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Sample records for wet granular matter

  1. 3D Imaging Of Wet Granular Matter

    E-print Network

    Anlage, Steven

    3D Imaging Of Wet Granular Matter Leonard Goff Advisor: Dr. Wolfgang Losert With Application to Penetrometer Insertion #12;3D Imaging Of Wet Granular Matter Leonard Goff, Advisor: Dr. Wolfgang Losert CoffeeSand Gravel Oops! #12;3D Imaging Of Wet Granular Matter Leonard Goff, Advisor: Dr. Wolfgang Losert

  2. Equation of State of Wet Granular Matter

    E-print Network

    A. Fingerle; S. Herminghaus

    2007-08-27

    A theory is derived for the nonequilibrium probability currents of the capillary interaction which determines the pair correlation function near contact. This yields an analytic expression for the equation of state, P = P(N/V,T), of wet granular matter for D=2 dimensions, valid in the complete density range from gas to jamming. Driven wet granular matter exhibits a van-der-Waals-like unstable branch at granular temperatures Tmatter [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 078001 (2006)], and extends the effect to higher dimensional systems. Since the limiting case of sticky bonds, E_cb >> T, is of relevance for aggregation in general, simulations have been performed which show very good agreement with the theoretically predicted coordination K of capillary bonds as a function of the bond length s_crit. This result implies that particles that stick at the surface, s_crit=0, form isostatic clusters.

  3. Equation of state of wet granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fingerle, A.; Herminghaus, S.

    2008-01-01

    An expression for the near-contact pair correlation function of D -dimensional weakly polydisperse hard spheres is presented, which arises from elementary free-volume arguments. Its derivative at contact agrees very well with our simulations for D=2 . For jammed states, the expression predicts that the number of exact contacts is equal to 2D, in agreement with established simulations. When the particles are wetted, they interact by the formation and rupture of liquid capillary bridges. Since formation and rupture events of capillary bonds are well separated in configuration space, the interaction is hysteretic with a characteristic energy loss Ecb . The pair correlation is strongly affected by this capillary interaction depending on the liquid-bond status of neighboring particles. A theory is derived for the nonequilibrium probability currents of the capillary interaction which determines the pair correlation function near contact. This finally yields an analytic expression for the equation of state, P=P(N/V,T) , of wet granular matter for D=2 , valid in the complete density range from gas to jamming. Driven wet granular matter exhibits a van der Waals-like unstable branch at granular temperatures Tgranular droplets reported for the free cooling of one-dimensional wet granular matter [A. Fingerle and S. Herminghaus, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 078001 (2006)], and extends the effect to higher dimensional systems. Since the limiting case of sticky bonds, Ecb?T , is of relevance for aggregation in general, simulations have been performed which show very good agreement with the theoretically predicted coordination K of capillary bonds as a function of the bond length scrit . This result implies that particles that stick at the surface, scrit=0 , form isostatic clusters. An extension of the theory in which the bridge coordination number K plays the role of a self-consistent mean-field is proposed.

  4. Period tripling causes rotating spirals in agitated wet granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kai; Rehberg, Ingo

    2012-02-01

    Pattern formation of a thin layer of vertically agitated wet granular matter is investigated experimentally. Due to the strong cohesion arising from the capillary bridges formed between adjacent particles, agitated wet granular matter exhibits a different scenario as its dry counter-part. Rotating spirals with three arms, which correspond to the kinks between regions with different colliding phases, are the dominating pattern. This preferred number of arms corresponds to period tripling of the agitated granular layer, unlike predominantly subharmonic Faraday crispations in dry granular matter. The chirality of the spatiotemporal pattern corresponds to the rotation direction of the spirals. Understanding this well traceable instability could pave a way for testifying elaborate theories on dense flow of wet granular matter.

  5. Arrest stress of uniformly sheared wet granular matter

    E-print Network

    S. H. Ebrahimnazhad Rahbari; M. Brinkmann; J. Vollmer

    2015-06-21

    We conduct extensive independent numerical experiments considering frictionless disks without internal degrees of freedom (rotation etc.) in two dimensions. We report here that for a large range of the packing fractions below random-close packing, all components of the stress tensor of wet granular materials remain finite in the limit of zero shear rate. This is direct evidence for a fluid-to-solid arrest transition. The offset value of the shear stress characterizes plastic deformation of the arrested state {which corresponds to {\\em dynamic yield stress} of the system}. {Based on an analytical line of argument, we propose that the mean number of capillary bridges per particle, $\

  6. Arrest stress of uniformly sheared wet granular matter.

    PubMed

    Rahbari, S H Ebrahimnazhad; Brinkmann, M; Vollmer, J

    2015-06-01

    We conduct extensive independent numerical experiments considering frictionless disks without internal degrees of freedom (rotation, etc.) in two dimensions. We report here that for a large range of the packing fractions below random-close packing, all components of the stress tensor of wet granular materials remain finite in the limit of zero shear rate. This is direct evidence for a fluid-to-solid arrest transition. The offset value of the shear stress characterizes plastic deformation of the arrested state which corresponds to dynamic yield stress of the system. Based on an analytical line of argument, we propose that the mean number of capillary bridges per particle, ?, follows a nontrivial dependence on the packing fraction, ?, and the capillary energy, ?. Most noticeably, we show that ? is a generic and universal quantity which does not depend on the driving protocol. Using this universal quantity, we calculate the arrest stress, ?(a), analytically based on a balance of the energy injection rate due to the external force driving the flow and the dissipation rate accounting for the rupture of capillary bridges. The resulting prediction of ?(a) is a nonlinear function of the packing fraction, ?, and the capillary energy, ?. This formula provides an excellent, parameter-free prediction of the numerical data. Corrections to the theory for small and large packing fractions are connected to the emergence of shear bands and of contributions to the stress from repulsive particle interactions, respectively. PMID:26172699

  7. Foam-film-stabilized liquid bridge networks in evaporative lithography and wet granular matter.

    PubMed

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Marston, Jeremy O; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2013-04-23

    Evaporative lithography using latex particle templates is a novel approach for the self-assembly of suspension-dispersed nanoparticles into ordered microwire networks. The phenomenon that drives the self-assembly process is the propagation of a network of interconnected liquid bridges between the template particles and the underlying substrate. With the aid of video microscopy, we demonstrate that these liquid bridges are in fact the border zone between the underlying substrate and foam films vertical to the substrate, which are formed during the evaporation of the liquid from the suspension. The stability of the foam films and thus the liquid bridge network stability are due to the presence of a small amount of surfactant in the evaporating solution. We show that the same type of foam-film-stabilized liquid bridge network can also propagate in 3D clusters of spherical particles, which has important implications for the understanding of wet granular matter. PMID:23534699

  8. The Role of Contact Angle Hysteresis for Fluid Transport in Wet Granular Matter

    E-print Network

    Roman Mani; Ciro Semprebon; Dirk Kadau; Hans J. Herrmann; Martin Brinkmann; Stephan Herminghaus

    2015-08-06

    The stability of sand castles is determined by the structure of wet granulates. Experimental data about the size distribution of fluid pockets are ambiguous about their origin. We discovered that contact angle hysteresis plays a fundamental role in the equilibrium distribution of bridge volumes, and not geometrical disorder as commonly conjectured, which has substantial consequences on the mechanical properties of wet granular beds, including a history dependent rheology and lowered strength. Our findings are obtained using a novel model where the Laplace pressures, bridge volumes and contact angles are dynamical variables associated to the contact points. While accounting for contact line pinning, we track the temporal evolution of each bridge. We observe a cross-over to a power-law decay of the variance of capillary pressures at late times and a saturation of the variance of bridge volumes to a finite value connected to contact line pinning. Large scale simulations of liquid transport in the bridge network reveal that the equilibration dynamics at early times is well described by a mean field model. The spread of final bridge volumes can be directly related to the magnitude of contact angle hysteresis.

  9. Erosion dynamics of a wet granular medium

    E-print Network

    Gautier Lefebvre; Pierre Jop

    2014-12-08

    Liquid may give strong cohesion properties to a granular medium, and confer a solid-like behavior. We study the erosion of a fixed circular aggregate of wet granular matter subjected to a flow of dry grains inside a half-filled rotating drum. During the rotation, the dry grains flow around the fixed obstacle. We show that its diameter decreases linearly with time for low liquid content, as wet grains are pulled-out of the aggregate. This erosion phenomenon is governed by the properties of the liquids. The erosion rate decreases exponentially with the surface tension while it depends on the viscosity to the power -1. We propose a model based on the force fluctuations arising inside the flow, explaining both dependencies: the capillary force acts as a threshold and the viscosity controls the erosion time scale. We also provide experiments using different flowing grains confirming our model.

  10. Granular matter: Charges dropped

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spahn, Frank; Sei?, Martin

    2015-09-01

    Granular charging can create some spectacular interactions, but gravity obscures our ability to observe and understand them. A neat desktop experiment circumvents this problem, shining a light on granular clustering -- and perhaps even planet formation.

  11. Wet granular materials submitted to thermal cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumay, Geoffroy; Ludewig, Francois; Fiscina, Jorge; Pakpour, Maryam; Vandewalle, Nicolas; Dorbolo, Stephane

    2015-03-01

    Many phenomenons observed in nature are related to the particular behavior of wet granular materials submitted to temperature cycling: ice-lens formation in soil leading to frost heaving, landslides, structures formation in permafrost, stone heave and possibly some geological formations observed on Mars. We present experimental results concerning the effect of thermal cycling on the packing fraction of equal spheres with the presence of water. First, the case corresponding to completely immersed granular piles is considered. Afterward, the effect of thermal cycling on unsaturated granular piles is discussed. The pile is submitted to temperature cycling ranging from T1 to T2. If the temperature is always higher than 4°C, the temperature increase (or decrease) induces a dilatation (or contraction) of the grains and of the water. We show that the packing fraction variation is mainly related to water dilatation and contraction. If the temperature decreases under 0°C during a cycle, the water situated between the grains experiences a strong dilatation during the freezing step and a contraction during the ice melting step. In this case, we show how the freeze-thaw transition affects the packing fraction of the pile.

  12. Morphological clues to wet granular pile stability.

    PubMed

    Scheel, M; Seemann, R; Brinkmann, M; Di Michiel, M; Sheppard, A; Breidenbach, B; Herminghaus, S

    2008-03-01

    When a granular material such as sand is mixed with a certain amount of liquid, the surface tension of the latter bestows considerable stiffness to the material, which enables, for example, sand castles to be sculpted. The geometry of the liquid interface within the granular pile is of extraordinary complexity and strongly varies with the liquid content. Surprisingly, the mechanical properties of the pile are largely independent of the amount of liquid over a wide range. We resolve this puzzle with the help of X-ray microtomography, showing that the remarkable insensitivity of the mechanical properties to the liquid content is due to the particular organization of the liquid in the pile into open structures. For spherical grains, a simple geometric rule is established, which relates the macroscopic properties to the internal liquid morphologies. We present evidence that this concept is also valid for systems with non-spherical grains. Hence, our results provide new insight towards understanding the complex physics of a large variety of wet granular systems including land slides, as well as mixing and agglomeration problems. PMID:18264104

  13. Locomotion and drag in wet and dry granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Daniel; Kuckuk, Robyn; Sharpe, Sarah

    2015-03-01

    Many animals move within substrates such as soil and dry sand; the resistive properties of such granular materials (GM) can depend on water content and compaction, but little is known about how such parameters affect locomotion or the relevant physics of drag and penetration. We developed a system to create homogeneous wet GM of varying moisture content and compaction in quantities sufficient to study the burial and subsurface locomotion of the Ocellated skink (C. ocellatus) a desert-generalist lizard. X-ray imaging revealed that in wet and dry GM the lizard slowly buried (~ 30 seconds) propagating a wave from head to tail, while moving in a start-stop motion. During forward movement, the head oscillated, and the forelimb on the convex side of the body propelled the animal. Although body kinematics (and ``slip'') were similar in both substrates, the burial depth was smaller in wet GM. Penetration and drag force experiments on smooth cylinders revealed that wet GM was ~ 3 × more resistive than dry GM, suggesting that during burial the lizard operated near its maximum force producing capability and was thus constrained by environmental properties. work supported by NSF PoLS.

  14. Swimming C. elegans in a wet granular medium Sunghwan Jung,1

    E-print Network

    Jung, Sunghwan "Sunny"

    , to characterize the surrogate efficiency of locomotion. Swimming motion in a granular medium, which more closelySwimming C. elegans in a wet granular medium Sunghwan Jung,1 Stella Lee,2 and Aravinthan Samuel2 1 per- form experiments on wild-type C. elegans swimming in a granular medium composed of 98 m glass

  15. $1/f$ noise on the brink of wet granular melting

    E-print Network

    Kai Huang

    2015-07-23

    The collective behavior of a two-dimensional wet granular cluster under horizontal swirling motions is investigated experimentally. Depending on the balance between the energy injection and dissipation, the cluster evolves into various nonequilibrium stationary states with strong internal structure fluctuations with time. Quantitative characterizations of the fluctuations with the bond orientational order parameter $q_{\\rm 6}$ reveal power spectra of the form $f^{\\alpha}$ with the exponent $\\alpha$ closely related to the stationary states of the system. In particular, $1/f$ type of noise with $\\alpha\\approx-1$ emerges as melting starts from the free surface of the cluster, suggesting the possibility of using $1/f$ noise as an indicator for phase transitions in systems driven far from thermodynamic equilibrium.

  16. Penetration depth scaling for impact into wet granular packings

    E-print Network

    Theodore A. Brzinski III; Jorin Schug; Kelly Mao; Douglas J. Durian

    2015-01-25

    We present experimental measurements of penetration depths for the impact of spheres into wetted granular media. We observe that the penetration depth in the liquid saturated case scales with projectile density, size, and drop height in a fashion consistent with the scaling observed in the dry case, but that penetration depths into saturated packings tend to be smaller. This result suggests that, for the range of impact energies observed, the stopping force is set by static contact forces between grains within the bed, and that the presence of liquid serves, primarily, to enhance these contact forces. The enhancement to the stopping force has a complicated dependence on liquid fraction, accompanied by a change in the drop-height dependence, that must be the consequence of accompanying changes in the conformation of the liquid phase in the interstices.

  17. Friction and dilatancy in immersed granular matter

    E-print Network

    Thibaut Divoux; Jean-Christophe Géminard

    2008-06-10

    The friction of a sliding plate on a thin immersed granular layer obeys Amonton-Coulomb law. We bring to the fore a large set of experimental results which indicate that, over a few decades of values, the effective dynamical friction-coefficient depends neither on the viscosity of the interstitial fluid nor on the size of beads in the sheared layer, which bears out the analogy with the solid-solid friction in a wide range of experimental parameters. We accurately determine the granular-layer dilatancy, which dependance on the grain size and slider velocity can be qualitatively accounted by considering the rheological behaviour of the whole slurry. However, additional results, obtained after modification of the grain surface by a chemical treatment, demonstrate that the theoretical description of the flow properties of granular matter, even immersed, requires the detailed properties of the grain surface to be taken into account.

  18. Extraterrestrial sink dynamics in granular matter

    E-print Network

    Altshuler, E; González-Pita, A; Sánchez-Colina, G; Pérez-Penichet, C; Waitukaitis, S; Hidalgo, R C

    2013-01-01

    A loosely packed bed of sand sits precariously on the fence between mechanically stable and flowing states. This has especially strong implications for animals or vehicles needing to navigate sandy environments, which can sink and become stuck in a "dry quicksand" if their weight exceeds the yield stress of this fragile matter. While it is known that the contact stresses in these systems are loaded by gravity, very little is known about the sinking dynamics of objects into loose granular systems under gravitational accelerations different from the Earth's (g). A fundamental understanding of how objects sink in different gravitational environments is not only necessary for successful planetary navigation and engineering, but it can also improve our understanding of celestial impact dynamics and crater geomorphology. Here we perform and explain the first systematic experiments of the sink dynamics of objects into granular media in gravitational accelerations other than g. By using an accelerating experimental a...

  19. Extraterrestrial sink dynamics in granular matter

    E-print Network

    E. Altshuler; H. Torres; A. González-Pita; G. Sánchez-Colina; C. Pérez-Penichet; S. Waitukaitis; R. C. Hidalgo

    2013-06-04

    A loosely packed bed of sand sits precariously on the fence between mechanically stable and flowing states. This has especially strong implications for animals or vehicles needing to navigate sandy environments, which can sink and become stuck in a "dry quicksand" if their weight exceeds the yield stress of this fragile matter. While it is known that the contact stresses in these systems are loaded by gravity, very little is known about the sinking dynamics of objects into loose granular systems under gravitational accelerations different from the Earth's (g). A fundamental understanding of how objects sink in different gravitational environments is not only necessary for successful planetary navigation and engineering, but it can also improve our understanding of celestial impact dynamics and crater geomorphology. Here we perform and explain the first systematic experiments of the sink dynamics of objects into granular media in different gravitational accelerations. By using an accelerating experimental apparatus, we explore gravitational conditions ranging from 0.4g to 1.2g. With the aid of discrete element modeling simulations, we reproduce these results and extend this range to include objects as small as asteroids and as large as Jupiter. Surprisingly, we find that the final sink depth is independent of the gravitational acceleration, an observation with immediate relevance to the design of future extraterrestrial structures land-roving spacecraft. Using a phenomenological equation of motion that includes a gravity-loaded frictional term, we are able to quantitatively explain the experimental and simulation results.

  20. Scaling of liquid-drop impact craters in wet granular media

    E-print Network

    Qianyun Zhang; Ming Gao; Runchen Zhao; Xiang Cheng

    2015-10-27

    Combining high-speed photography with laser profilometry, we study the dynamics and the morphology of liquid-drop impact cratering in wet granular media---a ubiquitous phenomenon relevant to many important geological, agricultural, and industrial processes. By systematically investigating important variables such as impact energy, the size of impinging drops and the degree of liquid saturation in granular beds, we uncover a novel scaling for the size of impact craters. We show that this scaling can be explained by considering the balance between the inertia of impinging drops and the strength of impacted surface. Such a theoretical understanding confirms that the unique energy partition originally proposed for liquid-drop impact cratering in dry granular media also applies for impact cratering in wet granular media. Moreover, we demonstrate that compressive stresses, instead of shear stresses, control granular impact cratering. Our study enriches the picture of generic granular impact cratering and sheds light on the familiar phenomena of raindrop impacts in granular media.

  1. Scaling of liquid-drop impact craters in wet granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qianyun; Gao, Ming; Zhao, Runchen; Cheng, Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Combining high-speed photography with laser profilometry, we study the dynamics and the morphology of liquid-drop impact cratering in wet granular media—a ubiquitous phenomenon relevant to many important geological, agricultural, and industrial processes. By systematically investigating important variables such as impact energy, the size of impinging drops, and the degree of liquid saturation in granular beds, we uncover a scaling law for the size of impact craters. We show that this scaling can be explained by considering the balance between the inertia of impinging drops and the strength of impacted surface. Such a theoretical understanding confirms that the unique energy partition originally proposed for liquid-drop impact cratering in dry granular media also applies for impact cratering in wet granular media. Moreover, we demonstrate that compressive stresses, instead of shear stresses, control the process of granular impact cratering. Our study enriches the picture of generic granular impact cratering and sheds light on the familiar phenomena of raindrop impacts in granular media.

  2. Scaling of liquid-drop impact craters in wet granular media.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianyun; Gao, Ming; Zhao, Runchen; Cheng, Xiang

    2015-10-01

    Combining high-speed photography with laser profilometry, we study the dynamics and the morphology of liquid-drop impact cratering in wet granular media-a ubiquitous phenomenon relevant to many important geological, agricultural, and industrial processes. By systematically investigating important variables such as impact energy, the size of impinging drops, and the degree of liquid saturation in granular beds, we uncover a scaling law for the size of impact craters. We show that this scaling can be explained by considering the balance between the inertia of impinging drops and the strength of impacted surface. Such a theoretical understanding confirms that the unique energy partition originally proposed for liquid-drop impact cratering in dry granular media also applies for impact cratering in wet granular media. Moreover, we demonstrate that compressive stresses, instead of shear stresses, control the process of granular impact cratering. Our study enriches the picture of generic granular impact cratering and sheds light on the familiar phenomena of raindrop impacts in granular media. PMID:26565233

  3. Quantitatively mimicking wet colloidal suspensions with dry granular media

    PubMed Central

    Messina, René; Aljawhari, Sarah; Bécu, Lydiane; Schockmel, Julien; Lumay, Geoffroy; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Athermal two-dimensional granular systems are exposed to external mechanical noise leading to Brownian-like motion. Using tunable repulsive interparticle interaction, it is shown that the same microstructure as that observed in colloidal suspensions can be quantitatively recovered at a macroscopic scale. To that end, experiments on granular and colloidal systems made up of magnetized particles as well as computer simulations are performed and compared. Excellent agreement throughout the range of the magnetic coupling parameter is found for the pair distribution as well as the bond-orientational correlation functions. This finding opens new ways to efficiently and very conveniently explore phase transitions, crystallization, nucleation, etc in confined geometries. PMID:26030718

  4. Quantitatively mimicking wet colloidal suspensions with dry granular media.

    PubMed

    Messina, René; Aljawhari, Sarah; Bécu, Lydiane; Schockmel, Julien; Lumay, Geoffroy; Vandewalle, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Athermal two-dimensional granular systems are exposed to external mechanical noise leading to Brownian-like motion. Using tunable repulsive interparticle interaction, it is shown that the same microstructure as that observed in colloidal suspensions can be quantitatively recovered at a macroscopic scale. To that end, experiments on granular and colloidal systems made up of magnetized particles as well as computer simulations are performed and compared. Excellent agreement throughout the range of the magnetic coupling parameter is found for the pair distribution as well as the bond-orientational correlation functions. This finding opens new ways to efficiently and very conveniently explore phase transitions, crystallization, nucleation, etc in confined geometries. PMID:26030718

  5. Bottom pressure scaling of vibro-fluidized granular matter.

    PubMed

    Katsuragi, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Vibrated granular beds show various interesting phenomena such as convection, segregation, and so on. However, its fundamental physical properties (e.g., internal pressure structure) have not yet been understood well. Thus, in this study, the bottom wall pressure in a vertically vibrated granular column is experimentally measured and used to reveal the nature of granular fluidization. The scaling method allows us to elucidate the fluidization (softening) degree of a vibrated granular column. The peak value of the bottom pressure pm is scaled as ?, where pJ, d, g, ?, H, and ? are the Janssen pressure, grain diameter, gravitational acceleration, angular frequency, height of the column, and dimensionless vibrational acceleration, respectively. This scaling implies that the pressure of vibrated granular matter is quite different from the classical pressure forms: static and dynamic pressures. This scaling represents the importance of geometric factors for discussing the behavior of vibro-fluidized granular matter. The scaling is also useful to evaluate the dissipation degree in vibro-fluidized granular matter. PMID:26602973

  6. Bottom pressure scaling of vibro-fluidized granular matter

    PubMed Central

    Katsuragi, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Vibrated granular beds show various interesting phenomena such as convection, segregation, and so on. However, its fundamental physical properties (e.g., internal pressure structure) have not yet been understood well. Thus, in this study, the bottom wall pressure in a vertically vibrated granular column is experimentally measured and used to reveal the nature of granular fluidization. The scaling method allows us to elucidate the fluidization (softening) degree of a vibrated granular column. The peak value of the bottom pressure pm is scaled as ?, where pJ, d, g, ?, H, and ? are the Janssen pressure, grain diameter, gravitational acceleration, angular frequency, height of the column, and dimensionless vibrational acceleration, respectively. This scaling implies that the pressure of vibrated granular matter is quite different from the classical pressure forms: static and dynamic pressures. This scaling represents the importance of geometric factors for discussing the behavior of vibro-fluidized granular matter. The scaling is also useful to evaluate the dissipation degree in vibro-fluidized granular matter. PMID:26602973

  7. Electrical properties of granular matter: From "Branly effect" to intermittency

    E-print Network

    Falcon, Eric - Laboratoire Matière et Systèmes Complexes, Université Paris 7

    Electrical properties of granular matter: From "Branly effect" to intermittency E. Falcon & B; Falcon et al. 2004). Our goal in this paper is to understand the dc Branly effect by means of an experiment with a chain of metallic beads (Falcon et al. 2004; Falcon & Castaing 2005). Our focus

  8. Controlled preparation of wet granular media reveals limits to lizard burial ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Sarah S.; Kuckuk, Robyn; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2015-07-01

    Many animals move within ground composed of granular media (GM); the resistive properties of such substrates can depend on water content and compaction, but little is known about how such parameters affect locomotion or the physics of drag and penetration. Using apparatus to control compaction of GM, our recent studies of movement in dry GM have revealed locomotion strategies of specialized dry-sand-swimming reptiles. However, these animals represent a small fraction of the diversity and presumed burial strategies of fossorial reptilian fauna. Here we develop a system to create states of wet GM of varying moisture content and compaction in quantities sufficient to study the burial and subsurface locomotion of the Ocellated skink (C. ocellatus), a generalist lizard. X-ray imaging revealed that in wet and dry GM the lizard slowly buried (? 30 s) propagating a wave from head to tail, while moving in a start-stop motion. During forward movement, the head oscillated, and the forelimb on the convex side of the body propelled the animal. Although body kinematics and ‘slip’ were similar in both substrates, the burial depth was smaller in wet GM. Penetration and drag force experiments on smooth cylinders revealed that wet GM was ? 4× more resistive than dry GM. In total, our measurements indicate that while the rheology of the dry and wet GM differ substantially, the lizard's burial motor pattern is conserved across substrates, while its burial depth is largely constrained by environmental resistance.

  9. Controlled preparation of wet granular media reveals limits to lizard burial ability.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Sarah S; Kuckuk, Robyn; Goldman, Daniel I

    2015-07-01

    Many animals move within ground composed of granular media (GM); the resistive properties of such substrates can depend on water content and compaction, but little is known about how such parameters affect locomotion or the physics of drag and penetration. Using apparatus to control compaction of GM, our recent studies of movement in dry GM have revealed locomotion strategies of specialized dry-sand-swimming reptiles. However, these animals represent a small fraction of the diversity and presumed burial strategies of fossorial reptilian fauna. Here we develop a system to create states of wet GM of varying moisture content and compaction in quantities sufficient to study the burial and subsurface locomotion of the Ocellated skink (C. ocellatus), a generalist lizard. X-ray imaging revealed that in wet and dry GM the lizard slowly buried (?30 s) propagating a wave from head to tail, while moving in a start-stop motion. During forward movement, the head oscillated, and the forelimb on the convex side of the body propelled the animal. Although body kinematics and 'slip' were similar in both substrates, the burial depth was smaller in wet GM. Penetration and drag force experiments on smooth cylinders revealed that wet GM was ?4× more resistive than dry GM. In total, our measurements indicate that while the rheology of the dry and wet GM differ substantially, the lizard's burial motor pattern is conserved across substrates, while its burial depth is largely constrained by environmental resistance. PMID:26109565

  10. Runaway electrification of friable self-replicating granular matter.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Julyan H E; Escribano, Bruno; Grothe, Hinrich; Piro, Oreste; Sainz Díaz, C Ignacio; Tuval, Idan

    2013-10-15

    We establish that the nonlinear dynamics of collisions between particles favors the charging of an insulating, friable, self-replicating granular material that undergoes nucleation, growth, and fission processes; we demonstrate with a minimal dynamical model that secondary nucleation produces a positive feedback in an electrification mechanism that leads to runaway charging. We discuss ice as an example of such a self-replicating granular material: We confirm with laboratory experiments in which we grow ice from the vapor phase in situ within an environmental scanning electron microscope that charging causes fast-growing and easily breakable palmlike structures to form, which when broken off may form secondary nuclei. We propose that thunderstorms, both terrestrial and on other planets, and lightning in the solar nebula are instances of such runaway charging arising from this nonlinear dynamics in self-replicating granular matter. PMID:24041221

  11. Runaway electrification of friable self-replicating granular matter

    E-print Network

    Julyan H. E. Cartwright; Bruno Escribano; Hinrich Grothe; Oreste Piro; C. Ignacio Sainz Díaz; Idan Tuval

    2014-11-19

    We establish that the nonlinear dynamics of collisions between particles favors the charging of a insulating, friable, self-replicating granular material that undergoes nucleation, growth, and fission processes; we demonstrate with a minimal dynamical model that secondary nucleation produces a positive feedback in an electrification mechanism that leads to runaway charging. We discuss ice as an example of such a self-replicating granular material: We confirm with laboratory experiments in which we grow ice from the vapor phase in situ within an environmental scanning electron microscope that charging causes fast-growing and easily breakable palm-like structures to form, which when broken off may form secondary nuclei. We propose that thunderstorms, both terrestrial and on other planets, and lightning in the solar nebula are instances of such runaway charging arising from this nonlinear dynamics in self-replicating granular matter.

  12. Runaway Electrification of Friable Self-Replicating Granular Matter

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We establish that the nonlinear dynamics of collisions between particles favors the charging of an insulating, friable, self-replicating granular material that undergoes nucleation, growth, and fission processes; we demonstrate with a minimal dynamical model that secondary nucleation produces a positive feedback in an electrification mechanism that leads to runaway charging. We discuss ice as an example of such a self-replicating granular material: We confirm with laboratory experiments in which we grow ice from the vapor phase in situ within an environmental scanning electron microscope that charging causes fast-growing and easily breakable palmlike structures to form, which when broken off may form secondary nuclei. We propose that thunderstorms, both terrestrial and on other planets, and lightning in the solar nebula are instances of such runaway charging arising from this nonlinear dynamics in self-replicating granular matter. PMID:24041221

  13. Numerical investigation of the cylinder movement in granular matter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue; Sheng, Daichao; Kouretzis, George P; Krabbenhoft, Kristian; Sloan, Scott W

    2015-02-01

    We investigate numerically the mechanisms governing horizontal dragging of a rigid cylinder buried inside granular matter, with particular emphasis on enumerating drag and lift forces that resist cylinder movement. The recently proposed particle finite element method is employed, which combines the robustness of classical continuum mechanics formulations in terms of representing complex aspects of the material constitutive behavior, with the effectiveness of discrete element methods in simulating ultralarge deformation problems. The investigation focuses on the effect of embedment depth, cylinder roughness, granular matter macromechanical properties, and of the magnitude of the cylinder's horizontal displacement on the amplitude of the resisting forces, which are discussed in light of published experimental data. Interpretation of the results provides insight on how the material flow around the cylinder affects the developing resistance, and a mechanism is proposed to describe the development of a steady-state drag force at large horizontal movements of the cylinder. PMID:25768495

  14. Discrete particle simulations and experiments on the collapse of wet granular columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrieli, Fabio; Artoni, Riccardo; Santomaso, Andrea; Cola, Simonetta

    2013-10-01

    Small quantities of liquid in a granular material control the flow dynamics as well as the triggering and jamming phases. In order to study this problem, some experimental collapse tests conducted in a rectangular box were reproduced with a 1:1 scale numerical model using the Discrete Element Method. In simulations the effect of the capillary bridges has been investigated implementing a mid-range attractive force between particles based on the minimum energy approach. Also a bonding-debonding mechanism was incorporated in the algorithm and the volume of each sessile drop on the particle surface was considered during its motion. The influence of some variables was investigated with respect to the final slope profiles and the runout lengths: the initial liquid content, the particle size, the solid density, the liquid surface tension, and the liquid-solid contact angle. Also the crucial effect of the confinement walls on the collapse phenomenon was investigated: wet particles adhere to the lateral walls providing a higher flow resistance in comparison to the same material in dry conditions. It was observed that particles with largest path-lengths are localized near the movable wall at a middle-height of the initial column sample. Other particles at the surface moves in a rigid way especially if they were wet and with a low solid density. The "fidelity" of each particle with respect to the nearest neighbours was evaluated allowing to recognize the emergence of clusters of particles and rigid parts, to extract the failure surface and to localize where debonding mechanisms concentrate in the wet case.

  15. Stress-dependent normal-mode frequencies from the effective mass of granular matter.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanqing; Johnson, David L; Valenza, John J; Santibanez, Francisco; Makse, Hernán A

    2014-06-01

    A zero-temperature critical point has been invoked to control the anomalous behavior of granular matter as it approaches jamming or mechanical arrest. Criticality manifests itself in an anomalous spectrum of low-frequency normal modes and scaling behavior near the jamming transition. The critical point may explain the peculiar mechanical properties of dissimilar systems such as glasses and granular materials. Here we study the critical scenario via an experimental measurement of the normal modes frequencies of granular matter under stress from a pole decomposition analysis of the effective mass. We extract a complex-valued characteristic frequency which displays scaling |? (?)| ? ??' with vanishing stress ? for a variety of granular systems. The critical exponent is smaller than that predicted by mean-field theory opening new challenges to explain the exponent for frictional and dissipative granular matter. Our results shed light on the anomalous behavior of stress-dependent acoustics and attenuation in granular materials near the jamming transition. PMID:25019765

  16. Continuous shearing of dense and wet granular materials in a torsional rheometer 

    E-print Network

    Kannan, Raguraman

    2002-01-01

    . The experimental research mainly focuses on the rapid deformation of granular material in a confined area. Experiments were carried out on a torsional rheometer to study how the addition of different types of lubricating oils affect the characteristics of granular...

  17. Micro-macro transition and simplified contact models for wet granular materials

    E-print Network

    Sudeshna Roy; Abhinendra Singh; Stefan Luding; Thomas Weinhart

    2015-06-21

    Wet granular materials in a quasi-static steady state shear flow have been studied with discrete particle simulations. Macroscopic quantities, consistent with the conservation laws of continuum theory, are obtained by time averaging and spatial coarse-graining. Initial studies involve understanding the effect of liquid content and liquid properties like the surface tension on the macroscopic quantities. Two parameters of the liquid bridge contact model have been studied as the constitutive parameters that define the structure of this model (i) the rupture distance of the liquid bridge model, which is proportional to the liquid content, and (ii) the maximum adhesive force, as controlled by the surface tension of the liquid. Subsequently a correlation is developed between these micro parameters and the steady state cohesion in the limit of zero confining pressure. Furthermore, as second result, the macroscopic torque measured at the walls, which is an experimentally accessible parameter, is predicted from our simulation results as a dependence on the micro-parameters. Finally, the steady state cohesion of a realistic non-linear liquid bridge contact model scales well with the steady state cohesion for a simpler linearized irreversible contact model with the same maximum adhesive force and equal energy dissipated per contact.

  18. Micro-macro transition and simplified contact models for wet granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sudeshna; Singh, Abhinendra; Luding, Stefan; Weinhart, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Wet granular materials in a quasistatic steady-state shear flow have been studied with discrete particle simulations. Macroscopic quantities, consistent with the conservation laws of continuum theory, are obtained by time averaging and spatial coarse graining. Initial studies involve understanding the effect of liquid content and liquid properties like the surface tension on the macroscopic quantities. Two parameters of the liquid bridge contact model have been identified as the constitutive parameters that influence the macroscopic rheology (i) the rupture distance of the liquid bridge model, which is proportional to the liquid content, and (ii) the maximum adhesive force, as controlled by the surface tension of the liquid. Subsequently, a correlation is developed between these microparameters and the steady-state cohesion in the limit of zero confining pressure. Furthermore, as second result, the macroscopic torque measured at the walls, which is an experimentally accessible parameter, is predicted from our simulation results with the same dependence on the microparameters. Finally, the steady- state cohesion of a realistic non-linear liquid bridge contact model scales well with the steady-state cohesion for a simpler linearized irreversible contact model with the same maximum adhesive force and equal energy dissipated per contact.

  19. Force Network Ensemble: A New Approach to Static Granular Matter Jacco H. Snoeijer,1

    E-print Network

    van Saarloos, Wim

    Force Network Ensemble: A New Approach to Static Granular Matter Jacco H. Snoeijer,1 Thijs J. H) An ensemble approach for force distributions in static granular packings is developed. This frame- work is based on the separation of packing and force scales, together with an a priori flat measure in the force

  20. Granular Matter (2013) 15:893911 DOI 10.1007/s10035-013-0440-x

    E-print Network

    Luding, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    -Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013 Abstract Buoyancy driven granular convection is stud- ied for a shallow convection in vertically shaken granular matter: experiment, numerics, and theory Peter Eshuis · Ko van der convection is accurately reproduced P. Eshuis · H. J. van Gerner · M. van der Hoef · D. van der Meer · D

  1. Jamming during the discharge of granular matter from a silo Iker Zuriguel,1,

    E-print Network

    Weeks, Eric R.

    Jamming during the discharge of granular matter from a silo Iker Zuriguel,1, * Angel Garcimartín,1 February 2005; published 12 May 2005 In this work, we present an experimental study of the jamming bigger than the beads, granular material jams the outlet of the container due to the formation of an arch

  2. Correlation between Particle Motion and Voronoi-Cell-Shape Fluctuations during the Compaction of Granular Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotterback, Steven; Toiya, Masahiro; Goff, Leonard; Douglas, Jack F.; Losert, Wolfgang

    2008-12-01

    We track particle motions in a granular material subjected to compaction using a laser scattering-based imaging method where compaction is achieved through thermal cycling. Particle displacements in this jammed fluid correlate strongly with rearrangements of the Voronoi cells defining the local environment about the particles, similar to previous observations of Rahman on cooled liquids. Our observations provide further evidence of commonalities between particle dynamics in granular matter close to jamming and supercooled liquids.

  3. Granular Matter manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor)

    E-print Network

    Luding, Stefan

    to determine both rolling and torsion friction coefficients together with their associated length scales largest for rolling. Keywords Nanoindentation · Friction · Contact mechanics · Granular solids · Tribology · Adhesion R. Fuchs · J. Meyer · H. Zhuang · T. Staedler · X. Jiang Institute of Materials Engineering

  4. Scale invariance and universality of force networks in static granular matter

    E-print Network

    Srdjan Ostojic; Ellak Somfai; Bernard Nienhuis

    2006-01-03

    Force networks form the skeleton of static granular matter. They are the key ingredient to mechanical properties, such as stability, elasticity and sound transmission, which are of utmost importance for civil engineering and industrial processing. Previous studies have focused on the global structure of external forces (the boundary condition), and on the probability distribution of individual contact forces. The disordered spatial structure of the force network, however, has remained elusive so far. Here we report evidence for scale invariance of clusters of particles that interact via relatively strong forces. We analyzed granular packings generated by molecular dynamics simulations mimicking real granular matter; despite the visual variation, force networks for various values of the confining pressure and other parameters have identical scaling exponents and scaling function, and thus determine a universality class. Remarkably, the flat ensemble of force configurations--a simple generalization of equilibrium statistical mechanics--belongs to the same universality class, while some widely studied simplified models do not.

  5. Granular Matter (2008) 10:235246 DOI 10.1007/s10035-008-0099-x

    E-print Network

    Luding, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    -resistance · Adhesion · Plastic deformation 1 Introduction Cohesive, frictional, fine powders show a peculiar flow, but also the transition from the microscopic contact properties to the macroscopic flow behavior. This soGranular Matter (2008) 10:235­246 DOI 10.1007/s10035-008-0099-x Cohesive, frictional powders

  6. Granular Matter (2011) 13:241245 DOI 10.1007/s10035-011-0248-5

    E-print Network

    Blumenfeld, Rafi

    2011-01-01

    and growth in Da Vinci fluids Moshe Schwartz · Raphael Blumenfeld Received: 27 September 2010 / Published matter -- a da Vinci fluid. The local properties of the fluid are generically different from ordinary flow regions. Keywords Da Vinci fluid · Dense granular flow · Plug formation · Plug flow · Flow

  7. Particle Shape and Dynamics of Granular Matter: Swarming to Swirling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudrolli, Arshad

    2007-03-01

    We will discuss a series of experiments performed with granular rods, dimers, and flexible chains on a vibrated plate to illustrate the effect of particle shape on self-organization. A non-spherical shape is shown to lead to not only states which resemble nematic and smectic phases but also causes novel dynamics [1]. The ratchet mechanism which leads to vortex motion in a collection of rods on a vibrated plate and drift motion in a bouncing dimer will be discussed [2, 3]. The friction at the point of contact between particle and the substrate, and the coupling about the center of mass of a non-spherical is proposed to lead to observed motion. Exploiting this mechanism we construct mechanical self-propelled particles (SPP) using rods with asymmetric mass distributions. We then investigate the SSP number fluctuations, flow fields, and orientation order inside a container as a function of number density and excitation, and compare their statistics with recent models of active nematic particles and living cells.1. ``Vortices in vibrated granular rods," D.L. Blair, T. Neicu, and A. Kudrolli, Phys. Rev. E 67, 031303 (2003).2. ``Anisotropy driven dynamics in vibrated granular rods," D. Volfson, A. Kudrolli, and L.S. Tsimring, Phys. Rev. E 70, 051312 (2004).3. ``Dynamics of a bouncing dimer," S. Dorbolo, D. Volfson, L. Tsimring, and A. Kudrolli, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 044101 (2005).

  8. "Lock in accelerometry" to follow sink dynamics in shaken granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Cecile; Sanchez-Colina, Gustavo; Alonso-Llanes, Laciel; Martinez-Roman, Etien; Batitsta-Leyva, Alfo-Jose; Toussaint, Renaud; Altshuler, Ernesto

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the penetration dynamics of intruders in granular beds is relevant not only for fundamental Physics, but also for geophysical processes and construction on granular soils in earthquake areas. Indeed a phenomenon named soil liquefaction can cause buildings to sink or tilt in areas separated of 1000 km from the epicentre in the worst cases. The damages on the constructions, the pipes and the roads may be huge. There is a conventional understanding of liquefaction from which scientists made theoretical and empirical laws for geotechnical use and building construction, but the dynamical penetration of buildings into the soil is still not well understood. While the penetration of intruders in 2D laboratory granular beds can be followed using video recording, it is useless in 3D beds of non-transparent materials such as common sand. Wireless accelerometry constitutes a natural alternative that has been used in very few occasions, however, it has never been used to quantify the penetration into horizontally shaken granular beds. Here we propose a method to quantify the sink dynamics of an intruder into laterally shaken, fluidized granular bed. We developped an embarked accelerometer small enough to fit into a modelized building. This sensor allows us to follow the intruder in realistic conditions namely buried in a 3D box of sand. Our method is based on the temporal correlations between the signals from a reference accelerometer fixed to the shaken granular bed, and the accelerometer deployed inside the intruder. We demonstrate that our method is able to determine the time interval of sinking of an intruder into shaken granular beds for both quasi-2D and 3D systems [1]. Due to its analogy with the working principle of a lock in amplifier, we call this technique Lock in accelerometry (LIA). In the experiments the intruder stops at a depth that we assume to be the beginning of the "jammed" granular phase. We are now developing numerical simulations based on a molecular dynamic algorithm to confirm or not this assumption. We modelized a granular bed with particles of the same size than the one used in the experiments. Because we have access to the velocity of every particles we can quantify the dynamic of each layers of the granular medium and find its "jammed" boundary. Reference [1] G Sánchez-Colina, L Alonso-Llanes, E Martínez, AJ Batista-Leyva, C Clement, C Fliedner, R Toussaint, and E Altshuler. Note :"lock-in accelerometry" to follow sink dynamics in shaken granular matter. Review of Scientific Instruments, 85(12) :126101, 2014.

  9. A Maxwell Construction for Phase Separation in Vibrated Granular Matter?

    E-print Network

    James P. D. Clewett; Jack Wade; R. M. Bowley; Stephan Herminghaus; Michael R. Swift; Marco G. Mazza

    2015-02-28

    Experiments and computer simulations are carried out to investigate ordering principles in a granular gas which phase separates under vibration. The densities of the dilute and the dense phase are found to follow a lever rule. A Maxwell construction is found to predict both the coexisting pressure and binodal densities remarkably well, despite the fact that the pressure-volume characteristic $P(v)$ is not an isotherm. Although the system is far from equilibrium and energy conservation is strongly violated, we derive the construction from the minimization of mechanical work and fluctuating particle currents.

  10. Applying the model of Soft Glassy Rheology to slowly driven dense granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Dapeng; Chakraborty, Bulbul

    2009-03-01

    In recent work by S. Henkes and B. Chakraborty (PRL 95, 198002 (2005)), a new statistical framework is proposed to describe static granular packings. In this framework, stress replaces energy as the conserved quantity and fluctuations in the stress are controlled by a quantity analogous to the thermodynamic temperature. We adapt this framework in the quasi-static limit and the model of Soft Glassy Rheology (P. Sollich, PRE 78, 2020 (1997)) to describe the rheological behavior of slowly driven dense granular matter. The model explains the experimental observation of R. P. Behringer et al. (Nature 421, 928 (2003)). We will describe ongoing efforts to apply this model to different categories of slowly driven granular media, and to relate the model to threshold critical dynamics in other driven random media.

  11. Does canopy wetness matter? Evapotranspiration from a subtropical montane cloud forest in Taiwan

    E-print Network

    Chen, Jiquan

    Does canopy wetness matter? Evapotranspiration from a subtropical montane cloud forest in Taiwan, Münster, Germany Abstract: Evapotranspiration (ET) and canopy wetness were measured over a 2-year and formulate adaptive management plans. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. KEY WORDS evapotranspiration

  12. Flocking at a distance in active granular matter.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nitin; Soni, Harsh; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Sood, A K

    2014-01-01

    The self-organized motion of vast numbers of creatures in a single direction is a spectacular example of emergent order. Here, we recreate this phenomenon using actuated nonliving components. We report here that millimetre-sized tapered rods, rendered motile by contact with an underlying vibrated surface and interacting through a medium of spherical beads, undergo a phase transition to a state of spontaneous alignment of velocities and orientations above a threshold bead area fraction. Guided by a detailed simulation model, we construct an analytical theory of this flocking transition, with two ingredients: a moving rod drags beads; neighbouring rods reorient in the resulting flow like a weathercock in the wind. Theory and experiment agree on the structure of our phase diagram in the plane of rod and bead concentrations and power-law spatial correlations near the phase boundary. Our discovery suggests possible new mechanisms for the collective transport of particulate or cellular matter. PMID:25181961

  13. Flocking at a distance in active granular matter

    E-print Network

    Nitin Kumar; Harsh Soni; Sriram Ramaswamy; A. K. Sood

    2014-09-22

    The self-organised motion of vast numbers of creatures in a single direction is a spectacular example of emergent order. We recreate this phenomenon using actuated non-living components. We report here that millimetre-sized tapered rods, rendered motile by contact with an underlying vibrated surface and interacting through a medium of spherical beads, undergo a phase transition to a state of spontaneous alignment of velocities and orientations above a threshold bead area fraction. Guided by a detailed simulation model, we construct an analytical theory of this flocking transition, with two ingredients: a moving rod drags beads; neighbouring rods reorient in the resulting flow like a weathercock in the wind. Theory and experiment agree on the structure of our phase diagram in the plane of rod and bead concentrations and power-law spatial correlations near the phase boundary. Our discovery suggests possible new mechanisms for the collective transport of particulate or cellular matter.

  14. Granular magnetoresistance in cobalt/poly ,,3-hexylthiophene, 2, 5-diyl... hybrid thin films prepared by a wet chemical method

    E-print Network

    Krishnan, Kannan M.

    Granular magnetoresistance in cobalt/poly ,,3-hexylthiophene, 2, 5-diyl... hybrid thin films 98195-2120, USA Received 1 June 2009; accepted 8 August 2009; published online 27 August 2009 Cobalt regions containing the cobalt nanoparticles. Magnetic and transport measurements are consistent

  15. Simulation of electron-matter interaction during wet-STEM electron tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Septiyanto, Rahmat Firman; Masenelli-Varlot, Karine; Iskandar, Ferry

    2014-02-24

    Tomography is an efficient tool to probe the 3 dimensional (3D) structure of materials. In the laboratory, a device has been developed to perform electron tomography in an environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The configuration of Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) in Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) provides a novel approach for the characterization of the 3D structure of materials and optimizes a compromise between the resolution level of a few nm and the large tomogram due to the high thickness of transparency. Moreover, STEM allows the observation in 2D of wet samples in an ESEM by finely controlling the sample temperature and the water pressure of the sample environment. It has been recently demonstrated that it was possible to acquire image series of hydrated objects and thus to attain 3D characterization of wet samples. In order to get reliable and quantitative data, the present study deals with the simulation of electron-matter interactions. From such simulation on the MCM-41 material, we determine the minimum quantity of water layer which can be detected on wet materials.

  16. Attractive emulsion droplets probe the phase diagram of jammed granular matter.

    PubMed

    Jorjadze, Ivane; Pontani, Lea-Laetitia; Newhall, Katherine A; Brujic, Jasna

    2011-03-15

    It remains an open question whether statistical mechanics approaches apply to random packings of athermal particles. Although a jamming phase diagram has recently been proposed for hard spheres with varying friction, here we use a frictionless emulsion system in the presence of depletion forces to sample the available phase space of packing configurations. Using confocal microscopy, we access their packing microstructure and test the theoretical assumptions. As a function of attraction, our packing protocol under gravity leads to well-defined jammed structures in which global density initially increases above random close packing and subsequently decreases monotonically. Microscopically, the fluctuations in parameters describing each particle, such as the coordination number, number of neighbors, and local packing fraction, are for all attractions in excellent agreement with a local stochastic model, indicating that long-range correlations are not important. Furthermore, the distributions of local cell volumes can be collapsed onto a universal curve using the predicted k-gamma distribution, in which the shape parameter k is fixed by the polydispersity while the effect of attraction is captured by rescaling the average cell volume. Within the Edwards statistical mechanics framework, this result measures the decrease in compactivity with global density, which represents a direct experimental test of a jamming phase diagram in athermal systems. The success of these theoretical tools in describing yet another class of materials gives support to the much-debated statistical physics of jammed granular matter. PMID:21368191

  17. A k-{\\varepsilon} turbulence closure model of an isothermal dry granular dense matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chung

    2015-07-01

    The turbulent flow characteristics of an isothermal dry granular dense matter with incompressible grains are investigated by the proposed first-order k-{\\varepsilon} turbulence closure model. Reynolds-filter process is applied to obtain the balance equations of the mean fields with two kinematic equations describing the time evolutions of the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation. The first and second laws of thermodynamics are used to derive the equilibrium closure relations satisfying turbulence realizability conditions, with the dynamic responses postulated by a quasi-linear theory. The established closure model is applied to analyses of a gravity-driven stationary flow down an inclined moving plane. While the mean velocity decreases monotonically from its value on the moving plane toward the free surface, the mean porosity increases exponentially; the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation evolve, respectively, from their minimum and maximum values on the plane toward their maximum and minimum values on the free surface. The evaluated mean velocity and porosity correspond to the experimental outcomes, while the turbulent dissipation distribution demonstrates a similarity to that of Newtonian fluids in turbulent shear flows. When compared to the zero-order model, the turbulent eddy evolution tends to enhance the transfer of the turbulent kinetic energy and plane shearing across the flow layer, resulting in more intensive turbulent fluctuation in the upper part of the flow. Solid boundary as energy source and sink of the turbulent kinetic energy becomes more apparent in the established first-order model.

  18. Note: "Lock-in accelerometry" to follow sink dynamics in shaken granular matter

    E-print Network

    G. Sánchez-Colina; L. Alonso-Llanes; E. Martínez-Román; A. J. Batista-Leyva; C. Clement; C. Fliedner; R. Toussaint; E Altshuler

    2015-09-14

    Understanding the penetration dynamics of intruders in granular beds is relevant not only for fundamental Physics, but also for geophysical processes and construction on sediments or granular soils in areas potentially affected by earthquakes. While the penetration of intruders in two dimensional (2D) laboratory granular beds can be followed using video recording, it is useless in three dimensional (3D) beds of non-transparent materials such as common sand. Here we propose a method to quantify the sink dynamics of an intruder into laterally shaken granular beds based on the temporal correlations between the signals from a reference accelerometer fixed to the shaken granular bed, and a probe accelerometer deployed inside the intruder. Due to its analogy with the working principle of a lock in amplifier, we call this technique Lock in accelerometry (LIA). During Earthquakes, some soils can lose their ability to sustain shear and deform, causing subsidence and sometimes substantial building damage due to deformation or tumbling

  19. Note: "Lock-in accelerometry" to follow sink dynamics in shaken granular matter

    E-print Network

    Sánchez-Colina, G; Martínez-Román, E; Batista-Leyva, A J; Clement, C; Fliedner, C; Toussaint, R; Altshuler, E

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the penetration dynamics of intruders in granular beds is relevant not only for fundamental Physics, but also for geophysical processes and construction on sediments or granular soils in areas potentially affected by earthquakes. While the penetration of intruders in two dimensional (2D) laboratory granular beds can be followed using video recording, it is useless in three dimensional (3D) beds of non-transparent materials such as common sand. Here we propose a method to quantify the sink dynamics of an intruder into laterally shaken granular beds based on the temporal correlations between the signals from a reference accelerometer fixed to the shaken granular bed, and a probe accelerometer deployed inside the intruder. Due to its analogy with the working principle of a lock in amplifier, we call this technique Lock in accelerometry (LIA). During Earthquakes, some soils can lose their ability to sustain shear and deform, causing subsidence and sometimes substantial building damage due to deforma...

