Basem A.; Akawy, Ahmed

    2010-06-01

    Gold mineralisation at the Abu Marawat mine, central Eastern Desert of Egypt, is related to a system of massive and sheared, milky quartz veins cutting a sequence of Neoproterozoic island arc metavolcanic/volcaniclastic rocks and related banded iron formation (BIF). Sulphide-bearing quartz veins and related hydrothermal breccia bodies display a range of textures including sheared, boudinaged and recrystallised quartz, open space filling and microbreccia. These variable textures imply a complex history of crack-seal mechanism characterising the relation between mineral deposition and a major N-S-trending shear zone, during a late brittle-ductile deformation event which affected the area at about 550 Ma. Gold-base metal mineralisation is associated with brecciation and fracturing of the iron ore bands, close to silicified shears and related quartz veins. The auriferous quartz lodes are characterised by the occurrence of visible pyrite-chalcopyrite pyrrhotite sphalerite galena mineralisation. Gold is refractory in pyrite and chalcopyrite, but rare visible gold/electrum and telluride specks were observed in a few samples. Hydrothermal alteration includes pervasive silicification, pyritisation, sericitisation, carbonatisation confined to a delicate set of veins and altered shears, and a more widespread propylitic alteration assemblage (quartz + chlorite + pyrite + calcite epidote). Fluid inclusion petrography and microthermometric studies suggest heterogeneous trapping of a low-salinity (1.4-6.7 wt.% eq. NaCl) aqueous solution and a carbonic fluid. Evidence for fluid immiscibility during ore formation includes variable liquid/vapour ratios in inclusions along individual trails and bulk inclusion homogenisation into liquid and occasionally to vapour at comparable temperatures. The trapping conditions of intragranular aqueous-carbonic inclusions approximate 264-378 C at 700-1300 bar. Similar temperature estimates have been obtained from Al-in-chlorite geothermometry of chlorite associated with sulphides in the mineralised quartz veins. Fracturing enhanced fluid circulation through the wallrock and related BIF, allowing reaction of the S-bearing ore fluid with iron oxides. This caused pyrite formation and concomitant Au precipitation, enhanced by fluid immiscibility as H 2S partitioned preferentially into the carbonic phase. The ore fluids may have originated from granitoid intrusions (likely the post-Hammamat felsites, whereas gold and base metals might have been leached from the Abu Marawat basic metavolcanics.

  1. The Neoproterozoic Abu Dahr ophiolite, South Eastern Desert, Egypt: petrological characteristics and tectonomagmatic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gahlan, Hisham A.; Azer, Mokhles K.; Khalil, Ahmed E. S.

    2015-10-01

    The Neoproterozoic Abu Dahr ophiolite, South Eastern Desert, Egypt, is one of the best preserved and least dismembered ophiolite successions in the Arabian-Nubian Shield. It contains a Penrose-type ophiolite sequence from mantle section below mafic crust upward to oceanic sedimentary cover overlying mafic volcanics, although the original magmatic (stratigraphic) contact between the mantle and crustal sections is disrupted by tectonism. The Abu Dahr ophiolite is metamorphosed under greenschist facies conditions, and low-temperature alteration is widespread. Petrography reveals that: (i) the mantle is homogenous, serpentinized, and dominated by harzburgite and less abundant dunite; (ii) the cumulate ultramafics are represented by wehrlite and pyroxenite; and (iii) the crustal section is represented by metagabbros, meta-anorthosites and metabasalts. The Abu Dahr serpentinized peridotites show high Mg# (0.92-0.93), with enrichment of Ni, Cr and Co, and depletion of Al2O3 and CaO, and nearly flat and unfractionated REE chondrite-normalized pattern. Major and trace element characteristics of the Abu Dahr metagabbro and metabasalt (crustal section) indicate a tholeiitic to calc-alkaline affinity. Units of the crustal section have low-Nb and Zr concentrations, low Dy/Yb and relatively elevated La/Yb ratios, high U/Yb and Th/Yb ratios, and LREE enriched chondrite-normalized pattern. All of the Abu Dahr ophiolite units have trace-element signatures characterized by enrichment of LILE over HFSE. Rare and trace element patterns indicate a genetic link between the Abu Dahr mantle, cumulate ultramafics, and crust. Chromian spinel has survived metamorphism and is used as a petrogenetic indicator in the Abu Dahr serpentinized peridotites. The spinel is homogeneous with a limited composition, and shows high-Cr# (>0.6) combined with low-TiO2 character (mostly <0.1 wt.%). The Abu Dahr ophiolite is interpreted as a fragment of depleted oceanic lithosphere that experienced high degrees of partial melting (up to 35 %) and originated in a fore-arc setting. Such interpretation contributes to the body of evidence suggesting that tectonomagmatic processes of the Neoproterozoic were largely similar to those of the Phanerozoic, implying little, or no significant, change in the geothermal regime of Earth since the Neoproterozoic.

  2. Rare metal-bearing and barren granites, Eastern Desert of Egypt: geochemical characterization and metallogenetic aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, F. H.

    1993-11-01

    Three "younger granite" plutons from the Eastern Desert of Egypt are studied: petrographic and geochemical characteristics of the barren pink granites at Wadi Sikait and Wadi Nugrus are similar, of alkaline, mildly peraluminous nature and are enriched in LIL-elements and LREE with moderate negative Eu anomalies. In contrast, the Sn-Ta-W-bearing albite granite of Abu Dabbab is alkaline, peraluminous muscovite granite; its chemical specialization is manifested by the pronounced enrichment in Ta, Sn, W, F, Rb and Li coupled with marked depletion in Ca, Ti, Mg, Sr and Ba. Elemental ratios (e.g., K/Rb, Rb/Sr, Ba/Rb) discriminate the albite granite and the pink granites into "mineralized and barren granites", respectively. The albite granite is derived from Na-rich magma of within-plate characteristics. Fluorine was an important complexing anion during magmatic evolution history. The albite granite is emplaced at shallow depth (<100 MPa) and at the intersection of structural weaknesses. The pink granites might have a crustal and/or LIL-element enriched mantle sources, in which the subduction-related fingerprints are partly obliterated. For both types, reactivation of regional structures played a significant role in magma generation. Acid metasomatism is mainly manifested by the development of thin greisen veins along fracture systems in the albite granite. The chemistry of greisenization using mass balance approach reveals that the process is accompanied by dramatic increase in SiO 2, Fe 2O 3, MnO, F, Sn and Li as well as significant loss in Na 2O, K 2O, Ba, Nb and Zn. The process causes a significant increase in volume (30%). Changes in chemical components are consistent with the observed mineralogical changes. Microprobe results reveal that the wolframite crystals are typically huebnerite with Fe-rich cores and Mn-rich rims. Compositional variations in wolframite crystals are attributed to the physicochemical conditions (pH, T, etc.) and chemistry of the ore-bearing fluids.

  3. Geochemistry and tectonic evolution of the Neoproterozoic Wadi Ghadir ophiolite, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Rahman, Yasser Abd; Polat, Ali; Dilek, Yildirim; Fryer, Brian; El-Sharkawy, Mohamed; Sakran, Shawki

    2009-11-01

    We report new geochemical data from the Neoproterozoic ophiolite in the Wadi Ghadir area, Eastern Desert, Egypt. The Wadi Ghadir ophiolite (WGO) is composed of layered and isotropic gabbros and amygdaloidal to porphyritic pillow lavas. Both the gabbroic rocks and the pillow lavas are intruded by dike swarms with different chemical affinities and spatial orientations. The WGO occurs in an ophiolitic mélange (Wadi Ghadir mélange, WGM), and both the WGO and WGM are intruded by granitic rocks to the west. On the basis of Zr and Y variations, units of the WGO are classified as tholeiites (e.g., gabbros, amygdaloidal pillow lavas, D1, and D3 dikes). The late-stage D4 dikes show a calc-alkaline affinity, whereas porphyritic pillow lavas and D2 dikes have a transitional character. All ophiolitic units display subduction zone trace element signatures characterized by the enrichment of LILE over HFSE and negative Nb-Ta anomalies. Tholeiitic rocks are further divided into LREE-depleted (gabbros, D3 dikes) and LREE-enriched (amygdaloidal pillow lavas, D1 dikes) groups. Light REE-depleted tholeiitic rocks were derived from melting of a slightly depleted mantle source, whereas the LREE-enriched tholeiitic rocks were derived from a fertile N-MORB source. Calc-alkaline D4 dikes are characterized by steep REE patterns and have low Zr/Nb ratios (23-29), indicating melt contribution from an enriched mantle source, such as sub-continental lithospheric mantle and/or garnet peridotite. The transitional group has LREE-enriched patterns, but its degree of REE enrichment and Zr/Nb ratios are intermediate between the tholeiitic and calc-alkaline groups. The WGO is interpreted to have formed in a back-arc setting behind the Nugrus volcanic arc developed above a NE-dipping subduction zone. The collision of this arc-back-arc system with the passive margin of the Nubian shield (Hafafit dome) resulted in the accretion of the Nugrus arc and the WGO onto the Nubian continental margin and in the initiation of a new subduction zone dipping SW beneath the newly accreted arc-back-arc crust and Hafafit dome. The establishment of this new Andean-type continental margin produced the calc-alkaline D4 dikes, leucogabbros and granitoid plutons intrude the Hafafit dome, the WGO, and the ophiolitic mélange.

  4. Geochemistry of an island-arc plutonic suite: Wadi Dabr intrusive complex, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu El-Ela, Fawzy F.

    1997-05-01

    The Wadi Dabr intrusive complex, west of Mersa-Alam, Eastern Desert, Egypt ranges in composition from gabbro to diorite, quartz diorite and tonalite. The gabbroic rocks include pyroxene-horn blend e gabbro, hornblende gabbro, quartz-hornblende gabbro, metagabbro and amphibolite. Mineral chemistry data for the gabbroic rocks indicate that the composition of clinopyroxenes ranges from diopside to augite and the corresponding magma is equivalent to a volcanic-arc basalt. Plagioclase cores range from An 75 to An 34 for the gabbroic varieties, except for the metagabbro which has An 11-18. The brown amphiboles are primary phases and classified as calcic amphiboles, which range from tschermakitic hornblende to magnesiohornblende. Green hornblende and actinolite are secondary phases. Hornblende barometry and hornblende-plagioclase themometry for the gabbroic rocks estimate crystallisation conditions of 2-5 kb and 885-716°C. The intrusive rocks cover an extensive silica range (47.86-72.54 wt%) and do not exhibit simple straight-line variation on Harker diagrams for many elements (e.g. TiO 2, Al 2O 3, FeO ∗, MgP, CaO, P 2O 5, Cr, Ni, V, Sr, Zr and Y). Most of these elements exhibit two geochemical trends suggesting two magma sources. The gabbroic rocks are relatively enriched in large ion lithophile elements (K, Rb, Sr and Ba) and depleted in high field strength elements (Nb, Zr, Ti and Y) which suggest subduction-related magma. Rare earth element (REE) data demonstrate that the gabbroic rocks have a slight enrichment of light REE [(La/Yb) N=2.67-3.91] and depletion of heavy REE ((Tb/Yb) N=1.42-1.47], which suggest the parent magma was of relatively primitive mantle source. The diorites and tonalites are clearly calc-alkaline and have negative anomalies of Nb, Zr, and Y which also suggest subduction-related magma. They are related to continental trondhjemites in terms of RbSr, KNaCa, and to volcanic-arc granites in terms of Rband NbY. The Wadi Dabr intrusive complex is analogous to intrusions emplaced in immature ensimatic island-arcs and represents a mixture of mantle (gabbroic rocks) and crustal fusion products (diorites and tonalites) modified by fractional processes.

  5. Peculiar Feldspar And Quartz Inclusions Within Zircons From Anorthosites, North Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliwa, H. A.; Dawoud, M. I.; Khalaf, I. M.; Negendank, J. F.; Itaya, T.

    2004-12-01

    Zircons from three anorthosite outcrops along Wadi Dib area, north Eastern Desert of Egypt contain abundant and conspicuous inclusions of quartz, feldspar, amphibole and apatite. These anorthosites, as (50-100m thick) layers, represent the top of mafic-ultramafic intrusions exhibiting rhythmic layering visible by reputation of melanocratic and leucocratic layers. Field and microscopic studies exhibit that these anorthosites were affected by the action of residual magmatic solutions associated with the late stage crystallization of the younger granites, which modified their mineralogical composition. They are composed totally of plagioclase with subordinate amount of clinoenstatite, augite, amphibole, biotite, K-feldspar, and quartz. Accessories are magnetite, ilmenite, apatite and zircon. The abundance and the mode of occurrence of K-feldspar, quartz, and biotite with apatite and zircon among the megacrysts suggest their formation is ascribed to the interaction with the residual solutions. The microprobe data exhibit difference between feldspar and amphiboles contained herein zircons and those as anorthosite mineral constituents. The genetic relationship between zircons and their inclusions suggests later growth of zircons than inclusions and most probably at the final stage of rock modification. Zircons are magmatic and found in the interstitial feldspar and quartz among plagioclase megacrysts in aggregates or as individual grains. The microscopic and SEM images investigation exhibit that most zircons are subhedral to euhedral equant and prismatic crystals. Most zircons have same range of crystal morphologies and internal growth structures with predominance of prism /{100/} and pyramid /{101/} and occasionally prism /{110/} and pyramid /{111/}. No evidences for poly-faceted grains, inherited cores or later overgrowths were detected. CL images distinguished zircons with visible core-rim structures and others with regular and continuous growth zones contained herein various inclusions. The dark CL cores in the core-rim structured zircons are higher in U, Y and sometimes Hf relative to the CL bright rims. Microprobe data and x-ray chemical mapping of various zoned zircons suggest that U and Y with sometimes Hf have a negative correlation to the CL brightness, while Th doesn't exhibit any significant correlation.

  6. Greenstone-hosted lode-gold mineralization at Dungash mine, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoheir, Basem; Weihed, Pär

    2014-11-01

    The auriferous quartz ± carbonate veins at Dungash mine, central Eastern Desert of Egypt, are confined to ∼E-trending dilation zones within variably foliated/sheared metavolcanic/volcaniclastic rocks. The vein morphology and internal structures demonstrate formation concurrent with a dextral shear system. The latter is attributed to flexural displacement of folded, heterogeneous rock blocks through transpression increment, late in the Neoproterozoic deformation history of the area. Geochemistry of the host metavolcanic/metavolcaniclastic rocks from the mine area suggests derivation from a low-K, calc-alkaline magma in a subduction-related, volcanic arc setting. In addition, chemistry of disseminated Cr-spinels further constrain on the back-arc basin setting and low-grade metamorphism, typical of gold-hosting greenstone belts elsewhere. Mineralogy of the mineralized veins includes an early assemblage of arsenopyrite-As-pyrite-gersdorffite ± pyrrhotite, a transitional pyrite-Sb-arsenopyrite ± gersdorffite assemblage, and a late tetrahedrite-chalcopyrite-sphalerite-galena-gold assemblage. Based on arsenopyrite and chlorite geothermometers, formation of gold-sulfide mineralization occurred between ∼365 and 280 °C. LA-ICP-MS measurements indicate the presence of refractory Au in arsenian pyrite (up to 53 ppm) and Sb-bearing arsenopyrite (up to 974 ppm). Abundant free-milling gold associated with the late sulfide assemblage may have been mobilized and re-distributed by circulating, lower temperature ore fluids in the waning stages of the hydrothermal system. Based on the isotopic values of vein quartz and carbonate, the calculated average δ18OH2O values of the ore fluids are 5.0 ± 1.4‰ SMOW for quartz, and 3.3 ± 1.4‰ for vein carbonate. The measured carbonate δ13C values correspond to ore fluids with δ13CCO2 = -6.7 ± 0.7‰ PDB. These results suggest a mainly metamorphic source for ore fluids, in good agreement with the vein morphology, textures and hydrothermal alteration. The calculated δ34SH2S values for early, transitional, and late sulfide assemblages define three distinct ranges (∼1.5-3.6‰), (∼0.4-1.0‰), and (-3.7‰ to -1.9‰), respectively. The systematic evolution towards lighter δ34S values may be attributed to recrystallization, or to ore fluid buffering under variable physicochemical conditions. The shear zone-related setting, mineralogy and isotopic characteristics of gold mineralization in Dungash mine are comparable with other orogenic gold deposits in the region (e.g., Barramiya deposit), which may suggest a regional setting controlling gold metallogeny of the region. This setting should guide future exploration programs in the central Eastern Desert province.

  7. Medium-to high-pressure garnet-amphibolites from Gebel Zabara and Wadi Sikait, south Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surour, Adel A.

    1995-10-01

    Garnet-amphibolites from Gebel Zabara and Wadi Sikait in the southern Eastern Desert of Egypt occur as highly flattened metamorphosed basic volcanic bands enclosed within garnetiferous metasediments. Samples from both localities have almost the same metamorphic assemblage of garnet-amphibole-plagioclase-ilmeniterutile. An electron microprobe study indicates that garnet, amphibole and plagioclase are cryptically zoned only in samples from Wadi Sikait. The composition of amphiboles (tschermakitic hornblende to tschermakite) reflects a temperature range equivalent to that of the staurolite-kyanite zone of the metapelitic sequences. Geothermometric calculations of the pairs garnet-amphibole and amphibole-plagioclase indicate average temperatures of 550C for samples from Wadi Sikait and Gebel Zabara, respectively. Pressures of about 6.8 kbar and 7.7 kbar are obtained using some mineral equilibria of both silicates and opaque phases. The garnet-amphibolites are considered as a part of the infrastructural suite in the Eastern Desert. A comparison with the Pan-African amphibolites from the Eastern Desert and Sinai is presented.

  8. Diagenesis of the lower Eocene Thebes Formation, Gebel Rewagen area, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaaban, Mohamad N.

    2004-03-01

    The diagenesis of lower Eocene shallow water carbonates with flint was studied in the Gebel Rewagen area, Eastern Desert, Egypt. The carbonates are mainly wackestones to packstones with benthic bioclasts embedded in a dark red luminescent micrite matrix. The studied succession displays a complex diagenetic history that involves syngenetic and late diagenetic processes. Silica, which exists either as persistent bands, nodules and/or silicified benthic bioclasts shows a distinctive pattern regarding its distribution, source, depositional environments and timing. Three lines of evidence support a syngenetic origin of the chert bands: (1) they alternate in a cyclic manner within the host carbonates and (2) they exhibit noticeable lateral persistence throughout the investigated area following the strata boundaries and (3) there is a lack of any carbonate dissolution in limestone adjacent to chert bands. The deposition of silica bands in association with shallow water carbonates is possibly related to eustatic sea-level changes, which were accompanied by episodic variations in silica and carbonate productivities. With a relative sea-level fall and the establishment of a lowstand period at the end of the early Eocene, a basinward shift of the groundwater zones is expected within the carbonate platform. During this period some late diagenetic processes took place, which involve: (1) the formation of siliceous and carbonate concretionary growths, (2) partial silicification of bioclasts, (3) neomorphic stabilization of the CaCO 3 bioclasts and (4) the formation of equant calcite cement. Siliceous and carbonate concretions are believed to have taken place within microenvironments created and controlled by sulphate-reducing bacteria and physico-chemical and kinetic factors near a marine-meteoric water mixing zone. This is inferred from the distribution of iron sulphides, the non-ferroan nature of all concretions and the depleted δ13C (-5.4‰ to -6.0‰ PDB) and δ18O (-5.8‰ to -6.8‰ PDB) values of the carbonate concretions. The silica fabrics of all the partly silicified benthic bioclasts, with abundant pyrite cubes, argue for a delayed silicification process within the sulphate reduction zone. The close and relatively depleted δ18O values of the low-Mg calcite micrite matrix (-3.0‰ to -4.4‰ PDB) and benthic bioclasts (-3.4‰ to -4.8‰ PDB) indicate that both matrix and bioclasts have probably suffered neomorphic stabilization from freshwater-dominated solutions. The initial marine δ13C values of both low-Mg calcite matrix (+0.2‰ to -2.2‰ PDB) and altered benthic bioclasts (-0.2‰ to -0.9‰ PDB) are retained and not affected by diagenesis. The luminescence character and the extremely depleted oxygen values (-8.3‰ to -10.1‰ PDB) of the equant void-filling calcite mosaics are consistent with their formation within a meteoric phreatic realm.

  9. Origin of tourmaline in the metamorphosed Sikait pelitic belt, south Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harraz, H. Z.; El-Sharkawy, M. F.

    2001-08-01

    A Neoproterozoic metapelitic schist belt at the Sikait area of the south Eastern Desert is a favourable environment for localisation of tourmaline mineralisation in the Pan-African Belt in Egypt. Local concentrations of tourmaline in the Sikait area are closely associated with stratiform metapelitic schists. They are confined to the Nugrus shear zone, along which various leucocratic rocks (leucogranite, pegmatite, aplite) are syntectonically emplaced with various stages of hydrothermal quartz veins. Tourmaline occurs either as disseminated isolated clusters of crystals or as discontinuous tourmalinite bands within the metapelitic rocks, pegmatites and quartz veins. Four types of tourmaline-rich rocks were distinguished: (i) fine-grained tourmaline-rich rocks, which are associated with the biotite schist along contacts with gneissose granites (TR1); (ii) tourmaline-rich rocks, associated with the metapelitic and amphibolitic closely to Nugrus thrust zones (TR2); (iii) tourmaline-rich rocks, associated with the pelitic hornfels at the contact between metapelitic schist and leucogranite (TR3); and (iv) tourmaline-rich rocks and quartz veins, associated with chlorite-graphite schist in contact aureoles with leucogranite and pegmatite veins (TR4). Microprobe analyses revealed that tourmalines are Al saturated for the given Fe/Mg alkali-deficient group tourmaline with minor X-site vacancy and substitution of Ca for Na. Tourmalines belong to the schorl-dravite solid solution series and have a wide compositional range, from nearly end member dravite for TR3 tourmalines to schorl for TR4 tourmalines; TR1 and TR2 tourmalines have intermediate compositions. The Fe/(Fe + Mg) varies between 0.02 and 0.89. Variation in composition of Al-rich tourmalines is essentially caused by variations in Mg, Fe, Na, Ca and Ti. The whole rock chemical analyses of tourmaline-rich rocks closely resemble the trends observed for metapelitic schist and leucocratic rock and reflect mixing between phyllosilicate-rich and quartz-rich end members, which indicates that tourmaline-rich rocks do not contain a significant detrital component. Chondrite-normalised patterns of rare earth elements (REE) in tourmaline-rich rocks and quartz-rich tourmalines are similar to those of the surrounding unaltered metapelitic schists and leucocratic rocks, respectively. Minor depletions of LREE and local negative Ce anomalies characterise the chondrite-normalised REE pattern of TR1 tourmaline-rich rocks, suggesting its formation in the presence of seawater-derived fluids. However, TR4 types are characterised by low content ΣREE, such as that of leucocratic rocks. Thus, the geochemical data imply relative immobility of Al, Ti, Cr and HREE during hydrothermal alteration and later metamorphism. The different tourmaline varieties and their respective compositions are interpreted in terms of multistage evolution. Formation of the TR1 tourmaline-rich rocks probably was the net result of several processes, including direct precipitation from B-rich hydrothermal fluids or colloids, early diagenetic reactions of biotite-pelitic sediments with these fluids and subsequent recrystallisation during late regional deformation and metamorphism to give TR2 tourmaline-rich rocks. The TR3 tourmaline-rich rocks mainly developed by the thermal metamorphic recrystallisation of TR1. Tourmaline-rich rocks and veins adjacent to leucogranite and pegmatite veins (TR4) are the result of B-metasomatism; the primary B having been recycled from tourmalinites during regional metamorphism and magmatism.

  10. Determination of chromium and trace elements in El-Rubshi chromite from Eastern Desert, Egypt by neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    El-Taher, A

    2010-09-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) is one of the most powerful analytical techniques for multielement determination of rocks. In the present work NAA and HPGe detector gamma-spectroscopy was used to determine chromium and 15 minor and trace elements qualitatively and quantitatively from chromite rock samples collected from El-Robshi area in the Eastern Desert, Egypt. The samples were properly prepared together with their standards and simultaneously irradiated by thermal neutrons at the TRIGA Mainz research reactor. Short time irradiation (1-5min) was used to determine Mg, Ti and Mn. Long time irradiation (6h) was used to determine Na, Ga, As, La, Sc, Cr, Fe, Co, Zn, Zr, Ce, Ce, Yb, Lu, Hf and Ta. In El-Robshi chromite comprises 18 sites, more than 100 lenses of massive chromite, more than 2700 tons averaging 44% Cr(2)O(3) and the average of (51)Cr 40.2%. PMID:20444611

  11. Estimating and interpretation of radioactive heat production using airborne gamma-ray survey data of Gabal Arrubushi area, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, Mohamed A. S.

    2016-02-01

    The present work deals with mapping of radioactive heat production from rocks in the Gabal Arrubushi area in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt based on airborne spectral gamma-ray survey data. The results show that the radioactive heat production in the areas ranges from 0.01 μWm-3 to 5.2 μWm-3. Granites, muscovite and sericite schists in the western part of Gabal Arrubushi area have abnormally high radioactive heat production values from 2.57 μWm-3 to 4.44 μWm-3. Meanwhile, the higher averages of radioactive heat production of these rock units change from 1.21 μWm-3 to 1.5 μWm-3. The intermediate averages of heat production of felsitic mylonite schist, chlorite schist, felsites, amphibolites and Hammamat sediments are below the crustal average value range, i.e., from 0.8 μWm-3 to 1.2 μWm-3. The lowest averages of heat production values are less than 0.8 μWm-3 and found in the following rock units: Wadi sediments, rhyolites, andesites, gabbro and serpentinites.

  12. Petrology and petrogenesis of the older and younger granitoids of Wadi Beizah area, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragab, A. I.; Menesy, M. Y.; Diab, M. M.

    The studied granitoids of Wadi Beizah area, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt, are represented by older arc-granitoids intruded by a post-collisional stock of younger pink granite. The arc-granitoids (I-type) cover a wide compositional spectrum from meladiorites, diorites, quartzdiorites/monzodiorites and tonalites, to leucogranodiorites. Their distribution pattern is unimodal dominated by diorites. They are of low-K calc-alkaline character and represent the plutonic rocks of the mature, ensimatic island arc stage. Three models for the geotectonic environment of the younger granites of the Eastern Desert of Egypt have been suggested: (1) Within-plate, rifting, tensional environment similar to the Oslo Rift of Norway (Greenberg, 1981) Stern et al., 1984, 1986), (2) Extensive crustal anatexis during collisional tectonics, compression, thickening of the crust and thrust imbrication (Hussein et al., 1982; Ragab, 1987b), (3) Active continental margin geotectonic environment (Abdel-Rahman and Martin, 1987). These three models are discussed in detail. The present workers believe that the Younger Granites in general are the products of extensive crustal anatexis at the culmination of the Pan-African orogenic cycle when arc-arc suturing is complete. Recent studies revealed a low-angle thrust event in the Central Eastern Desert followed the initial arc-arc collision and continued after the deposition of the molasse-type sediments (Ries et al., 1983; El-Ramly et al., 1984; Greiling et al., 1984; Habib et al., 1985; Greiling and El-Ramly, 1985) which indicate thickening of the crust and compression regime at the time of emplacement of the Younger Granites. The dominance of ≪granite minimum≫ composition of these late orogenic granites suggests extensive crustal anatexis. Their low Nb-content (< 40 ppm) precludes within-plate hot-spot related magma, in comparison with: (1) The post-Pan-African (400-100 M.a.) granitic rocks from the NE Sudan which on a geochemical evidence are the products of within-continental plate ≪hot-spot≫ magmatism with Nb-content of about 50-300 ppm (Gass, 1979); (2) The Oslo Rift within-plate granites with Nb-content of 226 ppm (Pearce et al., 1984). A post-collision model showing the formation of the ≪petrotectonic assemblage≫ of this stage (molasse-type sediments deposited in fault-bounded troughs, and calc-alkaline bimodal intermediate and felsic magmas) as well as the heat sources in the geotectonic environment of thrust imbrication and the mode of formation of the Younger Granites by crustal anatexis is suggested. K/Ar dating of a younger granite sample gave an age of 584 ± 5 M.a. which is compatible with several similar ages of younger pink granites in the Eastern Desert of Egypt. An older granite sample gave an age of 591 ± 7 M.a. (K/Ar method) indicating resetting of its isotopic clocks probably as a result of the extensive crustal anatexis event.

  13. Ground-water quality and geochemistry, Carson Desert, western Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lico, Michael S.; Seiler, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    Aquifers in the Carson Desert are the primary source of drinking water, which is highly variable in chemical composition. In the shallow basin-fill aquifers, water chemistyr varies from a dilute calcium bicarbonate-dominated water beneath the irrigated areas to a saline sodium chloride- dominated water beneath unirrigated areas. Water samples from the shallow aquifers commonly have dissolved solids, chloride, magnesium, sulfate, arsenic, and manganese concentrations that exceed State of Nevada drinking-water standards. Water in the intermediante basin-fill aquifers is a dilute sodium bicarbonate type in the Fallon area and a distinctly more saline sodium chloride type in the Soda Lake-Upsal Hogback area. Dissolved solids, chloride, arsenic, fluoride, and manganese concen- trations commonly exceed drinking-water standards. The basalt aquifer contains a dilute sodium bicarbonate chloride water. Arsenic concentrations exceed standards in all sampled wells. The concen- trations of major constituents in ground water beneath the southern Carson Desert are the result of evapotranspiration and natural geochemical reactions with minerals derived mostly from igneous rocks. Water with higher concentrations of iron and manganese is near thermodynamic equilibrium with siderite and rhodochrosite and indicates that these elements may be limited by the solubility of their respective carbonate minerals. Naturally occurring radionuclides (uranium and radon-222) are present in ground water from the Carson Desert in concen- tratons higher than proposed drinking-water standards. High uranium concentrations in the shallow aquifers may be caused by evaporative concentration and the release of uranium during dissolution of iron and manganese oxides or the oxidation of sedimentary organic matter that typically has elevated uranium concentrations. Ground water in the Carson Desert does not appear to have be contaminated by synthetic organic chemicals.

  14. Extending the western North American Proterozoic and Paleozoic continental crust through the Mojave Desert

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, M.W.; Walker, J.D. )

    1992-08-01

    Data supporting the existence of Proterozoic basement in the central and western Mojave Desert include U-Pb zircon geochronology and Nd, Sr, and Pb isotopic values of quartzofeldspathic gneisses, detrital zircon provenance ages, and the presence of basement clasts in Paleozoic and Mesozoic conglomerates. These data corroborate existing isotopic data from Mesozoic and Tertiary intrusive rocks that suggest involvement of Proterozoic crust in their genesis. Exposures of Proterozoic basement and Late Proterozoic and Paleozoic transitional miogeoclinal-cratonal facies trends in the central and western Mojave Desert consistently imply that cratonal North America continues westward uninterrupted through this region to the San Andreas fault. These data place geographic limits on the position of several pre-Tertiary tectonic elements speculated to exist in the Mojave Desert.

  15. On trondhjemite pebbles from the late Pan-African Um Had conglomerate, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bouseily, Ahmed M.

    This paper deals with the petrography and geochemistry of granitic pebbles from the late Pan-African Um Had conglomerate, in eastern Egypt. The analyzed samples show consistently high SiO 2 (69.16-74.47%) and Na 2O (3.05-7.1%), low K 2O (0.88-2.57%), CaO (0.43-2.66%) and FeO ∗ + MgO (1.55-7.35%). Al 2O 3 is in most cases less than 15%. These major element characteristics would class the rock type of the pebbles as low-Al 2O 3 trondhjemite similar to that of SW Finland. Compared to average chemical compositions of different basement rock units in eastern Egypt, the analyzed pebbles are similar to some members of the Older Granites. Both are characteristically low in their LIL-element contents. Therefore, Older Granites are probably the main source for the clast assemblages of the Um Had conglomerate. A magmatic origin is proposed for the Older Granites, their Na-enrichment and K-depletion being interpreted as primary features inherited from a basaltic parent source. This is also indicated by the unusually high mean abundances of Cr (106 ppm) and Ni (61 ppm) in the analyzed pebbles. The spatial relationship between metavolcanics and granitic rocks in eastern Egypt may imply that they are linked to a common origin in the lower crust or upper mantle. The model proposed here for the granitic rocks is one in which at least some members of the Na-rich granites (Older Granites) were formed by partial melting of the Older Metavolcanics via trondhjemite trends. Remelting of the sodic granites and their extrusive equivalents gave rise to potassic granites (Younger Granites) via calc-alkaline trends in later Precambrian times. However, data on REE contents in Egyptian granites are needed to fully characterize the paleotectonic setting.

  16. Desert landforms of southwest Egypt: A basis for comparison with Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Baz, F. (Editor); Maxwell, T. A. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    Geologic interpretations of The Gilf Kebir-Uweinat of Apollo-Soyuz photographs were verified. The photographs and LANDSAT images showed features reminiscent of those depicted by Mariner and Viking missions to Mars. These features were to better understand their morphologic analogs on Mars. It is indicated that climate change played a significant role in the formation of the eastern Sahara. It is also revealed that correlations between the eolian features in southwestern Egypt and the wind blown patterns on the surface of Mars result in a better understanding of eolian activity on both planets.

  17. Natural radionuclide concentrations in granite rocks in Aswan and Central-Southern Eastern Desert, Egypt and their radiological implications.

    PubMed

    Issa, Shams A M; Uosif, M A M; Abd el-Salam, L M

    2012-07-01

    Different types of granites, used extensively in local construction, were collected from five localities in Egypt, namely: Abu Ziran (Central Eastern Desert), Gabal El Maesala (Aswan) and three areas from Wadi Allaqi, (Gabal Abu Marw, Gabal Haumor and Gabal um Shalman), in the South Eastern Desert. Granite samples were studied radiologically, petrographically and geochemically. The contents of natural radionuclides ((226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K) were measured in investigated samples by using gamma spectrometry [NaI (Tl) 3'×3']. The activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in the selected granite samples ranged from 9±0.5 to 111±7, 8±1 to 75±4 and 100±6 to 790±40 Bq kg(-1), respectively. The external hazard index (H(ex)), absorbed dose and annual effective dose rate were evaluated to assess the radiation hazard for people living in dwellings made of the materials studied. The calculated radium equivalents were lower than the values recommended for construction materials (370 Bq kg(-1)). The excess lifetime cancer risks were also calculated. Petrographically, the granites studied are varied in the form of potash-feldspar, quartz, plagioclase, mica and hornblende. The accessory minerals are zircon, apatite and allanite. Geochemically, the chemical composition of the granite is studied especially for major oxides. They are characterized to have SiO(2), K(2)O, Na(2)O and Al(2)O(3) with depletion in CaO, MgO, TiO(2) and P(2)O(5). PMID:22147926

  18. Mapping of Gold Mineralization Alteration Zones in Central Eastern Desert Egypt using Spectral Angular Mapper and Aeromagnetic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, E.; Fagin, T.; El Alfy, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Central Eastern Desert (CED), Egypt has long history of gold exploration and exploitation. In this study, we integrated Spectral Angular Mapper (SAM) technique and aeromagnetic data to map the gold mineralization associated within alteration zones in CED. The spectral reflectance curves of five main alteration minerals (Hematite, Illite, Kaolinite, Chlorite, and Quartz) were utilized as end members in the SAM supervised classification of ETM+ data. Each alteration mineral type was represented as a binary image that overlaid together to obtain single primary alteration map in CED. The possible pathways for the alteration migration was defined based on the subsurface and surface lineation features. For the subsurface lineation, Euler deconvolution filter was applied on the aeromagnetic data to locate the deep-seated faults. The surface lineation and shear zones were extracted from ETM+ data and used together with the subsurface lineation map to obtain a structural map. Layer intersection and fuzzy membership operation were applied for the entire datasets to identify the possible sites of alteration zones. Several GPS readings were taken from the field areas around the gold mine sites, and used as validation points for our primary results.

  19. Groundwater quality and management in arid and semi-arid regions: Case study, Central Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amer, Reda; Ripperdan, Robert; Wang, Tao; Encarnación, John

    2012-07-01

    This study presents a model budget for groundwater in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt. The stable isotopic composition and hydrochemistry of groundwater samples collected from different aquifers were determined to identify recharge sources and water quality. Stable isotopic values suggest that shallow alluvial and fracture zone aquifers are recharged from seasonal precipitation, while groundwater in deeper sedimentary sub-basins is paleowater that was recharged during periods of less arid regional climate. Hydrochemical analysis indicates elevated salinity in each aquifer type, which is attributed to leaching and dissolution of terrestrial salts and to mixing with marine water. Groundwater from sedimentary sub-basin aquifers can be treated and used for drinking and domestic purposes. Groundwater from shallow alluvial and fracture zone wells is suitable for animal husbandry and mineral ore dressing. A model water budget shows that approximately 4.8 × 109 m3 of recoverable groundwater is stored in sedimentary sub-basin aquifers, or approximately 550 years of water at present utilization rates.

  20. North-South Partnership in Space Research and Application: Space Research Center at Minufiyia University, Egypt, as Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaltout, M.

    With the starting the year 2002 the Minufiyia University Council taked an Issue by construction Space Research Center, as a first Center for Space Research in the Egyptian Universities (20 Universities), as a part from the Desert Environment Research Institute for temporal time, then after the growth, it will be independent center. The green area of Egypt (Nile Valley and Delta) are 4% only from the total area of Egypt, the remain 96% is desert area. The most useful thing is to study the desert from space. For that the suggested projects to be performed in this new center are: 1.Monitoring the storage tanks of the underground water in the Egyptian Desert (Sahara) by artificial satellites as GRACE of NASA and DLR. 2.Building 32 meter Radio telescope at Abu-Simbel in the South of Egypt as part of the European VLBI network (EVN) to cover the gab between the radio telescope in the western Europe and the radio telescope at Hartebessthock in South Africa. The cooperation of International interested institutions is being explored for this important project of Egypt. 3.Solar activity and the climatic changes through the 21st century as clarified by global solar radiation data at Khargha Oases at the western desert of Egypt. 4.Testing of the Martian exploration instruments for 2003 and 2005 space trips to Mars in the western desert of Egypt, as it is the driest area in the worl d, where are similarity between the dry atmosphere of Sahara and the atmosphere of Mars, also in the soil, and dry valleys. In collaboration with NASA and ESA. 5.Studding the eastern structure, due to meteoric impact in the western desert of Egypt since 28 Million years. Also, studding the meteors chemistry, for meteors found in the Egyptian desert, and the origin of life as meteor (Nachlet) in collaboration with NASA and ESA. Solar energy and humidity distribution over Sahara from artificial Satellite Meteostat observations.

  1. The way forward in capacity building in developing countries: space research center at Minoufiyia University, Egypt, as case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosalam Shaltout, M. A.

    With the starting the year 2002 the Menoufiyia University Council taked an Issue by construction Space Research Center, as a first Center for Space Research in the Egyptian Universities (20 Universities), as a part from the Desert Environment Research Institute for temporal time, then after the growth, it will be independent center. The green area of Egypt (Nile Valley and Delta) are 4% only from the total area of Egypt, the remain 96% is desert area. The most useful thing is to study the desert from space. For that the suggested projects to be performed in this new center are: 1. Monitoring the storage tanks of the underground water in the Egyptian Desert (Sahara) by artificial satellites as GRACE of NASA and DLR. 2. Building 32 meter Radio telescope at Abu-Simbel in the South of Egypt as part of the European VLBI network (EVN) to cover the gab between the radio telescope in the western Europe and the radio telescope at Hartebessthock in South Africa. The cooperation of International interested institutions is being explored for this important project of Egypt. 3. Solar activity and the climatic changes through the 21st century as clarified by global solar radiation data at Khargha Oases at the western desert of Egypt. 4. Testing of the Martian exploration instruments for 2005 space trips to Mars in the western desert of Egypt, as it is the driest area in the world, where are similarity between the dry atmosphere of Sahara and the atmosphere of Mars, also in the soil, and dry valleys. In collaboration with NASA and ESA. 5. Studding the eastern structure, due to meteoric impact in the western desert of Egypt since 28 Million years. Also, studding the meteors chemistry, for meteors found in the Egyptian desert, and the origin of life as meteor (Nachlet) in collaboration with NASA and ESA. 6. Solar energy and humidity distribution over Sahara from artificial Satellite Meteostat observations.

  2. Seismic hazard studies in Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Abuo El-Ela A.; El-Hadidy, M.; Deif, A.; Abou Elenean, K.

    2012-12-01

    The study of earthquake activity and seismic hazard assessment of Egypt is very important due to the great and rapid spreading of large investments in national projects, especially the nuclear power plant that will be held in the northern part of Egypt. Although Egypt is characterized by low seismicity, it has experienced occurring of damaging earthquake effect through its history. The seismotectonic sitting of Egypt suggests that large earthquakes are possible particularly along the Gulf of Aqaba-Dead Sea transform, the Subduction zone along the Hellenic and Cyprean Arcs, and the Northern Red Sea triple junction point. In addition some inland significant sources at Aswan, Dahshour, and Cairo-Suez District should be considered. The seismic hazard for Egypt is calculated utilizing a probabilistic approach (for a grid of 0.5 0.5) within a logic-tree framework. Alternative seismogenic models and ground motion scaling relationships are selected to account for the epistemic uncertainty. Seismic hazard values on rock were calculated to create contour maps for four ground motion spectral periods and for different return periods. In addition, the uniform hazard spectra for rock sites for different 25 periods, and the probabilistic hazard curves for Cairo, and Alexandria cities are graphed. The peak ground acceleration (PGA) values were found close to the Gulf of Aqaba and it was about 220 gal for 475 year return period. While the lowest (PGA) values were detected in the western part of the western desert and it is less than 25 gal.

  3. Heat production rate from radioactive elements in igneous and metamorphic rocks in Eastern Desert, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abbady, Adel G E; El-Arabi, A M; Abbady, A

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive heat-production data of Igneous and Metamorphic outcrops in the Eastern Desert are presented. Samples were analysed using a low level gamma-ray spectrometer (HPGe) in the laboratory. A total of 205 rock samples were investigated, covering all major rock types of the area. The heat-production rate of igneous rocks ranges from 0.11 (basalt) to 9.53 microWm(-3) (granite). In metamorphic rocks it varies from 0.28 (serpentinite ) to 0.91 microWm(-3) (metagabbro). The contribution due to U is about 51%, as that from Th is 31% and 18% from K. The corresponding values in igneous rocks are 76%, 19% and 5%, respectively. The calculated values showed good agreement with global values except in some areas containing granites. PMID:16120480

  4. Late Carboniferous macrofauna from Wadi Araba, Eastern Desert, Egypt, and their paleoecological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Shazly, Soheir H.

    2011-12-01

    The Upper Carboniferous rocks at Wadi Araba are highly rich in macrofaunal content. The systematic description of these macrofauna reveals the identification of 34 species, 17 species of which are recorded for the first time from the Carboniferous rocks of Egypt, among them the trilobite Cummingella ( C.) carringtonensis carringtonensis (Etheridge). Moreover, the paleoeclogic study on some crinoid and brachiopod specimens shows predation and commensal relations with some endo and epibionts fauna. The study presents also crinoidal infestation by Oxytoma ( Palmoxytoma) cygnipes (Young and Bird) species, a relation which is recorded for the first time. Evidences of crushing or biting damages on some brachiopod shells that have been attributed to nautiloids or conchostracan arthropods are also reported. The microfacies study of the carbonate rocks in this area reveals the identification of five microfacies types indicating that the rocks were deposited in an environment ranging from restricted inner to outer shelf lagoonal environments with open circulation. The microfacies study indicates also the presence of two types of microorganisms, the filamentous microorganisms and the fossilized microbial carbonate communities, which played an important role in iron oxide precipitation and rock diagenesis.

  5. Geochemical and K Ar age constraints on the Late Neoproterozoic (?) gneisses at Um Tenassib area, north Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliwa, Hassan A.

    2007-05-01

    Wadi Um Tenassib metamorphic rocks consist mainly of biotite gneiss and biotite-hornblende gneiss with subordinate intercalations of amphibolite, migmatitic gneiss, and aplitic granite. Biotite-hornblende gneiss, biotite gneiss, and aplitic granite are geochemically characterized and their cooling ages are determined by using the K-Ar method on biotite. The Um Tenassib gneisses (UTG) range in composition from quartz diorite/monzodiorite to granodiorite. They were derived from igneous rocks that pertain to calc alkaline and metaluminous to weakly peraluminous affinities and were generated in continental volcanic arc setting. REE patterns of the UTG are moderately fractionated (La N/Lu N = 5.9-7.5) relative to those of the aplitic granite (La N/Lu N = 33). The similarity in the geochemical characteristics and REE patterns of both gneiss types indicate their magmatic consanguinity. Amphiboles of the UTG biotite-hornblende gneisses are mainly hornblende, together with few paragasitic hornblende and edenite. Plagioclase composition is oligoclase to andesine (An 21-46) in the biotite-hornblende gneiss, and oligoclase (An 11-26) in the biotite gneiss. Mineral chemistry of amphibole and plagioclase indicate that the gneisses were metamorphosed under low- to medium-pressure of 2.6-6.4 kbar and at medium to high temperatures of 660-755 °C. The K-Ar biotite cooling ages (seven samples) range from 585 ± 12 Ma to 598 ± 12 Ma for the UTG, except one biotite-hornblende gneiss sample gives age of 577 ± 11 Ma. These ages suggest a latest metamorphic cooling event at ca. 585-600 Ma time span, which is consistent with the proposed cooling ages of ˜600 Ma for the Elat metamorphic rocks [Cosca, M.A., Shimron, A., Caby, R., 1999. Late Precambrian metamorphism and cooling in the Arabian-Nubian Shield: petrology and 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology of metamorphic rocks of the Elat area (southern Israel). Precamb. Res. 98, 107-127]. It may indicate that the metamorphism of the UTG might have been contemporaneous with the suggested regional metamorphism at 620 ± 10 Ma for Sinai metamorphic rocks (Cosca et al., 1999) and/or the emplacement age at 614 Ma for the granodiorite in the study area [Stern, R.J., Hedge, C.E., 1985. Geochronological and isotopic constraints on the Late Precambrian crustal evolution in the Eastern Desert of Egypt. Am. J. Sci. 285, 97-127]. These ages also lie within the range of magmatic activity of the Younger Granites in the North Eastern Desert (575-600 Ma).

  6. Construction of a hydrologic model for estimating Wadi runoff and ground water recharge in the Eastern Desert, Egypt.

    SciTech Connect

    Gheith, H.; Sultan, M.; Environmental Research

    2002-06-10

    We constructed a hydrologic model to estimate the groundwater recharge rate for alluvial aquifers of the Eastern Desert from sporadic precipitation over the Red Sea hills. To estimate initial losses over sub-basins, transmission losses through channel routing, and downstream runoff, we developed an integrated model combining spatial rainfall distribution, an appropriate basin unit hydrograph, and appropriate infiltration parameters. Watersheds and stream networks identified from digital terrain elevation data were verified by comparison with co-registered Landsat thematic mapper scenes and geologic maps. Records of a November 1994 storm event acquired from rain gauges along the Nile River and the Red Sea shore were used to generate a spatial precipitation distribution for the study area. A 2 hour design hyetograph was adopted from rain gauge data for the 1994 flood event. The model was tested against records from the November 1994 flood event at the outlets of the Tarfa and Hammamat watersheds. Groundwater recharge rates were estimated for the alluvial aquifers within the major watersheds of the north Eastern Desert. We estimated that during the 1994 flood event, the ground water recharge through transmission losses ranged from 21 to 31% (Tarfa: 15.8 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3}; Asyuti: 20 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3}, Qena: 49 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3}, Hammamat: 59 x10{sup 6} m{sup 3}) of the precipitated volume. The initial losses ranged from 65 to 77%. Only 3-7% of the precipitation reached the watershed outlets. Archival data show that rainfall events of the size of the November 1994 storm or larger occur every 40 months; thus, the annual recharge rates for the Tarfa, Asyuti, Qena, and Hammamat alluvial aquifers are estimated at 4.7 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3}, 6 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3}, 14.7 x 10{sup 6} m{sup 3}, and 17.7 x10{sup 6} m{sup 3}, respectively. Implications for the use of these renewable ground waters and similar water resources in other arid areas of Egypt and in neighboring countries are clear.

  7. Integration of geophysical and geological data for delimitation of mineralized zones in Um Naggat area, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaafar, Ibrahim

    2015-06-01

    An integrated approach for geophysical, geological and mineralogical data was followed for Um Naggat area, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt, in order to delineate its mineralized zones. The albitized granites are well-defined on the Th- and U-channel images, by their anomalous shapes, reaching 150 ppm and 90 ppm respectively, beside low K content. Interpretations of the aeromagnetic maps delineated four regional structural trends oriented due NNW, NW, ENE and E-W directions. They are identified as strike-slip faults, which coincide well with field observations, where NW-trending faults cut and displace right laterally ENE-trending older ones. The interaction between these two strike-slip fault systems confining the albite granite is easily identified on the regional data presenting longer wavelength anomalies, implying deep-seated structures. They could represent potential pathways for migration of enriched mineralized fluids. Geochemically, albite granites of peraluminous characteristics that had suffered extensive post-magmatic metasomatic reworking, resulted into development of (Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta, U, Th, Sn) and albite-enriched and greisenized granite body of about 600 m thick, and more than 3 km in strike length. The albite granite is characterized by sharp increase in average rare metal content: Zr (830 ppm), Hf (51 ppm), Nb (340 ppm), Ta (44 ppm), and U (90 ppm). Thorite, uranothorite, uraninite and zircon are the main uranium-bearing minerals of magmatic origin within the enclosing granite. However, with respect to Zr, Nb, and Ta, the albitized granite can be categorized as rare metal granite. The integration of airborne geophysical (magnetic and γ-ray spectrometric), geological, geochemical and mineralogical data succeeded in assigning the albite granite of Um Naggat pluton as a mineralized zone. This zone is characterized by its high thorium and uranium of hydrothermal origin as indicated by its low Th/U ratio, with rare metals mineralization controlled by two main structural trends in the NW- and ENE-directions.

  8. Remote sensing detection of gold related alteration zones in Um Rus area, Central Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amer, Reda; Kusky, Timothy; El Mezayen, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) images covering the Um Rus area in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt were evaluated for mapping geologic structure, lithology, and gold-related alteration zones. The study area is covered by Pan-African basement rocks including gabbro and granodiorite intruded into a variable mixture of metavolcanics and metasediments. The first three principal component analyses (PCA1, PCA2, PCA3) in a Red-Green-Blue (RGB) of the visible through shortwave-infrared (VNIR + SWIR) ASTER bands enabled the discrimination between lithological units. The results show that ASTER band ratios ((2 + 4)/3, (5 + 7)/6, (7 + 9)/8) in RGB identifies the lithological units and discriminates the granodiorite very well from the adjacent rock units.The granodiorites are dissected by gold-bearing quartz veins surrounded by alteration zones. The microscopic examination of samples collected from the alteration zones shows sericitic and argillic alteration zones. The Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) and Spectral Information Divergence (SID) supervised classification methods were applied using the reference spectra of the USGS spectral library. The results show that these classification methods are capable of mapping the alteration zones as indicated by field verification work. The PALSAR image was enhanced for fracture mapping using the second moment co-occurrence filter. Overlying extracted faults and alteration zone classification images show that the N30E and N-S fractures represent potential zones for gold exploration. It is concluded that the proposed methods can be used as a powerful tool for ore deposit exploration.

  9. Assessment study about using underground water for tilapia culture for the first time in El-Bahria Oasis Desert, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Hossam H; Ali, Fagr Kh; Kenawy, Amany M

    2008-01-01

    The present study was carried out in El-Bahria Oasis desert (Giza-Egypt) for 8 months (March-October) as a new study to assess the culture of tilapia spp. in underground well water. The obtained results showed a significant increase (P<0.01) in the values of plasma total protein, glucose, AST (aspartate aminotransferase), ALT (alanine aminotransferase), creatinine, uric acid, sodium, potassium and magnesium as well as a significant decrease (P<0.01) in plasma total lipids and calcium concentration. Furthermore, iron content in some selected vital organs was increased gradually with time, the studied organs are arranged according to their iron content in the following order: spleen > liver > kidney > gills > muscle. Remarkable changes were observed in the chemical muscle composition where the results showed a significant increase (P<0.01) in muscle water content, total lipids and ash. However, a significant decrease (P<0.01) in muscle total protein at the end of the study was observed. The growth of all male farmed tilapia in well water with a 3.2 mg/l iron concentration was unexpected; despite the presence of this high concentration of iron, the weight gain of cultured fish was 250 +/- 14.5 g. Molecular techniques are used nowadays as a good indicator for assessing the alteration in the genomes. RAPD-PCR technique indicated appearance of some changes in polymorphism band patterns. There also exists a distinct distance between the band patterns of cultured fish (T) and control fish (C). Histopathlogical sections showed pathological alterations in liver, kidney gills and spleen and the obtained results were discussed. PMID:19326732

  10. Full year cycle of desert dust spectral optical thickness and precipitable water vapor over Alexandria, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbah, I.; Ichoku, Charles; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Remer, Lorraine

    2001-08-01

    We study the annual cycle of dust loading in Alexandria, Egypt. Observations were performed from December 1997 to November 1998, including during the Kamaseen storms of March 1998. A ground-based, manual Sun photometer was used to measure aerosol optical thickness (τa) at four spectral bands in the 340-870 nm wavelength range (namely 340, 440, 675, 870). Total precipitable water vapor (W) was also measured simultaneously, based on the 936 nm channel measurements and extrapolations of the aerosol optical thickness from the neighboring 675 and 870 nm channels. Aerosol optical thickness τa at all the four spectral bands were very high (averaging 2.0-4.0) during the Kamaseen storms of late March 1998. Correspondingly, the Ångström wavelength exponent α of the optical thickness fell close to zero during that time, implying a substantial increase in dust. Overall, the monthly mean and median aerosol optical thickness were highest during January-May and lowest in June-October. During the January-May period total precipitable water vapor and Ångström exponent were lower than during the June-October period. There is a high correlation between the Ångström exponent and the optical thickness (r = 0.63), with a ranging from 0.0 to 0.5 for τa > 1.0, indicating high dust concentration. Trajectory analysis shows that the presence of dust was associated with air masses arriving predominantly from the Sahara or North Africa. No significant correlation was found between the optical thickness and the precipitable water vapor. These basic systematic observations are vital for assessing dust climatology in this important part of the world and also for validating satellite observations and dust transport models.

  11. 77 FR 26950 - Designation of Areas for Air Quality Planning Purposes; California; Western Mojave Desert Ozone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ...Under the Clean Air Act (CAA or Act), EPA is granting a request from the State of California to reclassify the Western Mojave Desert ozone nonattainment area from ``Moderate'' to ``Severe-15'' for the 1997 8-hour ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). EPA is also reclassifying Indian country under the jurisdiction of the Twenty-Nine Palms Band of Mission Indians of California......

  12. Chemical composition and tectonic setting of the Dokhan Volcanic Formation, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ressetar, R.; Monrad, J. R.

    The late Precambrian-Cambrian Dokhan Volcanic Formation represents the youngest component of the basement complex in the Egyptian Eastern Desert. Volcanic and sedimentary rocks predating the Dokhan Formation evolved in an oceanic island arc setting and were metamorphosed during the Pan-African event. The Dokhan rocks were subjected to low grade alteration during the waning stages of the Pan-African event. Post-dating the Dokhan Formation are terrestrial sediments and post-tectonic alkali-rich granites. Chemical analyses of the Dokhan volcanic rocks reveal a range of compositions from basaltic andesite to rhyolite (SiO 2 contents from 53 to 79 wt. %). Abundances of most other oxides and trace elements follow patterns similar to those seen in volcanic rocks in orogenic belts. However, certain elements diagnostic of tectonic setting for volcanic rocks (notably alkalis, Ti, Zr and Nb) are elevated in the Dokhan Formation with respect to worldwide averages of igneous rocks from active continental margins. These chemical characteristics are interpreted as reflecting genesis of the Dokhan lavas in a setting that was transitional toward a stable continental craton.

  13. Late Neoproterozoic Nuqara Dokhan Volcanics, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt: Geochemistery and petrogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Tharwat; Asran, Asran; Amron, Taha; Natflos, Theo

    2014-05-01

    The Nuqara volcanic is one of the northernmost outcrops of the Arabian-Nubian Shield Dokhan volcanics. The origin and tectonic setting of the late Neoproterozoic Dokhan volcanics (ca. 610-560 Ma) in the Egyptian Eastern Desert is highly debated. The debate concerns the tectonic setting where they formed during transition between convergent to extensional regime or after the East- and the West-Gondwana collision (~600Ma). In order to solve this problem, lavas from Nuqara area were studied geologically and geochemically. Nuqara Dokhan volcanics comprises two main rock suites: (a) an intermediate volcanic suite, consisting of basaltic andesite, andesite and their associated pyroclastics rocks; and (b) a felsic volcanic suite composed of dacite, rhyolite and ignimbrites. The two suites display well-defined major and trace element trends and continuum in composition with wide ranges in SiO2 (52-75.73%), CaO (9.19-0.22%), MgO (5.29-0.05%), Sr (1367-7.4 ppm), Zr (688.5-172.7 ppm), Cr (207-0.4 ppm), and Ni (94.3-0.2 ppm). The Nuqara Dokhan volcanics are characterized by strong enrichment in LILE relative to HFSE and affiliated to the calc-alkaline subducted - related magmatism. Geochemical Modeling displays that the evolution of these rocks was governed by fractional crystallization of plagioclase, amphiboles, pyroxene, magnetite and apatite in the intermediate varieties and plagioclase, amphibole, magnetite, apatite and zircon in the felsic varieties. The obtained mineral chemistry of these volcanics reveals: (a) Plagioclase range in composition from An55 to An40 in basaltic andesite and from An39 to An24 in andesite. (b) Alkali feldspars have sanidine composition. (c) Clinopyroxenes have augite composition. The low Al2O3 contents (1.94-5.588 wt %) indicate that clinopyroxene crystallized at low - pressure conditions. (d) Amphiboles have magnesio- hornblende composition.

  14. Is the Arabian Nubian Shield with Westward Subduction Polarity? Clues from Prograding Metamorphism in Mantle Peridotites, Eastern Desert of Egypt.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamal El Dien, H. M.; Abu El-Ela, A. S.; Hamdy, M.; Hassan, A.

    2014-12-01

    Neoproterozoic arc mantle beneath the Arabian Nubian Shield (ANS) in the Eastern Desert (ED) of Egypt exhumed due to intra-oceanic upthrusting are represented mainly by exposed ophiolitic peridotites serpentinized to different degree. Metamorphism is related to the Pan-African collision and the subduction of oceanic lithosphere. However, polarity of the Pan-African intra-oceanic subduction is still questionable. We here trace the variation of the degree of serpentinization and regional metamorphism of six serpentinite masses, widely distributed in the ED (from the east to the west: W (Wadi). Alam, W. Igla, W. Mubarak, G. El-Maiyit, W. Um El Saneyat and W. Atalla). This is based on their mineralogy, textures and mineral chemistry. Much difference in the degree of serpentinization is obvious among these rocks. They are mainly partly serpentinized containing primary olivine and orthopyroxene at W. Alam and W. Igla, while they are completely serpentinized in the other localities. With the increased degree of metamorphism, textures were transformed from the pseudomorphic to the non-pseudomorphic. The most common retrograde assemblage is composed of lizardite _ chrysotile_ brucite_ magnetite. The serpentine prograde textures can be viewed as a continuum from retrograde lizardite pseudomorphic textures, to very fine-grained transitional texture of lizardite and chrysotile, to chrysotile antigorite interlocking texture and finally to antigorite interpenetrating texture. These textures appear to represent successive stages in a recrystallization event. In late subduction-related metamorphism and early collisional emplacement stage, mylonitic-antigorite serpentinites formed and antigorite became the major phase in G. El-Maiyit, Um El-Saneyat andW. Atalla. Compositional zoning in spinel grains in all serpentinites reflect variation in the degree of alteration. The biggest variation of spinel compositions are among serpentinites from Um El-Saneyat and W. Atalla. The alteration zones were formed in a temperature < 400 C to 550 C corresponding to the low green-schist to the lower amphibolite facies. So, we propose that this is concordant with a westward polarity of the subducting oceanic lithosphere, associating the intra-oceanic arc ophiolite during the closure of the Mozambique ocean.

  15. Structural and remote sensing studies of gold mineralization and associated alteration in Abu-Marawat area, northern Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabr, Safwat Salah

    Gold has been mined in the Eastern Desert of Egypt since the time of the Pharaohs, yet the geologic setting of the gold mineralization, the structural controls, and its association with hydrothermal alteration zones is still not fully understood. A common application of remote sensing is to identify variations in surface mineralogy, structural elements, and geologic contacts. In this study, surface reflectance data derived from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and reflection Radiometer (ASTER) imagery is used to map areas of high potential gold mineralization within hydrothermal alteration zones through refining previously used satellite image processing techniques. Spectral unmixing in n-dimentional spectral feature space has proven very accurate in distinguishing different alteration minerals, as well as highlighting the extent and main trend of alteration zones around Abu-Marawat area. Band ratio image (bands 4/8, 4/2, 8/9 in RGB) has proved to be efficient in highlighting areas for high-potential gold mineralization. Studying the areas of potential gold mineralization by looking at the associated structural elements has helped us understand the formation and evolution of mineralized zones. Detailed field mapping and structural analysis has helped to identify the main phases of deformation affecting the study area of Abu-Marawat. Mineralized quartz veins, mainly hosted in normal fault shear zones, developed during a period of island arc formation and represent the oldest phase of hydrothermal events in the area. These mineralized veins have been deformed by folding and were subsequently cut by relatively undeformed barren quartz veins. This proposed early phase of arc-related gold mineralization is consistent with the presence of gold-rich banded iron formations of Abu-Marawat that also formed during the arc formation stage. The tectonic evolution model of the area is illustrated by relating the main structural elements to the major tectonic events that are known to have affected the study area. This model is compared to other tectonic model(s) proposed for the area for further validation.

