Science.gov

Sample records for wet granular matter

  1. Equation of state of wet granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fingerle, A.; Herminghaus, S.

    2008-01-01

    An expression for the near-contact pair correlation function of D -dimensional weakly polydisperse hard spheres is presented, which arises from elementary free-volume arguments. Its derivative at contact agrees very well with our simulations for D=2 . For jammed states, the expression predicts that the number of exact contacts is equal to 2D, in agreement with established simulations. When the particles are wetted, they interact by the formation and rupture of liquid capillary bridges. Since formation and rupture events of capillary bonds are well separated in configuration space, the interaction is hysteretic with a characteristic energy loss Ecb . The pair correlation is strongly affected by this capillary interaction depending on the liquid-bond status of neighboring particles. A theory is derived for the nonequilibrium probability currents of the capillary interaction which determines the pair correlation function near contact. This finally yields an analytic expression for the equation of state, P=P(N/V,T) , of wet granular matter for D=2 , valid in the complete density range from gas to jamming. Driven wet granular matter exhibits a van der Waals-like unstable branch at granular temperatures Tgranular droplets reported for the free cooling of one-dimensional wet granular matter [A. Fingerle and S. Herminghaus, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 078001 (2006)], and extends the effect to higher dimensional systems. Since the limiting case of sticky bonds, Ecb≫T , is of relevance for aggregation in general, simulations have been performed which show very good agreement with the theoretically predicted coordination K of capillary bonds as a function of the bond length scrit . This result implies that particles that stick at the surface, scrit=0 , form isostatic clusters. An extension of the theory in which the bridge coordination number K plays the role of a self-consistent mean-field is proposed.

  2. Pattern formation in wet granular matter under vertical vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butzhammer, Lorenz; Völkel, Simeon; Rehberg, Ingo; Huang, Kai

    2015-07-01

    Experiments on a thin layer of cohesive wet granular matter under vertical vibrations reveal kink-separated domains that collide with the container at different phases. Due to the strong cohesion arising from the formation of liquid bridges between adjacent particles, the domains move collectively upon vibrations. Depending on the periodicity of this collective motion, the kink fronts may propagate, couple with each other, and form rotating spiral patterns in the case of period tripling or stay as standing wave patterns in the case of period doubling. Moreover, both patterns may coexist with granular "gas bubbles"—phase separation into a liquidlike and a gaslike state. Stability diagrams for the instabilities measured with various granular layer mass m and container height H are presented. The onsets for both types of patterns and their dependency on m and H can be quantitatively captured with a model considering the granular layer as a single particle colliding completely inelastically with the container.

  3. Pattern formation in wet granular matter under vertical vibrations.

    PubMed

    Butzhammer, Lorenz; Völkel, Simeon; Rehberg, Ingo; Huang, Kai

    2015-07-01

    Experiments on a thin layer of cohesive wet granular matter under vertical vibrations reveal kink-separated domains that collide with the container at different phases. Due to the strong cohesion arising from the formation of liquid bridges between adjacent particles, the domains move collectively upon vibrations. Depending on the periodicity of this collective motion, the kink fronts may propagate, couple with each other, and form rotating spiral patterns in the case of period tripling or stay as standing wave patterns in the case of period doubling. Moreover, both patterns may coexist with granular "gas bubbles"-phase separation into a liquidlike and a gaslike state. Stability diagrams for the instabilities measured with various granular layer mass m and container height H are presented. The onsets for both types of patterns and their dependency on m and H can be quantitatively captured with a model considering the granular layer as a single particle colliding completely inelastically with the container. PMID:26274155

  4. Arrest stress of uniformly sheared wet granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimnazhad Rahbari, S. H.; Brinkmann, M.; Vollmer, J.

    2015-06-01

    We conduct extensive independent numerical experiments considering frictionless disks without internal degrees of freedom (rotation, etc.) in two dimensions. We report here that for a large range of the packing fractions below random-close packing, all components of the stress tensor of wet granular materials remain finite in the limit of zero shear rate. This is direct evidence for a fluid-to-solid arrest transition. The offset value of the shear stress characterizes plastic deformation of the arrested state which corresponds to dynamic yield stress of the system. Based on an analytical line of argument, we propose that the mean number of capillary bridges per particle, ν , follows a nontrivial dependence on the packing fraction, ϕ , and the capillary energy, ɛ . Most noticeably, we show that ν is a generic and universal quantity which does not depend on the driving protocol. Using this universal quantity, we calculate the arrest stress, σa, analytically based on a balance of the energy injection rate due to the external force driving the flow and the dissipation rate accounting for the rupture of capillary bridges. The resulting prediction of σa is a nonlinear function of the packing fraction, ϕ , and the capillary energy, ɛ . This formula provides an excellent, parameter-free prediction of the numerical data. Corrections to the theory for small and large packing fractions are connected to the emergence of shear bands and of contributions to the stress from repulsive particle interactions, respectively.

  5. Foam-film-stabilized liquid bridge networks in evaporative lithography and wet granular matter.

    PubMed

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Marston, Jeremy O; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2013-04-23

    Evaporative lithography using latex particle templates is a novel approach for the self-assembly of suspension-dispersed nanoparticles into ordered microwire networks. The phenomenon that drives the self-assembly process is the propagation of a network of interconnected liquid bridges between the template particles and the underlying substrate. With the aid of video microscopy, we demonstrate that these liquid bridges are in fact the border zone between the underlying substrate and foam films vertical to the substrate, which are formed during the evaporation of the liquid from the suspension. The stability of the foam films and thus the liquid bridge network stability are due to the presence of a small amount of surfactant in the evaporating solution. We show that the same type of foam-film-stabilized liquid bridge network can also propagate in 3D clusters of spherical particles, which has important implications for the understanding of wet granular matter. PMID:23534699

  6. Erosion dynamics of a wet granular medium.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Gautier; Jop, Pierre

    2013-09-01

    Liquid may give strong cohesion properties to a granular medium, and confer a solidlike behavior. We study the erosion of a fixed circular aggregate of wet granular matter subjected to a flow of dry grains inside a half-filled rotating drum. During the rotation, the dry grains flow around the fixed obstacle. We show that its diameter decreases linearly with time for low liquid content, as wet grains are pulled out of the aggregate. This erosion phenomenon is governed by the properties of the liquids. The erosion rate decreases exponentially with the surface tension while it depends on the viscosity to the power -1. We propose a model based on the force fluctuations arising inside the flow, explaining both dependencies: The capillary force acts as a threshold and the viscosity controls the erosion time scale. We also provide experiments using different flowing grains, confirming our model. PMID:24125259

  7. Compaction dynamics of wet granular packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandewalle, Nicolas; Ludewig, Francois; Fiscina, Jorge E.; Lumay, Geoffroy

    2013-03-01

    The extremely slow compaction dynamics of wet granular assemblies has been studied experimentally. The cohesion, due to capillary bridges between neighboring grains, has been tuned using different liquids having specific surface tension values. The characteristic relaxation time for compaction τ grows strongly with cohesion. A kinetic model, based on a free volume kinetic equations and the presence of a capillary energy barrier (due to liquid bridges), is able to reproduce quantitatively the experimental curves. This model allows one to describe the cohesion in wet granular packing. The influence of relative humidity (RH) on the extremely slow compaction dynamics of a granular assembly has also been investigated in the range 20 % - 80 % . Triboelectric and capillary condensation effects have been introduced in the kinetic model. Results confirm the existence of an optimal condition at RH ~ 45 % for minimizing cohesive interactions between glass beads.

  8. Vibrheology of Granular Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijksman, Joshua; Wortel, Geert; van Hecke, Martin

    2009-03-01

    We show how weak agitations substantially modify the rheology of granular materials. We experimentally probe dry granular flows in a weakly vibrated split bottom shear cell -- the weak vibrations act as the agitation source. By tuning the applied stress and vibration strength, and monitoring the resulting strain, we uncover a rich phase diagram in which non-trivial transitions separate a jammed phase, a creep flow case, and a steady flow case.

  9. Entropy of jammed granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briscoe, Christopher

    Granular matter can be considered a non-equilibrium system, such that equilibrium statistics is insufficient to describe the dynamics. A phase transition occurs when granular materials are compressed such that a nonzero stress develops in response to a strain deformation. This transition, referred to as the jamming transition, occurs at a critical volume fraction, φc depending on friction and preparation protocol. Analysis of the jamming transition produces a phase diagram of jammed granular matter for identical spheres, characterized by the critical volume fraction, φc and the average coordination number, Z. The boundaries of the phase diagram are related to well-defined upper and lower limits in the density of disordered packings; random close packing (RCP) and random loose packing (RLP). Frictional systems, such as granular matter, exhibit an inherent path dependency resulting in the loss of energy conservation, an important facet of equilibrium statistics. It has been suggested Edwards that the volume-force (V-F) ensemble, wherein volume replaces energy as the conservative quantity, may provide a sufficient framework to create a statistical ensemble for jammed granular matter. Treating a jammed system via the V-F ensemble introduces an analogue to temperature in equilibrium systems. This analogue, "compactivity", measures how compact a system could be and governs fluctuation in the volume statistics. Randomness in statistical systems is typically characterized by entropy, the equation of state derived from the number of microstates available to the system. In equilibrium statistical mechanics, entropy provides the link between these microstates and the macroscopic thermodynamic properties of the system. Therefore, calculating the entropy within the V-F ensemble can relate the available microscopic volume for each grain to the macroscopic system properties. The entropy is shown to be minimal at RCP and maximal at the minimum RLP limit, via several methods utilizing simulations and theoretical models. Within this framework RCP is achieved in the limit of minimal compactivity and RLP is achieved in the limit of maximal compactivity. The boundaries of a phase diagram for jammed matter could thereby be defined by the limits of zero and infinite compactivities, characterizing the RCP and RLP limits of granular matter.

  10. The physics of dense granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wambaugh, John

    Granular materials range in size from micron-sized pharmaceuticals to mountain-sized asteroids. Despite this great range of scales, certain aspects of their underlying physics are universal. In the case of dense, dry granular materials the physics is dominated by interparticle contacts. Because the mobilization of friction introduces an element of history dependence, the actual state of a granular system is not necessarily apparent without a careful study of how that state came to be. Additionally, the distribution of forces carried by interparticle contacts has been shown to be highly irregular, even for regularly packed grains. In dense granular matter there are large force fluctuations, many times greater than the mean, that are carried long distances over filament-like chains of contacts, forming complicated force networks. Features such as this are due to the non-equilibrium nature of granular matter. Because the influence of temperature is negligible even for micron-sized particles, the smallest push can potentially cause a system-wide avalanche. Since non-equilibrium physics of any type is in its infancy, the study of dense granular matter is an attempt to explore potential approaches to understand any non-equilibrium system. I have adapted experimental and analytic techniques to the exploration of this physics. I have evaluated the applicability of soil mechanics-based continuum approaches to describe the non-linear phenomena of dense granular flows. I have also investigated continuum descriptions of static granular matter under gravity. In both cases, I have examined the influence of large fluctuations on their behavior and in the case of static systems I have proposed describing those fluctuations in the language of percolation theory. I have found that certain regimes exist in which the discrete nature of granular matter can be smoothed over by a continuum description, but more importantly I have found many places where granular phenomena cannot be ignored.

  11. Maximum angle of stability of a wet granular pile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Sarah; Samadani, Azadeh; Kudrolli, Arshad

    2005-10-01

    Anyone who has built a sandcastle recognizes that adding liquid to the sand grains increases the overall stability. However, measurements of the stability in wet granular materials often conflict with theory and with each other. The friction-based Mohr-Coulomb model distinguishes between granular friction and interparticle friction, but uses the former without providing a physical mechanism. A frictionless model for the geometric stability of dry particles on the surface of a pile is in excellent agreement with experiment. However, the same model applied to wet grains overestimates the stability and predicts no dependence on system size. Here we take a frictionless liquid-bridge model and perform a stability analysis within the pile. We reproduce our experimentally observed dependence of the stability angle on system size, particle size and surface tension. Furthermore, we account for past discrepancies in experimental reports by showing that sidewalls can significantly increase the stability of granular material.

  12. Motility of small nematodes in wet granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, G.; Lu, K.; Sznitman, J.; Arratia, P. E.

    2010-11-01

    The motility of the worm nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is investigated in shallow, wet granular media as a function of particle size dispersity and area density (phi). Surprisingly, we find that the nematode's propulsion speed is enhanced by the presence of particles in a fluid and is nearly independent of area density. The undulation speed, often used to differentiate locomotion gaits, is significantly affected by the bulk material properties of wet mono- and polydisperse granular media for phi>=0.55. This difference is characterized by a change in the nematode's waveform from swimming to crawling in dense polydisperse media only. This change highlights the organism's adaptability to subtle differences in local structure and response between monodisperse and polydisperse media.

  13. Characterizing the rheology of fluidized granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmond, Kenneth W.; Villa, Umberto; Newey, Mike; Losert, Wolfgang

    2013-09-01

    In this study we characterize the rheology of fluidized granular matter subject to secondary forcing. Our approach consists of first fluidizing granular matter in a drum half filled with grains via simple rotation and then superimposing oscillatory shear perpendicular to the downhill flow direction. The response of the system is mostly linear, with a phase lag between the grain motion and the oscillatory forcing. The rheology of the system can be well characterized by the GDR MiDi model if the system is forced with slow oscillations. The model breaks down when the forcing time scale becomes comparable to the characteristic time for energy dissipation in the flow.

  14. Smarticles: smart, active granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoie, Will; Pazouki, Arman; Negrut, Dan; Goldman, Daniel

    We investigate a granular medium composed of smart, active particles, or ``smarticles''. Previously, we discovered that ensembles of ``u''-shaped particles exhibited geometrically-induced cohesion by mechanically entangling via particle interpenetration [Gravish et al., PRL, 2012]; the strength and/or extent of entanglement could be varied by changing particle level entanglement by changes in arm-to-base length of the u-particle. Since changing this parameter on demand is inconvenient, we develop a power-autonomous programmable robot composed of two motors and three links with an on-board microcontroller. This smarticle can be activated to change its configuration (specified by its two joint angles) through audio communication. To complement these experiments, since study large ensembles of smarticles is cost and labor prohibitive, we also develop a simulated smarticle in the Chrono multibody simulation environment. We systematically study ensemble cohesiveness and compaction as a function of shape changes of the smarticles. We find that suitable activation of smarticles allows ensembles to become cohesive to ``grip'' rigid objects and lose cohesion to release on command. Work supported by ARO.

  15. Dilute wet granular particles: nonequilibrium dynamics and structure formation.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Stephan; Aspelmeier, Timo; Zippelius, Annette; Roeller, Klaus; Fingerle, Axel; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2009-09-01

    We investigate a gas of wet granular particles covered by a thin liquid film. The dynamic evolution is governed by two-particle interactions, which are mainly due to interfacial forces in contrast to dry granular gases. When two wet grains collide, a capillary bridge is formed and stays intact up to a certain distance of withdrawal when the bridge ruptures, dissipating a fixed amount of energy. A freely cooling system is shown to undergo a nonequilibrium dynamic phase transition from a state with mainly single particles and fast cooling to a state with growing aggregates such that bridge rupture becomes a rare event and cooling is slow. In the early stage of cluster growth, aggregation is a self-similar process with a fractal dimension of the aggregates approximately equal to Df approximately 2 . At later times, a percolating cluster is observed which ultimately absorbs all the particles. The final cluster is compact on large length scales, but fractal with Df approximately 2 on small length scales. PMID:19905109

  16. Locomotion and drag in wet and dry granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Daniel; Kuckuk, Robyn; Sharpe, Sarah

    2015-03-01

    Many animals move within substrates such as soil and dry sand; the resistive properties of such granular materials (GM) can depend on water content and compaction, but little is known about how such parameters affect locomotion or the relevant physics of drag and penetration. We developed a system to create homogeneous wet GM of varying moisture content and compaction in quantities sufficient to study the burial and subsurface locomotion of the Ocellated skink (C. ocellatus) a desert-generalist lizard. X-ray imaging revealed that in wet and dry GM the lizard slowly buried (~ 30 seconds) propagating a wave from head to tail, while moving in a start-stop motion. During forward movement, the head oscillated, and the forelimb on the convex side of the body propelled the animal. Although body kinematics (and ``slip'') were similar in both substrates, the burial depth was smaller in wet GM. Penetration and drag force experiments on smooth cylinders revealed that wet GM was ~ 3 × more resistive than dry GM, suggesting that during burial the lizard operated near its maximum force producing capability and was thus constrained by environmental properties. work supported by NSF PoLS.

  17. Motility of small nematodes in disordered wet granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, Gabriel; Lu, Kevin; Sznitman, Josue; Arratia, Paulo E.

    2010-11-01

    Organisms that evolve within complex fluidic environments often develop unique methods of locomotion that allow them to exploit the properties of the media. In this talk, we present an investigation on the motility of the worm nematode Caenorhabditis elegans in shallow, wet granular media as a function of particle size dispersity and area density (φ) using both particle- and nematode-tracking methods. Surprisingly, the nematode's propulsion speed is enhanced by the presence of particles in a fluid and is nearly independent of local area density. The undulation speed, often used to differentiate locomotion gaits, is significantly affected by particle size dispersity for area densities above φ> 0.55, and is characterized by a change in the nematode's waveform from swimming to crawling. This change occurs for dense polydisperse media only and highlights the organism's adaptability to subtle differences in local structure between monodisperse and polydisperse media.

  18. Pattern formation in vibrated beds of dry and wet granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuan Lim, Eldin Wee

    2014-01-01

    The Discrete Element Method was coupled with a capillary liquid bridge force model for computational studies of pattern formation in vibrated granular beds containing dry or wet granular materials. Depending on the vibration conditions applied, hexagonal, stripes, or cellular pattern was observed in the dry vibrated granular bed. In each of these cases, the same hexagonal, stripes, or cellular pattern was also observed in the spatial distribution of the magnitudes of particle-particle collision forces prior to the formation of the corresponding actual pattern in physical distributions of the particles. This seemed to suggest that the pattern formation phenomenon of vibrated granular bed systems might be the result of a two-dimensional Newton's cradle effect. In the presence of a small amount of wetness, these patterns were no longer formed in the vibrated granular beds under the same corresponding set of vibration conditions. Despite the relatively much weaker capillary forces arising from the simulated liquid bridges between particles compared with particle-particle collision forces, the spatial distributions of these collision forces, physical distributions of particles, as well as time profiles of average collision forces were altered significantly in comparison with the corresponding distributions and profiles observed for the dry vibrated granular beds. This seemed to suggest the presence of a two-dimensional Stokes' cradle effect in these wet vibrated granular bed systems which disrupted the formation of patterns in the wet granular materials that would have been observed in their dry counterparts.

  19. Penetration of spherical projectiles into wet granular media.

    PubMed

    Birch, S P D; Manga, M; Delbridge, B; Chamberlain, M

    2014-09-01

    We measure experimentally the penetration depth d of spherical particles into a water-saturated granular medium made of much smaller sand-sized grains. We vary the density, size R, and velocity U of the impacting spheres, and the size δ of the grains in the granular medium. We consider velocities between 7 and 107 m/s, a range not previously addressed, but relevant for impacts produced by volcanic eruptions. We find that d∝R(1/3)δ(1/3)U(2/3). The scaling with velocity is similar to that identified in previous, low-velocity collisions, but it also depends on the size of the grains in the granular medium. We develop a model, consistent with the observed scaling, in which the energy dissipation is dominated by the work required to rearrange grains along a network of force chains in the granular medium. PMID:25314438

  20. Bottom pressure scaling of vibro-fluidized granular matter

    PubMed Central

    Katsuragi, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Vibrated granular beds show various interesting phenomena such as convection, segregation, and so on. However, its fundamental physical properties (e.g., internal pressure structure) have not yet been understood well. Thus, in this study, the bottom wall pressure in a vertically vibrated granular column is experimentally measured and used to reveal the nature of granular fluidization. The scaling method allows us to elucidate the fluidization (softening) degree of a vibrated granular column. The peak value of the bottom pressure pm is scaled as Γ, where pJ, d, g, ω, H, and Γ are the Janssen pressure, grain diameter, gravitational acceleration, angular frequency, height of the column, and dimensionless vibrational acceleration, respectively. This scaling implies that the pressure of vibrated granular matter is quite different from the classical pressure forms: static and dynamic pressures. This scaling represents the importance of geometric factors for discussing the behavior of vibro-fluidized granular matter. The scaling is also useful to evaluate the dissipation degree in vibro-fluidized granular matter. PMID:26602973

  1. Scaling of liquid-drop impact craters in wet granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qianyun; Gao, Ming; Zhao, Runchen; Cheng, Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Combining high-speed photography with laser profilometry, we study the dynamics and the morphology of liquid-drop impact cratering in wet granular media—a ubiquitous phenomenon relevant to many important geological, agricultural, and industrial processes. By systematically investigating important variables such as impact energy, the size of impinging drops, and the degree of liquid saturation in granular beds, we uncover a scaling law for the size of impact craters. We show that this scaling can be explained by considering the balance between the inertia of impinging drops and the strength of impacted surface. Such a theoretical understanding confirms that the unique energy partition originally proposed for liquid-drop impact cratering in dry granular media also applies for impact cratering in wet granular media. Moreover, we demonstrate that compressive stresses, instead of shear stresses, control the process of granular impact cratering. Our study enriches the picture of generic granular impact cratering and sheds light on the familiar phenomena of raindrop impacts in granular media.

  2. Scaling of liquid-drop impact craters in wet granular media.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianyun; Gao, Ming; Zhao, Runchen; Cheng, Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Combining high-speed photography with laser profilometry, we study the dynamics and the morphology of liquid-drop impact cratering in wet granular media-a ubiquitous phenomenon relevant to many important geological, agricultural, and industrial processes. By systematically investigating important variables such as impact energy, the size of impinging drops, and the degree of liquid saturation in granular beds, we uncover a scaling law for the size of impact craters. We show that this scaling can be explained by considering the balance between the inertia of impinging drops and the strength of impacted surface. Such a theoretical understanding confirms that the unique energy partition originally proposed for liquid-drop impact cratering in dry granular media also applies for impact cratering in wet granular media. Moreover, we demonstrate that compressive stresses, instead of shear stresses, control the process of granular impact cratering. Our study enriches the picture of generic granular impact cratering and sheds light on the familiar phenomena of raindrop impacts in granular media. PMID:26565233

  3. DEM study on the interaction between wet cohesive granular materials and tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Takuya; Matsui, Yu; Nakagawa, Yuta; Kadono, Yuuichi; Tanaka, Toshitsugu

    2013-06-01

    A model based on discrete element method has been developed for the interaction between wet cohesive granular materials and mechanical tools with complex geometry. To obtain realistic results, the motion of 52.5 million particles has been simulated and the formation of multiple shear bands during an excavation process by a bulldozer blade was observed.

  4. A Statistical Ensemble for Soft Granular Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkes, Silke; O'Hern, Corey; Chakraborty, Bulbul

    2007-03-01

    Work on packings of soft spheres (PRE 68, 011306 (2003)) has shown the existence of a Jamming transition and has highlighted the need for a general statistical framework to describe granular packings. This work presents an extension of the formalism proposed by Edwards (Physica A 157, 1080 (1989)) to packings of soft particles. We base our analysis on a height formalism developed in two dimensions (PRL 88, 115505 (2002)) to extract a topological invariant γ, the trace of the global stress tensor, which is conserved under internal rearrangements of the system. Upon assuming a flat measure in γ-space, we can derive a canonical distribution of the local γ-values in a grain packing. We then check the predictions of this ensemble against distributions of mechanically stable packings of frictionless disks obtained from computer simulations. Work supported by NSF-DMR 0549762.

  5. Runaway electrification of friable self-replicating granular matter.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Julyan H E; Escribano, Bruno; Grothe, Hinrich; Piro, Oreste; Sainz Díaz, C Ignacio; Tuval, Idan

    2013-10-15

    We establish that the nonlinear dynamics of collisions between particles favors the charging of an insulating, friable, self-replicating granular material that undergoes nucleation, growth, and fission processes; we demonstrate with a minimal dynamical model that secondary nucleation produces a positive feedback in an electrification mechanism that leads to runaway charging. We discuss ice as an example of such a self-replicating granular material: We confirm with laboratory experiments in which we grow ice from the vapor phase in situ within an environmental scanning electron microscope that charging causes fast-growing and easily breakable palmlike structures to form, which when broken off may form secondary nuclei. We propose that thunderstorms, both terrestrial and on other planets, and lightning in the solar nebula are instances of such runaway charging arising from this nonlinear dynamics in self-replicating granular matter. PMID:24041221

  6. Runaway Electrification of Friable Self-Replicating Granular Matter

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We establish that the nonlinear dynamics of collisions between particles favors the charging of an insulating, friable, self-replicating granular material that undergoes nucleation, growth, and fission processes; we demonstrate with a minimal dynamical model that secondary nucleation produces a positive feedback in an electrification mechanism that leads to runaway charging. We discuss ice as an example of such a self-replicating granular material: We confirm with laboratory experiments in which we grow ice from the vapor phase in situ within an environmental scanning electron microscope that charging causes fast-growing and easily breakable palmlike structures to form, which when broken off may form secondary nuclei. We propose that thunderstorms, both terrestrial and on other planets, and lightning in the solar nebula are instances of such runaway charging arising from this nonlinear dynamics in self-replicating granular matter. PMID:24041221

  7. Controlled preparation of wet granular media reveals limits to lizard burial ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Sarah S.; Kuckuk, Robyn; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2015-07-01

    Many animals move within ground composed of granular media (GM); the resistive properties of such substrates can depend on water content and compaction, but little is known about how such parameters affect locomotion or the physics of drag and penetration. Using apparatus to control compaction of GM, our recent studies of movement in dry GM have revealed locomotion strategies of specialized dry-sand-swimming reptiles. However, these animals represent a small fraction of the diversity and presumed burial strategies of fossorial reptilian fauna. Here we develop a system to create states of wet GM of varying moisture content and compaction in quantities sufficient to study the burial and subsurface locomotion of the Ocellated skink (C. ocellatus), a generalist lizard. X-ray imaging revealed that in wet and dry GM the lizard slowly buried (≈ 30 s) propagating a wave from head to tail, while moving in a start-stop motion. During forward movement, the head oscillated, and the forelimb on the convex side of the body propelled the animal. Although body kinematics and ‘slip’ were similar in both substrates, the burial depth was smaller in wet GM. Penetration and drag force experiments on smooth cylinders revealed that wet GM was ≈ 4× more resistive than dry GM. In total, our measurements indicate that while the rheology of the dry and wet GM differ substantially, the lizard's burial motor pattern is conserved across substrates, while its burial depth is largely constrained by environmental resistance.

  8. Controlled preparation of wet granular media reveals limits to lizard burial ability.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Sarah S; Kuckuk, Robyn; Goldman, Daniel I

    2015-07-01

    Many animals move within ground composed of granular media (GM); the resistive properties of such substrates can depend on water content and compaction, but little is known about how such parameters affect locomotion or the physics of drag and penetration. Using apparatus to control compaction of GM, our recent studies of movement in dry GM have revealed locomotion strategies of specialized dry-sand-swimming reptiles. However, these animals represent a small fraction of the diversity and presumed burial strategies of fossorial reptilian fauna. Here we develop a system to create states of wet GM of varying moisture content and compaction in quantities sufficient to study the burial and subsurface locomotion of the Ocellated skink (C. ocellatus), a generalist lizard. X-ray imaging revealed that in wet and dry GM the lizard slowly buried (≈30 s) propagating a wave from head to tail, while moving in a start-stop motion. During forward movement, the head oscillated, and the forelimb on the convex side of the body propelled the animal. Although body kinematics and 'slip' were similar in both substrates, the burial depth was smaller in wet GM. Penetration and drag force experiments on smooth cylinders revealed that wet GM was ≈4× more resistive than dry GM. In total, our measurements indicate that while the rheology of the dry and wet GM differ substantially, the lizard's burial motor pattern is conserved across substrates, while its burial depth is largely constrained by environmental resistance. PMID:26109565

  9. Universality of slip avalanches in flowing granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, D. V.; Lörincz, K. A.; Uhl, J. T.; Dahmen, K. A.; Schall, P.

    2016-02-01

    The search for scale-bridging relations in the deformation of amorphous materials presents a current challenge with tremendous applications in material science, engineering and geology. While generic features in the flow and microscopic dynamics support the idea of a universal scaling theory of deformation, direct microscopic evidence remains poor. Here, we provide the first measurement of internal scaling relations in the deformation of granular matter. By combining macroscopic force fluctuation measurements with internal strain imaging, we demonstrate the existence of robust scaling relations from particle-scale to macroscopic flow. We identify consistent power-law relations truncated by systematic pressure-dependent cutoff, in agreement with recent mean-field theory of slip avalanches in elasto-plastic materials, revealing the existence of a mechanical critical point. These results experimentally establish scale-bridging relations in the flow of matter, paving the way to a new universal theory of deformation.

  10. Universality of slip avalanches in flowing granular matter

    PubMed Central

    Denisov, D. V.; Lörincz, K. A.; Uhl, J. T.; Dahmen, K. A.; Schall, P.

    2016-01-01

    The search for scale-bridging relations in the deformation of amorphous materials presents a current challenge with tremendous applications in material science, engineering and geology. While generic features in the flow and microscopic dynamics support the idea of a universal scaling theory of deformation, direct microscopic evidence remains poor. Here, we provide the first measurement of internal scaling relations in the deformation of granular matter. By combining macroscopic force fluctuation measurements with internal strain imaging, we demonstrate the existence of robust scaling relations from particle-scale to macroscopic flow. We identify consistent power-law relations truncated by systematic pressure-dependent cutoff, in agreement with recent mean-field theory of slip avalanches in elasto-plastic materials, revealing the existence of a mechanical critical point. These results experimentally establish scale-bridging relations in the flow of matter, paving the way to a new universal theory of deformation. PMID:26883071

  11. Universality of slip avalanches in flowing granular matter.

    PubMed

    Denisov, D V; Lörincz, K A; Uhl, J T; Dahmen, K A; Schall, P

    2016-01-01

    The search for scale-bridging relations in the deformation of amorphous materials presents a current challenge with tremendous applications in material science, engineering and geology. While generic features in the flow and microscopic dynamics support the idea of a universal scaling theory of deformation, direct microscopic evidence remains poor. Here, we provide the first measurement of internal scaling relations in the deformation of granular matter. By combining macroscopic force fluctuation measurements with internal strain imaging, we demonstrate the existence of robust scaling relations from particle-scale to macroscopic flow. We identify consistent power-law relations truncated by systematic pressure-dependent cutoff, in agreement with recent mean-field theory of slip avalanches in elasto-plastic materials, revealing the existence of a mechanical critical point. These results experimentally establish scale-bridging relations in the flow of matter, paving the way to a new universal theory of deformation. PMID:26883071

  12. Fracturing in granular media: the role of capillarity, wetting, and disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanes, Ruben

    2015-11-01

    The advent of shale oil and shale gas into the energy landscape has relied on achieving vigorous stimulation of the rock by means of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Traditionally, hydraulic fracturing is understood as a single-fluid-phase, pressure-driven process, in which the fluid (typically water with additives) is injected at a high-enough rate that the pressure builds up faster than it can dissipate by permeating into the rock, thereby fracturing it. However, the prevalent conditions for shale (ultra fine pore size, moderate overburden stress, and poor cementation) suggest that capillary forces could play an important role in the fracturing process. Here, we show the results of our recent experimental and theoretical studies on fracturing of granular media by means of injection of an immiscible fluid. We conduct carefully controlled injection experiments in a quasi-2D granular medium (a circular Hele-Shaw cell filled with glass beads), in an experimental set-up that allows us to systematically study the impact of capillarity (by varying injection rate, bead size, and fluid-fluid surface tension), wetting properties (by treating the beads and the cell plates by chemical vapor deposition of silane-based substances) and confinement (by varying the load on the cell). Our choice of defending and invading liquids and granular medium allows us to investigate a wide range of contact angles, from drainage to imbibition. We demonstrate that wettability exerts a powerful influence on the invasion/fracturing morphology of unfavorable mobility displacements. High time resolution imaging techniques and particle image velocimetry (PIV) allow us to quantify matrix displacement and fracture opening dynamics. Our results provide insights on fracture propagation, fracture length distribution and the fracture drainage area, parameters which are critically important to better understand long-term hydrocarbon production from shale.

  13. Avalanche to Continuous flow transition in wet and cohesive granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orpe, Ashish; Basu, Saprativ; Doshi, Pankaj

    2013-11-01

    We have studied the flow of wet and cohesive granular media in a partially filled, horizontally rotating cylinder. Very small, amount of viscous liquid is added to dry granular particles and the mixture is rotated in the cylinder at various rotational speeds to determine the angle of repose in the avalanching regime, the continuous regime and at the transition rotational speed separating the two regimes. Every experimental run is carried out afresh at a pre-defined rotational speed using liquids with different free surface tension and added in different amounts. Increasing the liquid surface tension increases the angle of repose as well as shifts the transition rotational speed to increasingly higher values. Similar qualitative behaviour is also observed on increasing the amount liquid added. A linear dependence is observed when the transition angle of repose for all cases is plotted against the corresponding transition rotational speed. The entire flow regime is modeled using momentum and mass balance equations for the flowing layer of particles. The total stress in the flowing mass of particles is assumed to be a linear combination of frictional, collisional and capillary force contributions. The model equations are able to reproduce most of the observed flow behavior. Department of Science and Technology, India, (Grant No. SR/S3/CE/037/2009).

  14. Time-resolved dynamics of granular matter by random laser emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folli, Viola; Ghofraniha, Neda; Puglisi, Andrea; Leuzzi, Luca; Conti, Claudio

    2013-07-01

    Because of the huge commercial importance of granular systems, the second-most used material in industry after water, intersecting the industry in multiple trades, like pharmacy and agriculture, fundamental research on grain-like materials has received an increasing amount of attention in the last decades. In photonics, the applications of granular materials have been only marginally investigated. We report the first phase-diagram of a granular as obtained by laser emission. The dynamics of vertically-oscillated granular in a liquid solution in a three-dimensional container is investigated by employing its random laser emission. The granular motion is function of the frequency and amplitude of the mechanical solicitation, we show how the laser emission allows to distinguish two phases in the granular and analyze its spectral distribution. This constitutes a fundamental step in the field of granulars and gives a clear evidence of the possible control on light-matter interaction achievable in grain-like system.

  15. Confocal Microscopy of Jammed Matter: From Elasticity to Granular Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorjadze, Ivane

    Packings of particles are ubiquitous in nature and are of interest not only to the scientific community but also to the food, pharmaceutical, and oil industries. In this thesis we use confocal microscopy to investigate packing geometry and stress transmission in 3D jammed particulate systems. By introducing weak depletion attraction we probe the accessible phase-space and demonstrate that a microscopic approach to jammed matter gives validity to statistical mechanics framework, which is intriguing because our particles are not thermally activated. We show that the fluctuations of the local packing parameters can be successfully captured by the recently proposed 'granocentric' model, which generates packing statistics according to simple stochastic processes. This model enables us to calculate packing entropy and granular temperature, the so-called 'compactivity', therefore, providing a basis for a statistical mechanics of granular matter. At a jamming transition point at which there are formed just enough number of contacts to guarantee the mechanical stability, theoretical arguments suggest a singularity which gives rise to the surprising scaling behavior of the elastic moduli and the microstructure, as observed in numerical simulations. Since the contact network in 3D is typically hidden from view, experimental test of the scaling law between the coordination number and the applied pressure is lacking in the literature. Our data show corrections to the linear scaling of the pressure with density which takes into account the creation of contacts. Numerical studies of vibrational spectra, in turn, reveal sudden features such as excess of low frequency modes, dependence of mode localization and structure on the pressure. Chapter four describes the first calculation of vibrational density of states from the experimental 3D data and is in qualitative agreement with the analogous computer simulations. We study the configurational role of the pressure and demonstrate that low frequency modes become progressively localized as the packing density is increased. Another application of our oil-in-water emulsions serves to mimic cell adhesion in biological tissues. By analyzing the microstructure in 3D we find that a threshold compression force is necessary to overcome electrostatic repulsion and surface elasticity and establish protein-mediated adhesion.

  16. Effective Reduction of Coulomb Repulsion in Charged Granular Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffler, T.; Werth, J.; Wolf, D. E.

    2000-04-01

    This paper is an extension to a previous article by Scheffler and Wolfs.6 We study the rate of energy dissipation due to inelastic collisions in a charged granular gas. One observes that the electrostatic repulsion of two particles is effectively reduced by nearest neighbor interactions in a dense granular gas. We study the radial distribution function for dense systems, which leads to a better expression for the reduced energy barrier.

  17. Relevance of wet deposition of organic matter for alpine ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mladenov, N.; Williams, M. W.; Schmidt, S. K.; Goss, N. R.; Reche, I.

    2011-12-01

    In barren, alpine environments, carbon inputs from atmospheric deposition may be very important for ecological processes. Recent findings suggest that atmospheric deposition influences the quality of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in alpine lakes on a global scale. Here, we evaluate the inputs of DOM in atmospheric wet deposition to alpine terrestrial ecosystems, in terms of both quantity and quality. We show that at the Niwot Ridge Long Term Ecological Research Station (Colorado, USA) wet deposition represents a seasonally variable (Figure 1) mass input of organic carbon, depositing on average 6 kg C/ha/yr or roughly 1500 kg C to the Green Lake 4 watershed at Niwot Ridge. Wet deposition is, therefore, a substantial input of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the catchment when compared to the annual DOC yield from Green Lake 4, estimated at just over 1800 kg C. In terms of DOM bioavailability for alpine microorganisms, our optical spectroscopic results showing high amounts of amino acid-like fluorescence and low aromaticity suggest that DOM in wet deposition may be particularly labile, especially in the summer months. The heterotrophic processing of this organic carbon input has important implications for the cycling of other nutrients, such as nitrogen, in alpine environments. We have also shown that the sources of DOM in wet deposition include bioaerosols, such as pollen, which represent much of the summer DOC loading. However, relationships with inorganic N and sulfate also suggest that organic pollutants in the atmosphere may have an equally important influence on DOM in wet deposition. Additionally, the quality of wet deposition DOM in the spring is similar to that of dust deposition observed near the Sahara and may be influenced by dust events, as shown from air mass trajectories originating in or near the Colorado Plateau. The seasonality of DOM quality appears to be related to these varying sources and is, therefore, a critical topic for future research.

  18. Behaviour of granular matter under reduced-gravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, J.; Brucks, A.

    2007-08-01

    We present a study on low-gravity surface flows of granular materials. Planetary surfaces of small solar-system bodies are usually covered by granulates called regolith. We are interested in the static and dynamic characteristics of regolith under the lowgravity conditions prevailing on the surfaces of small bodies in the solar system. We are particularly interested at which lower boundary in g-level particles become dominated by cohesive forces. We investigated the effect of the reduction of the gravitational acceleration on the granular-flow behaviour. The experiments were performed under microgravity conditions in the Bremen Drop Tower and were using a slowly rotating centrifuge for simulating low-gravity environments. Surface flow effects were simulated in two flat (quasi-2D) sand glass experiments, in a rotating tumbler and in an avalanche box. We will present results from 15 microgravity experiments in an acceleration range between 0.01 g and 1 g.

  19. Force network ensemble: a new approach to static granular matter.

    PubMed

    Snoeijer, Jacco H; Vlugt, Thijs J H; van Hecke, Martin; van Saarloos, Wim

    2004-02-01

    An ensemble approach for force distributions in static granular packings is developed. This framework is based on the separation of packing and force scales, together with an a priori flat measure in the force phase space under the constraints that the contact forces are repulsive and balance on every particle. We show how the formalism yields realistic results, both for disordered and regular triangular "snooker ball" configurations, and obtain a shear-induced unjamming transition of the type proposed recently for athermal media. PMID:14995308

  20. Force Network Ensemble: A New Approach to Static Granular Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeijer, Jacco H.; Vlugt, Thijs J.; van Hecke, Martin; van Saarloos, Wim

    2004-02-01

    An ensemble approach for force distributions in static granular packings is developed. This framework is based on the separation of packing and force scales, together with an a priori flat measure in the force phase space under the constraints that the contact forces are repulsive and balance on every particle. We show how the formalism yields realistic results, both for disordered and regular triangular “snooker ball” configurations, and obtain a shear-induced unjamming transition of the type proposed recently for athermal media.

  1. Jamming ang energy propagation through dense granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiaoni; Kondic, Lou

    2009-11-01

    In previous work (Phys. Rev. E 79, 041304 (2009)) we found using discrete element simulations that a reasonable description of energy propagation through dense (jammed) granular system in which volume fraction is keep fixed (CV protocol) can be reached by a linear wave equation with damping. In the present work we consider the systems where we either decrease the volume fraction, or a system under constant applied pressure (CP protocal). In both of the considered scenarios one may distinguish between the jammed and unjammed configurations, defined by the coordination number. We discuss how the nature of energy propagation changes as one goes through the jamming transition.

  2. "Lock in accelerometry" to follow sink dynamics in shaken granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Cecile; Sanchez-Colina, Gustavo; Alonso-Llanes, Laciel; Martinez-Roman, Etien; Batitsta-Leyva, Alfo-Jose; Toussaint, Renaud; Altshuler, Ernesto

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the penetration dynamics of intruders in granular beds is relevant not only for fundamental Physics, but also for geophysical processes and construction on granular soils in earthquake areas. Indeed a phenomenon named soil liquefaction can cause buildings to sink or tilt in areas separated of 1000 km from the epicentre in the worst cases. The damages on the constructions, the pipes and the roads may be huge. There is a conventional understanding of liquefaction from which scientists made theoretical and empirical laws for geotechnical use and building construction, but the dynamical penetration of buildings into the soil is still not well understood. While the penetration of intruders in 2D laboratory granular beds can be followed using video recording, it is useless in 3D beds of non-transparent materials such as common sand. Wireless accelerometry constitutes a natural alternative that has been used in very few occasions, however, it has never been used to quantify the penetration into horizontally shaken granular beds. Here we propose a method to quantify the sink dynamics of an intruder into laterally shaken, fluidized granular bed. We developped an embarked accelerometer small enough to fit into a modelized building. This sensor allows us to follow the intruder in realistic conditions namely buried in a 3D box of sand. Our method is based on the temporal correlations between the signals from a reference accelerometer fixed to the shaken granular bed, and the accelerometer deployed inside the intruder. We demonstrate that our method is able to determine the time interval of sinking of an intruder into shaken granular beds for both quasi-2D and 3D systems [1]. Due to its analogy with the working principle of a lock in amplifier, we call this technique Lock in accelerometry (LIA). In the experiments the intruder stops at a depth that we assume to be the beginning of the "jammed" granular phase. We are now developing numerical simulations based on a molecular dynamic algorithm to confirm or not this assumption. We modelized a granular bed with particles of the same size than the one used in the experiments. Because we have access to the velocity of every particles we can quantify the dynamic of each layers of the granular medium and find its "jammed" boundary. Reference [1] G Sánchez-Colina, L Alonso-Llanes, E Martínez, AJ Batista-Leyva, C Clement, C Fliedner, R Toussaint, and E Altshuler. Note :"lock-in accelerometry" to follow sink dynamics in shaken granular matter. Review of Scientific Instruments, 85(12) :126101, 2014.

  3. Intermittent Flow of Granular Matter in an Annular Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzinski, Ted; Daniels, Karen E.

    Granular solids can be subjected to a finite stress below which the response is elastic. Above this yield stress, however, the material fails catastrophically, undergoing a rapid plastic deformation. In the case of a monotonically increasing stress the material exhibits a characteristic stick-slip response. We investigate the statistics of this intermittent failure in an annular shear geometry, driven with a linear-ramp torque in order to generate the stick-slip behavior. The apparatus is designed to allow visual access to particle trajectories and inter-particle forces (through the use of photoelastic materials). Additionally, twelve piezoelectric sensors at the outer wall measure acoustic emissions due to the plastic deformation of the material. We vary volume fraction, and use both fixed and deformable boundaries. We measure how the distribution of slip size and duration are related to the bulk properties of the packing, and compare to systems with similar governing statistics.

  4. A community-detection based approach to identification of inhomogeneities in granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navakas, Robertas; Džiugys, Algis; Peters, Bernhard

    2014-08-01

    Interparticle interactions in granular matter are commonly represented by appropriate graphs, therefore, inhomogeneities in granular matter can be possibly reflected by community structure in the respective graphs. Approaches and algorithms for community detection are being actively developed and the achievements in this area can be utilized for analysis of granular systems, where bridging the gap from microscopic configuration to macroscopic phenomena is of great interest. Here, we analyse applicability of graph community detection algorithms for identification of inhomogeneities of particle parameter distribution in granular matter, in order to explore the relevance of the selected approach in general. As an example application, we analyse identification of temperature distribution inhomogeneities in a simulated packed bed of fuel particles on a moving grate. We build a graph based on particle parameter similarity from the particle temperature data, available from Discrete Element/Particle Modelling, and the problem of identification of particle temperature inhomogeneities is thereby made equivalent to community detection in graphs. We apply a number of well-known community detection algorithms: Edge Betweenness, Walktrap, Infomap, Label Propagation, Spinglass and compare the resulting partitions. We apply this approach to a number of graphs, corresponding to different particle configurations, in order to identify regularities characteristic of partitions produced by different algorithms. We propose a procedure for additional postprocessing of the partitions in order to improve the quality of clusterization. In addition, we apply two alternative algorithms (not related to community detection in graphs) to identify particle distribution inhomogeneities. We also introduce a parameter to evaluate the cluster structure in particle systems.

  5. Flocking at a distance in active granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nitin; Soni, Harsh; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Sood, A. K.

    2014-09-01

    The self-organized motion of vast numbers of creatures in a single direction is a spectacular example of emergent order. Here, we recreate this phenomenon using actuated nonliving components. We report here that millimetre-sized tapered rods, rendered motile by contact with an underlying vibrated surface and interacting through a medium of spherical beads, undergo a phase transition to a state of spontaneous alignment of velocities and orientations above a threshold bead area fraction. Guided by a detailed simulation model, we construct an analytical theory of this flocking transition, with two ingredients: a moving rod drags beads; neighbouring rods reorient in the resulting flow like a weathercock in the wind. Theory and experiment agree on the structure of our phase diagram in the plane of rod and bead concentrations and power-law spatial correlations near the phase boundary. Our discovery suggests possible new mechanisms for the collective transport of particulate or cellular matter.

  6. Granular Matter Transport in Vertical Pipes: The Influence of Pipe Outlet Conditions on Gravity-driven Granular Flow.

    PubMed

    Jaklič, Miha; Kočevar, Klemen; Srčič, Stanko; Dreu, Rok

    2016-01-01

    Gravity transport of granular materials in vertical pipes is one of the most fundamental steps in bulk powder handling and processing. Presented study investigates powder flow characteristics in vertical pipes with open and closed outlets and condition of free powder fall. Powder flow of pharmaceutical grade powders was observed in transparent, vertical pipe model. Description of flow structures was performed. Powder volume flow rate, acceleration, and dilatation were quantified and correlated with powder properties. The results show that in pipes with a closed outlet the escaping air slows down the powder flow, resulting in a much slower flow than in pipes with an open outlet. A dense granular flow was detected in an open outlet condition, whereas in a closed outlet condition two concurrent flow regimes were observed: a slow moving, dense powder bed, and a fast dilute powder flow. Differences in flow regimes may promote segregation, with important implications to industrial processes. PMID:26970790

  7. Attractive emulsion droplets probe the phase diagram of jammed granular matter

    PubMed Central

    Jorjadze, Ivane; Pontani, Lea-Laetitia; Newhall, Katherine A.; Bruji?, Jasna

    2011-01-01

    It remains an open question whether statistical mechanics approaches apply to random packings of athermal particles. Although a jamming phase diagram has recently been proposed for hard spheres with varying friction, here we use a frictionless emulsion system in the presence of depletion forces to sample the available phase space of packing configurations. Using confocal microscopy, we access their packing microstructure and test the theoretical assumptions. As a function of attraction, our packing protocol under gravity leads to well-defined jammed structures in which global density initially increases above random close packing and subsequently decreases monotonically. Microscopically, the fluctuations in parameters describing each particle, such as the coordination number, number of neighbors, and local packing fraction, are for all attractions in excellent agreement with a local stochastic model, indicating that long-range correlations are not important. Furthermore, the distributions of local cell volumes can be collapsed onto a universal curve using the predicted k-gamma distribution, in which the shape parameter k is fixed by the polydispersity while the effect of attraction is captured by rescaling the average cell volume. Within the Edwards statistical mechanics framework, this result measures the decrease in compactivity with global density, which represents a direct experimental test of a jamming phase diagram in athermal systems. The success of these theoretical tools in describing yet another class of materials gives support to the much-debated statistical physics of jammed granular matter. PMID:21368191

  8. A k-{\\varepsilon} turbulence closure model of an isothermal dry granular dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chung

    2015-07-01

    The turbulent flow characteristics of an isothermal dry granular dense matter with incompressible grains are investigated by the proposed first-order k-{\\varepsilon} turbulence closure model. Reynolds-filter process is applied to obtain the balance equations of the mean fields with two kinematic equations describing the time evolutions of the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation. The first and second laws of thermodynamics are used to derive the equilibrium closure relations satisfying turbulence realizability conditions, with the dynamic responses postulated by a quasi-linear theory. The established closure model is applied to analyses of a gravity-driven stationary flow down an inclined moving plane. While the mean velocity decreases monotonically from its value on the moving plane toward the free surface, the mean porosity increases exponentially; the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation evolve, respectively, from their minimum and maximum values on the plane toward their maximum and minimum values on the free surface. The evaluated mean velocity and porosity correspond to the experimental outcomes, while the turbulent dissipation distribution demonstrates a similarity to that of Newtonian fluids in turbulent shear flows. When compared to the zero-order model, the turbulent eddy evolution tends to enhance the transfer of the turbulent kinetic energy and plane shearing across the flow layer, resulting in more intensive turbulent fluctuation in the upper part of the flow. Solid boundary as energy source and sink of the turbulent kinetic energy becomes more apparent in the established first-order model.

  9. Fiat or Bona Fide Boundary—A Matter of Granular Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Lars; Grobe, Peter; Quast, Björn; Bartolomaeus, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background Distinguishing bona fide (i.e. natural) and fiat (i.e. artificial) physical boundaries plays a key role for distinguishing natural from artificial material entities and is thus relevant to any scientific formal foundational top-level ontology, as for instance the Basic Formal Ontology (BFO). In BFO, the distinction is essential for demarcating two foundational categories of material entity: object and fiat object part. The commonly used basis for demarcating bona fide from fiat boundary refers to two criteria: (i) intrinsic qualities of the boundary bearers (i.e. spatial/physical discontinuity, qualitative heterogeneity) and (ii) mind-independent existence of the boundary. The resulting distinction of bona fide and fiat boundaries is considered to be categorial and exhaustive. Methodology/Principal Findings By referring to various examples from biology, we demonstrate that the hitherto used distinction of boundaries is not categorial: (i) spatial/physical discontinuity is a matter of scale and the differentiation of bona fide and fiat boundaries is thus granularity-dependent, and (ii) this differentiation is not absolute, but comes in degrees. By reducing the demarcation criteria to mind-independence and by also considering dispositions and historical relations of the bearers of boundaries, instead of only considering their spatio-structural properties, we demonstrate with various examples that spatio-structurally fiat boundaries can nevertheless be mind-independent and in this sense bona fide. Conclusions/Significance We argue that the ontological status of a given boundary is perspective-dependent and that the strictly spatio-structural demarcation criteria follow a static perspective that is ignorant of causality and the dynamics of reality. Based on a distinction of several ontologically independent perspectives, we suggest different types of boundaries and corresponding material entities, including boundaries based on function (locomotion, physiology, ecology, development, reproduction) and common history (development, heredity, evolution). We argue that for each perspective one can differentiate respective bona fide from fiat boundaries. PMID:23251333

  10. A novel strategy for simultaneous removal of nitrogen and organic matter using anaerobic granular sludge in anammox hybrid reactor.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Swati; Gupta, Sunil Kumar; Mishra, Brijesh Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The coexistence of organic matter (OM) and nitrogen in industrial effluent is the major bottleneck in field-scale application of anammox process. The present study emphasized on investigating the role of seeding anaerobic granular sludge towards simultaneous removal of ammonium and OM in anammox hybrid reactor (AHR). The study delineated simultaneous reduction of both OM (94.8%) and nitrogen (96.8%) at optimal COD/N ratio (0.54). Pearson correlation matrix showed positive and strong correlation of ARE (ammonium removal efficiency) and CRE (COD removal efficiency) with NRE (nitrogen removal efficiency). The negative correlation of OLR and COD/TN ratio with NRE indicated that increase in organic loadings may suppress anammox activity. The process inhibition was evaluated using Haldane model considering free ammonia, OM and nitrite as inhibitors. The strategy of using anaerobic granular sludge not only augmented endurance of bacterial communities against OM inhibition but also facilitated simultaneous removal of OM and nitrogen. PMID:26335285

  11. Critical Phenomena in Driven Granular Matter: Jamming and Glassy Behavior - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Teitel, Stephen

    2013-02-20

    Granular materials, such as powders, seeds, grains, sand, rocks, etc., are ubiquitous both in nature and in industrial processes. At the scale of individual grains, granular systems are particularly simple: particles interact only when they touch. But when viewed in the aggregate, granular systems can display complex behavior. In particular, as the volume packing fraction of the grains increases, the system undergoes a jamming transition from a flowing liquid to a disordered but rigid solid. We study the critical behavior of such systems near the jamming transition using numerical simulations of a simple model of soft-core, bidisperse, frictionless disks in two dimensions. We seek to understand the structural and transport properties of such systems under a variety of physical perturbations such as steady state shear driven flow, and finite thermal fluctuations.

  12. Simulation of electron-matter interaction during wet-STEM electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Septiyanto, Rahmat Firman; Masenelli-Varlot, Karine; Iskandar, Ferry

    2014-02-24

    Tomography is an efficient tool to probe the 3 dimensional (3D) structure of materials. In the laboratory, a device has been developed to perform electron tomography in an environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The configuration of Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) in Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) provides a novel approach for the characterization of the 3D structure of materials and optimizes a compromise between the resolution level of a few nm and the large tomogram due to the high thickness of transparency. Moreover, STEM allows the observation in 2D of wet samples in an ESEM by finely controlling the sample temperature and the water pressure of the sample environment. It has been recently demonstrated that it was possible to acquire image series of hydrated objects and thus to attain 3D characterization of wet samples. In order to get reliable and quantitative data, the present study deals with the simulation of electron-matter interactions. From such simulation on the MCM-41 material, we determine the minimum quantity of water layer which can be detected on wet materials.

  13. "EGM" (Electrostatics of Granular Matter): A Space Station Experiment to Examine Natural Particulate Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J.; Sauke, T.; Buehler, M.; Farrell, W.; Green, R.; Birchenough, A.

    1999-01-01

    A granular-materials experiment is being developed for a 2002 launch for Space Station deployment. The experiment is funded by NASA HQ and managed through NASA Lewis Research Center. The experiment will examine electrostatic aggregation of coarse granular materials with the goals of (a) obtaining proof for an electrostatic dipole model of grain interactions, and (b) obtaining knowledge about the way aggregation affects the behavior of natural particulate masses: (1) in unconfined dispersions (clouds such as nebulae, aeolian dust palls, volcanic plumes), (2) in semi-confined, self-loaded masses as in fluidized flows (pyroclastic surges, avalanches) and compacted regolith, or (3) in semi-confined non-loaded masses as in dust layers adhering to solar cells or space suits on Mars. The experiment addresses both planetary/astrophysical issues as well as practical concerns for human exploration of Mars or other solar system bodies. Additional information is contained in the original.

  14. Grain- and Pore-level Analysis of Drainage in Fractionally-wet Granular Media using Synchrotron X-ray Computed Microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willson, C. S.; Bradley, S.; Thompson, K. E.

    2011-12-01

    Numerous lab- and field-scale experimental studies have shown the strong impact of wettability on multiphase flow constitutive relations and how increased water repellency can lead to preferential flow paths and a heterogeneous water distribution. In conjunction, theoretical and pore-scale modeling work has been performed seeking to improve our understanding of the impact of grain-level wettability properties. Advances in high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (XCT) techniques now make it possible to nondestructively image opaque materials providing previously hard-to-observe qualitative and quantitative data and information. Furthermore, the characteristics of synchrotron X-rays make it possible to monochromatize the incident energy allowing for both k-edge absorption differencing and segmentation of fluids and materials that have even slightly different chemical composition. Concurrent with these advances has been the development of methods to extract granular packing and pore network structure data from XCT images. In this talk, we will present results from a series of experiments designed to obtain grain-, pore- and fluid-scale details during the drainage of water in fractionally-wet glass bead systems. Here, two sets of glass beads were used each having slightly different chemical compositions and thus, different X-ray absorption properties. One set was treated so that the bead surface was water neutral while the other set remained hydrophilic. Three sets of drainage experiments were conducted on three fractionally-wet systems: 100, 90, and 75% hydrophilic by weight. First, traditional lab-scale drainage experiments were performed to obtain a baseline set of characteristic drainage curves for the three systms. Next, a set of tomography-scale (i.e., 5.5 mm inner diameter column) drainage experiments were conducted in the lab to ensure that the drainage curves in the smaller columns were consistent with the lab-scale curves. Finally, tomography-scale drainage experiments were performed at the APS/GSECARS 13-BMD tomography beamline to obtain ~10 micron voxel resolution 3D images at specific capillary suction heads. Results will be presented that show that, at these levels of fractional-wettability, the drainage curves from the tomography-scale columns are consistent with the larger scale data and therefore, the fluid phase distribution imaged at the various drainage steps is also representative. Next, granular packing and pore network structure results will be discussed highlight our ability to characterize and uniquely identify the packing and distribution of different grain types and ensuring consistent pore morphology. Finally, the water phase distribution at different stages of drainage is correlated to the pore network structure and the individual water-wet and water-repellant grains providing valuable insights into the impact of grain- and pore-level wettability variations. These quantitative results show that grain-level differences in wettability captured using this approach have an impact on the connectivity of the water phase during drainage and should provide valuable insights for further development of theoretical and numerical approaches.

  15. Exact traveling wave solutions of the van der Waals normal form for fluidized granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abourabia, A. M.; Morad, A. M.

    2015-11-01

    Analytical solutions of the van der Waals normal form for fluidized granular media have been done to study the phase separation phenomenon by using two different exact methods. The Painlevé analysis is discussed to illustrate the integrability of the model equation. An auto-Bäcklund transformation is presented via the truncated expansion and symbolic computation. The results show that the exact solutions of the model introduce solitary waves of different types. The solutions of the hydrodynamic model and the van der Waals equation exhibit a behavior similar to the one observed in molecular dynamic simulations such that two pairs of shock and rarefaction waves appear and move away, giving rise to the bubbles. The dispersion properties and the relation between group and phase velocities of the model equation are studied using the plane wave assumption. The diagrams are drawn to illustrate the physical properties of the exact solutions, and indicate their stability and bifurcation.

  16. Flow of granular matter in a silo with multiple exit orifices: jamming to mixing.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Sandesh; Kunte, Amit; Doshi, Pankaj; Orpe, Ashish V

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the mixing characteristics of dry granular material while draining down a silo with multiple exit orifices. The mixing in the silo, which otherwise consists of noninteracting stagnant and flowing regions, is observed to improve significantly when the flow through specific orifices is stopped intermittently. This momentary stoppage of flow through the orifice is either controlled manually or is chosen by the system itself when the orifice width is small enough to cause spontaneous jamming and unjamming. We observe that the overall mixing behavior shows a systematic dependence on the frequency of closing and opening of specific orifices. In particular, the silo configuration employing random jamming and unjamming of any of the orifices shows early evidence of chaotic mixing. When operated in a multipass mode, the system exhibits a practical and efficient way of mixing particles. PMID:25615084

  17. The effect of water temperature on the adsorption equilibrium of dissolved organic matter and atrazine on granular activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bernd Schreiber; Viktor Schmalz; Thomas Brinkmann; Eckhard Worch

    2007-09-15

    The influence of water temperature on the adsorption of natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) on activated carbon has not been investigated intensively yet. In this study, batch experiments with granular activated carbon (GAC) F300, from bituminous coal, have been carried out at three temperatures (5, 20, 35{sup o} C) using a humic acid model water and different types of surface water (lake, river, canal). Furthermore, the adsorption of an anthropogenic contaminant, atrazine, was quantified in the absence and presence of DOM. The results indicate a significant influence of water temperature on the adsorption equilibrium of DOM and atrazine. Contrary to expectations, DOM and atrazine adsorption in surface water tends to be increased with increasing water temperature, whereas the extent of this effect is dependent on the type and concentration of DOM. Furthermore, the temperature effect on atrazine adsorption is controlled by competition of DOM and atrazine on adsorption sites. Some assumptions are proposed and discussed for explaining the temperature effects observed in the batch studies. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Production response of lactating cows fed dried versus wet brewers' grain in diets with similar dry matter content.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, T R; Bingham, H R; Radloff, H D

    2003-09-01

    Twenty-four Holstein-Friesian dairy cows (20 intact and 4 fitted with rumen cannula) during early lactation (56 +/- 25.3 d in milk) were assigned to two treatments to determine intake and production responses to feeding dried and wet brewers' grain. There were two cows fitted with a rumen cannula in each treatment. Cows were fed a total mixed ration twice daily containing either dried or wet brewers' grain at 15% of the dietary dry matter (DM). The diet contained 47% forage and 53% concentrate. The experimental design was a replicated 2 x 2 Latin square with two periods of 5 wk each. First 2 wk in each period were considered as adaptation to diets and data from the last 3 wk were used for treatment comparisons. Dried and wet brewers' diets contained 68.0 and 66.5% DM, respectively. Feeding brewers' grain dry or wet to dairy cows had no influence on feed intake (25.6 vs. 25.1 kg/d), fat corrected milk yield (40.1 vs. 40.7 kg/d), milk composition and feed consumption. The pH, ammonia, total volatile fatty acids and molar ratios of volatile fatty acids in the rumen fluid were not different between treatments. Fatty acid composition of milk fat from cows fed diets containing dry or wet brewers' grain was identical, except C18:2 and C18:3 fatty acids were lower in milk fat from cows fed wet brewers' grain compared with dried brewers' grain. The results from the present study suggest that the performance of cows fed either dried or wet brewers' grain at 15% of dietary DM was similar when diets had the same DM. The average price for dried and wet brewers' grain in the United States from July 2001 to June 2002 was dollars 145.3 and dollars 96.9/metric tonne DM, respectively. Using wet instead of dried brewers' grain will save dollars 49/metric tonne minus the difference in storage costs. Wet brewers' grain can be fed to dairy cows in areas that are close to the brewery and provides nutritive value similar to the dried brewers' grain. PMID:14507027

  19. Collection of ultrafine diesel particulate matter (DPM) in cylindrical single-stage wet electrostatic precipitators.

    PubMed

    Saiyasitpanich, Phirun; Keener, Tim C; Lu, Mingming; Khang, Soon-Jai; Evans, Douglas E

    2006-12-15

    Long-term exposures to diesel particulate matter (DPM) emissions are linked to increasing adverse human health effects due to the potential association of DPM with carcinogenicity. Current diesel vehicular particulate emission regulations are based solely upon total mass concentration, albeit it is the submicrometer particles that are highly respirable and the most detrimental to human health. In this study, experiments were performed with a tubular single-stage wet electrostatic precipitator (wESP) to evaluate its performance for the removal of number-based DPM emissions. A nonroad diesel generator utilizing a low sulfur diesel fuel (500 ppmw) operating under varying load conditions was used as a stationary DPM emission source. An electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) was used to quantify the number concentration distributions of diesel particles in the diluted exhaust gas at each tested condition. The wESP was evaluated with respect to different operational control parameters such as applied voltage, gas residence time, etc., to determine their effect on overall collection efficiency, as well as particle size dependent collection efficiency. The results show that the total DPM number concentrations in the untreated diesel exhaust are in the magnitude of approximately108/cm(3) at all engine loads with the particle diameter modes between 20 and 40 nm. The measured collection efficiency of the wESP operating at 70 kV based on total particle numbers was 86% at 0 kW engine load and the efficiency decreased to 67% at 75 kW due to a decrease in gas residence time and an increase in particle concentrations. At a constant wESP voltage of 70 kV and at 75 kW engine load, the variation of gas residence time within the wESP from approximately 0.1 to approximately 0.4 s led to a substantial increase in the collection efficiency from 67% to 96%. In addition, collection efficiency was found to be directly related to the applied voltage, with increasing collection efficiency measured for increases in applied voltage. The collection efficiency based on particle size had a minimum for sizes between 20 and 50 nm, but at optimal wESP operating conditions it was possible to remove over 90% of all particle sizes. A comparison of measured and calculated collection efficiencies reveals that the measured values are significantly higher than the predicted values based on the well-known Deutsch equation. PMID:17256544

  20. Significance of wet deposition to removal of atmospheric particulate matter and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: A case study in Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ling-Chuan; Bao, Lian-Jun; She, Jian-Wen; Zeng, Eddy Y.