  20. Role and significance of extracellular polymeric substances from granular sludge for simultaneous removal of organic matter and ammonia nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lilong; Liu, Yu; Wen, Yan; Ren, Yuan; Hao, Guoxin; Zhang, Ying

    2015-03-01

    This study analyzed the organics and content of metal ions in extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs), tightly (TB-EPSs) and loosely (LB-EPSs) bound EPSs of granular sludge with simultaneous removal of organic matters and ammonia nitrogen, studied the dynamic variation of metal ions in EPSs from granular sludge with different particle sizes and the change of zeta potential before and after cation exchange resin (CER) treatment. Results showed, with particle size increasing, the protein content gradually increased, the content of polysaccharide basically unchanged; the content of Ca, Mg, K, Na and Zn also increased, whereas others did not show a consistent regularity. The existence of metal ions reduced zeta potential of EPSs. The existence of metal ions helped to the adhesion among granules, in order to form a granule with bigger particle size. PMID:25575205

  1. A novel strategy for simultaneous removal of nitrogen and organic matter using anaerobic granular sludge in anammox hybrid reactor.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Swati; Gupta, Sunil Kumar; Mishra, Brijesh Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The coexistence of organic matter (OM) and nitrogen in industrial effluent is the major bottleneck in field-scale application of anammox process. The present study emphasized on investigating the role of seeding anaerobic granular sludge towards simultaneous removal of ammonium and OM in anammox hybrid reactor (AHR). The study delineated simultaneous reduction of both OM (94.8%) and nitrogen (96.8%) at optimal COD/N ratio (0.54). Pearson correlation matrix showed positive and strong correlation of ARE (ammonium removal efficiency) and CRE (COD removal efficiency) with NRE (nitrogen removal efficiency). The negative correlation of OLR and COD/TN ratio with NRE indicated that increase in organic loadings may suppress anammox activity. The process inhibition was evaluated using Haldane model considering free ammonia, OM and nitrite as inhibitors. The strategy of using anaerobic granular sludge not only augmented endurance of bacterial communities against OM inhibition but also facilitated simultaneous removal of OM and nitrogen. PMID:26335285

  2. Efficient numerical simulation of granular matter using the Bottom-To-Top Reconstruction method

    E-print Network

    Thomas Schwager; Thorsten Poeschel

    2006-11-24

    The numerical simulation of granular systems of even moderate size is a challenging computational problem. In most investigations, either Molecular Dynamics or Event-driven Molecular Dynamics is applied. Here we show that in certain cases, mainly (but not exclusively) for static granular packings, the Bottom-to-top Reconstruction method allows for the efficient simulation of very large systems. We apply the method to heap formation, granular flow in a rotating cylinder and to structure formation in nano-powders. We also present an efficient implementation of the algorithm in C++, including a benchmark.

  3. Fiat or Bona Fide Boundary—A Matter of Granular Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Lars; Grobe, Peter; Quast, Björn; Bartolomaeus, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background Distinguishing bona fide (i.e. natural) and fiat (i.e. artificial) physical boundaries plays a key role for distinguishing natural from artificial material entities and is thus relevant to any scientific formal foundational top-level ontology, as for instance the Basic Formal Ontology (BFO). In BFO, the distinction is essential for demarcating two foundational categories of material entity: object and fiat object part. The commonly used basis for demarcating bona fide from fiat boundary refers to two criteria: (i) intrinsic qualities of the boundary bearers (i.e. spatial/physical discontinuity, qualitative heterogeneity) and (ii) mind-independent existence of the boundary. The resulting distinction of bona fide and fiat boundaries is considered to be categorial and exhaustive. Methodology/Principal Findings By referring to various examples from biology, we demonstrate that the hitherto used distinction of boundaries is not categorial: (i) spatial/physical discontinuity is a matter of scale and the differentiation of bona fide and fiat boundaries is thus granularity-dependent, and (ii) this differentiation is not absolute, but comes in degrees. By reducing the demarcation criteria to mind-independence and by also considering dispositions and historical relations of the bearers of boundaries, instead of only considering their spatio-structural properties, we demonstrate with various examples that spatio-structurally fiat boundaries can nevertheless be mind-independent and in this sense bona fide. Conclusions/Significance We argue that the ontological status of a given boundary is perspective-dependent and that the strictly spatio-structural demarcation criteria follow a static perspective that is ignorant of causality and the dynamics of reality. Based on a distinction of several ontologically independent perspectives, we suggest different types of boundaries and corresponding material entities, including boundaries based on function (locomotion, physiology, ecology, development, reproduction) and common history (development, heredity, evolution). We argue that for each perspective one can differentiate respective bona fide from fiat boundaries. PMID:23251333

  4. Grain- and Pore-level Analysis of Drainage in Fractionally-wet Granular Media using Synchrotron X-ray Computed Microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willson, C. S.; Bradley, S.; Thompson, K. E.

    2011-12-01

    Numerous lab- and field-scale experimental studies have shown the strong impact of wettability on multiphase flow constitutive relations and how increased water repellency can lead to preferential flow paths and a heterogeneous water distribution. In conjunction, theoretical and pore-scale modeling work has been performed seeking to improve our understanding of the impact of grain-level wettability properties. Advances in high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (XCT) techniques now make it possible to nondestructively image opaque materials providing previously hard-to-observe qualitative and quantitative data and information. Furthermore, the characteristics of synchrotron X-rays make it possible to monochromatize the incident energy allowing for both k-edge absorption differencing and segmentation of fluids and materials that have even slightly different chemical composition. Concurrent with these advances has been the development of methods to extract granular packing and pore network structure data from XCT images. In this talk, we will present results from a series of experiments designed to obtain grain-, pore- and fluid-scale details during the drainage of water in fractionally-wet glass bead systems. Here, two sets of glass beads were used each having slightly different chemical compositions and thus, different X-ray absorption properties. One set was treated so that the bead surface was water neutral while the other set remained hydrophilic. Three sets of drainage experiments were conducted on three fractionally-wet systems: 100, 90, and 75% hydrophilic by weight. First, traditional lab-scale drainage experiments were performed to obtain a baseline set of characteristic drainage curves for the three systms. Next, a set of tomography-scale (i.e., 5.5 mm inner diameter column) drainage experiments were conducted in the lab to ensure that the drainage curves in the smaller columns were consistent with the lab-scale curves. Finally, tomography-scale drainage experiments were performed at the APS/GSECARS 13-BMD tomography beamline to obtain ~10 micron voxel resolution 3D images at specific capillary suction heads. Results will be presented that show that, at these levels of fractional-wettability, the drainage curves from the tomography-scale columns are consistent with the larger scale data and therefore, the fluid phase distribution imaged at the various drainage steps is also representative. Next, granular packing and pore network structure results will be discussed highlight our ability to characterize and uniquely identify the packing and distribution of different grain types and ensuring consistent pore morphology. Finally, the water phase distribution at different stages of drainage is correlated to the pore network structure and the individual water-wet and water-repellant grains providing valuable insights into the impact of grain- and pore-level wettability variations. These quantitative results show that grain-level differences in wettability captured using this approach have an impact on the connectivity of the water phase during drainage and should provide valuable insights for further development of theoretical and numerical approaches.

  5. Granular Fluids

    E-print Network

    James W. Dufty

    2007-09-04

    The terminology granular matter refers to systems with a large number of hard objects (grains) of mesoscopic size ranging from millimeters to meters. Geological examples include desert sand and the rocks of a landslide. But the scope of such systems is much broader, including powders and snow, edible products such a seeds and salt, medical products like pills, and extraterrestrial systems such as the surface regolith of Mars and the rings of Saturn. The importance of a fundamental understanding for granular matter properties can hardly be overestimated. Practical issues of current concern range from disaster mitigation of avalanches and explosions of grain silos to immense economic consequences within the pharmaceutical industry. In addition, they are of academic and conceptual importance as well as examples of systems far from equilibrium. Under many conditions of interest, granular matter flows like a normal fluid. In the latter case such flows are accurately described by the equations of hydrodynamics. Attention is focused here on the possibility for a corresponding hydrodynamic description of granular flows. The tools of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics, developed over the past fifty years for fluids composed of atoms and molecules, are applied here to a system of grains for a fundamental approach to both qualitative questions and practical quantitative predictions. The nonlinear Navier-Stokes equations and expressions for the associated transport coefficients are obtained.

  6. Critical Phenomena in Driven Granular Matter: Jamming and Glassy Behavior - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Teitel, Stephen

    2013-02-20

    Granular materials, such as powders, seeds, grains, sand, rocks, etc., are ubiquitous both in nature and in industrial processes. At the scale of individual grains, granular systems are particularly simple: particles interact only when they touch. But when viewed in the aggregate, granular systems can display complex behavior. In particular, as the volume packing fraction of the grains increases, the system undergoes a jamming transition from a flowing liquid to a disordered but rigid solid. We study the critical behavior of such systems near the jamming transition using numerical simulations of a simple model of soft-core, bidisperse, frictionless disks in two dimensions. We seek to understand the structural and transport properties of such systems under a variety of physical perturbations such as steady state shear driven flow, and finite thermal fluctuations.

  7. Multiscale `tomography-to-simulation' framework for granular matter: the road ahead

    E-print Network

    Andrade, Jose

    is the basic granular scale where kinematics, contact forces and fabric control the macroscopic mechanical the last decade, however, the birth of in situ characterisation techniques (Desrues et al., 1996; Alshibli has also gravitated towards the grain scale. Discrete element methods (DEM) have led the way, but have

  8. Granular Matter (2012) 14:229234 DOI 10.1007/s10035-012-0339-y

    E-print Network

    Huppert, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    that the steady flow of granular material down a rough inclined plane has a surface that is not parallel plane inclined at a range of angles, a steady flow develops between static levées down the slope [1­3]. Remarkably, however, the surface of the flowing region is not parallel to the inclined plane, but is curved

  9. "EGM" (Electrostatics of Granular Matter): A Space Station Experiment to Examine Natural Particulate Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J.; Sauke, T.; Buehler, M.; Farrell, W.; Green, R.; Birchenough, A.

    1999-01-01

    A granular-materials experiment is being developed for a 2002 launch for Space Station deployment. The experiment is funded by NASA HQ and managed through NASA Lewis Research Center. The experiment will examine electrostatic aggregation of coarse granular materials with the goals of (a) obtaining proof for an electrostatic dipole model of grain interactions, and (b) obtaining knowledge about the way aggregation affects the behavior of natural particulate masses: (1) in unconfined dispersions (clouds such as nebulae, aeolian dust palls, volcanic plumes), (2) in semi-confined, self-loaded masses as in fluidized flows (pyroclastic surges, avalanches) and compacted regolith, or (3) in semi-confined non-loaded masses as in dust layers adhering to solar cells or space suits on Mars. The experiment addresses both planetary/astrophysical issues as well as practical concerns for human exploration of Mars or other solar system bodies. Additional information is contained in the original.

  10. Exact traveling wave solutions of the van der Waals normal form for fluidized granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abourabia, A. M.; Morad, A. M.

    2015-11-01

    Analytical solutions of the van der Waals normal form for fluidized granular media have been done to study the phase separation phenomenon by using two different exact methods. The Painlevé analysis is discussed to illustrate the integrability of the model equation. An auto-Bäcklund transformation is presented via the truncated expansion and symbolic computation. The results show that the exact solutions of the model introduce solitary waves of different types. The solutions of the hydrodynamic model and the van der Waals equation exhibit a behavior similar to the one observed in molecular dynamic simulations such that two pairs of shock and rarefaction waves appear and move away, giving rise to the bubbles. The dispersion properties and the relation between group and phase velocities of the model equation are studied using the plane wave assumption. The diagrams are drawn to illustrate the physical properties of the exact solutions, and indicate their stability and bifurcation.

  11. Flow of granular matter in a silo with multiple exit orifices: Jamming to mixing

    E-print Network

    Sandesh Deshmukh; Amit Kunte; Pankaj Doshi; Ashish V. Orpe

    2014-12-17

    We investigate the mixing characteristics of dry granular material while draining down a silo with multiple exit orifices. The mixing in the silo, which otherwise consists of noninteracting stagnant and flow regions, is observed to improve significantly when the flow through specific orifices is stopped intermittently. This momentary stoppage of flow through the orifice is either controlled manually or is chosen by the system itself when the orifice width is small enough to cause spontaneous jamming and unjamming. We observe that the overall mixing behavior shows a systematic dependence on the frequency of closing and opening of specific orifices. In particular, the silo configuration employing random jamming and unjamming of any of the orifices shows early evidence of chaotic mixing. When operated in a multipass mode, the system exhibits a practical and efficient way of mixing particles.

  12. Coherent transport and symmetry breaking—laser dynamics of constrained granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubatsch, Andreas; Frank, Regine

    2014-08-01

    We present diagrammatic transport theory including self-consistent nonlinear enhancement and dissipation in the multiple scattering regime. Our model of Vollhardt-Wölfle transport of photons is fit-parameter-free and raises the claim that the results hold up to the closest packed volume of randomly arranged ZnO Mie scatterers. We find that a symmetry breaking caused by dissipative effects through the lossy underlying silicon (SI) substrate leads to qualitatively different physics of coherence and lasing in granular amplifying media. According to our results, confined and extended random laser modes and their laser thresholds can be clearly attributed to unbroken and broken spatial symmetry. The diameters and emission profiles of the modes, as well as their thresholds and the positional-dependent degree of coherence, can be checked experimentally.

  13. Removal of Particulate Matter in a Tubular Wet Electrostatic Precipitator Using a Water Collection Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Ho; Yoo, Hee-Jung; Hwang, You-Seong; Kim, Hyeok-Gyu

    2012-01-01

    As one of the effective control devices of air pollutants, the wet electrostatic precipitator (ESP) is an effective technique to eliminate acid mist and fine particles that are re-entrained in a collection electrode. However, its collection efficiency can deteriorate, as its operation is subject to water-induced corrosion of the collection electrode. To overcome this drawback, we modified the wet ESP system with the installation of a PVC dust precipitator wherein water is supplied as a replacement of the collection electrode. With this modification, we were able to construct a compact wet ESP with a small specific collection area (SCA, 0.83?m2/(m3/min)) that can acquire a high collection efficiency of fine particles (99.7%). PMID:22577353

  14. Significance of wet deposition to removal of atmospheric particulate matter and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: A case study in Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ling-Chuan; Bao, Lian-Jun; She, Jian-Wen; Zeng, Eddy Y.

    2014-02-01

    Rainwater samples were simultaneously collected from three locations in Guangzhou, a mega metropolitan center in South China, during the entire year of 2010, and analyzed for particulate matter (PM), total organic carbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), with the objectives of assessing the seasonality of washout effects and efficiency for removal of pollutants from the atmosphere by wet deposition. The contents of PM, particulate organic carbon, and dissolved organic carbon were in the ranges of 0.74-420 (average: 8.1 mg L-1), 0.16-40 (average: 1.3 mg L-1), and 0.34-6.9 mg L-1 (average: 1.4 mg L-1), respectively. Concentrations of ?15PAH (sum of the 16 priority PAH compounds defined by the United States Environmental Protection Agency minus naphthalene) in wet deposition samples ranged from 39 to 1580 ng L-1 with an average of 170 ng L-1. The PAH concentration levels were slightly abated compared to those acquired previously in Guangzhou during the year of 2005, probably indicating a favorable change of energy consumption patterns in the region. There were moderately significant negative correlations between washout ratios and rainfall intensities (0-4.3 mm h-1). The total annual fluxes of wet and dry depositions combined for PM and PAHs in the urban area of Guangzhou were 34 g m-2 yr-1 and 6.0 × 102 ?g m-2 yr-1 with 50 and 57% being contributed from wet deposition, respectively. The monthly capacity for removal (CR) of PM and PAHs (calculated as the wet deposition flux dividing the total flux) varied widely with different months, and was lower during the dry weather season (January-March and October-December) than during the wet weather season (April-September). Finally, the air quality index related to PM10 was negatively correlated to CR values of PM and PAHs, indicating the need to control the emissions of anthropogenically derived pollutants during the dry weather season.

  15. The effect of water temperature on the adsorption equilibrium of dissolved organic matter and atrazine on granular activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Bernd Schreiber; Viktor Schmalz; Thomas Brinkmann; Eckhard Worch

    2007-09-15

    The influence of water temperature on the adsorption of natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) on activated carbon has not been investigated intensively yet. In this study, batch experiments with granular activated carbon (GAC) F300, from bituminous coal, have been carried out at three temperatures (5, 20, 35{sup o} C) using a humic acid model water and different types of surface water (lake, river, canal). Furthermore, the adsorption of an anthropogenic contaminant, atrazine, was quantified in the absence and presence of DOM. The results indicate a significant influence of water temperature on the adsorption equilibrium of DOM and atrazine. Contrary to expectations, DOM and atrazine adsorption in surface water tends to be increased with increasing water temperature, whereas the extent of this effect is dependent on the type and concentration of DOM. Furthermore, the temperature effect on atrazine adsorption is controlled by competition of DOM and atrazine on adsorption sites. Some assumptions are proposed and discussed for explaining the temperature effects observed in the batch studies. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Impact of natural organic matter on monochloramine reduction by granular activated carbon: the role of porosity and electrostatic surface properties

    SciTech Connect

    Julian L. Fairey; Gerald E. Speitel Jr.; Lynn E. Katz

    2006-07-01

    Steady-state monochloramine reduction in fixed-bed reactors (FBRs) was quantified on five types of granular activated carbon (GAC) using two background waters - one natural source water (LAW) containing 2.5-3.5 mg/L organic carbon and one synthetic organic-free water (NW). GACs used were coal-based Filtrasorb 400, Filtrasorb 600, Centaur and Medical Grade, and wood-based AquaGuard. While more monochloramine was reduced at steady-state using NW compared to LAW for each GAC and empty-bed contact time studied, the differences in removal varied considerably among the GACs tested. Physical characterization of the GACs suggested that the degree of interference caused by natural organic matter (NOM) increased with increasing GAC surface area contained within pores greater than 2 nm in width. Acid/base and electrostatic properties of the GACs were not found to be significant in terms of NOM uptake, which indicated that size exclusion effects of the GAC pores overwhelmed the impact of the GAC surface chemistry. Therefore, selection of GAC to limit the impact of NOM on monochloramine reduction in FBRs should be based on pore size distribution alone, with the impact of NOM decreasing with decreasing mesoporosity and macroporosity. 23 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Controlling cohesive forces in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G"Ogelein, Christoph; Schr"Oter, Matthias; Brinkmann, Martin; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2009-11-01

    When adding a small amount of water to a pile of granular matter, e.g., sand heap, close-by grains can be connected by liquid bridges [1]. Thus, the material becomes plastically and can sustain a larger stress as compared to dry sand. Our general aim is to compare the mechanical properties of wet and dry granular media. For this purpose, we use a suspension of micrometer large glass or Latex spheres dispersed in a binary liquid mixture. The suspending water-lutidine(oil) mixture exhibits a lower critical solution temperature leading to a water-oil-like phase separation slightly above ambient temperature. Close to this demixing region, the oil-like phase undergoes a pre-wetting transition on the particle glass surface inducing liquid bridges [2]. Thus, by varying the temperature we can switch the liquid bridges on and off. We will report on our attempts to directly visualize the formation and control of liquid bridges using confocal and non- confocal microscopy. [4pt] [1] M. Scheel, et al., Nature Materials 7, 174 (2008)[0pt] [2] D. Beysens, and D. Esteve, Phys. Rev. Lett. 54, 2123 (1985)

  18. Effects of surface-active organic matter on carbon dioxide nucleation in atmospheric wet aerosols: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Daskalakis, Vangelis; Charalambous, Fevronia; Panagiotou, Fostira; Nearchou, Irene

    2014-11-21

    Organic matter (OM) uptake in cloud droplets produces water-soluble secondary organic aerosols (SOA) via aqueous chemistry. These play a significant role in aerosol properties. We report the effects of OM uptake in wet aerosols, in terms of the dissolved-to-gas carbon dioxide nucleation using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Carbon dioxide has been implicated in the natural rainwater as well as seawater acidity. Variability of the cloud and raindrop pH is assumed in space and time, as regional emissions, local human activities and geophysical characteristics differ. Rain scavenging of inorganic SOx, NOx and NH3 plays a major role in rain acidity in terms of acid-base activity, however carbon dioxide solubility also remains a key parameter. Based on the MD simulations we propose that the presence of surface-active OM promotes the dissolved-to-gas carbon dioxide nucleation in wet aerosols, even at low temperatures, strongly decreasing carbon dioxide solubility. A discussion is made on the role of OM in controlling the pH of a cloud or raindrop, as a consequence, without involving OM ionization equilibrium. The results are compared with experimental and computational studies in the literature. PMID:25272147

  19. Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Ethanol Fermentation of High Dry Matter Wet-Exploded Wheat Straw at Low Enzyme Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, Tania I.; Hou, Xiaoru; Hilstrøm, Troels; Ahring, Birgitte K.

    Wheat straw was pretreated by wet explosion using three different oxidizing agents (H2O2, O2, and air). The effect of the pretreatment was evaluated based on glucose and xylose liberated during enzymatic hydrolysis. The results showed that pretreatment with the use of O2 as oxidizing agent was the most efficient in enhancing overall convertibility of the raw material to sugars and minimizing generation of furfural as a by-product. For scale-up of the process, high dry matter (DM) concentrations of 15-20% will be necessary. However, high DM hydrolysis and fermentation are limited by high viscosity of the material, higher inhibition of the enzymes, and fermenting microorganism. The wet-explosion pretreatment method enabled relatively high yields from both enzymatic hydrolysis and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) to be obtained when performed on unwashed slurry with 14% DM and a low enzyme loading of 10 FPU/g cellulose in an industrial acceptable time frame of 96 h. Cellulose and hemicellulose conversion from enzymatic hydrolysis were 70 and 68%, respectively, and an overall ethanol yield from SSF was 68%.

  20. Granularity in granular cell ameloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Yamunadevi, Andamuthu; Madhushankari, G. S.; Selvamani, Manickam; Basandi, Praveen S.; Yoithapprabhunath, Thukanayyakanpalayam Ragunathan; Ganapathy, N.

    2014-01-01

    Granular cell ameloblastoma (GCA) is one of the rare histological variants of ameloblastoma (1.5-3.5%), identified by Krompechner in 1918 and is diagnosed by the characteristic presence of granular cells. These granular cells are seen in several physiological and pathological conditions and the granularity in GCA is due to lysosomal aggregates. This review is about the clinical features, histopathological features and differential diagnosis of GCA and also adds the theories for occurrence of granularity, electron microscopic findings, cell signaling pathways and immunohistochemistry findings related to these granular cells in GCA. PMID:25210361

  1. WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Hugo S. Caram; Natalie Foster

    1997-03-31

    The objective was to visualize the flow of granular materials in flat bottomed silo. This was done by for dry materials introducing mustard seeds and poppy seeds as tracer particles and imaging them using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The region sampled was a cylinder 25 mm in diameter and 40 mm in length. Eight slices containing 128*128 to 256*256 pixels were generated for each image. The size of the silo was limited by the size of the high resolution NMR imager available. Cross-sections of 150mm flat bottomed silos, with the tracer layers immobilized by a gel, showed similar qualitative patterns for both dry and wet granular solids.

  2. Wet to dry crossover and a flow vortex-lattice in active nematics

    E-print Network

    Doostmohammadi, Amin; Thampi, Sumesh P; Yeomans, Julia M

    2015-01-01

    Active systems, from bacterial suspensions to vibrated granular matter, are continuously driven out of equilibrium by local injection of energy from their constituent elements. The energy input leads to exotic behaviour such as collective motion, pattern formation, topological defects and active turbulence, but theories that link the different manifestations of activity across systems and length scales are lacking. Here we unify two different classes of active matter by using friction as a control parameter to interpolate between wet active systems, whose behaviour is dominated by hydrodynamics, and dry active matter where any flow is screened. At the wet-dry crossover, we find a novel lattice of flow vortices interleaved with an ordered network of topological defects which arises from the competition between friction and viscous dissipation. Our results contribute to understanding the physics of matter operating out-of-equilibrium, with its potential in the design of active micro- and nano-machines.

  3. Wet to dry crossover and a flow vortex-lattice in active nematics

    E-print Network

    Amin Doostmohammadi; Michael Adamer; Sumesh P. Thampi; Julia M. Yeomans

    2015-05-15

    Active systems, from bacterial suspensions to vibrated granular matter, are continuously driven out of equilibrium by local injection of energy from their constituent elements. The energy input leads to exotic behaviour such as collective motion, pattern formation, topological defects and active turbulence, but theories that link the different manifestations of activity across systems and length scales are lacking. Here we unify two different classes of active matter by using friction as a control parameter to interpolate between wet active systems, whose behaviour is dominated by hydrodynamics, and dry active matter where any flow is screened. At the wet-dry crossover, we find a novel lattice of flow vortices interleaved with an ordered network of topological defects which arises from the competition between friction and viscous dissipation. Our results contribute to understanding the physics of matter operating out-of-equilibrium, with its potential in the design of active micro- and nano-machines.

  4. Stabilization of Stormwater Biofilters: Impacts of Wetting and Drying Phases and the Addition of Organic Matter to Filter Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, D. N.; Egodawatta, P.; Mather, P.; Rajapakse, J. P.

    2015-09-01

    Ripening period refers to a phase of stabilization in sand filters in water treatment systems that follow a new installation or cleaning of the filter. Intermittent wetting and drying, a unique property of stormwater biofilters, would similarly be subjected to a phase of stabilization. Suspended solids are an important parameter that is often used to monitor the stabilization of sand filters in water treatment systems. Stormwater biofilters, however, contain organic material that is added to the filter layer to enhance nitrate removal, the dynamics of which is seldom analyzed in stabilization of stormwater biofilters. Therefore, in this study of stormwater biofiltration in addition to suspended solids (turbidity), organic matter (TOC, DOC, TN, and TKN) was also monitored as a parameter for stabilization of the stormwater biofilter. One Perspex bioretention column (94 mm internal diameter) was fabricated with filter layer that contained 8 % organic material and fed with tapwater with different antecedent dry days (0-40 day) at 100 mL/min. Samples were collected from the outflow at different time intervals between 2 and 150 min and were tested for total organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, total nitrogen, total Kjeldhal nitrogen, and turbidity. The column was observed to experience two phases of stabilization, one at the beginning of each event that lasted for 30 min, while the other phase was observed across subsequent events that are related to the age of filter.

  5. Stabilization of Stormwater Biofilters: Impacts of Wetting and Drying Phases and the Addition of Organic Matter to Filter Media.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, D N; Egodawatta, P; Mather, P; Rajapakse, J P

    2015-09-01

    Ripening period refers to a phase of stabilization in sand filters in water treatment systems that follow a new installation or cleaning of the filter. Intermittent wetting and drying, a unique property of stormwater biofilters, would similarly be subjected to a phase of stabilization. Suspended solids are an important parameter that is often used to monitor the stabilization of sand filters in water treatment systems. Stormwater biofilters, however, contain organic material that is added to the filter layer to enhance nitrate removal, the dynamics of which is seldom analyzed in stabilization of stormwater biofilters. Therefore, in this study of stormwater biofiltration in addition to suspended solids (turbidity), organic matter (TOC, DOC, TN, and TKN) was also monitored as a parameter for stabilization of the stormwater biofilter. One Perspex bioretention column (94 mm internal diameter) was fabricated with filter layer that contained 8 % organic material and fed with tapwater with different antecedent dry days (0-40 day) at 100 mL/min. Samples were collected from the outflow at different time intervals between 2 and 150 min and were tested for total organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, total nitrogen, total Kjeldhal nitrogen, and turbidity. The column was observed to experience two phases of stabilization, one at the beginning of each event that lasted for 30 min, while the other phase was observed across subsequent events that are related to the age of filter. PMID:25971737

  6. Field measurement of acid gases and soluble anions in atmospheric particulate matter using a parallel plate wet denuder and an alternating filter-based automated analysis system.

    PubMed

    Boring, C Bradley; Al-Horr, Rida; Genfa, Zhang; Dasgupta, Pumendu K; Martin, Michael W; Smith, William F

    2002-03-15

    We present a new fully automated instrument for the measurement of acid gases and soluble anionic constituents of atmospheric particulate matter. The instrument operates in two independent parallel channels. In one channel, a wet denuder collects soluble acid gases; these are analyzed by anion chromatography (IC). In a second channel, a cyclone removes large particles and the aerosol stream is then processed by another wet denuder to remove potentially interfering gases. The particles are then collected by one of two glass fiber filters which are alternately sampled, washed, and dried. The washings are preconcentrated and analyzed by IC. Detection limits of low to subnanogram per cubic meter concentrations of most gaseous and particulate constituents can be readily attained. The instrument has been extensively field-tested; some field data are presented. Results of attempts to decipher the total anionic constitution of urban ambient aerosol by IC-MS analysis are also presented. PMID:11922292

  7. Granular physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valance, Alexandre; Louge, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Granular media play a major role in geophysics and industrial processes. Their interactions are complicated by relatively small-scale separation between individual particles and system size, by the presence of other interpenetrating phases such as water or air, by the large number of grains involved in realistic applications, and by the importance of microscopic contact forces, such as solid friction, which are challenging to measure or control. Yet significant progress has been made in the last two decades toward the understanding of granular media, thanks to the curiosity of physicists and engineers. This thematic issue gathers contributions from researchers dealing with diverse aspects of granular mechanics, from static assemblies to flowing suspensions, and from theory to natural phenomena. These review articles illustrate rather different approaches to these complicated systems.

  8. Bioturbation and dissolved organic matter enhance contaminant fluxes from sediment treated with powdered and granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Kupryianchyk, D; Noori, A; Rakowska, M I; Grotenhuis, J T C; Koelmans, A A

    2013-05-21

    Sediment amendment with activated carbon (AC) is a promising technique for in situ sediment remediation. To date it is not clear whether this technique sufficiently reduces sediment-to-water fluxes of sediment-bound hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) in the presence of bioturbators. Here, we report polychlorobiphenyl (PCB) pore water concentrations, fluxes, mass transfer coefficients, and survival data of two benthic species, for four treatments: no AC addition (control), powdered AC addition, granular AC addition and addition and subsequent removal of GAC (sediment stripping). AC addition decreased mass fluxes but increased apparent mass transfer coefficients because of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) facilitated transport across the benthic boundary layer (BBL). In turn, DOC concentrations depended on bioturbator activity which was high for the PAC tolerant species Asellus aquaticus and low for AC sensitive species Lumbriculus variegatus. A dual BBL resistance model combining AC effects on gradients, DOC facilitated transport and biodiffusion was evaluated against the data and showed how the type of resistance differs with treatment and chemical hydrophobicity. Data and simulations illustrate the complex interplay between AC and contaminant toxicity to benthic organisms and how differences in species tolerance affect mass fluxes from sediment to the water column. PMID:23590290

  9. WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-03-25

    The yield locus, tensile strength and fracture mechanisms of wet granular materials were studied. The yield locus of a wet material was shifted to the left of that of the dry specimen by a constant value equal to the compressive isostatic stress due to pendular bridges. for materials with straight yield loci, the shift was computed from the uniaxial tensile strength, either measured in a tensile strength tester or calculated from the correlation, and the angle of internal friction of the material. The predicted shift in the yield loci due to different moisture contents compare well with the measured shift in the yield loci of glass beads, crushed limestone, super D catalyst and Leslie coal. Measurement of the void fraction during the shear testing was critical to obtain the correct tensile strength theoretically or experimentally.

  10. Granular Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shattuck, M. D.; Ingale, R. A.; Reis, P. M.

    2009-06-01

    We present experimental evidence for a strong analogy between quasi-2D uniform non-equilibrium steady states (NESS) of excited granular materials and equilibrium thermodynamics. Under isochoric conditions we find that the structure of granular NESS, as measured by the radial distribution function, the bond order parameter, and the distribution of Voronoi cells, is the same as that found in equilibrium simulations of hard disks. Three distinct states are found corresponding to a gas, a dense gas, and a crystal. The dynamics of the dense gas is characterized by sub-diffusive behavior on intermediate time scales (caging). Under isobaric conditions we find a sharp first-order phase transition characterized by a discontinuous change in density and granular temperature as a function of excitation strength. The transition shows rate dependent hysteresis but is completely reversible if the excitation strength changes quasi-statically. All of these behaviors are analogous to equilibrium thermodynamics. The one difference is the velocity distributions, which are well described by P(c) = fMB[1+a2S2(c2)], in the range -2granular temperature, fmb is a Maxwell-Boltzmann and S2 is a second order Sonine polynomial. The single adjustable parameter, a2, is a function of the filling fraction, but not T. For |c|?2, P(c)?exp(-A×c-3/2) as observed in many other experiments.

  11. Effect of granular activated carbon concentration on the content of organic matter and salt, influencing E. coli activity and survival in fluidized bed disinfection reactor.

    PubMed

    Racyte, Justina; Langenhoff, Alette A M; Ribeiro, Ana F M M R; Paulitsch-Fuchs, Astrid H; Bruning, Harry; Rijnaarts, Huub H M

    2014-10-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) is used in water treatment systems, typically to remove pollutants such as natural organic matter, volatile organic compounds, chlorine, taste, and odor. GAC is also used as a key component of a new technology that combines a fluidized bed reactor with radio frequency electric fields for disinfection. So far, the effects of GAC on bacteria in these fluidized bed reactors are unclear. This paper describes a systematic study of the physico-chemical changes in five microbial media compositions caused by different concentrations (23-350?g/L) of GAC, and the effects of these physico-chemical changes on the metabolic activity and survival of a model microorganism (Escherichia coli YMc10) in a fluidized bed reactor. The chemical adsorption taking place in suspensions with specific GAC changed nutritional, osmotic, and pH conditions in the investigated microbial media (LB, diluted LB, PBS, diluted PBS, and tap water), leading to a decay of the metabolic activity and survival of E. coli. Especially media that are poor in organic and mineral compounds (e.g., PBS) with suspended GAC showed a concentration decay of 3.5?Log CFU/mL E. coli after 6?h. Organic compounds depletion and severe pH variation were enhanced in the presence of higher GAC concentrations. PMID:24729067

  12. Open problems in active chaotic flows: Competition between chaos and order in granular materials.

    PubMed

    Ottino, J. M.; Khakhar, D. V.

    2002-06-01

    There are many systems where interaction among the elementary building blocks-no matter how well understood-does not even give a glimpse of the behavior of the global system itself. Characteristic for these systems is the ability to display structure without any external organizing principle being applied. They self-organize as a consequence of synthesis and collective phenomena and the behavior cannot be understood in terms of the systems' constitutive elements alone. A simple example is flowing granular materials, i.e., systems composed of particles or grains. How the grains interact with each other is reasonably well understood; as to how particles move, the governing law is Newton's second law. There are no surprises at this level. However, when the particles are many and the material is vibrated or tumbled, surprising behavior emerges. Systems self-organize in complex patterns that cannot be deduced from the behavior of the particles alone. Self-organization is often the result of competing effects; flowing granular matter displays both mixing and segregation. Small differences in either size or density lead to flow-induced segregation and order; similar to fluids, noncohesive granular materials can display chaotic mixing and disorder. Competition gives rise to a wealth of experimental outcomes. Equilibrium structures, obtained experimentally in quasi-two-dimensional systems, display organization in the presence of disorder, and are captured by a continuum flow model incorporating collisional diffusion and density-driven segregation. Several open issues remain to be addressed. These include analysis of segregating chaotic systems from a dynamical systems viewpoint, and understanding three-dimensional systems and wet granular systems (slurries). General aspects of the competition between chaos-enhanced mixing and properties-induced de-mixing go beyond granular materials and may offer a paradigm for other kinds of physical systems. (c) 2002 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12779570

  13. PREFACE: Dynamics of wetting Dynamics of wetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grest, Gary S.; Oshanin, Gleb; Webb, Edmund B., III

    2009-11-01

    Capillary phenomena associated with fluids wetting other condensed matter phases have drawn great scientific interest for hundreds of years; consider the recent bicentennial celebration of Thomas Young's paper on equilibrium contact angles, describing the geometric shape assumed near a three phase contact line in terms of the relevant surface energies of the constituent phases [1]. Indeed, nearly a century has passed since the seminal papers of Lucas and Washburn, describing dynamics of capillary imbibition [2, 3]. While it is generally appreciated that dynamics of fluid wetting processes are determined by the degree to which a system is out of capillary equilibrium, myriad complications exist that challenge the fundamental understanding of dynamic capillary phenomena. The topic has gathered much interest from recent Nobel laureate Pierre-Gilles de Gennes, who provided a seminal review of relevant dissipation mechanisms for fluid droplets spreading on solid surfaces [4] Although much about the dynamics of wetting has been revealed, much remains to be learned and intrinsic technological and fundamental interest in the topic drives continuing high levels of research activity. This is enabled partly by improved experimental capabilities for resolving wetting processes at increasingly finer temporal, spatial, and chemical resolution. Additionally, dynamic wetting research advances via higher fidelity computational modeling capabilities, which drive more highly refined theory development. The significance of this topic both fundamentally and technologically has resulted in a number of reviews of research activity in wetting dynamics. One recent example addresses the evaluation of existing wetting dynamics theories from an experimentalist's perspective [5]. A Current Opinion issue was recently dedicated to high temperature capillarity, including dynamics of high temperature spreading [6]. New educational tools have recently emerged for providing instruction in wetting dynamics and the broader field of fluid dynamics [7-9]. Such an active field requires an occasional collective examination of current research to highlight both recent successes and remaining challenges. Herein, we have collected a range of articles to illustrate the broad nature of research associated with understanding dynamics of moving condensed matter three phase contact lines. Despite the breadth of topics examined, certain unifying themes emerge. The role of the substrate surface is critical in determining kinetics of wetting; this is evidenced by the attention given to this in articles herein. McHale et al investigate the role of surface topography on wetting kinetics and how its effect can be incorporated in existing theories describing contact line dynamics. Moosavi et al examine surface topography effects via a mesoscopic hydrodynamics approach. The capillary driven motion of fluid through structures on a surface bears tremendous importance for microfluidics studies and the emerging field of nanofluidics. Blow et al examine this phenomena for liquid imbibition into a geometric array of structures on a solid surface, while Shen et al analyze the effects of surface temperature during boiling and non-boiling conditionson droplet impingement dynamics. Finally, Pesika et al discover a wonderful world of smart surfaces, like gecko adhesion pads. A number of papers utilize computational modeling to explore phenomena underlying wetting dynamics and to consider relevant mechanisms in terms of existing theory for contact line dynamics. Winter et al utilize Monte Carlo simulation techniques and thermodynamic integration methods to test classical theory describing heterogeneous nucleation at a wall near a wetting transition. Qian et al briefly review the Onsager principle of minimum energy dissipation underlying many descriptions of dissipative systems; they then provide a variational approach description of hydrodynamics of moving contact lines and demonstrate the validity of their continuum model via comparison with molecular dynamics simulations.Bertrand et al

  14. Survey on granularity clustering.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shifei; Du, Mingjing; Zhu, Hong

    2015-12-01

    With the rapid development of uncertain artificial intelligent and the arrival of big data era, conventional clustering analysis and granular computing fail to satisfy the requirements of intelligent information processing in this new case. There is the essential relationship between granular computing and clustering analysis, so some researchers try to combine granular computing with clustering analysis. In the idea of granularity, the researchers expand the researches in clustering analysis and look for the best clustering results with the help of the basic theories and methods of granular computing. Granularity clustering method which is proposed and studied has attracted more and more attention. This paper firstly summarizes the background of granularity clustering and the intrinsic connection between granular computing and clustering analysis, and then mainly reviews the research status and various methods of granularity clustering. Finally, we analyze existing problem and propose further research. PMID:26557926

  15. Percolation Session on Granular Matter

    E-print Network

    Connelly, Robert

    example: Immerse a large stone in a bucket of water. What it probability that the center of the stone-tree condition, the pebble game, etc.) For the following description, see Jacobs and Hendrickson 1997. In both cases 9 = e = 2n-3 = 2*6-3. Not generically rigidGenerically rigid #12;9 The pebble game Start

  16. Distribution and disinfection of bacterial loadings associated with particulate matter fractions transported in urban wet weather flows.

    PubMed

    Dickenson, Joshua A; Sansalone, John J

    2012-12-15

    Urban runoff is a resource for reuse water. However, runoff transports indicator and pathogenic organisms which are mobilized from sources of fecal contamination. These organisms are entrained with particulate matter (PM) that can serve as a mobile substrate for these organisms. Within a framework of additional treatment for reuse of treated runoff which requires the management of PM inventories in unit operations and drainage systems there is a need to characterize organism distributions on PM and the disinfection potential thereof. This study quantifies total coliform, Escherichia coli, fecal streptococcus, and enterococcus generated from 25 runoff events. With the ubiquity and hetero-dispersivity of PM in urban runoff this study examines organism distributions for suspended, settleable and sediment PM fractions differentiated based on PM size and transport functionality. Hypochlorite is applied in batch to elaborate inactivation of PM-associated organisms for each PM fraction. Results indicate that urban runoff bacterial loadings of indicator organisms exceed U.S. wastewater reuse, recreational contact, and Australian runoff reuse criteria as comparative metrics. All monitored events exceeded the Australian runoff reuse criteria for E. coli in non-potable residential and unrestricted access systems. In PM-differentiated events, bacteriological mobilization primarily occurred in the suspended PM fraction. However, sediment PM shielded PM-associated coliforms at all hypochlorite doses, whereas suspended and settleable PM fractions provide less shielding resulting in higher inactivation by hypochlorite. PMID:22244969

  17. Sound wave propagation in weakly polydisperse granular materials

    E-print Network

    Luding, Stefan

    Sound wave propagation in weakly polydisperse granular materials O. Mouraille, S. Luding NSM Introduction The stress-wave (sound) propagation through dense granular matter is the superposition of many/DCT/TUDelft, Julianalaan 136, 2628 BL Delft, Netherlands Abstract Dynamic simulations of wave propagation are performed

  18. Transport in granular systems

    E-print Network

    Wendell, Dawn M. (Dawn Marie), 1983-

    2011-01-01

    There are many situations in which a continuum view of granular systems does not fully capture the relevant mechanics. In order for engineers to be able to design systems for transporting granular materials, there needs ...

  19. Granular temperature field of monodisperse granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollin, Devis; Bowman, Elisabeth; Shepley, Paul

    2015-04-01

    For dry granular flows as well as solid-fluid mixtures such as debris avalanches, the momentum transfer is carried by frictional and collisional stresses. The latter may be described by the granular temperature, which provides a measure of the energy contained within the fluctuating nature of the granular motion. Thus, granular temperature can be used as a valuable means to infer the ability of a granular system to flow. Granular materials are known for the difficulties they pose in obtaining accurate microscale laboratory measurements. This is why many theories, such as the kinetic theory of granular gases, are primarily compared to numerical simulations. However, thanks to recent advancements in optical techniques along with high-speed recording systems, experimentalists are now able to obtain robust measurements of granular temperature. At present, the role of granular temperature in granular flows still entails conjecture. As a consequence, it is extremely important to provide experimental data against which theories and simulations can be judged. This investigation focuses on dry granular flows of sand and spherical beads performed on a simple inclined chute geometry. Fluctuation velocity, granular temperature and velocity patterns are obtained by means of particle image velocimetry (PIV). Flow behaviour is probed for different spatial (interrogation sizes) and temporal (frame rates) resolutions. Through the variation of these parameters an attempt to demonstrate the consistency of the degree of unsteadiness within the flow is made. In many studies a uniform stationary flow state is usually sought or preferably assumed for the simplicity it provides in the calculations. If one tries to measure microscale fields such as granular temperature, this assumption may be inappropriate. Thus, a proper definition of the flow regime should be made in order to estimate the correct flow properties. In addition, PIV analysis is compared against particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). This alternative technique provides high-accuracy measurements and allows individual flow tracer particles to be tracked. In comparison, PIV provides exhaustive analyses although some limitations exist. The interrogation size plays an important role in determining the achievable spatial resolution of the flow. There is a limit on how large or small this region can be for adequate measurements. A further limitation is encountered when velocity gradients are presents which apt to bias the displacement estimate. Ultimately, the above techniques and analysis will be applied to 3D polydisperse granular systems. This is extremely valuable to gain a more complete understanding and move towards more realistic flows. The overall aim of this study lies in obtaining a clearer understanding of the micromechanical processes governing granular flows and improving the modelling of debris avalanche hazards.

  20. A constitutive law for dense granular flows

    E-print Network

    Pierre Jop; Yoël Forterre; Olivier Pouliquen

    2006-12-05

    A continuum description of granular flows would be of considerable help in predicting natural geophysical hazards or in designing industrial processes. However, the constitutive equations for dry granular flows, which govern how the material moves under shear, are still a matter of debate. One difficulty is that grains can behave like a solid (in a sand pile), a liquid (when poured from a silo) or a gas (when strongly agitated). For the two extreme regimes, constitutive equations have been proposed based on kinetic theory for collisional rapid flows, and soil mechanics for slow plastic flows. However, the intermediate dense regime, where the granular material flows like a liquid, still lacks a unified view and has motivated many studies over the past decade. The main characteristics of granular liquids are: a yield criterion (a critical shear stress below which flow is not possible) and a complex dependence on shear rate when flowing. In this sense, granular matter shares similarities with classical visco-plastic fluids such as Bingham fluids. Here we propose a new constitutive relation for dense granular flows, inspired by this analogy and recent numerical and experimental work. We then test our three-dimensional (3D) model through experiments on granular flows on a pile between rough sidewalls, in which a complex 3D flow pattern develops. We show that, without any fitting parameter, the model gives quantitative predictions for the flow shape and velocity profiles. Our results support the idea that a simple visco-plastic approach can quantitatively capture granular flow properties, and could serve as a basic tool for modelling more complex flows in geophysical or industrial applications.

  1. PREFACE: Wetting: introductory note

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herminghaus, S.

    2005-03-01

    The discovery of wetting as a topic of physical science dates back two hundred years, to one of the many achievements of the eminent British scholar Thomas Young. He suggested a simple equation relating the contact angle between a liquid surface and a solid substrate to the interfacial tensions involved [1], ?lg cos ? = ?sg - ?sl (1) In modern terms, ? denotes the excess free energy per unit area of the interface indicated by its indices, with l, g and s corresponding to the liquid, gas and solid, respectively [2]. After that, wetting seems to have been largely ignored by physicists for a long time. The discovery by Gabriel Lippmann that ? may be tuned over a wide range by electrochemical means [3], and some important papers about modifications of equation~(1) due to substrate inhomogeneities [4,5] are among the rare exceptions. This changed completely during the seventies, when condensed matter physics had become enthusiastic about critical phenomena, and was vividly inspired by the development of the renormalization group by Kenneth Wilson [6]. This had solved the long standing problem of how to treat fluctuations, and to understand the universal values of bulk critical exponents. By inspection of the critical exponents of the quantities involved in equation~(1), John W Cahn discovered what he called critical point wetting: for any liquid, there should be a well-defined transition to complete wetting (i.e., ? = 0) as the critical point of the liquid is approached along the coexistence curve [7]. His paper inspired an enormous amount of further work, and may be legitimately viewed as the entrance of wetting into the realm of modern physics. Most of the publications directly following Cahn's work were theoretical papers which elaborated on wetting in relation to critical phenomena. A vast amount of interesting, and in part quite unexpected, ramifications were discovered, such as the breakdown of universality in thin film systems [8]. Simultaneously, a number of very specific and quantitative predictions were put forward which were aimed at direct experimental tests of the developed concepts [9]. Experimentally, wetting phenomena proved to be a rather difficult field of research. While contact angles seem quite easy to measure, deeper insight can only be gained by assessing the physical properties of minute amounts of material, as provided by the molecularly thin wetting layers. At the same time, the variations in the chemical potential relevant for studying wetting transitions are very small, such that system stability sometimes poses hard to solve practical problems. As a consequence, layering transitions in cryogenic systems were among the first to be thoroughly studied [10] experimentally, since they require comparably moderate stability. First-order wetting transitions were not observed experimentally before the early nineties, either in (cryogenic) quantum systems [11,12] or in binary liquid mixtures [13,14]. The first observation of critical wetting, a continuous wetting transition, in 1996 [15] was a major breakthrough [16]. In the meantime, a detailed seminal paper by Pierre Gilles de Gennes published in 1985 [17] had spurred a large number of new research projects which were directed to wetting phenomena other than those related to phase transitions. More attention was paid to non-equilibrium physics, as it is at work when oil spreads over a surface, or a liquid coating beads off (`dewets') from its support and forms a pattern of many individual droplets. This turned out to be an extremely fruitful field of research, and was more readily complemented by experimental efforts than was the case with wetting transitions. It was encouraging to find effects analogous to layering (as mentioned above) in more common systems such as oil films spreading on a solid support [18,19]. Long standing riddles such as the divergence of dissipation at a moving contact line were now addressed both theoretically and experimentally [20,21]. However, the requirements concerning resolution of the measurements, as well as the sta

  2. “Smoking Wet

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Christopher R.; Baram, Michael; Cavarocchi, Nicholas C.

    2013-01-01

    Reports have suggested that the use of a dangerously tainted form of marijuana, referred to in the vernacular as “wet” or “fry,” has increased. Marijuana cigarettes are dipped into or laced with other substances, typically formaldehyde, phencyclidine, or both. Inhaling smoke from these cigarettes can cause lung injuries. We report the cases of 2 young adults who presented at our hospital with respiratory failure soon after they had smoked “wet” marijuana cigarettes. In both patients, progressive hypoxemic respiratory failure necessitated rescue therapy with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. After lengthy hospitalizations, both patients recovered with only mild pulmonary function abnormalities. To our knowledge, this is the first 2-patient report of severe respiratory failure and rescue therapy with extracorporeal oxygenation after the smoking of marijuana cigarettes thus tainted. We believe that, in young adults with an unexplained presentation of severe respiratory failure, the possibility of exposure to tainted marijuana cigarettes should be considered. PMID:23466531

  3. Cooperative penetration in a light granular medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Suarez, J. Carlos; Pacheco-Vazquez, Felipe

    2010-11-01

    A projectile impacting against a granular medium exemplifies the interesting nature of granular matter. Whether the projectile is an asteroid striking the crust of a planet or an object thrown against a granular bed in the laboratory, once the intruder makes contact with the medium it inevitably encounters a stopping force. The character of this force underscore several fundamental issues, from geological and biological sciences, to soil research and technological applications. The impact velocity dependence, the final penetration depth as a function of different parameters, the nature of the drag force, are nowadays well understood thanks to the recent work carried out by different groups. Furthermore, the effects of confinement, object symmetry and fragility of the medium have also been considered. However, despite all this effort, we know very little about what occurs when more than one intruder impact simultaneously a granular medium. Here we show and discuss some experimental findings about the penetration dynamics followed by a group of intruders impacting a granular medium. The particles used in our study are much lighter than water, therefore, intruders penetrate deeply into the system depicting intriguing cooperative behaviours that hint to hydrodynamic-like interactions.

  4. Granular Shear Flow in Varying Gravitational Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdoch, N.; Rozitis, B.; Green, S. F.; de Lophem, T.-L.; Michel, P.; Losert, W.

    2016-01-01

    Despite their very low surface gravities, asteroids exhibit a number of different geological processes involving granular matter. Understanding the response of this granular material subject to external forces in microgravity conditions is vital to the design of a successful asteroid sub-surface sampling mechanism, and in the interpretation of the fascinating geology on an asteroid. We have designed and flown a Taylor-Couette shear cell to investigate granular flow due to rotational shear forces under the conditions of parabolic flight microgravity. The experiments occur under weak compression. First, we present the technical details of the experimental design with particular emphasis on how the equipment has been specifically designed for the parabolic flight environment. Then, we investigate how a steady state granular flow induced by rotational shear forces differs in varying gravitational environments. We find that the effect of constant shearing on the granular material, in a direction perpendicular to the effective acceleration, does not seem to be strongly influenced by gravity. This means that shear bands can form in the presence of a weak gravitational field just as on Earth.

  5. Self Assembly in Soft Matter 

    E-print Network

    Chremos, Alexandros

    2009-01-01

    The term “soft matter” applies to a variety of physical systems, such as liquids, colloids, polymers, foams, gels, and granular materials. The most fascinating aspect of soft matter lies in the fact that they are not ...

  6. Self assembly in soft matter 

    E-print Network

    Chremos, Alexandros

    2009-01-01

    The term “soft matter” applies to a variety of physical systems, such as liquids, colloids, polymers, foams, gels, and granular materials. The most fascinating aspect of soft matter lies in the fact that they are not ...

  7. Photoluminescence and local structure of Ge nanoclusters on Si without a wetting layer Condensed Matter Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831, USA

    E-print Network

    Pennycook, Steve

    Condensed Matter Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831, USA F. Flack, USA M. F. Chisholm and K. Yoo Condensed Matter Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831, USA Zhenyu Zhang and H. H. Weitering Condensed Matter Sciences Division, Oak

  8. On granular elasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qicheng; Jin, Feng; Wang, Guangqian; Song, Shixiong; Zhang, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Mesoscopic structures form in dense granular materials due to the self-organisation of the constituent particles. These structures have internal structural degrees of freedom in addition to the translational degree of freedom. The resultant granular elasticity, which exhibits intrinsic variations and inevitable relaxation, is a key quantity that accounts for macroscopic solid- or fluid-like properties and the transitions between them. In this work, we propose a potential energy landscape (PEL) with local stable basins and low elastic energy barriers to analyse the nature of granular elasticity. A function for the elastic energy density is proposed for stable states and is further calibrated with ultrasonic measurements. Fluctuations in the elastic energy due to the evolution of internal structures are proposed to describe a so-called configuration temperature Tc as a counterpart of the classical kinetic granular temperature Tk that is attributed to the translational degrees of freedom. The two granular temperatures are chosen as the state variables, and a fundamental equation is established to develop non-equilibrium thermodynamics for granular materials. Due to the relatively low elastic energy barrier in the PEL, granular elasticity relaxes more under common mechanical loadings, and a simple model based on mean-field theory is developed to account for this behaviour. PMID:25951049

  9. Gravity and Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behringer, R. P.; Hovell, Daniel; Kondic, Lou; Tennakoon, Sarath; Veje, Christian

    1999-01-01

    We describe experiments that probe a number of different types of granular flow where either gravity is effectively eliminated or it is modulated in time. These experiments include the shaking of granular materials both vertically and horizontally, and the shearing of a 2D granular material. For the shaken system, we identify interesting dynamical phenomena and relate them to standard simple friction models. An interesting application of this set of experiments is to the mixing of dissimilar materials. For the sheared system we identify a new kind of dynamical phase transition.