  16. Stratigraphy, sedimentology and tectonic evolution of the Upper Cretaceous/Paleogene succession in north Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ayyat, Abdalla M.; Obaidalla, Nageh A.

    2013-05-01

    The stratigraphy, sedimentology and syn-depositional tectonic events (SdTEs) of the Upper Cretaceous/Paleogene (K-P) succession at four localities in north Eastern Desert (NED) of Egypt have been studied. These localities are distributed from south-southwest to north-northeast at Gebel Millaha, at North Wadi Qena, at Wadi El Dakhal, and at Saint Paul Monastery. Lithostratigraphically, four rock units have been recorded: Sudr Formation (Campanian-Maastrichtian); Dakhla Formation (Danian-Selandian); Tarawan Formation (Selandian-Thanetian) and Esna Formation (Thanetian-Ypresian). These rock units are not completely represented all over the study area because some of them are absent at certain sites and others have variable thicknesses. Biostratigrapgically, 18 planktonic foraminiferal zones have been recorded. These are in stratigraphic order: Globotruncana ventricosa Zone (Campanian); Gansserina gansseri, Contusotruncana contusa, Recimguembelina fructicosa, Pseudohastigerina hariaensis, Pseudohastigerina palpebra and Plummerita hantkenenoides zones (Maastrichtian); Praemurica incostans, Praemurica uncinata, Morozovella angulata and Praemurica carinata/Igorina albeari zones (Danian); Igorina albeari, Globanomanlina pseudomenradii/Parasubbotina variospira, Acarinina subsphaerica, Acarinina soldadoensis/Globanomanlina pseudomenardii and Morozovella velascoensis zones (Selandian/Thantian); and Acarinina sibaiyaensis, Pseudohastigerina wilcoxensis/Morozovella velascoensis zones (earliest Ypresian). Sedimentologically, four sedimentary facies belts forming southwest gently-dipping slope to basin transect have been detected. They include tidal flats, outer shelf, slumped continental slope and open marine hemipelagic facies. This transect can be subdivided into a stable basin plain plus outer shelf in the extreme southwestern parts; and an unstable slope shelf platform in the northeastern parts. The unstable slope shelf platform is characterized by open marine hemipelagic, fine-grained limestones and fine siliciclastic shales (Sudr, Dakhla, Tarawan and Esna formations). The northeastern parts are marked by little contents of planktonic foraminifera and dolomitized, slumped carbonates, intercalated with basinal facies. Tectonically, four remarkable syn-depositional tectonic events (SdTEs) controlled the evolution of the studied succession. These events took place strongly within the Campanian-Ypresian time interval and were still active till Late Eocene. These events took place at: the Santonian/Campanian (S/C) boundary; the Campanian/Maastrichtian (C/M) boundary; the Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/P) boundary; and the Middle Paleocene-Early Eocene interval. These tectonic events are four pronounced phases in the tectonic history of the Syrian Arc System (SAS), the collision of the Afro-Arabian and Eurasian plates as well as the closure of the Tethys Sea.

  17. Stratigraphy, facies architecture, and palaeoenvironment of Neoproterozoic volcanics and volcaniclastic deposits in Fatira area, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalaf, Ezz El Din Abdel Hakim

    Fatira area in the Central Eastern Desert, Egypt, is a composite terrane consisting of Neoproterozoic volcanics and sediments laid down in submarine to subaerial environment, intruded by voluminous old to young granitic rocks. The various lithofacies of the study area can be grouped in three distinct lithostratigraphic sequences, which are described here in stratigraphic order, from base to top as the Fatira El Beida, Fatira El Zarqa and Gabal Fatira sequences. Each depositional sequence, is intimately related to volcanic activity separated by time intervals of volcanic inactivity, such as marked hiatuses, reworked volcaniclasts, and or turbidite sedimentation. Four submarine facies groups have been recognized within the oldest, folded eruption sequence of Fatira El Beida. The southern part of the study area is occupied by sheet lava (SL), pillow lavas (PL), pillow breccias (PB), and overlying Bouma turbiditic volcaniclastites (VC). The four facies groups of Fatira El Beida sequence occur in a predictable upward-deepening succession, essentially from base to top, an SL-PL-PB-VC stacking pattern. The coeval tholeiitic mafic and felsic volcaniclastic rocks of this sequence indicate an extensional back-arc tectonic setting. The El Beida depositional sequence appears to fit a submarine-fan and slope-apron environment in an intra-arc site. The Fatira El Zarqa sequence involves a large volume of subaerial calc-alkaline intermediate to felsic volcanics and an unconformably overlying siliciclastic succession comprising clast-supported conglomerates (Gm), massive sandstone sheet floods (Sm) and mudstones (FI), together with a lateritic argillite paleosol (P) top formed in an alluvial-fan system. The youngest rock of Gabal Fatira sequence comprises anorogenic trachydacites and rhyolites with locally emergent domes associated with autobrecciation and sill-dyke rock swarms that could be interpreted as feeders and subvolcanic intrusions. Unconformity and lithofacies assemblages define seven events and three unconformity-bounded tectonic stages that record uplift-subsidence cycles in the study area. A proximal-distal relationship has been established within the depositional products, based on the relative dominance of erosional and depositional features.

  18. Application of ground geophysical data to uranium mineralization in the El-Missikat area, central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkattan, Elsayed M.; Abdulhadi, Hassan M.; Rabie, Said I.; Hassanein, Hamdy I. E.

    1996-01-01

    The El-Missikat prospect lies in the Eastern Desert of Egypt, 85 km from Qena along the river Nile. The area of the prospect is covered by pink granites of the Gabal (G.) El-Missikat pluton from the south and quartz diorite from the north, as well as wadi alluvium at Wadi El-Missikat, which passes through the study area from south to north. The importance of the study area comes from previous studies, airborne geophysics, surface and mining geology and ground spectrometric and magnetic studies, which prove that the area has radioactive mineralization zones at the northeastern periphery of G. El-Missikat. These mineralized zones he along northeastsouthwest jasperiod veins and shear zones which occur inside the granitic rocks. The previous studies concluded that the radioactive mineralization was mostly associated with sulphides, especially at the reduction zones. These sulphides give a good response to electrical or electromagnetic techniques. Accordingly, the present study uses self potential, electrically induced polarization and horizontal loop electromagnetic surveys to explore the extension of the mineralization zones at the subsurface. The self potential (SP) technique shows that there are numerous (31) mineralized zones. Most of these zones are distributed in the southern part of the area along the contact between the quartz diorite, the granite and the shear zones inside the El-Missikat granitic pluton. In addition, the induced polarization (In method is applied on two selected profiles (450E and 500E) to delineate the subsurface contact between granite and quartz diorite in Wadi El-Missikat and to calculate the shape and depth of the mineralization zones in the subsurface along these profiles. The horizontal loop electromagnetic survey, which was applied on three selected profiles, delineated some weak mineralization occurrences corrosponding to the shear zones. The integration of the results obtained using these three techniques, in addition to the different ground geophysical methods prviously used, make it possible to determine the most appropriate zones for developement of exploration at the area of investigation.

  19. Ground geophysical study for development and exploration of El Missikat radioactive minerals prospect, Central Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkattan, E. M.; Sadek, H. S.; Rabie, S. I.; Hassanein, H. I.

    1995-08-01

    The El Missikat area lies in the Eastern Desert of Egypt, 85 km west of Qena town. The area being studied is covered mainly by pink granite, quartz-diorite rocks and wadi deposits. The importance of the area originates from previous studies, including airborne geophysics, surface geology and mining geology which indicate that the area has features of radioactive mineralization at the northeastern periphary of G. El Missikat. The present study deals with the use of ground geophysical methods (totalcount radiometric and magnetic) in the exploration of radioactive mineralization and their relation to the geology and structural pattern of the area. The ground total-count radiometric method is used to describe the radioactivity of different rock units and the construction of the standard deviation (or anomaly) contour map to define the anomalous radioactive zones. Eight prominent radioactive anomalies were outlined from this study and they represented targets of high priority for ground follow-up. Accordingly, to emphasize the extension of the anomalous zones at the subsurface, ?-ray logging was carried out on a total-count basis in one inclined drill hole (120 m depth) with dip angle 29 and azimuth N20W at a selected location. In addition five subsurface radiometric anomalies were identified by ?-ray logging interpretation. The interpreted radioactive anomaly No. IV is considered a good indication of the subsurface continuity of a surface mineralized zone associated with the silica vein which was geologically mapped at the north of El Missikat well number II. Meanwhile, the total magnetic intensity survey was used to delineate the major structural features. The results of this study revealed the presence of six major, deep-seated faults, five basement tectonic blocks, basic or/and acidic zones, near-surface faults, contact between granite and quartz-diorite and several shear zones as well as dykes and veins. The integration between results of these two methods guided the development of exploration and solved many problems that were obscure for the field geologists and mining works in the area studied. It could also help in defining the radioactive mineralized zones, and their setting in depth. Also, it was observed that the interpreted radioactive anomalies are associated with acidic shear zones which may be due to hydrothermal solutions that percolated through, or around, these shear zones.

  20. Integrating geologic and satellite imagery data for high-resolution mapping and gold exploration targets in the South Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoheir, Basem; Emam, Ashraf

    2012-05-01

    The granitoid-greenstone belts of the Arabian-Nubian Shield are well-endowed with lode gold and massive sulfide ores. Although generally characterized by excellent outcrops and arid desert realm, poor accessibility and lack of finance have been always retardant to detailed geologic mapping of vast areas of the shield. Lack of comprehensive geological information and maps at appropriate scales would definitely hinder serious exploration programs. In this study, band ratioing, principal component analysis (PCA), false-color composition (FCC), and frequency filtering (FFT-RWT) of ASTER and ETM+ data have substantially improved visual interpretation for detailed mapping of the Gebel Egat area in South Eastern Desert of Egypt. By compiling field, petrographic and spectral data, controls on gold mineralization have been assessed in terms of association of gold lodes with particular lithological units and structures. Contacts between foliated island arc metavolcanics and ophiolites or diorite are likely to be favorable loci for auriferous quartz veins, especially where the NW-SE foliation is deflected into steeply dipping NNW-trending shear planes. High-resolution mapping of the greenstone belt, structures and alteration zones associated with gold lodes in the study area suggests that dilatation by foliation deflection was related to emplacement of the Egat granitic intrusion, attendant with a sinistral transpression regime (i.e., 640-550 Ma?). Gold mineralization associated with granitoid intrusions in transpression-induced pull-apart structures elsewhere in the Eastern Desert (e.g., Fawakhir, Sukari and Hangaliya mines) emphasize the reliability of this setting as a model for gold exploration targets in greenstone terrains of Egypt, and may be elsewhere in the Arabian-Nubian Shield.

  1. Morphodynamic implications for shoreline management of the western-Mediterranean sector of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frihy, Omran E.

    2009-09-01

    Although the western-Mediterranean coast of Egypt between Sallum and Alexandria, ~550 km long, has maintained a considerable equilibrium throughout history, developers have built traditional protective structures in an effort to form sheltered recreational beaches without taking into consideration its geomorphologic characteristics, coastal processes and their harmful impact on the coastal environment and human safety. The improper practices in this environmentally valuable region have induced us to undertake an initiative to carry out a morphodynamic analysis to provide a framework for understanding the relationship between coastal morphology and the prevailing dynamic forces. Based on the degree of natural protection or wave sheltering, the study shoreline can be categorized into four distinct morphotypical stretches: (1) high-energy wave-exposed shores and the outer margins of the rocky headlands, (2) moderate to high wave-energy beaches along semi-exposed embayments and bays mostly downdrift of the rocky headlands, (3) low-wave energy at semi-exposed headland lee-sided and pocket beaches, and (4) calm wave-sheltered enclosing water basins for safe anchorages, moorings and recreation beaches. The results deducted will have practical applications for shoreline management initiatives regarding sustained sites suitable for future beachfront development such as safe swimming conditions, sport facilities, water intakes and sheltered areas for vessels. In addition, benefits realized by the understanding of the morphodynamic processes would enhance our awareness of the significance of the role of western coast morphodynamics in supporting sustainable development via shoreline management. As far as sustainability is concerned, the selection of appropriate sites would help avoiding or minimizing the formation of the hard structures needed for creating safe recreation beaches. On a national scale, results reached could provide reliable database for information that can be used in establishing a sustainable shoreline management plan, which is, in turn, an essential part when implementing an Integrated Coastal Zone Management Plan for this region of attraction.

  2. 100 Kyr Old Desert of Western India: Morhodynamics and Environmental Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, N.

    2012-04-01

    The Late Quaternary oscillations in sea levels and resultant changes in the coastal environment have remained a popular aspect of study amongst the earthscientists and archaeologists. The Saurashtra peninsula of the western India that lies on the southwestern side of the Thar Desert, has archived a fascinating record of such environmental changes since last interglacial (~120kyr) in the form of a fossil desert exhibiting various aeolian land forms constituted by the sand largely derived from the coastal areas due to an oscillatory sea level change. A variety of dunes viz., coastal transverse, parabolic, longitudinal, barchans, climbing and falling dunes along with valley fills and sand sheets have been mapped. Being biogenic calcium carbonate rich, the sands have been lithified under the influence of an increase in moisture and thus the dune and bed forms are preserved in its best shape. The intense aeolian activities are also evident in the form of desert varnish on rocky outcrops. The sequence comprises smaller climate perturbations in the form of stabilization, erosion and karstification of older dunes and deposition of fluvial sediments in between. The paper deals with the mode of occurrence, response of sediments to wind dynamics and palaeo topography, internal structures, later modifications of sediments and significance of the geochronologically constrained aeolianites in understanding of environmental changes since 100kyr in the region.

  3. Pan-African adakitic rocks of the north Arabian-Nubian Shield: petrological and geochemical constraints on the evolution of the Dokhan volcanics in the north Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obeid, Mohamed A.; Azer, Mokhles K.

    2015-04-01

    The Precambrian basement of Egypt is part of the Red Sea Mountains and represents the north-western part of the Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS). Five volcanic sections are exposed in the Egyptian basement complex, namely El Kharaza, Monqul, Abu Had, Mellaha and Abu Marwa. They are located in the north Eastern Desert (ED) of Egypt and were selected for petrological and geochemical studies as they represent the Dokhan volcanics. The volcanics divide into two main pulses, and each pulse was frequently accompanied by deposition of immature molasse type sediments, which represent a thick sequence of the Hammamat group in the north ED. Compositionally, the rocks form a continuum from basaltic andesite, andesite, dacite (lower succession) to rhyodacite and rhyolite (upper succession), with no apparent compositional gaps. These high-K calc-alkaline rocks have strong affinities to subduction-related rocks with enriched LILEs (Rb, Ba, K, Th, Ce) relative to high field strength elements (Nb, Zr, P, Ti) and negative Nb anomalies relative to NMORB. The lower succession displays geochemical characteristics of adakitic rocks with SiO2 >53 wt%, Al2O3 >15 wt%, MgO >2.5 wt%, Mg# >49, Sr >650 ppm, Y <17 ppm, Yb <2 ppm, Ni >25 ppm, Cr >50 ppm and Sr/Y >42.4. They also have low Nb, Rb and Zr compared to the coexisting calc-alkaline rhyodacites and rhyolites. The highly fractionated rhyolitic rocks have strong negative Eu anomalies and possess the geochemical characteristics of A-type suites. Trace element geochemical signatures indicate a magma source consistent with post-collisional suites that retain destructive plate signatures associated with subduction zones. The adakitic rocks in the northern ANS are generated through partial melting of delaminated mafic lower crust interacting with overlying mantle-derived magma. The Dokhan volcanics were likely generated by a combination of processes, including partial melting, crystal fractionation and assimilation.

  4. Northeast Egypt as seen from STS-58

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This oblique view, looking northeast from central Egypt, shows great expanses of the sand covered and rocky Western Desert in the foreground (bottom). The dark patches bottom right are the Dakhla Oases on the south side of an escarpment. The northern half of Egypt's Nile appears here, from about the latitude of Luxor to the delta. Green colors indicate the small area of crops which feed Egypt's population of 55 million. The Nile Delta is partly obscured by a band of clouds, but can be discerned at the coast as a flattened triangle of green. The smaller triangle close by is the Falyum Basin, a depression irrigated by water from the Nile. The coast of the Mediterranean Sea appears left.

  5. Benefits of protective fencing to plant and rodent communities of the western Mojave Desert, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Matthew L.

    1995-01-01

    Human disturbance in the western Mojave Desert takes many forms. The most pervasive are livestock grazing and off-highway vehicle use. Over the past few decades several areas within this region have been fenced to preclude human disturbance. These areas provide opportunities to study the impact of human activities in a desert ecosystem. This paper documents the response of plant and small mammal populations to fencing constructed between 1978 and 1979 at the Desert Tortoise Research Natural Area, Kern County, California. Aboveground live annual plant biomass was generally greater inside than outside the fenced plots during April 1990, 1991, and 1992. The alien grass Schismus barbatus was a notable exception, producing more biomass in the unprotected area. Forb biomass was greater than that of alien annual grasses inside the fence during all three years of the study. Outside the fence, forb biomass was significantly higher than that of alien grasses only during spring 1992. Percent cover of perennial shrubs was higher inside the fence than outside, while no significant trend was detected in density. There was als more seed biomass inside the fence; this may have contributed to the greater diversity and density of Merriam's kangaroo rats ( Dipodomys merriami), long-tailed pocket mice ( Chaetodipus formosus), and southern grasshopper mice ( Onychomys torridus) in the protected area. These results show that protection from human disturbance has many benefits, including greater overall community biomass and diversity. The significance and generality of these results can be further tested by studying other exclosures of varying age and configurations in different desert regions of the southwestern United States.

  6. Near eastern neolithic genetic input in a small oasis of the Egyptian Western Desert.

    PubMed

    Kujanová, Martina; Pereira, Luísa; Fernandes, Verónica; Pereira, Joana B; Cerný, Viktor

    2009-10-01

    The Egyptian Western Desert lies on an important geographic intersection between Africa and Asia. Genetic diversity of this region has been shaped, in part, by climatic changes in the Late Pleistocene and Holocene epochs marked by oscillating humid and arid periods. We present here a whole genome analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and high-resolution molecular analysis of nonrecombining Y-chromosomal (NRY) gene pools of a demographically small but autochthonous population from the Egyptian Western Desert oasis el-Hayez. Notwithstanding signs of expected genetic drift, we still found clear genetic evidence of a strong Near Eastern input that can be dated into the Neolithic. This is revealed by high frequencies and high internal variability of several mtDNA lineages from haplogroup T. The whole genome sequencing strategy and molecular dating allowed us to detect the accumulation of local mtDNA diversity to 5,138 +/- 3,633 YBP. Similarly, theY-chromosome gene pool reveals high frequencies of the Near Eastern J1 and the North African E1b1b1b lineages, both generally known to have expanded within North Africa during the Neolithic. These results provide another piece of evidence of the relatively young population history of North Africa. PMID:19425100

  7. Magnetic fabrics and Pan-African structural evolution in the Najd Fault corridor in the Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeen, Mamdouh M.; Greiling, Reinhard O.; Sadek, Mohamed F.; Hamad, Sayed S.

    2014-11-01

    In order to assess the Pan-African structural evolution from early orogenic fabrics through Najd wrenching to the latest orogenic collapse/extension, the authors used field work, aided by aerial photographs and satellite images. This work is complemented by the study of the anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility (AMS, or magnetic fabric). The Pan-African rock associations of the Um Gheig-Kadabora area can be divided into a lower tier composed mainly of amphibolite-migmatite and granitoid gneisses, and an upper tier of ophiolitic rocks, metavolcanics and their related volcaniclastics, and molasse-type Hammamat sediments. Both these units are intruded by late orogenic granitoid plutons and dykes. The lower tier is exposed in a domal structure in the El Sibai area, the upper tier forms a series of weakly to highly deformed thrust units, called Pan-African Nappes here, which are dissected by high strain shear zones. According to their age, these rock units are divided here into early and late-orogenic. The early orogenic rock association is characterized by medium-high metamorphic grades. The late orogenic rock association is characterized by low metamorphic grade. The rocks in the upper tier form a series of low angle thrust sheets, which are bounded by NW-striking high angle shear zones related to the Najd Fault System. The early orogenic rocks show a polyphase structural evolution with early folds, thrusts, and strike-slip shear zones. The late orogenic rocks show a relatively weaker deformation. The latest intrusives studied here are the dykes dissecting the late orogenic Kadabora granite. In the present work magnetic fabric data document the deformational features in detail and assess the role of the Najd Fault System in the deformational evolution. A strong variation in volume susceptibility of various rocks, due to their variations in mineral composition, is observed. Lower values are in the range of 10-6 SI units for late-orogenic alkaline granite and the dykes dissecting it, the highest susceptibilities exceed 7 × 10-2 SI units in magnetite-bearing serpentinite. Early orogenic rocks are characterized by relatively high anisotropies (P‧ up to 1.7) and are deformed in numerous shear zones. Most of these shear zones can be related to the Najd Fault System. In contrast, late orogenic sediments and intrusives show mostly low anisotropies. However, magnetic lineations are still distinctly oriented parallel with the Najd Fault trend. The very latest Pan-African intrusives, the broadly N-S trending dykes crosscutting the Kadabora pluton, imply c. E-W directed extension. Such an extension is consistent with the magnetic fabric in some of the dykes. Therefore, the Kadabora dykes mark the end of Najd wrenching and a late stage of extension in this part of the Eastern Desert of Egypt. The other dykes display mostly primary fabrics, related to magma flow during their intrusion and are thus post-deformational with regard to the Pan-African orogeny.

  8. Remote sensing based improvement of the geological map of the Neoproterozoic Ras Gharib segment in the Eastern Desert (NE-Egypt) using texture features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Sandra; Bhler, Benjamin; Gloaguen, Richard; Breitkreuz, Christoph; Eliwa, Hassan Ali; El Gameel, Khaled

    2015-11-01

    Geological mapping in the Eastern Desert is impeded by difficult accessibility. We improve the existing geological maps by including texture features in a classification scheme of ASTER and Landsat 8 data. We tested the improvement of support vector machine classification using band ratios, principal component analysis (PCA) and texture analysis in the Ras Gharib segment (NE Egypt). A very high classification overall accuracy of 99.85% was achieved. We demonstrate that the input of textures provide valuable additional data for lithological mapping. With the gained information, the existing geological map of the study area was improved distinctly in precision and resolution, but also in terms of correction of yet wrong or inaccurate locations and of lithological unit extents.

  9. Prospect evaluation of BED 3 and Sitra oilfields, Abu Gharadig Basin, North Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Ibrahim; Ghazala, Hosni; El Diasty, Waleed

    2015-12-01

    The occurrence of hydrocarbons is closely linked to the elements of petroleum system history of the BED 3 and Sitra 8 oilfields, which has created multiple reservoir and seal combinations. BED 3 Field and Sitra concessions occupy the northwestern part of the Abu Gharadig Basin and extends between latitudes 29°45‧ and 30°05‧N and longitudes 27°30‧ and 28°10‧E. The comprehensive integration of the geo-related data and the interpretation of the well logging, geochemical, seismic data in time domain and depth and sealing mechanisms explain the occurrence of hydrocarbons in some certain reservoirs during cretaceous age and other reservoirs in the same fields don't have any hydrocarbon accumulation. Detailed seismic data interpretation was performed for the target units of BED 3 and Sitra 8 oilfields in time domain and converted to depth domain. Sitra 8 Field is a three-way dip closure bounded by NW-SE faults while BED 3 field is represented by a WNW-ESE trending horst dipping to the east. The Albian-Cenomanian Kharita Formation has a high energy shallow marine shelf environment and considered as the main pay zone in the BED 3 oilfield. On the other hand, Kharita sands are dry in the Sitra 8 Field. Also, the shallow marine shale, sandstone, limestone and dolomite interbeds of the Abu Roash G Member are another hydrocarbon bearing reservoir in the Sitra 8 Field. Sealing mechanisms were applied to explain why certain reservoirs have hydrocarbon and others don't. Allan's juxtaposition diagram for the main faults in the study area shows that Kharita sands in BED 3 area have excellent juxtaposition as Kharita juxtapose to upper Bahariya and intra Bahariya, which consist of shale and limestone. Abu Roash G sands in BED 3 area have bad juxtaposition as the Abu Roash G juxtapose to Abu Roash C sand (sand juxtaposed sand). Allan's diagram shows that the Abu Roash G reservoir (main target) in Sitra 8 is juxtaposing Abu Roash D which is composed of limestone and shale, which acts as very good seal rock, while the Kharita reservoir is juxtaposing Abu Roash G sand (sand juxtaposed sand) from the crest position which can explain the bad juxtaposition.

  10. Application of LANDSAT satellite imagery for iron ore prospecting in the western desert of Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elshazly, E. M.; Abdel-Hady, M. A.; Elghawaby, M. A.; Khawasik, S. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The delineation of the geological units and geological structures through image interpretation, corroborated by field observations and structural analysis, led to the discovery of new iron ore deposits. A new locality for iron ore deposition, namely Gebel Qalamun, was discovered, as well as new occurrences within the already known iron ore region of Bahariya Oasis.

  11. Luminescence dating of Holocene playa sediments of the Egyptian Plateau Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bubenzer, O.; Hilgers, A.

    2003-05-01

    This study is part of a multidisciplinary project dealing with the investigation of geoarchaeological sites on the Egyptian Plateau. With the aim of reconstructing the palaeoecological background, providing age assessment which put the various results in an age frame that is of special interest. Here, results of one particular section have been selected because of a discrepancy in age determination based on different approaches. Radiocarbon ages were inconsistent with the age range provided by the archaeological context in this area. The underestimation observed is inferred to be caused by poor 14C-sample quality. An attempt to overcome this problem was the determination of the depositional ages of the non-organic sediments by using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). Equivalent doses of four sediment samples were estimated from OSL measurements carried out on sand-sized quartz grains using the single-aliquot regenerative-dose (SAR) protocol. Dose rates were calculated from neutron activation analysis results. From the OSL ages obtained, we conclude that the sediment sequence exposing an alternation of lacustrine and eolian layers was deposited in a short period of time during the mid-Holocene (mean of OSL ages ˜7.8 ka). Compared to the 14C ages, the luminescence ages fit better into the archaeological context confirmed by surface dating.

  12. Human Impact On Landscape And The Revenue In Wadi El Rayan Western Desert Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asayed El Gammal, El

    2010-05-01

    Wadi El-Rayan depression occupy about 1800 Km2, it lies in 170 km southwest Cairo. Two lakes in El-Rayan depression initiated since 1973 in a big project when people inundate with excess agricultural sewage water. This article aim to estimate the landscape's response and it's revenue to human's intervention. Two new geomorphological maps, before and after the lakes prepared in the field to understand the landscape changes and its characteristics. Water fluctuation in El Rayan Lakes required multitemporal Landsat image. Geomorphological landforms disappeared and others initiated and neo-ecosystem had been generated. Active elongated sand dune fields covered by water and the dune pattern changed from straight-linear pattern to braided pattern and sand sheets delineating that linear dunes lost activity. Hence avoid and avert dunes hazards on the agriculture west of Nile Valley. Landforms and geologic heritage demonstrated that there is an old lake under El Rayan depression. The artificial lakes lead to rise the water table which may abut attempts to utilize from the underground water my stored and water from artificial lakes may infiltrate and contaminate this water. The water volume changed in the southern lake from 501,2 km at 1984 to 1097,4 km at 1999.

  13. On the origin of the compositional variations of the post-collisional granitoids in arc-terranes and suture zones, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragab, A. I.

    The Pan-African (Late Precambrian) basement complex of the Eastern Desert of Egypt is thought to be the product of immature intra-oceanic island arcs, mature intra-oceanic island arcs, and syn- and post-collision crustal anatexis. Aswan granitoids intruding the southern suture zone, Ras Gharib granitoids and the subvolcanic peralkaline granites of Gabal Nuqara intruding the northern arc-terrane of the Eastern Desert of Egypt are selected for a comparative study of post-collision granitoids. AFM variation diagram and Peacock's 1931 alkali-lime index revealed the calc-alkaline character of the "granodiorite-adamellite-leucogranite suite". Petrochemical variation diagrams show that the Aswan granitoids are relatively enriched in K 2O and FeO ∗; whereas the Ras Gharib granitoids are relatively enriched in CaO. They plot dominantly in the field of granites on Ab-An-Or diagram of Barker 1979, suggesting crustal anatexis for their magma source, in contrast to subduction-related magmas which are usually dominated by diorites or tonalites. The minor peralkaline granites, which are synchronous with the calc-alkaline post-collision granites, are not enriched in Nb, Zr and REE as typical anorogenic granites, which suggest that they may be formed as a late phase of the post-collision granites by gas-transfer processes. Assimilation of schists and gneisses rich in K and Fe in micas, which are common in the suture zones; and dioritetonalite rocks, rich in CaNa plagioclases, which characterize the arc-terranes may modify the primarily "near-eutectic" granitic magma locally in some granite intrusions forming "contaminated" or "hybrid" granitoids of the granodiorite-adamellite-leucogranite suite.

  14. Water Management Strategy in Assessing the Water Scarcity in Northern Western Region of Nile Delta, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabrouk, Badr; Arafa, Salah; Gemajl, Khaled

    2015-04-01

    Sustainable development in the Nile Delta of Egypt is retarded by serious environmental problems, where land-use and land-cover of the region are subjected to continuous changes; including shoreline changes either by erosion or accretion, subsidence of the delta, as well as by sea level rise due to climate change. The current research attempts to; (1) study the vulnerability of the northern western region of the Nile Delta coastal zone to climate change/sea level rise while setting basic challenges, review adaptation strategies based on adaptation policy framework, and highlight recommended programs for preparedness to climate change, (2) study the scarcity of water resources in the area of study with review of the socioeconomic impacts and the critical need of establishing desalination plants with new standards assessing the environmental situation and population clusters, and (3) monitor of the brine water extracted from the desalination plants and injected to subsurface strata. This monitoring process is divided into 3 main directions: 1) studying the chemical characteristics of water extracted from the water desalinations plants qualitatively and quantitatively. 2) mapping the subsurface of which that brine water will be injected to it and the flow directions and effects using resistivity data, and 3) using GIS and suitable numerical models in order to study the effect, volume, flow of the brine water and its long term environmental impacts on the area. The results indicate that the area is particularly vulnerable to the impact of SLR, salt water intrusion, the deterioration of coastal tourism and the impact of extreme dust storms. This in turn will directly affect the agricultural productivity and human settlements in coastal zones. The paper presents different scenarios for water management and recommends the most suitable scenarios in order to establish a core for water management strategy in the region according to existing socio-economic and environmental situations. Key words: Nile Delta, climate change, socioeconomic, sea level rise, groundwater monitoring, GIS

  15. Habitat invasibility and dominance by alien annual plants in the western Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, M.L.

    1999-01-01

    Patterns of habitat invasibility and alien dominance, respectively measured as species richness and biomass of alien annual plants, were evaluated in association with four habitat factors at the Desert Tortoise Research Natural Area (DTNA) in the western Mojave Desert, USA. Habitat factors varied in levels of disturbance outside (high) and inside (low) the DTNA, and in levels of soil nutrients in washlet (high) and hummock (low) topographic positions, in Larrea-north (high), Larrea-south (medium), and interspace (low) microhabitats near creosote bushes (Larrea tridentata), and during 1995 when rainfall was 207% (high) and 1994 when rainfall was 52% (low) of the long-term average. Dominant alien plants included the annual grasses Bromus rubens, Bromus trinii, and Schismus spp., and the forb Erodium cicutarium. Species richness and dominance of alien annual plants were slightly higher where disturbance was high, and much higher where soil nutrients were high. B. rubens and B. trinii were most dominant in washlets and in the Larrea-north microhabitats during both years. These two species evolved in mesic ecosystems, and appeared to be particularly limited by soil nutrients at this site. Schismus spp. and E. cicutarium were also most dominant in washlets, but their dominance varied between interspaces in 1994 and the Larrea-south microhabitat in 1995. Monitoring to detect the invasion of new annual plants should focus on regions of high rainfall and nitrogen deposition and on washes and beneath-canopy microhabitats. The ecological range of each alien species should be evaluated separately, because their evolutionary origins may greatly affect their patterns of invasion and dominance in the Mojave Desert.

  16. Application and calibration of the subsurface mapping capability of SIR-B in desert regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaber, G. G.; Mccauley, J. F.; Breed, C. S.; Grolier, M. J.; Issawi, B.; Haynes, C. V.; Mchugh, W.; Walker, A. S.; Blom, R.

    1984-01-01

    The penetration capability of the shuttle imaging radar (SIR-B) sensor in desert regions is investigated. Refined models to explain this penetration capability in terms of radar physics and regional geologic conditions are devised. The sand-buried radar-rivers discovered in the Western Desert in Egypt and Sudan are defined. Results and procedures developed during previous SIR-A investigation of the same area are extrapolated.

  17. Prospecting cold deserts of north western Himalayas for microbial diversity and plant growth promoting attributes.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ajar Nath; Sachan, Shashwati Ghosh; Verma, Priyanka; Saxena, Anil Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Microbial communities in different samples collected from cold deserts of north western Himalayas, India, were analyzed using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) analysis. A total of 232 bacterial isolates were characterized employing 16S rDNA-Amplified Ribosomal DNA Restriction Analysis with the three restriction endonucleases Alu I, Msp I and Hae III, which led to formation of 29-54 groups for the different sites, adding up to169 groups. 16S rRNA gene based phylogenetic analysis, revealed that 82 distinct species of 31 different genera, belonged to four phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. PLFA profiling was performed for concerned samples which gave an estimate of microbial communities without cultivating the microorganisms. PLFA analysis led to characterization of diverse group of microbes in different samples such as gram-negative, gram-positive bacteria, actinomycetes, cyanobacteria, anaerobic bacteria, sulphate reducing bacteria and fungi. The representative strains were screened for their plant growth promoting attributes, which included production of ammonia, HCN, gibberellic acid, IAA and siderophore; solubilization of phosphorus and activity of ACC deaminase. In vitro antifungal activity assay was performed against Rhizoctonia solani and Macrophomina phaseolina. Cold adapted microorganisms may serve as inoculants for crops growing under cold climatic conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first report for the presence of Arthrobacter nicotianae, Brevundimonas terrae, Paenibacillus tylopili and Pseudomonas cedrina in cold deserts and exhibit multifunctional PGP attributes at low temperatures. PMID:25575970

  18. Nest site characteristics and nesting success of the Western Burrowing Owl in the eastern Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Longshore, Kathleen M.; Crowe, Dorothy E.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated nest site selection at two spatial scales (microsite, territory) and reproductive success of Western Burrowing Owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea) at three spatial scales (microsite, territory, landscape) in the eastern Mojave Desert. We used binary logistic regression within an information-theoretic approach to assess factors influencing nest site choice and nesting success. Microsite-scale variables favored by owls included burrows excavated by desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii), burrows with a large mound of excavated soil at the entrance, and a greater number of satellite burrows within 5 m of the nest burrow. At the territory scale, owls preferred patches with greater cover of creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) within 50 m of the nest burrow. An interaction between the presence or absence of a calcic soil horizon layer over the top of the burrow (microsite) and the number of burrows within 50 m (territory) influenced nest site choice. Nesting success was influenced by a greater number of burrows within 5 m of the nest burrow. Total cool season precipitation was a predictor of nesting success at the landscape scale. Conservation strategies can rely on management of habitat for favored and productive nesting sites for this declining species.

  19. Bi-Static Deep Electromagnetic Soundings for Martian Subsurface Characterization: Experimental Validation in the Egyptian Western Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarletti, V.; Le Gall, A.; Berthelier, J. J.; Corbel, Ch.; Dolon, F.; Ney, R.; Reineix, A.; Guiffaud, Ch.; Clifford, S.; Heggy, E.

    2007-03-01

    A bi-static version of the HF GPR TAPIR developed for martian deep soundings has been operated in the Egyptian Western Desert. The study presented focuses on the retrieval of the direction of arrival of the observed echoes on both simulated and measured d

  20. Resilience to disturbance and resistance to alien grass invasions in the cold desert of western North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alien grass invasions are resulting in ecosystem-level transformations of entire landscapes in arid and semi-arid ecosystems. The cold desert of western US is undergoing such a transformation, and is considered one of the most imperiled large ecosystems in the US. To address the rapid and complex ch...

  1. Desert varnish and environmental change near Broken Hill, Western New South Wales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragovich, D.

    1988-12-01

    Desert varnish is widespread in arid Australia, and occurs as a thin often discontinuous manganese-enriched surface coating near Broken Hill, western New South Wales. Radiocarbon dating of calcium carbonate associated with this varnish indicated that major varnishing took place before about 10,000 years B.P., with varnish-forming conditions continuing during the Holocene. Small patches of varnish on secondary carbonate, on non-varnished rock and sometimes on existing varnish suggest that current environmental conditions allow for some varnish formation. Loss of varnish has resulted from within-channel abrasion, weathering by lichens, minor breakdown of varnish substrates, and localized weathering, possibly related to a previously higher soil surface.

  2. Upper Oligocene evaporites in basin fill of Sevier Desert region, western Utah ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, D.A.; Glanzman, R.K.; Naeser, C.W.; Nicholas, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    The basin fill beneath the Sevier Desert of western Utah contains evaporites that were deposited in a broad closed basin. All of the basin fill penetrated by the Gulf Oil 1 Gronning contains abundant volcanic detritus and its alteration products of Cenozoic age. Fission-track dating of tuffaceous sandstone yields ages of 26-28 m.y. Fossil pollen from mudstone in the evaporite-bearing strata includes forms no older than late Oligocene, in good agreement with the fission-track ages. Thus the age of evaporites is late Oligocene and younger. Anhydrite is present throughout approximately 900m of volcaniclastic rocks in the lower part of the section cut by the Gulf hole. Fossil pollen are indicative of an arid to semiarid flora.-from Authors

  3. Trace elements assessment in agricultural and desert soils of Aswan area, south Egypt: Geochemical characteristics and environmental impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwish, Mohamed Abdallah Gad; Pöllmann, Hebert

    2015-12-01

    Determination of chemical elements, Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, P, Pb, Sc, Sr, Ti, Y, and Zn have been performed in agricultural and desert soils and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) at Aswan area. Consequently, the pollution indices, univariate and multivariate statistical methods have been applied, in order to assess the geochemical characteristics of these elements and their impact on soil environmental quality and plant, and to reach for their potential input sources. The investigation revealed that the mean and range values of all element concentrations in agricultural soil are higher than those in desert soil. Furthermore, the agricultural soil displayed various degrees of enrichment and pollution of Cd, Zn, Mo, Co, P, Ti, Pb. The geochemical pattern of integrated pollution indices gave a clear image of extreme and strong pollution in the agricultural soil stations, their poor quality with high risk to human health and considered as a tocsin for an alert. In contrast, the desert soil is the good environmental quality and safe for plant, animal and human health. Alfalfa is tolerant plant and considered as a biomarker for P and Mo in polluted agricultural soil. Four geochemical associations of analyzing elements in agricultural soil and three ones in desert soil have been generated, and their enhancements were essentially caused by various anthropogenic activities and geogenic sources. The investigation also revealed that the broad extended desert soil is fruitful and promising as cultivable lands for agricultural processes in the futures.

  4. [Antoine Barthlmy Clot-Bey, a physician from Marseille founder of Western medicine in Egypt].

    PubMed

    Ruf, Henri

    2011-01-01

    Born in Grenoble in 1793 Clot was first a doctor in Marseilles with great success and honour. But for unclear reasons he had to resign, and then decided to be recruited in Egypt, where he was soon called "Clot-Bey" (Bey = officer)": he contributed greatly to modernizing Egyptian medical system: he founded the School of medicine, that of pharmacy, and that of obstetrics, and promoted hygiens and variolisation. After Mehmet Ali abdicated he lost most of his influence, and left Egypt for ever in 1858. PMID:21598579

  5. Estimation of heat generation by radioactive decay of some phosphate rocks in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Din, Khaled Salahel

    2009-11-01

    Radiogenic heat production data for phosphate rocks outcropping on the three main areas Eastern Desert, Western Desert and Nile Valley are presented. They were derived from uranium, thorium and potassium concentration measurements of gamma radiation originating from the decay of (214)Bi ((238)U series), (208)Tl ((232)Th series) and the primary decay of (40)K. A low radioactive heat production rate (0.32+/-0.1 microWm(-3)) was found for Wadi Hegaza, whereas the highest value (19+/-4.1 microWm(-3)) was found for Gabel Anz, Eastern Desert of Egypt. PMID:19186064

  6. Interstratified vermiculite-mica in the gneiss-metapelite-serpentinite rocks at Hafafit area, Southern Eastern Desert, Egypt: From metasomatism to weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harraz, H. Z.; Hamdy, M. M.

    2010-09-01

    The Hafafit vermiculite in the Southern Eastern Desert of Egypt at the contact of the metapelite and serpentinite rocks with the pegmatites and gneisses of the Hafafit uplift is the only known deposit in the Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS) rocks of the Eastern Desert (ED). It is distinctively interstratified with mica. The mineralogy and mineral chemistry of this vermiculite at four sites (HV1, HV2, HV3 and HV4) were studied to better understand its origin, which might refers to a specific geologic setting retained to Hafafit area. The vermiculite at Hafafit forms with phlogopite, actinolite-tremolite, asbestos-anthophyllite-talc and talc zones that are arranged from pegmatite and gneisses to the metapelite and serpentinite rocks. These zones were probably formed by metasomatism that related to the intrusion of the granitoid rocks and the connected pegmatites in the upper Pan-African. The XRD and EMPA studies of the interstratified vermiculite-mica concluded that vermiculitization took place through a layer-by-layer transformation of original micas. This formed, in decreasing abundance, mixed-layer phases of biotite/vermiculite (hydrobiotite), phlogopite/vermiculite (hydrophlogopite) and chlorite/vermiculite (corrensite) and discrete phases of vermiculite, chlorite and smectite. A model is suggested, in which chemical weathering by the moving downward meteoric water led to replacement of the interlayer K, in biotite from gneiss and in phlogopite from metasomatic zones, by H 2O molecules, Fe 2+ was oxidized and (OH) - replaced O 2- forming hydrobiotite and hydrophlogopite. By more K remove, Fe was replaced by Mg with the introduction of more layers of H 2O molecules leading to formation of the vermiculite. Weathering formed corrensite mixed-layer and chlorite expandable minerals on the expense of chlorite. Formation of the incomplete smectite-like layers and Al-hydroxy interlayers (13.97 ?) took place at the expense of vermiculite, replacing the Mg interlayer cations (12.63 ?). Weathering took place mostly by low-pH solutions and in warm environment and the most extensive degree of weathering was at the HV4 site, in which the lode of vermiculite is the biggest. We propose that vermiculitization at Hafafit occurred due to a specific integration between the geologic setting (including rock type and tectonics) of the area and weathering processes producing the only vermiculite deposit in the ANS rocks of the ED of Egypt.

  7. Stable-isotope stratigraphy of the Cenomanian-Turonian (Upper Cretaceous) boundary event (CTBE) in Wadi Qena, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagm, Emad; El-Qot, Gamal; Wilmsen, Markus

    2014-12-01

    A high-resolution δ13C isotope record from Cenomanian-Turonian boundary interval of shallow marine successions in Egypt is presented. The δ13C curves show the typical features of the globally documented Cenomanian-Turonian positive excursion, including three of the main positive isotope peaks defining the Cenomanian-Turonian Boundary Event (CTBE). Based on high-resolution ammonite biostratigraphy, the CTBE started in the study area above the Late Cenomanian Neolobites vibrayeanus Zone within the Galala Formation, directly above the global sequence boundary Cenomanian 5 (SB Ce 5). A stratigraphic gap at that level cuts out the lower a-peak of the CTBE. The Cenomanian-Turonian boundary is located within the upper part of the positive excursion between carbon excursion peaks c and d, coinciding with the boundary between the Late Cenomanian Vascoceras cauvini and the Early Turonian Vascoceratid zones. The CTBE ended up-section of peak d, at the base of the Choffaticeras spp. Zone. The amplitude of the positive δ13C excursion in Egypt is very high (reaching 6.5‰ vs. V-PDB) and largely matches curves of European standard sections and others localities from different basins. Furthermore, the Lower Turonian Holywell Isotope Event, an important marker within the lowermost Turonian, has tentatively been recognized. The positive carbon stable isotope curves presented herein represent the outreach of the oceanic anoxic event (OAE) 2 in shallow-water nearshore sequences.

  8. The Release of Chromium in Aquifers Underlying the Western Mojave Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachikian, C. S.; Plotkin, C.; Monterrosa, A.; Ramirez, P.

    2004-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that chromium (Cr) in aquifers underlying the western part of the Mojave Desert may be naturally occurring, resulting from the release of this element from aquifer materials in oxic ground water with pH > 8.0. In order to test this hypothesis, we studied the kinetic release of Cr from aquifer material collected from the Sheep Creek fan near Victorville, CA. Pulverized and untreated aquifer material were incubated in 15mL Falcon tubes with water at three different pH values (2, 7, and 9) for 227 days. Duplicate samples were incubated in a heating bath at temperatures 20oC above ambient, in order to accelerate the kinetics of Cr release. Samples from each tube were collected, filtered through a 0.22 ? m filter, and analyzed using a graphite furnace atomic absorption photospectrometer using EPA Method 7199. Due to the heterogeneity of the aquifer material an accurate measure of Cr release kinetics was not possible; results presented here represent equilibrium values at the end of the incubation period. For untreated aquifer material incubated at ambient temperatures, Cr was found at concentrations of 26.0 8.0 ppb at pH = 2, 5.2 0.6 ppb at pH=7, and 9.1 0.9 ppb at pH=9. As expected, the highest value of Cr was found for the samples incubated at pH=2. Pulverization of the samples resulted in an increase in Cr release by a factor of 1.5, 2.4, and 1.6 at pH values of 2, 7, and 9, respectively. Heating the pulverized samples at pH 7 and 9 resulted in an increase in the concentration of Cr released (by 25% and 9% respectively). However, heating the pulverized sample at pH=2 resulted in an almost 95% decrease in the concentration of released Cr (from 37.8 ppb to 2.2 ppb). The reason for this decrease is not known at this point. Our results indicate that significant concentrations of Cr are released naturally in Western Mojave Desert aquifers under various geochemical conditions. Additional studies are underway to study the kinetic release of Cr in packed columns.

  9. Finite strain analysis of metavolcanics and metapyroclastics in gold-bearing shear zone of the Dungash area, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassem, Osama M. K.; Abd El Rahim, Said H.

    2014-11-01

    The Dungash gold mine area is situated in an EW-trending quartz vein along a shear zone in metavolcanic and metasedimentary host rocks in the Eastern Desert of Egypt. These rocks are associated with the major geologic structures, which are attributed to various deformational stages of the Neoproterozoic basement rocks. Field geology, finite strain and microstructural analyses were carried out and the relation-ships between the lithological contacts and major/minor structures have been studied. The R f/? and Fry methods were applied on the metavolcano-sedimentary and metapyroclastic samples from 5 quartz veins samples, 7 metavolcanics samples, 3 metasedimentary samples and 4 metapyroclastic samples in Dungash area. Finite-strain data show that a low to moderate range of deformation of the metavolcano-sedimentary samples and axial ratios in the XZ section range from 1.70 to 4.80 for the R f/? method and from 1.65 to 4.50 for the Fry method. We conclude that finite strain in the deformed rocks is of the same order of magnitude for all units of metavolcano-sedimentary rocks. Furthermore, the contact between principal rock units is sheared in the Dungash area under brittle to semi-ductile deformation conditions. In this case, the accumulated finite strain is associated with the deformation during thrusting to assemble nappe structure. It indicates that the sheared contacts have been formed during the accumulation of finite strain.

  10. The distribution of radioelements in El Gluf biotite granite, north Eastern Desert, Egypt: a guide to the recognition of anomalously radioactive zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammar, A. A.; Elkattan, E. M.; Elsadek, M. A.

    1993-05-01

    El-Gluf area is located in the north Eastern Desert of Egypt. It is underlain mainly by Precambrian basement rocks and Phanerozoic sediments. It has been systematically surveyed using high-sensitivity airborne gamma-ray spectrometric and magnetic methods. To identify and outline significant radiometric zones of anomalously high uranium and thorium concentrations in El Gluf biotite granite. These zones could be favourable for potential economic radioactive and/or metallic mineralization. This study could serve as a model for investigating the relationship between the geological structure and radioactive mineralization. Statistical analysis of the gamma-ray spectrometric data were carried out to delineate anomalies. A two-dimensional trend analysis of faults as tracedfrom the geological map, the radiometric gradients, magnetic lineations and the courses of wadis (valleys) were carried out to delineate major and minor trends in the area. Seven spectrometric anomalies (two pure uranium, two pure thorium, and three mixed) could be related to the prevailing faulting directions: N-S, N-W and NE. The NW and NE fault trends proved to have a significant impact on the localization of radiometric anomalies, which may point to potential and structurally controlled uranium and thorium mineralizations whose structures are considered to have acted as channel ways for the mineralized solutions.

  11. Neoproterozoic diamictite in the Eastern Desert of Egypt and Northern Saudi Arabia: evidence of ~750 Ma glaciation in the Arabian-Nubian Shield?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Kamal A.; Stern, Robert J.; Manton, William I.; Johnson, Peter R.; Mukherjee, Sumit K.

    2010-06-01

    The Neoproterozoic Atud diamictite in Wadi Kareim and Wadi Mobarak in the Eastern Desert of Egypt and the Nuwaybah formation in NW Saudi Arabia consist of poorly sorted, polymictic breccia, with clasts up to 1 m of granitoid, quartz porphyry, quartzite, basalt, greywacke, marble, arkose, and microconglomerate in fine-grained matrix. Stratigraphic relations indicate that the diamictite was deposited in a marine environment. Integrated field investigation, petrographic study and U-Pb SHRIMP zircon ages demonstrate that the Atud and Nuwaybah are correlative. The distribution of zircon ages indicate that ~750 Ma ages are dominant with a significant component of older materials, characterized by minor Mesoproterozoic and more abundant Paleoproterozoic and Neoarchean ages. Some matrix and metasedimentary clast zircons yield ages that are a few 10s of Ma younger than the age of the youngest clast (754 ± 15 Ma), suggesting Atud/Nuwaybah diamictite deposition ~750 Ma or slightly later, broadly consistent with being deposited during the Sturtian glaciation (740-660 Ma). The Paleoproterozoic and Neoarchean clasts have no source within the ensimatic Arabian-Nubian Shield. The distribution of the pre-Neoproterozoic ages are similar to the distribution of the pre-Neoproterozoic ages in Yemen and Saharan Metacraton, suggesting that these clasts have been transported hundreds of kilometers, maybe by ice-rafting. The Atud diamictite may represent important evidence for Cryogenian “Snowball Earth” in the Arabian-Nubian Shield.

  12. Petrology of the Motaghairat mafic-ultramafic complex, Eastern Desert, Egypt: A high-Mg post-collisional extension-related layered intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Halim, Ali H.; Helmy, Hassan M.; Abd El-Rahman, Yasser M.; Shibata, Tomoyuki; El Mahallawi, Mahmoud M.; Yoshikawa, Masako; Arai, Shoji

    2016-02-01

    The geodynamic settings of the Precambrian mafic-ultramafic complexes in the Eastern Desert of Egypt have important bearing on understanding the geotectonic evolution of the Arabian Nubian Shield. We present a detailed petrological study on a layered mafic-ultramafic intrusion that is located at the contact between the Precambrian continental crust and the Miocene Red Sea oceanic crust. The Motaghairat layered intrusion consists of basal lherzolite, orthopyroxenite, troctolite, olivine gabbro and anorthosite on the top. Variations in modal mineralogy and mineral chemistry along with the chemical composition of these units suggest their derivation from a common high-Mg tholeiitic parent melt through fractional crystallization processes. The parental magma was derived from a metasomatised mantle source. The primitive mantle-normalized patterns of the calculated melts exhibit enrichment in U relative to Th and Ba relative LREE which indicate that the enriched lithospheric mantle source was metasomatised by fluids derived from a subducted oceanic crust rather than by a sediment melt. Geological and petrological evidences suggest that the layered Motaghairat intrusion was emplaced during post-orogenic extension following subduction break-off and lithospheric delamination after the collision between the amalgamated island arc terranes and the Saharan Metacraton. The heat source required to melt the metasomatised lithospheric mantle was derived from the upwelling of hot asthenosphere after the subduction-break-off.

  13. Thermodynamic modelling of Sol Hamed serpentinite, South Eastern Desert of Egypt: implication for two serpentinization stages in the Arabian-Nubian Shield ophiolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Alam, T.; Hamdy, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Arabian-Nubian Shield is the largest tract of juvenile continental crust of Neoproterozoic age on Earth. This crust was generated due to arc-arc collision associated with the closing of the Mozambique Ocean. Distribution of ophiolitic rocks marks fossils suture zones in the shield. Petrological, mineral chemistry, whole-rock chemistry and thermodynamic studies are carried out to examine the serpentinite component of Sol Hamed ophiolite in south Eastern Desert of Egypt. The protolith mantle was harzburgite and formed in subduction zone of forearc setting. Serpentinization occurred in two stages. The first by intrusion of high concentrated CO2 fluid released from carbonate-bearing sediments and altered basalt at the subduction zone. The serpentinization achieved during isobaric cooling path at pressure of 1 kbar and before the emplacement. The minimum temperature limit of the serpentinization is above the breakdown of lizardite to antigorite and brucite (170 C). The fluid composition during the isobaric cooling path was buffered by the metamorphic reactions. The second stage of serpentinization took place through prograde path which led to formation of chrysotile after lizardite. The increasing in the pressure during this stage occurred as a result of extensive duplex array and thrusting of oceanic crust. The crust in the forearc basin was overloaded by 28 km of obducted and thrusted oceanic crust from both mid-oceanic and forearc basins, respectively.

  14. Geochemical constraints from the Hafafit Metamorphic Complex (HMC): Evidence of Neoproterozoic back-arc basin development in the central Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El-Naby, H.; Frisch, W.

    2006-06-01

    The Hafafit Metamorphic Complex (HMC) is a part of the Precambrian belt in the central Eastern Desert of Egypt. Two distinct metamorphic units were identified: gneisses and amphibolites. The gneisses are subdivided on mineralogical grounds into granitic gneiss, biotite-gneiss, hornblende-gneiss and psammitic gneiss. Using major elements discrimination criteria to discriminate between orthogneiss and paragneiss, the granitic gneiss shows igneous origin, whereas biotite-gneiss, hornblende-gneiss and psammitic gneiss show sedimentary origin. The mineralogical and chemical compositions of the granitic gneisses indicate that they are tonalitic to trondhjemitic and have compositions consistent with hydrous partial melting of a mafic source, suggesting subduction-related magmatism. Based on Si, Al and alkali contents of paragneisses, the psammitic gneiss could be classified as metamorphosed lithic arenite, whereas biotite- and hornblende-gneisses are classified as metamorphosed greywacke. Sedimentation may have occurred in a back-arc basin setting with transitional deposition from shallow-marine to terrestrial environment. This sedimentation was probably occurred on a tholeiitic basaltic oceanic crust. The amphibolites are subdivided according to mineralogical basis into clinopyroxene-amphibolite, garnet-amphibolite and garnet-free massive amphibolite. Chemical data of amphibolites shows tholeiitic affinity, which suggests a back-arc geotectonic setting. A generation of the leucogranite along thrust zones is related to the late phase of metamorphism of Hafafit rocks. This interpretation is supported by the similarity between metamorphic age and granite emplacement age.

  15. An assessment of the external radiological impact in granites and pegmatite in central Eastern Desert in Egypt with elevated natural radioactivity.

    PubMed

    Uosif, M A M; Abdel-Salam, L M

    2011-11-01

    The contents of natural radionuclides ((226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K) were measured in investigated samples (granite Gabal Ras Barud, Eastern Desert in Egypt) by using gamma spectrometry (NaI (Tl) 3″×3″). The activities of (226)Ra, (232)Th series and (40)K are between (3.8±0.5 and 172.8±1135.1±56.8 8.6), (2.3±0.3 and 103.8±5.2) and (53.1±2.7 and 1135.1±56.8) Bq kg(-1), respectively. With average total annual dose being only 67.2 μSv y(-1), this value is about 6.72 % of the 1.0 mSv y(-1) recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP-60, 1990) as the maximum annual dose to members of the public. Geochemical studies revealed that Gabal Ras Barud is formed from a highly fractionated biotite granite, with SiO(2) >75 % and generally enriched in alkali with K/Na >8 %. PMID:21131664

  16. Upper Oligocene evaporites in basin fill of Sevier Desert region, western Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, D.A.; Glanzman, R.K.; Naeser, C.W.; Nichols, D.J.

    1981-02-01

    The basin fill beneath the Sevier Desert of western Utah contains evaporites of late Oligocene age that were deposited in a broad closed basin. All of the basin fill penetrated by the Gulf Oil 1 Gronning (2458 m TD), one of only three deep holes in the basin, contains abundant volcanic detritus and its alteration products of Cenozoic age, when volcanism was intense in western Utah. Fission-track dating of tuffaceous sandstone, interbedded with evaporite minerals and representative of sandstone in the lower formations penetrated, yields ages of 26 to 28 m.y.; concordance of ages indicates no thermal resetting. Fossil pollen from mudstone in the evaporite-bearing strata includes forms no older than late Oligocene, in good agreement with the fission-track ages. Thus the age of the evaporites, and of all the basin fill penetrated by drilling, is late Oligocene and younger; previous work had assigned them ages ranging from Triassic to Eocene. Evaporite-bearing rocks were deposited during late Oligocene time in a broad closed basin under arid or semiarid conditions much like those of the Great Basin today. Anhydrite is present throughout approximately 900 m of volcaniclastic rocks in the lower part of the section cut by the Gulf hole, and more than 1500 m of anhydrite and halite is present in possibly equivalent strata in the nearby Argonaut dry hole. Fossil pollen from anhydrite-bearing rocks in the Gulf hole are indicative of an arid to semiarid flora, including plants similar to Mormon tea and possibly saltbush or buffalo berry. Evaporite minerals formed in the basin during dry periods; tuff was erupted from nearby volcanic centers, reworked by water, and deposited in the basin.

  17. Effects of protective fencing on birds, lizards, and black-tailed hares in the Western Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, M.

    1999-01-01

    Effects of protective fencing on birds, lizards, black-tailed hares (Lepus californicus), perennial plant cover, and structural diversity of perennial plants were evaluated from spring 1994 through winter 1995 at the Desert Tortoise Research Natural Area (DTNA), in the Mojave Desert, California. Abundance and species richness of birds were higher inside than outside the DTNA, and effects were larger during breeding than wintering seasons and during a high than a low rainfall year. Ash-throated flycatchers (Myiarchus cinerascens), cactus wrens (Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus), LeConte's thrashers (Toxostoma lecontei), loggerhead shrikes (Lanius ludovicianus), sage sparrows (Amphispiza belli), and verdins (Auriparus flaviceps) were more abundant inside than outside the DTNA. Nesting activity was also more frequent inside. Total abundance and species richness of lizards and individual abundances of western whiptail lizards (Cnemidophorous tigris) and desert spiny lizards (Sceloporus magister) were higher inside than outside. In contrast, abundance of black-tailed hares was lower inside. Structural diversity of the perennial plant community did not differ due to protection, but cover was 50% higher in protected areas. Black-tailed hares generally prefer areas of low perennial plant cover, which may explain why they were more abundant outside than inside the DTNA. Habitat structure may not affect bird and lizard communities as much as availability of food at this desert site, and the greater abundance and species richness of vertebrates inside than outside the DTNA may correlate with abundances of seeds and invertebrate prey.

  18. Geothermal resources of the western arm of the Black Rock Desert, northwestern Nevada. Part I. Geology and geophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, D.H.; Welch, A.H.; Maurer, D.K.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of the geothermal potential of the western arm of the Black Rock Desert in northwestern Nevada included a compilation of existing geologic data on a detailed map, a temperature survey at 1-meter depth, a thermal-scanner survey, and gravity and seismic surveys to determine basin geometry. The temperature survey showed the effects of heating at shallow depths due to rising geothermal fluids near the known hot spring areas. Lower temperatures were noted in areas of probable near-surface ground-water movement. The thermal-scanner survey verified the known geothermal areas and showed relatively high-temperature areas of standing water and ground-water discharge. The upland areas of the desert were found to be distinctly warmer than the playa area, probably due to the low thermal diffusivity of upland areas caused by low moisture content. Surface geophysical surveys indicated that the maximum thickness of valley-fill deposits in the desert is about 3200 meters. Gravity data further showed that changes in the trend of the desert axis occurred near thermal areas. 53 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Geothermal resources of the western arm of the Black Rock Desert, northwestern Nevada; Part I, geology and geophysics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaefer, Donald H.; Welch, Alan H.; Mauzer, Douglas K.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of the geothermal potential of the western arm of the Black Rock Desert in northwestern Nevada included a compilation of existing geologic data on a detailed map, a temperature survey at 1-meter depth, a thermal-scanner survey, and gravity and seismic surveys to determine basin geometry. The temperature survey showed the effects of heating at shallow depths due to rising geothermal fluids near the known hot spring areas. Lower temperatures were noted in areas of probable near-surface ground-water movement. The thermal-scanner survey verified the known geothermal areas and showed relatively high-temperature areas of standing water and ground-water discharge. The upland areas of the desert were found to be distinctly warmer than the playa area, probably due to low thermal diffusivity resulting from low moisture content. The surface geophysical surveys indicated that the maximum thickness of valley-fill deposits in the desert is about 3,200 meters. Gravity data further showed that changes in the trend of the desert axis occurred near thermal areas. (USGS)

  20. Late Pan-African granite emplacement during regional deformation, evidence from magnetic fabric and structural studies in the Hammamat-Atalla area, Central Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiling, R. O.; de Wall, H.; Sadek, M. F.; Dietl, C.