    2014-02-01

    Rainwater samples were simultaneously collected from three locations in Guangzhou, a mega metropolitan center in South China, during the entire year of 2010, and analyzed for particulate matter (PM), total organic carbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), with the objectives of assessing the seasonality of washout effects and efficiency for removal of pollutants from the atmosphere by wet deposition. The contents of PM, particulate organic carbon, and dissolved organic carbon were in the ranges of 0.74-420 (average: 8.1 mg L-1), 0.16-40 (average: 1.3 mg L-1), and 0.34-6.9 mg L-1 (average: 1.4 mg L-1), respectively. Concentrations of Σ15PAH (sum of the 16 priority PAH compounds defined by the United States Environmental Protection Agency minus naphthalene) in wet deposition samples ranged from 39 to 1580 ng L-1 with an average of 170 ng L-1. The PAH concentration levels were slightly abated compared to those acquired previously in Guangzhou during the year of 2005, probably indicating a favorable change of energy consumption patterns in the region. There were moderately significant negative correlations between washout ratios and rainfall intensities (0-4.3 mm h-1). The total annual fluxes of wet and dry depositions combined for PM and PAHs in the urban area of Guangzhou were 34 g m-2 yr-1 and 6.0 × 102 μg m-2 yr-1 with 50 and 57% being contributed from wet deposition, respectively. The monthly capacity for removal (CR) of PM and PAHs (calculated as the wet deposition flux dividing the total flux) varied widely with different months, and was lower during the dry weather season (January-March and October-December) than during the wet weather season (April-September). Finally, the air quality index related to PM10 was negatively correlated to CR values of PM and PAHs, indicating the need to control the emissions of anthropogenically derived pollutants during the dry weather season.

  1. Controlling cohesive forces in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G"Ogelein, Christoph; Schr"Oter, Matthias; Brinkmann, Martin; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2009-11-01

    When adding a small amount of water to a pile of granular matter, e.g., sand heap, close-by grains can be connected by liquid bridges [1]. Thus, the material becomes plastically and can sustain a larger stress as compared to dry sand. Our general aim is to compare the mechanical properties of wet and dry granular media. For this purpose, we use a suspension of micrometer large glass or Latex spheres dispersed in a binary liquid mixture. The suspending water-lutidine(oil) mixture exhibits a lower critical solution temperature leading to a water-oil-like phase separation slightly above ambient temperature. Close to this demixing region, the oil-like phase undergoes a pre-wetting transition on the particle glass surface inducing liquid bridges [2]. Thus, by varying the temperature we can switch the liquid bridges on and off. We will report on our attempts to directly visualize the formation and control of liquid bridges using confocal and non- confocal microscopy. [4pt] [1] M. Scheel, et al., Nature Materials 7, 174 (2008)[0pt] [2] D. Beysens, and D. Esteve, Phys. Rev. Lett. 54, 2123 (1985)

  2. Effects of surface-active organic matter on carbon dioxide nucleation in atmospheric wet aerosols: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Daskalakis, Vangelis; Charalambous, Fevronia; Panagiotou, Fostira; Nearchou, Irene

    2014-11-21

    Organic matter (OM) uptake in cloud droplets produces water-soluble secondary organic aerosols (SOA) via aqueous chemistry. These play a significant role in aerosol properties. We report the effects of OM uptake in wet aerosols, in terms of the dissolved-to-gas carbon dioxide nucleation using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Carbon dioxide has been implicated in the natural rainwater as well as seawater acidity. Variability of the cloud and raindrop pH is assumed in space and time, as regional emissions, local human activities and geophysical characteristics differ. Rain scavenging of inorganic SOx, NOx and NH3 plays a major role in rain acidity in terms of acid-base activity, however carbon dioxide solubility also remains a key parameter. Based on the MD simulations we propose that the presence of surface-active OM promotes the dissolved-to-gas carbon dioxide nucleation in wet aerosols, even at low temperatures, strongly decreasing carbon dioxide solubility. A discussion is made on the role of OM in controlling the pH of a cloud or raindrop, as a consequence, without involving OM ionization equilibrium. The results are compared with experimental and computational studies in the literature. PMID:25272147

  3. Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Ethanol Fermentation of High Dry Matter Wet-Exploded Wheat Straw at Low Enzyme Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, Tania I.; Hou, Xiaoru; Hilstrøm, Troels; Ahring, Birgitte K.

    Wheat straw was pretreated by wet explosion using three different oxidizing agents (H2O2, O2, and air). The effect of the pretreatment was evaluated based on glucose and xylose liberated during enzymatic hydrolysis. The results showed that pretreatment with the use of O2 as oxidizing agent was the most efficient in enhancing overall convertibility of the raw material to sugars and minimizing generation of furfural as a by-product. For scale-up of the process, high dry matter (DM) concentrations of 15-20% will be necessary. However, high DM hydrolysis and fermentation are limited by high viscosity of the material, higher inhibition of the enzymes, and fermenting microorganism. The wet-explosion pretreatment method enabled relatively high yields from both enzymatic hydrolysis and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) to be obtained when performed on unwashed slurry with 14% DM and a low enzyme loading of 10 FPU/g cellulose in an industrial acceptable time frame of 96 h. Cellulose and hemicellulose conversion from enzymatic hydrolysis were 70 and 68%, respectively, and an overall ethanol yield from SSF was 68%.

  4. Dissolved Organic Matter as a Mechanism for Carbon Stabilization at Depth in Wet Tropical Forest Volcanic Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin-Spiotta, E.; Kramer, M. G.; Chadwick, O. A.

    2007-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays an important role in many biological and chemical processes in soils. Our understanding of the types of plant and microbially-derived organic matter that accumulate in soils and the mechanisms responsible for their transformation and stabilization is still limited. In particular, we know very little about how microbial activity and water movement contribute to the production of DOM and the formation of stable C in soils. In well-drained soils under wet climates, DOM is potentially a primary pathway for the transport of C from the surface litter layers and the zones of highest microbial activity to deeper horizons in the soil profile where the potential for long-term storage increases. The mechanisms for long-term stabilization of organic C in deep mineral horizons include an accumulation of chemically recalcitrant C, strong sorption of soluble and otherwise labile C to mineral and/or metals making them inaccessible to decomposers, and microenvironmental conditions (low pH, low O2) which result in incomplete decomposition and persistence of labile C. Although most work to date has focused on the role of dissolved organic C and N (DOC and DON) in the C and N cycles of temperate forests, DOM fluxes may be even more important in forests in the wet tropics, where high rainfall and high primary productivity could lead to greater DOM production. In order to address the role of DOC in the transport and stabilization of C in mineral horizons, we are studying DOC production, transformation, and loss pathways in volcanic soils dominated by highly reactive, non-crystalline minerals (allophane). We are quantifying flux and solute concentrations (C, N, cations, anions) in rainwater, throughfall, and in soil water. We have installed tension and zero tension lysimeters throughout sequentially deeper organic and mineral horizons in an intermediate aged soil (ca. 350k years) under wet (ca. 3000 mm mean annual rainfall) native tropical forest cover on the island of Hawai'i. Previous research has measured soil organic C with very long mean residence times in the deeper mineral horizons at similar sites. Our study is focused on identifying the source of this highly stabilized C and the role of preferential water flow-paths in the vertical transport of C and nutrients. The soil's strongly blocky structure facilitates the downward movement of DOM to lower horizons where it comes in contact with allophane and is potentially sorbed. Through field sampling and laboratory manipulations, we will identify the zones of greatest DOC production and removal. Using separation by column chromatography (XAD resins), specific UV-absorbance, 13C-NMR, and microbial bioavailability assays, we will describe differences in the chemical composition of the organic material in solution amd solid-phase with depth.

  5. Stabilization of Stormwater Biofilters: Impacts of Wetting and Drying Phases and the Addition of Organic Matter to Filter Media.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, D N; Egodawatta, P; Mather, P; Rajapakse, J P

    2015-09-01

    Ripening period refers to a phase of stabilization in sand filters in water treatment systems that follow a new installation or cleaning of the filter. Intermittent wetting and drying, a unique property of stormwater biofilters, would similarly be subjected to a phase of stabilization. Suspended solids are an important parameter that is often used to monitor the stabilization of sand filters in water treatment systems. Stormwater biofilters, however, contain organic material that is added to the filter layer to enhance nitrate removal, the dynamics of which is seldom analyzed in stabilization of stormwater biofilters. Therefore, in this study of stormwater biofiltration in addition to suspended solids (turbidity), organic matter (TOC, DOC, TN, and TKN) was also monitored as a parameter for stabilization of the stormwater biofilter. One Perspex bioretention column (94 mm internal diameter) was fabricated with filter layer that contained 8 % organic material and fed with tapwater with different antecedent dry days (0-40 day) at 100 mL/min. Samples were collected from the outflow at different time intervals between 2 and 150 min and were tested for total organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, total nitrogen, total Kjeldhal nitrogen, and turbidity. The column was observed to experience two phases of stabilization, one at the beginning of each event that lasted for 30 min, while the other phase was observed across subsequent events that are related to the age of filter. PMID:25971737

  6. Stabilization of Stormwater Biofilters: Impacts of Wetting and Drying Phases and the Addition of Organic Matter to Filter Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, D. N.; Egodawatta, P.; Mather, P.; Rajapakse, J. P.

    2015-09-01

    Ripening period refers to a phase of stabilization in sand filters in water treatment systems that follow a new installation or cleaning of the filter. Intermittent wetting and drying, a unique property of stormwater biofilters, would similarly be subjected to a phase of stabilization. Suspended solids are an important parameter that is often used to monitor the stabilization of sand filters in water treatment systems. Stormwater biofilters, however, contain organic material that is added to the filter layer to enhance nitrate removal, the dynamics of which is seldom analyzed in stabilization of stormwater biofilters. Therefore, in this study of stormwater biofiltration in addition to suspended solids (turbidity), organic matter (TOC, DOC, TN, and TKN) was also monitored as a parameter for stabilization of the stormwater biofilter. One Perspex bioretention column (94 mm internal diameter) was fabricated with filter layer that contained 8 % organic material and fed with tapwater with different antecedent dry days (0-40 day) at 100 mL/min. Samples were collected from the outflow at different time intervals between 2 and 150 min and were tested for total organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, total nitrogen, total Kjeldhal nitrogen, and turbidity. The column was observed to experience two phases of stabilization, one at the beginning of each event that lasted for 30 min, while the other phase was observed across subsequent events that are related to the age of filter.

  7. Granular physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valance, Alexandre; Louge, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Granular media play a major role in geophysics and industrial processes. Their interactions are complicated by relatively small-scale separation between individual particles and system size, by the presence of other interpenetrating phases such as water or air, by the large number of grains involved in realistic applications, and by the importance of microscopic contact forces, such as solid friction, which are challenging to measure or control. Yet significant progress has been made in the last two decades toward the understanding of granular media, thanks to the curiosity of physicists and engineers. This thematic issue gathers contributions from researchers dealing with diverse aspects of granular mechanics, from static assemblies to flowing suspensions, and from theory to natural phenomena. These review articles illustrate rather different approaches to these complicated systems.

  8. WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Hugo S. Caram; Natalie Foster

    1997-03-31

    The objective was to visualize the flow of granular materials in flat bottomed silo. This was done by for dry materials introducing mustard seeds and poppy seeds as tracer particles and imaging them using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The region sampled was a cylinder 25 mm in diameter and 40 mm in length. Eight slices containing 128*128 to 256*256 pixels were generated for each image. The size of the silo was limited by the size of the high resolution NMR imager available. Cross-sections of 150mm flat bottomed silos, with the tracer layers immobilized by a gel, showed similar qualitative patterns for both dry and wet granular solids.

  9. Bioturbation and dissolved organic matter enhance contaminant fluxes from sediment treated with powdered and granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Kupryianchyk, D; Noori, A; Rakowska, M I; Grotenhuis, J T C; Koelmans, A A

    2013-05-21

    Sediment amendment with activated carbon (AC) is a promising technique for in situ sediment remediation. To date it is not clear whether this technique sufficiently reduces sediment-to-water fluxes of sediment-bound hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) in the presence of bioturbators. Here, we report polychlorobiphenyl (PCB) pore water concentrations, fluxes, mass transfer coefficients, and survival data of two benthic species, for four treatments: no AC addition (control), powdered AC addition, granular AC addition and addition and subsequent removal of GAC (sediment stripping). AC addition decreased mass fluxes but increased apparent mass transfer coefficients because of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) facilitated transport across the benthic boundary layer (BBL). In turn, DOC concentrations depended on bioturbator activity which was high for the PAC tolerant species Asellus aquaticus and low for AC sensitive species Lumbriculus variegatus. A dual BBL resistance model combining AC effects on gradients, DOC facilitated transport and biodiffusion was evaluated against the data and showed how the type of resistance differs with treatment and chemical hydrophobicity. Data and simulations illustrate the complex interplay between AC and contaminant toxicity to benthic organisms and how differences in species tolerance affect mass fluxes from sediment to the water column. PMID:23590290

  10. Effect of granular activated carbon concentration on the content of organic matter and salt, influencing E. coli activity and survival in fluidized bed disinfection reactor.

    PubMed

    Racyte, Justina; Langenhoff, Alette A M; Ribeiro, Ana F M M R; Paulitsch-Fuchs, Astrid H; Bruning, Harry; Rijnaarts, Huub H M

    2014-10-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) is used in water treatment systems, typically to remove pollutants such as natural organic matter, volatile organic compounds, chlorine, taste, and odor. GAC is also used as a key component of a new technology that combines a fluidized bed reactor with radio frequency electric fields for disinfection. So far, the effects of GAC on bacteria in these fluidized bed reactors are unclear. This paper describes a systematic study of the physico-chemical changes in five microbial media compositions caused by different concentrations (23-350 g/L) of GAC, and the effects of these physico-chemical changes on the metabolic activity and survival of a model microorganism (Escherichia coli YMc10) in a fluidized bed reactor. The chemical adsorption taking place in suspensions with specific GAC changed nutritional, osmotic, and pH conditions in the investigated microbial media (LB, diluted LB, PBS, diluted PBS, and tap water), leading to a decay of the metabolic activity and survival of E. coli. Especially media that are poor in organic and mineral compounds (e.g., PBS) with suspended GAC showed a concentration decay of 3.5 Log CFU/mL E. coli after 6 h. Organic compounds depletion and severe pH variation were enhanced in the presence of higher GAC concentrations. PMID:24729067

  11. Interfacial Instability during Granular Erosion.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Gautier; Merceron, Aymeric; Jop, Pierre

    2016-02-12

    The complex interplay between the topography and the erosion and deposition phenomena is a key feature to model granular flows such as landslides. Here, we investigated the instability that develops during the erosion of a wet granular pile by a dry dense granular flow. The morphology and the propagation of the generated steps are analyzed in relation to the specific erosion mechanism. The selected flowing angle of the confined flow on a dry heap appears to play an important role both in the final state of the experiment, and for the shape of the structures. We show that the development of the instability is governed by the inertia of the flow through the Froude number. We model this instability and predict growth rates that are in agreement with the experiment results. PMID:26919014

  12. Interfacial Instability during Granular Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Gautier; Merceron, Aymeric; Jop, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    The complex interplay between the topography and the erosion and deposition phenomena is a key feature to model granular flows such as landslides. Here, we investigated the instability that develops during the erosion of a wet granular pile by a dry dense granular flow. The morphology and the propagation of the generated steps are analyzed in relation to the specific erosion mechanism. The selected flowing angle of the confined flow on a dry heap appears to play an important role both in the final state of the experiment, and for the shape of the structures. We show that the development of the instability is governed by the inertia of the flow through the Froude number. We model this instability and predict growth rates that are in agreement with the experiment results.

  13. Removal of dissolved organic matter by granular-activated carbon adsorption as a pretreatment to reverse osmosis of membrane bioreactor effluents.

    PubMed

    Gur-Reznik, Shirra; Katz, Ilan; Dosoretz, Carlos G

    2008-03-01

    The adsorption of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on granular-activated carbon (GAC) as a pretreatment to reverse osmosis (RO) desalination of membrane bioreactor (MBR) effluents was studied in lab- and pilot-scale columns. The pattern and efficiency of DOM adsorption and fate of the hydrophobic (HPO), transphilic (TPI) and hydrophilic (HPI) fractions were characterized, as well as their impact on organic fouling of the RO membranes. Relatively low DOM adsorption capacity and low intensity of adsorption were observed in batch studies. Continuous adsorption experiments performed within a range of hydraulic velocities of 0.9-12m/h depicted permissible values within the mass transfer zone up to 1.6m/h. The breakthrough curves within this range displayed a non-adsorbable fraction of 24+/-6% and a biodegradable fraction of 49+/-12%. Interestingly, the adsorbable fraction remained almost constant ( approximately 30%) in the entire hydraulic range studied. Comparative analysis by HPO interaction chromatography showed a steady removal (63-66%) of the HPO fraction. SUVA index and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectra indicated that DOM changes during the adsorption phase were mainly due to elution of the more HPI components. GAC pretreatment in pilot-scale columns resulted in 80-90% DOM removal from MBR effluents, which in turn stabilized membrane permeability and increased permeate quality. FTIR analysis indicated that the residual DOM present in the RO permeate, regardless of the pretreatment, was mainly of HPI character (e.g., low-molecular-weight humics linked to polysaccharides and proteins). The DOM removed by GAC pretreatment is composed mainly of HPO and biodegradable components, which constitutes the fraction primarily causing organic fouling. PMID:17980400

  14. The effect of moisture content on the explosively driven fragmentation of wet sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, K.

    2014-05-01

    A comprehensive model is established to account for the instability onset of rapidly expanding granular shells subject to the explosion loadings generated by the detonation of the central explosives. The moisture content strongly influences the shock interactions in the wet particle beds and the ensuing evolvement of the granular compacts. A material model for granular materials which can account for the degree of saturation was incorporated into a nonlinear dynamic simulation program to investigate the moisture effect on the shock responses of wet granular materials. In conjunction with our instability model, the predicted instability diameters of the expanding dry/wet granular shells are in a good agreement with the experimental results. Particularly the postponed instability onset of the wet granular shell found both experimentally and analytically can largely be attributed to the significantly greater kinetic energy obtained by wet particles thanks to less energy of shock wave consumed in compacting the granular material.

  15. The effect of moisture content on the dynamic fragmentation of wet sand at high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Kun

    2014-03-01

    A comprehensive model is established to account for the instability onset of rapidly expanding granular shells subject to the explosion loadings generated by the detonation of the central explosives. The moisture content strongly influences the shock interactions in the wet particle beds and the ensuing evolvement of the granular compacts. A material model for granular materials which can account for the degree of saturation was incorporated into a non-linear dynamic simulation program to investigate the moisture of effect on the shock responses of wet granular materials. In conjunction with our instability model, the predicted instability diameters of the expanding dry/wet granular shells are in a good agreement with the experimental results. Particularly the postponed instability onset of the wet granular shell found both experimentally and analytically can largely be attributed to the significantly greater kinetic energy obtained by wet particles thanks to less energy of shock wave consumed in compacting the granular materials.

  16. Dilatancy in slow granular flows.

    PubMed

    Kabla, Alexandre J; Senden, Tim J

    2009-06-01

    When walking on wet sand, each footstep leaves behind a temporarily dry impression. This counterintuitive observation is the most common illustration of the Reynolds principle of dilatancy: that is, a granular packing tends to expand as it is deformed, therefore increasing the amount of porous space. Although widely called upon in areas such as soil mechanics and geotechnics, a deeper understanding of this principle is constrained by the lack of analytical tools to study this behavior. Using x-ray radiography, we track a broad variety of granular flow profiles and quantify their intrinsic dilatancy behavior. These measurements frame Reynolds dilatancy as a kinematic process. Closer inspection demonstrates, however, the practical importance of flow induced compaction which competes with dilatancy, leading more complex flow properties than expected. PMID:19658906

  17. Survey on granularity clustering.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shifei; Du, Mingjing; Zhu, Hong

    2015-12-01

    With the rapid development of uncertain artificial intelligent and the arrival of big data era, conventional clustering analysis and granular computing fail to satisfy the requirements of intelligent information processing in this new case. There is the essential relationship between granular computing and clustering analysis, so some researchers try to combine granular computing with clustering analysis. In the idea of granularity, the researchers expand the researches in clustering analysis and look for the best clustering results with the help of the basic theories and methods of granular computing. Granularity clustering method which is proposed and studied has attracted more and more attention. This paper firstly summarizes the background of granularity clustering and the intrinsic connection between granular computing and clustering analysis, and then mainly reviews the research status and various methods of granularity clustering. Finally, we analyze existing problem and propose further research. PMID:26557926

  18. Crystalline silica dust and respirable particulate matter during indoor concrete grinding - wet grinding and ventilated grinding compared with uncontrolled conventional grinding.

    PubMed

    Akbar-Khanzadeh, Farhang; Milz, Sheryl; Ames, April; Susi, Pamela P; Bisesi, Michael; Khuder, Sadik A; Akbar-Khanzadeh, Mahboubeh

    2007-10-01

    The effectiveness of wet grinding (wet dust reduction method) and ventilated grinding (local exhaust ventilation method, LEV) in reducing the levels of respirable crystalline silica dust (quartz) and respirable suspended particulate matter (RSP) were compared with that of uncontrolled (no dust reduction method) conventional grinding. A field laboratory was set up to simulate concrete surface grinding using hand-held angle grinders in an enclosed workplace. A total of 34 personal samples (16 pairs side-by-side and 2 singles) and 5 background air samples were collected during 18 concrete grinding sessions ranging from 15-93 min. General ventilation had no statistically significant effect on operator's exposure to dust. Overall, the arithmetic mean concentrations of respirable crystalline silica dust and RSP in personal air samples during: (i) five sessions of uncontrolled conventional grinding were respectively 61.7 and 611 mg/m(3) (ii) seven sessions of wet grinding were 0.896 and 11.9 mg/m(3) and (iii) six sessions of LEV grinding were 0.155 and 1.99 mg/m(3). Uncontrolled conventional grinding generated relatively high levels of respirable silica dust and proportionally high levels of RSP. Wet grinding was effective in reducing the geometric mean concentrations of respirable silica dust 98.2% and RSP 97.6%. LEV grinding was even more effective and reduced the geometric mean concentrations of respirable silica dust 99.7% and RSP 99.6%. Nevertheless, the average level of respirable silica dust (i) during wet grinding was 0.959 mg/m(3) (38 times the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists [ACGIH] threshold limit value [TLV] of 0.025 mg/m(3)) and (ii) during LEV grinding was 0.155 mg/m(3) (6 times the ACGIH TLV). Further studies are needed to examine the effectiveness of a greater variety of models, types, and sizes of grinders on different types of cement in different positions and also to test the simulated field lab experimentation in the field. PMID:17763068

  19. Granular temperature field of monodisperse granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollin, Devis; Bowman, Elisabeth; Shepley, Paul

    2015-04-01

    For dry granular flows as well as solid-fluid mixtures such as debris avalanches, the momentum transfer is carried by frictional and collisional stresses. The latter may be described by the granular temperature, which provides a measure of the energy contained within the fluctuating nature of the granular motion. Thus, granular temperature can be used as a valuable means to infer the ability of a granular system to flow. Granular materials are known for the difficulties they pose in obtaining accurate microscale laboratory measurements. This is why many theories, such as the kinetic theory of granular gases, are primarily compared to numerical simulations. However, thanks to recent advancements in optical techniques along with high-speed recording systems, experimentalists are now able to obtain robust measurements of granular temperature. At present, the role of granular temperature in granular flows still entails conjecture. As a consequence, it is extremely important to provide experimental data against which theories and simulations can be judged. This investigation focuses on dry granular flows of sand and spherical beads performed on a simple inclined chute geometry. Fluctuation velocity, granular temperature and velocity patterns are obtained by means of particle image velocimetry (PIV). Flow behaviour is probed for different spatial (interrogation sizes) and temporal (frame rates) resolutions. Through the variation of these parameters an attempt to demonstrate the consistency of the degree of unsteadiness within the flow is made. In many studies a uniform stationary flow state is usually sought or preferably assumed for the simplicity it provides in the calculations. If one tries to measure microscale fields such as granular temperature, this assumption may be inappropriate. Thus, a proper definition of the flow regime should be made in order to estimate the correct flow properties. In addition, PIV analysis is compared against particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). This alternative technique provides high-accuracy measurements and allows individual flow tracer particles to be tracked. In comparison, PIV provides exhaustive analyses although some limitations exist. The interrogation size plays an important role in determining the achievable spatial resolution of the flow. There is a limit on how large or small this region can be for adequate measurements. A further limitation is encountered when velocity gradients are presents which apt to bias the displacement estimate. Ultimately, the above techniques and analysis will be applied to 3D polydisperse granular systems. This is extremely valuable to gain a more complete understanding and move towards more realistic flows. The overall aim of this study lies in obtaining a clearer understanding of the micromechanical processes governing granular flows and improving the modelling of debris avalanche hazards.

  20. WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-03-25

    The yield locus, tensile strength and fracture mechanisms of wet granular materials were studied. The yield locus of a wet material was shifted to the left of that of the dry specimen by a constant value equal to the compressive isostatic stress due to pendular bridges. for materials with straight yield loci, the shift was computed from the uniaxial tensile strength, either measured in a tensile strength tester or calculated from the correlation, and the angle of internal friction of the material. The predicted shift in the yield loci due to different moisture contents compare well with the measured shift in the yield loci of glass beads, crushed limestone, super D catalyst and Leslie coal. Measurement of the void fraction during the shear testing was critical to obtain the correct tensile strength theoretically or experimentally.

  1. Spectroscopic and wet chemical characterization of solid waste organic matter of different age in landfill sites, southern Germany.

    PubMed

    Bumler, Rupert; Kgel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2008-01-01

    Landfill sites are potential sources of hazardous emissions by degradation and transformation processes of waste organic matter. Its chemical composition and microbial degradability are key factors for risk management, after-care, and estimation of potential emissions. The aim of the study is to provide information about composition and extent of transformation of waste organic matter in four landfill sites in Bavaria, Southern Germany by means of (13)C NMR spectroscopy, acid-hydrolyzable carbohydrates, chloroform-methanol extractable lipids, acid-hydrolyzable proteins, and lignin compounds after CuO oxidation. Ten samples of about 20 to 25 yr, 15 to 20 yr, and 5 to 10 yr of deposition each were taken at 2 m depth intervals by grab drilling till 10-m depth. Increasing temperatures from about 15 degrees C at 2-m depth to >40 degrees C at 10-m depth are found at some of the sites, representing optimum conditions for mesophile methane bacteria. Moisture contents of 160 to 310 g kg(-1) (oven dry), however, provide limiting conditions for anaerobic biodecay. Spectroscopic and chemical variables generally indicate a low extent of biodegradation and transformation at all sites despite a considerable heterogeneity of the samples. Independent of the time and depth of deposition more than 50% of the carbohydrate fraction of the waste organic matter provide a high potential for methane emissions and on-site energy production. There was no significant accumulation of long-chain organic and aromatic compounds, and of lignin degradation products even after more than 25 yr of rotting indicating higher extent of decomposition or stabilization of the waste organic matter. Installation of seepage water cleaning and recirculation systems are recommended to increase suboptimal moisture contents with respect to microbial methanogenesis, energy production, and long-term stabilization of municipal solid waste. PMID:18178887

  2. Harnessing the instabilities of soft matter: Dynamically tuning of wetting, assembly and pattern transformation in polymer microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying

    2008-10-01

    In this dissertation, we have investigated the fabrication, mechanical instability and applications of two kinds of polymer micro/nano-structures: high-aspect-ratio (HAR) polymer pillar arrays, and periodic porous elastomer membranes. For HAR polymer pillar arrays, we demonstrated the fabrication of high-aspect-ratio (up to 18) polymer micropillars with different shapes and dimensions by replica molding. Capillary force lithography (CFL) is also demonstrated as a simple and flexible method to fabricate microstructures with controlled aspect ratios. Meanwhile, by introducing conventional photoresist SU-8, CFL is successfully coupled with photolithography and used to create hierarchical 2D or 3D structures, which greatly expand the capability of current capillary force lithography. The mechanical stability of HAR structures with varied materials and different aspect ratio, density and shape were also studied and the results show that the adhesive forces from environment are the major cause of structure collapsing. When HAR polymer pillars are subjected to different solvents treatment, both capillary force and solvent swelling need to be considered to completely understand the structure instability. On HAR micropillar array, thermoresponsive polymer brushes, poly ( N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), were selectively grafted at different locations for dynamically tuning surface wetting or pattern assembly. When the temperature changed from 40°C to 20°, depending on the location of polymer brushes, different wetting transitions, either from a composite solid/air state (Cassie state) to a composite solid/liquid state (Hemi-wicking state) or a transition between two Cassie states were observed. Meanwhile, the dynamically tuning of water contact angle enables us to control capillary drying force and thus harness pattern collapse to create superlattice micropatterns. For periodic porous elastomer membrane, a novel pattern transformation effect is discovered due to the mechanical instability of membrane under solvent swelling. To harness this elastic instability, we convectively assemble nanoparticles onto a swollen membrane and capture this dynamic pattern transformation process. By using the nanoparticle film that imprinted with deformed pattern as a master mold, the complex pattern formed by elastic deformation can be transferred into other materials through replica molding, capillary imprinting & selective etching. The unique 3D morphology of the elastic deformation pattern allows us to perform gradient etching, allowing more flexibility to control pattern morphology.

  3. Scaling of liquid-drop impact craters in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Runchen; Zhang, Qianyun; Tjugito, Hendro; Gao, Ming; Cheng, Xiang

    Granular impact cratering by liquid drops is a ubiquitous phenomenon, directly relevant to many important natural and industrial processes such as soil erosion, drip irrigation, and dispersion of micro-organisms in soil. Here, by combining the high-speed photography with high precision laser profilometry, we investigate the liquid-drop impact dynamics on granular surfaces and monitor the morphology of resulting craters. Our experiments reveal novel scaling relations between the size of granular impact craters and important control parameters including the impact energy, the size of impinging drops and the degree of liquid saturation in a granular bed. Interestingly, we find that the scaling for liquid-drop impact cratering in dry granular media can be quantitatively described by the Schmidt-Holsapple scaling originally proposed for asteroid impact cratering. On the other hand, the scaling for impact craters in wet granular media can be understood by balancing the inertia of impinging drops and the strength of impacted surface. Our study sheds light on the mechanism governing liquid-drop impacts on dry/wet granular surfaces and reveals a remarkable analogy between familiar phenomena of raining and catastrophic asteroid strikes. Scaling of liquid-drop impact craters in granular media.

  4. PREFACE: Dynamics of wetting Dynamics of wetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grest, Gary S.; Oshanin, Gleb; Webb, Edmund B., III

    2009-11-01

    Capillary phenomena associated with fluids wetting other condensed matter phases have drawn great scientific interest for hundreds of years; consider the recent bicentennial celebration of Thomas Young's paper on equilibrium contact angles, describing the geometric shape assumed near a three phase contact line in terms of the relevant surface energies of the constituent phases [1]. Indeed, nearly a century has passed since the seminal papers of Lucas and Washburn, describing dynamics of capillary imbibition [2, 3]. While it is generally appreciated that dynamics of fluid wetting processes are determined by the degree to which a system is out of capillary equilibrium, myriad complications exist that challenge the fundamental understanding of dynamic capillary phenomena. The topic has gathered much interest from recent Nobel laureate Pierre-Gilles de Gennes, who provided a seminal review of relevant dissipation mechanisms for fluid droplets spreading on solid surfaces [4] Although much about the dynamics of wetting has been revealed, much remains to be learned and intrinsic technological and fundamental interest in the topic drives continuing high levels of research activity. This is enabled partly by improved experimental capabilities for resolving wetting processes at increasingly finer temporal, spatial, and chemical resolution. Additionally, dynamic wetting research advances via higher fidelity computational modeling capabilities, which drive more highly refined theory development. The significance of this topic both fundamentally and technologically has resulted in a number of reviews of research activity in wetting dynamics. One recent example addresses the evaluation of existing wetting dynamics theories from an experimentalist's perspective [5]. A Current Opinion issue was recently dedicated to high temperature capillarity, including dynamics of high temperature spreading [6]. New educational tools have recently emerged for providing instruction in wetting dynamics and the broader field of fluid dynamics [7-9]. Such an active field requires an occasional collective examination of current research to highlight both recent successes and remaining challenges. Herein, we have collected a range of articles to illustrate the broad nature of research associated with understanding dynamics of moving condensed matter three phase contact lines. Despite the breadth of topics examined, certain unifying themes emerge. The role of the substrate surface is critical in determining kinetics of wetting; this is evidenced by the attention given to this in articles herein. McHale et al investigate the role of surface topography on wetting kinetics and how its effect can be incorporated in existing theories describing contact line dynamics. Moosavi et al examine surface topography effects via a mesoscopic hydrodynamics approach. The capillary driven motion of fluid through structures on a surface bears tremendous importance for microfluidics studies and the emerging field of nanofluidics. Blow et al examine this phenomena for liquid imbibition into a geometric array of structures on a solid surface, while Shen et al analyze the effects of surface temperature during boiling and non-boiling conditionson droplet impingement dynamics. Finally, Pesika et al discover a wonderful world of smart surfaces, like gecko adhesion pads. A number of papers utilize computational modeling to explore phenomena underlying wetting dynamics and to consider relevant mechanisms in terms of existing theory for contact line dynamics. Winter et al utilize Monte Carlo simulation techniques and thermodynamic integration methods to test classical theory describing heterogeneous nucleation at a wall near a wetting transition. Qian et al briefly review the Onsager principle of minimum energy dissipation underlying many descriptions of dissipative systems; they then provide a variational approach description of hydrodynamics of moving contact lines and demonstrate the validity of their continuum model via comparison with molecular dynamics simulations.Bertrand et al use large scale molecular dynamics simulations to examine fundamental questions about wetting dynamics and how they depend upon interactions between a liquid drop and solid substrate; in particular, atomic scale mechanisms directly associated with the molecular kinetic theory of wetting are observed and quantified. Sun et al explore, by molecular dynamics simulations, atomistic mechanisms of high temperature contact line advancement for a rapidly spreading liquid droplet. Starov et al discuss general aspects of surface forces and wetting phenomena, while Courbin et al present anoverview of diverse dynamical processes ranging from inertial spreading to viscous imbibition. Mukhopadhyay et al examine the effect of Marangoni and centrifugal forces on the wetting dynamics of thin liquid films and drops. Willis et al analyze an enhanced droplet spreading due to thermal fluctuations. How wetting and contact line dynamics depend upon the complexity of the structure in the liquid is interesting both academically and technologically; Delabre et al illustrate this with a study of wetting of liquid crystals and the role of molecular scale organization. In addition, Mechkov et al explore this realm by studying post-Tanner spreading for nematic droplets and, in general, post-Tanner spreading of liquid droplets governed by the contact line-tension effects. Liang et al focus on spreading dynamics of power-law fluid droplets, while Wei et al discuss dynamics of wetting in viscous Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. Yin et al discuss an important issue of reactive wetting in metal-metal systems. We hope that the articles gathered here will permit readers to understand the wide range of condensed matter systems impacted by wetting kinetics and the many complicating factors that emerge in describing contact line dynamics for realistic materials. We wish to thank all the contributing authors for their effort and support of our endeavour. References [1] Young T 1805 Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A 95 65 [2] Lucas R 1918 Kolloidn. Zh. 23 15 [3] Washburn E W 1921 Phys. Rev. 17 273 [4] de Gennes P G 1985 Rev. Mod. Phys. 57 827 [5] Ralston J, Popescu M and Sedev R 2008 Annu. Rev. Mater. Res.38 23 [6] High Temperature Capillarity Focus Issue 2005 Current Opinion in Solid State and Materials Science 9 149-254 [7] Starov V M, Velarde M G and Radke C J 2007 Wetting and Spreading Dynamics (Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press) [8] Golub J 2008 Phys. Today 61 8 [9] Homsby G M (ed) 2008 Multimedia Fluid Mechanics 2nd edn (New York: Cambridge University Press) (Also see www.efluids.com)

  5. Biomedical Informatics and Granularity

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Barry; Novotny, Daniel D.

    2004-01-01

    An explicit formal-ontological representation of entities existing at multiple levels of granularity is an urgent requirement for biomedical information processing. We discuss some fundamental principles which can form a basis for such a representation. We also comment on some of the implicit treatments of granularity in currently available ontologies and terminologies (GO, FMA, SNOMED CT). PMID:18629139

  6. On granular elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qicheng; Jin, Feng; Wang, Guangqian; Song, Shixiong; Zhang, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Mesoscopic structures form in dense granular materials due to the self-organisation of the constituent particles. These structures have internal structural degrees of freedom in addition to the translational degree of freedom. The resultant granular elasticity, which exhibits intrinsic variations and inevitable relaxation, is a key quantity that accounts for macroscopic solid- or fluid-like properties and the transitions between them. In this work, we propose a potential energy landscape (PEL) with local stable basins and low elastic energy barriers to analyse the nature of granular elasticity. A function for the elastic energy density is proposed for stable states and is further calibrated with ultrasonic measurements. Fluctuations in the elastic energy due to the evolution of internal structures are proposed to describe a so-called configuration temperature Tc as a counterpart of the classical kinetic granular temperature Tk that is attributed to the translational degrees of freedom. The two granular temperatures are chosen as the state variables, and a fundamental equation is established to develop non-equilibrium thermodynamics for granular materials. Due to the relatively low elastic energy barrier in the PEL, granular elasticity relaxes more under common mechanical loadings, and a simple model based on mean-field theory is developed to account for this behaviour. PMID:25951049

  7. Gravity and Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behringer, R. P.; Hovell, Daniel; Kondic, Lou; Tennakoon, Sarath; Veje, Christian

    1999-01-01

    We describe experiments that probe a number of different types of granular flow where either gravity is effectively eliminated or it is modulated in time. These experiments include the shaking of granular materials both vertically and horizontally, and the shearing of a 2D granular material. For the shaken system, we identify interesting dynamical phenomena and relate them to standard simple friction models. An interesting application of this set of experiments is to the mixing of dissimilar materials. For the sheared system we identify a new kind of dynamical phase transition.

  8. Dynamics of Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behringer, Robert P.

    1996-01-01

    Granular materials exhibit a rich variety of dynamical behavior, much of which is poorly understood. Fractal-like stress chains, convection, a variety of wave dynamics, including waves which resemble capillary waves, l/f noise, and fractional Brownian motion provide examples. Work beginning at Duke will focus on gravity driven convection, mixing and gravitational collapse. Although granular materials consist of collections of interacting particles, there are important differences between the dynamics of a collections of grains and the dynamics of a collections of molecules. In particular, the ergodic hypothesis is generally invalid for granular materials, so that ordinary statistical physics does not apply. In the absence of a steady energy input, granular materials undergo a rapid collapse which is strongly influenced by the presence of gravity. Fluctuations on laboratory scales in such quantities as the stress can be very large-as much as an order of magnitude greater than the mean.

  9. Rare events in granular media: a volcanic-like explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khain, Evgeniy; Sander, Leonard

    2015-11-01

    Granular matter is ubiquitous in nature and exhibits a variety of nontrivial phenomena. Within the same system, different regions of granular media can be at a solid or a gas phase. Here we focus on a granular Leidenfrost effect: a solid-like cluster is levitating above the ``hot'' granular gas. This state was observed experimentally, when granular matter was vertically vibrated in a two-dimensional container. This solid-gas coexistence can be described by using granular hydrodynamics, taking into account the viscosity divergence in the solid cluster. The approach is similar to the one employed in investigating solid-fluid coexistence in dense shear granular flows. We performed extensive molecular dynamics simulations of a simple model of inelastic hard spheres driven by a ``thermal'' bottom wall. Simulations showed that for low wall temperatures, the levitating cluster is stable, while for high wall temperatures, it breaks down, and a hot gas bursts out resembling a volcanic explosion. We found a hysteresis: for a wide range of bottom wall temperatures, both the clustering state and the volcanic state are stable. However, even if the system is at the (stable) clustering state, a volcanic explosion is possible: it is a rare event driven by large fluctuations. We propose a special simulation technique that allows investigating such rare events.

  10. Swimming in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Takashi; Kadau, Dirk; Shinbrot, Troy; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2009-08-01

    A class of reptiles known as sand swimmers adapts to hot environments by submerging beneath desert sands during the day and so provide a unique probe into the dynamics of intruders in granular beds. To understand the mechanism for swimming in an otherwise solid bed, we study a simple model of periodic contraction and extension of large intruders in a granular bed. Using an event-driven simulation, we find optimal conditions that idealized swimmers must use to critically fluidize a sand bed so that it is rigid enough to support a load when needed, but fluid enough to permit motion with minimal resistance. Swimmers—or other intruders—that agitate the bed too rapidly produce large voids that prevent traction from being achieved, while swimmers that move too slowly cannot travel before the bed resolidifies around them, i.e., the swimmers locally probe the fundamental time scale in a granular packing.

  11. Metastasizing granular cell ameloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Anju; Bhatnagar, Amar; Saxena, Sunita

    2012-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is a slow growing odontogenic epithelial tumor of jaw. It accounts for 1% of all tumors and cysts arising in maxilla and mandible. Although it is locally invasive and has a marked tendency to recur, metastasis is rare. Of the various histological patterns of ameloblastoma, the granular cell type is extremely rare accounting for 4% of ameloblastomas. We report a case of granular cell ameloblastoma with metastasis to the cervical lymph node presenting in a 40-year-old Indian female. PMID:22434948

  12. Impact of granular drops.

    PubMed

    Marston, J O; Mansoor, M M; Thoroddsen, S T

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the spreading and splashing of granular drops during impact with a solid target. The granular drops are formed from roughly spherical balls of sand mixed with water, which is used as a binder to hold the ball together during free-fall. We measure the instantaneous spread diameter for different impact speeds and find that the normalized spread diameter d/D grows as (tV/D)(1/2). The speeds of the grains ejected during the "splash" are measured and they rarely exceed twice that of the impact speed. PMID:23944390

  13. Self-Organization in Granular Slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottino, Julio M.; Jain, Nitin; Lueptow, Richard M.; Khakhar, Devang V.

    2000-11-01

    Mixtures of tumbled granular materials under flow exhibit various intriguing types of un-mixing or self-organization. Small differences in particles' density, size or shape may trigger the effect. Nearly all studies to date have addressed the case of dry granular media, where the interparticle fluid is typically air. Here we report the existence of self-organization in wet granular media or slurries, mixtures of particles of different sizes dispersed in a lower density liquid. Technological examples appear in cement, ceramics, fine chemicals, and in the food industry; examples in nature appear in evolution of landslides and transport in river sediments. In spite of significantly different physics at the particle level, both axial banding (alternating bands rich in small and large particles in a long rotating cylinder) and radial segregation (in quasi 2D containers) are observed in slurries. However, axial segregation is significantly faster and the spectrum of outcomes is richer. Moreover, experiments with suitable fluids, reveal, for the first time, the internal structure of axially segregated systems, something that up to now has been accessible only via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experimentation.

  14. A granular fountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbina, R. E.; Díaz, K. K.; Bramer-Escamilla, W.; Sánchez, I.

    2014-07-01

    We present a fascinating experiment, with great potential for entry-level educational and public outreach applications: a granular fountain. It is an example of the rich and sometimes counterintuitive phenomena that takes place when fine sand is vertically vibrated at low frequencies. We offer guidelines for reproducing the experiment and also a short discussion on the physics behind the effect.

  15. Rainwater Channelization and Infiltration in Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cejas, Cesare; Wei, Yuli; Barrois, Remi; Durian, Douglas; Dreyfus, Remi; Compass Team

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the formation of fingered flow in dry granular media under simulated rainfall using a quasi-2D experimental set-up composed of a random close packing of mono-disperse glass beads. We determine effects of grain diameter and surface wetting properties on the formation and infiltration of water channels. For hydrophilic granular media, rainwater initially infiltrates a shallow top layer of soil creating a uniform horizontal wetting front before instabilities occur and grow to form water channels. For hydrophobic media, rainwater ponds on the soil surface rather than infiltrates and water channels may still occur at a later time when the hydraulic pressure of the ponding water exceeds the capillary repellency of the soil. We probe the kinetics of the fingering instabilities that serve as precursors for the growth and drainage of water channels. We also examine the effects of several different methods on improving rainwater channelization such as varying the level of pre-saturation, modifying the soil surface flatness, and adding superabsorbent hydrogel particles.

  16. Modeling Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackbill, J. U.

    2000-11-01

    Granular materials are often cited as examples of systems with complex and unusual properties. Much of this complexity is captured by computational models in which the actual material properties of individual grains are idealized and simplified. Because material properties can be important under extreme conditions, we consider assemblies of grains with more realistic properties. Our model grains may deform, their resulting stresses are computed from elastic / plastic constitutive models, and their interactions with each other include Coulomb friction and bonding. Our model equations are solved using a particle-in-cell (PIC) method, which combines a Lagrangian representation of the materials with an adaptive grid [1]. Our contact model between grains is linear in the number of grains, and we model assemblies with statistically significant numbers of grains. With our model, we have studied the response of dense granular material to shear, with especial attention to the probability density function governing the volume distribution of stress for mono- and poly-disperse samples, circular and polygonal grains, and various values of microscopic friction coefficients, yield stresses, and packing fractions [2]. Remarkably, PDF's are similar in form for all cases simulated, and similar to those observed in experiments with granular materials under both compression and shear. Namely, the simulations yield an exponential probability of large stresses above the mean, and there is a finite chance that a few grains in a large assembly are subjected to extreme stresses at any given time, even at low strain rates. For energetic materials, such as explosives, this is a signficant finding. We have also studied the relationship between distributions of boundary tractions and volume distributions of stress. The ratio of normal and tangential components of traction on the boundary defines a bulk frictional response, which we find increases with the inter-granular friction coefficient. However, the bulk friction is always larger than the inter-granular friction for densely packed samples. Bulk friction is also strongly dependent on grain size distribution and shape. We also present new observations of force-chain banding during recrystallization, of slip systems in monodisperse samples, and of the effects of plastic yield. Acknowledgement: This work was performed in collaboration with S. G. Bardenhagen, University of Utah, D. Sulsky, University of New Mexico, and Sharen Cummins, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and is supported by the Department of Energy, under contract W-7405-ENG-36. [1] Bardenhagen, S. G., J. U. Brackbill, and D. Sulsky, The material-point method for granular materials, Comput. Meths. Appl. Mech. and Engn., 187, 529-541, 2000. [2] Bardenhagen, S. G., J. U. Brackbill, and D. L. Sulsky, Numerical study of stress distribution in sheared granular material in two dimensions, Phys. Rev E, 62, 2000 (to appear).

  17. Flow of wet granular materials: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamseh, Saeed; Roux, Jean-Noël; Chevoir, François

    2015-08-01

    We simulate dense assemblies of frictional spherical grains in steady shear flow under controlled normal stress P in the presence of a small amount of an interstitial liquid, which gives rise to capillary menisci, assumed isolated (pendular regime), and attractive forces, which are hysteretic: Menisci form at contact, but do not break until grains are separated by a finite rupture distance. The system behavior depends on two dimensionless control parameters, inertial number I and reduced pressure P*=a P /(π Γ ) , comparing confining forces ˜a2P to meniscus tensile strength F0=π Γ a , for grains of diameter a joined by menisci with surface tension Γ . We pay special attention to the quasistatic limit of slow flow and observe systematic, enduring strain localization in some of the cohesion-dominated (P*˜0.1 ) systems. Homogeneous steady flows are characterized by the dependence of internal friction coefficient μ* and solid fraction Φ on I and P*. We also record normal stress differences, fairly small but not negligible and increasing for decreasing P*. The system rheology is moderately sensitive to saturation within the pendular regime, but would be different in the absence of capillary hysteresis. Capillary forces have a significant effect on the macroscopic behavior of the system, up to P* values of several units, especially for longer force ranges associated with larger menisci. The concept of effective pressure may be used to predict an order of magnitude for the strong increase of μ* as P* decreases but such a crude approach is unable to account for the complex structural changes induced by capillary cohesion, with a significant decrease of Φ and different agglomeration states and anisotropic fabric. Likewise, the Mohr-Coulomb criterion for pressure-dependent critical states is, at best, an approximation valid within a restricted range of pressures, with P*≥1 . At small enough P*, large clusters of interacting grains form in slow flows, in which liquid bonds survive shear strains of several units. This affects the anisotropies associated with different interactions and the shape of function μ*(I ) , which departs more slowly from its quasistatic limit than in cohesionless systems (possibly explaining the shear banding tendency).

  18. Flow of wet granular materials: A numerical study.

    PubMed

    Khamseh, Saeed; Roux, Jean-Noël; Chevoir, François

    2015-08-01

    We simulate dense assemblies of frictional spherical grains in steady shear flow under controlled normal stress P in the presence of a small amount of an interstitial liquid, which gives rise to capillary menisci, assumed isolated (pendular regime), and attractive forces, which are hysteretic: Menisci form at contact, but do not break until grains are separated by a finite rupture distance. The system behavior depends on two dimensionless control parameters, inertial number I and reduced pressure P*=aP/(πΓ), comparing confining forces ∼a2P to meniscus tensile strength F0=πΓa, for grains of diameter a joined by menisci with surface tension Γ. We pay special attention to the quasistatic limit of slow flow and observe systematic, enduring strain localization in some of the cohesion-dominated (P*∼0.1) systems. Homogeneous steady flows are characterized by the dependence of internal friction coefficient μ* and solid fraction Φ on I and P*. We also record normal stress differences, fairly small but not negligible and increasing for decreasing P*. The system rheology is moderately sensitive to saturation within the pendular regime, but would be different in the absence of capillary hysteresis. Capillary forces have a significant effect on the macroscopic behavior of the system, up to P* values of several units, especially for longer force ranges associated with larger menisci. The concept of effective pressure may be used to predict an order of magnitude for the strong increase of μ* as P* decreases but such a crude approach is unable to account for the complex structural changes induced by capillary cohesion, with a significant decrease of Φ and different agglomeration states and anisotropic fabric. Likewise, the Mohr-Coulomb criterion for pressure-dependent critical states is, at best, an approximation valid within a restricted range of pressures, with P*≥1. At small enough P*, large clusters of interacting grains form in slow flows, in which liquid bonds survive shear strains of several units. This affects the anisotropies associated with different interactions and the shape of function μ*(I), which departs more slowly from its quasistatic limit than in cohesionless systems (possibly explaining the shear banding tendency). PMID:26382388

  19. Stress transmission and incipient yield flow in dense granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenfeld, Raphael

    2010-05-01

    Jammed granular matter transmits stresses non-uniformly like no conventional solid, especially when it is on the verge of failure. Jamming is caused by self-organization of granular matter under external loads, often giving rise to networks of force chains that support the loads non-uniformly. An ongoing debate in the literature concerns the correct way to model the static stress field in such media: good old elasticity theory or newcomer isostaticity theory. The two differ significantly and, in particular in 2D, isostaticity theory leads naturally to force chain solutions. More recently, it has been proposed that real granular materials are made of mixtures of regions, some behaving elastically and some isostatically. The theory to describe these systems has been named stato-elasticity. In this paper, I first present the rationale for stato-elasticity theory. An important step towards the construction of this theory is a good understanding of stress transmission in the regions of pure isostatic states. A brief description is given of recently derived general solutions for 2D isostatic regions with nonuniform structures, which go well beyond the over-simplistic picture of force chains. I then show how the static stress equations are related directly to incipient yield flow and derive the equations that govern yield and creep rheology of dense granular matter at the initial stages of failure. These equations are general and describe strains in granular materials of both rigid and compliant particles.

  20. Spreading of triboelectrically charged granular matter

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepak; Sane, A.; Gohil, Smita.; Bandaru, P. R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Ghosh, Shankar

    2014-01-01

    We report on the spreading of triboelectrically charged glass particles on an oppositely charged surface of a plastic cylindrical container in the presence of a constant mechanical agitation. The particles spread via sticking, as a monolayer on the cylinder's surface. Continued agitation initiates a sequence of instabilities of this monolayer, which first forms periodic wavy-stripe-shaped transverse density modulation in the monolayer and then ejects narrow and long particle-jets from the tips of these stripes. These jets finally coalesce laterally to form a homogeneous spreading front that is layered along the spreading direction. These remarkable growth patterns are related to a time evolving frictional drag between the moving charged glass particles and the countercharges on the plastic container. The results provide insight into the multiscale time-dependent tribolelectric processes and motivates further investigation into the microscopic causes of these macroscopic dynamical instabilities and spatial structures. PMID:24919483

  1. Granular convection in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, N; Rozitis, B; Nordstrom, K; Green, S F; Michel, P; de Lophem, T-L; Losert, W

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the role of gravity on convection in a dense granular shear flow. Using a microgravity-modified Taylor-Couette shear cell under the conditions of parabolic flight microgravity, we demonstrate experimentally that secondary, convective-like flows in a sheared granular material are close to zero in microgravity and enhanced under high-gravity conditions, though the primary flow fields are unaffected by gravity. We suggest that gravity tunes the frictional particle-particle and particle-wall interactions, which have been proposed to drive the secondary flow. In addition, the degree of plastic deformation increases with increasing gravitational forces, supporting the notion that friction is the ultimate cause. PMID:23383851

  2. Granular Dynamics during Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordstrom, Kerstin; Lim, Emily; Harrington, Matt; Losert, Wolfgang

    2013-03-01

    In this work, we study the impact of a projectile onto a bed of 3 mm grains immersed in an index-matched fluid. Using a laser sheet scanning technique, a high speed camera, and particle tracking, we can measure the trajectory of each grain throughout an impact event. We characterize the bulk and microscopic dynamics within the granular material as a function of initial sample preparation, specifically applying a uniaxial prestrain to the sample. We find that small changes in sample preparation lead to drastic departures from the universal depth scaling seen in previous studies of shallow granular impacts. By examining the nonaffine motion within the system, we propose the effect is due to different loading and buckling of force chains within the system. Supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency

  3. Granular flow over inclined channels with constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunuguntla, Deepak; Weinhart, Thomas; Thornton, Anthony; Bokhove, Onno

    2013-04-01

    Study of granular flows down inclined channels is essential in understanding the dynamics of natural grain flows like landslides and snow avalanches. As a stepping stone, dry granular flow over an inclined channel with a localised constriction is investigated using both continuum methods and particle simulations. Initially, depth-averaged equations of motion (Savage & Hutter 1989) containing an unknown friction law are considered. The shallow-layer model for granular flows is closed with a friction law obtained from particle simulations of steady flows (Weinhart et al. 2012) undertaken in the open source package Mercury DPM (Mercury 2010). The closed two-dimensional (2D) shallow-layer model is then width-averaged to obtain a novel one-dimensional (1D) model which is an extension of the one for water flows through contraction (Akers & Bokhove 2008). Different flow states are predicted by this novel one-dimensional theory. Flow regimes with distinct flow states are determined as a function of upstream channel Froude number, F, and channel width ratio, Bc. The latter being the ratio of the channel exit width and upstream channel width. Existence of multiple steady states is predicted in a certain regime of F - Bc parameter plane which is in agreement with experiments previously undertaken by (Akers & Bokhove 2008) and for granular flows (Vreman et al. 2007). Furthermore, the 1D model is verified by solving the 2D shallow granular equations using an open source discontinuous Galerkin finite element package hpGEM (Pesch et al. 2007). For supercritical flows i.e. F > 1 the 1D asymptotics holds although the two-dimensional oblique granular jumps largely vary across the converging channel. This computationally efficient closed 1D model is validated by comparing it to the computationally more expensiveaa three-dimensional particle simulations. Finally, we aim to present a quasi-steady particle simulation of inclined flow through two rectangular blocks separated by a gap, investigate the channel formed by the dead zones and compare it with our analytical calculations. REFERENCES 1. Akers, B. & Bokhove, O. 2008 Hydraulic flow through a channel contraction: Multiple steady states. Physics of fluids 20 (056601), 056601. 2. Mercury 2010 http://www2.msm.ctw.utwente.nl/athornton/md/ . 3. Pesch, L., Bell, A., Sollie, H., Ambati, V.R., Bokhove, O. & Van der Vegt, J.J.W. 2007 hpGEM—a software framework for discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods. ACM Transactions on Mathematical Software (TOMS) 33 (4), 23. 4. Savage, SB & Hutter, K. 1989 The motion of a finite mass of granular material down a rough incline. Journal of Fluid Mechanics 199 (1), 177-215. 5. Vreman, AW, Al-Tarazi, M., Kuipers, JAM, van Sint Annaland, M. & Bokhove, O. 2007 Supercritical shallow granular flow through a contraction: experiment, theory and simulation. Journal of Fluid Mechanics 578 (1), 233-269. 6. Weinhart, T., Thornton, A.R., Luding, S. & Bokhove, O. 2012 Closure relations for shallow granular flows from particle simulations. Granular Matter 14 (4), 531-552.

  4. Spatiotemporally resolved granular acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Eli; Daniels, Karen

    2011-03-01

    Acoustic techniques provide a non-invasive method of characterizing granular material properties; however, there are many challenges in formulating accurate models of sound propagation due to the inherently heterogeneous nature of granular materials. In order to quantify acoustic responses in space and time, we perform experiments in a photoelastic granular material in which the internal stress pattern (in the form of force chains) is visible. We utilize two complementary methods, high-speed imaging and piezoelectric transduction, to provide particle-scale measurements of the amplitude of the acoustic wave. We observe that the average wave amplitude is largest within particles experiencing the largest forces. The force-dependence of this amplitude is in qualitative agreement with a simple Hertzian-like model for contact area. In addition, we investigate the power spectrum of the propagating signal using the piezoelectric sensors. For a Gaussian wave packet input, we observe a broad spectrum of transmitted frequencies below the driving frequency, and we quantify the characteristic frequencies and corresponding length scales of our material as the system pressure is varied.

  5. Wet Adhesion and Adhesive Locomotion of Snails on Anti-Adhesive Non-Wetting Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shirtcliffe, Neil J.; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces. PMID:22693563

  6. Constitutive relations for steady, dense granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vescovi, D.; Berzi, D.; di Prisco, C. G.

    2011-12-01

    In the recent past, the flow of dense granular materials has been the subject of many scientific works; this is due to the large number of natural phenomena involving solid particles flowing at high concentration (e.g., debris flows and landslides). In contrast with the flow of dilute granular media, where the energy is essentially dissipated in binary collisions, the flow of dense granular materials is characterized by multiple, long-lasting and frictional contacts among the particles. The work focuses on the mechanical response of dry granular materials under steady, simple shear conditions. In particular, the goal is to obtain a complete rheology able to describe the material behavior within the entire range of concentrations for which the flow can be considered dense. The total stress is assumed to be the linear sum of a frictional and a kinetic component. The frictional and the kinetic contribution are modeled in the context of the critical state theory [8, 10] and the kinetic theory of dense granular gases [1, 3, 7], respectively. In the critical state theory, the granular material approaches a certain attractor state, independent on the initial arrangement, characterized by the capability of developing unlimited shear strains without any change in the concentration. Given that a disordered granular packing exists only for a range of concentration between the random loose and close packing [11], a form for the concentration dependence of the frictional normal stress that makes the latter vanish at the random loose packing is defined. In the kinetic theory, the particles are assumed to interact through instantaneous, binary and uncorrelated collisions. A new state variable of the problem is introduced, the granular temperature, which accounts for the velocity fluctuations. The model has been extended to account for the decrease in the energy dissipation due to the existence of correlated motion among the particles [5, 6] and to deal with non-instantaneous collisions [4]. We have shown that the present theory is capable of reproducing, qualitatively and quantitatively, the numerical simulations on disks [2] and the experiments on incline flows of glass spere [9]. [1] C. S. Campbell, Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics 22, 57 (1990) [2] F. da Cruz, S. Emam, M. Prochnow, J. Roux, and F. Chevoir, Physical Review E 72, 021309 (2005) [3] I. Goldhirsch, Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics 35, 267 (2003). [4] H. Hwang and K. Hutter, Continuum Mechanics and Thermodynamics 7, 357 (1995) [5] J. T. Jenkins, Granular Matter 10, 47 (2007) [6] J. T. Jenkins, Physics of Fluids 18, 103307 (2006) [7] J. T. Jenkins and M. W. Richman, Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis 87, 355 (1985) [8] D. Muir Wood, Geotechnical modelling (Spon Press, New York, 2004) [9] O. Pouliquen, Physics of Fluids 11, 542 (1999) [10] A. N. Schofield and C. P. Wroth, Critical state soil mechanics (McGraw-Hill, London, U.K., 1968) [11] C. Song, P. Wang, and H. A. Makse, Nature 453, 629 (2008)

  7. Entangled granular media.

    PubMed

    Gravish, Nick; Franklin, Scott V; Hu, David L; Goldman, Daniel I

    2012-05-18

    We study the geometrically induced cohesion of ensembles of granular "u particles" that mechanically entangle through particle interpenetration. We vary the length-to-width ratio l/w of the u particles and form them into freestanding vertical columns. In a laboratory experiment, we monitor the response of the columns to sinusoidal vibration (with peak acceleration Γ). Column collapse occurs in a characteristic time τ which follows the relation τ∝exp(Γ/Δ). Δ resembles an activation energy and is maximal at intermediate l/w. A simulation reveals that optimal strength results from competition between packing and entanglement. PMID:23003190

  8. Cooling and aggregation in wet granulates.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Stephan; Aspelmeier, Timo; Roeller, Klaus; Fingerle, Axel; Herminghaus, Stephan; Zippelius, Annette

    2009-04-10

    Wet granular materials are characterized by a defined bond energy in their particle interaction such that breaking a bond implies an irreversible loss of a fixed amount of energy. Associated with the bond energy is a nonequilibrium transition, setting in as the granular temperature falls below the bond energy. The subsequent aggregation of particles into clusters is shown to be a self-similar growth process with a cluster size distribution that obeys scaling. In the early phase of aggregation the clusters are fractals with D{f}=2, for later times we observe gelation. We use simple scaling arguments to derive the temperature decay in the early and late stages of cooling and verify our results with event-driven simulations. PMID:19392486

  9. Subsurface Explosions in Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Shuyue; Houim, Ryan; Oran, Elaine

    2015-11-01

    Numerical simulations of coupled gas-granular flows are used to study properties of shock formation and propagation in media, such as sand or regolith on the moon, asteroids, or comets. The simulations were performed with a multidimensional fully compressible model, GRAF, which solves two sets of coupled Navier-Stokes equations, one for the gas and one for the granular medium. The specific case discussed here is for a subsurface explosion in a granular medium initiated by an equivalent of 200g of TNT in depths ranging from 0.1m to 3m. The background conditions of 100K, 10 Pa and loose initial particle volume fraction of 25% are consistent with an event on a comet. The initial blast creates a cavity as a granular shock expands outwards. Since the gas-phase shock propagates faster than the granular shock in loose, granular material, some gas and particles are ejected before the granular shock arrives. When the granular shock reaches the surface, a cap-like structure forms. This cap breaks and may fall back on the surface and in this process, relatively dense particle clusters form. At lower temperatures, the explosion timescales are increased and entrained particles are more densely packed.

  10. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Electrical, dielectric and surface wetting properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes/nylon-6 nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yun-Ze; Li, Meng-Meng; Sui, Wan-Mei; Kong, Qing-Shan; Zhang, Lei

    2009-03-01

    This paper reports that the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)/nylon-6 (PA6) nanocomposites with different MWCNT loadings have been prepared by a simple melt-compounding method. The electrical, dielectric, and surface wetting properties of the CNT/PA6 composites have been studied. The temperature dependence of the conductivity of the CNT/PA6 composite with 10.0 wt% CNT loading (σRT ~ 10-4 S/cm) are measured, and afterwards a charge-energy-limited tunnelling model (ln σ(T) ~ T-1/2) is found. With increasing CNT weight percentage from 0.0 to 10.0 wt%, the dielectric constant of the CNT/PA6 composites enhances and the dielectric loss tangent increases two orders of magnitude. In addition, water contact angles of the CNT/PA6 composites increase and the composites with CNT loading larger than 2.0 wt% even become hydrophobic. The obtained results indicate that the electrical and surface properties of the composites have been significantly enhanced by the embedded carbon nanotubes.