  10. Scaling of granular temperature in a vibrated granular bed.

    PubMed

    Zivkovic, V; Biggs, M J; Glass, D H

    2011-03-01

    Granular temperature underpins the kinetic theory of granular flows as well as models for heat transfer, segregation, erosion, attrition, and aggregation in various granular systems. It is generally thought that granular temperature in vibrated granular systems scales with the square of the peak vibrational velocity. However, careful diffusing wave spectroscopy experiments and statistical analysis of data obtained from these for a three-dimensional vibrated bed of monodisperse glass particles reveals that the granular temperature is also significantly correlated with other vibrational parameters. Reexamination of previously published data obtained by others using alternative methods further supports our thus far unremarked upon observation reported here. PMID:21517495

  11. Coarsening in granular systems

    E-print Network

    Andrea Baldassarri; Andrea Puglisi; Alessandro Sarracino

    2015-04-28

    We review a few representative examples of granular experiments or models where phase separation, accompanied by domain coarsening, is a relevant phenomenon. We first elucidate the intrinsic non-equilibrium, or athermal, nature of granular media. Thereafter, dilute systems, the so-called "granular gases" are discussed: idealized kinetic models, such as the gas of inelastic hard spheres in the cooling regime, are the optimal playground to study the slow growth of correlated structures, e.g. shear patterns, vortices and clusters. In fluidized experiments, liquid-gas or solid-gas separations have been observed. In the case of monolayers of particles, phase coexistence and coarsening appear in several different setups, with mechanical or electrostatic energy input. Phenomenological models describe, even quantitatively, several experimental measures, both for the coarsening dynamics and for the dynamic transition between different granular phases. The origin of the underlying bistability is in general related to negative compressibility from granular hydrodynamics computations, even if the understanding of the mechanism is far from complete. A relevant problem, with important industrial applications, is related to the demixing or segregation of mixtures, for instance in rotating tumblers or on horizontally vibrated plates. Finally, the problem of compaction of highly dense granular materials, which has many important applications, is usually described in terms of coarsening dynamics: there, bubbles of mis-aligned grains evaporate, allowing the coalescence of optimally arranged islands and a progressive reduction of total occupied volume.

  12. Self-Organization in Granular Slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottino, Julio M.; Jain, Nitin; Lueptow, Richard M.; Khakhar, Devang V.

    2000-11-01

    Mixtures of tumbled granular materials under flow exhibit various intriguing types of un-mixing or self-organization. Small differences in particles' density, size or shape may trigger the effect. Nearly all studies to date have addressed the case of dry granular media, where the interparticle fluid is typically air. Here we report the existence of self-organization in wet granular media or slurries, mixtures of particles of different sizes dispersed in a lower density liquid. Technological examples appear in cement, ceramics, fine chemicals, and in the food industry; examples in nature appear in evolution of landslides and transport in river sediments. In spite of significantly different physics at the particle level, both axial banding (alternating bands rich in small and large particles in a long rotating cylinder) and radial segregation (in quasi 2D containers) are observed in slurries. However, axial segregation is significantly faster and the spectrum of outcomes is richer. Moreover, experiments with suitable fluids, reveal, for the first time, the internal structure of axially segregated systems, something that up to now has been accessible only via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experimentation.

  13. Rainwater Channelization and Infiltration in Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cejas, Cesare; Wei, Yuli; Barrois, Remi; Durian, Douglas; Dreyfus, Remi; Compass Team

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the formation of fingered flow in dry granular media under simulated rainfall using a quasi-2D experimental set-up composed of a random close packing of mono-disperse glass beads. We determine effects of grain diameter and surface wetting properties on the formation and infiltration of water channels. For hydrophilic granular media, rainwater initially infiltrates a shallow top layer of soil creating a uniform horizontal wetting front before instabilities occur and grow to form water channels. For hydrophobic media, rainwater ponds on the soil surface rather than infiltrates and water channels may still occur at a later time when the hydraulic pressure of the ponding water exceeds the capillary repellency of the soil. We probe the kinetics of the fingering instabilities that serve as precursors for the growth and drainage of water channels. We also examine the effects of several different methods on improving rainwater channelization such as varying the level of pre-saturation, modifying the soil surface flatness, and adding superabsorbent hydrogel particles.

  14. Microfiltration of gluten processing streams from corn wet milling C.I. Thompson a

    E-print Network

    Microfiltration of gluten processing streams from corn wet milling C.I. Thompson a , K.D. Rausch b 2005; accepted 6 February 2005 Available online 12 April 2005 Abstract In corn wet milling, dry matter composition; Corn processing; Membrane filtration; Corn gluten meal; Wet milling 1. Introduction Wet milling

  15. Wet Sand flows better than dry sand

    E-print Network

    Jorge E. Fiscina; Christian Wagner

    2007-11-19

    We investigated the yield stress and the apparent viscosity of sand with and without small amounts of liquid. By pushing the sand through a tube with an enforced Poiseuille like profile we minimize the effect of avalanches and shear localization. We find that the system starts to flow when a critical shear of the order of one particle diameter is exceeded. In contrast to common believe, we observe that the resistance against the flow of wet sand is much smaller than that of dry sand. For the dissipative flow we propose a non-equilibrium state equation for granular fluids.

  16. Multiscale modeling in granular flow

    E-print Network

    Rycroft, Christopher Harley

    2007-01-01

    Granular materials are common in everyday experience, but have long-resisted a complete theoretical description. Here, we consider the regime of slow, dense granular flow, for which there is no general model, representing ...

  17. Flow of wet granular materials: A numerical study.

    PubMed

    Khamseh, Saeed; Roux, Jean-Noël; Chevoir, François

    2015-08-01

    We simulate dense assemblies of frictional spherical grains in steady shear flow under controlled normal stress P in the presence of a small amount of an interstitial liquid, which gives rise to capillary menisci, assumed isolated (pendular regime), and attractive forces, which are hysteretic: Menisci form at contact, but do not break until grains are separated by a finite rupture distance. The system behavior depends on two dimensionless control parameters, inertial number I and reduced pressure P^{*}=aP/(??), comparing confining forces ?a^{2}P to meniscus tensile strength F_{0}=??a, for grains of diameter a joined by menisci with surface tension ?. We pay special attention to the quasistatic limit of slow flow and observe systematic, enduring strain localization in some of the cohesion-dominated (P^{*}?0.1) systems. Homogeneous steady flows are characterized by the dependence of internal friction coefficient ?^{*} and solid fraction ? on I and P^{*}. We also record normal stress differences, fairly small but not negligible and increasing for decreasing P^{*}. The system rheology is moderately sensitive to saturation within the pendular regime, but would be different in the absence of capillary hysteresis. Capillary forces have a significant effect on the macroscopic behavior of the system, up to P^{*} values of several units, especially for longer force ranges associated with larger menisci. The concept of effective pressure may be used to predict an order of magnitude for the strong increase of ?^{*} as P^{*} decreases but such a crude approach is unable to account for the complex structural changes induced by capillary cohesion, with a significant decrease of ? and different agglomeration states and anisotropic fabric. Likewise, the Mohr-Coulomb criterion for pressure-dependent critical states is, at best, an approximation valid within a restricted range of pressures, with P^{*}?1. At small enough P^{*}, large clusters of interacting grains form in slow flows, in which liquid bonds survive shear strains of several units. This affects the anisotropies associated with different interactions and the shape of function ?^{*}(I), which departs more slowly from its quasistatic limit than in cohesionless systems (possibly explaining the shear banding tendency). PMID:26382388

  18. Flow of wet granular materials: a numerical study

    E-print Network

    Saeed Khamseh; Jean-Noël Roux; François Chevoir

    2015-04-15

    We simulate dense assemblies of frictional spherical grains in steady shear flow under controlled normal stress $P$ in the presence of a small amount of an interstitial liquid, which gives rise to capillary menisci, assumed isolated (pendular regime), and to attractive forces. The system behavior depends on two dimensionless control parameters: inertial number $I$ and reduced pressure $P^*=aP/(\\pi\\Gamma)$, comparing confining forces $\\sim a^2P$ to meniscus tensile strength $F_0=\\pi\\Gamma a$, for grains of diameter $a$ joined by menisci with surface tension $\\Gamma$. We pay special attention to the quasi-static limit of slow flow and observe systematic, enduring strain localization in some of the cohesion-dominated ($P^*\\sim 0.1$) systems. Homogeneous steady flows are characterized by the dependence of internal friction coefficient $\\mu^*$ and solid fraction $\\Phi$ on $I$ and $P^*$. We record fairly small but not negligible normal stress differences and the moderate sensitivity of the system to saturation within the pendular regime. Capillary forces have a significant effect on the macroscopic behavior of the system, up to $P^*$ values of several units. The concept of effective pressure may be used to predict an order of magnitude for the strong increase of $\\mu^*$ as $P^*$ decreases but such a crude approach is unable to account for the complex structural changes induced by capillary cohesion. Likewise, the Mohr-Coulomb criterion for pressure-dependent critical states is, at best, an approximation valid within a restricted range of pressures, with $P^*\\ge 1$. At small enough $P^*$, large clusters of interacting grains form in slow flows, in which liquid bonds survive shear strains of several units. This affects the anisotropies associated to different interactions, and the shape of function $\\mu^*(I)$, which departs more slowly from its quasistatic limit than in cohesionless systems.

  19. Flow of wet granular materials: a numerical study

    E-print Network

    Khamseh, Saeed; Chevoir, François

    2015-01-01

    We simulate dense assemblies of frictional spherical grains in steady shear flow under controlled normal stress $P$ in the presence of a small amount of an interstitial liquid, which gives rise to capillary menisci, assumed isolated (pendular regime), and to attractive forces. The system behavior depends on two dimensionless control parameters: inertial number $I$ and reduced pressure $P^*=aP/(\\pi\\Gamma)$, comparing confining forces $\\sim a^2P$ to meniscus tensile strength $F_0=\\pi\\Gamma a$, for grains of diameter $a$ joined by menisci with surface tension $\\Gamma$. We pay special attention to the quasi-static limit of slow flow and observe systematic, enduring strain localization in some of the cohesion-dominated ($P^*\\sim 0.1$) systems. Homogeneous steady flows are characterized by the dependence of internal friction coefficient $\\mu^*$ and solid fraction $\\Phi$ on $I$ and $P^*$. We record fairly small but not negligible normal stress differences and the moderate sensitivity of the system to saturation with...

  20. Flow of dry and wet granular materials: Numerical simulation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamseh, Saeed; Roux, Jean-Noël; Chevoir, François

    2013-06-01

    We use a DEM method to simulate dense assemblies of frictional spherical grains in 3D steady shear flow under controlled normal stress P, either dry or in the presence of a small amount of an interstitial liquid, which gives rise to capillary menisci and attractive forces. We pay special attention to the quasi-static limit of slow flow. The system behavior is characterized by the dependence of internal friction coefficient and solid fraction on two dimensionless control parameters: the inertial number, I and the reduced pressure, P*, comparing confining forces to contact tensile strength. Capillary forces have a significant effect on the macroscopic behavior of the system, up to P* values of several unities, especially for longer force ranges associated with larger menisci. We relate this effect to fabric anisotropy parameters of contact and distant interactions.

  1. Flow of wet granular materials: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamseh, Saeed; Roux, Jean-Noël; Chevoir, François

    2015-08-01

    We simulate dense assemblies of frictional spherical grains in steady shear flow under controlled normal stress P in the presence of a small amount of an interstitial liquid, which gives rise to capillary menisci, assumed isolated (pendular regime), and attractive forces, which are hysteretic: Menisci form at contact, but do not break until grains are separated by a finite rupture distance. The system behavior depends on two dimensionless control parameters, inertial number I and reduced pressure P*=a P /(? ? ) , comparing confining forces ˜a2P to meniscus tensile strength F0=? ? a , for grains of diameter a joined by menisci with surface tension ? . We pay special attention to the quasistatic limit of slow flow and observe systematic, enduring strain localization in some of the cohesion-dominated (P*˜0.1 ) systems. Homogeneous steady flows are characterized by the dependence of internal friction coefficient ?* and solid fraction ? on I and P*. We also record normal stress differences, fairly small but not negligible and increasing for decreasing P*. The system rheology is moderately sensitive to saturation within the pendular regime, but would be different in the absence of capillary hysteresis. Capillary forces have a significant effect on the macroscopic behavior of the system, up to P* values of several units, especially for longer force ranges associated with larger menisci. The concept of effective pressure may be used to predict an order of magnitude for the strong increase of ?* as P* decreases but such a crude approach is unable to account for the complex structural changes induced by capillary cohesion, with a significant decrease of ? and different agglomeration states and anisotropic fabric. Likewise, the Mohr-Coulomb criterion for pressure-dependent critical states is, at best, an approximation valid within a restricted range of pressures, with P*?1 . At small enough P*, large clusters of interacting grains form in slow flows, in which liquid bonds survive shear strains of several units. This affects the anisotropies associated with different interactions and the shape of function ?*(I ) , which departs more slowly from its quasistatic limit than in cohesionless systems (possibly explaining the shear banding tendency).

  2. Strain Effects on Granular Impact

    E-print Network

    Anlage, Steven

    Strain Effects on Granular Impact Emily Lim, Kerstin Nordstrom, Matt Harrington, Steven Slotterback, Wolfgang Losert #12;Impacts into Granular Materials Tunguska Crater June 1908 - Leveled more than 2,000 sq km Foot-Ground Interaction How does preparation of the granular material affect impact dynamics

  3. Stress transmission and incipient yield flow in dense granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenfeld, Raphael

    2010-05-01

    Jammed granular matter transmits stresses non-uniformly like no conventional solid, especially when it is on the verge of failure. Jamming is caused by self-organization of granular matter under external loads, often giving rise to networks of force chains that support the loads non-uniformly. An ongoing debate in the literature concerns the correct way to model the static stress field in such media: good old elasticity theory or newcomer isostaticity theory. The two differ significantly and, in particular in 2D, isostaticity theory leads naturally to force chain solutions. More recently, it has been proposed that real granular materials are made of mixtures of regions, some behaving elastically and some isostatically. The theory to describe these systems has been named stato-elasticity. In this paper, I first present the rationale for stato-elasticity theory. An important step towards the construction of this theory is a good understanding of stress transmission in the regions of pure isostatic states. A brief description is given of recently derived general solutions for 2D isostatic regions with nonuniform structures, which go well beyond the over-simplistic picture of force chains. I then show how the static stress equations are related directly to incipient yield flow and derive the equations that govern yield and creep rheology of dense granular matter at the initial stages of failure. These equations are general and describe strains in granular materials of both rigid and compliant particles.

  4. Structure and dynamics of vibrated granular chains: Comparison to equilibrium polymers Kevin Safford,1

    E-print Network

    Kudrolli, Arshad

    is well developed 5­7 . A vibrated bed is used widely in industry to transport and sort granular matter shown to occur when persistence length of an elastic wire is large compared with the container size 17

  5. Enuresis (Bed-Wetting)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... their development. Bed-wetting is more common among boys than girls. What causes bed-wetting? A number of things ... valves in boys or in the ureter in girls or boys Abnormalities in the spinal cord A small bladder ...

  6. Definition of temperature in dense granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colizza, Vittoria; Barrat, Alain; Loreto, Vittorio

    2002-05-01

    In this paper we report the measurement of a pseudotemperature for compacting granular media on the basis of the fluctuation-dissipation relations in the aging dynamics of a model system. From the violation of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem emerges an effective temperature (a dynamical temperature Tdyn) whose value depends on the particle density. We compare the results for Tdyn at several densities with the values of Edwards' compactivity at the corresponding densities [S. F. Edwards, in Granular Matter: An Interdisciplinary Approach, edited by A. Mehta (Springer-Verlag, New York, 1994) and references therein]. It turns out that the dynamical temperature and Edwards' compactivity coincide on a large range of densities, opening in this way the door to experimental checks as well as theoretical constructions.

  7. The shock and release properties of dry and wetted silica sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, James; Braithwaite, Christopher; Taylor, Nicholas; Jardine, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    While the shock response of dry sand has been studied at length, the Hugoniots for partially and fully wetted silicaceous granular materials are less well understood. Here, we present an extensive experimental plate impact investigation for a well characterized silica sand under dry, moist and water-saturated conditions. Particular attention is paid to cell design and sample preparation. Furthermore, we have applied our technique for measuring both shock Hugoniot and release to vacuum for granular materials, as presented previously, to the wetted systems studied.

  8. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Electrical, dielectric and surface wetting properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes/nylon-6 nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yun-Ze; Li, Meng-Meng; Sui, Wan-Mei; Kong, Qing-Shan; Zhang, Lei

    2009-03-01

    This paper reports that the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)/nylon-6 (PA6) nanocomposites with different MWCNT loadings have been prepared by a simple melt-compounding method. The electrical, dielectric, and surface wetting properties of the CNT/PA6 composites have been studied. The temperature dependence of the conductivity of the CNT/PA6 composite with 10.0 wt% CNT loading (?RT ~ 10-4 S/cm) are measured, and afterwards a charge-energy-limited tunnelling model (ln ?(T) ~ T-1/2) is found. With increasing CNT weight percentage from 0.0 to 10.0 wt%, the dielectric constant of the CNT/PA6 composites enhances and the dielectric loss tangent increases two orders of magnitude. In addition, water contact angles of the CNT/PA6 composites increase and the composites with CNT loading larger than 2.0 wt% even become hydrophobic. The obtained results indicate that the electrical and surface properties of the composites have been significantly enhanced by the embedded carbon nanotubes.

  9. Modeling Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackbill, J. U.

    2000-11-01

    Granular materials are often cited as examples of systems with complex and unusual properties. Much of this complexity is captured by computational models in which the actual material properties of individual grains are idealized and simplified. Because material properties can be important under extreme conditions, we consider assemblies of grains with more realistic properties. Our model grains may deform, their resulting stresses are computed from elastic / plastic constitutive models, and their interactions with each other include Coulomb friction and bonding. Our model equations are solved using a particle-in-cell (PIC) method, which combines a Lagrangian representation of the materials with an adaptive grid [1]. Our contact model between grains is linear in the number of grains, and we model assemblies with statistically significant numbers of grains. With our model, we have studied the response of dense granular material to shear, with especial attention to the probability density function governing the volume distribution of stress for mono- and poly-disperse samples, circular and polygonal grains, and various values of microscopic friction coefficients, yield stresses, and packing fractions [2]. Remarkably, PDF's are similar in form for all cases simulated, and similar to those observed in experiments with granular materials under both compression and shear. Namely, the simulations yield an exponential probability of large stresses above the mean, and there is a finite chance that a few grains in a large assembly are subjected to extreme stresses at any given time, even at low strain rates. For energetic materials, such as explosives, this is a signficant finding. We have also studied the relationship between distributions of boundary tractions and volume distributions of stress. The ratio of normal and tangential components of traction on the boundary defines a bulk frictional response, which we find increases with the inter-granular friction coefficient. However, the bulk friction is always larger than the inter-granular friction for densely packed samples. Bulk friction is also strongly dependent on grain size distribution and shape. We also present new observations of force-chain banding during recrystallization, of slip systems in monodisperse samples, and of the effects of plastic yield. Acknowledgement: This work was performed in collaboration with S. G. Bardenhagen, University of Utah, D. Sulsky, University of New Mexico, and Sharen Cummins, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and is supported by the Department of Energy, under contract W-7405-ENG-36. [1] Bardenhagen, S. G., J. U. Brackbill, and D. Sulsky, The material-point method for granular materials, Comput. Meths. Appl. Mech. and Engn., 187, 529-541, 2000. [2] Bardenhagen, S. G., J. U. Brackbill, and D. L. Sulsky, Numerical study of stress distribution in sheared granular material in two dimensions, Phys. Rev E, 62, 2000 (to appear).

  10. Granular flow over inclined channels with constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunuguntla, Deepak; Weinhart, Thomas; Thornton, Anthony; Bokhove, Onno

    2013-04-01

    Study of granular flows down inclined channels is essential in understanding the dynamics of natural grain flows like landslides and snow avalanches. As a stepping stone, dry granular flow over an inclined channel with a localised constriction is investigated using both continuum methods and particle simulations. Initially, depth-averaged equations of motion (Savage & Hutter 1989) containing an unknown friction law are considered. The shallow-layer model for granular flows is closed with a friction law obtained from particle simulations of steady flows (Weinhart et al. 2012) undertaken in the open source package Mercury DPM (Mercury 2010). The closed two-dimensional (2D) shallow-layer model is then width-averaged to obtain a novel one-dimensional (1D) model which is an extension of the one for water flows through contraction (Akers & Bokhove 2008). Different flow states are predicted by this novel one-dimensional theory. Flow regimes with distinct flow states are determined as a function of upstream channel Froude number, F, and channel width ratio, Bc. The latter being the ratio of the channel exit width and upstream channel width. Existence of multiple steady states is predicted in a certain regime of F - Bc parameter plane which is in agreement with experiments previously undertaken by (Akers & Bokhove 2008) and for granular flows (Vreman et al. 2007). Furthermore, the 1D model is verified by solving the 2D shallow granular equations using an open source discontinuous Galerkin finite element package hpGEM (Pesch et al. 2007). For supercritical flows i.e. F > 1 the 1D asymptotics holds although the two-dimensional oblique granular jumps largely vary across the converging channel. This computationally efficient closed 1D model is validated by comparing it to the computationally more expensiveaa three-dimensional particle simulations. Finally, we aim to present a quasi-steady particle simulation of inclined flow through two rectangular blocks separated by a gap, investigate the channel formed by the dead zones and compare it with our analytical calculations. REFERENCES 1. Akers, B. & Bokhove, O. 2008 Hydraulic flow through a channel contraction: Multiple steady states. Physics of fluids 20 (056601), 056601. 2. Mercury 2010 http://www2.msm.ctw.utwente.nl/athornton/md/ . 3. Pesch, L., Bell, A., Sollie, H., Ambati, V.R., Bokhove, O. & Van der Vegt, J.J.W. 2007 hpGEM—a software framework for discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods. ACM Transactions on Mathematical Software (TOMS) 33 (4), 23. 4. Savage, SB & Hutter, K. 1989 The motion of a finite mass of granular material down a rough incline. Journal of Fluid Mechanics 199 (1), 177-215. 5. Vreman, AW, Al-Tarazi, M., Kuipers, JAM, van Sint Annaland, M. & Bokhove, O. 2007 Supercritical shallow granular flow through a contraction: experiment, theory and simulation. Journal of Fluid Mechanics 578 (1), 233-269. 6. Weinhart, T., Thornton, A.R., Luding, S. & Bokhove, O. 2012 Closure relations for shallow granular flows from particle simulations. Granular Matter 14 (4), 531-552.

  11. The influence of moisture content on the shock compression responses of brittle granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Kun

    2015-03-01

    The irreversible energy-absorbing compaction processes of shocked particle layers change with the moisture content. The shock wave interaction with dry and wet granular layers is experimentally investigated to elucidate the moisture effects on the energy distribution in the brittle granular layers. It is found that the frictional and breakage dissipation combined as the plastic dissipation in the granular layers is increasingly mitigated by the increasing moisture content. The higher strain rate in the shock loaded wet granular layer leads to an increased number of debris as predicted by the theoretical analysis. Nevertheless the inter-particle moisture effectively lubricates the enhanced particle friction arising from the intensive particle rearrangement concomitant with the greater degree of particle breakage. As a result, the efficiency of the momentum transfer in the wet granular layer is significantly improved manifested by the much larger particle kinetic energy. Meanwhile the particle breakage mode transits from the corner grinding to the shear cleavage with moisture content as revealed by the SEM image of the recovered grains from shock wave experiments.

  12. Hydrodynamic Theory of Granular Solids: Permanent, Transient and Granular Elasticity

    E-print Network

    Yimin Jiang; Mario Liu

    2007-06-10

    Although fully elastic when static, granular media become transiently elastic when being slowly sheared -- during which both the elastic energy and stress relax. Starting from this observation, we cogently derive the framework for granular hydrodynamics, a set of differential equations consistent with general principles of physics, especially reversible and irreversible thermodynamics. In addition, an expression for the granular elastic energy is reviewed and further discussed.

  13. Wet-Nanotechnology: fl id t NIUnanofluids at NIU

    E-print Network

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    Wet-Nanotechnology: fl id t NIUnanofluids at NIU Suspensions of nanoparticles in base fluids Size does matter: unique transport properties, differentq p p p , from conventional suspensions: do , flow , catalyst , and other field conditions #12;Wet-Nanotechnology: fl id ' li inanofluids

  14. Rhizoctonia seed, seedling, and wet root rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wet root rot caused by Rhizoctonia solani Kühn can cause seed and seedling rot of both lentil and chickpea as well as many other agricultural crops worldwide. The pathogen is favored in cool, sandy soil with high organic matter under no-till or reduced-till soil management practices. Survival spor...

  15. Swimming in Granular Media

    E-print Network

    Takashi Shimada; Dirk Kadau; Troy Shinbrot; Hans J. Herrmann

    2009-11-06

    We study a simple model of periodic contraction and extension of large intruders in a granular bed to understand the mechanism for swimming in an otherwise solid media. Using an event-driven simulation, we find optimal conditions that idealized swimmers must use to critically fluidize a sand bed so that it is rigid enough to support a load when needed, but fluid enough to permit motion with minimal resistance. Swimmers - or other intruders - that agitate the bed too rapidly produce large voids that prevent traction from being achieved, while swimmers that move too slowly cannot travel before the bed re-solidifies around them i.e., the swimmers locally probe the fundamental time-scale in a granular packing.

  16. Granular cell ameloblastoma mimicking oncocytoma.

    PubMed

    Oza, Nirima; Agrawal, Karoon

    2012-09-01

    Granular cell ameloblastoma is a variant of ameloblastoma where cells located in the central portion of the follicles have granular eosinophilic cytoplasm and the peripheral cells resemble ameloblasts. A case of granular cell ameloblastoma of the mandible having very similar histopathological features of oncocytoma (oxyphilic adenoma) is reported where tumor cells were arranged in cords, sheets and follicles and their cytoplasm was full of eosinophilic granules. PMID:23248486

  17. Constitutive relations for steady, dense granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vescovi, D.; Berzi, D.; di Prisco, C. G.

    2011-12-01

    In the recent past, the flow of dense granular materials has been the subject of many scientific works; this is due to the large number of natural phenomena involving solid particles flowing at high concentration (e.g., debris flows and landslides). In contrast with the flow of dilute granular media, where the energy is essentially dissipated in binary collisions, the flow of dense granular materials is characterized by multiple, long-lasting and frictional contacts among the particles. The work focuses on the mechanical response of dry granular materials under steady, simple shear conditions. In particular, the goal is to obtain a complete rheology able to describe the material behavior within the entire range of concentrations for which the flow can be considered dense. The total stress is assumed to be the linear sum of a frictional and a kinetic component. The frictional and the kinetic contribution are modeled in the context of the critical state theory [8, 10] and the kinetic theory of dense granular gases [1, 3, 7], respectively. In the critical state theory, the granular material approaches a certain attractor state, independent on the initial arrangement, characterized by the capability of developing unlimited shear strains without any change in the concentration. Given that a disordered granular packing exists only for a range of concentration between the random loose and close packing [11], a form for the concentration dependence of the frictional normal stress that makes the latter vanish at the random loose packing is defined. In the kinetic theory, the particles are assumed to interact through instantaneous, binary and uncorrelated collisions. A new state variable of the problem is introduced, the granular temperature, which accounts for the velocity fluctuations. The model has been extended to account for the decrease in the energy dissipation due to the existence of correlated motion among the particles [5, 6] and to deal with non-instantaneous collisions [4]. We have shown that the present theory is capable of reproducing, qualitatively and quantitatively, the numerical simulations on disks [2] and the experiments on incline flows of glass spere [9]. [1] C. S. Campbell, Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics 22, 57 (1990) [2] F. da Cruz, S. Emam, M. Prochnow, J. Roux, and F. Chevoir, Physical Review E 72, 021309 (2005) [3] I. Goldhirsch, Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics 35, 267 (2003). [4] H. Hwang and K. Hutter, Continuum Mechanics and Thermodynamics 7, 357 (1995) [5] J. T. Jenkins, Granular Matter 10, 47 (2007) [6] J. T. Jenkins, Physics of Fluids 18, 103307 (2006) [7] J. T. Jenkins and M. W. Richman, Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis 87, 355 (1985) [8] D. Muir Wood, Geotechnical modelling (Spon Press, New York, 2004) [9] O. Pouliquen, Physics of Fluids 11, 542 (1999) [10] A. N. Schofield and C. P. Wroth, Critical state soil mechanics (McGraw-Hill, London, U.K., 1968) [11] C. Song, P. Wang, and H. A. Makse, Nature 453, 629 (2008)

  18. Wide and Universal Shear Zones In Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenistein, Denis; van Hecke, Martin

    2004-11-01

    We present experiments in which wide and universal shear zones are created in the bulk of granular material. The modification of a Couette cell whose bottom is split at a given radius allows the observation of bulk shear zones that strongly contrat the usual picture of granular matter flow where narrow particle-dependent shear bands are localized at a boundary. We focuss on the description of the universal Gaussian strain rate profiles. The position and width of the shear zones appear to be uncorrelated and can be tuned by the experimental geometry and the particle properties. 1 Fenistein & Van Hecke, Nature 425, 256 (2003)

  19. Spreading of triboelectrically charged granular matter

    E-print Network

    Deepak Kumar; A. Sane; Smita Gohil; P. R. Bandaru; S. Bhattacharya; Shankar Ghosh

    2014-06-10

    We report on the spreading of triboelectrically charged glass particles on an oppositely charged surface of a plastic cylindrical container in the presence of a constant mechanical agitation. The particles spread via sticking, as a monolayer on the cylinder's surface. Continued agitation initiates a sequence of instabilities of this monolayer, which first forms periodic wavy-stripe-shaped transverse density modulation in the monolayer and then ejects narrow and long particle-jets from the tips of these stripes. These jets finally coalesce laterally to form a homogeneous spreading front that is layered along the spreading direction. These remarkable growth patterns are related to a time evolving frictional drag between the moving charged glass particles and the countercharges on the plastic container. The results provide insight into the multiscale time-dependent tribolelectric processes and motivates further investigation into the microscopic causes of these macroscopic dynamical instabilities and spatial structures.

  20. Spreading of triboelectrically charged granular matter

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Deepak; Sane, A.; Gohil, Smita.; Bandaru, P. R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Ghosh, Shankar

    2014-01-01

    We report on the spreading of triboelectrically charged glass particles on an oppositely charged surface of a plastic cylindrical container in the presence of a constant mechanical agitation. The particles spread via sticking, as a monolayer on the cylinder's surface. Continued agitation initiates a sequence of instabilities of this monolayer, which first forms periodic wavy-stripe-shaped transverse density modulation in the monolayer and then ejects narrow and long particle-jets from the tips of these stripes. These jets finally coalesce laterally to form a homogeneous spreading front that is layered along the spreading direction. These remarkable growth patterns are related to a time evolving frictional drag between the moving charged glass particles and the countercharges on the plastic container. The results provide insight into the multiscale time-dependent tribolelectric processes and motivates further investigation into the microscopic causes of these macroscopic dynamical instabilities and spatial structures. PMID:24919483

  1. Dynamic wetting on superhydrophobic surfaces: Droplet impact and wetting hysteresis

    E-print Network

    Smyth, Katherine M.

    We study the wetting energetics and wetting hysteresis of sessile and impacting water droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces as a function of surface texture and surface energy. For sessile drops, we find three wetting ...

  2. Very, Very Fast Wetting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacqmin, David; Lee, Chi-Ming (Technical Monitor); Salzman, Jack (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Just after formation, optical fibers are wetted stably with acrylate at capillary numbers routinely exceeding 1000. It is hypothesized that this is possible because of dissolution of air into the liquid coating. A lubrication/boundary integral analysis that includes gas diffusion and solubility is developed. It is applied using conservatively estimated solubility and diffusivity coefficients and solutions are found that are consistent with industry practice and with the hypothesis. The results also agree with the claim of Deneka, Kar & Mensah (1988) that the use of high solubility gases to bathe a wetting line allows significantly greater wetting speeds. The solutions indicate a maximum speed of wetting which increases with gas solubility and with reduction in wetting-channel diameter.

  3. Spreading of a granular droplet.

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, I.; Raynaud, F.; Lanuza, J.; Andreotti, B.; Clement, E.; Aranson, I. S.; Materials Science Division; Univ. Simon; CNRS-ESPCI-Univ.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of controlled vibrations on the granular rheology is investigated in a specifically designed experiment in which a granular film spreads under the action of horizontal vibrations. A nonlinear diffusion equation is derived theoretically that describes the evolution of the deposit shape. A self-similar parabolic shape (the granular droplet) and a spreading dynamics are predicted that both agree quantitatively with the experimental results. The theoretical analysis is used to extract effective friction coefficients between the base and the granular layer under sustained and controlled vibrations. A shear thickening regime characteristic of dense granular flows is evidenced at low vibration energy, both for glass beads and natural sand. Conversely, shear thinning is observed at high agitation.

  4. Granular Avalanches in Fluids

    E-print Network

    S. Courrech du Pont; P. Gondret; B. Perrin; M. Rabaud

    2002-09-03

    Three regimes of granular avalanches in fluids are put in light depending on the Stokes number St which prescribes the relative importance of grain inertia and fluid viscous effects, and on the grain/fluid density ratio r. In gas (r >> 1 and St > 1, e.g., the dry case), the amplitude and time duration of avalanches do not depend on any fluid effect. In liquids (r ~ 1), for decreasing St, the amplitude decreases and the time duration increases, exploring an inertial regime and a viscous regime. These regimes are described by the analysis of the elementary motion of one grain.

  5. Entangled granular media

    E-print Network

    Nick Gravish; Scott V. Franklin; David L. Hu; Daniel I. Goldman

    2012-04-30

    We study the geometrically induced cohesion of ensembles of granular "u-particles" which mechanically entangle through particle interpenetration. We vary the length-to-width ratio $l/w$ of the u-particles and form them into free-standing vertical columns. In laboratory experiment we monitor the response of the columns to sinusoidal vibration (frequency $f$, peak acceleration $\\Gamma$). Column collapse occurs in a characteristic time, $\\tau$, which follows the relation $\\tau = f^{-1} \\exp(\\Delta / \\Gamma)$. $\\Delta$ resembles an activation energy and is maximal at intermediate $l/w$. Simulation reveals that optimal strength results from competition between packing and entanglement.

  6. Labyrinthic granular landscapes

    E-print Network

    H. Caps; N. Vandewalle

    2002-12-11

    We have numerically studied a model of granular landscape eroded by wind. We show the appearance of labyrinthic patterns when the wind orientation turns by $90^\\circ$. The occurence of such structures are discussed. Morever, we introduce the density $n_k$ of ``defects'' as the dynamic parameter governing the landscape evolution. A power law behavior of $n_k$ is found as a function of time. In the case of wind variations, the exponent (drastically) shifts from 2 to 1. The presence of two asymptotic values of $n_k$ implies the irreversibility of the labyrinthic formation process.

  7. Size Effects in Granular Media Size Effect of Inclusions in Granular Media

    E-print Network

    Kuhn, Matthew R.

    Size Effects in Granular Media Size Effect of Inclusions in Granular Media S. Joseph Antony1 Conference 2005 #12;Size Effects in Granular Media Outline 1 Background Particle stress Simulations: Particle Questions about granular behavior Experiment results #12;Size Effects in Granular Media Background Particle

  8. Wet solids flow enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Caram, H.S.; Agrawal, D.K.; Foster, N.

    1997-07-01

    The objective was to visualize the flow of granular materials in the silo using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. This was done by introducing traces. Mustard seeds and poppy seeds were used as trace particles. The region sampled was a cylinder 25 mm in diameter and 40 mm in length. Eight slices containing 128 by 128 to 256 by 256 pixels were generated for each image.

  9. [Effects of processing by granular heated beds on the chemical and functional properties of legume grains].

    PubMed

    Loayza Jibaja, C; Bressani, R

    1988-03-01

    The present research compares the effect of cooking cowpea, canavalia and lupine by pressure cooking and by a granular bed roaster, on chemical and physical characteristics. The wet cooking process was carried out by pressure cooking at 121 degrees C for 30 min at 15 psi, using a bean-to-water ratio of 3 to 1. The cooked samples were dried with heated air (60 degrees C). The granular bed roasting was carried out at 200 and 250 degrees C for contact times of 2 and 2.5 minutes, at a 5 to 1 sand:bean ratio. For this process, a granular bed roaster was designed and constructed. This process induced in the grain temperatures which varied from 90-128 degrees C, and thermic efficiencies which fluctuated between 38 and 60%. The wet and the dry processes did not affect protein and fat content, although available lysine values decreased slightly. The two processes did not affect water absorption and water solubility. The nitrogen solubility index, however, decreased as roasting temperatures increased in the case of the granular bed roaster, and it also decreased in the wet-cooking procedure. Both processes affected color of the cooked flours, with a light orange color, suggesting non-enzymatic browning due to the high temperatures used. PMID:3151432

  10. Heterogeneities in granular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mehta, A; Barker, G C; Luck, J M

    2008-06-17

    The absence of Brownian motion in granular media is a source of much complexity, including the prevalence of heterogeneity, whether static or dynamic, within a given system. Such strong heterogeneities can exist as a function of depth in a box of grains; this is the system we study here. First, we present results from three-dimensional, cooperative and stochastic Monte Carlo shaking simulations of spheres on heterogeneous density fluctuations. Next, we juxtapose these with results obtained from a theoretical model of a column of grains under gravity; frustration via competing local fields is included in our model, whereas the effect of gravity is to slow down the dynamics of successively deeper layers. The combined conclusions suggest that the dynamics of a real granular column can be divided into different phases-ballistic, logarithmic, activated, and glassy-as a function of depth. The nature of the ground states and their retrieval (under zero-temperature dynamics) is analyzed; the glassy phase shows clear evidence of its intrinsic ("crystalline") states, which lie below a band of approximately degenerate ground states. In the other three phases, by contrast, the system jams into a state chosen randomly from this upper band of metastable states. PMID:18541918

  11. What is soil organic matter worth?

    PubMed

    Sparling, G P; Wheeler, D; Vesely, E-T; Schipper, L A

    2006-01-01

    The conservation and restoration of soil organic matter are often advocated because of the generally beneficial effects on soil attributes for plant growth and crop production. More recently, organic matter has become important as a terrestrial sink and store for C and N. We have attempted to derive a monetary value of soil organic matter for crop production and storage functions in three contrasting New Zealand soil orders (Gley, Melanic, and Granular Soils). Soil chemical and physical characteristics of real-life examples of three pairs of matched soils with low organic matter contents (after long-term continuous cropping for vegetables or maize) or high organic matter content (continuous pasture) were used as input data for a pasture (grass-clover) production model. The differences in pasture dry matter yields (non-irrigated) were calculated for three climate scenarios (wet, dry, and average years) and the yields converted to an equivalent weight and financial value of milk solids. We also estimated the hypothetical value of the C and N sequestered during the recovery phase of the low organic matter content soils assuming trading with C and N credits. For all three soil orders, and for the three climate scenarios, pasture dry matter yields were decreased in the soils with lower organic matter contents. The extra organic matter in the high C soils was estimated to be worth NZ$27 to NZ$150 ha(-1) yr(-1) in terms of increased milk solids production. The decreased yields from the previously cropped soils were predicted to persist for 36 to 125 yr, but with declining effect as organic matter gradually recovered, giving an accumulated loss in pastoral production worth around NZ$518 to NZ$1239 ha(-1). This was 42 to 73 times lower than the hypothetical value of the organic matter as a sequestering agent for C and N, which varied between NZ$22,963 to NZ$90,849 depending on the soil, region, discount rates, and values used for carbon and nitrogen credits. PMID:16510699

  12. Contact dynamics simulations of compacting cohesive granular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadau, Dirk; Bartels, Guido; Brendel, Lothar; Wolf, Dietrich E.

    2002-08-01

    The modelling of cohesion on the particle scale in granular matter [Vermeer et al., 2001] [1] has recently received increasing attention, because various important applications call for a microscopic foundation for the existing phenomenological continuum theories. Specifically for understanding the different behaviour of nano-powders and ordinary granular matter cohesion has to be taken into account. An example in this context is the so-called sinter-forging of nano-powders, i.e. pressure sintering at relatively low temperatures [Skandan et al., 1994] [2]. We model the corresponding compaction by the rearrangement of a large number of grains by means of contact-dynamics. For this purpose we introduce an attractive force (cohesion) as well as rolling friction between the (round) grains. The latter turns out to be crucial for the stabilization of force chains.

  13. Membrane-based wet electrostatic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    David J. Bayless; Liming Shi; Gregory Kremer; Ben J. Stuart; James Reynolds; John Caine

    2005-06-01

    Emissions of fine particulate matter, PM2.5, in both primary and secondary form, are difficult to capture in typical dry electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). Wet (or waterbased) ESPs are well suited for collection of acid aerosols and fine particulates because of greater corona power and virtually no re-entrainment. However, field disruptions because of spraying (misting) of water, formation of dry spots (channeling), and collector surface corrosion limit the applicability of current wet ESPs in the control of secondary PM2.5. Researchers at Ohio University have patented novel membrane collection surfaces to address these problems. Water-based cleaning in membrane collectors made of corrosion-resistant fibers is facilitated by capillary action between the fibers, maintaining an even distribution of water. This paper presents collection efficiency results of lab-scale and pilot-scale testing at First Energy's Bruce Mansfield Plant for the membrane-based wet ESP. The data indicate that a membrane wet ESP was more effective at collecting fine particulates, acid aerosols, and oxidized mercury than the metal-plate wet ESP, even with {approximately}15% less collecting area. 15 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Entropy and Temperature of a Static Granular Assembly

    E-print Network

    Silke Henkes; Corey S. O'Hern; Bulbul Chakraborty

    2007-01-19

    Granular matter is comprised of a large number of particles whose collective behavior determines macroscopic properties such as flow and mechanical strength. A comprehensive theory of the properties of granular matter, therefore, requires a statistical framework. In molecular matter, equilibrium statistical mechanics, which is founded on the principle of conservation of energy, provides this framework. Grains, however, are small but macroscopic objects whose interactions are dissipative since energy can be lost through excitations of the internal degrees of freedom. In this work, we construct a statistical framework for static, mechanically stable packings of grains, which parallels that of equilibrium statistical mechanics but with conservation of energy replaced by the conservation of a function related to the mechanical stress tensor. Our analysis demonstrates the existence of a state function that has all the attributes of entropy. In particular, maximizing this state function leads to a well-defined granular temperature for these systems. Predictions of the ensemble are verified against simulated packings of frictionless, deformable disks. Our demonstration that a statistical ensemble can be constructed through the identification of conserved quantities other than energy is a new approach that is expected to open up avenues for statistical descriptions of other non-equilibrium systems.

  15. Collective phenomena in granular and atmospheric electrification

    E-print Network

    Freja Nordsiek; Daniel P. Lathrop

    2015-09-14

    In clouds of suspended particles (grains, droplets, spheres, crystals, etc.), collisions electrify the particles and the clouds producing large electric potential differences over large scales. This is seen most spectacularly in the atmosphere as lighting in thunderstorms, thundersnow, dust storms, and volcanic ash plumes where multi-million-volt potential differences over scales of kilometers can be produced, but it is a general phenomena in granular systems as a whole. The electrification process is not well understood, especially for electrification of insulating particles of the same material. To investigate the relative importances of particle properties (material, size, etc.) and collective phenomena (behaviors of systems at large scales not easily predicted from local dynamics) in granular and atmospheric electrification, we used a table-top experiment that mechanically shakes particles inside a cell where we measure the macroscopic electric field between the electrically conducting end plates. The measured electric fields are a result of capacitive coupling and direct charge transfer between the particles and the plates. Using a diverse range of mono-material particle sets (plastics, ceramic, glass, and metals), we found that all our particle materials electrify and show similar dynamics with long time-scale temporal variation and an electric field amplitude that depends on the particle quantity in a complex way. These results suggest that while particle properties do matter like previous investigations have shown, macroscopic electrification of solids is relatively material agnostic and large scale collective phenomena play a major role.

  16. Different Effects of Roughness (Granularity) and Hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirtcliffe, Neil; McHale, Glen; Hamlett, Christopher; Newton, Michael

    2010-05-01

    With thanks to Stefan Doerr and Jorge Mataix-Solera for their invitation Superhydrophobicity is an interesting effect that appears to be simple on the outset; increased surface area from roughness increases interfacial area and therefore energy loss or gain. More extreme roughness prevents total wetting, resulting in gas pockets present at the surface and a drastic change in the properties of the system. Increases in complexity of the system, by adding porosity (granularity), allowing the structures to move, varying the shape of the roughness or the composition of the liquid used often has unexpected effects. Here we will consider a few of these related to complex topography. Overhanging features are commonly used in test samples as they perform better in some tests than simple roughness. It has been shown to be a prerequisite for superoleophobic surfaces as it allows liquids to be suspended for contact angles considerably below 90°. It also allows trapping of gas in lower layers even if the first layer is flooded. This is important in soils as a fixed bed of granules behaves just like a surface with overhanging roughness. Using simple geometry it is possible to predict at what contact angle penetration will occur. Plants have some structured superhydrophobic surfaces and we have shown that some use them in conjunction with other structured surfaces to control water flows. This allows some plants to survive in difficult environments and shows us how subtly different structures interact completely differently with water. Long fibres can either cause water droplets to roll over a plant surface or halt it in its tracks. Implications of this in soils include predicting when particles will adhere more strongly to water drops and why organic fibrous material may play a greater role in the behaviour of water in soils than may be expected from the amount present. The garden snail uses a biosurfactant that is very effective at wetting surfaces and can crawl over most superhydrophobic surfaces. There are some, however, that defeat even the snail's complex slime. Looking at these surfaces in more detail reveals that some superhydrophobic surfaces are much more resistant to the effects of surfactants than others. As mentioned above, overhanging structures, such as those found in granular materials are particularly effective at suspending liquids. This does not, however, always translate to them being more effective against surfactants, unfortunately, however, surfactants are not always as effective as we would like them to be, although drops do not skate across superhydrophobic surfaces they often do not penetrate into them fully either.

  17. Adsorption of methyl tertiary butyl ether on granular zeolites: Batch and column studies.

    PubMed

    Abu-Lail, Laila; Bergendahl, John A; Thompson, Robert W

    2010-06-15

    Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) has been shown to be readily removed from water with powdered zeolites, but the passage of water through fixed-beds of very small powdered zeolites produces high friction losses not encountered in flow through larger sized granular materials. In this study, equilibrium and kinetic adsorption of MTBE onto granular zeolites, a coconut shell granular activated carbon (CS-1240), and a commercial carbon adsorbent (CCA) sample was evaluated. In addition, the effect of natural organic matter (NOM) on MTBE adsorption was evaluated. Batch adsorption experiments determined that ZSM-5 was the most effective granular zeolite for MTBE adsorption. Further equilibrium and kinetic experiments verified that granular ZSM-5 is superior to CS-1240 and CCA in removing MTBE from water. No competitive adsorption effects between NOM and MTBE were observed for adsorption to granular ZSM-5 or CS-1240, however there was competition between NOM and MTBE for adsorption onto the CCA granules. Fixed-bed adsorption experiments for longer run times were performed using granular ZSM-5. The bed depth service time model (BDST) was used to analyze the breakthrough data. PMID:20153106

  18. Wet storage integrity update

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.

    1983-09-01

    This report includes information from various studies performed under the Wet Storage Task of the Spent Fuel Integrity Project of the Commercial Spent Fuel Management (CSFM) Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. An overview of recent developments in the technology of wet storage of spent water reactor fuel is presented. Licensee Event Reports pertaining to spent fuel pools and the associated performance of spent fuel and storage components during wet storage are discussed. The current status of fuel that was examined under the CSFM Program is described. Assessments of the effect of boric acid in spent fuel pool water on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel and the stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel piping containing stagnant water at spent fuel pools are discussed. A list of pertinent publications is included. 84 references, 21 figures, 11 tables.

  19. Experimental Investigation of Plastic Deformations Before Granular Avalanche

    E-print Network

    Axelle Amon; Roman Bertoni; Jérôme Crassous

    2012-11-23

    We present an experimental study of the deformation inside a granular material that is progressively tilted. We investigate the deformation before the avalanche with a spatially resolved Diffusive Wave Spectroscopy setup. At the beginning of the inclination process, we first observe localized and isolated events in the bulk, with a density which decreases with the depth. As the angle of inclination increases, series of micro-failures occur periodically in the bulk, and finally a granular avalanche takes place. The micro-failures are observed only when the tilt angles are larger than a threshold angle much smaller than the granular avalanche angle. We have characterized the density of reorganizations and the localization of micro-failures. We have also explored the effect of the nature of the grains, the relative humidity conditions and the packing fraction of the sample. We discuss those observations in the framework of the plasticity of granular matter. Micro-failures may then be viewed as the result of the accumulation of numerous plastic events.

  20. Granular Superconductors and Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David; Koczor, Ron

    1999-01-01

    As a Bose condensate, superconductors provide novel conditions for revisiting previously proposed couplings between electromagnetism and gravity. Strong variations in Cooper pair density, large conductivity and low magnetic permeability define superconductive and degenerate condensates without the traditional density limits imposed by the Fermi energy (approx. 10(exp -6) g cu cm). Recent experiments have reported anomalous weight loss for a test mass suspended above a rotating Type II, YBCO superconductor, with a relatively high percentage change (0.05-2.1%) independent of the test mass' chemical composition and diamagnetic properties. A variation of 5 parts per 104 was reported above a stationary (non-rotating) superconductor. In experiments using a sensitive gravimeter, bulk YBCO superconductors were stably levitated in a DC magnetic field and exposed without levitation to low-field strength AC magnetic fields. Changes in observed gravity signals were measured to be less than 2 parts in 108 of the normal gravitational acceleration. Given the high sensitivity of the test, future work will examine variants on the basic magnetic behavior of granular superconductors, with particular focus on quantifying their proposed importance to gravity.

  1. Silo Collapse under Granular Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, G.; Colonnello, C.; Boltenhagen, P.; Darias, J. R.; Peralta-Fabi, R.; Brau, F.; Clément, E.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate, at a laboratory scale, the collapse of cylindrical shells of radius R and thickness t induced by a granular discharge. We measure the critical filling height for which the structure fails upon discharge. We observe that the silos sustain filling heights significantly above an estimation obtained by coupling standard shell-buckling and granular stress distribution theories. Two effects contribute to stabilize the structure: (i) below the critical filling height, a dynamical stabilization due to granular wall friction prevents the localized shell-buckling modes to grow irreversibly; (ii) above the critical filling height, collapse occurs before the downward sliding motion of the whole granular column sets in, such that only a partial friction mobilization is at play. However, we notice also that the critical filling height is reduced as the grain size d increases. The importance of grain size contribution is controlled by the ratio d /?{R t }. We rationalize these antagonist effects with a novel fluid-structure theory both accounting for the actual status of granular friction at the wall and the inherent shell imperfections mediated by the grains. This theory yields new scaling predictions which are compared with the experimental results.

  2. Dynamic granularity of imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissel, Matthias; Smith, Ian C.; Shores, Jonathon E.; Porter, John L.

    2015-11-01

    Imaging systems that include a specific source, imaging concept, geometry, and detector have unique properties such as signal-to-noise ratio, dynamic range, spatial resolution, distortions, and contrast. Some of these properties are inherently connected, particularly dynamic range and spatial resolution. It must be emphasized that spatial resolution is not a single number but must be seen in the context of dynamic range and consequently is better described by a function or distribution. We introduce the "dynamic granularity" G dyn as a standardized, objective relation between a detector's spatial resolution (granularity) and dynamic range for complex imaging systems in a given environment rather than the widely found characterization of detectors such as cameras or films by themselves. This relation can partly be explained through consideration of the signal's photon statistics, background noise, and detector sensitivity, but a comprehensive description including some unpredictable data such as dust, damages, or an unknown spectral distribution will ultimately have to be based on measurements. Measured dynamic granularities can be objectively used to assess the limits of an imaging system's performance including all contributing noise sources and to qualify the influence of alternative components within an imaging system. This article explains the construction criteria to formulate a dynamic granularity and compares measured dynamic granularities for different detectors used in the X-ray backlighting scheme employed at Sandia's Z-Backlighter facility.

  3. Wet and Wild Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana State Dept. of Education, Indianapolis. Center for School Improvement and Performance.