    2014-11-01

    Field investigations, microstructural observations, and magnetic fabric analyses revealed a polyphase, late Pan-African deformational evolution in the Um Sheqila-Um Had (595 Ma) composite pluton and in the Hammamat and Atalla areas of the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt in Ediacaran times. Major stages are early shortening (NNW-SSE), subsequent strike-slip (NW-SE shear zones), and late shortening (NW-SE). Strain studies on pebbles and xenoliths together with AMS data show a predominance of shallow, NW-SE trending X axes or magnetic lineations, associated with steep, NW-SE striking magnetic foliations. Magnetic fabrics and microstructures indicate a tectonic fabric in the Um Sheqila-Um Had granitoid plutons, which is dominated by steep NW-SE striking foliations and shallow NW-SE trending lineations, similar to those in the high-angle Atalla Shear Zone. There is a change of lineation directions from ESE-WNW at Um Sheqila (oldest) to NW-SE to Um Had II (youngest). This pattern may indicate an influence of strike-slip and is also consistent with NE-SW compression. This holds also true for the asymmetry of the contact aureole, which is extended towards NW, parallel with the trend of the magnetic lineation. The character and orientation of the deformation pattern in the Um Sheqila-Um Had plutons and the Atalla Shear Zone is thus similar to the pattern of the late shortening phase. The intrusion of the Um Sheqila-Um Had granitoid rocks, therefore, took place before the late shortening stage, but postdates early deformation, which, according to published data, was associated with lithospheric thinning in the Central Eastern Desert. Therefore, these Pan-African plutons do not represent the earliest post-deformational intrusions but a late stage of syn-deformational magmatic activity. At a regional scale, this deformation with steep foliations and shallow lineations may also be related with lateral escape tectonics. The pluton emplacement, the importance of transcurrent shear zones, and the low lithospheric thickness in the area are not consistent with tectonic elements at the Pan-African orogenic margin but imply a more internal position for the Wadi Hammamat area.

  1. Unique chemistry of a diamond-bearing pebble from the Libyan Desert Glass strewnfield, SW Egypt: Evidence for a shocked comet fragment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramers, Jan D.; Andreoli, Marco A. G.; Atanasova, Maria; Belyanin, Georgy A.; Block, David L.; Franklyn, Chris; Harris, Chris; Lekgoathi, Mpho; Montross, Charles S.; Ntsoane, Tshepo; Pischedda, Vittoria; Segonyane, Patience; Viljoen, K. S. (Fanus); Westraadt, Johan E.

    2013-11-01

    We have studied a small, very unusual stone, here named Hypatia, found in the area of southwest Egypt where an extreme surface heating event produced the Libyan Desert Glass 28.5 million years ago. It is angular, black, shiny, extremely hard and intensely fractured. We report on exploratory work including X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with EDS analysis, deuteron nuclear reaction analysis, C-isotope and noble gas analyses. Carbon is the dominant element in Hypatia, with heterogeneous O/C and N/C ratios ranging from 0.3 to 0.5 and from 0.007 to 0.02, respectively. The major cations of silicates add up to less than 5%. The stone consists chiefly of apparently amorphous, but very hard carbonaceous matter, in which patches of sub-?m diamonds occur. ?13C values (ca. 0) exclude an origin from shocked terrestrial coal or any variety of terrestrial diamond. They are also higher than the values for carbonaceous chondrites but fall within the wide range for interplanetary dust particles and comet 81P/Wild2 dust. In step heating, 40Ar/36Ar ratios vary from 40 to the air value (298), interpreted as a variable mixture of extraterrestrial and atmospheric Ar. Isotope data of Ne, Kr and Xe reveal the exotic noble gas components G and P3 that are normally hosted in presolar SiC and nanodiamonds, while the most common trapped noble gas component of chondritic meteorites, Q, appears to be absent. An origin remote from the asteroid belt can account for these features. We propose that the Hypatia stone is a remnant of a cometary nucleus fragment that impacted after incorporating gases from the atmosphere. Its co-occurrence with Libyan Desert Glass suggests that this fragment could have been part of a bolide that broke up and exploded in the airburst that formed the Glass. Its extraordinary preservation would be due to its shock-transformation into a weathering-resistant assemblage.

  2. Bistatic GPR Measurements in the Egyptian Western Desert - Measured and Simulated data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarletti, V.; Le Gall, A.; Berthelier, J.; Ney, R.; Corbel, C.; Dolon, F.

    2006-12-01

    The TAPIR (Terrestrial And Planetary Investigation Radar) instrument has been designed at CETP (Centre d'etude des Environnements Terrestre et Planetaires) to explore the deep Martian subsurface (down to a few kilometers) and to detect liquid water reservoirs. TAPIR is an impulse ground penetrating radar operating at central frequencies ranging from 2 to 4 MHz operating from the surface. In November 2005, an updated version of the instrument working either in monostatic or in bi-static mode was tested in the Egyptian Western Desert. The work presented here focuses on the bi-static measurements performed on the Abou Saied plateau which shows a horizontally layered sub-surface. The electromagnetic signal was transmitted using one of the two orthogonal 70 m loaded electrical dipole antennas of the transmitting GPR. A second GPR, 50 or 100 meters apart, was dedicated to the signal reception. The received waves were characterized by a set of 5 measurements performed on the receiving GPR : the two horizontal components of the electric field and the three composants of the magnetic field. They were used to compute the direction of arrival of the incoming waves and to retrieve more accurately their propagation path and especially to discriminate between waves due to some sub-surface reflecting structure and those due to interaction with the surface clutter. A very efficient synchronization between the two radars enabled us to perform coherent additions up to 2^{31} which improves dramatically the obtained signal to noise ratio. Complementary electromagnetic measurements were conducted on the same site by the LPI (Lunar and Planetary Institute) and the SwRI (Southwest Research Institute). They provided independent information which helped the interpretation of the TAPIR data. Accurate simulations obtained by FDTD taking into account the information available are presented and used for both the interpretation of the measured data and the validation of the instrument.

  3. Origin of I- and A-type granitoids from the Eastern Desert of Egypt: Implications for crustal growth in the northern Arabian Nubian Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahat, E. S.; Mohamed, H. A.; Ahmed, A. F.; El Mahallawi, M. M.

    2007-09-01

    I- and A-type granitoid rocks, emplaced during pre- and post-collision stages, respectively, of the Neoproterozoic Pan-African Orogeny, are widely distributed in the Eastern Desert of Egypt, constituting ˜60% of the basement outcrop. Petrological and geochemical data are presented for a selection of the two groups, the I-type, El Bula tonalite-granodiorite suite, and the A-type, Lômân alkali granites, with the aim of discussing their origin and geotectonic implications. The El Bula (EB) rocks have geochemical characteristics of medium-K calc-alkaline, metaluminous to mildly peraluminous, granitoids formed in an island-arc environment. The Lômân (LM) granites display midalkaline, metaluminous, post-orogenic, A-type characteristics. With respect to the EB granitoids, the LM granites contain lower Al 2O 3, Fe 2O 3, MgO, MnO, CaO, TiO 2, Sr, Ba, and V, but higher Na 2O, K 2O, Nb, Zr, Th, and Rb. The I-type granitoids were presumably formed by high degrees of partial melting (˜40%) of a mafic (amphibolitic), lower crustal source, whereas the A-type granites are derived from a tonalitic, middle crustal source, followed by some crystal fractionation. Such high degrees of partial melting attest to the large areal distribution of these rocks and require broad thermal anomalies, likely related to significant geodynamic features of the Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS) evolution. We propose petrogenetic models involving an upwelling of hot asthenospheric mantle, due to oblique convergence during the pre-collision stage, and following a lithospheric delamination during the post-collision stage. Such asthenosphere uprise could account for the high crustal growth rate of the ANS.

  4. Multi-stage emerald formation during Pan-African regional metamorphism: The Zabara, Sikait, Umm Kabo deposits, South Eastern desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundmann, G.; Morteani, G.

    2008-02-01

    The genesis of gem-quality deep green emeralds of Zabara, Sikait and Umm Kabo (South Eastern Desert, Egypt) is to date a controversial topic. The emerald-bearing biotite schists and quartz lenses are interpreted alternatively as a product of (i) thrust-fault-shear zone - controlled large scale alkali-metasomatism driven by post-magmatic fluid flow or of (ii) a large scale interaction between syntectonic pegmatitic magma or hydrothermal fluids with pre-existing basic to ultrabasic rocks, or of (iii) a syn- to post-tectonic regional metamorphism and small scale blackwall metasomatism. Detailed microstructural and chemical analyses of the Egyptian emeralds and their host rocks show that three generations of beryl can be distinguished: a colourless pegmatitic beryl; a pale green Cr-poor beryl crystallized from pegmatite-related hydrothermal fluids; and a deep green Cr- and Mg-rich emerald. The crystallization of the Cr- and Mg-rich emerald was controlled by the very local availability of Cr, Mg and Be-rich metamorphic fluids during the Pan-African tectono-thermal event. Emerald-rich quartz lenses demonstrate that those fluids locally did mobilize quartz, too. The pale green emeralds found within the pegmatites in association with colourless beryl are the product of a mobilization of colourless pegmatitic beryl and/or phenakite by late pegmatitic fluids slightly enriched in Cr by an interaction with the Cr-rich country rocks. The late pegmatitic fluids are typically Na-rich as is demonstrated by the pervasive albitization of the pegmatites. The complex interplay of magmatic and regional metamorphic events during the genesis of the Egyptian emeralds/beryls makes it impossible through stable oxygen isotope data to relate their genesis to the one or the other event.

  5. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of Pan-African I-type granitoids at Gabal Igla Ahmar, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanen, Mohamed A.; El-Nisr, Said A.; Mohamed, Fathy H.

    1996-01-01

    Younger granites (post tectonic) are common throughout the Precambrian igneous/metamorphic terrain of Egypt and they played a significant role in the evolution of the Pan-African crust. The Gabal Igla Ahmar pluton comprises two magmatic suites: a calc-alkaline diorite/quartz diorite-granodiorite suite and an aluminous monzogranite-granophyre suite. The calc-alkaline rocks have low K 2O, relatively low LREE and display fractionated HREE ( {Tb}/{Ybn} = 1.3-2.2 ). They appear to represent a suite of andean-type intrusives emplaced in an active continental margin. The monzogranites are metalummous to slightly peralummous, highly differentiated I-type granitoids apparently representing a post-collision phase of intrusion. Three distinct petrogenetic models for magma genesis are suggested to explain the petrological, major, trace and REE element variations in these magmatic suites: i) The calc-alkaline quartz diorite was derived by partial melting of garnet amphibolite leaving a homblende-rich residue. ii) The monzogranites evolved by 75-85% crystal fractionation of the quartz diorite melt. The crystallization took place at depth from a water saturated magma of minimum melt composition. After a further interval, the granitic melt was emplaced at shallow crustal levels at pressures of 1-3 kbar. iii) Simple mixing of quartz dioritic and granitic melts as two end-member components could explain the origin of the granodiorite. This model is consistent with the field petrographical and chemical characteristics of the granodiorite. At a late stage of monzogranite crystallization, the water contents in residual, intercrystalline melt became sufficiently high to promote the development of eutectoid intergrowths of quartz and feldspar to form the granophyre.

  6. Early Cretaceous counterclockwise rotation of Northeast Africa within the equatorial zone: Paleomagnetic study on Mansouri ring complex, Southeastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfy, Hamza I.

    2015-06-01

    The Mansouri ring complex (132 Ma) is, paleomagnetically, studied to shed light on the paleo-tectonic position of Northeast Africa during the Early Cretaceous. Progressive thermal demagnetization of all samples verified a general bi-vectorial decay of the natural remanence. After the removal of the present-day field overprint, the decaying anchored component was either: A dual-polarity, shallow NW-SE directed component residing in magnetite (400-585 C) of shiny fresh samples, or, A normal-polarity, medium-inclination, north-oriented component stored in haematite of few reddish ferruginous sites. This component was considered as chemical remagnetization carried by secondary haematite. Due to its steady stability, overwhelming existence in most sites, positive reversal test and its residence in fresh-samples' magnetite, the first dual-polarity, shallow NW-SE component, was considered as the characteristic remanent magnetization [ChRM] representing the paleomagnetic field during cooling of the Mansouri ring complex. The mean paleomagnetic pole of the isolated ChRM was at 47N/259E, Dp/Dm = 3.4/6.6. This Hauterivian pole from Egypt shows reasonable consistency with its coeval poles rotated from the main tectonic units to Northeast Africa. It reveals that in Early Cretaceous: Northeast Africa was equatorial, lying just south the Equator. Cairo, which is now at 30N, was at -1.5 paleo-latitude. The Azimuth of the African Plate was NE-SW, about 30 clockwise with respect to the present-day N-S trend. Comparing this Hauterivian pole to that of the Wadi Natash basalts [107 4 Ma], which was at [55N/250E] during the Albian, the African Plate seems to have rotated counter-clockwise about 10 with Northeast Africa moving northwards [Cairo was moving from 1.5S to 1.5N] within the equatorial zone, during the Early Cretaceous.

  7. Effects of Protective Fencing on Birds, Lizards, and Black-Tailed Hares in the Western Mojave Desert.

    PubMed

    BROOKS

    1999-04-01

    / Effects of protective fencing on birds, lizards, black-tailed hares (Lepus californicus), perennial plant cover, and structural diversity of perennial plants were evaluated from spring 1994 through winter 1995 at the Desert Tortoise Research Natural Area (DTNA), in the Mojave Desert, California. Abundance and species richness of birds were higher inside than outside the DTNA, and effects were larger during breeding than wintering seasons and during a high than a low rainfall year. Ash-throated flycatchers (Myiarchus cinerascens), cactus wrens (Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus), LeConte's thrashers (Toxostoma lecontei), loggerhead shrikes (Lanius ludovicianus), sage sparrows (Amphispiza belli), and verdins (Auriparus flaviceps) were more abundant inside than outside the DTNA. Nesting activity was also more frequent inside. Total abundance and species richness of lizards and individual abundances of western whiptail lizards (Cnemidophorous tigris) and desert spiny lizards (Sceloporus magister) were higher inside than outside. In contrast, abundance of black-tailed hares was lower inside. Structural diversity of the perennial plant community did not differ due to protection, but cover was 50% higher in protected areas. Black-tailed hares generally prefer areas of low perennial plant cover, which may explain why they were more abundant outside than inside the DTNA. Habitat structure may not affect bird and lizard communities as much as availability of food at this desert site, and the greater abundance and species richness of vertebrates inside than outside the DTNA may correlate with abundances of seeds and invertebrate prey. KEY WORDS: Birds; Fenced protection; Lepus californicus, Lizards; Mojave Desert; Off-highway vehicles; Protected area management; Sheep grazing PMID:9950700

  8. Evaluation of heat generation by radioactive decay of sedimentary rocks in Eastern Desert and Nile Valley, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abbady, Adel G E

    2010-10-01

    Radioactive heat-production (RHP) data of sedimentary outcrops in Gebel Anz (Eastern Desert) and Gebel Sarai (Nile Valley) are presented. A total of 103 rock samples were investigated, covering all major rock types of the areas. RHP were derived from uranium, thorium and potassium concentrations measured from gamma-radiation originating from the decay of (214)Bi ((238)U series), (208)Tl ((232)Th series) and the primary decay of (40)K, obtained with a NaI (Tl) detector. The heat-production rate of Gebel Anz ranges from 0.94 (Nubai Sandstone ) to 5.22 microW m(-3) (Duwi Formation). In Gebel Sarai it varies from 0.82 (Esna Shale) to 7 microW m(-3) (Duwi Formation). The contribution due to U is about 62%, from Th is 34% and 4% from K in Gebel Anz. The corresponding values in Gebel Sarai are 69.6%, 26.9% and 3.5%, respectively. These data can be used to discuss the effects of the lateral variation of the RHP rate on the heat flux and the temperature fields in the upper crust. PMID:20472452

  9. Holocene freshwater carbonate structures in the hyper-arid Gebel Uweinat region of the Sahara Desert (Southwestern Egypt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinova, Margarita M.; Meckler, A. Nele; McKay, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    The eastern part of the Sahara is at present the driest region of the desert. Yet the extensive animal rock art in the area, presumed to depict real activities in the lives of the painters, suggests that environmental conditions were significantly different when the rock art was produced. Here we report on exploration of the area, which led to the discovery of morphologically-distinct carbonate structures that line the walls of two valleys in Gebel Uweinat, and were likely formed in standing water. The carbonate structures comprise what appear to be shoreline carbonate formations, and date back to 8100 and 9400 years BP. The chemical and morphological similarity of these formations to carbonate structures from modern lakes suggests that these lakes contained fresh, standing water suitable for human and animal use. However, the significant quartz content suggests that windblown sand was pervasive, and thus the vegetation cover may have been sparse. This discovery supports the possibility of grasslands in the area, which may have been able to support human habitation, and adds to the evidence for a wetter climate in the area in the early Holocene.

  10. Radioactivity and distribution of U and Th in some granitic masses, Wadi El-Saqia Area, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Monem, A. A.; Hussein, H. A.; Abdel-Kader, Z. M.; Abu Zied, H. T.; Ammar, S. E.

    1996-05-01

    Radioactivity measurements and U and Th content determinations were carried out on 3 small granitic plutons, Gabal Abu Aqarib, Gabal El-Himeiyer and Gabal Um Zarabit, in the Central Eastern Desert. The Abu Aqarib and Um Zarabit alkali feldspar granites are elenogated bodies intruded into the Dokhan Volcanics, whereas El-Himeiyir is intruded into an ophiolitic melange section. Compared to the average content of U and Th of world granites, El-Himeiyir alkali feldspar granites show normal content of both U and Th. On the other hand, Abu Aqarib alkali feldspar granite shows some enrichments in both U and Th, whereas Um Zarabit granite shows enrichments in U contents only. The two discovered anomalous radioactive sites show 154 ppm U, and 256 ppm Th contents for Gabal Abu Aqarib site, and 24 ppm U, and 107 ppm Th contents for El-Himeiyir one. The two sites are associated with NE-trending shear zones and exhibit hydrothermal alteration features such a hematitization and silicification. The high radioactivity is ascribed to unusual accumulations of zircon and/or apatite; however, some of the enriched U may be of epigenetic origin.

  11. Mesozoic evolution of northeast African shelf margin, Libya and Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Aadland, R.K.; Schamel, S.

    1989-03-01

    The present tectonic features of the northeast African shelf margin between the Nile delta and the Gulf of Sirte are products of (1) precursory late Paleozoic basement arches, (2) early Mesozoic rifting and plate separation, and (3) Late Cretaceous structural inversion. The 250 km-wide and highly differentiated Mesozoic passive margin in the Western Desert region of Egypt is developed above a broad northwest-trending Late Carboniferous basement arch. In northeastern Libya, in contrast, the passive margin is restricted to just the northernmost Cyrenaica platform, where subsidence was extremely rapid in the Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. The boundary between the Western Desert basin and the Cyrenaica platform is controlled by the western flank of the basement arch. In the middle Cretaceous (100-90 Ma), subsidence accelerated over large areas of the Western desert, further enhancing a pattern of east-west-trending subbasins. This phase of rapid subsidence was abruptly ended about 80 Ma by the onset of structural inversion that uplifted the northern Cyrenaica shelf margin and further differentiated the Western Desert subbasin along a northeasterly trend.

  12. Occurrence of hexavalent chromium in ground water in the western Mojave Desert, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, J.W.; Izbicki, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    About 200 samples from selected public supply, domestic, and observation wells completed in alluvial aquifers underlying the western Mojave Desert were analyzed for total dissolved Cr and Cr(VI). Because Cr(VI) is difficult to preserve, samples were analyzed by 3 methods. Chromium(VI) was determined in the field using both a direct colorimetric method and EPA method 218.6, and samples were speciated in the field for later analysis in the laboratory using a cation-exchange method developed for the study described in this paper. Comparison of the direct colorimetric method and EPA method 218.6 with the new cation-exchange method yielded r2 values of 0.9991 and 0.9992, respectively. Total dissolved Cr concentrations ranged from less than the 0.1 ??g/l detection limit to 60 ??g/l, and almost all the Cr present was Cr(VI). Near recharge areas along the mountain front pH values were near neutral, dissolved O2 concentrations were near saturation, and Cr(VI) concentrations were less than the 0.1 ??g/l detection limit. Chromium(VI) concentrations and pH values increased downgradient as long as dissolved O 2 was present. However, low Cr(VI) concentrations were associated with low dissolved O2 concentrations near ground-water discharge areas along dry lakes. Chromium(VI) concentrations as high as 60 ??g/l occurred in ground water from the Sheep Creek fan alluvial deposits weathered from mafic rock derived from the San Gabriel Mountains, and Cr(VI) concentrations as high as about 36 ??g/l were present in ground water from alluvial deposits weathered from less mafic granitic, metamorphic, and volcanic rocks. Chromium(III) was the predominant form of Cr only in areas where dissolved O2 concentrations were less than 1 mg/l and was detected at a median concentration of 0.1 ??g/l, owing to its low solubility in water of near-neutral pH. Depending on local hydrogeologic conditions and the distribution of dissolved O2, Cr(VI) concentrations may vary considerably with depth. Samples collected under pumping conditions from different depths within wells show that Cr(VI) concentrations can range from less than the 0.1 ??g/l detection limit to 36 ??g/l in a single well and that dissolved O2 concentrations likely control the concentration and redox speciation of Cr in ground water.

  13. Chromium, chromium isotopes and selected trace elements, western Mojave Desert, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izbicki, J.A.; Ball, J.W.; Bullen, T.D.; Sutley, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    Chromium(VI) concentrations in excess of the California Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 50 ??g/L occur naturally in alkaline, oxic ground-water in alluvial aquifers in the western Mojave Desert, southern California. The highest concentrations were measured in aquifers eroded from mafic rock, but Cr(VI) as high as 27 ??g/L was measured in aquifers eroded from granitic rock. Chromium(VI) concentrations did not exceed 5 ??g/L at pH < 7.5 regardless of geology. ??53Cr values in native ground-water ranged from 0.7 to 5.1??? and values were fractionated relative to the average ??53Cr composition of 0??? in the earth's crust. Positive ??53Cr values of 1.2 and 2.3??? were measured in ground-water recharge areas having low Cr concentrations, consistent with the addition of Cr(VI) that was fractionated on mineral surfaces prior to entering solution. ??53Cr values, although variable, did not consistently increase or decrease with increasing Cr concentrations as ground-water flowed down gradient through more oxic portions of the aquifer. However, increasing ??53Cr values were observed as dissolved O2 concentrations decreased, and Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III), and subsequently removed from solution. As a result, the highest ??53Cr values were measured in water from deep wells, and wells in discharge areas near dry lakes at the downgradient end of long flow paths through alluvial aquifers. ??53Cr values at an industrial site overlying mafic alluvium having high natural background Cr(VI) concentrations ranged from -0.1 to 3.2???. Near zero ??53Cr values at the site were the result of anthropogenic Cr. However, mixing with native ground-water and fractionation of Cr within the plume increased ??53Cr values at the site. Although ??53Cr was not necessarily diagnostic of anthropogenic Cr, it was possible to identify the extent of anthropogenic Cr at the site on the basis of the ??53Cr values in conjunction with major-ion data, and the ??18O and ??D composition of water from wells.

  14. Geotectonic significance of Neoproterozoic amphibolites from the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt: A possible dismembered sub-ophiolitic metamorphic sole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahat, E. S.

    2011-07-01

    Supra-subduction zone ophiolites in the Egyptian Central Eastern Desert (CED) occur as clusters in its northern (NCEDO) and southern (SCEDO) parts, displaying abundant island arc-boninitic and MORB/island-arc geochemical affinities, respectively. An amphibolite belt, including the investigated massive to slightly foliated Wadi Um Gheig (WUG) amphibolites, is exposed in the southeast most of the NCEDO thrusting over the El Sibai gneissic association and intruded by late- to post-orogenic granitoids and gabbros. The WUG rocks are metamorphosed under epidote amphibolite to common amphibolite facies. The amphiboles are calcic and represented by actinolitic hornblende to magnesio-hornblende in the epidote amphibolites and magnesio- to ferro-hornblende in the amphibolites. Plagioclase composition varies from pure albite (An3-8) in the epidote amphibolites to andesine and labradorite (An36-65) in the amphibolites. The estimated P-T conditions are in favor of their metamorphism under epidote amphibolite (c. 550-600 C and 2-3 1.5 kbar) and amphibolite (c. 618-720 C and 3-6 1.5 kbar) facies. The peak metamorphic conditions point to a burial depth of c.15-20 km. Geochemically, the WUG amphibolites show basaltic to andesitic compositions of tholeiitic affinity. They display LILE-enriched MORB-normalized patterns with negative Nb anomalies characteristic of the subduction-related rocks. However, their chondrite-normalized rare-earth element (REE) patterns vary from LREE-depleted (LaN/YbN = 0.29 to 0.49) to LREE-enriched (LaN/YbN = 2.97 to 3.74). Few samples show major and trace element contents typical of boninitic rocks, including U-shaped REE pattern. On the standard tectonic discrimination diagrams the WUG amphibolites plot mostly in the island-arc fields with some samples of MORB and boninitic affinities. Greenschist facies metamorphosed NCEDO obviously share these geochemical characteristics, implying formation in the same tectonic environment, i.e. forearc basin. This argues that the WUG amphibolites likely represent remnants of a dismembered metamorphic sole beneath the NCEDO. Their formation possibly involves intra-forearc basin thrusting followed by emplacement of ophiolite as imbricated stack of dismembered thrust slices in an accretionary wedge setting. This revives interests in geotectonic model in which the CED represents a forearc-arc-back-arc system above a southeast-dipping subduction zone.

  15. Phanerozoic tectono-thermal history of the Nubian massif, Eastern Desert, Egypt, and its relationship to the opening of the Red Sea as revealed by fission-track studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, G. I.

    Seventy-nine fission-track ages are reported on apatite, sphene, and zircon recovered from Eo-Cambrian to Cretaceous ring complexes and Precambrian granites, Eastern Desert, Egypt. With respect to the ring complexes, zircon and sphene ages are concordant with K/Ar and Rb/Sr emplacement ages, signifying rapid cooling following instrusion. Apatite ages, except for Abu Khruq, are significantly younger than the emplacement ages and are interpreted as uplift ages. Annealing of the apatite clocks is attributed to a combination of cauldron subsidence, sedimentary burial, and an increase in regional heat flow. Combining ages on the ring complexes and the granites suggests that, block faulting was important in the dynamics of the uplift history since early Late Paleozoic time. Four major blocks were identified in southeastern Egypt. Uplift along major faults affected blocks of regional dimensions. It appears that, the updoming preceding the rifting stage of the Red Sea took place in two stages: the earlier and more widespread phase occurred during Late Cretaceous, the later in Early Oligocene time. Total duration of the two stages prior to the initiation of the opening of the Red Sea was about 50 m.y. A time-table for events related to the rifting stage in the Eastern Desert is also presented.

  16. Potential of Electricity Generation on the Western Coast of Mediterranean Sea in Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed Shata, A. S.; Abdelaty, S. M.; Hanitsch, R.

    2008-01-01

    A technical and economic assessment has been made of the electricity generation by wind turbines located at three promising potential wind sites: Sidi Barrani, Mersa Matruh and El Dabaa in the extreme northwest of Egypt along the Mediterranean Sea. These contiguous stations along the coast have an annual mean wind speed greater than 5.0 m/s at a height of 10 m. Weibull's parameters and the power law coefficient for all seasons have been estimated and used to describe the distribution and behavior of seasonal winds at these stations. The annual values of wind potential at the heights of 70-100 m above the ground level were obtained by extrapolation of the 10 m data from the results of our previous work using the power law. The three stations have a high wind power density, ranging from 340-425 to 450-555 W/m2 at the heights of 70-100 m, respectively. In this paper, an analysis of the cost per kWh of electricity generated by two different systems has been made: one using a relatively large single 2 MW wind turbine and the other - 25 small wind turbines (80 kW, total 2 MW) arranged in a wind farm. The yearly energy output of each system at each site was determined, and the electricity generation costs in each case were also calculated and compared with those at using diesel oil, natural gas and photovoltaic systems furnished by the Egyptian Electricity Authority. The single 2 MW wind turbine was found to be more efficient than the wind farm. For all the three considered stations the electricity production cost was found to be less than 2 ? cent/kWh, which is about half the specific cost of the wind farm.

  17. Utilization of airborne gamma ray spectrometric data for geological mapping, radioactive mineral exploration and environmental monitoring of southeastern Aswan city, South Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, Mohamed A. S.; Elkhodary, Shadia T.

    2013-12-01

    The present work utilizes airborne gamma ray spectrometric data in a trial to refine surface geology of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, detect any radioactive mineralization and monitor environment at southeastern Aswan city, South Eastern Desert, Egypt. This area is mainly covered with igneous rocks (younger granites, older granites, metasediments, metavolcanics, metagabbro, Tertiary basalt and ring complex), metamorphic rocks as well as sedimentary rocks (Um Barmil Formation, Timsah Formation, Abu Aggag Formation and wadi sediments). Airborne gamma ray spectrometry can be very helpful in mapping surface geology. This provides estimates of the apparent surface concentrations of the most common naturally occurring radioactive elements, such as potassium (K), equivalent uranium (eU) and equivalent thorium (eTh). This is based on the assumption that, the absolute and relative concentrations of these radioelements vary measurably and significantly with lithology. The composite image technique is used to display simultaneously three parameters of the three radioelement concentrations and their three binary ratios on one image. The technique offers much in terms of lithological discrimination, based on colour differences and showed efficiency in defining areas, where different lithofacies occur within areas mapped as one continuous lithology. The integration between surface geological information and geophysical data led to detailing the surface geology and the contacts between different rock units. Significant locations or favourable areas for uranium exploration are defined, where the measurements exceed (X + 2S), taking X as the arithmetic mean of eU, eU/eTh and eU/K measurements and S as the standard deviation corresponding to each variables. The study area shows the presence of four relatively high uraniferous zones. These zones cannot be ignored and need further ground follow-up. In addition, the trend analysis based on the three radioelement maps and the published geological map shows that, most of the well-developed structural lineaments have NW, NE and ENE trends. Moreover, the average radiation dose rates in the study area, which range from 0.57 to 1.3 mSv yr-1 average, are calculated from the exposure rate for each rock unit. The dose rate levels still remain in the safe side to individuals and less than the maximum permissible from the natural gamma radiation sources, except younger granites and ring complex.

  18. Mid-Eocene alluvial-lacustrine succession at Gebel El-Goza El-Hamra (Shabrawet area, NE Eastern Desert, Egypt): Facies analysis, sequence stratigraphy and paleoclimatic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanas, H. A.; Sallam, E.; Zobaa, M. K.; Li, X.

    2015-11-01

    This study aims to provide the depositional facies, sequence stratigraphic and paleoclimatic characteristics of the Mid-Eocene (Bartonian) continental succession exposed at Gebel El-Goza El-Hamra (Shabrawet Area, NE Eastern Desert, Egypt). The studied succession consists of siliciclastic rocks followed upward by carbonate rocks. Detailed field observation and petrographic investigation indicate accumulation in floodplain-dominated alluvial and shallow lacustrine systems. The floodplain-dominated alluvial facies (45 m thick) is composed mainly of carbonate nodules-bearing, mottled mudrock with subordinate sandstone and conglomerate beds. The conglomerate and pebbly sandstone bodies interpreted as ephemeral braided channel deposits. The massive, laminated, planner cross-bedded, fine- to medium-grained sandstone bodies interlayered within mudstone reflect sheet flood deposits. The mudrocks associated with paleosols represent distal floodplain deposits. The shallow lacustrine facies (15 m thick) is made up of an alternation of marlstone, micritic limestone, dolostone and mudrock beds with charophytes and small gastropods. Both the alluvial and lacustrine facies show evidence of macro-and micro-pedogenic features. Pollen assemblages, stable δ18O and δ13C isotopes, and paleopedogenic features reflect prevalence of arid to semi-arid climatic conditions during the Bartonian. The sequence stratigraphic framework shows an overall fining-upward depositional sequence, consisting of Low- and High-accommodation Systems Tracts (LAST, HAST), and is bounded by two sequence boundaries (SB-1, SB-2). Conglomerate and pebbly sandstone deposits (braided channel and sheet flood deposits) of the lower part of the alluvial facies reflect a LAST. Mudrock and silty claystone facies (distal floodplain deposits) of the upper part of alluvial facies and its overlying lacustrine facies correspond to a HAST. The LAST, HAST and SB were formed during different accommodation-to-sediment supply (A/S) ratio phases. The variation in A/S ratios was mainly controlled by sea-level change as well as by local tectonic subsidence and uplift of the basin coincident with the reactivation of the Syrian Arc System during the Bartonian.

  19. Structural controls on Neoproterozoic mineralization in the South Eastern Desert, Egypt: an integrated field, Landsat TM, and SIR-C/X SAR approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusky, Timothy M.; Ramadan, Talaat M.

    2002-07-01

    The Arabian-Nubian Shield represents a complex amalgam of arcs and microcontinents assembled during Neoproterozoic closure of the Mozambique Ocean. The 750-720 Ma Allaqi suture is an arc/arc collision zone, formed when the Gerf terrane in the north overrode the circa 830-720 Ma Gabgaba terrane in the south, prior to closure of the Mozambique Ocean. Neoproterozoic rocks include ophiolitic ultramafic-mafic rocks, metasediments, intermediate metavolcanic rocks, intrusive gabbro-diorite rocks, granodiorites, biotite granites, and leucocratic granites. High-pressure/low-temperature metamorphism has been documented in rocks of the suture zone. Mineral deposits include nickel-copper-platinum and podiform chromite in ultramafic rocks, marble, gold-bearing quartz-veins in D 2 and D 3 shear zones, and radioactive mineralization associated with late leucocratic granitic rocks. Integrated field mapping and remote sensing techniques are used to distinguish and map the relationships between rock units, structures, and alteration zones associated with mineral deposits along the Allaqi suture of Egypt's SE Desert. Landsat TM images processed using a band ratioing technique show different rock types remarkably well, and are able to distinguish between alteration zones associated with ultramafic rocks (listwaenites) and those associated with leucocratic granitic rocks (greisenization, silicification and albitization). Black and white L-band SIR-C/X SAR images outline foliations, faults and folds that control mineralization at several deposits in the area, whereas color composite multiband Chh-Lhh-Lhv SIR-C/X SAR images reveal some elliptical granitic bodies that host radioactive mineralization. E-trending, tight to isoclinal, gently dipping folds, thrust faults and subvertical shear zones related to the Allaqi suture are overprinted by N-oriented structures related to the Wadi Ungate shear zone, formed during collision of east and west Gondwana during closure of the Mozambique Ocean. The location of the Wadi Ungate shear zone in the Wadi Shellman area was previously unknown due to burial of basement rocks beneath thin dry sands. A new structural map was prepared using Landsat TM ratio images and SIR-C/X SAR imagery. SIR-C/X SAR data conveys considerably more information about rocks and structures beneath the thin sand cover than discernible from aerial photographs or Landsat TM images.

  20. Petrogenesis of carbonated meta-ultramafic lenses from the Neoproterozoic Heiani ophiolite, South Eastern Desert, Egypt: A natural analogue to CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gahlan, Hisham A.; Arai, Shoji; Almadani, Sattam A.

    2015-02-01

    Among a set of peculiar meta-ultramafics, carbonate-orthopyroxenites are observed for the first time in the Heiani ophiolite belt, South Eastern Desert, Egypt. They form massive lensoidal masses up to 50 m long and 20 m wide. The lenses show a marked structural concordance with their neighboring country rocks. The typical country rocks are represented by the following high-grade metamorphic rocks: kyanite-muscovite schists, amphibolites, kyanite-bearing biotite gneisses, migmatites, granite gneisses and mobilizates. The studied carbonate-orthopyroxenites consist mainly of metamorphic orthopyroxene + magnesite, among other metamorphic, relict primary and retrograde secondary minerals. According to primary chromian spinel (Cr#, 0.7-0.84) chemistry and morphology, absence of clinopyroxene and presence of primary mantle olivine (Fo89-91) as relicts in the metamorphic orthopyroxene, the Heiani carbonate-orthopyroxenites seem to have formed from a highly depleted mantle peridotite precursor. At a late collisional stage during the Pan-Africa terrane accretion and the E-W crustal shortening (ca. 650-620 Ma), high-grade (upper amphibolite facies) low-P/high-T regional metamorphism (ca. 660 Ma) accompanied by CO2-metasomatism resulted in formation of the Heiani carbonate-orthopyroxenites. Mostly the carbonate-bearing shelf sediments beneath and/or in juxtaposition with the Heiani ophiolite are considered to be the proven source of the CO2-rich fluids. Although, a mixed sedimentary-mantle C source is not unlikely. A mineral paragenetic correlation with experimental data for the system MgO-SiO2-H2O-CO2 suggests metamorphic conditions consistent with those of the high-grade country rocks; i.e. 630-650 C, 6-7 kbar (20-23 km depth) and high-XCO2 (0.6-0.7). The CO2-bearing fluids discharging along faults gave rise to regionally widespread carbonate-bearing assemblages. Accordingly, the Heiani carbonate-orthopyroxenites are considered the by-products of natural carbon sequestration by an ultramafic rock.

  1. Bacterial diversity of Drass, cold desert in Western Himalaya, and its comparison with Antarctic and Arctic.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Puja; Sangwan, Naseer; Lal, Rup; Vakhlu, Jyoti

    2015-08-01

    Drass is the coldest inhabited place in India and the second coldest, inhabited place in the world, after Siberia. Using the 16SrDNA amplicon pyrosequencing, bacterial diversity patterns were cataloged across the Drass cold desert. In order to identify the ecotype abundance across cold desert environment, bacterial diversity patterns of Drass were further compared with the bacterial diversity of two other cold deserts, i.e., Antarctic and Arctic. Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria and Gemmatimonadetes were among the highly abundant taxonomic groups present across all the three cold deserts and were designated as the core phyla. However, Firmicutes, Nitrospirae, Armatimonadetes (former candidate division OP10), Planctomycetes, TM7, Chloroflexi, Deinococcus-Thermus, Tenericutes and candidate phyla WS3 were identified as rare phyla in Drass, Antarctic and Arctic samples. Differential abundance patterns were also computed across all the three samples, i.e., Acidobacteria (32.1%) were dominant in Drass and Firmicutes (52.917.6%) and Proteobacteria (421.3%) were dominant in Antarctic and Arctic reference samples, respectively. Alpha diversity values Shannon's (H) and Simpson's (1-D) diversity indices were highest for Antarctic samples, whereas richness estimators (ACE and Chao1) were maximum for Drass soil suggesting greater species richness in bacterial communities in Drass than the Antarctic and Arctic samples. PMID:26055487

  2. Preliminary crustal deformation model deduced from GPS and earthquakes data at Abu-Dabbab area, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Abdel-Monem S.; Hosny, A.; Abou-Aly, N.; Saleh, M.; Rayan, A.

    2013-06-01

    A local geodetic network consisting of eleven benchmarks has been established to study the recent crustal deformation in the Abu-Dabbab area. Seven campaigns of GPS measurements have been collected started from October 2008 and ended in March 2012. The collected data were processed using Bernese version 5.0, and the result values were adjusted to get the more accurate positions of the GPS stations. The magnitudes of horizontal displacements are variable from one epoch to another and in the range of 1-3 (0.2) mm/yr. Due to the differences in rates of the horizontal displacement; the area is divided into two main blocks. The first one, moves to the east direction of about 3 mm/yr, while the second block, moves to the SW direction of about 6 mm/yr. According to the strain fields that were calculated for the different epochs of measurement, the main force is compression force and is taken the NW-SE to NWW-SEE direction. This force could be because of local and regional tectonic processes affecting on the study area. The maximum values of compression stress are found in the southern central and western part of study area. Estimated accumulation of this strain energy may be considered as an indicator of the possibility of earthquake occurrence. From the seismic tomography study, the 3D Vp and Vp/Vs crustal models indicate high Vp/Vs values forms an elongated anomaly, in the central part of the study area, that extends from a depth of 12 km to about 1-2 km of depth is obtained. By using this crustal model in relocations all seismicity informed that most of the seismicity strongly tend to occur in a cluster manner exactly above the southern part of the study area. Based on the conducted source mechanism study, it is noticed that shallow earthquakes are associated by a high CLVD ratio (up to 40%). Furthermore, initiation of a high level seismic activity, without a large seismic main shock is observed in the Abu-Dabbab area. The distribution of micro-earthquakes tends to align in an ENE-WSW direction marking a zone of activity verse the Red Sea. The nucleation of the seismic activity beneath the southern part of the Abu-Dabbab crust is more consistent with the obtained crustal deformation result by increasing the crustal movement in the south part than the northern part. Then, based on the obtained results of the above mentioned studies; seismic tomography; source mechanisms, and crustal deformation we conclude that these seismic activities that are associated by crustal deformation are owing to some magma activity beneath the crust of the Abu-Dabbab area.

  3. Morphologic-anthropological investigations in tomb K93.12 at Dra' Abu el-Naga (Western Thebes, Egypt).

    PubMed

    Lsch, Sandra; Moghaddam, Negahnaz; Paladin, Alice; Rummel, Ute; Hower-Tilmann, Estelle; Zink, Albert

    2014-01-01

    In this study we present the analysis of the human remains from tomb K93.12 in the Ancient Egyptian necropolis of Dra' Abu el-Naga, located opposite the modern city of Luxor in Upper Egypt on the western bank of the Nile. Archaeological findings indicate that the rock tomb was originally built in the early 18th dynasty. Remains of two tomb-temples of the 20th dynasty and the looted burial of the High Priest of Amun Amenhotep have been identified. After the New Kingdom the tomb was reused as a burial place until the 26th dynasty. The skeletal and mummified material of the different tomb areas underwent a detailed anthropological and paleopathological analysis. The human remains were mostly damaged and scattered due to extensive grave robberies. In total, 79 individuals could be partly reconstructed and investigated. The age and sex distribution revealed a male predominance and a high percentage of young children (< 6 years) and adults in the range of 20 to 40 years. The paleopathological analysis showed a high prevalence of stress markers such as cribra orbitalia in the younger individuals, and other pathological conditions such as dental diseases, degenerative diseases and a possible case of ankylosing spondylitis. Additionally, 13 mummies of an intrusive waste pit could be attributed to three different groups belonging to earlier time periods based on their style of mummification and materials used. The study revealed important information on the age and sex distribution and diseases of the individuals buried in tomb K93.12. PMID:24818442

  4. Spermatogenesis and plasma testosterone levels in Western Australian burrowing desert frogs, Cyclorana platycephala, Cyclorana maini, and Neobatrachus sutor, during aestivation.

    PubMed

    Shalan, A G; Bradshaw, S D; Withers, P C; Thompson, G; Bayomy, M F F; Bradshaw, F J; Stewart, T

    2004-03-01

    Changes in testis size, histological status, and plasma levels of testosterone were monitored for males of three species of Western Australian desert frogs, Cyclorana maini, Cyclorana platycephala, and Neobatrachus sutor during aestivation. The frogs were induced to burrow and form cocoons soon after their capture and then disinterred at intervals in order to monitor changes in reproductive activity of the testes. All stages of spermatogenesis were evident in active frogs, which were collected a few days following rain from breeding choruses. Relative testis mass declined gradually in all species during the first 7 months of aestivation and then increased significantly at 16-19 months in the two species for which extended data were available (C. maini and N. sutor). A decrease in the number of sperm bundles 2-4 months after cocooning was associated with an initial increase in the number of free spermatazoa in all three species, which then returned to the levels seen in active animals after 7 months. Increases in the number of primary and secondary spermatogonia were most evident in C. platycephala after 4-7 months of aestivation, but early stages of spermatocytogenesis were evident in all species after 7 months of aestivation, especially in individuals that contained neither sperm bundles nor mature spermatazoa. Changes in plasma testosterone levels correlated significantly with variations in the diameter of the seminiferous tubules and the GSI, suggesting that this hormone plays a major role in controlling testicular recrudescence in aestivating, cocooned, desert frogs. Data from this study show that, in the absence of any external cues, testicular recrudescence is evident after approximately one year of aestivation in desert frogs which prepares them to breed again, once rain falls. PMID:14980800

  5. Implications of high altitude desert dust transport from Western Sahara to Nile Delta during biomass burning season.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Anup K; El-Askary, Hesham; Kafatos, Menas

    2010-11-01

    The air over major cities and rural regions of the Nile Delta is highly polluted during autumn which is the biomass burning season, locally known as black cloud. Previous studies have attributed the increased pollution levels during the black cloud season to the biomass or open burning of agricultural waste,vehicular, industrial emissions, and secondary aerosols. However, new multi-sensor observations (column and vertical profiles) from satellites, dust transport models and associated meteorology present a different picture of the autumn pollution. Here we show, for the first time, the evidence of long range transport of dust at high altitude (2.5-6km) from Western Sahara and its deposition over the Nile Delta region unlike current Models. The desert dust is found to be a major contributor to the local air quality which was previously considered to be due to pollution from biomass burning enhanced by the dominant northerly winds coming from Europe. PMID:20797813

  6. Multiprocess evolution of landforms in the Kharga Region, Egypt: Applications to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breed, C. S.; Mccauley, J. F.; Grolier, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    In order to understand better the polygenetic evolution of landforms on the martian surface, field studies were conducted in and around the Kharga Depression, Egypt. The Kharga region, on the eastern edge of Egypt's Western Desert, was subject to erosion under mostly hyperarid climatic conditions, punctuated by brief pluvial episodes of lesser aridity, since early Pleistocene time. The region contains numerous landforms analogous to features on the martian surface: yardangs carved in layered surficial deposits and in bedrock, invasive dune trains, wind-modified channels and interfluves, and depressions bounded by steep scarps. Like many of the topographic depresions on Mars, the Kharga Depression was invaded by crescentic dunes. In Egypt, stratigraphic relations between dunes, yardangs, mass-wasting debris, and wind-eroded flash-flood deposits record shifts in the relative effectiveness of wind, water, and mass-wasting processes as a function of climate change.

  7. Zonation of primary haloes of Atud auriferous quartz vein deposit, Central Eastern Desert of Egypt: A potential exploration model targeting for hidden mesothermal gold deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harraz, Hassan Z.; Hamdy, Mohamed M.

    2015-01-01

    The Atud gold mine located in the Neoproterozoic diorite and metagabbro of the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt has been initially excavated during Pharaonic times. Between 1953 and 1969, the Egyptian Geological Survey and Mining Authority performed underground prospection in the auriferous quartz vein and metasomatic alteration zones in the main Atud area, estimating a principal gold lode of 19,000 tones (16.28 g/ton), and 1600 tons of damp (1.24 g/ton). Yet the potentiality of the deposit has not been exhausted. However, for exploration of hidden ore, quantitative characterization using trace elements zoning of mineralization haloes with 280 samples from surface and three underground mining levels is applied. This was through multivariate statistical analysis (Factor analysis) of 11 selected trace elements. Axial (vertical) extents of primary haloes above and beneath gently dipping orebody are also visualized to interpret the level of erosion, determine the direction of mineralizing solutions as well as to examine whether the hidden orebody is promising at the Atud mine. Axial zones of primary dispersion aureoles of trace elements are: Ag, As, S and U around the auriferous quartz veins; Cu, and Pb in the surface horizons; and Zn, Ni, Co, and U along the lower margin of mineralization zone. Gold contents in bedrock and quartz vein samples from level-42M are the highest (5.7 and 40.3 ppm, respectively). In the transverse (lateral) direction, the maximum relative accumulation of Au and Zn occurs at the Northern Shaft; Pb, Cu, As, and U at the Main Shaft; and Ag, S, Co, and Ni at the Southern Shaft. The estimated axial zonation sequence of indicator elements using the variability index is Pb → Cu → Ag → Au → As → S → Ni → Co → U → Zn. According to this zonation, an index such as (Pb × Cu)D/(U × Zn)D can be a significant for predicting the Au potentiality at a particular depth. In addition, the Pb/U zonality index is an appropriate indicator for the degree of erosion at the Atud gold mine. The degree of surficial zonality of the mineralization as deduced from geochemical maps and the level of erosion of the geochemical anomalies as well as the decreasing of gold content with depth recorded throughout the different underground mine workings make it necessary for the prospection model to evaluate the drainage patterns dissecting the mineralized zone. The application of R-mode factor analysis estimated seven statistical factors, and factor score maps are portrayed. Factors 1 (Ag, Au, As, Co, S, U and Zn) and 2 (Zn, U, Co and S) significantly reflect the Au-mineralization (ore-controlled), and their score maps enable a more precise delineation of auriferous quartz veins and the area which may contain primary gold mineralization. The other factors reveal the distribution of Cu- and Pb-bearing minerals (supergene alteration factors), and Ba and Ni in the host diorite (lithologically-controlled). These are consistent with the calculated maximum relative accumulation of trace elements, proposing a potential model of exploration based on integrating underground geochemical data from old gold mine workings with spatial information from R-mode factor score maps.

  8. Multi-element association analysis of stream sediment geochemistry data for predicting gold deposits in Barramiya gold mine, Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harraz, Hassan Z.; Hamdy, Mohamed M.; El-Mamoney, Mohamed H.

    2012-06-01

    The use of traditional statistical methods can provide suitable indicators of geochemical element dispersion, and aids in targeting potential areas for mineral exploration. Analyzes of stream sediments from an ophiolite suite of ophiolitic mélange matrix and metasediments belt are used for regional geochemical prospecting of gold in the Barramiya mining district, Eastern Desert, Egypt. The principal rocks exposed in the study area are Late-Proterozoic volcano-sedimentary sequences intruded by serpentinite, small bodies of Older and Younger Granitoids, all injected by dykes of various compositions. Gold production derived mainly from shear zone with Au-bearing quartz veins hosted by ultramafic schists and serpentinites at fault intersections or along the basal décollement of the major thrusts, especially where granitoid massifs and stocks are common. Orebodies are mainly sulfide-bearing quartz and quartz-carbonate lodes associated with graphite-schist, listvenite and marble exposures, showing signs of structural control expressed in preferable orientation and consistent meso- and microfabrics. The area has two known gold deposits where several chromite mines are present. Auriferous veins are confined along E and ENE fracture systems and zones in a passive tectonic contact between the serpentinites and the metasediments. Results of 425 stream sediment samples from an area of ˜73 km2 analyzed for 13 trace elements are presented using simple statistical and R-mode factor methods. The overall sample density achieved by the survey is ˜6 samples/km2. Significant variations in background metal contents are recorded near the known mineralized sites. Preliminary visual interpretation of individual spatial distribution patterns of Ag, As, Au, Cu, Mo, Pb, and W show clear-cut relationships with known gold mineralization in the study area. Geochemical patterns of these elements delineate drainage basins with anomalous concentration of elements genetically related to gold mineralization. Gold in analyzed samples ranges from <0.02 to 3.51 ppm with average 0.21 ppm. Most of the high element concentrations in stream sediments are found in the graphite-schist and serpentinized marble rocks. Application of R-mode factor analysis indicates significant components of the sample composition. These reflect lithological, environmental and mineralization controls. Preparation of factor score map for the association Ag-Au-As-Cu-Zn-Pb-Mo-W enables a more precise delineation of zones of known gold mineralization as well as areas that may contain (on geological grounds) primary gold mineralization. The exploration significance of some anomalies has not been established, but a number of these anomalies may be related to undiscovered mineralization while others may be of no economic significance. Groundwater pH influences the hydromorphic dispersion patterns of Ag, As, and Au in different ways and this requires consideration during data interpretation.

  9. Structural controls, temperature-pressure conditions and fluid evolution of orogenic gold mineralisation at the Betam mine, south Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoheir, Basem A.

    2008-01-01

    The Betam gold deposit, located in the southern Eastern Desert of Egypt, is related to a series of milky quartz veins along a NNW-trending shear zone, cutting through pelitic metasedimentary rocks and small masses of pink granite. This shear zone, along with a system of discrete shear and fault zones, was developed late in the deformation history of the area. Although slightly sheared and boudinaged within the shear zone, the auriferous quartz veins are characterised by irregular walls with a steeply plunging ridge-in-groove lineation. Shear geometry of rootless intra-folial folds and asymmetrical strain shadows around the quartz lenses suggests that vein emplacement took place under a brittle-ductile shear regime, clearly post-dating the amphibolite-facies regional metamorphism. Hydrothermal alteration is pervasive in the wallrock metapelites and granite including sericitisation, silicification, sulphidisation and minor carbonatisation. Ore mineralogy includes pyrite, arsenopyrite and subordinate galena, chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite and gold. Gold occurs in the quartz veins and adjacent wallrocks as inclusions in pyrite and arsenopyrite, blebs and globules associated with galena, fracture fillings in deformed arsenopyrite or as thin, wire-like rims within or around rhythmic goethite. Presence of refractory gold in arsenopyrite and pyrite is inferred from microprobe analyses. Clustered and intra-granular trail-bound aqueous-carbonic (LCO2 + Laq VCO2) inclusions are common in cores of the less deformed quartz crystals, whereas carbonic (LCO2 VCO2) and aqueous H2O-NaCl (L + V) inclusions occur along inter-granular and trans-granular trails. Clathrate melting temperatures indicate low salinities of the fluid (3-8 wt.% NaCl eq.). Homogenisation temperatures of the aqueous-carbonic inclusions range between 297 and 323C, slightly higher than those of the intra-granular and inter-granular aqueous inclusions (263-304C), which are likely formed during grain boundary migration. Homogenisation temperatures of the trans-granular H2O-NaCl inclusions are much lower (130-221C), implying different fluids late in the shear zone formation. Fluid densities calculated from aqueous-carbonic inclusions along a single trail are between 0.88 and 0.98 g/cm3, and the resulting isochores suggest trapping pressures of 2-2.6 kbar. Based on the arsenopyrite-pyrite-pyrrhotite cotectic, arsenopyrite (30.4-30.7 wt.% As) associated with gold inclusions indicates a temperature range of 325-344C. This ore paragenesis constrains f S2 to the range of 10-10 to 10-8.5 bar. Under such conditions, gold was likely transported mainly as bisulphide complexes by low salinity aqueous-carbonic fluids and precipitated because of variations in pH and f O2 through pressure fluctuation and CO2 effervescence as the ore fluids infiltrated the shear zone, along with precipitation of carbonate and sericite. Wallrock sulphidation also likely contributed to destabilising the gold-bisulphide complexes and precipitating gold in the hydrothermal alteration zone adjacent to the mineralised quartz veins.

  10. Depositional cycles: an approach to the sequence stratigraphy of the Dakhla Formation, west Dakhla-Farafra stretch, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Azabi, M. H.; El-Araby, A.

    2000-05-01

    The latest Campanian-Middle Palocene Dakhla Formation has been the subject of few sedimentological studies, despite its great areal distribution. This shale/mudstone unit exhibits marked facies variations in a northwest-southeast direction. The facies distribution patterns, stratal geometries and type, as well as frequency of the associated microfauna, allow a possible subdivision of the Dakhla Formation into ten depositional cycles. These cycles are delineated from each other by a bounding surface, which is defined by an abrupt facies change and/or intensively bioturbated hardground. The sediments of these cycles have been accumulated in a shallow subtidal-upper intertidal-flat environment during Late Cretaceous and in a middle/outer shelf-lower intertidal suite during Palocene times. Deposition took place in a topographically irregular basin under a constantly high clastic input derived largely from the south and southwest. The cyclic pattern of deposition that characterises the Dakhla Formation, points to repeated relative sea level fluctuations. The submarine palorelief also plays a significant role on the facies pattern. It is found that the succession was deposited along the marginal part of a palostructural low. Its deeper area is located around present-day Edmonstone. The study of sedimentary facies characteristics and cyclicity of the Dakhla Formation leads to the recognition of four depositional sequences bounded by five type 2 sequence boundaries. The first and second type 2 depositional sequences correspond to the Late Maastrichtian Mawhoob Shale and lower-middle part of the Beris Mudstone Members, respectively. The third sequence comprises the Beris Mudstone Member 'upper part' and the Latest Maastrichtian partition of the Kharga Shale Member. The well-documented Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary marks the type 2 sequence boundary at the top of this sequence. The last depositional sequence coincides with the late Early-Middle Palocene subdivision of the Kharga Shale Member. These sequences comprise nine systems tracts, mainly of transgressive and highstand systems tract deposits.

  11. Fugitive dust mitigation for PM{sub 10} attainment in the western Mojave Desert: Recommendations on revegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Grantz, D.A.; Vaughn, D.L.; Roberts, E.

    1997-12-31

    Methods to suppress fugitive dust and associated violations of federal PM{sub 10} standards in the western Mojave Desert, following removal of native vegetation by tillage or overgrazing, have been under investigation by a multi-agency task force for several years. Interim recommendations are now possible for this area of high winds, low rainfall, and mostly arable soil with patchy blowing sand. There can be no guarantee of success in any revegetation program in the desert, but the greatest probability of success in this area can be attained by using the native shrub Atriplex canescens, whether direct seeded or transplanted. No additional nitrogen should be added, and excess nitrogen should be removed if possible, perhaps by a preliminary cropping of barley. This will itself stabilize the soil surface in the short term. Young plants should be protected from herbivory and the harsh elements by using plastic cones. Irrigation is helpful if available. In areas located near native populations of rabbitbrush annual plant cover should be burned but no tillage or other soil disturbance should be imposed, as this facilitates invasion of annual species, including russian thistle, and prevents establishment of rabbitbrush. In sandy areas, seeding with Indian ricegrass may be more effective than with A. canescens. For immediate, short-term, mitigation of blowing dust, furrowing alone and installation of windfences may be effective. Rainfall exhibits high annual variability in arid regions. Absence of fugitive dust emissions in rainy periods, associated with ground cover by annual vegetation, is unlikely to survive several years of low, but normal, rainfall. It is precisely during those periods when rainfall is adequate that long-term revegetation with shrubs has the best chance of success.

  12. Paleohydrology of flash floods in small desert watersheds in western Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, P. Kyle; Baker, Victor R.

    2001-06-01

    In this study, geological, historical, and meteorological data were combined to produce a regional chronology of flood magnitude and frequency in nine small basins (7-70 km2). The chronology spans more than 1000 years and demonstrates that detailed records of flood magnitude and frequency can be compiled in arid regions with little to no conventional hydrologic information. The recent (i.e., post-1950) flood history was evaluated by comparing a 50-year series of aerial photographs with precipitation data, ages of flood-transported beer cans, anthropogenic horizons in flood sediments, postbomb 14C dates on flotsam, and anecdotal accounts. Stratigraphic analysis of paleoflood deposits extended the regional flood record in time, and associated flood magnitudes were determined by incorporating relict high-water evidence into a hydraulic model. The results reveal a general consistency among the magnitudes of the largest floods in the historical and the paleoflood records and indicate that the magnitudes and relative frequencies of actual large floods are at variance with "100-year" flood magnitudes predicted by regional flood frequency models. This suggests that the predictive equations may not be appropriate for regulatory, management, or design purposes in the absence of additional, real data on flooding. Augmenting conventional approaches to regional flood magnitude and frequency analysis with real information derived from the alternative methods described here is a viable approach to improving assessments of regional flood characteristics in sparsely gaged desert areas.

