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Sample records for wetland vegetation establishment

  1. Wetland vegetation establishment in L-Lake

    SciTech Connect

    Kroeger, S.R.

    1990-07-01

    Wetland vegetation was transplanted from PAR Pond to L-Lake between January and August, 1987. Approximately 100,000 individual plants representing over 40 species were transplanted along the southern shoreline. Three zones of vegetation were created: (1) submersed/floating-leaved, (2) emergent, (3) upper emergent/shrub. During the summers of 1987, 1988, 1989, the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory sampled the vegetation in 54 permanent transects located in planted (N=32) and unplanted areas (N=22). The 1989 vegetation data from L-Lake were compared to 1985 data from PAR Pond.

  2. Upland and wetland vegetation establishment on coal slurry in northern Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Skeel, V.A.; Nawrot, J.R.

    1998-12-31

    Since the Cooperative Wildlife Research Laboratory`s (CWRL) Mined Land Reclamation Program`s first establishment of a wetland on slurry in 1976, industry, state, and federal agency interest in reclamation alternatives for inactive slurry has increased. CWRL has been involved in pre-reclamation site characterization and monitoring for inactive slurry impoundments throughout Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Missouri, and Washington. Geochemical site characterization of three slurry impoundments at the AECI Bee Veer Mine located near Macon, Missouri began in April 1990. A substrate sampling grid was established for all slurry impoundments with a centerline orientated parallel to the discharge to decant flow pattern. Surface (0--6 in.) and subsurface (30--36 in.) slurry samples were collected annually and analyzed for acid-base balance, immediate acidity macro- and micro-nutrients, potential phytotoxic metallic ions and salts, and texture. Water table elevations and water quality were monitored quarterly from shallow ({le}12 ft.) piezometers. General reclamation plans included annual (3 years) incremental limestone amendments (35--50 tons/acre) and direct vegetation establishment. Cool and warm season grasses dominate vegetation cover in upland habitats (slurry cell RDA1) while wetland habitats (palustrine emergent seasonally-permanently inundated) have been established in slurry cells (RDA2 and RDA3). Isolated hot spots continue to be amended with limestone and supplemental vegetation establishment is scheduled.

  3. Seed bank and established vegetation in the last remnants of the Mexican Central Plateau wetlands: the Lerma marshes.

    PubMed

    Zepeda, Carmen; Lot, Antonio; Nemiga, Xanat Antonio; Manjarrez, Javier

    2014-06-01

    Seed banks play a central role in vegetation dynamics of many wetlands. Therefore, knowledge of seed reservoirs in the soils of aquatic communities should provide useful tools for conservation and restoration efforts. This study was conducted in the Lerma marshes, one of the last remnants of the vast wetlands that were once in the Mexican Central Plateau. The main objective was to determine the composition and abundance of seed bank and its relationship with established vegetation of the three Lerma marshes. In each marsh, we systematically selected 18 to 40 sampling sites. In each site, the composition of vascular plant vegetation was evaluated in two 10m lines perpendicular to the shore. Every 0.5m, we determined the coverage of species by measuring the intercepted length for each plant or group of plants. At each sampling site where we had evaluated the established vegetation, we collected a sample of the top 10cm of sediment; the soil cores were divided into an upper layer (0-5cm) and a lower layer (5-10cm). These samples were used to evaluate the seed bank by the seedling emergence method. All samples were placed in a greenhouse at 20-25 degrees C and remained flooded for 15 weeks. Forty-nine species were recorded in the vegetation. Chiconahuapan had the richest and most diverse flora and the greatest number of perennial species. A life-forms analysis showed that perennial herbs, especially rooted-emergent hydrophytes, dominated in the three wetlands. Sixty-one species were identified in the total seed bank; Chimaliapan had the most diverse total seed bank, whereas the mean seedling density was higher in Chignahuapan. Only two species of the total seed bank of each marsh had a density greater than 10% of the total, and more than half were uncommon. The upper layer of sediment (0-5cm) contained two times more seeds/m2 and species per sample than the lower layer (5-10cm), and there was a significant decrease of seed density with depth. The detrended correspondence analysis produced a clear separation between the composition of the seed banks and established vegetation. In general, in each marsh there was less species diversity in the established vegetation than in the seed bank. Dominance by a few species in the seed bank, the presence of opportunistic species, and the low representation of established species in the seed bank suggest wetland degradation and a low probability of regenerating the natural communities from the seed bank. To ensure the permanence of these marshes, their biodiversity, and therefore the environmental services they provide, up to date planning is a must, and efforts to control and monitor hydrology, water quality, and the influence of human activities are suggested. PMID:25102631

  4. Vegetation establishment and evolution in four ponds that received sewage and wastewater in a portion of the Olezoa wetland complex, Yaounde, Cameroon, central Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Atekwana, E.A. . Dept. of Geology); Agendia, P.L. . Dept. of Plant Biology)

    1994-04-01

    A study of the spatial and temporal changes in the pattern and distribution of tropical wetland vegetation in four ponds that received sewage and wastewater discharge, was undertaken for a small wetland ecosystem in the Olezoa drainage basin in Yaounde, Cameroon. More than 25 years of nutrient loading has led to the eutrophication and subsequent establishment of wetland vegetation in these ponds. Estimated free water surface areas of the ponds in 1964, 1976, and 1986 and 1992 determined from digitized aerial photographs and field measurements suggests a decline of 70 to 100% in the pond surface areas due to invasion and colonization by plants. The rate of pond surface decline and vegetation development is correlated with the construction of sewage plants and the discharge of untreated sewage and wastewater into the ponds. The main wetland plants that are established in the ponds consist of aquatic species Nymphae lotus, Enhydra fluctuants, Pistia stratiotes, Commelina sp., Ipomea aquatica and terrestrial species Echinochloa sp., Thalia welwitschii, Polygonum senegalense, Leersia haxandra and Cyperus papyrus. The pattern of wetland plant succession that resulted within each pond is correlated to the timing, duration and magnitude of sewage and wastewater discharge into the wetland complex.

  5. Disturbance metrics predict a wetland Vegetation Index of Biotic Integrity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Mack, John; Adams, Jean V.; Gara, Brian; Micacchion, Mick

    2013-01-01

    Indices of biological integrity of wetlands based on vascular plants (VIBIs) have been developed in many areas in the USA. Knowledge of the best predictors of VIBIs would enable management agencies to make better decisions regarding mitigation site selection and performance monitoring criteria. We use a novel statistical technique to develop predictive models for an established index of wetland vegetation integrity (Ohio VIBI), using as independent variables 20 indices and metrics of habitat quality, wetland disturbance, and buffer area land use from 149 wetlands in Ohio, USA. For emergent and forest wetlands, predictive models explained 61% and 54% of the variability, respectively, in Ohio VIBI scores. In both cases the most important predictor of Ohio VIBI score was a metric that assessed habitat alteration and development in the wetland. Of secondary importance as a predictor was a metric that assessed microtopography, interspersion, and quality of vegetation communities in the wetland. Metrics and indices assessing disturbance and land use of the buffer area were generally poor predictors of Ohio VIBI scores. Our results suggest that vegetation integrity of emergent and forest wetlands could be most directly enhanced by minimizing substrate and habitat disturbance within the wetland. Such efforts could include reducing or eliminating any practices that disturb the soil profile, such as nutrient enrichment from adjacent farm land, mowing, grazing, or cutting or removing woody plants.

  6. Placing a Fyke Net in Wetland Vegetation

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Glen Black of GLSC and Angela Wahlquist of Northland College places fyke net in wetland vegetation in Fish Creek Slough of Lake Superior near Ashland, Wisconsin, as part of a study of bioindicators of wetland degradation in the Great Lakes. This study is funded by the U.S. EPA Environmental Research...

  7. FLUVIAL DISTURBANCE AND WETLAND VEGETATION DEVELOPMENT, UPPER MAIN STEM, WILLAMETTE RIVER, OREGON, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogeomorphic processes drive vegetation establishment, and promote development of diverse wetland and riparian types associated with lotic ecosystems. The main objective of this study was to estimate the rate and pattern of vegetation development on bars tracked since 1936, a...

  8. Evaluating Vegetation in the National Wetland Condition Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vegetation is a key biotic indicator of wetland ecological condition and forms a critical element of the USEPA 2011 National Wetland Condition Assessment. Data describing plant species composition and abundance, vegetation structure, and ground surface characteristics were colle...

  9. Does prescribed fire benefit wetland vegetation?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, C.; Bounds, D.L.; Ruby, D.E.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of fire on wetland vegetation in the mid-Atlantic region of the United States are poorly known, despite the historical use of fire by federal, state, and private landowners in the Chesapeake Bay Region. Prescribed fire is widely used by land managers to promote vegetation that is beneficial to migratory waterfowl, muskrats, and other native wildlife and to reduce competition from less desirable plant species. We compared vegetative response to two fire rotations, annual burns and 3-year burns, and two control sites, Control 1 and Control 2. We tested the effects of fire within six tidal marsh wetlands at Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge and Fishing Bay Wildlife Management Area in Maryland. We examined changes in total live biomass (all species), total stem density, litter, and changes in live biomass and stem density of four dominant wetland plant species (11 variables). Our results suggest that annual prescribed fires will decrease the accumulation of litter, increase the biomass and stem densities of some wetland plants generally considered less desirable for wildlife, and have little or no effect on other wetland plants previously thought to benefit from fire. ?? 2011 US Government.

  10. Effects of dominant species on vegetation change in Carolina bay wetlands following a multi-year drought.

    SciTech Connect

    Mulhouse, John, M.; De Steven, Diane; Lide, Robert, F.; Sharitz, Rebecca, R.

    2005-05-01

    Wetland vegetation is strongly dependent upon climate-influenced hydrologic conditions, and plant composition responds in generally consistent ways to droughts. However, the extent of species composition change during drought may be influenced by the pre-existing structure of wetland vegetation. We characterized the vegetation of ten herbaceous Carolina bay wetlands on the South Carolina Upper Coastal Plain during a period of average rainfall and again near the end of a four-year drought. We hypothesized that, as a group, bays dominated by less robust plant species (characteristic of open-water pond and depression meadow vegetation types) would show greater compositional change than bays dominated by dense, robust-form clonal graminoids (characteristic of grass and sedge marsh vegetation types). Aquatic species decreased during the drought in all wetlands, regardless of vegetation group. Compared to grass/sedge marshes, pond/meadow wetlands acquired more species, particularly non-wetland species, during the drought. Pond/meadow wetlands also had greater increases in the abundances of species that require unflooded conditions to establish. Prior to the drought, all wetlands were ponded almost continuously, but during drought the pond/meadow wetlands had shorter and more variable hydroperiods than the grass/sedge marshes. Thus, vegetation change may be partly confounded with hydrologic conditions that provide greater opportunities for species recruitment in pond/meadow bays. The results suggest that Carolina bay vegetation dynamics may differ as a function of dominant vegetation and climate driven variation in wetland hydrologic condition.

  11. Vegetation survey of PEN Branch wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    A survey was conducted of vegetation along Pen Branch Creek at Savannah River Site (SRS) in support of K-Reactor restart. Plants were identified to species by overstory, understory, shrub, and groundcover strata. Abundance was also characterized and richness and diversity calculated. Based on woody species basal area, the Pen Branch delta was the most impacted, followed by the sections between the reactor and the delta. Species richness for shrub and groundcover strata were also lowest in the delta. No endangered plant species were found. Three upland pine areas were also sampled. In support of K Reactor restart, this report summarizes a study of the wetland vegetation along Pen Branch. Reactor effluent enters Indian Grove Branch and then flows into Pen Branch and the Pen Branch Delta.

  12. Metric Similarity in Vegetation-Based Wetland Assessment Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wetland vegetation is a recognized indicator group for wetland assessments, but until recently few published protocols used plant-based indicators. To examine the proliferation of such protocols since 1999, this report reviewed 20 published index of biotic integrity (IBI) type p...

  13. Wetland Vegetation at Dorman Slough, Lower Brule Indian Reservation, SD

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    View of wetland vegetation (distant) and food plot (right) at Dorman Slough. A reconnaissance-level study of selected wetlands on and near the Lower Brule Indian Reservation in South Dakota was completed in 2012-13 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe using g...

  14. TerraSAR-X dual-pol time-series for mapping of wetland vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betbeder, Julie; Rapinel, Sébastien; Corgne, Samuel; Pottier, Eric; Hubert-Moy, Laurence

    2015-09-01

    Mapping vegetation formations at a fine scale is crucial for assessing wetland functions and for better landscape management. Identification and characterization of vegetation formations is generally conducted at a fine scale using ecological ground surveys, which are limited to small areas. While optical remotely sensed imagery is limited to cloud-free periods, SAR time-series are used more extensively for wetland mapping and characterization using the relationship between distribution of vegetation formations and flood duration. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal number and key dates of SAR images to be classified to map wetland vegetation formations at a 1:10,000 scale. A series of eight dual-polarization TerraSAR-X images (HH/VV) was acquired in 2013 during dry and wet seasons in temperate climate conditions. One polarimetric parameter was extracted first, the Shannon entropy, which varies with wetland flooding status and vegetation roughness. Classification runs of all the possible combinations of SAR images using different k (number of images) subsets were performed to determine the best combinations of the Shannon entropy images to identify wetland vegetation formations. The classification runs were performed using Support Vector Machine techniques and were then analyzed using the McNemar test to investigate significant differences in the accuracy of all classification runs based on the different image subsets. The results highlight the relevant periods (i.e. late winter, spring and beginning of summer) for mapping vegetation formations, in accordance with ecological studies. They also indicate that a relationship can be established between vegetation formations and hydrodynamic processes with a short time-series of satellite images (i.e. 5 dates). This study introduces a new approach for herbaceous wetland monitoring using SAR polarimetric imagery. This approach estimates the number and key dates required for wetland management (e.g. restoration) and biodiversity studies using remote sensing data.

  15. Changes in the Vegetation Cover in a Constructed Wetland at Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, C.L.; LaGory, K.

    2004-01-01

    Wetlands are valuable resources that are disappearing at an alarming rate. Land development has resulted in the destruction of wetlands for approximately 200 years. To combat this destruction, the federal government passed legislation that requires no net loss of wetlands. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for regulating wetland disturbances. In 1991, the USACE determined that the construction of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory would damage three wetlands that had a total area of one acre. Argonne was required to create a wetland of equal acreage to replace the damaged wetlands. For the first five years after this wetland was created (1992-1996), the frequency of plant species, relative cover, and water depth was closely monitored. The wetland was not monitored again until 2002. In 2003, the vegetation cover data were again collected with a similar methodology to previous years. The plant species were sampled using quadrats at randomly selected locations along transects throughout the wetland. The fifty sampling locations were monitored once in June and percent cover of each of the plant species was determined for each plot. Furthermore, the extent of standing water in the wetland was measured. In 2003, 21 species of plants were found and identified. Eleven species dominated the wetland, among which were reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), crown vetch (Coronilla varia), and Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense). These species are all non-native, invasive species. In the previous year, 30 species were found in the same wetland. The common species varied from the 2002 study but still had these non-native species in common. Reed canary grass and Canada thistle both increased by more than 100% from 2002. Unfortunately, the non-native species may be contributing to the loss of biodiversity in the wetland. In the future, control measures should be taken to ensure the establishment of more desired native species.

  16. A spatial simulation model of hydrology and vegetation dynamics in semi-permanent prairie wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poiani, Karen A.; Johnson, W. Carter

    1993-01-01

    The objective of this study was to construct a spatial simulation model of the vegetation dynamics in semi-permanent prairie wetlands. A hydrologic submodel estimated water levels based on precipitation, runoff, and potential evapotranspiration. A vegetation submodel calculated the amount and distribution of emergent cover and open water using a geographic information system. The response of vegetation to water-level changes was based on seed bank composition, seedling recruitment and establishment, and plant survivorship. The model was developed and tested using data from the Cottonwood Lake study site in North Dakota. Data from semi-permanent wetland P1 were used to calibrate the model. Data from a second wetland, P4, were used to evaluate model performance. Simulation results were compared with actual water data from 1797 through 1989. Test results showed that differences between calculated and observed water levels were within 10 cm 75% of the time. Open water over the past decade ranged from 0 to 7% in wetland P4 and from 0 to 8% in submodel simulations. Several model parameters including evapotranspiration and timing of seedling germination could be improved with more complex techniques or relatively minor adjustments. Despite these differences the model adequately represented vegetation dynamics of prairie wetlands and can be used to examine wetland response to natural or human-induced climate change.

  17. Coevolution of hydraulic, soil and vegetation processes in estuarine wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivisonno, Franco; Rodriguez, Jose F.; Riccardi, Gerardo; Saco, Patricia; Stenta, Hernan

    2014-05-01

    Estuarine wetlands of south eastern Australia, typically display a vegetation zonation with a sequence mudflats - mangrove forest - saltmarsh plains from the seaward margin and up the topographic gradient. Estuarine wetlands are among the most productive ecosystems in the world, providing unique habitats for fish and many terrestrial species. They also have a carbon sequestration capacity that surpasess terrestrial forest. Estuarine wetlands respond to sea-level rise by vertical accretion and horizontal landward migration, in order to maintain their position in the tidal frame. In situations in which buffer areas for landward migration are not available, saltmarsh can be lost due to mangrove encroachment. As a result of mangrove invasion associated in part with raising estuary water levels and urbanisation, coastal saltmarsh in parts of south-eastern Australia has been declared an endangered ecological community. Predicting estuarine wetlands response to sea-level rise requires modelling the coevolving dynamics of water flow, soil and vegetation. This paper presents preliminary results of our recently developed numerical model for wetland dynamics in wetlands of the Hunter estuary of NSW. The model simulates continuous tidal inflow into the wetland, and accounts for the effect of varying vegetation types on flow resistance. Coevolution effects appear as vegetation types are updated based on their preference to prevailing hydrodynamic conditions. The model also considers that accretion values vary with vegetation type. Simulations are driven using local information collected over several years, which includes estuary water levels, accretion rates, soil carbon content, flow resistance and vegetation preference to hydraulic conditions. Model results predict further saltmarsh loss under current conditions of moderate increase of estuary water levels.

  18. Performance Criteria, Compliance Success, and Vegetation Development in Compensatory Mitigation Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Jeffrey W.; Endress, Anton G.

    2008-01-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers often requires wetland creation or restoration as compensation for wetlands damaged during development. These wetlands are typically monitored postconstruction to determine the level of compliance with respect to site-specific performance standards. However, defining appropriate goals and measuring success of restorations has proven difficult. We reviewed monitoring information for 76 wetlands constructed between 1992 and 2002 to summarize the performance criteria used to measure progress, assess compliance with those criteria, and, finally, to evaluate the appropriateness of those criteria. Goals were overwhelmingly focused on plant communities. Attributes used to assess the quality of restored plant communities, including percent native species and the Floristic Quality Index, increased over time but were apparently unrelated to the number of species planted. Compliance frequencies varied depending on site goals; sites often failed to comply with criteria related to survival of planted vegetation or requirements that dominant plant species should not be exotic or weedy, whereas criteria related to the establishment of cover by vegetation or by wetland-dependent plants were often met. Judgment of a site’s success or failure was largely a function of the goals set for the site. Some performance criteria were too lenient to be of value in distinguishing failed from successful sites, whereas other criteria were unachievable without more intensive site management. More appropriate goals could be devised for restored wetlands by basing performance standards on past performance of similar restorations, identifying consistent temporal trends in attributes of restored sites, and using natural wetlands as references.

  19. Reestablishment of wetland vegetation on gas pipeline rights-of-way in six different wetland ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.E. Shem, L.; Wilkey, P.L.; Van Dyke, G.D.; Hackney, C.; Gowdy, M.

    1992-05-01

    Vegetational surveys were carried out to compare reestablished vegetation on pipeline rights-of-way (ROWS) with that in adjacent natural ecosystems undisturbed by pipeline installation. Six sites of various ages were surveyed in ecosystems ranging from coastal marsh to forested wetland. At all sites except one, both the number and the percentage of wetland species on the ROW approximated or exceeded those in the adjacent natural area. In four ecosystems, the vegetation on the ROW was limited to a herbaceous layer by ROW maintenance; thus, the ROWs often involved a complex of species quite different from that found in the adjacent ecosystems.

  20. Modeling Hydrologic and Vegetation Responses in Freshwater Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui, Ting Fong May; Low, Swee Yang; Liong, Shie-Yui

    2010-05-01

    Wetlands constitute 6 - 7 % of the Earth's land surface and provide various critical ecosystem services such as purifying the air and water, mitigating floods and droughts, and supporting wildlife habitats. Despite the importance of wetlands, they are under threat of degradation by human-induced land use changes and climate change. Even if the value of wetlands is recognized, they are often not managed properly or restored successfully due to an inadequate understanding of the ecosystems and their responses to management scenarios. A better understanding of the main components of wetlands, namely the interdependent hydrologic and vegetation systems, and the sensitivity of their responses to engineering works and climate change, is crucial for the preservation of wetlands. To assess these potential impacts, a model is developed in this study for characterizing the coupled dynamics between soil moisture and plant biomass in wetland habitats. The hydrology component of the model is based on the Richards' equation and simulates spatially-varying groundwater movement and provides information on soil moisture at different depths. The plant growth component of the model is described through an equation of the Lotka-Volterra type modified for plant growth dynamics and is adapted from published literature. The two components are coupled via transpiration and ecosystem carrying capacity for plants. Transpiration is modeled for both unsaturated and saturated zones, while the carrying capacity describes limiting oxygen and subsequent nutrient availability in the soil column as a function of water table depth. Vegetation is represented by two species characteristic of mudflat herbaceous plants ranging from facultative wetland to upland plants. The model is first evaluated using a simplified domain and the hydrological information available in the RG2 site of the Everglades wetlands region. The modeled water table fluctuations in general are comparable to field data collected on-site, indicating the potential of the model in capturing soil moisture dynamics. Further application of the model for impact assessments demonstrates that drainage of wetlands resulting in groundwater drawdown is expected to produce appreciable effects on vegetation biomass response. The model developed in this study simulates the coupled and spatially-varying groundwater movement and plant growth dynamics, which allows researchers to better understand and protect the integrated hydrologic and vegetation systems of wetlands worldwide.

  1. Classification of wetlands vegetation using small scale color infrared imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, F. S. L.

    1975-01-01

    A classification system for Chesapeake Bay wetlands was derived from the correlation of film density classes and actual vegetation classes. The data processing programs used were developed by the Laboratory for the Applications of Remote Sensing. These programs were tested for their value in classifying natural vegetation, using digitized data from small scale aerial photography. Existing imagery and the vegetation map of Farm Creek Marsh were used to determine the optimal number of classes, and to aid in determining if the computer maps were a believable product.

  2. Coevolution of hydrodynamics, vegetation and channel evolution in wetlands of a semi-arid floodplain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seoane, Manuel; Rodriguez, Jose Fernando; Rojas, Steven Sandi; Saco, Patricia Mabel; Riccardi, Gerardo; Saintilan, Neil; Wen, Li

    2015-04-01

    The Macquarie Marshes are located in the semi-arid region in north western NSW, Australia, and constitute part of the northern Murray-Darling Basin. The Marshes are comprised of a system of permanent and semi-permanent marshes, swamps and lagoons interconnected by braided channels. The wetland complex serves as nesting place and habitat for many species of water birds, fish, frogs and crustaceans, and portions of the Marshes was listed as internationally important under the Ramsar Convention. Some of the wetlands have undergone degradation over the last four decades, which has been attributed to changes in flow management upstream of the marshes. Among the many characteristics that make this wetland system unique is the occurrence of channel breakdown and channel avulsion, which are associated with decline of river flow in the downstream direction typical of dryland streams. Decrease in river flow can lead to sediment deposition, decrease in channel capacity, vegetative invasion of the channel, overbank flows, and ultimately result in channel breakdown and changes in marsh formation. A similar process on established marshes may also lead to channel avulsion and marsh abandonment, with the subsequent invasion of terrestrial vegetation. All the previous geomorphological evolution processes have an effect on the established ecosystem, which will produce feedbacks on the hydrodynamics of the system and affect the geomorphology in return. In order to simulate the complex dynamics of the marshes we have developed an ecogeomorphological modelling framework that combines hydrodynamic, vegetation and channel evolution modules and in this presentation we provide an update on the status of the model. The hydrodynamic simulation provides spatially distributed values of inundation extent, duration, depth and recurrence to drive a vegetation model based on species preference to hydraulic conditions. It also provides velocities and shear stresses to assess geomorphological changes. Regular updates of stream network, floodplain surface elevations and vegetation coverage provide feedbacks to the hydrodynamic model.

  3. Effects of Woody Vegetation on Prairie Wetland Birds DAVID E. NAUGLE1

    E-print Network

    . agriCUltural land'icape that is less conducive to wet- land bird production. Population declines}" , Effects of Woody Vegetation on Prairie Wetland Birds DAVID E. NAUGLE1 , KENNETH F. HIGGlNs2 on prairie wetland birds. Canadian Field-Naturalist 113(3): 487-492. Bird surveys were conducted in wetlands

  4. Carbon gas fluxes in re-established wetlands on organic soils differ relative to plant community and hydrology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Robin L.

    2011-01-01

    We measured CO2 and CH4 fluxes for 6 years following permanent flooding of an agriculturally managed organic soil at two water depths (~25 and ~55 cm standing water) in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California, as part of research studying C dynamics in re-established wetlands. Flooding rapidly reduced gaseous C losses, and radiocarbon data showed that this, in part, was due to reduced oxidation of "old" C preserved in the organic soils. Both CO2 and CH4 emissions from the water surface increased during the first few growing seasons, concomitant with emergent marsh establishment, and thereafter appeared to stabilize according to plant communities. Areas of emergent marsh vegetation in the shallower wetland had greater net CO2 influx (-485 mg Cm-1 h-1), and lower CH4 emissions (11.5 mg Cm-2 h-1), than in the deeper wetland (-381 and 14.1 mg Cm-2 h-1, respectively). Areas with submerged and floating vegetation in the deeper wetland had CH4 emissions similar to emergent vegetation (11.9 and 12.6 mg Cm-2 h-1, respectively), despite lower net CO2 influx (-102 gC m-2 h-1). Measurements of plant moderated net CO2 influx and CH4 efflux indicated greatest potential reduction of greenhouse gases in the more shallowly flooded wetland.

  5. Vegetation establishment success in restored carolina bay depressions on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina - phase one.

    SciTech Connect

    Sharitz, Rebecca, A.; Mulhouse, John, M.

    2004-05-01

    Successful wetlands restoration must re-establish or enhance three parameters: wetland hydrology, hydric soils, and hydrophytic vegetation (Mitsch and Gosselink 2000). On the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, restoration of small Carolina bay depression-wetlands was initiated in FY 2001 to provide wetland acreage for mitigation banking (US DOE 1997). Sixteen small depressions that had historically been drained for agricultural purposes were selected for restoration, and an additional four were initially chosen to serve as non-restored controls. Restoration treatments included plugging the existing ditches to increase water volume retention and wetland hydroperiod and clear-cutting removal of woody vegetation in the interiors. Planned endpoints of the restoration were herbaceous meadow and forested savanna bay interiors, and pine savanna and pine/hardwood forested bay margins (Barton and Singer 2001). To promote forested savanna interiors, saplings of bald cypress and swamp tupelo were planted following removal of the woody species.

  6. Vegetative ecological characteristics of restored reed (Phragmites australis) wetlands in the Yellow River Delta, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuehong; Yu, Junbao; Zhou, Di; Dong, Hongfang; Li, Yunzhao; Lin, Qianxin; Guan, Bo; Wang, Yongli

    2012-02-01

    In this study, we compared ecological characteristics of wetland vegetation in a series of restoration projects that were carried out in the wetlands of Yellow River Delta. The investigated characteristics include plant composition structure, species diversity and community similarity in three kinds of Phragmites australis wetlands, i.e. restored P. australis wetlands (R1, R2, R3 and R4: restored in 2002, 2005, 2007 and 2009, respectively), natural P. australis wetland (N) and degraded P. australis wetland (D) to assess the process of wetlands restoration. The coverage of the R1 was 99%, which was similar to natural wetland. Among all studied wetlands, the highest and lowest stem density was observed in R1 and R2, respectively, Plant height and stem diameter show the same trend as N > R2 > R1 > R3 > D > R4. Species diversity of restored P. australis wetlands became closed to natural wetland. Both species richness and Shannon-Wiener index had similar tendency: increased first and then decreased with restored time. The highest species richness and species diversity were observed in R2, while the lowest values of those parameters were found in natural P. australis wetland. Similarity indexes between restored wetlands and natural wetland increased with the restoration time, but they were still less than 50%. The results indicate that the vegetation of P. australis wetlands has experienced a great improvement after several years' restoration, and it is feasible to restored degraded P. australis wetlands by pouring fresh water into those wetlands in the Yellow River Delta. However, it is notable that costal degraded P. australis wetland in this region may take years to decades to reach the status of natural wetland. PMID:21968874

  7. Waving Vegetation Facilitates Gas Transfer in Wetland Surface Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, M. R.; Variano, E. A.

    2014-12-01

    Wind-driven movement of flexible vegetation has been an overlooked mechanism in wetland gas models. To understand the magnitude of this effect, a laboratory experiment was conducted. An array of plastic tubes, representing vegetation, was mechanically forced at a range of frequencies and amplitudes matching those observed in the field. Starting from deoxygenated water, we measured dissolved oxygen at mid-depth in the water column using a YSI ProODO as the water re-equilibrated with the atmosphere. From this DO timeseries, we calculated the gas transfer velocity, k, using the thin film gas transport model. This measurement of k was independent of the water-wall interactions, which can be significant in laboratory-scale tanks. Our experiments have shown that the movement of vegetation stirs the water column and thus contributes to the transfer of dissolved gases across the air-water interface. Increased transfer was observed with movements of higher frequency and amplitude. To estimate the occurrence of this phenomena in natural systems, data (e.g. velocity profiles) from a long-term monitoring project in the Florida Everglades will be analyzed. The results can help improve current gas budgets and predict biogeochemical processes.