  11. Drop floating on a granular raft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jambon-Puillet, Etienne; Josserand, Christophe; Protiere, Suzie

    2015-11-01

    When a droplet comes in contact with a bath of the same liquid, it coalesces to minimize the surface energy. This phenomenon reduces emulsion stability and is usually fought with surfactant molecules. Another way to slow down coalescence is to use colloidal solid particles. In this case the particles spontaneously migrate to the interface to form ``Pickering'' emulsions and act as a barrier between droplets. Here we use dense, large particles (~ 500 μm) which form a monolayer at an oil/water interface that we call a granular raft. When a droplet is placed on top of such a raft, for a given set of particle properties (contact angle/size), the raft prevents coalescence indefinitely. However, in contrast to what happens when a droplet is placed on a hydrophobic surface and never wets the surface, here the droplet is strongly anchored to the raft and deforms it. We will use this specific configuration to probe the mechanical response of the granular raft: by controlling the droplet volume we can impose tensile or compressive stresses. Finally we will show that the drop, spherical at first, slowly takes a more complex shape as it's volume increases. This shape is not reversible as the drop volume is decreased. The drop can become oblate or prolate with wrinkling of the raft.

  12. Heterogeneities in granular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mehta, A; Barker, G C; Luck, J M

    2008-06-17

    The absence of Brownian motion in granular media is a source of much complexity, including the prevalence of heterogeneity, whether static or dynamic, within a given system. Such strong heterogeneities can exist as a function of depth in a box of grains; this is the system we study here. First, we present results from three-dimensional, cooperative and stochastic Monte Carlo shaking simulations of spheres on heterogeneous density fluctuations. Next, we juxtapose these with results obtained from a theoretical model of a column of grains under gravity; frustration via competing local fields is included in our model, whereas the effect of gravity is to slow down the dynamics of successively deeper layers. The combined conclusions suggest that the dynamics of a real granular column can be divided into different phases-ballistic, logarithmic, activated, and glassy-as a function of depth. The nature of the ground states and their retrieval (under zero-temperature dynamics) is analyzed; the glassy phase shows clear evidence of its intrinsic ("crystalline") states, which lie below a band of approximately degenerate ground states. In the other three phases, by contrast, the system jams into a state chosen randomly from this upper band of metastable states. PMID:18541918

  13. An Application of the Study of Granular Shocks to Aerospace Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padgett, David Alan

    Granular systems are collections of macroscopic particles which interact with each other through contact. Common examples of granular systems are piles of sand, actual grain in silos or other storage facilities, and industrial powders. Researchers display a heavy interest in granular materials because they are ubiquitous in the world, but their states and interactions with other matter are difficult to describe mathematically. One of the many counterintuitive facts about granular systems is that, under certain circumstances, granular systems can behave like fluids and exhibit shock wave behavior. This dissertation details the development of an event-driven simulation to study the behavior of granular systems as well as some observations made by examining different granular systems as they impact wedges and discs. This dissertation also discusses a novel method of exploiting the shock behavior of granular systems in order to investigate problems in aerospace engineering. Typical computational fluid dynamics solvers can be inefficient when dealing with flows which include shock waves. Prior knowledge of the location of shock waves in a flow can help engineers create CFD grids that allow fluid dynamics solvers to converge faster than they otherwise would and still preserve the accuracy of the solution. By investigating an ideal fluid system with an analogous granular system, the locations of the shock waves are observed and efficient grids for solving the Navier- Stokes equations are developed. Through case studies, this dissertation will show that such efficient grids lead to fluid flow solutions which converge in much less time than comparable fine grids.

  14. PREFACE: Wetting: introductory note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herminghaus, S.

    2005-03-01

    The discovery of wetting as a topic of physical science dates back two hundred years, to one of the many achievements of the eminent British scholar Thomas Young. He suggested a simple equation relating the contact angle between a liquid surface and a solid substrate to the interfacial tensions involved [1], γlg cos θ = γsg - γsl (1) In modern terms, γ denotes the excess free energy per unit area of the interface indicated by its indices, with l, g and s corresponding to the liquid, gas and solid, respectively [2]. After that, wetting seems to have been largely ignored by physicists for a long time. The discovery by Gabriel Lippmann that θ may be tuned over a wide range by electrochemical means [3], and some important papers about modifications of equation~(1) due to substrate inhomogeneities [4,5] are among the rare exceptions. This changed completely during the seventies, when condensed matter physics had become enthusiastic about critical phenomena, and was vividly inspired by the development of the renormalization group by Kenneth Wilson [6]. This had solved the long standing problem of how to treat fluctuations, and to understand the universal values of bulk critical exponents. By inspection of the critical exponents of the quantities involved in equation~(1), John W Cahn discovered what he called critical point wetting: for any liquid, there should be a well-defined transition to complete wetting (i.e., θ = 0) as the critical point of the liquid is approached along the coexistence curve [7]. His paper inspired an enormous amount of further work, and may be legitimately viewed as the entrance of wetting into the realm of modern physics. Most of the publications directly following Cahn's work were theoretical papers which elaborated on wetting in relation to critical phenomena. A vast amount of interesting, and in part quite unexpected, ramifications were discovered, such as the breakdown of universality in thin film systems [8]. Simultaneously, a number of very specific and quantitative predictions were put forward which were aimed at direct experimental tests of the developed concepts [9]. Experimentally, wetting phenomena proved to be a rather difficult field of research. While contact angles seem quite easy to measure, deeper insight can only be gained by assessing the physical properties of minute amounts of material, as provided by the molecularly thin wetting layers. At the same time, the variations in the chemical potential relevant for studying wetting transitions are very small, such that system stability sometimes poses hard to solve practical problems. As a consequence, layering transitions in cryogenic systems were among the first to be thoroughly studied [10] experimentally, since they require comparably moderate stability. First-order wetting transitions were not observed experimentally before the early nineties, either in (cryogenic) quantum systems [11,12] or in binary liquid mixtures [13,14]. The first observation of critical wetting, a continuous wetting transition, in 1996 [15] was a major breakthrough [16]. In the meantime, a detailed seminal paper by Pierre Gilles de Gennes published in 1985 [17] had spurred a large number of new research projects which were directed to wetting phenomena other than those related to phase transitions. More attention was paid to non-equilibrium physics, as it is at work when oil spreads over a surface, or a liquid coating beads off (`dewets') from its support and forms a pattern of many individual droplets. This turned out to be an extremely fruitful field of research, and was more readily complemented by experimental efforts than was the case with wetting transitions. It was encouraging to find effects analogous to layering (as mentioned above) in more common systems such as oil films spreading on a solid support [18,19]. Long standing riddles such as the divergence of dissipation at a moving contact line were now addressed both theoretically and experimentally [20,21]. However, the requirements concerning resolution of the measurements, as well as the stability and cleanliness of the systems, were immense for the reasons mentioned above. The pronounced impact of impurities was already well-known from contact angle measurements, where one invariably observes quite significant hysteresis effects and history dependence of the measured angle due to minute substrate inhomogeneity. This is why pioneering work on characteristic patterns emerging upon dewetting of thin liquid films [22] opened a long lasting, and eventually very fruitful, controversy on the question whether the underlying mechanism was unstable surface waves [24] (which was unambiguously observed for the first time in 1996 [23]) or `just' nucleation from defects. By the mid-nineties, the physics of wetting had made its way into the canon of physical science topics in its full breadth. The number of fruitful aspects addressed by that time is far too widespread to be covered here with any ambition to completeness. The number of researchers turning to this field was continuously growing, and many problems had already been successfully resolved, and many questions answered. However, quite a number of fundamental problems remained, which obstinately resisted solution. Only a few shall be mentioned: There was no satisfactory explanation for triple point wetting [25], in particular for its ubiquity. The numerical values of contact line tensions in both theory and (very reproducible) experiments [26] were many orders of magnitude apart. In the particularly interesting field of structure formation, i.e., dewetting, there was no clear interpretation of many experimental results, and no possibility to distinguish with certainty between the different possible mechanisms. Furthermore, the impact of the rather strong non-linearities of the involved van der Waals forces was entirely unclear. In the more remote field of bionics, it was not clear how some plants manage to make liquids bead off so perfectly from their leaves. This list, which is of course far from complete, serves to illustrate the wide scope of open questions. At that time, research groups in Germany concerned with wetting phenomena gathered and finally applied for a priority programme on wetting and structure formation at interfaces, which obtained funding from the German Science Foundation [27]. This special issue is dedicated to the research carried out within this programme. It spans the period starting from spring 1998 until summer 2004, and is presented as a combination of review over that period and original presentation of the state-of-the-art at its end. Although only a very limited number of problems could be tackled within the programme, a few significant achievements could be attained. Some of these shall be highlighted: It could be shown that triple point wetting is a direct consequence of topographic substrate imperfection. By taking the bending energy of a solid slab on a rough substrate into account, accordance between theory [28] and experiment [29] was finally achieved. By applying scanning force microscopy to three phase contact lines, it could be shown that the `real' contact line tension is indeed much smaller than `observed' on macroscopic scale [39], and comes close to what is theoretically expected. In the field of structure formation by dewetting, unprecedented agreement between experiment [31], theory [32], and particularly careful simulations [33] was achieved. The underlying mechanisms could be clearly distinguished by means of Minkowski functionals. It could be shown both theoretically [34,35] and experimentally [36,37] that chemically patterned substrates give rise not only to a large variety of liquid morphologies, but that the latter can be manipulated and controlled in a precise manner. It was demonstrated that spherical (colloidal) beads may not only be used like surfactants as in Pickering emulsions, but that the resulting interface configurations may be applied to generate an amazing variety of well-controlled porous membranes, with a lot of potential applications [39]. This gives a flavour of the variety of topics addressed in the papers making up this issue. They are organized in five sections, each of which is opened with a short introduction explaining their mutual relation. For further access to the pertinent literature, the reader is referred to the references given in each article separately. References [1] Young T 1805 Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London 95 65 [2] Equation (1) is readily derived by demanding force balance at the contact line, where all three phases meet. [3] Lippmann G 1886 Anal. Chim. 48 776 [4] Cassie A B D and Baxter S 1944 Trans. Faraday Soc. 40 546 [5] Wenzel R N 1949 J. Phys. Chem. 53 1466 [6] Wilson K G 1971 Phys. Rev. B 4 3174 and 3184 [7] Cahn J W 1977 J. Chem. Phys. 66 3667 [8] See, for example Dietrich S and Schick M 1986 Phys. Rev. B 33 4952 [9] See, for example Cheng E et al 1991 Phys. Rev. Lett. 67 1007 [10] Dash J G and Ruvalds J (ed) 1980 Phase Transitions in Surface Films (NATO advanced study series vol B51) (New York: Plenum) [11] Nacher P J and Dupont-Roc J 1991 Phys. Rev. Lett. 67 2966 [12] Rutledge J E and Taborek P 1992 Phys. Rev. Lett. 69 937 [13] Bonn D, Kellay H and Wegdam G H 1992 Phys. Rev. Lett. 69 1975 [14] Bonn D, Kellay H and Wegdam G H 1993 J. Chem. Phys. 99 7115 [15] Ragil K et al 1996 Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 1532 [16] Findenegg G H and Herminghaus S 1997 Curr. Opin. Colloid Interface Sci. 2 301 [17] de Gennes P G 1985 Rev. Mod. Phys. 57 827 [18] Heslot F, Fraysse N and Cazabat A M 1989 Nature 338 1289 [19] Fraysse N et al 1993 J. Colloid Int. Sci. 158 27 [20] Huh C and Scriven L E 1971 J. Colloid Int. Sci. 35 85 [21] Brochard F et al 1994 Langmuir 10 1566 [22] Reiter G 1992 Phys. Rev. Lett. 68 75 [23] Bischof J et al 1996 Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 1536 [24] Ruckenstein E and Jain R K 1974 J. Chem. Soc. Faraday Trans. II 70 132 [25] Herminghaus S et al 1997 Annal. Phys. 6 425 [26] Li D and Neumann A W 1990 Colloids Surf. 43 195 [27] Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, Schwerpunktprogramm 1052, `Benetzung und Strukturbildung an Grenzflächen' [28] Esztermann A and Löwen H 2005 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 17 S429 [29] Sohaili M et al 2005 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 17 S415 [30] Pompe T and Herminghaus S 2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 85 1930 [31] Seemann R et al 2005 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 17 S267 [32] Herminghaus S et al 1998 Science 282 916 [33] Becker J and Gr\\"un G 2005 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 17 S291 [34] Lipowsky R \\etal 2005 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 17 S537 [35] Dietrich S et al 2005 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 17 S577 [36] Gau H et al 19999 Science 283 46 [37] Mugele F \\etal 2005 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 17 S559 [38] Pfohl T et al 2003 Chem. Phys. Chem. 4 1291 [39 Xu H et al 2005 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 17 S465

  15. Dynamic weakening is limited by granular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwano, O.; Hatano, T.

    2011-12-01

    Earthquakes are the result of the frictional instability of faults containing fine rock powders called gouge derived from attrition in past fault motions. Understanding the frictional instability of granular matter in terms of constitutive laws is thus important. Because of the importance of granular matter for industries and engineering, the friction of granular matter has been studied in the field of solid earth science and other fields, such as statistical physics. In solid earth science, the rate- and state-dependent friction law was established by laboratory experiments at a very low sliding velocity (μm/s to mm/s). Recent experiments conducted at sub-seismic to seismic sliding velocities (mm/s to m/s), however, show that frictional properties are much richer than those predicted by the rate- and state-dependent friction law. One of the most important findings in such experiments is the remarkable weakening due to mechano-chemical effects by frictional heating [Tullis, 2007]. In statistical physics, another empirical law holds for much faster deformation than the former, showing positive shear-rate dependence. Until Recently, friction of granular matter has been investigated independently in the fields of solid earth science and statistical physics, and thus the relation between these distinct constitutive laws is not clear. Recently, some experimental studies have been reported to connect the achievements in these two fields. For example, a laboratory experiment on dry glass beads under very low normal stress (0.02 to 0.05 MPa) in which the frictional heat is negligible reveals the transition from velocity-weakening friction at low sliding velocities to velocity-strengthening friction at high sliding velocities [Kuwano et al., 2011]. Importantly, the velocity-strengthening nature at high sliding velocities is quantitatively the same as those observed in simulations. The inelastic deformation of the grains therefore plays a vital role at high sliding velocities. In this study, we report a friction experiment under higher pressure (0.1 to 0.9 MPa), in which the frictional heat is significant. To clarify the effect of frictional heat in high-speed friction systematically, we investigated both the pressure and the velocity dependence of the friction coefficient over a wide range of sliding velocities ranging from aseismic to seismic slip velocities. We observed considerable weakening, described well by a flash-heating theory, above the sliding velocity of 1 cm/s regardless of pressure. At higher velocities, the velocity strengthening behavior replaced the velocity weakening behavior. This strengthening at higher velocities agrees with data from numerical simulations on sheared granular matter and is therefore described in terms of energy dissipation due to the inelastic deformation of grains. We propose a unified steady-state friction law that well describes the velocity and pressure dependence of the steady-state friction coefficient.

  16. Granular Materials Research at NASA-Glenn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agui, Juan H.; Daidzic, Nihad; Green, Robert D.; Nakagawa, Masami; Nayagam, Vedha; Rame, Enrique; Wilkinson, Allen

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs of granular materials research at NASA-Glenn. The topics include: 1) Impulse dispersion of a tapered granular chain; 2) High Speed Digital Images of Tapered Chain Dynamics; 3) Impulse Dispersion; 4) Three Dimensional Granular Bed Experimental Setup; 5) Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Fluid Flow in Porous Media; and 6) Net Charge on Granular Materials (NCharG).

  17. Enuresis (Bed-Wetting)

    MedlinePlus

    ... their development. Bed-wetting is more common among boys than girls. What causes bed-wetting? A number of things ... valves in boys or in the ureter in girls or boys Abnormalities in the spinal cord A small bladder ...

  18. Granular Superconductors and Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David; Koczor, Ron

    1999-01-01

    As a Bose condensate, superconductors provide novel conditions for revisiting previously proposed couplings between electromagnetism and gravity. Strong variations in Cooper pair density, large conductivity and low magnetic permeability define superconductive and degenerate condensates without the traditional density limits imposed by the Fermi energy (approx. 10(exp -6) g cu cm). Recent experiments have reported anomalous weight loss for a test mass suspended above a rotating Type II, YBCO superconductor, with a relatively high percentage change (0.05-2.1%) independent of the test mass' chemical composition and diamagnetic properties. A variation of 5 parts per 104 was reported above a stationary (non-rotating) superconductor. In experiments using a sensitive gravimeter, bulk YBCO superconductors were stably levitated in a DC magnetic field and exposed without levitation to low-field strength AC magnetic fields. Changes in observed gravity signals were measured to be less than 2 parts in 108 of the normal gravitational acceleration. Given the high sensitivity of the test, future work will examine variants on the basic magnetic behavior of granular superconductors, with particular focus on quantifying their proposed importance to gravity.

  19. Subharmonic instability of a self-organized granular jet.

    PubMed

    Kollmer, J E; Pöschel, T

    2016-01-01

    Downhill flows of granular matter colliding in the lowest point of a valley, may induce a self-organized jet. By means of a quasi two-dimensional experiment where fine grained sand flows in a vertically sinusoidally agitated cylinder, we show that the emergent jet, that is, a sheet of ejecta, does not follow the frequency of agitation but reveals subharmonic response. The order of the subharmonics is a complex function of the parameters of driving. PMID:27001207

  20. Subharmonic instability of a self-organized granular jet

    PubMed Central

    Kollmer, J. E.; Pöschel, T.

    2016-01-01

    Downhill flows of granular matter colliding in the lowest point of a valley, may induce a self-organized jet. By means of a quasi two-dimensional experiment where fine grained sand flows in a vertically sinusoidally agitated cylinder, we show that the emergent jet, that is, a sheet of ejecta, does not follow the frequency of agitation but reveals subharmonic response. The order of the subharmonics is a complex function of the parameters of driving. PMID:27001207

  1. Subharmonic instability of a self-organized granular jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollmer, J. E.; Pöschel, T.

    2016-03-01

    Downhill flows of granular matter colliding in the lowest point of a valley, may induce a self-organized jet. By means of a quasi two-dimensional experiment where fine grained sand flows in a vertically sinusoidally agitated cylinder, we show that the emergent jet, that is, a sheet of ejecta, does not follow the frequency of agitation but reveals subharmonic response. The order of the subharmonics is a complex function of the parameters of driving.

  2. Effects of cohesion on the flow patterns of granular materials in spouted beds.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Runru; Li, Shuiqing; Yao, Qiang

    2013-02-01

    Two-dimensional spouted bed, capable to provide both dilute granular gas and dense granular solid flow patterns in one system, was selected as a prototypical system for studying granular materials. Effects of liquid cohesion on such kind of complex granular patterns were studied using particle image velocimetry. It is seen that the addition of liquid oils by a small fraction of 10(-3)-10(-2) causes a remarkable narrowing (about 15%) of the spout area. In the dense annulus, as the liquid fraction increases, the downward particle velocity gradually decreases and approaches a minimum where, at a microscopic grain scale, the liquid bridge reaches spherical regimes with a maximum capillarity. Viscous lubrication effect is observed at a much higher fraction but is really weak with respect to the capillary effect. In the dilute spout, in contrast to the dry grains, the wet grains have a lightly smaller acceleration in the initial 1/3 of the spout, but have a dramatically higher acceleration in the rest of the spout. We attribute the former to the additional work needed to overcome interparticle cohesion during particle entrainment at the spout-annulus interface. Then, using mass and momentum balances, the latter is explained by the relative higher drag force resulting from both higher gas velocities and higher voidages due to spout narrowing in the wet system. The experimental findings will provide useful data for the validation of discrete element simulation of cohesive granular-fluid flows. PMID:23496504

  3. Elastic Granular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    The dry granular flowmap can be broken into two broad categories, the Elastic and the Inertial. Elastic flows are dominated by force chains and stresses are generated by the compression of the interparticle contacts within those chains, and thus are proportional to the stiffness of the contacts. The Elastic zone can be subdivided into two regimes, the Elastic-Quasistatic where forces are independent of the shear rate which at high shear rates transitions to Elastic-Inertial where the particle inertia is reflected in the forces and the stresses increase linearly with the shear rate. In the Inertial regime, the stresses vary with the square of the shear rate. It also is divided into two regimes, the Dense-Inertial where the flow is dominated by clusters of particles, and the Inertial-Collisional where the flow is dominated by binary collisions. Appropriately the elastic theory grew out of an old study of landslides. But like most such studies, all of the above depend on idealized computer simulations of uniform sized spherical particles. Real particles are never round, never of uniform size, and the process of flowing changes surface properties and may even shatter the particles. But all indications are that real systems still fit into the pattern drawn out in the last paragraph. A grave problem facing the field is how to incorporate these effects without losing a fundamental understanding of the internal rheological processes. This talk will begin with an overview of the Elastic flowmap and the behaviors associated with each flow regime. It will then discuss early work to include effects of particle shape and size mixtures and perhaps some effects of particle breakage.

  4. Granular structure determined by terahertz scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Born, Philip; Rothbart, Nick; Sperl, Matthias; Hübers, Heinz-Wilhelm

    2014-05-01

    Light scattering from particles reveals static and dynamical information about the particles and their correlations. Such methods are particularly powerful when the wavelength of the light is chosen similar to the sizes and distances of the particles. To apply scattering to investigate granular matter in particular —or other objects of similar submillimeter size— light of suitable wavelength in the terahertz regime needs to be chosen. By using a quantum cascade laser in a benchtop setup we determine the angle-dependent scattering of spherical particles as well as coffee powder and sugar grains. The scattering from single particles can be interpreted by form factors derived within the Mie theory. In addition, collective correlations can be extracted as static structure factors and compared to recent computer simulations.

  5. Active microrheology of driven granular particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ting; Grob, Matthias; Zippelius, Annette; Sperl, Matthias

    2014-04-01

    When pulling a particle in a driven granular fluid with constant force Fex, the probe particle approaches a steady-state average velocity v. This velocity and the corresponding friction coefficient of the probe ζ =Fex/v are obtained within a schematic model of mode-coupling theory and compared to results from event-driven simulations. For small and moderate drag forces, the model describes the simulation results successfully for both the linear as well as the nonlinear region: The linear response regime (constant friction) for small drag forces is followed by shear thinning (decreasing friction) for moderate forces. For large forces, the model demonstrates a subsequent increasing friction in qualitative agreement with the data. The square-root increase of the friction with force found in [Fiege et al., Granul. Matter 14, 247 (2012), 10.1007/s10035-011-0309-9] is explained by a simple kinetic theory.

  6. Active microrheology of driven granular particles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Grob, Matthias; Zippelius, Annette; Sperl, Matthias

    2014-04-01

    When pulling a particle in a driven granular fluid with constant force Fex, the probe particle approaches a steady-state average velocity v. This velocity and the corresponding friction coefficient of the probe ζ=Fex/v are obtained within a schematic model of mode-coupling theory and compared to results from event-driven simulations. For small and moderate drag forces, the model describes the simulation results successfully for both the linear as well as the nonlinear region: The linear response regime (constant friction) for small drag forces is followed by shear thinning (decreasing friction) for moderate forces. For large forces, the model demonstrates a subsequent increasing friction in qualitative agreement with the data. The square-root increase of the friction with force found in [Fiege et al., Granul. Matter 14, 247 (2012)] is explained by a simple kinetic theory. PMID:24827243

  7. Dynamic granularity of imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissel, Matthias; Smith, Ian C.; Shores, Jonathon E.; Porter, John L.

    2015-11-01

    Imaging systems that include a specific source, imaging concept, geometry, and detector have unique properties such as signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, spatial resolution, distortions, and contrast. Some of these properties are inherently connected, particularly dynamic range and spatial resolution. It must be emphasized that spatial resolution is not a single number but must be seen in the context of dynamic range and consequently is better described by a function or distribution. We introduce the "dynamic granularity" G dyn as a standardized, objective relation between a detector's spatial resolution (granularity) and dynamic range for complex imaging systems in a given environment rather than the widely found characterization of detectors such as cameras or films by themselves. This relation can partly be explained through consideration of the signal's photon statistics, background noise, and detector sensitivity, but a comprehensive description including some unpredictable data such as dust, damages, or an unknown spectral distribution will ultimately have to be based on measurements. Measured dynamic granularities can be objectively used to assess the limits of an imaging system's performance including all contributing noise sources and to qualify the influence of alternative components within an imaging system. This article explains the construction criteria to formulate a dynamic granularity and compares measured dynamic granularities for different detectors used in the X-ray backlighting scheme employed at Sandia's Z-Backlighter facility.

  8. Silo Collapse under Granular Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, G.; Colonnello, C.; Boltenhagen, P.; Darias, J. R.; Peralta-Fabi, R.; Brau, F.; Clément, E.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate, at a laboratory scale, the collapse of cylindrical shells of radius R and thickness t induced by a granular discharge. We measure the critical filling height for which the structure fails upon discharge. We observe that the silos sustain filling heights significantly above an estimation obtained by coupling standard shell-buckling and granular stress distribution theories. Two effects contribute to stabilize the structure: (i) below the critical filling height, a dynamical stabilization due to granular wall friction prevents the localized shell-buckling modes to grow irreversibly; (ii) above the critical filling height, collapse occurs before the downward sliding motion of the whole granular column sets in, such that only a partial friction mobilization is at play. However, we notice also that the critical filling height is reduced as the grain size d increases. The importance of grain size contribution is controlled by the ratio d /√{R t }. We rationalize these antagonist effects with a novel fluid-structure theory both accounting for the actual status of granular friction at the wall and the inherent shell imperfections mediated by the grains. This theory yields new scaling predictions which are compared with the experimental results.

  9. Silo collapse under granular discharge.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, G; Colonnello, C; Boltenhagen, P; Darias, J R; Peralta-Fabi, R; Brau, F; Clément, E

    2015-01-01

    We investigate, at a laboratory scale, the collapse of cylindrical shells of radius R and thickness t induced by a granular discharge. We measure the critical filling height for which the structure fails upon discharge. We observe that the silos sustain filling heights significantly above an estimation obtained by coupling standard shell-buckling and granular stress distribution theories. Two effects contribute to stabilize the structure: (i) below the critical filling height, a dynamical stabilization due to granular wall friction prevents the localized shell-buckling modes to grow irreversibly; (ii) above the critical filling height, collapse occurs before the downward sliding motion of the whole granular column sets in, such that only a partial friction mobilization is at play. However, we notice also that the critical filling height is reduced as the grain size d increases. The importance of grain size contribution is controlled by the ratio d/√[Rt]. We rationalize these antagonist effects with a novel fluid-structure theory both accounting for the actual status of granular friction at the wall and the inherent shell imperfections mediated by the grains. This theory yields new scaling predictions which are compared with the experimental results. PMID:25615503

  10. What is soil organic matter worth?

    PubMed

    Sparling, G P; Wheeler, D; Vesely, E-T; Schipper, L A

    2006-01-01

    The conservation and restoration of soil organic matter are often advocated because of the generally beneficial effects on soil attributes for plant growth and crop production. More recently, organic matter has become important as a terrestrial sink and store for C and N. We have attempted to derive a monetary value of soil organic matter for crop production and storage functions in three contrasting New Zealand soil orders (Gley, Melanic, and Granular Soils). Soil chemical and physical characteristics of real-life examples of three pairs of matched soils with low organic matter contents (after long-term continuous cropping for vegetables or maize) or high organic matter content (continuous pasture) were used as input data for a pasture (grass-clover) production model. The differences in pasture dry matter yields (non-irrigated) were calculated for three climate scenarios (wet, dry, and average years) and the yields converted to an equivalent weight and financial value of milk solids. We also estimated the hypothetical value of the C and N sequestered during the recovery phase of the low organic matter content soils assuming trading with C and N credits. For all three soil orders, and for the three climate scenarios, pasture dry matter yields were decreased in the soils with lower organic matter contents. The extra organic matter in the high C soils was estimated to be worth NZ$27 to NZ$150 ha(-1) yr(-1) in terms of increased milk solids production. The decreased yields from the previously cropped soils were predicted to persist for 36 to 125 yr, but with declining effect as organic matter gradually recovered, giving an accumulated loss in pastoral production worth around NZ$518 to NZ$1239 ha(-1). This was 42 to 73 times lower than the hypothetical value of the organic matter as a sequestering agent for C and N, which varied between NZ$22,963 to NZ$90,849 depending on the soil, region, discount rates, and values used for carbon and nitrogen credits. PMID:16510699

  11. Granular Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Vinningland, Jan Ludvig; Johnsen, Oistein; Flekkoey, Eirik G.; Maaloey, Knut Joergen; Toussaint, Renaud

    2009-06-18

    A granular instability driven by gravity is studied experimentally and numerically. The instability arises as grains fall in a closed Hele-Shaw cell where a layer of dense granular material is positioned above a layer of air. The initially flat front defined by the grains subsequently develops into a pattern of falling granular fingers separated by rising bubbles of air. A transient coarsening of the front is observed right from the start by a finger merging process. The coarsening is later stabilized by new fingers growing from the center of the rising bubbles. The structures are quantified by means of Fourier analysis and quantitative agreement between experiment and computation is shown. This analysis also reveals scale invariance of the flow structures under overall change of spatial scale.

  12. Initiation of immersed granular avalanches.

    PubMed

    Mutabaruka, Patrick; Delenne, Jean-Yves; Soga, Kenichi; Radjai, Farhang

    2014-05-01

    By means of coupled molecular dynamics-computational fluid dynamics simulations, we analyze the initiation of avalanches in a granular bed of spherical particles immersed in a viscous fluid and inclined above its angle of repose. In quantitative agreement with experiments, we find that the bed is unstable for a packing fraction below 0.59 but is stabilized above this packing fraction by negative excess pore pressure induced by the effect of dilatancy. From detailed numerical data, we explore the time evolution of shear strain, packing fraction, excess pore pressures, and granular microstructure in this creeplike pressure redistribution regime, and we show that they scale excellently with a characteristic time extracted from a model based on the balance of granular stresses in the presence of a negative excess pressure and its interplay with dilatancy. The cumulative shear strain at failure is found to be ≃ 0.2, in close agreement with the experiments, irrespective of the initial packing fraction and inclination angle. Remarkably, the avalanche is triggered when dilatancy vanishes instantly as a result of fluctuations while the average dilatancy is still positive (expanding bed) with a packing fraction that declines with the initial packing fraction. Another nontrivial feature of this creeplike regime is that, in contrast to dry granular materials, the internal friction angle of the bed at failure is independent of dilatancy but depends on the inclination angle, leading therefore to a nonlinear dependence of the excess pore pressure on the inclination angle. We show that this behavior may be described in terms of the contact network anisotropy, which increases with a nearly constant connectivity and levels off at a value (critical state) that increases with the inclination angle. These features suggest that the behavior of immersed granular materials is controlled not only directly by hydrodynamic forces acting on the particles but also by the influence of the fluid on the granular microstructure. PMID:25353783

  13. Initiation of immersed granular avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutabaruka, Patrick; Delenne, Jean-Yves; Soga, Kenichi; Radjai, Farhang

    2014-05-01

    By means of coupled molecular dynamics-computational fluid dynamics simulations, we analyze the initiation of avalanches in a granular bed of spherical particles immersed in a viscous fluid and inclined above its angle of repose. In quantitative agreement with experiments, we find that the bed is unstable for a packing fraction below 0.59 but is stabilized above this packing fraction by negative excess pore pressure induced by the effect of dilatancy. From detailed numerical data, we explore the time evolution of shear strain, packing fraction, excess pore pressures, and granular microstructure in this creeplike pressure redistribution regime, and we show that they scale excellently with a characteristic time extracted from a model based on the balance of granular stresses in the presence of a negative excess pressure and its interplay with dilatancy. The cumulative shear strain at failure is found to be ≃0.2, in close agreement with the experiments, irrespective of the initial packing fraction and inclination angle. Remarkably, the avalanche is triggered when dilatancy vanishes instantly as a result of fluctuations while the average dilatancy is still positive (expanding bed) with a packing fraction that declines with the initial packing fraction. Another nontrivial feature of this creeplike regime is that, in contrast to dry granular materials, the internal friction angle of the bed at failure is independent of dilatancy but depends on the inclination angle, leading therefore to a nonlinear dependence of the excess pore pressure on the inclination angle. We show that this behavior may be described in terms of the contact network anisotropy, which increases with a nearly constant connectivity and levels off at a value (critical state) that increases with the inclination angle. These features suggest that the behavior of immersed granular materials is controlled not only directly by hydrodynamic forces acting on the particles but also by the influence of the fluid on the granular microstructure.

  14. Granular packings: nonlinear elasticity, sound propagation, and collective relaxation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Makse, Hernán A; Gland, Nicolas; Johnson, David L; Schwartz, Lawrence

    2004-12-01

    Experiments on isotropic compression of a granular assembly of spheres show that the shear and bulk moduli vary with the confining pressure faster than the 1/3 power law predicted by Hertz-Mindlin effective medium theories of contact elasticity. Moreover, the ratio between the moduli is found to be larger than the prediction of the elastic theory by a constant value. The understanding of these discrepancies has been a long-standing question in the field of granular matter. Here we perform a test of the applicability of elasticity theory to granular materials. We perform sound propagation experiments, numerical simulations, and theoretical studies to understand the elastic response of a deforming granular assembly of soft spheres under isotropic loading. Our results for the behavior of the elastic moduli of the system agree very well with experiments. We show that the elasticity partially describes the experimental and numerical results for a system under compressional loads. However, it drastically fails for systems under shear perturbations, particularly for packings without tangential forces and friction. Our work indicates that a correct treatment should include not only the purely elastic response but also collective relaxation mechanisms related to structural disorder and nonaffine motion of grains. PMID:15697350

  15. Nonlinear instability and convection in a vertically vibrated granular bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Priyanka; Ansari, I. H.; van der Meer, D.; Lohse, Detlef; Alam, Meheboob

    2015-11-01

    The nonlinear instability of the density-inverted granular Leidenfrost state and the resulting convective motion in strongly shaken granular matter are analysed via a weakly nonlinear analysis. Under a quasi-steady ansatz, the base state temperature decreases with increasing height away from from the vibrating plate, but the density profile consists of three distinct regions: (i) a collisional dilute layer at the bottom, (ii) a levitated dense layer at some intermediate height and (iii) a ballistic dilute layer at the top of the granular bed. For the nonlinear stability analysis, the nonlinearities up-to cubic order in perturbation amplitude are retained, leading to the Landau equation. The genesis of granular convection is shown to be tied to a supercritical pitchfork bifurcation from the Leidenfrost state. Near the bifurcation point the equilibrium amplitude is found to follow a square-root scaling law, Ae √{ ▵} , with the distance ▵ from bifurcation point. The strength of convection is maximal at some intermediate value of the shaking strength, with weaker convection both at weaker and stronger shaking. Our theory predicts a novel floating-convection state at very strong shaking.

  16. Rhizoctonia seed, seedling, and wet root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wet root rot caused by Rhizoctonia solani Kühn can cause seed and seedling rot of both lentil and chickpea as well as many other agricultural crops worldwide. The pathogen is favored in cool, sandy soil with high organic matter under no-till or reduced-till soil management practices. Survival spor...

  17. Influence of cohesive forces on the macroscopic properties of granular assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumay, Geoffroy; Fiscina, Jorge; Ludewig, Francois; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2013-06-01

    The influence of cohesive forces inside a granular material is analyzed with compaction experiments. To begin, a model cohesive granular material is considered. This granular material is made of millimetric grains with a cohesion induced by an external magnetic field. Therefore, the cohesion between the grains is adjusted through the intensity of the applied magnetic field. Afterward, the cohesion induced by capillary bridges are considered. In the first study concerning capillary forces, the cohesion between neighboring grains is induced by liquid bridges in a wet granular material. The cohesiveness is tuned using different liquids having specific surface tension values. The second study performed with capillary forces concerns initially dry granular materials surrounded by a well controlled air humidity. Then, the cohesion inside the packing is controlled through the relative humidity which influence both triboelectric and capillary effects. The evolution of the parameters extracted from the compaction curves have been analyzed as a function of the cohesiveness. All the results show that the packing fraction of a pile and the compaction dynamics is strongly sensitive to cohesive forces. Therefore, the compaction measurement is a good way to characterize a powder or a granular material for R&D and quality control in industrial applications. Finally, we show that the cohesive forces play an important role when the grain size is typically below 50μm.

  18. Non Steady State Granular Shear Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losert, Wolfgang; Kwon, Gene

    2002-11-01

    We experimentally investigate the shear flow of granular matter in a cylindrical Couette cell. Since granular flows dissipate energy, they must be continuously driven to remain in a flowing state. Previous experiments on steady state shear flows have found that velocity gradients are confined to a thin shear band, and that the shear force is roughly independent of shear rate if the material is allowed to dilate. Our experiments in a Couette geometry focus on two related questions about non-steady state flows: 1) How does a granular shear flow start? 2) How does a granular system respond to oscillatory shear? In particular, we investigate the role of boundary conditions, which we expect to be of particular importance, since granular flows must be continuously driven (in general from a boundary) in order to be sustained. In our Couette cell a shear flow is generated by moving either the inner cylinder or the outer cylinder or both cylinders. The motion of grains on the top surface is measured directly with fast imaging and particle tracking techniques. Previous studies have indicated that the velocity profile on the top surface is very similar to the velocity profile within the bulk. Measurements of the corresponding shear forces are in progress. Initial experiments determined the steady state flow profiles under different driving conditions, with either inner, outer or both cylinders moving. In steady state, velocity gradients are confined to a roughly exponential shearband several particle diameters wide. The shear band is always located at the inner cylinder. A probable reason for this observation is the slightly smaller surface area of the inner cylinder compared to the outer cylinder. Since shear forces are transmitted from one cylinder to the other, the smaller surface area of the inner cylinder leads to larger shear stresses. Shear flow confined to regions of high stress can be reproduced in continuum mechanics models which include plastic flow, non-Newtonian fluid models, or locally Newtonian hydrodynamic models that include a strong density dependence of viscosity. Most of these models are isotropic with respect to the shear direction. However, anisotropies manifest themselves in two distinct flow transients, when rotation of one of the cylinders is started. When the cylinder had been rotated in the same direction before, the thin shear band immediately forms. When the previous motion of the cylinder had been in the opposite direction, particles far from the moving cylinder are initially more mobile. After an extra displacement of up to six particle diameters, a thin shearband forms again in steady state. The extra displacement of particles far from the shear surface does not strongly depend on the shear rate prior or after the stop, solely on the direction of prior shear. This indicates that the static configuration of grains after a shear flow exhibits anisotropies. The flow transient, at least, can then no longer be modeled with the isotropic form of the models described above. Finally, we investigate oscillatory shear flow. During small amplitude oscillations the shear flow is confined to a thin shear band. In addition, a gradual compaction and strengthening of the granular material is observed. For sufficiently large oscillation amplitudes, the flow resembles a sequence of shear reversals. In oscillatory flows driven by the outer cylinder, coexistence of shearbands at the outer and inner cylinder can be found. In summary, we have elucidated important properties of granular shear flows from non-steady state flow measurements: First, shear bands form preferentially near the inner cylinder, even when the outer cylinder is sheared. Transiently a shear band can also form near the outer cylinder during oscillatory driving. These observations should help refine models of granular shear flow. One challenge in improving models of granular shear flow is the observation that the initial flow transient contains 'memory' of the direction of previously applied shear. In order to incorporate this observation into flow models, the nature of the anisotropy requires further study. Currently we are investigating the three dimensional configuration of grains during the start of shear flow using confocal microscopy.

  19. Wet solids flow enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Caram, H.S.; Agrawal, D.K.; Foster, N.

    1997-07-01

    The objective was to visualize the flow of granular materials in the silo using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. This was done by introducing traces. Mustard seeds and poppy seeds were used as trace particles. The region sampled was a cylinder 25 mm in diameter and 40 mm in length. Eight slices containing 128 by 128 to 256 by 256 pixels were generated for each image.

  20. Dynamic granularity of imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Geissel, Matthias; Smith, Ian C.; Shores, Jonathon E.; Porter, John L.

    2015-11-04

    Imaging systems that include a specific source, imaging concept, geometry, and detector have unique properties such as signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, spatial resolution, distortions, and contrast. Some of these properties are inherently connected, particularly dynamic range and spatial resolution. It must be emphasized that spatial resolution is not a single number but must be seen in the context of dynamic range and consequently is better described by a function or distribution. We introduce the “dynamic granularity” Gdyn as a standardized, objective relation between a detector’s spatial resolution (granularity) and dynamic range for complex imaging systems in a given environment rather than the widely found characterization of detectors such as cameras or films by themselves. We found that this relation can partly be explained through consideration of the signal’s photon statistics, background noise, and detector sensitivity, but a comprehensive description including some unpredictable data such as dust, damages, or an unknown spectral distribution will ultimately have to be based on measurements. Measured dynamic granularities can be objectively used to assess the limits of an imaging system’s performance including all contributing noise sources and to qualify the influence of alternative components within an imaging system. Our article explains the construction criteria to formulate a dynamic granularity and compares measured dynamic granularities for different detectors used in the X-ray backlighting scheme employed at Sandia’s Z-Backlighter facility.

  1. Dynamic granularity of imaging systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Geissel, Matthias; Smith, Ian C.; Shores, Jonathon E.; Porter, John L.

    2015-11-04

    Imaging systems that include a specific source, imaging concept, geometry, and detector have unique properties such as signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, spatial resolution, distortions, and contrast. Some of these properties are inherently connected, particularly dynamic range and spatial resolution. It must be emphasized that spatial resolution is not a single number but must be seen in the context of dynamic range and consequently is better described by a function or distribution. We introduce the “dynamic granularity” Gdyn as a standardized, objective relation between a detector’s spatial resolution (granularity) and dynamic range for complex imaging systems in a given environment rathermore » than the widely found characterization of detectors such as cameras or films by themselves. We found that this relation can partly be explained through consideration of the signal’s photon statistics, background noise, and detector sensitivity, but a comprehensive description including some unpredictable data such as dust, damages, or an unknown spectral distribution will ultimately have to be based on measurements. Measured dynamic granularities can be objectively used to assess the limits of an imaging system’s performance including all contributing noise sources and to qualify the influence of alternative components within an imaging system. Our article explains the construction criteria to formulate a dynamic granularity and compares measured dynamic granularities for different detectors used in the X-ray backlighting scheme employed at Sandia’s Z-Backlighter facility.« less

  2. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alshibli, Khalid A.; Costes, Nicholas C.; Porter, Ronald F.

    1996-01-01

    The constitutive behavior of uncemented granular materials such as strength, stiffness, and localization of deformations are to a large extend derived from interparticle friction transmitted between solid particles and particle groups. Interparticle forces are highly dependent on gravitational body forces. At very low effective confining pressures, the true nature of the Mohr envelope, which defines the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion for soils, as well as the relative contribution of each of non-frictional components to soil's shear strength cannot be evaluated in terrestrial laboratories. Because of the impossibility of eliminating gravitational body forces on earth, the weight of soil grains develops interparticle compressive stresses which mask true soil constitutive behavior even in the smallest samples of models. Therefore the microgravity environment induced by near-earth orbits of spacecraft provides unique experimental opportunities for testing theories related to the mechanical behavior of terrestrial granular materials. Such materials may include cohesionless soils, industrial powders, crushed coal, etc. This paper will describe the microgravity experiment, 'Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM)', scheduled to be flown on Space Shuttle-MIR missions. The paper will describe the experiment's hardware, instrumentation, specimen preparation procedures, testing procedures in flight, as well as a brief summary of the post-mission analysis. It is expected that the experimental results will significantly improve the understanding of the behavior of granular materials under very low effective stress levels.

  3. Order - disorder transitions in granular sphere packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panaitescu, Andreea M.

    Granular materials are ubiquitous in many industrial and natural processes, yet their complex behaviors characterized by unusual static and dynamic properties are still poorly understood. In this dissertation we investigate both the geometrical structure and the dynamical properties (the response to shear deformations, disorder-order transition and crystallization) of packings of mono-sized spheres as a function of the packing volume fraction. Different average packing fractions were obtained by submitting a dense granular material to periodic shear deformations and by epitaxy. Using advanced imaging techniques including the refractive index matched imaging (RIM) and X-ray computed tomography (CT) enables us to determine the three dimensional particles position inside the packing. From positions we obtain the Voronoi tessellation corresponding to the particles in the bulk and calculate the radial distribution and the bond-order metric. These two parameters are widely used to quantify the structure of the spherical particle systems. A granular packing undergoing periodic shear deformations is observed to slowly evolve towards crystallization and the packing fraction is correspondingly observed to increase smoothly from loose packing fraction, 0.59, well above the random close packing fraction, 0.637. Tracking the particles over several shear cycles allows us to obtain the probability distributions of particle displacements and the mean-square displacements and to compute the components of the diffusion tensor. We find that in a shear flow, the initial self-diffusion of the particles is anisotropic with diffusion greater in the flow direction compared with the velocity gradient direction which in turn is greater than in the vorticity direction. We further find that the granular matter under cyclic shear shows reversible as well as irreversible or plastic response for small enough strain amplitude. The appearance and the propagation of the crystalline order were studied using the orientational order metric. By following the evolution of the nucleating crystallites, we identified critical nuclei, determined their size and symmetry, and measured the average surface free energy. The structure of the nuclei was found to be random hexagonal close-packed, their average shape was non-spherical and they were oriented preferentially along the shear axis. When the packing volume fraction approaches a value close to the random close packing, crystallites with face centered cubic (fcc) order are observed with increasing probability, and ordered domains grow rapidly. A polycrystalline phase with domains of fcc and hcp order is obtained after hundreds of thousands of shear cycles. Depositing spheres on a substrate under the influence of gravity gives rise to a wide range of volume fractions and packing structures by simply controlling the nature of the substrate, the deposition rate and the energy of the particles. We analyzed the structures formed and investigate the development of the disordered phases as a function of the deposition rate. Furthermore, by comparing these structures with packings obtained by cyclic shear we showed that the structure of a granular packing depends strongly on the protocol used.

  4. Particle deposition in granular media: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Tien, Chi

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses topics on particle deposition in granular media. The six topics discussed are: experimental determination of initial collection efficiency in granular beds - an assessment of the effect of instrument sensitivity and the extent of particle bounce-off; deposition of polydispersed aerosols in granular media; in situ observation of aerosol deposition in a two-dimensional model filter; solid velocity in cross-flow granular moving bed; aerosol deposition in granular moving bed; and aerosol deposition in a magnetically stabilized fluidized bed. (LSP)

  5. Very, Very Fast Wetting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacqmin, David; Lee, Chi-Ming (Technical Monitor); Salzman, Jack (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Just after formation, optical fibers are wetted stably with acrylate at capillary numbers routinely exceeding 1000. It is hypothesized that this is possible because of dissolution of air into the liquid coating. A lubrication/boundary integral analysis that includes gas diffusion and solubility is developed. It is applied using conservatively estimated solubility and diffusivity coefficients and solutions are found that are consistent with industry practice and with the hypothesis. The results also agree with the claim of Deneka, Kar & Mensah (1988) that the use of high solubility gases to bathe a wetting line allows significantly greater wetting speeds. The solutions indicate a maximum speed of wetting which increases with gas solubility and with reduction in wetting-channel diameter.

  6. HYPERELASTIC MODELS FOR GRANULAR MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Humrickhouse, Paul W; Corradini, Michael L

    2009-01-29

    A continuum framework for modeling of dust mobilization and transport, and the behavior of granular systems in general, has been reviewed, developed and evaluated for reactor design applications. The large quantities of micron-sized particles expected in the international fusion reactor design, ITER, will accumulate into piles and layers on surfaces, which are large relative to the individual particle size; thus, particle-particle, rather than particle-surface, interactions will determine the behavior of the material in bulk, and a continuum approach is necessary and justified in treating the phenomena of interest; e.g., particle resuspension and transport. The various constitutive relations that characterize these solid particle interactions in dense granular flows have been discussed previously, but prior to mobilization their behavior is not even fluid. Even in the absence of adhesive forces between particles, dust or sand piles can exist in static equilibrium under gravity and other forces, e.g., fluid shear. Their behavior is understood to be elastic, though not linear. The recent “granular elasticity” theory proposes a non-linear elastic model based on “Hertz contacts” between particles; the theory identifies the Coulomb yield condition as a requirement for thermodynamic stability, and has successfully reproduced experimental results for stress distributions in sand piles. The granular elasticity theory is developed and implemented in a stand- alone model and then implemented as part of a finite element model, ABAQUS, to determine the stress distributions in dust piles subjected to shear by a fluid flow. We identify yield with the onset of mobilization, and establish, for a given dust pile and flow geometry, the threshold pressure (force) conditions on the surface due to flow required to initiate it. While the granular elasticity theory applies strictly to cohesionless granular materials, attractive forces are clearly important in the interaction of micron-sized particles; extension of the theory to account for these effects is also considered. A set of continuum models are proposed for use in the future dust transport modeling.

  7. Electrification of Shaken Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, Onur; Nordsiek, Freja; Lathrop, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Granular charging of particle laden flows are widespread and has long been observed. Volcanic ash clouds, desert sandstorms, dust devils, thunderstorms and snowstorms all undergo electrification at large scale. However the mechanism by which such processes occur, is not yet well understood. We confine granular particles to an oscillating cylindrical chamber which is enclosed and sealed by two conducting plates. The primary measurement obtained is the voltage between the two plates. We find that collective effects occurring in the bulk of the material play a significant role in the electrification process. We extend the previous results by the addition of photodectection capabilities to the experimental chamber. We present simultaneous measurements of voltage and light emission.

  8. Instability in shocked granular gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirmas, Nick; Radulescu, Matei

    2013-11-01

    Shocks in granular media, such as vertically oscillated beds, have been shown to develop instabilities. Similar jet formation has been observed in explosively dispersed granular media. In the current study, we investigate the origin of this instability. Our previous work addresses this instability by performing discrete-particle simulations of inelastic media undergoing shock compression. By allowing finite dissipation within the shock wave, instability manifests itself as distinctive high density non-uniformities and convective rolls within the shock structure. By analyzing the time evolution of the material undergoing the shock wave compression and further relaxation, we found that the clustering instability is the dominant mechanism controlling this instability. In the present study we extend this work to investigate the instability at the continuum level. We model the Euler equations for granular gases with a modified cooling rate to include an impact velocity threshold necessary for inelastic collisions. Our results demonstrate a fair agreement between the continuum and discrete-particle models. Slight discrepancies, such as higher frequency non-uniformities in our continuum results may be attributed to the absence of viscous effects.

  9. Dynamic compaction of granular materials

    PubMed Central

    Favrie, N.; Gavrilyuk, S.

    2013-01-01

    An Eulerian hyperbolic multiphase flow model for dynamic and irreversible compaction of granular materials is constructed. The reversible model is first constructed on the basis of the classical Hertz theory. The irreversible model is then derived in accordance with the following two basic principles. First, the entropy inequality is satisfied by the model. Second, the corresponding ‘intergranular stress’ coming from elastic energy owing to contact between grains decreases in time (the granular media behave as Maxwell-type materials). The irreversible model admits an equilibrium state corresponding to von Mises-type yield limit. The yield limit depends on the volume fraction of the solid. The sound velocity at the yield surface is smaller than that in the reversible model. The last one is smaller than the sound velocity in the irreversible model. Such an embedded model structure assures a thermodynamically correct formulation of the model of granular materials. The model is validated on quasi-static experiments on loading–unloading cycles. The experimentally observed hysteresis phenomena were numerically confirmed with a good accuracy by the proposed model. PMID:24353466

  10. Bipedal locomotion in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingsbury, Mark; Zhang, Tingnan; Goldman, Daniel

    Bipedal walking, locomotion characterized by alternating swing and double support phase, is well studied on ground where feet do not penetrate the substrate. On granular media like sand however, intrusion and extrusion phases also occur. In these phases, relative motion of the two feet requires that one or both feet slip through the material, degrading performance. To study walking in these phases, we designed and studied a planarized bipedal robot (1.6 kg, 42 cm) that walked in a fluidized bed of poppy seeds. We also simulated the robot in a multibody software environment (Chrono) using granular resistive force theory (RFT) to calculate foot forces. In experiment and simulation, the robot experienced slip during the intrusion phase, with the experiment presenting additional slip due to motor control error during the double support phase. This exaggerated slip gave insight (through analysis of ground reaction forces in simulation) into how slip occurs when relative motion exists between the two feet in the granular media, where the foot with higher relative drag forces (from its instantaneous orientation, rotation, relative direction of motion, and depth) remains stationary. With this relationship, we generated walking gaits for the robot to walk with minimal slip.

  11. Anisotropy of weakly vibrated granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortel, Geert H.; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-10-01

    We experimentally probe the anisotropy of weakly vibrated flowing granular media. Depending on the driving parameters—flow rate and vibration strength—this anisotropy varies significantly. We show how the anisotropy collapses when plotted as a function of the driving stresses, uncovering a direct link between stresses and anisotropy. Moreover, our data suggest that for small anisotropies, the shear stresses vanish. Anisotropy of the fabric of granular media thus plays a crucial role in determining the rheology of granular flows.

  12. Impact induced splash and spill in a quasi-confided granular medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogale, S. B.

    2005-03-01

    Dissipation of the energy of impact in a granular medium and its effects has been a subject of considerable scientific for quite some time. In this work we have explored and analyzed the splash and spill effects caused by the impact of a ball dropped from a height into a granular medium in a open container. Three different granular media, namely rice, mustard seeds, and cream of wheat were used. The amount of spilled-over granular matter was measured as a function of the ball-drop height. Digital pictures of the splash process were also recorded. The quantity of spilled granular matter varies linearly with the impact energy. However additional step like structures are also noted. Specifically, a distinct and large jump is seen in the spilled quantity at a specific impact energy in the case of mustard seeds, which also exhibit obvious charging effects and repulsion. Although the parameters such as mass per grain and packing density for the case of mustard seeds are intermediate between those for rice and cream of wheat, the spill quantity for comparable impact energy is considerably higher. These data will be presented and discussed.

  13. Robophysical study of jumping dynamics on granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, Jeffrey; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2016-03-01

    Characterizing forces on deformable objects intruding into sand and soil requires understanding the solid- and fluid-like responses of such substrates and their effect on the state of the object. The most detailed studies of intrusion in dry granular media have revealed that interactions of fixed-shape objects during free impact (for example, cannonballs) and forced slow penetration can be described by hydrostatic- and hydrodynamic-like forces. Here we investigate a new class of granular interactions: rapid intrusions by objects that change shape (self-deform) through passive and active means. Systematic studies of a simple spring-mass robot jumping on dry granular media reveal that jumping performance is explained by an interplay of nonlinear frictional and hydrodynamic drag as well as induced added mass (unaccounted by traditional intrusion models) characterized by a rapidly solidified region of grains accelerated by the foot. A model incorporating these dynamics reveals that added mass degrades the performance of certain self-deformations owing to a shift in optimal timing during push-off. Our systematic robophysical experiment reveals both new soft-matter physics and principles for robotic self-deformation and control, which together provide principles of movement in deformable terrestrial environments.

  14. Experimental velocity fields and forces for a cylinder penetrating into a granular medium.

    PubMed

    Seguin, A; Bertho, Y; Martinez, F; Crassous, J; Gondret, P

    2013-01-01

    We present here a detailed granular flow characterization together with force measurements for the quasi-bidimensional situation of a horizontal cylinder penetrating vertically at a constant velocity in dry granular matter between two parallel glass walls. In the velocity range studied here, the drag force on the cylinder does not depend on the velocity V(0) and is mainly proportional to the cylinder diameter d. While the force on the cylinder increases with its penetration depth, the granular velocity profile around the cylinder is found to be stationary with fluctuations around a mean value leading to the granular temperature profile. Both mean velocity profile and temperature profile exhibit strong localization near the cylinder. The mean flow perturbation induced by the cylinder decreases exponentially away from the cylinder on a characteristic length λ that is mainly governed by the cylinder diameter for a large enough cylinder/grain size ratio d/d(g): λ~d/4+2d(g). The granular temperature exhibits a constant plateau value T(0) in a thin layer close to the cylinder of extension δ(T(0))~λ/2 and decays exponentially far away with a characteristic length λ(T) of a few grain diameters (λ(T)~3d(g)). The granular temperature plateau T(0) that scales as V(0)(2)d(g)/d is created by the flow itself from the balance between the "granular heat" production by the shear rate V(0)/λ over δ(T(0)) close to the cylinder and the granular dissipation far away. PMID:23410320

  15. Membrane-based wet electrostatic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    David J. Bayless; Liming Shi; Gregory Kremer; Ben J. Stuart; James Reynolds; John Caine

    2005-06-01

    Emissions of fine particulate matter, PM2.5, in both primary and secondary form, are difficult to capture in typical dry electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). Wet (or waterbased) ESPs are well suited for collection of acid aerosols and fine particulates because of greater corona power and virtually no re-entrainment. However, field disruptions because of spraying (misting) of water, formation of dry spots (channeling), and collector surface corrosion limit the applicability of current wet ESPs in the control of secondary PM2.5. Researchers at Ohio University have patented novel membrane collection surfaces to address these problems. Water-based cleaning in membrane collectors made of corrosion-resistant fibers is facilitated by capillary action between the fibers, maintaining an even distribution of water. This paper presents collection efficiency results of lab-scale and pilot-scale testing at First Energy's Bruce Mansfield Plant for the membrane-based wet ESP. The data indicate that a membrane wet ESP was more effective at collecting fine particulates, acid aerosols, and oxidized mercury than the metal-plate wet ESP, even with {approximately}15% less collecting area. 15 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Dynamics of Sheared Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondic, Lou; Utter, Brian; Behringer, Robert P.

    2002-01-01

    This work focuses on the properties of sheared granular materials near the jamming transition. The project currently involves two aspects. The first of these is an experiment that is a prototype for a planned ISS (International Space Station) flight. The second is discrete element simulations (DES) that can give insight into the behavior one might expect in a reduced-g environment. The experimental arrangement consists of an annular channel that contains the granular material. One surface, say the upper surface, rotates so as to shear the material contained in the annulus. The lower surface controls the mean density/mean stress on the sample through an actuator or other control system. A novel feature under development is the ability to 'thermalize' the layer, i.e. create a larger amount of random motion in the material, by using the actuating system to provide vibrations as well control the mean volume of the annulus. The stress states of the system are determined by transducers on the non-rotating wall. These measure both shear and normal components of the stress on different size scales. Here, the idea is to characterize the system as the density varies through values spanning dense almost solid to relatively mobile granular states. This transition regime encompasses the regime usually thought of as the glass transition, and/or the jamming transition. Motivation for this experiment springs from ideas of a granular glass transition, a related jamming transition, and from recent experiments. In particular, we note recent experiments carried out by our group to characterize this type of transition and also to demonstrate/ characterize fluctuations in slowly sheared systems. These experiments give key insights into what one might expect in near-zero g. In particular, they show that the compressibility of granular systems diverges at a transition or critical point. It is this divergence, coupled to gravity, that makes it extremely difficult if not impossible to characterize the transition region in an earth-bound experiment. In the DE modeling, we analyze dynamics of a sheared granular system in Couette geometry in two (2D) and three (3D) space dimensions. Here, the idea is to both better understand what we might encounter in a reduced-g environment, and at a deeper level to deduce the physics of sheared systems in a density regime that has not been addressed by past experiments or simulations. One aspect of the simulations addresses sheared 2D system in zero-g environment. For low volume fractions, the expected dynamics of this type of system is relatively well understood. However, as the volume fraction is increased, the system undergoes a phase transition, as explained above. The DES concentrate on the evolution of the system as the solid volume fraction is slowly increased, and in particular on the behavior of very dense systems. For these configurations, the simulations show that polydispersity of the sheared particles is a crucial factor that determines the system response. Figures 1 and 2 below, that present the total force on each grain, show that even relatively small (10 %) nonuniformity of the size of the grains (expected in typical experiments) may lead to significant modifications of the system properties, such as velocity profiles, temperature, force propagation, and formation shear bands. The simulations are extended in a few other directions, in order to provide additional insight to the experimental system analyzed above. In one direction, both gravity, and driving due to vibrations are included. These simulations allow for predictions on the driving regime that is required in the experiments in order to analyze the jamming transition. Furthermore, direct comparison of experiments and DES will allow for verification of the modeling assumptions. We have also extended our modeling efforts to 3D. The (preliminary) results of these simulations of an annular system in zero-g environment will conclude the presentation.

  17. The Underlying Physics in Wetted Particle Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, Carly; Hrenya, Christine; Davis, Robert

    2008-11-01

    Wetted granular particles are relevant in many industries including the pharmaceutical and chemical industries and has applications to granulation, filtration, coagulation, spray coating, drying and pneumatic transport. In our current focus, we investigate the dynamics of a three-body normal wetted particle collision. In order to conduct collisions we use an apparatus called a ``Stokes Cradle,'' similar to the Newton's Cradle (desktop toy) except that the target particles are covered with oil. Here, we are able to vary the oil thickness, oil viscosity, and material properties. With a three particle collision there are four possible outcomes: fully agglomerated (FA); Newton's Cradle (NC), the striker and the first target ball are agglomerated and the last target ball is separated; Reverse Newton's Cradle (RNC), the striker is separated and the two targets are agglomerated; and fully separated (FS). Varying the properties of the collisions, we have observed all four outcomes. We use elastohydrodynamics as a theoretical basis for modeling the system. We also have considered the glass transition of the oil as the pressure increases upon impact and the cavitation of the oil as the pressure drops below the vapor pressure upon rebound. A toy model has been developed where the collision is modeled as a series of two-body collisions. A qualitative agreement between the toy model and experiments gives insight into the underlying physics.

  18. Experimental quantification of a granular crater induced by a liquid-to-granular impact using a 3D scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyser, Emmanuel; Abellan, Antonio; Carrea, Dario; Rudaz, Benjamin; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Granular impacts have been extensively studied but much remains to be investigated regarding the complex topic of liquid-to-granular impact. Its applications to Geosciences are of interest regarding recent advances in the investigation of the raindrop erosion or the sediment flux. In our study, we focus on the quantification of both the excavated and deposited volumes resulting from a water-droplet impact onto a fine granular. The quantification of the existing relationships between the impact energy, the packing fraction and the excavated volume is also of interest. Indeed, the relationship between the packing fraction and the excavated volume has still to be investigated for constant impact energy (fixed height of fall and droplet size). Moreover, the volume distribution of the granular matter around the impact target has still to be achieved regarding the previous studies. Much of the previous work was focused on the ejected particles distribution but less is known about the volume distribution of the ejected mass. In this study, we have developed a specific methodology in order to investigate these two topics, as follows: a) First of all, we carried out experimental investigations in laboratory on a setup inspired by the previous works of Long et al. (2014) and Furbish et al. (2007). Granular samples were prepared using a compaction device in order to produce various packing fractions. Pre- and post-impact surface geometries were recorded using a high precision 3D scanner (KONICA MINOLTA VIVID 9i). This provided an accurate point cloud of the impact crater and ejecta deposits. b) Afterwards, we processed each point cloud pairs using different softwares (PolyWorks & MATLAB). We used an accurate change detection method by computing orthogonal distance from points (post-geometry) to reference meshed surface (pre-geometry) to extract the points belonging to deposits (positive distance) or crater (negative distance). Then, we used the computational geometry toolbox provided by MATLAB to compute the excavated and deposited volumes. Results show that both excavated and deposited volumes seem to be dependent on the packing fraction (e.g the higher the packing the lower the volume) for a constant impact energy. The radial volume distribution is more likely to be a Burr XII distribution rather than an exponential distribution. Following our experimental results, numerical modeling for the cratering process has yet to be established coupling different numerical methods (Computational Fluid Dynamic and Discrete Element Method) in order to reproduce similar volume distribution. Such numerical methods are promising techniques for further simulations of liquid-to-granular impact.

  19. Theoretical model of granular compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Naim, E.; Knight, J.B.; Nowak, E.R. |; Jaeger, H.M.; Nagel, S.R.

    1997-11-01

    Experimental studies show that the density of a vibrated granular material evolves from a low density initial state into a higher density final steady state. The relaxation towards the final density follows an inverse logarithmic law. As the system approaches its final state, a growing number of beads have to be rearranged to enable a local density increase. A free volume argument shows that this number grows as N = {rho}/(1 {minus} {rho}). The time scale associated with such events increases exponentially e{sup {minus}N}, and as a result a logarithmically slow approach to the final state is found {rho} {infinity} {minus}{rho}(t) {approx_equal} 1/lnt.

  20. Rapid wetting dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Andreas; Bellani, Gabriele; Amberg, Gustav

    2010-11-01

    Contact lines between solids and liquid or gas interfaces appear in very many instances of fluid flows. This could be coffee stains, water-oil mixtures in oil recovery, hydrophobic feet of insects or leaves in nature. In the present work we elucidate some of the wetting physics governing the very rapid wetting. Experimental and numerical results of spontaneously spreading droplets are presented, where focus is directed towards understanding the very rapid flow regime and highly dynamic initial wetting phase, where the contact line speed is limited by dissipative processes on a molecular scale occurring at the contact line. In particular we show the influence of the surface wettability and the liquid viscosity on the spreading dynamics, such as the contact line motion and dynamic contact angle in time.