  13. Geothermal resources of the Western Arm of the Black Rock Desert, northwestern Nevada; Part II, Aqueous geochemistry and hydrology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welch, A.H.; Preissler, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    The western arm of the Black Rock Desert, Nevada, includes several distinct hydrothermal systems, some of which exceed 150 C and may exceed 200 C at depth, determined on the basis of chemical geothermometry. The cation composition of the thermal water appears to be controlled by aluminosilicate minerals that are common in other active geothermal systems. Estimates of the equilibrium temperatures at which some mineral pairs are stable, when compared with the more commonly applied geothermometer estimates, indicate that thermodynamic data may be useful for estimating deep aquifer temperatures. Thermal water at Great Boiling and Mud Springs, which has a chloride concentration of about 2,000 mg/L and a total dissolved-solids concentration of 4 ,500 mg/L, appears to have been affected by shallow evapotranspiration in an adjacent playa prior to deep circulation. This model of recharge within the basin floor is distinctly different from models proposed for most other geothermal systems in the northern Great Basin. (USGS)

  14. Isolation and characterization of osmotolerant bacteria from thar desert of western Rajasthan (India).

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ramavtar; Manda, Rajni; Gupta, Shikha; Kumar, Sushil; Kumar, Vinod

    2013-12-01

    The Thar Desert harsher environment harbors a limited diversity of life forms due to extreme conditions like low moisture of sandy soils and high soil temperature. In the present study, osmotolerant bacteria from the Thar soils were isolated and characterized. Bacteria were isolated from 20 soil samples (100 g), collected from sand dunes, suspended in water and absolute alcohol. A total of 11 biochemical and morphological tests were carried out for generic identification of bacteria. Osmotic tolerance capacity of isolates was examined on glycerol, NaCI and alcohol; and sequencing of 16S rRNA gene was also performed for bacterial identification. 16S to 23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer analysis (RISA) was done for phylogenetic analysis of isolates. The soil suspended in water contained 2.5 x 10(6) bacteria/g of soil while alcohol suspended soil had 4.4 x 10(4) bacteria/g. The 24 bacterial isolates were found tolerant to 26% glycerol, 14% NaCI and 10% of alcohol, and 22 out of 24 isolates were found Gram positive. The results showed that 45.83% and 41.67% bacteria belong to Bacillus spp. and Corynebacterium spp., respectively, while Acinetobacter spp., Aeromonas spp. and Staphylococcus spp. were in equal proportion (4.16% each). Six isolates were selected for 16S rRNA gene sequencing and five were found 95% similar with Bacillus licheniformis whereas one isolate was identified as B. subtilis. All the isolates showed good growth up to 50 degrees C with gradual reduction on subsequent increment of temperature. Out of 24 isolates, six could survive at 65 degrees C while one isolate could grow at 63 degrees C. Growth kinetic studies revealed that the reduction in generation time in solute(s) and temperature stress was more as compared to generation time in plain medium. This study suggests that virgin sand dunes may be a rich source of bacteria, tolerant to osmotrophic solutes, and can be examined for plant growth promotion activity in agriculture. Moreover, study might help to resolve the tactic adopted by microbes to defeat desiccation induced by various types of solutes. PMID:24432519

  15. Bioprospecting of plant growth promoting psychrotrophic Bacilli from the cold desert of north western Indian Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Ajar Nath; Sachan, Shashwati Ghosh; Verma, Priyanka; Saxena, Anil Kumar

    2016-02-01

    The plant growth promoting psychrotrophic Bacilli were investigated from different sites in north western Indian Himalayas. A total of 247 morphotypes were obtained from different soil and water samples and were grouped into 43 clusters based on 16S rDNA-RFLP analysis with three restriction endonucleases. Sequencing of representative isolates has revealed that these 43 Bacilli belonged to different species of 11 genera viz., Desemzia, Exiguobacterium, Jeotgalicoccus, Lysinibacillus, Paenibacillus, Planococcus, Pontibacillus, Sinobaca, Sporosarcina, Staphylococcus and Virgibacillus. With an aim to develop microbial inoculants that can perform efficiently at low temperatures, all representative isolates were screened for different plant growth promoting traits at low temperatures (5-15 degrees C). Among the strains, variations were observed for production (%) of indole-3-acetic acid (20), ammonia (19), siderophores (11), gibberellic acid (4) and hydrogen cyanide (2); solubilisation (%) of zinc (14), phosphate (13) and potassium (7); 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase activity (6%) and biocontrol activity (4%) against Rhizoctonia solani and Macrophomina phaseolina. Among all the strains, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus muralis, Desemzia incerta, Paenibacillus tylopili and Sporosarcina globispora were found to be potent candidates to be developed as inoculants as they exhibited multiple PGP traits at low temperature. PMID:26934782

  16. Evidence for population fragmentation within a subterranean aquatic habitat in the Western Australian desert.

    PubMed

    Guzik, M T; Cooper, S J B; Humphreys, W F; Ong, S; Kawakami, T; Austin, A D

    2011-09-01

    The evolution of subterranean animals following multiple colonisation events from the surface has been well documented, but few studies have investigated the potential for species diversification within cavernicolous habitats. Isolated calcrete (carbonate) aquifers in central Western Australia have been shown to contain diverse assemblages of aquatic subterranean invertebrate species (stygofauna) and to offer a unique model system for exploring the mechanisms of speciation in subterranean ecosystems. In this paper, we investigated the hypothesis that microallopatric speciation processes (fragmentation and isolation by distance (IBD)) occur within calcretes using a comparative phylogeographic study of three stygobiontic diving beetle species, one amphipod species and a lineage of isopods. Specimens were sequenced for the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene from three main sites: Quandong Well, Shady Well (SW) and Mt. Windarra (MW), spanning a 15 km region of the Laverton Downs Calcrete. Phylogenetic and haplotype network analyses revealed that each species possessed a single divergent clade of haplotypes that were present only at the southern MW site, despite the existence of other haplotypes at MW that were shared with SW. IBD between MW and SW was evident, but the common phylogeographic pattern most likely resulted from fragmentation, possibly by a salt lake adjacent to MW. These findings suggest that microallopatric speciation within calcretes may be a significant diversifying force, although the proportion of stygofauna species that may have resulted from in situ speciation in this system remains to be determined. PMID:21343944

  17. Evidence for population fragmentation within a subterranean aquatic habitat in the Western Australian desert

    PubMed Central

    Guzik, M T; Cooper, S J B; Humphreys, W F; Ong, S; Kawakami, T; Austin, A D

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of subterranean animals following multiple colonisation events from the surface has been well documented, but few studies have investigated the potential for species diversification within cavernicolous habitats. Isolated calcrete (carbonate) aquifers in central Western Australia have been shown to contain diverse assemblages of aquatic subterranean invertebrate species (stygofauna) and to offer a unique model system for exploring the mechanisms of speciation in subterranean ecosystems. In this paper, we investigated the hypothesis that microallopatric speciation processes (fragmentation and isolation by distance (IBD)) occur within calcretes using a comparative phylogeographic study of three stygobiontic diving beetle species, one amphipod species and a lineage of isopods. Specimens were sequenced for the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase 1 gene from three main sites: Quandong Well, Shady Well (SW) and Mt. Windarra (MW), spanning a 15 km region of the Laverton Downs Calcrete. Phylogenetic and haplotype network analyses revealed that each species possessed a single divergent clade of haplotypes that were present only at the southern MW site, despite the existence of other haplotypes at MW that were shared with SW. IBD between MW and SW was evident, but the common phylogeographic pattern most likely resulted from fragmentation, possibly by a salt lake adjacent to MW. These findings suggest that microallopatric speciation within calcretes may be a significant diversifying force, although the proportion of stygofauna species that may have resulted from in situ speciation in this system remains to be determined. PMID:21343944

  18. The meaning of desert color in earth orbital photographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Baz, F.

    1978-01-01

    The color of desert surfaces as seen in earth orbital photographs is indicative of soil composition. Apollo-Soyuz photographs of the Sturt and Simpson Deserts of Australia confirm that sand grains become redder as the distance from the source increases. Reddening is caused by a thin iron-oxide coating on individual sand grains and can be used, in some cases, to map relative-age zones. Photographs of the Western (Libyan) Desert of Egypt indicate three distinct and nearly parallel color zones that have been correlated in the field with: (1) arable soil composed of quartz, clay, and calcium carbonate particles; (2) relatively active sand with or without sparse vegetation; and (3) relatively inactive sand mixed with dark (desert-varnished) pebbles. The youngest sands are in the form of longitudinal dunes, which are migrating to the south-southeast along the prevailing wind direction. Some of the young dune fields are encroaching on the western boundary of the fertile Nile Valley.

  19. Combining molecular-marker and chemical analysis of Capparis decidua (Capparaceae) in the Thar Desert of Western Rajasthan (india).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sushil; Sharma, Ramavtar; Kumar, Vinod; Vyas, Govind K; Rathore, Abhishek

    2013-03-01

    The Thar Desert, a very inhospitable place, accommodates only plant species that survive acute drought, unpredictable precipitation, and those can grow in the limited moisture of sandy soils. Capparis decidua is among one of the few plants able to grow well under these conditions. This species is highly exploited and has been naturally taken, as local people use it for various purposes like food, timber and fuel, although, no management or conservation efforts have been established. The present study was conducted in this arid area of Western Rajasthan (India) with the aim to obtain preliminary molecular information about this group of plants. We evaluated diversity among 46 samples of C. decidua using chemical parameters and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. Fourteen chemical parameters and eight minerals (total 22 variables) of this species fruits were estimated. A total of 14 RAPD primers produced 235 band positions, of which 81.27% were polymorphic. Jaccard's similarity coefficients for RAPD primers ranged from 0.34 to 0.86 with a mean genetic similarity of 0.50. As per observed coefficient of variation, NDF (Neutral Detergent Fiber) content was found to be the most variable trait followed by starch and soluble carbohydrate. The Manhattan dissimilarity coefficient values for chemical parameters ranged between 0.02-0.31 with an average of 0.092. The present study revealed a very low correlation (0.01) between chemical parameters and RAPD-based matrices. The low correlation between chemical- and RAPD-based matrices indicated that the two methods were different and highly variable. The chemical-based diversity will assist in selection of nutritionally rich samples for medicinal purpose, while genetic diversity to face natural challenges and find sustainable ways to promote conservation for future use. PMID:23894984

  20. Three-dimensional structure of Conrad and Moho discontinuities in Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelwahed, Mohamed F.; El-Khrepy, Sami; Qaddah, Atef

    2013-09-01

    The three-dimensional structures of Conrad and Moho discontinuities beneath Egypt are investigated by local earthquake travel time inversion. A number of 2513 events with 24,696 arrival time data recorded by the Egyptian National Seismic Network (ENSN) are used. The station corrections of P- and S-waves and the hypocentral parameters are simultaneously estimated with the Conrad and Moho depths. The results of this study show that the discontinuities form patterns of shallow and deep structures getting shallow toward the northern and eastern coast, and deeper toward western Desert and northeastern Sinai. The Conrad and Moho discontinuities are located within the depth range 9-17 km and 27-41 km, respectively. The depth ranges of Conrad and Moho discontinuities are respectively: 15-16 km and 31-33 km in greater Cairo and Dahshour; 15-18 km and 32-35 km in Sinai; 16-17 and 33-35 km along the Nile River; 9 and 30 km near the Red Sea coast; 15 and 39 km toward the western desert. The comprehensive comparison with previous crustal studies suggests that the main patterns of Moho undulations and the range of Moho depths are in good agreement with the previous crustal models in Egypt, as well as with the Bouguer gravity anomalies that well explain the Nile River sediments, Red Sea mountain belts and Western Desert depression and Oasis. The model of the Moho and Conrad discontinuities improves knowledge of the three dimensional structure of the crust beneath Egypt in wide areas where geophysical data is sparse.

  1. Methanogens at the top of the world: occurrence and potential activity of methanogens in newly deglaciated soils in high-altitude cold deserts in the Western Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Aschenbach, Katrin; Conrad, Ralf; Reháková, Klára; Doležal, Jiří; Janatková, Kateřina; Angel, Roey

    2013-01-01

    Methanogens typically occur in reduced anoxic environments. However, in recent studies it has been shown that many aerated upland soils, including desert soils also host active methanogens. Here we show that soil samples from high-altitude cold deserts in the western Himalayas (Ladakh, India) produce CH4 after incubation as slurry under anoxic conditions at rates comparable to those of hot desert soils. Samples of matured soil from three different vegetation belts (arid, steppe, and subnival) were compared with younger soils originating from frontal and lateral moraines of receding glaciers. While methanogenic rates were higher in the samples from matured soils, CH4 was also produced in the samples from the recently deglaciated moraines. In both young and matured soils, those covered by a biological soil crust (biocrust) were more active than their bare counterparts. Isotopic analysis showed that in both cases CH4 was initially produced from H2/CO2 but later mostly from acetate. Analysis of the archaeal community in the in situ soil samples revealed a clear dominance of sequences related to Thaumarchaeota, while the methanogenic community comprised only a minor fraction of the archaeal community. Similar to other aerated soils, the methanogenic community was comprised almost solely of the genera Methanosarcina and Methanocella, and possibly also Methanobacterium in some cases. Nevertheless, ~10(3) gdw(-1) soil methanogens were already present in the young moraine soil together with cyanobacteria. Our results demonstrate that Methanosarcina and Methanocella not only tolerate atmospheric oxygen but are also able to survive in these harsh cold environments. Their occurrence in newly deglaciated soils shows that they are early colonizers of desert soils, similar to cyanobacteria, and may play a role in the development of desert biocrusts. PMID:24348469

  2. Methanogens at the top of the world: occurrence and potential activity of methanogens in newly deglaciated soils in high-altitude cold deserts in the Western Himalayas

    PubMed Central

    Aschenbach, Katrin; Conrad, Ralf; Řeháková, Klára; Doležal, Jiří; Janatková, Kateřina; Angel, Roey

    2013-01-01

    Methanogens typically occur in reduced anoxic environments. However, in recent studies it has been shown that many aerated upland soils, including desert soils also host active methanogens. Here we show that soil samples from high-altitude cold deserts in the western Himalayas (Ladakh, India) produce CH4 after incubation as slurry under anoxic conditions at rates comparable to those of hot desert soils. Samples of matured soil from three different vegetation belts (arid, steppe, and subnival) were compared with younger soils originating from frontal and lateral moraines of receding glaciers. While methanogenic rates were higher in the samples from matured soils, CH4 was also produced in the samples from the recently deglaciated moraines. In both young and matured soils, those covered by a biological soil crust (biocrust) were more active than their bare counterparts. Isotopic analysis showed that in both cases CH4 was initially produced from H2/CO2 but later mostly from acetate. Analysis of the archaeal community in the in situ soil samples revealed a clear dominance of sequences related to Thaumarchaeota, while the methanogenic community comprised only a minor fraction of the archaeal community. Similar to other aerated soils, the methanogenic community was comprised almost solely of the genera Methanosarcina and Methanocella, and possibly also Methanobacterium in some cases. Nevertheless, ~103 gdw−1 soil methanogens were already present in the young moraine soil together with cyanobacteria. Our results demonstrate that Methanosarcina and Methanocella not only tolerate atmospheric oxygen but are also able to survive in these harsh cold environments. Their occurrence in newly deglaciated soils shows that they are early colonizers of desert soils, similar to cyanobacteria, and may play a role in the development of desert biocrusts. PMID:24348469

  3. Remote sensing and geochemical investigations of selected surface processes in Egypt and Missouri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crombie, Mary Katherine

    This thesis consists of three studies of surface processes on Earth: 1. Age and isotopic constraints of pluvial episodes in the Western Desert of Egypt. North Africa has undergone drastic climatic change over the past several hundred thousand years. Timing of humid intervals called pluvials was investigated by uranium- series disequilibrium dating of travertines from the Kurkur Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt. Stable oxygen isotopes of the travertines were used in equilibrium oxygen isotope fractionation calculations indicating the Kurkur travertines have δ18O values similar to ancient Western Desert groundwaters (~[- ]11/perthous). The ages of the of the travertines correspond to times of monsoonal maxima, eustatic sea level high stands and interglacial maxima. Increased precipitation, recharge of Western Desert groundwaters, and resultant travertine deposition are interpreted to be consequences of Milankovitch cycle forcing, through enhanced Atlantic and Indian Ocean monsoons during periods of enhanced northern summer insolation. 2. Identification of soil moisture as an environmental risk factor for filariasis in Egypt. Bancroftian filariasis is a deforming illness transmitted by mosquitoes (Culex. pipiens) and caused by the parasite Wuchereria bancrofti (WHO technical report 821; Neva and Brown, 1994). Environmental variables, such as humidity, play an important role in the transmission cycle of filariasis. Landsat Thematic Mapper data were used to model the surface soil moisture conditions of the southern Nile Delta region of Egypt as a proxy for environmental humidity. Filariasis infection rates were found to be negligible for areas with low surface soil moisture availability (>20%). Variable infection rates were observed for regions with higher surface soil moisture content, possibly due to anthropogenic influences such as insect control and the use of anti- filarial drugs. 3. Monitoring of Pb aerosol fallout in the vicinity of the Glover smelter, Southeastern Missouri. Pb ore smelting in Southeastern Missouri is a point source for heavy metal particulates that are dispersed over a wide region. Pb ratios of the ores are distinct from local bedrock and background atmospheric Pb. A feasibility study to determine the usefulness of Sector Field ICP-MS analysis of Pb isotopes and heavy metal concentrations of leaves sampled at increasing distance from the smelter was initiated. The goal was to develop an inexpensive and relatively simple means of mapping the impact of heavy metals on the ecosystem surrounding the smelter.

  4. Nile River, Lake Nasser, Aswan Dam, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Egypt's High Aswan Dam on the Nile River at the first cataracts, Nile River, (24.0N, 33.0E) was completed in 1971 to provide cheap hydroelectric power and to regulate the historically uneven flow of the Nile River. The contrast between the largely base rock desert east of the Nile versus the sand covered desert west of the river and the ancient irrigated floodplain downstream from the damsite is clearly shown.

  5. PIXE micro-mapping of minor elements in Hypatia, a diamond bearing carbonaceous stone from the Libyan Desert Glass area, Egypt: Inheritance from a cold molecular cloud?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreoli, M. A. G.; Przybylowicz, W. J.; Kramers, J.; Belyanin, G.; Westraadt, J.; Bamford, M.; Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, J.; Venter, A.

    2015-11-01

    Matter originating from space, particularly if it represents rare meteorite samples, is ideally suited to be studied by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) as this analytical technique covers a broad range of trace elements and is per se non-destructive. We describe and interpret a set of micro-PIXE elemental maps obtained on two minute (weighing about 25 and 150 mg), highly polished fragments taken from Hypatia, a controversial, diamond-bearing carbonaceous pebble from the SW Egyptian desert. PIXE data show that Hypatia is chemically heterogeneous, with significant amounts of primordial S, Cl, P and at least 10 elements with Z > 21 (Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Os, Ir) locally attaining concentrations above 500 ppm. Si, Al, Ca, K, O also occur, but are predominantly confined to cracks and likely represent contamination from the desert environment. Unusual in the stone is poor correlation between elements within the chalcophile (S vs. Cu, Zn) and siderophile (i.e.: Fe vs. Ni, Ir, Os) groups, whereas other siderophiles (Mn, Mo and the Platinum group elements (PGEs)) mimic the distribution of lithophile elements such as Cr and V. Worthy of mention is also the presence of a globular domain (Ø ∼ 120 μm) that is C and metals-depleted, yet Cl (P)-enriched (>3 wt.% and 0.15 wt.% respectively). While the host of the Cl remains undetermined, this chemical unit is enclosed within a broader domain that is similarly C-poor, yet Cr-Ir rich (up to 1.2 and 0.3 wt.% respectively). Our data suggest that the pebble consists of shock-compacted, primitive carbonaceous material enriched in cold, pre-solar dust.

  6. Timing and characteristics of Late Pleistocene and Holocene wetter periods in the Eastern Desert and Sinai of Egypt, based on 14C dating and stable isotope analysis of spring tufa deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, Mohamed A.; Brook, George A.

    2015-12-01

    There is very little dated evidence on wet periods in the Eastern Desert and Sinai Peninsula of Egypt during the Late Pleistocene and Holocene. To obtain such information, we have studied the petrography, isotope geochemistry and AMS radiocarbon ages of mostly relict tufas deposited by springs draining perched ground water bodies in metamorphic and volcanic rocks. The tufas unconformably overly Precambrian basic igneous rocks (basalt, diabase and gabbro). As the ages of tufa carbonate are frequently older than the true ages of the deposits because of the incorporation of old, 14C-dead carbon, we have dated both the carbonate matrix and insoluble organic material of the tufas. These ages show that the tufas were largely formed during two broad time periods, the most recent from 12,058 to 6678 cal yr BP (African Humid Period), and the other from ∼31,200-22,500 cal yr BP, with preferential growth during the coldest times of this period namely during Heinrich Events 2 and 3 (H2 and H3) and the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The time span between 19,000-9000 cal yr BP, including the YD and H1, appears to have been relatively more arid than the earlier LGM or H2 periods or the later Holocene. The Late Pleistocene tufas are depleted in 18O relative to the Holocene tufas and were deposited at a lower temperature (∼14.0°-20.8 °C vs. 18.4°-23.4 °C). We believe that the Holocene tufas in the Sinai were formed by rainfall from the Mediterranean and those in the southern part of the Eastern Desert by African monsoon rainfall derived from the Red Sea-Gulf of Aden and Indian Ocean. In contrast, the moisture that fed the Late Pleistocene tufas, which are depleted in 18O relative to Holocene deposits, and progressively depleted from north to south, was probably brought by the Westerlies from the Atlantic-Mediterranean Sea when the Westerly circulation was pushed southwards during the coldest periods of the Late Pleistocene. Periods of tufa deposition correlate with major documented paleoclimatic events in North Africa during the late Pleistocene and Holocene; such as the Nile floods, high sea level and the formation of sapropels in the Mediterranean.

  7. Composition, age, and origin of the ~620 Ma Humr Akarim and Humrat Mukbid A-type granites: no evidence for pre-Neoproterozoic basement in the Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Kamal A.; Moghazi, Abdel-Kader M.; Maurice, Ayman E.; Omar, Sayed A.; Wang, Qiang; Wilde, Simon A.; Moussa, Ewais M.; Manton, William I.; Stern, Robert J.

    2012-10-01

    The Humr Akarim and Humrat Mukbid plutons, in the central Eastern Desert of Egypt, are late Neoproterozoic post-collisional alkaline A-type granites. Humr Akarim and Humrat Mukbid plutonic rocks consist of subsolvus alkali granites and a subordinate roof facies of albite granite, which hosts greisen and Sn-Mo-mineralized quartz veins; textural and field evidence strongly suggest the presence of late magmatic F-rich fluids. The granites are Si-alkali rich, Mg-Ca-Ti poor with high Rb/Sr (20-123), and low K/Rb (27-65). They are enriched in high field strength elements (e.g., Nb, Ta, Zr, Y, U, Th) and heavy rare earth elements (La n /Yb n = 0.27-0.95) and exhibit significant tetrad effects in REE patterns. These geochemical attributes indicate that granite trace element distribution was controlled by crystal fractionation as well as interaction with fluorine-rich magmatic fluids. U-Pb SHRIMP zircon dating indicates an age of ~630-620 Ma but with abundant evidence that zircons were affected by late corrosive fluids (e.g., discordance, high common Pb). ɛNd at 620 Ma ranges from +3.4 to +6.8 (mean = +5.0) for Humr Akarim granitic rocks and from +4.8 to +7.5 (mean = +5.8) for Humrat Mukbid granitic rocks. Some slightly older zircons (~740 Ma, 703 Ma) may have been inherited from older granites in the region. Our U-Pb zircon data and Nd isotope results indicate a juvenile magma source of Neoproterozoic age like that responsible for forming most other ANS crust and refute previous conclusions that pre-Neoproterozoic continental crust was involved in the generation of the studied granites.

  8. Spatial association of Neoproterozoic continental arc I-type and post-collision A-type granitoids in the Arabian-Nubian Shield: The Wadi Al-Baroud Older and Younger Granites, North Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bialy, Mohammed Zaky; Omar, Mohamed M.

    2015-03-01

    The Neoproterozoic basement of Wadi Al-Baroud area located at the northern Eastern Desert (ED) of Egypt, at the northernmost segment of the Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS), is comprised of two different granite suites. A large batholith ascribed to the Older Granite suite, extends across the boundary between the northern and central ED, and is intruded by two isolated plutons of the Younger Granite suite. The Older Granite suite includes gray-colored, massive to gneissose, granodiorites to tonalites typically containing microgranular mafic enclaves. These are calc-alkaline, magensian, metaluminous I-type granitoids, with high Sr contents, and depleted in Rb, Nb, Y and REE. The Younger Granite suite plutons are pink to red, biotite and two-mica monzogranites. These are peraluminous A-type granites exhibiting a high-K calc-alkaline nature, and varying between ferroan and magnesian type granites. The A-type granites of the Younger Granite suite are enriched in Ga, Y, HFSE and REE elements, and depleted in the LILE elements Ba, Sr and Rb and transition metals Cr, Ni, Co, Sc and V. Magmatic saturation temperatures indicate early crystallization of apatite at high temperature in the metaluminous I-type Older Granite suite, while in the peraluminous A-type Younger Granites its crystallization occurs later after separation of zircon and monazite. The plutons of the Younger Granite suite were generated during the post-collisional stage of the northern ANS, following collision between the juvenile ANS crust and the pre-Neoproterozoic continental blocks of west Gondwana. The emplacement of the Older Granite suite took place earlier, within a normally mature continental arc prior to the collision. These pre-collision granitoids evolved through assimilation-fractional crystallization processes from mantle-derived parental magmas, which have interacted with crustal materials during ascent and storage. The post-collisional Younger Granite suite seems to have been derived by high degree, partial melting of metasedimentary sources, particularly psammitic and pelitic metasediments.

  9. Spectroscopy of olivine basalts using FieldSpec and ASTER data: A case study from Wadi Natash volcanic field, south Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madani, Ahmed

    2015-10-01

    This paper aims at revealing the spectral characteristics of the olivine basalts exposed at Wadi Natash area, Egypt, using FieldSpec spectroradiometer. It also evaluates band ratios and fusion techniques for mapping purposes using ASTER data. Several volcanic episodes occurred during Early- to Late-Cretaceous are recorded in the study area. Early-Cretaceous olivine basalts are highly carbonated. Late-Cretaceous eruptions took place throughout several volcanic cones aligned in NW direction. Based on FieldSpec measurements and petrographic data, two groups of olivine basalt namely `A' and `B' are recognized. Fresh olivine basalt (group A) is characterized by low flat spectral profile with overall low reflectance values (˜20%). Spectral profile of altered olivine basalt (group B) shows moderate reflectance values (˜37%) with four little absorption features around the 1.10, 1.40, 2.00 and 2.35 μm wavelength regions. These absorption features are attributed mainly to the presence of chlorite and carbonate alteration products as indicated by petrographic examination. ASTER false colour composite band ratio image (3/2:R, 8/1:G and 8/5:B) discriminates easily the fresh and altered basalts by deep blue and reddish blue colours respectively. Image fusion between previously mentioned FCC ratios image and high spatial resolution ASTER panchromatic image are carried out using brovey and HSV transformation methods. Visual and statistical assessment methods proved that HSV fusion image yields better image interpretability results compared to brovey image. It improves the spatial resolution of original FCC ratios image with acceptable spectral preservation. The present study proved the usefulness of FieldSpec spectral profiles and the processed ASTER data for discriminating different olivine basalt groups exposed at the study area.

  10. Thermodynamic modelling of Sol Hamed serpentinite, South Eastern Desert of Egypt: Implication for fluid interaction in the Arabian-Nubian Shield ophiolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Alam, Tamer S.; Hamdy, Mohamed M.

    2014-11-01

    The Arabian-Nubian Shield is the largest tract of juvenile continental crust of the Neoproterozoic. This juvenile crust is composed of intra-oceanic island arc/back arc basin complexes and micro-continents welded together along sutures as the Mozambique Ocean was closed. Some of these sutures are marked by ophiolite decorated linear belts. The Sol Hamed ophiolite (808 14 Ma) in southeastern Egypt at the Allaqi-Heiani-Onib-Sol Hamed-Yanbu arc-arc suture represents an uncommon example of rocks that might be less deformed than other ophiolites in the Arabian-Nubian Shield. In order to understand fluid-rock interactions before and during arc-arc collision, petrological, mineral chemistry, whole-rock chemistry and thermodynamic studies were applied to the Sol Hamed serpentinized ophiolitic mantle fragment. These studies reveal that the protolith had a harzburgite composition that probably originated as forearc mantle in the subducted oceanic slab. We propose that these rocks interacted with Ti-rich melts (boninite) in suprasubduction zone, which latter formed the Sol Hamed cumulates. Spinel's Cr# associated with the whole rock V-MgO composition suggest that the harzburgites are highly refractory residues after partial melting up to 29%. The melt extraction mostly occurred under reducing conditions, similar to peridotites recovered from the subducted lithosphere. Protolith alteration resulted from two stages of fluid-rock interaction. The first stage occurred as a result of infiltration of concentrated CO2-rich fluid released from carbonate-bearing sediments and altered basalt at the subduction zone. The alteration occurred during isobaric cooling at a pressure of 1 kbar. The fluid composition during the isobaric cooling was buffered by the metamorphic reactions. The second stage of fluid-rock interactions took place through prograde metamorphism. The increase in pressure during this stage occurred as a result of thrusting within the oceanic crust. In this process the forearc crust was loaded by roughly 20-30 km of overthrust rocks.

  11. Use of the subsurface thermal regime as a groundwater-flow tracer in the semi-arid western Nile Delta, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Zenhom E.; Bayumy, Dina A.

    2016-02-01

    Temperature profiles from 25 boreholes were used to understand the spatial and vertical groundwater flow systems in the Western Nile Delta region of Egypt, as a case study of a semi-arid region. The study area is located between the Nile River and Wadi El Natrun. The recharge areas, which are located in the northeastern and the northwestern parts of the study area, have low subsurface temperatures. The discharge areas, which are located in the western (Wadi El Natrun) and southern (Moghra aquifer) parts of the study area, have higher subsurface temperatures. In the deeper zones, the effects of faults and the recharge area in the northeastern direction disappear at 80 m below sea level. For that depth, one main recharge and one main discharge area are recognized. The recharge area is located to the north in the Quaternary aquifer, and the discharge area is located to the south in the Miocene aquifer. Two-dimensional groundwater-flow and heat-transport models reveal that the sealing faults are the major factor disturbing the regional subsurface thermal regime in the study area. Besides the main recharge and discharge areas, the low permeability of the faults creates local discharge areas in its up-throw side and local recharge areas in its down-throw side. The estimated average linear groundwater velocity in the recharge area is 0.9 mm/day to the eastern direction and 14 mm/day to the northwest. The average linear groundwater discharge velocities range from 0.4 to 0.9 mm/day in the southern part.

  12. Late Neoproterozoic volcanics and associated granitoids at Wadi Ranga, south Eastern Desert, Egypt: A transition from subduction related to intra-arc magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharib, Moustafa Esmail; Ahmed, Ahmed Hassan

    2012-12-01

    The late Neoproterozoic of Wadi Ranga area, south Eastern Desert was characterized by extensive magmatism consisting predominantly of calc-alkaline older granitoids, Ranga volcanics and granite porphyry intrusions forming a belt of volcanic-intrusive complexes. Geological studies of the Ranga volcanics revealed two sequences of volcanic suites: the older mafic sequence composed essentially of basalt/basaltic andesite lava flows and the associated pyroclastics, while the younger felsic one represented by pitchstone porphyry. Geochemically, the older granitoids are exhibit low K-calc-alkaline characters and most likely formed in a convergent margin (arc) tectonic environment. Basalt/basaltic andesites are compositionally uniform with tholeiitic affinity. They have trace element characteristics of arc related volcanics with low Nb (0.2-0.9 ppm), Zr/Nb ratios of 40-81 with an average 54 compared to 32 in average N-MORB, signify a convergent margin setting with a depleted mantle wedge. Low Mg# (45 to 60 with an average 51), Co and Ni contents may be indicative of a non-plume-influenced mantle wedge. Compositionally, these mafic volcanics are commensurate with modern intra-arc basalts. REE modeling indicates that the magma from which these mafic volcanics were formed was generated by about 17-30% partial melting of a depleted mantle that composed mainly of spinel lherzolite in an extensional marginal basin. Geochemical characters of major, trace and REE patterns of the granite and pitchstone porphyries proved their formation from the same magma source which is originally different from the magma producing the mafic volcanics. The relative enrichment in K2O and LREE of the pitchstone porphyry along with the depletion in CaO and MgO relative to granite porphyry probably resulted from crustal contamination processes.

  13. 76 FR 59682 - Desert Southwest Customer Service Region-Western Area Lower Colorado Balancing Authority-Rate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ..., DSW-EI2, DSW- SPR2, and DSW-SUR2 on June 26, 2006 (Rate Order No. WAPA-127, 71 FR 36332).\\1\\ These..., Extension of Rate Order No. WAPA-127 through September 30, 2013. 76 FR 28767, May 18, 2011. Desert Southwest... published on September 18, 1985 (50 FR 37835). Under Delegation Order Nos. 00-037.00 and 00-001.00C, 10...

  14. Community composition, abundance and biomass of tintinnids (Ciliata: Protozoa) in the Western Harbour, south-eastern Mediterranean Sea, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Heneash, Ahmed M M; Abdel-Rahman, Nasser S; Gharib, Samiha M

    2015-08-01

    Seasonal variations in species composition, abundance and biomass of tintinnids (Protozoa: Ciliata) were investigated in the Western Harbour, seasonally during 2012. There were remarkable seasonal variations in environmental parameters, phytoplankton concentrations and abundance and biomass of tintinnids: highest in spring and lowest in autumn. Annual average abundance and biomass of tintinnids were 8.435 ind. l(-1) and 3.725 ?g C l(-1), respectively. A total of 29 species of tintinnids belonging to 11 genera was identified. Of which, Tintinnopsis was the most abundant genus in terms of number of species (9), but Favella was the best quantitatively (89% of the total tintinnids). The overall mean abundance and biomass were highest (mean 24.415 ind. l(-1) and 10.355 ?g C l(-1), respectively) during spring than the remaining seasons. Due to significant positive relationship between the total biomass of tintinnids and phytoplankton concentrations, food supply is not a problem for tintinnids harbouring in the Western Harbour. Hence, predation loss by meso- and macrozooplankton might be the possible reasons for the estimated low biomass of tintinnids in the present study. Some of the seasonal environmental factors as water salinity, nitrite, dissolved oxygen and pH values exert an influence on the species composition, abundance and biomass of tintinnids. PMID:26202815

  15. Effect of the temperature variation between Mediterranean Sea and Syrian deserts on the dust storm occurrence in the western half of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amanollahi, Jamil; Kaboodvandpour, Shahram; Qhavami, Samira; Mohammadi, Bakhtiyar

    2015-03-01

    Recent dust storms have caused crises in western Iran, which necessitate the prediction of these storms a few days before their occurrence. This is the first study of its type that analyzes the effect of temperature differences between the Mediterranean Sea surface and Syrian deserts (creation zone of the dusts storms) on the formation of dust storms in the west of Iran. The study also seeks to identify any changes in the atmospheric temperature created by the extreme dust storm of July 5, 2009 in west of Iran (Sanandaj City). In this study, the MODIS images from 2000 to 2008, and particulate matter data of the Sanandaj station from 2008 to 2012 were utilized to identify the dust storm days. The Mediterranean Sea surface temperature data were extracted from NOAA satellites for dust storm days up to four days preceding them. The web site of world weather was used to obtain the temperature of Damascus, Syria station as the selected land station. According to the results, significant differences were acquired between surface temperatures of Damascus station and the Mediterranean Sea in the dust storm days and up to three days before them. As the dust storm days approached, a rising trend was observed in changes of the temperature difference between land and sea. Thermal map analysis of the atmosphere of the Syrian deserts on July 5, 2009 showed significant decrease in the levels of 1000 hPa and 500 hPa but for the days preceding it no significant changes were observed. It can be concluded that the temperature difference between the Mediterranean Sea surface and the Syrian deserts four days before the dust storm occurrences is the important factor in predicting this event.

  16. Solar Energy for Rural Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelsalam, Tarek I.; Darwish, Ziad; Hatem, Tarek M.

    Egypt is currently experiencing the symptoms of an energy crisis, such as electricity outage and high deficit, due to increasing rates of fossil fuels consumption. Conversely, Egypt has a high solar availability of more than 18.5 MJ daily. Additionally, Egypt has large uninhabited deserts on both sides of the Nile valley and Sinai Peninsula, which both represent more than 96.5 % of the nation's total land area. Therefore, solar energy is one of the promising solutions for the energy shortage in Egypt. Furthermore, these vast lands are advantageous for commissioning large-scaled solar power projects, not only in terms of space availability, but also of availability of high quality silicon (sand) required for manufacturing silicon wafers used in photovoltaic (PV) modules. Also, rural Egypt is considered market a gap for investors, due to low local competition, and numerous remote areas that are not connected to the national electricity grid. Nevertheless, there are some obstacles that hinder the progress of solar energy in Egypt; for instance, the lack of local manufacturing capabilities, security, and turbulent market in addition to other challenges. This paper exhibits an experience of the authors designing and installing decentralized PV solar systems, with a total rated power of about 11 kW, installed at two rural villages in at the suburbs of Fayoum city, in addition to a conceptual design of a utility scale, 2 MW, PV power plant to be installed in Kuraymat. The outcomes of this experience asserted that solar PV systems can be a more technically and economically feasible solution for the energy problem in rural villages.

  17. Electrical resistivity mapping of the buried stream channel of the Canopic branch in the western Nile Delta, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gamili, M. M.; Shaaban, F. F.; El-Morsi, O. A.

    1994-08-01

    Buried stream channels, which can often be mapped accurately by resistivity, are favoured targets for exploration. Horizontal profiling, electrical soundings, or both, are generally used. In the western Nile Delta, the electrical sounding method was applied using a Schlumberger electrode array with the maximum AB distance being 200 m. The field survey was conducted along profiles extending NE-SW, perpendicular to the expected historical Canopic buried stream channel. About 107 vertical electrical soundings (VES) were measured along eleven profiles. The (VES) field curves were interpreted using the automatic interpretation method of Zohdy and Bisdorf (1989) in which a layered model is obtained directly from a digitized sounding curve. The interpreted results were correlated with borehole data to delineate the main lithological units and to help construct geoelectrical cross-sections based on layer thicknesses and their corresponding ranges in litho-resistivity. The lithological information from borehole data, surface geology and the present layer resistivities indicate three major lithofacies: Holocene clay and silt at the top, Pleistocene sands, and then gravelly sands and gravels (El-Tahrir gravels) at the bottom. From the thickness of the riverine topmost clay-silt facies and the paleotopograph of the Pleistocene sands, the buried stream channels can be delineated. It is evident that two streams existed for the defunct Canopic branch. These defunct streams are discussed and correlated with the historical records.

  18. Nile behaviour and Late Palaeolithic humans in Upper Egypt during the Late Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeersch, Pierre M.; Van Neer, Wim

    2015-12-01

    The reconstruction of the environment and the human population history of the Nile Valley during the Late Pleistocene have received a lot of attention in the literature thus far. There seems to be a consensus that during MIS2 extreme dry conditions prevailed over north-eastern Africa, which was apparently not occupied by humans. The Nile Valley seems to be an exception; numerous field data have been collected suggesting an important population density in Upper Egypt during MIS2. The occupation remains are often stratified in, or at least related to, aeolian and Nile deposits at some elevation above the present-day floodplain. They are rich in lithics and animal bones, mainly fish, illustrating the exploitation of the Nile Valley by the Late Palaeolithic inhabitants. The fluvial processes active during that period have traditionally been interpreted as a continuously rising highly braided river. In this paper we summarize the evidence thus far available for the Late Pleistocene on the population densities in the Nile Valley, and on the models of Nilotic behaviour. In the discussion we include data on the environmental conditions in Eastern Africa, on the aeolian processes in the Western Desert of Egypt derived from satellite images, 14C and OSL dates, in order to formulate a new model that explains the observed high remnants of aeolian and Nilotic deposits and the related Late Palaeolithic sites. This model hypothesizes that, during the Late Pleistocene, and especially the LGM, dunes from the Western Desert invaded the Nile Valley at several places in Upper Egypt. The much reduced activity of the White Nile and the Blue Nile was unable to evacuate incoming aeolian sand and, as a consequence, several dams were created in the Upper Egyptian Nile Valley. Behind such dams the created lakes offered ideal conditions for human subsistence. This model explains the occurrence of Late Palaeolithic hunter-fisher-gatherers in a very arid environment with very low Nile flows, even in late summer.

  19. Ancient Egypt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evers, Virginia

    This four-week fourth grade social studies unit dealing with religious dimensions in ancient Egyptian culture was developed by the Public Education Religion Studies Center at Wright State University. It seeks to help students understand ancient Egypt by looking at the people, the culture, and the people's world view. The unit begins with outlines…

  20. Atom Trap, Krypton-81, and Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zheng-Tian

    2003-10-01

    We are developing the Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA) method for the analysis of two long-lived rare krypton isotopes, ^81Kr (t_1/2=2.3 × 10^5 years, I.A. ˜ 10-13) and ^85Kr (t_1/2=10.8 years, I.A. ˜ 10-11). ^81Kr analyses can be used to determine the ages of old ice and groundwater in a range (5 × 10^4 - 2 × 10^6 years) beyond the reach of radio-carbon dating; Analyses of ^85Kr , a fission product of uranium and plutonium, can serve as a means to help verify compliance with the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. In ATTA, individual atoms of the desired isotope are selectively captured into a laser trap and detected by observing the fluorescence of trapped atoms. The first application of ATTA is dating the ancient groundwater of the Nubian Aquifer underneath the Western Desert of Egypt. This is one of the largest aquifers in the world. The residence time of its water are of great interest in fundamental geology as well as for utilitarian reasons. This work marks the beginning of a useful tool in Earth sciences. * This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Nuclear Physics, under contract W-31-109-ENG-38.

  1. Late Holocene Paleoclimatic Reconstruction from Playa Lake Sediments, Thar Desert, India: Comparison between Eastern and Western Margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, P.; Nagar, Y.; Singhvi, A.; Smykatz-Kloss, W.

    2006-05-01

    Located in the downstream of south-west monsoonal winds, the Thar Desert of India is a region of sharp climatic gradient (rainfall change of ~1mm/km). Low annual rainfall (500-100 mm/yr) and high evapo- transpiration (2000-1500 mm/yr) lead to a negative water balance in the region. Across this region of negative water balance, numerous shallow, endorheic saline playa lakes are present and fed by rainfall events. This contribution reconstructs the late Holocene paleo-hydrological conditions by a multi-proxy study comprising lithostratigraphy, mineralogy, elemental and isotope geochemistry along with optical dating of sediments from two lakes, viz. Phulera (eastern margin of the desert with rainfall of 500 mm/yr) and Pokharan (arid core with rainfall of 200 mm/ yr). Geochemical proxies on closely sampled cores along with mineralogical abundance enabled identification of four zones of comparable chemical weathering, aeolian activity and salinity that are manifestations of changes in precipitation and aridity. Zone IV dated to ~7 - 4.3 ka suggested high energy storm surge events. Between 4.3 - 2.8 ka (zone III), geochemical evidences indicated fluctuating brackish and fresh water regime. During 2.8 - 1.4 ka (zone II), the lakes experienced hypersaline condition and finally the lakes desiccated at ~1.4 ka. During this event, the dominance of gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O) in the Pokharan playa and abundance of proto- dolomite (Ca(Mg,Fe)(CO3)2) in the Phulera playa suggest that the magnitude of evaporation was higher in the west compared to east. The sub recent zone I (1.4 - 0 ka) indicates overall improved south-west monsoon condition in the region. In this presentation a synthesis of the overall records from the playa lakes of the region and its import on the climatic gradients through time will be presented.

  2. Mesozoic and Cenozoic thermal history of the eastern Mojave Desert, California and western Arizona, with emphasis on the Old Woman Mountains area and the Chemehuevi metamorphic core complex

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    Mesozoic thickening and Cenozoic extension resulted in the juxtaposition of upper and middle crustal rocks in the eastern Mojave Desert, southeastern California and western Arizona. The application of {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar thermochronology and petrology/thermobarometry to rocks in this region provides information about the timing and nature of thrusting, plutonism, metamorphism, denudation, and detachment faulting. Orogenesis culminated during the Late Cretaceous when rocks exposed in the Old Woman-Piute, Chemehuevi, and Sacramento Mountains attained temperatures > 500C. High grade metamorphism of the Old Woman Mountains area was caused by the intrusion of the Old Woman-Piute batholith at 73 {plus minus} 1 Ma; Cretaceous mineral assemblages in Proterozoic pelites increase in grade from greenschist to upper amphibolite facies, and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar hornblende ages from Proterozoic amphibolites decrease in age from {approximately} 1,600 Ma to 73 {plus minus} 1 Ma, in the direction of 73 Ma plutons. Pluton emplacement and metamorphism occurred at 3 to 3.5 kbars and 400 > 600C in the Piute Mountains, and 3.5 to 4.5 kbars and 530 to > 650C in the Old Woman Mountains. Following the Cretaceous, the eastern Mojave Desert underwent a period of cooling at a rate of 2 to 10C/Ma between 65 and 25 Ma. By 30 Ma rocks exposed in the Old Woman-Piute, Marble Ship, Clipper and Turtle Mountains were below {approximately} 100C. {sup 40}/{sup 39}Ar ages from the Sacramento Mountains suggest that mylonitization caused by the onset of regional extension occurred at 23 {plus minus} 1 Ma. When extension started in the Chemehuevi Mountains, rocks exposed in the southwestern and northeastern portions of footwall to the Chemehuevi detachment fault were at {approximately} 180C and {approximately} 350C, respectively which suggests that this fault initiated at a dip of 5 to 30{degree}.

  3. The Formation of the Patterns of Desert Shrub Communities on the Western Ordos Plateau, China: The Roles of Seed Dispersal and Sand Burial

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yange; Yang, Xiaohui; Shi, Zhongjie

    2013-01-01

    The western Ordos Plateau is a key area of shrub diversity and a National Nature Reserve of endangered shrub species in north-west China. Desert expansion is becoming the most important threat to these endangered species. However, little is known about the effects of sand burial on the dynamics of the shrub community. This study aims to investigate how the shrubs as a community and as different individual shrubs respond to the disturbances caused by the desert expansion. The approach used by this study is to separate the seed-dispersal strategy from the sand-burial forces that are involved in structuring the shrub communities at different disturbance stages. Four communities for different disturbance stages were surveyed by using 50×50 m plots. The individual shrubs were classified into coloniser and successor groups at the seed-dispersal stage and strong and weak sand-burial tolerance groups at the sand-expansion stage. We employed spatial point pattern analysis with null models for each community to examine the seed-dispersal strategy and sand-burial forces affecting community distribution patterns. At the seed-dispersal stage, the interactions between the colonisers and the successors showed significant positive correlation at a scale of 0–1 m and significant negative correlation at a scale of 2 m; significant negative correlations between the groups with strong and weak sand-burial tolerance in the early stage of sand expansion at scales of 3–6 m, and significant positive correlation in the later stage of sand expansion at a scale of 13 m, were found. Seed-dispersal strategy is a reasonable mechanism to explain the shrub community pattern formation in the earlier stages, whereas sand burial is the primary reason for the disappearance of shrubs with weak sand-burial tolerance, this irreversible disturbance causes homogenisation of the community structure and produces aging populations of shrub species. This has an important influence on the succession direction of desert shrub communities. PMID:23922877

  4. Current status of phytoparasitic nematodes and their host plants in Egypt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Egypt many phytoparasitic nematodes constitute a major constraint to agricultural production, especially in sandy soil and reclaimed desert lands. Nematological surveys were conducted to determine the genera and species of phytoparasitic nematodes on associated host plants in Egypt. The results i...

  5. AIRSAR Data for Geological and Geomorphological Mapping in the Great Sandy Desert and Pilbara Regions of Western Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapley, Ian J.

    1996-01-01

    Enhancements of AIRSAR data have demonstrated the benefits of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for revealing an additional and mich higher level of information about the composition of the terrain than enhancements f either SPOT-PAN or Landsat TM data. With appropriate image processing techniques, surface and near surface geological structures, hydrological systems (both current and ancient) and landform features, have been evidenced in a diverse range of landscapes. In the Great Sandy Desert region where spectral variability is minimal, radar's sensitivity to the micromorphology of sparse exposures of subcrop and lag gravels has provided a new insight into the region's geological framework, its landforms, and their evolution. In the Pilbara region, advanced processing of AIRSAR data to unmix the backscatter between and within the three frequencies of data has highlighted subsurface extensions of greenstone lithologies below sand cover and morphological evidence of past flow conditions under former climate regimes. On the basis of these observations, it is recommend that radar remote sensing technology involving the use of high resolution, polarimetric data be seriously considered as a viable tool for exploration in erosional and depositional environments located within Australia's mineral and oil-prospective provinces.

  6. Impact of consecutive extreme rainstorm events on particle transport: Case study in a Sonoran Desert range, western USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, Ronald I.

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying erosion rates in different landscape settings provides insight into how landforms change under different climatic, tectonic and anthropogenic influences. Sediment traps designed to capture grus detached from granitic hill crests of an arid Sonoran Desert mountain range were placed prior to every precipitation event over a three-year period, just above rills that drain areas between 18 and 68 m2. The slopes are underlain by moderately to strongly weathered granitic rocks to a depth of about a meter. Within this 3-year window, a 1000-year precipitation event followed 27 days later by a 500-year event detached granitic grus in amounts far greater than previous storms, capturing between 22 and 63 the average amount transported in the previous 59 rain events - indicating the non-linear nature of the response of grus detachment to precipitation intensity. Considering every precipitation event over a 3-year period, no detachment occurred from events with less than 2 mm of total rainfall, and only minimal erosion occurred from rainfall events with totals between 2 and 10 mm with durations typically less than 30 min. Detachment increased greatly with rain intensities of 36 mm/h or more. Grus detachment from these arid crests increases with drainage area, a higher percentage of exposed soil, and steeper slopes. 87Sr/86Sr ratios reveal that suspended sediment transported from hill crest to trap derives from recycled dust and not the local granite bedrock.

  7. Resilience to stress and disturbance, and resistance to Bromus tectorum l. invasion in cold desert shrublands of western North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chambers, Jeanne C.; Bradley, Bethany A.; Brown, Cynthia S.; D'Antonio, Carla; Germino, Matthew J.; Grace, James B.; Hardegree, Stuart P.; Miller, Richard F.; Pyke, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Alien grass invasions in arid and semi-arid ecosystems are resulting in grass–fire cycles and ecosystem-level transformations that severely diminish ecosystem services. Our capacity to address the rapid and complex changes occurring in these ecosystems can be enhanced by developing an understanding of the environmental factors and ecosystem attributes that determine resilience of native ecosystems to stress and disturbance, and resistance to invasion. Cold desert shrublands occur over strong environmental gradients and exhibit significant differences in resilience and resistance. They provide an excellent opportunity to increase our understanding of these concepts. Herein, we examine a series of linked questions about (a) ecosystem attributes that determine resilience and resistance along environmental gradients, (b) effects of disturbances like livestock grazing and altered fire regimes and of stressors like rapid climate change, rising CO2, and N deposition on resilience and resistance, and (c) interacting effects of resilience and resistance on ecosystems with different environmental conditions. We conclude by providing strategies for the use of resilience and resistance concepts in a management context. At ecological site scales, state and transition models are used to illustrate how differences in resilience and resistance influence potential alternative vegetation states, transitions among states, and thresholds. At landscape scales management strategies based on resilience and resistance—protection, prevention, restoration, and monitoring and adaptive management—are used to determine priority management areas and appropriate actions.

  8. Morphology and development of pahoehoe flow-lobe tumuli and associated features from a monogenetic basaltic volcanic field, Bahariya Depression, Western Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalaf, Ezz El Din Abdel Hakim; Hammed, Mohamed Saleh

    2016-01-01

    The dimensions, landforms, and structural characteristics of pahoehoe flow-lobe tumuli from Bahariya Depression are collectively reported here for the first time. The flow-lobe tumuli documented here characterize hummocky flow surfaces. These tumuli are characterized by low, dome-like mounds, lava-inflation clefts, and squeeze ups. Flow-lobe tumuli are of various shapes and sizes, which are affected by the mechanism of inflation because they formed in response to the increase of pressure within the flow when the flow's crust becomes thicker. The tumuli often appear isolated or in small groups in the middle sectors of the lava flows, whereas in the distal sectors they form large concentration, suggesting the presence of complex lava tubes inside of the flow. Tumuli exhibited by El Bahariya lava flows are between 3.0 and 50 m in length and up to 5.0 m in height with lenticular geometry in aerial view. The flow emplacement of flow-lobe tumuli is controlled by variations in local characteristics such as nature of the substrate, flow orientation, slope, interferrence with other lobes, and rate of lava supply. Their presence generally towards the terminal ends of flow fields suggests that they seldom form over the clogged portions of distributary tubes or pathways. Thus, localized inflations that formed over blockages in major lava tubes result in formation of flow-lobe tumuli. The three-tiered (crust-core-basal zone) internal structure of the flow-lobe tumuli, resembling the typical distribution of vesicles in P-type lobes, confirms emplacement by the mechanism of inflation. All the available data show that the morphology and emplacement mechanism of the studied flow-lobe tumuli may be analogous to similar features preserved within topographically confined areas of the Hawaiian and Deccan hummocky lava flows. Considering the age of the studied volcanic fields (∼22 Ma) it is most probable that the structures described here may be amongst the oldest recognized examples of lava inflation.

  9. Movement of water through the thick unsaturated zone underlying Oro Grande and Sheep Creek Washes in the western Mojave Desert, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izbicki, John A.; Radyk, John; Michel, Robert L.

    2002-06-01

    Previous studies indicate that a small quantity of recharge occurs from infiltration of streamflow in intermittent streams in the upper Mojave River basin, in the western Mojave Desert, near Victorville, California. Chloride, tritium, and stable isotope data collected in the unsaturated zone between 1994 and 1998 from boreholes drilled in Oro Grande and Sheep Creek Washes indicate that infiltration of streamflow occurs to depths below the root zone, and presumably to the water table, along much of Oro Grande Wash and near the mountain front along Sheep Creek Wash. Differences in infiltration at sites along each wash are the result of hydrologic variables such as proximity to the mountain front, quantity of streamflow, and texture of the subsurface deposits. Differences in infiltration between the washes are the result of large-scale geomorphic processes. For example, Oro Grande wash is incised into the Victorville fan and infiltration has occurred at approximately the same location over recent geologic time. In contrast, Sheep Creek Wash overlies an active alluvial fan and the stream channel can move across the fan surface through time. Infiltration does not occur to depths below the root zone at control sites outside of the washes.

  10. Movement of water through the thick unsaturated zone underlying Oro Grande and Sheep Creek Washes in the western Mojave Desert, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izbicki, J.A.; Radyk, J.; Michel, R.L.

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that a small quantity of recharge occurs from infiltration of streamflow in intermittent streams in the upper Mojave River basin, in the western Mojave Desert, near Victorville, California. Chloride, tritium, and stable isotope data collected in the unsaturated zone between 1994 and 1998 from boreholes drilled in Oro Grande and Sheep Creek Washes indicate that infiltration of streamflow occurs to depths below the root zone, and presumably to the water table, along much of Oro Grande Wash and near the mountain front along Sheep Creek Wash. Differences in infiltration at sites along each wash are the result of hydrologic variables such as proximity to the mountain front, quantity of streamflow, and texture of the subsurface deposits. Differences in infiltration between the washes are the result of large-scale geomorphic processes. For example, Oro Grande wash is incised into the Victorville fan and infiltration has occurred at approximately the same location over recent geologic time. In contrast, Sheep Creek Wash overlies an active alluvial fan and the stream channel can move across the fan surface through time. Infiltration does not occur to depths below the root zone at control sites outside of the washes.

  11. Data from a thick unsaturated zone underlying Oro Grande and Sheep Creek washes in the western part of the Mojave Desert, near Victorville, San Bernardino County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izbicki, John A.; Clark, Dennis A.; Pimental, Maria I.; Land, Michael; Radyk, John C.; Michel, Robert L.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents data on the physical properties of unsaturated alluvial deposits and on the chemical and isotopic composition of soil water and soil gas collected at 12 monitoring sites in the western part of the Mojave Desert, near Victorville, California. Sites were installed using the ODEX air-hammer method. Seven sites were located in the active channels of Oro Grande and Sheep Creek Washes. The remaining five sites were located away from the active washes. Most sites were drilled to a depth of about 100 feet below land surface; two sites were drilled to the water table almost 650 feet below land surface. Drilling procedures, lithologic and geophysical data, and site construction and instrumentation are described. Core material was analyzed for water content, bulk density, water potential, particle size, and water retention. The chemical composition of leachate from almost 1,000 subsamples of cores and cuttings was determined. Water extracted from selected subsamples of cores was analyzed for tritium and the stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen. Water from suction-cup lysimeters and soil-gas samples also were analyzed for chemical and isotopic composition. In addition, data on the chemical and isotopic composition of bulk precipitation from five sites and on ground water from two water-table wells are reported.

  12. Cultural Diversity or Cultural Imperialism: Liberal Education in Egypt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanks, David R.

    1998-01-01

    A faculty member's experience at the American University in Cairo (Egypt) reveals that pluralism and tolerance are western concepts, even within the college curriculum. National identity affords cultural stability: where the American melting-pot experience is reinforced by the notion of cultural diversity, the national identity of Egypt is

  13. Configuration of the limestone aquifers in the central part of Egypt using electrical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Heleika, M. M.; Niesner, E.

    2009-03-01

    The Western Desert of Egypt is an area of natural expansion for agricultural, industrial, and civil activities. This expansion has led to a great demand for groundwater. In the central part of Egypt, on the western limestone plateau, vertical electrical sounding and borehole geophysical logging were conducted to delineate aquifer boundaries. The measurements were interpreted using the lithological information from the drilled wells as a constraining factor. Fractured chalky limestone sediments represent the main aquifer, which is covered by sand and gravel deposits and which rests directly on partially saturated and highly resistive massive limestone. Discontinuous clay layers, which overlie the aquifer unit, were detected in the southern part of the study area as well as a relatively thin marly limestone layer in the northern part. The integrated analyses carried out represent a significant and cost-effective method for delineating the main aquifer in this area. In turn, future well locations can be placed with more confidence than before, in accordance with the evaluation of the potentiality of the groundwater aquifers in the area. Although the groundwater is normally brackish, it can serve the acute demands for water, especially for agricultural purposes.

  14. Management of Egypt's Surface and Groundwater Resources: Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, M.; Ahmed, M.; Yan, E.; Milewski, A.; Mohamed, L.; Farag, A. Z. A.

    2014-12-01

    The River Nile is the main source of fresh water in Egypt. Most of Egypt's River Nile water (>85%) originates as precipitation over the Ethiopian highlands and is channeled by the Blue Nile. The construction (years: 2011 to 2017) of the Renaissance Dam (reservoir capacity: 70 x 109m3) on the Blue Nile poses an extreme threat to Egypt's population. If the reservoir was to be filled in 7 years, Egypt will lose (during each of 7 years following dam completion) a minimum of 15 x 109m3 of its annual allocation (55 x 109m3) to reservoir filling (10 x 109m3), evaporation (3.5 x 109m3), and infiltration (1.5 x 109m3). Three solutions are proposed: Solution I takes advantage of the cyclicity of Nile floods and is based on findings from a calibrated (against temporal head data) unconfined 2-dimensional transient groundwater flow model for Lake Nasser and surroundings and a calibrated (against lake levels) surface water model. Models show with time: (1) losses to infiltration will decrease (1975-193: 58.4 109m3; 1993-2001: 43.6 x 109m3) due to silting of Lake bottom and encroachment of excess Lake Nasser water will increase (e.g., 1975-1993: none; 1993-2001: 17 x 109m3). We propose to develop sustainable agricultural in the Western Desert: (1) In high flood years, excess Lake Nasser water (e.g., 1993-2001: 17 x 109m3) is channeled across the plateau bounding (from west) the River Nile valley to artificially recharge the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System (NSAS) that crops out west of the plateau and, (2) in low flood years, we extract the recharged groundwater. Solution II calls on mining the NSAS at reasonable rates. Using temporal (January 2003 - September 2012) Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data we estimate the annual depletion rates at 2 x 109m3 due to artificial extraction (1.5 x 109m3) and natural discharge (0.5 x 109m3). Assuming current GRACE depletion rates, the recoverable groundwater (5,180 x 109m3) will last for 2500 years; if we were to quadruple the artificial extraction rates (6 x 109m3), the reservoir will last for some 800 years. Solution III calls on the sustainable utilization of the NSAS groundwater in Sinai that receives an estimated minimum annual modern recharge of 13 x 106m3. Currently, these waters are lost as discharge in water bodies and/or diverted across political boundaries by major NE trending fault systems.