  8. DEVELOPING A WETLAND MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM: LAND USE, INVASIVE SPECIES AND BIOASSESSMENT CRITERIA FOR VEGETATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project is one of a suite of interdependent projects developed by members of the Montana Interagency Wetland Monitoring and Assessment Work Group to develop a comprehensive wetland monitoring and assessment program. This project will develop vegetation metrics related to we...

  9. Tidal wetland vegetation and ecotone profiles: The Rush Ranch Open Space Preserve

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Rush Ranch Open Space Preserve (Rush Ranch) is a component site of the San Francisco Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (SF Bay NERR) that includes one of the largest undiked tidal wetlands in the San Francisco Estuary. The brackish tidal wetlands grade into transitional vegetation and unde...

  10. DEVELOPING A WETLAND MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM; BIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT CRITERIA FOR VEGETATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Montana Natural Heritage Program will sample and evaluate riverine and depressional wetlands in the Middle Milk watershed in the Great Plains ecoregion. We will sample wetlands across a human disturbance gradient and collect data on vegetation structure and composition and e...

  11. Using MODIS Normalized Difference Vegetation Index to monitor seasonal and inter-annual dynamics of wetland vegetation in the Great Artesian Basin: a baseline for assessment of future changes in a unique ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petus, C.; Lewis, M.; White, D.

    2012-07-01

    The Great Artesian Basin mound springs (Australia) are unique wetland ecosystems of great significance. However, these unique ecosystems are endangered by anthropogenic water extraction. Relationships have been established between the vegetated wetland area and the discharge associated with individual springs, providing a potential means of monitoring groundwater flow using measurements of wetland area. Previous studies using this relationship to monitor Great Artesian Basin springs have used aerial photography or high resolution satellite images, giving sporadic temporal information. These "snapshot " studies need to be placed within a longer and more regular context to better assess changes in response to aquifer draw-downs. In this study, the potential of medium resolution MODIS Normalized Difference Vegetation Index data for studying the long-term and high frequency temporal dynamics of wetland vegetation at the Dalhousie Spring Complex of the GAB is tested. Photosynthetic activity within Dalhousie wetlands could be differentiated from surrounding land responses. The study showed good correlation between wetland vegetated area and groundwater flow, but also the important influence of natural species phenologies, rainfall, and human activity on the observed seasonal and inter-annual vegetation dynamic. Declining trends in the extent of wetland areas were observed over the 2000- 2009 period followed by a return of wetland vegetation since 2010. This study underlined the need to continue long-term medium resolution satellite studies of the Great Artesian Basin as these data provide a good understanding of variability within the wetlands, give temporal context for less frequent studies and a strong baseline for assessment of future changes.

  12. A Comparison of Vegetation in Artificially Isolated Wetlands on West Galveston Island 

    E-print Network

    Wilson, Ashley

    2012-07-16

    A COMPARISON OF VEGETATION IN ARTIFICALLY ISOLATED WETLANDS ON WEST GALVESTON ISLAND A Thesis by ASHLEY MICHELLE WILSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  13. Establishing a tracer-based sediment budget to preserve wetlands in Mediterranean mountain agroecosystems (NE Spain).

    PubMed

    Navas, Ana; López-Vicente, Manuel; Gaspar, Leticia; Palazón, Leticia; Quijano, Laura

    2014-10-15

    Mountain wetlands in Mediterranean regions are particularly threatened in agricultural environments due to anthropogenic activity. An integrated study of source-to-sink sediment fluxes was carried out in an agricultural catchment that holds a small permanent lake included in the European NATURA 2000 Network. More than 1000 yrs of human intervention and the variety of land uses pose a substantial challenge when attempting to estimate sediment fluxes which is the first requirement to protect fragile wetlands. To date, there have been few similar studies and those that have been carried out have not addressed such complex terrain. Geostatistical interpolation and GIS tools were used to derive the soil spatial redistribution from point (137)Cs inventories, and to establish the sediment budget in a catchment located in the Southern Pyrenees. The soil redistribution was intense and soil erosion predominated over soil deposition. On the areas that maintained natural vegetation the median soil erosion and deposition rates were moderate, ranging from 2.6 to 6 Mg ha yr(-1) and 1.5 to 2.1 Mg ha yr(-1), respectively. However, in cultivated fields both erosion and deposition were significantly higher (ca. 20 Mg ha yr(-1)), and the maximum rates were always associated with tillage practices. Farming activities in the last part of the 20th century intensified soil erosion, as evidenced by the 1963 (137)Cs peaks in the lake cores and estimates from the sediment budget indicated a net deposition of 671 Mg yr(-1). Results confirm a siltation risk for the lake and provide a foundation for designing management plans to preserve this threatened wetland. This comprehensive approach provides information useful for understanding processes that influence the patterns and rates of soil transfer and deposition within fragile Mediterranean mountain wetlands subjected to climate and anthropogenic stresses. PMID:25064720

  14. The flood pulse as the underlying driver of vegetation in the largest wetland and fishery of the Mekong Basin.

    PubMed

    Arias, Mauricio E; Cochrane, Thomas A; Norton, David; Killeen, Timothy J; Khon, Puthea

    2013-11-01

    The Tonle Sap is the largest wetland in Southeast Asia and one of the world's most productive inland fisheries. The Mekong River inundates the Tonle Sap every year, shaping a mosaic of natural and agricultural habitats. Ongoing hydropower development, however, will dampen the flood pulse that maintains the Tonle Sap. This study established the current underlying relationship among hydrology, vegetation, and human use. We found that vegetation is strongly influenced by flood duration; however, this relationship was heavily distorted by fire, grazing, and rice cultivation. The expected flood pulse alteration will result in higher water levels during the dry season, permanently inundating existing forests. The reduction of the maximum flood extent will facilitate agricultural expansion into natural habitats. This study is the most comprehensive field survey of the Tonle Sap to date, and it provides fundamental knowledge needed to understand the underlying processes that maintain this important wetland. PMID:23877417

  15. Influence of hummocks and emergent vegetation on hydraulic performance in a surface flow wastewater treatment wetland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keefe, Steffanie H.; Daniels, Joan S.; Runkel, Robert L.; Wass, Roland D.; Stiles, Eric A.; Barber, Larry B.

    2010-01-01

    A series of tracer experiments were conducted biannually at the start and end of the vegetation growing season in a surface flow wastewater treatment wetland located near Phoenix, AZ. Tracer experiments were conducted prior to and following reconfiguration and replanting of a 1.2 ha treatment wetland from its original design of alternating shallow and deep zones to incorporate hummocks (shallow planting beds situated perpendicular to flow). Tracer test data were analyzed using analysis of moments and the one-dimensional transport with inflow and storage numerical model to evaluate the effects of the seasonal vegetation growth cycle and hummocks on solute transport. Following reconfiguration, vegetation coverage was relatively small, and minor changes in spatial distribution influenced wetland hydraulics. During start-up conditions, the wetland underwent an acclimation period characterized by small vegetation coverage and large transport cross-sectional areas. At the start of the growing season, new growth of emergent vegetation enhanced hydraulic performance. At the end of the growing season, senescing vegetation created short-circuiting. Wetland hydrodynamics were associated with high volumetric efficiencies and velocity heterogeneities. The hummock design resulted in breakthrough curves characterized by multiple secondary tracer peaks indicative of varied flow paths created by bottom topography.

  16. Effects of vegetation management in constructed wetland treatment cells on water quality and mosquito production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thullen, J.S.; Sartoris, J.J.; Walton, W.E.

    2002-01-01

    The impact of three vegetation management strategies on wetland treatment function and mosquito production was assessed in eight free water surface wetland test cells in southern California during 1998-1999. The effectiveness of the strategies to limit bulrush Schoenoplectus californicus culm density within the cells was also investigated. Removing accumulated emergent biomass and physically limiting the area in which vegetation could reestablish, significantly improved the ammonia - nitrogen removal efficiency of the wetland cells, which received an ammonia-dominated municipal wastewater effluent (average loading rate = 9.88 kg/ha per day NH4-N). We determined that interspersing open water with emergent vegetation is critical for maintaining the wetland's treatment capability, particularly for systems high in NH4-N. Burning aboveground plant parts and thinning rhizomes only temporarily curtailed vegetation proliferation in shallow zones, whereas creating hummocks surrounded by deeper water successfully restricted the emergent vegetation to the shallower hummock areas. Since the hummock configuration kept open water areas interspersed throughout the stands of emergent vegetation, the strategy was also effective in reducing mosquito production. Decreasing vegetation biomass reduced mosquito refuge areas while increasing mosquito predator habitat. Therefore, the combined goals of water quality improvement and mosquito management were achieved by managing the spatial pattern of emergent vegetation to mimic an early successional growth stage, i.e. actively growing plants interspersed with open water. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of vegetation in mitigating the toxicity of pesticide mixtures in sediments of a wetland mesocosm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study assessed effects of a mixture of two pesticides, diazinon and permethrin, on 48-h sediment toxicity to Hyalella azteca in a constructed wetland mesocosm containing non-vegetated and vegetated sections. Sediment samples were collected at inflow, middle, and back points within each sectio...

  18. Aircraft MSS data registration and vegetation classification of wetland change detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, E.J.; Jensen, J.R.; Ramsey, Elijah W., III; Mackey, H.E., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Portions of the Savannah River floodplain swamp were evaluated for vegetation change using high resolution (5a??6 m) aircraft multispectral scanner (MSS) data. Image distortion from aircraft movement prevented precise image-to-image registration in some areas. However, when small scenes were used (200-250 ha), a first-order linear transformation provided registration accuracies of less than or equal to one pixel. A larger area was registered using a piecewise linear method. Five major wetland classes were identified and evaluated for change. Phenological differences and the variable distribution of vegetation limited wetland type discrimination. Using unsupervised methods and ground-collected vegetation data, overall classification accuracies ranged from 84 per cent to 87 per cent for each scene. Results suggest that high-resolution aircraft MSS data can be precisely registered, if small areas are used, and that wetland vegetation change can be accurately detected and monitored.

  19. Use of a wetland index to evaluate changes in riparian vegetation after livestock exclusion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coles-Ritchie, M. C.; Roberts, D.W.; Kershner, J.L.; Henderson, R.C.

    2007-01-01

    A method was developed to characterize ecological integrity of riparian sites based on the abundance of hydric species. This wetland index can be calculated with species data, or with community type data as performed here. Classified riparian community types were used to describe vegetation at 14 livestock exclosures and adjacent grazed areas. Community type wetland index values were generated and used to calculate site wetland index values. It was hypothesized that removal of livestock would result in higher wetland index values because of release from herbivory and decreased physical disturbance of vegetation, streambanks, and soil. The wetland index for exclosures was about 12% higher than grazed sites; differences were statistically significant (p < 0.01) based on paired t-tests. The increase in hydric vegetation after livestock exclusion may have contributed to the greater bank stability (p = 0.002) and smaller width-to-depth ratio (p = 0.005) in exclosures. Challenges were encountered in using community types to describe and compare site vegetation, which could be avoided with species data collection. The wetland index can be a tool to monitor sites over time, compare sites with similar environments, or compare sites for which environmental differences can be accounted.

  20. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Produce High-Resolution Seasonally-Relevant Imagery for Classifying Wetland Vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcaccio, J. V.; Markle, C. E.; Chow-Fraser, P.

    2015-08-01

    With recent advances in technology, personal aerial imagery acquired with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) has transformed the way ecologists can map seasonal changes in wetland habitat. Here, we use a multi-rotor (consumer quad-copter, the DJI Phantom 2 Vision+) UAV to acquire a high-resolution (< 8 cm) composite photo of a coastal wetland in summer 2014. Using validation data collected in the field, we determine if a UAV image and SWOOP (Southwestern Ontario Orthoimagery Project) image (collected in spring 2010) differ in their classification of type of dominant vegetation type and percent cover of three plant classes: submerged aquatic vegetation, floating aquatic vegetation, and emergent vegetation. The UAV imagery was more accurate than available SWOOP imagery for mapping percent cover of submergent and floating vegetation categories, but both were able to accurately determine the dominant vegetation type and percent cover of emergent vegetation. Our results underscore the value and potential for affordable UAVs (complete quad-copter system < 3,000 CAD) to revolutionize the way ecologists obtain imagery and conduct field research. In Canada, new UAV regulations make this an easy and affordable way to obtain multiple high-resolution images of small (< 1.0 km2) wetlands, or portions of larger wetlands throughout a year.

  1. Presence of indicator plant species as a predictor of wetland vegetation integrity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Adams, Jean V.; Gara, Brian

    2013-01-01

    We fit regression and classification tree models to vegetation data collected from Ohio (USA) wetlands to determine (1) which species best predict Ohio vegetation index of biotic integrity (OVIBI) score and (2) which species best predict high-quality wetlands (OVIBI score >75). The simplest regression tree model predicted OVIBI score based on the occurrence of three plant species: skunk-cabbage (Symplocarpus foetidus), cinnamon fern (Osmunda cinnamomea), and swamp rose (Rosa palustris). The lowest OVIBI scores were best predicted by the absence of the selected plant species rather than by the presence of other species. The simplest classification tree model predicted high-quality wetlands based on the occurrence of two plant species: skunk-cabbage and marsh-fern (Thelypteris palustris). The overall misclassification rate from this tree was 13 %. Again, low-quality wetlands were better predicted than high-quality wetlands by the absence of selected species rather than the presence of other species using the classification tree model. Our results suggest that a species’ wetland status classification and coefficient of conservatism are of little use in predicting wetland quality. A simple, statistically derived species checklist such as the one created in this study could be used by field biologists to quickly and efficiently identify wetland sites likely to be regulated as high-quality, and requiring more intensive field assessments. Alternatively, it can be used for advanced determinations of low-quality wetlands. Agencies can save considerable money by screening wetlands for the presence/absence of such “indicator” species before issuing permits.

  2. Impacts of Land Use on Wetland Vegetation in the Eastern United States: Timing and Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, C. E.; Willard, D. A.; Townsend, P.; Brown, R.

    2004-12-01

    The timing and scale of vegetation change are dependent on the resilience of the ecosystem to land use change that alters hydrologic response and sediment transport. Using palynological methods, we examine the impacts of land use change in 2 distinct ecosystems (the subtropical Florida Everglades and the temperate Roanoke River floodplain) in the Eastern United States. Twentieth century water management strategies have modified the hydrology within the Florida Everglades resulting in varying degrees of vegetation changes depending on community type and location within the greater Everglades ecosystem. Analysis of pollen assemblages from herbaceous wetland communities such as sawgrass ridges, open water sloughs, and marl prairies, show rapid vegetation change in response to both increases and decreases in hydrology. However, evaluations of these wetland environments over longer time periods (centuries to millennia) and through natural alterations to hydroperiod (like Medieval Warm Period) demonstrated the ability of the vegetation to recover within a few decades. Tree-island communities, composed of flood-intolerant, woody vegetation, are largely resistant to decreases in hydroperiod. They are, however, less tolerant to sustained increases (greater than 5 years) in water levels, with no seasonal drying, resulting in long-term degradation. Tree-island pollen assemblages indicate rapid changes in vegetation composition when subjected to prolonged hydroperiod (essentially drowning the tree islands). Pollen assemblages from the Roanoke River floodplain provide a perspective on the impacts of colonial land clearance, altered sedimentation, and changes in flooding regimes on forested wetland vegetation. After land clearance, organic to mineral sediments covered organic floodplain soils. Palynological evidence suggests a change towards less flood tolerant communities in areas of greatest sedimentation. These results demonstrate the rapid response of wetland plant communities to alterations in hydrology and sedimentation as a result of land use changes. Comparisons of modern records with paleoecological records provide a tool to evaluate the scale and timing of wetland vegetation response to land use change.

  3. Wetland vegetation change detection using high resolution aircraft MSS (multispectral scanner) data

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, E.J.; Jensen, J.R.; Ramsey, E.W.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Portions of the Savannah River floodplain were evaluated for wetland vegetation change using high-resolution (5.6 x 5.6 meter pixel) aircraft multispectral scanner (MSS) data. Image distortion from aircraft movement prevented precise image-to-image registration in some areas. However, when small scenes were used (190 to 240 hectares), a first-order linear transformation provided registration accuracies less than or equal to one pixel. A larger area was successfully registered using a piecewise linear method. Five wetland classes and one transitional community were indentified and evaluated for change. Phenological differences and the variable distribution of vegetation limited wetland type discrimination. Using unsupervised methods and ground-collected vegetation data, overall classification accuracies ranged from 84 to 87 percent for each scene. A post-classification change analysis identified wetlands transformations in some areas. Cypress-tupelo swamp forest was commonly replaced by more thermally and flood-tolerant marsh species. In areas where cooling water releases were discontinued, invasion by scrub/shrub communities occurred. Results show that multi-date, high-resolution aircraft MSS data can be registered if small areas are used, and that wetland vegetation change can be accurately detected and monitored. 33 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. The Effect of Manning's Roughness Calibration on Flow and Sediment transport in Wetlands: Vegetation Drag Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, M.; Nalesso, M.; Garcia, R. F.; Miralles-Wilhelm, F.

    2013-05-01

    Wetland hydrology is one of the most complex and important factors that dictate landscape patterning in wetlands. Understanding factors that affect wetland hydrology are very important. Subtropical wetlands with low gradient, such as The Everglades in South Florida, are generally covered by various type of vegetation with area of highly vegetated and area with almost no plant density. Ridge and slough are one of the several major habitat types in the Everglades that are characterized by highly vegetated ridge with higher elevation and channelized slough with less dense vegetation. They are originally consisted of a peat - based systems of dense sawgrass ridges (Cladium jamaicense) interspersed with adjacent and relatively open sloughs. Because of vegetation dynamics, the hydrology is highly depends on vegetation drag force. Kadlec (1990) and Shi et al., 1995 stated that additional drag exerted by plants reduces the mean flow velocity and depth within the vegetated regions. Vegetation flexibility (flexible grasslike vs. rigid or less flexible bushes or trees) may affect flow resistance. In addition, total or partially submerged vegetation may also change the flow velocity. Most of vegetation in wetlands are partially submerged and therefore, flow resistance can be related to bed shear stress (Yen, 2002; Wu et al., 1999). The new modified Manning's coefficient expression estimates roughness value based on vegetation type, length, density, and vegetation being submerged/unsubmerged (Wu et al., 1999). This modification was applied to flow simulation in the study area at Loxahatchee Impoundment Landscape Assessment (LILA). Loxahatchee Impoundment Landscape Assessment (LILA) is living laboratory of The Everglades and is located at Boynton Beach, Florida and consists of 80 acres land divided into four macrocosms of 200 m × 400 m. Each macrocosm includes one ridge one slough and two tree islands. Two of the cells are non flowing cells and the others are constant flowing cells in LILA. The constant flowing cell, M2, was selected as the study area. Flow was simulated using FLO2D, a FEMA approved program that simulates flow depth and velocity by using modified manning's roughness coefficient based on vegetation drag approach. The result of this simulation will provide an improved understanding of the effect of vegetation dynamics on hydrology and how different vegetation type and density may change flow velocity and therefore sediment transport over time.

  5. The impact of wetland vegetation drying time on abundance of mosquitoes and other invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Michelle R; Keiper, Joe B; Walton, William E

    2003-12-01

    Vegetation management for constructed treatment wetlands often involves knocking down emergent vegetation with heavy equipment and inundating the dead vegetation after a period of drying. Such practices create favorable conditions for larval mosquitoes. We studied the relationship between length of the drying period for an emergent macrophyte, Typha sp., and the abundance of aquatic invertebrates in replicated 0.18-m3 wading pools. The mosquito, Culex tarsalis, was significantly more abundant in pools containing vegetation aged for 2 wk before inundation compared to pools containing vegetation aged 5 wk, freshly cut vegetation, or without vegetation. Potential larval mosquito food resources (particles between 2 and 61 microm in equivalent spherical diameter) in the 2-wk aging treatment did not differ significantly from the other treatments during the 5-wk experiment. The abundance of other larval culicids, nonculicine Diptera, and potential mosquito predators (i.e., Dytiscidae and Aeshnidae) did not differ significantly among the vegetation aging treatments. PMID:14710737

  6. The use of discharge perturbations to understand in situ vegetation resistance in wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, A. M. Wasantha; Moustafa, M. Zaki; Wilcox, Walter M.

    2015-04-01

    The ability to better quantify resistance to water flow exerted by vegetation is receiving increased attention due to ongoing worldwide efforts to restore natural vegetation communities in the wetlands and use of vegetation for environmental benefits in streams and wetlands. In south Florida, vegetation resistance affects discharge through shallow wetlands of the Everglades and projects under way in the system to restore remaining natural systems. A more detailed knowledge of the flow dynamics in these wetlands is required to improve modeling of these systems that supports restoration and management efforts. The goal of this investigation is to understand the flow dynamics and the vegetation resistance within a 3 km by 7 km area in the Everglades referred to as STA-3/4 Cell 3A. Methods are developed to demonstrate the use of analytical solutions of partial differential equations (PDEs) and inverse methods to obtain bulk and spatially varying resistance parameters. To achieve this goal, a field test was conducted using sinusoidal discharge disturbances capable of creating water waves in the storm water treatment area (STAs). The discharges, wave speeds, and the wave attenuation rates from the test are used to develop graphical and empirical functions expressing discharge in terms of water depth and energy slope. The empirical functions developed are power law type, and different functions are developed for different depths. The results show that the Manning's equation is not applicable for wetlands with thick emergent vegetation, as well as the difficulty of applying a single power law-type expression for vegetation resistance over a wide range of depths and energy slopes without errors. This is partly due to the existence of multiple flow regimes and different power exponents over depth and energy slopes in these regimes. Results show that the flow regime at low depths is similar to porous media flow, and the flow regime at higher depths is more turbulent.

  7. Analysis on vegetation changes of Maqu alpine wetlands in the Yellow River source region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Lin; Huang, Chong; Liu, Gaohuan; Liu, Qingsheng; Zhao, Jun

    2014-11-01

    The Maqu alpine wetlands have irreplaceable function in maintaining ecological balance and conserving biodiversity to the upriver regions of the Yellow River. In last 30 years, Global warming causes significant changes in vegetation. However, the Maqu alpine wetland is undergoing a degradation caused by warming and drying climate. Aim of this study is to investigate the vegetation changes for a better understanding the consequence of climate variations to the wetland degradation. Based on the Landsat TM images of 2000 and 2010, the landscape pattern changes were analyzed by classification statistics, dynamic transfer matrix and landscape pattern indices. Based on the MOD11A2 and MOD13A2 data from 2000 to 2010, NDVI and land surface temperature (LST) dataset were extracted. NDVI time-series data processed with S-G filtering method was used to find temporal and spatial variation characteristics, and linear trend was analyzed by ordinary least squares regression method. NDVI and LST were used to construct Ts-NDVI feature space, and then TVDI was obtained to explore changes of soil moisture. Relationship between climate variations and wetland degradation were found by ordinary least squares regression method. Results indicated that both wetland area and landscape heterogeneity decreased. Annual NDVI presented fluctuated decreasing trend and there was strong spatial heterogeneity in patterns of NDVI change. Annual TVDI proved to have an increasing trend which showed the drought gradually intensified. "Warming and drought" climate appear to be critical factors contributing to wetland degradation. Precipitation has a stronger correlation rather than temperature.

  8. Mapping swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) seed productivity using spectral values and vegetation indices in managed wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Rahilly, P.J.A.; Li, D.; Guo, Q.; Zhu, J.; Ortega, R.; Quinn, N.W.T.; Harmon, T.C.

    2010-01-15

    This work examines the potential to predict the seed productivity of a key wetland plant species using spectral reflectance values and spectral vegetation indices. Specifically, the seed productivity of swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) was investigated in two wetland ponds, managed for waterfowl habitat, in California's San Joaquin Valley. Spectral reflectance values were obtained and associated spectral vegetation indices (SVI) calculated from two sets of high resolution aerial images (May 11, 2006 and June 9, 2006) and were compared to the collected vegetation data. Vegetation data were collected and analyzed from 156 plots for total aboveground biomass, total aboveground swamp timothy biomass, and total swamp timothy seed biomass. The SVI investigated included the Simple Ratio (SR), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), Transformed Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (TSAVI), Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI), and Global Environment Monitoring Index (GEMI). We evaluated the correlation of the various SVI with in situ vegetation measurements for linear, quadratic, exponential and power functions. In all cases, the June image provided better predictive capacity relative to May, a result that underscores the importance of timing imagery to coincide with more favorable vegetation maturity. The north pond with the June image using SR and the exponential function (R{sup 2}=0.603) proved to be the best predictor of swamp timothy seed productivity. The June image for the south pond was less predictive, with TSAVI and the exponential function providing the best correlation (R{sup 2}=0.448). This result was attributed to insufficient vegetal cover in the south pond (or a higher percentage of bare soil) due to poor drainage conditions which resulted in a delay in swamp timothy germination. The results of this work suggest that spectral reflectance can be used to estimate seed productivity in managed seasonal wetlands.

  9. Bathymetry and vegetation in isolated marsh and cypress wetlands in the northern Tampa Bay Area, 2000-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haag, Kim H.; Lee, Terrie M.; Herndon, Donald C.

    2005-01-01

    Wetland bathymetry and vegetation mapping are two commonly used lines of evidence for assessing the hydrologic and ecologic status of expansive coastal and riverine wetlands. For small isolated freshwater wetlands, however, bathymetric data coupled with vegetation assessments are generally scarce, despite the prevalence of isolated wetlands in many regions of the United States and the recognized importance of topography as a control on inundation patterns and vegetation distribution. In the northern Tampa Bay area of west-central Florida, bathymetry was mapped and vegetation was assessed in five marsh and five cypress wetlands. These 10 isolated wetlands were grouped into three categories based on the effects of ground-water withdrawals from regional municipal well fields: natural (no effect), impaired (drier than natural), and augmented (wetlands with artificially augmented water levels). Delineation of the wetland perimeter was a critical component for estimating wetland-surface area and stored water volume. The wetland perimeter was delineated by the presence of Serenoa repens (the 'palmetto fringe') at 9 of the 10 sites. At the 10th site, where the palmetto fringe was absent, hydric-soils indicators were used to delineate the perimeter. Bathymetric data were collected using one or more techniques, depending on the physical characteristics of each wetland. Wetland stage was measured hourly using continuous stage recorders. Wetland vegetation was assessed semiannually for 2 1/2 years in fixed plots located at three distinct elevations. Vegetation assessments were used to determine the community composition and the relative abundance of obligate, facultative wet, and facultative species at each elevation. Bathymetry maps were generated, and stage-area and stage-volume relations were developed for all 10 wetlands. Bathymetric data sets containing a high density of data points collected at frequent and regular spatial intervals provided the most useful stage-area and stage-volume relations. Bathymetric maps of several wetlands also were generated using a low density of data points collected along transect lines or contour lines. In a comparative analysis of the three mapping approaches, stage-area and stage-volume relations based on transect data alone underestimated (by 50-100 percent over certain ranges of stage) the wetland area and volume compared to results using a high density of data points. Adding data points collected along one elevation contour below the wetland perimeter to the transect data set greatly improved the agreement of the resulting stage-area and stage-volume relations to the high-density mapping approach. Stage-area relations and routinely monitored stage data were used to compare and contrast the average flooded area in a natural marsh and an impaired marsh over a 2-year period. Vegetation assessments used together with flooded-area information provided the potential for extrapolating vegetation results from points or transects to wetlands as a whole. A comparison of the frequency of flooding of different areas of the wetland and the species composition in vegetation plots at different elevations indicated the dependence of vegetation on inundation frequency. Because of the broad tolerances of many wetlands plants to a range of inundation conditions, however, vegetation assessments alone provided less definitive evidence of the hydrologic differences between the two sites, and hydrologic changes occurring during the 2 years, than the flooded-area frequencies. Combining flooded-area frequencies with vegetation assessments could provide a more versatile and insightful approach for determining the ecological status of wetlands than using vegetation and stage data alone. Flooded-area frequencies may further provide a useful approach for assessing the ecological status of wetlands where historical vegetation surveys and stage data are lacking. Comparing the contemporary flooded-area frequencies a

  10. Experimental removal of wetland emergent vegetation leads to decreased methylmercury production in surface sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Windham-Myers, L.; Marvin-DiPasquale, M.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Agee, J.L.; Cox, M.H.; Heredia-Middleton, P.; Coates, C.; Kakouros, E.

    2009-01-01

    We performed plant removal (devegetation) experiments across a suite of ecologically diverse wetland settings (tidal salt marshes, river floodplain, rotational rice fields, and freshwater wetlands with permanent or seasonal flooding) to determine the extent to which the presence (or absence) of actively growing plants influences the activity of the Hg(II)-methylating microbial community and the availability of Hg(II) to those microbes. Vegetated control plots were paired with neighboring devegetated plots in which photosynthetic input was terminated 4-8 months prior to measurements, through clipping aboveground biomass, severing belowground connections, and shading the sediment surface to prevent regrowth. Across all wetlands, devegetation decreased the activity of the Hg(II)-methylating microbial community (kmeth) by 38%, calculated MeHg production potential (MP) rates by 36%, and pore water acetate concentration by 78%. Decreases in MP were associated with decreases in microbial sulfate reduction in salt marsh settings. In freshwater agricultural wetlands, decreases in MP were related to indices of microbial iron reduction. Sediment MeHg concentrations were also significantly lower in devegetated than in vegetated plots in most wetland settings studied. Devegetation effects were correlated with live root density (percent volume) and were most profound in vegetated sites with higher initial pore water acetate concentrations. Densely rooted wetlands had the highest rates of microbial Hg(II)-methylation activity but often the lowest concentrations of bioavailable reactive Hg(II). We conclude that the exudation of labile organic carbon (e.g., acetate) by plants leads to enhanced microbial sulfate and iron reduction activity in the rhizosphere, which results in high rates of microbial Hg(II)-methyation and high MeHg concentrations in wetland sediment.