  1. Wet storage integrity update

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1983-09-01

    This report includes information from various studies performed under the Wet Storage Task of the Spent Fuel Integrity Project of the Commercial Spent Fuel Management (CSFM) Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. An overview of recent developments in the technology of wet storage of spent water reactor fuel is presented. Licensee Event Reports pertaining to spent fuel pools and the associated performance of spent fuel and storage components during wet storage are discussed. The current status of fuel that was examined under the CSFM Program is described. Assessments of the effect of boric acid in spent fuel pool water on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel and the stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel piping containing stagnant water at spent fuel pools are discussed. A list of pertinent publications is included. 84 references, 21 figures, 11 tables.

  2. Wrinkling of wet paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ho-Young; Kim, Jungchul; Mahadevan, L.

    2011-11-01

    It is a mundane experience that paper stained with water wrinkles. It is because a wetted portion of paper, which swells due to the hygroexpansive nature of the cellulose fiber network, deforms out of its original plane. Here we quantify the dynamics of wrinkling of wet paper coupled to the capillary imbibition of water into paper using a combination of experiment and theory. While supplying water from a capillary tube that touches the center of a paper strip, we measure the spreading rate of the wet area, wait time for the out-of-plane buckling, and temporal growth of a wrinkling magnitude. Using a theoretical model assuming a linear increase of the strain and an exponential decay of the elastic modulus with the water concentration, we construct scaling laws to predict the simultaneous capillary imbibition and wrinkling rates. This work was supported by the Wyss Institute of Harvard University.

  3. Three-dimensional (3D) experimental realization and observation of a granular gas in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harth, Kirsten; Trittel, Torsten; May, Kathrin; Wegner, Sandra; Stannarius, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Experiments with granular gases do not only provide statistical information on multi-particle systems undergoing random dissipative interactions, they may also help to test predictions of numerical simulations and to gain understanding of the self-organization of dilute granular matter to clusters and stable assemblies. We shortly review an experiment under zero gravity conditions on different platforms. Implementations on a sounding rocket flight, parabolic flights and drop tower shots are analyzed. We evaluate general experimental requirements, judge the appropriateness of the different platforms, and present quantitative results.

  4. Granular neural networks: concepts and development schemes.

    PubMed

    Song, Mingli; Pedrycz, Witold

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we introduce a concept of a granular neural network and develop its comprehensive design process. The proposed granular network is formed on the basis of a given (numeric) neural network whose structure is augmented by the formation of granular connections (being realized as intervals) spanned over the numeric ones. Owing to its simplicity of the underlying processing, the interval connections become an appealing alternative of information granules to clarify the main idea. We introduce a concept of information granularity and its quantification (viewed as a level of information granularity). Being treated as an essential design asset, the assumed level of information granularity is distributed (allocated) among the connections of the network in several different ways so that certain performance index becomes maximized. Due to the high dimensionality nature of some protocols of allocation of information granularity and the nature of the allocation process itself, single-objective versions of particle swarm optimization is considered a suitable optimization vehicle. As we are concerned with the granular output of the network, which has to be evaluated with regard to the numeric target of data, two criteria are considered; namely, coverage of numeric data and specificity of information granules (intervals). A series of numeric studies completed for synthetic data and data coming from the machine learning and StatLib repositories provide a useful insight into the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:24808376

  5. Collective workload organization in confined excavation of granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaenkova, Daria; Linevich, Vadim; Goodisman, Michael A.; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2015-03-01

    Many social insects collectively construct large nests in complex substrates; such structures are often composed of narrow tunnels. The benefits of collective construction, including reduced construction costs per worker come with challenges of navigation in crowded, confined spaces. Here we study the workforce organization of groups of S. invicta fire ants creating tunnels in wet granular media. We monitor the activity levels of marked (painted) workers-defined as a number of tunnel visits over 12 hours- during initiation of tunnels. The activity levels are described by a Lorenz curve with a Gini coefficient of ~ 0 . 7 indicating that a majority of the excavation is performed by a minority of workers. We hypothesize that this workload distribution is beneficial for excavation in crowded conditions, and use a 2D cellular automata (CA) model to reproduce behaviors of the excavating ants. CA simulations reveal that tunnel construction rates decrease in groups of equally active animals compared to groups with the natural workload distribution. We use predictions of the CA model to organize collective excavation of granular material by teams of digging robots, and use the robots to test hypotheses of crowded excavation in the physical world. We acknowledge support of National Science Foundation, Physics of Living Systems division.

  6. Impact of Wettability on Fracturing of Nano-Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trojer, M.; Juanes, R.

    2014-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is a well-known reservoir stimulation technique, by which the permeability of the near-wellbore region is enhanced through the creation of tensile fractures within the rock, formed in the direction perpendicular to the least principal stress. While it is well known that fracturing of granular media strongly depends on the type of media, the pore fluids, and the fracking fluids, the interplay between multiphase flow, wettability and fracture mechanics of shale-like (nano-granular) materials remains poorly understood. Here, we study experimentally the dynamics of multiphase-flow fracking in nano-porous media and its dependence on the wetting properties of the system. The experiments consist in saturating a thin bed of glass beads with a viscous fluid, injecting a less viscous fluid, and imaging the invasion morphology. We investigate three control parameters: the injection rate of the less-viscous invading phase, the confining stress, and the contact angle, which we control by altering the surface chemistry of the beads and the Hele-Shaw cell. We quantify the dynamic fracture pattern by means of particle image velocimetry (PIV), and elucidate the role of wettability on the emerging flow physics at the length scale of the viscous-frictional instability.

  7. Partitioning of fresh crude oil between floating, dispersed and sediment phases: Effect of exposure order to dispersant and granular materials.

    PubMed

    Boglaienko, Daria; Tansel, Berrin

    2016-06-15

    When three or more high and low energy substrates are mixed, wetting order can significantly affect the behavior of the mixture. We analyzed the phase distribution of fresh floating Louisiana crude oil into dispersed, settled and floating phases depending on the exposure sequence to Corexit 9500A (dispersant) and granular materials. In the experiments artificial sea water at salinity 34‰ was used. Limestone (2.00-0.300 mm) and quartz sand (0.300-0.075 mm) were used as the natural granular materials. Dispersant Corexit 9500A increased the amount of dispersed oil up to 33.76 ± 7.04%. Addition of granular materials after the dispersant increased dispersion of oil to 47.96 ± 1.96%. When solid particles were applied on the floating oil before the dispersant, oil was captured as oil-particle aggregates and removed from the floating layer. However, dispersant addition led to partial release of the captured oil, removing it from the aggregated form to the dispersed and floating phases. There was no visible oil aggregation with the granular materials when quartz or limestone was at the bottom of the flask before the addition of oil and dispersant. The results show that granular materials can be effective when applied from the surface for aggregating or dispersing oil. However, the granular materials in the sediments are not effective neither for aggregating nor dispersing floating oil. PMID:27019358

  8. Centrifuge modelling of granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Miguel Angel; Wu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    A common characteristic of mass flows like debris flows, rock avalanches and mudflows is that gravity is their main driving force. Gravity defines the intensity and duration of the main interactions between particles and their surrounding media (particle-particle, particle-fluid, fluid-fluid). At the same time, gravity delimits the occurrence of phase separation, inverse segregation, and mass consolidation, among other phenomena. Therefore, in the understanding of the flow physics it is important to account for the scaling of gravity in scaled models. In this research, a centrifuge model is developed to model free surface granular flows down an incline at controlled gravity conditions. Gravity is controlled by the action of an induced inertial acceleration field resulting from the rotation of the model in a geotechnical centrifuge. The characteristics of the induced inertial acceleration field during flow are discussed and validated via experimental data. Flow heights, velocity fields, basal pressure and impact forces are measured for a range of channel inclinations and gravity conditions. Preliminary results enlighten the flow characteristics at variable gravity conditions and open a discussion on the simulation of large scale processes at a laboratory scale. Further analysis on the flow physics brings valuable information for the validation of granular flows rheology.

  9. Compaction Waves in Granular HMX

    SciTech Connect

    E. Kober; R. Menikoff

    1999-01-01

    Piston driven compaction waves in granular HMX are simulated with a two-dimensional continuum mechanics code in which individual grains are resolved. The constitutive properties of the grains are modeled with a hydrostatic pressure and a simple elastic-plastic model for the shear stress. Parameters are chosen to correspond to inert HMX. For a tightly packed random grain distribution (with initial porosity of 19%) we varied the piston velocity to obtain weak partly compacted waves and stronger fully compacted waves. The average stress and wave speed are compatible with the porous Hugoniot locus for uni- axial strain. However, the heterogeneities give rise to stress concentrations, which lead to localized plastic flow. For weak waves, plastic deformation is the dominant dissipative mechanism and leads to dispersed waves that spread out in time. In addition to dispersion, the granular heterogeneities give rise to subgrain spatial variation in the thermodynamic variables. The peaks in the temperature fluctuations, known as hot spots, are in the range such that they are the critical factor for initiation sensitivity.

  10. Granular media in transformation: dynamics and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merceron, Aymeric; Jop, Pierre; Sauret, Alban; SVI, CNRS/Saint-Gobain Team

    2015-11-01

    Sintering, glass melting and other industrially relevant processes turn batches of grains into continuous end products. Such processes involve complex and mostly misunderstood chemical and physical transformations of the granular packing. Affecting the contact network, physicochemical reactions entail mechanical rearrangements. But such reorganizations may also trigger new potential reactions. Granular reactive systems are strongly coupled and need investigations for achieving industrial optimizations. This study is focused on how transformations appearing on its components affect the response of the granular packing. Inert brass disks and grains undergoing well-known transformations like volume decrease are mixed and then confined in a vertical 2D cell. While the system reacts, the granular packing is regularly photographed with a high-resolution camera. Events largely distributed both spatially and temporally occur around reactive grains. Thanks to image processing, this reorganization process is then analyzed. Spatial and temporal amplitudes of events are quantified as well as their local and global impacts on the granular structure.

  11. Bed wetting at home

    MedlinePlus

    ... have your child take an active part in cleaning up from the bed wetting (such as helping to strip the bed and put the sheets in the laundry). Reward your child for dry nights. Some families use a chart or diary ...

  12. Wet-Atmosphere Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamner, Richard M.; Mcguire, Janice K.

    1988-01-01

    Water content in gas controlled. Portable flow-control system generates nitrogen/water atmosphere having range of dew points and pressures. One use of system provides wet nitrogen for canister of wide-field camera requiring this special atmosphere. Also used to inject trace gases other than water vapor for leak testing of large vessels. Potential applications in photography, hospitals, and calibration laboratories.

  13. Wet and Wild Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana State Dept. of Education, Indianapolis. Center for School Improvement and Performance.

    This guide uses a thematic approach to show the integration of subjects (reading, mathematics, language arts, science/fine arts) and skills to create a context for learning. The contents of this guide are presented in a holistic format. There are six major topics in the guide, each with subtopics: (1) "Getting Your Feet Wet--An Introduction to

  14. Wet and Wild Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana State Dept. of Education, Indianapolis. Center for School Improvement and Performance.

    This guide uses a thematic approach to show the integration of subjects (reading, mathematics, language arts, science/fine arts) and skills to create a context for learning. The contents of this guide are presented in a holistic format. There are six major topics in the guide, each with subtopics: (1) "Getting Your Feet Wet--An Introduction to…

  15. Shear viscosity of a model for confined granular media.

    PubMed

    Soto, Rodrigo; Risso, Dino; Brito, Ricardo

    2014-12-01

    The shear viscosity in the dilute regime of a model for confined granular matter is studied by simulations and kinetic theory. The model consists on projecting into two dimensions the motion of vibrofluidized granular matter in shallow boxes by modifying the collision rule: besides the restitution coefficient that accounts for the energy dissipation, there is a separation velocity that is added in each collision in the normal direction. The two mechanisms balance on average, producing stationary homogeneous states. Molecular dynamics simulations show that in the steady state the distribution function departs from a Maxwellian, with cumulants that remain small in the whole range of inelasticities. The shear viscosity normalized with stationary temperature presents a clear dependence with the inelasticity, taking smaller values compared to the elastic case. A Boltzmann-like equation is built and analyzed using linear response theory. It is found that the predictions show an excellent agreement with the simulations when the correct stationary distribution is used but a Maxwellian approximation fails in predicting the inelasticity dependence of the viscosity. These results confirm that transport coefficients depend strongly on the mechanisms that drive them to stationary states. PMID:25615082

  16. Role of defects in the onset of wall-induced granular convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortini, Andrea; Huang, Kai

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the onset of wall-induced convection in vertically vibrated granular matter by means of experiments and two-dimensional computer simulations. In both simulations and experiments we find that the wall-induced convection occurs inside the bouncing bed region of the parameter space, in which the granular bed behaves like a bouncing ball. A good agreement between experiments and simulations is found for the peak vibration acceleration at which convection starts. By comparing the results of simulations initialized with and without defects, we find that the onset of convection occurs at lower vibration strengths in the presence of defects. Furthermore, we find that the convection of granular particles initialized in a perfect hexagonal lattice is related to the nucleation of defects and the process is described by an Arrhenius law.

  17. Role of defects in the onset of wall-induced granular convection.

    PubMed

    Fortini, Andrea; Huang, Kai

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the onset of wall-induced convection in vertically vibrated granular matter by means of experiments and two-dimensional computer simulations. In both simulations and experiments we find that the wall-induced convection occurs inside the bouncing bed region of the parameter space, in which the granular bed behaves like a bouncing ball. A good agreement between experiments and simulations is found for the peak vibration acceleration at which convection starts. By comparing the results of simulations initialized with and without defects, we find that the onset of convection occurs at lower vibration strengths in the presence of defects. Furthermore, we find that the convection of granular particles initialized in a perfect hexagonal lattice is related to the nucleation of defects and the process is described by an Arrhenius law. PMID:25871102

  18. BOOK REVIEW: Kinetic Theory of Granular Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trizac, Emmanuel

    2005-11-01

    Granular gases are composed of macroscopic bodies kept in motion by an external energy source such as a violent shaking. The behaviour of such systems is quantitatively different from that of ordinary molecular gases: due to the size of the constituents, external fields have a stronger effect on the dynamics and, more importantly, the kinetic energy of the gas is no longer a conserved quantity. The key role of the inelasticity of collisions has been correctly appreciated for about fifteen years, and the ensuing consequences in terms of phase behaviour or transport properties studied in an increasing and now vast body of literature. The purpose of this book is to help the newcomer to the field in acquiring the essential theoretical tools together with some numerical techniques. As emphasized by the authors—who were among the pioneers in the domain— the content could be covered in a one semester course for advanced undergraduates, or it could be incorporated in a more general course dealing with the statistical mechanics of dissipative systems. The book is self-contained, clear, and avoids mathematical complications. In order to elucidate the main physical ideas, heuristic points of views are sometimes preferred to a more rigorous route that would lead to a longer discussion. The 28 chapters are short; they offer exercises and worked examples, solved at the end of the book. Each part is supplemented with a relevant foreword and a useful summary including take-home messages. The editorial work is of good quality, with very few typographical errors. In spite of the title, kinetic theory stricto sensu is not the crux of the matter covered. The authors discuss the consequences of the molecular chaos assumption both at the individual particle level and in terms of collective behaviour. The first part of the book addresses the mechanics of grain collisions. It is emphasized that considering the coefficient of restitution ɛ —a central quantity governing the inelasticity of inter-grain encounters—as velocity independent is inconsistent with the mechanical point of view. An asymptotic expression for the impact velocity dependence of ɛ is therefore derived for visco-elastic spheres. The important inelastic Boltzmann equation is introduced in part II and the associated velocity distribution characterized for a force-free medium (so-called free cooling regime). Transport processes can then be analyzed in part III at the single particle level, and part IV from a more macroscopic viewpoint. The corresponding Chapman Enskog-like hydrodynamic approach is worked out in detail, in a clear fashion. Finally, the tendency of granular gases to develop instabilities is illustrated in part V where the hydrodynamic picture plays a pivotal role. This book clearly sets the stage. For the sake of simplicity, the authors have discarded some subtle points, such as the open questions underlying the hydrodynamic description (why include the temperature among the hydrodynamic modes, and what about the separation of space and time scales between kinetic and hydrodynamic excitations?). Such omissions are understandable. To a certain extent however, the scope of the book is centered on previous work by the authors, and I have a few regrets. Special emphasis is put on the (variable ɛ) visco-elastic model, which enhances the technical difficulty of the presentation. On the other hand, the important physical effects including scaling laws, hydrodynamic behaviour and structure formation, can be understood in two steps, from the results derived within the much simpler constant ɛ model, allowing subsequently \\varepsilon to depend on the granular temperature. The authors justify their choice with the inconsistency of the constant ɛ route. The improvements brought by the visco-elastic model remain to be assessed, since the rotational degrees of freedom, discarded in the book, play an important role and require due consideration of both tangential and normal restitution coefficients, that are again velocity dependent. This seems to be the price of a consistent approach, which does not lend itself to much insight. In addition, the behaviour of driven systems is not addressed, whereas in the realm of granular media, force-free systems are the exception rather than the rule. The differences between constant ɛ and visco-elastic models is presumably less pronounced in the driven case. Study of driven systems also reveals that the rheology of granular gases is intrinsically non-Newtonian, which is a key feature. Finally, the powerful direct simulation Monte Carlo technique is not described, whereas it is an important tool, particularly relevant for the physics of the Boltzmann equation, and straightforward to implement in its simplest version. N Brilliantov and T Pöschel concentrate on the (equally relevant) molecular dynamics method instead. In conclusion, the book fills a gap in the field. The companion webpage from where molecular dynamics and symbolic algebra programs can be downloaded is also useful.

  19. Numerical Simulations of Granular Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Derek C.; Michel, Patrick; Schwartz, Stephen R.; Ballouz, Ronald-Louis; Yu, Yang; Matsumura, Soko

    2014-11-01

    Spacecraft images and indirect observations including thermal inertia measurements indicate most small bodies have surface regolith. Evidence of granular flow is also apparent in the images. This material motion occurs in very low gravity, therefore in a completely different gravitational environment than on the Earth. Understanding and modeling these motions can aid in the interpretation of imaged surface features that may exhibit signatures of constituent material properties. Also, upcoming sample-return missions to small bodies, and possible future manned missions, will involve interaction with the surface regolith, so it is important to develop tools to predict the surface response. We have added new capabilities to the parallelized N-body gravity tree code pkdgrav [1,2] that permit the simulation of granular dynamics, including multi-contact physics and friction forces, using the soft-sphere discrete-element method [3]. The numerical approach has been validated through comparison with laboratory experiments (e.g., [3,4]). Ongoing and recently completed projects include: impacts into granular materials using different projectile shapes [5]; possible tidal resurfacing of asteroid Apophis during its 2029 encounter [6]; the Brazil-nut effect in low gravity [7]; and avalanche modeling.Acknowledgements: DCR acknowledges NASA (grants NNX08AM39G, NNX10AQ01G, NNX12AG29G) and NSF (AST1009579). PM acknowledges the French agency CNES. SRS works on the NEOShield Project funded under the European Commission’s FP7 program agreement No. 282703. SM acknowledges support from the Center for Theory and Computation at U Maryland and the Dundee Fellowship at U Dundee. Most simulations were performed using the YORP cluster in the Dept. of Astronomy at U Maryland and on the Deepthought High-Performance Computing Cluster at U Maryland.References: [1] Richardson, D.C. et al. 2000, Icarus 143, 45; [2] Stadel, J. 2001, Ph.D. Thesis, U Washington; [3] Schwartz, S.R. et al. 2012, Gran. Matt. 14, 363. [4] Schwartz, S.R. et al. 2013, Icarus 226, 67; [5] Schwartz, S.R. et al. 2014, P&SS, 10.1016/j.pss.2014.07.013; [6] Yu, Y. et al. 2014, Icarus, 10.1016/j.icarus.2014.07.027; [7] Matsumura, S. et al. 2014, MNRAS, 10.1093/mnras/stu1388.

  20. Structural features in granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Thomas G.

    1990-06-01

    High-speed motion pictures document a series of essentially two-dimensional, free-surface flows of 6-mm diameter plastic spheres generated in an inclined glass-walled chute 3.7 m long and 6.7 mm wide. Flows exhibit a diverse suite of structural features, depending on particle flux, chute inclination, and geometry of the fixed bed. Flows at sufficiently low inclination or high particle flux can generally be divided into factional and collisional regions. In the frictional region, intergranular momentum transfer occurs by enduring, frictional contacts; kinetic theories of granular flow do not apply. The frictional region typically consists of a quasi-static zone extending up from the fixed bed and an overlying block-gliding zone, in which coherent blocks of grains move parallel to the bed. The collisional region overlies the contact region in sufficiently deep flows; otherwise it extends to the bed. In it, momentum transfer is dominated by collisions. It typically consists of three zones: a lower grain-layer-gliding zone, in which grains appear to slide over one another; a middle chaotic zone, in which grain motions are highly random, as in a dense gas; and an overlying saltational zone, in which grains trace long, curved paths. Zones grade smoothly into one another, and some are missing in certain flows. In none of the flows does a frictional region overlie a collisional region. Zone thicknesses and block dimensions are previously unrecognized length scales in granular flows. The no-slip velocity boundary condition applies only when a frictional region adjoins a geometrically rough fixed bed, otherwise significant slip occurs (up to 50% of the mean flow velocity). Binary collisions dominate only in the collisional region and there perhaps only in the chaotic and saltational zones. Because many collision-dominated geophysical flows start from friction-dominated ones and end by reverting to the frictional regime as the energy supply diminishes, kinetic theories of granular flow, which unanimously employ the binary-collision assumption, can at best describe only a portion of the phenomena. Microstructural descriptions of the relatively slow, compact, and frictional regions evident in most geophysical flows are required to complement existing kinetic theories.

  1. Granular filtration in a fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, J.S.; Yue, P.C.; Halow, J.S.

    1995-12-31

    Successful development of advanced coal-fired power conversion systems often require reliable and efficient cleanup devices which can remove particulate and gaseous pollutants from high-temperature high-pressure gas stream. A novel filtration concept for particulate cleanup has been developed at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the U.S. Department of Energy. The filtration system consists of a fine metal screen filter immersed in a fluidized bed of granular material. As the gas stream passes through the fluidized bed, a layer of the bed granular material is entrained and deposited at the screen surface. This material provides a natural granular filter to separate fine particles from the gas stream passing through the bed. Since the filtering media is the granular material supplied by the fluidized bed, the filter is not subjected to blinding like candle filters. Because only the in-flowing gas, not fine particle cohesive forces, maintains the granular layer at the screen surface, once the thickness and permeability of the granular layer is stabilized, it remains unchanged as long as the in-flowing gas flow rate remains constant. The weight of the particles and the turbulent nature of the fluidized bed limits the thickness of the granular layer on the filter leading to a self-cleaning attribute of the filter. Batch mode filtration performance of the filter was first reported at the Ninth Annual Coal-Fueled Heat Engines, Advanced Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustion, and Gas Stream Cleanup Systems Contractors Review Meeting.

  2. Fracture surfaces of granular pastes.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Abdelhaye, Y O; Chaouche, M; Van Damme, H

    2013-11-01

    Granular pastes are dense dispersions of non-colloidal grains in a simple or a complex fluid. Typical examples are the coating, gluing or sealing mortars used in building applications. We study the cohesive rupture of thick mortar layers in a simple pulling test where the paste is initially confined between two flat surfaces. After hardening, the morphology of the fracture surfaces was investigated, using either the box counting method to analyze fracture profiles perpendicular to the mean fracture plane, or the slit-island method to analyze the islands obtained by cutting the fracture surfaces at different heights, parallel to the mean fracture plane. The fracture surfaces were shown to exhibit scaling properties over several decades. However, contrary to what has been observed in the brittle or ductile fracture of solid materials, the islands were shown to be mass fractals. This was related to the extensive plastic flow involved in the fracture process. PMID:24241751

  3. Aerofractures in Confined Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, Fredrik K.; Turkaya, Semih; Toussaint, Renaud; Måløy, Knut J.; Flekkøy, Eirik G.

    2015-04-01

    We will present the optical analysis of experimental aerofractures in confined granular media. The study of this generic process may have applications in industries involving hydraulic fracturing of tight rocks, safe construction of dams, tunnels and mines, and in earth science where phenomena such as mud volcanoes and sand injectites are results of subsurface sediment displacements driven by fluid overpressure. It is also interesting to increase the understanding the flow instability itself, and how the fluid flow impacts the solid surrounding fractures and in the rest of the sample. Such processes where previously studied numerically [Niebling 2012a, Niebling 2012b] or in circular geometries. We will here explore experimentally linear geometries. We study the fracturing patterns that form when air flows into a dense, non-cohesive porous medium confined in a Hele-Shaw cell - i.e. into a packing of dry 80 micron beads placed between two glass plates separated by ~1mm. The cell is rectangular and fitted with a semi-permeable boundary to the atmosphere - blocking beads but not air - on one short edge, while the other three edges are impermeable. The porous medium is packed inside the cell between the semi-permeable boundary and an empty volume at the sealed side where the air pressure can be set and kept at a constant overpressure (1-2bar). Thus, for the air trapped inside the cell to release the overpressure it has to move through the solid. At high enough overpressures the air flow deforms the solid and increase permeability in some regions along the air-solid interface, which results in unstable flow and aerofracturing. Aerofractures are thought to be an analogue to hydrofractures, and an advantage of performing aerofracturing experiments in a Hele-Shaw cell is that the fracturing process can easily be observed in the lab. Our experiments are recorded with a high speed camera with a framerate of 1000 frames per second. In the analysis, by using various image processing techniques, we segment out and study the aerofractures over time looking at growth dynamics, fractal dimension and characteristics such as average finger thickness as function of depth into the solid. Also, by performing image correlation on two subsequent frames we estimate displacement fields and investigate the surrounding stress and strain fields in the solid around the fractures. Several experiments are performed with various overpressures and packing densities, and we compare the results. In a directly related project, acoustic emissions are recorded on a cell plate during experiments, and one of our goals is to correlate acoustic events and observations. We will also compare the dependence of the patterns on the saturation of the initial deformable porous material, by comparing experiments performed by air injection in air saturated granular media, to some in liquid saturated granular media. References: MJ Niebling, R Toussaint, EG Flekkøy, KJ Måløy, 2012, Dynamic aerofracture of dense granular packings, 2012, Physical Review E 86 (6), 061315 M Niebling, R Toussaint, EG Flekkøy, KJ Måløy, 2012, Numerical studies of aerofractures in porous media, Revista Cubana de Fisica 29 (1E), pp. 1E66-1E70

  4. Capillary fracturing in granular media.

    PubMed

    Holtzman, Ran; Szulczewski, Michael L; Juanes, Ruben

    2012-06-29

    We study the displacement of immiscible fluids in deformable, noncohesive granular media. Experimentally, we inject air into a thin bed of water-saturated glass beads and observe the invasion morphology. The control parameters are the injection rate, the bead size, and the confining stress. We identify three invasion regimes: capillary fingering, viscous fingering, and "capillary fracturing," where capillary forces overcome frictional resistance and induce the opening of conduits. We derive two dimensionless numbers that govern the transition among the different regimes: a modified capillary number and a fracturing number. The experiments and analysis predict the emergence of fracturing in fine-grained media under low confining stress, a phenomenon that likely plays a fundamental role in many natural processes such as primary oil migration, methane venting from lake sediments, and the formation of desiccation cracks. PMID:23004989

  5. Force distributions in granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2002-03-01

    A fundamental problem in the study of disordered materials concerns the propagation of forces. Static granular media, such as sand particles inside a rigid container, have emerged as an important model system as they embody the zero temperature limit of disordered materials comprised of hardsphere repulsive particles. In this talk, I will review recent results on the distribution forces along the boundaries of granular material subjected to an applied load. While the spatial distribution of mean forces sensitively reflects the (macroscopic) packing structure of the material, the ensemble-averaged probability distribution of force fluctuations around the mean value, P(f), exhibits universal behavior. The shape of P(f) is found to be independent not only of the macroscopic packing arrangement but also of the inter-particle friction and, over a wide range, of the applied external stress. This shape is characterized by an exponential decay in the probability density for fluctuations above the mean force and only a small reduction, by no more than a factor two, for fluctuations below the mean [1]. Surprisingly, the exponential, non-Gaussian behavior appears to hold up even in the case of highly compressible grains, and it also has been observed in simulations of supercooled liquids [2]. I will discuss the implications of these findings on our current understanding of stress transmission in disordered media in general, and on glassy behavior in particular. [1] D. L. Blair, N. W. Mueggenburg, A. H. Marshall, H. M. Jaeger, and S. R. Nagel, Phys. Rev. E 63, 041304 (2001). [2] S. O’Hern, S. A. Langer, A. J. Liu, and S. R. Nagel, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 111 (2001). * Work performed in collaboration with D. L. Blair, J. M. Erikson, A. H. Marshall, N. W. Mueggenburg, and S. R. Nagel.

  6. 21 CFR 133.145 - Granular cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Granular cheese for manufacturing. 133.145 Section... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.145 Granular cheese for manufacturing. Granular cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for granular cheese by §...

  7. 21 CFR 133.145 - Granular cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Granular cheese for manufacturing. 133.145 Section... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.145 Granular cheese for manufacturing. Granular cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for granular cheese by §...

  8. 21 CFR 133.145 - Granular cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Granular cheese for manufacturing. 133.145 Section... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.145 Granular cheese for manufacturing. Granular cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for granular cheese by §...

  9. 21 CFR 133.145 - Granular cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Granular cheese for manufacturing. 133.145 Section... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.145 Granular cheese for manufacturing. Granular cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for granular cheese by §...

  10. 21 CFR 133.145 - Granular cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Granular cheese for manufacturing. 133.145 Section... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.145 Granular cheese for manufacturing. Granular cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for granular cheese by §...

  11. Process improvement: wet reads.

    PubMed

    Tobey, Mary Ellen; Yamamoto, Alvin; Robertson, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    Through a four month Clinical Process Improvement Leadership Program, professionals at North Shore Medical Center in Massachusetts developed a process improvement to gain efficiency in communicating urgently requested x-ray results, or "wet reads." The initial steps included summoning a diverse team, mapping the process in detail, and clearly defining the problem. Once the problem was defined, the team brainstormed potential solutions and constructed a priority/pay-off matrix. By using the Plan Do Study Act (PDSA) system, a repeating cycle of activity that tests the new experimental work flow by tracking, adjusting, tweaking, and tracking again, efforts were built upon until the goal was met.The average wet read turnaround time went from 44 minutes to 15 minutes, a reduction of 66%. PMID:24605443

  12. Clinical Trials for Wet AMD

    MedlinePlus

    ... Browse: Home / Research / Clinical Trials For Wet AMD Clinical Trials For Wet AMD Listen Clinical trials are the final research phase before a ... is testing in humans through a succession of clinical trials. Research on treatments starts in the laboratory ...

  13. Impact compaction of a granular material

    SciTech Connect

    Fenton, Gregg; Asay, Blaine; Dalton, Devon

    2015-05-19

    The dynamic behavior of granular materials has importance to a variety of engineering applications. Structural seismic coupling, planetary science, and earth penetration mechanics, are just a few of the application areas. Although the mechanical behavior of granular materials of various types have been studied extensively for several decades, the dynamic behavior of such materials remains poorly understood. High-quality experimental data are needed to improve our general understanding of granular material compaction physics. This study will describe how an instrumented plunger impact system can be used to measure pressure-density relationships for model materials at high and controlled strain rates and subsequently used for computational modeling.

  14. Fluctuations in an agitated granular fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichol, Kiri; van Hecke, Martin

    2008-03-01

    Granular media can be fluidized by a flow that occurs far away. Intruders placed in such a 'stationary granular fluid' sink until they reach a depth given by a granular analogue of Archimedes law. Once they float at this depth, these intruders effectively probe the microscopic agitations in the material that cause the fluidization. The spectrum of these fluctuations is anomalous. We present its dependence on experimental parameters such as driving rate, floating depth and probe size, and discuss the possibility of applying a non-equilibrium Fluctuation Dissipation relation to this system.

  15. Continuum description of avalanches in granular media.

    SciTech Connect

    Aranson, I. S.; Tsimring, L. S.

    2000-12-05

    A continuum theory of partially fluidized granular flows is proposed. The theory is based on a combination of the mass and momentum conservation equations with the order parameter equation which describes the transition between flowing and static components of the granular system. We apply this model to the dynamics of avalanches in chutes. The theory provides a quantitative description of recent observations of granular flows on rough inclined planes (Daerr and Douady 1999): layer bistability, and the transition from triangular avalanches propagating downhill at small inclination angles to balloon-shaped avalanches also propagating uphill for larger angles.

  16. Recent bright gully deposits on Mars: Wet or dry flow?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pelletier, J.D.; Kolb, K.J.; McEwen, A.S.; Kirk, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    Bright gully sediments attributed to liquid water flow have been deposited on Mars within the past several years. To test the liquid water flow hypothesis, we constructed a high-resolution (1 m/pixel) photogrammetric digital elevation model of a crater in the Centauri Montes region, where a bright gully deposit formed between 2001 and 2005. We conducted one-dimensional (1-D) and 2-D numerical flow modeling to test whether the deposit morphology is most consistent with liquid water or dry granular How. Liquid water flow models that incorporate freezing can match the runout distance of the flow for certain freezing rates but fail to reconstruct the distributary lobe morphology of the distal end of the deposit. Dry granular flow models can match both the observed runout distance and the distal morphology. Wet debris flows with high sediment concentrations are also consistent with the observed morphology because their rheologies are often similar to that of dry granular flows. As such, the presence of liquid water in this flow event cannot be ruled out, but the available evidence is consistent with dry landsliding. ?? 2008 The Geological Society of America.

  17. Wet chemistry instrument prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A wet chemistry instrument prototype for detecting amino acids in planetary soil samples was developed. The importance of amino acids and their condensation products to the development of life forms is explained. The characteristics of the instrument and the tests which were conducted to determine the materials compatibility are described. Diagrams are provided to show the construction of the instrument. Data obtained from the performance tests are reported.

  18. Wetting of porous solids.

    PubMed

    Patkar, Saket; Chaudhuri, Parag

    2013-09-01

    This paper presents a simple, three stage method to simulate the mechanics of wetting of porous solid objects, like sponges and cloth, when they interact with a fluid. In the first stage, we model the absorption of fluid by the object when it comes in contact with the fluid. In the second stage, we model the transport of absorbed fluid inside the object, due to diffusion, as a flow in a deforming, unstructured mesh. The fluid diffuses within the object depending on saturation of its various parts and other body forces. Finally, in the third stage, oversaturated parts of the object shed extra fluid by dripping. The simulation model is motivated by the physics of imbibition of fluids into porous solids in the presence of gravity. It is phenomenologically capable of simulating wicking and imbibition, dripping, surface flows over wet media, material weakening, and volume expansion due to wetting. The model is inherently mass conserving and works for both thin 2D objects like cloth and for 3D volumetric objects like sponges. It is also designed to be computationally efficient and can be easily added to existing cloth, soft body, and fluid simulation pipelines. PMID:23846102

  19. Wetting of Porous Solids.

    PubMed

    Patkar, Saket; Chaudhuri, Parag

    2013-01-10

    This paper presents a simple, three stage method to simulate the mechanics of wetting of porous solid objects, like sponges and cloth, when they interact with a fluid. In the first stage, we model the absorption of fluid by the object when it comes in contact with the fluid. In the second stage, we model the transport of absorbed fluid inside the object, due to diffusion, as a flow in a deforming, unstructured mesh. The fluid diffuses within the object depending on saturation of its various parts and other body forces. Finally, in the third stage, over-saturated parts of the object shed extra fluid by dripping. The simulation model is motivated by the physics of imbibition of fluids into porous solids in the presence of gravity. It is phenomenologically capable of simulating wicking and imbibition, dripping, surface flows over wet media, material weakening and volume expansion due to wetting. The model is inherently mass conserving and works for both thin 2D objects like cloth and for 3D volumetric objects like sponges. It is also designed to be computationally efficient and can be easily added to existing cloth, soft body and fluid simulation pipelines. PMID:23319518

  20. Granular activated algae for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Tiron, O; Bumbac, C; Patroescu, I V; Badescu, V R; Postolache, C

    2015-01-01

    The study used activated algae granules for low-strength wastewater treatment in sequential batch mode. Each treatment cycle was conducted within 24 h in a bioreactor exposed to 235 μmol/m²/s light intensity. Wastewater treatment was performed mostly in aerobic conditions, oxygen being provided by microalgae. High removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was achieved (86-98%) in the first hours of the reaction phase, during which the indicator's removal rate was 17.4 ± 3.9 mg O₂/g h; NH(4)(+) was removed during organic matter degradation processes with a rate of 1.8 ± 0.6 mg/g h. After almost complete COD removal, the (O⁺) remaining in the liquor was removed through nitrification processes promoted by the increase of the liquor's oxygen saturation (O₂%), the transformation rate of NH4(+) into NO(3)(-) increasing from 0.14 ± 0.05 to 1.5 ± 0.4 mg NH4(+)/g h, along with an O₂% increase. A wide removal efficiency was achieved in the case of PO(4)(3)(-) (11-85%), with the indicator's removal rate being 1.3 ± 0.7 mg/g h. In the provided optimum conditions, the occurrence of the denitrifying activity was also noticed. A large pH variation was registered (5-8.5) during treatment cycles. The granular activated algae system proved to be a promising alternative for wastewater treatment as it also sustains cost-efficient microalgae harvesting, with microalgae recovery efficiency ranging between 99.85 and 99.99% after granules settling with a velocity of 19 ± 3.6 m/h. PMID:25812091

  1. Slope streaks on Mars: A new wet mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreslavsky, Mikhail A.; Head, James W.

    2009-06-01

    Slope steaks are one of the most intriguing modern phenomena observed on Mars. They have been mostly interpreted as some specific type of granular flow. We propose another mechanism for slope streak formation on Mars. It involves natural seasonal formation of a modest amount of highly concentrated chloride brines within a seasonal thermal skin, and runaway propagation of percolation fronts. Given the current state of knowledge of temperature regimes and the composition and structure of the surface layer in the slope streak regions, this mechanism is consistent with the observational constraints; it requires an assumption that a significant part of the observed chlorine to be in form of calcium and ferric chloride, and a small part of the observed hydrogen to be in form of water ice. This "wet" mechanism has a number of appealing advantages in comparison to the widely accepted "dry" granular flow mechanism. Potential tests for the "wet" mechanism include better modeling of the temperature regime and observations of the seasonality of streak formation.

  2. Capillary Movement in Granular Beds in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yendler, Boris S.; Bula, Ray J.; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of capillary flow through unsaturated porous media is very important for the development of an effective water and nutrient delivery system for growing plants in microgravity and chemical engineering applications. Experiments were conducted on the Space Shuttle during the STS-63 mission using three experimental cuvettes called "Capillary Testbed-M." These experiments studied the effect of bead diameter on capillary flow by comparing the capillary flow in three different granular beds. It was observed that the speed of water propagation in the granular bed consisting of 1.5 mm diameter particles was less than that in the bed consisting of 1.0 mm. diameter particles. Such results contradict the existing theory of capillary water propagation in granular beds. It was found also that in microgravity water propagates independently in adjacent layers of a layered granular bed .

  3. NMR Measurements of Granular Flow and Compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Eiichi

    1998-03-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can be used to measure statistical distributions of granular flow velocity and fluctuations of velocity, as well as spatial distributions of particulate concentration, flow velocity, its fluctuations, and other parameters that may be derived from these. All measurements have been of protons in liquid-containing particles such as mustard seeds or pharmaceutical pills. Our favorite geometry has been the slowly rotating partially filled rotating drum with granular flow taking place along the free surface of the particles. All the above-mentioned parameters have been studied as well as a spatial distribution of particulate diffusion coefficients, energy dissipation due to collisions, as well as segregation of non-uniform mixtures of granular material. Finally, we describe some motions of granular material under periodic vibrations.

  4. Acoustical properties of double porosity granular materials.

    PubMed

    Venegas, Rodolfo; Umnova, Olga

    2011-11-01

    Granular materials have been conventionally used for acoustic treatment due to their sound absorptive and sound insulating properties. An emerging field is the study of the acoustical properties of multiscale porous materials. An example of these is a granular material in which the particles are porous. In this paper, analytical and hybrid analytical-numerical models describing the acoustical properties of these materials are introduced. Image processing techniques have been employed to estimate characteristic dimensions of the materials. The model predictions are compared with measurements on expanded perlite and activated carbon showing satisfactory agreement. It is concluded that a double porosity granular material exhibits greater low-frequency sound absorption at reduced weight compared to a solid-grain granular material with similar mesoscopic characteristics. PMID:22087905

  5. Tunable magneto-granular phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allein, F.; Tournat, V.; Gusev, V. E.; Theocharis, G.

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports on the study of the dynamics of 1D magneto-granular phononic crystals composed of a chain of spherical steel beads inside a properly designed magnetic field. This field is induced by an array of permanent magnets, located in a holder at a given distance from the chain. The theoretical and experimental results of the band gap structure are displayed, including all six degrees of freedom for the beads, i.e., three translations and three rotations. Experimental evidence of transverse-rotational modes of propagation is presented; moreover, by changing the strength of the magnetic field, the dynamic response of the granular chain is tuned. The combination of non-contact tunability with the potentially strong nonlinear behavior of granular systems ensures the suitability of magneto-granular phononic crystals as nonlinear, tunable mechanical metamaterials for use in controlling elastic wave propagation.

  6. Shear dispersion in dense granular flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Christov, Ivan C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-04-18

    We formulate and solve a model problem of dispersion of dense granular materials in rapid shear flow down an incline. The effective dispersivity of the depth-averaged concentration of the dispersing powder is shown to vary as the Péclet number squared, as in classical Taylor–Aris dispersion of molecular solutes. An extension to generic shear profiles is presented, and possible applications to industrial and geological granular flows are noted.

  7. Aerobic granular processes: Current research trends.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quanguo; Hu, Jianjun; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-06-01

    Aerobic granules are large biological aggregates with compact interiors that can be used in efficient wastewater treatment. This mini-review presents new researches on the development of aerobic granular processes, extended treatments for complicated pollutants, granulation mechanisms and enhancements of granule stability in long-term operation or storage, and the reuse of waste biomass as renewable resources. A discussion on the challenges of, and prospects for, the commercialization of aerobic granular process is provided. PMID:26873285

  8. Rheology of weakly vibrated granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijksman, J. A.; Wortel, G.; van Hecke, M.

    2009-06-01

    We show how weak vibrations substantially modify the rheology of granular materials. We experimentally probe dry granular flows in a weakly vibrated split bottom shear cell—the weak vibrations modulate gravity and act as an agitation source. By tuning the applied stress and vibration strength, and monitoring the resulting strain as a function of time, we uncover a rich phase diagram in which non-trivial transitions separate a jammed phase, a creep flow case, and a steady flow case.

  9. Rheology of weakly vibrated granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortel, Geert H.; Dijksman, Joshua A.; van Hecke, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We probe the rheology of weakly vibrated granular flows as function of flow rate, vibration strength, and pressure by performing experiments in a vertically vibrated split-bottom shear cell. For slow flows, we establish the existence of a vibration-dominated granular flow regime, where the driving stresses smoothly vanish as the driving rate is diminished. We distinguish three qualitatively different vibration-dominated rheologies, most strikingly a regime where the shear stresses no longer are proportional to the pressure.

  10. Shear dispersion in dense granular flows

    SciTech Connect

    Christov, Ivan C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-04-18

    We formulate and solve a model problem of dispersion of dense granular materials in rapid shear flow down an incline. The effective dispersivity of the depth-averaged concentration of the dispersing powder is shown to vary as the Pclet number squared, as in classical TaylorAris dispersion of molecular solutes. An extension to generic shear profiles is presented, and possible applications to industrial and geological granular flows are noted.

  11. PPCPs removal by aerobic granular sludge membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xia; Chen, Zhong-Lin; Wang, Xiao-Chun; Shen, Ji-Min; Xu, Hao

    2014-12-01

    An aerobic granular sludge membrane bioreactor (GMBR) was applied to the treatment of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) wastewater. The influence of granular sludge on five antibiotic and antiphlogistic PPCPs wastewater and the removal effect of methyl alcohol and conventional organic matter were investigated while constantly reducing the density of inflow organic matter. The results showed that the sludge granulation process in the system was rapid but unstable, and that the system exhibits a dissolution-reunion dynamic equilibrium. The reactor demonstrated varying removal effects of PPCPs on different objects. The use of a GMBR was more effective for the removal of prednisolone, naproxen, and ibuprofen; the first two drugs were lower the average removal rate of which reached 98.46 and 84.02 %, respectively; whereas the average removal rate of ibuprofen was 63.32 %. By contrast, the GMBR has an insignificant degradation effect on antibiotics such as amoxicillin, indicating that such antibiotic medicine is not easily degraded by microorganisms, which plays different roles in system operation. Because of the different chemical structures and characteristics of drugs that result in various degradation behavior. During the GMBR granulation process, the value of mixed liquor volatility suspended solids (MLVSS) gradually increases from 1.5 to 4.1 g/L during the GMBR granulation process, and the removal rate of CODCr reaches up to 87.98 %. After reducing the density of organic matter is reduced, the removal rates of NH3-N and TP both reach more than 90 %, respectively. Moreover, the proposed technique is considerably effective in the removal of methanol. PMID:25038925

  12. Contact micromechanics in granular media with clay

    SciTech Connect

    Ita, S.L.

    1994-08-01

    Many granular materials, including sedimentary rocks and soils, contain clay particles in the pores, grain contacts, or matrix. The amount and location of the clays and fluids can influence the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the granular material. This research investigated the mechanical effects of clay at grain-to-grain contacts in the presence of different fluids. Laboratory seismic wave propagation tests were conducted at ultrasonic frequencies using spherical glass beads coated with Montmorillonite clay (SWy-1) onto which different fluids were adsorbed. For all bead samples, seismic velocity increased and attenuation decreased as the contact stiffnesses increased with increasing stress demonstrating that grain contacts control seismic transmission in poorly consolidated and unconsolidated granular material. Coating the beads with clay added stiffness and introduced viscosity to the mechanical contact properties that increased the velocity and attenuation of the propagating seismic wave. Clay-fluid interactions were studied by allowing the clay coating to absorb water, ethyl alcohol, and hexadecane. Increasing water amounts initially increased seismic attenuation due to clay swelling at the contacts. Attenuation decreased for higher water amounts where the clay exceeded the plastic limit and was forced from the contact areas into the surrounding open pore space during sample consolidation. This work investigates how clay located at grain contacts affects the micromechanical, particularly seismic, behavior of granular materials. The need for this work is shown by a review of the effects of clays on seismic wave propagation, laboratory measurements of attenuation in granular media, and proposed mechanisms for attenuation in granular media.

  13. Surface wave acoustics of granular packing under gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Eric; Bonneau, Lenaic; Andreotti, Bruno

    2009-06-01

    Due to the non-linearity of Hertzian contacts, the speed of sound in granular matter increases with pressure. For a packing under gravity and in the presence of a free surface, bulk acoustic waves cannot propagate due to the inherent refraction toward the surface (the mirage effect). Thus, only modes corresponding to surface waves (Raleigh-Hertz modes) are able to propagate the acoustic signal. First, based on a non-linear elasticity model, we describe the main features associated to these surface waves. We show that under gravity, a granular packing is from the acoustic propagation point of view an index gradient waveguide that selects modes of two distinct families i.e. the sagittal and transverse waves localized in the vicinity of the free surface. A striking feature of these surface waves is the multi-modal propagation: for both transverse and sagittal waves, we show the existence of a infinite but discrete series of propagating modes. In each case, we determine the mode shape and and the corresponding dispersion relation. In the case of a finite size system, a geometric waveguide is superimposed to the index gradient wave guide. In this later case, the dispersion relations are modified by the appearance of a cut-off frequency that scales with depth. The second part is devoted to an experimental study of surface waves propagating in a granular packing confined in a long channel. This set-up allows to tune a monomodal emission by taking advantage of the geometric waveguide features combined with properly designed emitters. For both sagittal and transverses waves, we were able to isolate a single mode (the fundamental one) and to plot the dispersion relation. This measurements agree well with the Hertzian scaling law as predicted by meanfield models. Furthermore, it allows us to determine quantitatively relations on the elastic moduli. However, we observe that our data yield a shear modulus abnormally weak when compared to several meanfield predictions.

  14. Surface wave acoustics of granular packing under gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, Eric; Andreotti, Bruno; Bonneau, Lenaic

    2009-06-18

    Due to the non-linearity of Hertzian contacts, the speed of sound in granular matter increases with pressure. For a packing under gravity and in the presence of a free surface, bulk acoustic waves cannot propagate due to the inherent refraction toward the surface (the mirage effect). Thus, only modes corresponding to surface waves (Raleigh-Hertz modes) are able to propagate the acoustic signal. First, based on a non-linear elasticity model, we describe the main features associated to these surface waves. We show that under gravity, a granular packing is from the acoustic propagation point of view an index gradient waveguide that selects modes of two distinct families i.e. the sagittal and transverse waves localized in the vicinity of the free surface. A striking feature of these surface waves is the multi-modal propagation: for both transverse and sagittal waves, we show the existence of a infinite but discrete series of propagating modes. In each case, we determine the mode shape and and the corresponding dispersion relation. In the case of a finite size system, a geometric waveguide is superimposed to the index gradient wave guide. In this later case, the dispersion relations are modified by the appearance of a cut-off frequency that scales with depth. The second part is devoted to an experimental study of surface waves propagating in a granular packing confined in a long channel. This set-up allows to tune a monomodal emission by taking advantage of the geometric waveguide features combined with properly designed emitters. For both sagittal and transverses waves, we were able to isolate a single mode (the fundamental one) and to plot the dispersion relation. This measurements agree well with the Hertzian scaling law as predicted by meanfield models. Furthermore, it allows us to determine quantitatively relations on the elastic moduli. However, we observe that our data yield a shear modulus abnormally weak when compared to several meanfield predictions.

  15. Prediction of permeability of monodisperse granular materials with a micromechanics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Rongwei; Lemarchand, Eric; Fen-Chong, Teddy; Li, Kefei

    2016-04-01

    Prediction of the permeability of porous media is of vital importance to such fields as petroleum engineering, agricultural engineering and civil engineering. The liquid water within unsaturated granular materials is distinguished as the intergranular layer, the wetting layer and the water film. By means of the micromechanics approach, a physical conceptual model is developed to predict the permeability (intrinsic and relative permeabilities) of the monodisperse granular materials. The proposed model has been validated by comparing the available experimental data and the empirical models, and has been used to re-interpret the Kozeny-Carman's relation in particular. The results obtained with this model show that the intergranular water will dominate the flow transport when the saturation degree is higher than the residual saturation degree; when the saturation degree is below the residual saturation degree, the wetting layer will govern the flow transport and the relative permeability will decrease by 3 to 8 orders of magnitude depending on the connectivity of the wetting layer.

  16. Wet-dog shake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Andrew; Mills, Zack; Hu, David

    2010-11-01

    The drying of wet fur is a critical to mammalian heat regulation. We investigate experimentally the ability of hirsute animals to rapidly oscillate their bodies to shed water droplets, nature's analogy to the spin cycle of a washing machine. High-speed videography and fur-particle tracking is employed to determine the angular position of the animal's shoulder skin as a function of time. We determine conditions for drop ejection by considering the balance of surface tension and centripetal forces on drops adhering to the animal. Particular attention is paid to rationalizing the relationship between animal size and oscillation frequency required to self-dry.

  17. Wetting in Color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Ian Bruce

    Colorimetric litmus tests such as pH paper have enjoyed wide commercial success due to their inexpensive production and exceptional ease of use. However, expansion of colorimetry to new sensing paradigms is challenging because macroscopic color changes are seldom coupled to arbitrary differences in the physical/chemical properties of a system. In this thesis I present in detail the development of Wetting in Color Technology, focusing primarily on its application as an inexpensive and highly selective colorimetric indicator for organic liquids. The technology exploits chemically-encoded inverse-opal photonic crystals to control the infiltration of fluids to liquid-specific spatial patterns, projecting minute differences in liquids' wettability to macroscopically distinct, easy-to-visualize structural color patterns. It is shown experimentally and corroborated with theoretical modeling using percolation theory that the high selectivity of wetting, upon-which the sensitivity of the indicator relies, is caused by the highly symmetric structure of our large-area, defect-free SiO2 inverse-opals. The regular structure also produces a bright iridescent color, which disappears when infiltrated with liquid - naturally coupling the optical and fluidic responses. Surface modification protocols are developed, requiring only silanization and selective oxidation, to facilitate the deterministic design of an indicator that differentiates a broad range of liquids. The resulting tunable, built-in horizontal and vertical chemistry gradients allow the wettability threshold to be tailored to specific liquids across a continuous range, and make the readout rely only on countable color differences. As wetting is a generic fluidic phenomenon, Wetting in Color technology could be suitable for applications in authentication or identification of unknown liquids across a broad range of industries. However, the generic nature of the response also ensures chemical non-specificity. It is shown that combinatorial measurements from an array of indicators add a degree of chemical specificity to the platform, which can be further improved by monitoring the drying of the inverse-opal films. While colorimetry is the central focus of this thesis, applications of this platform in encryption, fluidics and nanofabrication are also briefly explored.

  18. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is an illustration of the analytical procedure of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) on board the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument. By dissolving small amounts of soil in water, WCL can determine the pH, the abundance of minerals such as magnesium and sodium cations or chloride, bromide and sulfate anions, as well as the conductivity and redox potential.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is an illustration of soil analysis on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) on board the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument. By dissolving small amounts of soil in water, WCL will attempt to determine the pH, the abundance of minerals such as magnesium and sodium cations or chloride, bromide and sulfate anions, as well as the conductivity and redox potential.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  20. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, Lonnie C.; Simpson, Marc L.

    1995-01-01

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically.

  1. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, L.C.; Simpson, M.L.

    1995-01-17

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically. 4 figures.

  2. Chemotaxis of large granular lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Pohajdak, B.; Gomez, J.; Orr, F.W.; Khalil, N.; Talgoy, M.; Greenberg, A.H.

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis that large granular lymphocytes (LGL) are capable of directed locomotion (chemotaxis) was tested. A population of LGL isolated from discontinuous Percoll gradients migrated along concentration gradients of N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (f-MLP), casein, and C5a, well known chemoattractants for polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes, as well as interferon-..beta.. and colony-stimulating factor. Interleukin 2, tuftsin, platelet-derived growth factor, and fibronectin were inactive. Migratory responses were greater in Percoll fractions with the highest lytic activity and HNK-1/sup +/ cells. The chemotactic response to f-MLP, casein, and C5a was always greater when the chemoattractant was present in greater concentration in the lower compartment of the Boyden chamber. Optimum chemotaxis was observed after a 1 hr incubation that made use of 12 ..mu..m nitrocellulose filters. LGL exhibited a high degree of nondirected locomotion when allowed to migrate for longer periods (> 2 hr), and when cultured in vitro for 24 to 72 hr in the presence or absence of IL 2 containing phytohemagluttinin-conditioned medium. LGL chemotaxis to f-MLP could be inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by the inactive structural analog CBZ-phe-met, and the RNK tumor line specifically bound f-ML(/sup 3/H)P, suggesting that LGL bear receptors for the chemotactic peptide.

  3. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The packing of particles can change radically during cyclic loading such as in an earthquake or when shaking a container to compact a powder. A large hole (1) is maintained by the particles sticking to each other. A small, counterclockwise strain (2) collapses the hole, and another large strain (3) forms more new holes which collapse when the strain reverses (4). Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (after T.L. Youd, Packing Changes and Liquefaction Susceptibility, Journal of the Geotechnical Engieering Division, 103: GT8,918-922, 1977)(Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center.)(Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder).

  4. Granular hypoplasticity with Cosserat effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, J. D.

    2010-05-01

    This paper provides an extension to Cosserat mechanics of a recently proposed version of hypoplasticity [1], and this extension is achieved economically by means of a novel complex-variable formulation of Cosserat theory. The present work represents a compact synthesis and theoretical framework for both non-polar and polar hypoplasticity, and it encompasses various special cases considered in the literature, as discussed in the recent monograph by Tejchman [2]. The current approach offers a perspective on granular dilatancy, elastoplastic yield, and energy dissipation which differs from the standard hypoplasticity and which serves to establish a connection to classical incremental plasticity. In contrast to the classical theory, the present approach, based entirely on the concept of pseudo-linear forms, admits but does require elastoplastic potentials to describe plastic flow. When such potentials are assumed, it is shown that they can be related to the plastic moduli of the present formulation. It is also shown that hypoplasticity allows for a distinction between active and passive internal variables, with the latter serving to define parameters. Finally, the known forms for linear isotropic Cosserat elasticity are employed to represent isotropic hypoplasticity, and the resulting formulae appear to encompass several empiricisms found in the literature.

  5. Shear jamming in granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie

    2013-03-01

    For frictionless particles with purely repulsive interactions, there is a critical packing fraction ϕJ below which no jammed states exist. Frictional granular particles in the regime of ϕ <ϕJ act differently under shear: early experiments by Zhang & Behringer at Duke University show jammed states can be created by the application of shear stress. Compared to the states above ϕJ, the shear-jammed states (SJS) are mechanically more fragile, but they can resist shear. Formation of these states requires the anisotropic contact network as a backbone and these new states must be incorporated into a more general jamming picture (Bi et al Nature 2011). If time permits, I will present some new results from recent experiments at SJTU aimed towards understanding the more detailed nature of SJS and the transition from unjammed states to SJS. This work is in collaboration with Bob Behringer at Duke University, Dapeng Bi (now at Syracuse) and Bulbul Chakraborty at Brandeis University. The work at SJTU is in collaboration with Ling Zhang and several undergrads in the physics department.

  6. Microfluidics of soft granular gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Ryan; Bhattacharjee, Tapomoy; Sawyer, W. Gregory; Angelini, Thomas E.

    Microfluidic methods for encapsulating cells and particles typically involve drop making with two immiscible fluids. The main materials constraint in this approach is surface tension, creating inherent instability between the two fluids. We can eliminate this instability by using miscible inner and outer phases. This is achieved by using granular micro gels which are chemically miscible but physically do not mix. These microgels are yield stress materials, so they flow as solid plugs far from shear gradients, and fluidize where gradients are generated - near an injection nozzle for example. We have found that tuning the yield stress of the material by varying polymer concentration, device performance can be controlled. The solid like behavior of the gel allows us to produces infinitely stable jets that maintain their integrity and configuration over long distances and times. These properties can be combined and manipulated to produce discrete particulate bunches of an inner phase, flowing inside of an outer phase, well enough even to print a Morse code message suspended within flow chambers about a millimeter in diameter moving at millimeters a second.

  7. Passive Separation of Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Joseph; Lievano, Diana

    2013-11-01

    Despite its industrial importance, particle separation techniques remain typically quite ``low tech'' and often are energy-intensive (e.g., sieving) or environmentally unfriendly (e.g., froth floatation) or both. Rate-based separation processes, on the other hand, represent a unique approach to particle separation that has the potential to be more flexible, more efficient, and more environmentally friendly than existing ``low tech'' techniques. In the present paper, we highlight a passive granular separation technique, where particles of differing properties flow through a device often called a Galton board. In this type of device, the gravity-driven flow of particles down an inclined plane causes collisions between the particles and distributed pegs along the board. Collisions between particles as well as between particles and pegs results in a diffusion-like motion of particles perpendicular to the flow. The extent of separation (i.e., how far one type of particle is removed from another) depends on the different distances traversed by the two types of particles and, ultimately, on the collision rate and energy dissipation for particle-peg events. A simple theory, based on statistics and single-collision mechanics, will be set forth for comparison with our results.

  8. Discrete Element Modeling of Complex Granular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movshovitz, N.; Asphaug, E. I.

    2010-12-01

    Granular materials occur almost everywhere in nature, and are actively studied in many fields of research, from food industry to planetary science. One approach to the study of granular media, the continuum approach, attempts to find a constitutive law that determines the material's flow, or strain, under applied stress. The main difficulty with this approach is that granular systems exhibit different behavior under different conditions, behaving at times as an elastic solid (e.g. pile of sand), at times as a viscous fluid (e.g. when poured), or even as a gas (e.g. when shaken). Even if all these physics are accounted for, numerical implementation is made difficult by the wide and often discontinuous ranges in continuum density and sound speed. A different approach is Discrete Element Modeling (DEM). Here the goal is to directly model every grain in the system as a rigid body subject to various body and surface forces. The advantage of this method is that it treats all of the above regimes in the same way, and can easily deal with a system moving back and forth between regimes. But as a granular system typically contains a multitude of individual grains, the direct integration of the system can be very computationally expensive. For this reason most DEM codes are limited to spherical grains of uniform size. However, spherical grains often cannot replicate the behavior of real world granular systems. A simple pile of spherical grains, for example, relies on static friction alone to keep its shape, while in reality a pile of irregular grains can maintain a much steeper angle by interlocking force chains. In the present study we employ a commercial DEM, nVidia's PhysX Engine, originally designed for the game and animation industry, to simulate complex granular flows with irregular, non-spherical grains. This engine runs as a multi threaded process and can be GPU accelerated. We demonstrate the code's ability to physically model granular materials in the three regimes mentioned above: (1) a static and steep granular pile; (2) granular flow with a complex velocity field; and (3) an agitated granular pile resulting in size based segregation. We compare our simulations to laboratory experiments in the first and third regimes, and to a known empirical constitutive law (Jop et al. 2006) in the second. We discuss application of this code in studies of several planetary systems, including analysis of the tensile strength of comets from evidence of tidal disruption, and bulking and banding on rubble-pile asteroids, as an indication of their seismic history.

  9. Wet air oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, V.S.; Mahajani, V.V.; Joshi, J.B. . Dept. of Chemical Technology)

    1995-01-01

    Wet air oxidation (WAO), involving oxidation at high temperature (125--320 C) and pressure (0.5--20 MPa) conditions, is useful for the treatment of hazardous, toxic, and nonbiodegradable waste streams. The process becomes self-sustaining when the feed chemical oxygen demand (COD) is about 20,000 mg/l and can be a net energy producer at sufficient higher feed COD's. All the published information on WAO has been analyzed and presented in a coherent manner. Wet air oxidation studies on pure compounds have been critically reviewed. Mechanism, kinetics, and structure-oxidizability correlation for WAO of carboxylic acids, phenols, cyanides, and nitriles have been described. The industrial applications discussed include municipal sewage sludge treatment, distillery waste treatment, black liquor treatment, cyanide and nitrile wastewater treatment, spent carbon regeneration, and energy and resource regeneration. Waste streams from other sources and some miscellaneous applications of WAO have also been included. Special emphasis is given to WAO under supercritical conditions (above the critical temperature of water) and oxydesulfurization of coal. In addition to the industrial applications, some other aspects (like various catalysts and oxidizing agents) of WAO have also been discussed. Recommendations and suggestions for further investigations have been made. 560 refs.

  10. Granular gas of ellipsoids: analytical collision detection implemented on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio-Largo, S. M.; Lind, P. G.; Maza, D.; Hidalgo, R. C.

    2015-06-01

    We present a hybrid GPU-CPU implementation of an accurate discrete element model for a system of ellipsoids. The ellipsoids have three translational degrees of freedom, their rotational motion being described through quaternions and the contact interaction between two ellipsoids is described by a force which accounts for the elastic and dissipative interactions. Further we combine the exact derivation of contact points between ellipsoids (Wang et al. in Computing 72(1-2):235-246, 2004) with the advantages of the GPU-NVIDIA parallelization strategy (Owens et al. in Comput Graph Forum 26:80-113, 2007). This novelty makes the analytical algorithm computationally feasible when dealing with several thousands of particles. As a benchmark, we simulate a granular gas of frictionless ellipsoids identifying a classical homogeneous cooling state for ellipsoids. For low dissipative systems, the behavior of the granular temperature indicates that the cooling dynamics is governed by the elongation of the ellipsoids and the restitution coefficient. Our outcomes comply with the statistical mechanical laws and the results are in agreement with previous findings for hard ellipsoids (Bereolos et al. in J Chem Phys 99:6087, 1993; Villemot and Talbot in Granul Matter 14:91-97, 2012). Additionally, new insight is provided namely suggesting that the mean field description of the cooling dynamics of elongated particles is conditioned by the particle shape and the degree of energy equipartition.

  11. [Fertility and Environmental Impacts of Urban Scattered Human Feces Used as Organic Granular Fertilizer for Leaf Vegetables].