  15. Composition and antimicrobial activity of the essential oil of Heracleum thomsonii (Clarke) from the cold desert of the western Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Guleria, Shailja; Saini, Rikki; Jaitak, Vikas; Kaul, V K; Lal, Brij; Rahi, Praveen; Gulati, Arvind; Singh, Bikram

    2011-08-01

    Volatile oil composition of hydro-distilled (HD) and supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO(2)) essential oil of freshly collected aerial parts of Heracleum thomsonii (Umbeliferae) from the western Himalayas was studied by GC-FID and GC-MS. Results revealed qualitative and quantitative dissimilarity in the composition of hydro-distilled and SC-CO(2) extracted oils. Nineteen constituents, which accounted for 89.32% of total constituents in HD oil, represented by limonene (4.31%), (Z)-β-ocimene (3.69%), terpinolene (22.24%), neryl acetate (36.19%), nerol (9.51%) and p-cymene-8-ol (2.61%) were identified. In SC-CO(2) extracted oil, 24 constituents representing 89.95% of total constituents were identified. Terpinolene (5.08%), germacrene D (2.17%), neryl acetate (51.62%), nerol (9.78%), geranyl acetate (2.06%), α-bisabolol (2.48%) and 1-nonadecanol (4.96%) were the dominating constituents. In vitro antimicrobial activity of hydro-distilled oil was conducted against microrobial strains including two Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis) and five Gram-negative (Burkholderia cepacia, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebseilla pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) bacteria as well as seven fungi (Candida albicans, Issatchenkia orientalis, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus parasiticus, Aspergillus sydowii and Trichophyton rubrum) using broth microdilution method. The results of bioassay showed that the oil exhibited moderate to high antimicrobial activity against fungi C. albicans (MIC 625 µg ml(-1)), A. parasiticus (MIC 312.5 µg ml(-1)), A. sydowii (MIC 312.5 µg ml(-1)), T. rubrum (MIC 625 µg ml(-1)), Gram-positive bacteria B. subtilis (MIC 625 µg ml(-1)) and Gram-negative bacteria P. aeruginosa (MIC 312.5 µg ml(-1)). PMID:21854172

  16. Fairy, tadpole, and clam shrimps (Branchiopoda) in seasonally inundated clay pans in the western Mojave Desert and effect on primary producers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Fairy shrimps (Anostraca), tadpole shrimps (Notostraca), clam shrimps (Spinicaudata), algae (primarily filamentous blue-green algae [cyanobacteria]), and suspended organic particulates are dominant food web components of the seasonally inundated pans and playas of the western Mojave Desert in California. We examined the extent to which these branchiopods controlled algal abundance and species composition in clay pans between Rosamond and Rogers Dry Lakes. We surveyed branchiopods during the wet season to estimate abundances and then conducted a laboratory microcosm experiment, in which dried sediment containing cysts and the overlying algal crust were inundated and cultured. Microcosm trials were run with and without shrimps; each type of trial was run for two lengths of time: 30 and 60 days. We estimated the effect of shrimps on algae by measuring chlorophyll content and the relative abundance of algal species. Results We found two species of fairy shrimps (Branchinecta mackini and B. gigas), one tadpole shrimp (Lepidurus lemmoni), and a clam shrimp (Cyzicus setosa) in our wet-season field survey. We collected Branchinecta lindahli in a pilot study, but not subsequently. The dominant taxa were C. setosa and B. mackini, but abundances and species composition varied greatly among playas. The same species found in field surveys also occurred in the microcosm experiment. There were no significant differences as a function of experimental treatments for either chlorophyll content or algal species composition (Microcoleus vaginatus dominated all treatments). Conclusions The results suggest that there was no direct effect of shrimps on algae. Although the pans harbored an apparently high abundance of branchiopods, these animals had little role in regulating primary producers in this environment. PMID:21143855

  17. Isolation and Pharmacological Characterization of α-Elapitoxin-Ot1a, a Short-Chain Postsynaptic Neurotoxin from the Venom of the Western Desert Taipan, Oxyuranus temporalis.

    PubMed

    Barber, Carmel M; Ahmad Rusmili, Muhamad Rusdi; Hodgson, Wayne C

    2016-01-01

    Taipans (Oxyuranus spp.) are elapids with highly potent venoms containing presynaptic (β) and postsynaptic (α) neurotoxins. O. temporalis (Western Desert taipan), a newly discovered member of this genus, has been shown to possess venom which displays marked in vitro neurotoxicity. No components have been isolated from this venom. We describe the characterization of α-elapitoxin-Ot1a (α-EPTX-Ot1a; 6712 Da), a short-chain postsynaptic neurotoxin, which accounts for approximately 30% of O. temporalis venom. α-Elapitoxin-Ot1a (0.1-1 µM) produced concentration-dependent inhibition of indirect-twitches, and abolished contractile responses to exogenous acetylcholine and carbachol, in the chick biventer cervicis nerve-muscle preparation. The inhibition of indirect twitches by α-elapitoxin-Ot1a (1 µM) was not reversed by washing the tissue. Prior addition of taipan antivenom (10 U/mL) delayed the neurotoxic effects of α-elapitoxin-Ot1a (1 µM) and markedly attenuated the neurotoxic effects of α-elapitoxin-Ot1a (0.1 µM). α-Elapitoxin-Ot1a displayed pseudo-irreversible antagonism of concentration-response curves to carbachol with a pA₂ value of 8.02 ± 0.05. De novo sequencing revealed the main sequence of the short-chain postsynaptic neurotoxin (i.e., α-elapitoxin-Ot1a) as well as three other isoforms found in O. temporalis venom. α-Elapitoxin-Ot1a shows high sequence similarity (i.e., >87%) with other taipan short-chain postsynaptic neurotoxins. PMID:26938558

  18. Sensitivity of growth and biomass allocation patterns to increasing nitrogen: a comparison between ephemerals and annuals in the Gurbantunggut Desert, north-western China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaobing; Zhang, Yuanming; Niklas, Karl J.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Biomass accumulation and allocation patterns are critical to quantifying ecosystem dynamics. However, these patterns differ among species, and they can change in response to nutrient availability even among genetically related individuals. In order to understand this complexity further, this study examined three ephemeral species (with very short vegetative growth periods) and three annual species (with significantly longer vegetative growth periods) in the Gurbantunggut Desert, north-western China, to determine their responses to different nitrogen (N) supplements under natural conditions. Methods Nitrogen was added to the soil at rates of 0, 05, 10, 30, 60 and 240 g N m?2 year?1. Plants were sampled at various intervals to measure relative growth rate and shoot and root dry mass. Key Results Compared with annuals, ephemerals grew more rapidly, increased shoot and root biomass with increasing N application rates and significantly decreased root/shoot ratios. Nevertheless, changes in the biomass allocation of some species (i.e. Erodium oxyrrhynchum) in response to the N treatment were largely a consequence of changes in overall plant size, which was inconsistent with an optimal partitioning model. An isometric log shoot vs. log root scaling relationship for the final biomass harvest was observed for each species and all annuals, while pooled data of three ephemerals showed an allometric scaling relationship. Conclusions These results indicate that ephemerals and annuals differ observably in their biomass allocation patterns in response to soil N supplements, although an isometric log shoot vs. log root scaling relationship was maintained across all species. These findings highlight that different life history strategies behave differently in response to N application even when interspecific scaling relationships remain nearly isometric. PMID:24287812

  19. Nomograms for determining fault parameters from gravity data application to the Mersa Matruh Basin, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelrahman, E. M.; Bayoumi, A. I.

    Rigorous calculation of gravity effects of faults for the interpretation of subsurface structure from exploration gravity surveys is time-consuming and tedious. Resort to electronic computers is convenient but not always necessary. Simple hand calculations can be instructive and are often adequate and useful. This paper confirms the basic ideas of some geophysicists on the usefulness of approximating most fault structures by one semi-infinite horizontal slab, and presents two simple nomograms to determine the slab parameters from gravity very rapidly. A field example from the Mersa Matruh Basin, Western Desert of Egypt, is presented in which the thickness and depth of a fault are estimated from the nomograms and verified from drilling data.

  20. Desert dust in rural western US; the influence of dust storms, large particles, and land-use change on aerosol loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, D.; MacDonald, A. E.; Rosen, R. D.; Edmonds, H. N.; Key, E.; Swanberg, N.; Wiseman, W. J.; Sandgathe, S. A.; Neff, J. C.; Fernandez, D.; Munson, S.; Reynolds, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are common in urban settings as well as dryland rural environments and are important to both climate and biogeochemical cycling. Most urban and far traveled aerosols are less than 10 micrometers in diameter with many particles in the less than 2.5 or 1 micrometer-size classes. Small aerosols, including many generated by industrial activity, are the focus of federal environmental law and have a major impact on human health. In rural areas of the western US, however, these small industrially derived particles appear to make up a small part of the overall aerosol load. Rather, dust in the rural West is dominated by mineral aerosols including a large amount of particles that range in size from 10 to 40 microns. These particles can travel for hundreds of kilometers, particularly during periods when dust storms are common. In the dusty spring and summer periods in and around Canyonlands and Mesa Verde National Parks, large particles (particles greater than 10 micrometers in diameter) appear to contribute between 50 and 90% to the overall particle load several meters above the ground. During large dust storms, concentrations of total suspended particulates increase by a factor of 8 to 10 while particles less than 10 micrometers in diameter are minimally affected. The presence of large particles in the atmosphere of the rural West is notable for several reasons. First, the majority of the existing aerosol monitoring networks focus on the small particle-size classes of less than 2.5 and 10 microns. Because many aerosol-collection instruments are designed with specific particle-size cutoff criteria, these instruments and the networks that depend on them are effectively blind to the larger particles that can dominate aerosol loads in the West. Second, for large portions of the year including the spring and summer months when dust storms are common, large particles likely play a major role in visibility restrictions across the protected airsheds of the western US. Finally, the sources of large mineral aerosols are different from those of industrial aerosols that dominate urban areas, and thus the concentrations of large particles do not correspond with variations in urban concentrations of small industrial aerosols. Mineral aerosols are produced by both natural erosion of desert soils and the variety of human activities such as grazing, resource extraction, and recreation that lead to surface disturbance. In large areas of the rural West, resource extraction and recreational activities have been increasing leading to the potential for increases in mineral aerosol concentrations. Without improved monitoring capabilities that focus on these large particles, any potential long-term changes in large-particle aerosol loads in the rural west will continue to go undetected.

  1. Desert Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NatureScope, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Provides: (1) background information on desert communities, their similarities, and differences; (2) student activities on this topic; and (3) ready-to-copy student pages with pictures of desert animals and plants. Each activity includes objective(s), recommended age level(s), subject area(s), list of materials needed, and procedures. (DH)

  2. Ghetto poverty and pollution in Egypt: a deadly threat for western countries caused by new and infectious mutants. A cultural, social and microbiological synopsis.

    PubMed

    Wassili, J H; Baradaeus, Cyril

    2012-10-01

    Egypt, whose soil germinated the first civilization, monotheism, refined ethics and culture of sharing the abundance of extracted natural resources among its populace became the crucible proliferating de-novo genotypes of organic and moral maladies. The enigma is these mutations are synchronized by several factors, namely; failing medical health, if there is any, abundant filth, cultural bankruptcy, over population, dogmatic militarism, societal deprivation and characterization, etc. These domineering ingredients fossilized Egypt as of 1952 coup in an irrevocable national apoptosis, together with the crippled social justice and imbalanced distribution of wealth among Egyptians, rates of bacterial and viral evolution to second generation resistant to known medical interventions are expected to exponentially accelerate. Therefore, it deemed essential to elaborate on pollution and psychosis-induced inflammations and grievous crimes evoked by dogmatic cults at the breeding source, e.g., ghettos and sporadic locations of the homeless in Cairo, Alexandria and Upper Egyptian villages. While this second generation of viral and bacterial diseases could labor plagues threatening the precariously maintained so-called social fabric of Middle Eastern countries, that are uniquely segregating its populace according to their dogmatic affiliations and soaked into intolerance, it would definitely compromise the integrity of the expensively managed medical care system of developed countries. PMID:22762378

  3. Egypt's fundamentalists say condoms immoral.

    PubMed

    Soliman, S

    1995-06-01

    The first AIDS case in Egypt was reported almost 10 years ago, yet Egypt still does not have reliable statistics on the HIV/AIDS epidemic (officially, 513 HIV infections and 88 AIDS cases; more likely, 3000 and 10,000, respectively). HIV/AIDS bears a stigma. The government claims that every HIV-infected Egyptian acquired the infection through a blood transfusion while in the Gulf or through sexual intercourse in Europe. Cultural, social, and religious norms that discourage promiscuity may explain the low HIV/AIDS rate but these same taboos put women at risk by making it difficult for them to protect themselves. Islamic fundamentalist women reinforce the Islamic principle of forbidding sex education. They consider AIDS a plague of immoral Western society. They refuse to accept the fact that many men do not practice safer sex. These women consider condoms immoral. They think God will curse women who refuse to have sexual intercourse at their husbands' bidding. Many nongovernmental organizations consider an intensive education program as the only means to avert disaster. Egypt has yet to implement its model AIDS program. All hospitals in Cairo and some hospitals in rural areas have equipment to test for HIV. Surveillance systems have been limited to high risk groups. In Egypt, it is mandatory to test foreigners for HIV. Prisoners, prostitutes, homosexuals, and blood donors are tested randomly without their consent. Positive results are often reported to authorities before the persons learn their HIV status. A campaign for widespread sex education is the only action recommended so far. It includes a mass media component and community meetings and conferences. An Egyptian physician has found an anti-viral drug that stimulates the immune system, but his work does not receive much coverage outside Egypt. Egyptians need to tackle their cultural taboos about discussion of sex to curb the HIV/AIDS epidemic. PMID:12289036

  4. Ancient Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swamy, Ashwin Balegar

    This thesis involves development of an interactive GIS (Geographic Information System) based application, which gives information about the ancient history of Egypt. The astonishing architecture, the strange burial rituals and their civilization were some of the intriguing questions that motivated me towards developing this application. The application is a historical timeline starting from 3100 BC, leading up to 664 BC, focusing on the evolution of the Egyptian dynasties. The tool holds information regarding some of the famous monuments which were constructed during that era and also about the civilizations that co-existed. It also provides details about the religions followed by their kings. It also includes the languages spoken during those periods. The tool is developed using JAVA, a programing language and MOJO (Map Objects Java Objects) a product of ESRI (Environmental Science Research Institute) to create map objects, to provide geographic information. JAVA Swing is used for designing the user interface. HTML (Hyper Text Markup Language) pages are created to provide the user with more information related to the historic period. CSS (Cascade Style Sheets) and JAVA Scripts are used with HTML5 to achieve creative display of content. The tool is kept simple and easy for the user to interact with. The tool also includes pictures and videos for the user to get a feel of the historic period. The application is built to motivate people to know more about one of the prominent and ancient civilization of the Mediterranean world.

  5. Whole-Genome Optical Mapping and Finished Genome Sequence of Sphingobacterium deserti sp. nov., a New Species Isolated from the Western Desert of China

    PubMed Central

    Molnr, Istvn; Li, Xinna; Tang, Ran; Chen, Ming; Wang, Lin; Su, Shiyou; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Min

    2015-01-01

    A novel Gram-negative bacterium, designated ZWT, was isolated from a soil sample of the Western Desert of China, and its phenotypic properties and phylogenetic position were investigated using a polyphasic approach. Growth occurred on TGY medium at 542C with an optimum of 30C, and at pH 7.011.0 with an optimum of pH 9.0. The predominant cellular fatty acids were summed feature 3 (C16:1?7c/C16:1?6c or C16:1?6c/C16:1?7c) (39.22%), iso-C15:0 (27.91%), iso-C17:0 3OH (15.21%), C16:0 (4.98%), iso-C15:0 3OH (3.03%), C16:0 3OH (5.39%) and C14:0 (1.74%). The major polar lipid of strain ZWT is phosphatidylethanolamine. The only menaquinone observed was MK-7. The GC content of the DNA of strain ZWT is 44.9 mol%. rDNA phylogeny, genome relatedness and chemotaxonomic characteristics all indicate that strain ZWT represents a novel species of the genus Sphingobacterium. We propose the name S. deserti sp. nov., with ZWT (= KCTC 32092T = ACCC 05744T) as the type strain. Whole genome optical mapping and next-generation sequencing was used to derive a finished genome sequence for strain ZWT, consisting of a circular chromosome of 4,615,818 bp in size. The genome of strain ZWT features 3,391 protein-encoding and 48 tRNA-encoding genes. Comparison of the predicted proteome of ZWT with those of other sphingobacteria identified 925 species-unique proteins that may contribute to the adaptation of ZWT to its native, extremely arid and inhospitable environment. As the first finished genome sequence for any Sphingobacterium, our work will serve as a useful reference for subsequent sequencing and mapping efforts for additional strains and species within this genus. PMID:25830331

  6. Fracture types detected in eastern Mediterranean reservoirs (Turkey and Egypt)

    SciTech Connect

    Nurmi, R.; Taha, M.

    1988-08-01

    Most of Turkey's reservoirs are in the fractured Cretaceous Mardin Formation; however, new possibilities in fractured Paleozoic sandstones are being sought. The dominant fractures are fold related and are found on the northern flanks of the asymmetrical anticlines. The strike of these fractures is perpendicular to bedding planes and parallel to dip. There are fewer tear-fault-related and crestal-position fractures, but these may have a greater vertical extent. Fractures are present in all the producing areas of Egypt except the Nile delta. Basement fractures associated with shear zones in the southern Gulf of Suez have become an important exploration target. Fracture orientations are related to the major shear orientations except where later folding and faulting have caused structural rotation. The development of Zeit Bay field has shown that fractured basement rock can constitute a significant reservoir. The fracture reservoirs in northern Sinai and the Western Desert are in Cretaceous and Jurassic limestones and/or dolomitic limestones. The major shear fractures are parallel to the northwest-north-northwest compressive stresses that formed the reservoir structures; however, local fold- and fault-related fractures are also present.

  7. Geomorphology and Quaternary geology of the Dakhla Oasis Region, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookes, Ian A.

    Dakhla Oasis (25.5°N, 29°E) occupies a structurally localized depression at 90-140 m above sea level, ˜1200 km 2 in area, below a 300 m escarpment bordering the Libyan Plateau, Western Desert of Egypt. Semi-arid intervals of the Quaternary period generated eight sedimentary formations, separated by erosion during hyper-arid intervals. Sediments comprise three generations of colluvial/fluvial fanglomerates, two generations of tabular spring-laid clastic and chemical sediments, two generations of mound springs and basinal sediments. of fluvio-lacustrine, evaporitic, pluvio-aeolian and aeolian origins. Discussion of these sediments is organized according to geomorphic region, from north to south, plateau, scarp and piedmont, lowland and cuesta plain. Chronological evidence is restricted to many radiocarbon dates of Holocene cultural material associated with playa sediments (9-4.5 ka), a {Th}/{U} isochron age of ˜62.0 ±7.6 ka for basinal evaporites, and two {Th}/{U} ages of ˜176 and ˜170 ka for a boulder of derived travertine. The regional Quaternary sequence is reconstructed from stratigraphic and geomorphic relationships of the sediments and erosion surfaces. It is broadly similar to sequences earlier reconstructed in the topographically similar Kharga Oasis region 150 km to the east, and Kurkur Oasis, 400 km to the south-southeast. Speculations on chronology and driving mechanism are offered in conclusion.

  8. Geochemical modeling of evaporation process in Lake Qarun, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Wahed, Mahmoud S. M.; Mohamed, Essam A.; El-Sayed, Mohamed I.; M'nif, Adel; Sillanpää, Mika

    2014-09-01

    Lake Qarun is an inland closed saline lake. It lies within the Fayoum Depression in the Western Desert of Egypt. Evaporation modeling has been carried out using PHREEQC to simulate the geochemical evolution of surface drainage waters inflow towards lake water. In the case of Lake Qarun, it is the first attempt to carry out such kind of modeling. Performance of this model helped to address the different sources of dissolved major ions to Lake Qarun and to identify the mechanisms control the lake's water chemistry. The model demonstrated that evaporation-crystallization process is the main mechanism controlling the evolution of lake water chemistry where major ions Na+, Mg2+, Cl- and SO42- have been built up in the lake by evaporation while Ca2+ and HCO3- are depleted by calcite precipitation. Moreover, the simulated model reproduced the real data observed in Lake Qarun except in the case of SO42- which is in real more enriched in the lake than the model output. The additional source of SO42- is reported to be from groundwater. The models result agreed well with the modified evolutionary Hardie and Eugster's scheme (1970) in which the final major composition of Lake Qarun water is Na-Mg-SO4-Cl type. In future, the monitoring of Lake Qarun chemistry with detection of any other sources of elements and/or local reactions inside the lake can be detected by performing the simulated evaporation model reported by the present study.

  9. Thar Desert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This ASTER sub-scene covers an area of 12 x 15 km in NW India in the Thar Desert. The sand dunes of the Thar Desert constantly shift and take on new shapes. Located in northwestern India and eastern Pakistan, the desert is bounded on the south by a salt marsh known as the Rann of Kutch, and on the west by the Indus River plain. About 800 kilometers long and about 490 kilometers wide, the desert's terrain is mainly rolling sandhills with scattered growths of shrub and rock outcroppings. Only about 12 to 25 centimeters of rain fall on the desert each year, and temperatures rise as high as 52 degrees Celsius. Much of the population is pastoral, raising sheep for their wool. The image is located at 24.4 degrees north latitude and 69.3 degrees east longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  10. Lake Nasser and Toshka Lakes, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Lake Nasser (center) and the Toshka Lakes (center left) glow emerald green and black in this MODIS true-color image acquired March 8, 2002. Located on and near the border of Egypt and Norther Sudan, these lakes are an oasis of water in between the Nubian (lower right) and Libyan Deserts (upper left). Also visible are the Red Sea (in the upper right) and the Nile River (running north from Lake Nasser). Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  11. Calcareous nannofossils and paleoenvironments of the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) interval in central Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, Mohamed

    2016-02-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) interval was examined from four outcrops in Central Egypt to document the response of the floral communities across the PETM. The four outcrops are: Gebel Taramsa west of Qena, Gebel Duwi in the Red Sea Coast, and Gebel Qeryia, Gebel Arras sections in Wadi Qena. The qualitative and quantitative analyses of calcareous nannofossils used samples on a high resolution scale. The PETM is characterized by distinguished lithological succession, the Dababyia Quarry Beds (DQB) which extend over the Nile Valley, the Eastern Desert and the Western Desert. The calcareous nannofossils changes across the Paleocene/Eocene boundary (NP9a/NP9b) is marked by the following events: 1) abrupt decreases in both diversity and abundance, 2) dramatic decrease of Fasciculithus both in diversity and abundance, 3) first acme of Coccolithus pelagicus/Coccolithus subpertusus, and 4) first occurrence of excursion taxa including Discoaster araneus, Discoaster. anartios, Discoaster aegyptiacus and Rhomboaster spp). These events may refer to relatively warm and oligotrophic surface waters. The abundance of Toweius spp. in the upper part of the PETM which associated with Campylosphaera characterizes the return to normal conditions.

  12. Dust Plume off the Coast of Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Dwarfing the Nile, a river of dust flowed out of the deserts of northern Egypt on May 19, 2007. As the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead at 12:05 p.m. local time in Cairo, the sensor captured this image of the dust spreading northward over the Mediterranean Sea from the sandy deserts that span the country. At the margins of the plume, ribbons and ripples of dust are translucent, allowing a glimpse of the desert and water beneath, but in the center, the cloud is opaque, revealing nothing of the surface below. The part of north-central Egypt hidden by the dust plume is the Qattara Depression, the country's lowest point. Dipping down to 133 meters below sea level (436 feet), the depression is home to sandy deserts and dry lake beds that occasionally flood. The sand and fine, lake bed sediments are easily lofted into the air by strong winds that scour the area in late winter and early spring. In the eastern (right-hand) part of the image, the Nile River is lined by narrow ribbons of dull green vegetation. The fan-shaped delta is dotted with tan-colored spots, marking the location of cities and towns. The Nile Valley and Delta make up only a small fraction of the country's total land area, yet they support almost the entire population. The large image provided above has a spatial resolution (level of detail) of 250 meters per pixel. The MODIS Rapid Response Team provides this image in additional resolutions. The Earth Observatory also provides a 250-meter-resolution KMZ file of this image for use with Google Earth.

  13. Desert Survivors!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Jessica; Friedenstab, Steve

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a special third-grade classroom unit based on the reality show "Survivor." The goal of this engaging and interactive unit was to teach students about physical and behavioral adaptations that help animals survive in various desert biomes. The activity combines research, argument, and puppet play over one week of

  14. Desert Survivors!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Jessica; Friedenstab, Steve

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a special third-grade classroom unit based on the reality show "Survivor." The goal of this engaging and interactive unit was to teach students about physical and behavioral adaptations that help animals survive in various desert biomes. The activity combines research, argument, and puppet play over one week of…

  15. Discovering Deserts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Discovering Deserts." Contents are organized into the following sections: (1)…

  16. Napoleon in Egypt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Brian

    1989-01-01

    Recounts the 1798 Egyptian campaign of Napoleon Bonaparte, whose Scientific and Artistic Commission documented and described the glories of ancient Egypt. The expedition was a disaster by military standards, but the cultural legacies included the Rosetta Stone, and a chronicle entitled "Description de L'Egypte," which did much to popularize

  17. Ancient Egypt: History 380.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turk, Laraine D.

    "Ancient Egypt," an upper-division, non-required history course covering Egypt from pre-dynastic time through the Roman domination is described. General descriptive information is presented first, including the method of grading, expectation of student success rate, long-range course objectives, procedures for revising the course, major course

  18. Ancient Egypt: History 380.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turk, Laraine D.

    "Ancient Egypt," an upper-division, non-required history course covering Egypt from pre-dynastic time through the Roman domination is described. General descriptive information is presented first, including the method of grading, expectation of student success rate, long-range course objectives, procedures for revising the course, major course…

  19. Napoleon in Egypt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, Brian

    1989-01-01

    Recounts the 1798 Egyptian campaign of Napoleon Bonaparte, whose Scientific and Artistic Commission documented and described the glories of ancient Egypt. The expedition was a disaster by military standards, but the cultural legacies included the Rosetta Stone, and a chronicle entitled "Description de L'Egypte," which did much to popularize…

  20. Nile behaviour and Upper Palaeolithic humans in Upper Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeersch, Pierre M.

    2014-05-01

    There is evidence of a decreasing human occupation of the Upper Egyptian Nile valley during the MIS 5 to MIS 3 period. Whereas very large extraction sites of the Middle Stone Age have been recorded, only very few sites of the Upper Palaeolithic have been found. The best explanation of this fact is that during the Late Middle Stone Age and the Upper Palaeolithc there was nearly no need for raw materials because there was only a very restricted population present in Upper Egypt. From about 22 ka BP an important population increase is registered by the presence of numerous Late Palaeolithic sites. During the whole LGM there is abundant presence of humans along the Nile Valley in Upper Egypt. This population was mainly living from fishing. There seems to be an abrupt end of the Palaeolithic occupation after 12.8 ka BP. Until now, no sites were found in the Valley until some rare Epipaleolithic sites occur about 8.0 ka BP. It will be suggested that these population changes are influenced by the river Nile behaviour. The best interpretation of the observations in the Upper Egyptian Nile Valley is the hypothesis that at the same time that Nile flow was reduced because of the dryness in its source area, the impact of aeolian activity was increased over Northeast Africa. The increased aeolian activity by northern winds in the Fayum and Wadi Ryan during the LGM resulted in the accumulation of aeolian sand in the valley. That aeolian sand was transported along the western Nile valley cliffs until it was accumulated when the Nile Valley change it S-N direction, such as at Nag'Hammadi. At other places sand was invading the Nile valley, directly from the Western Desert, creating a damming of the Nile at several places such as Armant and Aswan. As Nile flow was quite reduced, the Nile was unable to erode all the incoming sand and the Nile water with its important clay content was dammed. At several places large lakes were created in the Nile Valley. Those lakes were an ideal place for the settlement of the Late Palaeolithic fishers. There came an abrupt end to this situation when the Nile returned to its meandering regime at the end of the LGM. This situation created an catastrophic food crisis for the

  1. Field and ASTER imagery data for the setting of gold mineralization in Western Allaqi-Heiani belt, Egypt: A case study from the Haimur deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoheir, Basem; Emam, Ashraf

    2014-11-01

    Although associated with carbonatized/listvenitized ophiolites and thrust structures, the morphology and internal structures of the auriferous quartz veins in the Haimur deposit suggest mineralization concurrent with NE-SW dextral brittle-ductile shear zones. The latter are attributed to intense transpression regime and are associated with (N)NE-trending tight to isoclinals folds that deform the early accretionary structures. Image processing techniques applicable to the Advanced Space-borne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data are used for mapping structures and hydrothermal alteration associated with the Haimur deposit. The automated lineament extraction by LINE module on high resolution ASTER imagery provides efficient data for potential dilation loci. Emphasis is placed on reliability of mineral indices extracted from the ASTER band ratios for identification of possibly mineralized alteration zones associated with NE-trending shear zones. Field and remote sensing data, together with the structural fabrics along the lode-associated shear zones clearly constrain on the genetic relationship between the Haimur gold deposit and post-accretionary transpression/shearing. We conclude that hydrothermal alteration zones that are confined to tightly enfolded ophiolites and transpressive shear zones along the Western Allaqi-Heiani belt are most potential targets for new exploration plans.

  2. Geochemical and hydrological processes controlling groundwater quality in Assiut Governorate, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, R. G.; Tempel, R.; Gomaa, M.; Korany, E.

    2011-12-01

    Groundwater in Assiut area, Egypt, is an important source of fresh water for human consumption, agriculture, and domestic and industrial purposes. Due to a growing population and expansion of agricultural reclamation projects in the desert fringes of the Nile Valley, there is an increasing water demand in this arid region. This study has investigated the geochemical and hydrological processes that control groundwater quality within the Pleistocene, Plio-Pleistocene, and Eocene aquifers in Assiut, in addition to the hydraulic relationships between surface and groundwater systems and the relations among the defined groundwater aquifers. A total of 28 surface and 160 groundwater samples were collected for geochemical analysis (major and minor element chemistry, and stable isotope analyses). Total dissolved solids = 182 to 5657 mg/L, water-delta 18O = -7.5 to +6.5%, and water-delta D = -55 to +32%. Geochemical and stable isotope data indicate that the principal source of recharge to the Pleistocene and Plio-Pleistocene aquifers is the surface water system (irrigation canals), while the prevalence of Na-Cl type waters in the Eocene aquifer indicates recharge by upward leakage from the underlying Nubian sandstone aquifer which contains the same Na-Cl water type. Evaporation prior to infiltration, mixing, and mineral equilibria (dissolution and precipitation) are the main factors that affect water quality. Ion exchange plays a secondary role in controlling the water chemistry of the Pleistocene aquifer, but is more effective in controlling water quality within the Plio-Pleistocene and Eocene aquifers due to the prevalence of clay minerals within the matrices. The fresh water exploited from the Eocene aquifer may be of great importance for land reclamation projects not only at the western desert fringes, but also at the eastern desert fringes of Assiut and similar settings around the River Nile south of Assiut Governorate. Results of this study will be helpful for sustainable development, and raising the standard of living of people in the Assiut area, which is one of the poorest regions of Egypt.

  3. Astronomy in ancient Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitchin, Chris

    2003-03-01

    Focus: the ancients. Many of the artefacts constructed between three and six or more millennia ago in Egypt appear to be aligned in directions that have some astronomical or geographical significance.

  4. Enrichment in Egypt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Jean S.

    1985-01-01

    The Cairo (Egypt) American College, offers a program for academically able elementary students based on a broad enrichment philosophy model and selective pullout classes. A resource teacher describes her experiences with the program and its students. (CL)

  5. What Makes a Desert a Desert?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NatureScope, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents background information and activities which focus on definition of a desert, locations of deserts, and factors influencing locations. Activities include objective(s), recommended age level(s), subject area(s), list of materials needed, and procedures. Two ready-to-copy pages with desert landforms and temperature/rainfall data are

  6. Gold of the Pharaohs 6000 years of gold mining in Egypt and Nubia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemm, Dietrich; Klemm, Rosemarie; Murr, Andreas

    2001-08-01

    The legendary wealth in gold of ancient Egypt seems to correspond with an unexpected high number of gold production sites in the Eastern Desert of Egypt and Nubia. This contribution introduces briefly the general geology of these vast regions and discusses the geology of the different varieties of the primary gold occurrences (always related to auriferous quartz mineralization in veins or shear zones) as well as the variable physico-chemical genesis of the gold concentrations. The development of gold mining over time, from Predynastic (ca. 3000 BC) until the end of Arab gold production times (about 1350 AD), including the spectacular Pharaonic periods is outlined, with examples of its remaining artefacts, settlements and mining sites in remote regions of the Eastern Desert of Egypt and Nubia. Finally, some estimates on the scale of gold production are presented.

  7. Desert Test Site Uniformity Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerola, Dana X.; Bruegge, Carol J.

    2009-01-01

    Desert test sites such as Railroad Valley (RRV) Nevada, Egypt-1, and Libya-4 are commonly targeted to assess the on-orbit radiometric performance of sensors. Railroad Valley is used for vicarious calibration experiments, where a field-team makes ground measurements to produce accurate estimates of top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiances. The Sahara desert test sites are not instrumented, but provide a stable target that can be used for sensor cross-comparisons, or for stability monitoring of a single sensor. These sites are of interest to NASA's Atmospheric Carbon Observation from Space (ACOS) and JAXA's Greenhouse Gas Observation SATellite (GOSAT) programs. This study assesses the utility of these three test sites to the ACOS and GOSAT calibration teams. To simulate errors in sensor-measured radiance with pointing errors, simulated data have been created using MODIS Aqua data. MODIS data are further utilized to validate the campaign data acquired from June 22 through July 5, 2009. The first GOSAT vicarious calibration experiment was conducted during this timeframe.

  8. Geologic and hydrologic controls on the movement of water through a thick, heterogeneous unsaturated zone underlying an intermittent stream in the western Mojave Desert, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izbicki, John A.

    2002-03-01

    A two-dimensional, axially symmetric, unsaturated flow model was developed to test hypotheses about geologic and hydrologic controls on the movement of water through the thick, heterogeneous, unsaturated zone underlying Oro Grande Wash in the Mojave Desert, California. Heterogeneity within the unsaturated zone was simulated with multiple realizations of subsurface geology estimated on the basis of transition probability/Markov chain statistics. Model results show lateral spreading of water away from the wash was best approximated by realizations that include thin, horizontally extensive clay layers that impede the downward movement of water. There was a wide range in model responses for these realizations, and the movement of water through unsaturated zones containing thin, horizontally extensive clay layers may be more difficult to predict than water movement through unsaturated zones where clay layers are less extensive. For realizations having less extensive clay layers, the range of model responses decreased with time, and model results became increasingly similar as water encountered larger volumes of material.

  9. Desert Dust Aerosol Air Mass Mapping in the Western Sahara, Using Particle Properties Derived from Space-Based Multi-Angle Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph; Petzold, Andreas; Wendisch, Manfred; Bierwirth, Eike; Dinter, Tilman; Esselborn, Michael; Fiebig, Marcus; Heese, Birgit; Knippertz, Peter; Mueller, Detlef; Schladitz, Alexander; Von Hoyningen-Huene, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Coincident observations made over the Moroccan desert during the Sahara mineral dust experiment (SAMUM) 2006 field campaign are used both to validate aerosol amount and type retrieved from multi-angle imaging spectroradiometer (MISR) observations, and to place the suborbital aerosol measurements into the satellite s larger regional context. On three moderately dusty days during which coincident observations were made, MISR mid-visible aerosol optical thickness (AOT) agrees with field measurements point-by-point to within 0.05 0.1. This is about as well as can be expected given spatial sampling differences; the space-based observations capture AOT trends and variability over an extended region. The field data also validate MISR s ability to distinguish and to map aerosol air masses, from the combination of retrieved constraints on particle size, shape and single-scattering albedo. For the three study days, the satellite observations (1) highlight regional gradients in the mix of dust and background spherical particles, (2) identify a dust plume most likely part of a density flow and (3) show an aerosol air mass containing a higher proportion of small, spherical particles than the surroundings, that appears to be aerosol pollution transported from several thousand kilometres away.

  10. Desert Dust Air Mass Mapping in the Western Sahara, using Particle Properties Derived from Space-based Multi-angle Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph; Petzold, Andreas; Wendisch, Manfred; Bierwirth, Eike; Dinter, Tilman; Fiebig, Marcus; Schladitz, Alexander; von Hoyningen-Huene, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Coincident observations made over the Moroccan desert during the SAhara Mineral dUst experiMent (SAMUM) 2006 field campaign are used both to validate aerosol amount and type retrieved from Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) observations, and to place the sub-orbital aerosol measurements into the satellite's larger regional context. On three moderately dusty days for which coincident observations were made, MISR mid-visible aerosol optical thickness (AOT) agrees with field measurements point-by-point to within 0.05 to 0.1. This is about as well as can be expected given spatial sampling differences; the space-based observations capture AOT trends and variability over an extended region. The field data also validate MISR's ability to distinguish and to map aerosol air masses, from the combination of retrieved constraints on particle size, shape, and single-scattering albedo. For the three study days, the satellite observations (a) highlight regional gradients in the mix of dust and background spherical particles, (b) identify a dust plume most likely part of a density flow, and (c) show an air mass containing a higher proportion of small, spherical particles than the surroundings, that appears to be aerosol pollution transported from several thousand kilometers away.

  11. Safsaf Oasis, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    These images show two views of a region of south-central Egypt, each taken by a different type of spaceborne sensor. On the left is an optical image from the Landsat Thematic Mapper, and on the right is a radar image from the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR). This comparison shows that the visible and infrared wavelengths of Landsat are only sensitive to the materials on the surface, while the radar wavelengths of SIR-C/X-SAR can penetrate the thin sand cover in this arid region to reveal details hidden below the surface. Field studies in this area indicate that the L-band radar can penetrate as much as 2 meters (6.5 feet) of very dry sand to image buried rock structures. Ancient drainage channels, shown at the bottom of this image, are filled with sand more than 2 meters (6.5 feet) thick and therefore appear dark because the radar waves cannot penetrate them. Only the most recently active channels are visible in the Landsat scene. Some geologic structures at the surface are visible in both images. However, many buried features, such as rock fractures and the blue circular granite bodies in the upper center of the image on the right, are visible only to the radar. The Safsaf Oasis is located near the bright yellow feature in the lower left center of the Landsat image. Scientists are using the penetrating capabilities of radar imaging in desert areas to study structural geology, mineral exploration, ancient climates, water resources and archaeology. Each image is 30.8 kilometers by 25.6 kilometers (19.1 miles by 15.9 miles) and is centered at 22.7 degrees north latitude, 29.3 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper right. In the Landsat image, the colors are assigned as follows: red is Band 7 (mid-infrared); green is Band 4 (near infrared); and blue is Band 1 (visible blue light). The colors assigned to the radar frequencies and polarizations are as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and received; green is C-band, horizontally transmitted and received; and blue is X-band, vertically transmitted and received. The radar image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/ X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) on April 16, 1994, on board the space shuttle Endeavour. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise. The Landsat Program is managed jointly by NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the United States Geological Survey.

    Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.v.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations, and data processing of X-SAR.

  12. The Politics of Educational Transfer and Policymaking in Egypt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Ali S.

    2010-01-01

    For the past two centuries, western modern education has informed education policies and practices in Egypt. However, few researchers have analyzed the historical or current politics of educational transfer in this country. This article investigates the ways in which foreign transfer has influenced Egyptian education, both historically and

  13. Dwarfs in ancient Egypt.

    PubMed

    Kozma, Chahira

    2006-02-15

    Ancient Egypt was one of the most advanced and productive civilizations in antiquity, spanning 3000 years before the "Christian" era. Ancient Egyptians built colossal temples and magnificent tombs to honor their gods and religious leaders. Their hieroglyphic language, system of organization, and recording of events give contemporary researchers insights into their daily activities. Based on the record left by their art, the ancient Egyptians documented the presence of dwarfs in almost every facet of life. Due to the hot dry climate and natural and artificial mummification, Egypt is a major source of information on achondroplasia in the old world. The remains of dwarfs are abundant and include complete and partial skeletons. Dwarfs were employed as personal attendants, animal tenders, jewelers, and entertainers. Several high-ranking dwarfs especially from the Old Kingdom (2700-2190 BCE) achieved important status and had lavish burial places close to the pyramids. Their costly tombs in the royal cemeteries and the inscriptions on their statutes indicate their high-ranking position in Egyptian society and their close relation to the king. Some of them were Seneb, Pereniankh, Khnumhotpe, and Djeder. There were at least two dwarf gods, Ptah and Bes. The god Ptah was associated with regeneration and rejuvenation. The god Bes was a protector of sexuality, childbirth, women, and children. He was a favored deity particularly during the Greco-Roman period. His temple was recently excavated in the Baharia oasis in the middle of Egypt. The burial sites and artistic sources provide glimpses of the positions of dwarfs in daily life in ancient Egypt. Dwarfs were accepted in ancient Egypt; their recorded daily activities suggest assimilation into daily life, and their disorder was not shown as a physical handicap. Wisdom writings and moral teachings in ancient Egypt commanded respect for dwarfs and other individuals with disabilities. PMID:16380966

  14. Surgery in Egypt.

    PubMed

    el-Zawahry, M D; Ramzy, A F; el-Sahwi, E; Bahnasy, A F; Khafaga, M; Rizk-Allah, M A; Abou el-Hoda, M F

    1997-07-01

    The history of medicine can never be complete without referral to ancient Egyptian medicine. Imhotep has been identified as the god of medicine. There are 13 faculties of medicine in Egypt; the oldest is the Kasr El Aini Faculty, which started in 1925. We review undergraduate and postgraduate education in Egypt. The Egyptian Society of Surgeons organizes the scientific surgical activities. Schistosomiasis is a national health problem. Health care is provided by many types of hospitals, including university, teaching, Ministry of Public Health, military, and private hospitals. PMID:9230851

  15. Occupational health in Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Ata, Gehad Ahmed Abo; Arnaout, Said N

    2002-01-01

    This review aims to evaluate current occupational health services (OHS) in Egypt. The authors begin with a background on the geography, population, and economy, and then briefly describe the labor force. They discuss the legislative aspects of OHS (including health insurance) and the environment; OHS training and education; and activities such as research, inspection, environmental monitoring, and management of occupational diseases. Occupational accidents and diseases, registered during 2000, are analyzed. Problems with OHS administration in Egypt are presented, along with relevant countermeasures. Various promotion and support measures for administrative policy are prioritized and discussed. PMID:12028958

  16. Nile Delta, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Nile Delta of Egypt (30.0N, 31.0E) irrigated by the Nile River and its many distributaries, is some of the richest farm land in the world and home to some 45 million people, over half of Egypt's population of 57 million. The capital city of Cairo is at the apex of the delta in the middle of the scene. Across the river from Cairo can be seen the three big pyramids and sphinx at Giza and the Suez Canal is just to the right of the delta.

  17. Nile River Delta, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The Nile River Delta of Egypt (30.0N, 31.0E) irrigated by the Nile River and its many distributaries, is some of the richest farm land in the world and home to some 45 million people, over half of Egypt's population. The capital city of Cairo is at the apex of the delta. Just across the river from Cairo can be seen the ancient three big pyramids and sphinx at Giza and the Suez Canal is just to the right of the delta.

  18. Data from a Thick Unsaturated Zone Underlying Two Artificial Recharge Sites along Oro Grande Wash in the Western Part of the Mojave Desert, near Victorville, San Bernardino County, California, 2001-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Dennis A.; Izbicki, John A.; Johnson, Russell D.; Land, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This report presents data on the physical and hydraulic properties of unsaturated alluvial deposits and on the chemical and isotopic composition of water collected at two recharge sites in the western part of the Mojave Desert, near Victorville, California, from 2001 to 2006. Unsaturated-zone monitoring sites were installed adjacent to the two recharge ponds using the ODEX air-hammer and air rotary method to depths of about 460 feet and 269 feet below land surface. Each of the two unsaturated-zone monitoring sites included a water-table well, matric-potential sensors, and suction-cup lysimeters installed in a single bore hole. Drilling procedures, lithologic and geophysical data, and site construction and instrumentation are described. Core material was analyzed for water content, bulk density, water potential, particle size, and water retention. The chemical composition of leachate from almost 400 samples of cores and cuttings was determined. Water from suction-cup lysimeters also was analyzed for chemical and isotopic composition. In addition, data on the chemical and isotopic composition of groundwater from the two water-table wells are reported along with chemical and isotopic composition of the surface water in the recharge ponds.

  19. Desert Voices: Southwestern Children's Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polette, Keith

    1997-01-01

    Examines three books with different ways of writing about the desert. Discusses: "Here Is the Southwestern Desert" by Madeline Dunphy, "The Desert Is My Mother" by Pat Mora, and "The Desert Mermaid" by Alberto Blanco. (PA)

  20. Egypt's National Education Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Bradley James

    2000-01-01

    Examines the vigorous dialectic occurring among intellectuals, religious leaders, and politicians trying to define the appropriate role of Islam in Egyptian education. Discusses the call for the Islamization of education in contemporary Egypt, aspects of Islamic law, the position of the state on religious education, and the influence of a small

  1. Ancient Egypt: Personal Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolinski, Arelene

    This teacher resource book provides information on ancient Egypt via short essays, photographs, maps, charts, and drawings. Egyptian social and religious life, including writing, art, architecture, and even the practice of mummification, is conveniently summarized for the teacher or other practitioner in a series of one to three page articles with…

  2. Reflections about bizarre mummification practices on mummies at Egypt's Dakhleh oasis: a review.

    PubMed

    Aufderheide, Arthur C

    2009-12-01

    About 100 mummified human remains were excavated from the Dakhleh Oasis in Egypt's Western Desert. Of these, less than half were examined by dissection. These dated to the Late Ptolemaic and Roman Periods. Initially, a confusing pattern of mortuary mummification practices was encountered that was identified ultimately as a product of primarily initial spontaneous mummification by desiccation. This was followed by tomb robbing in antiquity with unwrapping; body disarticulation followed, in turn, by mummy body reconstruction with atypical use of resin applications. Some of the resin was shown to be contaminated by bitumen that was responsible for inappropriately old radiocarbon dates of mummy tissue samples. Chemical reconstruction of diet using stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen characterized their diet to be primarily that of C3 plants, consistent with trading records excavated from that site. Analysis of the mummy coprolites also enabled the first finding of the intestinal parasite Enterobius vermicularis in either ancient or modern Egyptian human coprolites. The principal focus of this report is to demonstrate and verify the value of including visceral dissection as part of a mummy examination whenever possible. PMID:20440958

  3. Proterozoic deformation of the East Saharan Craton in Southeast Libya, South Egypt and North Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schandelmeier, H.; Richter, A.; Harms, U.

    1987-09-01

    The basement areas in Southeast Libya, South Egypt and North Sudan, west of the Nile, between Gebel Uweinat and the Bayuda Desert, are part of an approximately 1000-km-wide, complexly folded, polymetamorphic zone with a regional N-NNE-NE-ENE trend of foliation and fold axis. Since this belt extends southwestward into the area of Zalingei in the southern Darfur block (West Sudan), it is named the Northern Zalingei fold zone. Sr and Nd isotopic studies suggest that this zone is older than Pan-African and further indicate that, apart from Archean rocks in the Gebel Uweinat area, this belt is of Early-Middle Proterozoic age. An Early-Middle Proterozoic three-stage deformational and anatectic event established the present-day fold and fault geometry in the western parts of this zone in the Gebel UweinatGebel Kamil area. The Pan-African tectono-thermal episode was most effective in the eastern part of the belt, near the boundary with the Nubian Shield volcano-sedimentary-ophiolite-granitoid assemblages. It caused migmatization, granite emplacement, mylonitization and large-scale wrench faulting which was related to Late Proterozoic accretionary and collisional events of the Arabian-Nubian Shield with the margin of the East Saharan Craton.

  4. Recent environmental change and prehistoric human activity in Egypt and Northern Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoll, Kathleen

    2004-03-01

    This paper reviews the various Late Quaternary records that are available from western Egypt and northern Sudan, which includes more than 500 published radiocarbon dates and various sedimentary archives from local landscape components, including palaeolakes, soils, drainages (wadis), and archaeological sites. This palaeoenvironmental compilation frames the spatial and temporal context of local cultural activities when the region was most hospitable ˜9000-6000 BP; at this time, monsoonal weather influenced the portion of the African continental interior, creating enough convective rainfall for occasional surface water storage. In this part of the modern Sahara, rapid hydroclimatic changes play a key role in geomorphic evolution and resource availability. As 'watering holes' formed and dried up in the Early to Middle Holocene, Neolithic people developed various subsistence strategies, including opportunistic hunting of small animals (e.g. gazelle and hare), and food-related (e.g. wild sorghum, millet, and legumes) activities: gathering, plant cultivation and livestock-rearing. During its wettest phases during the 'monsoonal maximum,' the area was drought-prone, sustaining a meager steppe-shrub desert flora. Further desertification and aeolian deflation during the Middle and Late Holocene fostered technological innovation, migration and settlement, as well as the further development of agrarian communities and complex culture.

  5. SHUTTLE IMAGING RADAR PROVIDES FRAMEWORK FOR SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC EXPLORATION IN EGYPT AND SUDAN.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breed, Carol S.; McCauley, John F.; Schaber, Gerald G.

    1984-01-01

    Shuttle Imaging Radar provides a pictorial framework to guide exploration for mineral resources (potential placers), groundwater sources, and prehistoric archaeological sites in the Western Desert of Egypt and Sudan. Documented penetration by the SIR-A signal of dry surficial sediment to depths of a meter or more revealed bedrock geologic features and networks of former stream valleys otherwise concealed beneath windblown sand, alluvium, and colluvial deposits. 'Radar units' mapped on SIR-A images according to relative brightness and degree of mottling correspond to subsurface geologic and topographic features identified in more than 50 test pits. Petrologic examination of pit samples confirms that a variety of depositional environments existed in this now hyper-arid region before it was mantled by windblown sand sheets and dunes. Wet sand was discovered in two buried valleys shown on the radar images and located in the field with the aid of co-registered maps and Landsat images, and a satellite navigation device. Buried valleys whose streams once traversed mineralized zones are potential sites of placers (gold, tin).

  6. ECOLOGY OF DESERT SYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventional wisdom considers deserts stark, harsh regions that support few living things. Most people also believe that water alone makes the desert bloom. Ecology of Desert Systems challenges these conventional views. This volume explores a broad range of topics of interest to ecosystem, popula...

  7. Astronomy at Nabta Playa, Southern Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKim Malville, J.

    Nabta Playa may contain the oldest human-made features with astronomical alignments in Egypt. In the Late and Terminal Neolithic (7,500-5,400 BP), nomadic pastoralists built a ceremonial center on the western shore of Nabta Playa, consisting of some 30 complex megalithic structures, stone circles, and lines of megaliths crossing the playa. The megaliths may once have aligned with Arcturus, the Belt of Orion, Sirius, and ? Cen. Reorientations of the northern set of megaliths suggest a response to precession. Elaborate burials at the nearby cemetery at Gebel Ramlah indicate the nomads consisted of Mediterranean and sub-Saharan populations with little social stratification.

  8. The Regional Environmental Impacts of Atmospheric Aerosols over Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakey, Ashraf; Ibrahim, Alaa

    2015-04-01

    Identifying the origin (natural versus anthropogenic) and the dynamics of aerosols over Egypt at varying temporal and spatial scales provide valuable knowledge on the regional climate impacts of aerosols and their ultimate connections to the Earth's regional climate system at the MENA region. At regional scale, Egypt is exposed to air pollution with levels exceeding typical air-quality standards. This is particularly true for the Nile Delta region, being at the crossroads of different aerosol species originating from local urban-industrial and biomass-burning activities, regional dust sources, and European pollution from the north. The Environmental Climate Model (EnvClimA) is used to investigate both of the biogenic and anthropogenic aerosols over Egypt. The dominant natural aerosols over Egypt are due to the sand and dust storms, which frequently occur during the transitional seasons (spring and autumn). In winter, the maximum frequency reaches 2 to 3 per day in the north, which decreases gradually southward with a frequency of 0.5-1 per day. Monitoring one of the most basic aerosol parameters, the aerosol optical depth (AOD), is a main experimental and modeling task in aerosol studies. We used the aerosol optical depth to quantify the amount and variability of aerosol loading in the atmospheric column over a certain areas. The aerosols optical depth from the model is higher in spring season due to the impacts of dust activity over Egypt as results of the westerly wind, which carries more dust particles from the Libyan Desert. The model result shows that the mass load of fine aerosols has a longer life-time than the coarse aerosols. In autumn season, the modelled aerosol optical depth tends to increase due to the biomass burning in the delta of Egypt. Natural aerosol from the model tends to scatter the solar radiation while most of the anthropogenic aerosols tend to absorb the longwave solar radiation. The overall results indicate that the AOD is lowest in winter due to airborne particles washed out by rain events. Conversely, the AOD increases in summer because particle accumulation is favored by the absence of precipitation during this season. Moreover, in summer, photochemical processes in the atmosphere lead to slight increases in the values of aerosol optical characteristics, despite lower wind speeds [hence less wind-blown dust] relative to other seasons. This study has been conducted under the PEER 2-239 research project titled "the Impact of Biogenic and Anthropogenic Atmospheric Aerosols to Climate in Egypt". Project website: CleanAirEgypt.org

  9. Hydrogeochemical analysis and evaluation of groundwater in the reclaimed small basin of Abu Mina, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Zenhom E.; Atwia, Mohamed G.; El-Horiny, Mohamed M.

    2015-09-01

    Agricultural reclamation activities during the last few decades in the Western Nile Delta have led to great changes in the groundwater levels and quality. In Egypt, changing the desert land into agricultural land has been done using transferred Nile water (through irrigation canal systems) or/and groundwater. This research investigates the hydrogeochemical changes accompanying the reclamation processes in the small basin of Abu Mina, which is part of the Western Nile Delta region. In summer 2008, 23 groundwater samples were collected and groundwater levels were measured in 40 observation wells. Comparing the groundwater data of the pre-reclamation (1974) and the post-reclamation (2008) periods, groundwater seems to have been subjected to many changes: rise in water level, modification of the flow system, improvement of water quality, and addition of new salts through dissolution processes. Generally, Abu Mina basin is subdivided into two areas, recharge and discharge. The dissolution and mixing were recognized in the recharge areas, while the groundwater of the discharge region carries the signature of the diluted pre-reclamation groundwater. The salts of soil and aquifer deposits play an important role in the salt content of the post and pre-reclamation groundwater. NaCl was the predominant water type in the pre-reclamation groundwater, while CaSO4, NaCl and MgSO4 are the common chemical facies in the post-reclamation groundwater. The post-reclamation groundwater mostly indicates mixing between the pre-reclamation groundwater and the infiltrated freshwater with addition of some ions due to interaction with soil and sediments.

  10. Hydrogeochemical analysis and evaluation of groundwater in the reclaimed small basin of Abu Mina, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Zenhom E.; Atwia, Mohamed G.; El-Horiny, Mohamed M.

    2015-12-01

    Agricultural reclamation activities during the last few decades in the Western Nile Delta have led to great changes in the groundwater levels and quality. In Egypt, changing the desert land into agricultural land has been done using transferred Nile water (through irrigation canal systems) or/and groundwater. This research investigates the hydrogeochemical changes accompanying the reclamation processes in the small basin of Abu Mina, which is part of the Western Nile Delta region. In summer 2008, 23 groundwater samples were collected and groundwater levels were measured in 40 observation wells. Comparing the groundwater data of the pre-reclamation (1974) and the post-reclamation (2008) periods, groundwater seems to have been subjected to many changes: rise in water level, modification of the flow system, improvement of water quality, and addition of new salts through dissolution processes. Generally, Abu Mina basin is subdivided into two areas, recharge and discharge. The dissolution and mixing were recognized in the recharge areas, while the groundwater of the discharge region carries the signature of the diluted pre-reclamation groundwater. The salts of soil and aquifer deposits play an important role in the salt content of the post and pre-reclamation groundwater. NaCl was the predominant water type in the pre-reclamation groundwater, while CaSO4, NaCl and MgSO4 are the common chemical facies in the post-reclamation groundwater. The post-reclamation groundwater mostly indicates mixing between the pre-reclamation groundwater and the infiltrated freshwater with addition of some ions due to interaction with soil and sediments.

  11. [Sexuality in Ancient Egypt].

    PubMed

    Androutsos, G; Marketos, S

    1994-10-01

    The present article explores the sexuality in ancient Egypt. In particular in this article are presented the ways of concubinage (marriage, concubinage, adultery), the incest, loves of the pharaohs and of the common people, the freedom of choice in garments, the status of the hetairas and of the whores, the sexual perversions (male and female homosexuality, necrophilia, sodomism, bestiality, rape, masturbation, exhibitionism), the operations of the genitals (circumcision, excision, castration) and finally the level of knowledge in gynaecology, fertility, contraception and obstetrics that even today demands our admiration. PMID:7858632

  12. Egypt at the crossroads.

    PubMed

    Hinrichsen, D

    1992-01-01

    Egypt is the location of the 1994 International Population and Development Conference. Conditions in Egypt due to expected population growth rates are anticipated as headed for "ecological breakdown." There is loss of prime agricultural land to urban expansion and difficulties in providing employment and vital services. The fertility decline to 4 children/family is still inadequate to meet resource needs; a 2-child family norm must be adopted because the country can barely meet the needs of 90 million people. Cairo is becoming a mega-city of squatter settlements and slums. Population densities approach 140,000/sq. kilometers. The family planning (FP) program receives top political support. The contraceptive prevalence rate has risen to just over 50%, a 10% increase since 1988. Egypt is the first Muslim country to surpass the 50% mark. Credit for this accomplishment is given to public information and education campaigns to reduce family size, expansion of maternal and child health services and FP, the cooperation of Muslim clerics, and better educated women. Nongovernmental organizations have played an active role in FP. The future challenge is to improve services and outreach and keep up with demand. Attitudes in rural areas have changed, so that desiring children to help with farm work is the exception. Progress on arresting environmental destruction has not been as successful. There are still poor irrigation practices. The breadbasket the Nile River sustained no longer exists; Egypt is a net importer of food. Water shortages and water quality limit productivity. 57.2 billion cu. meters out of 58.4 billion cu. meters of freshwater available from the Nile River are used primarily for irrigation of the 17.6 million hectares of agricultural land along the river and its delta. Salts have polluted the river from fertilizers and pesticides and municipal and industrial wastes. Industrial dumping is illegal, but continues. Treatment plants are inadequate and water pipes are in need of repair. In order to meet water needs in the year 2000, irrigation water needs to be reclaimed. There is a race against time toe correct mismanagement. PMID:12344703

  13. Climate Change and the Fate of Desert Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisbee, Marty D.; Wilson, John L.; Sada, Donald W.

    2013-04-01

    Springs are integral components of the unique web of life in desert ecosystems of the western United States. Many desert springs would not exist without local mountains to intercept and store water from rainfall and snowmelt, and many desert aquatic ecosystems would not exist without the springs, illustrating the connectivity between landscape processes (the realm of geoscientists) and ecosystem functioning (the realm of ecologists). On a human scale, early exploration, inhabitation, and survival in the arid and semiarid western United States would not have been feasible without springs. People living there today continue to value springs as dependable sources of water for irrigation, livestock, drinking, and recreational and economic uses (e.g., hot springs). Unfortunately, some desert springs may be less resistant to the effects of climate change than others. How can this resistance be quantified?

  14. Mesozoic carbonate-siliciclastic platform to basin systems of a South Tethyan margin (Egypt, East Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassy, Aurlie; Crouzy, Emmanuel; Gorini, Christian; Rubino, Jean-Loup

    2015-04-01

    The Mesozoc Egyptian margin is the south margin of a remnant of the Neo-Tethys Ocean, at the African northern plate boundary. East Mediterranean basin developed during the late Triassic-Early Jurassic rifting with a NW-SE opening direction (Frizon de Lamotte et al., 2011). During Mesozoc, Egypt margin was a transform margin with a NW-SE orientation of transform faults. In the Eastern Mediterranean basin, Mesozoc margins are characterized by mixed carbonate-siliciclastics platforms where subsidence and eustacy are the main parameters controlling the facies distribution and geometries of the platform-to-basin transition. Geometries and facies on the platform-slope-basin system, today well constrained on the Levant area, where still poorly known on the Egyptian margin. Geometries and stratigraphic architecture of the Egyptian margin are revealed, thanks to a regional seismic and well data-base provided by an industrial-academic group (GRI, Total). The objective is to understand the sismostratigraphic architecture of the platform-slope-basin system in a key area from Western Desert to Nile delta and Levant margin. Mapping of the top Jurassic and top Cretaceous show seismic geomorphology of the margin, with the cartography of the hinge line from Western Desert to Sina. During the Jurassic, carbonate platform show a prograding profile and a distally thickening of the external platform, non-abrupt slope profiles, and palaeovalleys incisions. Since the Cretaceous, the aggrading and retrograding mixed carbonate-siliciclastic platform show an alternation of steep NW-SE oblique segments and distally steepened segments. These structures of the platform edge are strongly controlled by the inherited tethyan transform directions. Along the hinge line, embayments are interpreted as megaslides. The basin infilling is characterised by an alternation of chaotic seismic facies and high amplitude reflectors onlaping the paleoslopes. MTC deposits can mobilize thick sedimentary series (up to 3500 m) as a mixed combination of debris flows, internal preserved blocks, and/or compressively-deformed distal allochthonous masses. Transported material have proceeded from the dismantling of the Mesozoic mixed carbonate-siliciclastic platform. They can spread down slope over areas as large as 70000 of km2. According to stratigraphic correlations with global sea-level positions, platform instability would have been triggered by the gravitational collapse of the carbonate-siliciclastic platform under its own weight after successive subaerial exposures which were able to generate karstification processes. Seismic interpretation is constrained by a detailed assessment of the Egyptian margin paleogeography supported by wells. This margin segment is briefly compared to the outcropping Apulian margin in Italy.

  15. Paleocene stratigraphy in Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farouk, Sherif

    2016-01-01

    The Egyptian Paleocene is widely distributed with vertical and lateral facies changes geographically separated and subject to different tectonic and sedimentary regimes. Five coeval facies associations of the Paleocene outcrops are identified and named from south to north: Garra El-Arbain, Nile Valley, Farafra, Sinai, and Southern Galala. Ten Paleocene third-order depositional sequences (Ds Da1 to Ds Th9) are tentatively distinguished in Egypt. These are bounded at their base and top by ten sequence boundaries (Eg.Da-1, Eg.Da-2, Eg.Da-3, Eg.Da-4, Eg.Da-5, Eg.Da-6, Eg.Se-7, Eg.Th.-8, Eg.Th.-9, and Eg.Eo-10). The relative ages and correlation of the Paleocene depositional sequences are based on planktonic foraminiferal biostratigraphy. Comparison of identified Paleocene sequences in and outside Egypt are referred to eustatic sea-level changes and partly to regional tectonics events, which have caused hiatuses of variable durations and different configurations of Paleocene sedimentary regimes from place to place.