  11. Experimental removal of wetland emergent vegetation leads to decreased methylmercury production in surface sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Agee, Jennifer L.; Cox, Marisa H.; Heredia-Middleton, Pilar; Coates, Carolyn; Kakouros, Evangelos

    2009-01-01

    We performed plant removal (devegetation) experiments across a suite of ecologically diverse wetland settings (tidal salt marshes, river floodplain, rotational rice fields, and freshwater wetlands with permanent or seasonal flooding) to determine the extent to which the presence (or absence) of actively growing plants influences the activity of the Hg(II)-methylating microbial community and the availability of Hg(II) to those microbes. Vegetated control plots were paired with neighboring devegetated plots in which photosynthetic input was terminated 4–8 months prior to measurements, through clipping aboveground biomass, severing belowground connections, and shading the sediment surface to prevent regrowth. Across all wetlands, devegetation decreased the activity of the Hg(II)-methylating microbial community (kmeth) by 38%, calculated MeHg production potential (MP) rates by 36%, and pore water acetate concentration by 78%. Decreases in MP were associated with decreases in microbial sulfate reduction in salt marsh settings. In freshwater agricultural wetlands, decreases in MP were related to indices of microbial iron reduction. Sediment MeHg concentrations were also significantly lower in devegetated than in vegetated plots in most wetland settings studied. Devegetation effects were correlated with live root density (percent volume) and were most profound in vegetated sites with higher initial pore water acetate concentrations. Densely rooted wetlands had the highest rates of microbial Hg(II)-methylation activity but often the lowest concentrations of bioavailable reactive Hg(II). We conclude that the exudation of labile organic carbon (e.g., acetate) by plants leads to enhanced microbial sulfate and iron reduction activity in the rhizosphere, which results in high rates of microbial Hg(II)-methyation and high MeHg concentrations in wetland sediment.

  12. Diazinon mitigation in constructed wetlands: influence of vegetation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In intensively cultivated areas, agriculture is a significant source of pesticides associated with storm runoff. When these pollutants enter aquatic receiving waters, they have potential to damage nearby aquatic ecosystems. Constructed wetlands are a best management practice (BMP) designed to help...

  13. HYDROLOGIC CONSTRAINTS TO THE EFFECTIVENESS OF VEGETATED RIPARIAN BUFFERS AND CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS FOR POLLUTION CONTROL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetated riparian buffers and constructed wetlands are among the stream-corridor management systems that can reduce the amount of sediments, nutrients, and biocides entering streams. Hydrologic factors can constrain water-quality benefits of these practices because riparian buffers can only affect...

  14. Modeling Vegetation Dynamics in Response to Hydrological Changes in a Small Urban Tropical Freshwater Wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui, T. M.; Palanisamy, B.; Mohanadas, H.

    2011-12-01

    Wetlands worldwide face drastic degradation from human-induced changes. A small freshwater wetland located within the dense urbanized island state of Singapore---the Nee Soon Wetland---is no exception. It is the only significant locality in Singapore of peat swamp forest and is home to a wide range of rare and endangered floral and faunal species. Unfortunately, changes in downstream land use and surrounding reservoirs' operations may pose threats to the coupled hydrological and vegetation systems. This study develops and applies coupled hydrological-vegetation models to understand the dynamic relationships between hydrology and vegetation systems, and simulates vegetation responses to hydrological changes in Nee Soon. The models combine a hydrological component with a vegetation component. The hydrological component accounts for both saturated and unsaturated flows, and incorporates evapotranspiration, rainfall infiltration and recharge from streams and reservoirs. The vegetation component is described by Lokta-Volterra equations that are tailored for plant growth, to simulate the vegetation dynamics of up to three species that thrive in different flooding conditions. Important findings include: (1) groundwater levels within Nee Soon are not highly sensitive to the operating levels of the surrounding reservoirs. However, (2) downstream drainage results in a localized zone of influence with significant adverse impacts, especially on the less flood-tolerant species. In addition, (3) the severely impacted less flood-tolerant species is unable to recover even when previous hydrological conditions are restored, unless the downstream drainage duration is reduced, or the plant characteristics such as maximum assimilation rates or competitiveness are increased. Finally, (4) hydrological conditions and species competitiveness supersede any other plant growth characteristics in determining the stable coexistence of different species. The developed models and modeling results simulation results help preservation efforts and guide conservation strategies in Nee Soon, as well as many wetlands worldwide.

  15. Soil-vegetation correlations in selected wetlands and uplands of North-Central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Best, G. Ronnie; Wolfe, Charlotte; Segal, Debra S.

    1990-01-01

    Vegetation on four hydric and two nonhydric soils series in north-central Florida was sampled as part of a national study examining the correspondence between wetland vegetation and soils. The wetland character of the vegetation was estimated by weighted average calculations using published wetland indicator values for individual plant species. The weighted averages produced an ordering of plant communities in general agreement with the hydric character of the soils. However, the two nonhydric soils has weighted average scores slightly below 3, normally considered the lowest end of the range of nonhydric vegetation. There was no clear or consistent effect of fire management on the weighted average scores. Vegetation strata (herbaceous, low shrub, tall shrub, and trees) were generally similar in weighted average values, with the wettest of the hydric soils tending to be low in all strata and the nonhydric soils tending to be high in all strata. However, strata differed considerably in the specific values for a single soil and in the specific rank ordering of soils in different strata.

  16. Integrating field sampling, geostatistics and remote sensing to map wetland vegetation in the Pantanal, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arieira, J.; Karssenberg, D.; de Jong, S. M.; Addink, E. A.; Couto, E. G.; Nunes da Cunha, C.; Skøien, J. O.

    2011-03-01

    Development of efficient methodologies for mapping wetland vegetation is of key importance to wetland conservation. Here we propose the integration of a number of statistical techniques, in particular cluster analysis, universal kriging and error propagation modelling, to integrate observations from remote sensing and field sampling for mapping vegetation communities and estimating uncertainty. The approach results in seven vegetation communities with a known floral composition that can be mapped over large areas using remotely sensed data. The relationship between remotely sensed data and vegetation patterns, captured in four factorial axes, were described using multiple linear regression models. There were then used in a universal kriging procedure to reduce the mapping uncertainty. Cross-validation procedures and Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantify the uncertainty in the resulting map. Cross-validation showed that accuracy in classification varies according with the community type, as a result of sampling density and configuration. A map of uncertainty derived from Monte Carlo simulations revealed significant spatial variation in classification, but this had little impact on the proportion and arrangement of the communities observed. These results suggested that mapping improvement could be achieved by increasing the number of field observations of those communities with a scattered and small patch size distribution; or by including a larger number of digital images as explanatory variables in the model. Comparison of the resulting plant community map with a flood duration map, revealed that flooding duration is an important driver of vegetation zonation. This mapping approach is able to integrate field point data and high-resolution remote-sensing images, providing a new basis to map wetland vegetation and allow its future application in habitat management, conservation assessment and long-term ecological monitoring in wetland landscapes.

  17. Hydrologic, soil, and vegetation gradients in remnant and constructed riparian wetlands in west-central Missouri, 2001-04

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heimann, David C.; Mettler-Cherry, Paige A.

    2004-01-01

    A study was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Conservation at the Four Rivers Conservation Area (west-central Missouri), between January 2001 and March 2004, to examine the relations between environmental factors (hydrology, soils, elevation, and landform type) and the spatial distribution of vegetation in remnant and constructed riparian wetlands. Vegetation characterization included species composition of ground, understory, and overstory layers in selected landforms of a remnant bottomland hardwood ecosystem, monitoring survival and growth of reforestation plots in leveed and partially leveed constructed wetlands, and determining gradients in colonization of herbaceous vegetation in a constructed wetland. Similar environmental factors accounted for variation in the distribution of ground, understory, and overstory vegetation in the remnant bottomland forest plots. The primary measured determining factors in the distribution of vegetation in the ground layer were elevation, soil texture (clay and silt content), flooding inundation duration, and ponding duration, while the distribution of vegetation in the understory layer was described by elevation, soil texture (clay, silt, and sand content), total flooding and ponding inundation duration, and distance from the Marmaton or Little Osage River. The primary measured determining factors in the distribution of overstory vegetation in Unit 1 were elevation, soil texture (clay, silt, and sand content), total flooding and ponding inundation duration, ponding duration, and to some extent, flooding inundation duration. Overall, the composition and structure of the remnant bottomland forest is indicative of a healthy, relatively undisturbed flood plain forest. Dominant species have a distribution of individuals that shows regeneration of these species with significant recruitment in the smaller size classes. The bottomland forest is an area whose overall hydrology has not been significantly altered; however, portions of the area have suffered from hydrologic alteration by a drainage ditch that is resulting in the displacement of swamp and marsh species by colonizing shrub and tree species. This area likely will continue to develop into an immature flood plain forest under the current (2004) hydrologic regime. Reforestation plots in constructed wetlands consisted of sampling survival and growth of multiple tree species (Quercus palustris, pin oak; Carya illinoiensis, pecan) established under several production methods and planted at multiple elevations. Comparison of survival between tree species and production types showed no significant differences for all comparisons. Survival was high for both species and all production types, with the highest mortality seen in the mounded root production method (RPM?) Quercus palustris (pin oak, 6.9 percent), while direct seeded Quercus palustris at middle elevation and bare root Quercus palustris seedlings at the low elevation plots had 100 percent survival. Measures of growth (diameter and height) were assessed among species, production types, and elevation by analyzing relative growth. The greatest rate of tree diameter (72.3 percent) and height (65.3 percent) growth was observed for direct seeded Quercus palustris trees planted at a middle elevation site. Natural colonized vegetation data were collected at multiple elevations within an abandoned cropland area of a constructed wetland. The primary measured determining factors in the distribution of herbaceous vegetation in this area were elevation, ponding duration, and soil texture. Richness, evenness, and diversity were all significantly greater in the highest elevation plots as a result of more recent disturbance in this area. While flood frequency and duration define the delivery mechanism for inundation on the flood plain, it is the duration of ponding and amount of 'topographic capture' of these floodwaters in fluvial lan

  18. Drivers and feedbacks in spatial and temporal patterning of hydrology and vegetation in the Everglades wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralles-Wilhelm, F.; Foti, R.; Rinaldo, A.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.; Del Jesus, M.

    2013-05-01

    Hosting a large variety of vegetal and animal species, many of which rare or endangered, wetlands are among the most rich and vulnerable ecosystems in the world. Throughout the past century, the growing climatic impact and the increasing anthropogenic pressure have seriously threatened their natural equilibrium and substantially deteriorated their ecosystems. For fragility, biodiversity and extension, the Everglades is probably one of the most iconic wetlands in the world. After decades of land seizing and exploitation following the southward march of development in Florida, awareness of the importance of the Everglades wetlands has recently risen, bringing it to the center of one of the largest and most ambitious restoration projects ever attempted. Wetlands equilibrium and biodiversity are crucially linked to the hydrologic regime. In the Everglades, hydroperiods (i.e. percent of time a site is inundated) exert a critical control in the creation of habitat niches for different plant species. However, the feedbacks between the hydrologic signature and the plant dynamics that ultimately yield the observed spatial vegetation patterns are unknown. We identify both the main hydrologic and local drivers of the vegetation species spatial configuration and use them within a robust modeling framework able to reproduce the vegetation structures currently observed in the Everglades. By including both exogenous (i.e. hydrologic) and endogenous (i.e. local interactions) forcings, we are able to describe the mechanisms yielding to the observed power law behavior of the cluster size distribution of vegetation species. Since power law clustering is often associated with self-organization and systems near critical transitions, these findings can be successfully used to quantitatively assess the impact of potential climatic shifts and the effect of habitat loss or deterioration due to human activity, and can assist policy makers in identifying case-specific ecosystems restoration and preservation measures.

  19. Vegetation survey of Four Mile Creek wetlands. [Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Loehle, C.

    1990-11-01

    A survey of forested wetlands along upper Four Mile Creek was conducted. The region from Road 3 to the creek headwaters was sampled to evaluate the composition of woody and herbaceons plant communities. All sites were found to fall into either the Nyssa sylvatica (Black Gum) -- Persea borbonia (Red Bay) or Nyssa sylvatica -- Acer rubrum (Red Maple) types. These community types are generally species-rich and diverse. Previous studies (Greenwood et al., 1990; Mackey, 1988) demonstrated contaminant stress in areas downslope from the F- and H-Area seepage basins. In the present study there were some indications of contaminant stress. In the wetland near H-Area, shrub basal area, ground cover stratum species richness, and diversity were low. In the area surrounding the F-Area tree kill zone, ground cover stratum cover and shrub basal area were low and ground cover stratum species richness was low. The moderately stressed site at F-Area also showed reduced overstory richness and diversity and reduced ground cover stratum richness. These results could, however, be due to the very high basal area of overstory trees in both stressed F-Area sites that would reduce light availability to understory plants. No threatened or endangered plant species were found in the areas sampled. 40 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. An ecohydrological model for studying groundwater-vegetation interactions in wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui, Ting Fong May; Low, Swee Yang; Liong, Shie-Yui

    2011-10-01

    SummaryDespite their importance to the natural environment, wetlands worldwide face drastic degradation from changes in land use and climatic patterns. To help preservation efforts and guide conservation strategies, a clear understanding of the dynamic relationship between coupled hydrology and vegetation systems in wetlands, and their responses to engineering works and climate change, is needed. An ecohydrological model was developed in this study to address this issue. The model combines a hydrology component based on the Richards' equation for characterizing variably saturated groundwater flow, with a vegetation component described by Lotka-Volterra equations tailored for plant growth. Vegetation is represented by two characteristic wetland herbaceous plant types which differ in their flood and drought resistances. Validation of the model on a study site in the Everglades demonstrated the capability of the model in capturing field-measured water table and transpiration dynamics. The model was next applied on a section of the Nee Soon swamp forest, a tropical wetland in Singapore, for studying the impact of possible drainage works on the groundwater hydrology and native vegetation. Drainage of 10 m downstream of the wetland resulted in a localized zone of influence within half a kilometer from the drainage site with significant adverse impacts on groundwater and biomass levels, indicating a strong need for conservation. Simulated water table-plant biomass relationships demonstrated the capability of the model in capturing the time-lag in biomass response to water table changes. To test the significance of taking plant growth into consideration, the performance of the model was compared to one that substituted the vegetation component with a pre-specified evapotranspiration rate. Unlike its revised counterpart, the original ecohydrological model explicitly accounted for the drainage-induced plant biomass decrease and translated the resulting reduced transpiration toll back to the groundwater hydrology for a more accurate soil water balance. This study represents, to our knowledge, the first development of an ecohydrological model for wetland ecosystems that characterizes the coupled relationship between variably-saturated groundwater flow and plant growth dynamics.

  1. Wetland vegetation responses to liming an Adirondack watershed

    SciTech Connect

    Mackun, I.R.

    1993-01-01

    Watershed liming as a long-term mitigation strategy to neutralize lake acidity, from increasing acid deposition, was initiated in North America at Woods Lake in the west central Adirondack region of New York. In October 1989, a dose of 10 MT lime (83.5% CaCO[sub 3]) ha[sup [minus]1] was aerially applied to 48% of the watershed. The wetlands adjacent to Woods Lake showed two distinct community types: one dominated by Chamaedaphne calyculata, and one dominated by graminoids and other herbaceous species. Within two years, liming did not alter the structure of either community type, and changed the cover or frequency of only 6 of 64 individual taxa. Most of these changes occurred in the herbaceous community type. The only strong positive response to liming was a nearly threefold increase in cover of the rhizomatous sedge Cladium mariscoides. The cover of Carex interior and Sphagnum spp. benefited from lime addition, while cover of Drosera intermedia and Muhlenbergia uniflora, and frequency of Hypericum canadense responded negatively to lime. Liming influenced the competitive release of only three taxa, all forbs with small growth forms. The tissue chemistry of foliage and twigs of Myrica gale, Chamaedaphne calyculata, and Carex stricta in the Chamaedaphne calyculata community type clearly illustrated species-specific patterns of nutrient accumulation and allocation both before and after liming. Concentrations of 17 of 20 elements responded to liming, although the responses varied among species and plant parts. Carex foliage was least responsive to liming, and Chamaedaphne twigs were most responsive. Elemental changes in plant tissues will be reflected in litter and many influence long-term nutrient dynamics in the wetland community.

  2. RELATIVE NATURE OF WETLANDS: RIPARIAN AND VEGETATIONAL CONSIDERATIONS 1

    E-print Network

    conditions do support, a prevalence of vegetation typically adapted for life in saturated soil conditions of definition. Each person defining these terms uses concepts appropriate to their own particular situation, that address the combi- nation of these seven entities. The current regulations and the proposed seven day test

  3. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  4. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  5. Effects of different vegetation zones on CH4 and N2O emissions in coastal wetlands: a model case study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuhong; Wang, Lixin; Bao, Shumei; Liu, Huamin; Yu, Junbao; Wang, Yu; Shao, Hongbo; Ouyang, Yan; An, Shuqing

    2014-01-01

    The coastal wetland ecosystems are important in the global carbon and nitrogen cycle and global climate change. For higher fragility of coastal wetlands induced by human activities, the roles of coastal wetland ecosystems in CH4 and N2O emissions are becoming more important. This study used a DNDC model to simulate current and future CH4 and N2O emissions of coastal wetlands in four sites along the latitude in China. The simulation results showed that different vegetation zones, including bare beach, Spartina beach, and Phragmites beach, produced different emissions of CH4 and N2O in the same latitude region. Correlation analysis indicated that vegetation types, water level, temperature, and soil organic carbon content are the main factors affecting emissions of CH4 and N2O in coastal wetlands. PMID:24892044

  6. Integrating field sampling, spatial statistics and remote sensing to map wetland vegetation in the Pantanal, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arieira, J.; Karssenberg, D.; de Jong, S. M.; Addink, E. A.; Couto, E. G.; Nunes da Cunha, C.; Skøien, J. O.

    2010-09-01

    To improve the protection of wetlands, it is imperative to have a thorough understanding of their structuring elements and of the identification of efficient methods to describe and monitor them. This article uses sophisticated statistical classification, interpolation and error propagation techniques, in order to describe vegetation spatial patterns, map plant community distribution and evaluate the capability of statistical approaches to produce high-quality vegetation maps. The approach results in seven vegetation communities with a known floral composition that can be mapped over large areas using remotely sensed data. The relations between remotely sensing data and vegetation patterns, captured in four factorial axes, were formalized mathematically in multiple linear regression models and used in a universal kriging procedure to reduce the uncertainty in mapped communities. Universal kriging has shown to be a valuable interpolation technique because parts of vegetation variability not explained by the images could be modeled as spatially correlated residuals, increasing prediction accuracy. Differences in spatial dependence of the vegetation gradients evidenced the multi-scale nature of vegetation communities. Cross validation procedures and Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantify the uncertainty in the resulting map. Cross-validation showed that accuracy in classification varies according with the community type, as a result of sampling density and configuration. A map of uncertainty resulted from Monte Carlo simulations displayed the spatial variation in classification accuracy, showing that the quality of classification varies spatially, even though the proportion and arrangement of communities observed in the original map is preserved to a great extent. These results suggested that mapping improvement could be achieved by increasing the number of field observations of those communities with a scattered and small patch size distribution; or by including new digital images as explanatory variables in the model. By comparing the resulting plant community map with a flood duration map, we verified that flooding duration is an important driver of vegetation zonation. We discuss our study in the context of developing a mapping approach that is able to integrate field point data and high-resolution remote sensing images, providing new basis to map wetland vegetation and allowing its future application in habitat management, conservation assessment and long-term ecological monitoring in wetland landscapes.

  7. Microbial Transformations of Nitrogen, Sulfur, and Iron Dictate Vegetation Composition in Wetlands: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lamers, Leon P. M.; van Diggelen, Josepha M. H.; Op den Camp, Huub J. M.; Visser, Eric J. W.; Lucassen, Esther C. H. E. T.; Vile, Melanie A.; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Smolders, Alfons J. P.; Roelofs, Jan G. M.

    2012-01-01

    The majority of studies on rhizospheric interactions focus on pathogens, mycorrhizal symbiosis, or carbon transformations. Although the biogeochemical transformations of N, S, and Fe have profound effects on vegetation, these effects have received far less attention. This review, meant for microbiologists, biogeochemists, and plant scientists includes a call for interdisciplinary research by providing a number of challenging topics for future ecosystem research. Firstly, all three elements are plant nutrients, and microbial activity significantly changes their availability. Secondly, microbial oxidation with oxygen supplied by radial oxygen loss from roots in wetlands causes acidification, while reduction using alternative electron acceptors leads to generation of alkalinity, affecting pH in the rhizosphere, and hence plant composition. Thirdly, reduced species of all three elements may become phytotoxic. In addition, Fe cycling is tightly linked to that of S and P. As water level fluctuations are very common in wetlands, rapid changes in the availability of oxygen and alternative terminal electron acceptors will result in strong changes in the prevalent microbial redox reactions, with significant effects on plant growth. Depending on geological and hydrological settings, these interacting microbial transformations change the conditions and resource availability for plants, which are both strong drivers of vegetation development and composition by changing relative competitive strengths. Conversely, microbial composition is strongly driven by vegetation composition. Therefore, the combination of microbiological and plant ecological knowledge is essential to understand the biogeochemical and biological key factors driving heterogeneity and total (i.e., microorganisms and vegetation) community composition at different spatial and temporal scales. PMID:22539932

  8. Short-term responses of wetland vegetation after liming of an Adirondack watershed

    SciTech Connect

    Mackun, I.R.; Leopold, D.J.; Raynal, D.J. )

    1994-08-01

    Watershed liming has been suggested as a long-term mitigation strategy for lake acidity, particularly in areas subject to high levels of acidic deposition. However, virtually no information has been available on the impacts of liming on wetland vegetation. In 1989, 1100 Mg of limestone (83.5% CaCO[sub 3]) were aerially applied to 48% (100 ha) of the Woods Lake watershed in the west-central Adirondack region of New York as part of the first comprehensive watershed liming study in North America. We inventoried wetland vegetation in 1.0-m[sup 2] plots before liming and during the subsequent 2 yr. Within this period liming influenced the cover, frequency, or importance values of only 6 of 64 wetland taxa. The cover of Sphagnum spp. and of the cespitose sedge Carex interior decreased in control relative to limed plots, and cover of the rhizomatous sedge Cladium mariscoides increased nearly threefold in limed areas. These two sedges, which are relatively tall, are characteristic of more calcareous habitats. Cover of the grass Muhlenbergia uniflora, cover and importance were adversely affected or inhibited by lime. It is unclear whether liming directly inhibited the growth of these three small-statured species, or whether the adverse effects of lime were mediated through shifts in competitive interactions with other species. The limited responses that we observed to liming, along with changes that occurred in control plots over the study period, may indicate that in the short term watershed liming was no more of a perturbation than the environmental factors responsible for natural annual variation in wetland communities.

  9. Vegetation influences on groundwater salinity and chemical heterogeneity in a freshwater, recharge floodplain wetland, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, Marc S.; Kindness, Andrew; Ellery, William N.; Hughes, Jeffrey C.; Bond, Jonathan K.; Barnes, Kirsten B.

    2011-12-01

    SummaryKnowledge of wetland systems from sub-humid and semi-arid regions remains poor, particularly with regards to surface water-groundwater interactions. As a result of variable inflow and high evapotranspiration rates, such systems are often associated with the development of groundwater salinity. By focusing on the riparian species, Acacia xanthophloea, this study investigates the interaction between vegetation, groundwater, and occurrence of salinity on the Mkuze River floodplain, a seasonally dry, freshwater wetland. The relationship between groundwater chemistry and water table elevation suggests that these deep-rooted trees act as evapotranspirational pumps, selectively removing water and causing the subsurface concentration of solutes. Extensive root systems that reach the water table, coupled with high transpiration rates, result in local groundwater reaching electrical conductivities in excess of 20 mS/cm, approximately 15-20 times higher than those commonly found elsewhere on the floodplain. In this environment, these trees appear tolerant of salinities that would be toxic to most other plants. Plant tissue ion concentrations indicate that solute exclusion is the dominant means for avoidance of salt toxicity, with root turnover a possible regulatory mechanism. Data presented support our hypothesis that these trees exert feedback interactions on groundwater and sediment chemistry. Transpiration results not only in the development of saline groundwater, which is likely to influence vegetation distribution, but also initiates the precipitation of less soluble minerals, such as CaCO 3 and SiO 2, which have the potential to modify sediment pH, hydraulic conductivity, and landscape topography. Spatial variation in chemical processing is thus likely to play a role in creating and maintaining habitat diversity on the floodplain. Wetlands in semi-arid and sub-humid regions are often susceptible to shallow groundwater chemical transformations due to seasonal or episodic inflows and higher evapotranspiration demand. The documentation of solute concentration and retention in wetland systems from a variety of semi-arid and sub-humid areas suggests that evapotranspiration-driven processes may be more widespread than is currently understood. In environments where evapotranspiration plays an important role in the overall water budget of a wetland, similar vegetation-groundwater interactions and chemical processes are likely to occur. Recognition of broad differences between such systems and those of their better studied counterparts in tropical and temperate regions makes it necessary to develop a greater understanding of these processes.

  10. Vegetation composition and soil microbial community structural changes along a wetland hydrological gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasooriya, W. K.; Denef, K.; Peters, J.; Verhoest, N. E. C.; Boeckx, P.

    2008-02-01

    Fluctuations in wetland hydrology create an interplay between aerobic and anaerobic conditions, controlling vegetation composition and microbial community structure and activity in wetland soils. In this study, we investigated the vegetation composition and microbial community structural and functional changes along a wetland hydrological gradient. Two different vegetation communities were distinguished along the hydrological gradient; Caricetum gracilis at the wet depression and Arrhenatheretum elatioris at the drier upper site. Microbial community structural changes were studied by a combined in situ 13CO2 pulse labeling and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) based stable isotope probing approach, which identifies the microbial groups actively involved in assimilation of newly photosynthesized, root-derived C in the rhizosphere soils. Gram negative bacterial communities were relatively more abundant in the surface soils of the drier upper site than in the surface soils of the wetter lower site, while the lower site and the deeper soil layers were relatively more inhabited by gram positive bacterial communities. Despite their large abundance, the metabolically active proportion of gram positive bacterial and actinomycetes communities was much smaller at both sites, compared to that of the gram negative bacterial and fungal communities. This suggests much slower assimilation of root-derived C by gram positive and actinomycetes communities than by gram negative bacteria and fungi at both sites. Ground water depth showed a significant effect on the relative abundance of several microbial communities. Relative abundance of gram negative bacteria significantly decreased with increasing ground water depth while the relative abundance of gram positive bacteria and actinomycetes at the surface layer increased with increasing ground water depth.

  11. Vegetation composition and soil microbial community structural changes along a wetland hydrological gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasooriya, W. K.; Denef, K.; Peters, J.; Verhoest, N. E. C.; Boeckx, P.

    2007-10-01

    Fluctuations in wetland hydrology create an interplay between aerobic and anaerobic conditions, controlling vegetation composition and microbial community structure and activity in wetland soils. In this study, we investigated the vegetation composition and microbial community structural and functional changes along a wetland hydrological gradient. Two different vegetation communities were distinguished along the hydrological gradient; textit{Caricetum gracilis} at the wet depression and textit{Arrhenatherum elatioris} at the drier upper site. Microbial community structural changes were studied by a combined in situ 13CO2 pulse labeling and phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) based stable isotope probing approach, which identifies the microbial groups actively involved in assimilation of newly photosynthesized, root-derived C in the rhizosphere soils. Gram negative bacterial communities were relatively more abundant in the surface soils of the drier upper site than in the surface soils of the wetter lower site, while the lower site and the deeper soil layers were relatively more inhabited by gram positive bacterial communities. Despite their large abundance, the metabolically active proportion of gram positive bacterial and actinomycetes communities was much smaller at both sites, compared to that of the gram negative bacterial and fungal communities. This suggests much slower assimilation of root-derived C by gram positive and actinomycetes communities than by gram negative bacteria and fungi at both sites. Ground water depth showed a significant effect on the relative abundance of several microbial communities. Relative abundance of gram negative bacteria was significantly decreased with increasing ground water depth while the relative abundance of gram positive bacteria and actinomycetes at the surface layer increased with increasing ground water depth.

  12. Hydrologic and Vegetative Removal of Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia, and Toxoplasma gondii Surrogate Microspheres in Coastal Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Jennifer N.; Daniels, Miles E.; Watson, Fred G.; Oates, Stori C.; Miller, Melissa A.; Conrad, Patricia A.; Shapiro, Karen; Hardin, Dane; Dominik, Clare; Melli, Ann; Jessup, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Constructed wetland systems are used to reduce pollutants and pathogens in wastewater effluent, but comparatively little is known about pathogen transport through natural wetland habitats. Fecal protozoans, including Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia, and Toxoplasma gondii, are waterborne pathogens of humans and animals, which are carried by surface waters from land-based sources into coastal waters. This study evaluated key factors of coastal wetlands for the reduction of protozoal parasites in surface waters using settling column and recirculating mesocosm tank experiments. Settling column experiments evaluated the effects of salinity, temperature, and water type (“pure” versus “environmental”) on the vertical settling velocities of C. parvum, G. lamblia, and T. gondii surrogates, with salinity and water type found to significantly affect settling of the parasites. The mesocosm tank experiments evaluated the effects of salinity, flow rate, and vegetation parameters on parasite and surrogate counts, with increased salinity and the presence of vegetation found to be significant factors for removal of parasites in a unidirectional transport wetland system. Overall, this study highlights the importance of water type, salinity, and vegetation parameters for pathogen transport within wetland systems, with implications for wetland management, restoration efforts, and coastal water quality. PMID:23315738

  13. Establishment of vegetation on mined sites by management of mycorrhizae

    SciTech Connect

    Marrs, L.F.; Marx, D.H.; Cordell, C.E.