    PubMed

    Lü, Wen-zhou; Qiao, Yu-xiang; Yu, Ning; Shi, Rong-hua; Wang, Guang-ming

    2015-09-01

    The disposal of urban scattered human feces has become a difficult problem for the management of modern city. In present study, the scattered human feces underwent the collection, scum removal, flocculation and dehydration, finally became the granular fertilizer; the effects of the ratio of fertilizer to soil on the growth of the pakchoi and the quality of soil and leaching water were evaluated, and the feasibility of granular fertilizer manuring the pakchoi was discussed by pot experiments. The results showed that the granular fertilizer significantly enhanced the production of the pakchoi which were not polluted by the intestinal microorganisms under the experiment conditions; meanwhile, at the proper ratio of fertilizer to soil, the concentration of these microorganisms in the leaching water was lower than that in the control check. Chemical analyses of soil revealed that the nutrient content of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and organic matters in soil became much richer in all treatments. In addition, the granular fertilizer improved the physical- chemical properties of soil, including raising the level of soil porosity and reducing the volume weight of soil. Application of granular fertilizer won't pollute the soil or leaching water; instead, it can also prevent nitrogen, potassium and intestinal microorganisms from leaching inio ground water at the proper ratio of granular fertilizer to soil. PMID:26717716

  12. Numerical analysis of granular soil fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbahn, L.; Huhn, K.

    2012-04-01

    Soil stability strongly depends on the material strength that is in general influenced by deformation processes and vice versa. Hence, investigation of material strength is of great interest in many geoscientific studies where soil deformations occur, e.g. the destabilization of slopes or the evolution of fault gouges. Particularly in the former case, slope failure occurs if the applied forces exceed the shear strength of slope material. Hence, the soil resistance or respectively the material strength acts contrary to deformation processes. Besides, geotechnical experiments, e.g. direct shear or ring shear tests, suggest that shear resistance mainly depends on properties of soil structure, texture and fabric. Although laboratory tests enable investigations of soil structure and texture during shear, detailed observations inside the sheared specimen during the failure processes as well as fabric effects are very limited. So, high-resolution information in space and time regarding texture evolution and/or grain behavior during shear is refused. However, such data is essential to gain a deeper insight into the key role of soil structure, texture, etc. on material strength and the physical processes occurring during material deformation on a micro-scaled level. Additionally, laboratory tests are not completely reproducible enabling a detailed statistical investigation of fabric during shear. So, almost identical setups to run methodical tests investigating the impact of fabric on soil resistance are hard to archive under laboratory conditions. Hence, we used numerical shear test experiments utilizing the Discrete Element Method to quantify the impact of different material fabrics on the shear resistance of soil as this granular model approach enables to investigate failure processes on a grain-scaled level. Our numerical setup adapts general settings from laboratory tests while the model characteristics are fixed except for the soil structure particularly the used grain shapes. So, ideal round or stick- and plate-shaped grains were utilized to represent natural silts or clays to test two end-members. To quantify texture influences on soil strength, physical parameters, e.g. soil resistance, were calculated during deformation process. Furthermore, fabric analysis during shear reveals new information on detailed pore space regarding distribution and shape of voids. For this, a three-dimensional visualization of pore space is realized with the Visualization Toolkit (VTK) that allows the volume calculation and hence a quantification of single voids with progressive deformation. As a result, imaging of particle contact distribution and particle orientations within samples show significant changes with ongoing strain such as strong variations in material fabric and particle re-organization and therewith significant structural changes. These findings confirm that in general grain shape and its factor of soil fabric is not negligible for soil resistance and hence soil strength. This is notably affected by the deformation behavior of granular matter. With the broad investigation of the three most important factors that specify fabric behavior, this study attains a comprehensive view evaluating the impact of fabric on soil strength.

  13. Low Speed Granular-Granular Impact Crater Opening Mechanism in 2D Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartali, Roberto; Nahmad-Molinari, Yuri; Rodríguez-Liñán, Gustavo M.

    2015-12-01

    Quasi-2D, low-velocity experiments of colliding granular projectiles against granular targets were performed by means of a 7 m-long Hele-Shaw cell. The processes involved in the crater-opening mechanism of low-velocity granular-against-granular collisions are described. We show that the crater is opened mainly by a compaction process of the target. The projectile is fragmented and its lower section suffers a severe compaction; this projectile remnant forms a central dome or peak inside the crater. When the target reaches its maximum degree of compaction, the excess of momentum generates fast avalanches sliding on the slopes of the confined material, and exerts pressure on the crater walls, increasing its diameter. We propose that low-velocity collisions between granular aggregates are a possible mechanism that allows the growth of small planetary objects or the aggregation after catastrophic or high-energy collisions.

  14. Low Speed Granular-Granular Impact Crater Opening Mechanism in 2D Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartali, Roberto; Nahmad-Molinari, Yuri; Rodríguez-Liñán, Gustavo M.

    2015-08-01

    Quasi-2D, low-velocity experiments of colliding granular projectiles against granular targets were performed by means of a 7 m-long Hele-Shaw cell. The processes involved in the crater-opening mechanism of low-velocity granular-against-granular collisions are described. We show that the crater is opened mainly by a compaction process of the target. The projectile is fragmented and its lower section suffers a severe compaction; this projectile remnant forms a central dome or peak inside the crater. When the target reaches its maximum degree of compaction, the excess of momentum generates fast avalanches sliding on the slopes of the confined material, and exerts pressure on the crater walls, increasing its diameter. We propose that low-velocity collisions between granular aggregates are a possible mechanism that allows the growth of small planetary objects or the aggregation after catastrophic or high-energy collisions.

  15. Spatiotemporal stick-slip phenomena in a coupled continuum-granular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecke, Robert

    In sheared granular media, stick-slip behavior is ubiquitous, especially at very small shear rates and weak drive coupling. The resulting slips are characteristic of natural phenomena such as earthquakes and well as being a delicate probe of the collective dynamics of the granular system. In that spirit, we developed a laboratory experiment consisting of sheared elastic plates separated by a narrow gap filled with quasi-two-dimensional granular material (bi-dispersed nylon rods) . We directly determine the spatial and temporal distributions of strain displacements of the elastic continuum over 200 spatial points located adjacent to the gap. Slip events can be divided into large system-spanning events and spatially distributed smaller events. The small events have a probability distribution of event moment consistent with an M - 3 / 2 power law scaling and a Poisson distributed recurrence time distribution. Large events have a broad, log-normal moment distribution and a mean repetition time. As the applied normal force increases, there are fractionally more (less) large (small) events, and the large-event moment distribution broadens. The magnitude of the slip motion of the plates is well correlated with the root-mean-square displacements of the granular matter. Our results are consistent with mean field descriptions of statistical models of earthquakes and avalanches. We further explore the high-speed dynamics of system events and also discuss the effective granular friction of the sheared layer. We find that large events result from stored elastic energy in the plates in this coupled granular-continuum system.

  16. Mortality of passerines adjacent to a North Carolina corn field treated with granular carbofuran.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Augspurger, Tom; Smith, Milton R.; Meteyer, Carol U.; Converse, Kathryn A.

    1996-01-01

    Red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) were collected during an epizootic in southeastern North Carolina (USA). Activity of brain cholinesterase (ChE) was inhibited by 14 to 48% in three of five specimens, and returned to normal levels after incubation. Gastrointestinal tracts were analyzed for 30 anti-ChE agents. Carbofuran, the only compound detected, was present in all specimens at levels from 5.44 to 72.7 μg/g wet weight. Application of granular carbofuran in an adjacent corn field, results of necropsy examinations, and chemical analyses are consistent with a diagnosis of carbofuran poisoning in these specimens.

  17. Local rheological measurements in the granular flow around an intruder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguin, A.; Coulais, C.; Martinez, F.; Bertho, Y.; Gondret, P.

    2016-01-01

    The rheological properties of granular matter within a two-dimensional flow around a moving disk is investigated experimentally. Using a combination of photoelastic and standard tessellation techniques, the strain and stress tensors are estimated at the grain scale in the time-averaged flow field around a large disk pulled at constant velocity in an assembly of smaller disks. On the one hand, one observes inhomogeneous shear rate and strongly localized shear stress and pressure fields. On the other hand, a significant dilation rate, which has the same magnitude as the shear strain rate, is reported. Significant deviations are observed with local rheology that justify the need of searching for a nonlocal rheology.

  18. Controlling conditions for wet welding

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.

    1985-11-01

    Wet welding is finding increased use for repairing and maintaining vessel hulls around the world. Users are developing new methods and procedures to expand the technology. A wet welded joint underwater can be made as strong as one welded in a dry habitat, but at a greatly reduced cost. The design of the joint for wet welding and the procedures that need to be followed are outlined. In designing for wet welding, high tensile strength, ease of access, and over-design should be considered.

  19. Wetting of cholesteric liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Silvestre, Nuno M; Figueirinhas Pereira, Maria Carolina; Bernardino, Nelson R; Telo da Gama, Margarida M

    2016-02-01

    We investigate theoretically the wetting properties of cholesteric liquid crystals at a planar substrate. If the properties of substrate and of the interface are such that the cholesteric layers are not distorted, the wetting properties are similar to those of a nematic liquid crystal. If, on the other hand, the anchoring conditions force the distortion of the liquid crystal layers the wetting properties are altered, the free cholesteric-isotropic interface is non-planar and there is a layer of topological defects close to the substrate. These deformations can either promote or hinder the wetting of the substrate by a cholesteric, depending on the properties of the cholesteric liquid crystal. PMID:26920516

  20. Reversibility in locomotion in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoie, William; Goldman, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    A recent study of a self-deforming robot [Hatton et al., PRL, 2013] demonstrated that slow movement in dry granular media resembles locomotion in low Re fluids, in part because inertia is dominated by friction. The study indicated that granular swimming was kinematically reversible, a surprise because yielding in granular flow is irreversible. To investigate if reciprocal motions lead to net displacements in granular swimmers, in laboratory experiments, we study the locomotion of a robotic ``scallop'' consisting of a square body with two flipper-like limbs controlled to flap forward and backward symmetrically (a flap cycle). The body is constrained by linear bearings to allow motion in only one dimension. We vary the the flapping frequency f, the body/flipper burial depth d, and the number of flaps N in a deep bed of 6 mm diameter plastic spheres. Over a range of f and d, the N = 1 cycle produces net translation of the body; however for large N, a cycle produces no net translation. We conclude that symmetric strokes in granular swimming are irreversible at the onset of self-deformation, but become asymptotically reversible. work supported by NSF and ARL.

  1. Granular Materials and Risks In ISRU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behringer, Robert P.; Wilkinson, R. Allen

    2004-01-01

    Working with soil, sand, powders, ores, cement and sintered bricks, excavating, grading construction sites, driving off-road, transporting granules in chutes and pipes, sifting gravel, separating solids from gases, and using hoppers are so routine that it seems straightforward to execute these operations on the Moon and Mars as we do on Earth. We discuss how little these processes are understood and point out the nature of trial-and-error practices that are used in today's massive over-design. Nevertheless, such designs have a high failure rate. Implementation and extensive incremental scaling up of industrial processes are routine because of the inadequate predictive tools for design. We present a number of pragmatic scenarios where granular materials play a role, the risks involved, what some of the basic issues are, and what understanding is needed to greatly reduce the risks. This talk will focus on a particular class of granular flow issues, those that pertain to dense materials, their physics, and the failure problems associated with them. In particular, key issues where basic predictability is lacking include stability of soils for the support of vehicles and facilities, ability to control the flow of dense materials (jamming and flooding/unjamming at the wrong time), the ability to predict stress profiles (hence create reliable designs) for containers such as bunkers or silos. In particular, stress fluctuations, which are not accounted for in standard granular design models, can be very large as granular materials flows, and one result is frequent catastrophic failure of granular devices.

  2. Granular Materials and Risks in ISRU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behringer, Robert P.; Wilki8nson, R. Allen

    2004-01-01

    Working with soil, sand, powders, ores, cement and sintered bricks, excavating, grading construction sites, driving off-road, transporting granules in chutes and pipes, sifting gravel, separating solids from gases, and using hoppers are so routine that it seems straightforward to execute these operations on the Moon and Mars as we do on Earth. We discuss how little these processes are understood and point out the nature of trial-and-error practices that are used in today s massive over-design. Nevertheless, such designs have a high failure rate. Implementation and extensive incremental scaling up of industrial processes are routine because of the inadequate predictive tools for design. We present a number of pragmatic scenarios where granular materials play a role, the risks involved, what some of the basic issues are, and what understanding is needed to greatly reduce the risks. This talk will focus on a particular class of granular flow issues, those that pertain to dense materials, their physics, and the failure problems associated with them. In particular, key issues where basic predictability is lacking include stability of soils for the support of vehicles and facilities, ability to control the flow of dense materials (jamming and flooding/unjamming at the wrong time), the ability to predict stress profiles (hence create reliable designs) for containers such as bunkers or silos. In particular, stress fluctuations, which are not accounted for in standard granular design models, can be very large as granular materials flows, and one result is frequent catastrophic failure of granular devices.

  3. Characteristics of undulatory locomotion in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhiwei; Pak, On Shun; Elfring, Gwynn J.

    2016-03-01

    Undulatory locomotion is ubiquitous in nature and observed in different media, from the swimming of flagellated microorganisms in biological fluids, to the slithering of snakes on land, or the locomotion of sandfish lizards in sand. Despite the similarity in the undulating pattern, the swimming characteristics depend on the rheological properties of different media. Analysis of locomotion in granular materials is relatively less developed compared with fluids partially due to a lack of validated force models but recently a resistive force theory in granular media has been proposed and shown useful in studying the locomotion of a sand-swimming lizard. Here we employ the proposed model to investigate the swimming characteristics of a slender filament, of both finite and infinite length, undulating in a granular medium and compare the results with swimming in viscous fluids. In particular, we characterize the effects of drifting and pitching in terms of propulsion speed and efficiency for a finite sinusoidal swimmer. We also find that, similar to Lighthill's results using resistive force theory in viscous fluids, the sawtooth swimmer is the optimal waveform for propulsion speed at a given power consumption in granular media. The results complement our understanding of undulatory locomotion and provide insights into the effective design of locomotive systems in granular media.

  4. Wetting front instability in an initially wet unsaturated fracture

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholl, M.J.; Glass, R.J.; Nguyen, H.A.

    1992-12-31

    Experimental results exploring gravity-driven wetting front instability in a pre-wetted, rough-walled analog fracture are presented. Initial conditions considered include a uniform moisture field wetted to field capacity of the analog fracture and the structured moisture field created by unstable infiltration into an initially dry fracture. As in previous studies performed under dry initial conditions, instability was found to result both at the cessation of stable infiltration and at flux lower than the fracture capacity under gravitational driving force. Individual fingers were faster, narrower, longer, and more numerous than observed under dry initial conditions. Wetting fronts were found to follow existing wetted structure, providing a mechanism for rapid recharge and transport.

  5. Plastic deformation in a metallic granular chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musson, Ryan W.; Carlson, William

    2016-03-01

    Solitary wave response was investigated in a metallic granular chain-piston system using LS-DYNA. A power law hardening material model was used to show that localized plastic deformation is present in a metallic granular chain for an impact velocity of 0.5 m/s. This loss due to plastic deformation was quantified via impulse, and it was shown that the loss scales nearly linearly with impact velocity. Therefore, metallic grains may not be suitable for devices that require high-amplitude solitary waves. There would be too much energy lost to plastic deformation. One can assume that ceramics will behave elastically; therefore, the response of an aluminum oxide granular chain was compared to that of a steel chain.

  6. Creep and aging in jammed granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Ishan; Fisher, Timothy

    Granular materials flow (or unjam) when stressed above the Coulomb yield stress, but a slow creep is observed when the applied stresses are low. In this work, using a recently introduced enthalpy-based variable-cell simulation method, we will present results on the creep and slow aging dynamics in granular systems comprised of soft particles of varying shape that are hydrostatically jammed and subjected to an external stress. We observe a two-stage creep with an initial fast exponential evolution followed by a slow logarithmic evolution over long time scales. We correlate the slow creeping dynamics with micromechanical evolution at the grain scale, such as increasing dynamical heterogeneity and force-chain rearrangements. Results will also be presented on the effect of grain shape (faceted vs. spherical) on the creep and aging dynamics. Finally, a continuum granular fluidity model is developed to rationalize these observations.

  7. Unsteady granular flows down an inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parez, Stanislav; Aharonov, Einat; Toussaint, Renaud

    2016-04-01

    The continuum description of granular flows is still a challenge despite their importance in many geophysical and industrial applications. We extend previous works, which have explored steady flow properties, by focusing on unsteady flows accelerating or decelerating down an inclined plane in the simple shear configuration. We solve the flow kinematics analytically, including predictions of evolving velocity and stress profiles and the duration of the transient stage. The solution shows why and how granular materials reach steady flow on slopes steeper than the angle of repose and how they decelerate on shallower slopes. The model might facilitate development of natural hazard assessment and may be modified in the future to explore unsteady granular flows in different configurations.

  8. Impact compaction of a granular material

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fenton, Gregg; Asay, Blaine; Dalton, Devon

    2015-05-19

    The dynamic behavior of granular materials has importance to a variety of engineering applications. Structural seismic coupling, planetary science, and earth penetration mechanics, are just a few of the application areas. Although the mechanical behavior of granular materials of various types have been studied extensively for several decades, the dynamic behavior of such materials remains poorly understood. High-quality experimental data are needed to improve our general understanding of granular material compaction physics. This study will describe how an instrumented plunger impact system can be used to measure pressure-density relationships for model materials at high and controlled strain rates and subsequentlymore » used for computational modeling.« less

  9. Statistical mechanics of dense granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicodemi, M.; Coniglio, A.; de Candia, A.; Fierro, A.; Ciamarra, M. Pica; Tarzia, M.

    2005-12-01

    We discuss some recent results on Statistical Mechanics approach to dense granular media. In particular, by analytical mean field investigation we derive the phase diagram of monodisperse and bydisperse granular assemblies. We show that "jamming" corresponds to a phase transition from a "fluid" to a "glassy" phase, observed when crystallization is avoided. The nature of such a "glassy" phase turns out to be the same found in mean field models for glass formers. This gives quantitative evidence to the idea of a unified description of the "jamming" transition in granular media and thermal systems, such as glasses. We also discuss mixing/segregation transitions in binary mixtures and their connections to phase separation and "geometric" effects.

  10. Statistical mechanics of dense granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coniglio, A.; Fierro, A.; Nicodemi, M.; Pica Ciamarra, M.; Tarzia, M.

    2005-06-01

    We discuss some recent results on the statistical mechanics approach to dense granular media. In particular, by analytical mean field investigation we derive the phase diagram of monodisperse and bidisperse granular assemblies. We show that 'jamming' corresponds to a phase transition from a 'fluid' to a 'glassy' phase, observed when crystallization is avoided. The nature of such a 'glassy' phase turns out to be the same as found in mean field models for glass formers. This gives quantitative evidence for the idea of a unified description of the 'jamming' transition in granular media and thermal systems, such as glasses. We also discuss mixing/segregation transitions in binary mixtures and their connections to phase separation and 'geometric' effects.

  11. Structure of Particle Networks in Capillary Suspensions with Wetting and Nonwetting Fluids.

    PubMed

    Bossler, Frank; Koos, Erin

    2016-02-16

    The mechanical properties of a suspension can be dramatically altered by adding a small amount of a secondary fluid that is immiscible with the bulk phase. The substantial changes in the strength of these capillary suspensions arise due to the capillary force inducing a percolating particle network. Spatial information on the structure of the particle networks is obtained using confocal microscopy. It is possible, for the first time, to visualize the different types of percolating structures of capillary suspensions in situ. These capillary networks are unique from other types of particulate networks due to the nature of the capillary attraction. We investigate the influence of the three-phase contact angle on the structure of an oil-based capillary suspension with silica microspheres. Contact angles smaller than 90° lead to pendular networks of particles connected with single capillary bridges or clusters comparable to the funicular state in wet granular matter, whereas a different clustered structure, the capillary state, forms for angles larger than 90°. Particle pair distribution functions are obtained by image analysis, which demonstrate differences in the network microstructures. When porous particles are used, the pendular conformation also appears for apparent contact angles larger than 90°. The complex shear modulus can be correlated to these microstructural changes. When the percolating structure is formed, the complex shear modulus increases by nearly three decades. Pendular bridges lead to stronger networks than the capillary state network conformations, but the capillary state clusters are nevertheless much stronger than pure suspensions without the added liquid. PMID:26807651

  12. Structure of Particle Networks in Capillary Suspensions with Wetting and Nonwetting Fluids

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of a suspension can be dramatically altered by adding a small amount of a secondary fluid that is immiscible with the bulk phase. The substantial changes in the strength of these capillary suspensions arise due to the capillary force inducing a percolating particle network. Spatial information on the structure of the particle networks is obtained using confocal microscopy. It is possible, for the first time, to visualize the different types of percolating structures of capillary suspensions in situ. These capillary networks are unique from other types of particulate networks due to the nature of the capillary attraction. We investigate the influence of the three-phase contact angle on the structure of an oil-based capillary suspension with silica microspheres. Contact angles smaller than 90° lead to pendular networks of particles connected with single capillary bridges or clusters comparable to the funicular state in wet granular matter, whereas a different clustered structure, the capillary state, forms for angles larger than 90°. Particle pair distribution functions are obtained by image analysis, which demonstrate differences in the network microstructures. When porous particles are used, the pendular conformation also appears for apparent contact angles larger than 90°. The complex shear modulus can be correlated to these microstructural changes. When the percolating structure is formed, the complex shear modulus increases by nearly three decades. Pendular bridges lead to stronger networks than the capillary state network conformations, but the capillary state clusters are nevertheless much stronger than pure suspensions without the added liquid. PMID:26807651

  13. Uncertainty Management in Seismic Vulnerability Assessment Using Granular Computing Based on Covering of Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamespanah, F.; Delavar, M. R.; Zare, M.

    2013-05-01

    Earthquake is an abrupt displacement of the earth's crust caused by the discharge of strain collected along faults or by volcanic eruptions. Earthquake as a recurring natural cataclysm has always been a matter of concern in Tehran, capital of Iran, as a laying city on a number of known and unknown faults. Earthquakes can cause severe physical, psychological and financial damages. Consequently, some procedures should be developed to assist modelling the potential casualties and its spatial uncertainty. One of these procedures is production of seismic vulnerability maps to take preventive measures to mitigate corporeal and financial losses of future earthquakes. Since vulnerability assessment is a multi-criteria decision making problem depending on some parameters and expert's judgments, it undoubtedly is characterized by intrinsic uncertainties. In this study, it is attempted to use Granular computing (GrC) model based on covering of universe to handle the spatial uncertainty. Granular computing model concentrates on a general theory and methodology for problem solving as well as information processing by assuming multiple levels of granularity. Basic elements in granular computing are subsets, classes, and clusters of a universe called elements. In this research GrC is used for extracting classification rules based on seismic vulnerability with minimum entropy to handle uncertainty related to earthquake data. Tehran was selected as the study area. In our previous research, Granular computing model based on a partition model of universe was employed. The model has some kinds of limitations in defining similarity between elements of the universe and defining granules. In the model similarity between elements is defined based on an equivalence relation. According to this relation, two objects are similar based on some attributes, provided for each attribute the values of these objects are equal. In this research a general relation for defining similarity between elements of universe is proposed. The general relation is used for defining similarity and instead of partitioning the universe, granulation is done based on covering of universe. As a result of the study, a physical seismic vulnerability map of Tehran has been produced based on granular computing model. The accuracy of the seismic vulnerability map is evaluated using granular computing model based on covering of universe. The comparison between this model and granular computing model based on partition model of universe is undertaken which verified the superiority of the GrC based on covering of the universe in terms of the match between the achieved results with those confirmed by the related experts' judgments.

  14. Comparison of Hyperelastic Models for Granular Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Paul W. Humrickhouse; J. Phil Sharpe; Michael L. Corradini

    2010-01-01

    Three recently proposed hyperelastic models for granular materials are compared with experiment data. Though all three are formulated to give elastic moduli that are power law functions of the mean stress, they have rather different dependencies on individual stresses, and generally differ from well established experimental forms. Predicted static stress distributions are in qualitative agreement with experiments, but do not differ greatly from isotropic linear elasticity, and similarly fail to account for variability in experiment data that presumably occurs due to a preparation dependence of granular materials.

  15. How granularity issues concern biomedical ontology integration.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Stefan; Boeker, Martin; Stenzhorn, Holger

    2008-01-01

    The application of upper ontologies has been repeatedly advocated for supporting interoperability between domain ontologies in order to facilitate shared data use both within and across disciplines. We have developed BioTop as a top-domain ontology to integrate more specialized ontologies in the biomolecular and biomedical domain. In this paper, we report on concrete integration problems of this ontology with the domain-independent Basic Formal Ontology (BFO) concerning the issue of fiat and aggregated objects in the context of different granularity levels. We conclude that the third BFO level must be ignored in order not to obviate cross-granularity integration. PMID:18487840

  16. Angularly anisotropic correlation in granular packings

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Chengjie; Cao, Yixin; Kou, Binquan; Li, Jindong; Wang, Yujie; Xiao, Xianghui; Fezzaa, Kamel

    2014-12-01

    We present an x-ray microtomography study of the three-dimensional structural correlations in monodisperse granular packings. By measuring an orientation-dependent pair correlation function, we find that the local structure shows an angularly anisotropic orientation correlation. The correlation is strongest along the major axis of the local Minkowski tensor of the Voronoi cell. It turns out that this anisotropic correlation is consistent with the existence of some locally favored structures. The study suggests the importance of high-order structural correlations in random granular packings.

  17. Impulse absorption by horizontal magnetic granular chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Dingxin; Wang, Xiaojie; Liu, Guijie; Sun, Lingyu

    2016-02-01

    The granular medium is known as a protecting material for shock mitigation. We study the impulse absorption of an alignment of magnetic spheres placed horizontally under a non-uniform magnetic field. The phenomenon of the wave dispersion is presented. This system can absorb 85% ˜ 95% (88% ˜ 98%) of the incident peak force (energy) under the applied magnetic field strength in 0.1 T ˜ 1.0 T. The shock attenuation capacities are enhanced by the increment of field strength. With an intelligent control system, it is conceivable that the magnetic granular chain may offer possibilities in developing adaptive shock protectors.

  18. Challenges in Predicting Planetary Granular Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.

    2005-01-01

    Through the course of human history, our needs in agriculture, habitat construction, and resource extraction have driven us to gain more experience working with the granular materials of planet Earth than with any other type of substance in nature, with the possible exception being water. Furthermore, throughout the past two centuries we have seen a dramatic and ever growing interest among scientists and engineers to understand and predict both its static and rheological properties. Ironically, however, despite this wealth of experience we still do not have a fundamental understanding of the complex physical phenomena that emerge even as just ordinary sand is shaken, squeezed or poured. As humanity is now reaching outward through the solar system, not only robotic ally but also with our immediate human presence, the need to understand and predict granular mechanics has taken on a new dimension. We must learn to farm, build and mine the regoliths of other planets where the environmental conditions are different than on Earth, and we are rapidly discovering that the effects of these environmental conditions are not trivial. Some of the relevant environmental features include the regolith formation processes throughout a planet's geologic and hydrologic history, the unknown mixtures of volatiles residing within the soil, the relative strength of gravitation, d the atm9spheric pressure and its seasonal variations. The need to work with soils outside our terrestrial experience base provides us with both a challenge and an opportunity. The challenge is to learn how to extrapolate our experience into these new planetary conditions, enabling the engineering decisions that are needed right now as we take the next few steps in solar system exploration. The opportunity is to use these new planetary environments as laboratories that will help us to see granular mechanics in new ways, to challenge our assumptions, and to help us finally unravel the elusive physics that lie behind complex granular phenomena. Toward these goals, a workshop was held recently at NASA's John F. Kennedy Space Center, attracting over a hundred scientists and engineers from around the world and from a broad crosssection of scientific and engineering disciplines. This talk will provide an out-briefing from that workshop, communicating some of its early findings in regard to lunar and Martian exploration: (1) the requirements for working with granular materials, (2) the challenges that granular materials will pose, (3) the environmental conditions that affect granular mechanics, (4) instruments and measurements that are needed on the Moon and Mars to support granular material research, and (5) some of the possible research avenues that should be pursued.

  19. MODELING THE WET MILLING PROCESS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Process engineering and cost models for a conventional corn wet milling process have been developed to aid research being conducted by the USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Eastern Regional Research Center. Information on the corn wet milling process was obtained from various technical sources i...

  20. Two scenarios for avalanche dynamics in inclined granular layers.

    PubMed

    Börzsönyi, Tamás; Halsey, Thomas C; Ecke, Robert E

    2005-05-27

    We report experimental measurements of avalanche behavior of thin granular layers on an inclined plane for low volume flow rate. The dynamical properties of avalanches were quantitatively and qualitatively different for smooth glass beads compared to irregular granular materials such as sand. Two scenarios for granular avalanches on an incline are identified, and a theoretical explanation for these different scenarios is developed based on a depth-averaged approach that takes into account the differing rheologies of the granular materials. PMID:16090290

  1. Pore-Scale Investigation on Stress-Dependent Characteristics of Granular Packs and Their Impact on Multiphase Fluid Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrealba, V.; Karpyn, Z.; Yoon, H.; Hart, D. B.; Klise, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    The pore-scale dynamics that govern multiphase flow under variable stress conditions are not well understood. This lack of fundamental understanding limits our ability to quantitatively predict multiphase flow and fluid distributions in natural geologic systems. In this research, we focus on pore-scale, single and multiphase flow properties that impact displacement mechanisms and residual trapping of non-wetting phase under varying stress conditions. X-ray micro-tomography is used to image pore structures and distribution of wetting and non-wetting fluids in water-wet synthetic granular packs, under dynamic load. Micro-tomography images are also used to determine structural features such as medial axis, surface area, and pore body and throat distribution; while the corresponding transport properties are determined from Lattice-Boltzmann simulations performed on lattice replicas of the imaged specimens. Results are used to investigate how inter-granular deformation mechanisms affect fluid displacement and residual trapping at the pore-scale. This will improve our understanding of the dynamic interaction of mechanical deformation and fluid flow during enhanced oil recovery and geologic CO2 sequestration. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Scale-up of catalytic wet oxidation under moderate conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Harf, J.; Hug, A.; Vogel, F.; Rohr, P.R. von

    1999-05-01

    The Catalytic Wet Oxidation with pure oxygen is a suitable treatment process for the degradation of organic matter in wastewaters and sludges. The applied moderate reaction conditions lead only to a partial oxidation of the organics. Therefore the resulting process water has to be purified in a biological treatment plant. In this study, experimental data collected during the wet oxidation of phenol and sewage sludge in a laboratory batch reactor as well as in a pilot plant are presented. A generalized kinetic model combined with a residence time analysis allows to predict accurately the degradation of organic matter in the pilot plant. The wet oxidation of wastewaters and sewage sludge was realized in one single plant concept. Treating suspended or diluted organic wastes produces a highly biodegradable process water containing low molecular oxidation products. The investigated Catalytic Wet Oxidation of sewage sludge generates a residual solid complying with the European quality standards of disposal concerning leachability and organic content. Due to its low capital and operating costs, the Catalytic Wet Oxidation process constitutes an acceptable alternative to incineration for the disposal of sludges.

  3. Does surface roughness amplify wetting?

    SciTech Connect

    Malijevský, Alexandr

    2014-11-14

    Any solid surface is intrinsically rough on the microscopic scale. In this paper, we study the effect of this roughness on the wetting properties of hydrophilic substrates. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to the well-known Wenzel's law, predict that surface roughness should amplify the wetting properties of such adsorbents. We use a fundamental measure density functional theory to demonstrate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., wetting is hindered. Based on three independent analyses we show that microscopic surface corrugation increases the wetting temperature or even makes the surface hydrophobic. Since for macroscopically corrugated surfaces the solid texture does indeed amplify wetting there must exist a crossover between two length-scale regimes that are distinguished by opposite response on surface roughening. This demonstrates how deceptive can be efforts to extend the thermodynamical laws beyond their macroscopic territory.

  4. Underwater wet welding of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, S.; Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.

    1995-05-01

    Underwater wet welding is conducted directly in water with the shielded metal arc (SMA) and flux cored arc (FCA) welding processes. Underwater wet welding has been demonstrated as an acceptable repair technique down to 100 meters (325 ft.) in depth, but wet welds have been attempted on carbon steel structures down to 200 meters (650 ft.). The primary purpose of this interpretive report is to document and evaluate current understanding of metallurgical behavior of underwater wet welds so that new welding consumables can be designed and new welding practices can be developed for fabrication and repair of high strength steel structures at greater depths. First the pyrometallurgical and physical metallurgy behaviors of underwater weldments are discussed. Second, modifications of the welding consumables and processes are suggested to enhance the ability to apply wet welding techniques.

  5. From Elasticity to Hypoplasticity: Dynamics of Granular Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yimin; Liu, Mario

    2007-09-01

    Granular elasticity,” useful for calculating static stress distributions in granular media, is generalized by including the effects of slowly moving, deformed grains. The result is a hydrodynamic theory for granular solids that agrees well with models from soil mechanics.

  6. From elasticity to hypoplasticity: dynamics of granular solids.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yimin; Liu, Mario

    2007-09-01

    "Granular elasticity," useful for calculating static stress distributions in granular media, is generalized by including the effects of slowly moving, deformed grains. The result is a hydrodynamic theory for granular solids that agrees well with models from soil mechanics. PMID:17930395

  7. Wet Mars, Dry Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillingim, Matthew; Brain, D.; Peticolas, L.; Yan, D.; Fricke, K.; Thrall, L.

    2012-10-01

    The magnetic fields of the large terrestrial planets, Venus, Earth, and Mars, are all vastly different from each other. These differences can tell us a lot about the interior structure, interior history, and even give us clues to the atmospheric history of these planets. This poster highlights the third in a series of presentations that target school-age audiences with the overall goal of helping the audience visualize planetary magnetic field and understand how they can impact the climatic evolution of a planet. Our first presentation, "Goldilocks and the Three Planets," targeted to elementary school age audiences, focuses on the differences in the atmospheres of Venus, Earth, and Mars and the causes of the differences. The second presentation, "Lost on Mars (and Venus)," geared toward a middle school age audience, highlights the differences in the magnetic fields of these planets and what we can learn from these differences. Finally, in the third presentation, "Wet Mars, Dry Mars," targeted to high school age audiences and the focus of this poster, the emphasis is on the long term climatic affects of the presence or absence of a magnetic field using the contrasts between Earth and Mars. These presentations are given using visually engaging spherical displays in conjunction with hands-on activities and scientifically accurate 3D models of planetary magnetic fields. We will summarize the content of our presentations, discuss our "lessons learned" from formative evaluation, and show (pictures of) our hands-on activities and 3D models.

  8. Wet Mars, Dry Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillingim, M. O.; Brain, D. A.; Peticolas, L. M.; Yan, D.; Fricke, K. W.; Thrall, L.

    2012-12-01

    The magnetic fields of the large terrestrial planets, Venus, Earth, and Mars, are all vastly different from each other. These differences can tell us a lot about the interior structure, interior history, and even give us clues to the atmospheric history of these planets. This poster highlights the third in a series of presentations that target school-age audiences with the overall goal of helping the audience visualize planetary magnetic field and understand how they can impact the climatic evolution of a planet. Our first presentation, "Goldilocks and the Three Planets," targeted to elementary school age audiences, focuses on the differences in the atmospheres of Venus, Earth, and Mars and the causes of the differences. The second presentation, "Lost on Mars (and Venus)," geared toward a middle school age audience, highlights the differences in the magnetic fields of these planets and what we can learn from these differences. Finally, in the third presentation, "Wet Mars, Dry Mars," targeted to high school age audiences and the focus of this poster, the emphasis is on the long term climatic affects of the presence or absence of a magnetic field using the contrasts between Earth and Mars. These presentations are given using visually engaging spherical displays in conjunction with hands-on activities and scientifically accurate 3D models of planetary magnetic fields. We will summarize the content of our presentations, discuss our lessons learned from evaluations, and show (pictures of) our hands-on activities and 3D models.

  9. WET AND DRY SCRUBBERS FOR EMISSION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Generally speaking, absorption equipment includes two major categories: Wet adsorption scrubbers (or wet scrubbers); Dry absorption scrubbers (or dry scrubbers).
    Wet scrubbers: As the name implies, wet scrubbers (also known as wet collectors) are devices which use a liquid fo...

  10. Granular Elasticity’ and the loss of elastic stability in granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    P. W. Humrickhouse

    2009-07-01

    A recently proposed hyperelastic model for granular materials, called "granular elasticity", identifies a yield angle as a result of thermodynamic instability. GE gives yield angles that are smaller than those found in real materials; a generalization of the theory is considered here that includes dependence on the third strain invariant. This generalization proves unsuccessful, as it gives smaller, not larger, yield angles. Fully convex hyperelastic models are identified as a point for future investigation.

  11. Bipotential continuum models for granular mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goddard, Joe

    2014-03-01

    Most currently popular continuum models for granular media are special cases of a generalized Maxwell fluid model, which describes the evolution of stress and internal variables such as granular particle fraction and fabric,in terms of imposed strain rate. It is shown how such models can be obtained from two scalar potentials, a standard elastic free energy and a ``dissipation potential'' given rigorously by the mathematical theory of Edelen. This allows for a relatively easy derivation of properly invariant continuum models for granular media and fluid-particle suspensions within a thermodynamically consistent framework. The resulting continuum models encompass all the prominent regimes of granular flow, ranging from the quasi-static to rapidly sheared, and are readily extended to include higher-gradient or Cosserat effects. Models involving stress diffusion, such as that proposed recently by Kamrin and Koval (PRL 108 178301), provide an alternative approach that is mentioned in passing. This paper provides a brief overview of a forthcoming review articles by the speaker (The Princeton Companion to Applied Mathematics, and Appl. Mech. Rev.,in the press, 2013).

  12. A granular description of ECG signals.

    PubMed

    Gacek, Adam; Pedrycz, Witold

    2006-10-01

    In this paper, we develop a general framework of a granular representation of ECG signals. The crux of the approach lies in the development and ongoing processing realized in the setting of information granules-fuzzy sets. They serve as basic conceptual and semantically meaningful entities using which we describe signals and build their models (such as various predictive schemes or classifiers). A comprehensive two-phase scheme of the design of the information granules is proposed and described. At the first phase, we discuss the temporal granulation through a series of temporal windows (granular windows) and an aggregation of the values of signal by means of fuzzy sets. To address this issue, offered is a detailed method of building a fuzzy set based on numeric data and a certain optimization criterion that strikes a balance between the highest experimental relevance of the fuzzy set supported by numeric data and its substantial specificity. At the next phase of the granular design, a collection of information granules is further summarized with the use of fuzzy clustering (Fuzzy C-Means). The resulting prototypes (centroids) formed by this grouping process serve as elements of the granular vocabulary. We discuss ways of using these vocabularies in the knowledge-based representation, modeling, and classification of ECG beats. PMID:17019861

  13. Granular dynamics under shear with deformable boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, Drew; Backhaus, Scott; Ecke, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Granular materials under shear develop complex patterns of stress as the result of granular positional rearrangements under an applied load. We consider the simple planar shear of a quasi two-dimensional granular material consisting of bi-dispersed nylon cylinders confined between deformable boundaries. The aspect ratio of the gap width to total system length is 50, and the ratio of particle diameter to gap width is about 10. This system, designed to model a long earthquake fault with long range elastic coupling through the plates, is an interesting model system for understanding effective granular friction because it essentially self tunes to the jamming condition owing to the hardness of the grains relative to that of the boundary material, a ratio of more than 1000 in elastic moduli. We measure the differential strain displacements of the plates, the inhomogeneous stress distribution in the plates, the positions and angular orientations of the individual grains, and the shear force, all as functions of the applied normal stress. There is significant stick-slip motion in this system that we quantify through our quantitative measurements of both the boundary and the grain motion, resulting in a good characterization of this sheared 2D hard sphere system.

  14. Granular Gas in a Periodic Lattice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorbolo, S.; Brandenbourger, M.; Damanet, F.; Dister, H.; Ludewig, F.; Terwagne, D.; Lumay, G.; Vandewalle, N.

    2011-01-01

    Glass beads are placed in the compartments of a horizontal square grid. This grid is then vertically shaken. According to the reduced acceleration [image omitted] of the system, the granular material exhibits various behaviours. By counting the number of beads in each compartment after shaking, it is possible to define three regimes. At low

  15. Motile Fluids: Granular, Colloidal and Living

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Sriram

    2014-03-01

    My talk will present our recent results from theory, simulation and experiment on flocking, swarming and instabilities in diverse realizations of active systems. The findings I will report include: flocking at a distance in vibrated granular monolayers; the active hydrodynamics of self-propelled solids; clusters, asters and oscillations in colloidal chemotaxis. Supported by a J C Bose Fellowship.

  16. Granular materials interacting with thin flexible rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, Alfredo Gay; Campello, Eduardo M. B.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we develop a computational model for the simulation of problems wherein granular materials interact with thin flexible rods. We treat granular materials as a collection of spherical particles following a discrete element method (DEM) approach, while flexible rods are described by a large deformation finite element (FEM) rod formulation. Grain-to-grain, grain-to-rod, and rod-to-rod contacts are fully permitted and resolved. A simple and efficient strategy is proposed for coupling the motion of the two types (discrete and continuum) of materials within an iterative time-stepping solution scheme. Implementation details are shown and discussed. Validity and applicability of the model are assessed by means of a few numerical examples. We believe that robust, efficiently coupled DEM-FEM schemes can be a useful tool to the simulation of problems wherein granular materials interact with thin flexible rods, such as (but not limited to) bombardment of grains on beam structures, flow of granular materials over surfaces covered by threads of hair in many biological processes, flow of grains through filters and strainers in various industrial segregation processes, and many others.

  17. DOWNFLOW GRANULAR FILTRATION OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE EFFLUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of downflow granular filters subjected to effluents from activated sludge processes was investigated at the EPA-DC Pilot Plant in Washington, D.C. Several media combinations were investigated, including both single anthracite and dual anthracite-sand configuration...

  18. Drag on intruder in dense granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Hu; Bares, Jonathan; Wang, Dong; Behringer, Robert

    2015-11-01

    We perform an experimental study on an intruder dragged at a constant force in a quasi-statically cyclic-sheared granular medium. A Teflon disk is embedded in a layer of bidisperse photoelastic disks. The granular medium is contained in a horizontal square cell, which can be deformed into a parallelogram with the same area to produce simple shear. We find that the forward motion of the intruder happens at the fragile state during shear reversals, while only reversible affine motion could be found at the Jammed state. There is a burst of non-affine motion for the granular particles at each shear reversal. For a range of packing fractions, the cumulative intruder displacement shows a linear increase proportional to the number of cycles of shear. To explain the behavior of intruder motion, we analyze the coordination number, density, affine and non-affine motion of disk-granular system variations as the shear strain. We acknowledge support from NSF Grant No. DMR1206351, NASA Grant No. NNX15AD38G and the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  19. Testing ergodicity in dense granular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guo-Jie; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy; O'Hern, Corey

    2008-03-01

    The Edwards' entropy formalism provides a statistical mechanical framework for describing dense granular systems. Experiments on vibrated granular columns and numerical simulations of quasi- static shear flow of dense granular systems have provided indirect evidence that the Edwards' theory may accurately describe certain aspects of these systems. However, a fundamental assumption of the Edwards' description---that all mechanically stable (MS) granular packings at a given packing fraction and externally imposed stress are equally accessible---has not been explicitly tested. We investigate this assumption by generating all mechanically stable hard disk packings in small bidisperse systems using a protocol where we successively compress or decompress the system followed by energy minimization. We then apply quasi-static shear flow at zero pressure to these MS packings and record the MS packings that occur during the shear flow. We generate a complete library of the allowed MS packings at each value of shear strain and determine the frequency with which each MS packing occurs. We find that the MS packings do not occur with equal probability at any value of shear strain. In fact, in small systems we find that the evolution becomes periodic with a period that grows with system-size. Our studies show that ergodicity can be improved by either adding random fluctuations to the system or increasing the system size.

  20. Granular Gas in a Periodic Lattice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorbolo, S.; Brandenbourger, M.; Damanet, F.; Dister, H.; Ludewig, F.; Terwagne, D.; Lumay, G.; Vandewalle, N.

    2011-01-01

    Glass beads are placed in the compartments of a horizontal square grid. This grid is then vertically shaken. According to the reduced acceleration [image omitted] of the system, the granular material exhibits various behaviours. By counting the number of beads in each compartment after shaking, it is possible to define three regimes. At low…

  1. Influence of magnetic cohesion on the stability of granular slopes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, K; King, P J; Swift, Michael R

    2008-09-01

    We use a molecular dynamics model to simulate the formation and evolution of a granular pile in two dimensions in order to gain a better understanding of the role of magnetic interactions in avalanche dynamics. We find that the angle of repose increases only slowly with magnetic field; the increase in angle is small even for intergrain cohesive forces many times stronger than gravity. The magnetic forces within the bulk of the pile partially cancel as a result of the anisotropic nature of the dipole-dipole interaction between grains. However, we show that this cancellation effect is not sufficiently strong to explain the discrepancy between the angle of repose in wet systems and magnetically cohesive systems. In our simulations we observe shearing deep within the pile, and we argue that it is this motion that prevents the angle of repose from increasing dramatically. We also investigate different implementations of friction with the front and back walls of the container, and conclude that the nature of the friction dramatically affects the influence of magnetic cohesion on the angle of repose. PMID:18851028

  2. Vortex Transport in Thickness-Modulated Granular Aluminum Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demann, August; Mueller, Sara; Field, Stuart; Liu, Yaohua; Reich, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    The nature of superconducting vortices driven in a periodic potential has been the subject of much recent theoretical and experimental interest. We report here the results of transport studies of vortex dynamics in a periodic potential fabricated using a novel technique; this technique yields exceptionally smooth, nearly sinusoidal potentials that are ideal for the investigation of both static and dynamics vortex configurations. Our method starts with a glass substrate into which a periodic square-wave grating is fabricated by electron-beam lithography followed by a subsequent wet etch. The period of the gratings is ~ 2 ? m. A subsequent annealing step at 650 C smooths the grating into a sinusoidal profile. Finally, a low-pinning granular aluminum film, with Tc ~ 1 . 7 K, is evaporated onto this substrate at an angle with respect to the normal, leading to a superconducting film that also has a sinusoidal modulation in its thickness. We have performed experiments comparing the transport properties of these modulated films to flat films grown at the same time; the modulated films show clear signatures of an increased critical current and effects due to matching and commensurability. Work Supported by NSF DMR-0308669 and DOE-BES SC0008482.

  3. Forced wetting and hydrodynamic assist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Terence D.; Fernandez-Toledano, Juan-Carlos; Doyen, Guillaume; De Coninck, Joël

    2015-11-01

    Wetting is a prerequisite for coating a uniform layer of liquid onto a solid. Wetting failure and air entrainment set the ultimate limit to coating speed. It is well known in the coating art that this limit can be postponed by manipulating the coating flow to generate what has been termed "hydrodynamic assist," but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Experiments have shown that the conditions that postpone air entrainment also reduce the apparent dynamic contact angle, suggesting a direct link, but how the flow might affect the contact angle remains to be established. Here, we use molecular dynamics to compare the outcome of steady forced wetting with previous results for the spontaneous spreading of liquid drops and apply the molecular-kinetic theory of dynamic wetting to rationalize our findings and place them on a quantitative footing. The forced wetting simulations reveal significant slip at the solid-liquid interface and details of the flow immediately adjacent to the moving contact line. Our results confirm that the local, microscopic contact angle is dependent not simply only on the velocity of wetting but also on the nature of the flow that drives it. In particular, they support an earlier suggestion that during forced wetting, an intense shear stress in the vicinity of the contact line can assist surface tension forces in promoting dynamic wetting, thus reducing the velocity-dependence of the contact angle. Hydrodynamic assist then appears as a natural consequence of wetting that emerges when the contact line is driven by a strong and highly confined flow. Our theoretical approach also provides a self-consistent model of molecular slip at the solid-liquid interface that enables its magnitude to be estimated from dynamic contact angle measurements. In addition, the model predicts how hydrodynamic assist and slip may be influenced by liquid viscosity and solid-liquid interactions.

  4. Cohesion, granular solids, granular liquids, and their connection to small near-Earth objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, P.; Scheeres, D.

    2014-07-01

    During the last 15 years or so, the Planetary Sciences community has been using Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulation codes to study small near-Earth objects (NEOs). In general, these codes treat gravitational aggregates as conglomerates of spherical particles; a good approximation given that many asteroids are self-gravitating granular media. Unfortunately, the degree of sophistication of these codes, and our own understanding, has not been high enough as to appropriately represent realistic physical properties of granular matter. In particular, angles of friction (θ) and cohesive strength (σ_c) of the aggregates were rarely taken in consideration and this could have led to unrealistic dynamics, and therefore, unrealistic conclusions about the dynamical evolution of small NEOs. In our research, we explore the failure mechanics of spherical (r=71 m) and ellipsoidal (r_1=92 m) self-gravitating aggregates with different angles of friction and values for their cohesive strength, in order to better understand the geophysics of rubble-pile asteroids. In particular we focused on the deformation and different disruption modes provoked by an always increasing angular velocity (spin rate). Scaling arguments allow us to regard simulations with the same aggregate size and different σ_c as equivalent to simulations of aggregates of different size and the same σ_c. We use a computational code that implements a Soft-Sphere DEM. The aggregates are composed by 3,000 spherical solid spheres (7--10 m) with 6 degrees of freedom. The code calculates normal, as well as, frictional (tangential) contact forces by means of soft potentials and the aggregate as a whole mimics the effect of non- spherical particles through the implementation of rolling friction. Cohesive forces, and a cohesive stress, are calculated as the net effect of the sum of the van der Waals forces between the smaller regolith, sand and dust (powder) that are present in real asteroids [1]. These finer materials form a matrix of sorts that holds the bigger boulders together. The aggregates were slowly spun up to disruption controlling for angle of friction, cohesion and global shape. Systems with no frictional forces had θ≈ 12° and are in effect granular liquids in the best case scenario. Systems with only surface-surface friction had θ≈ 25°, which is typical in laboratory experiments with spherical glass beads. Systems that also implemented rolling friction had θ≈ 35°, which is typical of non-cohesive granular media on the Earth. How much each aggregate deformed before disruption was directly related to the angle of friction. The greater θ allowed for much less deformation before disruption. Cohesive forces on the other hand controlled the mode of disruption and maximum spin rate and showed that the change from shedding to fission is continuous and therefore, they should not be seen as different disruption processes. The figure shows the deformation and disruption of three initially spherical aggregates (left) and three initially ellipsoidal aggregates (right) with increasing cohesive strength from left to right (θ≈ 35°). Through scaling arguments we could also see these aggregates as having the exact same σ_c=25 Pa but different sizes. If we do that, the aggregates measure about 1.6 km, 5 km, and 22 km, and the particles, or groups of particles being detached now have similar sizes. This has now become a problem of resolution, i.e., the number and size of particles used in a simulation. These results start to raise fundamental questions regarding the difference between shedding and fission. Is it shedding when it is dust grain by dust grain ejection from the main body or when it is in groups of 10, 100, or 100,000 dust particles? Is it fission when a 1-m piece of the asteroid detaches or when it splits in the middle? Which values of θ and σ_c are realistic? These and other questions will be explored.

  5. Granular Mechanics in the Asteroid Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Paul; Swift, M. R.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2009-09-01

    We study the granular mechanics properties of asteroid regolith and of asteroids modeled as gravitational aggregates using soft-sphere molecular simulation codes. For definiteness we assume parameters similar to the asteroid Itokawa, for which we have detailed observational data. Essential questions that can be studied using the techniques of granular mechanics are why large blocks dominate 80% of the surface of Itokawa and why the remaining 20% is uniformly covered with smaller particles, indicating global segregation mechanisms at work on this body. The prime energy source proposed for the segregation of granular materials on asteroids has been seismic shaking due to hypervelocity impacts with asteroids much smaller than the target body. We analyze the detailed mechanics of segregation physics in the asteroid environment due to such interactions. First we analyze the so-called Brazil Nut Effect (BNE), which preferentially causes larger particles to rise to the highest potential energy in a granular material. We note that the regions of highest potential on Itokawa are dominated by larger blocks, while the potential lows are dominated by smaller blocks. We verify and characterise the BNE effect in an asteroid environment under a variety of boundary and shaking conditions. We also extend our analyses to a global-scale simulation of aggregates, modeling the response of self-gravitating granules of a mixture of sizes to impacts. Analysis of such global-scale systems show additional mechanics that may account for the exposure of large blocks on the surface. Specifically we find that hypervelocity impacts are more effective in removing and transporting smaller regolith, exposing sub-surface larger blocks that might otherwise be covered in finer grained material. We discuss the scaling of granular mechanics effects from local regolith to global aggregate scale.

  6. Self-assembly of granular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shattuck, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Acoustic meta-materials are engineered materials with the ability to control, direct, and manipulate sound waves. Since the 1990s, several groups have developed acoustic meta-materials with novel capabilities including negative index materials for acoustic super-lenses, phononic crystals with acoustic band gaps for wave guides and mirrors, and acoustic cloaking device. Most previous work on acoustic meta-materials has focused on continuum solids and fluids. In contrast, we report on coordinated computational and experimental studies to use macro-self-assembly of granular materials to produce acoustic meta-materials. The advantages of granular acoustic materials are three-fold: 1) Microscopic control: The discrete nature of granular media allows us to optimize acoustic properties on both the grain and network scales. 2) Tunability: The speed of sound in granular media depends strongly on pressure due to non-linear contact interactions and contact breaking. 3) Direct visualization: The macro-scale size of the grains enables visualization of the structure and stress propagation within granular assemblies. We report simulations and experiments of vibrated particles that form a variety of self-assembled ordered structures in two- and three-dimensions. In the simplest case of mono-disperse spheres, using a combination of pressure and vibration we produce crystals with long-range order on the scale of 100's of particles. Using special particle shapes that form ``lock and key'' structures we are able to make binary crystals with prescribed stoichiometries. We discuss the mechanical properties of these structures and methods to create more complicated structures.

  7. Low biosorption of PVA coated engineered magnetic nanoparticles in granular sludge assessed by magnetic susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Herrling, Maria P; Fetsch, Katharina L; Delay, Markus; Blauert, Florian; Wagner, Michael; Franzreb, Matthias; Horn, Harald; Lackner, Susanne

    2015-12-15

    When engineered nanoparticles (ENP) enter into wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) their removal from the water phase is driven by the interactions with the biomass in the biological treatment step. While studies focus on the interactions with activated flocculent sludge, investigations on the detailed distribution of ENP in other types of biomass, such as granulated sludge, are needed to assess their potential environmental pollution. This study employed engineered magnetic nanoparticles (EMNP) coated with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as model nanoparticles to trace their fate in granular sludge from WWT. For the first time, magnetic susceptibility was used as a simple approach for the in-situ quantification of EMNP with a high precision (error <2%). Compared to other analytical methods, the magnetic susceptibility requires no sample preparation and enabled direct quantification of EMNP in both the aqueous phase and the granular sludge. In batch experiments granular sludge was exposed to EMNP suspensions for 18 h. The results revealed that the removal of EMNP from the water phase (5-35%) and biosorption in the granular sludge were rather low. Less than 2.4% of the initially added EMNP were associated with the biomass. Loosely bounded to the granular sludge, desorption of EMNP occurred. Consequently, the removal of EMNP was mainly driven by physical co-sedimentation with the biomass instead of sorption processes. A mass balance elucidated that the majority of EMNP were stabilized by particulate organic matter in the water phase and can therefore likely be transported further. The magnetic susceptibility enabled tracing EMNP in complex matrices and thus improves the understanding of the general distribution of ENP in technical as well as environmental systems. PMID:26282738

  8. Supporting user-defined granularities in a spatiotemporal conceptual model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Khatri, V.; Ram, S.; Snodgrass, R.T.; O'Brien, G. M.

    2002-01-01

    Granularities are integral to spatial and temporal data. A large number of applications require storage of facts along with their temporal and spatial context, which needs to be expressed in terms of appropriate granularities. For many real-world applications, a single granularity in the database is insufficient. In order to support any type of spatial or temporal reasoning, the semantics related to granularities needs to be embedded in the database. Specifying granularities related to facts is an important part of conceptual database design because under-specifying the granularity can restrict an application, affect the relative ordering of events and impact the topological relationships. Closely related to granularities is indeterminacy, i.e., an occurrence time or location associated with a fact that is not known exactly. In this paper, we present an ontology for spatial granularities that is a natural analog of temporal granularities. We propose an upward-compatible, annotation-based spatiotemporal conceptual model that can comprehensively capture the semantics related to spatial and temporal granularities, and indeterminacy without requiring new spatiotemporal constructs. We specify the formal semantics of this spatiotemporal conceptual model via translation to a conventional conceptual model. To underscore the practical focus of our approach, we describe an on-going case study. We apply our approach to a hydrogeologic application at the United States Geologic Survey and demonstrate that our proposed granularity-based spatiotemporal conceptual model is straightforward to use and is comprehensive.

  9. Tap density equations of granular powders based on the rate process theory and the free volume concept.

    PubMed

    Hao, Tian

    2015-02-28

    The tap density of a granular powder is often linked to the flowability via the Carr index that measures how tight a powder can be packed, under an assumption that more easily packed powders usually flow poorly. Understanding how particles are packed is important for revealing why a powder flows better than others. There are two types of empirical equations that were proposed to fit the experimental data of packing fractions vs. numbers of taps in the literature: the inverse logarithmic and the stretched exponential. Using the rate process theory and the free volume concept under the assumption that particles will obey similar thermodynamic laws during the tapping process if the "granular temperature" is defined in a different way, we obtain the tap density equations, and they are reducible to the two empirical equations currently widely used in literature. Our equations could potentially fit experimental data better with an additional adjustable parameter. The tapping amplitude and frequency, the weight of the granular materials, and the environmental temperature are grouped into this parameter that weighs the pace of the packing process. The current results, in conjunction with our previous findings, may imply that both "dry" (granular) and "wet" (colloidal and polymeric) particle systems are governed by the same physical mechanisms in term of the role of the free volume and how particles behave (a rate controlled process). PMID:25589375

  10. Record Dynamics and the Parking Lot Model for granular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibani, Paolo; Boettcher, Stefan

    Also known for its application to granular compaction (E. Ben-Naim et al., Physica D, 1998), the Parking Lot Model (PLM) describes the random parking of identical cars in a strip with no marked bays. In the thermally activated version considered, cars can be removed at an energy cost and, in thermal equilibrium, their average density increases as temperature decreases. However, equilibration at high density becomes exceedingly slow and the system enters an aging regime induced by a kinematic constraint, the fact that parked cars may not overlap. As parking an extra car reduces the available free space,the next parking event is even harder to achieve. Records in the number of parked cars mark the salient features of the dynamics and are shown to be well described by the log-Poisson statistics known from other glassy systems with record dynamics. Clusters of cars whose positions must be rearranged to make the next insertion possible have a length scale which grows logarithmically with age, while their life-time grows exponentially with size. The implications for a recent cluster model of colloidal dynamics,(S. Boettcher and P. Sibani, J. Phys.: Cond. Matter, 2011 N. Becker et al., J. Phys.: Cond. Matter, 2014) are discussed. Support rom the Villum Foundation is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Multiscale modeling of multi-component granular avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinhart, Thomas; Tunuguntla, Deepak; Luding, Stefan; Thornton, Anthony

    2014-05-01

    Geophysical flows (e.g. snow slab avalanches, debris flows and pyroclastic flows and landslides) often contain particles of different sizes, shapes and materials, which can cause the constituent phases to segregate. Here we will focus of the effects of size and density. Kinetic sieving causes the particles to segregate by size, with small particles sifting downwards, as they have a higher probability than large particles to fit into void spaces [1]. The large particles on the surface are transported sideways to form levees that increase the resistance to lateral motion and thus enhance the run-out. At the same time, particles also segregate by density due to buoyancy, which shifts lighter particles upwards. For bidisperse flows, a mixture-theory continuum model is used that includes the effects of both size and density segregation [2]. We use DEM (DPM) simulations to investigate two key model parameters that are hard to obtain from experiments. A novel coarse-graining expression for the stress tensor of discrete mechanical systems is applied for mixtures to obtain the partial stresses and the interaction drag force [3,4]. The goal is to develop predictive multi-component models of granular avalanches by utilising both continuum and particle simulation approaches. REFERENCES [1] Thornton, A.R., Weinhart, T., Luding, S., Bokhove, O., Modelling of particle size segregation: Calibration using the discrete particle method, Int. J. Mod. Phys. C 23, (2012). [2] Tunuguntla, D., Bokhove, O., Thornton, A.R., Particle segregation in free-surface flows, submitted to JFM rapids (2013) [3] T. Weinhart, A. R. Thornton, S. Luding, O. Bokhove, From discrete particles to continuum fields near a boundary, Granular Matter 14(2), 289-294 (2012). [4] T. Weinhart, S. Luding, A.R. Thornton, From discrete particles to continuum fields in mixtures, AIP Conf. Proc. 1542, 1202-1205 (2013)

  12. Constitutive Relation in Transitional Granular Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Hayley H.; Hanes, Daniel M.; Jenkins, James T.

    2002-01-01

    To study the constitutive behavior of granular materials, the presence of gravity is detrimental. Although empirical relations have been obtained for engineering designs to control granular flows on Earth, it is not known how well these Earthbound relations can be used in another gravity field. Fundamental understanding must be derived to reliably design for granular flows in space exploration. There are two extremes of granular flows of which significant amount of knowledge is available. One deals with a dense and quasi-static situation where the deformation rate nearly vanishes. The other deals with dilute and rapidly fluctuating grain velocities where particle inertia dominates. This project, funded by the NASA Microgravity Fluid Physics Program, aims to study this transitional regime via physical experiments and computer simulations. A conceptual model has been established as described below. There are two natural time scales in a granular flow. One is the travel time between two consecutive collisions and the other is the duration of a collision contact. At a very low shear-rate, the shear-induced particle velocity is low. Hence the travel time between collisions is longer than the contact time between colliding particles. Binary collisions prevail. As the shear-rate increases, the traveling time between collisions reduces and the probability of multiple collisions goes up. These particle groups disperse shortly after and new groups form. When shear-rate is further increased, clusters grow in size due to an increasing chance for free particles to join before groups have the time to disperse. The maximum cluster size may depend on the global concentration and material properties. As the solid concentration approaches zero, the cluster size goes to one particle diameter. The maximum possible cluster size under any condition is the container size, provided that the shear flow is inside a container. The critical shear-rates that dictate the initiation of the multiple contacts, and the size and lifetime of the collision clusters, are functions of the concentration also. A 'regime' theory has been proposed by Babic et al. This theory suggested that both the solid concentration, C, and the non-dimensional shear-rate, B, are important in determining the regimes of the granular constitutive law. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  13. Drag Force and Penetration in Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffer, Peter; Tsui, Yeekin; Albert, Istvan; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2002-11-01

    The motion of a solid object being pulled slowly through a granular medium is resisted by jamming of the grains, resulting in a drag force which differs dramatically from viscous drag in a fluid both in its average properties and in having large fluctuations with distinct characteristics. The drag process thus provides an excellent test-bed for the strength of locally jammed states among the grains and the effects of confinement on the jamming. We have studied the drag force as a function of the velocity, the depth in the medium, the grain size and morphology for a vertical cylinder. The data agree well with theory for spherical media, but show an anomalously strong depth dependence for non-spherical grains. We also study the drag force on discrete objects with circular cross section moving slowly through a spherical granular medium. Variations in the geometry of the dragged object change the drag force only by a small fraction relative to shape effects in fluid drag. The drag force depends quadratically on the object's diameter as expected. We do observe, however, a deviation above the expected linear depth dependence, and the magnitude of the deviation is apparently controlled by geometrical factors. We also have studied fluctuations in the drag force experienced by a vertical moving through a granular medium. The successive formation and collapse of jammed states give a stick-slip nature to the fluctuations which are periodic at small depths but become 'stepped' at large depths, a transition which we interpret as a consequence of the long-range nature of the force chains and the finite size of our experiment. Very recent work has focused on the effects of solid barriers within the grains on penetration of a granular medium. We have studied the force required to insert an object vertically into a granular medium, with particular attention to the effect of the bottom boundary. We find that, despite the long range nature of the force chains, the existence of the solid bottom of the granular container only affects the force when the inserted object is within a short range of the bottom, and that the roughness of the bottom surface has a strong effect on the force's depth profile. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  14. SETAC-U.S. EPA WET INITIATIVES: ALL WET AND NOTHING BUT WET

    EPA Science Inventory

    To ensure that sould scientific principles and sound science are applied to the challenging issues in t he Whole Effluent Toxicity (WET) process, the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) Foundation for Environmental Education was awarded a cooperative agreem...