  16. Reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert

    PubMed Central

    Sabo, John L.; Sinha, Tushar; Bowling, Laura C.; Schoups, Gerrit H. W.; Wallender, Wesley W.; Campana, Michael E.; Cherkauer, Keith A.; Fuller, Pam L.; Graf, William L.; Hopmans, Jan W.; Kominoski, John S.; Taylor, Carissa; Trimble, Stanley W.; Webb, Robert H.; Wohl, Ellen E.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing human appropriation of freshwater resources presents a tangible limit to the sustainability of cities, agriculture, and ecosystems in the western United States. Marc Reisner tackles this theme in his 1986 classic Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water. Reisner's analysis paints a portrait of region-wide hydrologic dysfunction in the western United States, suggesting that the storage capacity of reservoirs will be impaired by sediment infilling, croplands will be rendered infertile by salt, and water scarcity will pit growing desert cities against agribusiness in the face of dwindling water resources. Here we evaluate these claims using the best available data and scientific tools. Our analysis provides strong scientific support for many of Reisner's claims, except the notion that reservoir storage is imminently threatened by sediment. More broadly, we estimate that the equivalent of nearly 76% of streamflow in the Cadillac Desert region is currently appropriated by humans, and this figure could rise to nearly 86% under a doubling of the region's population. Thus, Reisner's incisive journalism led him to the same conclusions as those rendered by copious data, modern scientific tools, and the application of a more genuine scientific method. We close with a prospectus for reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert, including a suite of recommendations for reducing region-wide human appropriation of streamflow to a target level of 60%. PMID:21149727

  17. Reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert.

    PubMed

    Sabo, John L; Sinha, Tushar; Bowling, Laura C; Schoups, Gerrit H W; Wallender, Wesley W; Campana, Michael E; Cherkauer, Keith A; Fuller, Pam L; Graf, William L; Hopmans, Jan W; Kominoski, John S; Taylor, Carissa; Trimble, Stanley W; Webb, Robert H; Wohl, Ellen E

    2010-12-14

    Increasing human appropriation of freshwater resources presents a tangible limit to the sustainability of cities, agriculture, and ecosystems in the western United States. Marc Reisner tackles this theme in his 1986 classic Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water. Reisner's analysis paints a portrait of region-wide hydrologic dysfunction in the western United States, suggesting that the storage capacity of reservoirs will be impaired by sediment infilling, croplands will be rendered infertile by salt, and water scarcity will pit growing desert cities against agribusiness in the face of dwindling water resources. Here we evaluate these claims using the best available data and scientific tools. Our analysis provides strong scientific support for many of Reisner's claims, except the notion that reservoir storage is imminently threatened by sediment. More broadly, we estimate that the equivalent of nearly 76% of streamflow in the Cadillac Desert region is currently appropriated by humans, and this figure could rise to nearly 86% under a doubling of the region's population. Thus, Reisner's incisive journalism led him to the same conclusions as those rendered by copious data, modern scientific tools, and the application of a more genuine scientific method. We close with a prospectus for reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert, including a suite of recommendations for reducing region-wide human appropriation of streamflow to a target level of 60%. PMID:21149727

  18. Reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sabo, John L.; Sinha, Tushar; Bowling, Laura C.; Schoups, Gerrit H.W.; Wallender, Wesley W.; Campana, Michael E.; Cherkauer, Keith A.; Fuller, Pam L.; Graf, William L.; Hopmans, Jan W.; Kominoski, John S.; Taylor, Carissa; Trimble, Stanley W.; Webb, Robert H.; Wohl, Ellen E.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing human appropriation of freshwater resources presents a tangible limit to the sustainability of cities, agriculture, and ecosystems in the western United States. Marc Reisner tackles this theme in his 1986 classic Cadillac Desert: The American West and Its Disappearing Water. Reisner's analysis paints a portrait of region-wide hydrologic dysfunction in the western United States, suggesting that the storage capacity of reservoirs will be impaired by sediment infilling, croplands will be rendered infertile by salt, and water scarcity will pit growing desert cities against agribusiness in the face of dwindling water resources. Here we evaluate these claims using the best available data and scientific tools. Our analysis provides strong scientific support for many of Reisner's claims, except the notion that reservoir storage is imminently threatened by sediment. More broadly, we estimate that the equivalent of nearly 76% of streamflow in the Cadillac Desert region is currently appropriated by humans, and this figure could rise to nearly 86% under a doubling of the region's population. Thus, Reisner's incisive journalism led him to the same conclusions as those rendered by copious data, modern scientific tools, and the application of a more genuine scientific method. We close with a prospectus for reclaiming freshwater sustainability in the Cadillac Desert, including a suite of recommendations for reducing region-wide human appropriation of streamflow to a target level of 60%.

  19. Transect workshop held in Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazangi, Muawia

    A workshop on the progress of the Global Geoscience Transects (GGT) project in the Middle East and Africa (see maps) was held January 15-17 in Cairo, Egypt. (Transect plans in the region have been described in Eos, 69, p. 124). It was jointly organized and funded by the Egyptian National Committee of Geodesy and Geophysics and the International Lithosphere Program coordinating Committee CC-7 of GGT. A. Ashour of Cairo University, Egypt, chaired the workshop; the general secretary was S. Riad of Assiut University, Egypt, who was responsible for most of the organization, scheduling and implementation of the workshop.

  20. Schistosomiasis and Cancer in Egypt: Review

    PubMed Central

    Khaled, Hussein

    2013-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is not known to be associated with any malignant disease other than bladder cancer. Bladder cancer is still the most common malignant tumor among males in Egypt and some African and Middle East countries. However, the frequency rate of bladder cancer has declined significantly during the last 25years. This drop is mainly related to the control of Schistosomiasis. Many studies have elucidated the pathogenic events of Schistosomal-related bladder cancer with a suggested theory of pathogenesis. Furthermore, the disease presents with a distinct clinicopathologic profile that is quite different from bladder cancer elsewhere with younger age at presentation, more male predominance, more invasive stages, and occurrence of squamous cell carcinoma pathologic subtype. However, recent data suggest that this profile has been dramatically changed over the past 25years leading to minimization of the differences between its features in Egypt and that in Western countries. Management of muscle-invasive localized disease is mainly surgery with 5-year survival rates of 3050%. Although still a debatable issue, adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy have improved treatment outcomes including survival and bladder preservation rates in most studies. This controversy emphasizes the need of individualized treatment options based on a prognostic index or other factors that can define the higher risk groups where more aggressive therapy is needed. The treatment for locally advanced and/or metastatic disease has passed through a series of clinical trials since 1970s. These phase II and III trials have included the use of single agent and combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens. The current standard of systemic chemotherapy of generally fit patients is now the gemcitabinecisplatin combination. In conclusion, a changing pattern of bladder cancer in Egypt is clearly observed. This is mainly due to the success in the control of Schistosomiasis. It may also be due to increased exposure to other etiologic factors that include smoking, pesticides, and/or other causative agents. This change will ultimately affect disease management. PMID:25685453

  1. Desert Storm environmental effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimball, E. W.

    It is noted that after more than six months of operation of the Patriot launch station in the Saudi Arabian desert no problems that were attributed to high temperature occurred. The environmental anomalies that did occur were cosmetic in nature and related to dust and salt fog. It was concluded that the Desert Storm environmental effects were typical of worldwide hot, dry climates.

  2. Animals of the Desert.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NatureScope, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Provides background information and student activities on how desert animals have adapted to dryness and heat, how and when animals move on the desert, and nocturnal/diurnal animals. Each activity includes objective(s), recommended age level(s), subject area(s), list of materials needed, and procedures. Ready-to-copy pages are included for a…

  3. People and Deserts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NatureScope, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Provides: (1) background information on ways people affect deserts and ways deserts affect people; (2) student activities on this topic; and (3) ready-to-copy materials (culture match worksheet and causes worksheet). Each activity includes objective(s), recommended age level(s), subject area(s), list of materials needed, and procedures. (DH)

  4. Desert Perchlorate Field Work

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    USGS scientists dig soil pits in Nevada's Amargosa Desert to study the distribution of natural perchlorate and to determine the atmospheric-soil-plant interactions that affected perchlorate's cycling in a terrestrial ecosystem. Amargosa Desert, Nevada ~17 km south of Beatty; ~20 km east of D...

  5. Calcareous benthonic foraminifera across the Cretaceous/Paleocene transition of Gebel Um El-Ghanayem, Kharga Oasis, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orabi, Orabi H.; Khalil, Hamza M.

    2014-08-01

    The studies of benthic calcareous foraminifera of the Maastrichtian-early Paleocene Dakhla Formation in Gebel Um El-Ghanayem (Western Desert, Egypt), improve reconstruction of depositional environments of these successions. In total, 68 taxa of benthic foraminifera were identified in the studied succession. The late Maastrichtian assemblages (Zone CF3) are dominated by calcareous foraminifera with tapered tests, this tapered taxon Loxostomum applinae, Lox. tegulatum various dentalinid taxa, and Buliminella cushmani dominate in CF3 Biozone. We thus interpret these faunas as being dominated by infaunal morphogroups, suggesting a moderately eutrophic environment. Danian assemblages are characterized by abundant epifaunal trochospiral species, such as Cibicidoides abudurbensis, Cibicidoides farafraensis, and Gyroidinoides girardanus. The infaunal morphogroups make up 25-47% of fauna in the Danian, in contrast to 62-76% in the Upper Maastrichtian. This dominance of the Danian benthic foraminiferal assemblages by epifaunal or mixed epifaunal/infaunal morphogroups suggests that the food supply to the benthos was less abundant than in the latest Cretaceous. The Cretaceous/Paleocene boundary (K/Pg) is within the upper unit of the Lower Kharga Member and marked by a hiatus in at least the top of CF3 Zone of the Upper Maastrichtian to the Lower Paleocene (base Plc Zone).

  6. New insights into microbially induced sedimentary structures in alkaline hypersaline El Beida Lake, Wadi El Natrun, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taher, Amany G.; Abdel-Motelib, Ali

    2015-10-01

    Microbially induced sedimentary structures (MISS) were studied in detail in the alkaline hypersaline El Beida Lake of Wadi El Natrun in the western desert sector of Egypt, based on field observations and sampling performed in 2013 and 2014. Geomorphologically, the lake can be subdivided into three zones, each with characteristic sedimentary and biosedimentary structures. The marginal elevated zone that borders the lake is characterized by thick blocky crusts devoid of microbial mats. The middle-lower supratidal zone has luxuriant microbial mats associated with knotty surfaces, mat cracks and wrinkle structures. A zone of ephemeral shallow pools and channels is characterized by reticulate surfaces, pinnacle mats, sieve-like surfaces, gas domes and mat chips. In the microbial mats, authigenic minerals include thenardite Na2SO4, trona Na3(CO3)(HCO3)•2H2O and halite NaCl. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses revealed that the minerals are closely associated with the MISS, suggesting some influence of microorganisms on mineral precipitation. Complex interactions between regional hydrological cycles and diagenetic processes imply low preservation potential. MISS signatures of such saline lakes can serve as key analogues for interpreting the geologic record.

  7. Transport of dust and anthropogenic aerosols across Alexandria, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Askary, H.; Farouk, R.; Ichoku, C.; Kafatos, M.

    2009-07-01

    The flow of pollutants from Europe and desert dust to Europe from the Sahara desert both affects the air quality of the coastal regions of Egypt. As such, measurements from both ground and satellite observations assume great importance to ascertain the conditions and flow affecting the Nile Delta and the large city of Alexandria. We note that special weather conditions prevailing in the Mediterranean Sea result in a westerly wind flow pattern during spring and from North to South during the summer. Such flow patterns transport dust-loaded and polluted air masses from the Sahara desert and Europe, respectively, through Alexandria, and the Nile Delta in Egypt. We have carried out measurements acquired with a ground- based portable sun photometer (Microtops II) and the satellite-borne TERRA/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor during the periods of October 1999-August 2001 and July 2002-September 2003. These measurements show a seasonal variability in aerosol optical depth (AOD) following these flow patterns. Maximum aerosol loadings accompanied by total precipitable water vapor (W) enhancements are observed during the spring and summer seasons. Pronounced changes have been observed in the ngstrm exponent (?) derived from ground-based measurements over Alexandria (31.14 N, 29.59 E) during both dust and pollution periods. We have followed up the observations with a 3-day back-trajectories model to trace the probable sources and pathways of the air masses causing the observed aerosol loadings. We have also used other NASA model outputs to estimate the sea salt, dust, sulfates and black carbon AOD spatial distributions during different seasons. Our results reveal the probable source regions of these aerosol types, showing agreement with the trajectory and ngstrm exponent analysis results. It is confirmed that Alexandria is subjected to different atmospheric conditions involving dust, pollution, mixed aerosols and clean sky.

  8. Negev: Land, Water, and Life in a Desert Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, William

    In view of the continuing increased concern about the extreme fragility of deserts and desert margins, Negev provides a timely discussion of land-use practices compatible with the often conflicting goals of preservation and development. The success o f agricultural and hydrologic experiments in the Negev desert of Israel offers hope to the large percentage of the world's population that lives with an unacceptably low quality of life in desert margins. Deserts are the one remaining type of open space that, with proper use, has the potential for alleviating the misery often associated with expanding population.In addition to the science in the book, the author repeatedly reinforces the concept that “western civilization is inextricably bound to the Negev and its environs, from which it has drawn, via its desert-born religions—Judasium, Christianity, and Islam—many of the mores and concepts, and much of the imagery and love of the desert, including man's relation to nature and to ‘God’.” Deserts often are erroneously perceived to be areas of no water: In reality, these are areas in which a little rainfall occurs sporadically and unpredictably over time. This meager water supply can be meticulously garnered to produce nutritious crops and forage.

  9. Deserts : geology and resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, Alta S.

    1996-01-01

    Approximately one-third of the Earth's land surface is desert, arid land with meager rainfall that supports only sparse vegetation and a limited population of people and animals. Deserts stark, sometimes mysterious worlds have been portrayed as fascinating environments of adventure and exploration from narratives such as that of Lawrence of Arabia to movies such as "Dune." These arid regions are called deserts because they are dry. They may be hot, they may be cold. They may be regions of sand or vast areas of rocks and gravel peppered with occasional plants. But deserts are always dry. Deserts are natural laboratories in which to study the interactions of wind and sometimes water on the arid surfaces of planets. They contain valuable mineral deposits that were formed in the arid environment or that were exposed by erosion. Because deserts are dry, they are ideal places for human artifacts and fossils to be preserved. Deserts are also fragile environments. The misuse of these lands is a serious and growing problem in parts of our world.

  10. Egypt/FOF reorganize.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    In Egypt, both the national family planning program and the privately operated social marketing program, Family of the Future (FOF), are currently being reorganized. The Population and Family Planning Board, orginally charged with the responsibility of overseeing the national family planning program, was replaced by the newly created National Council. The reasons for the change and the type of program changes which will ensue from this organizational change are unclear. The FOF recently adopted a new management organizational structure, implemented a computerized management and information system, and initiated a staff training program. The management of the program's product line is now divided into 3 sections. There are separate sections for IUDs, barrier methods, and hormonal methods. Each section is responsible for developing a marketing plan for its products and overseeing the distribution of its products. The management staff is now provided with management skills training. To date, 9 managers have received training in management techniques in the US at George Washington University. Personal computers are being installed at the FOF office in Cairo. The system will be used to keep tract of inventory, volunteer activities, and product distribution and to handle accounting procedures. These innovations are expected to facilitate the handling of planned changes in FOF's product line. FOF will begin selling surgical gloves, as a supplemental item for its currently marketed IUD kit, and pregnancy testing kits for use by physicians and hospitals. Other anticipated introductions include Depo Provera, an injectable contraceptive, the new Ortho vaginal tablet which will replace the currently marketed Annan vaginal tablet, and possibly, the implant contraceptive, Norplant. Triton is currently under contract with the US Agency for International Development to provide technical assistance for the FOF program. This contract is due to expire in December, 1984, and a contract renewal decision is still pending. In 1984, FOF opened its 3rd regional office. The new office is located in Assiut in upper Egypt. PMID:12340331

  11. The effect of drought on four plant communities in the northern Mojave Desert

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, B.W.; Ostler, W.K.

    1993-12-31

    Desert plant communities contain many perennial plant species that are well adapted to arid environments; therefore, one would intuitively believe that perennial desert species readily survive drought conditions. Abundant research on plant-soil-water relationships in North American deserts has shown that many species can maintain water uptake and growth when the soil-water potential is low. Little research, however, has focused on how prolonged drought conditions affect plant species in vegetation associations in desert ecosystems. A prolonged and widespread drought occurred in much of the western United States, including the Northern Mojave Desert, from 1987 through 1991. During this drought period vegetation characterization studies, initiated in 1990, by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, allowed EG and G Energy Measurements to collect data that could be used to infer how both desert vegetation associations and desert plant species reacted to a prolonged drought. This paper presents the preliminary results.

  12. Groundwater of Egypt: ``an environmental overview''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Tahlawi, M. R.; Farrag, A. A.; Ahmed, S. S.

    2008-08-01

    Although Egypt has the great Nile River, which is the main supply of water, Egypts water is limited to 55.5 billion m3 per annum. Owing to the rapid growth of the population and the increasing consumption of water in agriculture, industry, domestic use, etc., it is expected that Egypt will rely to some extent on groundwater to develop the new projects such as Tushka in Upper Egypt and East Oweinat. Issues related to groundwater in Egypt are identified with the common geological features associated with formation of the aquifers and demonstrating the location of the main resources of groundwater, followed by the main objective of this paper, which is addressing the environmental issues related to groundwater in Egypt. Several studies have been reviewed and personal communication made with the authorities to introduce this work and provide an overview of the groundwater quality problems in Egypt with examples from different parts of the country.

  13. Prevention of hemoglobinopathies in Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Beshlawy, Amal; Youssry, Ilham

    2009-01-01

    The hemoglobin disorders are the most common clinically serious single gene disorders in the world. In Egypt, beta-thalassemia is the most common type with a carrier rate varying from 5.3 to > or =9% and a gene frequency of 0.03. So, it was estimated that 1,000/1.5 million per year live births will suffer from thalassemia disease in Egypt (total live births 1,936,205 in 2006). beta-Thalassemia creates a social and financial burden for the patients' family and the Egyptian government. The high frequency of beta-thalassemia carriers with increasing rate of newly born cases is a pressing reason for the importance to develop prevention program for beta-thalassemia in Egypt. Sickle-cell disease (SCD) is not frequent in Egypt except in the Oases where the carrier rate varies from 9 to 22%. Our objectives were to provide an in-depth analysis of the current status of hemoglobinopathies in Egypt and what we need for prevention of these diseases. PMID:20001619

  14. The use of multifrequency and polarimetric SIR-C/X-SAR data in geologic studies of Bir Safsaf, Egypt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaber, G.G.; McCauley, J.F.; Breed, C.S.

    1997-01-01

    Bir Safsaf, within the hyperarid 'core' of the Sahara in the Western Desert of Egypt, was recognized following the SIR-A and SIR-B missions in the 1980s as one of the key localities in northeast Africa, where penetration of dry sand by radar signals delineates previously unknown, sand-buried paleodrainage valleys ('radar-rivers') of middle Tertiary to Quaternary age. The Bir Safsaf area was targeted as a focal point for further research in sand penetration and geologic mapping using the multifrequency and polarimetric SIR-C/X-SAR sensors. Analysis of the SIR-C/X-SAR data from Bir Safsaf provides important new information on the roles of multiple SAR frequency and polarimetry in portraying specific types of geologic units, materials, and structures mostly hidden from view on the ground and on Landsat TM images by a relatively thin, but extensive blanket of blow sand. Basement rock units (granitoids and gneisses) and the fractures associated with them at Bir Safsaf are shown here for the first time to be clearly delineated using C- and L-band SAR images. The detectability of most geologic features is dependent primarily on radar frequency, as shown for wind erosion patterns in bedrock at X-band (3 cm wavelength), and for geologic units and sand and clay-filled fractures in weathered crystal-line basement rocks at C-band (6 cm) and L-band (24 cm). By contrast, Quaternary paleodrainage channels are detectable at all three radar frequencies owing, among other things, to an usually thin cover of blow sand. The SIR-C/X-SAR data investigated to date enable us to make specific recommendations about the utility of certain radar sensor configurations for geologic and paleoenvironmental reconnaissance in desert regions.Analysis of the shuttle imaging radar-C/X-synthetic aperture radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) data from Bir Safsaf provides important new information on the roles of multiple SAR frequency and polarimetry in portraying specific types of geologic units, materials, and structures mostly hidden from view on the ground and on Landsat images by a relatively thin, but extensive blanket of blow sand. Basement rock units and associated fractures at the Bir Safsaf are clearly delineated using C- and L-band SAR images. The detectability of most geologic features depend primarily on radar frequency. The SIR-C/X-SAR data also provide recommendations about the utility of certain radar configurations for geologic and paleoenvironmental reconnaissance in deserts.

  15. DISTRIBUTIONAL CHANGES AND POPULATION STATUS FOR AMPHIBIANS IN THE EASTERN MOJAVE DESERT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of amphibian species historically inhabited sparsely distributed wetlands in the Mojave Desert of western North America, habitats that have been dramatically altered or eliminated as a result of human activities. The population status and distributional changes for amphi...

  16. New Paleocene Sepiid Coleoids (Cephalopoda) from Egypt: Evolutionary Significance and Origin of the Sepiid ‘Rostrum’

    PubMed Central

    Košťák, Martin; Jagt, John W. M.; Speijer, Robert P.; Stassen, Peter; Steurbaut, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    New coleoid cephalopods, assignable to the order Sepiida, are recorded from the Selandian/Thanetian boundary interval (Middle to Upper Paleocene transition, c. 59.2 Ma) along the southeastern margin (Toshka Lakes) of the Western Desert in Egypt. The two genera recognised, Aegyptosaepia n. gen. and ?Anomalosaepia Weaver and Ciampaglio, are placed in the families Belosaepiidae and ?Anomalosaepiidae, respectively. They constitute the oldest record to date of sepiids with a ‘rostrum-like’ prong. In addition, a third, generically and specifically indeterminate coleoid is represented by a single rostrum-like find. The taxonomic assignment of the material is based on apical parts (as preserved), i.e., guard, apical prong (or ‘rostrum-like’ structure), phragmocone and (remains of) protoconch, plus shell mineralogy. We here confirm the shell of early sepiids to have been bimineralic, i.e., composed of both calcite and aragonite. Aegyptosaepia lugeri n. gen., n. sp. reveals some similarities to later species of Belosaepia, in particular the possession of a distinct prong. General features of the phragmocone and protoconch of the new form are similar to both Belocurta (Middle Danian [Lower Paleocene]) and Belosaepia (Eocene). However, breviconic coiling and the presence of a longer ventral conotheca indicate closer ties with late Maastrichtian–Middle Danian Ceratisepia. In this respect, Aegyptosaepia n. gen. constitutes a link between Ceratisepia and the Eocene Belosaepia. The occurrence of the new genus near the Selandian/Thanetian boundary suggests an earlier origin of belosaepiids, during the early to Middle Paleocene. These earliest known belosaepiids may have originated in the Tethyan Realm. From northeast Africa, they subsequently spread to western India, the Arabian Plate and, probably via the Mediterranean region, to Europe and North America. PMID:24348918

  17. Range and habitats of the desert tortoise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Germano, D.J.; Bury, R.B.; Esque, T.C.; Fritts, T.H.

    1994-01-01

    We determined the current range of the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) based on the available latest data from government agencies, the literature, and our experience. We developed the first detailed range map of this species and summarized information about habitat preferences. New records of occurrences were incorporated, and some peripheral localities of questionable authenticity were deleted. The distribution oCG. agassizii covers the broadest range of latitude, climatic regimes, habitats, and biotic regions of any North American tortoise. The northern portion ofits range is in the Mojave Desert of sDuth"eastern California, southern Nevada, southwestern Utah, and northwestern Arizona. The central portion of the range consists of several subdivisions of the Sonaran Desert in southeastern California, western and southern Arizona, and western Sonora, Mexico. The southern edge of its range is in the semitropical Sinaloan thornscrub and Sinaloan deciduous forest of eastern Sonora and northern Sinaloa, Mexico. This species has marked geogi-aphic differences but seems to construct burrows throughout its range.

  18. Sonoran Desert: Fragile Land of Extremes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Produced and Directed by Wessells, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    'Sonoran Desert: Fragile Land of Extremes' shows how biologists with the U.S. Geological Survey work with other scientists in an effort to better understand native plants and animals such as desert tortoises, saguaro cacti, and Gila monsters. Much of the program was shot in and around Saguaro National Park near Tucson, Arizona. Genetic detective work, using DNA, focuses on understanding the lives of tortoises. Studies of saguaros over many decades clarify how these amazing plants reproduce and thrive in the desert. Threats from fire, diseases in tortoises, and a growing human population motivate the scientists. Their work to identify how these organisms live and survive is a crucial step for the sound management of biological resources on public lands. This 28-minute program, USGS Open-File Report 03-305, was shot entirely in high definition video and produced by the USGS Western Ecological Research Center and Southwest Biological Science Center; produced and directed by Stephen Wessells, Western Region Office of Communications.

  19. Eyewitness introduction to Egypt: "The gift of the Nile".

    PubMed

    Brown, Geraldine

    2009-01-01

    Northeastern corner of Africa, lying at the crossroads between the two continents of Europe and Asia (in the Sinai Peninsula), while bordering Libya, Sudan, Israel and the Red Sea. Egypt is the most ancient tourist country in the world. Several health fact-finding missions in the last few years were made to this small country that is frequently defined by the Valley of the Nile. With the spreading deserts on either side, or a very rich heritage of ancient relics, these scenic vistas are without equal elsewhere in the world. Although there are significant cultural differences among the population, Egypt has a long history of ethnic and religious compassion. Among the many rarities, main tourist attractions include the three great Pyramids of Giza and the Sphinx, amazing ancient wonders of the world. These fact-finding missions included how health and medical care are defined, how people and culture are intertwined with its physical features, land use, and the economy and its resources. PMID:19927898

  20. ASTER View of Sharm El Sheik, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Red Sea golf resort in Sharm El Sheik, Egypt, where President Clinton met with Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak and Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat, stands out against the desert landscape in this image acquired on August 25, 2000.

    This image of the southern tip of the Sinai Peninsula shows an area about 30 by 40 kilometers (19 by 25 miles) in the visible and near infrared wavelength region. Vegetation appears in red. The blue areas in the water at the top and bottom of the image are coral reefs. The airport is visible just to the north of the golf resort.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats, monitoring potentially active volcanoes, identifying crop stress, determining cloud morphology and physical properties, wetlands Evaluation, thermal pollution monitoring, coral reef degradation, surface temperature mapping of soils and geology, and measuring surface heat balance.

  1. Analysis of groundwater flow in arid areas with limited hydrogeological data using the Grey Model: a case study of the Nubian Sandstone, Kharga Oasis, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmod, Wael Elham; Watanabe, Kunio; Zahr-Eldeen, Ashraf A.

    2013-08-01

    Management of groundwater resources can be enhanced by using numerical models to improve development strategies. However, the lack of basic data often limits the implementation of these models. The Kharga Oasis in the western desert of Egypt is an arid area that mainly depends on groundwater from the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System (NSAS), for which the hydrogeological data needed for groundwater simulation are lacking, thereby introducing a problem for model calibration and validation. The Grey Model (GM) was adopted to analyze groundwater flow. This model combines a finite element method (FEM) with a linear regression model to try to obtain the best-fit piezometric-level trends compared to observations. The GM simulation results clearly show that the future water table in the northeastern part of the study area will face a severe drawdown compared with that in the southwestern part and that the hydraulic head difference between these parts will reach 140 m by 2060. Given the uncertainty and limitation of available data, the GM produced more realistic results compared with those obtained from a FEM alone. The GM could be applied to other cases with similar data limitations.

  2. The application of petrophysics to resolve fluid flow units and reservoir quality in the Upper Cretaceous Formations: Abu Sennan oil field, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lala, Amir Maher Sayed; El-sayed, Nahla Abd El-Aziz

    2015-02-01

    Petrophysical flow unit concept can be used to resolve some of the key challenges faced in the characterization of hydrocarbon reservoirs. The present study deals with petrophysical evaluation of some physical properties of the Upper Cretaceous rock samples obtained from the Abu-Roash and the Bahariya Formations at southwest of Sennan oil field in the Western Desert of Egypt. The aim of this study was achieved through carrying out some petrophysical measurements of porosity, bulk density, permeability, mean hydraulic radius (Rh), irreducible water saturation, and radius of pore throat at mercury saturation of 35% in order to determine reservoir characteristics. In this study, the relationships obtained between the measured petrophysical properties such as porosity, permeability and pore throat flow unit types were established for 53 sandstone core samples obtained from two different stratigraphic units. Flow zone indicator (FZI) has been calculated to quantify the flow character of the Abu-Roash and Bahariya reservoir rocks based on empirically derived equations of robust correlation coefficients. The correlations among porosity, permeability, bulk density, mean hydraulic radius and pore throat flow properties reflect the most important reservoir behavior characteristics. The calculated multiple regression models indicate close correlation among petrophysical properties and Rh and R35%. The obtained models are able to predict Rh and R35% by using porosity and permeability, to map reservoir performance and predict the location of stratigraphic traps.

  3. Modified Grey Model and its application to groundwater flow analysis with limited hydrogeological data: a case study of the Nubian Sandstone, Kharga Oasis, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Mahmod, Wael Elham; Watanabe, Kunio

    2014-02-01

    Groundwater flow at Kharga Oasis, located in the western desert of Egypt, was previously analyzed using numerical models; however, the lack of basic data often limits the implementation of these models, as well as introducing a problem for model calibration and validation. The Grey Model (GM) was used to overcome these difficulties of data limitation and uncertainty of hydrogeological conditions. However, no clear theories exist for selecting the number of input model trends and the most suitable values of input parameters. Therefore, in the current study, a modification of the GM is newly proposed and called the Modified Grey Model (MGM) in an attempt to determine a process for selecting the best input models' trends with the appropriate values of input parameters to achieve acceptable fitting to observations. The sensitivity analysis results showed that the MGM produced more stable results than the GM using a wide range of values for input parameters. Moreover, the MGM reduced the calculation time required for fitting the measured piezometric level trends by 99.8%. Three development scenarios of groundwater withdrawal were proposed that involved either expanding the present extraction rate or redistributing the groundwater withdrawal over the recent working production wells (RWPWs). The results concluded that the groundwater table in the northern part of the oasis could be temporally recovered to an economical piezometric level; however, the table in the southern part is severely decreased. Therefore, new production wells are recommended to be constructed in the southern part far enough from the RWPWs. PMID:24092253

  4. Tectonic framework of northeast Egypt and its bearing on hydrocarbon exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, M.; Moustafa, A.R.

    1995-08-01

    Detailed structural study of northern and central Sinai, the northern Eastern Desert, and the northern Gulf of Suez clarified the tectonic framework of northeast Egypt. This framework is related to the movements between the African Plate and the Eurasian and Arabian Plates. Late Cretaceous folding and thrusting in response to oblique convergence between the African and Eurasian Plates formed NE-ENE oriented, doubly plunging, en echelon folds of the northern Egypt fold belt. This fold belt is well exposed in northern Sinai and a few other places but is concealed under younger sediments in the other parts of northern Egypt. Younger folding of local importance is related to dextral slip on the Themed Fault (Central Sinai) in post Middle Eocene-pre Miocene time. Early Miocene rifting of the Afro-Arabian Plate led to the opening of the Suez rift and deposition of significant syn-rift facies. Half grabens and tilted fault blocks dominate the rift. Slightly tilted fault blocks characterize the competent Middle Eocene limestones of the Eastern Desert south of the Cairo-Suez road but north of this road, Middle Eocene rocks are locally dragged on nearby E-W and NW-SE oriented faults forming fault-drag folds. Ductile Upper Eocene and Miocene rocks are also folded about gentle NW-SE oriented doubly plunging folds. The different stages of tectonic activity in northern Egypt contributed to the development of different types of structural traps as well as different source, reservoir, and cap rocks. The sedimentary history of the region indicates well developed marine sediments of Jurassic, Cretaceous, Eocene, and Miocene ages. Basin development in structurally low areas provided good sites for hydrocarbon generation and maturation.

  5. Plants of the Desert.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NatureScope, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Provides background information and student activities on plants of the desert, including various adaptations for life with limited water supplies. Each activity includes objective(s), recommended age level(s), subject area(s), list of materials needed, and procedures. A ready-to-copy student worksheet is included. (DH)

  6. How desert varnish forms?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Randall S.; Kolb, Vera M.; Lynne, Bridget Y.; Sephton, Mark A.; Mcloughlin, Nicola; Engel, Michael H.; Olendzenski, Lorraine; Brasier, Martin; Staley, James T., Jr.

    2005-09-01

    Desert varnish is a black, manganese-rich rock coating that is widespread on Earth. The mechanism underlying its formation, however, has remained unresolved. We present here new data and an associated model for how desert varnish forms, which substantively challenges previously accepted models. We tested both inorganic processes (e.g. clays and oxides cementing coatings) and microbial methods of formation. Techniques used in this preliminary study include SEM-EDAX with backscatter, HRTEM of focused ion beam prepared (FIB) wafers and several other methods including XRPD, Raman spectroscopy, XPS and Tof-SIMS. The only hypothesis capable of explaining a high water content, the presence of organic compounds, an amorphous silica phase (opal-A) and lesser quantities of clays than previously reported, is a mechanism involving the mobilization and redistribution of silica. The discovery of silica in desert varnish suggests labile organics are preserved by interaction with condensing silicic acid. Organisms are not needed for desert varnish formation but Bacteria, Archaea, Eukarya, and other organic compounds are passively incorporated and preserved as organominerals. The rock coatings thus provide useful records of past environments on Earth and possibly other planets. Additionally this model also helps to explain the origin of key varnish and rock glaze features, including their hardness, the nature of the "glue" that binds heterogeneous components together, its layered botryoidal morphology, and its slow rate of formation.

  7. Palynology and Stratigraphy of the Nubian Sandstone in Libya and Comparison with Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekbali, Ali; Hlal, Osama

    2013-04-01

    The so-called "Nubian Sandstone" outcrops along a wide area from Algeria to the Red Sea, forming two regressive phases. The lower phase is represented in Egypt by the Basal Clastic Unit, the Desert Rose Unit, the Abu Ballas Formation and the Matruh Shale. In Libya it is represented by the Mesak Sandstone, Sarir Sandstone, Cabao Sandstone and Kiklah Formation. In both countries, these successions are covered by a carbonate sequence, resulting from the Tethyan transgression during the Cenomanian. In Egypt however, the upper regressive phase is represented by the Taref Sandstone which was deposited during a brief period of active progradation, following the Tethyan incursion. This is not observed in Libya. Comparison of palynological studies in Libya with those documented by several authors in Egypt reveals that the "Nubian" facies in Libya were deposited before equivalent facies in Egypt. The Basal Clastic Unit, dated as Hautrauvian-Barremian, may be equivalent, at least to a part of the Neocomian Cabao Sandstone in NW Libya. Jarmah Member of the Mesak Formation in Libya was dated as Berriasian on the basis of Pilosisporites and Trilobosporites. This makes it older than any "Nubian" unit in Egypt. The Matruh Shale was assigned to the Aptian on the basis of Tricolpites, and the Abu Balls Formation 34 as Aptian-Albian on the basis of Tricolpites and Rousisporites radiatus. Whereas, there is no equivalent to the Aptian in NW Libya, the Aptian-Albian of Egypt is similar to Zone 1 of the Kiklah Formation and As Sarir Sandstone, which were dated as early Albian on the basis of Afropollis spp., and Perotriletes pannuceus, an Albian element not recorded in Egypt. The Plant Beds in southwestern Egypt were dated as Cenomanian on the basis of advanced angiosperm pollen. In Libya, equivalent bodies were considered Vraconian, representing the uppermost Albian, because it lacks Cenomanian pollen (e.g. Tricolpites mutabilis). Comparison of local sea-level changes with global sea-level curves is used to reconstruct paleogeography. Integration of palynology with geological data and tectonic implications indicates that, despite similarity in paleogeographic processes of the Nubian Sandstone, geological and structural settings remain different. The "Nubian Sandstone" provides a typical succession that can be studied in the light of sequence stratigraphy.

  8. A study of Desert Dermatoses in the Thar Desert Region

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Manas; Vasudevan, Biju

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Desert dermatology describes the cutaneous changes and the diseases affecting those living in the desert. Diurnal variation in temperature is high and is characteristic of the deserts. The lack of water affects daily activities and impacts dermatological conditions. Adaptation to the desert is therefore important to survival. This original article focuses on dermatoses occurring in a population in the Thar desert of India, predominantly located in Rajasthan. Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive study involving various dermatoses seen in patients residing in the Thar desert region over a duration of 3 years. Results: Infections were the most common condition seen among this population and among them fungal infections were the most common. The high incidence of these infections would be accounted for by the poor hygienic conditions due to lack of bathing facilities due to scarcity of water and the consequent sweat retention and overgrowth of cutaneous infective organisms. Pigmentary disorders, photodermatoses, leishmaniasis and skin tumors were found to be more prevalent in this region. Desert sweat dermatitis was another specific condition found to have an increased incidence. Conclusion: The environment of the desert provides for a wide variety of dermatoses that can result in these regions with few of these dermatoses found in much higher incidence than in other regions. The concept of desert dermatology needs to be understood in more details to provide better care to those suffering from desert dermatoses and this article is a step forward in this regard. PMID:25657392

  9. Egypt in the framework of global tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Paul

    1990-01-01

    An overview is presented to explicitly describe the role of global tectonics in the tectonic and geologic history of Egypt. The major global tectonic events that have directly or indirectly affected the geology of Egypt are summarized and those events are described chronologically, emphasizing the regional geological implications of each event. It is shown that the analysis of Egyptian geological history within the framework of global tectonics suggests that most of the major geological features of Egypt can be explained in terms of the interaction of global tectonics. Finally, it appears that Egypt is entering a new phase of the Wilson cycle of opening and closing of oceans.

  10. Wind modeling of Chihuahuan Desert dust outbreaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Rivera, Nancy I.; Gill, Thomas E.; Gebhart, Kristi A.; Hand, Jennifer L.; Bleiweiss, Max P.; Fitzgerald, Rosa M.

    The Chihuahuan Desert region of North America is a significant source of mineral aerosols in the Western Hemisphere, and Chihuahuan Desert dust storms frequently impact the Paso del Norte (El Paso, USA/Ciudad Juarez, Mexico) metropolitan area. A statistical analysis of HYSPLIT back trajectory residence times evaluated airflow into El Paso on all days and on days with synoptic (non-convective) dust events in 2001-2005. The incremental probabilitya measure of the areas most likely to have been traversed by air masses arriving at El Paso during dusty dayswas only strongly positively associated with the region west-southwest of the city, a zone of known dust source areas. Focused case studies were made of major dust events on 15 April and 15 December 2003. Trajectories approached the surface and MM5 (NCAR/Penn State Mesoscale Model) wind speeds increased at locations consistent with dust sources observed in satellite imagery on those dates. Back trajectory and model analyses suggested that surface cyclones adjacent to the Chihuahuan Desert were associated with the extreme dust events, consistent with previous studies of dust storms in the Southern High Plains to the northeast. The recognition of these meteorological patterns serves as a forecast aid for prediction of dust events likely to impact the Paso del Norte.

  11. Regional geothermal exploration in Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.; Boulos, F. K.; Swanberg, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    A study is presented of the evaluation of the potential geothermal resources of Egypt using a thermal gradient/heat flow technique and a groundwater temperature/chemistry technique. Existing oil well bottom-hole temperature data, as well as subsurface temperature measurements in existing boreholes, were employed for the thermal gradient/heat flow investigation before special thermal gradient holes were drilled. The geographic range of the direct subsurface thermal measurements was extended by employing groundwater temperature and chemistry data. Results show the presence of a regional thermal high along the eastern margin of Egypt with a local thermal anomaly in this zone. It is suggested that the sandstones of the Nubian Formation may be a suitable reservoir for geothermal fluids. These findings indicate that temperatures of 150 C or higher may be found in this reservoir in the Gulf of Suez and Red Sea coastal zones where it lies at a depth of 4 km and deeper.

  12. Snow, the Great River, and the Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rango, A.

    2005-12-01

    While many major rivers around the world originate from alpine snowpacks in mountain regions, some experience the extreme contrast of flowing through harsh desert environments downriver. One such stream is the Rio Grande which rises in the San Juan and the Sangre de Christo mountains of southern Colorado and northern New Mexico. Eventually, the snow fed Rio Grande flows through North America's largest desert, the Chihuahuan Desert in New Mexico, Texas, and Mexico, and simultaneously becomes part of the border between the United States and Mexico. As is often true, urban areas develop along the river corridors rather than in more inaccessible mountain regions. This demographic preference tends to isolate the vast majority of population in the Rio Grande, who are dependent on water for their livelihoods, from the mountain snowpacks where the flow is generated. Ironically then, snow is seldom viewed as the source of the much needed water flowing through the desert by the majority of the basin's population. In arid regions of the western U.S., water demand far exceeds the water supply, and water use is apportioned under the doctrine of prior appropriation with the oldest right getting the first use of water. The increasing population in urban areas does not usually have a right to use the water flowing through the desert unless water rights have been purchased by municipalities from the major category of water user in these basins, namely, irrigated agriculture. In the entire Rio Grande basin, irrigation makes up 80% of the consumptive use of water. Additionally, basin compacts and international treaties apportion water between states and countries. Because these formal agreements were based on above average runoff years, there is little flexibility in changing the use of water, particularly in dry to normal runoff years. Most of the older water rights in the Rio Grande, especially the upper basin, are supplied by snowmelt. This leaves the lower basin to depend upon rainfall-produced runoff occurring mostly during the sporadic summer monsoon season. Water harvesting techniques which promote heterogeneous water accumulation or production can effectively make more water available in certain areas at the expense the expense of nearby areas. The use of water ponding dikes on arid rangeland can promote increased native vegetation productivity through increases in soil moisture. Stock tanks lined with impervious material are also used to collect whatever runoff that is generated for later use. Desert dwellers living along rivers must rely on conservation measures and ingenuity in order to come up with a very limited water resource to survive. This survival is continually in doubt because population(and consequently water demand) continues to grow in these arid regions while the water supply remains relatively constant.

  13. Epidemic of mesothelioma in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Gaafar, R M; Eldin, N H Aly

    2005-07-01

    Asbestos has been recognized in Egypt since a long time as ancient Egyptians were using it in mummification. Mesothelioma in Egypt is mainly attributed to environmental origin with a high incidence of women and young adults affected. The incidence of mesothelioma is rising in Egypt. Epidemiological data for 635 malignant mesothelioma (MM) patients over 4 years in the third Millennium were collected from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), Cairo University and Abbassia Chest hospital. This number is more than four times the number diagnosed in the previous 11 years at NCI. A clinicopathological study was done for 100 malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) patients and showed that asbestos exposure and SV40 positivity were evident in 67% and 60% of cases, respectively. The median survival was 14.3 months and the 1 and 2 year survival rates were 60% and 27%, respectively. Evaluation of p53 and pRb immunohistochemically showed that pRb alteration was related to poor survival. Other biological prognostic factors such as EGFR, HER-2, glutathione S transferase (GST) and MDR were evaluated in 50 cases. Overexpression of EGFR was correlated with lack of clinical benefit and poor survival. GST potentiated the effect of EGFR on survival. The use of EGFR inhibitors may have a role in the treatment of MM. Asbestos in Cairo is a silent killer and measures toward eliminating it entirely or at least strictly controlling human contact with this dangerous carcinogen have to be taken in order to combat the coming epidemic of mesothelioma in Egypt. PMID:15950794

  14. Deserts of China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, Alta S.

    1982-01-01

    Improving arid land quality requires an understanding of the original state of the land and its relationship to wind, water, and plant regimes, as well as understanding of interactions within the present ecosystem.  Chinese scientists and local residents have made significant advances in improving arid environments in gobi and sandy deserts and in less arid sandy lands.  Wind patterns are being changed by planting forest belts to protect oases and sandy lands, and on a smaller scale by planting grasses and shrubs or constructing straw grids.  Research on reclamation of deserts is now focusing on how sand-fixing plants may be adapted to local environments, and how the resources of grazing land and water may be effectively exploited without being overused.

  15. Orthopedic surgery in ancient Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Blomstedt, Patric

    2014-01-01

    Background — Ancient Egypt might be considered the cradle of medicine. The modern literature is, however, sometimes rather too enthusiastic regarding the procedures that are attributed an Egyptian origin. I briefly present and analyze the claims regarding orthopedic surgery in Egypt, what was actually done by the Egyptians, and what may have been incorrectly ascribed to them. Methods — I reviewed the original sources and also the modern literature regarding surgery in ancient Egypt, concentrating especially on orthopedic surgery. Results — As is well known, both literary sources and the archaeological/osteological material bear witness to treatment of various fractures. The Egyptian painting, often claimed to depict the reduction of a dislocated shoulder according to Kocher’s method, is, however, open to interpretation. Therapeutic amputations are never depicted or mentioned in the literary sources, while the specimens suggested to demonstrate such amputations are not convincing. Interpretation — The ancient Egyptians certainly treated fractures of various kinds, and with varying degrees of success. Concerning the reductions of dislocated joints and therapeutic amputations, there is no clear evidence for the existence of such procedures. It would, however, be surprising if dislocations were not treated, even though they have not left traces in the surviving sources. Concerning amputations, the general level of Egyptian surgery makes it unlikely that limb amputations were done, even if they may possibly have been performed under extraordinary circumstances. PMID:25140982

  16. Astronomy Education Challenges in Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Fady Beshara Morcos, Abd

    2015-08-01

    One of the major challenges in Egypt is the quality of education. Egypt has made significant progress towards achieving the Education for All and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Many associations and committees as education reform program and education support programs did high efforts in supporting scientific thinking through the scientific clubs. The current state of astronomical education in Egypt has been developed. Astronomy became a part in both science and geography courses of primary, preparatory and secondary stages. Nowadays the Egyptian National Committee for Astronomy, put on its shoulders the responsibility of revising of astronomy parts in the education courses, beside preparation of some training programs for teachers of different stages of educations, in collaboration with ministry of education. General lectures program has been prepared and started in public places , schools and universities. Many TV and Radio programs aiming to spread astronomical culture were presented. In the university stage new astronomy departments are established and astrophysics courses are imbedded in physics courses even in some private universities.

  17. Namib Desert, Namibia, Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    One of the driest regions on Earth, the Namib Desert, Namibia, Africa (23.0N, 15.0E) lies adjacent to the Atlantic coast but the upwelling oceanic water causes a very stable rainless atmosphere. The few local inland rivers do not reach the sea but instead, appear as long indentations where they penetrate the dune fields and end as small dry lakes. The vast dune fields are the result of sands deposited over millions of years by the stream flow.

  18. Namib Desert, Namibia, Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    One of the driest regions on Earth, the Namib Desert, Namibia, Africa (23.0N, 15.0E) lies adjacent to the Atlantic coast but upwelling oceanic water causes a very stable rainless atmosphere. The few local inland rivers do not reach the sea but instead appear as long indentations where rivers penetrate the dune fields and end as small dry lakes. The vast dune fields are the result of sands deposited over millions of years by the stream flow.

  19. Environmental Processes and Spectral Reflectance Characteristics Associated with Soil Erosion in Desert Fringe Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobberger, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    Results of analysis of spectral variation of sand dunes in El Ghorabi, Bahariya, Egypt; Tombouctou/Azaouad, Mali; and Tsodilo Hills, western Botswana are presented. Seasonal variations in dune extent and location of dune crests and their relationship to such factors as wind and weather variations are emphasized.

  20. Metal and fluid sources in a potential world-class gold deposit: El-Sid mine, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmy, Hassan; Zoheir, Basem

    2015-04-01

    Lode gold mineralization at the El-Sid mine area is associated with the ca. 600 Ma Fawakhir granite intrusion, which cuts the ~737 Ma ophiolite nappes in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt. The mineralized quartz veins are hosted by ~E- and NE-trending fault/fracture sets cutting the western boundary of the intrusion and sheared ophiolites. The results of electron microprobe analyses of gold-associated hydrothermal sulfide and silicate minerals suggest that Au was mobilized alongside Ni, Co, Cr and As from the adjacent ophiolitic serpentinite. After granite emplacement, hydrothermal fluids interacted with the sheared serpentinite, leaching metals and re-depositing them in the faults/fractures and adjacent wall rock in a cyclic process. Low-salinity aqueous-carbonic fluids with significant quantities of volatile species (CO2, CH4, and N2 ± H2S) leached and transported Au from deep to shallow crustal levels. Carbon dioxide had a buffering effect on the Au-bearing hydrothermal solution, maintaining its pH within a narrow near-neutral range, where elevated gold concentration was transported by complexation with reduced magmatic sulfur in a reducing environment. Gold deposition along fault/fracture conduits in the Fawakhir granite and adjacent serpentinite resulted from interplay of pressure drop, fluctuations in oxygen and sulfur fugacities, and exsolution of the volatile phases. Infiltration of meteoric water may have contributed to the formation of the late stage gold-sulfide mineralization that formed at shallower levels during terrane uplift. Sulfidation of the Fe-rich magmatic minerals was, on the other hand, the overriding process in the wall rock as evidenced by abundant disseminated sulfides with gold inclusions. Considering the structural control by regional shear zones (fluid conduits) and the voluminous granitic and ophiolitic rocks (metal sources), a high tonnage gold deposit amenable to open pit mining at the El-Sid mine area is very likely.

  1. Hydrogeochemical evolution of inland lakes’ water: A study of major element geochemistry in the Wadi El Raiyan depression, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Essam A.; El-Kammar, Ahmed M.; Yehia, Mohamed M.; Abu Salem, Hend S.

    2015-01-01

    Wadi El Raiyan is a great depression located southwest of Cairo in the Western Desert of Egypt. Lake Qarun, located north of the study area, is a closed basin with a high evaporation rate. The source of water in the lake is agricultural and municipal drainage from the El Faiyum province. In 1973, Wadi El Raiyan was connected with the agricultural wastewater drainage system of the Faiyum province and received water that exceeded the capacity of Lake Qarun. Two hydrogeological regimes have been established in the area: (i) higher cultivated land and (ii) lower Wadi El Raiyan depression lakes. The agricultural drainage water of the cultivated land has been collected in one main drain (El Wadi Drain) and directed toward the Wadi El Raiyan depression, forming two lakes at different elevations (upper and lower). In the summer of 2012, the major chemical components were studied using data from 36 stations distributed over both hydrogeological regimes in addition to one water sample collected from Bahr Youssef, the main source of freshwater for the Faiyum province. Chemical analyses were made collaboratively. The major ion geochemical evolution of the drainage water recharging the El Raiyan depression was examined. Geochemically, the Bahr Youssef sample is considered the starting point in the geochemical evolution of the studied surface water. In the cultivated area, major-ion chemistry is generally influenced by chemical weathering of rocks and minerals that are associated with anthropogenic inputs, as well as diffuse urban and/or agricultural drainage. In the depression lakes, the water chemistry generally exhibits an evaporation-dependent evolutionary trend that is further modified by cation exchange and precipitation of carbonate minerals. PMID:26644942

  2. Hydrogeochemical evolution of inland lakes' water: A study of major element geochemistry in the Wadi El Raiyan depression, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Essam A; El-Kammar, Ahmed M; Yehia, Mohamed M; Abu Salem, Hend S

    2015-11-01

    Wadi El Raiyan is a great depression located southwest of Cairo in the Western Desert of Egypt. Lake Qarun, located north of the study area, is a closed basin with a high evaporation rate. The source of water in the lake is agricultural and municipal drainage from the El Faiyum province. In 1973, Wadi El Raiyan was connected with the agricultural wastewater drainage system of the Faiyum province and received water that exceeded the capacity of Lake Qarun. Two hydrogeological regimes have been established in the area: (i) higher cultivated land and (ii) lower Wadi El Raiyan depression lakes. The agricultural drainage water of the cultivated land has been collected in one main drain (El Wadi Drain) and directed toward the Wadi El Raiyan depression, forming two lakes at different elevations (upper and lower). In the summer of 2012, the major chemical components were studied using data from 36 stations distributed over both hydrogeological regimes in addition to one water sample collected from Bahr Youssef, the main source of freshwater for the Faiyum province. Chemical analyses were made collaboratively. The major ion geochemical evolution of the drainage water recharging the El Raiyan depression was examined. Geochemically, the Bahr Youssef sample is considered the starting point in the geochemical evolution of the studied surface water. In the cultivated area, major-ion chemistry is generally influenced by chemical weathering of rocks and minerals that are associated with anthropogenic inputs, as well as diffuse urban and/or agricultural drainage. In the depression lakes, the water chemistry generally exhibits an evaporation-dependent evolutionary trend that is further modified by cation exchange and precipitation of carbonate minerals. PMID:26644942

  3. Aquaporins in desert rodent physiology.

    PubMed

    Pannabecker, Thomas L

    2015-08-01

    Desert rodents face a sizeable challenge in maintaining salt and water homeostasis due to their life in an arid environment. A number of their organ systems exhibit functional characteristics that limit water loss above that which occurs in non-desert species under similar conditions. These systems include renal, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, nasal, and skin epithelia. The desert rodent kidney preserves body water by producing a highly concentrated urine that reaches a maximum osmolality nearly three times that of the common laboratory rat. The precise mechanism by which urine is concentrated in any mammal is unknown. Insights into the process may be more apparent in species that produce highly concentrated urine. Aquaporin water channels play a fundamental role in water transport in several desert rodent organ systems. The role of aquaporins in facilitating highly effective water preservation in desert rodents is only beginning to be explored. The organ systems of desert rodents and their associated AQPs are described. PMID:26338874

  4. Desert Farming Benefits from Microbial Potential in Arid Soils and Promotes Diversity and Plant Health

    PubMed Central

    Kberl, Martina; Mller, Henry; Ramadan, Elshahat M.; Berg, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Background To convert deserts into arable, green landscapes is a global vision, and desert farming is a strong growing area of agriculture world-wide. However, its effect on diversity of soil microbial communities, which are responsible for important ecosystem services like plant health, is still not known. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied the impact of long-term agriculture on desert soil in one of the most prominent examples for organic desert farming in Sekem (Egypt). Using a polyphasic methodological approach to analyse microbial communities in soil as well as associated with cultivated plants, drastic effects caused by 30 years of agriculture were detected. Analysing bacterial fingerprints, we found statistically significant differences between agricultural and native desert soil of about 60%. A pyrosequencing-based analysis of the 16S rRNA gene regions showed higher diversity in agricultural than in desert soil (Shannon diversity indices: 11.21/7.90), and displayed structural differences. The proportion of Firmicutes in field soil was significantly higher (37%) than in the desert (11%). Bacillus and Paenibacillus play the key role: they represented 96% of the antagonists towards phytopathogens, and identical 16S rRNA sequences in the amplicon library and for isolates were detected. The proportion of antagonistic strains was doubled in field in comparison to desert soil (21.6%/12.4%); disease-suppressive bacteria were especially enriched in plant roots. On the opposite, several extremophilic bacterial groups, e.g., Acidimicrobium, Rubellimicrobium and Deinococcus-Thermus, disappeared from soil after agricultural use. The N-fixing Herbaspirillum group only occurred in desert soil. Soil bacterial communities were strongly driven by the a-biotic factors water supply and pH. Conclusions/Significance After long-term farming, a drastic shift in the bacterial communities in desert soil was observed. Bacterial communities in agricultural soil showed a higher diversity and a better ecosystem function for plant health but a loss of extremophilic bacteria. Interestingly, we detected that indigenous desert microorganisms promoted plant health in desert agro-ecosystems. PMID:21912695

  5. Satellite observed seasonal and inter-annual variation of vegetation over the Kalahari, the Great Victoria Desert, and the Great Sandy Desert - 1979-1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Tucker, C. J.

    1987-01-01

    Time-series observations by two spaceborne sensors over three desert regions, the Kalahari (in southern Africa) and the Great Victoria Desert and the Great Sandy Desert (in western Australia), are presented. The observations are by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer on board the NOAA-7 satellite from April 1982 to December 1984, and by the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer on board the Nimbus-7 satellite from January 1979 to February 1985. The objective was to compare and contrast seasonal and interannual variation of vegetation over these three deserts using the normalized difference vegetation index and the 37 GHz brightness temperature. The seasonal variation from both sensors was found to be most pronounced over the Kalahari, followed by the Great Sandy Desert and the Great Victoria Desert. The normalized difference vegetation index was roughly identical over the two Australian deserts and was significantly higher for the Kalahari. There was no consistent change from both sensors over the two Australian deserts, but a consistent decrease from 1979 to 1984 over the Kalahari was found in the 37 GHz microwave data.

  6. Jeeps Penetrating a Hostile Desert

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Herb

    2009-01-01

    Several jeeps are poised at base camp on the edge of a desert aiming to escort one of them as far as possible into the desert, while the others return to camp. They all have full tanks of gas and share their fuel to maximize penetration. In a friendly desert it is best to leave caches of fuel along the way to help returning jeeps. We solve the…

  7. Microbial origin of desert varnish.

    PubMed

    Dorn, R I; Oberlander, T M

    1981-09-11

    Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analyses of desert varnish reveal that microorganisms concentrate ambient manganese that becomes greatly enhanced in brown to black varnish. Specific characteristics of desert varnish and of varnish bacteria support a microbial origin for manganese-rich films. Varnish microbes can be cultured and produce laboratory manganese films. Accordingly, natural desert varnish and also manganese-rich rock varnishes in nondesert environments appear to be a product of microbial activity. PMID:17744757

  8. Jeeps Penetrating a Hostile Desert

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Herb

    2009-01-01

    Several jeeps are poised at base camp on the edge of a desert aiming to escort one of them as far as possible into the desert, while the others return to camp. They all have full tanks of gas and share their fuel to maximize penetration. In a friendly desert it is best to leave caches of fuel along the way to help returning jeeps. We solve the

  9. Probabilistic earthquake hazard analysis for Cairo, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawy, Ahmed; Korrat, Ibrahim; El-Hadidy, Mahmoud; Gaber, Hanan

    2015-11-01

    Cairo is the capital of Egypt and the largest city in the Arab world and Africa, and the sixteenth largest metropolitan area in the world. It was founded in the tenth century (969 uc(ad)) and is 1046 years old. It has long been a center of the region's political and cultural life. Therefore, the earthquake risk assessment for Cairo has a great importance. The present work aims to analysis the earthquake hazard of Cairo as a key input's element for the risk assessment. The regional seismotectonics setting shows that Cairo could be affected by both far- and near-field seismic sources. The seismic hazard of Cairo has been estimated using the probabilistic seismic hazard approach. The logic tree frame work was used during the calculations. Epistemic uncertainties were considered into account by using alternative seismotectonics models and alternative ground motion prediction equations. Seismic hazard values have been estimated within a grid of 0.1° × 0.1 ° spacing for all of Cairo's districts at different spectral periods and four return periods (224, 615, 1230, and 4745 years). Moreover, the uniform hazard spectra have been calculated at the same return periods. The pattern of the contour maps show that the highest values of the peak ground acceleration is concentrated in the eastern zone's districts (e.g., El Nozha) and the lowest values at the northern and western zone's districts (e.g., El Sharabiya and El Khalifa).

  10. Probabilistic earthquake hazard analysis for Cairo, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawy, Ahmed; Korrat, Ibrahim; El-Hadidy, Mahmoud; Gaber, Hanan

    2016-04-01

    Cairo is the capital of Egypt and the largest city in the Arab world and Africa, and the sixteenth largest metropolitan area in the world. It was founded in the tenth century (969 ad) and is 1046 years old. It has long been a center of the region's political and cultural life. Therefore, the earthquake risk assessment for Cairo has a great importance. The present work aims to analysis the earthquake hazard of Cairo as a key input's element for the risk assessment. The regional seismotectonics setting shows that Cairo could be affected by both far- and near-field seismic sources. The seismic hazard of Cairo has been estimated using the probabilistic seismic hazard approach. The logic tree frame work was used during the calculations. Epistemic uncertainties were considered into account by using alternative seismotectonics models and alternative ground motion prediction equations. Seismic hazard values have been estimated within a grid of 0.1° × 0.1 ° spacing for all of Cairo's districts at different spectral periods and four return periods (224, 615, 1230, and 4745 years). Moreover, the uniform hazard spectra have been calculated at the same return periods. The pattern of the contour maps show that the highest values of the peak ground acceleration is concentrated in the eastern zone's districts (e.g., El Nozha) and the lowest values at the northern and western zone's districts (e.g., El Sharabiya and El Khalifa).

  11. Sphinx and Great Pyramid of Giza, Egypt

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The Spinx and the Great Pyramid of Giza, Egypt are pictured here. USGS and University of Pennsylvania research shows that ancient pollen and charcoal preserved in deeply buried sediments in Egypt's Nile Delta document the region’s ancient droughts and fires, including a huge drought 4,200...