    1999-07-01

    Plant ecosystems, including those in the tropical, temperate, boreal, and desert zones, began evolving more than 400 million years ago. Trees and other land plants in these environments were faced with many natural stresses including extreme temperature changes, fluctuating levels of available water, soil infertility, catastrophic fires and storms, poor soil physical conditions and competition. Basically, these plants evolved by genetic selection and developed many physical, chemical, and biological requirements necessary to survive these periodically stressed environments. Survivors were those that could form extensive lateral root systems to occupy soil volumes sufficiently large for them to obtain enough essential mineral elements and water to support their above and below ground growth needs. The most competitive plants in these stressed ecosystems were those with the largest root systems. One major biological requirement that evolved was the association of plants with mycorrhizal fungi. This is still true today for land that has been disturbed by mining, construction, and other activities. Successful vegetation establishment on these lands has been achieved by using the biological tools; native tree seedlings, shrubs, forbs, and grasses inoculated with specific, beneficial mycorrhizal fungi. Trees and shrubs are custom grown in nurseries with selected mycorrhizal fungi, such as Pisolithus tinctorius (Pt) and other fungi, provide significant benefits to the plants through increased water and mineral adsorption, decreased toxin absorption and overall reduction of plant stress. This has resulted in significant increases in plant growth and survival rates, density and sustainable vegetation.

  14. A computer model to forecast wetland vegetation changes resulting from restoration and protection in coastal Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Visser, Jenneke M.; Duke-Sylvester, Scott M.; Carter, Jacoby; Broussard, Whitney P., III

    2013-01-01

    The coastal wetlands of Louisiana are a unique ecosystem that supports a diversity of wildlife as well as a diverse community of commercial interests of both local and national importance. The state of Louisiana has established a 5-year cycle of scientific investigation to provide up-to-date information to guide future legislation and regulation aimed at preserving this critical ecosystem. Here we report on a model that projects changes in plant community distribution and composition in response to environmental conditions. This model is linked to a suite of other models and requires input from those that simulate the hydrology and morphology of coastal Louisiana. Collectively, these models are used to assess how alternative management plans may affect the wetland ecosystem through explicit spatial modeling of the physical and biological processes affected by proposed modifications to the ecosystem. We have also taken the opportunity to advance the state-of-the-art in wetland plant community modeling by using a model that is more species-based in its description of plant communities instead of one based on aggregated community types such as brackish marsh and saline marsh. The resulting model provides an increased level of ecological detail about how wetland communities are expected to respond. In addition, the output from this model provides critical inputs for estimating the effects of management on higher trophic level species though a more complete description of the shifts in habitat.

  15. Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Patricia L.

    1986-01-01

    Suggests studying New York's wetlands, both in the classroom and in the field, to illustrate ecological concepts of diversity, succession, and adaptation and to learn about their importance in controlling flooding, erosion, and pollution. (NEC)

  16. Recent Trends in Satellite Vegetation Index Observations Indicate Decreasing Vegetation Biomass in the Southeastern Saline Everglades Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, D. O.

    2013-12-01

    We analyzed trends in time series of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) from multitemporal satellite imagery for 2001-2010 over the southeastern Everglades where major changes in vegetation structure and type have been associated with sea-level rise and reduced freshwater flow since the 1940s. Non-parametric trend analysis using the Theil-Sen slope revealed that 84.4% of statistically significant trends in NDVI were negative, mainly concentrated in scrub mangrove, sawgrass (Cladium jamaicense) and spike rush (Eleocharis cellulosa) communities within 5 km of the shoreline. Observed trends were consistent with trends in sawgrass biomass measurements made from 1999-2010 in three Long-term Ecological Research (LTER) sites within our study area. A map of significant trends overlaid on a RapidEye high-resolution satellite image showed large patches of negative trends parallel to the shoreline in and around the 'white zone,' which corresponds to a low-productivity band that has moved inland over the past 70 years. Significantly positive trends were observed mainly in the halophytic prairie community where highly salt tolerant species are typically found. Taken as a whole, the results suggest that increased saline intrusion associated with sea-level rise continues to reduce the photosynthetic biomass within freshwater and oligohaline marsh communities of the southeastern Everglades. Trends in 2001-2010 NDVI in southern saline Everglades wetlands of South Florida. a) slope values; b) areas of significant slope; c) location of the study area.

  17. Accounting for non-photosynthetic vegetation in remote-sensing-based estimates of carbon flux in wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schile, Lisa M.; Byrd, Kristin B.; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; Kelly, Maggi

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring productivity in coastal wetlands is important due to their high carbon sequestration rates and potential role in climate change mitigation. We tested agricultural- and forest-based methods for estimating the fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (f APAR), a key parameter for modelling gross primary productivity (GPP), in a restored, managed wetland with a dense litter layer of non-photosynthetic vegetation, and we compared the difference in canopy light transmission between a tidally influenced wetland and the managed wetland. The presence of litter reduced correlations between spectral vegetation indices and f APAR. In the managed wetland, a two-band vegetation index incorporating simulated World View-2 or Hyperion green and near-infrared bands, collected with a field spectroradiometer, significantly correlated with f APAR only when measured above the litter layer, not at the ground where measurements typically occur. Measures of GPP in these systems are difficult to capture via remote sensing, and require an investment of sampling effort, practical methods for measuring green leaf area and accounting for background effects of litter and water.

  18. A test of vegetation-related indicators of wetland quality in the prairie pothole region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kantrud, H.A.; Newton, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    This study was part of an effort by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to quantitatively assess the environmental quality or 'health' of wetland resources on regional and national scales. During a two-year pilot study, we tested selected indicators of wetland quality in the U.S. portion of the prairie pothole region (PPR). We assumed that the amount of cropland versus non-cropland (mostly grassland) in the plots containing these basins was a proxy for their quality. We then tested indicators by their ability to discriminate between wetlands at the extremes of that proxy. Amounts of standing dead vegetation were greater in zones of greater water permanence. Depth of litter was greater in zones of greater water permanence and in zones of basins in poor-quality watersheds. Amounts of unvegetated bottom were greater in basins in poor-quality watersheds; lesser amounts occurred in all wetlands during a wetter year. Greater amounts of open water occurred during a wetter year and in zones of greater water permanence. When unadjusted for areas (ha) of communities, plant taxon richness was higher in wet-meadow and shallow-marsh zones in good-quality watersheds than in similar zones in poor-quality watersheds. Wet-meadow zones in good-quality watersheds had greater numbers of native perennials than those in poor-quality watersheds. This relation held when we eliminated all communities in good-quality watersheds larger than the largest communities in poor-quality watersheds from the data set. We conclude that although amounts of unvegetated bottom and plant taxon richness in wet-meadow zones were useful indicators of wetland quality during our study, the search for additional such indicators should continue. The value of these indicators may change with the notoriously unstable hydrological conditions in the PPR. Most valuable would be indicators that could be photographed or otherwise remotely sensed and would remain relatively stable under various hydrological conditions. An ideal set of indicators could detect the absence of stressors, as well as the presence of structures or functions, of known value to major groups of organisms.

  19. Influence of varying nutrient and pesticide mixtures on abatement efficiency using a vegetated free water surface constructed wetland mesocosm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficiency of a vegetated free water surface constructed wetland in abating agrichemicals was examined using varying types of pollutant mixtures. Three different mixture conditions were assessed: nutrients only (N and P); pesticides only (2 herbicides and 1 insecticide); and a mixture of nutrie...

  20. Flora and ecological profile of native and exotic estuarine wetland vegetation by hydrogeomorphic setting at Rush Ranch, Suisun Marsh

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The manuscript includes a profile of the ecology and distribution of estuarine wetland vegetation at the Rush Ranch reserve site in the brackish Suisun Marsh reach of San Francisco Estuary The data and analyses will serve as a baseline for future scientific research and conservation management. A ...

  1. Evaluating the effect of rainfall variability on vegetation establishment in a semidesert grassland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Of the operations required for reclamation in arid and semi-arid regions, establishing vegetation entails the most uncertainty due to reliance on unpredictable rainfall for seed germination and seedling establishment. The frequency of successful vegetation establishment was estimated based on a land...

  2. Derivation of Ground Surface and Vegetation in a Coastal Florida Wetland with Airborne Laser Technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raabe, Ellen A.; Harris, Melanie S.; Shrestha, Ramesh L.; Carter, William E.

    2008-01-01

    The geomorphology and vegetation of marsh-dominated coastal lowlands were mapped from airborne laser data points collected on the Gulf Coast of Florida near Cedar Key. Surface models were developed using low- and high-point filters to separate ground-surface and vegetation-canopy intercepts. In a non-automated process, the landscape was partitioned into functional landscape units to manage the modeling of key landscape features in discrete processing steps. The final digital ground surface-elevation model offers a faithful representation of topographic relief beneath canopies of tidal marsh and coastal forest. Bare-earth models approximate field-surveyed heights by + 0.17 m in the open marsh and + 0.22 m under thick marsh or forest canopy. The laser-derived digital surface models effectively delineate surface features of relatively inaccessible coastal habitats with a geographic coverage and vertical detail previously unavailable. Coastal topographic details include tidal-creek tributaries, levees, modest topographic undulations in the intertidal zone, karst features, silviculture, and relict sand dunes under coastal-forest canopy. A combination of laser-derived ground-surface and canopy-height models and intensity values provided additional mapping capabilities to differentiate between tidal-marsh zones and forest types such as mesic flatwood, hydric hammock, and oak scrub. Additional derived products include fine-scale shoreline and topographic profiles. The derived products demonstrate the capability to identify areas of concern to resource managers and unique components of the coastal system from laser altimetry. Because the very nature of a wetland system presents difficulties for access and data collection, airborne coverage from remote sensors has become an accepted alternative for monitoring wetland regions. Data acquisition with airborne laser represents a viable option for mapping coastal topography and for evaluating habitats and coastal change on marsh-dominated coasts. Such datasets can be instrumental in effective coastal-resource management.

  3. Regeneration of vegetation on wetland crossings for gas pipeline rights-of-way one year after construction

    SciTech Connect

    Shem, L.M.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Zellmer, S.D.; Van Dyke, G.D.; Rastorfer, J.R.

    1993-10-01

    Four wetland crossings of gas pipeline rights-of-way (ROWs), located in Florida, Michigan, New Jersey, and New York, were surveyed for generation of vegetation roughly one year after pipeline construction was completed. Conventional trench-and-fill construction techniques were employed for all four sites. Estimated areal coverage of each species by vegetative strata within transect plots was recorded for plots on the ROW and in immediately adjacent wetlands undisturbed by construction activities. Relative success of regeneration was measured by percent exposed soil, species diversity, presence of native and introduced species, and hydric characteristics of the vegetation. Variable site factors included separation and replacement of topsoil, final grading of the soil, application of seed and fertilizer, and human disturbance unrelated to construction. Successful regeneration exhibited greater dependency on the first three factors listed.

  4. A High Density Storm Surge Monitoring Network: Evaluating the Ability of Wetland Vegetation to Reduce Storm Surge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, S.; Denton, M.; Ferreira, C.

    2013-12-01

    Recent tropical storm activity in the Chesapeake Bay and a potential increase in the predicted frequency and magnitude of weather systems have drawn increased attention to the need for improved tools for monitoring, modeling and predicting the magnitude of storm surge, coastal flooding and the respective damage to infrastructure and wetland ecosystems. Among other forms of flood protection, it is believed that coastal wetlands and vegetation can act as a natural barrier that slows hurricane flooding, helping to reduce the impact of storm surge. However, quantifying the relationship between the physical process of storm surge and its attenuation by wetland vegetation is an active area of research and the deployment of in-situ measuring devices is crucial to data collection efforts in this field. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) mobile storm-surge network has already successfully provided a framework for evaluating hurricane induced storm surge water levels on a regional scale through the use of in-situ devices installed in areas affected by storm surge during extreme events. Based on the success of the USGS efforts, in this study we adapted the monitoring network to cover relatively small areas of wetlands and coastal vegetation with an increased density of sensors. Groups of 6 to 10 water level sensors were installed in sites strategically selected in three locations on the Virginia coast of the lower Chesapeake Bay area to monitor different types of vegetation and the resulting hydrodynamic patterns (open coast and inland waters). Each group of sensors recorded time series data of water levels for both astronomical tide circulation and meteorological induced surge. Field campaigns were carried out to survey characteristics of vegetation contributing to flow resistance (i.e. height, diameter and stem density) and mapped using high precision GPS. A geodatabase containing data from field campaigns will support the development and calibration of computational models to simulate storm surge flow over wetlands specifically designed to represent Virginia's aquatic vegetation and to improve our fundamental knowledge of tide and storm surge hydrodynamics in estuarine wetlands. This poster will present the results of the field measurements for events during the 2013 Hurricane Season, tidal flows within the study areas, and surge attenuation rates according to vegetation characteristics.

  5. A demonstration of wetland vegetation mapping in Florida from computer-processed satellite and aircraft multispectral scanner data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butera, M. K. (principal investigator)

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Major vegetative classes identified by the remote sensing technique were cypress swamp, pine, wetland grasses, salt grass, mixed mangrove, black mangrove, Brazilian pepper. Australian pine and melaleuca were not satisfactorily classified from LANDSAT. Aircraft scanners provided better resolution resulting in a classification of finer surface detail. An edge effect, created by the integration of diverse spectral responses within boundary elements of digital data, affected the wetlands classification. Accuracy classification for aircraft was 68% and for LANDSAT was 74%.

  6. Wetland vegetation and nutrient retention in Nakivubo and Kirinya wetlands in the Lake Victoria basin of Uganda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugisha, P.; Kansiime, F.; Mucunguzi, P.; Kateyo, E.

    Wetlands form an important part of the catchment area of the African Great Lakes and protect water resources therein. One of the most important functions is the retention of nutrients from the inflowing water from the catchment, by wetland plants which store them in their phytomass. An assessment of the capacity in storing nutrients by dominant plants ( Cyeprus papyrus, Miscanthus violaceus, Phragmites mauritianus and Colocasia C. esculenta), of Nakivubo and Kirinya wetlands at the shores of Lake Victoria in Uganda, was studied through the determination of phytomass production and nutrient concentration in the plant parts at different stages of growth. The above ground phytomass production increased rapidly during the exponential growth for C. papyrus and P. mauritianus. In all the dominant plants, nitrogen concentration was highest in juvenile plants and decreased with increasing age. The most pronounced nitrogen level occurred in the young umbels of C. papyrus during the first month of growth with total nitrogen content of 1.95% DW which dropped to 0.62% DW after the fifth month in Nakivubo wetland. Corms (tubers) of yams had the highest nitrogen content in Kirinya and Nakivubo wetlands exhibiting respective values of 4.8% DW and 3.7% DW. There is a close relationship between nutrient content and increase in phytomass. In Nakivubo and Kirinya wetlands, the rapid increase in phytomass during the third and fourth month corresponded with high nutrient levels. Since plants store significant amounts of nitrogen during their growth, periodic harvesting of above ground plant parts can remove significant amounts of nutrients (during the first five months of growth) from the wastewater flowing into the two wetlands. Wetland plant species with high phytomass productivity and well developed root systems and ability to withstand flooding are the best in nutrient removal.

  7. A numerical study of vegetation impact on reducing storm surge by wetlands in a semi-enclosed estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelin, Hu; Qin, Chen; Wang, Hongqing

    2014-01-01

    Coastal wetlands play a unique role in extreme hurricane events. The impact of wetlands on storm surge depends on multiple factors including vegetation, landscape, and storm characteristics. The Delft3D model, in which vegetation effects on flow and turbulence are explicitly incorporated, was applied to the semi-enclosed Breton Sound (BS) estuary in coastal Louisiana to investigate the wetland impact. Guided by extensive field observations, a series of numerical experiments were conducted based on variations of actual vegetation properties and storm parameters from Hurricane Isaac in 2012. Both the vegetation-induced maximum surge reduction (MSR) and maximum surge reduction rate (MSRR) increased with stem height and stem density, and were more sensitive to stem height. The MSR and MSRR decreased significantly with increasing wind intensity. The MSRR was the highest with a fast-moving weak storm. It was also found that the MSRR varied proportionally to the expression involving the maximum bulk velocity and surge over the area of interest, and was more dependent on the maximum bulk surge. Both MSR and MSRR appeared to increase when the area of interest decreased from the whole BS estuary to the upper estuary. Within the range of the numerical experiments, the maximum simulated MSR and MSRR over the upper estuary were 0.7 m and 37%, respectively.

  8. Removal of organic pollutants from oak leachate in pilot scale wetland systems: How efficient are aeration and vegetation treatments?

    PubMed

    Svensson, Henric; Ekstam, Börje; Marques, Marcia; Hogland, William

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of aeration and/or vegetation in experimental constructed wetlands (CWs) as mesocosms on the removal of pollutants in oak wood leachate. Twelve outdoor wetland mesocosms, with randomized replicated treatment combinations of vegetation (Phragmites australis) and aeration was monitored during the second and third year after construction. The investigation included control tanks with no aeration and no vegetation. The parameters monitored were polyphenols (PPs), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and water colour. The reduction of COD after 28 days was approx. 50% and more than 50% of PPs, whereas only 40% of the water colour was removed. Aeration increased the effect of both COD and PP removal. The vegetation treatment had a small but significant effect on removal of COD. The vegetation + aeration treatment, as well as aeration alone, increased the removal efficiency of COD from 9.5 g m(-3) d(-1) in the control to 11 g m(-3) d(-1). The results suggest that CWs can be used to treat stormwater contaminated by oak wood leachate. Further, it is suggested that the main processes for removal of pollutants in the leachate occur in the open-water habitat and that the hydraulic retention time is more important for removal than aeration and vegetation related processes. PMID:26218465

  9. Effects of Agricultural Runoff on Vegetation Composition of a Priority Conservation Wetland, Vermont, USA

    E-print Network

    Vermont, University of

    of the basin. In pollution in the watershed of Franklin Bog. Protection of wetlands addition to Sphagnum, many. Forested the Franklin Bog watershed; second, stream water qual- and agricultural runoff from the mixed land patterns in the wetland, including weedy species and third, within the wetland, these water quality

  10. After the deluge: Establishing rates of geographically isolated wetland loss within the prairie pothole region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serran, J.; Creed, I. F.

    2014-12-01

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs) from the prairie pothole region of North America are particularly vulnerable to loss and increasing urban, agricultural, and natural resource development pressures continue to place these wetlands at risk. Although small in area and low in surface hydrologic connectivity, GIWs provide important functions such as flood control and water purification and their loss has been recognized as a contributing factor to the eutrophication of Lake Winnipeg. Within Canada, GIW loss can be attributed to the lack of high-resolution wetland inventories and the lack of information about historic wetland loss rates. In this study, we tested an approach to estimate GIW loss by improving their detection and delineation. To initialize our work, a high-resolution wetland inventory was created using a novel approach that fuses LiDAR data (probability of wetland) with aerial photographs (to distinguish open water and wet meadow) for the Beaverhill watershed, a major tributary of the North Saskatchewan watershed. Our wetland mapping results validated our ability to detect wetlands on the landscape. Secondly, we applied a power law area-frequency function to an aerial photograph time series spanning the watershed's natural climate variation range (1960 to present) to estimate historic wetland loss, with historic wetland loss determined via a break in slope in the power law function. Our analysis revealed ongoing loss of small GIWs in the watershed, despite the implementation of wetland policy measures to mitigate this loss. This ongoing GIW loss is particularly detrimental as it is concomitant with a loss in the important associated ecosystem functions of these GIWs, which has serious repercussions for downstream waters. Overall, our findings support a shift in wetland policies from area to function assessments that provide governments with tools to manage the potential consequences of wetland loss in terms of increased flooding and pollution of downstream waters.

  11. Demonstration of wetland vegetation mapping in Florida from computer-processed satellite and aircraft multispectral scanner data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butera, M. K.

    1979-01-01

    The success of remotely mapping wetland vegetation of the southwestern coast of Florida is examined. A computerized technique to process aircraft and LANDSAT multispectral scanner data into vegetation classification maps was used. The cost effectiveness of this mapping technique was evaluated in terms of user requirements, accuracy, and cost. Results indicate that mangrove communities are classified most cost effectively by the LANDSAT technique, with an accuracy of approximately 87 percent and with a cost of approximately 3 cent per hectare compared to $46.50 per hectare for conventional ground survey methods.

  12. Vegetation types alter soil respiration and its temperature sensitivity at the field scale in an estuary wetland.

    PubMed

    Han, Guangxuan; Xing, Qinghui; Luo, Yiqi; Rafique, Rashad; Yu, Junbao; Mikle, Nate

    2014-01-01

    Vegetation type plays an important role in regulating the temporal and spatial variation of soil respiration. Therefore, vegetation patchiness may cause high uncertainties in the estimates of soil respiration for scaling field measurements to ecosystem level. Few studies provide insights regarding the influence of vegetation types on soil respiration and its temperature sensitivity in an estuary wetland. In order to enhance the understanding of this issue, we focused on the growing season and investigated how the soil respiration and its temperature sensitivity are affected by the different vegetation (Phragmites australis, Suaeda salsa and bare soil) in the Yellow River Estuary. During the growing season, there were significant linear relationships between soil respiration rates and shoot and root biomass, respectively. On the diurnal timescale, daytime soil respiration was more dependent on net photosynthesis. A positive correlation between soil respiration and net photosynthesis at the Phragmites australis site was found. There were exponential correlations between soil respiration and soil temperature, and the fitted Q10 values varied among different vegetation types (1.81, 2.15 and 3.43 for Phragmites australis, Suaeda salsa and bare soil sites, respectively). During the growing season, the mean soil respiration was consistently higher at the Phragmites australis site (1.11 µmol CO2 m(-2) s(-1)), followed by the Suaeda salsa site (0.77 µmol CO2 m(-2) s(-1)) and the bare soil site (0.41 µmol CO2 m(-2) s(-1)). The mean monthly soil respiration was positively correlated with shoot and root biomass, total C, and total N among the three vegetation patches. Our results suggest that vegetation patchiness at a field scale might have a large impact on ecosystem-scale soil respiration. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the differences in vegetation types when using models to evaluate soil respiration in an estuary wetland. PMID:24608636

  13. Wetland vegetation in Manzala lagoon, Nile Delta coast, Egypt: Rapid responses of pollen to altered nile hydrology and land use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bernhardt, C.E.; Stanley, J.-D.; Horton, B.P.

    2011-01-01

    The pollen record in a sediment core from Manzala lagoon on the Nile delta coastal margin of Egypt, deposited from ca. AD 1860 to 1990, indicates rapid coastal wetland vegetation responses to two primary periods of human activity. These are associated with artificially altered Nile hydrologic regimes in proximal areas and distal sectors located to ???1200 km south of Manzala. Freshwater wetland plants that were dominant, such as Typha and Phragmites, decreased rapidly, whereas in the early 1900s, brackish water wetland species (e.g., Amaranthaceae) increased. This change occurred after closure of the Aswan Low Dam in 1902. The second major modification in the pollen record occurred in the early 1970s, after Aswan High Dam closure from 1965 to 1970, when Typha pollen abundance increased rapidly. Massive population growth occurred along the Nile during the 130 years represented by the core section. During this time, the total volume of lagoon water decreased because of conversion of wetland areas to agricultural land, and input of organic-rich sediment, sewage (municipal, agricultural, industrial), and fertilizer in Manzala lagoon increased markedly. Although the wetland plant community has continued to respond to increasingly intensified and varied human-induced pressures in proximal sectors, the two most marked changes in Manzala pollen best correlate with distal events (i.e., closure of the two dams at Aswan). The study also shows that the two major vegetation changes in Manzala lagoon each occurred less than 10 years after closure upriver of the Low and High dams that markedly altered the Nile regime from Upper Egypt to the coast. ?? 2011, the Coastal Education & Research Foundation (CERF).

  14. Hydrology, vegetation, and soils of four north Florida River flood plains with an evaluation of state and federal wetland determinations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Light, H.M.; Darst, M.R.; MacLaughlin, M.T.; Sprecher, S.W.

    1993-01-01

    A study of hydrologic conditions, vegetation, and soils was made in wetland forests of four north Florida streams from 1987 to 1990. The study was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Florida Department of Environmental Regulation to support State and Federal efforts to improve wetland delineation methodology in flood plains. Plant communities and soils were described and related to topographic position and long-term hydrologic conditions at 10 study plots located on 4 streams. Detailed appendixes give average duration, frequency, and depth of flooding; canopy, subcanopy, and ground-cover vegetation; and taxonomic classification, series, and profile descriptions of soils for each plot. Topographic relief, range in stage, and depth of flooding were greatest on the alluvial flood plain of the Ochlockonee River, the largest of the four streams. Soils were silty in the lower elevations of the flood plain, and tree communities were distinctly different in each topographic zone. The Aucilla River flood plain was dominated by levees and terraces with very few depressions or low backwater areas. Oaks dominated the canopy of both lower and upper terraces of the Aucilla flood plain. Telogia Creek is a blackwater stream that is a major tributary of the Ochlockonee River. Its low, wet flood plain was dominated by Wyssa ogeche (Ogeechee tupelo) trees, had soils with mucky horizons, and was inundated by frequent floods of very short duration. The St. Marks River, a spring-fed stream with high base flow, had the least topographic relief and lowest range in stage of the four streams. St. Marks soils had a higher clay content than the other streams, and limestone bedrock was relatively close to the surface. Wetland determinations of the study plots based on State and Federal regulatory criteria were evaluated. Most State and Federal wetland determinations are based primarily on vegetation and soil characteristics because hydrologic records are usually not available. In this study, plots were located near long-term gaging stations, thus wetland determinations based on plant and soil characteristics could be evaluated at sites where long-term hydrologic conditions were known. Inconsistencies among hydrology, vegetation, and soil determinations were greatest on levee communities of the Ochlockonee and Aucilla River flood plains. Duration of average annual longest flood was almost 2 weeks for both plots. The wetland species list currently used (1991) by the State lacks many ground-cover species common to forested flood plains of north Florida rivers. There were 102 ground-cover species considered upland plants by the State that were present on the nine annually flooded plots of this study. Among them were 34 species that grew in areas continuously flooded for an average of 5 weeks or more each year. Common flood-plain species considered upland plants by the State were: Hypoxis leptocarpa (yellow star-grass), and two woody vines, Brunnichia ovata (ladies' eardrops) and Campsis radicans (trumpet-creeper), which were common in areas flooded continuously for 6 to 9 weeks a year; Sebastiania fruticosa (Sebastian-bush), Chasmanthium laxum (spikegrass), and Panicum dichotomum (panic grass), which typically grew in areas flooded an average of 2 to 3 weeks or more per year; Vitis rotundifolia (muscadine) and Toxicodendron radicans (poison-ivy), usually occurring in areas flooded an average of 1 to 2 weeks a year; and Quercus virginiana (live oak) present most often in areas flooded approximately 1 week a year. Federal wetland regulations (1989) limited wetland jurisdiction to only those areas that are inundated or saturated during the growing season. However, year-round hydrologic records were chosen in this report to describe the influence of hydrology on vegetation, because saturation, inundation, or flowing water can have a variety of both beneficial and adverse effects on flood-plain vegetation at any time of the

  15. Isolated spring wetlands in the Great Basin and Mojave deserts, USA: potential response of vegetation to groundwater withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Patten, Duncan T; Rouse, Leigh; Stromberg, Juliet C

    2008-03-01

    Desert springs, often the sole sources of water for wildlife and cattle, support wetland and wetland/upland transition ecosystems including rare and endemic species. In the basin and range province in Nevada, USA, springs in the Great Basin and Mojave deserts are sustained by interconnected deep carbonate and shallow basin-fill aquifers which are threatened by proposed groundwater withdrawal to sustain rapidly expanding urban areas, a common problem in arid regions worldwide. This paper draws on historic groundwater data, groundwater modeling, and studies of environmental controls of spring ecosystems to speculate on the potential effects of groundwater withdrawal and water table decline on spring-supported vegetation. The focus is on springs in the Great Basin and Mojave deserts representative of those that may be affected by future, planned groundwater withdrawal. Groundwater withdrawal is expected to reduce spring discharge directly through reduced flows from the shallow basin-fill aquifer or through reduction of the hydraulic head of the deep carbonate aquifer. This flow reduction will truncate the outflow stream, reducing the areal cover of wetland and wetland/upland transition vegetation. Lowering the local water table may also reduce the amount of upland phreatophytic vegetation by causing water levels to drop below plant rooting depths. Percolation of salts to surface soils may be reduced, eventually altering desert shrub cover from halophytes to nonhalophytes. The extent of these effects will vary among springs, based on their distance from extraction sites and location relative to regional groundwater flow paths. On-site monitoring of biotic variables (including cover of selected hygrophytes and phreatophytes) should be a necessary complement to the planned monitoring of local hydrologic conditions. PMID:18060450

  16. Relationships among vegetation, geomorphology and hydrology in the Bananal Island tropical wetlands, Araguaia River basin, Central Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valente, C. R.; Latrubesse, E. M.; Ferreira, L. G.