    This guide uses a thematic approach to show the integration of subjects (reading, mathematics, language arts, science/fine arts) and skills to create a context for learning. The contents of this guide are presented in a holistic format. There are six major topics in the guide, each with subtopics: (1) "Getting Your Feet Wet--An Introduction to…

  4. Shallow granular flows O. Bokhove1

    E-print Network

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    will not be required to model these shallow flows. From a macro-scale viewpoint, the dynamics of fast granular flows though less distinct. Depending on the particle size, the free surface in these fast shallow granular application of granular flows concerns the inflow of sinter, pellets and cokes, via a rotating inclined

  5. Hydrodynamics of vibrated granular monolayer.

    SciTech Connect

    Khain, E.; Aranson, I. S.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the long-standing puzzle of phase separation in a granular monolayer vibrated from below. Although this system is three dimensional, an interesting dynamics occurs mostly in the horizontal plane, perpendicular to the direction of vibration. Experiments [Olafsen and Urbach, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81 4369 (1998)] demonstrated that for a high amplitude of vibration the system is in the gaslike phase, but when the amplitude becomes smaller than a certain threshold, a phase separation occurs: A solidlike dense condensate of particles forms in the center of the system, surrounded by particles in the gaslike phase. We explain theoretically the experimentally observed coexistence of dilute and dense phases, employing Navier-Stokes granular hydrodynamics. We show that the phase separation is associated with a negative compressibility of granular gas.

  6. Granular Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    SciTech Connect

    Vinningland, Jan Ludvig; Johnsen, Oistein; Flekkoey, Eirik G.; Maaloey, Knut Joergen; Toussaint, Renaud

    2009-06-18

    A granular instability driven by gravity is studied experimentally and numerically. The instability arises as grains fall in a closed Hele-Shaw cell where a layer of dense granular material is positioned above a layer of air. The initially flat front defined by the grains subsequently develops into a pattern of falling granular fingers separated by rising bubbles of air. A transient coarsening of the front is observed right from the start by a finger merging process. The coarsening is later stabilized by new fingers growing from the center of the rising bubbles. The structures are quantified by means of Fourier analysis and quantitative agreement between experiment and computation is shown. This analysis also reveals scale invariance of the flow structures under overall change of spatial scale.

  7. Clinical Trials for Wet AMD

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Browse: Home / Research / Clinical Trials For Wet AMD Clinical Trials For Wet AMD Listen Clinical trials are the final research phase before a ... is testing in humans through a succession of clinical trials. Research on treatments starts in the laboratory ...

  8. Initiation of immersed granular avalanches.

    PubMed

    Mutabaruka, Patrick; Delenne, Jean-Yves; Soga, Kenichi; Radjai, Farhang

    2014-05-01

    By means of coupled molecular dynamics-computational fluid dynamics simulations, we analyze the initiation of avalanches in a granular bed of spherical particles immersed in a viscous fluid and inclined above its angle of repose. In quantitative agreement with experiments, we find that the bed is unstable for a packing fraction below 0.59 but is stabilized above this packing fraction by negative excess pore pressure induced by the effect of dilatancy. From detailed numerical data, we explore the time evolution of shear strain, packing fraction, excess pore pressures, and granular microstructure in this creeplike pressure redistribution regime, and we show that they scale excellently with a characteristic time extracted from a model based on the balance of granular stresses in the presence of a negative excess pressure and its interplay with dilatancy. The cumulative shear strain at failure is found to be ? 0.2, in close agreement with the experiments, irrespective of the initial packing fraction and inclination angle. Remarkably, the avalanche is triggered when dilatancy vanishes instantly as a result of fluctuations while the average dilatancy is still positive (expanding bed) with a packing fraction that declines with the initial packing fraction. Another nontrivial feature of this creeplike regime is that, in contrast to dry granular materials, the internal friction angle of the bed at failure is independent of dilatancy but depends on the inclination angle, leading therefore to a nonlinear dependence of the excess pore pressure on the inclination angle. We show that this behavior may be described in terms of the contact network anisotropy, which increases with a nearly constant connectivity and levels off at a value (critical state) that increases with the inclination angle. These features suggest that the behavior of immersed granular materials is controlled not only directly by hydrodynamic forces acting on the particles but also by the influence of the fluid on the granular microstructure. PMID:25353783

  9. HYPERELASTIC MODELS FOR GRANULAR MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Humrickhouse, Paul W; Corradini, Michael L

    2009-01-29

    A continuum framework for modeling of dust mobilization and transport, and the behavior of granular systems in general, has been reviewed, developed and evaluated for reactor design applications. The large quantities of micron-sized particles expected in the international fusion reactor design, ITER, will accumulate into piles and layers on surfaces, which are large relative to the individual particle size; thus, particle-particle, rather than particle-surface, interactions will determine the behavior of the material in bulk, and a continuum approach is necessary and justified in treating the phenomena of interest; e.g., particle resuspension and transport. The various constitutive relations that characterize these solid particle interactions in dense granular flows have been discussed previously, but prior to mobilization their behavior is not even fluid. Even in the absence of adhesive forces between particles, dust or sand piles can exist in static equilibrium under gravity and other forces, e.g., fluid shear. Their behavior is understood to be elastic, though not linear. The recent “granular elasticity” theory proposes a non-linear elastic model based on “Hertz contacts” between particles; the theory identifies the Coulomb yield condition as a requirement for thermodynamic stability, and has successfully reproduced experimental results for stress distributions in sand piles. The granular elasticity theory is developed and implemented in a stand- alone model and then implemented as part of a finite element model, ABAQUS, to determine the stress distributions in dust piles subjected to shear by a fluid flow. We identify yield with the onset of mobilization, and establish, for a given dust pile and flow geometry, the threshold pressure (force) conditions on the surface due to flow required to initiate it. While the granular elasticity theory applies strictly to cohesionless granular materials, attractive forces are clearly important in the interaction of micron-sized particles; extension of the theory to account for these effects is also considered. A set of continuum models are proposed for use in the future dust transport modeling.

  10. Initiation of immersed granular avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutabaruka, Patrick; Delenne, Jean-Yves; Soga, Kenichi; Radjai, Farhang

    2014-05-01

    By means of coupled molecular dynamics-computational fluid dynamics simulations, we analyze the initiation of avalanches in a granular bed of spherical particles immersed in a viscous fluid and inclined above its angle of repose. In quantitative agreement with experiments, we find that the bed is unstable for a packing fraction below 0.59 but is stabilized above this packing fraction by negative excess pore pressure induced by the effect of dilatancy. From detailed numerical data, we explore the time evolution of shear strain, packing fraction, excess pore pressures, and granular microstructure in this creeplike pressure redistribution regime, and we show that they scale excellently with a characteristic time extracted from a model based on the balance of granular stresses in the presence of a negative excess pressure and its interplay with dilatancy. The cumulative shear strain at failure is found to be ?0.2, in close agreement with the experiments, irrespective of the initial packing fraction and inclination angle. Remarkably, the avalanche is triggered when dilatancy vanishes instantly as a result of fluctuations while the average dilatancy is still positive (expanding bed) with a packing fraction that declines with the initial packing fraction. Another nontrivial feature of this creeplike regime is that, in contrast to dry granular materials, the internal friction angle of the bed at failure is independent of dilatancy but depends on the inclination angle, leading therefore to a nonlinear dependence of the excess pore pressure on the inclination angle. We show that this behavior may be described in terms of the contact network anisotropy, which increases with a nearly constant connectivity and levels off at a value (critical state) that increases with the inclination angle. These features suggest that the behavior of immersed granular materials is controlled not only directly by hydrodynamic forces acting on the particles but also by the influence of the fluid on the granular microstructure.

  11. Momentum Transport in Granular Flows

    E-print Network

    Gregg Lois; Anael Lemaitre; Jean M. Carlson

    2006-02-10

    We investigate the error induced by only considering binary collisions in the momentum transport of hard-sphere granular materials, as is done in kinetic theories. In this process, we first present a general microscopic derivation of the momentum transport equation and compare it to the kinetic theory derivation, which relies on the binary collision assumption. These two derivations yield different microscopic expressions for the stress tensor, which we compare using simulations. This provides a quantitative bound on the regime where binary collisions dominate momentum transport and reveals that most realistic granular flows occur in the region of phase space where the binary collision assumption does not apply.

  12. Peripheral granular cell odontogenic fibroma.

    PubMed

    Rinaggio, Joseph; Cleveland, Deborah; Koshy, Ranie; Gallante, Albert; Mirani, Neena

    2007-11-01

    Peripheral odontogenic fibroma is a rare lesion that arises on the gingiva and can clinically mimic a variety of reactive lesions, benign neoplasms, and metastases. We describe a symptomatic lesion arising on the mandibular gingiva of a 58-year-old female with no history of trauma or dental disease in the area. An excisional biopsy showed the lesional stroma to contain numerous polyhedral granular cells with occasional interspersed islands of inactive odontogenic epithelium. We believe this to represent the fourth case of peripheral granular cell odontogenic fibroma to be reported in detail in the literature. PMID:17223586

  13. Stress fluctuations and macroscopic stick-slip in granular materials.

    PubMed

    Evesque, P; Adjémian, F

    2002-11-01

    This paper deals with the quasi-static regime of deformation of granular matter. It investigates the size of the Representative Elementary Volume (REV), which is the minimum packing size above which the macroscopic mechanical behaviour of granular materials can be defined from averaging. The first part uses typical results from recent literature and finds that the minimum REV contains in general 10 grains; this result holds true either for most experiments or for Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulation. This appears to be quite small. However, the second part gives a counterexample, which has been found when investigating uniaxial compression of glass spheres which exhibit stick-slip; we show in this case that the minimum REV becomes 10(7) grains. This makes the system not computable by DEM. Moreover, similarity between the Richter law of seism and the exponential statistics of stick-slip is stressed. PMID:15010916

  14. Friction and the oscillatory motion of granular flows

    E-print Network

    Lydie Staron

    2012-11-26

    This contribution reports on numerical simulations of 2D granular flows on erodible beds. The broad aim is to investigate whether simple flows of model granular matter exhibits spontaneous oscillatory motion in generic flow conditions, and in this case, whether the frictional properties of the contacts between grains may affect the existence or the characteristics of this oscillatory motion. The analysis of different series of simulations show that the flow develops an oscillatory motion with a well-defined frequency which increases like the inverse of the velocity's square root. We show that the oscillation is essentially a surface phenomena. The amplitude of the oscillation is higher for lower volume fractions, and can thus be related to the flow velocity and grains friction properties. The study of the influence of the periodic geometry of the simulation cell shows no significant effect. These results are discussed in relation to sonic sands.

  15. Particle deposition in granular media: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Tien, Chi

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses topics on particle deposition in granular media. The six topics discussed are: experimental determination of initial collection efficiency in granular beds - an assessment of the effect of instrument sensitivity and the extent of particle bounce-off; deposition of polydispersed aerosols in granular media; in situ observation of aerosol deposition in a two-dimensional model filter; solid velocity in cross-flow granular moving bed; aerosol deposition in granular moving bed; and aerosol deposition in a magnetically stabilized fluidized bed. (LSP)

  16. Recent bright gully deposits on Mars: Wet or dry flow?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pelletier, J.D.; Kolb, K.J.; McEwen, A.S.; Kirk, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    Bright gully sediments attributed to liquid water flow have been deposited on Mars within the past several years. To test the liquid water flow hypothesis, we constructed a high-resolution (1 m/pixel) photogrammetric digital elevation model of a crater in the Centauri Montes region, where a bright gully deposit formed between 2001 and 2005. We conducted one-dimensional (1-D) and 2-D numerical flow modeling to test whether the deposit morphology is most consistent with liquid water or dry granular How. Liquid water flow models that incorporate freezing can match the runout distance of the flow for certain freezing rates but fail to reconstruct the distributary lobe morphology of the distal end of the deposit. Dry granular flow models can match both the observed runout distance and the distal morphology. Wet debris flows with high sediment concentrations are also consistent with the observed morphology because their rheologies are often similar to that of dry granular flows. As such, the presence of liquid water in this flow event cannot be ruled out, but the available evidence is consistent with dry landsliding. ?? 2008 The Geological Society of America.

  17. Wet chemistry instrument prototype

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A wet chemistry instrument prototype for detecting amino acids in planetary soil samples was developed. The importance of amino acids and their condensation products to the development of life forms is explained. The characteristics of the instrument and the tests which were conducted to determine the materials compatibility are described. Diagrams are provided to show the construction of the instrument. Data obtained from the performance tests are reported.

  18. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alshibli, Khalid A.; Costes, Nicholas C.; Porter, Ronald F.

    1996-01-01

    The constitutive behavior of uncemented granular materials such as strength, stiffness, and localization of deformations are to a large extend derived from interparticle friction transmitted between solid particles and particle groups. Interparticle forces are highly dependent on gravitational body forces. At very low effective confining pressures, the true nature of the Mohr envelope, which defines the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion for soils, as well as the relative contribution of each of non-frictional components to soil's shear strength cannot be evaluated in terrestrial laboratories. Because of the impossibility of eliminating gravitational body forces on earth, the weight of soil grains develops interparticle compressive stresses which mask true soil constitutive behavior even in the smallest samples of models. Therefore the microgravity environment induced by near-earth orbits of spacecraft provides unique experimental opportunities for testing theories related to the mechanical behavior of terrestrial granular materials. Such materials may include cohesionless soils, industrial powders, crushed coal, etc. This paper will describe the microgravity experiment, 'Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM)', scheduled to be flown on Space Shuttle-MIR missions. The paper will describe the experiment's hardware, instrumentation, specimen preparation procedures, testing procedures in flight, as well as a brief summary of the post-mission analysis. It is expected that the experimental results will significantly improve the understanding of the behavior of granular materials under very low effective stress levels.

  19. Reduction of bromate by granular activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Kirisits, M.J.; Snoeyink, V.L.; Kruithof, J.C.

    1998-07-01

    Ozonation of waters containing bromide can lead to the formation of bromate, a probable human carcinogen. Since bromate will be regulated at 10 {micro}g/L by the Stage 1 Disinfectants/Disinfection By-Products Rule, there is considerable interest in finding a suitable method of bromate reduction. Granular activated carbon (GAC) can be used to chemically reduce bromate to bromide, but interference from organic matter and anions present in natural water render this process inefficient. In an effort to improve bromate reduction by GAC, several modifications were made to the GAC filtration process. The use of a biologically active carbon (BAC) filter ahead of a fresh GAC filter with and without preozonation, to remove the biodegradable organic matter, did not substantially improve the bromate removal of the GAC filter. The use of the BAC filter for biological bromate reduction proved to be the most encouraging experiment. By lowering the dissolved oxygen in the influent to the BAC from 8.0 mg/L to 2.0 mg/L, the percent bromate removal increased from 42% to 61%.

  20. Wet steam wetness measurement in a 10 MW steam turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolovratník, Michal; Bartoš, Ond?ej

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce a new design of the extinction probes developed for wet steam wetness measurement in steam turbines. This new generation of small sized extinction probes was developed at CTU in Prague. A data processing technique is presented together with yielded examples of the wetness distribution along the last blade of a 10MW steam turbine. The experimental measurement was done in cooperation with Doosan Škoda Power s.r.o.

  1. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is an illustration of the analytical procedure of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) on board the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument. By dissolving small amounts of soil in water, WCL can determine the pH, the abundance of minerals such as magnesium and sodium cations or chloride, bromide and sulfate anions, as well as the conductivity and redox potential.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  2. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Lab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This is an illustration of soil analysis on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL) on board the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument. By dissolving small amounts of soil in water, WCL will attempt to determine the pH, the abundance of minerals such as magnesium and sodium cations or chloride, bromide and sulfate anions, as well as the conductivity and redox potential.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  3. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, L.C.; Simpson, M.L.

    1995-01-17

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically. 4 figures.

  4. Wet-dog shake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Andrew; Mills, Zack; Hu, David

    2010-11-01

    The drying of wet fur is a critical to mammalian heat regulation. We investigate experimentally the ability of hirsute animals to rapidly oscillate their bodies to shed water droplets, nature's analogy to the spin cycle of a washing machine. High-speed videography and fur-particle tracking is employed to determine the angular position of the animal's shoulder skin as a function of time. We determine conditions for drop ejection by considering the balance of surface tension and centripetal forces on drops adhering to the animal. Particular attention is paid to rationalizing the relationship between animal size and oscillation frequency required to self-dry.

  5. Wet scavenging processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, J.M.; Berkowitz, C.M.; Easter, R.C.

    1987-02-01

    This paper presents an overview of scavenging-calculation techniques coming into use at the present time and attempts to describe how research products generated in related scientific endeavors can be incorporated with the newer models for improvement of wet-removal calculations. The capacity for direct application of mechanistic information from a variety of sources is a distinguishing feature of the newer models and is an encouraging advancement in our ability to coordinate diverse research efforts for practical value in this area. Scavenging calculations for reactive pollutants tend to become mathematically involved, and the cursory presentation given in this paper should be recognized as introductory material only.

  6. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOEpatents

    Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically.

  7. Wet coastal plain tundra

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, J.P.; McCaffery, B.J.; Pitelka, F.A.

    1980-01-01

    This years's census data for the wet coastal plain tundra in Alaska; North Slope Borough, 3 km SSW of Naval Arctic Research Laboratory, Barrow; 71/sup 0/ 18'N, 156/sup 0/ 43'W; Barrow Quadrangle, USGS, reflect an increase in breeding species of 31% over the 5-year average, while breeding density was up 22%. Ten species increased and only 4 decreased. There was a total of 17 species; 61.5 territorial males or females (171/km/sup 2/, 69/100 acres).

  8. The Jamming Perspective on Wet Foams

    E-print Network

    Gijs Katgert; Brian P. Tighe; Martin van Hecke

    2011-10-05

    Amorphous materials as diverse as foams, emulsions, colloidal suspensions and granular media can {\\em jam} into a rigid, disordered state where they withstand finite shear stresses before yielding. The jamming transition has been studied extensively, in particular in computer simulations of frictionless, soft, purely repulsive spheres. Foams and emulsions are the closest realizations of this model, and in foams, the (un)jamming point corresponds to the wet limit, where the bubbles become spherical and just form contacts. Here we sketch the relevance of the jamming perspective for the geometry and flow of foams --- and also discuss the impact that foams studies may have on theoretical studies on jamming. We first briefly review insights into the crucial role of disorder in these systems, culminating in the breakdown of the affine assumption that underlies the rich mechanics near jamming. Second, we discuss how crucial theoretical predictions, such as the square root scaling of contact number with packing fraction, and the nontrivial role of disorder and fluctuations for flow have been observed in experiments on 2D foams. Third, we discuss a scaling model for the rheology of disordered media that appears to capture the key features of the flow of foams, emulsions and soft colloidal suspensions. Finally, we discuss how best to confront predictions of this model with experimental data.

  9. Capturing nonlocal effects in 2D granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamrin, Ken; Koval, Georg

    2013-03-01

    There is an industrial need, and a scientific desire, to produce a continuum model that can predict the flow of dense granular matter in an arbitrary geometry. A viscoplastic continuum approach, developed over recent years, has shown some ability to approximate steady flow and stress profiles in multiple inhomogeneous flow environments. However, the model incorrectly represents phenomena observed in the slow, creeping flow regime. As normalized flow-rate decreases, granular stresses are observed to become largely rate-independent and a dominating length-scale emerges in the mechanics. This talk attempts to account for these effects, in the simplified case of 2D, using the notion of nonlocal fluidity, which has proven successful in treating nonlocal effects in emulsions. The idea is to augment the local granular fluidity law with a diffusive second-order term scaled by the particle size, which spreads flowing zones accordingly. Below the yield stress, the local contribution vanishes and the fluidity becomes rate-independent, as we require. We implement the modified law in multiple geometries and validate its flow and stress predictions in multiple geometries compared against discrete particle simulations. In so doing, we demonstrate that the nonlocal relation proposed is satisfied universally in a seemingly geometry-independent fashion.

  10. From Elasticity to Hypoplasticity: Dynamics of Granular Solids

    E-print Network

    Yimin Jiang; Mario Liu

    2007-06-10

    "Granular elasticity," useful for calculating static stress distributions in granular media, is generalized by including the effects of slowly moving, deformed grains. The result is a hydrodynamic theory for granular solids that agrees well with models from soil mechanics.

  11. 77 FR 59979 - Pure Magnesium (Granular) From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ...731-TA-895 (Second Review)] Pure Magnesium (Granular) From China Determination...of the antidumping duty order on pure magnesium (granular) from China would be likely...4350 (September 2012), entitled Pure Magnesium (Granular) from China:...

  12. Wetting of cholesteric liquid crystals

    E-print Network

    Nuno M. Silvestre; Maria Carolina Figueirinhas Pereira; Nelson R. Bernardino; Margarida M. Telo da Gama

    2015-07-16

    We investigate theoretically the wetting properties of cholesteric liquid crystals at a planar substrate. If the properties of substrate and of the interface are such that the cholesteric layers are not distorted the wetting properties are similar to those of a nematic liquid crystal. If, on the other hand, the anchoring conditions force the distortion of the liquid crystal layers the wetting properties are altered, the free cholesteric-isotropic interface is non-planar and there is a layer of topological defects close to the substrate. These deformations can either promote or hinder the wetting of the substrate by a cholesteric, depending on the properties of the cholesteric liquid crystal.

  13. Why Granular Media Are, After All, Thermal

    E-print Network

    Yimin Jiang; Mario Liu

    2014-07-27

    Granular media are considered "athermal", because the grains are too large to display Brownian type thermal fluctuations. Yet being macroscopic, every grain undergoes thermal expansion, possesses a temperature that may be measured with a thermometer, and consists of many, many internal degrees of freedom that in their sum do affect granular dynamics. Therefore, including them in a comprehensive approach to account for granular behavior entails crucial advantages. The pros and cons of thermal versus athermal descriptions are considered.

  14. Anisotropy of weakly vibrated granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortel, Geert H.; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-10-01

    We experimentally probe the anisotropy of weakly vibrated flowing granular media. Depending on the driving parameters—flow rate and vibration strength—this anisotropy varies significantly. We show how the anisotropy collapses when plotted as a function of the driving stresses, uncovering a direct link between stresses and anisotropy. Moreover, our data suggest that for small anisotropies, the shear stresses vanish. Anisotropy of the fabric of granular media thus plays a crucial role in determining the rheology of granular flows.

  15. Impact of Wettability on Fracturing of Nano-Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trojer, M.; Juanes, R.

    2014-12-01

    Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is a well-known reservoir stimulation technique, by which the permeability of the near-wellbore region is enhanced through the creation of tensile fractures within the rock, formed in the direction perpendicular to the least principal stress. While it is well known that fracturing of granular media strongly depends on the type of media, the pore fluids, and the fracking fluids, the interplay between multiphase flow, wettability and fracture mechanics of shale-like (nano-granular) materials remains poorly understood. Here, we study experimentally the dynamics of multiphase-flow fracking in nano-porous media and its dependence on the wetting properties of the system. The experiments consist in saturating a thin bed of glass beads with a viscous fluid, injecting a less viscous fluid, and imaging the invasion morphology. We investigate three control parameters: the injection rate of the less-viscous invading phase, the confining stress, and the contact angle, which we control by altering the surface chemistry of the beads and the Hele-Shaw cell. We quantify the dynamic fracture pattern by means of particle image velocimetry (PIV), and elucidate the role of wettability on the emerging flow physics at the length scale of the viscous-frictional instability.

  16. Collective workload organization in confined excavation of granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaenkova, Daria; Linevich, Vadim; Goodisman, Michael A.; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2015-03-01

    Many social insects collectively construct large nests in complex substrates; such structures are often composed of narrow tunnels. The benefits of collective construction, including reduced construction costs per worker come with challenges of navigation in crowded, confined spaces. Here we study the workforce organization of groups of S. invicta fire ants creating tunnels in wet granular media. We monitor the activity levels of marked (painted) workers-defined as a number of tunnel visits over 12 hours- during initiation of tunnels. The activity levels are described by a Lorenz curve with a Gini coefficient of ~ 0 . 7 indicating that a majority of the excavation is performed by a minority of workers. We hypothesize that this workload distribution is beneficial for excavation in crowded conditions, and use a 2D cellular automata (CA) model to reproduce behaviors of the excavating ants. CA simulations reveal that tunnel construction rates decrease in groups of equally active animals compared to groups with the natural workload distribution. We use predictions of the CA model to organize collective excavation of granular material by teams of digging robots, and use the robots to test hypotheses of crowded excavation in the physical world. We acknowledge support of National Science Foundation, Physics of Living Systems division.

  17. Dynamic compaction of granular materials

    PubMed Central

    Favrie, N.; Gavrilyuk, S.

    2013-01-01

    An Eulerian hyperbolic multiphase flow model for dynamic and irreversible compaction of granular materials is constructed. The reversible model is first constructed on the basis of the classical Hertz theory. The irreversible model is then derived in accordance with the following two basic principles. First, the entropy inequality is satisfied by the model. Second, the corresponding ‘intergranular stress’ coming from elastic energy owing to contact between grains decreases in time (the granular media behave as Maxwell-type materials). The irreversible model admits an equilibrium state corresponding to von Mises-type yield limit. The yield limit depends on the volume fraction of the solid. The sound velocity at the yield surface is smaller than that in the reversible model. The last one is smaller than the sound velocity in the irreversible model. Such an embedded model structure assures a thermodynamically correct formulation of the model of granular materials. The model is validated on quasi-static experiments on loading–unloading cycles. The experimentally observed hysteresis phenomena were numerically confirmed with a good accuracy by the proposed model. PMID:24353466

  18. FNA of thyroid granular cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Harp, Eric; Caraway, Nancy P

    2013-09-01

    Granular cell tumor rarely occurs in the thyroid. This case report describes the cytologic features of a granular cell tumor seen in a fine needle aspirate obtained from a 27-year-old woman with a gradually enlarging thyroid nodule. The aspirate showed single as well as syncytial clusters of cells with abundant granular cytoplasm. The differential diagnosis in this case included granular cell tumor, Hurthle cell lesion/neoplasm, and a histiocytic reparative process. Immunohistochemical studies, including S-100 protein and CD68, performed on a cell block preparation were helpful in supporting the diagnosis. PMID:22508678

  19. Granular cell ameloblastic fibroma, ultrastructure and histogenesis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Y

    1986-04-01

    A case of peripheral granular cell ameloblastic fibroma arising in the right upper premolar gingiva in a 34-year-old Japanese woman is reported. Ultrastructural examination revealed a clear separation of granular cells and epithelial component, and indicated granular cells were derived from mesenchymal cells, probably fibroblasts. Direct communication between the overlying gingival epithelium and the epithelial component of the tumor was found. It is postulated that residual ectomesenchymal influence may be responsible for proliferation of both epithelial and mesenchymal components which subsequently are transformed into granular cells. PMID:3083023

  20. WET AND DRY SCRUBBERS FOR EMISSION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Generally speaking, absorption equipment includes two major categories: Wet adsorption scrubbers (or wet scrubbers); Dry absorption scrubbers (or dry scrubbers).
    Wet scrubbers: As the name implies, wet scrubbers (also known as wet collectors) are devices which use a liquid fo...

  1. MODELING THE WET MILLING PROCESS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Process engineering and cost models for a conventional corn wet milling process have been developed to aid research being conducted by the USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Eastern Regional Research Center. Information on the corn wet milling process was obtained from various technical sources i...

  2. Role of defects in the onset of wall-induced granular convection

    E-print Network

    Andrea Fortini; Kai Huang

    2015-03-23

    We investigate the onset of the wall-induced convection in vertically vibrated granular matter by means of experiments and two-dimensional computer simulations. In both simulations and experiments we find that the wall-induced convection occurs inside the bouncing bed region of the parameter space in which the granular bed behaves like a bouncing ball. A good agreement between experiments and simulations is found for the peak vibration acceleration at which convection starts. By comparing the results of simulations initialised with and without defects, we find that the onset of convection occurs at lower vibration strengths in the presence of defects. Furthermore, we find that the convection of granular particles initialised in a perfect hexagonal lattice is related to the nucleation of defects and the process is described by an Arrhenius law.

  3. Role of defects in the onset of wall-induced granular convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortini, Andrea; Huang, Kai

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the onset of wall-induced convection in vertically vibrated granular matter by means of experiments and two-dimensional computer simulations. In both simulations and experiments we find that the wall-induced convection occurs inside the bouncing bed region of the parameter space, in which the granular bed behaves like a bouncing ball. A good agreement between experiments and simulations is found for the peak vibration acceleration at which convection starts. By comparing the results of simulations initialized with and without defects, we find that the onset of convection occurs at lower vibration strengths in the presence of defects. Furthermore, we find that the convection of granular particles initialized in a perfect hexagonal lattice is related to the nucleation of defects and the process is described by an Arrhenius law.

  4. Underwater wet welding of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, S.; Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.

    1995-05-01

    Underwater wet welding is conducted directly in water with the shielded metal arc (SMA) and flux cored arc (FCA) welding processes. Underwater wet welding has been demonstrated as an acceptable repair technique down to 100 meters (325 ft.) in depth, but wet welds have been attempted on carbon steel structures down to 200 meters (650 ft.). The primary purpose of this interpretive report is to document and evaluate current understanding of metallurgical behavior of underwater wet welds so that new welding consumables can be designed and new welding practices can be developed for fabrication and repair of high strength steel structures at greater depths. First the pyrometallurgical and physical metallurgy behaviors of underwater weldments are discussed. Second, modifications of the welding consumables and processes are suggested to enhance the ability to apply wet welding techniques.

  5. Rheological properties of dense granular flows

    E-print Network

    Pierre Jop

    2015-03-18

    Recent progresses in understanding the behavior of dense granular flows are presented. After presenting a bulk rheology of granular materials, I focus on the new developments to account for non-local effects, and on ongoing research concerning the surface rheology and the evolution of mechanical properties for heterogeneous systems.

  6. Constitutive relations for cohesionless frictional granular materials

    E-print Network

    Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    Constitutive relations for cohesionless frictional granular materials Sia Nemat-Nasser* and Juhua: Coustitutive models; Granular materials; Cyclic streaming; Coulomt friction; Anisotropy; Fabric 1. Introduction. The backstress #12;, is proportional to the pressure p, and an effective friction coefficient. Its magnitude

  7. Shock-Precursor Waves in Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, William; Chapman, David; Proud, William

    2011-06-01

    Shock compaction studies of sand, and other brittle granular materials, have produced wave profiles that show an unsteady precursor-wave followed by a steady shock-wave. It is theorised that this wave is a result of the pre-compaction of the particles within the granular bed. This theory has been tested experimentally and the results are discussed.

  8. Pulse Propagation in Granular Chains Katja Lindenberg

    E-print Network

    Lindenberg, Katja

    sedimentary systems, and also in man-made forms such as shock absorbers and bulletproof vests. Man-made granular materials are frequently used to dampen the effect of a shock or energy pulse (sequence of sizes and masses) would optimize the shock absorption capability of a granular chain? What

  9. Dynamics of Sheared Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondic, Lou; Utter, Brian; Behringer, Robert P.

    2002-01-01

    This work focuses on the properties of sheared granular materials near the jamming transition. The project currently involves two aspects. The first of these is an experiment that is a prototype for a planned ISS (International Space Station) flight. The second is discrete element simulations (DES) that can give insight into the behavior one might expect in a reduced-g environment. The experimental arrangement consists of an annular channel that contains the granular material. One surface, say the upper surface, rotates so as to shear the material contained in the annulus. The lower surface controls the mean density/mean stress on the sample through an actuator or other control system. A novel feature under development is the ability to 'thermalize' the layer, i.e. create a larger amount of random motion in the material, by using the actuating system to provide vibrations as well control the mean volume of the annulus. The stress states of the system are determined by transducers on the non-rotating wall. These measure both shear and normal components of the stress on different size scales. Here, the idea is to characterize the system as the density varies through values spanning dense almost solid to relatively mobile granular states. This transition regime encompasses the regime usually thought of as the glass transition, and/or the jamming transition. Motivation for this experiment springs from ideas of a granular glass transition, a related jamming transition, and from recent experiments. In particular, we note recent experiments carried out by our group to characterize this type of transition and also to demonstrate/ characterize fluctuations in slowly sheared systems. These experiments give key insights into what one might expect in near-zero g. In particular, they show that the compressibility of granular systems diverges at a transition or critical point. It is this divergence, coupled to gravity, that makes it extremely difficult if not impossible to characterize the transition region in an earth-bound experiment. In the DE modeling, we analyze dynamics of a sheared granular system in Couette geometry in two (2D) and three (3D) space dimensions. Here, the idea is to both better understand what we might encounter in a reduced-g environment, and at a deeper level to deduce the physics of sheared systems in a density regime that has not been addressed by past experiments or simulations. One aspect of the simulations addresses sheared 2D system in zero-g environment. For low volume fractions, the expected dynamics of this type of system is relatively well understood. However, as the volume fraction is increased, the system undergoes a phase transition, as explained above. The DES concentrate on the evolution of the system as the solid volume fraction is slowly increased, and in particular on the behavior of very dense systems. For these configurations, the simulations show that polydispersity of the sheared particles is a crucial factor that determines the system response. Figures 1 and 2 below, that present the total force on each grain, show that even relatively small (10 %) nonuniformity of the size of the grains (expected in typical experiments) may lead to significant modifications of the system properties, such as velocity profiles, temperature, force propagation, and formation shear bands. The simulations are extended in a few other directions, in order to provide additional insight to the experimental system analyzed above. In one direction, both gravity, and driving due to vibrations are included. These simulations allow for predictions on the driving regime that is required in the experiments in order to analyze the jamming transition. Furthermore, direct comparison of experiments and DES will allow for verification of the modeling assumptions. We have also extended our modeling efforts to 3D. The (preliminary) results of these simulations of an annular system in zero-g environment will conclude the presentation.

  10. Pattern formation and shocks in granular gases

    E-print Network

    Harry L. Swinney; E. C. Rericha

    2004-08-11

    Granular media such as sand and sugar are ubiquitous in nature and industry but are less well understood than fluids or solids. We consider the behavior of rapid granular flows where the transfer of momenta by collisions dominates. The physics is quite different for the opposite limit of static or slowly moving grains (e.g., sand piles). To gain understanding of granular flows we consider two problems that have been investigated with experiments, particle simulations and hydrodynamic theory: vertically oscillating granular layers and flow past an obstacle. Oscillating granular layers spontaneously form spatial patterns when the container acceleration amplitude exceeds a critical value, about 2.5 times the gravitational acceleration. Simulations with hard spheres that conserve linear momentum and dissipate energy in collisions are in qualitative accord with some but not all aspects of the observed patterns. It is necessary to include friction and angular momentum conservation in the simulations to achieve quantitative accord with observations. [Abridged

  11. Ring Kinetic Theory for Granular Response Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufty, James

    2010-03-01

    The response functions for an isolated (cooling or thermostated) granular gas are described by kinetic theory [1]. The linear kinetic equation is obtained by a systematic expansion of the dimensionless BBGKY hierarchy scaled relative to the mean free time and mean free path [2]. At first order beyond Boltzmann the effects of ring (repeated) collisions and associated mode coupling are included. Qualitative differences from the Boltzmann approximation are described. [4pt] [1] ``Kinetic Theory of Response Functions for the Hard Sphere Granular Fluid,'' A. Baskaran, J. Dufty, and J. Brey, J. Stat. Mech. 12, p12002 (2007); ``Linear Response for Granular Fluids,'' J. Dufty, in Frontiers in Nonequilibrium Physics, Prog. of Theor. Phys. Supp., (to appear). [0pt] [2] ``Kinetic Theory and Hydrodynamics for a Low Density Granular Gas,'' J. Dufty in Challenges in Granular Physics, T. Halsey and A. Mehta, eds. (World Scientific, N. J. 2002).

  12. Granular collapse in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmforth, N. J.; Kerswell, R. R.

    2005-08-01

    An experimental investigation is conducted into the collapse of granular columns inside rectangular channels. The final shape is documented for slumps inside relatively wide channels, and for collapses inside much narrower slots. In both cases, the collapse is initiated by withdrawing a swinging gate or sliding door, and the flow remains fairly two-dimensional. Four different granular media are used; the properties of the materials vary significantly, notably in their angles of friction for basal sliding and internal deformation. If H is the initial height of the column, h_{infty} the maximum final height of the column and a the initial aspect ratio, then the data suggest that H/h_{infty} {˜} a(0.6) in wide channels and H/h_{infty} {˜} a(0.5) for narrow slots. For the runout, we find that (l_{infty} {-} L)/L {˜} a({0.9±) 0.1} for wide channels, and (l_{infty} {-} L)/L {˜} a(0.65±0.05) or l_infty/L {˜} a(0.55±0.05) for narrow slots, where l_{infty} is the maximum runout of the material and L the initial length of the column along the channel (a {:=} H/L). In all cases, the numerical constant of proportionality in these scaling relations shows clear material dependence. In wide slots, there is no obvious universal scaling behaviour of the final profile, but such a behaviour is evident in narrow slots. The experimental results are compared with theoretical results based on a shallow granular-flow model. The qualitative behaviour of the slump in the wide slot is reproduced by the theoretical model. However, there is qualitative disagreement between theory and the experiments in the narrow slot because of the occurrence of secondary surface avalanching.

  13. Rheology of confined granular flows

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, Patrick; Valance, Alexandre; Metayer, Jean-Francois; Crassous, Jerome; Delannay, Renaud; Louge, Michel

    2010-05-05

    The properties of confined granular flows on a heap are studied through numerical simulations and experiments. We address how such system can be simulated with period boundaries in the flow direction. The packing fraction and velocity profiles are found to be described by one length scale. The dependence of the kinematic properties on the number of grains and on micromechanical parameters (coefficient of restitution and coefficient of friction) is described. Our results show that the friction at the sidewalls gradually decreases and that this decrease can be explained by the intermittent motion of the grains in the quasistatic part of the flow.

  14. Granular segregation under vertical tapping

    E-print Network

    M. Pica Ciamarra; M. D. De Vizia; A. Fierro; M. Tarzia; A. Coniglio; M. Nicodemi

    2006-01-13

    We present extensive Molecular Dynamics simulations on species segregation in a granular mixture subject to vertical taps. We discuss how grain properties, e.g., size, density, friction, as well as, shaking properties, e.g., amplitude and frequency, affect such a phenomenon. Both Brazil Nut Effect (larger particles on the top, BN) and the Reverse Brazil Nut Effect (larger particles on the bottom, RBN) are found and we derive the system comprehensive ``segregation diagram'' and the BN to RBN crossover line. We also discuss the role of friction and show that particles which differ only for their frictional properties segregate in states depending on the tapping acceleration and frequency.

  15. Where the Granular Flows Bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomenko, E.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Solanki, S. K.; del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Gandorfer, A.; Bonet, J. A.; Domingo, V.; Schmidt, W.; Barthol, P.; Knölker, M.

    2010-11-01

    Based on IMaX/SUNRISE data, we report on a previously undetected phenomenon in solar granulation. We show that in a very narrow region separating granules and intergranular lanes, the spectral line width of the Fe I 5250.2 Å line becomes extremely small. We offer an explanation of this observation with the help of magneto-convection simulations. These regions with extremely small line widths correspond to the places where the granular flows bend from upflow in granules to downflow in intergranular lanes. We show that the resolution and image stability achieved by IMaX/SUNRISE are important requisites to detect this interesting phenomenon.

  16. WHERE THE GRANULAR FLOWS BEND

    SciTech Connect

    Khomenko, E.; Martinez Pillet, V.; Bonet, J. A.; Del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; Domingo, V.; Schmidt, W.; Knoelker, M.

    2010-11-10

    Based on IMaX/SUNRISE data, we report on a previously undetected phenomenon in solar granulation. We show that in a very narrow region separating granules and intergranular lanes, the spectral line width of the Fe I 5250.2 A line becomes extremely small. We offer an explanation of this observation with the help of magneto-convection simulations. These regions with extremely small line widths correspond to the places where the granular flows bend from upflow in granules to downflow in intergranular lanes. We show that the resolution and image stability achieved by IMaX/SUNRISE are important requisites to detect this interesting phenomenon.

  17. Wet Mars, Dry Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillingim, M. O.; Brain, D. A.; Peticolas, L. M.; Yan, D.; Fricke, K. W.; Thrall, L.

    2012-12-01

    The magnetic fields of the large terrestrial planets, Venus, Earth, and Mars, are all vastly different from each other. These differences can tell us a lot about the interior structure, interior history, and even give us clues to the atmospheric history of these planets. This poster highlights the third in a series of presentations that target school-age audiences with the overall goal of helping the audience visualize planetary magnetic field and understand how they can impact the climatic evolution of a planet. Our first presentation, "Goldilocks and the Three Planets," targeted to elementary school age audiences, focuses on the differences in the atmospheres of Venus, Earth, and Mars and the causes of the differences. The second presentation, "Lost on Mars (and Venus)," geared toward a middle school age audience, highlights the differences in the magnetic fields of these planets and what we can learn from these differences. Finally, in the third presentation, "Wet Mars, Dry Mars," targeted to high school age audiences and the focus of this poster, the emphasis is on the long term climatic affects of the presence or absence of a magnetic field using the contrasts between Earth and Mars. These presentations are given using visually engaging spherical displays in conjunction with hands-on activities and scientifically accurate 3D models of planetary magnetic fields. We will summarize the content of our presentations, discuss our lessons learned from evaluations, and show (pictures of) our hands-on activities and 3D models.

  18. Wet Mars, Dry Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillingim, Matthew; Brain, D.; Peticolas, L.; Yan, D.; Fricke, K.; Thrall, L.

    2012-10-01

    The magnetic fields of the large terrestrial planets, Venus, Earth, and Mars, are all vastly different from each other. These differences can tell us a lot about the interior structure, interior history, and even give us clues to the atmospheric history of these planets. This poster highlights the third in a series of presentations that target school-age audiences with the overall goal of helping the audience visualize planetary magnetic field and understand how they can impact the climatic evolution of a planet. Our first presentation, "Goldilocks and the Three Planets," targeted to elementary school age audiences, focuses on the differences in the atmospheres of Venus, Earth, and Mars and the causes of the differences. The second presentation, "Lost on Mars (and Venus)," geared toward a middle school age audience, highlights the differences in the magnetic fields of these planets and what we can learn from these differences. Finally, in the third presentation, "Wet Mars, Dry Mars," targeted to high school age audiences and the focus of this poster, the emphasis is on the long term climatic affects of the presence or absence of a magnetic field using the contrasts between Earth and Mars. These presentations are given using visually engaging spherical displays in conjunction with hands-on activities and scientifically accurate 3D models of planetary magnetic fields. We will summarize the content of our presentations, discuss our "lessons learned" from formative evaluation, and show (pictures of) our hands-on activities and 3D models.

  19. Forced wetting and hydrodynamic assist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Terence D.; Fernandez-Toledano, Juan-Carlos; Doyen, Guillaume; De Coninck, Joël

    2015-11-01

    Wetting is a prerequisite for coating a uniform layer of liquid onto a solid. Wetting failure and air entrainment set the ultimate limit to coating speed. It is well known in the coating art that this limit can be postponed by manipulating the coating flow to generate what has been termed "hydrodynamic assist," but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Experiments have shown that the conditions that postpone air entrainment also reduce the apparent dynamic contact angle, suggesting a direct link, but how the flow might affect the contact angle remains to be established. Here, we use molecular dynamics to compare the outcome of steady forced wetting with previous results for the spontaneous spreading of liquid drops and apply the molecular-kinetic theory of dynamic wetting to rationalize our findings and place them on a quantitative footing. The forced wetting simulations reveal significant slip at the solid-liquid interface and details of the flow immediately adjacent to the moving contact line. Our results confirm that the local, microscopic contact angle is dependent not simply only on the velocity of wetting but also on the nature of the flow that drives it. In particular, they support an earlier suggestion that during forced wetting, an intense shear stress in the vicinity of the contact line can assist surface tension forces in promoting dynamic wetting, thus reducing the velocity-dependence of the contact angle. Hydrodynamic assist then appears as a natural consequence of wetting that emerges when the contact line is driven by a strong and highly confined flow. Our theoretical approach also provides a self-consistent model of molecular slip at the solid-liquid interface that enables its magnitude to be estimated from dynamic contact angle measurements. In addition, the model predicts how hydrodynamic assist and slip may be influenced by liquid viscosity and solid-liquid interactions.

  20. 21 CFR 133.145 - Granular cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Granular cheese for manufacturing. 133.145 Section... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.145 Granular cheese for manufacturing. Granular cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for granular cheese by §...

  1. 21 CFR 133.145 - Granular cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Granular cheese for manufacturing. 133.145 Section... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.145 Granular cheese for manufacturing. Granular cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for granular cheese by §...

  2. 21 CFR 133.145 - Granular cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Granular cheese for manufacturing. 133.145 Section... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.145 Granular cheese for manufacturing. Granular cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for granular cheese by §...

  3. 21 CFR 133.145 - Granular cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Granular cheese for manufacturing. 133.145 Section... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.145 Granular cheese for manufacturing. Granular cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for granular cheese by §...

  4. 21 CFR 133.145 - Granular cheese for manufacturing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Granular cheese for manufacturing. 133.145 Section... Standardized Cheese and Related Products § 133.145 Granular cheese for manufacturing. Granular cheese for manufacturing conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed for granular cheese by §...

  5. BOOK REVIEW: Kinetic Theory of Granular Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trizac, Emmanuel

    2005-11-01

    Granular gases are composed of macroscopic bodies kept in motion by an external energy source such as a violent shaking. The behaviour of such systems is quantitatively different from that of ordinary molecular gases: due to the size of the constituents, external fields have a stronger effect on the dynamics and, more importantly, the kinetic energy of the gas is no longer a conserved quantity. The key role of the inelasticity of collisions has been correctly appreciated for about fifteen years, and the ensuing consequences in terms of phase behaviour or transport properties studied in an increasing and now vast body of literature. The purpose of this book is to help the newcomer to the field in acquiring the essential theoretical tools together with some numerical techniques. As emphasized by the authors—who were among the pioneers in the domain— the content could be covered in a one semester course for advanced undergraduates, or it could be incorporated in a more general course dealing with the statistical mechanics of dissipative systems. The book is self-contained, clear, and avoids mathematical complications. In order to elucidate the main physical ideas, heuristic points of views are sometimes preferred to a more rigorous route that would lead to a longer discussion. The 28 chapters are short; they offer exercises and worked examples, solved at the end of the book. Each part is supplemented with a relevant foreword and a useful summary including take-home messages. The editorial work is of good quality, with very few typographical errors. In spite of the title, kinetic theory stricto sensu is not the crux of the matter covered. The authors discuss the consequences of the molecular chaos assumption both at the individual particle level and in terms of collective behaviour. The first part of the book addresses the mechanics of grain collisions. It is emphasized that considering the coefficient of restitution ? —a central quantity governing the inelasticity of inter-grain encounters—as velocity independent is inconsistent with the mechanical point of view. An asymptotic expression for the impact velocity dependence of ? is therefore derived for visco-elastic spheres. The important inelastic Boltzmann equation is introduced in part II and the associated velocity distribution characterized for a force-free medium (so-called free cooling regime). Transport processes can then be analyzed in part III at the single particle level, and part IV from a more macroscopic viewpoint. The corresponding Chapman Enskog-like hydrodynamic approach is worked out in detail, in a clear fashion. Finally, the tendency of granular gases to develop instabilities is illustrated in part V where the hydrodynamic picture plays a pivotal role. This book clearly sets the stage. For the sake of simplicity, the authors have discarded some subtle points, such as the open questions underlying the hydrodynamic description (why include the temperature among the hydrodynamic modes, and what about the separation of space and time scales between kinetic and hydrodynamic excitations?). Such omissions are understandable. To a certain extent however, the scope of the book is centered on previous work by the authors, and I have a few regrets. Special emphasis is put on the (variable ?) visco-elastic model, which enhances the technical difficulty of the presentation. On the other hand, the important physical effects including scaling laws, hydrodynamic behaviour and structure formation, can be understood in two steps, from the results derived within the much simpler constant ? model, allowing subsequently \\varepsilon to depend on the granular temperature. The authors justify their choice with the inconsistency of the constant ? route. The improvements brought by the visco-elastic model remain to be assessed, since the rotational degrees of freedom, discarded in the book, play an important role and require due consideration of both tangential and normal restitution coefficients, that are again velocity dependent. This seems to be the price of a cons

  6. Extensional Rheology of Granular Staples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Scott

    2013-03-01

    Collections of U-shaped granular materials (e.g. staples) show a surprising resistance to being pulled apart. We conduct extensional stress-strain experiments on staple piles with vary arm/spine (barb) ratio. The elongation is not smooth, with the pile growing in bursts, reminiscent of intruder motion through ordinary and rod-like granular materials. The force-distance curve shows a power-law scaling, consistent with previous intruder experiments. Surprisingly, there is significant plastic creep of the pile as particles rearrange slightly in response to the increasing force. There is a broad distribution of yield forces that does not seem to evolve as the pile lengthens, suggesting that each yield event is independent of the pile's history. The distribution of yield forces can be interpreted in the context of a Weibullian weakest-link theory that predicts the maximum pile strength to decrease sharply with increasing pile length. From this interpretation arise length and force scales that may be used to characterize the sample. This research supported in part by the NSF (CBET-#1133722) and ACS-PRF (#51438-UR10).

  7. Centrifuge modelling of granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Miguel Angel; Wu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    A common characteristic of mass flows like debris flows, rock avalanches and mudflows is that gravity is their main driving force. Gravity defines the intensity and duration of the main interactions between particles and their surrounding media (particle-particle, particle-fluid, fluid-fluid). At the same time, gravity delimits the occurrence of phase separation, inverse segregation, and mass consolidation, among other phenomena. Therefore, in the understanding of the flow physics it is important to account for the scaling of gravity in scaled models. In this research, a centrifuge model is developed to model free surface granular flows down an incline at controlled gravity conditions. Gravity is controlled by the action of an induced inertial acceleration field resulting from the rotation of the model in a geotechnical centrifuge. The characteristics of the induced inertial acceleration field during flow are discussed and validated via experimental data. Flow heights, velocity fields, basal pressure and impact forces are measured for a range of channel inclinations and gravity conditions. Preliminary results enlighten the flow characteristics at variable gravity conditions and open a discussion on the simulation of large scale processes at a laboratory scale. Further analysis on the flow physics brings valuable information for the validation of granular flows rheology.

  8. Wet to dry dressing changes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... dressing: Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and warm water before and after each dressing change. Put on ... is sticking to your skin, wet it with warm water to loosen it. Remove the gauze pads or ...

  9. Granular filtration in a fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, J.S.; Yue, P.C.; Halow, J.S.

    1995-12-01

    Successful development of advanced coal-fired power conversion systems often require reliable and efficient cleanup devices which can remove particulate and gaseous pollutants from high-temperature high-pressure gas streams. A novel filtration concept for particulate cleanup has been developed at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the U.S. Department of Energy. The filtration system consists of a fine metal screen filter immersed in a fluidized bed of granular material. As the gas stream passes through the fluidized bed, a layer of the bed granular material is entrained and deposited at the screen surface. This material provides a natural granular filter to separate fine particles from the gas stream passing through the bed. Since the filtering media is the granular material supplied by the fluidized bed, the filter is not subjected to blinding like candle filters. Because only the inflowing gas, not fine particle cohesive forces, maintains the granular layer at the screen surface, once the thickness and permeability of the granular layer is stabilized, it remains unchanged as long as the in-flowing gas flow rate remains constant. The weight of the particles and the turbulent nature of the fluidized bed limits the thickness of the granular layer on the filter leading to a self-cleaning attribute of the filter. This paper presents work since then on a continuous filtration system. The continuous filtration testing system consisted of a filter, a two-dimensional fluidized-bed, a continuous powder feeder, a laser-based in-line particle counting, sizing, and velocimeter (PCSV), and a continuous solids feeding/bed material withdrawal system. The two-dimensional, transparent fluidized-bed allowed clear observation of the general fluidized state of the granular material and the conditions under which fines are captured by the granular layer.

  10. Cohesion, granular solids, granular liquids, and their connection to small near-Earth objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, P.; Scheeres, D.

    2014-07-01

    During the last 15 years or so, the Planetary Sciences community has been using Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulation codes to study small near-Earth objects (NEOs). In general, these codes treat gravitational aggregates as conglomerates of spherical particles; a good approximation given that many asteroids are self-gravitating granular media. Unfortunately, the degree of sophistication of these codes, and our own understanding, has not been high enough as to appropriately represent realistic physical properties of granular matter. In particular, angles of friction (?) and cohesive strength (?_c) of the aggregates were rarely taken in consideration and this could have led to unrealistic dynamics, and therefore, unrealistic conclusions about the dynamical evolution of small NEOs. In our research, we explore the failure mechanics of spherical (r=71 m) and ellipsoidal (r_1=92 m) self-gravitating aggregates with different angles of friction and values for their cohesive strength, in order to better understand the geophysics of rubble-pile asteroids. In particular we focused on the deformation and different disruption modes provoked by an always increasing angular velocity (spin rate). Scaling arguments allow us to regard simulations with the same aggregate size and different ?_c as equivalent to simulations of aggregates of different size and the same ?_c. We use a computational code that implements a Soft-Sphere DEM. The aggregates are composed by 3,000 spherical solid spheres (7--10 m) with 6 degrees of freedom. The code calculates normal, as well as, frictional (tangential) contact forces by means of soft potentials and the aggregate as a whole mimics the effect of non- spherical particles through the implementation of rolling friction. Cohesive forces, and a cohesive stress, are calculated as the net effect of the sum of the van der Waals forces between the smaller regolith, sand and dust (powder) that are present in real asteroids [1]. These finer materials form a matrix of sorts that holds the bigger boulders together. The aggregates were slowly spun up to disruption controlling for angle of friction, cohesion and global shape. Systems with no frictional forces had ?? 12° and are in effect granular liquids in the best case scenario. Systems with only surface-surface friction had ?? 25°, which is typical in laboratory experiments with spherical glass beads. Systems that also implemented rolling friction had ?? 35°, which is typical of non-cohesive granular media on the Earth. How much each aggregate deformed before disruption was directly related to the angle of friction. The greater ? allowed for much less deformation before disruption. Cohesive forces on the other hand controlled the mode of disruption and maximum spin rate and showed that the change from shedding to fission is continuous and therefore, they should not be seen as different disruption processes. The figure shows the deformation and disruption of three initially spherical aggregates (left) and three initially ellipsoidal aggregates (right) with increasing cohesive strength from left to right (?? 35°). Through scaling arguments we could also see these aggregates as having the exact same ?_c=25 Pa but different sizes. If we do that, the aggregates measure about 1.6 km, 5 km, and 22 km, and the particles, or groups of particles being detached now have similar sizes. This has now become a problem of resolution, i.e., the number and size of particles used in a simulation. These results start to raise fundamental questions regarding the difference between shedding and fission. Is it shedding when it is dust grain by dust grain ejection from the main body or when it is in groups of 10, 100, or 100,000 dust particles? Is it fission when a 1-m piece of the asteroid detaches or when it splits in the middle? Which values of ? and ?_c are realistic? These and other questions will be explored.