  15. Bright YAG:Ce Nanorod Phosphors Prepared via a Partial Wet Chemical Route and Biolabeling Applications.

    PubMed

    Guo, Daidong; Ma, Baojin; Zhao, Lili; Qiu, Jichuan; Liu, Wei; Sang, Yuanhua; Claverie, Jerome; Liu, Hong

    2016-05-18

    Cerium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG:Ce) nanorods were prepared via a partial wet chemical route followed by a calcination process by using Al2O3 nanorods as both templates and the reactant. These novel well-crystallized YAG:Ce phosphors with a 200-300 nm diameter and a 2-3 μm length have a high specific surface area while being virtually devoid of surface defects. The YAG:Ce nanorod phosphors possess good luminescent properties compared with granular YAG:Ce phosphors. Photoluminescence quantum yields of YAG:Ce nanorod phosphors are higher than those of granular ones. The YAG:Ce nanorod phosphors exhibit two luminescent decay times due to their unique morphology. The YAG:Ce nanorods exhibited good cytocompatibility with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and can be used as biolabel nanoparticles in bioimaging. PMID:27117763

  16. The design of free structure granular mappings: the use of the principle of justifiable granularity.

    PubMed

    Pedrycz, Witold; Al-Hmouz, Rami; Morfeq, Ali; Balamash, Abdullah

    2013-12-01

    The study introduces a concept of mappings realized in presence of information granules and offers a design framework supporting the formation of such mappings. Information granules are conceptually meaningful entities formed on a basis of a large number of experimental input–output numeric data available for the construction of the model. We develop a conceptually and algorithmically sound way of forming information granules. Considering the directional nature of the mapping to be formed, this directionality aspect needs to be taken into account when developing information granules. The property of directionality implies that while the information granules in the input space could be constructed with a great deal of flexibility, the information granules formed in the output space have to inherently relate to those built in the input space. The input space is granulated by running a clustering algorithm; for illustrative purposes, the focus here is on fuzzy clustering realized with the aid of the fuzzy C-means algorithm. The information granules in the output space are constructed with the aid of the principle of justifiable granularity (being one of the underlying fundamental conceptual pursuits of Granular Computing). The construct exhibits two important features. First, the constructed information granules are formed in the presence of information granules already constructed in the input space (and this realization is reflective of the direction of the mapping from the input to the output space). Second, the principle of justifiable granularity does not confine the realization of information granules to a single formalism such as fuzzy sets but helps form the granules expressed any required formalism of information granulation. The quality of the granular mapping (viz. the mapping realized for the information granules formed in the input and output spaces) is expressed in terms of the coverage criterion (articulating how well the experimental data are “covered” by information granules produced by the granular mapping for any input experimental data). Some parametric studies are reported by quantifying the performance of the granular mapping (expressed in terms of the coverage and specificity criteria) versus the values of a certain parameters utilized in the construction of output information granules through the principle of justifiable granularity. The plots of coverage–specificity dependency help determine a knee point and reach a sound compromise between these two conflicting requirements imposed on the quality of the granular mapping. Furthermore, quantified is the quality of the mapping with regard to the number of information granules (implying a certain granularity of the mapping). A series of experiments is reported as well. PMID:23757519

  17. Surface waves in granular phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichard, H.; Duclos, A.; Groby, J.-P.; Tournat, V.; Zheng, L.; Gusev, V. E.

    2016-02-01

    The existence of surface elastic waves at a mechanically free surface of granular phononic crystals is studied. The granular phononic crystals are made of spherical particles distributed periodically on a simple cubic lattice. It is assumed that the particles are interacting by means of normal, shear, and bending contact rigidities. First, Rayleigh-type surface acoustic waves, where the displacement of the particles takes place in the sagittal plane while the particles possess one rotational and two translational degrees of freedom, are analyzed. Second, shear-horizontal-type waves, where the displacement of the particles is normal to the sagittal plane while the particles possess one translational and two rotational degrees of freedom are studied. The existence of zero-group-velocity surface acoustic waves of Rayleigh type is theoretically predicted and interpreted. A comparison with surface waves predicted by the reduced Cosserat theory is performed, and some limitations of the latter are established.

  18. Granular Quality Reporting for Cervical Cytology Testing

    PubMed Central

    Wagholikar, Kavishwar B.; MacLaughlin, Kathy L.; Chute, Christopher G.; Greenes, Robert A.; Liu, Hongfang; Chaudhry, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    Quality reporting for cervical cancer prevention is focused on patients with normal cervical cytology, and excludes patients with cytological abnormalities that may be at higher risk. The major obstacles for granular reporting are the complexity of surveillance guidelines and free-text data. We performed automated chart review to compare the cytology testing rates for patients with ’atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance’ (ASCUS) cytology, with the rates for patients with normal cytology. We modeled the surveillance guidelines, and extracted information from free-text cytology reports, to perform this study on 28101 female patients. Our results show that patients with ASCUS cytology had significantly higher adherence rates (94.9%) than those for patients with normal cytology (90.4%). Overall our study indicates that the quality of care varies significantly between the high and average risk patients. Our study demonstrates the use of health information technology for higher granularity of reporting for cervical cytology testing. PMID:26306264

  19. Heat flux in a granular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brey, J. J.; Ruiz-Montero, M. J.

    2012-11-01

    A peculiarity of the hydrodynamic Navier-Stokes equations for a granular gas is the modification of the Fourier law, with the presence of an additional contribution to the heat flux that is proportional to the density gradient. Consequently, the constitutive relation involves, in the case of a one-component granular gas, two transport coefficients: the usual (thermal) heat conductivity and a diffusive heat conductivity. A very simple physical interpretation of this effect, in terms of the mean free path and the mean free time is provided. It leads to the modified Fourier law with an expression for the diffusive Fourier coefficient that differs in a factor of the order of unity from the expression obtained by means of the inelastic Boltzmann equation. Also, some aspects of the Chapman-Enskog computation of the new transport coefficients as well as of the comparison between simulation results and theory are discussed.

  20. Spreading granular material with a blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressaire, Emilie; Singh, Vachitar; Grimaldi, Emma; Sauret, Alban

    2015-11-01

    The spreading of a complex fluid with a blade is encountered in applications that range from the bulldozing of granular material in construction projects to the coating of substrates with fluids in industrial applications. This spreading process is also present in everyday life, when we use a knife to turn a lump of peanut butter into a thin layer over our morning toast. In this study, we rely on granular media in a model experiment to describe the three-dimensional spreading of the material. Our experimental set-up allows tracking the spreading of a sandpile on a translating flat surface as the blade remains fixed. We characterize the spreading dynamics and the shape of the spread fluid layer when varying the tilt of the blade, its spacing with the surface and its speed. Our findings suggest that it is possible to tune the spreading parameters to optimize the coating.

  1. Compaction of granular material inside confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, Benjy; Sandnes, Bjornar; Dumazer, Guillaume; Eriksen, Jon Alm; Måløy, Knut Jørgen

    2015-06-01

    In both nature and the laboratory, loosely packed granular materials are often compacted inside confined geometries. Here, we explore such behaviour in a quasi-two dimensional geometry, where parallel rigid walls provide the confinement. We use the discrete element method to investigate the stress distribution developed within the granular packing as a result of compaction due to the displacement of a rigid piston. We observe that the stress within the packing increases exponentially with the length of accumulated grains, and show an extension to current analytic models which fits the measured stress. The micromechanical behaviour is studied for a range of system parameters, and the limitations of existing analytic models are described. In particular, we show the smallest sized systems which can be treated using existing models. Additionally, the effects of increasing piston rate, and variations of the initial packing fraction, are described.

  2. Plant Root Growth In Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendell, Dawn; Hosoi, Peko

    2010-03-01

    Roots grow in a variety of granular substrates. However, the substrates are often treated in ways which minimize or neglect the inhomogeneities arising from the influence of inter-particle forces. Experiments are often run using gels or average stress measurements. This presentation discusses the effect of the local structure of the particulate environment on the root's direction. Using photoelastic particles and particles with a variety of Young's Moduli, we investigate the influence of inter-particle forces and particle stiffness on a pinto bean root's ability to grow through a fully-saturated granular medium. The level of particle contact force through which the roots successfully grow is determined and the influence of particle stiffness on root direction is investigated.

  3. Erosion and flow of hydrophobic granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utter, Brian; Benns, Thomas; Mahler, Joseph

    2013-11-01

    We experimentally investigate submerged granular flows of hydrophobic and hydrophilic grains both in a rotating drum geometry and under erosion by a surface water flow. While slurry and suspension flows are common in nature and industry, effects of surface chemistry on flow behavior have received relatively little attention. In the rotating drum , we use varying concentrations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic grains of sand submerged in water rotated at a constant angular velocity. Sequential images of the resulting avalanches are taken and analyzed. High concentrations of hydrophobic grains result in an effectively cohesive interaction between the grains forming aggregates, with aggregate size and repose angle increasing with hydrophobic concentration. However, the formation and nature of the aggregates depends significantly on the presence of air in the system. We present results from a related experiment on erosion by a surface water flow designed to characterize the effects of heterogeneous granular surfaces on channelization and erosion. Supported by NSF CBET Award 1067598.

  4. Erosion and flow of hydrophobic granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utter, Brian; Benns, Thomas; Foltz, Benjamin; Mahler, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    We experimentally investigate submerged granular flows of hydrophobic and hydrophilic grains both in a rotating drum geometry and under erosion by a surface water flow. While slurry and suspension flows are common in nature and industry, effects of surface chemistry on flow behavior have received relatively little attention. In the rotating drum, we use varying concentrations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic grains of sand submerged in water rotated at a constant angular velocity. Sequential images of the resulting avalanches are taken and analyzed. High concentrations of hydrophobic grains result in an effectively cohesive interaction between the grains forming aggregates, with aggregate size and repose angle increasing with hydrophobic concentration. However, the formation and nature of the aggregates depends significantly on the presence of air in the system. We present results from a related experiment on erosion by a surface water flow designed to characterize the effects of heterogeneous granular surfaces on channelization and erosion.

  5. Capillary movement of liquid in granular beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yendler, Boris; Webbon, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    Knowledge of capillary migration of liquids in granular beds in microgravity is essential for the development of a substrate based nutrient delivery sytem for the growth of plants in space. This problem is also interesting from the theoretical as well as the practical point of view. The purpose of this study was to model capillary water propagation through a granular bed in microgravity. In our ground experiments, water propagation is driven primarily by capillary force. Data for spherical partical sizes in the range from 0.46 to 2 mm have been obtained. It was shown that the velocity of water propagation is very sensitive to particle size. Theoretical consideration is also provided. Actual space flight experiments are planned for the future to confirm our results.

  6. Writing in the granular gel medium

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Tapomoy; Zehnder, Steven M.; Rowe, Kyle G.; Jain, Suhani; Nixon, Ryan M.; Sawyer, W. Gregory; Angelini, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Gels made from soft microscale particles smoothly transition between the fluid and solid states, making them an ideal medium in which to create macroscopic structures with microscopic precision. While tracing out spatial paths with an injection tip, the granular gel fluidizes at the point of injection and then rapidly solidifies, trapping injected material in place. This physical approach to creating three-dimensional (3D) structures negates the effects of surface tension, gravity, and particle diffusion, allowing a limitless breadth of materials to be written. With this method, we used silicones, hydrogels, colloids, and living cells to create complex large aspect ratio 3D objects, thin closed shells, and hierarchically branched tubular networks. We crosslinked polymeric materials and removed them from the granular gel, whereas uncrosslinked particulate systems were left supported within the medium for long times. This approach can be immediately used in diverse areas, contributing to tissue engineering, flexible electronics, particle engineering, smart materials, and encapsulation technologies. PMID:26601274

  7. Maximizing energy transfer in vibrofluidized granular systems.

    PubMed

    Windows-Yule, C R K; Rosato, A D; Parker, D J; Thornton, A R

    2015-05-01

    Using discrete particle simulations validated by experimental data acquired using the positron emission particle tracking technique, we study the efficiency of energy transfer from a vibrating wall to a system of discrete, macroscopic particles. We demonstrate that even for a fixed input energy from the wall, energy conveyed to the granular system under excitation may vary significantly dependent on the frequency and amplitude of the driving oscillations. We investigate the manner in which the efficiency with which energy is transferred to the system depends on the system variables and determine the key control parameters governing the optimization of this energy transfer. A mechanism capable of explaining our results is proposed, and the implications of our findings in the research field of granular dynamics as well as their possible utilization in industrial applications are discussed. PMID:26066169

  8. Medical privacy protection based on granular computing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-Wei; Liau, Churn-Jung; Hsu, Tsan-Sheng

    2004-10-01

    Based on granular computing methodology, we propose two criteria to quantitatively measure privacy invasion. The total cost criterion measures the effort needed for a data recipient to find private information. The average benefit criterion measures the benefit a data recipient obtains when he received the released data. These two criteria remedy the inadequacy of the deterministic privacy formulation proposed in Proceedings of Asia Pacific Medical Informatics Conference, 2000; Int J Med Inform 2003;71:17-23. Granular computing methodology provides a unified framework for these quantitative measurements and previous bin size and logical approaches. These two new criteria are implemented in a prototype system Cellsecu 2.0. Preliminary system performance evaluation is conducted and reviewed. PMID:15364097

  9. Freely evolving self gravitating granular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Shikha; Ahmad, Syed Rashid

    2016-05-01

    Granular Materials are composed of large number of discrete solid particles. They can be considered solid, liquid or gas depending on movement of the constituting particles and are characterized by loss of energy whenever grains come in contact. We are studying the dynamics of such materials using computer simulations. In particular, we are studying systems that interact with long-range gravitational force in addition to dissipative contact forces. Our focus is on evolution morphology and clustering of particles in this system.

  10. The Quantitative Mineralogy of Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoal, Karin O.; Appleby, Sarah K.; Stammer, Jane G.

    2009-06-01

    Knowledge of the mineralogy of granular materials can be critical to understanding the behavior of these materials. Particles in which minerals impact process development include concentrates, flotation and leach feed materials (mining industry), cuttings (oil and gas industry), soils, dust, and precipitates (environmental science), and lunar soils and simulants (planetary research). In each of these cases, the grain size, aspect ratio, angularity, hardness, porosity and mineral association are key components of the behavior of the material and are directly related to its mineralogy.

  11. Cantor set dynamics of a granular piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, Jarosław; Talbot, Julian; Viot, Pascal

    2010-05-01

    We consider an asymmetric, granular piston of mass M composed of two materials with different coefficients of restitution that undergoes inelastic collisions with a bath of particles of mass m. We show that if the velocity distribution of the bath particles consists of two discrete opposite velocities, the velocity spectrum of the piston may be: (i) continuous (ii) discrete but countable; (iii) a Cantor set, depending on the mass ratio and the inelasticities.

  12. Swimming in a granular frictional fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    X-ray imaging reveals that the sandfish lizard swims within granular media (sand) using axial body undulations to propel itself without the use of limbs. To model the locomotion of the sandfish, we previously developed an empirical resistive force theory (RFT), a numerical sandfish model coupled to an experimentally validated Discrete Element Method (DEM) model of the granular medium, and a physical robot model. The models reveal that only grains close to the swimmer are fluidized, and that the thrust and drag forces are dominated by frictional interactions among grains and the intruder. In this talk I will use these models to discuss principles of swimming within these granular ``frictional fluids". The empirical drag force laws are measured as the steady-state forces on a small cylinder oriented at different angles relative to the displacement direction. Unlike in Newtonian fluids, resistive forces are independent of speed. Drag forces resemble those in viscous fluids while the ratio of thrust to drag forces is always larger in the granular media than in viscous fluids. Using the force laws as inputs, the RFT overestimates swimming speed by approximately 20%. The simulation reveals that this is related to the non-instantaneous increase in force during reversals of body segments. Despite the inaccuracy of the steady-state assumption, we use the force laws and a recently developed geometric mechanics theory to predict optimal gaits for a model system that has been well-studied in Newtonian fluids, the three-link swimmer. The combination of the geometric theory and the force laws allows us to generate a kinematic relationship between the swimmer's shape and position velocities and to construct connection vector field and constraint curvature function visualizations of the system dynamics. From these we predict optimal gaits for forward, lateral and rotational motion. Experiment and simulation are in accord with the theoretical prediction, and demonstrate that swimming in sand can be viewed as movement in a localized frictional fluid.

  13. Critical Phase Transitions in Vibrated Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortel, Geert; Dauchot, Olivier; van Hecke, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Granular media, such as sand, jam under low stresses but yield and flow when stressed sufficiently. We present experiments that uncover that weak vibrations qualitatively modify the nature of this yielding transition from 1st to 2nd order: when the vibration strength, which plays a role similar to temperature, is raised sufficiently, the yielding transition becomes continuous. At the critical point, we find diverging fluctuations, growing timescales and the emergence of a length scale: hallmarks of criticality never seen before in sand.

  14. Legged-locomotion on inclined granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieser, Jennifer; Qian, Feifei; Goldman, Daniel

    Animals traverse a wide variety of complex environments, including situations in which the ground beneath them can yield (e.g. dry granular media in desert dunes). Locomotion strategies that are effective on level granular media can fail when traversing a granular slope. Taking inspiration from successful legged-locomotors in sandy, uneven settings, we explore the ability of a small (15 cm long, 100 g), six-c-shaped legged robot to run uphill in a bed of 1-mm-diameter poppy seeds, using an alternating tripod gait. Our fully automated experiments reveal that locomotor performance can depend sensitively on both environmental parameters such as the inclination angle and volume fraction of the substrate, and robot morphology and control parameters like leg shape, step frequency, and the friction between the feet of the robot and the substrate. We assess performance by measuring the average speed of the robot, and we find that the robot tends to perform better at higher step frequency and lower inclination angles, and that average speed decreases more rapidly with increasing angle for higher step frequency.

  15. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Test Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A test cell for Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is tested for long-term storage with water in the system as plarned for STS-107. This view shows the compressed sand column with the protective water jacket removed. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder

  16. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Flight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A test cell for the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is shown in its on-orbit configuration in Spacehab during preparations for STS-89. The twin locker to the left contains the hydraulic system to operate the experiment. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Note: Because the image on the screen was muted in the original image, its brightness and contrast are boosted in this rendering to make the test cell more visible. Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  17. Mechanics of Granular Materials Test Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A test cell for Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is shown from all three sides by its video camera during STS-89. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  18. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    One of three Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) test cells after flight on STS-79 and before impregnation with resin. Note that the sand column has bulged in the middle, and that the top of the column is several inches lower than the top of the plastic enclosure. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder

  19. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Test Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A test cell for Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is shown approximately 20 and 60 minutes after the start of an experiment on STS-89. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  20. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Test Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A test cell for Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is tested for long-term storage with water in the system as plarned for STS-107. This view shows the top of the sand column with the metal platten removed. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder

  1. Electrical charging in shaken granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordsiek, Freja; Lathrop, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Collisional electrification of granular particles and the resulting electric fields are seen but poorly understood in sand storms, volcanic ash clouds, thunderstorms, and thundersnow. We present results on the electrical charging of granular media (100 micron to 1 mm in size) shaken between two conducting plates. The voltage between the plates was measured. We saw particle electrification through capacitive coupling with the plates and electrical discharges for a diverse class of materials: polystyrene (polymer), soda-lime glass (glass), 69%:31% ZrO2:SiO2 (ceramic), and aluminum (metal). We found 1) a monotonic increase in charging with shaking strength, 2) a threshold in the number of particles to see charging of about the number of particles needed to form a monolayer on the plate, 3) material and diameter differences causing an order of magnitude spread in measured signal but little difference between mono-material sets with one size range and bi-material and/or bi-size range set combinations, and 4) long time scale transients. We argue that while two-body collisions and the physical properties of the particles (material and size) are relevant, collective phenomena are a necessary part of explaining natural charging of granular flows. We gratefully acknowledge funding from the Julien Schwinger Foundation.

  2. Characterization of undulatory locomotion in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhiwei; Pak, On Shun; Elfring, Gwynn

    2015-11-01

    Undulatory locomotion is ubiquitous in nature, from the swimming of flagellated microorganisms in biological fluids, to the slithering of snakes on land, or the locomotion of sandfish lizards in sand. Analysis of locomotion in granular materials is relatively less developed compared with fluids partially due to a lack of validated force models but a recently proposed resistive force theory (RFT) in granular media has been shown useful in studying the locomotion of a sand-swimming lizard. Here we employ this model to investigate the swimming characteristics of an undulating slender filament of both finite and infinite length. For infinite swimmers, similar to results in viscous fluids, the sawtooth waveform is found to be optimal for propulsion speed at a given power consumption. We also compare the swimming characteristics of sinusoidal and sawtooth swimmers with swimming in viscous fluids. More complex swimming dynamics emerge when the assumption of an infinite swimmer is removed. In particular, we characterize the effects of drifting and pitching in terms of propulsion speed and efficiency for a finite sinusoidal swimmer. The results complement our understanding of undulatory locomotion and provide insights into the effective design of locomotive systems in granular media.

  3. Oblique impact of dense granular sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellowitz, Jake; Guttenberg, Nicholas; Jaeger, Heinrich M.; Nagel, Sidney R.; Zhang, Wendy W.

    2013-11-01

    Motivated by experiments showing impacts of granular jets with non-circular cross sections produce thin ejecta sheets with anisotropic shapes, we study what happens when two sheets containing densely packed, rigid grains traveling at the same speed collide asymmetrically. Discrete particle simulations and a continuum frictional fluid model yield the same steady-state solution of two exit streams emerging from incident streams. When the incident angle Δθ is less than Δθc =120° +/-10° , the exit streams' angles differ from that measured in water sheet experiments. Below Δθc , the exit angles from granular and water sheet impacts agree. This correspondence is surprising because 2D Euler jet impact, the idealization relevant for both situations, is ill posed: a generic Δθ value permits a continuous family of solutions. Our finding that granular and water sheet impacts evolve into the same member of the solution family suggests previous proposals that perturbations such as viscous drag, surface tension or air entrapment select the actual outcome are not correct. Currently at Department of Physics, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403.

  4. Mechanics of Granular Materials-3 (MGM-3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sture, Stein; Alshibi, Khalid; Guynes, Buddy (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Scientists are going to space to understand how earthquakes and other forces disturb grains of soil and sand. They will examine how the particle arrangement and structure of soils, grains and powders are changed by external forces and gain knowledge about the strength, stiffness and volume changes properties of granular materials at low pressures. The Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment uses the microgravity of orbit to test sand columns under conditions that cannot be obtained in experiments on Earth. Research can only go so far on Earth because gravity-induced stresses complicate the analysis and change loads too quickly for detailed analysis. This new knowledge will be applied to improving foundations for buildings, managing undeveloped land, and handling powdered and granular materials in chemical, agricultural, and other industries. NASA wants to understand the way soil behaves under different gravity levels so that crews can safely build habitats on Mars and the Moon. Future MGM experiments will benefit from extended tests aboard the International Space Station, including experiments under simulated lunar and Martian gravity in the science centrifuge.

  5. Recent developments in granular bed filters

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, S.C.

    1981-08-01

    Granular-bed filters in various modes (fixed, fluidized, and moving) have been used for particulate and vapor filtration from gas streams for a long time. In recent years, their exploitation in coal conversion processes for removal of fine dust and traces of metal vapors has been pursued with good success. Exxon, Westinghous, Combustion Power Company, General Electric, EFB, and Air Pollution Technology are engaged in developing such filters for the purification of hot and compressed flue gas from pressurized fluidized-bed combustors for power generation. In each mode of granular-bed filter operation, the particulate collection efficiency improves by the application of an external electric field and even further enhancement is possible if the dust particles are charged. A granular bed consisting of an admixture of magnetic and nomagnetic particles in a magnetic field is found to be a very attractive filter, and its complete promise and potential is under investigation. All these continuing recent efforts are reviewed and examined, and recommendations are made for future research in this particular area of coal combustion technology.

  6. Mutiscale Modeling of Segregation in Granular Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Sun

    2007-08-03

    Modeling and simulation of segregation phenomena in granular flows are investigated. Computational models at different scales ranging from particle level (microscale) to continuum level (macroscale) are employed in order to determine the important microscale physics relevant to macroscale modeling. The capability of a multi-fluid model to capture segregation caused by density difference is demonstrated by simulating grain-chaff biomass flows in a laboratory-scale air column and in a combine harvester. The multi-fluid model treats gas and solid phases as interpenetrating continua in an Eulerian frame. This model is further improved by incorporating particle rotation using kinetic theory for rapid granular flow of slightly frictional spheres. A simplified model is implemented without changing the current kinetic theory framework by introducing an effective coefficient of restitution to account for additional energy dissipation due to frictional collisions. The accuracy of predicting segregation rate in a gas-fluidized bed is improved by the implementation. This result indicates that particle rotation is important microscopic physics to be incorporated into the hydrodynamic model. Segregation of a large particle in a dense granular bed of small particles under vertical. vibration is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Wall friction is identified as a necessary condition for the segregation. Large-scale force networks bearing larger-than-average forces are found with the presence of wall friction. The role of force networks in assisting rising of the large particle is analyzed. Single-point force distribution and two-point spatial force correlation are computed. The results show the heterogeneity of forces and a short-range correlation. The short correlation length implies that even dense granular flows may admit local constitutive relations. A modified minimum spanning tree (MST) algorithm is developed to asymptotically recover the force statistics in the force networks. This algorithm provides a possible route to constructing a continuum model with microstructural information supplied from it. Microstructures in gas fluidized beds are also analyzed using a hybrid method, which couples the discrete element method (DEM) for particle dynamics with the averaged two-fluid (TF) equations for the gas phase. Multi-particle contacts are found in defluidized regions away from bubbles in fluidized beds. The multi-particle contacts invalidate the binary-collision assumption made in the kinetic theory of granular flows for the defluidized regions. Large ratios of contact forces to drag forces are found in the same regions, which confirms the relative importance of contact forces in determining particle dynamics in the defluidized regions.

  7. Surface structure determines dynamic wetting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiayu; Do-Quang, Minh; Cannon, James J.; Yue, Feng; Suzuki, Yuji; Amberg, Gustav; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    Liquid wetting of a surface is omnipresent in nature and the advance of micro-fabrication and assembly techniques in recent years offers increasing ability to control this phenomenon. Here, we identify how surface roughness influences the initial dynamic spreading of a partially wetting droplet by studying the spreading on a solid substrate patterned with microstructures just a few micrometers in size. We reveal that the roughness influence can be quantified in terms of a line friction coefficient for the energy dissipation rate at the contact line, and that this can be described in a simple formula in terms of the geometrical parameters of the roughness and the line-friction coefficient of the planar surface. We further identify a criterion to predict if the spreading will be controlled by this surface roughness or by liquid inertia. Our results point to the possibility of selectively controlling the wetting behavior by engineering the surface structure. PMID:25683872

  8. Squeezing wetting and nonwetting liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilov, V. N.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2004-01-01

    We present molecular-dynamics results for the squeezing of octane (C8H18) between two approaching solid elastic walls with different wetting properties. The interaction energy between the octane bead units and the solid walls is varied from a very small value (1 meV), corresponding to a nonwetting surface with a very large contact angle (nearly 180 degrees), to a high value (18.6 meV) corresponding to complete wetting. When at least one of the solid walls is wetted by octane we observe well defined molecular layers develop in the lubricant film when the thickness of the film is of the order of a few atomic diameters. An external squeezing-pressure induces discontinuous, thermally activated changes in the number n of lubricant layers (n→n-1 layering transitions). With increasing interaction energy between the octane bead units and the solid walls, the transitions from n to n-1 layers occur at higher average pressure. This results from the increasing activation barrier to nucleate the squeeze-out with increasing lubricant-wall binding energy (per unit surface area) in the contact zone. Thus, strongly wetting lubricant fluids are better boundary lubricants than the less wetting ones, and this should result in less wear. We analyze in detail the effect of capillary bridge formation (in the wetting case) and droplets formation (in the nonwetting case) on the forces exerted by the lubricant on the walls. For the latter case small liquid droplets may be trapped at the interface, resulting in a repulsive force between the walls during squeezing, until the solid walls come into direct contact, where the wall-wall interaction may be initially attractive. This effect is made use of in some practical applications, and we give one illustration involving conditioners for hair care application.

  9. Jamming, Yielding, and Rheology of Weakly Vibrated Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijksman, Joshua A.; Wortel, Geert H.; van Dellen, Louwrens T. H.; Dauchot, Olivier; van Hecke, Martin

    2011-09-01

    We establish that the rheological curve of dry granular media is nonmonotonic, both in the presence and absence of external mechanical agitations. In the presence of weak vibrations, the nonmonotonic flow curves govern a hysteretic transition between slow but steady and fast, inertial flows. In the absence of vibrations, the nonmonotonic flow curve governs the yielding behavior of granular media. Finally, we show that nonmonotonic flow curves can be seen in at least two different flow geometries and for several granular materials.

  10. Granular cell tumor of the tongue: Report of a case

    PubMed Central

    Dive, Alka; Dhobley, Akshay; Fande, Prajakta Zade; Dixit, Sudhanshu

    2013-01-01

    Granular cell tumor (GCT) is a benign lesion characterized by the accumulation of plump cells with abundant granular cytoplasm. The formation of a granular cell tumor is a neoplastic process and the lesions formed are of neural derivation, as supported by immunophenotypic and ultra structural evidence. This type of tumor has been found to be both benign and malignant although malignancy is rare and comprises only 2% of all granular cell tumors. Here we report a case of GCT in a 40 year old male patient on the posterolateral border of tongue. PMID:23798853

  11. Granular Leidenfrost effect in vibrated beds with bumpy surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lim, E W C

    2010-08-01

    The effects of subjecting a bed of granular materials to horizontal vibrations by a bumpy oscillating surface have been investigated computationally in this study. The behaviour of the granular bed is determined by the vibration conditions applied which include the vibrating frequency and amplitude as well as the bumpiness of the oscillating surface. Under sufficiently vigorous vibration conditions, the granular Leidenfrost effect whereby the entire granular bed is levitated above the vibrating base by a layer of highly energetic particles may be observed. Granular temperature profiles of systems that exhibit the granular Leidenfrost effect indicate an unequal distribution of energy between particles near the vibrating base and those in the bulk. A bumpy oscillating surface was also observed to be more effective at introducing perturbations and transferring energy into a granular bed. The granular Leidenfrost effect can be induced by the application of larger grain sizes of particles constituting the bumpy vibrating base under vibration conditions that are normally insufficient for the onset of the effect. Lastly, a phase diagram which can be utilized for predicting the behaviours of granular beds that are subjected to oscillations by various types of bumpy surfaces has been constructed based on the simulation results obtained. PMID:20820844

  12. Computational study on the behaviors of granular materials under mechanical cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Ye, Minyou; Chen, Hongli

    2015-11-01

    Considering that fusion pebble beds are probably subjected to the cyclic compression excitation in their future applications, we presented a computational study to report the effect of mechanical cycling on the behaviors of granular matter. The correctness of our numerical experiments was confirmed by a comparison with the effective medium theory. Under the cyclic loads, the fast granular compaction was observed to evolve in a stretched exponential law. Besides, the increasing stiffening in packing structure, especially the decreasing moduli pressure dependence due to granular consolidation, was also observed. For the force chains inside the pebble beds, both the internal force distribution and the spatial distribution of force chains would become increasingly uniform as the external force perturbation proceeded and therefore produced the stress relief on grains. In this case, the originally proposed 3-parameter Mueth function was found to fail to describe the internal force distribution. Thereby, its improved functional form with 4 parameters was proposed here and proved to better fit the data. These findings will provide more detailed information on the pebble beds for the relevant fusion design and analysis.

  13. Impact-induced splash and spill in a quasi-confined granular medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogale, S. B.; Shinde, S. R.; Karve, P. A.; Ogale, Abhijit S.; Kulkarni, A.; Athawale, A.; Phadke, A.; Thakurdas, R.

    2006-05-01

    The splash and spill effects caused by the impact of a ball dropped from a height into a granular medium held in a small open container are examined. Different granular media, namely rice, mustard seeds, cream of wheat and plastic beads are used. The quantity of spilled-over granular matter ( W, grams) is measured as a function of the ball-drop height and compared for different cases. Digital pictures of the splash process are also recorded. The quantity W is seen to vary approximately linearly with the energy of impact. Interestingly, a distinct upward jump is seen in the spilled quantity at specific impact energy in the case of mustard seeds, which have spherical shape and also exhibit some charging effects. Similar jump was also confirmed for the case of plastic beads with broadly similar properties. Although the parameters such as mass per grain and packing density for the case of mustard seeds are intermediate between those for rice and cream of wheat, the spill quantity for comparable impact energy is considerably higher in the former case. The possible reasons for this non-monotonicity of behavior are discussed in terms of the differences in grain shapes and properties. Experiments are also performed using plastic beads of the same type but with four different sizes to explore the dependence of spilled quantity on bead size. The container size dependence is also examined for various bead types. Interesting systematics are seen, which are discussed qualitatively.

  14. Capillarylike fluctuations of a solid-liquid interface in a noncohesive granular system.

    PubMed

    Luu, Li-Hua; Castillo, Gustavo; Mujica, Nicolás; Soto, Rodrigo

    2013-04-01

    One of the most noticeable collective motion of noncohesive granular matter is clustering under certain conditions. In particular, when a quasi-two-dimensional monolayer of monodispersed noncohesive particles is vertically vibrated, a solid-liquid-like transition occurs when the driving amplitude exceeds a critical value. Here the physical mechanism underlying particle clustering relies on the strong interactions mediated by grain collisions, rather than on grain-grain cohesive forces. In average, the solid cluster resembles a drop, with a striking circular shape. We experimentally investigate the coarse-grained solid-liquid interface fluctuations, which are characterized through the static and dynamic correlation functions in the Fourier space. These fluctuations turn out to be well described by the capillary wave theory, which allows us to measure the solid-liquid interface surface tension and mobility once the granular "thermal" kinetic energy is determined. Despite that the system is strongly out of equilibrium and that the granular temperature is not uniform, there is energy equipartition at the solid-liquid interface, for a relatively large range of angular wave numbers. Furthermore, both surface tension and mobility are consistent with a simple order of magnitude estimation considering the characteristic energy, length, and time scales, which is very similar to what can be done for atomic systems. PMID:23679358

  15. Microgravity Experiments to Evaluate Electrostatic Forces in Controlling Cohesion and Adhesion of Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J.; Weislogel, M.; Jacobson, T.

    1999-01-01

    The bulk behavior of dispersed, fluidized, or undispersed stationary granular systems cannot be fully understood in terms of adhesive/cohesive properties without understanding the role of electrostatic forces acting at the level of the grains themselves. When grains adhere to a surface, or come in contact with one another in a stationary bulk mass, it is difficult to measure the forces acting on the grains, and the forces themselves that induced the cohesion and adhesion are changed. Even if a single gain were to be scrutinized in the laboratory, it might be difficult, perhaps impossible, to define the distribution and character of surface charging and the three- dimensional relationship that charges (electrons, holes) have to one another. The hypothesis that we propose to test in microgravity (for dielectric materials) is that adhesion and cohesion of granular matter are mediated primarily by dipole forces that do not require the presence of a net charge; in fact, nominally electrically neutral materials should express adhesive and cohesive behavior when the neutrality results from a balance of positive and negative charge carriers. Moreover, the use of net charge alone as a measure of the electrical nature of grain-to-grain relationships within a granular mass may be misleading. We believe that the dipole forces arise from the presence of randomly-distributed positive and negative fixed charge carriers on grains that give rise to a resultant dipole moment. These dipole forces have long-range attraction. Random charges are created whenever there is triboelectrical activity of a granular mass, that is, whenever the grains experience contact/separation sequences or friction. Electrostatic forces are generally under-estimated for their role in causing agglomeration of dispersed grains in particulate clouds, or their role in affecting the internal frictional relationships in packed granular masses. We believe that electrostatic, in particular dipole-mediated processes, are pervasive and probably affect, at some level, everything from astrophysical-scale granular systems such as interstellar nebulae, protoplanetary dust and debris disks, planetary-scale systems such as debris palls from meteorite impact, volcanic eruptions, and aeolian dust storms, all the way to industrial-scale systems in mining, powder and grain processing, pharmaceuticals, and smoke-stack technologies. NASA must concern itself with the electrostatic behavior of dust and sand on Mars because of its potentially critical importance to human exploration. The motion and adhesion of martian surface materials will affect the design and performance of spacesuits, habitats, processing plants, solar panels, and any externally exposed equipment such as surface rovers or communication and weather stations. Additionally, the adhesion of dust and sand could greatly enhance contact with the potentially toxic components of the martian soil.

  16. Point release wet snow avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valero, C. Vera; Bühler, Y.; Bartelt, P.

    2015-04-01

    Wet snow avalanches can initiate from large fracture slabs or small point releases. Point release wet snow avalanches can reach dangerous proportions when they (1) initiate on steep and long avalanche paths and (2) entrain warm moist snow. In this paper we investigate the dynamics of point release wet snow avalanches by applying a numerical model to simulate documented case studies on high altitude slopes in the Chilean Andes (33° S). The model predicts avalanche flow temperature as well as meltwater production, given the thermal initial conditions of the release mass and snowcover entrainment. As the release mass is small, avalanche velocity and runout are primarily controlled by snowcover temperature and moisture content. We demonstrate how the interaction between terrain and entrainment processes influence the production of meltwater and therefore lubrication processes leading to longer runout. This information is useful to avalanche forecasters. An understanding of wet snow avalanche dynamics is important to study how climate change scenarios will influence land usage in mountain regions in the near future.

  17. Solidification of underwater wet welds

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, A.M.; Medeiros, R.C. de; Liu, S.

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the shape of a weld pool can influence the microstructure and segregation pattern of the final solidified weld metal. Mechanical properties and susceptibility to defects are consequently affected by the solidification mode of the weld. In this work the solidification behavior of weld beads deposited in air and underwater wet welding using rutile electrodes were compared. The welds were deposited by gravity feed, on low carbon, manganese steel plates using similar welding conditions. Macroscopic observation of the weld craters showed that welds deposited in air presented an elliptical weld pool. The underwater wet welds, on the other hand, solidified with a tear drop shape. Although the welds differed in shape, their lengths were approximately the same. Microscopic examinations carried out on transverse, normal and longitudinal sections revealed a coarser columnar grain structure in the underwater welds. These results suggest that the tear-drop shaped pool induced solidification in a preferred orientation with segregation more likely in welds deposited under wet conditions. This change in weld pool geometry can be explained by the surface heat loss conditions that occur in a wet weld: slower when covered by the steam bubble and faster in the region in contact with water behind the pool.

  18. CEILCOTE IONIZING WET SCRUBBER EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of a Ceilcote ionizing wet scrubber installed on a refractory brick kiln. Tests involved particulate mass emission, particle size distribution, and opacity. Overall efficiency was 93% with an average outlet opacity determined with a heate...

  19. Segregation induced fingering instabilities in granular avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodhouse, Mark; Thornton, Anthony; Johnson, Chris; Kokelaar, Pete; Gray, Nico

    2013-04-01

    It is important to be able to predict the distance to which a hazardous natural granular flows (e.g. snow slab avalanches, debris-flows and pyroclastic flows) might travel, as this information is vital for accurate assessment of the risks posed by such events. In the high solids fraction regions of these flows the large particles commonly segregate to the surface, where they are transported to the margins to form bouldery flow fronts. In many natural flows these bouldery margins experience a much greater frictional force, leading to frontal instabilities. These instabilities create levees that channelize the flow vastly increasing the run-out distance. A similar effect can be observed in dry granular experiments, which use a combination of small round and large rough particles. When this mixture is poured down an inclined plane, particle size segregation causes the large particles to accumulate near the margins. Being rougher, the large particles experience a greater friction force and this configuration (rougher material in front of smoother) can be unstable. The instability causes the uniform flow front to break up into a series of fingers. A recent model for particle size-segregation has been coupled to existing avalanche models through a particle concentration dependent friction law. In this talk numerical solutions of this coupled system are presented and compared to both large scale experiments carried out at the USGS flume and more controlled small scale laboratory experiments. The coupled depth-averaged model captures the accumulation of large particles at the flow front. We show this large particle accumulation at the head of the flow can lead to the break-up of the initially uniform front into a series of fingers. However, we are unable to obtain a fully grid-resolved numerical solution; the width of the fingers decreases as the grid is refined. By considering the linear stability of a steady, fully-developed, bidisperse granular layer it is shown that the governing equations, are linearly unstable to arbitrarily small perturbations. It should be noted similar stability characteristics are found for shallow layer fluid flows on an inclined plane, with small wavelength perturbations stabilised by the inclusion of empirical frictional drag and viscous dissipation. Furthermore, depth-averaged models for roll waves on a monodisperse, shallow granular layer released on an inclined plane have a similar problem with high wave-number modes remaining linearly unstable. In this case the high wavenumber instability can be suppressed by the inclusion of (phenomenological) viscous dissipation. It is possible that by including similar rheological terms in our depth-averaged model the small wavelength modes can be stabilised and a well defined finger width can be predicted. This is the first model to describe the break-up of a uniform front of granular material, and it represents a crucial step forward in obtaining a mathematical model of this process. However, the current model is not complete and remains linearly unstable to arbitrarily small wavelength perturbations. We anticipate that these small wavelength instabilities can be stabilised by including additional physical effects, and this remains an active avenue of investigation. Reference: Woodhouse, M; Thornton, A. R.; Johnson, C.G.; Kokelaar, P, and Gray, J.M.N.T. Segregation-induced fingering instabilities in granular free surface flows. Journal of Fluids Mechanics. (2012). 709 543-580

  20. Microgravity Experiments to Evaluate Electrostatic Forces in Controlling Cohesion and Adhesion of Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J.; Weislogel, M.; Jacobson, T.

    1999-01-01

    The bulk behavior of dispersed, fluidized, or undispersed stationary granular systems cannot be fully understood in terms of adhesive/cohesive properties without understanding the role of electrostatic forces acting at the level of the grains themselves. When grains adhere to a surface, or come in contact with one another in a stationary bulk mass, it is difficult to measure the forces acting on the grains, and the forces themselves that induced the cohesion and adhesion are changed. Even if a single grain were to be scrutinized in the laboratory, it might be difficult, perhaps impossible, to define the distribution and character of surface charging and the three-dimensional relationship that charges (electrons, holes) have to one another. The hypothesis that we propose to test in microgravity (for dielectric materials) is that adhesion and cohesion of granular matter are mediated primarily by dipole forces that do not require the presence of a net charge; in fact, nominally electrically neutral materials should express adhesive and cohesive behavior when the neutrality results from a balance of positive and negative charge carriers. Moreover, the use of net charge alone as a measure of the electrical nature of grain-to-grain relationships within a granular mass may be misleading. We believe that the dipole forces arise from the presence of randomly-distributed positive and negative fixed charge carriers on grains that give rise to a resultant dipole moment. These dipole forces have long-range attraction. Random charges are created whenever there is triboelectrical activity of a granular mass, that is, whenever the grains experience contact/separation sequences or friction.

  1. A Granular Bed for Use in a Nanoparticle Respiratory Deposition Sampler

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hong; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A.; Mines, Levi W. D.; Anthony, T. Renée; Grassian, Vicki H.; Peters, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    A granular bed was designed to collect nanoparticles as an alternative to nylon mesh screens for use in a nanoparticle respiratory deposition (NRD) sampler. The granular bed consisted of five layers in series: a coarse mesh, a large-bead layer, a small-bead layer, a second large-bead layer, and a second coarse mesh. The bed was designed to primarily collect particles in the small-bead layer, with the coarse mesh and large-bead layers designed to hold the collection layer in position. The collection efficiency of the granular bed was measured for varying depths of the small-bead layer and for test particles with different shape (cuboid, salt particles; and fractal, and stainless steel and welding particles). Experimental measurements of collection efficiency were compared to estimates of efficiency from theory and to the nanoparticulate matter (NPM) criterion, which was established to reflect the total deposition in the human respiratory system for particles smaller than 300 nm. The shape of the collection efficiency curve for the granular bed was similar to the NPM criterion in these experiments. The collection efficiency increased with increasing depth of the small-bead layer: the particle size associated with 50% collection efficiency, d50, for salt particles was 25 nm for a depth of 2.2 mm, 35 nm for 3.2 mm, and 45 nm for 4.3 mm. The best-fit to the NPM criterion was found for the bed with a small-bead layer of 3.2 mm. Compared to cubic salt particles, the collection efficiency was higher for fractal-shaped particles larger than 50 nm, presumably due to increased interception. Copyright 2015 American Association for Aerosol Research PMID:26900208

  2. The thermodynamics of dense granular flow and jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shih Yu

    The scope of the thesis is to propose, based on experimental evidence and theoretical validation, a quantifiable connection between systems that exhibit the jamming phenomenon. When jammed, some materials that flow are able to resist deformation so that they appear solid-like on the laboratory scale. But unlike ordinary fusion, which has a critically defined criterion in pressure and temperature, jamming occurs under a wide range of conditions. These condition have been rigorously investigated but at the moment, no self-consistent framework can apply to grains, foam and colloids that may have suddenly ceased to flow. To quantify the jamming behavior, a constitutive model of dense granular flows is deduced from shear-flow experiments. The empirical equations are then generalized, via a thermodynamic approach, into an equation-of-state for jamming. Notably, the unifying theory also predicts the experimental data on the behavior of molecular glassy liquids. This analogy paves a crucial road map for a unifying theoretical framework in condensed matter, for example, ranging from sand to fire retardants to toothpaste.

  3. Minkowski tensor shape analysis of cellular, granular and porous structures.

    PubMed

    Schröder-Turk, G E; Mickel, W; Kapfer, S C; Klatt, M A; Schaller, F M; Hoffmann, M J F; Kleppmann, N; Armstrong, P; Inayat, A; Hug, D; Reichelsdorfer, M; Peukert, W; Schwieger, W; Mecke, K

    2011-06-17

    Predicting physical properties of materials with spatially complex structures is one of the most challenging problems in material science. One key to a better understanding of such materials is the geometric characterization of their spatial structure. Minkowski tensors are tensorial shape indices that allow quantitative characterization of the anisotropy of complex materials and are particularly well suited for developing structure-property relationships for tensor-valued or orientation-dependent physical properties. They are fundamental shape indices, in some sense being the simplest generalization of the concepts of volume, surface and integral curvatures to tensor-valued quantities. Minkowski tensors are based on a solid mathematical foundation provided by integral and stochastic geometry, and are endowed with strong robustness and completeness theorems. The versatile definition of Minkowski tensors applies widely to different types of morphologies, including ordered and disordered structures. Fast linear-time algorithms are available for their computation. This article provides a practical overview of the different uses of Minkowski tensors to extract quantitative physically-relevant spatial structure information from experimental and simulated data, both in 2D and 3D. Applications are presented that quantify (a) alignment of co-polymer films by an electric field imaged by surface force microscopy; (b) local cell anisotropy of spherical bead pack models for granular matter and of closed-cell liquid foam models; (c) surface orientation in open-cell solid foams studied by X-ray tomography; and (d) defect densities and locations in molecular dynamics simulations of crystalline copper. PMID:21681830

  4. Are granular osmiophilic material deposits an epiphenomenon in CADASIL?

    PubMed

    Erro, Roberto; Moccia, Marcello; Cervasio, Mariarosaria; Penco, Silvana; De Caro, Marialaura Del Basso; Barone, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is caused by mutations in the NOTCH3 gene. Pathophysiologically, there seems to be multimerization of the extracellular domain of the protein with a possible gain of function on vascular smooth muscular cells. However, the mechanisms and determinants of NOTCH3 multimerization are not completely understood, and it is not completely elucidated whether NOTCH3 multimerization contributes to the appearance of granular osmiophilic material (GOM) deposits, which are the pathological hallmark of CADASIL. We recently reported a patient with parkinsonism and cognitive impairment and with evidence of diffuse white matter changes on imaging, carrying a NOTCH3 nonsense mutation in exon 3 (c.307C>T), and suggested that such a hypomorphic NOTCH3 mutation was likely to be pathogenic. We further pursued ultrastructural examination of skin vessels in our case, and here we report the results, wishing to make a comment on whether GOM deposits should be considered the pathological hallmark for a definitive diagnosis of CADASIL in those patients whose mutations are predicted in the production of hypomorphic protein products. PMID:26216120

  5. Adsorption of chlorophenols on granular activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, M.

    1993-12-31

    Studies were undertaken of the adsorption of chlorinated phenols from aqueous solution on granular activated carbon (Filtrasorb-400, 30 x 40 mesh). Single-component equilibrium adsorption data on the eight compounds in two concentration ranges at pH 7.0 fit the Langmuir equation better than the Freundlich equation. The adsorptive capacities at pH 7.0 increase from pentachlorophenol to trichlorophenols and are fairly constant from trichlorophenols to monochlorophenols. The adsorption process was found to be exothermic for pentachlorophenol and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, and endothermic for 2,4-dichlorophenol and 4-chlorophenol. Equilibrium measurements were also conducted for 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, and 4-chlorophenol over a wide pH range. A surface complexation model was proposed to describe the effect of pH on adsorption equilibria of chlorophenols on activated carbon. The simulations of the model are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. Batch kinetics studies were conducted of the adsorption of chlorinated phenols on granular activated carbon. The results show that the surface reaction model best describes both the short-term and long-term kinetics, while the external film diffusion model describes the short-term kinetics data very well and the linear-driving-force approximation improved its performance for the long-term kinetics. Multicomponent adsorption equilibria of chlorophenols on granular activated carbon was investigated in the micromolar equilibrium concentration range. The Langmuir competitive and Ideal Adsorbed Solution (IAS) models were tested for their performance on the three binary systems of pentachlorophenol/2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol/2,4-dichlorophenol, and 2,4-dichlorophenol/4-chlorophenol, and the tertiary system of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol/2,4-dichlorophenol/4-chlorophenol, and found to fail to predict the two-component adsorption equilibria of the former two binary systems and the tertiary system.

  6. Image Segmentation Techniques for Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, J.; O'Sullivan, C.; Coop, M. R.

    2009-06-01

    To improve understanding of the mechanical behavior of granular materials it is important to be able to quantify the relative arrangement of the grains, i.e. the fabric. This can be done, for example, by measuring the orientations of the particles (e.g. the long axis orientation) or by considering the orientations of the vectors normal to each grain-grain contact. In two dimensional (2D) analyses this information can be obtained by digital image analysis of images of thin sections obtained from an optical microscope. While such data is useful, granular materials of engineering interest are three dimensional (3D) materials and quantification of the 3D fabric is necessary. Micro Computed-Tomography (μCT) together with 3D image analysis has emerged as a promising technique for obtaining the 3D data required. This paper aims to highlight the challenges associated with using image analysis to provide quantitative information on fabric. While automated image segmentation has proved to produce reasonable results in some cases, it is sometimes less successful when dealing with highly irregular and angular soil grains. This paper evaluates the effectiveness of 2D and 3D segmentation techniques that rely on the watershed segmentation algorithm. The primary material considered is Reigate Silver Sand, a natural quartzitic sand with grain diameters in the range of 150-300 μm. While the sand considered is primarily of interest to geotechnical engineers, the results of this study will be of interest to anyone seeking to quantify granular material fabric using either 2D microscopy data or μCT 3D data sets.

  7. Fluidization of a horizontally driven granular monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckel, Michael; Sack, Achim; Kollmer, Jonathan E.; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2015-06-01

    We consider the transition of a horizontally vibrated monodisperse granular monolayer between its condensed state and its three-dimensional gaseous state as a function of the vibration parameters, amplitude, and frequency as well as particle number density. The transition is characterized by an abrupt change of the dynamical state which leaves its fingerprints in several measurable quantities including dissipation rate, sound emission, and a gap size which characterizes the sloshing motion of the material. The transition and its pronounced hysteresis is explained through the energy due to the collective motion of the particles relative to the container.

  8. Biological and robotic movement through granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Daniel

    2008-03-01

    We discuss laboratory experiments and numerical simulations of locomotion of biological organisms and robots on and within a granular medium. Terrestrial locomotion on granular media (like desert and beach sand) is unlike locomotion on rigid ground because during a step the material begins as a solid, becomes a fluid and then re-solidifies. Subsurface locomotion within granular media is unlike swimming in water for similar reasons. The fluidization and solidification depend on the packing properties of the material and can affect limb penetration depth and propulsive force. Unlike aerial and aquatic locomotion in which the Navier-Stokes equations can be used to model environment interaction, models for limb interaction with granular media do not yet exist. To study how the fluidizing properties affect speed in rapidly running and swimming lizards and crabs, we use a trackway composed of a fluidized bed of of 250 μm glass spheres. Pulses of air to the bed set the solid volume fraction 0.59<φ<0.63; a constant flow rate Q below the onset of fluidization (at Q=Qf) linearly reduces the material strength (resistance force per depth) at fixed φ for increasing Q. Systematic studies of four species of lizard and a species of crab (masses 20 grams) reveal that as Q increases, the average running speed of an animal decreases proportionally to √M/A-const(1-Q/Qf) where M is the mass of the animal and A is a characteristic foot area. While the crabs decrease speed by nearly 75 % as the material weakens to a fluid, the zebra tailed lizard uses long toes and a plantigrade foot posture at foot impact to maintain high speed ( 1.5 m/sec). We compare our biological results to systematic studies of a physical model of an organism, a 2 kg hexapedal robot SandBot. We find that the robot speed sensitively depends on φ and the details of the limb trajectory. We simulate the robot locomotion by computing ground reaction forces on a numerical model of the robot using a soft-sphere Molecular Dynamics code.

  9. Granular size segregation in underwater sand ripples.

    PubMed

    Rousseaux, G; Caps, H; Wesfreid, J-E

    2004-02-01

    We report an experimental study of a binary sand bed under an oscillating water flow. The formation and evolution of ripples is observed. The appearance of a granular segregation is shown to strongly depend on the sand bed preparation. The initial wavelength of the mixture is measured. In the final steady state, a segregation in volume is observed instead of a segregation at the surface as reported before. The correlation between this phenomenon and the fluid flow is emphasised. Finally, different "exotic" patterns and their geophysical implications are presented. PMID:15052430

  10. DEM simulation of experimental dense granular packing

    SciTech Connect

    Hanifpour, Maryam; Allaei, Mehdi Vaez; Francois, Nicolas; Saadatfar, Mohammad

    2013-06-18

    In this study we present numerical analysis performed on the experimental results of sphere packings of mono-sized hard sphere whose packing fraction spans across a wide range of 0.59<{Phi}<0.72. Using X-ray Computed Tomography (XCT), we have full access to the 3D structure of the granular packings. Numerical analysis performed on thr data provides the first experimental proofs of how densification affects local order parameters. Furthermore by combining Discrete Element Method (DEM) and the experimental results from XCT, we investigate how the intergranular forces change with the onset of crystallization.

  11. Granular Cell Tumors on Unusual Anatomic Locations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Joo

    2015-01-01

    Granular cell tumors (GCTs) are soft tissue tumors, which are thought to be derived from Schwann cells. Although most GCTs are reported to arise in tongue and oral cavity (30-50%), they can appear on any anatomic sites, even visceral organs. Herein, we report 5 cases of GCTs on unusual anatomic locations, such as palm, arm, thigh, finger, and vulvar area. Complete surgical excision is preferred treatment of choice to prevent recurrence. These cases emphasize that GCTs not involving oral cavity are more prevalent than expected, and the diagnosis should be histopathologically confirmed. PMID:26446660

  12. Mach cone in a shallow granular fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Heil, Patrick; Rericha, E. C.; Goldman, Daniel I.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2004-12-01

    We study the V-shaped wake (Mach cone) formed by a cylindrical rod moving through a thin, vertically vibrated granular layer. The wake, analogous to a shock (hydraulic jump) in shallow water, appears for rod velocities v{sub R} greater than a critical velocity c. We measure the half angle {theta} of the wake as a function of v{sub R} and layer depth h. The angle satisfies the Mach relation, sin {theta}=c/v{sub R}, where c={radical}(gh), even for h as small as one-particle diameter.

  13. Gravity-driven dense granular flows

    SciTech Connect

    ERTAS,DENIZ; GREST,GARY S.; HALSEY,THOMAS C.; DEVINE,DOV; SILBERT,LEONARDO E.

    2000-03-29

    The authors report and analyze the results of numerical studies of dense granular flows in two and three dimensions, using both linear damped springs and Hertzian force laws between particles. Chute flow generically produces a constant density profile that satisfies scaling relations suggestive of a Bagnold grain inertia regime. The type for force law has little impact on the behavior of the system. Failure is not initiated at the surface, consistent with the absence of surface flows and different principal stress directions at vs. below the surface.

  14. Exploring Granular Flows at Intermediate Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, E. E.; van der Elst, N.

    2012-12-01

    Geophysical and geomorphological flows often encompass a wide range of strain rates. Landslides accelerate from nearly static conditions to velocities in the range of meters/seconds. The rheology of granular flows for the end-members is moderately well-understood, but the constitutive low at intermediate velocities is largely unexplored. Here we present evidence that granular flows transition through a regime in which internally generated acoustic waves play a critical role in controlling rheology. In laboratory experiments on natural sand under shear in a commercial rheometer, we observe that the steady-state flows at intermediate velocities are compacted relative to the end members. In a confined volume, this compaction results in a decrease in stress on the boundaries. We establish the key role of the acoustic waves by measuring the noise generated by the shear flows with an accelerometer and then exciting the flow with similar amplitude noise under lower shear rate conditions. The observed compaction for a given amplitude noise is the same in both cases, regardless of whether the noise is generated internally by the grains colliding or artificially applied externally. The boundaries of this acoustically controlled regime can be successfully predicted through non-dimensional analysis balancing the overburden, acoustic pressure and granular inertial terms. In our laboratory experiments, this regime corresponds to 0.1 to 10 cm/s. The controlling role of acoustic waves in intermediate velocities is significant because: (1) Geological systems must pass through this regime on their route to instability. (2) Acoustic waves are much more efficiently generated by angular particles, likely to be found in natural samples, than by perfectly spherical particles, which are more tractable for laboratory and theoretical studies. Therefore, this regime is likely to be missed in many analog and computational approaches. (3) Different mineralogies and shapes result in different noise generation. Therefore, there is a potential to extrapolate and predict rheological behavior of an active flow through studies of the recoverable granular products.Steady-state thickness vs. shear rate for angular sand and glass beads. Individual curves represent multiple up-going and down-going velocity ramps, and thick error bars show means and standard deviations between runs. Thickness is independent of shear rate at low shear rates, and strongly dependent on shear rate for intermediate and high shear rates. Compaction is observed at intermediate shear rates for angular sand, but not for smooth glass beads.

  15. Assessing granular pit construction from larval Neuroptera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, Nicholas; Olafsen, Jeffrey S.; Loudon, Catherine; Steeples, Don W.

    2002-03-01

    Antlion larvae, Myrmeleon carolinus, build cone-shaped pits in dry sand for prey capture. The surface of these pits are prone to avalanches that can depend upon the physical properties of the sand in the local environment. The antlion larvae are observed to be capable of assessing both sand depth and particle size. In a polydisperse granular environment, the antlion demonstrates the ability to sort the sand by size in a dynamic manner. An imaging technique is developed to investigate the potential role of air viscosity on the pit construction process.

  16. Granular convection observed by magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrichs, E. E.; Jaeger, H. M.; Karczmar, Greg S.; Knight, James B.; Kuperman, Vadim Yu.; Nagel, Sidney R.

    1995-03-01

    Vibrations in a granular material can spontaneously produce convection rolls reminiscent of those seen in fluids. Magnetic resonance imaging provides a sensitive and noninvasive probe for the detection of these convection currents, which have otherwise been difficult to observe. A magnetic resonance imaging study of convection in a column of poppy seeds yielded data about the detailed shape of the convection rolls and the depth dependence of the convection velocity. The velocity was found to decrease exponentially with depth; a simple model for this behavior is presented here.

  17. Granular convection observed by magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrichs, E.E.; Jaeger, H.M.; Knight, J.B.; Nagel, S.R.; Karczmar, G.S.; Kuperman, V.Yu.

    1995-03-17

    Vibrations in a granular material can spontaneously produce convection rolls reminiscent of those seen in fluids. Magnetic resonance imaging provides a sensitive and noninvasive probe for the detection of these convection currents, which have otherwise been difficult to observe. A magnetic resonance imaging study of convection in a column of poppy seeds yielded data about the detailed shape of the convection rolls and the depth dependence of the convection velocity. The velocity was found to decrease exponentially with depth; a simple model for this behavior is presented here. 31 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Simulation of Granular Compacts in Two Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    VIDALES,A.M.; KENKRE,V.M.; HURD,ALAN J.

    2000-07-24

    Simulations of granular packings in 2-D by throwing disks in a rectangular die are performed. Different size distributions as bimodal, uniform and gaussian are used. Once the array of particles is done, a relaxation process is carried on using a large-amplitude, low-frequency vertical shaking. This relaxation is performed a number N of times. Then, the authors measure the density of the package, contact distribution, coordination number distribution, entropy and also the disks size distribution vs. height. The dependence of all these magnitudes on the number N of shakings used to relax the packing and on the size distribution parameters are explored and discussed.

  19. Mechanics of granular and polycrystalline solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicot, François; Darve, Félix

    2015-02-01

    The 2013 US-France Symposium was held in Aussois, close to Grenoble, on the topic "Mean-stress-dependent materials, recent advances and applications to natural risks". This series of workshops is devoted to solid and engineering mechanics. The idea for the 2013 Symposium was to focus on the mechanics of granular and polycrystalline metallic materials with some applications to natural risk modelling. Such applications are of great importance from a fundamental point of view and are critically important in terms of safety for the Rhône-Alpes Région.

  20. From nanoscale cohesion to macroscale entanglement: Opportunities for designing granular aggregate behavior by tailoring grain shape and interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Heinrich M.; Miskin, Marc Z.; Waitukaitis, Scott R.

    2013-06-01

    The packing arrangement of individual particles inside a granular material and the resulting response to applied stresses depend critically on particle-particle interactions. One aspect that recently received attention are nanoscale surface features of particles, which play an important role in determining the strength of cohesive van der Waals and capillary interactions and also affect tribo-charging of grains. We describe experiments on freely falling granular streams that can detect the contributions from all three of these forces. We show that it is possible to measure the charge of individual grains and build up distributions that are detailed enough to provide stringent tests of tribo-charging models currently available. A second aspect concerns particle shape. In this case steric interactions become important and new types of aggregate behavior can be expected when non-convex particle shapes are considered that can interlock or entangle. However, a general connection between the mechanical response of a granular material and the constituents' shape remains unknown. This has made it infeasible to tackle the "inverse packing problem", namely to start from a given, desired behavior for the aggregate as a whole and then find the particle shape the produces it. We discuss a new approach, using concepts rooted in artificial evolution that provides a way to solve this inverse problem. This approach facilitates exploring the role of arbitrary particle geometry in jammed systems and invites the discovery and design of granular matter with optimized properties.

  1. USE OF GRANULAR GRAPHITE FOR ELECTROLYTIC DECHLORINATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Granular graphite is a potential electrode material for the electrochemical remediation of refractory chlorinated organic compounds such as trichloroethylene (TCE). However, the use of granular graphite can complicate the experimental results. On one hand, up to 99% of TCE was re...

  2. 75 FR 67105 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy and Japan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-01

    ... granular polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Japan (53 FR 32267). On August 30, 1988, Commerce issued an... from Italy and Japan (65 FR 6147, February 8, 2000). Following second five-year reviews by Commerce and... orders on imports of granular polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Italy and Japan (70 FR 76026)....

  3. BACKWASH OF GRANULAR FILTERS USED IN WASTEWATER FILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of deep granular filters in waste treatment is of growing importance. The key to long-term operating success of such filters is proper bed design and adequate bed cleaning during backwashing. Cleaning granular filters by water backwash alone to fluidize the filter bed is ...