    2013-10-01

    The Bananal Plain spreading on the Middle Araguaia River basin in Central Brazil at the Cerrado-Amazonia ecotone is a unique system that sustains the largest seasonal wetlands of the Cerrado biome. The huge Bananal Plain is an intracratonic sedimentary basin filled with Pleistocene sediments of the Araguaia formation. Covering approximately two million hectares, the Bananal Island is a major geomorphologic feature of the Bananal plain. Fieldwork and the analysis of a temporal series of MODIS-VI and Landsat ETM images allowed us to discriminate Cerrado phyto-physiognomies on the Bananal Island. Maps of vegetation and geomorphologic units were created, and from the correlation between landforms and vegetation types we identified morpho-vegetation units. Our approach allowed us to postulate that Pleistocene landforms strongly influence, if not dominate, the distribution of vegetation units. For example, the distribution of current gallery forest is not only controlled by active floodplains, but also by alluvial belts abandoned by avulsion. Additionally, arboreal Cerrado vegetation is supported by laterite developed on the sediments of the Araguaia Formation. Some of these inactive landforms are in part modified by the present day geomorphologic processes and colonized by successional vegetation that varies from alluvial forest to Cerrado. Characterized by a very flat landscape with a hindered drainage, the muddy sediments of the Araguaia Formation and the high seasonal rainfall favor the development of regional seasonal wetlands. The Bananal plain is a key area for understanding the Quaternary climatic and biogeographic changes in tropical South America. The control exerted by relict Quaternary landforms on the current vegetation units demonstrates the strong links between geomorphologic aspects of the landscape and ecological patterns. This multidisciplinary approach provides a better understanding of the biogeographic patterns in the Cerrado-Amazon ecotone, which is useful for identifying and designing areas for conservation.

  17. Gas transfer velocities for quantifying methane, oxygen and other gas fluxes through the air-water interface of wetlands with emergent vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, C.; Variano, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Empirical models for the gas transfer velocity, k, in the ocean, lakes and rivers are fairly well established, but there are few data to predict k for wetlands. We have conducted experiments in a simulated emergent marsh in the laboratory to explore the relationship between k, wind shear and thermal convection. Now we identify the implications of these results for gas transfer in actual wetlands by (1) quantifying the range of wind conditions in emergent vegetation canopies and the range of thermal convection intensities in wetland water columns, and (2) describing the non-linear interaction of these two stirring forces over their relevant ranges in wetlands. We measured mean wind speeds and wind speed variance within the shearless region of a Schoenoplectus-Typha marsh canopy in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Northern California, USA). The mean wind speed within this region, , is significantly smaller than wind above the canopy. Based on our laboratory experiments, for calm or even average wind conditions in this emergent marsh k600 is only on the order 0.1 cm hr-1 (for neutrally or stably stratified water columns). We parameterize unstable thermal stratification and the resulting thermal convection using the heat flux through the air-water interface, q. We analyzed a water temperature record for the Schoenoplectus-Typha marsh to obtain a long-term heat flux record. We used these heat flux data along with short-term heat flux data from other wetlands in the literature to identify the range of the gas transfer velocity associated with thermal convection in wetlands. The typical range of heat fluxes through water columns shaded by closed emergent canopies (-200 W m-2 to +200 W m-2) yields k600 values of 0.5 - 2.5 cm hr-1 according to the model we developed in the laboratory. Thus for calm or average wind conditions, the gas transfer velocity associated with thermal convection is significantly larger than the gas transfer velocity associated with wind shear. Because of the diurnal pattern in water column heat flux that follows the diurnal pattern in incoming solar radiation, this difference means gas transfer velocities are expected to vary diurnally during calm or average wind conditions, peaking late at night and early in the morning. Conversely for very windy conditions, alone may determine the gas transfer velocity even when high heat fluxes out of the water column are relatively high. For the calculation of k600 from , we developed an enhancement factor to account for the very high wind speed variance observed in the Schoenoplectus-Typha emergent canopy and likely seen in other emergent canopies as well. These wetland targeted gas transfer velocities will improve the accuracy of wetland gas flux measurements and models and enable the partitioning of net gas fluxes from wetlands into plant-mediated fluxes, ebullitive fluxes and fluxes due to the hydrodynamic transport of dissolved gases through the water column.

  18. Demonstration Wetland at Henderson, Nevada

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Demonstration wetland at Henderson, Nevada, where vegetated hummocks were built into the wastewater treatment wetland to improve its effectiveness and sustainability, as well as provide quality wildlife habitat....

  19. Physical and Vegetative Characteristics of a Newly Constructed Wetland and Modified Stream Reach, Tredyffrin Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania, 2000-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaplin, Jeffrey J.; White, Kirk E.; Olson, Leif E.

    2009-01-01

    To compensate for authorized disturbance of naturally occurring wetlands and streams during roadway improvements to U.S. Highway 202 in Chester and Montgomery Counties, Pa., the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) constructed 0.42 acre of emergent wetland and 0.94 acre of scrub-shrub/forested wetland and modified sections of a 1,600-foot reach of Valley Creek with woody riparian plantings and streambank-stabilization structures (including rock deflectors). In accordance with project permits and additional guidance issued by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with PennDOT, collected data from 2000 through 2006 to quantify changes in 1) the vegetation, soils, and extent of emergent and scrub-shrub/forested parts of the constructed wetland, 2) the profile, dimension, and substrate in the vicinity of rock deflectors placed at two locations within the modified stream reach, and 3) the woody vegetation within the planted riparian buffer. The data for this investigation were collected using an approach adapted from previous investigations so that technology and findings may be more easily transferred among projects with similar objectives. Areal cover by planted and non-planted vegetation growing within the emergent and scrub-shrub/forested parts of the constructed wetland exceeded 85 percent at the end of each growing season, a criterion in special condition 25c in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers project permit. Areal cover of vegetation in emergent and scrub-shrub/forested parts of the constructed wetland exceeded 100 percent in all but one growing season. Frequent and long-lasting soil saturation favored obligate-wetland species like Typha latifolia (broadleaf cattail) and Scirpus validus (great bulrush), both of which maintained dominance in the emergent wetland throughout the study (percent cover was 20 and 78 percent, respectively, in 2006). Echinocloa crusgalli (barnyard grass), an annual invasive from Eurasia, initially established in the newly disturbed soils of the scrub-shrub/forested wetland (areal cover was 56 percent in 2000), but by 2002, E. crusgalli was not growing in any sample plots and other species including Agrostis stolonifera (creeping bent grass), Festuca rubra (red fescue), Cornus spp. (dogwood species), and Salix nigra (black willow) were becoming more common. Sal. nigra contributed 30-percent cover in the scrub-shrub/forested wetland part by fall 2003. Rapid colonization of this species in subsequent years increased annual cover through 2006, when 15- to 25-foot tall Sal. nigra trees dominated the tree/shrub stratum (48 percent of the areal cover in 2006). The understory of the scrub-shrub/forested wetland was mostly shaded because of the canopy of Sal. nigra trees. Herbaceous species growing under and near the margins of the canopy included Ag. stolonifera and Ty. latifolia (29- and 23-percent areal cover, respectively). Flows in Valley Creek are responsible for transporting sediment and shaping the channel. Annual mean streamflow during the period the modified stream reach was monitored ranged from 15.2 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) in the 2002 water year to 53.0 ft3/s in the 2004 water year. This is a range of about 55 percent lower to 58 percent higher than the annual mean streamflow for the period of record. Despite the variability in streamflow, longitudinal profiles surveyed near rock deflectors in two short (100-foot) reaches within the modified stream reach maintained a constant slope throughout the monitoring period, most likely because of the presence of bedrock control. Cross-section geometry in the upstream reach was virtually unchanged during the monitoring period but 10 feet of bank migration was measured downstream, leaving the rock deflectors in mid-stream. As indicated by the change in channel morphology at the downstream reach, it is apparent that the rock deflectors were ineffective at adequately protecting the bank

  20. Independent Wetland Vegetation Response to Climate Variability and Anthropogenic Hydrologic Control, Everglades, FL, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, C. E.; Willard, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    The response of a wetland landscape composed of multiple, distinct, plant communities to a single stimulus, whether it results from natural climate variability or human alterations, should not be assumed to be uniform across the entire landscape. The Florida Everglades is such a landscape where elevated sawgrass ridges are immediately next to water lily dominated sloughs, known collectively as the sawgrass ridge and slough landscape (SRS). The distribution of the Everglades individual sawgrass ridge and slough plant communities within the SRS was altered by 20th century construction of water control structures (canals, levees, and dikes) and alteration of the natural hydrologic regime. Although restoration planning to stabilize the remaining ridge and slough habitats is underway, little is known about the landscape's origin and response to past hydrologic changes. Analysis of pollen assemblages from transects of piston cores collected across SRS indicate that sawgrass ridges and sloughs have been vegetationally distinct from one another since the mid Holocene. Modern sawgrass ridges formed from a marsh-like environment, whereas slough communities occupied their present sites throughout the history of the sites. Ridge formation was triggered by intervals of drier climate (i.e., the Medieval Warm Period and Little Ice Age) and changes in the mean position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone. The sloughs are temporarily composed of more marsh plants during drier conditions, but quickly return to their original state when precipitation increases. During the 20th century, sloughs appear to be strongly influenced by North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) variability in spite of water management practices, while the sawgrass ridges respond primarily to [water management] anthropogenic changes in hydrology. Our evidence that, the sawgrass ridge and slough landscape communities can act independent of one another to changes in hydrology, indicates that restoring the pre-20th century hydrology may not restore all aspects of the pre-20th century landscape structure.

  1. Re-establishing a sustainable wetland at former Lake Karla, Greece, using Ramsar restoration guidelines.

    PubMed

    Zalidis, George C; Takavakoglou, Vasilios; Panoras, Athanasios; Bilas, George; Katsavouni, Sotiria

    2004-12-01

    Lake Karla, Greece, was almost completely drained in 1962 both to protect surrounding farmlands from flooding and to increase agricultural area. Loss of wetland functions and values resulted in environmental, social, and economic problems. A number of restoration plans were proposed to address these problems. The plan approved by the government in the early 1990s proposed construction of a 4200-ha reservoir solely to improve water storage and flood attenuation functions. However, the Ramsar Scientific and Technical Review Panel states that the primary goal of any restoration project is to create resilient and sustainable ecosystems, as measured on a human timescale, in order to improve the ecological character and enhance the socioeconomic role that the wetland plays in the watershed. This study utilizes Ramsar guidelines for sustainable restoration of Lake Karla. Eight additional restoration measures are proposed based on functional analysis of the wetland to enhance additional wetland functions and support multiple values for humans and nature. PMID:15633042

  2. -Establishment of Norway spruce seedlings -681 Journal of Vegetation Science 7: 681-684, 1996

    E-print Network

    Leps, Jan "Suspa"

    - Establishment of Norway spruce seedlings - 681 Journal of Vegetation Science 7: 681-684, 1996 abandoned for half a century and are sur- rounded by Picea abies (Norway spruce) forests. The causes of inhibition of establishment of Norway spruce seedlings in the meadows were tested experimentally

  3. Physical and vegetative characteristics of a relocated stream reach, constructed wetland, and riparian buffer, Upper Saucon Township, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, 2000-04

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaplin, Jeffrey J.; White, Kirk E.; Loper, Connie A.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, Engineering District 5-0, investigated physical and vegetative changes within a relocated stream reach, constructed wetland, and riparian buffer from September 2000 to October 2004. This report presents an evaluation of data collected using methods from multiple sources that have been adapted into a consistent approach. This approach is intended to satisfy a need for consistent collection of different types of data with the goal of transferring technology and findings to similar projects. Survey data indicate that adjustment of the upstream part of the relocated stream reach slowed over the monitoring period, but the downstream channel remains unstable as evidenced by excessive deposition. Upstream migration of a nick point has slowed or stopped altogether as of the 2003 assessment when this feature came in contact with the upstream-most part of the channel that is lined with riprap. Documented streambed erosion in the upstream cross sections, along with deposition downstream, has resulted in an overall decrease in slope of the stream channel over the monitoring period. Most streambed erosion took place prior to the 2002 assessment when annual mean streamflows were less than those in the final 2 years of monitoring. An abundance of fine sediment dominates the substrate of the relocated channel. Annual fluctuations of large particles within each cross section demonstrates the capacity of the relocated channel to transport the entire range of sediment. The substrate within the 0.28-acre constructed wetland (a mixture of soil from an off-site naturally occurring wetland and woodchips) supported a hydrophytic-vegetation community throughout the investigation. Eleocharis obtusa (spike rush), an obligate-wetland herb, was the most prevalent species, having a maximum areal cover of 90 percent in fall 2001 and a minimum of 23 percent in fall 2004. Drought-like conditions in water year 2002 (cumulative precipitation was 28.11 inches) allowed species like Panicum dichotomiflorum (witch grass), Salix sp. (willow), Leersia oryzoides (rice cutgrass), and Echinocloa crusgalli (barnyard grass) to become established by fall 2002. Above-average precipitation in water years 2003 and 2004 (58.55 and 53.17 inches, respectively) coincided with increased areal cover by E. obtusa in fall 2003 (56 percent) and decreased areal cover in fall 2004 (23 percent). Pond-like conditions that probably persisted throughout the 2004 growing season favored aquatic species like Alisma subcordatum (water plantain) to the detriment of many emergent species, including E. obtusa. Despite the pond-like conditions, L. oryzoides, an obligate-wetland grass, increased in areal cover (from 12 to 34 percent) between the 2003 and 2004 growing seasons because it was established in the higher elevations and the peripheral areas of the constructed wetland that were less prone to persistent inundation. Canopy development by trees and shrubs in the riparian buffer was initially (fall 2000) poor (39.7 percent), resulting in more available sunlight for the herbaceous understory than in any other growing season. As a result, areal cover of herbaceous species and trees and shrubs less than 1-meter tall was 108 percent in fall 2000 with Lolium perenne (perennial rye), Polygonum persicaria (lady's thumb), and Setaria faberi (foxtail) collectively contributing nearly half the cover (59.2 percent). Because of increases in canopy cover by trees and shrubs (39.7 percent in fall 2000 to 127 percent in fall 2004), herbaceous cover decreased to 76 percent by the fall of 2001 and varied between 72 and 77 percent for the rest of the study period. Tree density in the riparian buffer ranged from 3,078 and 4,130 plants per acre (fall 2000 and 2003, respectively) over the study period but essentially remained constant after fall 2001; computations reported each fall between fall 2001 and fall

  4. Catastrophic Shifts in Wetland Geomorphology and Ecology in Response to Hydrology-Vegetation-Sediment Transport Feedbacks (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, L. G.; Harvey, J. W.

    2010-12-01

    Coastal marshes and long-hydroperiod floodplain wetlands exhibit strong bi-directional feedback between hydrology, vegetation, and sediment that impacts landscape dynamics and ecosystem services. In these ecosystems, vegetation responds to and also influences the distribution of topography, with effects on habitat provision, biological diversity, landscape connectivity, surface-subsurface exchange, and microbial and redox reactions. Topography evolves both autogenically and allogenically. Autogenically, peat accretes under reducing conditions as a function of local water levels, vegetation community, and nutrient concentrations. Concurrently, an allogenic sediment redistribution feedback process involves erosion of sediment from low, sparsely vegetated areas and deposition of sediment within dense vegetation that resists flow. It is well documented that these feedback processes are dominantly responsible for evolution of tidal marsh morphology and response of coastal marshes to sea level rise. Less well understood is the role these feedbacks play in the evolution of more slowly flowing interior marshes and in the response of these systems to perturbations in flow velocity as well as water level. We developed a cellular automata model that physically simulates both sediment redistribution and differential peat accretion feedbacks. Because of the efficiency of this simplified modeling technique, we ran the model over a broad range of environmental conditions in a generalized sensitivity analysis. As a result of the two feedback processes, simulated landscapes reflected a variety of morphologies found in coastal and interior wetlands worldwide, with differences attributable to relative dominance of physical (e.g., surface-water flow, water level) or biological (e.g., vegetation productivity and colonization) drivers. Significantly, under moderate surface-water flow velocities (4-6 cm s-1), a class of patterned wetlands with regular ridges and sloughs oriented parallel to the dominant flow direction emerged, which mimics the patterned, flow-parallel topography found in the Florida Everglades. Sediment redistribution and differential peat accretion feedbacks constitute the first description of a viable mechanism for formation of this ecologically important landscape structure and provide guidance for restoration efforts. We show that because of vegetative resistance to flow, this patterned landscape structure is prone to shift to an alternate stable state, dominated by a monoculture of emergent vegetation, under changes in surface-water flow velocity or water level. Results suggest that twentieth-century degradation of the Everglades ridge and slough landscape is attributable primarily to changes in water level and, secondarily, to diminished surface-water flow velocities. Because hydrology-vegetation-sediment feedbacks cause hysteresis in landscape evolution trajectories, restoration of historic flow velocities and water levels will not necessarily produce a return to historic landscape structure. Understanding the dynamics of sediment redistribution and differential peat accretion feedbacks will be essential in predicting how wetlands worldwide will respond to changes in climate or water management.

  5. Control of reed canarygrass promotes wetland herb and tree seedling establishment in an upper Mississippi River Floodplain forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomsen, Meredith; Brownell, Kurt; Groshek, Matthew; Kirsch, Eileen

    2012-01-01

    Phalaris arundinacea (reed canarygrass) is recognized as a problematic invader of North American marshes, decreasing biodiversity and persisting in the face of control efforts. Less is known about its ecology or management in forested wetlands, providing an opportunity to apply information about factors critical to an invader's control in one wetland type to another. In a potted plant experiment and in the field, we documented strong competitive effects of reed canarygrass on the establishment and early growth of tree seedlings. In the field, we demonstrated the effectiveness of a novel restoration strategy, combining site scarification with late fall applications of pre-emergent herbicides. Treatments delayed reed canarygrass emergence the following spring, creating a window of opportunity for the early growth of native plants in the absence of competition from the grass. They also allowed for follow-up herbicide treatments during the growing season. We documented greater establishment of wetland herbs and tree seedlings in treated areas. Data from small exclosures suggest, however, that deer browsing can limit tree seedling height growth in floodplain restorations. Slower tree growth will delay canopy closure, potentially allowing reed canarygrass re-invasion. Thus, it may be necessary to protect tree seedlings from herbivory to assure forest regeneration.

  6. Monitoring of wetlands Ecosystems using satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowska-Zielinska, K.; Gruszczynska, M.; Yesou, H.; Hoscilo, A.

    Wetlands are very sensitive ecosystems, functioning as habitat for many organisms. Protection and regeneration of wetlands has been the crucial importance in ecological research and in nature conservation. Knowledge on biophysical properties of wetlands vegetation retrieved from satellite images will enable us to improve monitoring of these unique areas, very often impenetrable. The study covers Biebrza wetland situated in the Northeast part of Poland and is considered as Ramsar Convention test site. The research aims at establishing of changes in biophysical parameters as the scrub encroachment, lowering of the water table, and changes of the farming activity caused ecological changes at these areas. Data from the optical and microwave satellite images collected for the area of Biebrza marshland ecosystem have been analysed and compared with the detailed soil-vegetation ground measurements conducted in conjunction with the overflights. Satellite data include Landsat ETM, ERS-2 ATSR and SAR, SPOT VEGETATION, ENVISAT MERIS and ASAR, and NOAA AVHRR. From the optical data various vegetation indices have been calculated, which characterize the vegetation surface roughness, its moisture conditions and stage of development. Landsat ETM image has been used for classification of wetlands vegetation. For each class of vegetation various moisture indices have been developed. Ground data collected include wet and dry biomass, LAI, vegetation height, and TDR soil moisture. The water cloud model has been applied for retrieval of soil vegetation parameters taking into account microwave satellite images acquired at VV, HV and HH polarisations at different viewing angles. The vegetation parameters have been used for to distinguish changes, which occurred at the area. For each of the vegetation class the soil moisture was calculated from microwave data using developed algorithms. Results of this study will help mapping and monitoring wetlands with the high spatial and temporal resolution for better management and protection of this ecosystems. The research has been conducted under AO ID-122 ESA Project

  7. Camera derived vegetation greenness index as proxy for gross primary production in a low Arctic wetland area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westergaard-Nielsen, Andreas; Lund, Magnus; Hansen, Birger Ulf; Tamstorf, Mikkel Peter

    2013-12-01

    The Arctic is experiencing disproportionate warming relative to the global average, and the Arctic ecosystems are as a result undergoing considerable changes. Continued monitoring of ecosystem productivity and phenology across temporal and spatial scales is a central part of assessing the magnitude of these changes. This study investigates the ability to use automatic digital camera images (DCIs) as proxy data for gross primary production (GPP) in a complex low Arctic wetland site. Vegetation greenness computed from DCIs was found to correlate significantly (R2 = 0.62, p < 0.001) with a normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) product derived from the WorldView-2 satellite. An object-based classification based on a bi-temporal image composite was used to classify the study area into heath, copse, fen, and bedrock. Temporal evolution of vegetation greenness was evaluated and modeled with double sigmoid functions for each plant community. GPP at light saturation modeled from eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements were found to correlate significantly with vegetation greenness for all plant communities in the studied year (i.e., 2010), and the highest correlation was found between modeled fen greenness and GPP (R2 = 0.85, p < 0.001). Finally, greenness computed within modeled EC footprints were used to evaluate the influence of individual plant communities on the flux measurements. The study concludes that digital cameras may be used as a cost-effective proxy for potential GPP in remote Arctic regions.

  8. Mercury cycling in agricultural and managed wetlands of California: experimental evidence of vegetation-driven changes in sediment biogeochemistry and methylmercury production

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark; Stricker, Craig A.; Agee, Jennifer L.; Kieu, Le H.; Kakouros, Evangelos

    2014-01-01

    The role of live vegetation in sediment methylmercury (MeHg) production and associated biogeochemistry was examined in three types of agricultural wetlands (domesticated or white rice, wild rice, and fallow fields) and adjacent managed natural wetlands (cattail- and bulrush or tule-dominated) in the Yolo Bypass region of California's Central Valley, USA. During the active growing season for each wetland, a vegetated:de-vegetated paired plot experiment demonstrated that the presence of live plants enhanced microbial rates of mercury methylation by 20 to 669% (median = 280%) compared to de-vegetated plots. Labile carbon exudation by roots appeared to be the primary mechanism by which microbial methylation was enhanced in the presence of vegetation. Pore-water acetate (pw[Ac]) decreased significantly with de-vegetation (63 to 99%) among all wetland types, and within cropped fields, pw[Ac] was correlated with both root density (r = 0.92) and microbial Hg(II) methylation (kmeth. r = 0.65). Sediment biogeochemical responses to de-vegetation were inconsistent between treatments for “reactive Hg” (Hg(II)R), as were reduced sulfur and sulfate reduction rates. Sediment MeHg concentrations in vegetated plots were double those of de-vegetated plots (median = 205%), due in part to enhanced microbial MeHg production in the rhizosphere, and in part to rhizoconcentration via transpiration-driven pore-water transport. Pore-water concentrations of chloride, a conservative tracer, were elevated (median = 22%) in vegetated plots, suggesting that the higher concentrations of other constituents around roots may also be a function of rhizoconcentration rather than microbial activity alone. Elevated pools of amorphous iron (Fe) in vegetated plots indicate that downward redistribution of oxic surface waters through transpiration acts as a stimulant to Fe(III)-reduction through oxidation of Fe(II)pools. These data suggest that vegetation significantly affected rhizosphere biogeochemistry through organic exudation and transpiration-driven concentration of pore-water constituents and oxidation of reduced compounds. While the relative role of vegetation varied among wetland types, macrophyte activity enhanced MeHg production.

  9. Mercury cycling in agricultural and managed wetlands of California, USA: experimental evidence of vegetation-driven changes in sediment biogeochemistry and methylmercury production.

    PubMed

    Windham-Myers, Lisamarie; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark; A Stricker, Craig; Agee, Jennifer L; H Kieu, Le; Kakouros, Evangelos

    2014-06-15

    The role of live vegetation in sediment methylmercury (MeHg) production and associated biogeochemistry was examined in three types of agricultural wetlands (domesticated or white rice, wild rice, and fallow fields) and adjacent managed natural wetlands (cattail- and bulrush or tule-dominated) in the Yolo Bypass region of California's Central Valley, USA. During the active growing season for each wetland, a vegetated:de-vegetated paired plot experiment demonstrated that the presence of live plants enhanced microbial rates of mercury methylation by 20 to 669% (median=280%) compared to de-vegetated plots. Labile carbon exudation by roots appeared to be the primary mechanism by which microbial methylation was enhanced in the presence of vegetation. Pore-water acetate (pw[Ac]) decreased significantly with de-vegetation (63 to 99%) among all wetland types, and within cropped fields, pw[Ac] was correlated with both root density (r=0.92) and microbial Hg(II) methylation (kmeth. r=0.65). Sediment biogeochemical responses to de-vegetation were inconsistent between treatments for "reactive Hg" (Hg(II)R), as were reduced sulfur and sulfate reduction rates. Sediment MeHg concentrations in vegetated plots were double those of de-vegetated plots (median=205%), due in part to enhanced microbial MeHg production in the rhizosphere, and in part to rhizoconcentration via transpiration-driven pore-water transport. Pore-water concentrations of chloride, a conservative tracer, were elevated (median=22%) in vegetated plots, suggesting that the higher concentrations of other constituents around roots may also be a function of rhizoconcentration rather than microbial activity alone. Elevated pools of amorphous iron (Fe) in vegetated plots indicate that downward redistribution of oxic surface waters through transpiration acts as a stimulant to Fe(III)-reduction through oxidation of Fe(II)pools. These data suggest that vegetation significantly affected rhizosphere biogeochemistry through organic exudation and transpiration-driven concentration of pore-water constituents and oxidation of reduced compounds. While the relative role of vegetation varied among wetland types, macrophyte activity enhanced MeHg production. PMID:23809881

  10. Developing a National Vegetation Multimetric Metric Index of Wetland Condition for the Conterminous United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    This product is an abstract for the 2015 Ecological Society Meeting in Baltimore, Maryland in August. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), with states, tribes, and other partners, conducted the first-ever National Wetland Condition Assessment (NWCA) in 2011, using a...

  11. Temperature sensitivity of greenhouse gas production in wetland soils of different vegetation

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    and vegeta- tion type on both aerobic and anaerobic decomposi- tion of organic matter in subtropical wetland soils. As in many other studies, increased temperature resulted in higher rates of respiration and methanogenesis under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and the positive effect of temperature depended

  12. Surface-water transport of suspended matter through wetland vegetation of the Florida everglades

    E-print Network

    Saiers, James

    at a wetland in the Florida Everglades. Comparison of the results of this experiment to calculations of a three-dimensional transport model shows that dispersive mixing was small and that rate-limited mass- transfer reactions) to 15 mg/L. Surface water collected from the channel contained high concentrations of dissolved organic

  13. Vegetation dynamics of restored and remnant Willamette Valley, OR wet prairie wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wet prairie wetlands are now one of the rarest habitat types in the Willamette Valley of Oregon, USA. Less than two percent of their historic extent remains, with most having been converted into agricultural fields (Christy and Alverson 2011, ONHP 1983). This habitat is the obl...

  14. An integrated model of soil, hydrology, and vegetation for carbon dynamics in wetland ecosystems

    E-print Network

    and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire, USA Carl C. Trettin and Harbin Li Center on quantifying water table dynamics, soil thermal dynamics, growth of mosses and herbaceous plants, and soil biogeochemical processes under anaerobic conditions. In this paper, we report new developments made for Wetland

  15. The Role of Hydropedologic Vegetation Zones in Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Agricultural Wetland Landscapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Net greenhouse gas (GHG) source strength for agricultural wetland ecosystems in the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) and spatial constraints associated with CH4, CO2, and N2O fluxes are currently unknown. Greenhouse gas fluxes typically vary with edaphic, hydrologic, biologic, and climatic factors. In...

  16. Multisite comparison of drivers of methane emissions from wetlands in the European Arctic: influence of vegetation community and water table.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinsmore, Kerry; Drewer, Julia; Leeson, Sarah; Skiba, Ute; Levy, Pete; George, Charles

    2014-05-01

    Arctic and sub arctic wetlands are a major source of atmospheric CH4 and therefore have the potential to be important in controlling global radiative forcing. Furthermore, the strong links between wetland CH4 emissions and vegetation community, hydrology and temperature suggest potentially large feedbacks between climate change and future emissions. Quantifying current emissions over large spatial scales and predicting future climatic feedbacks requires a fundamental understanding of the ground based drivers of plot scale emissions. The MAMM project (Methane in the Arctic: Measurements and Modelling) aims to understand and quantify current CH4 emissions and future climatic impacts by combining both ground and aircraft measurements across the European Arctic with regional computer modelling. Here we present results from the ground-based MAMM measurement campaigns, analysing chamber-measured CH4 emissions from two sites in the European Arctic/Sub-Arctic region (Sodankylä, Finland; Stordalen Mire, Sweden) from growing seasons in 2012 and 2013. A total of 85 wetland static chambers were deployed across the two field sites; 39 at Sodankylä (67° 22'01' N, 26° 3'06' E) in 2012 and 46 at Stordalen Mire (68° 21'20' N, 19° 02'56' E) in 2013. Chamber design, protocol and deployment were the same across both sites. Chambers were located at sites chosen strategically to cover the local range of water table depths and vegetation communities. A total of 18 and 15 repeated measurements were made at each chamber in Sodankylä and Stordalen Mire, respectively, over the snow-free season. Preliminary results show a large range of CH4 fluxes across both sites ranging from a CH4 uptake of up to 0.07 and 0.06 mg CH4-C m-2 hr-1 to emissions of 17.3 and 44.2 mg CH4-C m-2 hr-1 in Sodankylä and Stordalen Mire, respectively. Empirical models based on vegetation community, water table depth, temperature and soil nutrient availability (Plant Root Simulator Probes, PRSTM) have been constructed with the aim of understanding the drivers of chamber scale fluxes. By combining measurements made at two different sites, >300km apart, using the same experimental setup, we are uniquely able to investigate whether CH4 emissions are driven by common parameters. Furthermore we are able to determine if plot scale empirical models and parameterisations can be used effectively to upscale emissions to landscape and whole Arctic scale.