  11. Continuum description of avalanches in granular media.

    SciTech Connect

    Aranson, I. S.; Tsimring, L. S.

    2000-12-05

    A continuum theory of partially fluidized granular flows is proposed. The theory is based on a combination of the mass and momentum conservation equations with the order parameter equation which describes the transition between flowing and static components of the granular system. We apply this model to the dynamics of avalanches in chutes. The theory provides a quantitative description of recent observations of granular flows on rough inclined planes (Daerr and Douady 1999): layer bistability, and the transition from triangular avalanches propagating downhill at small inclination angles to balloon-shaped avalanches also propagating uphill for larger angles.

  12. Drag Law of Two Dimensional Granular Fluids

    E-print Network

    Satoshi Takada; Hisao Hayakawa

    2015-11-04

    The drag force law acting on a moving circular disk in a two-dimensional granular medium is analyzed based on the discrete element method (DEM). It is remarkable that the drag force on the moving disk in moderate dense and pure two-dimensional granular medium can be well reproduced by a perfect fluid with separation from the surface of the tracer. A yield force, being independent of the moving speed of the disk, appears if a dry friction between the granular disks and the bottom plate exists. The perfect fluidity is violated in this case. The yield force and the drag force diverge at the jamming point.

  13. Impact compaction of a granular material

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fenton, Gregg; Asay, Blaine; Dalton, Devon

    2015-05-19

    The dynamic behavior of granular materials has importance to a variety of engineering applications. Structural seismic coupling, planetary science, and earth penetration mechanics, are just a few of the application areas. Although the mechanical behavior of granular materials of various types have been studied extensively for several decades, the dynamic behavior of such materials remains poorly understood. High-quality experimental data are needed to improve our general understanding of granular material compaction physics. This study will describe how an instrumented plunger impact system can be used to measure pressure-density relationships for model materials at high and controlled strain rates and subsequentlymore »used for computational modeling.« less

  14. Critical Exponents for Granular Phase Transitions

    E-print Network

    Gerald H. Ristow

    1998-10-20

    The solid--fluid phase transition of a granular material shaken horizontally is investigated numerically. We find that it is a second-order phase transition and propose two order parameters, namely the averaged kinetic energy and the averaged granular temperature, to determine the fluidization point precisely. It scales with the acceleration of the external vibration. Using this fluidization point as critical point, we discuss the scaling of the kinetic energy and show that the kinetic energy and the granular temperature show two different universal critical point exponents for a wide range of excitation amplitudes.

  15. Impact compaction of a granular material

    SciTech Connect

    Fenton, Gregg; Asay, Blaine; Dalton, Devon

    2015-05-19

    The dynamic behavior of granular materials has importance to a variety of engineering applications. Structural seismic coupling, planetary science, and earth penetration mechanics, are just a few of the application areas. Although the mechanical behavior of granular materials of various types have been studied extensively for several decades, the dynamic behavior of such materials remains poorly understood. High-quality experimental data are needed to improve our general understanding of granular material compaction physics. This study will describe how an instrumented plunger impact system can be used to measure pressure-density relationships for model materials at high and controlled strain rates and subsequently used for computational modeling.

  16. Pore-Scale Investigation on Stress-Dependent Characteristics of Granular Packs and Their Impact on Multiphase Fluid Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrealba, V.; Karpyn, Z.; Yoon, H.; Hart, D. B.; Klise, K. A.

    2013-12-01

    The pore-scale dynamics that govern multiphase flow under variable stress conditions are not well understood. This lack of fundamental understanding limits our ability to quantitatively predict multiphase flow and fluid distributions in natural geologic systems. In this research, we focus on pore-scale, single and multiphase flow properties that impact displacement mechanisms and residual trapping of non-wetting phase under varying stress conditions. X-ray micro-tomography is used to image pore structures and distribution of wetting and non-wetting fluids in water-wet synthetic granular packs, under dynamic load. Micro-tomography images are also used to determine structural features such as medial axis, surface area, and pore body and throat distribution; while the corresponding transport properties are determined from Lattice-Boltzmann simulations performed on lattice replicas of the imaged specimens. Results are used to investigate how inter-granular deformation mechanisms affect fluid displacement and residual trapping at the pore-scale. This will improve our understanding of the dynamic interaction of mechanical deformation and fluid flow during enhanced oil recovery and geologic CO2 sequestration. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. SETAC-U.S. EPA WET INITIATIVES: ALL WET AND NOTHING BUT WET

    EPA Science Inventory

    To ensure that sould scientific principles and sound science are applied to the challenging issues in t he Whole Effluent Toxicity (WET) process, the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) Foundation for Environmental Education was awarded a cooperative agreem...

  18. Numerical Simulations of Granular Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Derek C.; Michel, Patrick; Schwartz, Stephen R.; Ballouz, Ronald-Louis; Yu, Yang; Matsumura, Soko

    2014-11-01

    Spacecraft images and indirect observations including thermal inertia measurements indicate most small bodies have surface regolith. Evidence of granular flow is also apparent in the images. This material motion occurs in very low gravity, therefore in a completely different gravitational environment than on the Earth. Understanding and modeling these motions can aid in the interpretation of imaged surface features that may exhibit signatures of constituent material properties. Also, upcoming sample-return missions to small bodies, and possible future manned missions, will involve interaction with the surface regolith, so it is important to develop tools to predict the surface response. We have added new capabilities to the parallelized N-body gravity tree code pkdgrav [1,2] that permit the simulation of granular dynamics, including multi-contact physics and friction forces, using the soft-sphere discrete-element method [3]. The numerical approach has been validated through comparison with laboratory experiments (e.g., [3,4]). Ongoing and recently completed projects include: impacts into granular materials using different projectile shapes [5]; possible tidal resurfacing of asteroid Apophis during its 2029 encounter [6]; the Brazil-nut effect in low gravity [7]; and avalanche modeling.Acknowledgements: DCR acknowledges NASA (grants NNX08AM39G, NNX10AQ01G, NNX12AG29G) and NSF (AST1009579). PM acknowledges the French agency CNES. SRS works on the NEOShield Project funded under the European Commission’s FP7 program agreement No. 282703. SM acknowledges support from the Center for Theory and Computation at U Maryland and the Dundee Fellowship at U Dundee. Most simulations were performed using the YORP cluster in the Dept. of Astronomy at U Maryland and on the Deepthought High-Performance Computing Cluster at U Maryland.References: [1] Richardson, D.C. et al. 2000, Icarus 143, 45; [2] Stadel, J. 2001, Ph.D. Thesis, U Washington; [3] Schwartz, S.R. et al. 2012, Gran. Matt. 14, 363. [4] Schwartz, S.R. et al. 2013, Icarus 226, 67; [5] Schwartz, S.R. et al. 2014, P&SS, 10.1016/j.pss.2014.07.013; [6] Yu, Y. et al. 2014, Icarus, 10.1016/j.icarus.2014.07.027; [7] Matsumura, S. et al. 2014, MNRAS, 10.1093/mnras/stu1388.

  19. Surface wave acoustics of granular packing under gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, Eric; Andreotti, Bruno; Bonneau, Lenaic

    2009-06-18

    Due to the non-linearity of Hertzian contacts, the speed of sound in granular matter increases with pressure. For a packing under gravity and in the presence of a free surface, bulk acoustic waves cannot propagate due to the inherent refraction toward the surface (the mirage effect). Thus, only modes corresponding to surface waves (Raleigh-Hertz modes) are able to propagate the acoustic signal. First, based on a non-linear elasticity model, we describe the main features associated to these surface waves. We show that under gravity, a granular packing is from the acoustic propagation point of view an index gradient waveguide that selects modes of two distinct families i.e. the sagittal and transverse waves localized in the vicinity of the free surface. A striking feature of these surface waves is the multi-modal propagation: for both transverse and sagittal waves, we show the existence of a infinite but discrete series of propagating modes. In each case, we determine the mode shape and and the corresponding dispersion relation. In the case of a finite size system, a geometric waveguide is superimposed to the index gradient wave guide. In this later case, the dispersion relations are modified by the appearance of a cut-off frequency that scales with depth. The second part is devoted to an experimental study of surface waves propagating in a granular packing confined in a long channel. This set-up allows to tune a monomodal emission by taking advantage of the geometric waveguide features combined with properly designed emitters. For both sagittal and transverses waves, we were able to isolate a single mode (the fundamental one) and to plot the dispersion relation. This measurements agree well with the Hertzian scaling law as predicted by meanfield models. Furthermore, it allows us to determine quantitatively relations on the elastic moduli. However, we observe that our data yield a shear modulus abnormally weak when compared to several meanfield predictions.

  20. Aerofractures in Confined Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksen, Fredrik K.; Turkaya, Semih; Toussaint, Renaud; Måløy, Knut J.; Flekkøy, Eirik G.

    2015-04-01

    We will present the optical analysis of experimental aerofractures in confined granular media. The study of this generic process may have applications in industries involving hydraulic fracturing of tight rocks, safe construction of dams, tunnels and mines, and in earth science where phenomena such as mud volcanoes and sand injectites are results of subsurface sediment displacements driven by fluid overpressure. It is also interesting to increase the understanding the flow instability itself, and how the fluid flow impacts the solid surrounding fractures and in the rest of the sample. Such processes where previously studied numerically [Niebling 2012a, Niebling 2012b] or in circular geometries. We will here explore experimentally linear geometries. We study the fracturing patterns that form when air flows into a dense, non-cohesive porous medium confined in a Hele-Shaw cell - i.e. into a packing of dry 80 micron beads placed between two glass plates separated by ~1mm. The cell is rectangular and fitted with a semi-permeable boundary to the atmosphere - blocking beads but not air - on one short edge, while the other three edges are impermeable. The porous medium is packed inside the cell between the semi-permeable boundary and an empty volume at the sealed side where the air pressure can be set and kept at a constant overpressure (1-2bar). Thus, for the air trapped inside the cell to release the overpressure it has to move through the solid. At high enough overpressures the air flow deforms the solid and increase permeability in some regions along the air-solid interface, which results in unstable flow and aerofracturing. Aerofractures are thought to be an analogue to hydrofractures, and an advantage of performing aerofracturing experiments in a Hele-Shaw cell is that the fracturing process can easily be observed in the lab. Our experiments are recorded with a high speed camera with a framerate of 1000 frames per second. In the analysis, by using various image processing techniques, we segment out and study the aerofractures over time looking at growth dynamics, fractal dimension and characteristics such as average finger thickness as function of depth into the solid. Also, by performing image correlation on two subsequent frames we estimate displacement fields and investigate the surrounding stress and strain fields in the solid around the fractures. Several experiments are performed with various overpressures and packing densities, and we compare the results. In a directly related project, acoustic emissions are recorded on a cell plate during experiments, and one of our goals is to correlate acoustic events and observations. We will also compare the dependence of the patterns on the saturation of the initial deformable porous material, by comparing experiments performed by air injection in air saturated granular media, to some in liquid saturated granular media. References: MJ Niebling, R Toussaint, EG Flekkøy, KJ Måløy, 2012, Dynamic aerofracture of dense granular packings, 2012, Physical Review E 86 (6), 061315 M Niebling, R Toussaint, EG Flekkøy, KJ Måløy, 2012, Numerical studies of aerofractures in porous media, Revista Cubana de Fisica 29 (1E), pp. 1E66-1E70

  1. Slow relaxation in granular compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Knight, J. B.; Nowak, E. R.; Jaeger, H. M.; Nagel, S. R.

    1998-11-01

    Experimental studies show that the density of a vibrated granular material evolves from a low density initial state into a higher density final steady state. The relaxation towards the final density follows an inverse logarithmic law. As the system approaches its final state, a growing number of beads have to be rearranged to enable a local density increase. A free volume argument shows that this number grows as N = {?}/{(1-?)}. The time scale associated with such events increases exponentially ? e N, and as a result a logarithmically slow approach to the final state is found ? ? - ?(t) ? {1}/{lnt }. Furthermore, a one-dimensional toy model that captures this relaxation dynamics as well as the observed density fluctuations is discussed.

  2. Mechanical characterization of jammable granular systems

    E-print Network

    Hudson, Shaymus William

    2012-01-01

    The mode by which a granular material can transition between fluid-like and solid-like states has been often referred to as jamming. The use of this property (via vacuum pressure) for engineering applications has only ...

  3. Clustering and phases of compartmentalized granular gases.

    PubMed

    Chen, K C; Li, C C; Lin, C H; Guo, G H

    2009-02-01

    This paper experimentally investigates the clustering conditions for compartmentalized monodisperse granular gases, determining the critical particle number and condensation granular temperature at the gas-clustering transition. When one heavier intruding particle is added to a monodisperse gas, it is found that the condensation temperature decreases with the ratio of the mass of the intruding particle to that of the background particle. This phenomenon can be mathematically characterized by a proposed linear relation, which is reminiscent of a relation between the freezing point depression for a solvent and the concentration of an added solute. Finally we perform various tests by changing the numbers of two types of particles in bidisperse granular mixtures to construct the phase diagrams, which present the range of the five different states, namely, homogeneous gas, unstable-gas, one-clustering, two-clustering, and granular oscillation states. PMID:19391739

  4. Low Velocity Granular Drag in Reduced Gravity

    E-print Network

    D. J. Costantino; J. Bartell; K. Scheidler; P. Schiffer

    2011-02-01

    We probe the dependence of the low velocity drag force in granular materials on the effective gravitational acceleration (geff) through studies of spherical granular materials saturated within fluids of varying density. We vary geff by a factor of 20, and we find that the granular drag is proportional to geff, i.e., that the granular drag follows the expected relation Fprobe = {\\eta} {\\rho}grain geff dprobe hprobe^2 for the drag force, Fprobe on a vertical cylinder with depth of insertion, hprobe, diameter dprobe, moving through grains of density {\\rho}grain, and where {\\eta} is a dimensionless constant. This dimensionless constant shows no systematic variation over four orders of magnitude in effective grain weight, demonstrating that the relation holds over that entire range to within the precision of our data.

  5. Shear dispersion in dense granular flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Christov, Ivan C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-04-18

    We formulate and solve a model problem of dispersion of dense granular materials in rapid shear flow down an incline. The effective dispersivity of the depth-averaged concentration of the dispersing powder is shown to vary as the Péclet number squared, as in classical Taylor–Aris dispersion of molecular solutes. An extension to generic shear profiles is presented, and possible applications to industrial and geological granular flows are noted.

  6. Contact micromechanics in granular media with clay

    SciTech Connect

    Ita, S.L.

    1994-08-01

    Many granular materials, including sedimentary rocks and soils, contain clay particles in the pores, grain contacts, or matrix. The amount and location of the clays and fluids can influence the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the granular material. This research investigated the mechanical effects of clay at grain-to-grain contacts in the presence of different fluids. Laboratory seismic wave propagation tests were conducted at ultrasonic frequencies using spherical glass beads coated with Montmorillonite clay (SWy-1) onto which different fluids were adsorbed. For all bead samples, seismic velocity increased and attenuation decreased as the contact stiffnesses increased with increasing stress demonstrating that grain contacts control seismic transmission in poorly consolidated and unconsolidated granular material. Coating the beads with clay added stiffness and introduced viscosity to the mechanical contact properties that increased the velocity and attenuation of the propagating seismic wave. Clay-fluid interactions were studied by allowing the clay coating to absorb water, ethyl alcohol, and hexadecane. Increasing water amounts initially increased seismic attenuation due to clay swelling at the contacts. Attenuation decreased for higher water amounts where the clay exceeded the plastic limit and was forced from the contact areas into the surrounding open pore space during sample consolidation. This work investigates how clay located at grain contacts affects the micromechanical, particularly seismic, behavior of granular materials. The need for this work is shown by a review of the effects of clays on seismic wave propagation, laboratory measurements of attenuation in granular media, and proposed mechanisms for attenuation in granular media.

  7. Granular gas of ellipsoids: analytical collision detection implemented on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio-Largo, S. M.; Lind, P. G.; Maza, D.; Hidalgo, R. C.

    2015-06-01

    We present a hybrid GPU-CPU implementation of an accurate discrete element model for a system of ellipsoids. The ellipsoids have three translational degrees of freedom, their rotational motion being described through quaternions and the contact interaction between two ellipsoids is described by a force which accounts for the elastic and dissipative interactions. Further we combine the exact derivation of contact points between ellipsoids (Wang et al. in Computing 72(1-2):235-246, 2004) with the advantages of the GPU-NVIDIA parallelization strategy (Owens et al. in Comput Graph Forum 26:80-113, 2007). This novelty makes the analytical algorithm computationally feasible when dealing with several thousands of particles. As a benchmark, we simulate a granular gas of frictionless ellipsoids identifying a classical homogeneous cooling state for ellipsoids. For low dissipative systems, the behavior of the granular temperature indicates that the cooling dynamics is governed by the elongation of the ellipsoids and the restitution coefficient. Our outcomes comply with the statistical mechanical laws and the results are in agreement with previous findings for hard ellipsoids (Bereolos et al. in J Chem Phys 99:6087, 1993; Villemot and Talbot in Granul Matter 14:91-97, 2012). Additionally, new insight is provided namely suggesting that the mean field description of the cooling dynamics of elongated particles is conditioned by the particle shape and the degree of energy equipartition.

  8. Surface structure determines dynamic wetting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiayu; Do-Quang, Minh; Cannon, James J; Yue, Feng; Suzuki, Yuji; Amberg, Gustav; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    Liquid wetting of a surface is omnipresent in nature and the advance of micro-fabrication and assembly techniques in recent years offers increasing ability to control this phenomenon. Here, we identify how surface roughness influences the initial dynamic spreading of a partially wetting droplet by studying the spreading on a solid substrate patterned with microstructures just a few micrometers in size. We reveal that the roughness influence can be quantified in terms of a line friction coefficient for the energy dissipation rate at the contact line, and that this can be described in a simple formula in terms of the geometrical parameters of the roughness and the line-friction coefficient of the planar surface. We further identify a criterion to predict if the spreading will be controlled by this surface roughness or by liquid inertia. Our results point to the possibility of selectively controlling the wetting behavior by engineering the surface structure. PMID:25683872

  9. Surface structure determines dynamic wetting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiayu; Do-Quang, Minh; Cannon, James J.; Yue, Feng; Suzuki, Yuji; Amberg, Gustav; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    Liquid wetting of a surface is omnipresent in nature and the advance of micro-fabrication and assembly techniques in recent years offers increasing ability to control this phenomenon. Here, we identify how surface roughness influences the initial dynamic spreading of a partially wetting droplet by studying the spreading on a solid substrate patterned with microstructures just a few micrometers in size. We reveal that the roughness influence can be quantified in terms of a line friction coefficient for the energy dissipation rate at the contact line, and that this can be described in a simple formula in terms of the geometrical parameters of the roughness and the line-friction coefficient of the planar surface. We further identify a criterion to predict if the spreading will be controlled by this surface roughness or by liquid inertia. Our results point to the possibility of selectively controlling the wetting behavior by engineering the surface structure. PMID:25683872

  10. Squeezing wetting and nonwetting liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samoilov, V. N.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2004-01-01

    We present molecular-dynamics results for the squeezing of octane (C8H18) between two approaching solid elastic walls with different wetting properties. The interaction energy between the octane bead units and the solid walls is varied from a very small value (1 meV), corresponding to a nonwetting surface with a very large contact angle (nearly 180 degrees), to a high value (18.6 meV) corresponding to complete wetting. When at least one of the solid walls is wetted by octane we observe well defined molecular layers develop in the lubricant film when the thickness of the film is of the order of a few atomic diameters. An external squeezing-pressure induces discontinuous, thermally activated changes in the number n of lubricant layers (n?n-1 layering transitions). With increasing interaction energy between the octane bead units and the solid walls, the transitions from n to n-1 layers occur at higher average pressure. This results from the increasing activation barrier to nucleate the squeeze-out with increasing lubricant-wall binding energy (per unit surface area) in the contact zone. Thus, strongly wetting lubricant fluids are better boundary lubricants than the less wetting ones, and this should result in less wear. We analyze in detail the effect of capillary bridge formation (in the wetting case) and droplets formation (in the nonwetting case) on the forces exerted by the lubricant on the walls. For the latter case small liquid droplets may be trapped at the interface, resulting in a repulsive force between the walls during squeezing, until the solid walls come into direct contact, where the wall-wall interaction may be initially attractive. This effect is made use of in some practical applications, and we give one illustration involving conditioners for hair care application.

  11. Discrete Element Modeling of Complex Granular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movshovitz, N.; Asphaug, E. I.

    2010-12-01

    Granular materials occur almost everywhere in nature, and are actively studied in many fields of research, from food industry to planetary science. One approach to the study of granular media, the continuum approach, attempts to find a constitutive law that determines the material's flow, or strain, under applied stress. The main difficulty with this approach is that granular systems exhibit different behavior under different conditions, behaving at times as an elastic solid (e.g. pile of sand), at times as a viscous fluid (e.g. when poured), or even as a gas (e.g. when shaken). Even if all these physics are accounted for, numerical implementation is made difficult by the wide and often discontinuous ranges in continuum density and sound speed. A different approach is Discrete Element Modeling (DEM). Here the goal is to directly model every grain in the system as a rigid body subject to various body and surface forces. The advantage of this method is that it treats all of the above regimes in the same way, and can easily deal with a system moving back and forth between regimes. But as a granular system typically contains a multitude of individual grains, the direct integration of the system can be very computationally expensive. For this reason most DEM codes are limited to spherical grains of uniform size. However, spherical grains often cannot replicate the behavior of real world granular systems. A simple pile of spherical grains, for example, relies on static friction alone to keep its shape, while in reality a pile of irregular grains can maintain a much steeper angle by interlocking force chains. In the present study we employ a commercial DEM, nVidia's PhysX Engine, originally designed for the game and animation industry, to simulate complex granular flows with irregular, non-spherical grains. This engine runs as a multi threaded process and can be GPU accelerated. We demonstrate the code's ability to physically model granular materials in the three regimes mentioned above: (1) a static and steep granular pile; (2) granular flow with a complex velocity field; and (3) an agitated granular pile resulting in size based segregation. We compare our simulations to laboratory experiments in the first and third regimes, and to a known empirical constitutive law (Jop et al. 2006) in the second. We discuss application of this code in studies of several planetary systems, including analysis of the tensile strength of comets from evidence of tidal disruption, and bulking and banding on rubble-pile asteroids, as an indication of their seismic history.

  12. Low Speed Granular-Granular Impact Crater Opening Mechanism in 2D Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartali, Roberto; Nahmad-Molinari, Yuri; Rodríguez-Liñán, Gustavo M.

    2015-08-01

    Quasi-2D, low-velocity experiments of colliding granular projectiles against granular targets were performed by means of a 7 m-long Hele-Shaw cell. The processes involved in the crater-opening mechanism of low-velocity granular-against-granular collisions are described. We show that the crater is opened mainly by a compaction process of the target. The projectile is fragmented and its lower section suffers a severe compaction; this projectile remnant forms a central dome or peak inside the crater. When the target reaches its maximum degree of compaction, the excess of momentum generates fast avalanches sliding on the slopes of the confined material, and exerts pressure on the crater walls, increasing its diameter. We propose that low-velocity collisions between granular aggregates are a possible mechanism that allows the growth of small planetary objects or the aggregation after catastrophic or high-energy collisions.

  13. Uncertainty Management in Seismic Vulnerability Assessment Using Granular Computing Based on Covering of Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamespanah, F.; Delavar, M. R.; Zare, M.

    2013-05-01

    Earthquake is an abrupt displacement of the earth's crust caused by the discharge of strain collected along faults or by volcanic eruptions. Earthquake as a recurring natural cataclysm has always been a matter of concern in Tehran, capital of Iran, as a laying city on a number of known and unknown faults. Earthquakes can cause severe physical, psychological and financial damages. Consequently, some procedures should be developed to assist modelling the potential casualties and its spatial uncertainty. One of these procedures is production of seismic vulnerability maps to take preventive measures to mitigate corporeal and financial losses of future earthquakes. Since vulnerability assessment is a multi-criteria decision making problem depending on some parameters and expert's judgments, it undoubtedly is characterized by intrinsic uncertainties. In this study, it is attempted to use Granular computing (GrC) model based on covering of universe to handle the spatial uncertainty. Granular computing model concentrates on a general theory and methodology for problem solving as well as information processing by assuming multiple levels of granularity. Basic elements in granular computing are subsets, classes, and clusters of a universe called elements. In this research GrC is used for extracting classification rules based on seismic vulnerability with minimum entropy to handle uncertainty related to earthquake data. Tehran was selected as the study area. In our previous research, Granular computing model based on a partition model of universe was employed. The model has some kinds of limitations in defining similarity between elements of the universe and defining granules. In the model similarity between elements is defined based on an equivalence relation. According to this relation, two objects are similar based on some attributes, provided for each attribute the values of these objects are equal. In this research a general relation for defining similarity between elements of universe is proposed. The general relation is used for defining similarity and instead of partitioning the universe, granulation is done based on covering of universe. As a result of the study, a physical seismic vulnerability map of Tehran has been produced based on granular computing model. The accuracy of the seismic vulnerability map is evaluated using granular computing model based on covering of universe. The comparison between this model and granular computing model based on partition model of universe is undertaken which verified the superiority of the GrC based on covering of the universe in terms of the match between the achieved results with those confirmed by the related experts' judgments.

  14. Numerical analysis of granular soil fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbahn, L.; Huhn, K.

    2012-04-01

    Soil stability strongly depends on the material strength that is in general influenced by deformation processes and vice versa. Hence, investigation of material strength is of great interest in many geoscientific studies where soil deformations occur, e.g. the destabilization of slopes or the evolution of fault gouges. Particularly in the former case, slope failure occurs if the applied forces exceed the shear strength of slope material. Hence, the soil resistance or respectively the material strength acts contrary to deformation processes. Besides, geotechnical experiments, e.g. direct shear or ring shear tests, suggest that shear resistance mainly depends on properties of soil structure, texture and fabric. Although laboratory tests enable investigations of soil structure and texture during shear, detailed observations inside the sheared specimen during the failure processes as well as fabric effects are very limited. So, high-resolution information in space and time regarding texture evolution and/or grain behavior during shear is refused. However, such data is essential to gain a deeper insight into the key role of soil structure, texture, etc. on material strength and the physical processes occurring during material deformation on a micro-scaled level. Additionally, laboratory tests are not completely reproducible enabling a detailed statistical investigation of fabric during shear. So, almost identical setups to run methodical tests investigating the impact of fabric on soil resistance are hard to archive under laboratory conditions. Hence, we used numerical shear test experiments utilizing the Discrete Element Method to quantify the impact of different material fabrics on the shear resistance of soil as this granular model approach enables to investigate failure processes on a grain-scaled level. Our numerical setup adapts general settings from laboratory tests while the model characteristics are fixed except for the soil structure particularly the used grain shapes. So, ideal round or stick- and plate-shaped grains were utilized to represent natural silts or clays to test two end-members. To quantify texture influences on soil strength, physical parameters, e.g. soil resistance, were calculated during deformation process. Furthermore, fabric analysis during shear reveals new information on detailed pore space regarding distribution and shape of voids. For this, a three-dimensional visualization of pore space is realized with the Visualization Toolkit (VTK) that allows the volume calculation and hence a quantification of single voids with progressive deformation. As a result, imaging of particle contact distribution and particle orientations within samples show significant changes with ongoing strain such as strong variations in material fabric and particle re-organization and therewith significant structural changes. These findings confirm that in general grain shape and its factor of soil fabric is not negligible for soil resistance and hence soil strength. This is notably affected by the deformation behavior of granular matter. With the broad investigation of the three most important factors that specify fabric behavior, this study attains a comprehensive view evaluating the impact of fabric on soil strength.

  15. CEILCOTE IONIZING WET SCRUBBER EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an evaluation of a Ceilcote ionizing wet scrubber installed on a refractory brick kiln. Tests involved particulate mass emission, particle size distribution, and opacity. Overall efficiency was 93% with an average outlet opacity determined with a heate...

  16. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The packing of particles can change radically during cyclic loading such as in an earthquake or when shaking a container to compact a powder. A large hole (1) is maintained by the particles sticking to each other. A small, counterclockwise strain (2) collapses the hole, and another large strain (3) forms more new holes which collapse when the strain reverses (4). Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (after T.L. Youd, Packing Changes and Liquefaction Susceptibility, Journal of the Geotechnical Engieering Division, 103: GT8,918-922, 1977)(Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center.)(Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder).

  17. Driven fragmentation of granular gases.

    PubMed

    Cruz Hidalgo, Raúl; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio

    2008-06-01

    The dynamics of homogeneously heated granular gases which fragment due to particle collisions is analyzed. We introduce a kinetic model which accounts for correlations induced at the grain collisions and analyze both the kinetics and relevant distribution functions these systems develop. The work combines analytical and numerical studies based on direct simulation Monte Carlo calculations. A broad family of fragmentation probabilities is considered, and its implications for the system kinetics are discussed. We show that generically these driven materials evolve asymptotically into a dynamical scaling regime. If the fragmentation probability tends to a constant, the grain number diverges at a finite time, leading to a shattering singularity. If the fragmentation probability vanishes, then the number of grains grows monotonously as a power law. We consider different homogeneous thermostats and show that the kinetics of these systems depends weakly on both the grain inelasticity and driving. We observe that fragmentation plays a relevant role in the shape of the velocity distribution of the particles. When the fragmentation is driven by local stochastic events, the long velocity tail is essentially exponential independently of the heating frequency and the breaking rule. However, for a Lowe-Andersen thermostat, numerical evidence strongly supports the conjecture that the scaled velocity distribution follows a generalized exponential behavior f(c) approximately exp(-cn) , with n approximately 1.2 , regarding less the fragmentation mechanisms. PMID:18643255

  18. Chemotaxis of large granular lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Pohajdak, B.; Gomez, J.; Orr, F.W.; Khalil, N.; Talgoy, M.; Greenberg, A.H.

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis that large granular lymphocytes (LGL) are capable of directed locomotion (chemotaxis) was tested. A population of LGL isolated from discontinuous Percoll gradients migrated along concentration gradients of N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (f-MLP), casein, and C5a, well known chemoattractants for polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes, as well as interferon-..beta.. and colony-stimulating factor. Interleukin 2, tuftsin, platelet-derived growth factor, and fibronectin were inactive. Migratory responses were greater in Percoll fractions with the highest lytic activity and HNK-1/sup +/ cells. The chemotactic response to f-MLP, casein, and C5a was always greater when the chemoattractant was present in greater concentration in the lower compartment of the Boyden chamber. Optimum chemotaxis was observed after a 1 hr incubation that made use of 12 ..mu..m nitrocellulose filters. LGL exhibited a high degree of nondirected locomotion when allowed to migrate for longer periods (> 2 hr), and when cultured in vitro for 24 to 72 hr in the presence or absence of IL 2 containing phytohemagluttinin-conditioned medium. LGL chemotaxis to f-MLP could be inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by the inactive structural analog CBZ-phe-met, and the RNK tumor line specifically bound f-ML(/sup 3/H)P, suggesting that LGL bear receptors for the chemotactic peptide.

  19. A nondimensional model for axial digging in granular materials

    E-print Network

    Li, Hao, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the mechanics of thin diggers in a packing of granular materials. Experiments were conducted by pushing diggers of varying thickness into the granular packing and recording the force-depth data. The digger ...

  20. Achieving progressive fine granularity scalable coding in H.26L 

    E-print Network

    Shanmugampillai, Muthukumar

    2001-01-01

    Fine granularity scalable (FGS) coding and progressive fine granularity scalable (PFGS) coding are novel scalable video schemes which are ideally suited for streaming multimedia over networks with varying bandwidth, network conditions and receiver...

  1. Design and fabrication of granular materials for surface acoustic waves

    E-print Network

    Gan, Tian, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2015-01-01

    Granular materials with structural discreteness and periodicity can lead to novel propagation behaviors of mechanical waves. Acoustic studies of granular media typically involve macroscopic particles whereas contact-based ...

  2. Stochastic and deterministic models for dense granular flow

    E-print Network

    Kamrin, Kenneth Norman

    2008-01-01

    Granular materials such as sand or gravel surround us everyday and yet remain poorly understood. In this thesis, two models are developed for dense granular flow, each capable of predicting flows with accuracy in multiple ...

  3. Rapid start-up and microbial characteristics of partial nitrification granular sludge treating domestic sewage at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuhai; Li, Dong; Zeng, Huiping; Zhang, Cuidan; Zhang, Jie

    2015-11-01

    The successful suppression of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria in the partial nitrification (PN) stage was the main challenge for the application of autotrophic nitrogen removal process treating mainstream sewage. In this study, two identical PN granular reactors (P1 and P2) were rapid started-up using the simultaneous PN and granulation strategy, for treating the domestic sewage. P1 was seeded with 30% PN granular sludge to induce nucleation, in which the granule size achieved to more than 400?m in 12d, with ammonia oxidation rate and nitrite accumulation rate of 80% and 95%, respectively, while P2 realized granulation in 42d. The presence of organic matters and specific structure of granules were profitable for the stability of PN for treating sewage with low ammonia. High-throughput pyrosequencing results indicated the biodiversity of both reactors decreased after start-up, and Nitrosomonas was the predominant specie of aerobic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in PN granular sludge. PMID:26271439

  4. Granular Materials and Risks In ISRU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behringer, Robert P.; Wilkinson, R. Allen

    2004-01-01

    Working with soil, sand, powders, ores, cement and sintered bricks, excavating, grading construction sites, driving off-road, transporting granules in chutes and pipes, sifting gravel, separating solids from gases, and using hoppers are so routine that it seems straightforward to execute these operations on the Moon and Mars as we do on Earth. We discuss how little these processes are understood and point out the nature of trial-and-error practices that are used in today's massive over-design. Nevertheless, such designs have a high failure rate. Implementation and extensive incremental scaling up of industrial processes are routine because of the inadequate predictive tools for design. We present a number of pragmatic scenarios where granular materials play a role, the risks involved, what some of the basic issues are, and what understanding is needed to greatly reduce the risks. This talk will focus on a particular class of granular flow issues, those that pertain to dense materials, their physics, and the failure problems associated with them. In particular, key issues where basic predictability is lacking include stability of soils for the support of vehicles and facilities, ability to control the flow of dense materials (jamming and flooding/unjamming at the wrong time), the ability to predict stress profiles (hence create reliable designs) for containers such as bunkers or silos. In particular, stress fluctuations, which are not accounted for in standard granular design models, can be very large as granular materials flows, and one result is frequent catastrophic failure of granular devices.

  5. Granular Materials and Risks in ISRU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behringer, Robert P.; Wilki8nson, R. Allen

    2004-01-01

    Working with soil, sand, powders, ores, cement and sintered bricks, excavating, grading construction sites, driving off-road, transporting granules in chutes and pipes, sifting gravel, separating solids from gases, and using hoppers are so routine that it seems straightforward to execute these operations on the Moon and Mars as we do on Earth. We discuss how little these processes are understood and point out the nature of trial-and-error practices that are used in today s massive over-design. Nevertheless, such designs have a high failure rate. Implementation and extensive incremental scaling up of industrial processes are routine because of the inadequate predictive tools for design. We present a number of pragmatic scenarios where granular materials play a role, the risks involved, what some of the basic issues are, and what understanding is needed to greatly reduce the risks. This talk will focus on a particular class of granular flow issues, those that pertain to dense materials, their physics, and the failure problems associated with them. In particular, key issues where basic predictability is lacking include stability of soils for the support of vehicles and facilities, ability to control the flow of dense materials (jamming and flooding/unjamming at the wrong time), the ability to predict stress profiles (hence create reliable designs) for containers such as bunkers or silos. In particular, stress fluctuations, which are not accounted for in standard granular design models, can be very large as granular materials flows, and one result is frequent catastrophic failure of granular devices.

  6. Reversibility in locomotion in granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoie, William; Goldman, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    A recent study of a self-deforming robot [Hatton et al., PRL, 2013] demonstrated that slow movement in dry granular media resembles locomotion in low Re fluids, in part because inertia is dominated by friction. The study indicated that granular swimming was kinematically reversible, a surprise because yielding in granular flow is irreversible. To investigate if reciprocal motions lead to net displacements in granular swimmers, in laboratory experiments, we study the locomotion of a robotic ``scallop'' consisting of a square body with two flipper-like limbs controlled to flap forward and backward symmetrically (a flap cycle). The body is constrained by linear bearings to allow motion in only one dimension. We vary the the flapping frequency f, the body/flipper burial depth d, and the number of flaps N in a deep bed of 6 mm diameter plastic spheres. Over a range of f and d, the N = 1 cycle produces net translation of the body; however for large N, a cycle produces no net translation. We conclude that symmetric strokes in granular swimming are irreversible at the onset of self-deformation, but become asymptotically reversible. work supported by NSF and ARL.

  7. WET LOOSE SNOW AVALANCHING IN SOUTHWESTERN MONTANA Simon August Trautman

    E-print Network

    Dyer, Bill

    WET LOOSE SNOW AVALANCHING IN SOUTHWESTERN MONTANA by Simon August Trautman A thesis submitted ..........................................................................................................1 2. WET SNOW...................................................................................................................3 Metamorphism of Wet Snow

  8. Topological boundary modes in jammed matter

    E-print Network

    Daniel M. Sussman; Olaf Stenull; T. C. Lubensky

    2015-12-14

    Granular matter at the jamming transition is poised on the brink of mechanical stability, and hence it is possible that these random systems have topologically protected surface phonons. Studying two model systems for jammed matter, we find states that exhibit distinct mechanical topological classes, protected surface modes, and ubiquitous Weyl points. The detailed statistics of the boundary modes enable tests of a standard understanding of the detailed features of the jamming transition, and show that parts of this argument are invalid.

  9. Memory of jamming - multiscale flow in soft and granular matter

    E-print Network

    Nishant Kumar; Stefan Luding

    2015-11-03

    Soft, disordered, micro-structured materials are ubiquitous in nature and industry, and are different from ordinary fluids or solids, with unusual, interesting static and flow properties. The transition from fluid to solid - at the so-called jamming density - features a multitude of complex mechanisms, but there is no unified theoretical framework that explains them all. In this study, a simple yet quantitative and predictive model is presented, which allows for a variable, changing jamming density, encompassing the memory of the deformation history and explaining a multitude of phenomena at and around jamming. The jamming density, now introduced as a new state-variable, changes due to the deformation history and relates the system's macroscopic response to its micro-structure. The packing efficiency can increase logarithmically slow under gentle ``tapping'' or repeated (isotropic) compression, leading to an increase of the jamming density. In contrast, shear deformations cause anisotropy, changing the packing efficiency exponentially fast with either dilatancy or compactancy. The memory of the system near jamming can be explained by a micro-statistical model that involves a multiscale, fractal energy landscape and links the microscopic particle picture to the macroscopic continuum description, providing a unified explanation for the qualitatively different flow-behavior for different deformation modes. To complement our work, a recipe to extract the history-dependent jamming density from experimentally accessible data is proposed, and alternative state-variables are compared. The proposed simple, usable macroscopic model, will help understanding, predicting and avoiding failure of structures or geophysical hazards, and will bring forward industrial process design and optimization, and help solving scientific challenges in fundamental research.

  10. Micro-Macro and Rheology in sheared Granular Matter

    E-print Network

    Luding, Stefan

    at the Multi Scale Mechanics (MSM) group of the Faculty of Science and Technology of the University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands Web : http://www.utwente.nl/ctw/msm/ Email : a

  11. Granular Matter manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor)

    E-print Network

    Luding, Stefan

    . Luding · I.M. de Schepper Structure in cohesive powders studied with Spin-Echo Small Angle Neutron (SESANS) measurements in combina- tion with computer simulations on a fine powder of sil- ica, before and after uniaxial compression. The cohe- sive powder packing is modeled by using molecular dy- namics

  12. Granular Matter manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor)

    E-print Network

    Luding, Stefan

    objective constitutive relations for the flow behavior of cohesive powders. From a single simulation only (termination locus) of adhesive powders from a single numerical experiment Stefan Luding and Fernando Alonso, for adhesive powders ­ due to the nonlinear dependence of the contact adhesion on the confining forces

  13. Granular Matter manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor)

    E-print Network

    Luding, Stefan

    Introduction Cohesive, frictional, fine powders show a peculiar flow behavior that can be quantified contact properties to the macroscopic flow behavior. This so-called micro-macro transition should allow to understand the collective flow behavior of many particles as function of their contact properties. The goal

  14. Memory of jamming - multiscale models for soft and granular matter

    E-print Network

    Nishant Kumar; Stefan Luding

    2015-12-07

    Soft, disordered, micro-structured materials are ubiquitous in nature and industry, and are different from ordinary fluids or solids, with unusual, interesting static and flow properties. The transition from fluid to solid -at the so-called jamming density- features a multitude of complex mechanisms, but there is no unified theoretical framework that explains them all. In this study, a simple yet quantitative and predictive model is presented, which allows for a variable, changing jamming density, encompassing the memory of the deformation history and explaining a multitude of phenomena at and around jamming. The jamming density, now introduced as a new state-variable, changes due to the deformation history and relates the system's macroscopic response to its microstructure. The packing efficiency can increase logarithmically slow under gentle repeated (isotropic) compression, leading to an increase of the jamming density. In contrast, shear deformations cause anisotropy, changing the packing efficiency exponentially fast with either dilatancy or compactancy. The memory of the system near jamming can be explained by a microstatistical model that involves a multiscale, fractal energy landscape and links the microscopic particle picture to the macroscopic continuum description, providing a unified explanation for the qualitatively different flow-behavior for different deformation modes. To complement our work, a recipe to extract the history-dependent jamming density from experimentally accessible data is proposed, and alternative state-variables are compared. The proposed simple macroscopic constitutive model is calibrated with the memory of microstructure. Such approach can help understanding predicting and mitigating failure of structures or geophysical hazards, and will bring forward industrial process design/optimization, and help solving scientific challenges in fundamental research.

  15. Flocking at a distance in active granular matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Harsh; Kumar, Nitin; Ramaswamy, Sriram; Sood, Ajay

    2014-03-01

    Flocking, the self-organised motion of vast numbers of living creatures in a single direction, relies on organisms sensing each other's presence, orientation and direction of movement. We have attempted to emulate these properties in experiments of fore-aft asymmetric particles energised by a vertically vibrated horizontal surface, and validate and extend our results using computer simulations and a simple hydrodynamic theory. In these studies the asymmetric rods communicate their orientation and directed motion over several rod lengths through a medium of spherical beads. This results in a phase transition from an isotropic state to a coherently moving flock at exceptionally low rod concentrations, an observation reinforced by large-scale numerical simulations. Our findings include a phase diagram in the plane of rod and bead concentrations, power-law spatial correlations upon approaching the phase boundary, and insights into the underlying mechanisms.

  16. Magnetically shaped cell aggregates: from granular to contractile materials.

    PubMed

    Frasca, G; Du, V; Bacri, J-C; Gazeau, F; Gay, C; Wilhelm, C

    2014-07-28

    In recent decades, significant advances have been made in the description and modelling of tissue morphogenesis. By contrast, the initial steps leading to the formation of a tissue structure, through cell-cell adhesion, have so far been described only for small numbers of interacting cells. Here, through the use of remote magnetic forces, we succeeded at creating cell aggregates of half million cells, instantaneously and for several cell types, not only those known to form spheroids. This magnetic compaction gives access to the cell elasticity, found in the range of 800 Pa. The magnetic force can be removed at any time, allowing the cell mass to evolve spontaneously thereafter. The dynamics of contraction of these cell aggregates just after their formation (or, in contrast, their spreading for non-interacting monocyte cells) provides direct information on cell-cell interactions and allows retrieving the adhesion energy, in between 0.05 and 2 mJ m(-2), depending on the cell type tested, and in the case of cohesive aggregates. Thus, we show, by probing a large number of cell types, that cell aggregates behave like complex materials, undergoing a transition from a wet granular to contractile network, and that this transition is controlled by cell-cell interactions. PMID:24710948

  17. Influence of magnetic cohesion on the stability of granular slopes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, K; King, P J; Swift, Michael R

    2008-09-01

    We use a molecular dynamics model to simulate the formation and evolution of a granular pile in two dimensions in order to gain a better understanding of the role of magnetic interactions in avalanche dynamics. We find that the angle of repose increases only slowly with magnetic field; the increase in angle is small even for intergrain cohesive forces many times stronger than gravity. The magnetic forces within the bulk of the pile partially cancel as a result of the anisotropic nature of the dipole-dipole interaction between grains. However, we show that this cancellation effect is not sufficiently strong to explain the discrepancy between the angle of repose in wet systems and magnetically cohesive systems. In our simulations we observe shearing deep within the pile, and we argue that it is this motion that prevents the angle of repose from increasing dramatically. We also investigate different implementations of friction with the front and back walls of the container, and conclude that the nature of the friction dramatically affects the influence of magnetic cohesion on the angle of repose. PMID:18851028

  18. Aggressive granular cell ameloblastoma: Report of a rare case.

    PubMed

    Babu, N Aravindha; Sankari, S Leena; Anitha, N; Mohideen, Gouse

    2015-04-01

    Granular cell ameloblastoma is a slow growing odontogenic ectodermal tumor. The tumor shows typical ameloblastoma with the cells showing eosinophilic granularity. This variant of ameloblastoma is aggressive with high recurrence rates. We report a case of aggressive ameloblastoma of granular cell variant. PMID:26015731

  19. Aggressive granular cell ameloblastoma: Report of a rare case

    PubMed Central

    Babu, N. Aravindha; Sankari, S. Leena; Anitha, N.; Mohideen, Gouse

    2015-01-01

    Granular cell ameloblastoma is a slow growing odontogenic ectodermal tumor. The tumor shows typical ameloblastoma with the cells showing eosinophilic granularity. This variant of ameloblastoma is aggressive with high recurrence rates. We report a case of aggressive ameloblastoma of granular cell variant PMID:26015731

  20. Granular Solid Hydrodynamics: Dense Flow, Fluidization and Jamming

    E-print Network

    Stefan Mahle; Yimin Jiang; Mario Liu

    2010-10-26

    Granular solid hydrodynamics, constructed to describe quasi-elastic and plastic motion of granular solid, is shown also capable of accounting for the rheology of granular dense flow. This makes it a unified, though still qualitative, hydrodynamic description, enabling one to tackle fluidization and jamming, the hysteretic transition between elasto-plastic motion and uniform dense flow.

  1. A NONLINEAR ELLIPTIC PROBLEM RELATED TO FLOWING GRANULAR MATERIALS

    E-print Network

    A NONLINEAR ELLIPTIC PROBLEM RELATED TO FLOWING GRANULAR MATERIALS PIERRE A. GREMAUD Abstract. Similarity solutions for the flow of granular materials are constructed. Unlike pre- vious work, the present. Introduction. This paper is about the determination of the flow of granular material under gravity in hoppers

  2. 76 FR 39896 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in... antidumping duty order on granular polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Italy would be likely to lead to... Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin from Italy: Investigation No. 731-TA-385 (Third Review). By order...

  3. Formation of aerobic granular sludge biofilms for sustainable wastewater treatment

    E-print Network

    Lenstra, Arjen K.

    ENAC/ Formation of aerobic granular sludge biofilms for sustainable wastewater treatment David G to aerobic granular microbial biofilms (Confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis) Floc viscous bulking) Exopolysaccharide-producing Zoogloea spp. form the early-stage aerobic granular biofilms, and then decline

  4. Matching Dry to Wet Materials Yaser Yacoob

    E-print Network

    Daume III, Hal

    of Naval Research under Grant N00014-10-1-0934. Figure 1. A partially wet concrete pavement, water spilled is the same in both images. Figure 1 shows examples we analyze: (a) partially wet concrete pavement, (b) waterMatching Dry to Wet Materials Yaser Yacoob Computer Vision Laboratory University of Maryland

  5. 7 CFR 51.897 - Wet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...United States Standards for Grades of Table Grapes (European or Vinifera Type) 1 Definitions...51.897 Wet. Wet means that the grapes are wet from moisture from crushed, leaking, or decayed berries or from rain. Grapes which are moist from dew or other...

  6. 7 CFR 51.897 - Wet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...United States Standards for Grades of Table Grapes (European or Vinifera Type) 1 Definitions...51.897 Wet. Wet means that the grapes are wet from moisture from crushed, leaking, or decayed berries or from rain. Grapes which are moist from dew or other...

  7. 7 CFR 51.897 - Wet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...United States Standards for Grades of Table Grapes (European or Vinifera Type) 1 Definitions...51.897 Wet. Wet means that the grapes are wet from moisture from crushed, leaking, or decayed berries or from rain. Grapes which are moist from dew or other...

  8. 7 CFR 51.897 - Wet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...United States Standards for Grades of Table Grapes (European or Vinifera Type) 1 Definitions...51.897 Wet. Wet means that the grapes are wet from moisture from crushed, leaking, or decayed berries or from rain. Grapes which are moist from dew or other...

  9. 7 CFR 51.897 - Wet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...United States Standards for Grades of Table Grapes (European or Vinifera Type) 1 Definitions...51.897 Wet. Wet means that the grapes are wet from moisture from crushed, leaking, or decayed berries or from rain. Grapes which are moist from dew or other...

  10. Image superresolution reconstruction via granular computing clustering.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbing; Zhang, Fan; Wu, Chang-an; Huang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The problem of generating a superresolution (SR) image from a single low-resolution (LR) input image is addressed via granular computing clustering in the paper. Firstly, and the training images are regarded as SR image and partitioned into some SR patches, which are resized into LS patches, the training set is composed of the SR patches and the corresponding LR patches. Secondly, the granular computing (GrC) clustering is proposed by the hypersphere representation of granule and the fuzzy inclusion measure compounded by the operation between two granules. Thirdly, the granule set (GS) including hypersphere granules with different granularities is induced by GrC and used to form the relation between the LR image and the SR image by lasso. Experimental results showed that GrC achieved the least root mean square errors between the reconstructed SR image and the original image compared with bicubic interpolation, sparse representation, and NNLasso. PMID:25610456

  11. Image Superresolution Reconstruction via Granular Computing Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongbing; Zhang, Fan; Wu, Chang-an; Huang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The problem of generating a superresolution (SR) image from a single low-resolution (LR) input image is addressed via granular computing clustering in the paper. Firstly, and the training images are regarded as SR image and partitioned into some SR patches, which are resized into LS patches, the training set is composed of the SR patches and the corresponding LR patches. Secondly, the granular computing (GrC) clustering is proposed by the hypersphere representation of granule and the fuzzy inclusion measure compounded by the operation between two granules. Thirdly, the granule set (GS) including hypersphere granules with different granularities is induced by GrC and used to form the relation between the LR image and the SR image by lasso. Experimental results showed that GrC achieved the least root mean square errors between the reconstructed SR image and the original image compared with bicubic interpolation, sparse representation, and NNLasso. PMID:25610456

  12. Steady Flow Dynamics during Granular Impact

    E-print Network

    Abram H. Clark; Lou Kondic; Robert P. Behringer

    2015-10-06

    We study experimentally and computationally the dynamic flow of granular material during impacts, where intruders strike a collection of disks from above. In the regime where granular force dynamics are much more rapid than the intruder motion, we find that the particle flow near the intruder is proportional to the instantaneous intruder speed; it is essentially constant when normalized by that speed. The granular flow is nearly divergence-free and remains in balance with the intruder despite the latter's rapid deceleration, which may explain similarities between impacts and steady drag experiments. Simulations indicate that this observation is insensitive to grain properties, including friction, although friction has a substantial effect on the intruder dynamics (e.g., the final penetration depth). The separation of time scales between grain and intruder dynamics explains the insensitivity to flows may have similar dependence on the rate of external driving, if a comparable separation of time scales applies.

  13. Electrification of granular systems of identical insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kok, Jasper F.; Lacks, Daniel J.