  4. Intraorbital Granular Cell Tumor Ophthalmologic and Radiologic Findings

    PubMed Central

    de la Vega, Gabriela; Villegas, Victor M; Velazquez, Jose; Barrios, Mirelys; Murray, Timothy G; Elhammady, Mohamed Samy

    2015-01-01

    Granular cell tumor is a rare soft tissue neoplasm that commonly affects the head and neck regions. We describe a case of a granular cell tumor of the orbit including its clinical presentation, histopathology, and magnetic resonance imaging findings. PMID:25963156

  5. Clusters in a magnetic toy model for binary granular piles.

    PubMed

    Trojan, K; Ausloos, M

    2004-05-01

    Results on a generalized magnetically controlled ballistic deposition model of granular piles are reported in order to search for the effect of "spin flip" probability q in building a granular pile. Two different regimes of spin cluster site distributions have been identified, a borderline q(c) (betaJ) where J is the interaction potential strength. PMID:15244862

  6. Effects of granular charge on flow and mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinbrot, T.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2008-12-01

    Sandstorms in the desert have long been reported to produce sparks and other electrical disturbances - indeed as long ago as 1850, Faraday commented on the peculiarities of granular charging during desert sandstorms. Similarly, lightning strikes within volcanic dust plumes have been repeatedly reported for over half a century, but remain unexplained. The problem of granular charging has applied, as well as natural, implications, for charged particle clouds frequently generate spectacularly devastating dust explosions in granular processing plants, and sand becomes strongly electrified by helicopters traveling in desert environments. The issue even has implications for missions to the Moon and to Mars, where charged dust degrades solar cells viability and clings to spacesuits, limiting the lifetime of their joints. Despite the wide-ranging importance of granular charging, even the simplest aspects of its causes remain elusive. To take one example, sand grains in the desert manage to charge one another despite having only similar materials to rub against over expanses of many miles - thus existing theories of charging due to material differences fail entirely to account for the observed charging of desert sands. In this talk, we describe recent progress made in identifying underlying causes of granular charging, both in desert-like environments and in industrial applications, and we examine effects of granular charging on flow, mixing and separation of common granular materials. We find that charging of identical grains can occur under simple laboratory conditions, and we make new predictions for the effects of this charging on granular behaviours.

  7. Physical Properties of Various Materials Relevant to Granular Flow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of the ubiquitous nature of granular materials, ranging from natural avalanches to industrial storage and processing operations, interest in quantifying and predicting the dynamics of granular flow continues to increase. The objective of this study was to investigate various physical proper...

  8. Acoustic probing of elastic behavior and damage in weakly cemented granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlois, V.; Jia, X.

    2014-02-01

    We investigate the elastic behavior and damage of weakly cemented granular media under external load with ultrasound. The cementation controlled experiments are performed by freezing the capillary liquid at the bead contact in a dense glass or polymeric [poly(methyl methacrylate)] bead pack wet by tetradecane of volume fraction ? = 0.1%-4%. When the pendular rings are solidified, an abrupt increase by a factor of 2 in the compressional wave velocity is observed. We interpret the data in terms of effective medium models in which the contact stiffnesses are derived by either a bonded contact model [P. J. Digby, J. Appl. Mech. 48, 803 (1981), 10.1115/1.3157738] or a cemented contact model [J. Dvorkin, A. Nur, and H. Yin, Mech. Mater. 18, 351 (1994), 10.1016/0167-6636(94)90044-2]. The former fails to quantitatively account for the results with a soft cement relative to the grain, whereas the latter considering the mechanical properties of the cement does apply. Moreover, we monitor the irreversible behavior of the cemented granular packs under moderate uniaxial loading (<1.3 MPa) with the correlation method of ultrasound scattering. The damage of the cemented materials is accompanied by a compressional wave velocity decrease up to 60%, likely due to the fractures induced at the grain-cement interfaces.

  9. Process Performance of Secondary Effluent Granular Media Filtration with and without Preozonation.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Rion; De Las Casas, Carla; Henneman, Seppi; Witzgall, Robert; Yu, William; Ramberg, Steve; Parker, Denny; Ohlinger, Kurt

    2015-07-01

    A 10-month pilot study compared the performance of conventional granular media filtration (CGMF) with granular media filtration with preozonation (OGMF) to determine the effects of preozonation on filter performance. Filtration recoveries were lower for OGMF compared to CMGF when operated at a loading rate of 18.3 m/h. Operation at 18.3 m/h met turbidity requirements for California Department of Public Health Title 22 unrestricted reclaimed water requirements for both OGMF and CGMF. Preozonated secondary effluent at a transferred dose of 3 mg/L resulted in an increase in ultraviolet transmissivity (UVT) of approximately 6% and greater than 5-log inactivation of male-specific bacteriophage MS2. Wet weather flow events resulted in UVT decrease and a decline in MS2 inactivation to less than 3 log attributed to higher ozone demand in the secondary effluent. Preozonation increased N-nitrosodimethlyamine (NDMA) concentration approximately 10 times, but subsequent filtration reduced levels to secondary effluent values. A net increase in NDMA was observed at times. PMID:26163495

  10. Expression for the granular elastic energy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yimin; Zheng, Hepeng; Peng, Zheng; Fu, Liping; Song, Shixiong; Sun, Qicheng; Mayer, Michael; Liu, Mario

    2012-05-01

    Granular solid hydrodynamics (GSH) is a broad-ranged continual mechanical description of granular media capable of accounting for static stress distributions, yield phenomena, propagation and damping of elastic waves, the critical state, shear band, and fast dense flow. An important input of GSH is an expression for the elastic energy needed to deform the grains. The original expression, though useful and simple, has some drawbacks. Therefore a slightly more complicated expression is proposed here that eliminates three of them: (1) The maximal angle at which an inclined layer of grains remains stable is increased from 26^{∘} to the more realistic value of 30^{∘}. (2) Depending on direction and polarization, transverse elastic waves are known to propagate at slightly different velocities. The old expression neglects these differences, the new one successfully reproduces them. (3) Most importantly, the old expression contains only the Drucker-Prager yield surface. The new one contains in addition those named after Coulomb, Lade-Duncan, and Matsuoka-Nakai-realizing each, and interpolating between them, by shifting a single scalar parameter. PMID:23004747

  11. Mechanics of Granular Materials labeled hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) flight hardware takes two twin double locker assemblies in the Space Shuttle middeck or the Spacehab module. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: NASA/MSFC).

  12. Granular physics in low-gravity enviroments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tancredi, G.; Maciel, A.; Heredia, L.; Richeri, P.; Nesmachnow, S.

    2011-10-01

    The granular media are formed by a set of macroscopic objects (named grains) which interact through temporal or permanent contacts. Several processes has been identified which require a full understanding, like: grain blocking, formation of arcs, size segregation, response to shakes and impacts, etc. These processes has been studied experimentally in the laboratory, and, in the last decades, numerically. The Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulate the mechanical behavior in a media formed by a set of particles which interact through their contact points. We describe the implementation of DEM for the study of several relevant processes in minor bodies of the Solar System. We present the results of simulations of the process of size segregation in low-gravity environments, the so-called Brazil nut effect, in the cases of Eros and Itokawa. The segregation of particles with different densities is also analyzed, with the application to the case of P/Hartley 2. The surface shaking in these different gravity environments could produce the ejection of particles from the surface at very low relative velocities. The shaking that cause the above processes is due to impacts or explosions like the release of energy by the liberation of internal stresses or the reaccommodation of material. We run simulations of the passage of seismic wave produced at impact through a granular media.

  13. Machanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Investigator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Key persornel in the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment include Khalid Alshibli, project scientist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: MSFC).

  14. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Key persornel in the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment at the University of Colorado at Boulder include Tawnya Ferbiak (software engineer), Susan Batiste (research assistant), and Christina Winkler (graduate research assistant). Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder).

  15. Mechanic of Granular Materials (MGM) Investigator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Key persornel in the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment are Mark Lankton (Program Manager at University Colorado at Boulder), Susan Batiste (research assistance, UCB), and Stein Sture (principal investigator). Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder).

  16. Mesoscale Simulations of Granular Materials with Peridynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammi, Christopher; Littlewood, David; Vogler, Tracy

    2011-06-01

    The dynamic behavior of granular materials can be quite complex due to phenomena that occur at the scale of individual grains. For this reason, mesoscale simulations explicitly resolving individual grains with varying degrees of fidelity have been used to gain insight into the physics of granular materials. The vast majority of these simulations have, to date, been performed with Eulerian codes, which do a poor job of resolving fracture and grain-to-grain interactions. To address these shortcomings, we utilize a peridynamic modeling framework to examine the roles of fracture and contact under planar shock and other loading conditions. Peridynamics is a mesh-free Lagrangian technique that uses an integral formulation to better enable simulations involving fracture. Although some aspects of the peridynamic codes currently available are not well suited to the shock regime, the simulations provide results that are more physically realistic than the Eulerian simulations for some non-planar loading conditions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE.

  17. Pressure-shear experiments on granular materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhart, William Dodd; Thornhill, Tom Finley, III; Vogler, Tracy John; Alexander, C. Scott

    2011-10-01

    Pressure-shear experiments were performed on granular tungsten carbide and sand using a newly-refurbished slotted barrel gun. The sample is a thin layer of the granular material sandwiched between driver and anvil plates that remain elastic. Because of the obliquity, impact generates both a longitudinal wave, which compresses the sample, and a shear wave that probes the strength of the sample. Laser velocity interferometry is employed to measure the velocity history of the free surface of the anvil. Since the driver and anvil remain elastic, analysis of the results is, in principal, straightforward. Experiments were performed at pressures up to nearly 2 GPa using titanium plates and at higher pressure using zirconium plates. Those done with the titanium plates produced values of shear stress of 0.1-0.2 GPa, with the value increasing with pressure. On the other hand, those experiments conducted with zirconia anvils display results that may be related to slipping at an interface and shear stresses mostly at 0.1 GPa or less. Recovered samples display much greater particle fracture than is observed in planar loading, suggesting that shearing is a very effective mechanism for comminution of the grains.

  18. Dynamics of random packings in granular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rycroft, Chris H.; Bazant, Martin Z.; Grest, Gary S.; Landry, James W.

    2006-05-01

    We present a multiscale simulation algorithm for amorphous materials, which we illustrate and validate in a canonical case of dense granular flow. Our algorithm is based on the recently proposed spot model, where particles in a dense random packing undergo chainlike collective displacements in response to diffusing “spots” of influence, carrying a slight excess of interstitial free volume. We reconstruct the microscopic dynamics of particles from the “coarse grained” dynamics of spots by introducing a localized particle relaxation step after each spot-induced block displacement, simply to enforce packing constraints with a (fairly arbitrary) soft-core repulsion. To test the model, we study to what extent it can describe the dynamics of up to 135 000 frictional, viscoelastic spheres in granular drainage simulated by the discrete-element method (DEM). With only five fitting parameters (the radius, volume, diffusivity, drift velocity, and injection rate of spots), we find that the spot simulations are able to largely reproduce not only the mean flow and diffusion, but also some subtle statistics of the flowing packings, such as spatial velocity correlations and many-body structural correlations. The spot simulations run over 100 times faster than the DEM and demonstrate the possibility of multiscale modeling for amorphous materials, whenever a suitable model can be devised for the coarse-grained spot dynamics.

  19. Three-phase fracturing in granular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, James; Sandnes, Bjornar

    2015-04-01

    There exist numerous geo-engineering scenarios involving the invasion of a gas into a water-saturated porous medium: in fracking, this may occur during the fracking process itself or during subsequent gas penetration into propant beds; the process is also at the heart of carbon dioxide sequestration. We use a bed of water-saturated glass beads confined within a Hele-Shaw cell as a model system to illuminate these processes. Depending on packing density, injection rate and other factors, air injected into this system may invade in a broad variety of patterns, including viscous fingering, capillary invasion, bubble formation and fracturing. Here we focus primarily on the latter case. Fracturing is observed when air is injected into a loosely packed bed of unconsolidated granular material. Our approach allows us to image the complete fracture pattern as it forms, and as such to study both the topographical properties of the resulting pattern (fracture density, braching frequency etc) and the dynamics of its growth. We present an overview of the fracturing phenomenon within the context of pattern formation in granular fluids as a whole. We discuss how fracturing arises from an interplay between frictional, capillary and viscous forces, and demonstrate the influence of various parameters on the result.

  20. Continuum equations for dense shallow granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumaran, Viswanathan

    2015-11-01

    Simplified equations are derived for a granular flow in the `dense' limit where the volume fraction is close to that for dynamical arrest, and the `shallow' limit where the stream-wise length for flow development (L) is large compared to the cross-stream height (h). In the dense limit, the equations are simplified by taking advantage of the power-law divergence of the pair distribution function χ proportional to (ϕad - ϕ) - α, where ϕ is the volume fraction, and ϕad is the volume fraction for arrested dynamics. When the height h is much larger than the conduction length, the energy equation reduces to an algebraic balance between the rates of production and dissipation of energy, and the stress is proportional to the square of the strain rate (Bagnold law). The analysis reveals important differences between granular flows and the flows of Newtonian fluids. One important difference is that the Reynolds number (ratio of inertial and viscous terms) turns out to depend only on the layer height and Bagnold coefficients, and is independent of the flow velocity, because both the inertial terms in the conservation equations and the divergence of the stress depend on the square of the velocity/velocity gradients.

  1. Influence of particle characteristics on granular friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Jennifer L.; Marone, Chris

    2005-08-01

    We report on laboratory experiments designed to illuminate grain-scale deformation mechanisms within fault gouge. We vary particle size distribution, grain and surface roughness, and gouge layer thickness to better understand how grain sliding, rolling, dilation, and compaction affect the strength and stability of granular fault gouge. The experiments employed the double direct shear testing geometry and were run at room temperature, controlled humidity, and shearing rates from 0.1 to 3000 μm/s. Experiments were carried out under constant normal stress of 5 and 10 MPa and thus within a nonfracture loading regime where sliding friction for smooth, spherical particles is measurably lower than for rough, angular particles. We compare results from shear between smooth boundaries, where we hypothesize that grain boundary sliding is the dominant deformation mechanism, and roughened surfaces, where rolling and granular dilation contribute to shear deformation. We find that particle angularity and bounding surface roughness increase the frictional strength within sheared layers, indicating differences in particle reorganization due to these factors. In gouge material composed of <30% angular grains we observe repetitive stick-slip sliding where stress drop decreases while preinstability creep increases with increasing gouge layer thickness. Our data show significant differences in stick-slip characteristics as a function of gouge layer thickness and particle size, which we interpret in terms of the mechanics of grain bridges that support forces on the layers. We suggest that force chains exhibit qualitative differences as a function of grain angularity and bounding surface roughness.

  2. Statistics from granular stick-slip experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abed Zadeh, Aghil; Bares, Jonathan; Behringer, Robert

    2015-03-01

    We carry out experiments to characterize stick-slip for granular materials. In our experiment, a constant speed stage pulls a slider which rests on a vertical bed of circular photoelastic particles in a 2D system. The stage is connected to the slider by a spring. We measure the force on the spring as well as the slider's acceleration by a force sensor attached to the spring and accelerometers on the slider. The distributions of energy release and time duration of avalanches during slip obey power laws. We apply a novel event recognition approach using wavelets to extract the avalanche properties. We compare statistics from the wavelet approach with those obtained by typical methods, to show how noise can change the distribution of events. We analyze the power spectrum of various quantities to understand the effect of the loading speed and of the spring stiffness on the statistical behavior of the system. Finally, from a more local point of view and by using a high speed camera and the photoelastic properties of our particles, we characterize the internal granular structure during avalanches. This work is supported by NSF Grant DMR1206351 and NASA Grant NNX10AU01G.

  3. Lizard locomotion in heterogeneous granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiebel, Perrin; Goldman, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Locomotion strategies in heterogeneous granular environments (common substrates in deserts), are relatively unexplored. The zebra-tailed lizard (C. draconoides) is a useful model organism for such studies owing to its exceptional ability to navigate a variety of desert habitats at impressive speed (up to 50 body-lengths per second) using both quadrapedal and bidepal gaits. In laboratory experiments, we challenge the lizards to run across a field of boulders (2.54 cm diameter glass spheres or 3.8 cm 3D printed spheres) placed in a lattice pattern and embedded in a loosely packed granular medium of 0.3 mm diameter glass particles. Locomotion kinematics of the lizard are recorded using high speed cameras, with and without the scatterers. The data reveals that unlike the lizard's typical quadrupedal locomotion using a diagonal gait, when scatterers are present the lizard is most successful when using a bipedal gait, with a raised center of mass (CoM). We propose that the kinematics of bipedal running in conjunction with the lizard's long toes and compliant hind foot are the keys to this lizard's successful locomotion in the presence of such obstacles. NSF PoLS

  4. Collisional model for granular impact dynamics.

    PubMed

    Clark, Abram H; Petersen, Alec J; Behringer, Robert P

    2014-01-01

    When an intruder strikes a granular material from above, the grains exert a stopping force which decelerates and stops the intruder. Many previous studies have used a macroscopic force law, including a drag force which is quadratic in velocity, to characterize the decelerating force on the intruder. However, the microscopic origins of the force-law terms are still a subject of debate. Here, drawing from previous experiments with photoelastic particles, we present a model which describes the velocity-squared force in terms of repeated collisions with clusters of grains. From our high speed photoelastic data, we infer that "clusters" correspond to segments of the strong force network that are excited by the advancing intruder. The model predicts a scaling relation for the velocity-squared drag force that accounts for the intruder shape. Additionally, we show that the collisional model predicts an instability to rotations, which depends on the intruder shape. To test this model, we perform a comprehensive experimental study of the dynamics of two-dimensional granular impacts on beds of photoelastic disks, with different profiles for the leading edge of the intruder. We particularly focus on a simple and useful case for testing shape effects by using triangular-nosed intruders. We show that the collisional model effectively captures the dynamics of intruder deceleration and rotation; i.e., these two dynamical effects can be described as two different manifestations of the same grain-scale physical processes. PMID:24580216

  5. Interpreting concept learning in cognitive informatics and granular computing.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yiyu

    2009-08-01

    Cognitive informatics and granular computing are two emerging fields of study concerning information and knowledge processing. A central notion to this processing is information and knowledge granularity. Concepts, as the basic units of thought underlying human intelligence and communication, may play a fundamental role when integrating the results from the two fields in terms of information and knowledge coding, representation, communication, and processing. While cognitive informatics focuses on information processing in the abstract, in machines, and in the brain, granular computing models such processing at multiple levels of granularity. In this paper, we examine a conceptual framework for concept learning from the viewpoints of cognitive informatics and granular computing. Within the framework, we interpret concept learning based on a layered model of knowledge discovery. PMID:19342352

  6. Numerical study of perfect wetting in quenched QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brower, R. ); Huang, S. ); Potvin, J. Department of Science and Mathematics, Parks College of Saint Louis University, Cahokia, Illinois 62206 ); Rebbi, C.; Ross, J. )

    1992-11-15

    In the quenched approximation of QCD, the high-temperature phase (or gluon plasma phase) will be found in one of three degenerate vacua characterized by the average value of the Polyakov loop. Such vacua can coexist separated by a sharp interface. As {ital T}{r arrow}{ital T}{sub {ital c}}{sup +} (the confinement temperature) confined or glueball matter may be able to grow as a layer along this interface. QCD is said to obey {ital perfect} {ital wetting} if these layers are planar, or {ital imperfect} {ital wetting} if they are shaped like lenses. Evidence for perfect wetting in quenched QCD is studied from a calculation of the surface tension {alpha}{sub {ital p},}{ital p}/{ital T}{sup 3} between two high-temperature plasma phases at {ital T}{sub {ital c}} on a 16{sup 2}{times}32{times}4 lattice. By comparison with the value of the surface tension of a hadron-plasma interface, the data suggest that planar slabs or at least very long lenses develop along the interface, implying that QCD obeys perfect wetting.

  7. Alkali burns from wet cement.

    PubMed Central

    Peters, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    When water is added to the dry materials of Portland cement calcium hydroxide is formed; the wet cement is caustic (with a pH as high as 12.9) and can produce third-degree alkali burns after 2 hours of contact. Unlike professional cement workers, amateurs are usually not aware of any danger and may stand or kneel in the cement for long periods. As illustrated in a case report, general physicians may recognize neither the seriousness of the injury in its early stages nor the significance of a history of prolonged contact with wet cement. All people working with cement should be warned about its dangers and advised to immediately wash and dry the skin if contact does occur. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6561052

  8. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Laboratory Units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows four Wet Chemistry Laboratory units, part of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument on board NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. This image was taken before Phoenix's launch on August 4, 2007.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  9. Competitive Wetting in Active Brazes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chandross, Michael Evan

    2014-05-01

    We found that the wetting and spreading of molten filler materials (pure Al, pure Ag, and AgAl alloys) on a Kovar ™ (001) substrate was studied with molecular dynamics simulations. A suite of different simulations was used to understand the effects on spreading rates due to alloying as well as reactions with the substrate. Moreover, the important conclusion is that the presence of Al in the alloy enhances the spreading of Ag, while the Ag inhibits the spreading of Al.

  10. Competitive Wetting in Active Brazes

    SciTech Connect

    Chandross, Michael Evan

    2014-05-01

    We found that the wetting and spreading of molten filler materials (pure Al, pure Ag, and AgAl alloys) on a Kovar (001) substrate was studied with molecular dynamics simulations. A suite of different simulations was used to understand the effects on spreading rates due to alloying as well as reactions with the substrate. Moreover, the important conclusion is that the presence of Al in the alloy enhances the spreading of Ag, while the Ag inhibits the spreading of Al.

  11. Inhaled antibiotics: dry or wet?

    PubMed

    Tiddens, Harm A W M; Bos, Aukje C; Mouton, Johan W; Devadason, Sunalene; Janssens, Hettie M

    2014-11-01

    Dry powder inhalers (DPIs) delivering antibiotics for the suppressive treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients were developed recently and are now increasingly replacing time-consuming nebuliser therapy. Noninferiority studies have shown that the efficacy of inhaled tobramycin delivered by DPI was similar to that of wet nebulisation. However, there are many differences between inhaled antibiotic therapy delivered by DPI and by nebuliser. The question is whether and to what extent inhalation technique and other patient-related factors affect the efficacy of antibiotics delivered by DPI compared with nebulisers. Health professionals should be aware of the differences between dry and wet aerosols, and of patient-related factors that can influence efficacy, in order to personalise treatment, to give appropriate instructions to patients and to better understand the response to the treatment after switching. In this review, key issues of aerosol therapy are discussed in relation to inhaled antibiotic therapy with the aim of optimising the use of both nebulised and DPI antibiotics by patients. An example of these issues is the relationship between airway generation, structural lung changes and local concentrations of the inhaled antibiotics. The pros and cons of dry and wet modes of delivery for inhaled antibiotics are discussed. PMID:25323242

  12. Wetting hysteresis induced by nanodefects.

    PubMed

    Giacomello, Alberto; Schimmele, Lothar; Dietrich, Siegfried

    2016-01-19

    Wetting of actual surfaces involves diverse hysteretic phenomena stemming from ever-present imperfections. Here, we clarify the origin of wetting hysteresis for a liquid front advancing or receding across an isolated defect of nanometric size. Various kinds of chemical and topographical nanodefects, which represent salient features of actual heterogeneous surfaces, are investigated. The most probable wetting path across surface heterogeneities is identified by combining, within an innovative approach, microscopic classical density functional theory and the string method devised for the study of rare events. The computed rugged free-energy landscape demonstrates that hysteresis emerges as a consequence of metastable pinning of the liquid front at the defects; the barriers for thermally activated defect crossing, the pinning force, and hysteresis are quantified and related to the geometry and chemistry of the defects allowing for the occurrence of nanoscopic effects. The main result of our calculations is that even weak nanoscale defects, which are difficult to characterize in generic microfluidic experiments, can be the source of a plethora of hysteretical phenomena, including the pinning of nanobubbles. PMID:26721395

  13. Wetting hysteresis induced by nanodefects

    PubMed Central

    Giacomello, Alberto; Schimmele, Lothar; Dietrich, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    Wetting of actual surfaces involves diverse hysteretic phenomena stemming from ever-present imperfections. Here, we clarify the origin of wetting hysteresis for a liquid front advancing or receding across an isolated defect of nanometric size. Various kinds of chemical and topographical nanodefects, which represent salient features of actual heterogeneous surfaces, are investigated. The most probable wetting path across surface heterogeneities is identified by combining, within an innovative approach, microscopic classical density functional theory and the string method devised for the study of rare events. The computed rugged free-energy landscape demonstrates that hysteresis emerges as a consequence of metastable pinning of the liquid front at the defects; the barriers for thermally activated defect crossing, the pinning force, and hysteresis are quantified and related to the geometry and chemistry of the defects allowing for the occurrence of nanoscopic effects. The main result of our calculations is that even weak nanoscale defects, which are difficult to characterize in generic microfluidic experiments, can be the source of a plethora of hysteretical phenomena, including the pinning of nanobubbles. PMID:26721395

  14. Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einasto, Jaan

    2013-12-01

    I review the development of the concept of dark matter. The dark matter story passed through several stages, from a minor observational puzzle to a major challenge for theory of elementary particles. Modern data suggest that dark matter is the dominant matter component in the Universe and that it consists of some unknown non-baryonic particles. Dark matter is the dominant matter component in the Universe; therefore, properties of dark matter particles determine the structure of the cosmic web.

  15. Explosively driven fragmentation of granular materials.

    PubMed

    Xue, Kun; Li, Fangfang; Bai, Chunhua

    2013-08-01

    This paper investigates the explosively driven dynamics of dry and wet sand. Contrary to popular belief, wet sand under high strain rate loadings (10(4)s(-1)) is observed to have reduced resistance against flow compared to the dry sand, which is supported by a noticeably enhanced expansion before the breakup followed by an increased number of fragments. Even a small amount of interstitial oil (3.2 wt.%) suffices to substantially reduce the size of fragments whose average mass only amounts to 60% of the mass of the dry sand fragments. To predict the instability onset of the expanding sand shell, a kinetic instability model is proposed based on an instability criterion involving the opposing forces of stabilizing inertial pressures and destabilizing viscous resistance. The interstitial oil leads to a smaller viscous resistance of wet sand by the lubrication effect as well as lessening the degree of shock compaction. The dominance of viscous resistance thus commences later for the wet sand shell until a smaller thickness allows the inertial forces to be overtaken. Moreover, multi-shear localizations rather than interface instability are identified as the dominant mechanism for the instability onset of the expanding sand shells. PMID:23989757

  16. Comparison of two online flocculation monitoring techniques for predicting turbidity removal by granular media filtration.

    PubMed

    Ball, T; Carrière, A; Barbeau, B

    2011-07-01

    Particulate matter removal in drinking water treatment via direct granular filtration requires specific flocculation conditions (a process typically termed 'high energy flocculation'). Predicting filtered water turbidity based on flocculated water characteristics remains difficult. This study has sought to establish a relationship between filtered water turbidity and the flocculated water characteristics. Flocculation oflow-turbidity raw water was evaluated online using a Photometric Dispersion Analyser (PDA) and a Dynamic Particle Analyser in a modified jar test followed by a bench-scale anthracite filter. Coagulants used were alum, PASS100 and ferric sulphate, in addition to a polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (polyDADMAC) cationic polymer. They were dosed in warm and cold waters, and flocculated with intensities (G) from 0 to 100 s(-1). Of the two instruments selected to analyse flocculation performance, the Dynamic Particle Analyser was shown to be the most sensitive, detecting small changes in floc growth kinetics and even floc growth under low flocculation conditions which remained undetected by the PDA. Floc size was shown to be insufficient in predicting particulate matter removal by direct granular filtration as measured by turbidity, although a threshold d(v) value (50 microm) could be identified for the test conditions evaluated in this project, above which turbidity was systematically lower than 0.2 NTU. PMID:21882562

  17. Non-local rheology in dense granular flows: Revisiting the concept of fluidity.

    PubMed

    Bouzid, Mehdi; Izzet, Adrien; Trulsson, Martin; Clément, Eric; Claudin, Philippe; Andreotti, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss the concepts of non-local rheology and fluidity, recently introduced to describe dense granular flows. We review and compare various approaches based on different constitutive relations and choices for the fluidity parameter, focusing on the kinetic elasto-plastic model introduced by Bocquet et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett 103, 036001 (2009)) for soft matter, and adapted for granular matter by Kamrin et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 178301 (2012)), and the gradient expansion of the local rheology μ(I) that we have proposed (Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 238301 (2013)). We emphasise that, to discriminate between these approaches, one has to go beyond the predictions derived from linearisation around a uniform stress profile, such as that obtained in a simple shear cell. We argue that future tests can be based on the nature of the chosen fluidity parameter, and the related boundary conditions, as well as the hypothesis made to derive the models and the dynamical mechanisms underlying their dynamics. PMID:26614496

  18. Treatment of high loaded swine slurry in an aerobic granular reactor.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, M; Val del Río, A; Campos, J L; Mosquera-Corral, A; Méndez, R

    2011-01-01

    Aerobic granular sludge grown in a sequential batch reactor was proposed as an alternative to anaerobic processes for organic matter and nitrogen removal from swine slurry. Aerobic granulation was achieved with this wastewater after few days from start-up. On day 140 of operation, the granular properties were: 5 mm of average diameter, SVI of 32 mL (g VSS)(-1) and density around 55 g VSS (L(granule))(-1). Organic matter removal efficiencies up to 87% and nitrogen removal efficiencies up to 70% were achieved during the treatment of organic and nitrogen loading rates (OLR and NLR) of 4.4 kg COD m(-3) d(-1) and of 0.83 kg N m(-3) d(-1), respectively. However, nitrogen removal processes were negatively affected when applied OLR was 7.0 kg COD m(-3) d(-1) and NLR was 1.26 kg N m(-3) d(-1). The operational cycle of the reactor was modified by reducing the volumetric exchange ratio from 50 to 6% in order to be able to treat the raw slurry without dilution. PMID:21902017

  19. 49 CFR 173.159 - Batteries, wet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Batteries, wet. 173.159 Section 173.159... Batteries, wet. (a) Electric storage batteries, containing electrolyte acid or alkaline corrosive battery fluid (wet batteries), may not be packed with other materials except as provided in paragraphs (g)...

  20. Adhesion and wetting: Similarities and differences

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, M.E.R. )

    1991-10-01

    This article examines what is understood about adhesion and wetting both from the historical and scientific perspectives. Topics covered include mechanical adhesion, specific adhesion, chemical adhesion, adhesion by diffusion, the adsorption or wetting theory, bulk adhesion, the rheological theory, hysteresis effects in rubber adhesion, and hysteresis of wetting.

  1. 49 CFR 173.159 - Batteries, wet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Batteries, wet. 173.159 Section 173.159... Batteries, wet. (a) Electric storage batteries, containing electrolyte acid or alkaline corrosive battery fluid (wet batteries), may not be packed with other materials except as provided in paragraphs (g)...

  2. The critical wetting saga: how to draw the correct conclusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, A. O.; Rascón, C.; Bernardino, N. R.; Romero-Enrique, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    A long-standing problem in condensed matter physics concerns the nature of the critical wetting phase transition in the Ising model or, more generally, in 3D systems with short-ranged forces. This is of fundamental interest because 3D corresponds to the upper critical dimension of the transition and it is not clear a priori whether the behaviour of the system will be mean-field-like or fluctuation-dominated. Renormalization group studies of the standard coarse-grained effective interfacial Hamiltonian model famously predict strong non-universal critical exponents which depend on the value of the so-called wetting parameter ω. However, these predictions are at odds with extensive Monte Carlo simulations of wetting in the Ising model, due to Binder, Landau and coworkers, which appear to be more mean-field-like. Further amendments to the interfacial Hamiltonian, which included the presence of a position-dependent stiffness, worsened the problem by paradoxically predicting fluctuation-induced first-order wetting behaviour. Here we show from re-analysis of a microscopic Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson model of 3D short-ranged wetting that correlation functions are characterized by two diverging parallel length scales, not one, as previously thought. This has a simple diagrammatic explanation using a non-local interfacial Hamiltonian and yields a thermodynamically consistent theory of wetting in keeping with exact sum rules. The non-local model crucially contains long-ranged two-body interfacial interactions, characterized by the new length scale, which were missing in earlier treatments. For critical wetting the second length cuts off the spectrum of interfacial fluctuations determining the repulsion from the wall. We show how this corrects previous renormalization group predictions for fluctuation effects, based on local interfacial Hamiltonians. In particular, lowering the cut-off leads to a substantial reduction in the effective value of the wetting parameter controlling the non-universality and also prevents the transition being driven first-order. Quantitative comparison with the Ising model simulation studies is also made.

  3. Electrostatics of Granular Material (EGM): Space Station Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J.; Sauke, T.; Farrell, W.

    2000-01-01

    Aggregates were observed to form very suddenly in a lab-contained dust cloud, transforming (within seconds) an opaque monodispersed cloud into a clear volume containing rapidly-settling, long hair-like aggregates. The implications of such a "phase change" led to a series of experiments progressing from the lab, to KC-135, followed by micro-g flights on USML-1 and USML-2, and now EGM slated for Space Station. We attribute the sudden "collapse" of a cloud to the effect of dipoles. This has significant ramifications for all types of cloud systems, and additionally implicates dipoles in the processes of cohesion and adhesion of granular matter. Notably, there is the inference that like-charged grains need not necessarily repel if they are close enough together: attraction or repulsion depends on intergranular distance (the dipole being more powerful at short range), and the D/M ratio for each grain, where D is the dipole moment and M is the net charge. We discovered that these ideas about dipoles, the likely pervasiveness of them in granular material, the significance of the D/M ratio, and the idea of mixed charges on individual grains resulting from tribological processes --are not universally recognized in electrostatics, granular material studies, and aerosol science, despite some early seminal work in the literature, and despite commercial applications of dipoles in such modern uses as "Krazy Glue", housecleaning dust cloths, and photocopying. The overarching goal of EGM is to empirically prove that (triboelectrically) charged dielectric grains of material have dipole moments that provide an "always attractive" intergranular force as a result of both positive and negative charges residing on the surfaces of individual grains. Microgravity is required for this experiment because sand grains can be suspended as a cloud for protracted periods, the grains are free to rotate to express their electrostatic character, and Coulombic forces are unmasked. Suspended grains will be "interrogated" by applied electrical fields. In one module, grains will be immersed in an inhomogeneous electric field and allowed to be attracted towards or repelled from the central electrode of the module: part of the grain's speed will be a function of its net charge (monopole), part will be a function of the dipole. Observed grain position vs. time will provide a curve that can be deconvolved into the dipole and monopole forces responsible, since both have distinctive radial dependencies. In a second approach, the inhomogeneous field will be alternated at low frequency (e.g., every 5-10 seconds) so that the grains are alternately attracted and repelled from the center of the field. The resulting "zigzag" grain motion will gradually drift inwards, then suddenly change to a unidirectional inward path when a critical radial distance is encountered (a sort of "Coulombic event horizon") at which the dipole strength supersedes the monopole strength --thus proving the presence of a dipole, while also quantifying the D/M ratio. In a second module, an homogeneous electric field eliminates dipole effects (both Coulombic and induced) to provide calibration of the monopole and to more readily evaluate net charge statistical variance. In both modules, the e-fields will be exponentially step-ramped in voltage during the experiment, so that the field "nominalizes" grain speed while spreading the response time --effectively forcing each grain to "wait its turn" to be measured. In addition to rigorously quantifying M, D, and the D/M ratio for many hundreds of grains, the experiment will also observe gross electrometric and RF discharge phenomena associated with grain activity. The parameter space will encompass grain charging levels (via intentional triboelectrification), grain size, cloud density, and material type. Results will prove or disprove the dipole hypothesis. In either case, light will be shed on the role of electrostatic forces in governing granular systems. Knowledge so gained can be applied to natural clouds such as protostellar and protoplanetary dust and debris systems, planetary rings, planetary dust palls and aerosols created by volcanic, impact, aeolian, firestorm, or nuclear winter processes. The data are also directly applicable to adhesion, cohesion, transport, dispersion, and collection of granular materials in industrial, agricultural, pharmaceutical applications, and in fields as diverse as dust contamination of space suits on Mars and crop spraying on Earth.

  4. Birth and growth of a granular jet.

    PubMed

    Royer, John R; Corwin, Eric I; Conyers, Bryan; Flior, Andrew; Rivers, Mark L; Eng, Peter J; Jaeger, Heinrich M

    2008-07-01

    The interaction between fine grains and the surrounding interstitial gas in a granular bed can lead to qualitatively new phenomena not captured in a simple, single-fluid model of granular flows. This is demonstrated by the granular jet formed by the impact of a solid sphere into a bed of loose, fine sand. Unlike jets formed by impact in fluids, this jet is actually composed of two separate components, an initial thin jet formed by the collapse of the cavity left by the impacting object stacked on top of a second, thicker jet which depends strongly on the ambient gas pressure. This complex structure is the result of an interplay between ambient gas, bed particles, and impacting sphere. Here we present the results of systematic experiments that combine measurements of the jet above the surface varying the release height, sphere diameter, container size, and bed material with x-ray radiography below the surface to connect the changing response of the bed to the changing structure of the jet. We find that the interstitial gas trapped by the low permeability of a fine-grained bed plays two distinct roles in the formation of the jet. First, gas trapped and compressed between grains prevents compaction, causing the bed to flow like an incompressible fluid and allowing the impacting object to sink deep into the bed. Second, the jet is initiated by the gravity driven collapse of the cavity left by the impacting object. If the cavity is large enough, gas trapped and compressed by the collapsing cavity can amplify the jet by directly pushing bed material upwards and creating the thick jet. As a consequence of these two factors, when the ambient gas pressure is decreased, there is a crossover from a nearly incompressible, fluidlike response of the bed to a highly compressible, dissipative response. Compaction of the bed at reduced pressure reduces the final depth of the impacting object, resulting in a smaller cavity and in the demise of the thick jet. PMID:18763946

  5. Evolution of permeability in heterogeneous granular aggregates during chemical compaction: Granular mechanics models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Baisheng; Elsworth, Derek

    2012-03-01

    We develop a granular mechanics model to represent the process of chemical compaction within granular media. This model represents the serial processes of stress-enhanced dissolution, mass diffusion along the fluid film separating grain boundaries, and then mass ejection into the pore space, where it may then be either reprecipitated onto the pore wall or removed by fluid advection in an open system. This process is controlled by the evolution of intergranular effective stress and mass concentrations in the fluid either in the water film or the pore space. The evolution of intergranular stress is followed by a granular mechanics model that rigorously couples the magnitude of the grain-grain contact stress to determine the time history of stress-driven dissolution. Pore fluid concentration provides a feedback to intergranular dissolution, halting intergranular compaction as fluid concentrations approach aqueous saturation. Importantly, chemical feedbacks onto the mechanical system and mechanical feedbacks on the chemical system are rigorously accommodated. Compaction is halted either by the amelioration of the driving stress (through the growth of the contact area) or by the saturation of the fluid in the pore space. This model is used to explore the influence of heterogeneous assemblages of particles on the rate and ultimate magnitude of compaction and the resulting evolution of permeability. Specifically, we explore the influence of heterogeneity in granular packs by using heterogeneous distributions of particles (linear, Gaussian, or bimodal). Results indicate that porosity and permeability decrease with compaction. Small particles dominate this dissolution-mediated process and accelerate compaction; this is true both for homogeneous distributions of small particles and for coarser aggregates containing a fraction of smaller particles. Overall, compaction is also greater for finer aggregates resulting from the larger deformation required, reaching the critical stress that will halt compaction. This feature is due to the necessary redistribution of intergranular stresses that are shed from point contacts in active chemical dissolution onto those not deforming.

  6. Does macroscopic flow geometry influence wetting dynamic?

    PubMed

    Min, Qi; Duan, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Liang, Zhan-Peng; Si, Chao

    2011-10-01

    The macroscopic flow geometry has long been assumed to have little impact on dynamic wetting behavior of liquids on solid surfaces. This study experimentally studied both spontaneous spreading and forced wetting of several kinds of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids to study the effect of the macroscopic flow geometry on dynamic wetting. The relationship between the dynamic contact angle, θ(D), and the velocity of the moving contact line, U, indicates that the macroscopic flow geometry does not influence the advancing dynamic wetting behavior of Newtonian fluids, but does influence the advancing dynamic wetting behavior of non-Newtonian fluids, which had not been discovered before. PMID:21745667

  7. Dispersive behavior and acoustic scaling in granular rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlos, Santos; Vanessa, Urdaneta; Ernesto, Medina; Xavier, García

    2013-06-01

    Handling and making decisions based on data taken at different scales is a critical issue in the design of exploration and production tasks in the oil industry. Acoustic data is the classical example of the integration of dissimilar scales (i.e. seismic, well logs, lab data) where there is a scale dependent velocity. An understanding of the acoustic dispersion phenomenon in granular samples is needed. A detailed numerical work was conducted in order to establish the relationship between frequency and propagation speed for an acoustical pulse induced in simulated granular materials. The granular samples were generated with different grain size distributions while porosity and pressure were targeted and kept invariant using the grain radii expansion method. A sinusoidal burst with frequencies from 10Hz to 1MHz was applied and the corresponding acoustical speeds were estimated for each frequency. A coherent sigmoid dispersion relationship was obtained for each granular sample. The asymptotic boundaries for the dispersion function reflect the limiting cases for the wavelength/heterogeneity ratio in the granular pack. The lower speed asymptote was explained as the mean field value while upper speed asymptote can be understood based on a ray theory approximation scaled by a parameter we defined as the "acoustic tortuosity factor". This factor reflects the intricate acoustical path due to the texture of the stress network developed in the granular samples and can be used together with the sigmoid dispersive relationship to describe and clarify the scale discrepancy between different source acoustic data in granular materials.

  8. Continuum modeling of diffusion and dispersion in dense granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christov, Ivan C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-11-01

    Continuum modeling of granular flows remains a challenge of modern statistical physics. Granular materials do not perform Brownian motion, yet diffusion and shear dispersion can be observed in such systems when agitation causes inelastic collisions between particles. In a number of canonical flow regimes (e.g., in a rotating container or down an incline), granular materials can behave like fluids. We formulate and solve the granular counterparts to two basic fluid mechanics problems: diffusion of a pulse and shear dispersion of a pulse for dense granular materials in rapid flow. We provide a theory to account for the concentration-dependent diffusivity of bidisperse granular mixtures, and we give an asymptotic argument for the self-similar behavior of such a diffusion process for which an exact self-similar analytical solution does not exist. For shear dispersion, we show that the effective dispersivity of the depth-averaged concentration of the dispersing powder varies as the Péclet number squared, as in classical Taylor-Aris dispersion of molecular solutes. The calculation is extended to generic shear profiles, showing a significant enhancement for convex profiles due to the shear-rate dependence of the diffusivity of granular materials. ICC was supported by NSF Grant DMS-1104047 and the U.S. DOE through the LANL/LDRD Program; HAS was supported by NSF Grant CBET-1234500.

  9. Enhanced selection of micro-aerobic pentachlorophenol degrading granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yuancai; Chen, Yuancai; Song, Wenzhe; Hu, Yongyou

    2014-09-15

    Column-type combined reactors were designed to cultivate micro-aerobic pentachlorophenol (PCP) degrading granular sludge under oxygen-limited conditions (0.1-0.2 mgL(-1)) over 39-day experimental period. Micro-aerobic granular had both anaerobic activity (SMA: 2.34 mMCH4/hg VSS) and aerobic activity (SOUR: 2.21 mMO2/hg VSS). Metabolite analysis results revealed that PCP was sequentially dechlorinated to TCP, DCP, and eventually to MCP. Methanogens were not directly involved in the dechlorination of PCP, but might played a vital role in stabilizing the overall structure of the granule sludge. For Eubacteria, the Shannon Index (2.09 in inoculated granular sludge) increased both in micro-aerobic granular sludge (2.61) and PCP-degradation granular sludge (2.55). However, for Archaea, it decreased from 2.53 to 1.85 and 1.84, respectively. Although the Shannon Index demonstrated slight difference between micro-aerobic granular sludge and PCP-degradation granular sludge, the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) indicated obvious variance of the microbial composition, revealing significant effect of micro-aerobic condition and PCP on microbial community. Furthermore, nucleotide sequencing indicated that the main microorganisms for PCP degradation might be related to Actinobacterium and Sphingomonas. These results provided insights into situ bioremediation of environments contaminated by PCP and had practical implications for the strategies of PCP degradation. PMID:25151236

  10. Scaled experiments to determine the role of density on granular flows behavior: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Sedano, L. A.; Sarocchi, D.; Borselli, L.; Segura, O.

    2013-12-01

    Geological granular flows are very complex, gravity driven phenomena which can show different behaviors depending on its origin and the characteristics of the constituent material. Due to their dangerous nature, and multiple scientific and technological applications, these phenomena has being studied deeply in order to have a better comprehension, however, after more than one century of scientific research it remains as an open topic with more questions than answers. One of the aspects that still need exhaustive research is the effect of clast density on the flowing granular material, as pointed out by previous laboratory and field studies. There are anyway few studies which have tried to explain the role of bulk density, as well the density of different phases, as it increasing or decreasing on the kinematic and the rheological characteristics of geological granular flows. The content of low density juvenile material seems to condition the processes of transformations of debris flows to more diluted phases, as well the transport and emplacing mechanisms. It is well known that the content of clay in debris flows has great influence on its behavior, physical processes and the deposits characteristics for this reason lahars has being subdivided in base of this parameter. Our hypothesis is that, in like manner, the presence of low density material inside the granular flows (dry and wet) could conditioning its physical characteristics and its behavior. In order to put this to the test, we made some laboratory experiments using a five meter long and 0.3 m wide experimental flume equipped with a wide range of sensors and laser barriers to precisely measure the rheological properties and kinematic of the sliding avalanches. A special effort was devoted to determine a threshold or critical level in the amount of low density material at which the avalanche behavior suffer appreciable changes. The obtained preliminary results confirm our hypothesis and encouraged to perform further experiments. Such studies are important because they could provide useful information for developing analog models that take into account this important physical property.

  11. Emotional Granularity and Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Suvak, Michael K.; Litz, Brett T.; Sloan, Denise M.; Zanarini, Mary C.; Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Hofmann, Stefan G.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the affective dysregulation component of borderline personality disorder (BPD) from an emotional granularity perspective, which refers to the specificity in which one represents emotions. Forty-six female participants meeting criteria for BPD and 51 female control participants without BPD and Axis I pathology completed tasks that assessed the degree to which participants incorporated information about valence (pleasant–unpleasant) and arousal (calm–activated) in their semantic/conceptual representations of emotions and in using labels to represent emotional reactions. As hypothesized, participants with BPD emphasized valence more and arousal less than control participants did when using emotion terms to label their emotional reactions. Implications and future research directions are discussed. PMID:21171723

  12. Granular acoustic switches and logic elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Anzel, Paul; Yang, Jinkyu; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G.; Daraio, Chiara

    2014-10-01

    Electrical flow control devices are fundamental components in electrical appliances and computers; similarly, optical switches are essential in a number of communication, computation and quantum information-processing applications. An acoustic counterpart would use an acoustic (mechanical) signal to control the mechanical energy flow through a solid material. Although earlier research has demonstrated acoustic diodes or circulators, no acoustic switches with wide operational frequency ranges and controllability have been realized. Here we propose and demonstrate an acoustic switch based on a driven chain of spherical particles with a nonlinear contact force. We experimentally and numerically verify that this switching mechanism stems from a combination of nonlinearity and bandgap effects. We also realize the OR and AND acoustic logic elements by exploiting the nonlinear dynamical effects of the granular chain. We anticipate these results to enable the creation of novel acoustic devices for the control of mechanical energy flow in high-performance ultrasonic devices.

  13. High-Speed Granular Chute Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElwaine, J.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate models for high speed granular flows are critical for understanding long runout landslides and rockfalls. However reproducible experimental data is extremely limited and is mostly only available for steady state flows on moderate inclinations. We report on experiments over a much greater range of slope angles 30-50 degrees and flow depths 4-130 particle diameters with upto 20kg/s of sand flowing steadily. The data suggests that friction can be much larger than the μ(I)mu(I) rheology or kinetic theories predict and suggest and that there may be constant velocity states above the angle of vanishing hstop. We show similar high speed steady flows at angles up to 50 degress in Discrete Element Simuations and discuss how these can be understood theoretically.

  14. Contact breaking in frictionless granular packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qikai; Bertrand, Thibault; O'Hern, Corey; Shattuck, Mark

    We numerically study the breaking of interparticle contact networks in static granular packings of frictionless bidisperse disks that are subjected to vibrations. The packings are created using an isotropic compression protocol at different values of the total potential energy per particle Ep. We first add displacements along a single vibrational mode i of the dynamical matrix to a given packing and calculate the minimum amplitude Ai of the perturbation at which the first interparticle contact breaks. We then identify the minimum amplitude Amin over all perturbations along each mode and study the distribution of Amin from an ensemble of packings at each Ep. We then study two-, three-, and multi-mode excitations and determine the dependence of Amin on the number of modes that are included in the perturbation. W. M. Keck Foundation Science and Engineering Grant.

  15. Similarities between protein folding and granular jamming

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Prasanth P; Andricioaei, Ioan

    2012-01-01

    Grains and glasses, widely different materials, arrest their motions upon decreasing temperature and external load, respectively, in common ways, leading to a universal jamming phase diagram conjecture. However, unified theories are lacking, mainly because of the disparate nature of the particle interactions. Here we demonstrate that folded proteins exhibit signatures common to both glassiness and jamming by using temperature- and force-unfolding molecular dynamics simulations. Upon folding, proteins develop a peak in the interatomic force distributions that falls on a universal curve with experimentally measured forces on jammed grains and droplets. Dynamical signatures are found as a dramatic slowdown of stress relaxation upon folding. Together with granular similarities, folding is tied not just to the jamming transition, but a more nuanced picture of anisotropy, preparation protocol and internal interactions emerges. Results have implications for designing stable polymers and can open avenues to link protein folding to jamming theory. PMID:23093180

  16. Rheology of U-Shaped Granular Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Matthew; Franklin, Scott

    We study the response of cylindrical samples of U-shaped granular particles (staples) to extensional loads. Samples elongate in discrete bursts (events) corresponding to particles rearranging and re-entangling. Previous research on samples of constant cross-sectional area found a Weibullian weakest-link theory could explain the distribution of yield points. We now vary the cross-sectional area, and find that the maximum yield pressure (force/area) is a function of particle number density and independent of area. The probability distribution function of important event characteristics -- the stress increase before an event and stress released during an event -- both fall of inversely with magnitude, reminiscent of avalanche dynamics. Fourier transforms of the fluctuating force (or stress) scales inversely with frequency, suggesting dry friction plays a role in the rearrangements. Finally, there is some evidence that dynamics are sensitive to the stiffness of the tensile testing machine, although an explanation for this behavior is unknown.

  17. Hyperstaticity and loops in frictional granular packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tordesillas, Antoinette; Lam, Edward; Metzger, Philip T.

    2009-06-01

    The hyperstatic nature of granular packings of perfectly rigid disks is analyzed algebraically and through numerical simulation. The elementary loops of grains emerge as a fundamental element in addressing hyperstaticity. Loops consisting of an odd number of grains behave differently than those with an even number. For odd loops, the latent stresses are exterior and are characterized by the sum of frictional forces around each loop. For even loops, the latent stresses are interior and are characterized by the alternating sum of frictional forces around each loop. The statistics of these two types of loop sums are found to be Gibbsian with a "temperature" that is linear with the friction coefficient μ when μ<1.

  18. Dense annular flows of granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ryck, Alain; Louisnard, Olivier

    2013-06-01

    Dense granular flows constitute an important topic for geophysics and process engineering. To describe them, a rheology based on the coaxiality between the stress and strain tensors with a Mohr-Coulomb yield criterion has been proposed. We propose here an analytic study of flows in an annular cell, with this rheology. This geometry is relevant for a series of powder rheometers or mixing devices, but the discussion is focused on the split-bottom geometry, for which the internal flow has been investigated by NMR technique. In this case, the full resolution of the velocity and stress fields allow to localize the shear deformations. The theoretical results obtained for the latter are compared with the torque measurements by Dijksman et al. [Phys. Rev. E, 82 (2010) 060301].

  19. Shear jamming for highly strained granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bares, Jonathan; Berhinger, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Bi et al. (Nature 2011) have shown that, if sheared, a granular material can jam even if its packing fraction (?) is lower than the critical isotropic jamming point ?J. They have introduced a new critical packing fraction value ?S such that for ?S < ?

  20. Nonlinear Force Propagation During Granular Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Abram H.; Petersen, Alec J.; Kondic, Lou; Behringer, Robert P.

    2015-04-01

    We experimentally study nonlinear force propagation into granular material during impact from an intruder, and we explain our observations in terms of the nonlinear grain-scale force relation. Using high-speed video and photoelastic particles, we determine the speed and spatial structure of the force response just after impact. We show that these quantities depend on a dimensionless parameter, M'=tcv0/d , where v0 is the intruder speed at impact, d is the particle diameter, and tc is the collision time for a pair of grains impacting at relative speed v0. The experiments access a large range of M' by using particles of three different materials. When M'≪1 , force propagation is chainlike with a speed, vf, satisfying vf∝d /tc. For larger M', the force response becomes spatially dense and the force propagation speed departs from vf∝d /tc, corresponding to collective stiffening of a strongly compressed packing of grains.

  1. Granular Segregation Driven by Particle Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, C.; Zuriguel, I.; Garcimartín, A.; Mullin, T.

    2015-05-01

    We report the results of an experimental study of particle-particle interactions in a horizontally shaken granular layer that undergoes a second order phase transition from a binary gas to a segregation liquid as the packing fraction C is increased. By focusing on the behavior of individual particles, the effect of C is studied on (1) the process of cluster formation, (2) cluster dynamics, and (3) cluster destruction. The outcomes indicate that the segregation is driven by two mechanisms: attraction between particles with the same properties and random motion with a characteristic length that is inversely proportional to C . All clusters investigated are found to be transient and the probability distribution functions of the separation times display a power law tail, indicating that the splitting probability decreases with time.

  2. Granular segregation driven by particle interactions.

    PubMed

    Lozano, C; Zuriguel, I; Garcimartín, A; Mullin, T

    2015-05-01

    We report the results of an experimental study of particle-particle interactions in a horizontally shaken granular layer that undergoes a second order phase transition from a binary gas to a segregation liquid as the packing fraction C is increased. By focusing on the behavior of individual particles, the effect of C is studied on (1) the process of cluster formation, (2) cluster dynamics, and (3) cluster destruction. The outcomes indicate that the segregation is driven by two mechanisms: attraction between particles with the same properties and random motion with a characteristic length that is inversely proportional to C. All clusters investigated are found to be transient and the probability distribution functions of the separation times display a power law tail, indicating that the splitting probability decreases with time. PMID:25978265

  3. Flexural fracturing of a cohesive granular layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Géminard, Jean-Christophe; Champougny, Lorène; Lidon, Pierre; Melo, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    We report on the fracturing of cohesive granular materials subjected to a flexural deformation. A thin layer of glass beads or of flour is deposited on an unstretchable membrane to which flexion is imposed. We observe the formation of a periodic fracturing pattern whose characteristics are discussed in comparison with results previously obtained for an in-plane stretching [Alarcon, Ramos, Vanel, Vittoz, Melo, and Géminard, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.105.208001 105, 208001 (2010)]. In particular, at a given relative humidity, the wavelength is observed to depend linearly on the layer thickness but to be independent of the grain size, although the smallest grains are clearly more cohesive.

  4. Dynamical approach to weakly dissipative granular collisions.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Italo'Ivo Lima Dias; Rosas, Alexandre; Lindenberg, Katja

    2015-07-01

    Granular systems present surprisingly complicated dynamics. In particular, nonlinear interactions and energy dissipation play important roles in these dynamics. Usually (but admittedly not always), constant coefficients of restitution are introduced phenomenologically to account for energy dissipation when grains collide. The collisions are assumed to be instantaneous and to conserve momentum. Here, we introduce the dissipation through a viscous (velocity-dependent) term in the equations of motion for two colliding grains. Using a first-order approximation, we solve the equations of motion in the low viscosity regime. This approach allows us to calculate the collision time, the final velocity of each grain, and a coefficient of restitution that depends on the relative velocity of the grains. We compare our analytic results with those obtained by numerical integration of the equations of motion and with exact ones obtained by other methods for some geometries. PMID:26274154

  5. Mesoscopic effects in macroscopic granular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, A.; Frydman, A.

    2008-02-01

    Granular metals (systems of discontinuous metallic thin films) characterized by large distributions of grain sizes and inter-grain coupling were prepared by quench condensation. These samples, which are 2 mm × 2 mm in size, exhibit a number of experimental findings characteristic of low dimensional samples including magnetoresistance oscillations, sample-to-sample fluctuations and resistance switches. Such 'mesoscopic' effects are observed in a variety of metals such as Ni, Pb and Au. The results indicate that the transport in these systems is governed by a very small number of grains even though the sample contains about 109 grains. We interpret the findings as indications that the large distribution of resistances in the percolation network of the conduction trajectories facilitates the situation in which a small number of grains dominate the transport of the macroscopic system.

  6. Frictional granular mechanics: A variational approach

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, R.; Silin, D.B.; Patzek, T.W.

    2009-10-16

    The mechanical properties of a cohesionless granular material are evaluated from grain-scale simulations. Intergranular interactions, including friction and sliding, are modeled by a set of contact rules based on the theories of Hertz, Mindlin, and Deresiewicz. A computer generated, three-dimensional, irregular pack of spherical grains is loaded by incremental displacement of its boundaries. Deformation is described by a sequence of static equilibrium configurations of the pack. A variational approach is employed to find the equilibrium configurations by minimizing the total work against the intergranular loads. Effective elastic moduli are evaluated from the intergranular forces and the deformation of the pack. Good agreement between the computed and measured moduli, achieved with no adjustment of material parameters, establishes the physical soundness of the proposed model.

  7. Stability of freely falling granular streams.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Stephan; Zippelius, Annette

    2012-10-19

    A freely falling stream of weakly cohesive granular particles is modeled and analyzed with the help of event driven simulations and continuum hydrodynamics. The former show a breakup of the stream into droplets, whose size is measured as a function of cohesive energy. Extensional flow is an exact solution of the one-dimensional Navier-Stokes equation, corresponding to a strain rate, decaying like t(-1) from its initial value, γ[over ˙](0). Expanding around this basic state, we show that the flow is stable for short times, γ[over ˙](0)t<1, whereas for long times, γ[over ˙](0)t>1, perturbations of all wavelengths grow. The growth rate of a given wavelength depends on the instant of time when the fluctuation occurs, so that the observable patterns can vary considerably. PMID:23215093

  8. Particle filtration in consolidated granular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Lawrence M.; Wilkinson, David J.; Bolsterli, Mark; Hammond, Paul

    1993-03-01

    Grain-packing algorithms are used to model the mechanical trapping of dilute suspensions of particles by consolidated granular media. We study the distribution of filtrate particles, the formation of a damage zone (internal filter cake), and the transport properties of the host-filter-cake composite. At the early stages of filtration, our simulations suggest simple relationships between the structure of the internal filter cake and the characteristics of the underlying host matrix. These relationships are then used to describe the dynamics of the filtration process. Depending on the grain size and porosity of the host matrix, calculated filtration rates may either be greater than (spurt loss) or less than (due to internal clogging) those predicted by standard surface-filtration models.

  9. Dynamical approach to weakly dissipative granular collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Italo'Ivo Lima Dias; Rosas, Alexandre; Lindenberg, Katja

    2015-07-01

    Granular systems present surprisingly complicated dynamics. In particular, nonlinear interactions and energy dissipation play important roles in these dynamics. Usually (but admittedly not always), constant coefficients of restitution are introduced phenomenologically to account for energy dissipation when grains collide. The collisions are assumed to be instantaneous and to conserve momentum. Here, we introduce the dissipation through a viscous (velocity-dependent) term in the equations of motion for two colliding grains. Using a first-order approximation, we solve the equations of motion in the low viscosity regime. This approach allows us to calculate the collision time, the final velocity of each grain, and a coefficient of restitution that depends on the relative velocity of the grains. We compare our analytic results with those obtained by numerical integration of the equations of motion and with exact ones obtained by other methods for some geometries.

  10. Statistical Law of Turbulence in Granular Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Masaharu

    2012-12-01

    A novel description of granular gases from the viewpoint of “fluid turbulence” is presented. In the large-scale simulation by event-driven molecular dynamics simulations, we obtained clear evidence for the energy and enstrophy (square of vorticity) cascade, in which we found -5/3 (3D) and -3 (2D) exponents predicted by the Kolmogorov and Kraichnan-Leith-Bachelor energy spectrum, respectively. The growth of the Reynolds number based on the Taylor microscale confirmed that the cascade regimes were that of fully developed turbulence. During the evolving process of the regime in fully developed turbulent inhomogeneous state, we discovered a new regime arose from the collision between “clusters”, in which the previous theoretical predictions of the energy decay in this regime collapse.

  11. Granular cell leiomyosarcoma of the skin

    SciTech Connect

    Suster, S.; Rosen, L.B.; Sanchez, J.L.

    1988-06-01

    A case is presented of a multifocal malignant neoplasm involving the skin of the upper back in a 10-year-old boy following radiation therapy to the head and neck for a cerebellar medulloblastoma. Histologically, the neoplastic cells were remarkable for the presence of abundant periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive diastase-resistant intracytoplasmic eosinophilic granules. Immunoperoxidase procedures revealed strong positive staining of the tumor cells with desmin, vimentin, and smooth muscle myosin antibodies, and negative staining for myoglobin, S-100 protein and keratin, thus supporting a smooth muscle line of differentiation for this neoplasm. Electronmicroscopy demonstrated numerous intracytoplasmic autophagic vacuoles that corresponded to the granules observed under the light microscope. Leiomyosarcoma should be entertained in the differential diagnosis of poorly differentiated cutaneous neoplasms histologically characterized by a proliferation of cells containing abundant granular eosinophilic cytoplasm.

  12. Penetration drag in loosely packed granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bless, Stephan; Omidvar, Mehdi; Iskander, Magued; New York University Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    The drag coefficient for penetration of granular materials by conical-nosed penetrators was computed by assuming the particles are non-interacting and rebound elastically off of the advancing penetrator. The solution was C =4 [sin(theta)]**2, where theta is the half angle of the cone. Experiments were conducted in which the drag coefficient was measured over the range 30 to 80 m/s for four types of sand: Ottawa silica sand, crushed quartz glass, coral sand, and aragonite sand. The sands were tested at relative densities of 40 and 80%. The drag coefficients for the low density materials were in excellent agreement with this simple model. The high density material had a drag considerably larger than predicted, presumably because of particle-to-particle interactions.

  13. Trapping and sorting active granular rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Sriram; Kumar, Nitin; Soni, Harsh; Gupta, Rahul; Sood, Ajay

    We report experiments and simulations on collective trapping in a horizontal monolayer of tapered granular rods rendered motile by mechanical vibration. A macroscopic fraction of the particles are trapped by a V-shaped obstacle if its opening angle is less than a threshold value of about 120 degrees, consistent with active Brownian simulations [PRL 108, 268307 (2012)]. the transition between trapped and untrapped states becomes sharper with increasing system size in our numerical studies. We offer a theoretical understanding of this nonequilibrium phase transition based on collective noise suppression and an analysis of fluxes. We show also that the trap can serve to separate particles based on their motility and rotational diffusivity. On leave from Dept of Physics, Indian Institute of Science.

  14. NMRI Measurements of Flow of Granular Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakagawa, Masami; Waggoner, R. Allen; Fukushima, Eiichi

    1996-01-01

    We investigate complex 3D behavior of granular mixtures in shaking and shearing devices. NMRI can non-invasively measure concentration, velocity, and velocity fluctuations of flows of suitable particles. We investigate origins of wall-shear induced convection flow of single component particles by measuring the flow and fluctuating motion of particles near rough boundaries. We also investigate if a mixture of different size particles segregate into their own species under the influence of external shaking and shearing disturbances. These non-invasive measurements will reveal true nature of convecting flow properties and wall disturbance. For experiments in a reduced gravity environment, we will design a light weight NMR imager. The proof of principle development will prepare for the construction of a complete spaceborne system to perform experiments in space.

  15. Granular acoustic switches and logic elements.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Anzel, Paul; Yang, Jinkyu; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G; Daraio, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Electrical flow control devices are fundamental components in electrical appliances and computers; similarly, optical switches are essential in a number of communication, computation and quantum information-processing applications. An acoustic counterpart would use an acoustic (mechanical) signal to control the mechanical energy flow through a solid material. Although earlier research has demonstrated acoustic diodes or circulators, no acoustic switches with wide operational frequency ranges and controllability have been realized. Here we propose and demonstrate an acoustic switch based on a driven chain of spherical particles with a nonlinear contact force. We experimentally and numerically verify that this switching mechanism stems from a combination of nonlinearity and bandgap effects. We also realize the OR and AND acoustic logic elements by exploiting the nonlinear dynamical effects of the granular chain. We anticipate these results to enable the creation of novel acoustic devices for the control of mechanical energy flow in high-performance ultrasonic devices. PMID:25354587

  16. EFFECT OF UV IRRADIATION ON ORGANIC MATTER EXTRACTED FROM TREATED OHIO RIVER WATER STUDIED THROUGH THE USE OF ELECTROSPRAY MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ohio River water was treated by settling, sand filtration, and granular activated carbon filtration. It was then irradiated by low pressure (monochromatic) and medium pressure (polychromatic) UV lamps to investigate the effects of UV irradiation of natural organic matter (NOM). ...