  17. Comparison of phosphorus fractions and phosphatase activities in coastal wetland soils along vegetation zones of Yancheng National Nature Reserve, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lidong; Zhang, Yaohong; Shi, Yiming; Liu, Yibo; Wang, Lin; Yan, Ning

    2015-05-01

    Phosphorus (P) fractions and phosphatase activities were measured in 22 coastal wetland soils with typical vegetation successions in Yancheng National Nature Reserve, China. P forms and phosphatase activities varied greatly from site to site even under the same vegetation cover. NH4Cl-P, bicarbonate/dithionite extracted P and NaOH-P were remarkably higher (p < 0.05) in soils with exotic invasive plants, Spartina alterniflora, than in soils with the native species Suaeda salsa, Scirpus mariquete and Phragmites australis. HCl-P and refractory P showed little variation. No significant differences were detected for either alkaline phosphatase (ALAP) or acid phosphatase (ACAP) among the soils. All of the above properties were much higher in soils with plant growth compared to bare flat soils. Regression analysis demonstrated that organic matter (OM), Al, Ca, Fe and total P (TP) were able to explain more than 70% of the variations in the P fractions (except 29% of NH4Cl-P), and OM was the most important contributing factor. ALAP and ACAP were irrelevant to P but were significantly related to TOC, suggesting that carbon was a limiting factor for P mineralization in this area. Owing to its huge biomass and densities, Spartina alterniflora displayed great potential for carbon input, thus facilitating P mineralization and cycling. The results enhance our understanding of P availability differences in this area covered by invasive and native vegetation.

  18. Evaluating the influence of wetland vegetation on chemical residence time in Mississippi Delta drainage ditches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of emergent vegetation within channelized aquatic environments has the capacity to provide a number of biological functions as well as alter the hydrology of the system. Vegetation within the channel exerts roughness, drag and friction on flowing water, reducing flow rates, increasing w...

  19. Gradient Analysis and Classification of Carolina Bay Vegetation: A Framework for Bay Wetlands Conservation and Restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Diane De Steven,Ph.D.; Maureen Tone,PhD.

    1997-10-01

    This report address four project objectives: (1) Gradient model of Carolina bay vegetation on the SRS--The authors use ordination analyses to identify environmental and landscape factors that are correlated with vegetation composition. Significant factors can provide a framework for site-based conservation of existing diversity, and they may also be useful site predictors for potential vegetation in bay restorations. (2) Regional analysis of Carolina bay vegetation diversity--They expand the ordination analyses to assess the degree to which SRS bays encompass the range of vegetation diversity found in the regional landscape of South Carolina's western Upper Coastal Plain. Such comparisons can indicate floristic status relative to regional potentials and identify missing species or community elements that might be re-introduced or restored. (3) Classification of vegetation communities in Upper Coastal Plain bays--They use cluster analysis to identify plant community-types at the regional scale, and explore how this classification may be functional with respect to significant environmental and landscape factors. An environmentally-based classification at the whole-bay level can provide a system of templates for managing bays as individual units and for restoring bays to desired plant communities. (4) Qualitative model for bay vegetation dynamics--They analyze present-day vegetation in relation to historic land uses and disturbances. The distinctive history of SRS bays provides the possibility of assessing pathways of post-disturbance succession. They attempt to develop a coarse-scale model of vegetation shifts in response to changing site factors; such qualitative models can provide a basis for suggesting management interventions that may be needed to maintain desired vegetation in protected or restored bays.

  20. Coastal vegetation invasion increases greenhouse gas emission from wetland soils but also increases soil carbon accumulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yaping; Chen, Guangcheng; Ye, Yong

    2015-09-01

    Soil properties and soil-atmosphere fluxes of CO2, CH4 and N2O from four coastal wetlands were studied throughout the year, namely, native Kandelia obovata mangrove forest vs. exotic Sonneratia apetala mangrove forest, and native Cyperus malaccensis salt marsh vs. exotic Spartina alterniflora salt marsh. Soils of the four wetlands were all net sources of greenhouse gases while Sonneratia forest contributed the most with a total soil-atmosphere CO2-equivalent flux of 137.27 mg CO2 m(-2) h(-1), which is 69.23%, 99.75% and 44.56% higher than that of Kandelia, Cyperus and Spartina, respectively. The high underground biomass and distinctive root structure of Sonneratia might be responsible for its high greenhouse gas emission from the soil. Soils in Spartina marsh emitted the second largest amount of total greenhouse gases but it ranked first in emitting trace greenhouse gases. Annual average CH4 and N2O fluxes from Spartina soil were 13.77 and 1.14 ?mol m(-2) h(-1), respectively, which are 2.08 and 1.46 times that of Kandelia, 1.03 and 1.15 times of Sonneratia, and 1.74 and 1.02 times of Cyperus, respectively. Spartina has longer growing season and higher productivity than native marshes which might increase greenhouse gas emission in cold seasons. Exotic wetland soils had higher carbon stock as compared to their respective native counterparts but their carbon stocks were offset by a larger proportion because of their higher greenhouse gas emissions. Annual total soil-atmosphere fluxes of greenhouse gases reduced soil carbon burial benefits by 8.1%, 9.5%, 6.4% and 7.2% for Kandelia, Sonneratia, Cyperus and Spartina, respectively, which narrowed down the gaps in net soil carbon stock between native and exotic wetlands. The results indicated that the invasion of exotic wetland plants might convert local coastal soils into a considerable atmospheric source of greenhouse gases although they at the same time increase soil carbon accumulation. PMID:25918889

  1. -Post-fire bryophyte establishment in a continental bog -647 Journal of Vegetation Science 17: 647-652, 2006

    E-print Network

    Benscoter, Brian W.

    - Post-fire bryophyte establishment in a continental bog - 647 Journal of Vegetation Science 17-fire bryophyte establishment in a continental bog Benscoter, Brian W. Department of Plant Biology, Center production of the ground layer bryophytes, return of the ground layer vegetation following disturbance

  2. Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes

    E-print Network

    . Measurements of stable carbon isotopic ratios as well as carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) contents are sandy, hypersaline environments that support sparse vegetation. The marshes are dominated by black

  3. The influence of topography and vegetation self-organization over resource fluxes in wetland ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieglitz, Marc; Cheng, Yiwei; Truk, Greg; Engel, Victor; Ross, Joshua

    2014-05-01

    While it is recognized that topography and vegetation self-organization (SO) are both first order controls over ecosystem dynamics, the discrete contributions that these two controls have over ecosystem functioning have not been studied in any rigorous way. This work is focused on systematically isolating the separate and combined impacts of topography and SO over vegetation dynamics. We simulate the steady state and transient dynamics of nitrogen-limited patterned peat vegetation observed in the bogs of northern Siberia. We do so across a realistic range of land slopes, nutrient limitation values, and rainfall amounts. Simulation results show that on relatively shallow slopes, vegetation SO is a primary control over the spatial arrangement of vegetation, and that such self-organized arrangements yield the most efficient capture of ecosystem resources. However, as slope increases, and or resource limitation is low, topography begins to exert its control over the temporal and spatial dynamics. As will be discussed, these results suggest a simple continuum framework, valid across biomes, for understanding the interplay between these two first order controls. Specifically, as resources (e.g., water, nutrients) increase, ecosystem dynamics shift towards topographic control, while when resources are reduced, ecosystem dynamics shift towards vegetation SO control.

  4. [Spatial variation of soil moisture/salinity and the relationship with vegetation under natural conditions in Yancheng coastal wetland].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua-Bing; Liu, Hong-Yu; Li, Yu-Feng; An, Jing; Xue, Xing-Yu; Hou, Ming-Hang

    2013-02-01

    Taking the core part of Yancheng national nature reserve as the study area, according to soil sampling analysis of coastal wetlands in April and May 2011 land the 2011 ETM + remote sensing image, the spatial difference characteristic of coastal wetlands soil moisture and salinity, and the relationship with vegetation under natural conditions, were investigated with the model of correspondence analysis (CCA), linear regression simulation and geo-statistical method. The results showed: Firstly, the average level of the soil moisture was fluctuating between 36.820% and 46.333% , and the soil salinity was between 0.347% and 1.328% , in a more detailed sense, the Spartina swamp was the highest, followed by the mudflats swamp, the Suaeda salsa swamp, and the Reed marsh. Secondly, the spatial variation of soil moisture was consistent with that of the salinity, and the degree of variation in the east-west direction was greater than that in the north-south. The maximum soil moisture and salinity were found in the southwest Spartina swamp. The minimum was in the Reed swamp. The soil moisture and salinity were divided into 5 levels, from I to V. Level IV occupied the highest proportion, which were 36.156% and 28.531% , respectively. Finally, different landscape types with the combination of soil moisture and salinity showed a common feature that the moisture and salinity were from both high to low. The soil moisture value of Reed marshes was lower than 40.116% and the salinity value was lower than 0. 676% . The soil moisture value of Suaeda salsa marshes was between 38. 162% and 46. 403% and the salinity value was between 0.417% and 1.295%. The soil moisture value of Spartina swamp was higher than 43.214% and the salinity was higher than 1.090%. The soil moisture value of beach was higher than 43.214% and the salinity was higher than 0.677%. PMID:23668120

  5. Effect of vegetation in pilot-scale horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetlands treating sulphate rich groundwater contaminated with a low and high chlorinated hydrocarbon.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongbing; Wu, Shubiao; Braeckevelt, Mareike; Paschke, Heidrun; Kästner, Matthias; Köser, Heinz; Kuschk, Peter

    2012-10-01

    In order to characterize the effect of vegetation on performance of constructed wetlands (CWs) treating low and high chlorinated hydrocarbon, two pilot-scale horizontal subsurface flow (HSSF) CWs (planted with Phragmites australis and unplanted) treating sulphate rich groundwater contaminated with MCB (monochlorobenzene, as a low chlorinated hydrocarbon), (about 10 mg L(-1)), and PCE (perchloroethylene, as a high chlorinated hydrocarbon), (about 2 mg L(-1)), were examined. With mean MCB inflow load of 299 mg m(-2) d(-1), the removal rate was 58 and 208 mg m(-2) d(-1) in the unplanted and planted wetland, respectively, after 4 m from the inlet. PCE was almost completely removed in both wetlands with mean inflow load of 49 mg m(-2) d(-1). However, toxic metabolites cis-1,2-DCE (dichloroethene) and VC (vinyl chloride) accumulated in the unplanted wetland; up to 70% and 25% of PCE was dechlorinated to cis-1,2-DCE and VC after 4 m from the inlet, respectively. Because of high sulphate concentration (around 850 mg L(-1)) in the groundwater, the plant derived organic carbon caused sulphide formation (up to 15 mg L(-1)) in the planted wetland, which impaired the MCB removal but not statistically significant. The results showed significant enhancement of vegetation on the removal of the low chlorinated hydrocarbon MCB, which is probably due to the fact that aerobic MCB degraders are benefited from the oxygen released by plant roots. Vegetation also stimulated completely dechlorination of PCE due to plant derived organic carbon, which is potentially to provide electron donor for dechlorination process. The plant derived organic carbon also stimulated dissimilatory sulphate reduction, which subsequently have negative effect on MCB removal. PMID:22832338

  6. Ground-cover vegetation in wetland forests of the lower Suwannee River floodplain, Florida, and potential impacts of flow reductions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Darst, Melanie R.; Light, Helen M.; Lewis, Lori J.

    2002-01-01

    Ground-cover vegetation was surveyed in wetland forests in the lower Suwannee River floodplain, Florida, in a study conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Suwannee River Water Management District from 1996 to 1999. Increased water use in the basin, supplied primarily from ground water, could reduce ground-water discharge to the river and flows in the lower Suwannee River. Many of the 282 ground-cover species found in wetland forests of the floodplain have distributions that are related to flow-dependent hydrologic characteristics of forest types, and their distributions would change if flows were reduced. Overall species diversity in the floodplain might decrease, and the composition of ground-cover vegetation in all forest types might change with flow reductions. The study area included forests within the 10-year floodplain of the lower Suwannee River from its confluence with the Santa Fe River to the lower limit of forests near the Gulf of Mexico. The floodplain is divided into three reaches (riverine, upper tidal, and lower tidal) due to variations in hydrology, vegetation, and soils with proximity to the coast. The riverine (non-tidal) reach had the greatest number of total species (203) and species unique to that reach (81). Mitchella repens, Toxicodendron radicans, and Axonopus furcatus were the most frequently dominant species in riverine bottomland hardwoods. Free-floating aquatic species, such as Spirodela punctata and Lemna valdiviana, were the dominant species in the wettest riverine swamps. The upper tidal reach had the lowest number of total species (116), only two species unique to that reach, and the lowest density of ground cover (26 percent). Panicum commutatum and Crinum americanum were frequent dominant species in upper tidal forests. The lower tidal reach had the highest ground-cover density (43 percent) and the second highest number of total species (183) and number of species unique to that reach (55). Saururus cernuus and species of Carex were frequently dominant in lower tidal swamps. Lower tidal hammocks, the most elevated lower tidal forests, were dominated by Osmunda cinnamomea and Chasmanthium laxum. Flow reductions in the lower Suwannee River could change the flow-dependent hydrologic characteristics of wetland forests. Decreases in inundation and saturation in riverine forests could result in a decrease in the number and extent of semi-permanently inundated ponds. As a result, several species of free-floating, aquatic plants that grow only in riverine floodplain ponds might decrease in abundance or disappear if flows were reduced. Decreases in inundation and saturation could also result in a shift to more upland species in all riverine forests and upper tidal bottomland hardwoods. Upland species and some exotic species might increase in abundance in the floodplain, invading forests where hydrologic conditions have been altered by flow reductions. Depth and duration of inundation due to river flooding could decrease in all riverine and upper tidal forests, probably resulting in a shift of species to those that are typically found in forests with shallower, shorter-duration floods. Salinity in the lower tidal reach and adjacent areas of the upper tidal reach might increase with flow reductions, and the distribution of species might change due to varying tolerances of salinity among species. Species with low salt-tolerance unique to the lower tidal reach might disappear from the floodplain, and species with high salinity tolerance could increase in abundance, replacing less salt-tolerant species.

  7. Assessment of acreage and vegetation change in Florida's Big Bend tidal wetlands using satellite imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raabe, Ellen A.; Stumpf, Richard P.

    1997-01-01

    Fluctuations in sea level and impending development on the west coast of Florida have aroused concern for the relatively pristine tidal marshes of the Big Bend. Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images for 1986 and 1995 are processed and evaluated for signs of change. The images cover 250 km of Florida's Big Bend Gulf Coast, encompassing 160,000 acres of tidal marshes. Change is detected using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and land cover classification. The imagery shows negligible net loss or gain in the marsh over the 9-year period. However, regional changes in biomass are apparent and are due to natural disturbances such as low winter temperatures, fire, storm surge, and the conversion of forest to march. Within the marsh, the most prominent changes in NDVI and in land cover result from the recovery of mangroves from freezes, a decline of transitional upland vegetation, and susceptibility of the marsh edge and interior to variations in tidal flooding.

  8. Costs of alternative mulching materials for establishing herbaceous vegetation on harsh sites

    SciTech Connect

    Ringe, J.M.; Graves, D.H.

    1985-12-01

    Mulches have long been recognized for their beneficial effects in establishing vegetation and for their contribution to erosion control. Products used for these purposes range from loose material that is sprayed or blown onto a site to woven mat mulches that must be manually placed on site and mechanically fastened in place. A study to investigate both the effects and establishment costs of two hydromulches and four mat mulches indicated that both types of material provide similar herbaceous coverage. Mat mulches, however, are much more expensive and would, therefore, not be feasible except on small sites, sites that are too remote and too far from a water supply for a hydroseeder to operate efficiently, and sites where concentrated water runoff is a problem. 7 references, 5 tables.

  9. Effects of river hydrology and fluvial processes on riparian vegetation establishment, growth, and survival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafroth, P. B.; Merritt, D. M.; Wilcox, A. C.

    2012-12-01

    Stream hydrology, sediment, and geology interact to determine the spatial and temporal availability of river bottomland substrates on which plants establish and grow. Collectively, these surfaces comprise a mosaic of landscape patches with associated plant communities that fall along key gradients of physical disturbance and water availability. Aspects of flow such as magnitude, frequency, timing, and rate of change of floods and magnitude and duration of low flows, interact with sediment flux and plant traits to determine plant distribution and fitness in different parts of the bottomland. Flow and sediment dynamics can influence different aspects of the plant life cycle such as germination, establishment, growth, and survival. Feedbacks between plants and fluvial processes, such as increased surface roughness and associated reductions in flow velocity and potential for aggradation, can determine differential survival of plant species depending on their tolerance of high velocity flow and associated shear stress, dislodgement, or burial by sediment. We present an overview of some key relationships between flow, sediment, plant traits, and riparian vegetation responses, and provide specific examples from our research on rivers in the semi-arid western U.S., including unaltered systems, dam-altered systems, and in the context of development of environmental flows to restore native riparian vegetation communities. Further, we describe the riparian response guilds framework and demonstrate how it can facilitate both an understanding of vegetation response to changing flow, sediment, and disturbance regimes and the development of priorities for flow management. Through understanding how guilds of species respond to variations in flow and sediment regimes, we are be better able to anticipate and predict biotic change in response to human-caused and climate-driven flow alteration.

  10. Seasonal Dynamics of Soil Labile Organic Carbon and Enzyme Activities in Relation to Vegetation Types in Hangzhou Bay Tidal Flat Wetland

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Xuexin; Yang, Wenying; Wu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Soil labile organic carbon and soil enzymes play important roles in the carbon cycle of coastal wetlands that have high organic carbon accumulation rates. Soils under three vegetations (Phragmites australis, Spartina alterniflora, and Scirpusm mariqueter) as well as bare mudflat in Hangzhou Bay wetland of China were collected seasonally. Seasonal dynamics and correlations of soil labile organic carbon fractions and soil enzyme activities were analyzed. The results showed that there were significant differences among vegetation types in the contents of soil organic carbon (SOC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), excepting for that of microbial biomass carbon (MBC). The P. australis soil was with the highest content of both SOC (7.86 g kg-1) and DOC (306 mg kg-1), while the S. mariqueter soil was with the lowest content of SOC (6.83 g kg-1), and the bare mudflat was with the lowest content of DOC (270 mg kg-1). Soil enzyme activities were significantly different among vegetation types except for urease. The P. australis had the highest annual average activity of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (21.4 mg kg-1 h-1), and the S. alterniflora had the highest annual average activities of ?-glycosidase (4.10 mg kg-1 h-1) and invertase (9.81mg g-1 24h-1); however, the bare mudflat had the lowest activities of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (16.2 mg kg-1 h-1), ?-glycosidase (2.87 mg kg-1 h-1), and invertase (8.02 mg g-1 24h-1). Analysis also showed that the soil labile organic carbon fractions and soil enzyme activities had distinct seasonal dynamics. In addition, the soil MBC content was significantly correlated with the activities of urease and ?-glucosidase. The DOC content was significantly correlated with the activities of urease, alkaline phosphomonoesterase, and invertase. The results indicated that vegetation type is an important factor influencing the spatial-temporal variation of soil enzyme activities and labile organic carbon in coastal wetlands. PMID:26560310

  11. Clean tailing reclamation: Tailing reprocessing for sulfide removal and vegetation establishment

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, S.R.; Kruegar, J.

    1997-12-31

    Mine wastes exhibiting elevated heavy metal concentrations are widespread causes of resource degradation in the western US and elsewhere. This problem is further exacerbated by the presence of pyrite that oxidizes upon exposure to the atmosphere resulting in acid generation. Since pyrite was not recovered as a mineral of economic value during mining, it was disposed of in waste piles and tailing ponds that are now a source of acid generation and release of metals to the environment. Tailing cleaning, or sulfide mineral recovery through reprocessing, was evaluated as an innovative reclamation technology. Tailing materials, from both operational and abandoned mines, were collected to evaluate the feasibility of sulfide mineral recovery. Successful mineral separation was performed resulting in a low volume metal sulfide concentrate and a high volume cleaned silicate media. Total metal concentrations were decreased in the cleaned tailing material and elevated in the sulfide concentrate compared with the original tailing chemistry. In greenhouse trials, vegetation establishment in cleaned tailing material was compared with plant growth in topsoil and lime-amended tailings. While vegetation performance was best in the topsoil control, both lime-amended and cleaned tailings displayed adequate plant growth.

  12. Transpiration of gaseous elemental mercury through vegetation in a subtropical wetland in florida

    SciTech Connect

    Lindberg, Steven Eric; Dong, Weijin; Meyers, Tilden

    2002-07-01

    Four seasonal sampling campaigns were carried out in the Florida Everglades to measure elemental Hg vapor (Hg{sup o}) fluxes over emergent macrophytes using a modified Bowen ratio gradient approach. The predominant flux of Hg{sup o} over both invasive cattail and native sawgrass stands was emission; mean day time fluxes over cattail ranged from {approx}20 (winter) to {approx}40 (summer) ng m{sup -2} h{sup -1}. Sawgrass fluxes were about half those over cattail during comparable periods. Emission from vegetation significantly exceeded evasion of Hg{sup o} from the underlying water surface ({approx}1-2 ng m{sup -2} h{sup -1}) measured simultaneously using floating chambers. Among several environmental factors (e.g. CO{sub 2} flux, water vapor flux, wind speed, water, air and leaf temperature, and solar radiation), water vapor exhibited the strongest correlation with Hg{sup o} flux, and transpiration is suggested as an appropriate term to describe this phenomenon. The lack of significant Hg{sup o} emissions from a live, but uprooted (floating) cattail stand suggests that a likely source of the transpired Hg{sup o} is the underlying sediments. The pattern of Hg{sup o} fluxes typically measured indicated a diel cycle with two peaks, possibly related to different gas exchange dynamics: one in early morning related to lacunal gas release, and a second at midday related to transpiration; nighttime fluxes approached zero.

  13. Transplanting native dominant plants to facilitate community development in restored coastal plain wetlands.

    SciTech Connect

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.

    2007-12-01

    Abstract: Drained depressional wetlands are typically restored by plugging ditches or breaking drainage tiles to allow recovery of natural ponding regimes, while relying on passive recolonization from seed banks and dispersal to establish emergent vegetation. However, in restored depressions of the southeastern United States Coastal Plain, certain characteristic rhizomatous graminoid species may not recolonize because they are dispersal-limited and uncommon or absent in the seed banks of disturbed sites. We tested whether selectively planting such wetland dominants could facilitate restoration by accelerating vegetative cover development and suppressing non-wetland species. In an operational-scale project in a South Carolina forested landscape, drained depressional wetlands were restored in early 2001 by completely removing woody vegetation and plugging surface ditches. After forest removal, tillers of two rhizomatous wetland grasses (Panicum hemitomon, Leersia hexandra) were transplanted into singlespecies blocks in 12 restored depressions that otherwise were revegetating passively. Presence and cover of all plant species appearing in planted plots and unplanted control plots were recorded annually. We analyzed vegetation composition after two and four years, during a severe drought (2002) and after hydrologic recovery (2004). Most grass plantings established successfully, attaining 15%–85% cover in two years. Planted plots had fewer total species and fewer wetland species compared to control plots, but differences were small. Planted plots achieved greater total vegetative cover during the drought and greater combined cover of wetland species in both years. By 2004, planted grasses appeared to reduce cover of non-wetland species in some cases, but wetter hydrologic conditions contributed more strongly to suppression of non-wetland species. Because these two grasses typically form a dominant cover matrix in herbaceous depressions, our results indicated that planting selected species could supplement passive restoration by promoting a vegetative structure closer to that of natural wetlands.

  14. VEGETATION AND ALGAL COMMUNITY COMPOSITION AND DEVELOPMENT OF THREE CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS RECEIVING AGRICULTURAL RUNOFF AND SUBSURFACE DRAINAGE, 1998 TO 2001

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wetland Reservoir Subirrigation Systems (WRSIS) aim to reduce non-point source pollution from agricultural fields while maintaining crop yield and creating wetland wildlife habitat. The WRSIS system directs drainage water from agricultural fields to flow into a passively revegetated constructed wetl...

  15. Evidence and implications of the background phosphorus concentration of submerged aquatic vegetation wetlands in Stormwater Treatment Areas for Everglades restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juston, John M.; Debusk, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    The limits of phosphorus (P) removal from the 18,120 ha Stormwater Treatment Areas (STAs) for Everglades restoration depend largely on the performance of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) wetlands, as SAV treatment cells now provide final stage treatment for 85% of the STA project. A long-term internal P profile in STA-2 cell 3 (STA2C3), one of the longest-running and best performing SAV cells, demonstrated no further net removal in the back quarter of the cell once total P (TP) levels approached 15 ?g L-1. Inflow-outflow performance data from STA2C3 were analyzed at monthly and annual scales and were pooled with data from an additional eight STA SAV treatment cells. The pooled data allowed inference of background TP concentrations in SAV treatment cells using existing Bayesian methods. Results showed a central tendency of 16 ?g L-1 (13-17, 90% bounds), insensitivity to P loads less than ˜1.7 g m-2 yr-1, and interannual variability outside these bounds. Internal data from the STA2C3 profile provided validation. Background P concentrations of 7 and 6 ?g L-1 were identified for dissolved organic and particulate P fractions in the data pool, respectively, again similar to values in the STA2C3 gradient. Existing simulation modeling approaches for STA evaluations were identified as ineffective at or near background TP concentrations. Instead, we use an empirical and probabilistic approach based on full-scale data from STAs that produces annual risk of exceedance statistics and is easy to update. The current analysis suggests tangible risks for exceeding proposed annual discharge criteria from the STAs in the range of 16-20 ?g L-1.

  16. Pipeline Corridors through wetlands -- Impacts on plant communities: Mill Creek Tributary Crossing, Jefferson County, New York, 1992 Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyke, G.D.; Shem, L.M.; Zimmerman, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to identify representative impacts of existing pipelines on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and right-of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents the results of the survey July 1992, at the Mills Creek tributary crossing, Jefferson County, New York. Data were collected from three wetland communities along the 1991 pipeline and compared with predisturbance data obtained in a June 1991 survey. Within one year after pipeline installation, 50% of the soil surface of the ROW in the scrub-shrub community was covered by emergent vegetation. Average wetland values for the ROW in 1992 were lower than in 1991, indicating that the removal of woody plants resulted in a community composed of species with greater fidelity to wetlands. In the emergent marsh community after one year, the average percentage of surface covered by standing water was greater in the ROW than in the adjacent natural areas. The ROW in the forested wetland community also contained standing water, although none was found in the natural forest areas. The entire study site remains a wetland, with the majority of plant species in all sites being either obligate or facultative wetland species. Weighted and unweighted average wetland indices for each community, using all species, indicated wetland vegetation within the newly established ROW.

  17. Effects of vegetative propagule pressure on the establishment of an introduced clonal plant, Hydrocotyle vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruihua; Chen, Qiuwen; Dong, Bicheng; Yu, Feihai

    2014-01-01

    Some introduced clonal plants spread mainly by vegetative (clonal) propagules due to the absence of sexual reproduction in the introduced range. Propagule pressure (i.e. total number of propagules) may affect the establishment and thus invasion success of introduced clonal plants, and such effects may also depend on habitat conditions. A greenhouse experiment with an introduced plant, Hydrocotyle vulgaris was conducted to investigate the role of propagule pressure on its invasion process. High (five ramets) or low (one ramet) propagule pressure was established either in bare soil or in an experimental plant community consisting of four grassland species. H. vulgaris produced more total biomass under high than under low propagule pressure in both habitat conditions. Interestingly, the size of the H. vulgaris individuals was smaller under high than under low propagule pressure in bare soil, whereas it did not differ between the two propagule pressure treatments in the grassland community. The results indicated that high propagule pressure can ensure the successful invasion in either the grass community or bare soil, and the shift in the intraspecific interaction of H. vulgaris from competition in the bare soil to facilitation in the grassland community may be a potential mechanism. PMID:24981102

  18. Reducing sedimentation of depressional wetlands in agricultural landscapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skagen, S.K.; Melcher, C.P.; Haukos, D.A.

    2008-01-01

    Depressional wetlands in agricultural landscapes are easily degraded by sediments and contaminants accumulated from their watersheds. Several best management practices can reduce transport of sediments into wetlands, including the establishment of vegetative buffers. We summarize the sources, transport dynamics, and effect of sediments, nutrients, and contaminants that threaten wetlands and the current knowledge of design and usefulness of grass buffers for protecting isolated wetlands. Buffer effectiveness is dependent on several factors, including vegetation structure, buffer width, attributes of the surrounding watershed (i.e., area, vegetative cover, slope and topography, soil type and structure, soil moisture, amount of herbicides and pesticides applied), and intensity and duration of rain events. To reduce dissolved contaminants from runoff, the water must infiltrate the soil where microbes or other processes can break down or sequester contaminants. But increasing infiltration also diminishes total water volume entering a wetland, which presents threats to wetland hydrology in semi-arid regions. Buffer effectiveness may be enhanced significantly by implementing other best management practices (e.g., conservation tillage, balancing input with nutrient requirements for livestock and crops, precision application of chemicals) in the surrounding watershed to diminish soil erosion and associated contaminant runoff. Buffers require regular maintenance to remove sediment build-up and replace damaged or over-mature vegetation. Further research is needed to establish guidelines for effective buffer width and structure, and such efforts should entail a coordinated, regional, multi-scale, multidisciplinary approach to evaluate buffer effectiveness and impacts. Direct measures in "real-world" systems and field validations of buffer-effectiveness models are crucial next steps in evaluating how grass buffers will impact the abiotic and biotic variables attributes that characterize small, isolated wetlands. ?? 2008 The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  19. Involvement of Tcf/Lef in establishing cell types along the animal-vegetal axis of sea urchins.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Li, X; El-Hodiri, H M; Dayal, S; Wikramanayake, A H; Klein, W H

    2000-02-01

    Members of the Tcf/Lef family interact with beta-catenin to activate programs of gene expression during development. Recently beta-catenin was shown to be essential for establishing cell fate along the animal-vegetal axis of the sea urchin embryo. To examine the role of Tcf/Lef in sea urchins we cloned a Strongylocentrotus purpuratus Tcf/Lef homolog. Expression of SpTcf/Lef was maximal when beta-catenin became localized to nuclei of vegetal blastomeres, consistent with its acting in combination with beta-catenin to specify vegetal cell fates. Expression of a dominant-negative SpTcf/Lef inhibited primary and secondary mesenchyma, endoderm, and aboral ectoderm formation in a manner similar to that observed when nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin was prevented. Our results suggest that SpTcf/Lef functions by interacting with beta-catenin to specify cell fates along the sea urchin animal-vegetal axis. PMID:10664150

  20. WETLANDS and WATER QUALITY

    E-print Network

    Ma, Lena

    PURPOSE: Introduction to wetland ecosystems with emphasis on principles and problems associated and vegetation adaptations. Spring 2015 Instructor Mark Clark clarkmw@ufl.edu 352-294-3115 G175A McCarty Hall

  1. Impact of corn gluten meal on direct-seeded vegetable seedling establishment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn gluten meal (CGM) may be used as a preemergent or preplant-incorporated herbicide for organic weed control of young developing or emerging weed seedlings; unfortunately, CGM can also adversely impact seedling survival of certain direct-seeded vegetable crops. Various vegetable crop seedlings re...