    2009-05-01

    Insulating particles can become highly electrified during powder handling, volcanic eruptions, and the wind-blown transport of dust, sand, and snow. Measurements in these granular systems have found that smaller particles generally charge negatively, while larger particles charge positively. These observations are puzzling since particles in these systems are generally chemically identical and thus have no contact potential difference. We show here that simple geometry leads to a net transfer of electrons from larger to smaller particles, in agreement with these observations. We integrate this charging mechanism into the first quantitative charging scheme for a granular system of identical insulators and show that its predictions are in agreement with measurements. Our theory thus seems to provide an explanation for the hitherto puzzling phenomenon of the size-dependent charging of granular systems of identical insulators.

  14. Electrification of granular systems of identical insulators.

    PubMed

    Kok, Jasper F; Lacks, Daniel J

    2009-05-01

    Insulating particles can become highly electrified during powder handling, volcanic eruptions, and the wind-blown transport of dust, sand, and snow. Measurements in these granular systems have found that smaller particles generally charge negatively, while larger particles charge positively. These observations are puzzling since particles in these systems are generally chemically identical and thus have no contact potential difference. We show here that simple geometry leads to a net transfer of electrons from larger to smaller particles, in agreement with these observations. We integrate this charging mechanism into the first quantitative charging scheme for a granular system of identical insulators and show that its predictions are in agreement with measurements. Our theory thus seems to provide an explanation for the hitherto puzzling phenomenon of the size-dependent charging of granular systems of identical insulators. PMID:19518446

  15. Unstable blast shocks in dilute granular flows.

    PubMed

    Boudet, J F; Kellay, H

    2013-05-01

    Shocks and blasts can be readily obtained in granular flows be they dense or dilute. Here, by examining the propagation of a blast shock in a dilute granular flow, we show that such a front is unstable with respect to transverse variations of the density of grains. This instability has a well-defined wavelength which depends on the density of the medium and has an amplitude which grows as an exponential of the distance traveled. These features can be understood using a simple model for the shock front, including dissipation which is inherent to granular flows. While this instability bears much resemblance to that anticipated in gases, it is distinct and has special features we discuss here. PMID:23767525

  16. Shock waves in a dilute granular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, M. H. Lakshminarayana; Ansumali, Santosh; Alam, Meheboob

    2014-12-01

    We study the evolution of shock waves in a dilute granular gas which is modelled using three variants of hydrodynamic equations: Euler, 10-moment and 14-moment models. The one-dimensional shock-wave problem is formulated and the resulting equations are solved numerically using a relaxation-type scheme. Focusing on the specific case of blast waves, the results on the density, the granular temperature, the skew temperature, the heat flux and the fourth moment are compared among three models. We find that the shock profiles are smoother for the 14-moment model compared to those predicted by the standard Euler equations. A shock-splitting phenomenon is observed in the skew granular temperature profiles for a blast wave.

  17. Characteristics of undulatory locomotion in granular media

    E-print Network

    Peng, Zhiwei; Elfring, Gwynn J

    2015-01-01

    Undulatory locomotion is ubiquitous in nature and observed in different media, from the swimming of flagellated microorganisms in biological fluids, to the slithering of snakes on land, or the locomotion of sandfish lizards in sand. Despite the similarity in the undulating pattern, the swimming characteristics depend on the rheological properties of different media. Analysis of locomotion in granular materials is relatively less developed compared with fluids partially due to a lack of validated force models but recently a resistive force theory in granular media has been proposed and shown useful in studying the locomotion of a sand-swimming lizard. Here we employ the proposed model to investigate the swimming characteristics of a slender filament, of both finite and infinite length, undulating in a granular medium and compare the results with swimming in viscous fluids. In particular, we characterize the effects of drifting and pitching in terms of propulsion speed and efficiency for a finite sinusoidal swi...

  18. Low biosorption of PVA coated engineered magnetic nanoparticles in granular sludge assessed by magnetic susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Herrling, Maria P; Fetsch, Katharina L; Delay, Markus; Blauert, Florian; Wagner, Michael; Franzreb, Matthias; Horn, Harald; Lackner, Susanne

    2015-12-15

    When engineered nanoparticles (ENP) enter into wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) their removal from the water phase is driven by the interactions with the biomass in the biological treatment step. While studies focus on the interactions with activated flocculent sludge, investigations on the detailed distribution of ENP in other types of biomass, such as granulated sludge, are needed to assess their potential environmental pollution. This study employed engineered magnetic nanoparticles (EMNP) coated with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as model nanoparticles to trace their fate in granular sludge from WWT. For the first time, magnetic susceptibility was used as a simple approach for the in-situ quantification of EMNP with a high precision (error <2%). Compared to other analytical methods, the magnetic susceptibility requires no sample preparation and enabled direct quantification of EMNP in both the aqueous phase and the granular sludge. In batch experiments granular sludge was exposed to EMNP suspensions for 18 h. The results revealed that the removal of EMNP from the water phase (5-35%) and biosorption in the granular sludge were rather low. Less than 2.4% of the initially added EMNP were associated with the biomass. Loosely bounded to the granular sludge, desorption of EMNP occurred. Consequently, the removal of EMNP was mainly driven by physical co-sedimentation with the biomass instead of sorption processes. A mass balance elucidated that the majority of EMNP were stabilized by particulate organic matter in the water phase and can therefore likely be transported further. The magnetic susceptibility enabled tracing EMNP in complex matrices and thus improves the understanding of the general distribution of ENP in technical as well as environmental systems. PMID:26282738

  19. Internal Avalanches in a Granular Medium

    E-print Network

    S. S. Manna; D. V. Khakhar

    1998-08-04

    Avalanches of grain displacements can be generated by creating local voids within the interior of a granular material at rest in a bin. Modeling such a two-dimensional granular system by a collection of mono-disperse discs, the system on repeated perturbations, shows all signatures of Self-Organized Criticality. During the propagation of avalanches the competition among grains creates arches and in the critical state a distribution of arches of different sizes is obtained. Using a cellular automata model we demonstrate that the existence of arches determines the universal behaviour of the model system.

  20. Challenges in Predicting Planetary Granular Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.

    2005-01-01

    Through the course of human history, our needs in agriculture, habitat construction, and resource extraction have driven us to gain more experience working with the granular materials of planet Earth than with any other type of substance in nature, with the possible exception being water. Furthermore, throughout the past two centuries we have seen a dramatic and ever growing interest among scientists and engineers to understand and predict both its static and rheological properties. Ironically, however, despite this wealth of experience we still do not have a fundamental understanding of the complex physical phenomena that emerge even as just ordinary sand is shaken, squeezed or poured. As humanity is now reaching outward through the solar system, not only robotic ally but also with our immediate human presence, the need to understand and predict granular mechanics has taken on a new dimension. We must learn to farm, build and mine the regoliths of other planets where the environmental conditions are different than on Earth, and we are rapidly discovering that the effects of these environmental conditions are not trivial. Some of the relevant environmental features include the regolith formation processes throughout a planet's geologic and hydrologic history, the unknown mixtures of volatiles residing within the soil, the relative strength of gravitation, d the atm9spheric pressure and its seasonal variations. The need to work with soils outside our terrestrial experience base provides us with both a challenge and an opportunity. The challenge is to learn how to extrapolate our experience into these new planetary conditions, enabling the engineering decisions that are needed right now as we take the next few steps in solar system exploration. The opportunity is to use these new planetary environments as laboratories that will help us to see granular mechanics in new ways, to challenge our assumptions, and to help us finally unravel the elusive physics that lie behind complex granular phenomena. Toward these goals, a workshop was held recently at NASA's John F. Kennedy Space Center, attracting over a hundred scientists and engineers from around the world and from a broad crosssection of scientific and engineering disciplines. This talk will provide an out-briefing from that workshop, communicating some of its early findings in regard to lunar and Martian exploration: (1) the requirements for working with granular materials, (2) the challenges that granular materials will pose, (3) the environmental conditions that affect granular mechanics, (4) instruments and measurements that are needed on the Moon and Mars to support granular material research, and (5) some of the possible research avenues that should be pursued.

  1. Cluster Instability in Freely Evolving Granular Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brey, J. Javier

    A granular medium is formed by a large number of macroscopic particles or grains. Here large must be understood at a macroscopic level, i.e. a few thousands or even a few hundreds is already a large number in the present context, as compared with molecular systems which contain a number of atoms or molecules of the order of the Avogadro number. In this lecture, we will restrict ourselves to dry granular systems in which there is not any other fluid around the grains. Also, electrical effects are not considered. Under these circumstances, the grain-grain interaction can be taken as purely repulsive with no attractive part.

  2. Fourier's Law for a Granular Fluid

    E-print Network

    James W. Dufty

    2007-07-07

    Newton' viscosity law for the momentum flux and Fourier's law for the heat flux define Navier-Stokes hydrodynamics for a simple, one component fluid. There is ample evidence that a hydrodynamic description applies as well to a mesoscopic granular fluid with the same form for Newton's viscosity law. However, theory predicts a qualitative difference for Fourier's law with an additional contribution from density gradients even at uniform temperature. The reasons for the absence of such terms for normal fluids are indicated, and a related microscopic explanation for their existence in granular fluids is presented.

  3. Shock Waves in Weakly Compressed Granular Media

    E-print Network

    Siet van den Wildenberg; Rogier van Loo; Martin van Hecke

    2013-04-23

    We experimentally probe nonlinear wave propagation in weakly compressed granular media, and observe a crossover from quasi-linear sound waves at low impact, to shock waves at high impact. We show that this crossover grows with the confining pressure $P_0$, whereas the shock wave speed is independent of $P_0$ --- two hallmarks of granular shocks predicted recently. The shocks exhibit powerlaw attenuation, which we model with a logarithmic law implying that local dissipation is weak. We show that elastic and potential energy balance in the leading part of the shocks.

  4. Degradation of phenylamine by catalytic wet air oxidation using metal catalysts with modified supports.

    PubMed

    Torrellas, Silvia A; Escudero, Gabriel O; Rodriguez, Araceli R; Rodriguez, Juan G

    2015-01-01

    The effect of acid treatments with HCl and HNO3 on the surface area and surface chemistry of three granular activated carbons was studied. These supports were characterized and the hydrochloric acid treatment leads to the best activated carbon support (AC2-C). The catalytic behavior of Pt, Ru and Fe (1 wt.%) supported on granular activated carbon treated with HCl was tested in the phenylamine continuous catalytic wet air oxidation in a three-phase, high-pressure catalytic reactor over a range of reaction temperatures 130-170ºC and total pressure of 1.0-3.0 MPa at LHSV = 0.4-1 h(-1), whereas the phenylamine concentration range and the catalyst loading were 5-16 mol.m(-3) and 0.5-1.5 g, respectively. Activity as well as conversion varied as a function of the metal, the catalyst preparation method and operation conditions. Higher activities were obtained with Pt incorporated on hydrochloric acid -treated activated carbon by the ion exchange method. In steady state, approximately 98% phenylamine conversion, 77% of TOC and 94% of COD removal, was recorded at 150ºC, 11 mol m(-3) of phenylamine concentration and 1.5 g of catalyst, and the selectivity to non-organic compounds was 78%. Several reaction intermediaries were detected. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood model gave an excellent fit of the kinetic data of phenylamine continuous catalytic wet air oxidation over the catalysts of this work. PMID:25723063

  5. Phoenix's Wet Chemistry Laboratory Units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image shows four Wet Chemistry Laboratory units, part of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument on board NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. This image was taken before Phoenix's launch on August 4, 2007.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  6. Inhaled antibiotics: dry or wet?

    PubMed

    Tiddens, Harm A W M; Bos, Aukje C; Mouton, Johan W; Devadason, Sunalene; Janssens, Hettie M

    2014-11-01

    Dry powder inhalers (DPIs) delivering antibiotics for the suppressive treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients were developed recently and are now increasingly replacing time-consuming nebuliser therapy. Noninferiority studies have shown that the efficacy of inhaled tobramycin delivered by DPI was similar to that of wet nebulisation. However, there are many differences between inhaled antibiotic therapy delivered by DPI and by nebuliser. The question is whether and to what extent inhalation technique and other patient-related factors affect the efficacy of antibiotics delivered by DPI compared with nebulisers. Health professionals should be aware of the differences between dry and wet aerosols, and of patient-related factors that can influence efficacy, in order to personalise treatment, to give appropriate instructions to patients and to better understand the response to the treatment after switching. In this review, key issues of aerosol therapy are discussed in relation to inhaled antibiotic therapy with the aim of optimising the use of both nebulised and DPI antibiotics by patients. An example of these issues is the relationship between airway generation, structural lung changes and local concentrations of the inhaled antibiotics. The pros and cons of dry and wet modes of delivery for inhaled antibiotics are discussed. PMID:25323242

  7. Supporting user-defined granularities in a spatiotemporal conceptual model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Khatri, V.; Ram, S.; Snodgrass, R.T.; O'Brien, G. M.

    2002-01-01

    Granularities are integral to spatial and temporal data. A large number of applications require storage of facts along with their temporal and spatial context, which needs to be expressed in terms of appropriate granularities. For many real-world applications, a single granularity in the database is insufficient. In order to support any type of spatial or temporal reasoning, the semantics related to granularities needs to be embedded in the database. Specifying granularities related to facts is an important part of conceptual database design because under-specifying the granularity can restrict an application, affect the relative ordering of events and impact the topological relationships. Closely related to granularities is indeterminacy, i.e., an occurrence time or location associated with a fact that is not known exactly. In this paper, we present an ontology for spatial granularities that is a natural analog of temporal granularities. We propose an upward-compatible, annotation-based spatiotemporal conceptual model that can comprehensively capture the semantics related to spatial and temporal granularities, and indeterminacy without requiring new spatiotemporal constructs. We specify the formal semantics of this spatiotemporal conceptual model via translation to a conventional conceptual model. To underscore the practical focus of our approach, we describe an on-going case study. We apply our approach to a hydrogeologic application at the United States Geologic Survey and demonstrate that our proposed granularity-based spatiotemporal conceptual model is straightforward to use and is comprehensive.

  8. Granular Elasticity’ and the loss of elastic stability in granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    P. W. Humrickhouse

    2009-07-01

    A recently proposed hyperelastic model for granular materials, called "granular elasticity", identifies a yield angle as a result of thermodynamic instability. GE gives yield angles that are smaller than those found in real materials; a generalization of the theory is considered here that includes dependence on the third strain invariant. This generalization proves unsuccessful, as it gives smaller, not larger, yield angles. Fully convex hyperelastic models are identified as a point for future investigation.

  9. REGIONAL REACTIVATION OF GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    A major portion of the cost of using Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) as a water treatment unit process is associated with spent carbon replacement or reactivation. Regional reactivation or sharing a reactivation furnace among several users, has been proposed as a means of minimiz...

  10. Granular dynamics under shear with deformable boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, Drew; Backhaus, Scott; Ecke, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Granular materials under shear develop complex patterns of stress as the result of granular positional rearrangements under an applied load. We consider the simple planar shear of a quasi two-dimensional granular material consisting of bi-dispersed nylon cylinders confined between deformable boundaries. The aspect ratio of the gap width to total system length is 50, and the ratio of particle diameter to gap width is about 10. This system, designed to model a long earthquake fault with long range elastic coupling through the plates, is an interesting model system for understanding effective granular friction because it essentially self tunes to the jamming condition owing to the hardness of the grains relative to that of the boundary material, a ratio of more than 1000 in elastic moduli. We measure the differential strain displacements of the plates, the inhomogeneous stress distribution in the plates, the positions and angular orientations of the individual grains, and the shear force, all as functions of the applied normal stress. There is significant stick-slip motion in this system that we quantify through our quantitative measurements of both the boundary and the grain motion, resulting in a good characterization of this sheared 2D hard sphere system.

  11. Far-infrared absorption by granular superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, R.

    1984-04-01

    The far-infrared absorption spectrum of a granular superconductor consisting of Sn spheres in a KCl host is calculated using the longitudinal dielectric function in a nonlocal theory for the polarizability of a small sphere. The theory can explain the frequency dependence, but not the anomalously large magnitude of the observed absorption.

  12. Design and analysis of jammable granular systems

    E-print Network

    Cheng, Nadia G. (Nadia Gen San)

    2013-01-01

    Jamming--the mechanism by which granular media can transition between liquid-like and solid-like states-has recently been demonstrated as a variable strength and stiffness mechanism in a range of applications. As a low-cost ...

  13. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) treatment is a physicochemical process that removes a wide variety of contaminants by adsorbing them from liquid and gas streams [1, p. 6-3]. This treatment is most commonly used to separate organic contaminants from water or air; however, it can b...

  14. EPA'S RESEARCH PROGRAM IN GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research into Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) for use in drinking water treatment has a long history in the Drinking Water Research Division and its predecessor organizations. tudies were conducted by the U.S. Public Health Service in the late fifties and early sixties to examine...

  15. DOWNFLOW GRANULAR FILTRATION OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE EFFLUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The performance of downflow granular filters subjected to effluents from activated sludge processes was investigated at the EPA-DC Pilot Plant in Washington, D.C. Several media combinations were investigated, including both single anthracite and dual anthracite-sand configuration...

  16. Granular Gas in a Periodic Lattice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorbolo, S.; Brandenbourger, M.; Damanet, F.; Dister, H.; Ludewig, F.; Terwagne, D.; Lumay, G.; Vandewalle, N.

    2011-01-01

    Glass beads are placed in the compartments of a horizontal square grid. This grid is then vertically shaken. According to the reduced acceleration [image omitted] of the system, the granular material exhibits various behaviours. By counting the number of beads in each compartment after shaking, it is possible to define three regimes. At low…

  17. Stress and Temperature Distributions of Individual Particles in a Shock Wave Propagating through Dry and Wet Sand Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumaker, Merit; Stewart, Sarah T.; Borg, John P.

    2015-06-01

    Determining stress and temperature distributions of dynamically compacted particles is of interest to the geophysical and astrological research communities. However, these particle interactions during a shock event are not easily observed in planar shock experiments; it is with the utilization of mesoscale simulations that these granular particle interactions can be unraveled. Unlike homogenous materials, the overall averaged hugoniot state for heterogeneous granular materials differs from the individual stress and temperature states of particles during a shock event. From planar shock experiments on dry and wet sand mixtures, simulations were constructed using CTH. A baseline dry sand simulation was also setup to be compared to sand grains that possessed water particles between grains. It is from these simulations that the distributions of stress and temperatures for individual sand and water particles are presented and compared in this document.

  18. Granular Mechanics in the Asteroid Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Paul; Swift, M. R.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2009-09-01

    We study the granular mechanics properties of asteroid regolith and of asteroids modeled as gravitational aggregates using soft-sphere molecular simulation codes. For definiteness we assume parameters similar to the asteroid Itokawa, for which we have detailed observational data. Essential questions that can be studied using the techniques of granular mechanics are why large blocks dominate 80% of the surface of Itokawa and why the remaining 20% is uniformly covered with smaller particles, indicating global segregation mechanisms at work on this body. The prime energy source proposed for the segregation of granular materials on asteroids has been seismic shaking due to hypervelocity impacts with asteroids much smaller than the target body. We analyze the detailed mechanics of segregation physics in the asteroid environment due to such interactions. First we analyze the so-called Brazil Nut Effect (BNE), which preferentially causes larger particles to rise to the highest potential energy in a granular material. We note that the regions of highest potential on Itokawa are dominated by larger blocks, while the potential lows are dominated by smaller blocks. We verify and characterise the BNE effect in an asteroid environment under a variety of boundary and shaking conditions. We also extend our analyses to a global-scale simulation of aggregates, modeling the response of self-gravitating granules of a mixture of sizes to impacts. Analysis of such global-scale systems show additional mechanics that may account for the exposure of large blocks on the surface. Specifically we find that hypervelocity impacts are more effective in removing and transporting smaller regolith, exposing sub-surface larger blocks that might otherwise be covered in finer grained material. We discuss the scaling of granular mechanics effects from local regolith to global aggregate scale.

  19. Self-assembly of granular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shattuck, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Acoustic meta-materials are engineered materials with the ability to control, direct, and manipulate sound waves. Since the 1990s, several groups have developed acoustic meta-materials with novel capabilities including negative index materials for acoustic super-lenses, phononic crystals with acoustic band gaps for wave guides and mirrors, and acoustic cloaking device. Most previous work on acoustic meta-materials has focused on continuum solids and fluids. In contrast, we report on coordinated computational and experimental studies to use macro-self-assembly of granular materials to produce acoustic meta-materials. The advantages of granular acoustic materials are three-fold: 1) Microscopic control: The discrete nature of granular media allows us to optimize acoustic properties on both the grain and network scales. 2) Tunability: The speed of sound in granular media depends strongly on pressure due to non-linear contact interactions and contact breaking. 3) Direct visualization: The macro-scale size of the grains enables visualization of the structure and stress propagation within granular assemblies. We report simulations and experiments of vibrated particles that form a variety of self-assembled ordered structures in two- and three-dimensions. In the simplest case of mono-disperse spheres, using a combination of pressure and vibration we produce crystals with long-range order on the scale of 100's of particles. Using special particle shapes that form ``lock and key'' structures we are able to make binary crystals with prescribed stoichiometries. We discuss the mechanical properties of these structures and methods to create more complicated structures.

  20. Wetting of flexible fibre arrays.

    PubMed

    Duprat, C; Protière, S; Beebe, A Y; Stone, H A

    2012-02-23

    Fibrous media are functional and versatile materials, as demonstrated by their ubiquity both in natural systems such as feathers and adhesive pads and in engineered systems from nanotextured surfaces to textile products, where they offer benefits in filtration, insulation, wetting and colouring. The elasticity and high aspect ratios of the fibres allow deformation under capillary forces, which cause mechanical damage, matting self-assembly or colour changes, with many industrial and ecological consequences. Attempts to understand these systems have mostly focused on the wetting of rigid fibres or on elastocapillary effects in planar geometries and on a fibre brush withdrawn from an infinite bath. Here we consider the frequently encountered case of a liquid drop deposited on a flexible fibre array and show that flexibility, fibre geometry and drop volume are the crucial parameters that are necessary to understand the various observations referred to above. We identify the conditions required for a drop to remain compact with minimal spreading or to cause a pair of elastic fibres to coalesce. We find that there is a critical volume of liquid, and, hence, a critical drop size, above which this coalescence does not occur. We also identify a drop size that maximizes liquid capture. For both wetting and deformation of the substrates, we present rules that are deduced from the geometric and material properties of the fibres and the volume of the drop. These ideas are applicable to a wide range of fibrous materials, as we illustrate with examples for feathers, beetle tarsi, sprays and microfabricated systems. PMID:22358841

  1. Coal combustion by wet oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Bettinger, J.A.; Lamparter, R.A.; McDowell, D.C.

    1980-11-15

    The combustion of coal by wet oxidation was studied by the Center for Waste Management Programs, of Michigan Technological University. In wet oxidation a combustible material, such as coal, is reacted with oxygen in the presence of liquid water. The reaction is typically carried out in the range of 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 353/sup 0/C (650/sup 0/F) with sufficient pressure to maintain the water present in the liquid state, and provide the partial pressure of oxygen in the gas phase necessary to carry out the reaction. Experimental studies to explore the key reaction parameters of temperature, time, oxidant, catalyst, coal type, and mesh size were conducted by running batch tests in a one-gallon stirred autoclave. The factors exhibiting the greatest effect on the extent of reaction were temperature and residence time. The effect of temperature was studied from 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) with a residence time from 600 to 3600 seconds. From this data, the reaction activation energy of 2.7 x 10/sup 4/ calories per mole was determined for a high-volatile-A-Bituminous type coal. The reaction rate constant may be determined at any temperature from the activation energy using the Arrhenius equation. Additional data were generated on the effect of mesh size and different coal types. A sample of peat was also tested. Two catalysts were evaluated, and their effects on reaction rate presented in the report. In addition to the high temperature combustion, low temperature desulfurization is discussed. Desulfurization can improve low grade coal to be used in conventional combustion methods. It was found that 90% of the sulfur can be removed from the coal by wet oxidation with the carbon untouched. Further desulfurization studies are indicated.

  2. Wet/Dry Vacuum Cleaner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reimers, Harold; Andampour, Jay; Kunitser, Craig; Thomas, Ike

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum cleaner collects and retains dust, wet debris, and liquids. Designed for housekeeping on Space Station Freedom, it functions equally well in normal Earth Gravity or in microgravity. Generates acoustic noise at comfortably low levels and includes circuitry that reduces electromagnetic interference to other electronic equipment. Draws materials into bag made of hydrophobic sheet with layers of hydrophilic super-absorbing pads at downstream end material. Hydrophilic material can gel many times its own weight of liquid. Blower also provides secondary airflow to cool its electronic components.

  3. A Wet Chemistry Laboratory Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This picture of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) cell is labeled with components responsible for mixing Martian soil with water from Earth, adding chemicals and measuring the solution chemistry. WCL is part of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument suite on board the Phoenix lander.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  4. Wet coastal plain tundra III

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, J.P.; Gellman, S.T.; Pitelka, F.A.

    1980-01-01

    This year's census data for the wet coastal plain tundra in Alaska; North Slope Borough, 3 km SSE of Naval Arctic Research Laboratory, Barrow; 71/sup 0/ 18'N, 156/sup 0/ 38'W; Barrow Quadrangle, USGS reflect a decrease in the total number of species breeding. However, total breeding density rose by 82%. Lapland Longspurs (up 105%) accounted for half of this increase while the rest was spread among many species. There was a total of 8 species; 40.5 territorial males or females (162/km/sup 2/, 66/100 acres).

  5. Mars: Always Cold, Sometimes Wet?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Pascal; McKay, Christoper P.

    2003-01-01

    A synthesis of a diverse suite of observations of H2O-related landforms that are possible Mars analogs from terrestrial polar regions (Devon Island in the Arctic; the Dry Valleys of Antarctica) put into question any requirement for extended episode(s) of warm and wet climate in Mars past. Geologically transient episodes of localized H2O cycling, forced by exogenic impacts, enhanced endogenic heat flow, and/or orbit-driven short-term local environmental change under an otherwise cold, low pressure (=10(exp 2) mbar) global climate, may be sufficient to account for the martian surface's exposed record of aqueous activity. A Mars that was only sometimes locally warm and wet while remaining climatically cold throughout its history is consistent with results (difficulties) encountered in modeling efforts attempting to support warm martian climate hypotheses. Possible analogs from terrestrial cold climate regions for the recent gully features on Mars also illustrate how transient localized aqueous activity might, under specific circumstances, also occur on Mars under the present frigid global climatic regime.

  6. Elucidating the mysteries of wetting.

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Edmund Blackburn, III; Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Grillet, Anne Mary; Sackinger, Philip A.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Emerson, John Allen; Ash, Benjamin Jesse; Heine, David R.; Brooks, Carlton, F.; Gorby, Allen D.

    2005-11-01

    Nearly every manufacturing and many technologies central to Sandia's business involve physical processes controlled by interfacial wetting. Interfacial forces, e.g. conjoining/disjoining pressure, electrostatics, and capillary condensation, are ubiquitous and can surpass and even dominate bulk inertial or viscous effects on a continuum level. Moreover, the statics and dynamics of three-phase contact lines exhibit a wide range of complex behavior, such as contact angle hysteresis due to surface roughness, surface reaction, or compositional heterogeneities. These thermodynamically and kinetically driven interactions are essential to the development of new materials and processes. A detailed understanding was developed for the factors controlling wettability in multicomponent systems from computational modeling tools, and experimental diagnostics for systems, and processes dominated by interfacial effects. Wettability probed by dynamic advancing and receding contact angle measurements, ellipsometry, and direct determination of the capillary and disjoining forces. Molecular scale experiments determined the relationships between the fundamental interactions between molecular species and with the substrate. Atomistic simulations studied the equilibrium concentration profiles near the solid and vapor interfaces and tested the basic assumptions used in the continuum approaches. These simulations provide guidance in developing constitutive equations, which more accurately take into account the effects of surface induced phase separation and concentration gradients near the three-phase contact line. The development of these accurate models for dynamic multicomponent wetting allows improvement in science based engineering of manufacturing processes previously developed through costly trial and error by varying material formulation and geometry modification.

  7. Drag Force and Penetration in Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffer, Peter; Tsui, Yeekin; Albert, Istvan; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2002-11-01

    The motion of a solid object being pulled slowly through a granular medium is resisted by jamming of the grains, resulting in a drag force which differs dramatically from viscous drag in a fluid both in its average properties and in having large fluctuations with distinct characteristics. The drag process thus provides an excellent test-bed for the strength of locally jammed states among the grains and the effects of confinement on the jamming. We have studied the drag force as a function of the velocity, the depth in the medium, the grain size and morphology for a vertical cylinder. The data agree well with theory for spherical media, but show an anomalously strong depth dependence for non-spherical grains. We also study the drag force on discrete objects with circular cross section moving slowly through a spherical granular medium. Variations in the geometry of the dragged object change the drag force only by a small fraction relative to shape effects in fluid drag. The drag force depends quadratically on the object's diameter as expected. We do observe, however, a deviation above the expected linear depth dependence, and the magnitude of the deviation is apparently controlled by geometrical factors. We also have studied fluctuations in the drag force experienced by a vertical moving through a granular medium. The successive formation and collapse of jammed states give a stick-slip nature to the fluctuations which are periodic at small depths but become 'stepped' at large depths, a transition which we interpret as a consequence of the long-range nature of the force chains and the finite size of our experiment. Very recent work has focused on the effects of solid barriers within the grains on penetration of a granular medium. We have studied the force required to insert an object vertically into a granular medium, with particular attention to the effect of the bottom boundary. We find that, despite the long range nature of the force chains, the existence of the solid bottom of the granular container only affects the force when the inserted object is within a short range of the bottom, and that the roughness of the bottom surface has a strong effect on the force's depth profile. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  8. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  9. Directional wetting in anisotropic inverse opals.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Katherine R; Vogel, Nicolas; Burgess, Ian B; Perry, Carole C; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2014-07-01

    Porous materials display interesting transport phenomena due to restricted motion of fluids within the nano- to microscale voids. Here, we investigate how liquid wetting in highly ordered inverse opals is affected by anisotropy in pore geometry. We compare samples with different degrees of pore asphericity and find different wetting patterns depending on the pore shape. Highly anisotropic structures are infiltrated more easily than their isotropic counterparts. Further, the wetting of anisotropic inverse opals is directional, with liquids filling from the side more easily. This effect is supported by percolation simulations as well as direct observations of wetting using time-resolved optical microscopy. PMID:24941308

  10. Computational study on the behaviors of granular materials under mechanical cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Ye, Minyou; Chen, Hongli

    2015-11-01

    Considering that fusion pebble beds are probably subjected to the cyclic compression excitation in their future applications, we presented a computational study to report the effect of mechanical cycling on the behaviors of granular matter. The correctness of our numerical experiments was confirmed by a comparison with the effective medium theory. Under the cyclic loads, the fast granular compaction was observed to evolve in a stretched exponential law. Besides, the increasing stiffening in packing structure, especially the decreasing moduli pressure dependence due to granular consolidation, was also observed. For the force chains inside the pebble beds, both the internal force distribution and the spatial distribution of force chains would become increasingly uniform as the external force perturbation proceeded and therefore produced the stress relief on grains. In this case, the originally proposed 3-parameter Mueth function was found to fail to describe the internal force distribution. Thereby, its improved functional form with 4 parameters was proposed here and proved to better fit the data. These findings will provide more detailed information on the pebble beds for the relevant fusion design and analysis.

  11. Microgravity Experiments to Evaluate Electrostatic Forces in Controlling Cohesion and Adhesion of Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J.; Weislogel, M.; Jacobson, T.

    1999-01-01

    The bulk behavior of dispersed, fluidized, or undispersed stationary granular systems cannot be fully understood in terms of adhesive/cohesive properties without understanding the role of electrostatic forces acting at the level of the grains themselves. When grains adhere to a surface, or come in contact with one another in a stationary bulk mass, it is difficult to measure the forces acting on the grains, and the forces themselves that induced the cohesion and adhesion are changed. Even if a single gain were to be scrutinized in the laboratory, it might be difficult, perhaps impossible, to define the distribution and character of surface charging and the three- dimensional relationship that charges (electrons, holes) have to one another. The hypothesis that we propose to test in microgravity (for dielectric materials) is that adhesion and cohesion of granular matter are mediated primarily by dipole forces that do not require the presence of a net charge; in fact, nominally electrically neutral materials should express adhesive and cohesive behavior when the neutrality results from a balance of positive and negative charge carriers. Moreover, the use of net charge alone as a measure of the electrical nature of grain-to-grain relationships within a granular mass may be misleading. We believe that the dipole forces arise from the presence of randomly-distributed positive and negative fixed charge carriers on grains that give rise to a resultant dipole moment. These dipole forces have long-range attraction. Random charges are created whenever there is triboelectrical activity of a granular mass, that is, whenever the grains experience contact/separation sequences or friction. Electrostatic forces are generally under-estimated for their role in causing agglomeration of dispersed grains in particulate clouds, or their role in affecting the internal frictional relationships in packed granular masses. We believe that electrostatic, in particular dipole-mediated processes, are pervasive and probably affect, at some level, everything from astrophysical-scale granular systems such as interstellar nebulae, protoplanetary dust and debris disks, planetary-scale systems such as debris palls from meteorite impact, volcanic eruptions, and aeolian dust storms, all the way to industrial-scale systems in mining, powder and grain processing, pharmaceuticals, and smoke-stack technologies. NASA must concern itself with the electrostatic behavior of dust and sand on Mars because of its potentially critical importance to human exploration. The motion and adhesion of martian surface materials will affect the design and performance of spacesuits, habitats, processing plants, solar panels, and any externally exposed equipment such as surface rovers or communication and weather stations. Additionally, the adhesion of dust and sand could greatly enhance contact with the potentially toxic components of the martian soil.

  12. Frosted granular flow: A new hypothesis for mass wasting in martian gullies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenholtz, Chris H.

    2008-09-01

    Recent gully deposits on Mars have been attributed to both wet and dry mass wasting processes. In this paper frosted granular flow (FGF) is presented as a new hypothesis for recent mass wasting activity in martian gullies. FGF is a rare type of granular flow observed on a talus slope in the Province of Québec, Canada [Hétu, B., van Steijn, H., Vandelac, P., 1994. Géogr. Phys. Quat. 48, 3-22]. Frost reduces dynamic inter-particle friction, enabling flows to mobilize onto relatively low slope gradients (25-30°) compared to those involving dry granular flow of the same material (35-41°). Resulting erosional and depositional features include straight to sinuous channels, levees and digitate to branching arrangements of terminal deposits. Similar features are commonly found in association with geologically-young gully systems on Mars. Based on terrestrial observations of FGF processes the minimum criteria required for their occurrence on Mars include: (i) readily mobilized, unconsolidated sediment at the surface; (ii) an upper slope gradient at or near the angle of repose; (iii) frost accumulation at the surface; and (iv) triggering by rock fall. All four conditions appear to be met in many areas on present-day Mars though triggering mechanisms may vary. Compared to terrestrial FGFs, which are lubricated by thin liquid films at inter-particle contacts, those occurring on Mars are more likely lubricated by vaporization of CO 2 and small amounts of H 2O frost that becomes incorporated in the translating mass. Some recent mass wasting activity in martian gullies, therefore, could be interpreted as the product of FGF.

  13. Electrostatics of Granular Material (EGM): Space Station Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J.; Sauke, T.; Farrell, W.

    2000-01-01

    Aggregates were observed to form very suddenly in a lab-contained dust cloud, transforming (within seconds) an opaque monodispersed cloud into a clear volume containing rapidly-settling, long hair-like aggregates. The implications of such a "phase change" led to a series of experiments progressing from the lab, to KC-135, followed by micro-g flights on USML-1 and USML-2, and now EGM slated for Space Station. We attribute the sudden "collapse" of a cloud to the effect of dipoles. This has significant ramifications for all types of cloud systems, and additionally implicates dipoles in the processes of cohesion and adhesion of granular matter. Notably, there is the inference that like-charged grains need not necessarily repel if they are close enough together: attraction or repulsion depends on intergranular distance (the dipole being more powerful at short range), and the D/M ratio for each grain, where D is the dipole moment and M is the net charge. We discovered that these ideas about dipoles, the likely pervasiveness of them in granular material, the significance of the D/M ratio, and the idea of mixed charges on individual grains resulting from tribological processes --are not universally recognized in electrostatics, granular material studies, and aerosol science, despite some early seminal work in the literature, and despite commercial applications of dipoles in such modern uses as "Krazy Glue", housecleaning dust cloths, and photocopying. The overarching goal of EGM is to empirically prove that (triboelectrically) charged dielectric grains of material have dipole moments that provide an "always attractive" intergranular force as a result of both positive and negative charges residing on the surfaces of individual grains. Microgravity is required for this experiment because sand grains can be suspended as a cloud for protracted periods, the grains are free to rotate to express their electrostatic character, and Coulombic forces are unmasked. Suspended grains will be "interrogated" by applied electrical fields. In one module, grains will be immersed in an inhomogeneous electric field and allowed to be attracted towards or repelled from the central electrode of the module: part of the grain's speed will be a function of its net charge (monopole), part will be a function of the dipole. Observed grain position vs. time will provide a curve that can be deconvolved into the dipole and monopole forces responsible, since both have distinctive radial dependencies. In a second approach, the inhomogeneous field will be alternated at low frequency (e.g., every 5-10 seconds) so that the grains are alternately attracted and repelled from the center of the field. The resulting "zigzag" grain motion will gradually drift inwards, then suddenly change to a unidirectional inward path when a critical radial distance is encountered (a sort of "Coulombic event horizon") at which the dipole strength supersedes the monopole strength --thus proving the presence of a dipole, while also quantifying the D/M ratio. In a second module, an homogeneous electric field eliminates dipole effects (both Coulombic and induced) to provide calibration of the monopole and to more readily evaluate net charge statistical variance. In both modules, the e-fields will be exponentially step-ramped in voltage during the experiment, so that the field "nominalizes" grain speed while spreading the response time --effectively forcing each grain to "wait its turn" to be measured. In addition to rigorously quantifying M, D, and the D/M ratio for many hundreds of grains, the experiment will also observe gross electrometric and RF discharge phenomena associated with grain activity. The parameter space will encompass grain charging levels (via intentional triboelectrification), grain size, cloud density, and material type. Results will prove or disprove the dipole hypothesis. In either case, light will be shed on the role of electrostatic forces in governing granular systems. Knowledg

  14. Collective phenomena in granular and atmospheric electrification

    E-print Network

    Nordsiek, Freja

    2015-01-01

    In clouds of suspended particles (grains, droplets, spheres, crystals, etc.), collisions electrify the particles and the clouds producing large electric potential differences over large scales. This is seen most spectacularly in the atmosphere as lighting in thunderstorms, thundersnow, dust storms, and volcanic ash plumes where multi-million-volt potential differences over scales of kilometers can be produced, but it is a general phenomena in granular systems as a whole. The electrification process is not well understood, especially for electrification of insulating particles of the same material. To investigate the relative importances of particle properties (material, size, etc.) and collective phenomena (behaviors of systems at large scales not easily predicted from local dynamics) in granular and atmospheric electrification, we used a table-top experiment that mechanically shakes particles inside a cell where we measure the macroscopic electric field between the electrically conducting end plates. The mea...

  15. Maximizing energy transfer in vibrofluidized granular systems.

    PubMed

    Windows-Yule, C R K; Rosato, A D; Parker, D J; Thornton, A R

    2015-05-01

    Using discrete particle simulations validated by experimental data acquired using the positron emission particle tracking technique, we study the efficiency of energy transfer from a vibrating wall to a system of discrete, macroscopic particles. We demonstrate that even for a fixed input energy from the wall, energy conveyed to the granular system under excitation may vary significantly dependent on the frequency and amplitude of the driving oscillations. We investigate the manner in which the efficiency with which energy is transferred to the system depends on the system variables and determine the key control parameters governing the optimization of this energy transfer. A mechanism capable of explaining our results is proposed, and the implications of our findings in the research field of granular dynamics as well as their possible utilization in industrial applications are discussed. PMID:26066169

  16. Modeling force transmission in granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radjai, Farhang

    2015-01-01

    The probability density function of contact forces in granular materials has been extensively studied and modeled as an outstanding signature of granular microstructure. Arguing that particle environments play a fundamental role in force transmission, we analyze the effects of steric constraints with respect to force balance condition and show that each force may be considered as resulting from a balance between lower and larger forces in proportions that mainly depend on steric effects. This idea leads to a general model that predicts an analytical expression of force density with a single free parameter. This expression fits well our simulation data and generically predicts the exponential fall-off of strong forces, a small peak below the mean force and the non-zero probability of vanishingly small forces.

  17. Writing in the granular gel medium

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Tapomoy; Zehnder, Steven M.; Rowe, Kyle G.; Jain, Suhani; Nixon, Ryan M.; Sawyer, W. Gregory; Angelini, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Gels made from soft microscale particles smoothly transition between the fluid and solid states, making them an ideal medium in which to create macroscopic structures with microscopic precision. While tracing out spatial paths with an injection tip, the granular gel fluidizes at the point of injection and then rapidly solidifies, trapping injected material in place. This physical approach to creating three-dimensional (3D) structures negates the effects of surface tension, gravity, and particle diffusion, allowing a limitless breadth of materials to be written. With this method, we used silicones, hydrogels, colloids, and living cells to create complex large aspect ratio 3D objects, thin closed shells, and hierarchically branched tubular networks. We crosslinked polymeric materials and removed them from the granular gel, whereas uncrosslinked particulate systems were left supported within the medium for long times. This approach can be immediately used in diverse areas, contributing to tissue engineering, flexible electronics, particle engineering, smart materials, and encapsulation technologies. PMID:26601274

  18. Electrostatic granular bed filter development program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-12-01

    An electrostatic granular bed (EGB) filtration for pressurized fluidized bed combined cycle application was developed. Experiments provide the data necessary to design a hot test model and to perform systems integration and economic evaluation studies. Based on the laboratory results, preliminary engineering estimates of the capital and operating costs are provided for the selected approach. In parallel with the electrostatic granular bed filter testing, laboratory scale experiments and engineering assessments are performed for two concepts for removing corrosive alkali metal vapor from the combustion gases. An instrumentation plan was developed for the AFB model filter test. A filter as delivered and installed in the AFB facility, and testing began with molochite, limestone, sandy gravel, and coal. During attempted 100-hr tests, dust loadings of baghouses downstream of the EGB filter were measured.

  19. New boundary conditions for granular fluids

    E-print Network

    Mark D. Shattuck

    2007-03-22

    We present experimental evidence, which contradicts the the standard boundary conditions used in continuum theories of non-cohesive granular flows for the velocity normal to a boundary u.n=0, where n points into the fluid. We propose and experimentally verify a new boundary condition for u.n, based on the observation that the boundary cannot exert a tension force Fb on the fluid. The new boundary condition is u.n=0 if Fb.n>=0 else n.P.n=0, where P is the pressure tensor. This is the analog of cavitation in ordinary fluids, but due the lack of attractive forces and dissipation it occurs frequently in granular flows.

  20. Surface waves in granular phononic crystals

    E-print Network

    Pichard, Helene; Groby, Jean-Philippe; Tournat, Vincent; Zheng, Li-Yang; Gusev, Vitali

    2015-01-01

    The existence of surface elastic waves at a mechanically free surface of granular phononic crystals is studied. The granular phononic crystals are made of spherical particles distributed periodically on a simple cubic lattice. It is assumed that the particles are interacting by means of normal, shear and bending contact rigidities. First, Rayleigh-type surface acoustic waves, where the displacement of the particles takes place in the sagittal plane while the particles possess one rotational and two translational degrees of freedom, are analyzed. Second, shear-horizontal-type waves, where the displacement of the particles is normal to the sagittal plane while the particles possess one translational and two rotational degrees of freedom are studied. The existence of zero-group velocity surface acoustic waves of Rayleigh-type is theoretically predicted and interpreted. A comparison with surface waves predicted by the Cosserat theory is performed, and its limitations are established.

  1. Erosion and flow of hydrophobic granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utter, Brian; Benns, Thomas; Foltz, Benjamin; Mahler, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    We experimentally investigate submerged granular flows of hydrophobic and hydrophilic grains both in a rotating drum geometry and under erosion by a surface water flow. While slurry and suspension flows are common in nature and industry, effects of surface chemistry on flow behavior have received relatively little attention. In the rotating drum, we use varying concentrations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic grains of sand submerged in water rotated at a constant angular velocity. Sequential images of the resulting avalanches are taken and analyzed. High concentrations of hydrophobic grains result in an effectively cohesive interaction between the grains forming aggregates, with aggregate size and repose angle increasing with hydrophobic concentration. However, the formation and nature of the aggregates depends significantly on the presence of air in the system. We present results from a related experiment on erosion by a surface water flow designed to characterize the effects of heterogeneous granular surfaces on channelization and erosion.

  2. Erosion and flow of hydrophobic granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utter, Brian; Benns, Thomas; Mahler, Joseph

    2013-11-01

    We experimentally investigate submerged granular flows of hydrophobic and hydrophilic grains both in a rotating drum geometry and under erosion by a surface water flow. While slurry and suspension flows are common in nature and industry, effects of surface chemistry on flow behavior have received relatively little attention. In the rotating drum , we use varying concentrations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic grains of sand submerged in water rotated at a constant angular velocity. Sequential images of the resulting avalanches are taken and analyzed. High concentrations of hydrophobic grains result in an effectively cohesive interaction between the grains forming aggregates, with aggregate size and repose angle increasing with hydrophobic concentration. However, the formation and nature of the aggregates depends significantly on the presence of air in the system. We present results from a related experiment on erosion by a surface water flow designed to characterize the effects of heterogeneous granular surfaces on channelization and erosion. Supported by NSF CBET Award 1067598.

  3. Plant Root Growth In Granular Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendell, Dawn; Hosoi, Peko

    2010-03-01

    Roots grow in a variety of granular substrates. However, the substrates are often treated in ways which minimize or neglect the inhomogeneities arising from the influence of inter-particle forces. Experiments are often run using gels or average stress measurements. This presentation discusses the effect of the local structure of the particulate environment on the root's direction. Using photoelastic particles and particles with a variety of Young's Moduli, we investigate the influence of inter-particle forces and particle stiffness on a pinto bean root's ability to grow through a fully-saturated granular medium. The level of particle contact force through which the roots successfully grow is determined and the influence of particle stiffness on root direction is investigated.

  4. Eddy Viscosity in Dense Granular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, T.; Rognon, P.; Metzger, B.; Einav, I.

    2013-08-01

    We present a seminal set of experiments on dense granular flows in the stadium shear geometry. The advantage of this geometry is that it produces steady shear flow over large deformations, in which the shear stress is constant. The striking result is that the velocity profiles exhibit an S shape, and are not linear as local constitutive laws would predict. We propose a model that suggests this is a result of wall perturbations which span through the system due to the nonlocal behavior of the material. The model is analogous to that of eddy viscosity in turbulent boundary layers, in which the distance to the wall is introduced to predict velocity profiles. Our findings appear pivotal in a number of experimental and practical situations involving dense granular flows next to a boundary. They could further be adapted to other similar materials such as dense suspensions, foams, or emulsions.

  5. Structural evolution of granular systems: Theory

    E-print Network

    Raphael Blumenfeld

    2015-05-01

    A first-principles theory is developed for the general evolution of a key structural characteristic of planar granular systems - the cell order distribution. The dynamic equations are constructed and solved in closed form for a number of examples: dense systems undergoing progressive compaction; initial dilation of very dense systems; and the approach to steady state of general systems. It is shown that the convergence to steady state is exponential, except when contacts are only broken and no new contacts are made, in which case the approach is algebraic in time. Where no closed form solutions are possible, illustrative numerical solutions of the evolution are shown. These show that the dynamics are sensitive to the cell event rates, which are process dependent. The formalism can be extended to other structural characteristics, paving the way to a general theory of structural organisation of granular systems, parameterised by the contact event rates.

  6. Capillary movement of liquid in granular beds

    SciTech Connect

    Yendler, B.; Webbon, B.

    1993-12-31

    Knowledge of capillary migration of liquids in granular beds in microgravity is essential for the development of a substrate based nutrient delivery sytem for the growth of plants in space. This problem is also interesting from the theoretical as well as the practical point of view. The purpose of this study was to model capillary water propagation through a granular bed in microgravity. In our ground experiments, water propagation is driven primarily by capillary force. Data for spherical partical sizes in the range from 0.46 to 2 mm have been obtained. It was shown that the velocity of water propagation is very sensitive to particle size. Theoretical consideration is also provided. Actual space flight experiments are planned for the future to confirm our results.

  7. Compaction of granular material inside confined geometries

    E-print Network

    Benjy Marks; Bjørnar Sandnes; Guillaume Dumazer; Jon Alm Eriksen; Knut Jørgen Måløy

    2015-05-15

    In both nature and engineering, loosely packed granular materials are often compacted inside confined geometries. Here, we explore such behaviour in a quasi-two dimensional geometry, where parallel rigid walls provide the confinement. We use the discrete element method to investigate the stress distribution developed within the granular packing as a result of compaction due to the displacement of a rigid piston. We observe that the stress within the packing increases exponentially with the length of accumulated grains, and show an extension to current analytic models which fits the measured stress. The micromechanical behaviour is studied for a range of system parameters, and the limitations of existing analytic models are described. In particular, we show the smallest sized systems which can be treated using existing models. Additionally, the effects of increasing piston rate, and variations of the initial packing fraction, are described.

  8. Heat flux in a granular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brey, J. J.; Ruiz-Montero, M. J.

    2012-11-01

    A peculiarity of the hydrodynamic Navier-Stokes equations for a granular gas is the modification of the Fourier law, with the presence of an additional contribution to the heat flux that is proportional to the density gradient. Consequently, the constitutive relation involves, in the case of a one-component granular gas, two transport coefficients: the usual (thermal) heat conductivity and a diffusive heat conductivity. A very simple physical interpretation of this effect, in terms of the mean free path and the mean free time is provided. It leads to the modified Fourier law with an expression for the diffusive Fourier coefficient that differs in a factor of the order of unity from the expression obtained by means of the inelastic Boltzmann equation. Also, some aspects of the Chapman-Enskog computation of the new transport coefficients as well as of the comparison between simulation results and theory are discussed.

  9. Regeneration of granular activated carbon containing benzene with natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, D.E.; Veenstra, J.N.; Johannes, A.H.; Gasem, K.A.M.

    1996-11-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) is the most frequently used adsorbent in industrial applications due to its surface properties, large surface area, low pressure drop and relatively low cost. Regeneration of GAC beds can be accomplished using different techniques. Some of the more commonly used methods are: thermal regeneration; steam generation; supercritical fluid extraction (e.g., liquid CO{sub 2}); wet oxidation; and solvent extraction. Many of these techniques are not feasible options for on-site regeneration of GAC due to high capital or operating costs or potential disposal problems. In an attempt to simplify the regeneration process and to minimize additional waste streams, use of natural gas as the regeneration fluid is being evaluated at Oklahoma State University. Previous work has shown GAC to absorb natural gas to a limited extent as compared to other gases, to absorb less onto GAC at higher temperatures, and, to absorb less onto GAC at lower pressures. The low reactivity of natural gas, under certain conditions, is an indicator of its potential to be an effective regeneration agent. This paper presents preliminary results on the use of natural gas to regenerate GAC columns. To demonstrate the viability of this regeneration strategy, benzene has been selected as the adsorbate. Benzene is a common pollutant in many industries and is regulated under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. As such, it represents a sizable class of environmental pollutants. Air was chosen as the carrier for the benzene to simplify the experimental system and to allow determination of the effects of small amounts of water on the bed during the regeneration process.

  10. Process Performance of Secondary Effluent Granular Media Filtration with and without Preozonation.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Rion; De Las Casas, Carla; Henneman, Seppi; Witzgall, Robert; Yu, William; Ramberg, Steve; Parker, Denny; Ohlinger, Kurt

    2015-07-01

    A 10-month pilot study compared the performance of conventional granular media filtration (CGMF) with granular media filtration with preozonation (OGMF) to determine the effects of preozonation on filter performance. Filtration recoveries were lower for OGMF compared to CMGF when operated at a loading rate of 18.3 m/h. Operation at 18.3 m/h met turbidity requirements for California Department of Public Health Title 22 unrestricted reclaimed water requirements for both OGMF and CGMF. Preozonated secondary effluent at a transferred dose of 3 mg/L resulted in an increase in ultraviolet transmissivity (UVT) of approximately 6% and greater than 5-log inactivation of male-specific bacteriophage MS2. Wet weather flow events resulted in UVT decrease and a decline in MS2 inactivation to less than 3 log attributed to higher ozone demand in the secondary effluent. Preozonation increased N-nitrosodimethlyamine (NDMA) concentration approximately 10 times, but subsequent filtration reduced levels to secondary effluent values. A net increase in NDMA was observed at times. PMID:26163495

  11. Refraction of shear zones in granular materials

    E-print Network

    Tamas Unger

    2007-01-08

    We study strain localization in slow shear flow focusing on layered granular materials. A heretofore unknown effect is presented here. We show that shear zones are refracted at material interfaces in analogy with refraction of light beams in optics. This phenomenon can be obtained as a consequence of a recent variational model of shear zones. The predictions of the model are tested and confirmed by 3D discrete element simulations. We found that shear zones follow Snell's law of light refraction.