  12. Egypt: Beyond Pharaohs, Feluccas and Fellahin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Evelyn R.

    In a random study of five middle school social studies textbooks available for adoption in the state of Indiana in 1984, great variation in the treatment of Egypt was noted. Coverage of contemporary history was incomplete in all cases. All texts dealt with Egypt's ancient history, but what was reported was questionable. Only one text addressed in

  13. Inclusiveness in Higher Education in Egypt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cupito, Emily; Langsten, Ray

    2011-01-01

    In Egypt, before 1952, education, especially higher education, was the province of a privileged few. After the 1952 Revolution, in pursuit of social justice and economic development, Egypt's leaders eliminated fees, instituted a universal admission examination, promised government employment to all graduates of higher education, and expanded the

  14. Egypt: Beyond Pharaohs, Feluccas and Fellahin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Evelyn R.

    In a random study of five middle school social studies textbooks available for adoption in the state of Indiana in 1984, great variation in the treatment of Egypt was noted. Coverage of contemporary history was incomplete in all cases. All texts dealt with Egypt's ancient history, but what was reported was questionable. Only one text addressed in…

  15. Women--Sex Objects in Ancient Egypt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutimer, Brian T. P.

    Although it has been said that the women in Ancient Egypt enjoyed a reasonable state of social and professional equality with men, this paper presents an alternate theory--that women were second-class citizens whose physical prowess was secondary to their role as sex objects. It appears that men and women in Ancient Egypt often participated in the…

  16. Geochronology of anorogenic igneous complexes in the Sudan: isotopic investigations in North Kordofan, the Nubian Desert and the Red Sea Hills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhndorf, A.; Meinhold, K.-D.; Vail, J. R.

    1994-07-01

    RbSr isotopic analyses have been made on 14 selected anorogenic alkaline igneous complexes, composed mainly of quartz syenites and granites, which have been intruded through gneissic continental crust, and Neoproterozoic greenschists of the oceanic Nubian Shield. The complexes form three distinct provinces, two of which are aligned in narrow ENE bands across several hundreds of kilometres. In North Kordofan three groups of ages of emplacement have been delineated at 441 Ma, 280-270 Ma and 206-163 Ma. In the Nubian Desert, east of the Nile river, a group of four complexes has been dated at 297 Ma, 265 Ma, 257 Ma and 250 Ma; they form the western extremity of a WSW belt of intrusions in southern Egypt whose published ages date from 229 to 140 Ma. A pair of igneous complexes in the Central red Sea Hills of eastern Sudan has yielded ages of 480 Ma and 466 Ma. These results confirm the episodic nature of the igneous activity from the Ordovician to the Jurassic. The location of the centres and the similar low Sr initial ratios for all age groups testify to the deep seated influence of the crustal fractures, which enabled the mantle magmas to penetrate close to the surface.

  17. 75 FR 58353 - Business Development Mission to Egypt and Morocco

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... Eastern and Southern European markets. Commercial Setting Egypt Egypt is strategically located at the... country, and the fourth largest export market for U.S. products and services in the Middle East. The U.S... industrial port for the coastal city of Nador. Infrastructure Projects Egypt The Government of Egypt...

  18. Structural influence on the evolution of the pre-Eonile drainage system of southern Egypt: Insights from magnetotelluric and gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, Jeff; Abdelsalam, Mohamed G.; Atekwana, Estella; El-Qady, Gad; Tarabees, Elhamy Aly

    2011-12-01

    The Wadi Kubbaniya in the Western Desert of Egypt north of the City of Aswan has been interpreted as the downstream continuation of the Wadi Abu Subeira, comprising an ancient W- and NW-flowing river system originating from the Precambrian crystalline rocks of the Red Sea Hills which were uplifted during the Miocene in association with the opening of the Red Sea. This drainage system is thought to have been active before the onset of the N-flowing Egyptian Nile which started ˜6 Ma with the Eonile phase; an event that resulted in carving of ˜1000 km long canyon (the Eonile canyon) extending from the Mediterranean Sea in the north to Aswan in the south due to the Messinian Salinity Crisis. This study utilizes geophysical data to examine the role of regional tectonics and local structures in controlling the evolution of the pre-Eonile drainage system. Magnetotelluric (MT) and gravity surveys were conducted along two ˜5 km-long profiles across the NW-trending Wadi Kubbaniya. Two-dimensional (2D) inversion of MT data and gravity models indicate the Wadi Kubbaniya is filled with loosely-consolidated sandstone and conglomerate that extend to a depth of ˜150-200 m into Cretaceous sandstone formations which overlie Precambrian crystalline rocks. These results were evaluated in terms of two end-member models; an incision model in which the 150-200 m thick sedimentary rocks were considered as being deposited within an incised valley that was carved into bedrock, or a structural model in which the sedimentary rocks are considered as filling a NW-trending graben controlled by normal faults that deform the Cretaceous sandstone formations and the underlying Precambrian crystalline rocks. Geological observations as well as supporting seismic data favor the interpretation that the Wadi Kubbaniya is a NW-trending graben similar to other extensional structures found 400 km northwest along-strike of Wadi Kubbaniya. These structures are impressively parallel to the western shorelines of the Red Sea and the Gulf of Suez suggesting a regional tectonic link between them. Strain localization of these grabens (which are likely Miocene in age) might have been facilitated by inherited Precambrian and Jurassic - Early Cretaceous structures, such as the NW-trending Najd fault system, the most dominant regional structural grain in the Red Sea Hills of Egypt as well as the NW-trending grabens, such as the Kom Ombo graben located ˜25 km to the northeast of Wadi Kubbaniya.

  19. Factors influencing the rates, processes and magnitude of accumulation of carbon in desert soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfadden, Leslie D.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes research funded through NASA's Soil Landscape Climate Program which includes studies of the systematics of carbon storage and flux in the terrestrial environment, specifically terrestrial soils. Efforts focussed on the nature of carbon behavior in arid environments, where the majority of the carbon is present as inorganic carbon stored as pedogenic carbonate in desert calcic soils. Studies were supported of soils in two areas of western North America's major deserts: the Mojave Desert and the Chihuahuan Desert. Part 1 of this report summarizes the results of research conducted in the area of the Providence Mountains, California in the eastern Mojave Desert. Part 2 of this report summarizes the results of research in the Sevilleta Wildlife Refuge in central New Mexico, one of the sites of the UMN Biology Department's Long Term Ecological Research.

  20. Workshop on Extraterrestrial Materials from Cold and Hot Deserts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Ludolf (Editor); Franchi, Ian A. (Editor); Reid, Arch M. (Editor); Zolensky, Michael E. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    Since 1969 expeditions from Japan, the United States, and European countries have recovered more than 20,000 meteorite specimens from remote ice fields of Antarctica. They represent approximately 4000-6000 distinct falls, more than all non-Antarctic meteorite falls and finds combined. Recently many meteorite specimens of a new "population" have become available: meteorites from hot deserts. It turned out that suitable surfaces in hot deserts, like the Sahara in Africa, the Nullarbor Plain in Western and South Australia, or desert high plains of the U.S. (e.g., Roosevelt County, New Mexico), contain relatively high meteorite concentrations. For example, the 1985 Catalogue of Meteorites of the British Museum lists 20 meteorites from Algeria and Libya. Today, 1246 meteorites finds from these two countries have been published in MetBase 4.0. Four workshops in 1982, 1985, 1988, and 1989 have discussed the connections between Antarctic glaciology and Antarctic meteorites, and the differences between Antarctic meteorites and modem falls. In 1995, a workshop addressed differences between meteorites from Antarctica, hot deserts, and modem falls, and the implications of possible different parent populations, infall rates, and weathering processes. Since 1995 many more meteorites have been recovered from new areas of Antarctica and hot deserts around the world. Among these finds are several unusual and interesting specimens like lunar meteorites or SNCs of probable martian origin. The Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society took place in 1999 in Johannesburg, South Africa. As most of the recent desert finds originate from the Sahara, a special workshop was planned prior to this meeting in Africa. Topics discussed included micrometeorites, which have been collected in polar regions as well as directly in the upper atmosphere. The title "Workshop on Extraterrestrial Materials from Cold and Hot Deserts" was chosen and the following points were emphasized: (1) weathering processes, (2) terrestrial ages, (3) investigations of "unusual" meteorites, and (4) collection and curation.

  1. Workshop on Extraterrestrial Materials from Cold and Hot Deserts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Ludolf (Editor); Franchi, Ian A. (Editor); Reid, Arch M. (Editor); Zolensky, Michael E. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    Since 1969 expeditions from Japan, the United States, and European countries have recovered more than 20,000 meteorite specimens from remote ice fields of Antarctica. They represent approximately 4000-6000 distinct falls, more than all non-Antarctic meteorite falls and finds combined. Recently many meteorite specimens of a new "population" have become available: meteorites from hot deserts. It turned out that suitable surfaces in hot deserts, like the Sahara in Africa, the Nullarbor Plain in Western and South Australia, or desert high plains of the U.S. (e.g., Roosevelt County, New Mexico), contain relatively high meteorite concentrations. For example, the 1985 Catalog of Meteorites of the British Museum lists 20 meteorites from Algeria and Libya. Today, 1246 meteorites finds from these two countries have been published in MetBase 4.0. Four workshops in 1982, 1985, 1988, and 1989 have discussed the connections between Antarctic glaciology and Antarctic meteorites, and the differences between Antarctic meteorites and modern falls. In 1995, a workshop addressed differences between meteorites from Antarctica, hot deserts, and modem falls, and the implications of possible different parent populations, infall rates, and weathering processes. Since 1995 many more meteorites have been recovered from new areas of Antarctica and hot deserts around the world. Among these finds are several unusual and interesting specimens like lunar meteorites or SNCs of probable martian origin. The Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society took place in 1999 in Johannesburg, South Africa. As most of the recent desert finds originate from the Sahara, a special workshop was planned prior to this meeting in Africa. Topics discussed included micrometeorites, which have been collected in polar regions as well as directly in the upper atmosphere. The title "Workshop on Extraterrestrial Materials from Cold and Hot Deserts" was chosen and the following points were emphasized: (1) weathering processes, (2) terrestrial ages, (3) investigations of "unusual" meteorites, and (4) collection and curation.

  2. Space Radar Image of Safsaf Oasis, Egypt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This three-frequency space radar image of south-central Egypt demonstrates the unique capability of imaging radar to penetrate thin sand cover in arid regions to reveal hidden details below the surface. Nearly all of the structures seen in this image are invisible to the naked eye and to conventional optical satellite sensors. Features appear in various colors because the three separate radar wavelengths are able to penetrate the sand to different depths. Areas that appear red or orange are places that can be seen only by the longest wavelength, L-band, and they are the deepest of the buried structures. Field studies in this area indicate L-band can penetrate as much as 2 meters (6.5 feet) of very dry sand to image buried rock structures. Ancient drainage channels at the bottom of the image are filled with sand more than 2 meters (6.5 feet) thick and therefore appear dark because the radar waves cannot penetrate them. The fractured orange areas at the top of the image and the blue circular structures in the center of the image are granitic areas that may contain mineral ore deposits. Scientists are using the penetrating capabilities of radar imaging in desert areas in studies of structural geology, mineral exploration, ancient climates, water resources and archaeology. This image is 51.9 kilometers by 30.2 kilometers (32.2 miles by 18.7 miles) and is centered at 22.7 degrees north latitude, 29.3degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper right. The colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and received; green is C-band, horizontally transmitted and received; and blue is X-band, vertically transmitted and received. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) on April 16, 1994, on board the space shuttle Endeavour. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth program.

  3. The Kamil Crater in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Folco, Luigi; Di Martino, Mario; El Barkooky, Ahmed; D'Orazio, Massimo; Lethy, Ahmed; Urbini, Stefano; Nicolosi, Iacopo; Hafez, Mahfooz; Cordier, Carole; van Ginneken, Matthias; Zeoli, Antonio; Radwan, Ali M; El Khrepy, Sami; El Gabry, Mohamed; Gomaa, Mahomoud; Barakat, Aly A; Serra, Romano; El Sharkawi, Mohamed

    2010-08-13

    We report on the detection in southern Egypt of an impact crater 45 meters in diameter with a pristine rayed structure. Such pristine structures are typically observed on atmosphereless rocky or icy planetary bodies in the solar system. This feature and the association with an iron meteorite impactor and shock metamorphism provides a unique picture of small-scale hypervelocity impacts on Earth's crust. Contrary to current geophysical models, ground data indicate that iron meteorites with masses of the order of tens of tons can penetrate the atmosphere without substantial fragmentation. PMID:20651117

  4. [Urinary schistosomiasis in ancient Egypt].

    PubMed

    Ziskind, Bernard

    2009-12-01

    First described by Theodor Bilharz in 1851, Schistosoma haematobium, the worm responsible for urinary schistosomiasis, was a major health problem along the Nile Valley until the present days. Haematuria, the main symptom of this parasitic disease, was known and treated in Egyptian medical papyri since 1550 B.C. A relationship between haematuria and the god Seth was envisaged. Sir Marc Armand Ruffer, pioneer of paleopathology, found (1910) calcified Schistosoma eggs in Egyptian mummies of the xxth dynasty, establishing that bilharzia plagued ancient Egypt people. The ELISA method demonstrated the Schistosoma circulating anodic antigen in 45% of mummies studied. PMID:19617021

  5. Desert landscape irrigation

    SciTech Connect

    Quinones, R.

    1995-06-01

    Industrialization can take place in an arid environment if a long term, overall water management program is developed. The general rule to follow is that recharge must equal or exceed use. The main problem encountered in landscape projects is that everyone wants a lush jungle setting, tall shade trees, ferns, with a variety of floral arrangements mixed in. What we want, what we can afford, and what we get are not always the same. Vegetation that requires large quantities of water are not native to any desert. Surprisingly; there are various types of fruit trees, and vegetables that will thrive in the desert. Peaches, plums, nut trees, do well with drip irrigation as well as tomatoes. Shaded berry plans will also do well, the strawberry being one. In summary; if we match our landscape to our area, we can then design our irrigation system to maintain our landscape and grow a variety of vegetation in any arid or semiarid environment. The application of science and economics to landscaping has now come of age.

  6. Space Radar Image of Giza Egypt - with enlargement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This radar image shows the area west of the Nile River near Cairo, Egypt. The Nile River is the dark band along the right side of the image and it flows approximately due North from the bottom to the right. The boundary between dense urbanization and the desert can be clearly seen between the bright and dark areas in the center of the image. This boundary represents the approximate extent of yearly Nile flooding which played an important part in determining where people lived in ancient Egypt. This land usage pattern persists to this day. The pyramids at Giza appear as three bright triangles aligned with the image top just at the boundary of the urbanized area. They are also shown enlarged in the inset box in the top left of the image. The Great Pyramid of Khufu (Cheops in Greek) is the northern most of the three Giza pyramids. The side-looking radar illuminates the scene from the top, the two sides of the pyramids facing the radar reflect most of the energy back to the antenna and appear radar bright; the two sides away from the radar reflect less energy back and appear dark Two additional pyramids can be seen left of center in the lower portion of the image. The modern development in the desert on the left side of the image is the Sixth of October City, an area of factories and residences started by Anwar Sadat to relieve urban crowding. The image was taken on April 19, 1994 by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the shuttle Endeavour. SIR-C/X-SAR, a joint mission of the German, Italian and the United States space agencies, is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The image is centered on latitude 29.72 degrees North latitude and 30.83 degrees East longitude. The area shown is approximately 20 kilometers by 30 kilometers. The colors in the image are assigned to different frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band horizontally transmitted, horizontally received; green is C-band horizontally transmitted, horizontally received; blue is C-band horizontally transmitted, vertically received.

  7. The tectonic development of the western margin of the Gulf of Elat (Aqaba) rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyal, M.; Eyal, Y.; Bartov, Y.; Steinitz, G.

    1981-12-01

    Along the western coast of the Gulf of Elat, a 30 km wide shear belt of subparallel faults trending N-S to NE-SW is developed. This shear belt is observed mainly within the Precambrian basement terrain. Sinistral movements on these faults have been recognized based on offsets of magmatic bodies and lithological contacts in rocks of Precambrian age. The cumulative displacement, measured independently at several localities across the belt, attains a total of 24 km. Early Neogene volcanism, in the form of long dikes trending NW-SE is known from the eastern desert of Egypt, of the Gulf of Suez and along the Red Sea coast of Saudi Arabia. Volcanic bodies of a similar pattern have been identified in eastern Sinai. These bodies, mainly dolerites and basalts, intruding Mesozoic sediments, are parallel to each other and to the Gulf of Suez. They are tens to hundreds of kilometers long and spaced several tens of kilometers apart. Dating (K-Ar) of bodies in Sinai, Saudi Arabia and in the eastern desert of Egypt suggest an age of 20-22 m.y. for this extensive volcanism. All the dikes are sinistrally displaced by the individual faults of the eastern Sinai shear belt. The amount of movement recorded using the Precambrian markers is identical to movement recorded by offsets of the Early Neogene dikes. This proves that the total 24 km shear of this fault system postdates the 20-22 m.y. volcanic phase. It is assumed that the recorded movements are part of the 105-110 km shear persumed to exist along the Gulf of Elat which is also younger than 20-22 m.y. Preliminary results suggest that a similar amount of movement is observable along a shear zone developed on the eastern coast of the Gulf of Elat. Thus only some 60 km movement are taken up by faults in the Gulf itself. The evolving model suggests that: (a) The intrusion of very long basaltic dikes in a NW-SE direction, on both sides of the Red Sea, accompanied the initial stage of development of the Red SeaGulf of Suez rift valley. (b) A basic change in the geotectonic regime occurs after the intrusion of this volcanic suite: large scale horizontal movements are initiated, being recorded as a 105-110 km sinistral movement along the AravaJordan rift. This movement implies a synchronous opening of the Red Sea.

  8. Orbital and Ground-penetrating Radar Studies of Mars-analog Terrain in Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, T. A.; Grant, J. A.; Campbell, B. A.

    2007-05-01

    Several study groups have endorsed the concept of flying an imaging synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in orbit that would penetrate areas of thin surface cover revealing underlying terrain and providing additional information on surface roughness, physical properties and composition. Egypt provides many excellent terrestrial field sites to study both the processes that we expect to be revealed in a Mars SAR Mission, as well as the stratigraphic setting of past depositional environments that are similar to those seen in southern Egypt. We have used terrestrial orbital radar data for southern Egypt, comparing geologic materials and boundaries mapped in the field and with visible wavelengths (from Landsat) to those discerned via Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR) -C, and field checking key sites to determine the depth, physical characteristics and types of geologic boundaries that contribute to the radar returns. In addition to stratigraphic mapping of the thickness and extent of near-surface units in the field, we have used ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to determine the lateral extent and depth of subsurface interfaces. In this manner, we expect to learn more about the capabilities and limitations of orbital and ground-based systems, the trade-offs between frequency, polarization and resolution in Mars-like terrain for detecting buried interfaces and structures, and more about the geologic history of southern Egypt. Several studies have concentrated on one of the areas of prominent radar-detected channels near Bir Safsaf in the southwest desert, we have concentrated on the Bir Kiseiba region, an area where the mixture of gravel spreads, buried paleochannels, and alluvium creates a setting that may mimic outflow deposit locations on Mars. While bedrock incised channels may stand out in SAR images because of a near-surface, sharp dielectric interface (such as those at Safsaf and in northern Sudan), the more complex problem of distinguishing fluvial patterns in Mars-like alluvial environments requires additional study.

  9. A Microscopists View of Desert Varnish from the Sonoran Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvie, L. A. J.; Burt, D. M.; Buseck, P. R.

    2009-03-01

    Nanometer-scale element mapping and spectroscopy of desert varnish reveals a dynamic disequilibrium system characterized by post-depositional mineralogical, chemical, and structural changes, activated by liquid water.

  10. Applications of remote sensing, GIS, and groundwater flow modeling in evaluating groundwater resources: Two case studies; East Nile Delta, Egypt and Gold Valley, California, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelaziz Ali Ismael, Abdulaziz Mohamed

    Quaternary aquifer, East Nile Delta, Egypt. Due to the progressive increase in the development of desert land in Egypt, the demand for efficient water resources management and accurate land cover change information is increasing. In this study, we introduce a methodology to map and monitor land cover change patterns related to agricultural development and urban expansion in the desert fringes of the Eastern Nile Delta region. Using a hybrid classification approach, we employ multitemporal Landsat TM/ETM+ images from 1984, 1990, and 2003 to produce three land cover/land use maps. Post-classification comparison of these maps was used to obtain "from-to" statistics and change detection maps. The change detection results show that agricultural development increased 14% through the study period. Land reclamation during 1990-2003 exceeded that during 1984-1990 by a factor of two, reflecting a systematic national plan for desert reclamation that went into effect. We find that the increase in urbanization (by ˜21,300 hectares) during 1990-2003 was predominantly due to encroachment into traditionally cultivated land at the fringes of urban centers. Our results accurately quantify the land cover changes and delineate their spatial patterns, demonstrating the utility of Landsat data in analyzing landscape dynamics over time. Such information is critical for making efficient and sustainable policies for resource management. A three dimensional GIS-based groundwater flow model was developed to delineate a safe future framework for groundwater development in the Quaternary aquifer north Ismaelia Canal, East Nile Delta where a progressive rise in head associated with agricultural development is reported. The calibrated transient model was used to predict the future head distribution after 20 years assuming the same landuse. Results of this run showed that the groundwater head continued to increase with maximum increase up to 2.0 m in the unconfined part of the aquifer which jeopardizes a considerable area of the agricultural land with soil salinity and water logging. Therefore, three strategies, each with three scenarios, extending between 2004 and 2024 were designed to involve different pumping stress and infiltration rates from irrigation return to control the rising water level and estimate the production potential of the aquifer during drought. Gold Valley, Death Valley, California, USA. This study evaluates the hydrogeology of Gold Valley as a typical example of intermountain basins of Death Valley area and develops a GIS-based model that reasonably estimates the precipitation infiltration rates from altitude and slope data of the catchment area. Water balance calculations of the hydrological parameters in Gold Valley, provided by Inyo County, California, indicated that the majority of recharge takes place at high altitude (>1100 m) during winter with a negligible effect of evaporation on the stable isotopic composition of groundwater. Furthermore, water balance calculations in Gold Valley were utilized in identifying the coefficients of a GIS-based model that subsequently was refined to the best fit with the calculations of the water budget. A resistivity survey conducted in Gold Valley showed that groundwater is collected in upstream compartmentalized reservoirs and suggests that groundwater flow mostly takes place through the fracture zone of the bedrock. This pattern explains the relationship between precipitational infiltration in the Gold Valley catchment area and the attachment spring flow in Willow Creek. The estimated water budget in Gold Valley and the geoelectric profiles provided from this study can be investigated into the Death Valley Regional Groundwater Flow model (DVRGWF). In addition, the GIS-based model can be efficiently applied in other intermountain basins in Death Valley or other areas of arid environment of the Western U.S. to estimate the local precipitational infiltration. Accurate estimates of flux, well defined flow systems, and locations of recharge/discharge in mountain ranges provide essential parameters that can enhance the performance of the DVRGWF model and consequently its prediction capability. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  11. USGS Scientists in Wadi Degla, Northern Egypt

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    USGS scientists looking at Eocene sandstones and limestones in Wadi Degla, northern Egypt. This area was studied to understand the Levant Basin Province, as both regions have similar rock formations....

  12. Evolutionary hotspots in the Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandergast, Amy G.; Inman, Richard D.; Barr, Kelly R.; Nussear, Kenneth E.; Esque, Todd C.; Hathaway, Stacie A.; Wood, Dustin A.; Medica, Philip A.; Breinholt, Jesse W.; Stephen, Catherine L.; Gottscho, Andrew D.; Marks, Sharyn B.; Jennings, W. Bryan; Fisher, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic diversity within species provides the raw material for adaptation and evolution. Just as regions of high species diversity are conservation targets, identifying regions containing high genetic diversity and divergence within and among populations may be important to protect future evolutionary potential. When multiple co-distributed species show spatial overlap in high genetic diversity and divergence, these regions can be considered evolutionary hotspots. We mapped spatial population genetic structure for 17 animal species across the Mojave Desert, USA. We analyzed these in concurrence and located 10 regions of high genetic diversity, divergence or both among species. These were mainly concentrated along the western and southern boundaries where ecotones between mountain, grassland and desert habitat are prevalent, and along the Colorado River. We evaluated the extent to which these hotspots overlapped protected lands and utility-scale renewable energy development projects of the Bureau of Land Management. While 30–40% of the total hotspot area was categorized as protected, between 3–7% overlapped with proposed renewable energy project footprints, and up to 17% overlapped with project footprints combined with transmission corridors. Overlap of evolutionary hotspots with renewable energy development mainly occurred in 6 of the 10 identified hotspots. Resulting GIS-based maps can be incorporated into ongoing landscape planning efforts and highlight specific regions where further investigation of impacts to population persistence and genetic connectivity may be warranted.

  13. "Metabolic switch" for desert survival.

    PubMed Central

    Merkt, J R; Taylor, C R

    1994-01-01

    Food, like water, is in short supply in the desert. We report a specialized mechanism used by a desert mouse for surviving prolonged food shortages. The key element of this adaptation is a large reduction in resting metabolism. After about 2 weeks of restricted food intake (50% of normal), the desert mouse "switched down" its resting metabolism and was able to survive and maintain its weight indefinitely on these limited rations. When food was again freely available, resting metabolism "switched up," returning to normal levels in a single day. The reduced metabolism occurred without a decrease in body temperature or in levels of activity. In marked contrast, metabolism of the laboratory white mouse increased during food restriction, and the experiments had to be terminated to avoid starvation. We think this "metabolic switch" is common among desert mammals. It may be an amplification of a general metabolic response for coping with food scarcity common to all mammals, including humans. PMID:7991624

  14. Gujarat, Western India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Extremely high sediment loads are delivered to the Arabian Sea along the coast of Pakistan (upper left) and western India. In the case of the Indus River (far upper left) this sedimentation, containing large quantities of desert sand, combines with wave action to create a large sand-bar like delta. In the arid environment, the delta lacks much vegetation, but contains numerous mangrove-lined channels. This true-color image from May 2001 shows the transition from India's arid northwest to the wetter regions farther south along the coast. The increase in vegetation along the coast is brought about by the moisture trapping effect of the Western Ghats Mountain Range that runs north-south along the coast. Heavy sediment is visible in the Gulf of Kachchh (north) and the Gulf of Khambhat(south), which surround the Gujarat Peninsula.

  15. NASA Astronauts Desert Survival Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Fourteen NASA astronauts pose for group pictures at Stead Air Force Base in Nevada after a three-day stay in the Nevada desert where they completed a course in desert survival training. Front row: (left to right) William Anders, Walter Cunningham, Roger Chaffee, Richard Gordon, and Michael Collins. Second row: (left to right) Clifton Williams, Eugene Cernan, David Scott, Donn Eisele, Russell Schweickart, Edwin Aldrin, Alan Bean, Charles Bassett and Theodore Freeman.

  16. Mate desertion in the snail kite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beissinger, S.R.; Snyder, N.F.R.

    1988-01-01

    Mate desertion during the breeding cycle was documented at 28 of 36 (78%) snail kite, Rostrhamus sociabilis nests in Florida between 1979 and 1983. Offspring mortality occurred at only one deserted nest, however. Parents that were deserted by their mates continued to care for their young until independence (3?5 additional weeks) and provided snails at a rate similar to that of both parents combined before desertion. Males and females deserted with nearly equal frequency, except in 1982 when more females deserted. No desertion occurred during drought years, whereas desertion occurred at nearly every nest during favourable conditions. The occurrence of mate desertion was generally related to indirect measures of snail abundance: foraging range, snail delivery rates to the young and growth rates. Small broods were deserted more frequently by females than by males and tended to be deserted earlier than large ones. After desertion, deserters had the opportunity to re-mate and nest again since breeding seasons were commonly lengthy, but whether they did so was impossible to determine conclusively in most cases. The deserted bird sometimes incurred increased energetic costs and lost breeding opportunities during periods of monoparental care.

  17. Original sounding and drifting balloon-borne measurements in the western Mediterranean with the aerosol counter/sizer LOAC during summer ChArMEx campaigns, with a focus on desert dust events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Dulac, François; Vignelles, Damien; Jeannot, Matthieu; Verdier, Nicolas; Chazette, Patrick; Crenn, Vincent; Sciare, Jean; Totems, Julien; Durand, Pierre; Barret, Brice; Jambert, Corinne; Mallet, Marc; Menut, Laurent; Mailler, Sylvain; Basart, Sara; Baldasano, José Maria

    2015-04-01

    LOAC (Light Optical Aerosol Counter) is a new small optical particle counter/sizer of ~250 grams designed to fly under all kinds of balloons. The measurements are conducted at two scattering angles (12° and 60°), allowing the determination of the aerosol particle concentrations in 19 size classes within a diameter range of ~0.2-100 µm and some identification of the nature of particles dominating different size classes. Following laboratory calibration, the sensor particularly discriminates wet or liquid particles, mineral dust, soot carbon particles and salts. Comparisons with other in situ sensors at the surface and with remote sensing measurements on the vertical were performed to give confidence in measurements. The instrument has been operated at the surface, under all kinds of balloons up to more than 35 km in altitude, including tethered, sounding, open stratospheric and new boundary-layer pressurized drifting balloons (BLPB) from CNES, and was tested on board a small UAV. Operations encompass a variety of environments including the Arctic (Reykjavik, Island, and Kiruna, Sweden), Brazil (Sao Paolo), the western Mediterranean Basin, southwestern France, peri-urban (Ile de France) and urban areas (Paris and Vienna). Presented results are focused on the LOAC balloon-borne measurements performed in the western Mediterranean basin during MISTRALS/ChArMEx campaigns (Mediterranean Integrated Studies aT Regional And Local Scales/the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment; http://www.mistrals-hjome.org; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr), with a focus on African dust events. Two test flights with a first version of LOAC under sounding balloons were first successfully performed in late June 2012 near Marseille during an intense dust event. In 2013, 19 LOAC flights have been performed under meteorological balloons and 12 under low altitude drifting balloons, most of them from Minorca Island (Spain) in June and early July and others from Levant Island (south of France) in late July and early August . A number of the 2013 flights were coupled with ozone concentration measurements (see presentation of Gheusi et al. in the same session). LOAC balloons were especially, but not only, dedicated to study the various Saharan dust events that occurred during the campaign. In particular, a series of flights were conducted every 12 hours during the 15-19 June dust event. Forest fire smoke from North America was also sampled in late June over Minorca, as well as anthropogenic polluted layers in various occasions. LOAC data (available from ChArMEx database http://mistrals.sedoo.fr/ChArMEx) are interpreted with the help of coincident lidar, sun photometer remote sensing measurements available in Menorca, and satellite products and air mass trajectories. The sounding flights allow us to determine the vertical extent of the various aerosol layers, and to follow the particle size distribution and the concentration evolution along the vertical. The low altitude drifting balloons, which stayed roughly at constant altitude between 350 and 3330 m up to more than 25 h, allow us to study the time-evolution of the aerosol concentrations in the same air mass. Under both balloon types, LOAC has detected larges particles up to ~30 µm in diameter. The flights drifting within dust layers indicate that there is a relatively stable particle size distribution during transport over the sea, with no clear sedimentation loss of large particles. Aerosol simulations with the CHIMERE and NMMB/§BSC chemistry-transport models are compared to LOAC measurements. Acknowledgements: LOAC was developed with support of the French ANR. Balloon operations were performed by CNES and special acknowledgements are addressed to Gilles Dupouy, Françoise Douchin and collaborators for field operations. Alexis Doerenbacher from Météo-France and Claude Basdevant from Ecole Polytechnique are also acknowledged for their helpful contribution in providing balloon-related forecasts, quicklooks and data (http://www.lmd.polytechnique.fr/BAMED/index.html). The LOAC balloon campaigns were mainly funded by CNES, ADEME and CNRS/INSU, with support from CEA and Météo-France.

  18. Desert and desertification in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrami, M.

    2009-04-01

    One of the greatest environmental concerns in Iran as in other arid and semiarid countries is the transformation of once productive, or marginally productive, land to deteriorated land and soil unable to support plants and animals. Because the land becomes barren and dry, the process is described as desertification, which occurs as a sequence of events. The area of deserts in Iran is about 340,000 Km2 (less than one fifth of its total area), of which 100,000 Km2 is being used for some cultivation, 120,000 Km2 is subjected to moving sands about 40 % of which is active sand dunes. Most of features and processes usual in world famous deserts are also observed in Iran: low precipitation, high evaporation, poor or lack of vegetation, saline and alkaline soils, low population and small and sparse oases. The deserts of Iran are generally classified in the subtropical, warm, arid and semiarid group, but the effect and presence of some geographical and geoclimatical factors such as height, vicinity to Indian Ocean and so on do some changes in climatic conditions and geographical features causing some local and regional differences in them. Geographically, two groups of deserts have been known in Iran: (1) Coastal deserts which, like a ribbon with variable width, stretch from extreme southeast to extreme southwest, at the north parts of Oman Sea and Persian Gulf. One important feature of these deserts is relatively high humidity which differentiates them from other deserts. This causes an increase in vegetation coverage and hence a decrease in eolian erosion and also a dominance of chemical weathering to that of physical. (2) internal deserts, which rest in central, eastern and southeastern plateau of the country and in independent and semi dependent depressions. This situation, which is due to the surrounding high mountains, blocks humidity entry and causes the aridity of these deserts. Wind as a dominant process in the area causes deflated features such as Reg (desert pavement), Kalut (Yardang), Hoodoo and wind deposited features such as different kinds of sand dunes (Seif, Nebka, Rebdous, Barkhan, Ghourd, Erg) and Loess, most of which exhibit beautiful landscapes suitable for ecotourism and scientific tours. Salt deserts (Kavir or Playas), which rest in the lowest parts of internal depressions, are the most current features in Iran deserts. The most extensive and specific salt deserts are in the course of floods or at the end of them, which consist of fine grained sediments in the lowest parts of the depressions. Many factors have been participated in the formation of salt deserts in Iran, the most important of which, are morphotectonical (such as folding and faulting due to the last epirogenic and orogenic movements), climatical and hydrological (occurred in Quaternary), geological and pedological (such as the presence of Neogene evaporitic formations).

  19. 75 FR 61467 - Desert Southwest Power, LLC; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Desert Southwest Power, LLC; Notice of Filing September 27, 2010. Take notice that on September 24, 2010, Desert Southwest Power, LLC (Desert Southwest) supplemented the... Commission's July 28, 2010 letter regarding Desert Southwest's petition for declaratory order...

  20. 78 FR 14979 - Trade Mission to Egypt and Kuwait

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... Trade Mission to Egypt April 14-16, 2013, published at 78 FR 7752, February 4, 2013. The effect of this... participation in the U.S. Trade Mission to Egypt and Kuwait March 10-14, 2013, published at 77 FR 33439, June 6... Administration, U.S. and Foreign Commercial Service is organizing a Trade Mission to Cairo, Egypt to...

  1. 77 FR 71777 - Trade Mission to Egypt and Kuwait

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-04

    ... Trade Mission to Egypt and Kuwait March 10-14, 2013, published at 77 FR 33439, June 6, 2012 to revise... Mission to Egypt and Kuwait March 10-14, 2013, published at 77 FR 33439, June 6, 2012. Due to the.... Commercial Service Cairo, Egypt U.S. Commercial Service Washington, DC Dennis Simmons, Deputy...

  2. Opportunities for woody crop production using treated wastewater in Egypt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Nile River provides nearly 97% of Egypt's freshwater supply. Egypt's share of Nile waters is allocated according to international treaty obligations and is fixed at 55.5 billion cubic meters annually. As a result, Egypt will not be able to meet increasing water demand using freshwater from the N...

  3. Hematologic, plasma biochemistry, and acid-base analysis of adult Negev Desert tortoises (Testudo werneri) in Israel.

    PubMed

    Eshar, David; Gancz, Ady Y; Avni-Magen, Nili; King, Roni; Beaufrére, Hugues

    2014-12-01

    The Negev Desert tortoise (Testudo werneri) is one of the smallest tortoise species in the Mediterranean region. This is a critically endangered species (CITES I) in its native habitat, which includes the Saharo-Arabian sands of northern Egypt, Sinai, and the Negev Desert in Israel. Great efforts have been invested in captive breeding and reintroduction of this tortoise to the wild. The purpose of this study was to collect blood samples from healthy Negev Desert tortoises kept in well-managed zoologic collections in order to describe hematologic, plasma biochemistry, and acid-base analytes for this species. Data of 36 different blood analytes were collected using the Abaxis Vetscan bench-top analyzer and i-STAT handheld analyzer, and a significant difference was observed between males and females in 13 of the measured analytes. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of blood analytes for the Negev Desert tortoise; however, the data do not fully meet the strict ASVCP guidelines required for reference range determination and thus can only provide a rough estimate for evaluating the health status of Negev Desert tortoises using similar testing methodology. PMID:25632697

  4. Analysis of utilization of desert habitats with dynamic simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.K.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of climate and herbivores on cool desert shrubs in north-western Utah were investigated with a dynamic simulation model. Cool desert shrublands are extensively managed as grazing lands, and are defoliated annually by domestic livestock. A primary production model was used to simulate harvest yields and shrub responses under a variety of climatic regimes and defoliation patterns. The model consists of six plant components, and it is based on equations of growth analysis. Plant responses were simulated under various combinations of 20 annual weather patterns and 14 defoliation strategies. Results of the simulations exhibit some unexpected linearities in model behavior, and emphasize the importance of both the pattern of climate and the level of plant vigor in determining optimal harvest strategies. Model behaviors are interpreted in terms of shrub morphology, physiology and ecology.

  5. Intercalibration of GOES Imager visible channels over the Sonoran Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fangfang; Wu, Xiangqian; Grotenhuis, Michael; Qian, Haifeng

    2014-07-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) have been observing the Western Hemisphere since the late 1970s, providing valuable information for weather forecast and climate change studies. Due to the lack of an onboard calibration device for the visible channel, accurate reflectance of the visible channel data depends on vicarious calibration methods to provide postlaunch calibration coefficients to compensate for the degraded responsivity. In this study, the Sonoran Desert, which can be viewed by both GOES-East and GOES-West satellites, is used to intercalibrate the visible channels on board the three-axis stabilized GOES satellite Imagers traceable to the Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 6 (C6) calibration standard. It was found that when the anomalous reflectance in 2004 and 2005 are excluded, the Sonoran Desert is radiometrically, spatially, and spectrally stable at the GOES viewing geometries and thus can be considered as a pseudo-invariant calibration site to develop long-term GOES Imager visible data set. To characterize the desert target reflectance with the MODIS data, GOES observations over 1 year period are used to convert the MODIS reflectance to the GOES viewing and solar illumination geometries. The spectral band adjustment factor for each GOES Imager visible channel is generated with a set of clear-sky Hyperion measurements. A trending algorithm, which consists of a polynomial function for the description of instrument degradation performance and two sine terms for the impacts of the seasonal variations of the solar zenith angle and atmospheric components, is applied to fit the time series of prelaunch calibrated reflectance. The combined calibration uncertainty of the desert calibration method is less than 4% at the Aqua MODIS C6 calibration standard. The difference of the postlaunch calibration coefficients between the desert calibration and the current GOES visible operational calibration methods is mainly within 5%.

  6. Biological soil crusts as an integral component of desert environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, Jayne; Weber, Bettina

    2013-01-01

    The biology and ecology of biological soil crusts, a soil surface community of mosses, lichens, cyanobacteria, green algae, fungi, and bacteria, have only recently been a topic of research. Most efforts began in the western U.S. (Cameron, Harper, Rushforth, and St. Clair), Australia (Rogers), and Israel (Friedmann, Evenari, and Lange) in the late 1960s and 1970s (e.g., Friedmann et al. 1967; Evenari 1985reviewed in Harper and Marble 1988). However, these groups worked independently of each other and, in fact, were often not aware of each other’s work. In addition, biological soil crust communities were seen as more a novelty than a critical component of dryland ecosystems. Since then, researchers have investigated many different aspects of these communities and have shown that although small to microscopic, biological soil crusts are critical in many ecological processes of deserts. They often cover most of desert soil surfaces and substantially mediate inputs and outputs from desert soils (Belnap et al. 2003). They can be a large source of biodiversity for deserts, as they can contain more species than the surrounding vascular plant community (Rosentreter 1986). These communities are important in reducing soil erosion and increasing soil fertility through the capture of dust and the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen and carbon into forms available to other life forms (Elbert et al. 2012). Because of their many effects on soil characteristics, such as external and internal morphological characteristics, aggregate stability, soil moisture, and permeability, they also affect seed germination and establishment and local hydrological cycles. Covering up to 70% of the surface area in many arid and semi-arid regions around the world (Belnap and Lange 2003), biological soil crusts are a key component within desert environments.

  7. Phytoremediation for Oily Desert Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radwan, Samir

    This chapter deals with strategies for cleaning oily desert soils through rhizosphere technology. Bioremediation involves two major approaches; seeding with suitable microorganisms and fertilization with microbial growth enhancing materials. Raising suitable crops in oil-polluted desert soils fulfills both objectives. The rhizosphere of many legume and non-legume plants is richer in oil-utilizing micro-organisms than non-vegetated soils. Furthermore, these rhizospheres also harbour symbiotic and asymbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria, and are rich in simple organic compounds exuded by plant roots. Those exudates are excellent nutrients for oil-utilizing microorganisms. Since many rhizospheric bacteria have the combined activities of hydrocarbon-utilization and nitrogen fixation, phytoremediation provides a feasible and environmentally friendly biotechnology for cleaning oil-polluted soils, especially nitrogen-poor desert soils.

  8. Social and economic conditions in two newly reclaimed areas in Egypt: implications for schistosomiasis control strategies.

    PubMed

    Mehanna, S; Rizkalla, N H; el-Sayed, H F; Winch, P J

    1994-10-01

    Reclamation of land from the desert is currently taking place in all parts of Egypt. A side-effect of many of these projects has been the introduction of schistosome parasites and their snail intermediate hosts, sometimes among Bedouin population with no previous exposure to the disease. The purpose of the present study was to describe social, environmental and economic conditions which can affect the transmission and control of schistosomiasis in reclaimed areas, and to investigate how residents of these areas view local conditions. Two areas were found to have high rates of internal and external migration, many different social groups with widely divergent priorities and minimal contact with each other, and inadequate infrastructure in terms of roads, transport, water and sanitation and health services. As a result of these conditions, control strategies which are effective for the population living in the Nile Valley will have to be modified considerably if schistosomiasis is to be brought under control in reclaimed areas. PMID:7932925

  9. Geology and origin of Meatiq Dome, Egypt: A Precambrian metamorphic core complex?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturchio, Neil C.; Sultan, Mohamed; Batiza, Rodey

    1983-02-01

    Meatiq Dome, a metamorphic complex in the Precambrian basement of the Eastern Desert of Egypt, exhibits many of the essential features of Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes. It is an antiformal structure with low-dipping foliation and unidirectional mineral-slickenside lineation. The core consists of granite gneiss and is conformably overlain by a heterogeneous, isoclinally folded, mylonitic carapace. The carapace grades upward into a nonmylonitic cover of low-grade ophiolitic rocks. The mylonitic rocks are interpreted to have formed in a low-angle ductile shear zone during a compressional tectonic event accompanied by syntectonic intrusion of tonalite. Doming postdated mylonitization. The absence of a brittle detachment surface at Meatiq Dome is its primary distinction from the otherwise similar Cordilleran complexes.

  10. Advantages of endophyte infection for irrigated pastures of semiarid, cold-desert environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little research has evaluated possible endophyte benefits to adaptation and production of grasses in the irrigated pastures of the semiarid, cold-desert environments of the western USA. Severe irrigation shortages are common; however, production demands are increasing, necessitating maximizing tall ...

  11. BIOGENIC VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS FROM DESERT VEGETATION OF THE SOUTHWESTERN U.S.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thirteen common plant species in the Mojave and Sonoran Desert regions of the western United States were tested for emissions of biogenic non-methane volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). Only two of the species examined emitted isoprene at rates of 10 µgCg−1 ...

  12. BIOGENIC VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS FROM DESERT VEGETATION OF THE SOUTHWESTERN U.S.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thirteen common plant species in the Mojave and Sonoran Desert regions of the western United States were tested for emissions of biogenic non-methane volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). Only two of the species examined emitted isoprene at rates of 10 gCg?1 ...

  13. Study of free living amoebae in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Hamadto, H H; Aufy, S M; el-Hayawan, I A; Saleh, M H; Nagaty, I M

    1993-12-01

    At different locality in Egypt, free living amoebae (FLA) were detected in 32%, 20% and 4% of water samples obtained from swimming pools, surface water canals and tap water respectively. Naegleria spp. were identified from 12 (75%) out of 16 swimming pool samples and 6 (60%) out of 10 surface water & canals samples from different Governorates in Egypt, while Acanthamoeba spp. were identified from 4 (25%) of 16 swimming pools samples, 4 (40%) out of 10 surface water & canals samples and 2 (100%) tap samples. The isolated FLA in the present study were non-pathogenic as proved by the pathogenicity test. PMID:8308337

  14. Enhancing and restoring habitat for the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abella, Scott R.; Berry, Kristin H.

    2016-01-01

    Habitat has changed unfavorably during the past 150 years for the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii), a threatened species with declining populations in the Mojave and western Sonoran Desert. To support recovery efforts, we synthesized published information on relationships of desert tortoises with three habitat features (cover sites, forage, and soil) and candidate management practices for improving these features for tortoises. In addition to their role in soil health and facilitating recruitment of annual forage plants, shrubs are used by desert tortoises for cover and as sites for burrows. Outplanting greenhouse-grown seedlings, protected from herbivory, has successfully restored (>50% survival) a variety of shrubs on disturbed desert soils. Additionally, salvaging and re-applying topsoil using effective techniques is among the more ecologically beneficial ways to initiate plant recovery after severe disturbance. Some plant species provide better-quality forage than others. Tortoises selectively forage on particular annual and herbaceous perennial species, such as legumes, with favored plants varying with phenological stage within years. Non-native grasses are non-preferred forage and contribute fuel to spreading wildfires, which damage or kill shrubs that tortoises use for cover. Maintaining a diverse "menu" of native annual forbs and decreasing non-native grasses are priorities for restoring most desert tortoise habitats. Reducing herbivory by non-native animals, carefully timing herbicide applications, and strategically augmenting annual forage plants via seeding show promise for improving tortoise forage quality. Roads, another disturbance, negatively affect habitat in numerous ways (e.g., compacting soil, altering hydrology). Techniques such as re-contouring road berms to reestablish drainage patterns, vertical mulching ("planting" dead plant material), and creating barriers to prevent trespasses can assist natural recovery on decommissioned backcountry roads. Habitats will not necessarily recover naturally after severe disturbance and from centuries of degradation. A next step in recovering tortoise habitats could be implementing a set of integrated habitat enhancements (e.g., reducing non-native plants, improving forage quality, augmenting native perennial plants, and ameliorating altered hydrology) and monitoring short- and long-term indicators of habitat and tortoise health. This synthesis supports implementation of habitat enhancement measures described in the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's 2011 Revised Recovery Plan for the desert tortoise.

  15. A comprehensive study of noble gases and nitrogen in "Hypatia", a diamond-rich pebble from SW Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avice, Guillaume; Meier, Matthias M. M.; Marty, Bernard; Wieler, Rainer; Kramers, Jan D.; Langenhorst, Falko; Cartigny, Pierre; Maden, Colin; Zimmermann, Laurent; Andreoli, Marco A. G.

    2015-12-01

    This is a follow-up study of a work by Kramers et al. (2013) on a very unusual diamond-rich rock fragment found in the area of south west Egypt in the south-western side of the Libyan Desert Glass strewn field. This pebble, called Hypatia, is composed of almost pure carbon. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results reveal that Hypatia is mainly made of defect-rich diamond containing lonsdaleite and multiple deformation bands. These characteristics are compatible with an impact origin on Earth and/or in space. We also analyzed concentrations and isotopic compositions of all five noble gases and nitrogen in several ∼mg sized Hypatia samples. These data confirm the conclusion by Kramers et al. (2013) that Hypatia is extra-terrestrial. The sample is relatively rich in trapped noble gases with an isotopic composition being close to the Q component found in many types of meteorites. 40Ar/36Ar ratios in individual steps are as low as 0.4 ± 0.3. Cosmic-ray produced "cosmogenic" 21Ne is present in concentrations corresponding to a nominal cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) age of roughly 0.1 Myr if produced in a typical meter-sized meteoroid. Such an atypically low nominal CRE age suggests high shielding in a considerably larger body. In addition to the Xe-Q composition, an excess of radiogenic 129Xe (from the decay of short-lived radioactive 129I) is observed (129Xe /132Xe = 1.18 + / - 0.03). Two isotopically distinct N components are present, an isotopically heavy component (δ15N ∼ + 20 ‰) released at low temperatures and a major isotopically light component (δ15N ∼ - 110 ‰) at higher temperatures. This disequilibrium in N suggests that the diamonds in Hypatia were formed in space rather than upon impact on Earth (δN15atm = 0 ‰). All our data are broadly consistent with concentrations and isotopic compositions of noble gases in at least three different types of carbon-rich meteoritic materials: carbon-rich veins in ureilites, graphite in acapulcoites/lodranites and graphite nodules in iron meteorites. However, Hypatia does not seem to be directly related to any of these materials, but may have sampled a similar cosmochemical reservoir. Our study does not confirm the presence of exotic noble gases (e.g. G component) that led Kramers et al. (2013) to propose that Hypatia is a remnant of a comet nucleus that impacted the Earth.

  16. On a Crowded Desert Island.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothstein, Samuel

    1989-01-01

    Suggests reference sources most appropriate for a desert island. In addition to "Robinson Crusoe" (Daniel Defoe) and a reference guide to the literature of travel, the list includes basic books on reference work, guides to reference sources, journals, an almanac, encyclopedias, a guide to English usage, and a book of quotations. (14 references)

  17. Modeling Soil Moisture in the Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, David M.; Hughson, Debra; Schmidt, Kevin M.

    2008-01-01

    The Mojave Desert is an arid region of southeastern California and parts of Nevada, Arizona, and Utah; the desert occupies more than 25,000 square miles (fig. 1). Ranging from below sea level to over 5,000 feet (1,524 m) in elevation, the Mojave Desert is considered a ?high desert.? On the west and southwest it is bounded by the Sierra Nevada, the San Gabriel, and the San Bernardino Mountains. These imposing mountains intercept moisture traveling inland from the Pacific Ocean, producing arid conditions characterized by extreme fluctuations in daily temperatures, strong seasonal winds, and an average annual precipitation of less than six inches. The Mojave Desert lies farther south and at a lower elevation than the cooler Great Basin Desert and grades southward into the even lower and hotter Sonoran Desert.

  18. Desert Pathfinder at Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-09-01

    The Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) project celebrates the inauguration of its outstanding 12-m telescope, located on the 5100m high Chajnantor plateau in the Atacama Desert (Chile). The APEX telescope, designed to work at sub-millimetre wavelengths, in the 0.2 to 1.5 mm range, passed successfully its Science Verification phase in July, and since then is performing regular science observations. This new front-line facility provides access to the "Cold Universe" with unprecedented sensitivity and image quality. After months of careful efforts to set up the telescope to work at the best possible technical level, those involved in the project are looking with satisfaction at the fruit of their labour: APEX is not only fully operational, it has already provided important scientific results. "The superb sensitivity of our detectors together with the excellence of the site allow fantastic observations that would not be possible with any other telescope in the world," said Karl Menten, Director of the group for Millimeter and Sub-Millimeter Astronomy at the Max-Planck-Institute for Radio Astronomy (MPIfR) and Principal Investigator of the APEX project. ESO PR Photo 30/05 ESO PR Photo 30/05 Sub-Millimetre Image of a Stellar Cradle [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 627 pix - 200k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 1254 pix - 503k] [Full Res - JPEG: 1539 x 2413 pix - 1.3M] Caption: ESO PR Photo 30/05 is an image of the giant molecular cloud G327 taken with APEX. More than 5000 spectra were taken in the J=3-2 line of the carbon monoxide molecule (CO), one of the best tracers of molecular clouds, in which star formation takes place. The bright peak in the north of the cloud is an evolved star forming region, where the gas is heated by a cluster of new stars. The most interesting region in the image is totally inconspicuous in CO: the G327 hot core, as seen in methanol contours. It is a truly exceptional source, and is one of the richest sources of emission from complex organic molecules in the Galaxy (see spectrum at bottom). Credit: Wyrowski et al. (map), Bisschop et al. (spectrum). Millimetre and sub-millimetre astronomy opens exciting new possibility in the study of the first galaxies to have formed in the Universe and of the formation processes of stars and planets. In particular, APEX allows astronomers to study the chemistry and physical conditions of molecular clouds, that is, dense regions of gas and dust in which new stars are forming. Among the first studies made with APEX, astronomers took a first glimpse deep into cradles of massive stars, observing for example the molecular cloud G327 and measuring significant emission in carbon monoxide and complex organic molecules (see ESO PR Photo 30/05). The official inauguration of the APEX telescope will start in San Pedro de Atacama on September, 25th. The Ambassadors in Chile of some of ESO's member states, the Intendente of the Chilean Region II, the Mayor of San Pedro, the Executive Director of the Chilean Science Agency (CONICYT), the Presidents of the Communities of Sequitor and Toconao, as well as representatives of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Universities in Chile, will join ESO's Director General, Dr. Catherine Cesarsky, the Chairman of the APEX Board and MPIfR director, Prof. Karl Menten, and the Director of the Onsala Space Observatory, Prof. Roy Booth, in a celebration that will be held in San Pedro de Atacama. The next day, the delegation will visit the APEX base camp in Sequitor, near San Pedro, from where the telescope is operated, as well as the APEX site on the 5100m high Llano de Chajnantor.

  19. Censorship and Security Agents Pervade Egypt's Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    This article offers a glimpse into one of the many ways in which the Egyptian government and the campus administrators it appoints are slowly and persistently squeezing the life out of universities in Cairo, Egypt. Classroom discussions are monitored, faculty appointments and academic research are scrutinized, and faculty participation in outside

  20. Women's "Justification" of Domestic Violence in Egypt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yount, Kathryn M.; Li, Li

    2009-01-01

    We explored the influences of women's social learning, marital resources and constraints, and exposure to norms about women's family roles on their views about wife hitting or beating among 5,450 participants in the 2005 Egypt Demographic and Health Survey. One half justified wife hitting or beating for some reason. Women from rural areas who were

  1. Journey to Egypt: A Board Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvidge, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    This author describes how her elementary students first became interested in studying ancient Egypt. Her students' interest in the ancient Egyptian studies began when a student checked out a library book on Egyptology that contained colorful images and was soon swarmed by interested classmates. Many of her students began practicing writing

  2. Detection of Strawberry Viruses in Egypt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of a USAID-MERC funded project, Disease-indexing and mass propagation of superior strawberry cultivars, an effort was made to evaluate the virus status of strawberries in Egypt. Diagnostic reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) tests for Strawberry mottle, Strawberry cri...

  3. Review of Parasitic Zoonoses in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Ahmed I.; Uga, Shoji

    2014-01-01

    This review presents a comprehensive picture of the zoonotic parasitic diseases in Egypt, with particular reference to their relative prevalence among humans, animal reservoirs of infection, and sources of human infection. A review of the available literature indicates that many parasitic zoonoses are endemic in Egypt. Intestinal infections of parasitic zoonoses are widespread and are the leading cause of diarrhea, particularly among children and residents of rural areas. Some parasitic zoonoses are confined to specific geographic areas in Egypt, such as cutaneous leishmaniasis and zoonotic babesiosis in the Sinai. Other areas have a past history of a certain parasitic zoonoses, such as visceral leishmaniasis in the El-Agamy area in Alexandria. As a result of the implementation of control programs, a marked decrease in the prevalence of other zoonoses, such as schistosomiasis and fascioliasis has been observed. Animal reservoirs of parasitic zoonoses have been identified in Egypt, especially in rodents, stray dogs and cats, as well as vectors, typically mosquitoes and ticks, which constitute potential risks for disease transmission. Prevention and control programs against sources and reservoirs of zoonoses should be planned by public health and veterinary officers based on reliable information from systematic surveillance. PMID:24808742

  4. Women's "Justification" of Domestic Violence in Egypt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yount, Kathryn M.; Li, Li

    2009-01-01

    We explored the influences of women's social learning, marital resources and constraints, and exposure to norms about women's family roles on their views about wife hitting or beating among 5,450 participants in the 2005 Egypt Demographic and Health Survey. One half justified wife hitting or beating for some reason. Women from rural areas who were…

  5. Detection of Strawberry Viruses in Egypt

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of a USAID-MERC funded project, ‘Disease-indexing and mass propagation of superior strawberry cultivars’, an effort was made to evaluate the virus status of strawberries in Egypt. Diagnostic reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) tests for Strawberry mottle, Strawberry cri...

  6. Journey to Egypt: A Board Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvidge, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    This author describes how her elementary students first became interested in studying ancient Egypt. Her students' interest in the ancient Egyptian studies began when a student checked out a library book on Egyptology that contained colorful images and was soon swarmed by interested classmates. Many of her students began practicing writing…

  7. Mortality, Recruitment and Change of Desert Tree Populations in a Hyper-Arid Environment

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Gidske L.; Krzywinski, Knut

    2007-01-01

    Background Long-term vegetation changes in hyper-arid areas have long been neglected. Mortality, recruitment and change in populations of the ecologically and culturally important and drought persistent Acacia tortilis and Balanites aegyptiaca are therefore estimated in the Eastern Desert of Egypt, and are related to the primary agents of change, water conditions and human intervention. Methodology A change analysis using high-resolution Corona images (1965) in combination with field data (2003) is the basis for recruitment, mortality and change estimates. For assessing the influence of water conditions on patterns in recruitment and survival, different types of generalized linear models are tested. Conclusions The overall trend in population size in that part of the Eastern Desert studied here is negative. At some sites this negative trend is alarming, because the reduction in mature trees is substantial (>50%) at the same time as recruitment is nearly absent. At a few sites there is a positive trend and better recruitment. Frequent observations of sprouting in saplings indicate that this is an important mechanism to increase their persistence. It is the establishment itself that seems to be the main challenge in the recruitment process. There are indications that hydrological variables and surface water in particular can explain some of the observed pattern in mortality, but our results indicate that direct human intervention, i.e., charcoal production, is the main cause of tree mortality in the Eastern Desert. PMID:17299588

  8. Instrumental neutron activation analysis of soil and sediment samples from Siwa Oasis, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawy, Wael M.; Ali, Khaled; El-Samman, Hussein M.; Frontasyeva, Marina V.; Gundorina, Svetlana F.; Duliu, Octavian G.

    2015-07-01

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis was used to study geochemical peculiarities of the Siwa Oasis in the Western Egyptian Desert. A total of 34 elements were determined in soil and sediment samples (Na, Mg, Al, Cl, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, Sb, I, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Eu, Tb, Dy, Tm, Yb, Hf, Ta, Th, and U). For data interpretation Cluster analysis was applied. Comparison with the available literature data was carried out.

  9. Molecular subtype analysis determines the association of advanced breast cancer in Egypt with favorable biology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Prognostic markers and molecular breast cancer subtypes reflect underlying biological tumor behavior and are important for patient management. Compared to Western countries, women in North Africa are less likely to be prognosticated and treated based on well-characterized markers such as the estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and Her2. We conducted this study to determine the prevalence of breast cancer molecular subtypes in the North African country of Egypt as a measure of underlying biological characteristics driving tumor manifestations. Methods To determine molecular subtypes we characterized over 200 tumor specimens obtained from Egypt by performing ER, PR, Her2, CK5/6, EGFR and Ki67 immunohistochemistry. Results Our study demonstrated that the Luminal A subtype, associated with favorable prognosis, was found in nearly 45% of cases examined. However, the basal-like subtype, associated with poor prognosis, was found in 11% of cases. These findings are in sharp contrast to other parts of Africa in which the basal-like subtype is over-represented. Conclusions Egyptians appear to have favorable underlying biology, albeit having advanced disease at diagnosis. These data suggest that Egyptians would largely profit from early detection of their disease. Intervention at the public health level, including education on the benefits of early detection is necessary and would likely have tremendous impact on breast cancer outcome in Egypt. PMID:21961708

  10. Fracture analysis and its relation to radioactivity around Gebel Um Risha, south eastern desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Khateeb, S. O.; El Akraby, A. M.

    1994-07-01

    Analysis of radioactive fracture patterns prevailing in the study area revealed that there are a number of tectonic trends which show abnormal radioactivity. These trends can be arranged according to the degree of their importance as NW, NE, EW and NS. Meanwhile, they are applied in delineating interesting structural features that may serve as favourable loci of economic radioactive mineral deposits. Correlation of these radioactive fracture patterns with those deduced from surface geological map of the study area exhibits a good agreement assuring the importance of aeroradiometric survey data as an excellent tool in structural mapping.

  11. Isotopic and hydrogeochemical evaluation of groundwater at Qusier-Safaga area, eastern desert, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Awad, M A; Hamza, M S; Atwa, S M; Sallouma, M K

    1996-06-01

    The groundwater resources of the El-Qusier-Safaga area on the Red Sea coastal zone have still to be utilised fully for social and economic development. In the present study, an inventory of recharge sources and quality of groundwater in different water bearing formations is made to assist in management of these vital resources. From a hydrochemical point of view, the origin of salinity in the five investigated aquifers are mainly dissolution of terrestrial minerals, leaching of soilsvia floods or ion exchanges processes. Stable isotope data clarify the interaction between different aquifers and indicate that the source of recharge is mainly meteoric water originating from palaeowater of the Pleistocene pluvial period, and from local precipitation as well as some marine water. Evaluation of the groundwater quality for domestic, irrigation and industrial purposes is discussed. PMID:24194374

  12. Paleoclimatic and Tectonic History of the Eastern Desert, Egypt and Surroundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, Raymond E.