  2. Assessment of compost application to coal ash disposal sites to promote the rapid vegetation establishment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repmann, F.; Slazak, A.; Babic, M.; Schneider, B. U.; Schaaf, W.; Hüttl, R. F.

    2009-04-01

    In the city of Tuzla, located in Bosnia and Herzegovina, a coal fired thermo electric power plant is operated by the company JP ELEKTROPRIVERDA BIH TERMOELEKTRANA "TUZLA". High amounts of ash are produced by the power plant, which are currently disposed into settlement ponds bordered by dams in natural valleys. A total of four ash disposal sites covering an area of approx. 170 ha have been established during the last decades. Due to the fact that residual ash from coal combustion was found to contain a variety of trace elements (Ni, Cr, As, B), it must be assumed that ash disposal of that magnitude constitutes an environmental problem which is investigated within the EU-FP6 / STREP project "Reintegration of Coal Ash Disposal Sites and Mitigation of Pollution in the West Balkan Area" RECOAL. The main hazards relate to soil and groundwater contamination due to leaching toxins, dust dispersion, and toxins entering the food chain as these disposal sites are used for agricultural purposes. In order to rapidly establish a vegetation cover on barren ash dumps that particularly would prevent dust erosion we assessed the applicability of compost, produced from locally available municipal and industrial organic residues as an amendment to ash to improve substrate fertility. The envisaged remediation technology was considered to be a low cost, easy applicable and rapid method capable of substantially enhancing living conditions of residents in the vicinity of the abandoned disposal sites. Various compost application rates were evaluated in the field on experimental site Divkovici I in Tuzla and additionally in the greenhouse environment at Brandenburg Technical University Cottbus. Field and laboratory tests revealed that plant growth and cover rate can substantially be improved by mixing compost into the upper ash layer to a maximum depth of approx. 20 cm. Besides direct growth observations in the field analysis of soil parameters gave evidence that the fertility of ashy substrates amended with compost produced from locally available sewage sludge and saw dust can be improved. The metal content of grass grown in the various treatments was considered to be elevated compared to normal contents. However, metal uptake in compost treatments was lower than in untreated plots. A preliminary cost assessment, comparing the remediation technology tested on site Divkovici with a standard soil covering technique revealed financial benefits for the compost method due to significant lower application rates.

  3. Operational actual wetland evapotranspiration estimation for the Everglades using MODIS imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melesse, Assefa; Cereon, Cristobal

    2014-05-01

    Wetlands are one of the most important ecosystems with varied functions and structures. Humans have drained wetlands and altered the structure and functions of wetlands for various uses. Wetland restoration efforts require assessment of the level of ecohydrological restoration for the intended functions. Among the various indicators of success in wetland restoration, achieving the desired water level (hydrology) is the most important, faster to achieve and easier to monitor than the establishment of the hydric soils and wetland vegetation. Monitoring wetland hydrology using remote sensing based evapotranspiration (ET) is a useful tool and approach since point measurements for understanding the temporal (before and after restoration) and spatial (impacted and restored) parts of the wetland are not effective for large areas. Evapotranspiration accounts over 80% of the water budget of the wetlands necessitating the need for spatiotemporal monitoring of ET flux. A study employing remotely sensed data from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and modeling tools was conducted for a weekly spatial estimation of Everglades ET. Weekly surface temperature data were generated from the MODIS thermal band and evaporative fraction was estimated using the simplified surface energy balance (SSEB) approach. Based on the Simple Method, potential ET (PET) was estimated. Actual weekly wetland ET was computed as the (product of the PET and evaporative fraction). The ET product will be useful information for environmental restoration and wetland hydrology managers. The on-going restoration and monitoring work in the Everglades will benefit from this product and assist in evaluating progress and success in the restoration.

  4. Effects of irrigation on seed production and vegetative characteristics of four moist-soil plants on impounded wetlands in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mushet, D.M.; Euliss, N.H., Jr.; Harris, S.W.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the effects of irrigation on 4 moist-soil plants commonly managed for waterfowl in the Sacramento Valley, California. Irrigation resulted in taller and heavier swamp timothy (Heleochloa schoenoides), pricklegrass (Crypsis niliaca), and sprangletop (Leptochloa fasicularis). Barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crusgalli) grew taller in irrigated wetlands, but no significant difference in weight was detected. Only sprangletop yielded larger seed masses in response to irrigation. Without irrigation, swamp timothy and pricklegrass assumed a typical prostrate growth form, but with irrigation, they assumed a vertical growth form. Irrigation did not significantly affect plant density. Because of rising water costs, wetland managers should consider wildlife management objectives and plant responses before implementing irrigation practices.

  5. Effects of a long-term disturbance on arthropods and vegetation in subalpine wetlands: manifestations of pack stock grazing in early versus mid-season.

    PubMed

    Holmquist, Jeffrey G; Schmidt-Gengenbach, Jutta; Haultain, Sylvia A

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions regarding disturbance effects in high elevation or high latitude ecosystems based solely on infrequent, long-term sampling may be misleading, because the long winters may erase severe, short-term impacts at the height of the abbreviated growing season. We separated a) long-term effects of pack stock grazing, manifested in early season prior to stock arrival, from b) additional pack stock grazing effects that might become apparent during annual stock grazing, by use of paired grazed and control wet meadows that we sampled at the beginning and end of subalpine growing seasons. Control meadows had been closed to grazing for at least two decades, and meadow pairs were distributed across Sequoia National Park, California, USA. The study was thus effectively a landscape-scale, long-term manipulation of wetland grazing. We sampled arthropods at these remote sites and collected data on associated vegetation structure. Litter cover and depth, percent bare ground, and soil strength had negative responses to grazing. In contrast, fauna showed little response to grazing, and there were overall negative effects for only three arthropod families. Mid-season and long-term results were generally congruent, and the only indications of lower faunal diversity on mid-season grazed wetlands were trends of lower abundance across morphospecies and lower diversity for canopy fauna across assemblage metrics. Treatment x Season interactions almost absent. Thus impacts on vegetation structure only minimally cascaded into the arthropod assemblage and were not greatly intensified during the annual growing season. Differences between years, which were likely a response to divergent snowfall patterns, were more important than differences between early and mid-season. Reliance on either vegetation or faunal metrics exclusively would have yielded different conclusions; using both flora and fauna served to provide a more integrative view of ecosystem response. PMID:23308297

  6. Effects of a Long-Term Disturbance on Arthropods and Vegetation in Subalpine Wetlands: Manifestations of Pack Stock Grazing in Early versus Mid-Season

    PubMed Central

    Holmquist, Jeffrey G.; Schmidt-Gengenbach, Jutta; Haultain, Sylvia A.

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions regarding disturbance effects in high elevation or high latitude ecosystems based solely on infrequent, long-term sampling may be misleading, because the long winters may erase severe, short-term impacts at the height of the abbreviated growing season. We separated a) long-term effects of pack stock grazing, manifested in early season prior to stock arrival, from b) additional pack stock grazing effects that might become apparent during annual stock grazing, by use of paired grazed and control wet meadows that we sampled at the beginning and end of subalpine growing seasons. Control meadows had been closed to grazing for at least two decades, and meadow pairs were distributed across Sequoia National Park, California, USA. The study was thus effectively a landscape-scale, long-term manipulation of wetland grazing. We sampled arthropods at these remote sites and collected data on associated vegetation structure. Litter cover and depth, percent bare ground, and soil strength had negative responses to grazing. In contrast, fauna showed little response to grazing, and there were overall negative effects for only three arthropod families. Mid-season and long-term results were generally congruent, and the only indications of lower faunal diversity on mid-season grazed wetlands were trends of lower abundance across morphospecies and lower diversity for canopy fauna across assemblage metrics. Treatment x Season interactions almost absent. Thus impacts on vegetation structure only minimally cascaded into the arthropod assemblage and were not greatly intensified during the annual growing season. Differences between years, which were likely a response to divergent snowfall patterns, were more important than differences between early and mid-season. Reliance on either vegetation or faunal metrics exclusively would have yielded different conclusions; using both flora and fauna served to provide a more integrative view of ecosystem response. PMID:23308297

  7. The Carolina Bay Restoration Project: Implementation and Management of a Wetland Mitigation Bank.

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Christopher; DeSteven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca; Kilgo, John; Imm, Donald; Kolka, Randy; Blake, John, I.

    2003-01-01

    A wetlands Mitigation Bank was established at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in 1997 as a compensatory alternative for unavoidable wetland losses associated with future authorized construction and environmental restoration projects in SRS wetlands. The Bank was intended not only to hasten mitigation efforts with respect to regulatory requirements and implementation, but also to provide onsite and fully functional compensation of impacted wetland acreage prior to any impact. Restoration and enhancement of small isolated wetlands, as well as major bottomland wetland systems scattered throughout the nonindustrialized area of SRS were designated for inclusion in the Bank. Based on information and techniques gained from previous research efforts involving Carolina bay wetlands (DOE 1997), a project to restore degraded Carolina bays on SRS has been undertaken to serve as the initial ''deposit'' in The Bank. There are over 300 Carolina bays or bay-like depression wetlands on the SRS, of which an estimated two-thirds were ditched or disturbed prior to federal occupation of the Site (Kirkman et al., 1996). These isolated wetlands range from small ephemeral depressions to large permanent ponds of 10-50 hectares in size. They provide habitat to support a wide range of rare plant species, and many vertebrates (birds, amphibians, bats). Historical impacts to the Carolina bays at SRS were primarily associated with agricultural activities. Bays were often drained tilled and planted to crops. The consequence was a loss in the wetland hydrologic cycle, the native wetland vegetation, and associated wildlife. The purpose of this mitigation and research project is to restore the functions and vegetation typical of intact depression wetlands and, in doing so, to enhance habitat for wetland dependent wildlife on SRS.

  8. Pipeline corridors through wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.E.; Wilkey, P.L. ); Isaacson, H.R. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary findings from six vegetational surveys of gas pipeline rights-of-way (ROW) through wetlands and quantifies the impacts of a 20-year-old pipeline ROW through a boreal forest wetland. Six sites of various ages were surveyed in ecosystems ranging from coastal marsh to forested wetland. At all sites except one, both the number and the percentage of wetland species on the Row approximated or exceeded those in the adjacent natural area. The boreal forest study showed that (1) adjacent natural wetland areas were not altered in type; (2) water sheet flow restriction had been reversed by nature; (3) no nonnative plant species invaded the natural area; (4) three-quarters of the ROW area was a wetland, and (5) the ROW increased diversity.

  9. Pipeline corridors through wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.E.; Wilkey, P.L.; Isaacson, H.R.

    1992-12-01

    This paper presents preliminary findings from six vegetational surveys of gas pipeline rights-of-way (ROW) through wetlands and quantifies the impacts of a 20-year-old pipeline ROW through a boreal forest wetland. Six sites of various ages were surveyed in ecosystems ranging from coastal marsh to forested wetland. At all sites except one, both the number and the percentage of wetland species on the Row approximated or exceeded those in the adjacent natural area. The boreal forest study showed that (1) adjacent natural wetland areas were not altered in type; (2) water sheet flow restriction had been reversed by nature; (3) no nonnative plant species invaded the natural area; (4) three-quarters of the ROW area was a wetland, and (5) the ROW increased diversity.

  10. An integrated approach to assess broad-scale condition of coastal wetlands - The Gulf of Mexico Coastal Wetlands pilot survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nestlerode, J.A.; Engle, V.D.; Bourgeois, P.; Heitmuller, P.T.; Macauley, J.M.; Allen, Y.C.

    2009-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) initiated a two-year regional pilot survey in 2007 to develop, test, and validate tools and approaches to assess the condition of northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) coastal wetlands. Sampling sites were selected from estuarine and palustrine wetland areas with herbaceous, forested, and shrub/scrub habitats delineated by the US Fish and Wildlife Service National Wetlands Inventory Status and Trends (NWI S&T) program and contained within northern GOM coastal watersheds. A multi-level, stepwise, iterative survey approach is being applied to multiple wetland classes at 100 probabilistically-selected coastal wetlands sites. Tier 1 provides information at the landscape scale about habitat inventory, land use, and environmental stressors associated with the watershed in which each wetland site is located. Tier 2, a rapid assessment conducted through a combination of office and field work, is based on best professional judgment and on-site evidence. Tier 3, an intensive site assessment, involves on-site collection of vegetation, water, and sediment samples to establish an integrated understanding of current wetland condition and validate methods and findings from Tiers 1 and 2. The results from this survey, along with other similar regional pilots from the Mid-Atlantic, West Coast, and Great Lakes Regions will contribute to a design and implementation approach for the National Wetlands Condition Assessment to be conducted by EPA's Office of Water in 2011. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008.

  11. Wetland restoration and compliance issues on the Savannah River site

    SciTech Connect

    Wein, G.R.; McLeod, K.W.; Sharitz, R.R. )

    1993-01-01

    Operation of the nuclear production reactors on the Savannah River Site has faced potential conflicts with wetland regulations on several occasions. This paper provides two examples in which regulatory compliance and restoration research have been meshed, providing both compliance and better knowledge to aid future regulatory needs. The decision to restart the L reactor required the mitigation of thermal effluents under Sec. 316 of the Clean Water Act. The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System, permit for the selected mitigation alternative, a 405-ha once-through cooling reservoir, required the establishment of a balanced biological community (BBC) within the lake. To promote the development of a BBC, the reservoir was seeded with water from an existing BBC (Par Pond) and stocked with fish and had artificial reefs constructed. The US Department of Energy (DOE) also requested that the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory establish littoral/wetland vegetation along the shoreline to provide aquatic and wildlife habitat, shoreline stabilization, and a good faith effort toward the establishment of a BBC. The development of wetland vegetation was deemed important to the successful development of a BBC within L Lake. However, in a similar cooling reservoir system constructed in 1957 (Par Pond), wetland vegetation successfully developed without any planting effort. Other than the good faith effort toward a BBC, there is no reason to assume a littoral/wetland community would not develop of its own accord. However, research conducted at L Lake indicates that the planting of wetland vegetation at L Lake accelerated the process of natural selection over that of areas that were not planted.

  12. Differences in flooding tolerance between species from two wetland habitats with contrasting hydrology: implications for vegetation development in future floodwater retention areas

    PubMed Central

    Banach, Katarzyna; Banach, Artur M.; Lamers, Leon P. M.; De Kroon, Hans; Bennicelli, Riccardo P.; Smits, Antoine J. M.; Visser, Eric J. W.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Plants need different survival strategies in habitats differing in hydrological regimes. This probably has consequences for vegetation development when former floodplain areas that are currently confronted with soil flooding only, will be reconnected to the highly dynamical river bed. Such changes in river management are increasingly important, especially at locations where increased water retention can prevent flooding events in developed areas. It is therefore crucial to determine the responses of plant species from relatively low-dynamic wetlands to complete submergence, and to compare these with those of species from river forelands, in order to find out what the effects of such landscape-scale changes on vegetation would be. Methods To compare the species' tolerance to complete submergence and their acclimation patterns, a greenhouse experiment was designed with a selection of 19 species from two contrasting sites: permanently wet meadows in a former river foreland, and frequently submerged grasslands in a current river foreland. The plants were treated with short (3 weeks) and long (6 weeks) periods of complete submergence, to evaluate if survival, morphological responses, and changes in biomass differed between species of the two habitats. Key Results All tested species inhabiting river forelands were classified as tolerant to complete submergence, whereas species from wet meadows showed either relatively intolerant, intermediate or tolerant responses. Species from floodplains showed in all treatments stronger shoot elongation, as well as higher production of biomass of leaves, stems, fine roots and taproots, compared with meadow species. Conclusions There is a strong need for the creation of temporary water retention basins during high levels of river discharge. However, based on the data presented, it is concluded that such reconnection of former wetlands (currently serving as meadows) to the main river bed will strongly influence plant species composition and abundance. PMID:18836190

  13. Your Stake in WETLANDS Whaf Wetlands Are

    E-print Network

    water long enough to grow moist-soil plants. The i)asture pond is a wetland. The vast coastal marshes;The Duck Factory Water, vegetation, and sky are only part of the autumn marsh. It is the birds tliat, they raise tlie lliglits of waterfowl that give tiie autunui marsh life--and value. #12;1 The Safe Deposit

  14. Avian utilization of subsidence wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Nawrot, J.R.; Conley, P.S.; Smout, C.L.

    1995-09-01

    Diverse and productive wetlands have resulted from coal mining in the midwest. The trend from surface to underground mining has increased the potential for subsidence. Planned subsidence of longwall mining areas provides increased opportunities for wetland habitat establishment. Planned subsidence over a 180 meter (590 foot) deep longwall mine in southern Illinois during 1984 to 1986 produced three subsidence wetlands totaling 15 hectares (38 acres). The resulting palustrine emergent wetlands enhanced habitat diversity within the surrounding palustrine forested unsubsided area. Habitat assessments and evaluations of avian utilization of the subsidence wetlands were conducted during February 1990 through October 1991. Avian utilization was greatest within the subsided wetlands. Fifty-three bird species representing seven foraging guilds utilized the subsidence wetlands. Wading/fishing, dabbling waterfowl, and insectivorous avian guilds dominated the subsidence wetlands. The subsidence wetlands represented ideal habitat for wood ducks and great blue herons which utilized snags adjacent to and within the wetlands for nesting (19 great blue heron nests produced 25 young). Dense cover and a rich supply of macroinvertebrates provide excellent brood habitat for wood ducks, while herpetofauna and ichthyofauna provided abundant forage in shallow water zones for great blue herons and other wetland wading birds. The diversity of game and non-game avifauna utilizing the subsidence areas demonstrated the unique value of these wetlands. Preplanned subsidence wetlands can help mitigate loss of wetland habitats in the midwest.

  15. Better rationale for wetland management

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.W.; Weller, E.C.

    1984-07-01

    A sound, yet practical, rationale for wetland management and regulatory relief should be linked to the scarcity of certain wetland habitats, the habitat diversity or carrying capacity, the degree of degradation from past development, and the incremental losses already incurred within the same wetland ecosystem. The regulatory effort should be concentrated where these characteristics indicate high-value wetlands. Wetlands impacts appear to fit into five basic orders of magnitude: immediate, total, and essentially irreversible although confined wetland conversion by filling or excavation, or long-term wetland displacement by flooding or draining and clearing; permanent and practically irreversible adverse change to the hydrologic regime, primarily in wetland water levels, temperature, salinity, velocity, circulation, flushing, and fluctuation, resulting in the loss of wetland vegetation and wet or dry cycles; enduring, often economically irreversible, but gradual and relatively confined changes to wetland soils and substrate from erosion, sedimentation, and chemical contamination; chronic but usually low-level water-quality deterioration from nutrient overenrichment, organics with low biodegradability, and trace element that are potentially toxic; and temporary, usually localized damage to soils, water quality, vegetation, and other environmental features from effects such as high turbidity, oil or chemical spills, defoliation, noise, and similar phenomena.

  16. NUTRIENT AND HABITAT INDICATORS FOR CRITERIA DEVELOPMENT IN GREAT LAKES COASTAL WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Mid-Continent Ecology Division is testing indicators and establishing stressor - response relationships to support development of nutrient and habitat criteria for Great Lakes coastal wetlands. Our focus is on water quality changes, food web shifts, and vegetation loss as ...

  17. Do created wetlands replace the wetlands that are destroyed?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Randall J.

    1997-01-01

    Wetlands, once perceived as worthless land, are now recognized as a necessary component of a vital landscape. However, due to draining and filling we have lost many of our wetlands. The loss of wetlands can have undesirable effects on the landscape, such as erosion, flooding, habitat loss and deterioration of water quality. While natural wetland systems are being destroyed nationwide, the wetlands restored or created to compensate for these losses are commonly not evaluated or contain large percentages of non-wetland acreage. At the present time we do not have established methodology that can uniformly evaluate a wetland's function, or that is useful for providing guidelines that enhance wetland restoration/creation success.

  18. Mitigation bank promotes research on restoring Coastal Plain depression wetlands (South Carolina).

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Christopher D.; DeSteven, Diane; Kilgo, John C.

    2004-12-31

    Barton, Christopher, D., Diane DeSteven and John C. Kilgo. 2004. Mitigation bank promotes research on restoring Coastal Plain depression wetlands (South Carolina). Ecol. Rest. 22(4):291-292. Abstract: Carolina bays and smaller depression wetlands support diverse plant communities and provide critical habitat for semi-aquatic fauna throughout the Coastal Plain region of the southeastern United States. Historically, many depression wetlands were altered or destroyed by surface ditching, drainage, and agricultural or silviculture uses. These important habitats are now at further risk of alteration and loss following a U.S. Supreme Court decision in 2001 restricting federal regulation of isolated wetlands. Thus, there is increased attention towards protecting intact sites and developing methods to restore others. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) 312-mi2 (800-km2) Savannah River Site (SRS) in west-central South Carolina includes about 350 Carolina bays and bay-like wetland depressions, of which about two-thirds were degraded or destroyed prior to federal acquisition of the land. Although some of the altered wetlands have recovered naturally, others still have active active drainage ditches and contain successional forests typical of drained sites. In 1997, DOE established a wetland mitigation bank to compensate for unavoidable wetland impacts on the SRS. This effort provided an opportunity fir a systematic research program to investigate wetland restoration techniques and ecological responses. Consequently, research and management staffs from the USDA Forest Service, Westinghouse Savannah River Corporation, the Savannah River Technology Center, the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) and several universities developed a collaborative project to restore degraded depression wetlands on the SRS. The mitigation project seeks cost-effective methods to restore the hydrology and vegetation typical of natural depression wetlands, and so enhance habitats for wetland-dependent wildlife. We present a brief summary of this project and the research studies now underway.

  19. Assessment of Vegetation Establishment on Tailings Dam at an Iron Ore Mining Site of Suburban Beijing, China, 7 Years After Reclamation with Contrasting Site Treatment Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Demin; Zhao, Fangying; Sun, Osbert Jianxin

    2013-09-01

    Strip-mining operations greatly disturb soil, vegetation and landscape elements, causing many ecological and environmental problems. Establishment of vegetation is a critical step in achieving the goal of ecosystem restoration in mining areas. At the Shouyun Iron Ore Mine in suburban Beijing, China, we investigated selective vegetation and soil traits on a tailings dam 7 years after site treatments with three contrasting approaches: (1) soil covering (designated as SC), (2) application of a straw mat, known as "vegetation carpet", which contains prescribed plant seed mix and water retaining agent (designated as VC), on top of sand piles, and (3) combination of soil covering and application of vegetation carpet (designated as SC+VC). We found that after 7 years of reclamation, the SC+VC site had twice the number of plant species and greater biomass than the SC and VC sites, and that the VC site had a comparable plant abundance with the SC+VC site but much less biodiversity and plant coverage. The VC site did not differ with the SC site in the vegetation traits, albeit low soil fertility. It is suggested that application of vegetation carpet can be an alternative to introduction of topsoil for treatment of tailings dam with fine-structured substrate of ore sands. However, combination of topsoil treatment and application of vegetation carpet greatly increases vegetation coverage and plant biodiversity, and is therefore a much better approach for assisting vegetation establishment on the tailings dam of strip-mining operations. While application of vegetation carpet helps to stabilize the loose surface of fine-structured mine wastes and to introduce seed bank, introduction of fertile soil is necessary for supplying nutrients to plant growth in the efforts of ecosystem restoration of mining areas.

  20. Establishing the Capability of a 1D SVAT Modelling Scheme in Predicting Key Biophysical Vegetation Characterisation Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Gareth; Petropoulos, George P.; Carlson, Toby N.; Purdy, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    Sensitivity analysis (SA) consists of an integral and important validatory check of a computer simulation model before it is used to perform any kind of analysis. In the present work, we present the results from a SA performed on the SimSphere Soil Vegetation Atmosphere Transfer (SVAT) model utilising a cutting edge and robust Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) approach, based on the use of the Gaussian Emulation Machine for Sensitivity Analysis (GEM-SA) tool. The sensitivity of the following model outputs was evaluated: the ambient CO2 concentration and the rate of CO2 uptake by the plant, the ambient O3 concentration, the flux of O3 from the air to the plant/soil boundary, and the flux of O3 taken up by the plant alone. The most sensitive model inputs for the majority of model outputs were related to the structural properties of vegetation, namely, the Leaf Area Index, Fractional Vegetation Cover, Cuticle Resistance and Vegetation Height. External CO2 in the leaf and the O3 concentration in the air input parameters also exhibited significant influence on model outputs. This work presents a very important step towards an all-inclusive evaluation of SimSphere. Indeed, results from this study contribute decisively towards establishing its capability as a useful teaching and research tool in modelling Earth's land surface interactions. This is of considerable importance in the light of the rapidly expanding use of this model worldwide, which also includes research conducted by various Space Agencies examining its synergistic use with Earth Observation data towards the development of operational products at a global scale. This research was supported by the European Commission Marie Curie Re-Integration Grant "TRANSFORM-EO". SimSphere is currently maintained and freely distributed by the Department of Geography and Earth Sciences at Aberystwyth University (http://www.aber.ac.uk/simsphere). Keywords: CO2 flux, ambient CO2, O3 flux, SimSphere, Gaussian process emulators, BACCO GEM-SA, TRANSFORM-EO.

  1. HYDROMORPHIC DETERMINANTS OF AQUATIC HABITAT VARIABILITY IN LAKE SUPERIOR COASTAL WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manuscript evaluates patterns in water quality, water movement, substrate, and vegetation in 10 Lake Superior coastal wetlands in light of wetland hydrology and morphology. Water quality, substrate, and vegetation structure are important aspects of habitat for fishes that u...

  2. Chemical Properties of Pore Water and Sediment at Three Wetland Sites Near the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Friday, G.P.

    2001-05-15

    In 1980, vegetative stress and arboreal mortality in wetland plant communities down-gradient from the F- and H-Area seepage basins were detected using aerial imagery. By 1988, approximately six acres in H-Area and four acres in F-Area had been adversely impacted. Today, wetland plant communities have become well established at the H-Area tree-kill zone.

  3. A Study of Natural and Restored Wetland Hydrology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bayless, E. Randall; Arihood, Leslie D.; Sidle, William C.; Pavlovic, Noel B.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are jointly studying the hydrology of a long-existing natural wetland and a recently restored wetland in the Kankakee River Valley in northwestern Indiana. In characterizing the two wetlands, project investigators are testing innovative methods to identify the analytical tools best suited for evaluating the success of wetland restoration. Investigators also are examining and comparing the relations between hydrology and restored wetland vegetation.