  12. Congenital Granular Cell Tumor – A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Yuwanati, Monal; Mhaske, Shubhangi; Mhaske, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Congenital granular cell tumor is a rare benign neoplastic growth affecting the gingival mucosa of neonates. Prenatal ultrasound diagnosis has recently come to focus and in spite of several reports on immune-histochemical and other advanced marker studies, the cause and origin of the lesion remains debatable till date. Review of literature on prenatal diagnosis and histopathology along with immunohistochemistry is discussed. PMID:26034711

  13. Continuous Wire Reinforcement for Jammed Granular Architecture

    E-print Network

    Fauconneau, Matthias; Herrmann, Hans J

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of continuous fiber reinforced granular columns is simulated by means of a Discrete Element Model. Spherical particles are randomly deposited simultaneously with a wire, that is deployed following different patterns inside of a flexible cylinder for triaxial compression testing. We quantify the effect of three different fiber deployment patterns on the failure envelope, represented by Mohr-Coulomb cones, and derive suggestions for improved deployment strategies.

  14. The Wet-Dog Shake

    E-print Network

    Dickerson, Andrew; Bauman, Jay; Chang, Young-Hui; Hu, David

    2010-01-01

    The drying of wet fur is a critical to mammalian heat regulation. In this fluid dynamics video, we show a sequence of films demonstrating how hirsute animals to rapidly oscillate their bodies to shed water droplets, nature's analogy to the spin cycle of a washing machine. High-speed videography and fur-particle tracking is employed to determine the angular position of the animal's shoulder skin as a function of time. X-ray cinematography is used to track the motion of the skeleton. We determine conditions for drop ejection by considering the balance of surface tension and centripetal forces on drops adhering to the animal. Particular attention is paid to rationalizing the relationship between animal size and oscillation frequency required to self-dry.

  15. Pegaptanib for wet macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Fraunfelder, Frederick W

    2005-11-01

    Pegaptanib sodium injection (Macugen, Eyetech Pharmaceuticals, Pfizer, New York, NY, USA) is a relatively new medication intended to treat the so-called wet (neovascular ) form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This form of AMD is characterized by the growth of unwanted new blood vessels into the macula (angiogenesis). The aqueous solution containing pegaptanib is injected into the vitreous of the eye, where it binds to the 165 amino acid isoform of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a secreted protein that is thought to play a major role in the pathologic angiogenesis that occurs in wet AMD. Neovascular AMD is the leading cause of severe vision loss in people over age 60 in the United States and other industrialized countries (1). Pegaptanib acts as a selective VEGF antagonist through its molecular structure as an aptamer, a pegylated modified oligonucleotide that adopts a three-dimensional configuration, enabling it to bind to extracellular VEGF (Fig. 1). Aptamers are macromolecules composed of chemically synthesized single-stranded nucleic acids (either RNA or DNA) that bind with a high degree of selectivity and affinity when exposed to target proteins. Pegaptanib binds VEGF165, and bound VEGF165 is not able to bind to the VEGF receptor, thereby negating its ability to cause angiogenesis and vascular permeability. Other aptamers exist, as do other forms of treatment for AMD. To date, however, no treatment for AMD has allowed for better vision after treatment, with most surgical treatments leading to almost immediate loss of some vision in the expectation of preventing more severe loss. Research in the field of macular degeneration is advancing rapidly, and treatment with an aptamer such as pegaptanib is a viable option despite the possibility of adverse events. PMID:16395411

  16. A granular computing approach to gene selection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lin; Xu, Jiucheng

    2014-01-01

    Gene selection is a key step in performing cancer classification with DNA microarrays. The challenges from high dimension and small sample size of microarray dataset still exist. On rough set theory applied to gene selection, many algorithms have been presented, but most are time-consuming. In this paper, a granular computing-based gene selection as a new method is proposed. First, some granular computing-based concepts are introduced and then some of their important properties are derived. The relationship between positive region-based reduct and granular space-based reduct is discussed. Then, a significance measure of feature is proposed to improve the efficiency and decrease the complexity of classical algorithm. By using Hashtable and input sequence techniques, a fast heuristic algorithm is constructed for the better computational efficiency of gene selection for cancer classification. Extensive experiments are conducted on five public gene expression data sets and seven data sets from UCI respectively. The experimental results confirm the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:24212026

  17. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Test Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A test cell for Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is shown approximately 20 and 60 minutes after the start of an experiment on STS-89. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  18. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Flight Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A test cell for the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is shown in its on-orbit configuration in Spacehab during preparations for STS-89. The twin locker to the left contains the hydraulic system to operate the experiment. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Note: Because the image on the screen was muted in the original image, its brightness and contrast are boosted in this rendering to make the test cell more visible. Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  19. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Test Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A test cell for Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is tested for long-term storage with water in the system as plarned for STS-107. This view shows the top of the sand column with the metal platten removed. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder

  20. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Test Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A test cell for Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is tested for long-term storage with water in the system as plarned for STS-107. This view shows the compressed sand column with the protective water jacket removed. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder

  1. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    One of three Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) test cells after flight on STS-79 and before impregnation with resin. Note that the sand column has bulged in the middle, and that the top of the column is several inches lower than the top of the plastic enclosure. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder

  2. Mechanics of Granular Materials Test Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A test cell for Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is shown from all three sides by its video camera during STS-89. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  3. Electrical charging in shaken granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordsiek, Freja; Lathrop, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    Collisional electrification of granular particles and the resulting electric fields are seen but poorly understood in sand storms, volcanic ash clouds, thunderstorms, and thundersnow. We present results on the electrical charging of granular media (100 micron to 1 mm in size) shaken between two conducting plates. The voltage between the plates was measured. We saw particle electrification through capacitive coupling with the plates and electrical discharges for a diverse class of materials: polystyrene (polymer), soda-lime glass (glass), 69%:31% ZrO2:SiO2 (ceramic), and aluminum (metal). We found 1) a monotonic increase in charging with shaking strength, 2) a threshold in the number of particles to see charging of about the number of particles needed to form a monolayer on the plate, 3) material and diameter differences causing an order of magnitude spread in measured signal but little difference between mono-material sets with one size range and bi-material and/or bi-size range set combinations, and 4) long time scale transients. We argue that while two-body collisions and the physical properties of the particles (material and size) are relevant, collective phenomena are a necessary part of explaining natural charging of granular flows. We gratefully acknowledge funding from the Julien Schwinger Foundation.

  4. Vibratory Shock Compaction of Granular Nuclear Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amme, Robert C.

    2004-05-01

    Vibratory Shock Compaction (VSC) is a proven means for quickly forming strong, durable solids from a wide variety of granular materials[1]. Calcination of tank and other forms of high level radioactive wastes results in fine granular material that is quite amenable to volume reduction and stabilization. We have employed utilities coal ash as a calcine waste surrogate, blended with a quartz/feldspar-rich sand and 0-20% proportions of a borosilicate glass. The blends were compacted at room temperature and fired so that the glass melt could form an efficient binder. Included in the blend are small quantities of three RCRA metals, chromium, cadmium and lead, to permit testing for heavy metal stability. The VSC process is described and the results presented in terms of the waste form dissolution rates, compressive strengths, elastic moduli as determined from resonant frequency measurements, and heavy metal leach rates from Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure measurements. Vibratory shock compaction employing glass binders appears to be a viable alternative to traditional vitrification processes for granular waste forms. [1] See http://www.resonantshockcompact.com

  5. Mechanics of Granular Materials-3 (MGM-3)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sture, Stein; Alshibi, Khalid; Guynes, Buddy (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Scientists are going to space to understand how earthquakes and other forces disturb grains of soil and sand. They will examine how the particle arrangement and structure of soils, grains and powders are changed by external forces and gain knowledge about the strength, stiffness and volume changes properties of granular materials at low pressures. The Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment uses the microgravity of orbit to test sand columns under conditions that cannot be obtained in experiments on Earth. Research can only go so far on Earth because gravity-induced stresses complicate the analysis and change loads too quickly for detailed analysis. This new knowledge will be applied to improving foundations for buildings, managing undeveloped land, and handling powdered and granular materials in chemical, agricultural, and other industries. NASA wants to understand the way soil behaves under different gravity levels so that crews can safely build habitats on Mars and the Moon. Future MGM experiments will benefit from extended tests aboard the International Space Station, including experiments under simulated lunar and Martian gravity in the science centrifuge.

  6. The Sakharov Experiment Revisited for Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogler, Tracy

    2013-06-01

    Sakharov and co-workers in 1965 proposed an experiment in which a sinusoidal perturbation in a planar wave evolves as it travels through a material. More recent, Liu and co-workers utilized gas gun techniques rather than explosives to drive the shock wave, resulting in a better defined input. The technique has been applied to liquids such as water and mercury as well as solids such as aluminum. All analyses of the experiments conducted to date have utilized a viscous fluid approach, even for the solids. Here, the concept of the decay of a perturbation in a shock wave is revisited and applied to granular materials. Simulations utilizing continuum models for the granular materials as well as mesoscale models in which individual particles are resolved are utilized. It is found that the perturbation decay is influenced by the strength (deviatoric behavior) used in the continuum model. In the mesocale calculations, the simulation parameters as well as the computational approach influence the results. Finally, initial experimental results for the technique using granular tungsten carbide are presented. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Nonlinear elasto-plastic model for dense granular flow

    E-print Network

    Ken Kamrin

    2009-05-07

    This work proposes a model for granular deformation that predicts the stress and velocity profiles in well-developed dense granular flows. Recent models for granular elasticity (Jiang and Liu 2003) and rate-sensitive plastic flow (Jop et al. 2006) are reformulated and combined into one universal granular continuum law, capable of predicting flowing regions and stagnant zones simultaneously in any arbitrary 3D flow geometry. The unification is performed by justifying and implementing a Kroner-Lee elasto-plastic decomposition, with care taken to ensure certain continuum physical principles are necessarily upheld. The model is then numerically implemented in multiple geometries and results are compared to experiments and discrete simulations.

  8. Microgravity Experiments to Evaluate Electrostatic Forces in Controlling Cohesion and Adhesion of Granular Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J.; Weislogel, M.; Jacobson, T.

    1999-01-01

    The bulk behavior of dispersed, fluidized, or undispersed stationary granular systems cannot be fully understood in terms of adhesive/cohesive properties without understanding the role of electrostatic forces acting at the level of the grains themselves. When grains adhere to a surface, or come in contact with one another in a stationary bulk mass, it is difficult to measure the forces acting on the grains, and the forces themselves that induced the cohesion and adhesion are changed. Even if a single grain were to be scrutinized in the laboratory, it might be difficult, perhaps impossible, to define the distribution and character of surface charging and the three-dimensional relationship that charges (electrons, holes) have to one another. The hypothesis that we propose to test in microgravity (for dielectric materials) is that adhesion and cohesion of granular matter are mediated primarily by dipole forces that do not require the presence of a net charge; in fact, nominally electrically neutral materials should express adhesive and cohesive behavior when the neutrality results from a balance of positive and negative charge carriers. Moreover, the use of net charge alone as a measure of the electrical nature of grain-to-grain relationships within a granular mass may be misleading. We believe that the dipole forces arise from the presence of randomly-distributed positive and negative fixed charge carriers on grains that give rise to a resultant dipole moment. These dipole forces have long-range attraction. Random charges are created whenever there is triboelectrical activity of a granular mass, that is, whenever the grains experience contact/separation sequences or friction.

  9. Walking on water: why your feet get wet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelley, Michael; Fontana, Jake; Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    2009-03-01

    Walking on wet pavement during or after heavy rain results in wet shoes, and often, wet feet. We describe a peculiar transport process associated with walking on wet surfaces which results in the vamps, and frequently, the insides, of shoes getting wet. We discuss details of this process and compare experimental results with simple model predictions. Strategies for keeping feet dry will be considered.

  10. Wet runways. [aircraft landing and directional control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. B.

    1975-01-01

    Aircraft stopping and directional control performance on wet runways is discussed. The major elements affecting tire/ground traction developed by jet transport aircraft are identified and described in terms of atmospheric, pavement, tire, aircraft system and pilot performance factors or parameters. Research results are summarized, and means for improving or restoring tire traction/aircraft performance on wet runways are discussed.

  11. Simulation of granular jets: is granular flow really a perfect fluid?

    PubMed

    Sano, Tomohiko G; Hayakawa, Hisao

    2012-10-01

    We perform three-dimensional simulations of the impact of a granular jet for both frictional and frictionless grains. Small shear stress observed in the experiment [X. Cheng et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 188001 (2007)] is reproduced through our simulation. However, the fluid state after the impact is far from a perfect fluid, and thus the similarity between granular jets and quark gluon plasma is superficial because the observed viscosity is finite and its value is consistent with the prediction of the kinetic theory. PMID:23214581

  12. Mutiscale Modeling of Segregation in Granular Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Sun

    2007-08-03

    Modeling and simulation of segregation phenomena in granular flows are investigated. Computational models at different scales ranging from particle level (microscale) to continuum level (macroscale) are employed in order to determine the important microscale physics relevant to macroscale modeling. The capability of a multi-fluid model to capture segregation caused by density difference is demonstrated by simulating grain-chaff biomass flows in a laboratory-scale air column and in a combine harvester. The multi-fluid model treats gas and solid phases as interpenetrating continua in an Eulerian frame. This model is further improved by incorporating particle rotation using kinetic theory for rapid granular flow of slightly frictional spheres. A simplified model is implemented without changing the current kinetic theory framework by introducing an effective coefficient of restitution to account for additional energy dissipation due to frictional collisions. The accuracy of predicting segregation rate in a gas-fluidized bed is improved by the implementation. This result indicates that particle rotation is important microscopic physics to be incorporated into the hydrodynamic model. Segregation of a large particle in a dense granular bed of small particles under vertical. vibration is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Wall friction is identified as a necessary condition for the segregation. Large-scale force networks bearing larger-than-average forces are found with the presence of wall friction. The role of force networks in assisting rising of the large particle is analyzed. Single-point force distribution and two-point spatial force correlation are computed. The results show the heterogeneity of forces and a short-range correlation. The short correlation length implies that even dense granular flows may admit local constitutive relations. A modified minimum spanning tree (MST) algorithm is developed to asymptotically recover the force statistics in the force networks. This algorithm provides a possible route to constructing a continuum model with microstructural information supplied from it. Microstructures in gas fluidized beds are also analyzed using a hybrid method, which couples the discrete element method (DEM) for particle dynamics with the averaged two-fluid (TF) equations for the gas phase. Multi-particle contacts are found in defluidized regions away from bubbles in fluidized beds. The multi-particle contacts invalidate the binary-collision assumption made in the kinetic theory of granular flows for the defluidized regions. Large ratios of contact forces to drag forces are found in the same regions, which confirms the relative importance of contact forces in determining particle dynamics in the defluidized regions.

  13. EFFECT OF UV IRRADIATION ON ORGANIC MATTER EXTRACTED FROM TREATED OHIO RIVER WATER STUDIED THROUGH THE USE OF ELECTROSPRAY MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ohio River water was treated by settling, sand filtration, and granular activated carbon filtration. It was then irradiated by low pressure (monochromatic) and medium pressure (polychromatic) UV lamps to investigate the effects of UV irradiation of natural organic matter (NOM). ...

  14. Elastic weakening of a dense granular medium by acoustic fluidization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xiaoping; Laurent, Jerome; Wildenberg, Siet; van Hecke, Martin

    2012-02-01

    Elastic waves propagating through a dense granular pack provide a unique probe of the elastic properties and internal dissipation of the medium [1], and also allow investigating the irreversible rearrangement of the contact network at large vibration amplitude. In this talk, we describe two distinct types of nonlinearity, i.e. hertzian and frictional, at the grain contact by sound amplitude and velocity measurements, respectively, under different confining pressure [2]. Beyond certain wave amplitude, the sound-matter interaction becomes irreversible, leaving the medium in a weakened and slightly compacted state. A slow recovery of the initial elastic modulus is observed after acoustic perturbation, revealing the plastic creep growth of microcontacts. The cross-correlation function of configuration-specific acoustic speckles highlights the relationship between the macroscopic elastic weakening and the local change of the contact networks, induced by strong sound vibration, in the absence of appreciable grain motion. We show that the softening of elastic modulus is much more pronounced with the shear wave (up to 20%) than with the compressional wave (to 10%). [4pt] [1] Th. Brunet, X. Jia and P. Mills, Phys. Rev. Lett 101, 138001 (2008) [0pt] [2] Th. Brunet, X. Jia and P. Johnson, Geophys. Res. Lett 35, L19308 (2008); X. Jia, Th. Brunet and J. Laurent, Phys. Rev. E 00, 000300(R) (2011)

  15. Are granular osmiophilic material deposits an epiphenomenon in CADASIL?

    PubMed

    Erro, Roberto; Moccia, Marcello; Cervasio, Mariarosaria; Penco, Silvana; De Caro, Marialaura Del Basso; Barone, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is caused by mutations in the NOTCH3 gene. Pathophysiologically, there seems to be multimerization of the extracellular domain of the protein with a possible gain of function on vascular smooth muscular cells. However, the mechanisms and determinants of NOTCH3 multimerization are not completely understood, and it is not completely elucidated whether NOTCH3 multimerization contributes to the appearance of granular osmiophilic material (GOM) deposits, which are the pathological hallmark of CADASIL. We recently reported a patient with parkinsonism and cognitive impairment and with evidence of diffuse white matter changes on imaging, carrying a NOTCH3 nonsense mutation in exon 3 (c.307C>T), and suggested that such a hypomorphic NOTCH3 mutation was likely to be pathogenic. We further pursued ultrastructural examination of skin vessels in our case, and here we report the results, wishing to make a comment on whether GOM deposits should be considered the pathological hallmark for a definitive diagnosis of CADASIL in those patients whose mutations are predicted in the production of hypomorphic protein products. PMID:26216120

  16. Order of wetting transitions in electrolyte solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Ibagon, Ingrid Bier, Markus Dietrich, S.

    2014-05-07

    For wetting films in dilute electrolyte solutions close to charged walls we present analytic expressions for their effective interface potentials. The analysis of these expressions renders the conditions under which corresponding wetting transitions can be first- or second-order. Within mean field theory we consider two models, one with short- and one with long-ranged solvent-solvent and solvent-wall interactions. The analytic results reveal in a transparent way that wetting transitions in electrolyte solutions, which occur far away from their critical point (i.e., the bulk correlation length is less than half of the Debye length) are always first-order if the solvent-solvent and solvent-wall interactions are short-ranged. In contrast, wetting transitions close to the bulk critical point of the solvent (i.e., the bulk correlation length is larger than the Debye length) exhibit the same wetting behavior as the pure, i.e., salt-free, solvent. If the salt-free solvent is governed by long-ranged solvent-solvent as well as long-ranged solvent-wall interactions and exhibits critical wetting, adding salt can cause the occurrence of an ion-induced first-order thin-thick transition which precedes the subsequent continuous wetting as for the salt-free solvent.

  17. Critical point wetting drop tower experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, William F.

    1990-01-01

    The 100 m Drop Tower at NASA-Marshall was used to provide the step change in acceleration from 1.0 to 0.0005 g. An inter-fluid meniscus oscillates vertically within a cylindrical container when suddenly released from earth's gravity and taken into a microgravity environment. Oscillations damp out from energy dissipative mechanisms such as viscosity and interfacial friction. Damping of the oscillations by the later mechanism is affected by the nature of the interfacial junction between the fluid-fluid interface and the container wall. In earlier stages of the project, the meniscus shape which developed during microgravity conditions was applied to evaluations of wetting phenomena near the critical temperature. Variations in equilibrium contact angle against the container wall were expected to occur under critical wetting conditions. However, it became apparent that the meaningful phenomenon was the damping of interfacial oscillations. This latter concept makes up the bulk of this report. Perfluoromethyl cyclohexane and isopropanol in glass were the materials used for the experiment. The wetting condition of the fluids against the wall changes at the critical wetting transition temperature. This change in wetting causes a change in the damping characteristics of the interfacial excursions during oscillation and no measurable change in contact angle. The effect of contact line friction measured above and below the wetting transition temperature was to increase the period of vertical oscillation for the vapor-liquid interface when below the wetting transition temperature.

  18. Forced wetting of a reactive surface.

    PubMed

    Blake, T D

    2012-11-01

    The dynamic wetting of water on gelatin-coated poly(ethylene terephthalate) (GC-PET) has been investigated by forced wetting over a wide speed range and compared with earlier data obtained with unmodified PET. The results were analysed according to the molecular-kinetic theory of dynamic wetting (MKT). Both substrates show complex behaviour, with separate low- and high-speed modes. For the GC-PET, this is attributed to a rapid change in the wettability of the substrate on contact with water, specifically a surface molecular transformation from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. This results in a smooth wetting transition from one mode to the other. For the PET, the bimodal behaviour is attributed to surface heterogeneity, with the low-speed dynamics dominated by interactions with polar sites on the substrate that become masked at higher speeds. In this case, the transition is discontinuous. The study has general ramifications for the investigation of any wetting processes in which a physicochemical transformation takes place at the solid surface on contact with the liquid. In particular, it shows how forced wetting, combined with the MKT, can reveal subtle details of the processes involved. It is unlikely that similar insight could be gained from spontaneous wetting studies, such as spreading drops. PMID:22809733

  19. Granular Avalanches in Fluids Sylvain Courrech du Pont,1

    E-print Network

    Weeks, Eric R.

    Granular Avalanches in Fluids Sylvain Courrech du Pont,1 Philippe Gondret,1 Bernard Perrin,2 2003) Three regimes of granular avalanches in fluids are put in light depending on the Stokes number St of avalanches do not depend on any fluid effect. In liquids (r 1), for decreasing St, the amplitude decreases

  20. Physical Properties of Various Materials Relevant to Granular Flow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because of the ubiquitous nature of granular materials, ranging from natural avalanches to industrial storage and processing operations, interest in quantifying and predicting the dynamics of granular flow continues to increase. The objective of this study was to investigate various physical proper...

  1. Spiral patterns in oscillated granular layers John R. de Bruyn*

    E-print Network

    Texas at Austin. University of

    ­Be â?? nard convection in fluids. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.63.041305 PACS number#s#: 45.70.Qj, 45.70.Mg, 47.54.#r cases strongly nonintuitive. A variety of interesting phenomena occurring in granular ma­ terials has been studied recently, including convective flows in granular layers, heaping instabilities, force

  2. Geological and mathematical framework for failure modes in granular rock

    E-print Network

    Borja, Ronaldo I.

    Geological and mathematical framework for failure modes in granular rock Atilla Aydina, *, Ronaldo processes in granular rock and provide a geological framework for the corresponding structures. We describe show that sharp structures overlap older narrow tabular structures in the same rock. This switch

  3. High-Frequency Resistivity of Soft Magnetic Granular Films

    E-print Network

    permeability, power loss, soft magnetic film. I. INTRODUCTION SOFT magnetic granular films are considered idealHigh-Frequency Resistivity of Soft Magnetic Granular Films Weidong Li Yuqin Sun C. R. Sullivan From TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS, VOL. 41, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2005 3283 High-Frequency Resistivity of Soft Magnetic

  4. USE OF GRANULAR GRAPHITE FOR ELECTROLYTIC DECHLORINATION OF TRICHLOROETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Granular graphite is a potential electrode material for the electrochemical remediation of refractory chlorinated organic compounds such as trichloroethylene (TCE). However, the use of granular graphite can complicate the experimental results. On one hand, up to 99% of TCE was re...

  5. 75 FR 67105 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy and Japan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-01

    ... granular polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Italy (53 FR 33163). Following first five-year reviews by... duty orders on imports of granular polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Italy and Japan (65 FR 6147... polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Italy and Japan (70 FR 76026). The ] Commission is now conducting third reviews...

  6. Network model of survival signaling in large granular lymphocyte leukemia

    E-print Network

    Albert, Réka

    Network model of survival signaling in large granular lymphocyte leukemia Ranran Zhang , Mithun granular lymphocyte (T-LGL) leukemia features a clonal expansion of antigen-primed, competent, cytotoxic-LGL leukemia, we constructed a T-LGL survival signaling network by integrating the signaling pathways involved

  7. BACKWASH OF GRANULAR FILTERS USED IN WASTEWATER FILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of deep granular filters in waste treatment is of growing importance. The key to long-term operating success of such filters is proper bed design and adequate bed cleaning during backwashing. Cleaning granular filters by water backwash alone to fluidize the filter bed is ...

  8. Beneath Our Feet: Strategies for Locomotion in Granular

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Daniel I.

    Beneath Our Feet: Strategies for Locomotion in Granular Media A.E. Hosoi1 and Daniel I. Goldman2 1 for many reasons, including feeding, anchoring, shelter, and protection. Similar to swimming and flying for fliers, and granular media for diggers. Relative to their swimming and flying counterparts, digging

  9. Interpreting Concept Learning in Cognitive Informatics and Granular Computing

    E-print Network

    Yao, Yiyu

    granularity. Concepts, as the basic units of thought underlying human intelligence and communication, may play in the abstract, in machines and in the brain, granular computing models such processing at multiple levels formation, structured thinking, structured problem solving, structured information processing I

  10. A climatology of leaf surface wetness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemm, O.; Milford, C.; Sutton, M. A.; Spindler, G.; van Putten, E.

    The wetness of plant leaf surfaces is an important parameter in the deposition process of atmospheric trace gases. Particularly gases with high water solubility tend to deposit faster to a wet surface, compared to a dry one. Further, drying up of a wet leaf surface may lead to revolatilization of previously deposited gases. Despite the high importance of leaf surface wetness in biosphere/atmosphere exchange, there is no quantitative description of this parameter on the ecosystem scale, quantifying its initiation, duration, dissipation, correlation with parameters such as air humidity, turbulence, vegetation type, plant physiology, and others. This contribution is a first step towards a climatology of leaf surface wetness, based on a large data basis from various ecosystems. Leaf surface wetness was monitored at two grassland and two forest research sites in NW and central Europe throughout the vegetation period of 1998. It was sensed through measurement of the electrical conductivity between two electrodes that were clipped to the living plant leaf surfaces. This yields a relative signal that responds promptly to the presence of leaf wetness. A routine is presented that combines the data from several sensors to the dimensionless leaf wetness, LW, with values between zero and one. Periods of high leaf wetness (LW>0.9) were in most cases triggered by precipitation events. After termination of rain, LW decreased quickly at the forest sites and dropped to values below 0.1 within less than 24 hours in most cases. At the grassland sites, the formation of dew led to a more complex pattern, with the occurrence of diurnal cycles of LW. Although periods of low relative air humidity (e.g., rH<50%) are normally associated with periods of low leaf wetness, the extent of correlation between these two parameters at rH>60% varies between the different sites. The grassland sites show very similar distributions of the LW data with rH, indicating a positive correlation between LW and rH, although there is much scatter in the relationship. One forest site also exhibited a positive correlation, although LW was typically lower for a given rH than at the grassland sites. At another forest site in central mountainous Europe, the correlation between LW and rH was less well established, with low leaf wetness (LW<0.001) occurring within the entire air humidity range 60%wetness should be included in routine measurement programs studying biosphere-atmosphere exchange.

  11. Non-local rheology in dense granular flows -- Revisiting the concept of fluidity

    E-print Network

    Mehdi Bouzid; Adrien Izzet; Martin Trulsson; Eric Clement; Philippe Claudin; Bruno Andreotti

    2015-10-23

    The aim of this article is to discuss the concepts of non-local rheology and fluidity, recently introduced to describe dense granular flows. We review and compare various approaches based on different constitutive relations and choices for the fluidity parameter, focusing on the kinetic elasto-plastic model introduced by Bocquet et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett 103, 036001 (2009)] for soft matter, and adapted for granular matter by Kamrin et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 178301 (2012)], and the gradient expansion of the local rheology $\\mu(I)$ that we have proposed [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 238301 (2013)]. We emphasise that, to discriminate between these approaches, one has to go beyond the predictions derived from linearisation around a uniform stress profile, such as that obtained in a simple shear cell. We argue that future tests can be based on the nature of the chosen fluidity parameter, and the related boundary conditions, as well as the hypothesis made to derive the models and the dynamical mechanisms underlying their dynamics.

  12. Non-local rheology in dense granular flows : Revisiting the concept of fluidity.

    PubMed

    Bouzid, Mehdi; Izzet, Adrien; Trulsson, Martin; Clément, Eric; Claudin, Philippe; Andreotti, Bruno

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss the concepts of non-local rheology and fluidity, recently introduced to describe dense granular flows. We review and compare various approaches based on different constitutive relations and choices for the fluidity parameter, focusing on the kinetic elasto-plastic model introduced by Bocquet et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett 103, 036001 (2009)) for soft matter, and adapted for granular matter by Kamrin et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 178301 (2012)), and the gradient expansion of the local rheology ?(I) that we have proposed (Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 238301 (2013)). We emphasise that, to discriminate between these approaches, one has to go beyond the predictions derived from linearisation around a uniform stress profile, such as that obtained in a simple shear cell. We argue that future tests can be based on the nature of the chosen fluidity parameter, and the related boundary conditions, as well as the hypothesis made to derive the models and the dynamical mechanisms underlying their dynamics. PMID:26614496

  13. Numerical simulations of granular dynamics II. Particle dynamics in a shaken granular material

    E-print Network

    Naomi Murdoch; Patrick Michel; Derek C. Richardson; Kerstin Nordstrom; Christian R. Berardi; Simon F. Green; Wolfgang Losert

    2013-06-07

    Surfaces of planets and small bodies of our Solar System are often covered by a layer of granular material that can range from a fine regolith to a gravel-like structure of varying depths. Therefore, the dynamics of granular materials are involved in many events occurring during planetary and small-body evolution thus contributing to their geological properties. We demonstrate that the new adaptation of the parallel N-body hard-sphere code pkdgrav has the capability to model accurately the key features of the collective motion of bidisperse granular materials in a dense regime as a result of shaking. As a stringent test of the numerical code we investigate the complex collective ordering and motion of granular material by direct comparison with laboratory experiments. We demonstrate that, as experimentally observed, the scale of the collective motion increases with increasing small-particle additive concentration. We then extend our investigations to assess how self-gravity and external gravity affect collective motion. In our reduced-gravity simulations both the gravitational conditions and the frequency of the vibrations roughly match the conditions on asteroids subjected to seismic shaking, though real regolith is likely to be much more heterogeneous and less ordered than in our idealised simulations. We also show that collective motion can occur in a granular material under a wide range of inter-particle gravity conditions and in the absence of an external gravitational field. These investigations demonstrate the great interest of being able to simulate conditions that are to relevant planetary science yet unreachable by Earth-based laboratory experiments.

  14. Drag induced lift in granular media

    E-print Network

    Yang Ding; Nick Gravish; Daniel I. Goldman

    2011-08-09

    Laboratory experiments and numerical simulation reveal that a submerged intruder dragged horizontally at constant velocity within a granular medium experiences a lift force whose sign and magnitude depend on the intruder shape. Comparing the stress on a flat plate at varied inclination angle with the local surface stress on the intruders at regions with the same orientation demonstrates that intruder lift forces are well approximated as the sum of contributions from flat-plate elements. The plate stress is deduced from the force balance on the flowing media near the plate.

  15. Starting to move through a granular medium

    SciTech Connect

    Costantino, D. J.; Scheidemantel, T.; Stone, Matthew B; Conger, C.; Klein, K.; Lohr, M.; Modig, Z.; Schiffer, P.

    2008-01-01

    We explore the process of initiating motion through a granular medium by measuring the force required to push a flat circular plate upward from underneath the medium. In contrast to previous measurements of the drag and penetration forces, which were conducted during steady state motion, the initiation force has a robust dependence on the diameter of the grains forming the pile. We attribute this dependence to the requirement for local dilation of the grains around the circumference of the plate, as evidenced by an observed linear dependence of the initiation force on the plate diameter.

  16. Gravity-driven dense granular flows

    SciTech Connect

    ERTAS,DENIZ; GREST,GARY S.; HALSEY,THOMAS C.; DEVINE,DOV; SILBERT,LEONARDO E.

    2000-03-29

    The authors report and analyze the results of numerical studies of dense granular flows in two and three dimensions, using both linear damped springs and Hertzian force laws between particles. Chute flow generically produces a constant density profile that satisfies scaling relations suggestive of a Bagnold grain inertia regime. The type for force law has little impact on the behavior of the system. Failure is not initiated at the surface, consistent with the absence of surface flows and different principal stress directions at vs. below the surface.

  17. Mach cone in a shallow granular layer

    E-print Network

    Patrick Heil; E. C. Rericha; Daniel I. Goldman; Harry L. Swinney

    2004-09-16

    We study the V-shaped wake (Mach cone) formed by a cylindrical rod moving through a thin, vertically vibrated granular layer. The wake, analogous to a shock (hydraulic jump) in shallow water, appears for rod velocities v_R greater than a critical velocity c. We measure the half-angle, theta, of the wake as a function of v_R and layer depth, h. The angle satisfies the Mach relation, sin(theta)=c/v_R, where c=sqrt(gh), even for h as small as one particle diameter.

  18. Mach cone in a shallow granular fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Heil, Patrick; Rericha, E. C.; Goldman, Daniel I.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2004-12-01

    We study the V-shaped wake (Mach cone) formed by a cylindrical rod moving through a thin, vertically vibrated granular layer. The wake, analogous to a shock (hydraulic jump) in shallow water, appears for rod velocities v{sub R} greater than a critical velocity c. We measure the half angle {theta} of the wake as a function of v{sub R} and layer depth h. The angle satisfies the Mach relation, sin {theta}=c/v{sub R}, where c={radical}(gh), even for h as small as one-particle diameter.

  19. Granular parakeratosis presenting with facial keratotic papules.

    PubMed

    Joshi, R; Taneja, A

    2008-01-01

    A 27-year-old female presented with pruritic keratotic papules over the left side of the face since one month. The lesions developed a few days after working in a hot humid environment and were preceded by severe uncontrollable pruritus for which she had repeatedly wiped the area with handkerchiefs and towels. A biopsy from one of the keratotic papules revealed granular parakeratosis with a markedly thick stratum corneum that had parakeratosis and also housed keratohyaline granules. Similar changes were seen in keratotic plugs of dilated follicular infundibula. PMID:18187827

  20. Biological and robotic movement through granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Daniel

    2008-03-01

    We discuss laboratory experiments and numerical simulations of locomotion of biological organisms and robots on and within a granular medium. Terrestrial locomotion on granular media (like desert and beach sand) is unlike locomotion on rigid ground because during a step the material begins as a solid, becomes a fluid and then re-solidifies. Subsurface locomotion within granular media is unlike swimming in water for similar reasons. The fluidization and solidification depend on the packing properties of the material and can affect limb penetration depth and propulsive force. Unlike aerial and aquatic locomotion in which the Navier-Stokes equations can be used to model environment interaction, models for limb interaction with granular media do not yet exist. To study how the fluidizing properties affect speed in rapidly running and swimming lizards and crabs, we use a trackway composed of a fluidized bed of of 250 ?m glass spheres. Pulses of air to the bed set the solid volume fraction 0.59

  1. Granular jamming transitions for a robotic mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Allen; Aste, Tomaso; Dasgupta, Prokar; Althoefer, Kaspar; Nanayakkara, Thrishantha

    2013-06-01

    The jamming transitions for granules growing field of interest in robotics for use in variable stiffness mechanisms. However, the traditional use of air pressure to control the jamming transition requires heavy vacuums, reducing the mobility of the robot. Thus, we propose the use of water as a hydraulic fluid to control the transition between free and clustered granules. This paper presents comparative studies that show that a hydraulic granular jammed finger joint can both achieve the same stiffness level and maintain the same hysteresis level of a pneumatic system, with only a small volume of fluid.

  2. Granular Cell Tumors on Unusual Anatomic Locations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Joo

    2015-01-01

    Granular cell tumors (GCTs) are soft tissue tumors, which are thought to be derived from Schwann cells. Although most GCTs are reported to arise in tongue and oral cavity (30-50%), they can appear on any anatomic sites, even visceral organs. Herein, we report 5 cases of GCTs on unusual anatomic locations, such as palm, arm, thigh, finger, and vulvar area. Complete surgical excision is preferred treatment of choice to prevent recurrence. These cases emphasize that GCTs not involving oral cavity are more prevalent than expected, and the diagnosis should be histopathologically confirmed. PMID:26446660

  3. Compactivity measurements for a bidimensional granular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechenault, Frederic; Dacruz, Frederic; Dauchot, Olivier; Bertin, Eric

    2006-03-01

    We investigate experimentally the statistical properties of the free volumes inside a bidimensional granular packing. Having in mind the more general issue of the measure of intensive thermodynamical parameters in out-of-equilibrium systems, we propose an experimental procedure to access the compactivity of the packing from the free volume distributions over clusters of grains, varying the size of the cluster. Our main result is that the logarithm of the probability to find a given free volume in a cluster scales in a nonextensive way. The compactivity of the packing is then extracted from the corresponding scaling function for two different kinds of grains, and two levels of compaction.

  4. Rolling friction on a granular medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Blasio, Fabio Vittorio; Saeter, May-Britt

    2009-02-01

    We present experimental results for the rolling of spheres on a granular bed. We use two sets of glass and steel spheres with varying diameters and a high-speed camera to follow the motion of the spheres. Despite the complex phenomena occurring during the rolling, the results show a friction coefficient nearly independent of the velocity (0.45-0.5 for glass and 0.6-0.65 for steel). It is found that for a given sphere density, the large spheres reach a longer distance, a result that may also help explain the rock sorting along natural stone accumulations at the foot of mountain slopes.

  5. Nature of stress accommodation in sheared granular material: Insights from 3D numerical modeling

    E-print Network

    Mair, Karen

    Nature of stress accommodation in sheared granular material: Insights from 3D numerical modeling distinct accumulations of granular wear material. During shear, this granular material accommodates stress the nature of contact force distributions during 3D granular shear. Our 3D discrete numerical models consist

  6. Wetting behavior of alternative solder alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, F.M.; Vianco, P.T.; Hernandez, C.L.; Rejent, J.A.

    1993-07-01

    Recent economic and environmental issues have stimulated interest in solder alloys other than the traditional Sn-Pb eutectic or near eutectic composition. Preliminary evaluations suggest that several of these alloys approach the baseline properties (wetting, mechanical, thermal, and electrical) of the Sn-Pb solders. Final alloy acceptance will require major revisions to existing industrial and military soldering specifications. Bulk alloy and solder joint properties are consequently being investigated to validate their producibility and reliability. The work reported in this paper examines the wetting behavior of several of the more promising commercial alloys on copper substrates. Solder wettability was determined by the meniscometer and wetting balance techniques. The wetting results suggest that several of the alternative solders would satisfy pretinning and surface mount soldering applications. Their use on plated through hole technology might be more difficult since the alloys generally did not spread or flow as well as the 60Sn-40Pb solder.

  7. A study of bubble wetting on surfaces

    E-print Network

    Day, Julia Katherine

    2010-01-01

    In microfluidics, the formation of bubbles within devices obstructs flow and can damage the microfluidic chip or the samples contained therein. This thesis works toward a better understand of bubble wetting on surfaces, ...

  8. Making and Experimenting with a Wet Cell.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Arnold

    1993-01-01

    Presents an activity that demonstrates the physical and chemical changes that occur during the operation of a wet cell battery as it produces an electrical current. Provides instructions for the lesson. (MDH)

  9. Newton black films as wetting systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarazona, Pedro; Martínez, Hector; Chacón, Enrique; Bresme, Fernando

    2012-02-01

    Newton black films (NBFs) can appear under a wide range of experimental conditions. NBFs define the adhesive states of foams and emulsions, showing their formation is a very general physical phenomenon. We show that the existence of NBFs and their whole experimental behavior can be understood within the theory of wetting transitions. NBFs are experimental realizations of partial wetting or pre-wetting states. Hence, they provide experimental systems to investigate the pre-wetting transition, and the spreading behavior under conditions that are very difficult to realize in other experimental systems. We also introduce two new computational approaches to obtain the disjoining pressure isotherm from canonical simulations, and to estimate the contact angles of droplets of nanoscopic dimensions.

  10. Chlorine Disinfection of Wet Weather Managed Flows

    EPA Science Inventory

    Blending is a practice used in the wastewater industry to deal with wet weather events when the hydraulic capacity of the treatment facility could be compromised. Blending consists of primary wastewater treatment plant effluent, partially bypassing secondary treatment, and then ...

  11. 7 CFR 51.491 - Wet slip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... time of packing in which the stem scar is abnormally large, excessively wet and slippery, yields to slight pressure, and is frequently accompanied by fresh radial growth cracks at the edge of the stem scar....

  12. 7 CFR 51.491 - Wet slip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... time of packing in which the stem scar is abnormally large, excessively wet and slippery, yields to slight pressure, and is frequently accompanied by fresh radial growth cracks at the edge of the stem scar....

  13. 7 CFR 51.491 - Wet slip.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... time of packing in which the stem scar is abnormally large, excessively wet and slippery, yields to slight pressure, and is frequently accompanied by fresh radial growth cracks at the edge of the stem scar....

  14. ESTIMATING URBAN WET-WEATHER POLLUTANT LOADING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents procedures for estimating pollutant loads in urban watersheds emanating from wet-weather flow discharge. Equations for pollutant loading estimates will focus on the effects of wastewater characteristics, sewer flow carrying velocity, and sewer-solids depositi...

  15. Reducing the atmospheric impact of wet slaking

    SciTech Connect

    B.D. Zubitskii; G.V. Ushakov; B.G. Tryasunov; A.G.Ushakov

    2009-05-15

    Means of reducing the atmospheric emissions due to the wet slaking of coke are considered. One option, investigated here, is to remove residual active silt and organic compounds from the biologically purified wastewater sent for slaking, by coagulation and flocculation.

  16. MECA Wet Chemistry: The Next Generation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, R. C.; Aubrey, A. D.; Hecht, M. H.; Grunthaner, F. J.; Lee, M. C.; O'Neil, G. D.; DeFlores, L.

    2012-10-01

    The NERNST project is focused on developing the next generation wet chemistry laboratory based on techniques employed and lessons learned during the Mars Phoenix Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) in situ experiments.

  17. Structure of Wet Specimens in Electron Microscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    Discussed are past work and recent advances in the use of electron microscopes for viewing structures immersed in gas and liquid. Improved environmental chambers make it possible to examine wet specimens easily. (Author/RH)

  18. Application of wet waste from shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei) with or without sea mud to feeding sea cucumber ( Stichopus monotuberculatus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanfeng; Hu, Chaoqun; Ren, Chunhua

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, the applicability of the wet waste collected from shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei) to the culture of sea cucumber ( Stichopus monotuberculatus) was determined. The effects of dietary wet shrimp waste on the survival, specific growth rate (SGR), fecal production rate (FPR), ammonia- and nitrite-nitrogen productions of sea cucumber were studied. The total organic matter (TOM) level in the feces of sea cucumber was compared with that in corresponding feeds. Diet C (50% wet shrimp waste and 50% sea mud mash) made sea cucumber grow faster than other diets. Sea cucumber fed with either diet D (25% wet shrimp waste and 75% sea mud mash) or sole sea mud exhibited negative growth. The average lowest total FPR of sea cucumber occurred in diet A (wet shrimp waste), and there was no significant difference in total FPR between diet C and diet E (sea mud mash) ( P > 0.05). The average ammonia-nitrogen production of sea cucumber in different diet treatments decreased gradually with the decrease of crude protein content in different diets. The average highest nitrite-nitrogen production occurred in diet E treatment, and there was no significant difference in nitrite-nitrogen production among diet A, diet B (75% wet shrimp waste and 25% sea mud mash) and diet C treatments ( P > 0.05). In each diet treatment, the total organic matter (TOM) level in feces decreased to different extent compared with that in corresponding feeds.

  19. Wet/dry cooling tower and method

    DOEpatents

    Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Rohsenow, Warren R. (Waban, MA)

    1981-01-01

    A wet/dry cooling tower wherein a liquid to-be-cooled is flowed along channels of a corrugated open surface or the like, which surface is swept by cooling air. The amount of the surface covered by the liquid is kept small compared to the dry part thereof so that said dry part acts as a fin for the wet part for heat dissipation.

  20. Mesoscale Simulations of Granular Materials with Peridynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammi, Christopher; Littlewood, David; Vogler, Tracy

    2011-06-01

    The dynamic behavior of granular materials can be quite complex due to phenomena that occur at the scale of individual grains. For this reason, mesoscale simulations explicitly resolving individual grains with varying degrees of fidelity have been used to gain insight into the physics of granular materials. The vast majority of these simulations have, to date, been performed with Eulerian codes, which do a poor job of resolving fracture and grain-to-grain interactions. To address these shortcomings, we utilize a peridynamic modeling framework to examine the roles of fracture and contact under planar shock and other loading conditions. Peridynamics is a mesh-free Lagrangian technique that uses an integral formulation to better enable simulations involving fracture. Although some aspects of the peridynamic codes currently available are not well suited to the shock regime, the simulations provide results that are more physically realistic than the Eulerian simulations for some non-planar loading conditions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE.

  1. Machanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Investigator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Key persornel in the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment include Khalid Alshibli, project scientist at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: MSFC).

  2. Mechanic of Granular Materials (MGM) Investigator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Key persornel in the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment are Mark Lankton (Program Manager at University Colorado at Boulder), Susan Batiste (research assistance, UCB), and Stein Sture (principal investigator). Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder).

  3. Mechanics of Granular Materials labeled hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) flight hardware takes two twin double locker assemblies in the Space Shuttle middeck or the Spacehab module. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: NASA/MSFC).

  4. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Investigators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Key persornel in the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment at the University of Colorado at Boulder include Tawnya Ferbiak (software engineer), Susan Batiste (research assistant), and Christina Winkler (graduate research assistant). Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. MGM experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder).

  5. Three-phase fracturing in granular material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, James; Sandnes, Bjornar

    2015-04-01

    There exist numerous geo-engineering scenarios involving the invasion of a gas into a water-saturated porous medium: in fracking, this may occur during the fracking process itself or during subsequent gas penetration into propant beds; the process is also at the heart of carbon dioxide sequestration. We use a bed of water-saturated glass beads confined within a Hele-Shaw cell as a model system to illuminate these processes. Depending on packing density, injection rate and other factors, air injected into this system may invade in a broad variety of patterns, including viscous fingering, capillary invasion, bubble formation and fracturing. Here we focus primarily on the latter case. Fracturing is observed when air is injected into a loosely packed bed of unconsolidated granular material. Our approach allows us to image the complete fracture pattern as it forms, and as such to study both the topographical properties of the resulting pattern (fracture density, braching frequency etc) and the dynamics of its growth. We present an overview of the fracturing phenomenon within the context of pattern formation in granular fluids as a whole. We discuss how fracturing arises from an interplay between frictional, capillary and viscous forces, and demonstrate the influence of various parameters on the result.

  6. Pressure-shear experiments on granular materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhart, William Dodd; Thornhill, Tom Finley, III; Vogler, Tracy John; Alexander, C. Scott

    2011-10-01

    Pressure-shear experiments were performed on granular tungsten carbide and sand using a newly-refurbished slotted barrel gun. The sample is a thin layer of the granular material sandwiched between driver and anvil plates that remain elastic. Because of the obliquity, impact generates both a longitudinal wave, which compresses the sample, and a shear wave that probes the strength of the sample. Laser velocity interferometry is employed to measure the velocity history of the free surface of the anvil. Since the driver and anvil remain elastic, analysis of the results is, in principal, straightforward. Experiments were performed at pressures up to nearly 2 GPa using titanium plates and at higher pressure using zirconium plates. Those done with the titanium plates produced values of shear stress of 0.1-0.2 GPa, with the value increasing with pressure. On the other hand, those experiments conducted with zirconia anvils display results that may be related to slipping at an interface and shear stresses mostly at 0.1 GPa or less. Recovered samples display much greater particle fracture than is observed in planar loading, suggesting that shearing is a very effective mechanism for comminution of the grains.

  7. Granular physics in low-gravity enviroments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tancredi, G.; Maciel, A.; Heredia, L.; Richeri, P.; Nesmachnow, S.

    2011-10-01

    The granular media are formed by a set of macroscopic objects (named grains) which interact through temporal or permanent contacts. Several processes has been identified which require a full understanding, like: grain blocking, formation of arcs, size segregation, response to shakes and impacts, etc. These processes has been studied experimentally in the laboratory, and, in the last decades, numerically. The Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulate the mechanical behavior in a media formed by a set of particles which interact through their contact points. We describe the implementation of DEM for the study of several relevant processes in minor bodies of the Solar System. We present the results of simulations of the process of size segregation in low-gravity environments, the so-called Brazil nut effect, in the cases of Eros and Itokawa. The segregation of particles with different densities is also analyzed, with the application to the case of P/Hartley 2. The surface shaking in these different gravity environments could produce the ejection of particles from the surface at very low relative velocities. The shaking that cause the above processes is due to impacts or explosions like the release of energy by the liberation of internal stresses or the reaccommodation of material. We run simulations of the passage of seismic wave produced at impact through a granular media.

  8. Nonlocal modeling of granular flows down inclines.

    PubMed

    Kamrin, Ken; Henann, David L

    2015-01-01

    Flows of granular media down a rough inclined plane demonstrate a number of nonlocal phenomena. We apply the recently proposed nonlocal granular fluidity model to this geometry and find that the model captures many of these effects. Utilizing the model's dynamical form, we obtain a formula for the critical stopping height of a layer of grains on an inclined surface. Using an existing parameter calibration for glass beads, the theoretical result compares quantitatively to existing experimental data for glass beads. This provides a stringent test of the model, whose previous validations focused on driven steady-flow problems. For layers thicker than the stopping height, the theoretical flow profiles display a thickness-dependent shape whose features are in agreement with previous discrete particle simulations. We also address the issue of the Froude number of the flows, which has been shown experimentally to collapse as a function of the ratio of layer thickness to stopping height. While the collapse is not obvious, two explanations emerge leading to a revisiting of the history of inertial rheology, which the nonlocal model references for its homogeneous flow response. PMID:25376561

  9. Imaging of granular sources in high energy heavy ion collisions

    E-print Network

    Zhi-Tao Yang; Wei-Ning Zhang; Lei Huo; Jing-Bo Zhang

    2008-11-13

    We investigate the source imaging for a granular pion-emitting source model in high energy heavy ion collisions. The two-pion source functions of the granular sources exhibit a two-tiered structure. Using a parametrized formula of granular two-pion source function, we examine the two-tiered structure of the source functions for the imaging data of Au+Au collisions at Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) and Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). We find that the imaging technique introduced by Brown and Danielewicz is suitable for probing the granular structure of the sources. Our data-fitting results indicate that there is not visible granularity for the sources at AGS energies. However, the data for the RHIC collisions with the selections of $40 < {\\rm centrality} < 90%$ and $0.20granular emission than that of one Gaussian. The model with granular source has more parameters than the simple Gaussian, hence can describe more complicated shapes.

  10. Slow drag in granular materials under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fuping; Advani, Suresh G.; Wetzel, Eric D.

    2004-06-01

    The resistance offered by a cylindrical rod to creeping cross flow of granular materials under pressure is investigated. The experimental system consists of a confined bed of granular particles, which are compacted under high pressure to consolidate the granular medium. A cylindrical rod is pulled at a constant and slow rate through the granular medium, and the measured pulling resistance is characterized as a drag force. The influence of various parameters such as the velocity of the cylindrical rod, the rod diameter and length, the granular particle size, and the compaction pressure on the required drag force is investigated experimentally. Nondimensional analysis is performed to simplify the relationships between these variables. The results show that the drag force is independent of the drag velocity, is linearly proportional to compaction pressure and rod diameter, and increases with rod length and particle size. Additional compaction experiments show that the effective density of the granular bed increases linearly with pressure, and similar behavior is noted for all particle sizes. These results should prove useful in the development of constitutive equations that can describe the motion of solid objects through compacted granular media under high pressure, such as during ballistic penetration of soils or ceramic armors.

  11. Dispersive behavior and acoustic scaling in granular rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlos, Santos; Vanessa, Urdaneta; Ernesto, Medina; Xavier, García

    2013-06-01

    Handling and making decisions based on data taken at different scales is a critical issue in the design of exploration and production tasks in the oil industry. Acoustic data is the classical example of the integration of dissimilar scales (i.e. seismic, well logs, lab data) where there is a scale dependent velocity. An understanding of the acoustic dispersion phenomenon in granular samples is needed. A detailed numerical work was conducted in order to establish the relationship between frequency and propagation speed for an acoustical pulse induced in simulated granular materials. The granular samples were generated with different grain size distributions while porosity and pressure were targeted and kept invariant using the grain radii expansion method. A sinusoidal burst with frequencies from 10Hz to 1MHz was applied and the corresponding acoustical speeds were estimated for each frequency. A coherent sigmoid dispersion relationship was obtained for each granular sample. The asymptotic boundaries for the dispersion function reflect the limiting cases for the wavelength/heterogeneity ratio in the granular pack. The lower speed asymptote was explained as the mean field value while upper speed asymptote can be understood based on a ray theory approximation scaled by a parameter we defined as the "acoustic tortuosity factor". This factor reflects the intricate acoustical path due to the texture of the stress network developed in the granular samples and can be used together with the sigmoid dispersive relationship to describe and clarify the scale discrepancy between different source acoustic data in granular materials.