  17. Wet and dry African dust episodes over eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, M.; Castillo, S.; Querol, X.; Avila, A.; Alarcón, M.; Viana, M. M.; Alastuey, A.; Cuevas, E.; RodríGuez, S.

    2005-09-01

    The impact of the African dust on levels of atmospheric suspended particulate matter (SPM) and on wet deposition was evaluated in eastern Iberia for the period 1996-2002. An effort was made to compile both the SPM and wet episodes. To this end, the time series of levels of TSP and PM10 in Levantine air quality monitoring stations were evaluated and complemented with the computation of back trajectories, satellite images, and meteorological analysis. Wet deposition frequency was obtained from weekly collected precipitation data at a rural background station in which the African chemical signature was identified (mainly pH and Ca2+ concentrations). A number of African dust episodes (112) were identified (16 episodes per year). In 93 out of the 112 (13 episodes per year) the African dust influence caused high SPM levels. In 49 out of 112 (7 episodes per year), wet deposition was detected, and the chemistry was influenced by dust. There is a clear seasonal trend with higher frequency of dust outbreaks in May-August, with second modes in March and October. Wet events followed a different pattern, with a marked maximum in May. Except for one event, December was devoid of African air mass intrusions. On the basis of seasonal meteorological patterns affecting the Iberian Peninsula, an interpretation of the meteorological scenarios causing African dust transport over Iberia was carried out. Four scenarios were identified with a clear seasonal trend. The impact of the different dust outbreak scenarios on the levels of PM10 recorded at a rural site (Monagrega, Teruel, Spain) in the period 1996-2002 was also evaluated.

  18. Coal combustion by wet oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Bettinger, J.A.; Lamparter, R.A.; McDowell, D.C.

    1980-11-15

    The combustion of coal by wet oxidation was studied by the Center for Waste Management Programs, of Michigan Technological University. In wet oxidation a combustible material, such as coal, is reacted with oxygen in the presence of liquid water. The reaction is typically carried out in the range of 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 353/sup 0/C (650/sup 0/F) with sufficient pressure to maintain the water present in the liquid state, and provide the partial pressure of oxygen in the gas phase necessary to carry out the reaction. Experimental studies to explore the key reaction parameters of temperature, time, oxidant, catalyst, coal type, and mesh size were conducted by running batch tests in a one-gallon stirred autoclave. The factors exhibiting the greatest effect on the extent of reaction were temperature and residence time. The effect of temperature was studied from 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) with a residence time from 600 to 3600 seconds. From this data, the reaction activation energy of 2.7 x 10/sup 4/ calories per mole was determined for a high-volatile-A-Bituminous type coal. The reaction rate constant may be determined at any temperature from the activation energy using the Arrhenius equation. Additional data were generated on the effect of mesh size and different coal types. A sample of peat was also tested. Two catalysts were evaluated, and their effects on reaction rate presented in the report. In addition to the high temperature combustion, low temperature desulfurization is discussed. Desulfurization can improve low grade coal to be used in conventional combustion methods. It was found that 90% of the sulfur can be removed from the coal by wet oxidation with the carbon untouched. Further desulfurization studies are indicated.

  19. Wetting of flexible fibre arrays.

    PubMed

    Duprat, C; Protière, S; Beebe, A Y; Stone, H A

    2012-02-23

    Fibrous media are functional and versatile materials, as demonstrated by their ubiquity both in natural systems such as feathers and adhesive pads and in engineered systems from nanotextured surfaces to textile products, where they offer benefits in filtration, insulation, wetting and colouring. The elasticity and high aspect ratios of the fibres allow deformation under capillary forces, which cause mechanical damage, matting self-assembly or colour changes, with many industrial and ecological consequences. Attempts to understand these systems have mostly focused on the wetting of rigid fibres or on elastocapillary effects in planar geometries and on a fibre brush withdrawn from an infinite bath. Here we consider the frequently encountered case of a liquid drop deposited on a flexible fibre array and show that flexibility, fibre geometry and drop volume are the crucial parameters that are necessary to understand the various observations referred to above. We identify the conditions required for a drop to remain compact with minimal spreading or to cause a pair of elastic fibres to coalesce. We find that there is a critical volume of liquid, and, hence, a critical drop size, above which this coalescence does not occur. We also identify a drop size that maximizes liquid capture. For both wetting and deformation of the substrates, we present rules that are deduced from the geometric and material properties of the fibres and the volume of the drop. These ideas are applicable to a wide range of fibrous materials, as we illustrate with examples for feathers, beetle tarsi, sprays and microfabricated systems. PMID:22358841

  20. Wet Work and Barrier Function.

    PubMed

    Fartasch, Manigé

    2016-01-01

    Wet work defined as unprotected exposure to humid environments/water; high frequencies of hand washing procedures or prolonged glove occlusion is believed to cause irritant contact dermatitis in a variety of occupations. This review considers the recent studies on wet-work exposure and focuses on its influence on barrier function. There are different methods to study the effect of wet work on barrier function. On the one hand, occupational cohorts at risk can be monitored prospectively by skin bioengineering technology and clinical visual scoring systems; on the other hand, experimental test procedures with defined application of water, occlusion and detergents are performed in healthy volunteers. Both epidemiological studies and the results of experimental procedures are compared and discussed. A variety of epidemiological studies analyze occupational cohorts at risk. The measurement of transepidermal water loss, an indicator of the integrity of the epidermal barrier, and clinical inspection of the skin have shown that especially the frequencies of hand washing and water contact/contact to aqueous mixtures seem to be the main factors for the occurrence of barrier alterations. On the other hand, in a single cross-sectional study, prolonged glove wearing (e.g. occlusion for 6 h per shift in clean-room workers) without exposure to additional hazardous substances seemed not to affect the skin negatively. But regarding the effect of occlusion, there is experimental evidence that previously occluded skin challenged with sodium lauryl sulfate leads to an increased susceptibility to the irritant with an aggravation of the irritant reaction. These findings might have relevance for the real-life situation in so far as after occupational glove wearing, the skin is more susceptible to potential hazards to the skin even during leisure hours. PMID:26844906

  1. Large-strain dynamic cavity expansion in a granular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osinov, V. A.

    The dynamic problem of the symmetric expansion of a cylindrical or spherical cavity in a granular medium is considered. The constitutive behaviour of the material is governed by a hypoplasticity relation for granular soils capable of describing both monotonic and cyclic deformation. The problem is solved numerically by a finite-difference technique. A nonreflecting boundary condition used at the outer boundary of the computational domain makes it possible to model a continuous multi-cycle loading on the cavity wall. The solution is illustrated by numerical examples. Possible geomechanical applications to the modelling of the vibratory compaction and penetration in granular soils are discussed.

  2. Recurrent ameloblastoma of the mandible with unusual granular cell component.

    PubMed

    Argyris, Prokopios P; McBeain, Mackensie J T; Rake, Angela; Pambuccian, Stefan E; Gopalakrishnan, Rajaram; Koutlas, Ioannis G

    2015-06-01

    Ameloblastomas can present in various clinical and histomorphologic patterns. The granular cell variant accounts for only 3.5% to 5% of ameloblastomas. The aim of this case report is to present an example of ameloblastoma with unusual granular cell component, affecting a 63-year-old woman, in which both the inner and peripheral layers of follicles composed exclusively by eosinophilic granular cells. Assessment of the immunohistochemical and histochemical profile of the lesion was performed and the challenges of such a diagnosis were also addressed. PMID:25673632

  3. Wet/Dry Vacuum Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reimers, Harold; Andampour, Jay; Kunitser, Craig; Thomas, Ike

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum cleaner collects and retains dust, wet debris, and liquids. Designed for housekeeping on Space Station Freedom, it functions equally well in normal Earth Gravity or in microgravity. Generates acoustic noise at comfortably low levels and includes circuitry that reduces electromagnetic interference to other electronic equipment. Draws materials into bag made of hydrophobic sheet with layers of hydrophilic super-absorbing pads at downstream end material. Hydrophilic material can gel many times its own weight of liquid. Blower also provides secondary airflow to cool its electronic components.

  4. A Wet Chemistry Laboratory Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This picture of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) cell is labeled with components responsible for mixing Martian soil with water from Earth, adding chemicals and measuring the solution chemistry. WCL is part of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument suite on board the Phoenix lander.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  5. Electronic Structure of Wet DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Carloni, Paolo; Parrinello, Michele

    2002-08-01

    The electronic properties of a Z-DNA crystal synthesized in the laboratory are investigated by means of density-functional theory Car-Parrinello calculations. The electronic structure has a gap of only 1.28eV. This separates a manifold of 12 occupied states which came from the ? guanine orbitals from the lowest empty states in which the electron is transferred to the Na+ from PO-4 groups and water molecules. We have evaluated the anisotropic optical conductivity. At low frequency the conductivity is dominated by the ?-->Na+ transitions. Our calculation demonstrates that the cost of introducing electron holes in wet DNA strands could be lower than previously anticipated.

  6. This technology is all wet

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    The wet oxidation technology developed by Conor Pacific Environmental Technologies Inc. (CPET; Vancouver, British Columbia) is designed to eliminate hazardous and nonhazardous organic contaminants from liquid effluent. The technology, which originated in Denmark, uses oxygen homogeneously dissolved in water to treat organic contaminants. According to the company, the process eliminates hazardous and nonhazardous contaminants without generating pollutant emissions, making it relatively easy to permit. CPET says wet oxidation eliminates some inorganic compounds, such as cyanides, and all hazardous and nonhazardous organic pollutants, including those found in petroleum products, aromatic solvents, tar compounds, pesticides and plasticizers. The process also handles relatively high concentrations of such contaminants as phenol, oil, and coal, tar and wood preservatives. The technology can achieve up to 99.9999% destruction efficiencies. The process is exothermic, generating its own heat, and allows energy to be recovered and recycled. Some heating is required at start-up, and heat exchangers are used to overcome heat build-up later in the process.

  7. Mars: Always Cold, Sometimes Wet?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Pascal; McKay, Christoper P.

    2003-01-01

    A synthesis of a diverse suite of observations of H2O-related landforms that are possible Mars analogs from terrestrial polar regions (Devon Island in the Arctic; the Dry Valleys of Antarctica) put into question any requirement for extended episode(s) of warm and wet climate in Mars past. Geologically transient episodes of localized H2O cycling, forced by exogenic impacts, enhanced endogenic heat flow, and/or orbit-driven short-term local environmental change under an otherwise cold, low pressure (=10(exp 2) mbar) global climate, may be sufficient to account for the martian surface's exposed record of aqueous activity. A Mars that was only sometimes locally warm and wet while remaining climatically cold throughout its history is consistent with results (difficulties) encountered in modeling efforts attempting to support warm martian climate hypotheses. Possible analogs from terrestrial cold climate regions for the recent gully features on Mars also illustrate how transient localized aqueous activity might, under specific circumstances, also occur on Mars under the present frigid global climatic regime.

  8. Elucidating the mysteries of wetting.

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Edmund Blackburn, III; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Grillet, Anne Mary; Sackinger, Philip A.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Emerson, John Allen; Ash, Benjamin Jesse; Heine, David R.; Brooks, Carlton, F.; Gorby, Allen D.

    2005-11-01

    Nearly every manufacturing and many technologies central to Sandia's business involve physical processes controlled by interfacial wetting. Interfacial forces, e.g. conjoining/disjoining pressure, electrostatics, and capillary condensation, are ubiquitous and can surpass and even dominate bulk inertial or viscous effects on a continuum level. Moreover, the statics and dynamics of three-phase contact lines exhibit a wide range of complex behavior, such as contact angle hysteresis due to surface roughness, surface reaction, or compositional heterogeneities. These thermodynamically and kinetically driven interactions are essential to the development of new materials and processes. A detailed understanding was developed for the factors controlling wettability in multicomponent systems from computational modeling tools, and experimental diagnostics for systems, and processes dominated by interfacial effects. Wettability probed by dynamic advancing and receding contact angle measurements, ellipsometry, and direct determination of the capillary and disjoining forces. Molecular scale experiments determined the relationships between the fundamental interactions between molecular species and with the substrate. Atomistic simulations studied the equilibrium concentration profiles near the solid and vapor interfaces and tested the basic assumptions used in the continuum approaches. These simulations provide guidance in developing constitutive equations, which more accurately take into account the effects of surface induced phase separation and concentration gradients near the three-phase contact line. The development of these accurate models for dynamic multicomponent wetting allows improvement in science based engineering of manufacturing processes previously developed through costly trial and error by varying material formulation and geometry modification.

  9. Proximity coupling of a granular film with a ferroelectric substrate and giant electroresistance effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalov, O. G.; Chtchelkatchev, N. M.; Beloborodov, I. S.

    2014-08-01

    We study electron transport in granular film placed above the ferroelectric substrate. We show that the conductivity of granular film depends strongly on the ferroelectric state due to screening effects that modify the Coulomb blockade in granular film. In particular, the electric current in granular film is controlled by the direction of ferroelectric polarization. We show that the ferroelectric/granular film system has a large electroresistance effect. This effect can be utilized in memory and electric-field sensor applications.

  10. Eosinophilic and granular cell tumors of the breast.

    PubMed

    Damiani, S; Dina, R; Eusebi, V

    1999-05-01

    Eosinophilic and granular cell tumors of the breast are a heterogeneous group encompassing both epithelial and mesenchymal lesions. A granular appearance of the cytoplasm may be caused by the accumulation of secretory granules, mitochondria, or lysosomes. In the breast, mucoid carcinomas, carcinomas showing apocrine differentiation, and neuroendocrine carcinomas are well known entities, while tumors with oncocytic and acinic cell differentiation have been only recently recognized. An abundance of lysosomes is characteristic of Schwannian granular cell neoplasms, but smooth muscle cell tumors also may have this cytoplasmic feature. Awareness of all these possibilities when granular cells are found in breast lesions improves diagnostic accuracy and helps to avoid misdiagnosis of both benign lesions and malignant tumors. PMID:10452577

  11. A universal scaling law for the evolution of granular gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Mathias; Clewett, James P. D.; Mazza, Marco G.

    2016-04-01

    Dry, freely evolving granular materials in a dilute gaseous state coalesce into dense clusters only due to dissipative interactions. Here we show that the evolution of a dilute, freely cooling granular gas is determined in a universal way by the ratio of inertial flow and thermal velocities, that is, the Mach number. Theoretical calculations and direct numerical simulations of the granular Navier-Stokes equations show that irrespective of the coefficient of restitution, density or initial velocity distribution, the density fluctuations follow a universal quadratic dependence on the system's Mach number. We find that the clustering exhibits a scale-free dynamics but the clustered state becomes observable when the Mach number is approximately of O(1) . Our results provide a method to determine the age of a granular gas and predict the macroscopic appearance of clusters.

  12. A flexible self-learning model based on granular computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ting; Wu, Yu; Li, Yinguo

    2007-04-01

    Granular Computing(GrC) is an emerging theory which simulates the process of human brain understanding and solving problems. Rough set theory is a tool for dealing with uncertainty and vagueness aspects of knowledge model. SMLGrC algorithm introduces GrC to classical rough set algorithms, and makes the length of the rules relatively short but it can not process mass data sets. In order to solve this problem, based on the analysis of the hierarchical granular model of information table, the method of Granular Distribution List(GDL) is introduced to generate granule, and a granular computing algorithm(SLMGrC) is improved. Sample Covered Factor(SCF) is also introduced to control the generation of rules when the algorithm generates conflicting rules. The improved algorithm can process mass data sets directly without influencing the validity of SLMGrC. Experiments demonstrated the validity and flexibility of our method.

  13. GROWTH AND PERSISTENCE OF PATHOGENS ON GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON FILTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three enteric pathogens Yersinia enterocolitica 0:8, Salmonella typhimurium, and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, were examined for their ability to colonize granular activated carbon (GAC) in pure cultures and in the presence of autochthonous river water organisms. All three or...

  14. REPEATED REDUCTIVE AND OXIDATIVE TREATMENTS ON GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton oxidation and Fenton oxidation preceded by reduction solutions were applied to granular activated carbon (GAC) to chemically regenerate the adsorbent. No adsorbate was present on the GAC so physicochemical effects from chemically aggressive regeneration of the carbon coul...

  15. Instationary compaction wave propagation in highly porous cohesive granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunkelmann, Nina; Ringl, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2016-04-01

    We study the collision of a highly porous granular aggregate of adhesive μm-sized silica grains with a hard wall using a granular discrete element method. A compaction wave runs through the granular sample building up an inhomogeneous density profile. The compaction is independent of the length of the aggregate, within the regime of lengths studied here. Also short pulses, as they might be exerted by a piston pushing the granular material, excite a compaction wave that runs through the entire material. The speed of the compaction wave is larger than the impact velocity but considerably smaller than the sound speed. The wave speed is related to the compaction rate at the colliding surface and the average slope of the linear density profile.

  16. Inert plug formation in the DDT of granular energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Son, S.F.; Asay, B.W.; Bdzil, J.B.

    1995-09-01

    A mechanism is proposed to explain the {open_quotes}plugs{close_quotes} that have been observed in deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) of granular explosives. Numerical simulations are performed that demonstrate the proposed mechanism. Observed trends are reproduced.

  17. GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION AND INFRARED REACTIVATION: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study evaluated the effectiveness and cost of removing trace organic contaminants and surrogates from drinking water by granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption. The effect of multiple reactivations of spent GAC was also evaluated. Results indicated that reactivated GAC eff...

  18. A convex complementarity approach for simulating large granular flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Tasora, A.; Anitescu, M.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. degli Studi di Parma

    2010-07-01

    Aiming at the simulation of dense granular flows, we propose and test a numerical method based on successive convex complementarity problems. This approach originates from a multibody description of the granular flow: all the particles are simulated as rigid bodies with arbitrary shapes and frictional contacts. Unlike the discrete element method (DEM), the proposed approach does not require small integration time steps typical of stiff particle interaction; this fact, together with the development of optimized algorithms that can run also on parallel computing architectures, allows an efficient application of the proposed methodology to granular flows with a large number of particles. We present an application to the analysis of the refueling flow in pebble-bed nuclear reactors. Extensive validation of our method against both DEM and physical experiments results indicates that essential collective characteristics of dense granular flow are accurately predicted.

  19. Numerical simulation of impact cratering on granular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Koji; Senshu, Hiroki; Matsui, Takafumi

    2006-02-01

    A new numerical code based on the Distinct Element Method (DEM) is developed to study the impact cratering processes on granular material. This code has a potential advantage to simulate the cratering process on granular material, since the movement of discrete particles can be treated. To show the physical plausibility of this code, we conduct 3-D numerical simulations of vertical impact into granular material targets that consist of 384,000 particles, and compare the results with those from experimental studies. It is shown that the excavation stage of cratering derived from experimental studies is represented well by our simulation: the size of the crater cavity, and the ejecta velocity and angle distributions are consistent with those obtained in laboratory experiments. The impact simulation code developed in this study is thus suggested to be useful for the analysis of the impact cratering process on granular material.

  20. A universal scaling law for the evolution of granular gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Mathias; Clewett, James; Mazza, Marco G.

    Dry, freely evolving granular materials in a dilute gaseous state coalesce into dense clusters only due to dissipative interactions. This clustering transition is important for a number of problems ranging from geophysics to cosmology. Here we show that the evolution of a dilute, freely cooling granular gas is determined in a universal way by the ratio of inertial flow and thermal velocities, that is, the Mach number. Theoretical calculations and direct numerical simulations of the granular Navier-Stokes equations show that irrespective of the coefficient of restitution, density or initial velocity distribution, the density fluctuations follow a universal quadratic dependence on the system's Mach number. We find that the clustering exhibits a scale-free dynamics but the clustered state becomes observable when the Mach number is approximately of O(1). Our results provide a method to determine the age of a granular gas and predict the macroscopic appearance of clusters.

  1. Eddies, mixing and heat transfer in dense granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rognon, P.; Miller, T.; Einav, I.

    2013-06-01

    We investigate the ability of dense granular flows to transfer heat while flowing. Using discrete element simulations, we show that large correlated motions of grains develop in dense granular sheared layer, and lead to a strong heat transfer across streamlines. This process is similar to the convection induced by eddies in turbulent flows. However, granular eddies do not result from visco-inertial instability, but from the steric exclusion of closely packed grains. As a result, they seem to develop even at very low shear rates, which could have a significant practical interest. Beyond their different natures, classical turbulence and granular turbulence face similar challenges, and it is hoped that research in these two fields can benefit from each other.

  2. Adsorption properties of novel melanin-containing granular phytoadsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhremkova, G. S.; Lapina, V. A.; Dolidovich, A. F.

    2007-05-01

    Some adsorption and physicomechanical characteristics of novel melanin-containing granular phytoadsorbents have been determined. The influence of the binder on the phytoadsorbent adsorptivity for organic substances, benzene, ethyl acetate, and methanol, has been investigated. It has been shown that the adsorptive capacity of the granular phytoadsorbent depends on the nature of the adsorbent and the kind of binder, which is not “inert,” and decreases as its content in the granules increases.

  3. A novel numerical method for radiation exchange in granular medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayal, Ram; Gambaryan-Roisman, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    A very simple numerical method is developed to determine the inter-particle radiation heat transfer in a granular powder bed. The method is completely independent of coordinate system and does not require any domain discretization. The solution procedure does not involve any matrix inversion, thus making it suitable candidate for radiation heat transfer problems involving large number of interacting surfaces, especially granular powder beds.

  4. Dynamics of Granular Materials and Particle-Laden Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Swinney, Harry L.

    2007-07-11

    Rapid granular flows and particle-laden flows were studied in laboratory experiments, molecular dynamics simulations, and simulations of continuum equations. The research demonstrated that the inclusion of friction is crucial in realistic modeling of granular flows; hence extensive previous analyses and simulations by many researchers for frictionless particles must be reconsidered in the light of our work. We also made the first detailed comparison between experiment and the predictions of continuum theory for granular media (hydrodynamic equations). We found that shock waves easily form in granular flows since the speed of sound waves (pressure fluctuations) in a granular gas is small, typically 10 cm, while flow velocities are easily an order of magnitude larger. Our measurements on vertically oscillating granular layers led to the development of a novel technique for continuously separating particles of different sizes. Our study of craters formed by the impact of a projectile in a granular medium showed, surprisingly, that the time taken for a projectile to come to a rest in the granular layer is independent of the projectile’s impact energy. Another study supported by this grant examined a vertically oscillating layer of a mixture of cornstarch and water. The discovery of stable holes in the mixture was reported widely in the popular press, e.g., Science News [15 May 2004], “Imaging poking a liquid to create holes that persist like the holes in Swiss cheese. Incredible as that might sound, a group of scientists has done it.” Further experiments on glass spheres in an aqueous solution yielded the same holey fluid phenomenon, supporting our conjecture that such holes may occur in dense concentrations of particles in solution in industrial applications.

  5. Granular cells in ameloblastoma: An enigma in diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Dave, Aparna; Arora, Manpreet; Shetty, V P; Saluja, Pulin

    2015-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is an epithelial odontogenic tumor exhibiting diverse microscopic pattern that occurs singly or in combination with other patterns. This article describes a case of granular cell ameloblastoma (GCA) involving mandible in a 55-year-old male. The possibility of granular component is there in other odontogenic and nonodontogenic lesions. Sometimes dilemma exists in the diagnosis of such lesions. The purpose of this article is to unveil the hidden characteristics in GCA, which might help in differential diagnosis of GCA. PMID:26752883

  6. Granular materials: constitutive equations and strain localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, L.; Gu, C.

    2000-08-01

    Strain localization into shear bands is commonly observed in natural soil masses, as well as in human-built embankments, footings, retaining walls and other geotechnical structures. Numerical predictions for the process of shear band formation are critically dependent on the constitutive equations employed. In this paper, the plane strain "double-shearing" constitutive model (e.g., Spencer, A.J.M., 1964. A theory of the kinematics of ideal soils under plane strain conditions. Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids 12, 337-351; Spencer, A.J.M., 1982, Deformation of ideal granular materials. In: Hopkins, H.G., Sewell, M.J. (Eds.), Mechanics of Solids. Pergamon Press, Oxford and New York, pp. 607-652; Mehrabadi, M.M., Cowin, S.C., 1978. Initial planar deformation of dilatant granular materials. Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids 26, 269-284; Nemat-Nasser, S., Mehrabadi, M.M., Iwakuma, T. 1981. On certain macroscopic and microscopic aspects of plastic flow of ductile materials. In: Nemat-Nasser, S. (Ed.), Three-dimensional Constitutive Relations and Ductile Fracture. North-Holland, Amsterdam, pp. 157-172; Anand, L., 1983. Plane deformations of ideal granular materials. Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids 31, 105-122) is generalized to three dimensions including the effects of elastic deformation and pre-peak behavior. The constitutive model is implemented in a finite element program and is used to predict the formation of shear bands in plane strain compression, and plane strain cylindrical cavity expansion. The predictions from the model are shown to be in good quantitative agreement with the recent experiments of Han, C., Drescher, A., (1993. Shear bands in biaxial tests on dry coarse sand. Soils and Foundations 33, 118-132) and Alsiny, H., Vardoulakis, I., Drescher, A., (1992. Deformation localization in cavity inflation experiments on dry sand. Geotechnique 42, 395-410) on a dry sand. The constitutive model is also used to predict the stress state in a static sand pile — a topic which has occupied the attention of many investigators in recent years. In our simulations we model an initially loose sand mass as a cohesionless material with a mobilized internal friction coefficient which evolves from an initial value of zero to a saturation value. The formation of a sand pile is numerically modeled as a two-step process: (i) In the first step a conical sand mass is placed between a flat rigid surface and an axi-symmetric conical mold. Interaction between the sand mass and the rigid base plate is modeled using an interface friction coefficient which has the same value as the saturation value of the internal friction coefficient. The sand mass (which is confined between the base plate and the conical mold) is subjected to gravity loading, and the system is allowed to equilibrate. (ii) In the second step the conical mold is quickly lifted and the sand mass allowed to reach a new equilibrate, but slightly slumped configuration. In the process of slight slumping, there is non-homogeneous plastic deformation of the sand pile. This non-homogeneous plastic deformation, coupled with the evolving internal friction coefficient, naturally gives rise to a static stress state which exhibits the interesting feature that the vertical stress distribution at the base of the sand pile does not have a maximum under the apex of the cone, but shows a local dip there.

  7. When matter matters

    SciTech Connect

    Easson, Damien A.; Sawicki, Ignacy; Vikman, Alexander E-mail: ignacy.sawicki@uni-heidelberg.de

    2013-07-01

    We study a recently proposed scenario for the early universe:Subluminal Galilean Genesis. We prove that without any other matter present in the spatially flat Friedmann universe, the perturbations of the Galileon scalar field propagate with a speed at most equal to the speed of light. This proof applies to all cosmological solutions — to the whole phase space. However, in a more realistic situation, when one includes any matter which is not directly coupled to the Galileon, there always exists a region of phase space where these perturbations propagate superluminally, indeed with arbitrarily high speed. We illustrate our analytic proof with numerical computations. We discuss the implications of this result for the possible UV completion of the model.

  8. Continuum modeling of dense granular flow down heaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henann, David; Liu, Daren

    Dense, dry granular flows display many manifestations of grain-size dependence, or nonlocality, in which the finite-size of grains has an observable impact on flow phenomenology. Such behaviors make the formulation of an accurate continuum model for dense granular flow particularly difficult, since local continuum models are not equipped to describe size-effects. One example of grain-size dependence is seen when avalanches occur on a granular heap - a situation which is frequently encountered in industry, as in rotating drums, as well as in nature, such as in landslides. In this case, flow separates into a thin, quickly flowing surface layer and a slowly creeping bulk. While existing local granular flow models are capable of capturing aspects of the flowing surface layer, they fail to even predict the existence of creeping flow beneath, much less being able to quantitatively describe the flow fields. Recently, we have proposed a new, scale-dependent continuum model - the nonlocal granular fluidity (NGF) model - that successfully predicted steady, slow granular flow fields, including grain-size-dependent shear-band widths in a variety of flow configurations. In this talk, we extend our model to the rapid flow regime and show that the model is capable of quantitatively predicting all aspects of gravity-driven heap flow. In particular, the model predicts the coexistence of a rapidly flowing, rate-dependent top surface layer and a rate-independent, slowly creeping bulk - a feature which is beyond local continuum approaches.

  9. Guest Editorial Special Issue on Granular/Symbolic Data Processing.

    PubMed

    Su, Shun-Feng; Pedrycz, Witold; Hong, Tzung-Pei; De Carvalho, Francisco De A T

    2016-02-01

    Granular/symbolic data processing is an emerging conceptual and computing paradigm of information processing. In the era of big data, the emergence of granular/symbolic processing has been motivated by the urgent need for intelligent transformation of empirical data that are now commonly available in vast quantities, into a human-manageable knowledge. In such an aggregation process, we hope to retain as much information as possible while making the findings easily understood and well-supported by the existing experimental evidence. Those aggregated entities are often referred to as symbolic or granular data. Research areas referred to as symbolic data analysis in statistics and multivariate data analysis address some of the fundamental or applied facets of granular computing. The theoretical fundamentals of granular/symbolic data processing are well-established. They involve set theory (interval mathematics), fuzzy sets, rough sets, and random sets linked together in a highly comprehensive treatment of this emerging paradigm. In addition to interval-based formalism of information granules, we also encounter histograms, distributions, lists of values, etc. Hence, granular/symbolic data processing hinges on a general computation theory that effectively uses granules such as classes, clusters, subsets, groups, and intervals to build an efficient computational model for complex applications realized in the presence of huge amounts of data, information, and knowledge. This research arises as a substantial shift from the current machine-centric to human-centric approach to information and knowledge. PMID:26742157

  10. The effectiveness of resistive force theory in granular locomotiona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tingnan; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2014-10-01

    Resistive force theory (RFT) is often used to analyze the movement of microscopic organisms swimming in fluids. In RFT, a body is partitioned into infinitesimal segments, each of which generates thrust and experiences drag. Linear superposition of forces from elements over the body allows prediction of swimming velocities and efficiencies. We show that RFT quantitatively describes the movement of animals and robots that move on and within dry granular media (GM), collections of particles that display solid, fluid, and gas-like features. RFT works well when the GM is slightly polydisperse, and in the "frictional fluid" regime such that frictional forces dominate material inertial forces, and when locomotion can be approximated as confined to a plane. Within a given plane (horizontal or vertical) relationships that govern the force versus orientation of an elemental intruder are functionally independent of the granular medium. We use the RFT to explain features of locomotion on and within granular media including kinematic and muscle activation patterns during sand-swimming by a sandfish lizard and a shovel-nosed snake, optimal movement patterns of a Purcell 3-link sand-swimming robot revealed by a geometric mechanics approach, and legged locomotion of small robots on the surface of GM. We close by discussing situations to which granular RFT has not yet been applied (such as inclined granular surfaces), and the advances in the physics of granular media needed to apply RFT in such situations.

  11. Erosion processes in granular flows: insights from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farin, Maxime; Mangeney, Anne; Roche, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    Experimental granular column collapse were conducted over an inclined channel covered by an erodible bed of granular material in order to reproduce at laboratory scale erosion processes of natural flows propagating over deposits formed by earlier events. The studied control parameters were the slope angle, the aspect ratio (i.e. height over length), the volume and the shape of the granular column released, and the thickness and compaction of the erodible bed. The results show that erosion processes affect the flow runout distance over a critical slope angle ?c that depends on the column volume, aspect ratio, and shape. For slope higher than ?c, the granular avalanche excavates the erodible layer immediately at the flow front, behind which waves traveling downstream are observed and help entraining grains from the erodible bed. Erosion efficiency (i.e. maximal depth and duration of excavation, waves dimensions) is shown to increase as the slope angle and the column's volume increase. It is also dependent on the aspect ratio and on the nature of the erodible bed: the maximal excavation depth and the duration of the excavation decrease as the degree of compaction of the erodible granular bed increases. Erosion processes notably increase granular flows runout distance at inclinations close to the repose angle of the grains, in particular for columns of small aspect ratio. We demonstrate, however, that the flow runout distance observed on an erodible bed cannot be reproduced on a rough bed by simply adding the entrained volume of erodible bed to the initial column volume.

  12. Some Central Asian observatories for the WET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meistas, E.

    1993-01-01

    The Mt. Maidanak Observatory, one of several observatories in the former Soviet Central Asia, is located at an important longitude to fill in the gap in the WET (Whole Earth Telescope) network. The Lithuanian astronomical station on Mt. Maidanak was successfully tested in May 1992 for future WET campaigns. In the September 1992 campaign it provided some useful data for the WET. In February 1993 the observatory was nationalized by the Uzbekistan government, and almost all astronomical activities there have stopped. The future use of this observatory for the WET campaigns is uncertain, but there are some signs that the situation is improving. We have examined the possibility of using other Central Asian observatories for the WET. A contact was established with the Fesenkov Astronomical Institute in Alma-Ata, and in October 1993 WET observations were made at the Assy-Turgen Observatory in Kazakhstan.

  13. Simulating granular materials by energy minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krijgsman, D.; Luding, S.

    2016-03-01

    Discrete element methods are extremely helpful in understanding the complex behaviors of granular media, as they give valuable insight into all internal variables of the system. In this paper, a novel discrete element method for performing simulations of granular media is presented, based on the minimization of the potential energy in the system. Contrary to most discrete element methods (i.e., soft-particle method, event-driven method, and non-smooth contact dynamics), the system does not evolve by (approximately) integrating Newtons equations of motion in time, but rather by searching for mechanical equilibrium solutions for the positions of all particles in the system, which is mathematically equivalent to locally minimizing the potential energy. The new method allows for the rapid creation of jammed initial conditions (to be used for further studies) and for the simulation of quasi-static deformation problems. The major advantage of the new method is that it allows for truly static deformations. The system does not evolve with time, but rather with the externally applied strain or load, so that there is no kinetic energy in the system, in contrast to other quasi-static methods. The performance of the algorithm for both types of applications of the method is tested. Therefore we look at the required number of iterations, for the system to converge to a stable solution. For each single iteration, the required computational effort scales linearly with the number of particles. During the process of creating initial conditions, the required number of iterations for two-dimensional systems scales with the square root of the number of particles in the system. The required number of iterations increases for systems closer to the jamming packing fraction. For a quasi-static pure shear deformation simulation, the results of the new method are validated by regular soft-particle dynamics simulations. The energy minimization algorithm is able to capture the evolution of the isotropic and deviatoric stress and fabric of the system. Both methods converge in the limit of quasi-static deformations, but show interestingly different results otherwise. For a shear amplitude of 4 % , as little as 100 sampling points seems to be a good compromise between accuracy and computational time needed.

  14. Granular Shear Flows - Influence on Helioseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesis, A.; Hammer, R.; Kiefer, M.; Schleicher, H.

    Over the past few years, turbulence and the associated turbulent pressure in the upper convective layer have been recognized as potentially important for the physics of solar oscillations. The turbulent kinetic energy per volume, the turbulent pressure Pturb, could affect the thickness of the strongly superadiabatic layers and thus some of the results of helioseismology,(see Rosenthal 1998). According to Stein and Nordlund (1998), turbulent pressure is important in extending the mean atmosphere in the superadiabatic layers, which lowers the eigenfrequencies of medium and high ell modes. Our main emphasis in this paper is to provide observational support for this influence. Series of spectrograms of high spatial resolution, taken at the center of the solar disk with the German Vacuum Tower Telescope in Izana (Tenerife, Spain) in 1994 and 1997, represent the observational material for this study. The spectrograms were digitized and processed with wavelet techniques and regression analysis. The turbulent pressure Pturb is determined by the velocity in the granular layers. This velocity can be measured as Doppler shifts if it is spatially resolved, and as enhanced line widths otherwise. The resolved flow velocities are typically found to be ~1 km sec-1, both horizontally and vertically (Nesis and Mattig 1989). This yields a contribution to the ratio of turbulent to gas pressure of the order of Pturb / Pgas 0.12. Values of this size are also discussed in recent theoretical works (e.g., Stein and Nordlund 1998). Unresolved velocities are observed in terms of enhanced line broadening. We find these velocities to be highly intermittent along the slit, especially at locations with steep velocity gradients near the borders of large granules. In order to take this intermittency into account, we trace the peak to peak variations of the unresolved velocity, which turn out to be ~4km sec-1. The corresponding contribution to the turbulent pressure near the solar surface is thus likewise intermittent and amounts up to Pturb = 104 Pa. The ratio Pturb / Pgas may thus locally reach significant values up to about 0.5. Furthermore, we found that resolved and unresolved velocities in the granule/intergranule system cannot be related by a regression line, i.e. they are neither correlated nor anticorrelated globally. Rather the convective flow and the turbulence should be interpreted in terms of a turbulence-granulation dynamical system, which may indeed affect helioseismology. This system reveals a periodic cycle similar to the growth/decay models described by the Volterra-Lotka equations. The power spectra of the turbulent and granular velocity show a two-component character, which presumably reflects the action of two different processes determining the dynamics of the solar surface layers.

  15. Impact of wettability on two-phase displacement patterns in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trojer, M.; Szulczewski, M.; Holtzman, R.; Juanes, R.

    2013-12-01

    Two-phase flow in porous media is important in many natural and industrial processes like geologic CO2 sequestration, enhanced oil recovery, water infiltration in soil, and methane venting from organic-rich sediments. While the wetting properties of porous media can vary drastically depending on the type of media and the pore fluids, the effect of wettability on the fluid displacement remains poorly understood. Here, we study experimentally how wettability affects fluid displacement patterns in rigid granular media within the capillary and viscous fingering regimes. The experiments consist of saturating a thin bed of glass beads with a viscous fluid, injecting a less viscous fluid, and imaging the invasion morphology. There are two control parameters: the injection rate of the less viscous fluid and the contact angle, which we control by modifying the surface chemistry of the beads. When the contact angle is fixed at zero (drainage), we recover the well-known transition from capillary fingering to viscous fingering as the injection rate is increased. When the injection rate is fixed, we show that the invasion pattern becomes more stable as the contact angle increases (i.e., as the system transitions from drainage to imbibition), both in the capillary-fingering and viscous-fingering regimes. We quantify the effect of the contact angle on the length scale of the instability, and propose a mechanistic pore-scale model that explains the macroscopic observations. The results demonstrate that wettability can significantly impact multiphase flow in porous media, and highlight the need to better understand the specific effects in many processes such as CO2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery. Air displacing a water/glycerol mixture within a radial Hele-Shaw cell filled with glass beads. Varying the wetting properties of the solid matrix (horizontal axis) as well as the injection rate (vertical axis) systematically, the invasion pattern stabilizes as the invading phase (air) becomes more wetting.

  16. Wet comet model: Rosetta redux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldon, Robert B.

    2015-09-01

    The wet-comet model (WCM) of the structure and composition of comets was developed in 2005 to replace the "dirty-snowball" model (DSM) of Fred Whipple, because the first comet flybys of P/Halley "armada" revealed a very different landscape. Subsequent flybys of P/Borrelly, P/Wild-2, P/Hartley, P/Tempel-1 have confirmed and refined the model, so that we confidently predicted that the Rosetta mission would encounter a prolate, tumbling, concrete-encrusted, black comet: P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Unfortunately, the Philae lander team was preparing for a DSM and the anchors bounced off the concrete surface, but the orbiter has returned spec- tacular pictures of every crevice, which confirm and extend the WCM yet a sixth time. We report of what we predicted, what was observed, and several unexpected results from the ROSETTA mission.

  17. White matter dementia in CADASIL.

    PubMed

    Filley, C M; Thompson, L L; Sze, C I; Simon, J A; Paskavitz, J F; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, B K

    1999-03-01

    Cerebral white matter disorders may be associated with profound neurobehavioral dysfunction. We report a 62-year-old man who had a slowly progressive 25-year history of personality change, psychosis, mood disorder, and dementia. Neurologic examination disclosed abulia, impaired memory retrieval, and preserved language, with only minimal motor impairment. Neuropsychological testing found a sustained attention deficit, cognitive slowing, impaired learning with intact recognition, and perseveration. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed extensive leukoencephalopathy. Right frontal brain biopsy showed ill-defined white matter pallor with hyaline narrowing of white matter arterioles. Granular osmiophilic material adjacent to vascular smooth muscle cells on electron microscopy of a skin biopsy, and an arginine for cysteine replacement at position 169 in the 4 EGF motif of the notch 3 region on chromosome 19q12 established the diagnosis of cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL). This case illustrates that CADASIL can manifest as an isolated neurobehavioral disorder over an extended time period. The dementia associated with CADASIL closely resembles that which may occur with other white matter disorders, and represents an example of white matter dementia. PMID:10371078

  18. A new spin on wetting angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truscott, Tadd T.; Techet, Alexandra H.

    2007-11-01

    Non-rotating, spherical projectiles impacting a water surface generate different cavity and splash behaviors depending on the static wetting angle. The wetting angle made between a liquid and a solid surface varies with surface coating and roughness, with large angles for hydrophobic coatings and small angles for hydrophilic coatings. It has been shown that for sufficiently low static wetting angles and low impact velocities it is possible to prevent cavity and splash formation all together. The wetting angle changes dynamically when a solid surface moves relative to the surrounding fluid. Unique, asymmetric effects can be found when transverse spin is imparted to the sphere before impact. The tangential velocity of the sphere's surface results in a different dynamic wetting angle on the two opposite sides of the sphere. On the side of the sphere which descends the fastest, relative to the fluid, the wetting angle is increased and on the opposite side, which has a slower relative velocity, the wetting angle is decreased. For sufficiently high spin rates, this asymmetry can result in splash only forming on one side of the object where the dynamic wetting angle is highest. A physical explanation of the mechanism behind the formation of a fluid wedge across the center of the cavity will also be presented, as related to the dynamic wetting angle discussion.

  19. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  20. Rheology of a sonofluidized granular packing.

    PubMed

    Caballero-Robledo, G A; Clément, E

    2009-12-01

    We report experimental measurements on the rheology of a dry granular material under a weak level of vibration generated by sound injection. First, we measure the drag force exerted on a wire moving in the bulk. We show that when the driving vibration energy is increased, the effective rheology changes drastically: going from a non-linear dynamical friction behavior --weakly increasing with the velocity-- up to a linear force-velocity regime. We present a simple heuristic model to account for the vanishing of the stress dynamical threshold at a finite vibration intensity and the onset of a linear force-velocity behavior. Second, we measure the drag force on spherical intruders when the dragging velocity, the vibration energy, and the diameters are varied. We evidence a so-called "geometrical hardening" effect for smaller-size intruders and a logarithmic hardening effect for the velocity dependence. We show that this last effect is only weakly dependent on the vibration intensity. PMID:19998051

  1. Wave propagation in random granular chains.

    PubMed

    Manjunath, Mohith; Awasthi, Amnaya P; Geubelle, Philippe H

    2012-03-01

    The influence of randomness on wave propagation in one-dimensional chains of spherical granular media is investigated. The interaction between the elastic spheres is modeled using the classical Hertzian contact law. Randomness is introduced in the discrete model using random distributions of particle mass, Young's modulus, or radius. Of particular interest in this study is the quantification of the attenuation in the amplitude of the impulse associated with various levels of randomness: two distinct regimes of decay are observed, characterized by an exponential or a power law, respectively. The responses are normalized to represent a vast array of material parameters and impact conditions. The virial theorem is applied to investigate the transfer from potential to kinetic energy components in the system for different levels of randomness. The level of attenuation in the two decay regimes is compared for the three different sources of randomness and it is found that randomness in radius leads to the maximum rate of decay in the exponential regime of wave propagation. PMID:22587093

  2. Granular Material Flows with Interstitial Fluid Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Melany L.; Brennen, Christopher E.

    2004-01-01

    The research focused on experimental measurements of the rheological properties of liquid-solid and granular flows. In these flows, the viscous effects of the interstitial fluid, the inertia of the fluid and particles, and the collisional interactions of the particles may all contribute to the flow mechanics. These multiphase flows include industrial problems such as coal slurry pipelines, hydraulic fracturing processes, fluidized beds, mining and milling operation, abrasive water jet machining, and polishing and surface erosion technologies. In addition, there are a wide range of geophysical flows such as debris flows, landslides and sediment transport. In extraterrestrial applications, the study of transport of particulate materials is fundamental to the mining and processing of lunar and Martian soils and the transport of atmospheric dust (National Research Council 2000). The recent images from Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft dramatically depict the complex sand and dust flows on Mars, including dune formation and dust avalanches on the slip-face of dune surfaces. These Aeolian features involve a complex interaction of the prevailing winds and deposition or erosion of the sediment layer; these features make a good test bed for the verification of global circulation models of the Martian atmosphere.

  3. Enhancing bulk superconductivity by engineering granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayoh, James; García García, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    The quest for higher critical temperatures is one of the main driving forces in the field of superconductivity. Recent theoretical and experimental results indicate that quantum size effects in isolated nano-grains can boost superconductivity with respect to the bulk limit. Here we explore the optimal range of parameters that lead to an enhancement of the critical temperature in a large three dimensional array of these superconducting nano-grains by combining mean-field, semiclassical and percolation techniques. We identify a broad range of parameters for which the array critical temperature, TcArray, can be up to a few times greater than the non-granular bulk limit, Tc 0. This prediction, valid only for conventional superconductors, takes into account an experimentally realistic distribution of grain sizes in the array, charging effects, dissipation by quasiparticles and limitations related to the proliferation of thermal fluctuations for sufficiently small grains. For small resistances we find the transition is percolation driven. Whereas at larger resistances the transition occurs above the percolation threshold due to phase fluctuations. JM acknowledes support from an EPSRC Ph.D studentship, AMG acknowledges support from EPSRC, grant No. EP/I004637/1, FCT, grant PTDC/FIS/111348/2009 and a Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant PIRG07-GA-2010-268172.

  4. Granular media filtration: old process, new thoughts.

    PubMed

    Lawler, D F; Nason, J A

    2006-01-01

    The design of granular media filters has evolved over many years so that modern filters have larger media sizes and higher filtration velocities than in earlier times. The fundamental understanding of filtration has also improved over time, with current models that account reasonably for all characteristics of the media, the suspension and the filter operation. The methodology for design, however, has not kept pace with these improvements; current designs are based on pilot plants, past experience, or a simple guideline (the ratio of the bed depth to media grain size). We propose that design should be based universally on a characteristic removal length, with the provision of a bed depth that is some multiple of that characteristic length. This characteristic removal length is calculated using the most recent (and most complete) fundamental model and is based on the particle size with the minimum removal efficiency in a filter. The multiple of the characteristic length that yields the required bed depth has been calibrated to existing, successful filters. PMID:16752758

  5. Velocity fluctuations in dense granular flows.

    PubMed

    Drozd, John J; Denniston, Colin

    2008-10-01

    We use simulations to investigate velocity fluctuations in dry granular flow. Our system is comprised of mono- and polydisperse sets of spherical grains falling down a vertical chute under the influence of gravity. We find three different classes of velocity distributions depending on factors such as the local density. The class of the velocity distribution depends on whether the grains are in a free-fall, fluid, or glassy state. The analytic form of the distributions match those that have been found by other authors in fairly diverse systems. Here, we have all three present in a single system in steady state. Power-law tails that match recent experiments are also found but in a transition area suggesting they may be an artifact of crossover from one class of velocity distribution to another. We find evidence that the transition from one class to another may correspond to a second order dynamical phase transition in the limit that the vertical flow speed goes to zero. PMID:18999415

  6. Acoustic signals generated in inclined granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Danielle S.; Jenkins, James T.; Keast, Stephen C.; Sachse, Wolfgang H.

    2015-10-01

    Spontaneous avalanching in specific deserts produces a low-frequency sound known as "booming." This creates a puzzle, because avalanches down the face of a dune result in collisions between sand grains that occur at much higher frequencies. Reproducing this phenomenon in the laboratory permits a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms for the generation of such lower frequency acoustic emissions, which may also be relevant to other dry granular flows. Here we report measurements of low-frequency acoustical signals, produced by dried "sounding" sand (sand capable of booming in the desert) flowing down an inclined chute. The amplitude of the signal diminishes over time but reappears upon drying of the sand. We show that the presence of this sound in the experiments may provide supporting evidence for a previously published "waveguide" explanation for booming. Also, we propose a model based on kinetic theory for a sheared inclined flow in which the flowing layer exhibits "breathing" modes superimposed on steady shearing. The predicted oscillation frequency is of a similar order of magnitude as the measurements, indicating that small perturbations can sustain oscillations of a low frequency. However, the frequency is underestimated, which indicates that the stiffness has been underestimated. Also, the model predicts a discrete spectrum of frequencies, instead of the broadband spectrum measured experimentally.

  7. Deflagration to detonation experiments in granular HMX

    SciTech Connect

    Burnside, N.J.; Son, S.F.; Asay, B.W.; Dickson, P.M.

    1998-03-01

    In this paper the authors report on continuing work involving a series of deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) experiments in which they study the piston-initiated DDT of heavily confined granular cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine (HMX). These experiments were designed to he useful in model development and evaluation. A main focus of these experiments is the effect of density on the DDT event. Particle size distribution and morphology are carefully characterized. In this paper they present recent surface area analysis. Earlier studies demonstrated extensive fracturing and agglomeration in samples at densities as low as 75% TMD as evidenced by dramatic decreases in particle size distribution due to mild stimulus. This is qualitatively confirmed with SEM images and quantitatively studied with gas absorption surface area analysis. Also, in this paper they present initial results using a microwave interferometer technique. Dynamic calibration of the technique was performed, a 35 GHz signal is used to increase resolution, and the system has been designed to be inexpensive for repeated experiments. The distance to where deformation of the inner wall begins for various densities is reported. This result is compared with the microwave interferometer measurements.

  8. Autophagy in granular corneal dystrophy type 2.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung-Il; Kim, Eung Kweon

    2016-03-01

    Autophagy is a lysosomal degradative process that is essential for cellular homeostasis and metabolic stress adaptation. Defective autophagy is involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases including granular corneal dystrophy type 2 (GCD2). GCD2 is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by substitution of histidine for arginine at codon 124 (R124H) in the transforming growth factor β-induced gene (TGFBI) on chromosome 5q31. Transforming growth factor β-induced protein (TGFBIp) is degraded by autophagy, but mutant-TGFBIp accumulates in autophagosomes and/or lysosomes, despite significant activation of basal autophagy, in GCD2 corneal fibroblasts. Furthermore, inhibition of autophagy induces cell death of GCD2 corneal fibroblasts through active caspase-3. As there is currently no pharmacological treatment for GCD2, development of novel therapies is required. A potential strategy for preventing cytoplasmic accumulation of mutant-TGFBIp in GCD2 corneal fibroblasts is to enhance mutant-TGFBIp degradation. This could be achieved by activation of the autophagic pathway. Here, we will consider the role and the potential therapeutic benefits of autophagy in GCD2, with focus on TGFBIp degradation, in light of the recently established role of autophagy in protein degradation. PMID:26386150

  9. The drainage of foamy granular suspensions.

    PubMed

    Haffner, Benjamin; Khidas, Yacine; Pitois, Olivier

    2015-11-15

    Foam-based materials are promising micro-structured materials with interesting thermal and acoustical properties. The control of the material morphology requires counteracting all the destabilizing mechanisms during their production, starting with the drainage process, which remains to be understood in the case of the complex fluids that are commonly used to be foamed. Here we perform measurements for the drainage velocity of aqueous foams made with granular suspensions of hydrophilic monodisperse particles and we show that the effect of the particles can be accounted by two parameters: the volume fraction of particles in the suspension (φp) and the confinement parameter (λ), that compares the particle size to the size of passage through constrictions in the foam network. We report data over wide ranges for those two parameters and we identify all the regimes and transitions occurring in the φp-λ diagram. In particular, we highlight a transition which refers to the included/excluded configuration of the particles with respect to the foam network, and makes the drainage velocity evolve from its minimal value (fully included particles) to its maximal one (fully excluded particles). We also determine the conditions (φp,λ) leading to the arrest of the drainage process. PMID:26218200

  10. Modeling density segregation in granular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Hongyi; Lueptow, Richard; Umbanhowar, Paul

    2015-11-01

    A recently developed continuum-based model accurately predicts segregation in flows of granular mixtures varying in particle size by considering the interplay of advection, diffusion and segregation. In this research, we extend the domain of the model to include density driven segregation. Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations of density bidisperse flows of mono-sized particles in a quasi-2D bounded heap were performed to determine the dependence of the density driven segregation velocity on local shear rate, particle concentration, and a segregation length which scales with the particle size and the logarithm of the density ratio. With these inputs, the model yields theoretical predictions of density segregation patterns that quantitatively match the DEM simulations over a range of density ratios (1.11-3.33) and flow rates (19.2-113.6 cm3/s). Matching experiments with various combinations of glass, steel and ceramic particles were also performed which reproduced the segregation patterns obtained in both the simulations and the theory.

  11. Granular Dynamics in Pebble Bed Reactor Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laufer, Michael Robert

    This study focused on developing a better understanding of granular dynamics in pebble bed reactor cores through experimental work and computer simulations. The work completed includes analysis of pebble motion data from three scaled experiments based on the annular core of the Pebble Bed Fluoride Salt-Cooled High- Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR). The experiments are accompanied by the development of a new discrete element simulation code, GRECO, which is designed to offer a simple user interface and simplified two-dimensional system that can be used for iterative purposes in the preliminary phases of core design. The results of this study are focused on the PB-FHR, but can easily be extended for gas-cooled reactor designs. Experimental results are presented for three Pebble Recirculation Experiments (PREX). PREX 2 and 3.0 are conventional gravity-dominated granular systems based on the annular PB-FHR core design for a 900 MWth commercial prototype plant and a 16 MWth test reactor, respectively. Detailed results are presented for the pebble velocity field, mixing at the radial zone interfaces, and pebble residence times. A new Monte Carlo algorithm was developed to study the residence time distributions of pebbles in different radial zones. These dry experiments demonstrated the basic viability of radial pebble zoning in cores with diverging geometry before pebbles reach the active core. Results are also presented from PREX 3.1, a scaled facility that uses simulant materials to evaluate the impact of coupled fluid drag forces on the granular dynamics in the PB-FHR core. PREX 3.1 was used to collect first of a kind pebble motion data in a multidimensional porous media flow field. Pebble motion data were collected for a range of axial and cross fluid flow configurations where the drag forces range from half the buoyancy force up to ten times greater than the buoyancy force. Detailed analysis is presented for the pebble velocity field, mixing behavior, and residence time distributions for each fluid flow configuration. The axial flow configurations in PREX 3.1 showed small changes in pebble motion compared to a reference case with no fluid flow and showed similar overall behavior to PREX 3.0. This suggests that dry experiments can be used for core designs with uniform one-dimensional coolant flow early in the design process at greatly reduced cost. Significant differences in pebble residence times were observed in the cross fluid flow configurations, but these were not accompanied by an overall horizontal diffusion bias. Radial zones showed only a small shift in position due to mixing in the diverging region and remained stable in the active core. The results from this study support the overall viability of the annular PB-FHR core by demonstrating consistent granular flow behavior in the presence of complex reflector geometries and multidimensional fluid flow fields. GRECO simulations were performed for each of the experiments in this study in order to develop a preliminary validation basis and to understand for which applications the code can provide useful analysis. Overall, the GRECO simulation results showed excellent agreement with the gravity-dominated PREX experiments. Local velocity errors were found to be generally within 10-15% of the experimental data. Average radial zone interface positions were predicted within two pebble diameters. GRECO simulations over predicted the amount of mixing around the average radial zone interface position and therefore can be treated as a conservative upper bound when used in neutronics analysis. Residence time distributions from the GRECO velocity data based on the Monte Carlo algorithm closely matched those derived from the experiment velocity statistics. GRECO simulation results for PREX 3.1 with coupled drag forces showed larger errors compared to the experimental data, particularly in the cases with cross fluid flow. The large discrepancies suggest that GRECO results in systems with coupled fluid drag forces cannot be used with high confidence at this point and future development work on coupled pebble and fluid dynamics with multidimensional fluid flow fields is required.

  12. Flow characteristics of the Cascade granular blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, J.H.; Walton, O.R.

    1985-07-01

    Analysis of a single granule on a rotating cone shows that for the 35/sup 0/ half-angle, double-cone-shaped Cascade chamber, blanket granules will stay against the chamber wall if the rotational speed is 50 rpm or greater. The granules move axially down the wall with a slight (5-mm or less) sinusoidal oscillation in the circumferential direction. Granule chute-flow experiments confirm that two-layered flow can be obtained when the chute is inclined slightly above the granular material angle of repose. The top surface layer is thin and fast moving (supercritical flow). A thick bottom layer moves more slowly (subcritical flow controlled at the exit) with a velocity that increases with distance from the bottom of the chute. This is a desirable velocity profile because in the Cascade chamber about one-third of the fusion energy is deposited in the form of x rays and fusion-fuel-pellet debris in the top surface (inner-radius) layer.

  13. Granular flows on a dissipative base.

    PubMed

    Louge, Michel Y; Valance, Alexandre; Lancelot, Paul; Delannay, Renaud; Artières, Olivier

    2015-08-01

    We study inclined channel flows of sand over a sensor-enabled composite geotextile fabric base that dissipates granular fluctuation energy. We record strain of the fabric along the flow direction with imbedded fiber-optic Bragg gratings, flow velocity on the surface by correlating grain position in successive images, flow thickness with the streamwise shift of an oblique laser light sheet, velocity depth profile through a transparent side wall using a high-speed camera, and overall discharge rate. These independent measurements at inclinations between 33∘ and 37∘ above the angle of repose at 32.1±0.8∘ are consistent with a mass flow rate scaling as the 3/2 power of the flow depth, which is markedly different than flows on a rigid bumpy boundary. However, this power changes to 5/2 when flows are forced on the sand bed below its angle of repose. Strain measurements imply that the mean solid volume fraction in the flowing layer above the angle of repose is 0.268±0.033, independent of discharge rate or inclination. PMID:26382391

  14. Granular flows on a dissipative base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louge, Michel Y.; Valance, Alexandre; Lancelot, Paul; Delannay, Renaud; Artières, Olivier

    2015-08-01

    We study inclined channel flows of sand over a sensor-enabled composite geotextile fabric base that dissipates granular fluctuation energy. We record strain of the fabric along the flow direction with imbedded fiber-optic Bragg gratings, flow velocity on the surface by correlating grain position in successive images, flow thickness with the streamwise shift of an oblique laser light sheet, velocity depth profile through a transparent side wall using a high-speed camera, and overall discharge rate. These independent measurements at inclinations between 33∘ and 37∘ above the angle of repose at 32.1 ±0 .8∘ are consistent with a mass flow rate scaling as the 3 /2 power of the flow depth, which is markedly different than flows on a rigid bumpy boundary. However, this power changes to 5 /2 when flows are forced on the sand bed below its angle of repose. Strain measurements imply that the mean solid volume fraction in the flowing layer above the angle of repose is 0.268 ±0.033 , independent of discharge rate or inclination.

  15. Flow characteristics of the Cascade granular blanket

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, J.H.; Walton, O.R.

    1985-04-15

    Analysis of a single granule on a rotating cone shows that for the 35/sup 0/ half-angle, double-cone-shaped Cascade chamber, blanket granules will stay against the chamber wall if the rotational speed is 50 rpm or greater. The granules move axially down the wall with a slight (5-mm or less) sinusoidal oscillation in the circumferential direction. Granule chute-flow experiments confirm that two-layered flow can be obtained when the chute is inclined slightly above the granular material angle of repose. The top surface layer is thin and fast moving (supercritical flow). A thick bottom layer moves more slowly (subcritical flow controlled at the exit) with a velocity that increases with distance from the bottom of the chute. This is a desirable velocity profile because in the Cascade chamber about one-third of the fusion energy is deposited in the form of x rays and fusion-fuel-pellet debris in the top surface (inner-radius) layer.

  16. Drag-force regimes in granular impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Mukesh; Mohan, T. R. Krishna; Sen, Surajit

    2014-12-01

    We study the penetration dynamics of a projectile incident normally on a substrate comprising of smaller granular particles in three-dimensions using the discrete element method. Scaling of the penetration depth is consistent with experimental observations for small velocity impacts. Our studies are consistent with the observation that the normal or drag force experienced by the penetrating grain obeys the generalized Poncelet law, which has been extensively invoked in understanding the drag force in the recent experimental data. We find that the normal force experienced by the projectile consists of position and kinetic-energy-dependent pieces. Three different penetration regimes are identified in our studies for low-impact velocities. The first two regimes are observed immediately after the impact and in the early penetration stage, respectively, during which the drag force is seen to depend on the kinetic energy. The depth dependence of the drag force becomes significant in the third regime when the projectile is moving slowly and is partially immersed in the substrate. These regimes relate to the different configurations of the bed: the initial loose surface packed state, fluidized bed below the region of impact, and the state after the crater formation commences.

  17. Measurements of gravity driven granular channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facto, Kevin

    This dissertation presents experiments that studied two gravity driven granular channel flows. The first experiment used magnetic resonance imaging to measure the density and displacement distributions of poppy seeds flowing in a rough walled channel. Time-averaged measurements of normalized velocity and density showed little flow speed dependence. Instantaneous measurements, however, showed marked velocity dependence in the displacement distributions. There was evidence of aperiodic starting and stopping at lower flow speeds and the onset of density waves on a continuous flow at higher speeds. The second experiment measured forces in all three spatial directions at the boundary of a flow of steel balls. The relationship between the normal and the tangential forces were examined statistically and compared to the Coulomb friction model. For both large and small forces, the tangential and normal forces are unrelated, as there appears to be a strong tendency for the tangential force to maintain a value that will bear the weight the weight of the particles in flow.

  18. Penetration of projectiles into granular targets.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Suárez, J C

    2013-06-01

    Energetic collisions of subatomic particles with fixed or moving targets have been very valuable to penetrate into the mysteries of nature. But the mysteries are quite intriguing when projectiles and targets are macroscopically immense. We know that countless debris wandering in space impacted (and still do) large asteroids, moons and planets; and that millions of craters on their surfaces are traces of such collisions. By classifying and studying the morphology of such craters, geologists and astrophysicists obtain important clues to understand the origin and evolution of the Solar System. This review surveys knowledge about crater phenomena in the planetary science context, avoiding detailed descriptions already found in excellent papers on the subject. Then, it examines the most important results reported in the literature related to impact and penetration phenomena in granular targets obtained by doing simple experiments. The main goal is to discern whether both schools, one that takes into account the right ingredients (planetary bodies and very high energies) but cannot physically reproduce the collisions, and the other that easily carries out the collisions but uses laboratory ingredients (small projectiles and low energies), can arrive at a synergistic intersection point. PMID:23660625

  19. Drag-force regimes in granular impact.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Mukesh; Mohan, T R Krishna; Sen, Surajit

    2014-12-01

    We study the penetration dynamics of a projectile incident normally on a substrate comprising of smaller granular particles in three-dimensions using the discrete element method. Scaling of the penetration depth is consistent with experimental observations for small velocity impacts. Our studies are consistent with the observation that the normal or drag force experienced by the penetrating grain obeys the generalized Poncelet law, which has been extensively invoked in understanding the drag force in the recent experimental data. We find that the normal force experienced by the projectile consists of position and kinetic-energy-dependent pieces. Three different penetration regimes are identified in our studies for low-impact velocities. The first two regimes are observed immediately after the impact and in the early penetration stage, respectively, during which the drag force is seen to depend on the kinetic energy. The depth dependence of the drag force becomes significant in the third regime when the projectile is moving slowly and is partially immersed in the substrate. These regimes relate to the different configurations of the bed: the initial loose surface packed state, fluidized bed below the region of impact, and the state after the crater formation commences. PMID:25615080

  20. Accelerated drop detachment in granular suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnoit, Claire; Bertrand, Thibault; Clément, Eric; Lindner, Anke

    2012-04-01

    We experimentally study the detachment of drops of granular suspensions using a density matched model suspension with varying grain volume fraction (ϕ = 15% to 55%) and grain diameter (d = 20 μm to 140 μm). We show that at the beginning of the detachment process, the suspensions behave as an effective fluid. The detachment dynamics in this regime can be entirely described by the shear viscosity of the suspension [R. J. Furbank and J. F. Morris, Int. J. Multiphase Flow 33(4), 448-468 (2007)]. At later stages of the detachment, the dynamics become independent of the volume fraction and are found to be identical to the dynamics of the interstitial fluid. Surprisingly, visual observation reveals that at this stage, particles are still present in the neck. We suspect rearrangements of particles to locally free the neck of grains, causing the observed dynamics. Close to the final pinch off, the detachment of the suspensions is further accelerated, compared to the dynamics of pure interstitial fluid. This acceleration might be due to the fact that the neck diameter gets of the order of magnitude of the size of the grains and a continuous thinning of the liquid thread is not possible any more. The crossover between the different detachment regimes is a function of the grain size and the initial volume fraction. We characterize the overall acceleration as a function of the grain size and volume fraction.