    1997-01-01

    This report covers work for the Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program, which has focused on three areas: analysis of the tectonics and paleoclimatic conditions in north eastern Africa, analysis of surficial geology and damage associated with the 1993 Missouri River floods and rates of lava flow degradation at Lunar Crater volcanic field in Nevada. Work has resulted in several dozen abstracts, several dissertations and a number of papers.

  13. Petrogenesis of the Pan-African El-Bula Igneous Suite, central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Shazly, S. M.; El-Sayed, M. M.

    2000-08-01

    The Precambrian rocks of the El-Bula area include syn-orogenic intrusive granitoids associated with gneisses, metavolcanics and metagabbro-diorite complexes. The metavolcanics range in composition from basalt to basaltic andesite. They show tholeiite affinity and provide unfractionated, flat rare earth element patterns and have geochemical features suggesting their generation in a back-arc environment. Low and variable Mg# of the basic metavolcanics suggest that they were derived from the upper mantle with subsequent modification by fractional crystallisation. The least evolved basaltic sample could be generated by 25% batch melting of a spinel Iherzolite source followed by 35% fractionation of clinopyroxene, olivine and plagioclase in proportions of 45%, 30% and 25%, respectively. The most evolved basaltic rock could be generated by 55% fractional crystallisation (65% hornblende, 30% plagioclase and 5% titanomagnetite) of the least evolved basaltic sample liquid. The El-Bula syn-orogenic granitoids show a normal igneous evolution from metaluminous tonalites to weakly peraluminous granodiorites. They exhibit geochemical features of I-type calc-alkaline granites emplaced in a volcanic arc environment. The least evolved tonalitic sample could be generated by about 30% batch melting of the most evolved basic metavolcanic sample. The ElBula tonalites and granodiorites have geochemical and petrological characteristics indicating that they might be genetically related by fractional crystallisation. The chemical variation in the tonalites is dominantly controlled by about 45% fractional crystallisation of hornblende, plagioclase and K-feldspar in proportions of 55%, 44% and 1%, respectively. The least evolved granodioritic sample could be produced from the most evolved tonalitic sample by about 20% crystallisation of plagioclase, biotite, hornblende and K-feldspar phases in proportions of 54%, 43%, 2.5% and 0.5%, respectively. The variations in the granodiorites could be modelled by about 30% fractional crystallisation of plagioclase, K-feldspar and biotite (62%, 24% and 14%, respectively).

  14. Mineralogy and genesis of secondary uranium deposits, Um Ara area, south eastern desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawood, Y. H.; Abd El-Naby, H. H.

    2001-02-01

    Secondary U mineralisation is found in the oxidised zone pervading fractured albitised and alkali-feldspar granites emplaced at the northern boundary of Um Ara Pluton. It occurs as stains along crevices and fracture surfaces and as acicular crystals filling cavities. X-ray diffraction and SEM were used to identify secondary U minerals and the associated alteration products. Uranophane and β-uranophane are the most abundant U minerals, whereas Ca-montmorillonite and illite represent low temperature alteration products of the host granitic rocks. The genesis of secondary U minerals is mainly attributed to the action of oxic groundwater on previously corroded primary U minerals. These secondary U minerals were deposited near the surface from the circulating groundwater by evaporation.

  15. Geometry and texture of quartz veins in Wadi Atalla area, Central Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akawy, Ahmed

    2007-02-01

    Several quartz vein sets with varying orientation, geometry and internal structure were recognized in the Atalla area. The veins were associated with the deformation phases affecting the area. En echelon and extensional veins are the main geometrical types. Syn-kinematic veins associated with the major northeast-over-southwest thrust faults were later boudinaged, folded and re-folded. En echelon veins, fibrous veins, and extensional veins are associated with the NNW-SSE faults. Other veins are associated with the NW-SE, N-S, NE-SW and E-W faults. Veins are concentrated at the intersection zones between faults. The internal structure of the veins comprises syntaxial, antitaxial, and composite types and reflects a change from a compressive stress regime to an extensional one. Chocolate-tablet structures and synchronous and co-genetic vein networks indicate later multi-directional extension of the area. Interaction between cracking and sealing of fractures is a common feature in the study area indicating that it was easy for the pore pressure to open pre-existing fractures instead of creating new ones. The reopening of pre-existing fractures rather than creating new ones is also indicated by the scattering of vein data around ?3. There is an alteration and change in characteristics of the wall rock due to increase in fluid flow rate. Fault-valving probably is also a cause of the complex geometry of some veins.

  16. Morphological characteristics of interactions between deserts and rivers in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Ping; Li, XiaoMei; Ma, YuFeng; Wu, Wei; Qian, Yao

    2015-12-01

    Arid regions are affected by long-term interactions between various factors including water and wind. Recent research has concentrated on aeolian-fluvial interactions in dryland environments, including the important role of rivers in providing sand and spaces for deserts development, as well as the influences of aeolian activity upon river landforms. However, there is still a lack of comprehensive data at the large watershed scale to support such research. In this study, we analyzed statistically the morphological parameters related to twelve deserts and ten watersheds in dryland regions of northern China using remote sensing data, maps of desert and watershed distributions, and classification of aeolian landforms. Results indicate that, in view of the relationship between deserts and rivers, the geomorphic structures of drainage basins in northern China can be overall divided into five large drainage zones: northwestern drainage (ND), western drainage (WD), drainage of northern Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (PD), middle drainage (MD) and eastern drainage (ED). In the terms of percent area of desert in drainages, it can be sequenced as WD > MD > ND > ED > PD. For percent area of shifting dunes in deserts, WD > PD > MD > ED > ND. Considering the classification of aeolian dunes, transverse dune dominates in all drainages, and its proportion can be sorted as PD > ED > MD > WD > ND. There is a significant difference in their morphological parameters between interior and exterior watersheds. In exterior watersheds, desert area, shifting dune or transverse dune areas are not significantly associated with drainage area respectively, but interior watersheds have good correlations between them. And in three rivers of Tarim Basin, along with increasing distance from the river bank, the types of aeolian dune (complexity) increased step-wisely, implying that sand dune extends along the river terrace. Those data and preliminary findings confirm that the rivers are indispensable to the development and evolution of deserts, performing as channels ('arteries') and platforms ('skeletons') in providing sand sources and spaces.

  17. Rheum palaestinum (desert rhubarb), a self-irrigating desert plant.

    PubMed

    Lev-Yadun, Simcha; Katzir, Gadi; Ne'eman, Gidi

    2009-03-01

    The rare plant Rheum palaestinum (Polygonaceae) is a perennial hemicryptophyte that grows during the rainy winter in desert mountainous areas in Israel and Jordan that receive an average annual rainfall of ca. 75 mm. It produces between one and four large round leaves that are tightly attached to the ground and form large rosettes of up to 1 m(2). These leaves differ markedly from the typical small leaves of most desert plants. Moreover, they have a unique 3D morphology resembling a scaled-down mountainous area with well-developed steep drainage systems, raising the question which selective agents were involved in their evolution. We propose that the large leaves collect rainwater that then infiltrates the soil surrounding the root. We measured the seasonal course of leaf growth, examined the area of wet soil surrounding the root after actual and simulated rain, and modeled the water harvesting capacity using the plant leaf area and the weekly precipitation. We show that even in the slightest rains, water flows above the veins to the leaf's base where it irrigates the vertical root. A typical plant harvests more than 4,100 cm(3) of water per year, and enjoys a water regime of about 427 mm/year, equivalent to the water supply in a Mediterranean climate. This is the first example of self-irrigation by large leaves in a desert plant, creating a leaf-made mini oasis. PMID:19030840

  18. Rheum palaestinum (desert rhubarb), a self-irrigating desert plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev-Yadun, Simcha; Katzir, Gadi; Ne`Eman, Gidi

    2009-03-01

    The rare plant Rheum palaestinum (Polygonaceae) is a perennial hemicryptophyte that grows during the rainy winter in desert mountainous areas in Israel and Jordan that receive an average annual rainfall of ca. 75 mm. It produces between one and four large round leaves that are tightly attached to the ground and form large rosettes of up to 1 m2. These leaves differ markedly from the typical small leaves of most desert plants. Moreover, they have a unique 3D morphology resembling a scaled-down mountainous area with well-developed steep drainage systems, raising the question which selective agents were involved in their evolution. We propose that the large leaves collect rainwater that then infiltrates the soil surrounding the root. We measured the seasonal course of leaf growth, examined the area of wet soil surrounding the root after actual and simulated rain, and modeled the water harvesting capacity using the plant leaf area and the weekly precipitation. We show that even in the slightest rains, water flows above the veins to the leafs base where it irrigates the vertical root. A typical plant harvests more than 4,100 cm3 of water per year, and enjoys a water regime of about 427 mm/year, equivalent to the water supply in a Mediterranean climate. This is the first example of self-irrigation by large leaves in a desert plant, creating a leaf-made mini oasis.

  19. Distribution of desert varnish in Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvidge, Christopher D.

    1989-01-01

    Desert varnish is the dark coat of clay and ferromanganese oxides developed on exposed rock surfaces in arid regions. It forms from the accretion of material from windblown dust. The distribution of desert varnish was mapped in Arizona. It was discovered that desert varnish could be mapped on a regional scale. Well developed desert varnish is common on stable rock surfaces in areas having alkaline soils and less than about 25 cm of annual precipitation. Rock surfaces in areas having more than 40 cm of annual precipitation are generally devoid of desert varnish. An experiment was conducted with varnished desert pavement stone. The stones were broken in half and half was set on a roof in central Illinois from April until October. Removed from the alkaline desert environment, it only took seven months for the varnish to develop an eroded appearance. This experiment graphically illustrates the dependency of desert varnish on alkalinity. In this context, the zones of eroded desert varnish in Arizona indicate that the area of active desert varnish formation has fluctuated, expanding in drier times and contracting/eroding in wetter times.

  20. Dynamics and Resilience of Desert Ecosystems under Changing Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, J.; Wainwright, J.; Parsons, A. J.; Okin, G. S.; Bestelmeyer, B.; Fredrickson, E. L.; Schlesinger, W. H.

    2008-12-01

    Ecological models have been used to probe the causes of spatial complexity and predict specific responses of desert ecosystems. However, many models have been limited in their focus: models of dynamics have been developed with no consideration of the inherent patchiness or patterns in the vegetation, or else models have been developed to generate patterns with no consideration of the dynamics. Models that attempt to address both pattern and dynamics have been qualitative and descriptive. Furthermore, if, as is commonly believed, both dynamics and patterns/patchiness are a function of resource (specifically water) limitation, then there has been little integration of this relationship into such models. Consequently, these models have limited utility for understanding resilience of desert ecosystems. Here we present an integrated approach to the observed patchiness and dynamics in desert vegetation that is based on a sound process-based understanding and is formulated to accommodate previous conceptual models within an overarching framework. This framework is implemented as a mathematical model. Our contribution represents an advance over previous work in that we propose a general model framework for the analysis of ecosystem change in deserts that explicitly considers spatial interactions among multiple vegetation types and multiple resources, and predict specific responses to a variety of endogenous and exogenous disturbances. We present an application of this model to investigate conditions the conditions that would result in observed desert vegetation patterns in south-western desert systems of North America. In particular, we investigate the encroachment of shrubs (Larrea tridentata) into formerly pure stands of grass (Bouteloua eriopoda). We present the results of simulations that rest on rainfall data that was reconstructed for the Jornada Basin Long-Term Ecological Research site in southern New Mexico, USA based on 300-year tree- ring records. The results show that populations of native grasslands were stable under all historical rainfall conditions and should have remained stable over the last century. The observed encroachment of shrubs can only be explained by the combination of periodic droughts with a second disturbance, which in this work is simulated as varying grazing intensities. We also show that the spatial pattern of the invading species is a function of the behaviour of the previously dominant species in redistributing resource and propagules during times of resource stress.

  1. Development of a GIS simulation model and the use of remote sensing for monitoring and prediction of soil salinity and waterlogging in the Nile delta (Egypt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goossens, Rudi G.; De Dapper, Morgan; Ghabour, Tharwat K.; El Badawi, Mohamed; Gad, Abd-Alla

    1993-08-01

    This paper is presenting the results of a three year program of the Belgian Ministry for Science Policy dealing with land degradation and remote sensing. In arid and semi-arid climates the soil salinity problem is becoming more and more important. In this paper two types of simulation models are presented, allowing the prediction of future risks for soil salinity and the interconnected problem of water logging. The method was elaborated in Egypt. One model is dealing with the delta soils, the other one with the desert soils in the newly reclaimed areas.

  2. Clinicopathological features of melanocytic skin lesions in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Mahmoud R; Elsers, Dalia A; Fadel, Sabah A; Omar, Abd-Elhady M

    2006-02-01

    Although melanocytic skin lesions have been recognized since antiquity, their literature was limited to Caucasians. To date, the clinicopathologic features of these lesions in Egyptians are still unknown. To define these features, diagnostic records of the melanocytic skin lesions received at the Pathology Department, Assuit University Hospitals (1989-2004) were reviewed. The lesions examined included 12 benign naevi (BN), 10 dysplastic naevi (DN), and 21 cutaneous malignant melanomas (CMMs). The DN and CMMs were more common in men than in women (2 : 1 and 1.5 : 1, respectively) while BN were more common in women (2 : 1). The average age incidence was 33+/-5, 38+/-7 and 54+/-3 years, for BN, DN and CMM, respectively. The lower limb (13/21, 62%), head and neck (7/21, 33%) were the most common sites for CMMs. The average size (mm) was 2+/-0.3, 4+/-0.6 and 21+/-0.3 for BN, DN and CMMs, respectively. Recurrence occurred in 10% of CMMs. Histologically, CMMs were of nodular type and composed of epithelioid (7/21, 33%), spindle cells (1/21, 5%), or mixed cells (13/21, 62%). The mean tumour thickness (Breslow) was 6+/-0.5 mm. CMMs included two of 21(9%), three of 21(14%), six of 21(38%), and 10 of 21(38%) with Clark level II, III, IV and V. In Egypt, CMM is the third most common cutaneous neoplasm following squamous and basal cell carcinomas. Compared with Western societies, melanoma has a male sex predilection, similar histological features but different topographical distribution and rare incidence. The striking difference from Western series is the incidence of nodular melanoma - in the West this represents 15-30% of melanomas, with superficial spreading being the majority. Another key difference from the West is the 'sun-bed' culture of the West and the desire to have suntans. This is the first study that reports the clinicopathologic features of melanocytic skin lesions in Egypt. PMID:16374232

  3. Influence of surface roughness of a desert

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sud, Y. C.; Smith, W. E.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical simulation study, using the current GLAS climate GCM, was carried out to examine the influence of low bulk aerodynamic drag parameter in the deserts. The results illustrate the importance of yet another feedback effect of a desert on itself, that is produced by the reduction in surface roughness height of land once the vegetation dies and desert forms. Apart from affecting the moisture convergence, low bulk transport coefficients of a desert lead to enhanced longwave cooling and sinking which together reduce precipitation by Charney's (1975) mechanism. Thus, this effect, together with albedo and soil moisture influence, perpetuate a desert condition through its geophysical feedback effect. The study further suggests that man made deserts is a viable hypothesis.

  4. Management of Disused Radioactive Sealed Sources in Egypt - 13512

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, Y.T.; Hasan, M.A.; Lasheen, Y.F.

    2013-07-01

    The future safe development of nuclear energy and progressive increasing use of sealed sources in medicine, research, industry and other fields in Egypt depends on the safe and secure management of disused radioactive sealed sources. In the past years have determined the necessity to formulate and apply the integrated management program for radioactive sealed sources to assure harmless and ecological rational management of disused sealed sources in Egypt. The waste management system in Egypt comprises operational and regulatory capabilities. Both of these activities are performed under legislations. The Hot Laboratories and Waste Management Center HLWMC, is considered as a centralized radioactive waste management facility in Egypt by law 7/2010. (authors)

  5. Network topology of the desert rose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hope, Sigmund; Kundu, Sumanta; Roy, Chandreyee; Manna, Subhrangshu; Hansen, Alex

    2015-09-01

    Desert roses are gypsum crystals that consist of intersecting disks. We determine their geometrical structure using computer assisted tomography. By mapping the geometrical structure onto a graph, the topology of the desert rose is analyzed and compared to a model based on diffusion limited aggregation. By comparing the topology, we find that the model gets a number of the features of the real desert rose right, whereas others do not fit so well.

  6. Benchmarking performance: Environmental impact statements in Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Badr, El-Sayed A.; Zahran, Ashraf A.; Cashmore, Matthew

    2011-04-15

    Environmental impact assessment (EIA) was formally introduced in Egypt in 1994. This short paper evaluates 'how well' the EIA process is working in practice in Egypt, by reviewing the quality of 45 environmental impact statements (EISs) produced between 2000 and 2007 for a variety of project types. The Lee and Colley review package was used to assess the quality of the selected EISs. About 69% of the EISs sampled were found to be of a satisfactory quality. An assessment of the performance of different elements of the EIA process indicates that descriptive tasks tend to be performed better than scientific tasks. The quality of core elements of EIA (e.g., impact prediction, significance evaluation, scoping and consideration of alternatives) appears to be particularly problematic. Variables that influence the quality of EISs are identified and a number of broad recommendations are made for improving the effectiveness of the EIA system.

  7. Ostrich (Struthio camelus) production in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Cooper, R G; Mahrose, K M A; El-Shafei, M; Marai, I F M

    2008-06-01

    This review discusses the historical, developmental and practices of ostrich farming in Egypt. In the early 20th century, ostrich farming was very important for production of ostrich feathers and documents were produced to perfect the art of procuring the plumes from the birds and subsequently processing them. Pharaohs used ostrich feathers for adornment. Of 43 provinces, 12 were featured in 2003-2004 as farming ostriches: Alexandria, Al-Behera, Al-Dakahlia, Al-Wadi Al-Gadid, Aswan, Cairo, El-Sharkia, Geiza, Ismailia, Kafr-El-Sheikh, Matrouh and Nubaria. Abattoirs and tanneries specialising in ostrich handling are limited to two. Egypt has numerous strengths and opportunities to develop its ostrich sector. Rising meat prices suggest that fresh ostrich meat is unaffordable to many locals. Funds may be allocated to local advertising campaigns to promote ostrich meat; provision of incentives to farmers; and improving the capacity of abattoirs. PMID:18509943

  8. The age of the Taklimakan Desert.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jimin; Liu, Tungsheng

    2006-06-16

    The Taklimakan Desert is located in the foreland basin of the Tibetan Plateau. We report here the results of stratigraphic investigations of a 1626-meter-thick sequence with interbedded wind-blown silt from the southern marginal Taklimakan Desert. Because the studied section is located downwind of the desert, the eolian silt accumulation is closely linked to desert formation. Our new evidence indicates that shifting sand dunes prevailed in the Tarim Basin by at least 5.3 million years ago, as they do today. We attribute this event to late Cenozoic climatic deterioration, as well as to changes in atmospheric circulation induced by Tibetan Plateau uplift. PMID:16778048

  9. Unusual dominance by desert pupfish (Cyprinodon macularius) in experimental ponds within the Salton Sea Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saiki, Michael K.; Martin, Barbara A.; Anderson, Thomas W.

    2011-01-01

    In October 2006, months after shallow experimental ponds in the Salton Sea Basin were filled with water from the Alamo River and Salton Sea, fish were observed in several ponds, although inlets had been screened to exclude fish. During October 2007November 2009, nine surveys were conducted using baited minnow traps to document species and relative abundance of fish. Surveys yielded 3,620 fish representing five species. Desert pupfish (Cyprinodon macularius), the only native species encountered, was the most numerous and comprised >93% of the catch. Nonnative species included western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis, 4.1%), sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna, 2.8%), and tilapia (a mixture of hybrid Mozambique tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus ?? O. urolepis and redbelly tilapia Tilapia zillii, <0.1%). Dominance by desert pupfish, which persisted over our 2 years of study, was unusual because surveys conducted in nearby agricultural drains yielded relatively few desert pupfish.

  10. Seismicity and kinematic evolution of middle Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawy, A.; Abdel-Monem, S. M.; Sakr, K.; Ali, Sh. M.

    2006-08-01

    Based on historical and instrumental seismicity as well as recent GPS measurements, the seismicity and kinematic evaluation of middle Egypt is presented. Middle Egypt suffered in historical times by six major earthquakes and the Ramses II temple on the west bank of the Nile in Luxor, was almost destroyed by an ancient event. The temporal distribution of recent earthquakes (1900-1997) is highly scattered with only nine events recorded. Only after the installation of the modern Egyptian national seismograph network (ENSN) the seismic record of middle Egypt increased with a total of 280 earthquakes from 1998 to 2004. Focal mechanism solutions of the largest five events during the ENSN's operation period reveal reverse faulting mechanism with minor strike-slip component on the west bank of the Nile, while a normal faulting mechanism dominate in the eastern side. The orientations of both P- and T-axes are consistent with the Red Sea-Gulf of Suez stress field. Dynamic source parameters of these five events were derived from P-wave spectra as well. Three campaigns of GPS measurements were carried out for the middle Egypt network that established after the first instrumental earthquake on 14 December 1998 in this area. The velocity vectors for each epoch of observations were calculated and deformation analysis was performed. The horizontal velocity varies between 1 and 4 mm/year across the network. The deformation pattern suggests significant contraction across the southeastern sector of the study area while, the northwestern part is characterized by an extension strain rates. High shear strain is observed along the epicenteral area of the Mw = 4.0 June 2003 earthquake possibly reflecting the stress accumulation stage of a seismic cycle.

  11. Lyme borreliosis: A neglected zoonosis in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Elhelw, Rehab A; El-Enbaawy, Mona I; Samir, Ahmed

    2014-12-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causal organism of Lyme borreliosis. In Egypt, available data about the occurrence of Lyme disease are scarce and no structured studies documented the presence of Lyme borreliosis in Egyptian animals and tick reservoirs verifying its zoonotic evidence. Besides, no successful trials to isolate B. burgdorferi from clinical samples have occurred. This study was conducted to investigate B. burgdorferi infection as an emerging zoonosis neglected in Egypt. A total number of 92 animals, tick and human companion specimens were collected and subjected for culture, PCR and/or serodetection. B. burgdorferi has been detected and isolated from Egyptian animal breeds. We also detected the presence of outer surface protein A gene of B. burgdorferi by PCR as well as anti-B. burgdorferi IgM by ELISA in human contacts who were suffering from fever of unknown origin. This report represents the first systematic study on animals associated with patients suffering from febrile illness to confirm the emerging of such neglected zoonosis in Egypt. PMID:25239124

  12. Integrated Human Futures Modeling in Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Passell, Howard D.; Aamir, Munaf Syed; Bernard, Michael Lewis; Beyeler, Walter E.; Fellner, Karen Marie; Hayden, Nancy Kay; Jeffers, Robert Fredric; Keller, Elizabeth James Kistin; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Mitchell, Michael David; Silver, Emily; Tidwell, Vincent C.; Villa, Daniel; Vugrin, Eric D.; Engelke, Peter; Burrow, Mat; Keith, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    The Integrated Human Futures Project provides a set of analytical and quantitative modeling and simulation tools that help explore the links among human social, economic, and ecological conditions, human resilience, conflict, and peace, and allows users to simulate tradeoffs and consequences associated with different future development and mitigation scenarios. In the current study, we integrate five distinct modeling platforms to simulate the potential risk of social unrest in Egypt resulting from the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) on the Blue Nile in Ethiopia. The five platforms simulate hydrology, agriculture, economy, human ecology, and human psychology/behavior, and show how impacts derived from development initiatives in one sector (e.g., hydrology) might ripple through to affect other sectors and how development and security concerns may be triggered across the region. This approach evaluates potential consequences, intended and unintended, associated with strategic policy actions that span the development-security nexus at the national, regional, and international levels. Model results are not intended to provide explicit predictions, but rather to provide system-level insight for policy makers into the dynamics among these interacting sectors, and to demonstrate an approach to evaluating short- and long-term policy trade-offs across different policy domains and stakeholders. The GERD project is critical to government-planned development efforts in Ethiopia but is expected to reduce downstream freshwater availability in the Nile Basin, fueling fears of negative social and economic impacts that could threaten stability and security in Egypt. We tested these hypotheses and came to the following preliminary conclusions. First, the GERD will have an important short-term impact on water availability, food production, and hydropower production in Egypt, depending on the short- term reservoir fill rate. Second, the GERD will have a very small impact on water availability in the Nile Basin over the longer term. Depending on the GERD fill rate, short-term (e.g., within its first 5 years of operation) annual losses in Egyptian food production may peak briefly at 25 percent. Long-term (e.g., 15 to 30 year) cumulative losses in Egypt's food production may be less than 3 percent regardless of the fill rate, with the GERD having essentially no impact on projected annual food production in Egypt about 25 years after opening. For the quick fill rates, the short-term losses may be sufficient to create an important decrease in overall household health among the general population, which, along with other economic stressors and different strategies employed by the government, could lead to social unrest. Third, and perhaps most importantly, our modeling suggests that the GERD's effect on Egypt's food and water resources is small when compared to the effect of projected Egyptian population and economic growth (and the concomitant increase in water consumption). The latter dominating factors are exacerbated in the modeling by natural climate variability and may be further exacerbated by climate change. Our modeling suggests that these growth dynamics combine to create long-term water scarcity in Egypt, regardless of the Ethiopian project. All else being equal, filling strategies that employ slow fill rates for the GERD (e.g., 8 to 13 years) may mitigate the risks in future scenarios for Egypt somewhat, but no policy or action regarding the GERD is likely to significantly alleviate the projected water scarcity in Egypt's Nile Basin. However, general beliefs among the Egyptian populace regarding the GERD as a major contributing factor for scarcities in Egypt could make Ethiopia a scapegoat for Egyptian grievances -- contributing to social unrest in Egypt and generating undesirable (and unnecessary) tension between these two countries. Such tension could threaten the constructive relationships between Egypt and Ethiopia that are vital to maintaining stability and security within and between their respective regional spheres of influence, Middle East and North Africa, and the Horn of Africa.

  13. Sea Breezes over the Red Sea: Affect of topography and interaction with Desert Convective Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Basit A.; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Abualnaja, Yasser

    2014-05-01

    Thermodynamic structure of sea-breeze, its interaction with coastal mountains, desert plateau and desert convective boundary layer have been investigated in the middle region of the Red Sea around 25N, at the Western coast of Saudi Arabia. Sea and land breeze is a common meteorological phenomenon in most of the coastal regions around the world. Sea-Breeze effects the local meteorology and cause changes in wind speed, direction, cloud cover and sometimes precipitation. The occurrence of sea-breeze, its intensity and landward propagation are important for wind energy resource assessment, load forecasting for existing wind farms, air pollution, marine and aviation applications. The thermally induced mesoscale circulation of sea breeze modifies the desert Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) by forming Convective Internal Boundary Layer (CIBL), and propagates inland as a density current. The leading edge of the denser marine air rapidly moves inland undercutting the hot and dry desert air mass. The warm air lifts up along the frontal boundary and if contains enough moisture a band of clouds is formed along the sea breeze front (SBF). This study focuses on the thermodynamic structure of sea-breeze as it propagates over coastal rocky mountain range of Al-Sarawat, east of the Red Sea coast, and the desert plateau across the mountain range. Additional effects of topographical gaps such as Tokar gap on the dynamics of sea-land breezes have also been discussed. Interaction of SBF with the desert convective boundary layer provide extra lifting that could further enhance the convective instability along the frontal boundary. This study provides a detailed analysis of the thermodynamics of interaction of the SBF and convective internal boundary layer over the desert. Observational data from a buoy and meteorological stations have been utilized while The Advanced Research WRF (ARW) modeling system has been employed in real and 2D idealized configuration.

  14. Characterization of the Sonoran desert as a radiometric calibration target for Earth observing sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Angal, Amit; Chander, Gyanesh; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Choi, Tae-young; Wu, Aisheng

    2011-01-01

    To provide highly accurate quantitative measurements of the Earth's surface, a comprehensive calibration and validation of the satellite sensors is required. The NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Characterization Support Team, in collaboration with United States Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation and Science Center, has previously demonstrated the use of African desert sites to monitor the long-term calibration stability of Terra MODIS and Landsat 7 (L7) Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+). The current study focuses on evaluating the suitability of the Sonoran Desert test site for post-launch long-term radiometric calibration as well as cross-calibration purposes. Due to the lack of historical and on-going in situ ground measurements, the Sonoran Desert is not usually used for absolute calibration. An in-depth evaluation (spatial, temporal, and spectral stability) of this site using well calibrated L7 ETM+ measurements and local climatology data has been performed. The Sonoran Desert site produced spatial variability of about 3 to 5% in the reflective solar regions, and the temporal variations of the site after correction for view-geometry impacts were generally around 3%. The results demonstrate that, barring the impacts due to occasional precipitation, the Sonoran Desert site can be effectively used for cross-calibration and long-term stability monitoring of satellite sensors, thus, providing a good test site in the western hemisphere.

  15. 77 FR 33439 - Trade Mission to Egypt and Kuwait

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ... government authorities that can address questions about policies, tariff rates, incentives, grid... Arab country with a population of 90 million, Egypt is the fourth largest export market for U.S. products and services in the Middle East. The United States is Egypt's largest bilateral trading...

  16. 78 FR 7752 - Trade Mission to Egypt and Kuwait

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... Trade Mission to Egypt and Kuwait March 10-14, 2013, published at 77 FR 71777, December 4, 2012, to... Administration, U.S. and Foreign Commercial Service is organizing a Trade Mission to Cairo, Egypt to explore... Eastern markets. Meetings will be offered with government authorities that can address questions...

  17. Resource Unit on Egypt for the Intermediate Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Husbands, Kenneth; Taylor, Bob

    Resources for teaching about modern and ancient Egypt are provided in this guide for intermediate grade social studies teachers. Material includes: a detailed outline for a unit on Egypt which contains a geographic overview followed by sections on the Nile River Valley, agriculture, the pharaohs, religion, architecture, science, hieroglyphics,

  18. Power and Gender in Ancient Egypt: The Case of Hatshepsut

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilliard, Kristina; Wurtzel, Kate

    2009-01-01

    Hatshepsut (1479-1458 B.C.E) ruled New Kingdom Egypt for roughly 20 years as one of the few female pharaohs in the history of ancient Egypt. Her rule began when her husband died and her stepson was too young to be pharaoh. To legitimize her role as pharaoh, Hatshepsut began a significant building campaign by constructing numerous images, temples,

  19. Separate but Equal: Segregated Religious Education in Egypt's Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaac, John

    2012-01-01

    The Arab Spring exposed the hidden secrets of Egyptian society to the global community. In spite of the insatiable media attention paid to the Mubarak regime and the toll it took on the entire country, Egypt's education system received little attention. For decades, Egypt's public schools have forced students to attend segregated classes, based on

  20. A SURVEY OF CYST NEMATODES (HETERODERA SPP.) IN NORTHERN EGYPT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Information concerning the occurrence and distribution of cyst nematodes (Heterodera spp.) in Egypt is important to assess their potential to cause economic damage to crop plants. A nematode survey was conducted in Alexandria and El-Behera Governorates in northern Egypt to identify the species of cy...

  1. Resource Unit on Egypt for the Intermediate Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Husbands, Kenneth; Taylor, Bob

    Resources for teaching about modern and ancient Egypt are provided in this guide for intermediate grade social studies teachers. Material includes: a detailed outline for a unit on Egypt which contains a geographic overview followed by sections on the Nile River Valley, agriculture, the pharaohs, religion, architecture, science, hieroglyphics,…

  2. Integrate the Arts. The Art of Ancient Egypt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parks, Mary

    1996-01-01

    Presents three art projects that can bring to life the study of ancient Egypt for elementary students. After researching Egypt's history and culture, students can create King Tut masks, make Cleopatra headdresses, and craft cartouche pendants. The article describes the materials needed and steps required to complete each project. (SM)

  3. Tech Talk for Social Studies Teachers: Ancient Egypt.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pahl, Ronald H.

    1998-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of 10 Web sites concerning ancient Egypt that have materials appropriate for social studies classes. Includes virtual tours of Egypt and specific temples, explorations of the pyramids, archaeological and geographic information, and information on the Egyptian "Book of the Dead." (MJP)

  4. Power and Gender in Ancient Egypt: The Case of Hatshepsut

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilliard, Kristina; Wurtzel, Kate

    2009-01-01

    Hatshepsut (1479-1458 B.C.E) ruled New Kingdom Egypt for roughly 20 years as one of the few female pharaohs in the history of ancient Egypt. Her rule began when her husband died and her stepson was too young to be pharaoh. To legitimize her role as pharaoh, Hatshepsut began a significant building campaign by constructing numerous images, temples,…

  5. Separate but Equal: Segregated Religious Education in Egypt's Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaac, John

    2012-01-01

    The Arab Spring exposed the hidden secrets of Egyptian society to the global community. In spite of the insatiable media attention paid to the Mubarak regime and the toll it took on the entire country, Egypt's education system received little attention. For decades, Egypt's public schools have forced students to attend segregated classes, based on…

  6. Notes from the Great American Desert

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Marilyn L.; LaCost, Barbara Y.

    2005-01-01

    In the good old days, the state that is Nebraska was identified as part of the Great American Desert. In many ways, in climate and terrain, it still bears a resemblance to a desert. As a frontier or a land of pioneers, it deserves recognition. Invisibility may be one of the greatest challenges women face. One of the great flaws in the writing of…

  7. On carbon sequestration in desert ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlesinger, W.H.; Belnap, J.; Marion, G.

    2009-01-01

    Recent reports of net ecosysytem production >100 g C m-2 yr-1 in deserts are incompatible with existing measurements of net primary production and carbon pools in deserts. The comparisions suggest that gas exchange measurements should be used with caution and better validation if they are expected to indicate the magnitude of carbon sink in these ecosysytems. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing.

  8. ECOLOGY OF DESERT SYSTEMS BOOK REVIEW

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 12 chapters of Whitford's book, Ecology of Desert Systems, summarize the comprehensive experiences and knowledge of a scientist with an extensive research background on a wide variety of physical and biological aspects of desert ecology. The author illustrates facts and concepts presented in th...

  9. Notes from the Great American Desert

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Marilyn L.; LaCost, Barbara Y.

    2005-01-01

    In the good old days, the state that is Nebraska was identified as part of the Great American Desert. In many ways, in climate and terrain, it still bears a resemblance to a desert. As a frontier or a land of pioneers, it deserves recognition. Invisibility may be one of the greatest challenges women face. One of the great flaws in the writing of

  10. Magnetic Analysis Techniques Applied to Desert Varnish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidgall, E. R.; Moskowitz, B. M.; Dahlberg, E. D.; Kuhlman, K. R.

    2003-01-01

    Desert varnish is a black or reddish coating commonly found on rock samples from arid regions. Typically, the coating is very thin, less than half a millimeter thick. Previous research has shown that the primary components of desert varnish are silicon oxide clay minerals (60%), manganese and iron oxides (20-30%), and trace amounts of other compounds [1]. Desert varnish is thought to originate when windborne particles containing iron and manganese oxides are deposited onto rock surfaces where manganese oxidizing bacteria concentrate the manganese and form the varnish [4,5]. If desert varnish is indeed biogenic, then the presence of desert varnish on rock surfaces could serve as a biomarker, indicating the presence of microorganisms. This idea has considerable appeal, especially for Martian exploration [6]. Magnetic analysis techniques have not been extensively applied to desert varnish. The only previous magnetic study reported that based on room temperature demagnetization experiments, there were noticeable differences in magnetic properties between a sample of desert varnish and the substrate sandstone [7]. Based upon the results of the demagnetization experiments, the authors concluded that the primary magnetic component of desert varnish was either magnetite (Fe3O4) or maghemite ( Fe2O3).

  11. Desert Amplification of Greenhouse Gas Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, K. H.

    2013-12-01

    Surface temperatures over the Sahara and Arabian Deserts are increasing at a rate that is 3.5 times that of the global mean. These regions have warmed by 1.4 K between 1980 and 2012. In the tropical (and global) mean, added energy incident at the surface due to increased concentrations of greenhouse gases is used partly to increase the surface temperature, and partly to evaporate water. The resulting atmospheric water vapor anomaly is effectively mixed vertically and horizontally throughout the tropics on annual time scales, and amplifies the greenhouse effect (increased longwave back radiation to the surface) everywhere, including over the deserts. But, on the desert surface, evaporative cooling is disabled and the enhanced longwave energy incident on the surface serves only to increase surface temperature. Despite the fact that this desert amplification mechanism should operate over any dry surface, the other deserts of the world are not exhibiting accelerated warming. Each of these deserts is smaller than the Sahara/Arabian Desert area, and various regional processes dominate over the desert amplification mechanism.

  12. Western Skink

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The Western skink (Plestiodon skiltonianus) is a relatively common and widespread lizard in Southern California. It is more secretive and prefers more grassy habitat than the Western fence lizard or the side-blotched lizard, yet USGS and National Park Service biologists are finding signs of genetic ...

  13. African Historical Religions: A Conceptual and Ethnical Foundation for "Western Religions."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, E. Curtis

    This paper attempts to set the record straight with regard to the following assumptions: (1) the Africans of the antiquities of Ethiopia and Egypt were black people; and (2) the same black people developed the foundation that provides the basis for the so-called major Western religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. There are two parts to

  14. PHYLOGEOGRAPHY OF BUFO PUNCTATUS: LONG TERM EVOLUTION WITHIN THE WARM DESERTS OF NORTH AMERICA AND LATE QUATERNARY RANGE SHIFTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bufo punctatus, the red-spotted toad, is a widespread anuran of the warm-desert regions of western North America. This distribution makes this species ideal for evaluating biotic response to geotectonically and climatically mediated episodes of landscape transformation (e.g., ear...

  15. First Ladies' Symposium on Early Childhood in Egypt (Cairo, Egypt, May 21, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Gara, Chloe

    This document is comprised of the papers presented at the First Ladies' Symposium on Early Childhood in Egypt in May 2001. Participating in the symposium were representatives from the World Bank, the Amsterdam Institute for International Development, the Children's Project, and the Academy for Educational Development. The symposium opened with an…

  16. Seed polymorphism in two western Nevada Indian ricegrass communities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Indian ricegrass (Achnatherum hymenoides) is a dominant perennial grass species in salt desert communities and lower elevations of the sagebrush (Artemisia) vegetation zone of western North America. This perennial bunchgrass reaches its heaviest densities on sandy soils and is an important winter f...

  17. Indirect determination of broadband turbidity coefficients over Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Metwally, Mossad

    2013-01-01

    Long-term data from diffuse and global irradiances were used to calculate direct beam irradiance which was used to determine three atmospheric turbidity coefficients (Linke T L , ngstrm ? and Unsworth-Monteith ? a ) at seven sites in Egypt in the period from 1981 to 2000. Seven study sites (Barrani, Matruh, Arish, Cairo, Asyut, Aswan and Kharga) have been divided into three categories: Mediterranean climate (MC), desert Nile climate (DNC) and urban climate (UC, Cairo). The indirect method (i.e., global irradiance minus diffuse irradiance) used here allows to estimate the turbidity coefficients with an RMSE% ?20 % (for ?, ? a and T L ) and ~30 % (for ?) if compared with those estimated by direct beam irradiance and sunphotometeric data, respectively. Monthly averages of T L , ? and ? a show seasonal variations with mainly maxima in spring at all stations, due to Khamsin depressions coming from Sahara. Secondary maxima is observed in summer and autumn at DNC and MC (Barrani and Arish) stations in summer due to dust haze which prevails during that season and at UC (Cairo) in autumn, due to the northern extension of the Sudan monsoon trough, which is accompanied by small-scale depressions with dust particles. The mean annual values of ?, ? a , and T L (0.216, 0.314, and 4.6, respectively) are larger in Cairo than at MC stations (0.146, 0.216, and 3.8, respectively) and DNC stations (0.153, 0.227, and 3.8, respectively). Both El-Chichon and Mt. Pinatubo eruptions were examined for all records data at MC, UC and DNC stations. The overburden caused by Mt. Pinatubo's eruption was larger than El-Chichon's eruption and overburden for ?, and T L at DNC stations (0.06, and 0.58 units, respectively) was more pronounced than that at MC (0.02, and 0.26, respectively) and UC (0.05 and 0.52 units, respectively) stations. The annual variations in wind speed and turbidity parameters show high values for both low and high wind speed at all stations. The wind directions have a clear effect on atmospheric turbidity, and consequently, largest turbidities occur when the wind carries aerosols from the main particle sources, such as industrial particle sources around Cairo or to some extent from the Sahara surrounding all study stations.

  18. Perceived night length ratios in ancient Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fermor, John

    The first record we have of a seasonal night length ratio for Egypt is from the mid 16th century BC. The origin of this estimate is traced to observations made three centuries previously, and the later reinterpretation and instrumental use of this ratio is traced down to 100AD. Extended comment is made on the astronomical dating involved in this description of events, and an attempt is made to reconstruct the alleged confirmation (or calibration) of the new timepiece that plays a central part in the story. It is believed that this is the earliest example of this fundamental scientific practice on record.

  19. Photovoltaics: alternative energy opportunities in Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Gadomski, C.R.

    1987-10-01

    Government subsidies for electricity have discouraged the growth of an alternative energy market, but economic problems and high utility bills are changing the market as the demand for electricity expands. Although the past five-year plan only called for five percent of Egypt's energy to come from renewable sources, the development of solar power plants, wind power, and resource recovery could raise that to seven percent. Planners are looking to joint ventures and technology transfers to get the stagnant alternative energy industry moving. 2 figures.

  20. 75 FR 57761 - Desert Southwest Power, LLC; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Desert Southwest Power, LLC; Notice of Filing September 14, 2010. Take notice that on September 10, 2010, Desert Southwest Power, LLC (Desert Southwest) filed responses to the... Commission's July 28, 2010 letter regarding Desert Southwest's petition for declaratory order...

  1. Thermal and water relations of desert beetles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cloudsley-Thompson, J.

    2001-11-01

    The physical problems that living organisms have to contend with in hot deserts are primarily extremes of temperature, low humidity, shortage or absence of free water, and the environmental factors that accentuate these - such as strong winds, sand-storms, lack of shade, rocky and impenetrable soils. Climatic factors are particularly important to smaller animals such as arthropods on account of their relatively enormous surface to volume ratios. Nevertheless, beetles (especially Tenebrionidae and, to a lesser extent, Chrysomelidae) are among the most successful animals of the desert, and are often the only ones to be seen abroad during the day. Similar physical problems are experienced by insects in all terrestrial biomes, but they are much enhanced in the desert. Although climatic extremes are often avoided by burrowing habits coupled with circadian and seasonal activity rhythms, as well as reproductive phenology, several species of desert beetle are nevertheless able to withstand thermal extremes that would rapidly cause the death of most other arthropods including insects. The reactions of desert beetles to heat are largely behavioural whilst their responses to water shortage are primarily physiological. The effects of coloration are not discussed. In addition to markedly low rates of transpiration, desert beetles can also withstand a considerable reduction in the water content of their tissues. The study of desert beetles is important because it illustrates many of the solutions evolved by arthropods to the problems engendered, in an extreme form, by life in all terrestrial environments.

  2. Multi-scale forcing and the formation of subtropical desert and monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, G. X.; Liu, Y.; Zhu, X.; Li, W.; Ren, R.; Duan, A.; Liang, X.

    2009-09-01

    This study investigates three types of atmospheric forcing across the summertime subtropics that are shown to contribute in various ways to the occurrence of dry and wet climates in the subtropics. To explain the formation of desert over the western parts of continents and monsoon over the eastern parts, we propose a new mechanism of positive feedback between diabatic heating and vorticity generation that occurs via meridional advection of planetary vorticity and temperature. Monsoon and desert are demonstrated to coexist as twin features of multi-scale forcing, as follows. First, continent-scale heating over land and cooling over ocean induce the ascent of air over the eastern parts of continents and western parts of oceans, and descent over eastern parts of oceans and western parts of continents. Second, local-scale sea-breeze forcing along coastal regions enhances air descent over eastern parts of oceans and ascent over eastern parts of continents. This leads to the formation of the well-defined summertime subtropical LOSECOD quadruplet-heating pattern across each continent and adjacent oceans, with long-wave radiative cooling (LO) over eastern parts of oceans, sensible heating (SE) over western parts of continents, condensation heating (CO) over eastern parts of continents, and double dominant heating (D: LO+CO) over western parts of oceans. Such a quadruplet heating pattern corresponds to a dry climate over the western parts of continents and a wet climate over eastern parts. Third, regional-scale orographic-uplift-heating generates poleward ascending flow to the east of orography and equatorward descending flow to the west. The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is located over the eastern Eurasian continent. The TP-forced circulation pattern is in phase with that produced by continental-scale forcing, and the strongest monsoon and largest deserts are formed over the Afro-Eurasian Continent. In contrast, the Rockies and the Andes are located over the western parts of their respective continents, and orography-induced ascent is separated from ascent due to continental-scale forcing. Accordingly, the deserts and monsoon climate over these continents are not as strongly developed as those over the Eurasian Continent. A new mechanism of positive feedback between diabatic heating and vorticity generation, which occurs via meridional transfer of heat and planetary vorticity, is proposed as a means of explaining the formation of subtropical desert and monsoon. Strong low-level longwave radiative cooling over eastern parts of oceans and strong surface sensible heating on western parts of continents generate negative vorticity that is balanced by positive planetary vorticity advection from high latitudes. The equatorward flow generated over eastern parts of oceans produces cold sea-surface temperature and stable stratification, leading in turn to the formation of low stratus clouds and the maintenance of strong in situ longwave radiative cooling. The equatorward flow over western parts of continents carries cold, dry air, thereby enhancing local sensible heating as well as moisture release from the underlying soil. These factors result in a dry desert climate. Over the eastern parts of continents, condensation heating generates positive vorticity in the lower troposphere, which is balanced by negative planetary vorticity advection of the meridional flow from low latitudes. The flow brings warm and moist air, thereby enhancing local convective instability and condensation heating associated with rainfall. These factors produce a wet monsoonal climate. Overall, our results demonstrate that subtropical desert and monsoon coexist as a consequence of multi-scale forcing along the subtropics.

  3. Diversity and Community Composition of Vertebrates in Desert River Habitats.

    PubMed

    Free, C L; Baxter, G S; Dickman, C R; Lisle, A; Leung, L K-P

    2015-01-01

    Animal species are seldom distributed evenly at either local or larger spatial scales, and instead tend to aggregate in sites that meet their resource requirements and maximise fitness. This tendency is likely to be especially marked in arid regions where species could be expected to concentrate at resource-rich oases. In this study, we first test the hypothesis that productive riparian sites in arid Australia support higher vertebrate diversity than other desert habitats, and then elucidate the habitats selected by different species. We addressed the first aim by examining the diversity and composition of vertebrate assemblages inhabiting the Field River and adjacent sand dunes in the Simpson Desert, western Queensland, over a period of two and a half years. The second aim was addressed by examining species composition in riparian and sand dune habitats in dry and wet years. Vertebrate species richness was estimated to be highest (54 species) in the riverine habitats and lowest on the surrounding dune habitats (45 species). The riverine habitats had different species pools compared to the dune habitats. Several species, including the agamid Gowidon longirostris and tree frog Litoria rubella, inhabited the riverine habitats exclusively, while others such as the skinks Ctenotus ariadnae and C. dux were captured only in the dune habitats. The results suggest that, on a local scale, diversity is higher along riparian corridors and that riparian woodland is important for tree-dependent species. Further, the distribution of some species, such as Mus musculus, may be governed by environmental variables (e.g. soil moisture) associated with riparian corridors that are not available in the surrounding desert environment. We conclude that inland river systems may be often of high conservation value, and that management should be initiated where possible to alleviate threats to their continued functioning. PMID:26637127

  4. Diversity and Community Composition of Vertebrates in Desert River Habitats

    PubMed Central

    Free, C. L.; Baxter, G. S.; Dickman, C. R.; Lisle, A.; Leung, L. K.-P.

    2015-01-01

    Animal species are seldom distributed evenly at either local or larger spatial scales, and instead tend to aggregate in sites that meet their resource requirements and maximise fitness. This tendency is likely to be especially marked in arid regions where species could be expected to concentrate at resource-rich oases. In this study, we first test the hypothesis that productive riparian sites in arid Australia support higher vertebrate diversity than other desert habitats, and then elucidate the habitats selected by different species. We addressed the first aim by examining the diversity and composition of vertebrate assemblages inhabiting the Field River and adjacent sand dunes in the Simpson Desert, western Queensland, over a period of two and a half years. The second aim was addressed by examining species composition in riparian and sand dune habitats in dry and wet years. Vertebrate species richness was estimated to be highest (54 species) in the riverine habitats and lowest on the surrounding dune habitats (45 species). The riverine habitats had different species pools compared to the dune habitats. Several species, including the agamid Gowidon longirostris and tree frog Litoria rubella, inhabited the riverine habitats exclusively, while others such as the skinks Ctenotus ariadnae and C. dux were captured only in the dune habitats. The results suggest that, on a local scale, diversity is higher along riparian corridors and that riparian woodland is important for tree-dependent species. Further, the distribution of some species, such as Mus musculus, may be governed by environmental variables (e.g. soil moisture) associated with riparian corridors that are not available in the surrounding desert environment. We conclude that inland river systems may be often of high conservation value, and that management should be initiated where possible to alleviate threats to their continued functioning. PMID:26637127

  5. Effects of desert wildfires on desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) and other small vertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Esque, T.C.; Schwalbe, C.R.; DeFalco, L.A.; Duncan, R.B.; Hughes, T.J.

    2003-01-01

    We report the results of standardized surveys to determine the effects of wildfires on desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) and their habitats in the northeastern Mojave Desert and northeastern Sonoran Desert. Portions of 6 burned areas (118 to 1,750 ha) were examined for signs of mortality of vertebrates. Direct effects of fire in desert habitats included animal mortality and loss of vegetation cover. A range of 0 to 7 tortoises was encountered during surveys, and live tortoises were found on all transects. In addition to desert tortoises, only small (<1 kg) mammals and reptiles (11 taxa) were found dead on the study areas. We hypothesize that indirect effects of fire on desert habitats might result in changes in the composition of diets and loss of vegetation cover, resulting in an increase in predation and loss of protection from temperature extremes. These changes in habitat also might cause changes in vertebrate communities in burned areas.

  6. Microphytic crusts: 'topsoil' of the desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belnap, Jayne

    1990-01-01

    Deserts throughout the world are the home of microphytic, or cryptogamic, crusts. These crusts are dominated by cyanobacteria, previously called blue-green algae, and also include lichens, mosses, green algae, microfungi and bacteria. They are critical components of desert ecosystems, significantly modifying the surfaces on which they occur. In the cold deserts of the Colorado Plateau (including parts of Utah, Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico), these crusts are extraordinarily well-developed, and may represent 70-80% of the living ground cover.

  7. Comparisons of diazotrophic communities in native and agricultural desert ecosystems reveal plants as important drivers in diversity

    PubMed Central

    Köberl, Martina; Erlacher, Armin; Ramadan, Elshahat M.; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Müller, Henry; Bragina, Anastasia; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Diazotrophs provide the only biological source of fixed atmospheric nitrogen in the biosphere. Although they are the key player for plant-available nitrogen, less is known about their diversity and potential importance in arid ecosystems. We investigated the nitrogenase gene diversity in native and agricultural desert soil as well as within root-associated microbiota of medicinal plants grown in Egypt through the combination of nifH-specific qPCR, fingerprints, amplicon pyrosequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization–confocal laser scanning microscopy. Although the diazotrophic microbiota were characterized by generally high abundances and diversity, statistically significant differences were found between both soils, the different microhabitats, and between the investigated plants (Matricaria chamomilla L., Calendula officinalis L. and Solanum distichum Schumach. and Thonn.). We observed a considerable community shift from desert to agriculturally used soil that demonstrated a higher abundance and diversity in the agro-ecosystem. The endorhiza was characterized by lower abundances and only a subset of species when compared to the rhizosphere. While the microbiomes of the Asteraceae were similar and dominated by potential root-nodulating rhizobia acquired primarily from soil, the perennial S. distichum generally formed associations with free-living nitrogen fixers. These results underline the importance of diazotrophs in desert ecosystems and additionally identify plants as important drivers in functional gene pool diversity. PMID:26705571

  8. Comparisons of diazotrophic communities in native and agricultural desert ecosystems reveal plants as important drivers in diversity.

    PubMed

    Köberl, Martina; Erlacher, Armin; Ramadan, Elshahat M; El-Arabi, Tarek F; Müller, Henry; Bragina, Anastasia; Berg, Gabriele

    2016-02-01

    Diazotrophs provide the only biological source of fixed atmospheric nitrogen in the biosphere. Although they are the key player for plant-available nitrogen, less is known about their diversity and potential importance in arid ecosystems. We investigated the nitrogenase gene diversity in native and agricultural desert soil as well as within root-associated microbiota of medicinal plants grown in Egypt through the combination of nifH-specific qPCR, fingerprints, amplicon pyrosequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization-confocal laser scanning microscopy. Although the diazotrophic microbiota were characterized by generally high abundances and diversity, statistically significant differences were found between both soils, the different microhabitats, and between the investigated plants (Matricaria chamomilla L., Calendula officinalis L. and Solanum distichum Schumach. and Thonn.). We observed a considerable community shift from desert to agriculturally used soil that demonstrated a higher abundance and diversity in the agro-ecosystem. The endorhiza was characterized by lower abundances and only a subset of species when compared to the rhizosphere. While the microbiomes of the Asteraceae were similar and dominated by potential root-nodulating rhizobia acquired primarily from soil, the perennial S. distichum generally formed associations with free-living nitrogen fixers. These results underline the importance of diazotrophs in desert ecosystems and additionally identify plants as important drivers in functional gene pool diversity. PMID:26705571

  9. Hidden carbon sink beneath desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Wang, Yu-Gang; Houghton, R. A.; Tang, Li-Song

    2015-07-01

    For decades, global carbon budget accounting has identified a "missing" or "residual" terrestrial sink; i.e., carbon dioxide (CO2) released by anthropogenic activities does not match changes observed in the atmosphere and ocean. We discovered a potentially large carbon sink in the most unlikely place on earth, irrigated saline/alkaline arid land. When cultivating and irrigating arid/saline lands in arid zones, salts are leached downward. Simultaneously, dissolved inorganic carbon is washed down into the huge saline aquifers underneath vast deserts, forming a large carbon sink or pool. This finding points to a direct, rapid link between the biological and geochemical carbon cycles in arid lands which may alter the overall spatial pattern of the global carbon budget.

  10. Desert Dust and Monsoon Rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2014-01-01

    For centuries, inhabitants of the Indian subcontinent have know that heavy dust events brought on by strong winds occur frequently in the pre-monsoon season, before the onset of heavy rain. Yet scientists have never seriously considered the possibility that natural dust can affect monsoon rainfall. Up to now, most studies of the impacts of aerosols on Indian monsoon rainfall have focused on anthropogenic aerosols in the context of climate change. However, a few recent studies have show that aerosols from antropogenic and natural sources over the Indian subcontinent may affect the transition from break to active monsoon phases on short timescales of days to weeks. Writing in Nature Geoscience, Vinoj and colleagues describe how they have shown that desert dust aerosols over the Arabian Sea and West Asia can strenghten the summer monsoon over the Indial subcontinent in a matter of days.

  11. Libyan Desert Glass: New field and Fourier transform infrared data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frhlich, F.; Poupeau, G.; Badou, A.; Le Bourdonnec, F. X.; Sacquin, Y.; Dubernet, S.; Bardintzeff, J. M.; Vran, M.; Smith, D. C.; Diemer, E.

    2013-12-01

    Results are presented of new geological observations and laboratory analyses on Libyan Desert Glass (LDG), a unique kind of impact glass found in Egypt, probably 28.5-29.4 million years in age. A new LDG occurrence has been discovered some 50 km southward of the main LDG occurrences in the Great Sand Sea. From Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis, the molecular structure of LDG is refined and significant differences are shown between LDG specimens and other pure silica glasses (fulgurite, industrial fused quartz, and amorphous biogenic silica) that are related to differences in their structures. The slight variations observed here for the mean Si-O-Si angle between the different glasses are attributed to their thermal histories. With regard to the other glasses analyzed, the LDG infrared spectral parameters point to a higher ratio of discontinuities and defects in the tetrahedral (SiO4) network. The quantitative mineralogical constitutions of sandstones and quartzites from the LDG geological setting were analyzed by FTIR. Cretaceous sandstones have a specific composition (about 90 wt% quartz, 10% dickite), clearly different from the Paleozoic ones (about 90 wt% quartz, but ?7% kaolinite). It is shown that the reddish silts bearing the LDG are constituted mainly of microquartz enriched with dickite, whose particle size distribution is characteristic of fluvio-lacustrine deposits, probably Oligocene to Miocene in age. The target rocks, most probably quartz sand, resulted from the weathering (loss of the cementing microquartz) of the Cretaceous sandstones from the Gilf Khebir Plateau with deposition in a high-energy environment.

  12. Desert Dust Satellite Retrieval Intercomparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carboni, E.; Thomas, G. E.; Sayer, A. M.; Siddans, R.; Poulsen, C. A.; Grainger, R. G.; Ahn, C.; Antoine, D.; Bevan, S.; Braak, R.; Brindley, H.; DeSouza-Mchado, S.; Deuze, J. L.; Diner, D.; Ducos, F.; Grey, W.; Hsu, C.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Kahn, R.; North, P. R. J.; Salustro, C.; Smith, A.; Tanre, D.; Torres, O.; Veihelmann, B.

    2012-01-01

    This work provides a comparison of satellite retrievals of Saharan desert dust aerosol optical depth (AOD) during a strong dust event through March 2006. In this event, a large dust plume was transported over desert, vegetated, and ocean surfaces. The aim is to identify and understand the differences between current algorithms, and hence improve future retrieval algorithms. The satellite instruments considered are AATSR, AIRS, MERIS, MISR, MODIS, OMI, POLDER, and SEVIRI. An interesting aspect is that the different algorithms make use of different instrument characteristics to obtain retrievals over bright surfaces. These include multi-angle approaches (MISR, AATSR), polarisation measurements (POLDER), single-view approaches using solar wavelengths (OMI, MODIS), and the thermal infrared spectral region (SEVIRI, AIRS). Differences between instruments, together with the comparison of different retrieval algorithms applied to measurements from the same instrument, provide a unique insight into the performance and characteristics of the various techniques employed. As well as the intercomparison between different satellite products, the AODs have also been compared to co-located AERONET data. Despite the fact that the agreement between satellite and AERONET AODs is reasonably good for all of the datasets, there are significant differences between them when compared to each other, especially over land. These differences are partially due to differences in the algorithms, such as as20 sumptions about aerosol model and surface properties. However, in this comparison of spatially and temporally averaged data, at least as significant as these differences are sampling issues related to the actual footprint of each instrument on the heterogeneous aerosol field, cloud identification and the quality control flags of each dataset.

  13. Dental health and disease in ancient Egypt.

    PubMed

    Forshaw, R J

    2009-04-25

    In ancient Egypt the exceptionally dry climate together with the unique burial customs has resulted in the survival of large numbers of well-preserved skeletal and mummified remains. Examinations of these remains together with an analysis of the surviving documentary, archaeological and ethnographic evidence has enabled a detailed picture of the dental health of these ancient people to be revealed, perhaps more so than for any other civilisation in antiquity. In this, the first of two articles, the dental pathological conditions that afflicted the ancient Egyptians is considered. The commonest finding is that of tooth wear, which was often so excessive that it resulted in pulpal exposure. Multiple abscesses were frequently seen, but caries was not a significant problem. Overall the findings indicate that the various pathological conditions and non-pathological abnormalities of teeth evident in dentitions in the twenty-first century were also manifest in ancient Egypt, although the incidences of these conditions varies considerably between the civilisations. PMID:19396207

  14. Fascioliasis an increasing zoonotic disease in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Haridy, F M; Ibrahim, B B; Morsy, T A; El-Sharkawy, I M

    1999-01-01

    Fascioliasis is now imposing itself as a zoonotic disease in sheep and cattle raising countries. In Egypt, human fascioliasis is increasing. During the years 1994 to 1997 the overall slaughtered animals in Egyptian abattoirs was 2,003,200 sheep and goats, 2,624,239 cattle and 3,536,744 buffaloes. The overall rates of fascioliasis were 2.02% for sheep and goats, 3.54% for cattle and 1.58% for buffaloes. Macroscopic examination of sheep liver showed up to 100 flukes per liver inside a largely dilated thick walled bile ducts. Cattle liver showed up to 275 flukes per liver inside thickened dilated and calcareous bile ducts with offensive yellowish brown bile. Buffaloes liver showed up to 330 flukes per liver. Microscopic examination showed mainly thickened wall, hyperplasia and marked fibrosis. The discussion focused on the zoonotic importance of fascioliasis in Egypt, diagnosis, treatment and prevention. No doubt, adequate control of fascioliasis is more or less a problem, since it requires the control of snail intermediate host(s) and control of infection in all affected animals and man. PMID:12561881

  15. Water use, productivity and interactions among desert plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ehleringer, J.R.

    1996-09-01

    On the Colorado Plateau, precipitation comes either from winter storms generated in the Gulf of Alaska or from summer convection storms generated by the Arizona monsoon system. Understanding the current seasonal and regional patterns of precipitation inputs into an ecosystem has ramifications at several levels: on carbon and mineral cycling at the ecosystem level, on biodiversity at the community level, and on productivity and adaptation at the po