  12. Progress in understanding wetting transitions on rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bormashenko, Edward

    2015-08-01

    The abrupt change in the apparent contact angle occurring on a rough surface is called wetting transition. This change may be spontaneous or promoted by external stimuli such as pressure or vibration. Understanding the physical mechanism of wetting transitions is crucial for the design of highly stable superhydrophobic and omniphobic materials. Wetting regimes occurring on rough surfaces are introduced. Experimental methods of study of wetting transitions are reviewed. Physical mechanisms of wetting transitions on rough surfaces are discussed. Time and energy scaling of wetting transitions are addressed. The problem of the stability of Cassie wetting on inherently hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces is discussed. The origin and value of a barrier separating the Cassie and Wenzel wetting states are treated in detail. Hierarchical roughness increases the value of the energy barrier. The stability of Cassie wetting observed on re-entrant topographies is explained. The irreversibility of wetting transitions is explained, based on the asymmetry of the energy barrier, which is low from the side of the metastable (higher-energy) state and high from the side of the stable state. The critical pressure necessary for a wetting transition is introduced. The problem of "dimension" of wetting transition is discussed. Reducing the micro-structural scales enlarges the threshold pressure of a wetting transition. The roles of gravity and air compressibility in wetting transitions are treated. The dynamics of wetting transitions is reviewed. The results of molecular simulations of wetting transitions are presented. The trends of future investigations are envisaged. PMID:24594103

  13. Recurrent ameloblastoma of the mandible with unusual granular cell component.

    PubMed

    Argyris, Prokopios P; McBeain, Mackensie J T; Rake, Angela; Pambuccian, Stefan E; Gopalakrishnan, Rajaram; Koutlas, Ioannis G

    2015-06-01

    Ameloblastomas can present in various clinical and histomorphologic patterns. The granular cell variant accounts for only 3.5% to 5% of ameloblastomas. The aim of this case report is to present an example of ameloblastoma with unusual granular cell component, affecting a 63-year-old woman, in which both the inner and peripheral layers of follicles composed exclusively by eosinophilic granular cells. Assessment of the immunohistochemical and histochemical profile of the lesion was performed and the challenges of such a diagnosis were also addressed. PMID:25673632

  14. Drag force scaling for penetration into granular media

    E-print Network

    H. Katsuragi; D. J. Durian

    2013-05-16

    Impact dynamics is measured for spherical and cylindrical projectiles of many different densities dropped onto a variety non-cohesive granular media. The results are analyzed in terms of the material-dependent scaling of the inertial and frictional drag contributions to the total stopping force. The inertial drag force scales similar to that in fluids, except that it depends on the internal friction coefficient. The frictional drag force scales as the square-root of the density of granular medium and projectile, and hence cannot be explained by the combination of granular hydrostatic pressure and Coulomb friction law. The combined results provide an explanation for the previously-observed penetration depth scaling.

  15. Hydrodynamic modeling of granular flows in a modified Couette cell

    E-print Network

    Pierre Jop

    2007-12-19

    We present simulations of granular flows in a modified Couette cell, using a continuum model recently proposed for dense granular flows. Based on a friction coefficient, which depends on an inertial number, the model captures the positions of the wide shear bands. We show that a smooth transition in velocity-profile shape occurs when increasing the height of the granular material, leading to a differential rotation of the central part close to the surface. The numerical predictions are in qualitative agreement with previous experimental results. The model provides predictions for the increase of the shear bands width when increasing the rotation rate.

  16. Dynamics of electrostatically-driven granular media. Effects of Humidity

    E-print Network

    D. W. Howell; I. S. Aranson; G. W. Crabtree

    2000-11-03

    We performed experimental studies of the effect of humidity on the dynamics of electrostatically-driven granular materials. Both conducting and dielectric particles undergo a phase transition from an immobile state (granular solid) to a fluidized state (granular gas) with increasing applied field. Spontaneous precipitation of solid clusters from the gas phase occurs as the external driving is decreased. The clustering dynamics in conducting particles is primarily controlled by screening of the electric field but is aided by cohesion due to humidity. It is shown that humidity effects dominate the clustering process with dielectric particles.

  17. Dynamics of electrostatically driven granular media: Effects of humidity

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, D. W.; Aronson, Igor S.; Crabtree, G. W.

    2001-05-01

    We performed experimental studies of the effect of humidity on the dynamics of electrostatically driven granular materials. Both conducting and dielectric particles undergo a phase transition from an immobile state (granular solid) to a fluidized state (granular gas) with increasing applied field. Spontaneous precipitation of solid clusters from the gas phase occurs as the external driving is decreased. The clustering dynamics in conducting particles is primarily controlled by screening of the electric field but is aided by cohesion due to humidity. It is shown that humidity effects dominate the clustering process with dielectric particles.

  18. N AND P ADSORPTION AND DESORPTION ON ION EXCHANGE RESINS UNDER FREEZE-THAW OR WET-DRY CONDITIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The stability of resins used in organic matter mineralization studies is not well known under various physical environmental conditions. The objective of this study was to measure the changes in N and P adsorption and desorption by resins subjected to freeze-thaw or wet-dry cycles. Mixed bed resin...

  19. Wetting Properties of Liquid Helium on Cesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, David J.

    The adsorption of helium onto cesium substrates has been examined over a range of temperatures extending from ~0.2 K to ~ 5.4 K. Both pure isotopes, ^3He and ^4He, have been used as well as mixtures with ^3He concentrations ranging from 0 to 1. Previous work has shown that ^4 He fails to wet cesium at temperatures lower than rm T_{w}~2 K, and that a line of prewetting transitions extends upward from the wetting transition on the vapor side of the bulk liquid-vapor coexistence line. The critical end point temperature of the prewetting line is ~ 2.5 K. The results presented here demonstrate that pure ^3He completely wets cesium at all temperatures. Additionally, the prewetting phase diagram has been determined for this isotope. In this case the prewetting line does not intersect the bulk liquid-vapor coexistence line as it does for ^4He. Instead it extrapolates to zero temperature on the vapor side of the bulk coexistence line. The critical end point temperature for the ^3He/cesium prewetting line is ~0.7 K. The ^3 He/cesium prewetting behavior does not exhibit any of the unusual characteristics that have been predicted by theory. The effect of ^3He impurities on the pure ^4He wetting transition has also been studied. Because of the ^3 He quasiparticle Andreev states at the ^4He liquid-vapor interface, the wetting transition becomes reentrant, with wetting at high and low temperatures and non-wetting at intermediate temperatures. The form of the T_{rm w} vs. X_3 phase diagram has been analyzed and shown to imply the existence of ^3 He quasiparticle states at the liquid-cesium interface which are similar to the Andreev states. Additionally, the adsorption of helium mixtures on cesium has been studied in the vicinity of bulk liquid phase separation. A wetting transition of the % ^4He rich liquid between the ^3 He rich liquid and the cesium substrate has been found with T_{w}~0.53 K. The surface phase transition line associated with this wetting transition is found to extend to both sides of the bulk coexistence line. On the ^3 He rich side it is prewetting line, and on the ^4He rich side it becomes a line of triple point induced dewetting transitions.

  20. Observations of mercury wet deposition in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anne M; Gay, David A

    2013-12-01

    We provide a longer-term record of Hg wet deposition at two tropical latitude monitoring sites in Mexico, selected to provide regionally representative data. Weekly wet deposition samples were collected over 2 years, from September 2003 to November 2005. Based on this data set, we discuss the magnitude and seasonal variation of Hg in wet deposition and compare the results to other measurement sites and to several model estimates. With precipitation-weighted mean (PWM) concentrations of 8.2 and 7.9 ng L(-1), respectively, during the sampling period from Sep 30 2003 to Oct 11 2005, and median weekly concentrations of 9.4 ± 1 ng L(-1) for both sites, the wet Hg concentrations and deposition at HD01 were much lower than those observed at the US Gulf Coast MDN sites while the wet Hg deposition at OA02 was much lower than most MDN sites, but somewhat similar to US MDN sites along the Pacific Coast. Based on the limited available data, we conclude that the approximately 30 % higher average precipitation at HD01 and roughly equal PWM concentrations lead to the higher deposition at HD01 versus OA02. We believe that these observations may offer scientists and modelers additional understanding of the depositional fluxes in the lower latitudes of North America. PMID:24062061

  1. Epimacular brachytherapy for wet AMD: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo P; Alforja, Socorro; Giralt, Joan; Farah, Michel E

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is considered the most common cause of blindness in the over-60 age group in developed countries. There are basically two forms of presentation: geographic (dry or atrophic) and wet (neovascular or exudative). Geographic atrophy accounts for approximately 85%–90% of ophthalmic frames and leads to a progressive degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium and the photoreceptors. Wet AMD causes the highest percentage of central vision loss secondary to disease. This neovascular form involves an angiogenic process in which newly formed choroidal vessels invade the macular area. Today, intravitreal anti-angiogenic drugs attempt to block the angiogenic events and represent a major advance in the treatment of wet AMD. Currently, combination therapy for wet AMD includes different forms of radiation delivery. Epimacular brachytherapy (EMBT) seems to be a useful approach to be associated with current anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents, presenting an acceptable efficacy and safety profile. However, at the present stage of research, the results of the clinical trials carried out to date are insufficient to justify extending routine use of EMBT for the treatment of wet AMD. PMID:25210436

  2. Dynamics of Gas-Fluidized Granular Rods

    E-print Network

    L. J. Daniels; Y. Park; T. C. Lubensky; D. J. Durian

    2008-11-17

    We study a quasi-two-dimensional monolayer of granular rods fluidized by a spatially and temporally homogeneous upflow of air. By tracking the position and orientation of the particles, we characterize the dynamics of the system with sufficient resolution to observe ballistic motion at the shortest time scales. Particle anisotropy gives rise to dynamical anisotropy and superdiffusive dynamics parallel to the rod's long axis, causing the parallel and perpendicular mean squared displacements to become diffusive on different timescales. The distributions of free times and free paths between collisions deviate from exponential behavior, underscoring the non-thermal character of the particle motion. The dynamics show evidence of rotational-translational coupling similar to that of an anisotropic Brownian particle. We model rotational-translation coupling in the single-particle dynamics with a modified Langevin model using non-thermal noise sources. This suggests a phenomenological approach to thinking about collections of self-propelling particles in terms of enhanced memory effects.

  3. Dynamical approach to weakly dissipative granular collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Italo'Ivo Lima Dias; Rosas, Alexandre; Lindenberg, Katja

    2015-07-01

    Granular systems present surprisingly complicated dynamics. In particular, nonlinear interactions and energy dissipation play important roles in these dynamics. Usually (but admittedly not always), constant coefficients of restitution are introduced phenomenologically to account for energy dissipation when grains collide. The collisions are assumed to be instantaneous and to conserve momentum. Here, we introduce the dissipation through a viscous (velocity-dependent) term in the equations of motion for two colliding grains. Using a first-order approximation, we solve the equations of motion in the low viscosity regime. This approach allows us to calculate the collision time, the final velocity of each grain, and a coefficient of restitution that depends on the relative velocity of the grains. We compare our analytic results with those obtained by numerical integration of the equations of motion and with exact ones obtained by other methods for some geometries.

  4. Shocks in Vertically Oscillated Granular Layers

    E-print Network

    J. Bougie; Sung Joon Moon; J. B. Swift; Harry L. Swinney

    2003-09-18

    We study shock formation in vertically oscillated granular layers, using both molecular dynamics simulations and numerical solutions of continuum equations to Navier-Stokes order. A flat layer of grains is thrown up from an oscillating plate during each oscillation cycle and collides with the plate later in the cycle. The collisions produce layer compaction near the plate and a high temperature shock front that rapidly propagates upward through the layer. The shock is highly time-dependent, propagating through the layer in only a quarter of the cycle. We compare numerical solutions of the continuum equations to molecular dynamics simulations that assume binary, instantaneous collisions between frictionless hard spheres. The two simulations yield results for the shock position, shape, and speed that agree well. An investigation of the effect of inelasticity shows that the shock velocity increases continuously with decreasing inelasticity; the elastic limit is not singular.

  5. NMRI Measurements of Flow of Granular Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakagawa, Masami; Waggoner, R. Allen; Fukushima, Eiichi

    1996-01-01

    We investigate complex 3D behavior of granular mixtures in shaking and shearing devices. NMRI can non-invasively measure concentration, velocity, and velocity fluctuations of flows of suitable particles. We investigate origins of wall-shear induced convection flow of single component particles by measuring the flow and fluctuating motion of particles near rough boundaries. We also investigate if a mixture of different size particles segregate into their own species under the influence of external shaking and shearing disturbances. These non-invasive measurements will reveal true nature of convecting flow properties and wall disturbance. For experiments in a reduced gravity environment, we will design a light weight NMR imager. The proof of principle development will prepare for the construction of a complete spaceborne system to perform experiments in space.

  6. Lightweight robot locomotion on granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tingnan; Qian, Feifei; Shen, Jeffrey; Li, Chen; Hoover, Aaron; Birkmeyer, Paul; Fearing, Ronald; Goldman, Daniel

    2011-11-01

    We present an experimental and computer simulation study of a small, light-weight, biologically inspired robot running on a model granular medium (GM), 3 mm diameter glass particles. The six-legged RoACH robot (10 cm long, 25 grams) utilizes an alternating tripod gait to run at speeds up to 25 cm/sec. Forward speed increases with increasing limb frequency 0 < f < 12 Hz. An experimentally validated discrete element method (DEM) simulation of the device captures the observed mechanics. Observation from high speed video and simulation reveals that at low f, there is little slip of the limb through the GM, and forward speed is set by step length. At higher f, limbs slip continuously through the GM and fluidize the surrounding material. In this regime, speed is dominated by fluid-like thrust forces.

  7. Time resolved particle dynamics in granular convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, J. M.; Maza, D.; Zuriguel, I.; Garcimartín, A.; Boudet, J.-F.

    2007-08-01

    We present an experimental study of the movement of individual particles in a layer of vertically shaken granular material. High-speed imaging allows us to investigate the motion of beads within one vibration period. This motion consists mainly of vertical jumps, and a global ordered drift. The analysis of the system movement as a whole reveals that the observed bifurcation in the flight time is not adequately described by the Inelastic Bouncing Ball Model. Near the bifurcation point, friction plays an important role, and the branches of the bifurcation do not diverge as the control parameter is increased. By fitting the grains trajectories near the wall it is possible to quantify the effective acceleration acting on them. A comparison of the mass centre flying time and the flying time determined for the grains near the wall exposes the underlying mechanism that causes the downward flow.

  8. Traffic jams, granular flow, and soliton selection

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtze, D.A.; Hong, D.C.

    1995-07-01

    The flow of traffic on a long section of road without entrances or exits can be modeled by continuum equations similar to those describing fluid flow. In a certain range of traffic density, steady flow becomes unstable against the growth of a cluster, or ``phantom`` traffic jam, which moves at a slower speed than the otherwise homogeneous flow. We show that near the onset of this instability, traffic flow is described by a perturbed Korteweg--de Vries (KdV) equation. The traffic jam can be identified with a soliton solution of the KdV equation. The perturbation terms select a unique member of the continuous family of KdV solitons. These results may also apply to the dynamics of granular relaxation.

  9. Granular acoustic switches and logic elements.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Anzel, Paul; Yang, Jinkyu; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G; Daraio, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Electrical flow control devices are fundamental components in electrical appliances and computers; similarly, optical switches are essential in a number of communication, computation and quantum information-processing applications. An acoustic counterpart would use an acoustic (mechanical) signal to control the mechanical energy flow through a solid material. Although earlier research has demonstrated acoustic diodes or circulators, no acoustic switches with wide operational frequency ranges and controllability have been realized. Here we propose and demonstrate an acoustic switch based on a driven chain of spherical particles with a nonlinear contact force. We experimentally and numerically verify that this switching mechanism stems from a combination of nonlinearity and bandgap effects. We also realize the OR and AND acoustic logic elements by exploiting the nonlinear dynamical effects of the granular chain. We anticipate these results to enable the creation of novel acoustic devices for the control of mechanical energy flow in high-performance ultrasonic devices. PMID:25354587

  10. Granular activated-carbon treatment. Engineering bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    Granular activated carbon (GAC) treatment is a physicochemical process that removes a wide variety of contaminants by adsorbing them from liquid and gas streams. The treatment is most commonly used to separate organic contaminants from water or air; however, it can be used to remove a limited number of inorganic contaminants. In most cases, the contaminants are collected in concentrated form on the GAC, and further treatment is required. Site-specific treatability studies are generally necessary to document the applicability and potential performance of a GAC system. The bulletin provides information on the technology applicability, technology limitations, a technology description, the types of residuals produced, site requirements, latest performance data, status of the technology, and sources for further information.

  11. Granular activated carbon: Design, operation and cost

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R.M.; Lykins, B.W.

    1990-01-01

    A summary is presented of design, cost, and performance information on the application of application of granular activated carbon (GAC) in drinking water based on field-scale experience. A brief history of the development of regulations for control of synthetic organics in drinking water is presented. The use of GAC in other countries is discussed and various design concepts for the unit operations that make up the GAC process are explored. Included in the book are chapters that present information from field-scale research projects dealing with the performance of virgin and reactivated carbon; problems and limitations of carbon reactivation systems; and use of carbon for removing trihalomethanes, trihalomethane precursors, and synthetic organics. The last chapter provides cost equations and comparative cost studies for full-scale application of GAC.

  12. Sound pulse broadening in stressed granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlois, Vincent; Jia, Xiaoping

    2015-02-01

    The pulse broadening and decay of coherent sound waves propagating in disordered granular media are investigated. We find that the pulse width of these compressional waves is broadened when the disorder is increased by mixing the beads made of different materials. To identify the responsible mechanism for the pulse broadening, we also perform the acoustic attenuation measurement by spectral analysis and the numerical simulation of pulsed sound wave propagation along one-dimensional disordered elastic chains. The qualitative agreement between experiment and simulation reveals a dominant mechanism by scattering attenuation at the high-frequency range, which is consistent with theoretical models of sound wave scattering in strongly random media via a correlation length.

  13. Sound pulse broadening in stressed granular media.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Vincent; Jia, Xiaoping

    2015-02-01

    The pulse broadening and decay of coherent sound waves propagating in disordered granular media are investigated. We find that the pulse width of these compressional waves is broadened when the disorder is increased by mixing the beads made of different materials. To identify the responsible mechanism for the pulse broadening, we also perform the acoustic attenuation measurement by spectral analysis and the numerical simulation of pulsed sound wave propagation along one-dimensional disordered elastic chains. The qualitative agreement between experiment and simulation reveals a dominant mechanism by scattering attenuation at the high-frequency range, which is consistent with theoretical models of sound wave scattering in strongly random media via a correlation length. PMID:25768496

  14. Ultrasound Induces Aging in Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espíndola, David; Galaz, Belfor; Melo, Francisco

    2012-10-01

    Aging and rejuvenation have been identified as the general mechanisms that rule the time evolution of granular materials subjected to some external confinement pressure. In creep experiments performed in a triaxial configuration, we obtained evidence that relatively high intensity ultrasound waves propagating through the material induce both weakening and significant plasticity. In the framework of glassy materials, it is shown that the effect of ultrasound can be simply accounted for by a general variable, the fluidity, whose dynamics are described by an effective aging parameter that strongly decreases with sound amplitude and vanishes at the yield stress limit. The response from step perturbations in ultrasound intensity provided a method to assess the effective-viscosity jumps which are direct evidence of acoustic fluidization.

  15. Frictional granular mechanics: A variational approach

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzman, R.; Silin, D.B.; Patzek, T.W.

    2009-10-16

    The mechanical properties of a cohesionless granular material are evaluated from grain-scale simulations. Intergranular interactions, including friction and sliding, are modeled by a set of contact rules based on the theories of Hertz, Mindlin, and Deresiewicz. A computer generated, three-dimensional, irregular pack of spherical grains is loaded by incremental displacement of its boundaries. Deformation is described by a sequence of static equilibrium configurations of the pack. A variational approach is employed to find the equilibrium configurations by minimizing the total work against the intergranular loads. Effective elastic moduli are evaluated from the intergranular forces and the deformation of the pack. Good agreement between the computed and measured moduli, achieved with no adjustment of material parameters, establishes the physical soundness of the proposed model.

  16. Laws of Granular Solids. Geometry and Topology

    E-print Network

    Eric DeGiuli; Jim McElwaine

    2011-10-14

    In a granular solid, mechanical equilibrium requires a delicate balance of forces at the disordered grain scale. To understand how macroscopic rigidity can emerge in this amorphous solid, it is crucial that we understand how Newton's laws pass from the disordered grain scale to the laboratory scale. In this work, we introduce an exact discrete calculus, in which Newton's laws appear as differential relations at the scale of a single grain. Using this calculus, we introduce gauge variables which describe identically force- and torque-balanced configurations. In a first, intrinsic formulation, we use the topology of the contact network, but not its geometry. In a second, extrinsic formulation, we introduce geometry with the Delaunay triangulation. These formulations show, with exact methods, how topology and geometry in a disordered medium are related by constraints. In particular, we derive Airy's expression for a divergence-free, symmetric stress tensor in two and three dimensions.

  17. Laws of granular solids: geometry and topology.

    PubMed

    DeGiuli, Eric; McElwaine, Jim

    2011-10-01

    In a granular solid, mechanical equilibrium requires a delicate balance of forces at the disordered grain scale. To understand how macroscopic rigidity can emerge in this amorphous solid, it is crucial that we understand how Newton's laws pass from the disordered grain scale to the laboratory scale. In this work, we introduce an exact discrete calculus, in which Newton's laws appear as differential relations at the scale of a single grain. Using this calculus, we introduce gauge variables that describe identically force- and torque-balanced configurations. In a first, intrinsic formulation, we use the topology of the contact network, but not its geometry. In a second, extrinsic formulation, we introduce geometry with the Delaunay triangulation. These formulations show, with exact methods, how topology and geometry in a disordered medium are related by constraints. In particular, we derive Airy's expression for a divergence-free, symmetric stress tensor in two and three dimensions. PMID:22181138

  18. Granular segregation driven by particle interactions.

    PubMed

    Lozano, C; Zuriguel, I; Garcimartín, A; Mullin, T

    2015-05-01

    We report the results of an experimental study of particle-particle interactions in a horizontally shaken granular layer that undergoes a second order phase transition from a binary gas to a segregation liquid as the packing fraction C is increased. By focusing on the behavior of individual particles, the effect of C is studied on (1) the process of cluster formation, (2) cluster dynamics, and (3) cluster destruction. The outcomes indicate that the segregation is driven by two mechanisms: attraction between particles with the same properties and random motion with a characteristic length that is inversely proportional to C. All clusters investigated are found to be transient and the probability distribution functions of the separation times display a power law tail, indicating that the splitting probability decreases with time. PMID:25978265

  19. Granular Segregation Driven by Particle Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, C.; Zuriguel, I.; Garcimartín, A.; Mullin, T.

    2015-05-01

    We report the results of an experimental study of particle-particle interactions in a horizontally shaken granular layer that undergoes a second order phase transition from a binary gas to a segregation liquid as the packing fraction C is increased. By focusing on the behavior of individual particles, the effect of C is studied on (1) the process of cluster formation, (2) cluster dynamics, and (3) cluster destruction. The outcomes indicate that the segregation is driven by two mechanisms: attraction between particles with the same properties and random motion with a characteristic length that is inversely proportional to C . All clusters investigated are found to be transient and the probability distribution functions of the separation times display a power law tail, indicating that the splitting probability decreases with time.

  20. Particle filtration in consolidated granular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Lawrence M.; Wilkinson, David J.; Bolsterli, Mark; Hammond, Paul

    1993-03-01

    Grain-packing algorithms are used to model the mechanical trapping of dilute suspensions of particles by consolidated granular media. We study the distribution of filtrate particles, the formation of a damage zone (internal filter cake), and the transport properties of the host-filter-cake composite. At the early stages of filtration, our simulations suggest simple relationships between the structure of the internal filter cake and the characteristics of the underlying host matrix. These relationships are then used to describe the dynamics of the filtration process. Depending on the grain size and porosity of the host matrix, calculated filtration rates may either be greater than (spurt loss) or less than (due to internal clogging) those predicted by standard surface-filtration models.

  1. Nonlinear Force Propagation During Granular Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Abram H.; Petersen, Alec J.; Kondic, Lou; Behringer, Robert P.

    2015-04-01

    We experimentally study nonlinear force propagation into granular material during impact from an intruder, and we explain our observations in terms of the nonlinear grain-scale force relation. Using high-speed video and photoelastic particles, we determine the speed and spatial structure of the force response just after impact. We show that these quantities depend on a dimensionless parameter, M'=tcv0/d , where v0 is the intruder speed at impact, d is the particle diameter, and tc is the collision time for a pair of grains impacting at relative speed v0. The experiments access a large range of M' by using particles of three different materials. When M'?1 , force propagation is chainlike with a speed, vf, satisfying vf?d /tc. For larger M', the force response becomes spatially dense and the force propagation speed departs from vf?d /tc, corresponding to collective stiffening of a strongly compressed packing of grains.

  2. Similarities between protein folding and granular jamming

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Prasanth P; Andricioaei, Ioan

    2012-01-01

    Grains and glasses, widely different materials, arrest their motions upon decreasing temperature and external load, respectively, in common ways, leading to a universal jamming phase diagram conjecture. However, unified theories are lacking, mainly because of the disparate nature of the particle interactions. Here we demonstrate that folded proteins exhibit signatures common to both glassiness and jamming by using temperature- and force-unfolding molecular dynamics simulations. Upon folding, proteins develop a peak in the interatomic force distributions that falls on a universal curve with experimentally measured forces on jammed grains and droplets. Dynamical signatures are found as a dramatic slowdown of stress relaxation upon folding. Together with granular similarities, folding is tied not just to the jamming transition, but a more nuanced picture of anisotropy, preparation protocol and internal interactions emerges. Results have implications for designing stable polymers and can open avenues to link protein folding to jamming theory. PMID:23093180

  3. Shear Thickening and Migration in Granular Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fall, Abdoulaye; Lemaître, Anaël; Bertrand, François; Bonn, Daniel; Ovarlez, Guillaume

    2010-12-01

    We study the emergence of shear thickening in dense suspensions of non-Brownian particles. We combine local velocity and concentration measurements using magnetic resonance imaging with macroscopic rheometry experiments. In steady state, we observe that the material is heterogeneous, and we find that the local rheology presents a continuous transition at low shear rate from a viscous to a shear thickening, Bagnoldian, behavior with shear stresses proportional to the shear rate squared, as predicted by a scaling analysis. We show that the heterogeneity results from an unexpectedly fast migration of grains, which we attribute to the emergence of the Bagnoldian rheology. The migration process is observed to be accompanied by macroscopic transient discontinuous shear thickening, which is consequently not an intrinsic property of granular suspensions.

  4. Sand transport, erosion and granular electrification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrison, J. P.

    2012-06-01

    The transport of granular materials by wind has a major impact on our environment through sand/soil erosion and the generation and transport of atmospheric dust aerosols. Terrestrially the transport of dust involves billions of tons of material every year, influencing the global climate and impacting directly upon human health. Research in aeolian transport involves the inter-related fields of fluid dynamics, granular materials and electrification/electrostatics which are in themselves diverse and complex. This review only touches upon this intricacy, but aims to overview the latest work which is expanding our current understanding and outline the areas of advancement needed in the future. Presentation is made of current models for wind driven detachment/entrainment and the transport rates of sand and dust, including the effects of contact induced grain electrification. This ubiquitous phenomenon can affect grain transport through the generation of intense electric fields and processes of electrostatic assembly. Importantly the transport of sand is characterized by saltation, which is known to be an active process for erosion and therefore a source for dust and sand formation. Using novel erosion simulation techniques the link between grain transport rates and erosion rates has been quantified. Furthermore this can be linked to production rates for dust and has been associated with chemical and mineral alteration through a process of mechanical activation of fractured surfaces. This work has implications for the evolution of all terrestrial-like planetary surfaces. Studies in non-terrestrial environments force researchers to be less empirical, ultimately leading to a deeper understanding of these processes.

  5. Experimental observations of granular debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghilardi, P.

    2003-04-01

    Various tests are run using two different laboratory flumes with rectangular cross section and transparent walls. The grains used in a single experiment have an almost constant grain sizes; mean diameter ranges from 5 mm to 20 mm. In each test various measurements are taken: hydrograms, velocity distribution near the transparent walls and on the free surface, average flow concentration. Concentration values are measured taking samples. Velocity distributions are obtained from movies recorded by high speed video cameras capable of 350 frames per second; flow rates and depth hydrograms are computed from the same velocity distributions. A gate is installed at the beginning of one of the flumes; this gate slides normally to the bed and opens very quickly, reproducing a dam-break. Several tests are run using this device, varying channel slope, sediment concentration, initial mixture thickness before the gate. Velocity distribution in the flume is almost constant from left to right, except for the flow sections near the front. The observed discharges and velocities are less than those given by a classic dam break formula, and depend on sediment concentration. The other flume is fed by a mixture with constant discharge and concentration, and is mainly used for measuring velocity distributions when the flow is uniform, with both rigid and granular bed, and to study erosion/deposition processes near debris flow dams or other mitigation devices. The equilibrium slope of the granular bed is very close to that given by the classical equilibrium formulas for debris flow. Different deposition processes are observed depending on mixture concentration and channel geometry.

  6. Granular Materials in the Disrupted Terrain of Olympus Mons Aureoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulmer, M. H.; Beller, D.; Griswold, J.; McGovern, P. J.

    2008-03-01

    The rugged aureoles that surround Olympus Mons contain one of the two major global concentrations of slope streaks. Streaks appear to be granular, derived from weathered basaltic lavas that form aureole units.

  7. Eosinophilic and granular cell tumors of the breast.

    PubMed

    Damiani, S; Dina, R; Eusebi, V

    1999-05-01

    Eosinophilic and granular cell tumors of the breast are a heterogeneous group encompassing both epithelial and mesenchymal lesions. A granular appearance of the cytoplasm may be caused by the accumulation of secretory granules, mitochondria, or lysosomes. In the breast, mucoid carcinomas, carcinomas showing apocrine differentiation, and neuroendocrine carcinomas are well known entities, while tumors with oncocytic and acinic cell differentiation have been only recently recognized. An abundance of lysosomes is characteristic of Schwannian granular cell neoplasms, but smooth muscle cell tumors also may have this cytoplasmic feature. Awareness of all these possibilities when granular cells are found in breast lesions improves diagnostic accuracy and helps to avoid misdiagnosis of both benign lesions and malignant tumors. PMID:10452577

  8. Drag coefficients on razor clams in slightly fluidized granular media

    E-print Network

    Becker, Christopher R. (Christopher Ryan)

    2008-01-01

    Razor clams are able to burrow deeply into granular media with only a small fraction of force required by traditional anchoring devices. It is hypothesized that the collapse of their shell and subsequent localized fluidization ...

  9. An Experimental Study of a Granular Gas Fluidized by Vibrations

    E-print Network

    Falcon, Eric

    An Experimental Study of a Granular Gas Fluidized by Vibrations #19; Eric Falcon 1 , St#19;ephan with a vertically vibrated piston. We did observe clustering, but we could not rule #12; 2 #19; Eric Falcon et al

  10. Fast spot-based multiscale simulations of granular drainage

    E-print Network

    Rycroft, Chris H.

    We develop a multiscale simulation method for dense granular drainage, based on the recently proposed spot model, where the particle packing flows by local collective displacements in response to diffusing “spots” of ...

  11. Fluidization of a vertically oscillated shallow granular layer

    E-print Network

    Jennifer Kreft; Matthias Schroeter; Jack B. Swift; Harry L. Swinney

    2007-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study fluidization of a vertically vibrated, three-dimensional shallow granular layer. As the container acceleration is increased above g, the granular temperature and root mean square particle displacement increase, gradually fluidizing the layer. For nearly elastic particles, or low shaking frequencies, or small layer depths, the end of the fluidization process is marked by an abrupt increase in the granular temperature and rms particle displacement. The layer is then fully fluidized since macroscopic, fluid-like phenomena such as convection rolls and surface waves are observed. Increasing the total dissipation (by either decreasing the restitution coefficient or increasing the total number of particles) decreases the increase in granular temperature and rms particle displacement at fluidization, and shifts the increase to higher accelerations. Increasing the frequency also decreases the magnitude of the jump, and shifts the change to lower accelerations.

  12. Numerical investigation of granular flow and dynamic pressure in silos 

    E-print Network

    Wang, Yin

    2012-06-25

    Although the flow of granular material in silos and the pressure acting on the silo walls have been studied for over a century, many challenges still remain in silo design. In particular, during the discharge process ...

  13. Force Network Evolution in a Tilted Granular Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Ashley

    2005-11-01

    The hierarchy of contacts between grains plays a central role in determining the properties of quasi-static granular materials. Viewed abstractly, the contacts form the connecting edges in a network of interacting nodes where the `weight' of the connection is proportional to the force between contacting grains. Force networks have become a popular method for presenting data produced by experiment and simulation. In this talk we discuss the key changes in the force network for a granular material in an inclined bed. We use particle dynamics to model the granular material as a two-dimensional system of polydisperse disks, and study the evolution of forces, contact angles and network topology as the system approaches the onset of flow. By applying novel network analysis techniques, we gain insight into how granular materials organize, restructure, and ultimately fail under shear.

  14. A convex complementarity approach for simulating large granular flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Tasora, A.; Anitescu, M.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. degli Studi di Parma

    2010-07-01

    Aiming at the simulation of dense granular flows, we propose and test a numerical method based on successive convex complementarity problems. This approach originates from a multibody description of the granular flow: all the particles are simulated as rigid bodies with arbitrary shapes and frictional contacts. Unlike the discrete element method (DEM), the proposed approach does not require small integration time steps typical of stiff particle interaction; this fact, together with the development of optimized algorithms that can run also on parallel computing architectures, allows an efficient application of the proposed methodology to granular flows with a large number of particles. We present an application to the analysis of the refueling flow in pebble-bed nuclear reactors. Extensive validation of our method against both DEM and physical experiments results indicates that essential collective characteristics of dense granular flow are accurately predicted.

  15. REPEATED REDUCTIVE AND OXIDATIVE TREATMENTS ON GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton oxidation and Fenton oxidation preceded by reduction solutions were applied to granular activated carbon (GAC) to chemically regenerate the adsorbent. No adsorbate was present on the GAC so physicochemical effects from chemically aggressive regeneration of the carbon coul...

  16. A universal scaling law for the evolution of granular gases

    E-print Network

    Mathias Hummel; James P. D. Clewett; Marco G. Mazza

    2015-10-21

    Dry, freely evolving granular materials in a dilute gaseous state coalesce into dense clusters only due to dissipative interactions. This clustering transition is important for a number of problems ranging from geophysics to cosmology. Here we show that the evolution of a dilute, freely cooling granular gas is determined in a universal way by the ratio of inertial flow and thermal velocities, that is, the Mach number. Theoretical calculations and direct numerical simulations of the granular Navier--Stokes equations show that irrespective of the coefficient of restitution, density or initial velocity distribution, the density fluctuations follow a universal quadratic dependence on the system's Mach number. We find that the clustering exhibits a scale-free dynamics but the clustered state becomes observable when the Mach number is approximately of $\\mathcal{O}(1)$. Our results provide a method to determine the age of a granular gas and predict the macroscopic appearance of clusters.

  17. GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION AND INFRARED REACTIVATION: A CASE STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study evaluated the effectiveness and cost of removing trace organic contaminants and surrogates from drinking water by granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption. The effect of multiple reactivations of spent GAC was also evaluated. Results indicated that reactivated GAC eff...

  18. DISINFECTION OF BACTERIA ATTACHED TO GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heterotrophic plate count bacteria, coliform organisms, and pathogenic microorganisms attached to granular activated carbon (GAC) particles were examined for their susceptibility to chlorine disinfection. When these bacteria were grown on carbon particles and then disinfected wit...

  19. Wet powder seal for gas containment

    DOEpatents

    Stang, Louis G. (Sayville, NY)

    1982-01-01

    A gas seal is formed by a compact layer of an insoluble powder and liquid filling the fine interstices of that layer. The smaller the particle size of the selected powder, such as sand or talc, the finer will be the interstices or capillary spaces in the layer and the greater will be the resulting sealing capacity, i.e., the gas pressure differential which the wet powder layer can withstand. Such wet powder seal is useful in constructing underground gas reservoirs or storage cavities for nuclear wastes as well as stopping leaks in gas mains buried under ground or situated under water. The sealing capacity of the wet powder seal can be augmented by the hydrostatic head of a liquid body established over the seal.

  20. Spiral patterns in oscillated granular layers John R. de Bruyn*

    E-print Network

    Texas at Austin. University of

    -Be´nard convection in fluids. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.63.041305 PACS number s : 45.70.Qj, 45.70.Mg, 47.54. r, 45.70. n nonintuitive. A variety of interesting phenomena occurring in granular ma- terials has been studied recently, including convective flows in granular layers, heaping instabilities, force chains, and front propagation 1

  1. Dynamics of Granular Materials and Particle-Laden Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Swinney, Harry L.

    2007-07-11

    Rapid granular flows and particle-laden flows were studied in laboratory experiments, molecular dynamics simulations, and simulations of continuum equations. The research demonstrated that the inclusion of friction is crucial in realistic modeling of granular flows; hence extensive previous analyses and simulations by many researchers for frictionless particles must be reconsidered in the light of our work. We also made the first detailed comparison between experiment and the predictions of continuum theory for granular media (hydrodynamic equations). We found that shock waves easily form in granular flows since the speed of sound waves (pressure fluctuations) in a granular gas is small, typically 10 cm, while flow velocities are easily an order of magnitude larger. Our measurements on vertically oscillating granular layers led to the development of a novel technique for continuously separating particles of different sizes. Our study of craters formed by the impact of a projectile in a granular medium showed, surprisingly, that the time taken for a projectile to come to a rest in the granular layer is independent of the projectile’s impact energy. Another study supported by this grant examined a vertically oscillating layer of a mixture of cornstarch and water. The discovery of stable holes in the mixture was reported widely in the popular press, e.g., Science News [15 May 2004], “Imaging poking a liquid to create holes that persist like the holes in Swiss cheese. Incredible as that might sound, a group of scientists has done it.” Further experiments on glass spheres in an aqueous solution yielded the same holey fluid phenomenon, supporting our conjecture that such holes may occur in dense concentrations of particles in solution in industrial applications.

  2. Stability of a granular layer on an inclined "fakir plane"

    E-print Network

    Jesica Benito; Yann Bertho; Irene Ippolito; Philippe Gondret

    2012-12-19

    We present here experimental results on the effect of a forest of cylinder obstacles (nails) on the stability of a granular layer over a rough incline, in a so-called "fakir plane" configuration. The nail forest is found to increase the stability of the layer, the more for the densest array, and such an effect is recovered by a simple model taking into account the additional friction force exerted by the pillar forest onto the granular layer.

  3. Propagation of elastic waves in granular solid hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Michael; Liu, Mario

    2010-10-01

    The anisotropic stress-dependent velocity of elastic waves in glass beads—as observed by Khidas and Jia [Phys. Rev. E 81, 021303 (2010)]10.1103/PhysRevE.81.021303—is shown to be well accounted for by “granular solid hydrodynamics,” a broad-range macroscopic theory of granular behavior. As the theory makes no reference to fabric anisotropy, the influence of which on sound is in doubt.

  4. Intermittent Granular Flow and Clogging with Internal Avalanches

    E-print Network

    S. S. Manna; H. J. Herrmann

    1999-09-12

    The dynamics of intermittent granular flow through an orifice in a granular bin and the associated clogging due to formation of arches blocking the outlet, is studied numerically in two-dimensions. Our numerical results indicate that for small hole sizes, the system self-organizes to a steady state and the distribution of the grain displacements decays as power laws. On the other hand, for large holes, the outflow distributions are also observed to follow power law distributions.

  5. Humidity Effects and Aging Behavior in Granular Media

    E-print Network

    F. Restagno; H. Gayvallet; L. Bocquet; E. Charlaix

    1999-08-10

    We present a study of humidity effects on the maximum stability angle in granular media. We show that a granular medium of small glass beads exhibits aging properties : the first avalanche angle increases logarithmically with the resting time of the pile. This aging behavior is found to depend on the relative humidity of the surrounding atmosphere. A short interpretation of this effect, based on a model of activated capillary condensation, is proposed.

  6. Slavic *mokr?, Irish ainmech ‘wet, rain’

    E-print Network

    Hamp, Eric P.

    2011-12-08

    ainmech ‘wet, rain’ Er i c P. Ha m P Professor Emeritus, Department of Linguistics, 1010 East 59th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, linguistics@uchicago.edu Avtor prikazuje etimološke povezave med baltš?ino, slovanš?ino, albanš?ino in keltš?ino za pojem... that this looks less than likely for us. Perhaps we can farther than Vendryes LÉIA M-60 or LEW3 2.30, but that is a discussion perhaps outside the present one. Note that peat goes beyond rain, wet, and urine. Pokorny IEW also mentioned Arm. m?r ‘Kot, Schlamm...

  7. Adhesion: elastocapillary coalescence in wet hair.

    PubMed

    Bico, José; Roman, Benoît; Moulin, Loïc; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2004-12-01

    We investigated why wet hair clumps into bundles by dunking a model brush of parallel elastic lamellae into a perfectly wetting liquid. As the brush is withdrawn, pairs of bundles aggregate successively, forming complex hierarchical patterns that depend on a balance between capillary forces and the elasticity of the lamellae. This capillary-driven self-assembly of flexible structures, which occurs in the tarsi of insects and in biomimetic adhesives but which can also damage micro-electromechanical structures or carbon nanotube 'carpets', represents a new type of coalescence process. PMID:15592402

  8. Controllable underwater anisotropic oil-wetting

    SciTech Connect

    Yong, Jiale; Chen, Feng Yang, Qing; Farooq, Umar; Bian, Hao; Du, Guangqing; Hou, Xun

    2014-08-18

    This Letter demonstrates a simple method to achieve underwater anisotropic oil-wetting using silicon surfaces with a microgroove array produced by femtosecond laser ablation. The oil contact angles along the direction perpendicular to the grooves are consistently larger than those parallel to the microgroove arrays in water because the oil droplet is restricted by the energy barrier that exists between the non-irradiated domain and the trapped water in the laser-ablated microgrooves. This underwater anisotropic oil-wetting is able to be controlled, and the anisotropy can be tuned from 0° to ?20° by adjusting the period of the microgroove arrays.

  9. Traction of Pneumatic Tires on Wet Runways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, Walter B.; Joyner, Upshur T.

    1965-01-01

    Recent work on the traction of pneumatic tires on wet runways is discussed, and it is shown that a loss of tire traction adversely affects cross-wind landings. The effect of runway surface texture is discussed,, and a simple method for measuring surface texture is described. A preliminary correlation of tire traction with surface texture is shown. Results of work at Langley Research Center on the use of air jets to improve tire traction on wet or flooded runways indicate that this is a promising approach for alleviating the large losses in tire braking and sideways traction that occur when tire hydroplaning occurs on a flooded runway.

  10. Wet air oxidation of propellant wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, T.L.; Copa, W.M.; Deitrich, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    Wet Air Oxidation studies have been conducted on a number of propellant wastewaters, to assess destruction levels of specific propellant components. OTTO fuel, used as a torpedo propellant, and hydrazine based rocket fuels were propellants of interest. OTTO fuel wastewaters contain substantial amounts of propylene glycol dinitrate. Hydrazine based rocket fuel wastewaters contain hydrazine and unsymmetrical dimethyl hydrazine. Laboratory Wet Air Oxidation studies on OTTO fuel wastewaters indicated that a 99+ percent destruction of propylene glycol dinitrate can be achieved at an oxidation temperature of 280/sup 0/C.

  11. Rheology of granular materials: dynamics in a stress landscape.

    PubMed

    Bi, Dapeng; Chakraborty, Bulbul

    2009-12-28

    We present a framework for analysing the rheology of dense driven granular materials, based on a recent proposal of a stress-based ensemble. In this ensemble, fluctuations in a granular system near jamming are controlled by a temperature-like parameter, the angoricity, which is conjugate to the stress of the system. In this paper, we develop a model for slowly driven granular materials based on the stress ensemble and the idea of a landscape in stress space. The idea of an activated process driven by the angoricity has been shown by Behringer et al. (Behringer et al. 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 268301) to describe the logarithmic strengthening of granular materials. Just as in the soft glassy rheology (SGR) picture, our model represents the evolution of a small patch of granular material (a mesoscopic region) in a stress-based trap landscape. The angoricity plays the role of the fluctuation temperature in the SGR. We determine (i) the constitutive equation, (ii) the yield stress, and (iii) the distribution of stress dissipated during granular shearing experiments, and compare these predictions with the experiments of Hartley & Behringer (Hartley & Behringer 2003 Nature 421, 928-931.). PMID:19933128

  12. Pattern formation of granular avalanches with vortex convection

    E-print Network

    Hirofumi Niiya; Akinori Awazu; Hiraku Nishimori

    2013-02-06

    It has been known that the granular flow of polystyrene particles down a slope forms a wavy pattern with many heads at the moving front of the resulting avalanche. In experiments of granular flow using low-density particles, the instability of the moving front and the subsequent head formation are driven by gravity and air drag. To elucidate the instability mechanism of granular avalanches, we propose a particle method considering gravity as the driving force for the avalanche, the contact interaction between granular particles, and the long-range interaction between granular particles through the ambient fluid as a type of air drag. Using this model, we simulate the head formation at the moving front of the avalanche, and we investigate the particle flow caused by the air drag. It is found that the air drag destabilizes the shape of the avalanche that deforms into a wavy pattern, leading to the generation of a pair of granular vortex convection currents inside the head. Further, the relationship between the particle radius and head size is found to satisfy the positive linear scaling law. Moreover, the hydrodynamic interaction between the particles causes their aggregation at the moving front of the avalanche, and this aggregation effect generates the head-tail structure. These numerical results are qualitatively consistent with the results of previous experiments.

  13. Numerical tests of constitutive laws for dense granular flows.

    PubMed

    Lois, Gregg; Lemaître, Anaël; Carlson, Jean M

    2005-11-01

    We numerically and theoretically study the macroscopic properties of dense, sheared granular materials. In this process we first consider an invariance in Newton's equations, explain how it leads to Bagnold's scaling, and discuss how it relates to the dynamics of granular temperature. Next we implement numerical simulations of granular materials in two different geometries--simple shear and flow down an incline--and show that measurements can be extrapolated from one geometry to the other. Then we observe nonaffine rearrangements of clusters of grains in response to shear strain and show that fundamental observations, which served as a basis for the shear transformation zone (STZ) theory of amorphous solids [M. L. Falk and J. S. Langer, Phys. Rev. E. 57, 7192 (1998); M.R.S. Bull 25, 40 (2000)], can be reproduced in granular materials. Finally we present constitutive equations for granular materials as proposed by Lemaître [Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 064303 (2002)], based on the dynamics of granular temperature and STZ theory, and show that they match remarkably well with our numerical data from both geometries. PMID:16383599

  14. Slow drag in polydisperse granular mixtures under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Fuping; Advani, Suresh G.; Wetzel, Eric D.

    2005-06-01

    The behavior of polydisperse granular materials, composed of mixtures of particles of different sizes, is studied under conditions of high pressure and confinement. Two types of experiments are performed. In the first type, granular mixtures are compressed, with the resulting force-displacement curve used to calculate density and volume modulus. In the second set of experiments, the drag force is measured by pulling a cylinder, horizontally, through a compressed granular mixture. The density, volume modulus, and drag forces for the mixtures are quantified in terms of the mixture composition. The results show that the behavior of these mixtures depends strongly on the mass fractions of the different sized particles, with density, volume modulus, and drag force all reaching values significantly higher than observed in the monodisperse granular materials. Furthermore, the trends for density and drag force show strong correlation, suggesting that drag resistance of confined granular media could be directly related to packing effects. These results should prove useful in understanding the physics of drag in granular materials under high pressure, such as ballistic penetration of soils or ceramic armors.

  15. The effectiveness of resistive force theory in granular locomotiona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tingnan; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2014-10-01

    Resistive force theory (RFT) is often used to analyze the movement of microscopic organisms swimming in fluids. In RFT, a body is partitioned into infinitesimal segments, each of which generates thrust and experiences drag. Linear superposition of forces from elements over the body allows prediction of swimming velocities and efficiencies. We show that RFT quantitatively describes the movement of animals and robots that move on and within dry granular media (GM), collections of particles that display solid, fluid, and gas-like features. RFT works well when the GM is slightly polydisperse, and in the "frictional fluid" regime such that frictional forces dominate material inertial forces, and when locomotion can be approximated as confined to a plane. Within a given plane (horizontal or vertical) relationships that govern the force versus orientation of an elemental intruder are functionally independent of the granular medium. We use the RFT to explain features of locomotion on and within granular media including kinematic and muscle activation patterns during sand-swimming by a sandfish lizard and a shovel-nosed snake, optimal movement patterns of a Purcell 3-link sand-swimming robot revealed by a geometric mechanics approach, and legged locomotion of small robots on the surface of GM. We close by discussing situations to which granular RFT has not yet been applied (such as inclined granular surfaces), and the advances in the physics of granular media needed to apply RFT in such situations.

  16. [Granular cell tumors. Rare tumors of the neurohypophysis].

    PubMed

    Barrande, G; Kujas, M; Gancel, A; Turpin, G; Bruckert, E; Kuhn, J M; Luton, J P

    1995-10-14

    Granular cell tumours of neurohypophysis are rare. These tumours are more often encountered as incidental autopsy findings seen in up to 17% of unselected adult autopsy cases. There are few reports of parasellar granular cell tumours large enough to cause symptoms. We present three cases of neurohypophysis granular cell tumour and a review of the literature. In one patient, the asymptomatic granular cell tumour was incidentally discovered at surgical removal of a corticotroph microadenoma. The remaining 2 patients had a symptomatic tumour which caused neurological symptoms such as visual disturbance and headaches and endocrine disorders such as hypopituitarism or hyperprolactinaemia. In these 2 cases, computerized tomography showed a well-circumscribed, contrast-enhanced, intrasellar and suprasellar mass. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an isointense gadolinium-enhanced mass in T1-weighted images. Transsphenoidal partial resection was performed and histology was interpreted as a granular cell tumour. The immunohistochemical study was positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and neuron specific enolase (NSE) in 1 of the 2 tumours and positive for S100 protein and vimentin in both tumours but negative for CD68. The histogenesis of neurohypophysis granular cell tumours is still controversial but ultrastructural and immunohistochemical studies support the theory that they may arise from pituicytes, the glial cells of neurohypophysis. Management of these benign, slow-growing, tumours is based mainly on neurosurgical resection. Data from the literature do not support a beneficial effect of postoperative radiation therapy on postoperative recurrences. PMID:8545314

  17. Simultaneous nitritation-denitritation for the treatment of high-strength nitrogen in hypersaline wastewater by aerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Corsino, Santo Fabio; Capodici, Marco; Morici, Claudia; Torregrossa, Michele; Viviani, Gaspare

    2016-01-01

    Fish processing industries produce wastewater containing high amounts of salt, organic matter and nitrogen. Biological treatment of such wastewaters could be problematic due to inhibitory effects exerted by high salinity levels. In detail, high salt concentrations lead to the accumulation of nitrite due to the inhibition of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. The feasibility of performing simultaneous nitritation and denitritation in the treatment of fish canning wastewater by aerobic granular sludge was evaluated, and simultaneous nitritation-denitritation was successfully sustained at salinities up to 50 gNaCl L(-1), with a yield of over 90%. The total nitrogen concentration in the effluent was less than 10 mg L(-1) at salinities up to 50 gNaCl L(-1). Nitritation collapsed above 50 gNaCl L(-1), and then, the only nitrogen removal mechanism was represented by heterotrophic synthesis. In contrast, organic matter removal was not affected by salinity but was instead affected by the organic loading rate (OLR). Both COD and BOD removal efficiencies were over 90%. The COD fractionation analysis indicated that aerobic granules were able to remove more than 95% of the particulate organic matter. Finally, results obtained in this work noted that aerobic granular sludge had an excellent ability to adapt under adverse environmental conditions. PMID:26512811

  18. 77 FR 71578 - Pure Magnesium in Granular Form From the People's Republic of China; Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ...Administration [A-570-864] Pure Magnesium in Granular Form From the People's...of the antidumping duty order on pure magnesium in granular form from the People's...of the antidumping duty order on pure magnesium in granular...

  19. 76 FR 1404 - Pure Magnesium in Granular Form From the People's Republic of China: Rescission of Changed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ...Administration [A-570-864] Pure Magnesium in Granular Form From the People's...antidumping duty order \\1\\ on pure magnesium in granular form from the People's...1\\ See Antidumping Duty Order: Pure Magnesium in Granular Form From the...

  20. Application of immobilized and granular dried anaerobic biomass for stabilizing and increasing anaerobic bio-systems tolerance for high organic loads and phenol shocks.

    PubMed

    Massalha, Nedal; Brenner, Asher; Sheindorf, Chaim; Sabbah, Isam

    2015-12-01

    This study focuses on the stability and tolerance of continuous-flow bioreactors inoculated with anaerobic methanogens in three different configurations: (R1) dried granular biomass immobilized in PAC-enriched hydrophilic polyurethane foam, (R2) dried granular biomass, and (R3) wet granular biomass. These systems were tested under two different organic loading rates (OLR) of 6.25 and 10.94 (gCOD/(Lreactor?d)), using a glucose-based synthetic mixture. The effect of an instantaneous shock load of phenol (5g/L for three days), and of phenol inclusion in the feed (0.5g/L) were also tested. At the lower OLR, all reactors performed similarly, however, increasing the OLR lead to a significant biomass washout and failure of R3. Biomass in R1 was more tolerant to phenol shock load than R2, though activity was recovered in both systems after about one month. PAC provided protection and shortened the adaptation time for 0.5g/L phenol that continuously was fed. PMID:26318929