  4. The importance of subsurface geology for water source and vegetation communities in Cherokee Marsh, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurtz, A.M.; Bahr, J.M.; Carpenter, Q.J.; Hunt, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Restoration of disturbed wetland systems is an important component of wetland mitigation, yet uncertainty remains about how hydrologic processes affect biologic processes and wetlands patterns. To design more effective restoration strategies and re-establish native plant communities in disturbed wetlands, it is imperative to understand undisturbed systems. A site within Cherokee Marsh located in Madison, Wisconsin, USA, contains a relatively undisturbed area of wetland consisting of plant communities common within the prairie landscape including a fen, sedge meadow, and shallow marsh. These distinct communities are found within an area of minimal topographic relief, yet transitions from one community to the next occur over short distances. This study sought to characterize the geologic, hydrologic, and chemical gradients associated with these shifts in vegetation to gain insight into the factors controlling the spatial differences in dominant plant species, which could be critical for restoration success. Vegetation analyses revealed a transition of dominant sedge species, which appeared to correspond to changes in hydrology from a ground-water dominated to a surface-water dominated system (as determined by water isotopes). Along the same vegetation transect, subsurface coring results show a heterogeneous composition of peat and till with lateral and vertical variations in stratigraphy, which relates to variability in ground-water discharge as evidenced by hydroperiods and stable isotope composition. Applications of this type of approach throughout the glaciated terrains of the midwestern and northeastern United States and Canada can improve future wetland restoration and management. ?? 2007, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  5. R00302040008 established vegetation,

    E-print Network

    CANYON FOREST SERVICE ROAD 57 6920 6960 6940 6880 6980 7020 6940 6980 6960 6940 6940 7020 6980 6920 6960 and 10-ft interval Contour, 2-ft interval New Mexico State Plane Coordinate System Central Zone (3002) North American Datum, 1983 (NAD 83) National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 (NGVD 1929, Hypsography 100

  6. Wetland InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wdowinski, S.; Kim, S.; Amelung, F.; Dixon, T.

    2006-12-01

    Wetlands are transition zones where the flow of water, the nutrient cycling, and the sun energy meet to produce a unique and very productive ecosystem. They provide critical habitat for a wide variety of plant and animal species, including the larval stages of many ocean fish. Wetlands also have a valuable economical importance, as they filter nutrients and pollutants from fresh water used by human and provide aquatic habitats for outdoor recreation, tourism, and fishing. Globally, many such regions are under severe environmental stress, mainly from urban development, pollution, and rising sea level. However, there is increasing recognition of the importance of these habitats, and mitigation and restoration activities have begun in a few regions. A key element in wetlands conservation, management, and restoration involves monitoring its hydrologic system, as the entire ecosystem depends on its water supply. Heretofore, hydrologic monitoring of wetlands are conducted by stage (water level) stations, which provide good temporal resolution, but suffer from poor spatial resolution, as stage station are typically distributed several, or even tens of kilometers, from one another. Wetland application of InSAR provides the needed high spatial resolution hydrological observations, complementing the high temporal resolution terrestrial observations. Although conventional wisdom suggests that interferometry does not work in vegetated areas, several studies have shown that both L- and C-band interferograms with short acquisition intervals (1-105 days) can maintain excellent coherence over wetlands. In this study we explore the usage of InSAR for detecting water level changes in various wetland environments around the world, including the Everglades (south Florida), Louisiana Coast (southern US), Chesapeake Bay (eastern US), Pantanal (Brazil), Okavango Delta (Botswana), and Lena Delta (Siberia). Our main study area is the Everglades wetland (south Florida), which is covered by probably the densest stage network in the world (more than 200 stations), located 5-10 km from one another. The stage data is very important in evaluating the uncertainty of the InSAR observations. Stage data also allow us to tie the relative InSAR observations (water level changes) to absolute reference frame and to produce high spatial-resolution (10-100 m resolution) maps of absolute water levels. High resolution wetland interferograms also provide direct observations of flow patterns and flow discontinuities and serve as excellent constraints for high resolution flow models. Because many wetlands are located in coastal zones, the high spatial resolution InSAR observations provide an opportunity to study dynamic interaction of tides and freshwater inflow, and the role of vegetation resistance to surface water flow.

  7. Influence of wetland type, hydrology, and wetland destruction on aquatic communities within wetland reservoir subirrigation systems in northwestern Ohio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Establishment of an agricultural water recycling system known as the wetland reservoir subirrigation system (WRSIS) results in the creation of two different types of wetlands adjacent to agricultural fields. Each WRSIS consists of one treatment wetland designed to process agricultural contaminants (...

  8. Wetland Mitigation Monitoring at the Fernald Preserve - 13200

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Jane; Bien, Stephanie; Decker, Ashlee; Homer, John; Wulker, Brian

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for 7.2 hectares (17.8 acres) of mitigation wetland at the Fernald Preserve, Ohio. Remedial activities affected the wetlands, and mitigation plans were incorporated into site-wide ecological restoration planning. In 2008, the Fernald Natural Resource Trustees developed a comprehensive wetland mitigation monitoring approach to evaluate whether compensatory mitigation requirements have been met. The Fernald Preserve Wetland Mitigation Monitoring Plan provided a guideline for wetland evaluations. The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (Ohio EPA) wetland mitigation monitoring protocols were adopted as the means for compensatory wetland evaluation. Design, hydrologic regime, vegetation, wildlife, and biogeochemistry were evaluated from 2009 to 2011. Evaluations showed mixed results when compared to the Ohio EPA performance standards. Results of vegetation monitoring varied, with the best results occurring in wetlands adjacent to forested areas. Amphibians, particularly ambystomatid salamanders, were observed in two areas adjacent to forested areas. Not all wetlands met vegetation performance standards and amphibian biodiversity metrics. However, Fernald mitigation wetlands showed substantially higher ratings compared to other mitigated wetlands in Ohio. Also, soil sampling results remain consistent with other Ohio mitigated wetlands. The performance standards are not intended to be 'pass/fail' criteria; rather, they are reference points for use in making decisions regarding future monitoring and maintenance. The Trustees approved the Fernald Preserve Wetland Mitigation Monitoring Report with the provision that long-term monitoring of the wetlands continues at the Fernald Preserve. (authors)

  9. Ecohydraulics and Estuarine Wetland Rehabilitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, J. F.; Howe, A.; Saintilan, N.; Spencer, J.

    2004-12-01

    The hydraulics or water flow in wetlands is known to be a key factor influencing ecosystem development in estuarine wetland environments. The relationship is indirect, with the hydraulics of wetlands influencing a host of factors including soil salinity, waterlogging, sediment transport, sediment chemistry, vegetation dispersal and growth and nutrient availability and cycling. The relationship is also not one way, with the hydraulics of wetlands being influenced by plant and animal activity. Understanding these complex interactions is fundamental for the adequate management of estuarine wetlands. Listed as a Wetland of International Importance under the 1971 Ramsar Convention, the Hunter River estuary is regarded as the most significant site for migratory shorebirds in New South Wales, Australia. Over the past 20 years, the number of migratory shorebirds in the estuary has sharply declined from 8,000 to 4,000 approx. Alteration of bird habitat is believed to be one of the reasons for this alarming trend. In 2004 we started a three-year program to investigate the links between hydraulics, sediment, benthic invertebrates, vegetation and migratory shorebird habitat in the estuary. During the first year we have focused on a highly disturbed part of the Hunter estuary wetlands located on Ash Island. The area is one of the major roosting sites in the estuary and is characterized by a complex hydraulic regime due to a restricted tidal interchange with the Hunter River and the presence of infrastructure for the maintenance of power lines (i.e., roads, bridges, culverts). Salt marshes, mudflat and mangroves are the dominant vegetation types. The monitoring program includes measurements of water levels, salinity, discharge, velocity, turbulence, sediment transport and deposition, plant species and density, soil composition and benthic invertebrates coordinated with observations of bird habitat utilization on a number of locations throughout the wetland and for different flow conditions. We present a preliminary analysis of the data aimed at the hydrodynamic and geomorphologic characterization of the different vegetation zones and the resulting habitat properties.

  10. Climate change and intertidal wetlands.

    PubMed

    Ross, Pauline M; Adam, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Intertidal wetlands are recognised for the provision of a range of valued ecosystem services. The two major categories of intertidal wetlands discussed in this contribution are saltmarshes and mangrove forests. Intertidal wetlands are under threat from a range of anthropogenic causes, some site-specific, others acting globally. Globally acting factors include climate change and its driving cause-the increasing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. One direct consequence of climate change will be global sea level rise due to thermal expansion of the oceans, and, in the longer term, the melting of ice caps and glaciers. The relative sea level rise experienced at any one locality will be affected by a range of factors, as will the response of intertidal wetlands to the change in sea level. If relative sea level is rising and sedimentation within intertidal wetlands does not keep pace, then there will be loss of intertidal wetlands from the seaward edge, with survival of the ecosystems only possible if they can retreat inland. When retreat is not possible, the wetland area will decline in response to the "squeeze" experienced. Any changes to intertidal wetland vegetation, as a consequence of climate change, will have flow on effects to biota, while changes to biota will affect intertidal vegetation. Wetland biota may respond to climate change by shifting in distribution and abundance landward, evolving or becoming extinct. In addition, impacts from ocean acidification and warming are predicted to affect the fertilisation, larval development, growth and survival of intertidal wetland biota including macroinvertebrates, such as molluscs and crabs, and vertebrates such as fish and potentially birds. The capacity of organisms to move and adapt will depend on their life history characteristics, phenotypic plasticity, genetic variability, inheritability of adaptive characteristics, and the predicted rates of environmental change. PMID:24832670

  11. Climate Change and Intertidal Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Pauline M.; Adam, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Intertidal wetlands are recognised for the provision of a range of valued ecosystem services. The two major categories of intertidal wetlands discussed in this contribution are saltmarshes and mangrove forests. Intertidal wetlands are under threat from a range of anthropogenic causes, some site-specific, others acting globally. Globally acting factors include climate change and its driving cause—the increasing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. One direct consequence of climate change will be global sea level rise due to thermal expansion of the oceans, and, in the longer term, the melting of ice caps and glaciers. The relative sea level rise experienced at any one locality will be affected by a range of factors, as will the response of intertidal wetlands to the change in sea level. If relative sea level is rising and sedimentation within intertidal wetlands does not keep pace, then there will be loss of intertidal wetlands from the seaward edge, with survival of the ecosystems only possible if they can retreat inland. When retreat is not possible, the wetland area will decline in response to the “squeeze” experienced. Any changes to intertidal wetland vegetation, as a consequence of climate change, will have flow on effects to biota, while changes to biota will affect intertidal vegetation. Wetland biota may respond to climate change by shifting in distribution and abundance landward, evolving or becoming extinct. In addition, impacts from ocean acidification and warming are predicted to affect the fertilisation, larval development, growth and survival of intertidal wetland biota including macroinvertebrates, such as molluscs and crabs, and vertebrates such as fish and potentially birds. The capacity of organisms to move and adapt will depend on their life history characteristics, phenotypic plasticity, genetic variability, inheritability of adaptive characteristics, and the predicted rates of environmental change. PMID:24832670

  12. Control of hardwood regeneration in restored carolina bay depression wetlands.

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, Lee, J.; Barton, Christopher, D.; Blake, John, I.

    2012-06-01

    Carolina bays are depression wetlands located in the coastal plain region of the eastern United States. Disturbance of this wetland type has been widespread, and many sites contain one or more drainage ditches. Restoration of bays is of interest because they are important habitats for rare flora and fauna. Previous bay restoration projects have identified flood-tolerant woody competitors in the seedbank and re-sprouting as impediments to the establishment of desired herbaceous wetland vegetation communities. We restored 3 bays on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, by plugging drainage ditches, harvesting residual pine/hardwood stands within the bays, and monitoring the vegetative response of the seedbank to the hydrologic change. We applied a foliar herbicide on one-half of each bay to control red maple (Acerrubrum), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), and water oak (Quercus nigra) sprouting, and we tested its effectiveness across a hydrologic gradient in each bay. Hardwood regeneration was partially controlled by flooding in bays that exhibited long growing season hydroperiods. The findings also indicated that herbicide application was an effective means for managing hardwood regeneration and re-sprouting in areas where hydrologic control was ineffective. Herbicide use had no effect on species richness in the emerging vegetation community. In late-season drawdown periods, or in bays where hydroperiods are short, more than one herbicide application may be necessary.

  13. H-02 CONSTRUCTED WETLAND STUDIES AMPHIBIANS AND PLANTS

    E-print Network

    Georgia, University of

    H-02 CONSTRUCTED WETLAND STUDIES AMPHIBIANS AND PLANTS FY-2008 ANNUAL REPORT Savannah River Ecology ................................................................................................. 4 CHAPTER II -- AMPHIBIAN AND REPTILE USE OF THE H-02 WETLAND .................................... 5 ............................................................................................... 17 CHAPTER III: VEGETATION COMMUNITY OF THE H-02 WETLANDS -- IMPORTANCE TO AMPHIBIANS

  14. H-02 CONSTRUCTED WETLAND STUDIES AMPHIBIANS AND PLANTS

    E-print Network

    Georgia, University of

    H-02 CONSTRUCTED WETLAND STUDIES AMPHIBIANS AND PLANTS FY-2009 ANNUAL REPORT Savannah River Ecology ................................................................................................. 4 Chapter II Amphibian and Reptile Use of the H-02 Wetland .................................... 5 ............................................................................................... 27 Chapter III Vegetation Community of the H-02 Wetlands: Importance to Amphibians

  15. Observations On Some Upper Amazonian Wetlands of Southeastern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Householder, J. E.; Muttiah, R.; Khanal, S.

    2007-05-01

    Upper Amazonian wetlands represent little studied, poorly understood, and grossly under protected systems. Scientific investigation of Amazonian wetlands is in its infancy; nor is there much known about their ecological services. Regionally, wetlands form a ubiquitous and significant component of floodplain habitat fed by perennial springs as well as overland runoff. Locally, wetland vegetation forms bewilderingly complex vegetation mosaics that seem to be governed by local topography and hydrology. Drawing upon intensive field campaigns and remotely sensed imagery, we summarize the results and experiences gathered in wetlands of southeastern Peru.

  16. Methane Fluxes from Subtropical Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLucia, N.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.; Bernacchi, C.

    2013-12-01

    It is well documented that green house gas concentrations have risen at unequivocal rates since the industrial revolution but the disparity between anthropogenic sources and natural sources is uncertain. Wetlands are one example of a natural ecosystem that can be a substantial source or sink for methane (CH4) depending on climate conditions. Due to strict anaerobic conditions required for CH4-generating microorganisms, natural wetlands are one of the main sources for biogenic CH4. Although wetlands occupy less than 5% of total land surface area, they contribute approximately 20% of total CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. The processes regulating CH4 emissions are sensitive to land use and management practices of areas surrounding wetlands. Variation in adjacent vegetation or grazing intensity by livestock can, for example, alter CH4 fluxes from wetland soils by altering nutrient balance, carbon inputs and hydrology. Therefore, understanding how these changes will affect wetland source strength is essential to understand the impact of wetland management practices on the global climate system. In this study we quantify wetland methane fluxes from subtropical wetlands on a working cattle ranch in central Florida near Okeechobee Lake (27o10'52.04'N, 81o21'8.56'W). To determine differences in CH4 fluxes associated with land use and management, a replicated (n = 4) full factorial experiment was designed for wetlands where the surrounding vegetation was (1) grazed or un-grazed and (2) composed of native vegetation or improved pasture. Net exchange of CH4 and CO2 between the land surface and the atmosphere were sampled with a LICOR Li-7700 open path CH4 analyzer and Li-7500A open path CO2/H20 analyzer mounted in a 1-m3 static gas-exchange chamber. Our results showed and verified that CH4 emissions from subtropical wetlands were larger when high soil moisture was coupled with high temperatures. The presence of cattle only amplified these results. These results help quantify GHG emissions from subtropical wetlands while demonstrating the differences in these fluxes based on the surrounding ecosystem.

  17. Windows of opportunity for salt marsh vegetation establishment on bare tidal flats: The importance of temporal and spatial variability in hydrodynamic forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhan; Belzen, Jim; Wal, Daphne; Balke, Thorsten; Wang, Zheng Bing; Stive, Marcel; Bouma, Tjeerd J.

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the mechanisms limiting and facilitating salt marsh vegetation initial establishment is of widespread importance due to the many valuable services salt marsh ecosystems offer. Salt marsh dynamics have been investigated by many previous studies, but the mechanisms that enable or disable salt marsh initial establishment are still understudied. Recently, the "windows of opportunity" (WoO) concept has been proposed as a framework providing an explanation for the initial establishment of biogeomorphic ecosystems and the role of physical disturbance herein. A WoO is a sufficiently long disturbance-free period following seedling dispersal, which enables successful establishment. By quantifying the occurrence of WoO, vegetation establishment pattern can be predicted. For simplicity sake and as prove of concept, the original WoO framework considers tidal inundation as the only physical disturbance to salt marsh establishment, whereas the known disturbance from tidal currents and wind waves is ignored. In this study, we incorporate hydrodynamic forcing in the WoO framework. Its spatial and temporal variability is considered explicitly in a salt marsh establishment model. We used this model to explain the observed episodic salt marsh recruitment in the Westerschelde Estuary, Netherlands. Our results reveal that this model can significantly increase the spatial prediction accuracy of salt marsh establishment compared to a model that excludes the hydrodynamic disturbance. Using the better performing model, we further illustrate how tidal flat morphology determines salt marsh establishing elevation and width via hydrodynamic force distribution. Our model thus offers a valuable tool to understand and predict bottlenecks of salt marsh restoration and consequences of changing environmental conditions due to climate change.

  18. Identification and characterization of wetlands in the Bear Creek watershed

    SciTech Connect

    Rosensteel, B.A.; Trettin, C.C.

    1993-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to identify, characterize, and map the wetlands in the Bear Creek watershed. A preliminary wetland categorization system based on the Cowardin classification system (Cowardin et al. 1979) with additional site-specific topographic, vegetation, and disturbance characteristic modifiers was developed to characterize the type of wetlands that exist in the Bear Creek watershed. An additional objective was to detect possible relationships among site soils, hydrology, and the occurrence of wetlands in the watershed through a comparison of existing data with the field survey. Research needs are discussed in the context of wetland functions and values and regulatory requirements for wetland impact assessment and compensatory mitigation.

  19. Differences in Aquatic Communities Between Wetlands Created by an Agricultural Water Recycling System

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Establishment of an agricultural water recycling system known as the wetland reservoir subirrigation system (WRSIS) results in the creation of wetlands adjacent to agricultural fields. Each WRSIS consists of one wetland designed to process agricultural chemicals (WRSIS wetlands) and one wetland to s...

  20. Freshwater Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides descriptions about freshwater wetlands, such as marshes, swamps, and bogs. Contains three learning activities which deal with unusual wetland plants, the animals and plants in a typical marsh, and the effects of a draught on a swamp. Included are reproducible handouts and worksheets for two of the activities. (TW)

  1. Productivity of wet soils: Biomass of cultivated and natural vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, C.A.

    1988-12-01

    Wet soils, soils which have agronomic limitations because of excess water, comprise 105 million acres of non-federal land in the conterminous United States. Wet soils which support hydrophytic plants are ''wetlands'', and are some of the most productive natural ecosystems in the world. When both above- and belowground productivity are considered, cattail (Typha latifolia) is the most productive temperate wetland species (26.4 Mg/ha/year). Both cattail and reed (Phragmites australis) have aboveground productivities of about 13 Mg/ha/year. Although average aboveground yields of reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea) are lower (9.5 Mg/ha/year), techniques for its establishment and cultivation are well-developed. Other herbaceous wetland species which show promise as biomass crops include sedge (Carex spp.), river bulrush (Scirpus fluviatilis) and prairie cordgrass (Spartina pectinata). About 40% of wet soils in the conterminous US are currently cultivated, and they produce one-quarter of the major US crops. Most of this land is artificially drained for crops such as corn, soybeans, and vegetables. US wetlands are drained for agriculture at the rate of 223,000 ha/yr. Paddies flooded with water are used to grow rice, cranberries, and wild rice. Forage and live sphagnum moss are products of undrained wetlands. A number of federal and state regulations apply to the draining or irrigation of wetlands, but most do not seriously restrict their use for agriculture. 320 refs., 36 tabs.

  2. ERTS-1 investigation of wetlands ecology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. R. (principal investigator); Carter, V.; Mcginness, J.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Data from aircraft can be used for large scale mapping where detailed information is necessary, whereas Landsat-1 data are useful for rapid mapping of gross wetland boundaries and vegetative composition and assessment of seasonal change plant community composition such as high and low growth forms of Spartina alterniflora, Juncus roemarianus, and Spartina cynosuroides. Spoil disposal and wetland ditching activities may also be defined. Wetland interpretation is affected by tidal stage; drainage patterns are more easily detected at periods of low water. Species discrimination is easier at periods of high water during the growing season; upper wetland boundaries in fresh water tidal marshes are more easily delineated during the winter months when marsh vegetation is largely dead or dormant. Fresh water discharges from coastal streams may be inferred from the species composition of contiguous wetlands.

  3. Microbiological study of ready-to-eat salad vegetables from retail establishments uncovers a national outbreak of salmonellosis.

    PubMed

    Sagoo, S K; Little, C L; Ward, L; Gillespie, I A; Mitchell, R T

    2003-03-01

    The increasing availability of bagged prepared salad vegetables reflects consumer demand for fresh, healthy, convenient, and additive-free foods that are safe and nutritious. During May and June 2001 a study of retail bagged prepared ready-to-eat salad vegetables was undertaken to determine the microbiological quality of these vegetables. Examination of the salad vegetables revealed that the vast majority (3,826 of 3,852 samples; 99.3%) were of satisfactory or acceptable microbiological quality according to Public Health Laboratory Service microbiological guidelines, while 20 (0.5%) samples were of unsatisfactory microbiological quality. Unsatisfactory quality was due to Escherichia coli and Listeria spp. (not Listeria monocytogenes) levels in excess of 10(2) CFU/g. However, six (0.2%) samples were of unacceptable microbiological quality because of the presence of Salmonella (Salmonella Newport PT33 [one sample], Salmonella Umbilo [three samples], and Salmonella Durban [one sample]) or because of a L. monocytogenes level of 660 CFU/g, which indicates a health risk. In each case, the retailer involved and the UK Food Standards Agency were immediately informed, and full investigations were undertaken. Nineteen cases of Salmonella Newport PT33 infection were subsequently identified throughout England and Wales. The outbreak strain of Salmonella Newport PT33 isolated from the salad and from humans had a unique plasmid profile. Campylobacter spp. and E. coli O157 were not detected in any of the samples examined. The presence of Salmonella, as well as high levels of L. monocytogenes, is unacceptable. However, minimally processed cut and packaged salad is exposed to a range of conditions during growth, harvest, preparation, and distribution, and it is possible that these conditions may increase the potential for microbial contamination, highlighting the necessity for the implementation of good hygiene practices from farm to fork to prevent contamination and/or bacterial growth in these salad products. PMID:12636292

  4. Soil and phosphorus accretion rates in sub-tropical wetlands: Everglades Stormwater Treatment Areas as a case example.

    PubMed

    Bhomia, R K; Inglett, P W; Reddy, K R

    2015-11-15

    Wetlands are known to serve as sinks for particulate matter and associated nutrients and contaminants. Consequently rate of soil accretion is critical for continued performance of wetlands to provide ecosystem services including water quality improvement and reduce excess contaminant loads into downstream waters. Here we demonstrate a new technique to determine rate of soil accretion in selected subtropical treatment wetlands located in southern USA. We also report changes in soil accretion rates and subsequent phosphorus (P) removal efficiency with increasing operational history of these treatment wetlands. Utilizing discernible signatures preserved within the soil depth profiles, 'change points' (CP) that corresponded to specific events in the life history of a wetland were determined. The CP was observed as an abrupt transition in the physico-chemical properties of soil as a manifestation of prevailing historical conditions (e.g. startup of treatment wetlands in this case). Vertical depth of CP from the soil surface was equivalent to the depth of recently accreted soil (RAS) and used for soil accretion rate calculations. Annual soil and P accretion rates determined using CP technique (CPT) in studied wetlands ranged from 1.0±0.3 to 1.7±0.8 cm yr(-1) and 1.3±0.6 to 3.3±2 g m(-2) yr(-1), respectively. There was no difference in RAS depth between emergent and submerged aquatic vegetation communities found at the study location. Our results showed that soil and P accretion rates leveled off after 10 yr of treatment wetlands' operation. On comparison, soil accretion rates and RAS depth determined by CPT were commensurate with that measured by other techniques. CPT can be easily used where a reliable record of wetland establishment date or some significant alteration/perturbation is available. This technique offers a relatively simple alternative to determine vertical accretion rates in free-water surface wetlands. PMID:26172597

  5. Uptake of /sup 226/Ra by established vegetation and black cutworm larvae, Agrotis ipsilon (class Insecta: order Lepidoptera), on U mill tailings at Elliot Lake, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Clulow, F.V.; Dave, N.K.; Lim, T.P.; Cloutier, N.R.

    1988-07-01

    Radium-226 levels in samples from an inactive U tailings site at Elliot Lake, Ontario, Canada, were: 9140 +/- 500 mBq g-1 dry weight in the substrate; 62 +/- 1 mBq g-1 dry weight in rye, Secale cereale, and less than 3.7 mBq g-1 dry weight in oats, Avena sativa, the dominant species established by revegetation of the tailings; and 117 +/- 7 mBq g-1 dry weight in washed and unwashed black cutworm larvae. Concentration ratios were: vegetation to tailings 0.001-0.007; black cutworms to vegetation 3.6 and black cutworms to tailings 0.01. The values are considered too low to be considered a hazard to herring gulls, Larus argentatus, which occasionally feed on cutworms.

  6. WETLANDS INVENTORY, ASSESSMENT, AND MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The duration of the work described in this proposal will be approximately 24 months. There will essentially be two cycles. During the first year the wildlife and vegetation inventories and the wetland assessments will be done for the area of the Warwick and Tokio Aquifers. The...

  7. What AreWetlands? Wetlands are areas of land that are

    E-print Network

    George, Edward I.

    . Keep your ears and eyes open for the animal and plant life that thrive in our wetlands. Bird Boxes that they can support flood tolerant vegetation or plants that require wet soil.Wetlands are transition zones installation began in 2001-2 and plantings continue today. The underground tiles were broken and natural spring

  8. Interaction between neighboring vegetation patches: Impact on flow and deposition

    E-print Network

    Meire, Dieter W. S. A.

    Flow and sedimentation around patches of vegetation are important to landscape evolution, and a better understanding of these processes would facilitate more effective river restoration and wetlands engineering. In wetlands ...

  9. Measuring Above Ground Biomass and Vegetation Structure in the South Florida Everglades Wetland Ecosystem with X-, C-, and L-band SAR data and Ground-based LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feliciano, E. A.; Wdowinski, S.; Potts, M.; Chin, S.; Phillips, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    Worldwide, anthropogenic activities are disturbing and disrupting nutrient rich bio-diverse wetland ecosystems. Disturbance of the South Florida Everglades has been particularly acute, but difficult to quantify given its limited accessibility. Successful ecosystem monitoring requires the use of remote sensing. We used space-based Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) observations to estimate vegetation structure and above-ground biomass and track their changes over time. Our study leveraged three different SAR wavelengths that interact with different aspects of the vegetation. The short wavelength X-band (3.2 cm) signal interacts mainly with canopies; the intermediate wavelength C-band (5.6 cm) signal interacts with both canopies and branches; and the long wavelength L-band (24 cm) signal interacts with both the surface and lower portion of the vegetation. We used dual- and quadruple-polarization observations acquired from the TerraSAR-X, RadarSAT-2, and ALOS satellites. Different polarization data reflect radar signal interaction with different sections of the vegetation due to different scattering mechanisms. In order to calibrate the multi-wavelength and multi-polarization SAR observations, we conducted field measurement in three vegetation communities: hammock, pine and cypress. Our ground measurements included both traditional forestry surveys and state-of-the-art Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS), a.k.a. ground based LiDAR surveys. A week long TLS survey was conducted in the Everglades National Park in the three calibrations sites using a Leica ScanStation C10 TLS instrument which utilizes a narrow, green (532 nm) laser beam. During this week we collected a total of 29 scans (33 GB of data). The TLS surveys provided centimeter resolution 3-D point clouds of the ground surface and below-canopy vegetation. Initial analysis of the data has provided detailed 3-D estimates of the vegetation structure and above ground biomass. A comparative analysis of the ability of the three bands of SAR to quantify above ground biomass in the different communities is presented. We also determine the essential bands needed to most efficiently estimate biomass. We find that the performance of SAR differs by community types. More rigorous data processing will provide important quantitative measures that will allow careful calibration of the remote sensing SAR data.

  10. Hydrogeomorphic and Anthropogenic Influences on Water Quality, Habitat, and Fish of Great Lakes Coastal Wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    Great Lakes coastal wetlands represent a dynamic interface between coastal watersheds and the open lake. Compared to the adjacent lakes, these wetlands have generally warmer water, reduced wave energy, shallow bathymetry, higher productivity, and structurally complex vegetated h...

  11. Results of preliminary reconnaissance trip to determine the presence of wetlands in wet forest habitats on the Island of Hawaii as part of the Hawaii Geothermal Project, October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Wakeley, J.S.; Sprecher, S.W.; Lichvar, R.

    1994-02-25

    In October 1993, the authors sampled soils, vegetation, and hydrology at eight sites representing a range of substrates, elevations, soil types, and plant community types within rainforest habitats on the Island of Hawaii. Their purpose was to determine whether any of these habitats were wetlands according to the 1987 Corps of Engineers Wetlands Delineation Manual. None of the rainforest habitats they sampled was wetland in its entirety. However, communities established on pahoehoe lava flows contained scattered wetlands in depressions and folds in the lava, where water could accumulate. Therefore, large construction projects, such as that associated with proposed geothermal energy development in the area, have the potential to impact a significant number and/or area of wetlands. To estimate those impacts more accurately, they present a supplementary scope of work and cost estimate for additional sampling in the proposed geothermal project area.

  12. Opposing environmental gradients govern vegetation zonation in an intermountain playa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanderson, J.S.; Kotliar, N.B.; Steingraeber, D.A.

    2008-01-01

    Vegetation zonation was investigated at an intermountain playa wetland (Mishak Lakes) in the San Luis Valley (SLV) of southern Colorado. Plant composition and abiotic conditions were quantified in six vegetation zones. Reciprocal transplants were performed to test the importance of abiotic factors in governing zonation. Abiotic conditions differed among several vegetation zones. Prolonged inundation led to anaerobic soils in the Eleocharis palustris and the submerged aquatics zones, on the low end of the site's 1.25 m elevation gradient. On the high end of the gradient, soil salinity and sodicity (a measure of exchangeable sodium) were high in the Distichlis spicata zone (electrical conductivity, EC = 5.3 dS/m, sodium absorption ratio, SAR = 44.0) and extreme in the Sarcobatus vermiculatus zone (EC = 21 dS/m, SAR = 274). Transplanted species produced maximum biomass in the zone where they originated, not in any other higher or lower vegetation zone. The greatest overall transplant effect occurred for E. palustris, which experienced a ??? 77% decline in productivity when transplanted to other zones. This study provides evidence that physical factors are a major determinant of vegetation zone composition and distribution across the entire elevation gradient at Mishak Lakes. Patterns at Mishak Lakes arise from counter-directional stress gradients: a gradient from anaerobic to well-oxygenated from basin bottom to upland and a gradient from extremely high salinity to low salinity in the opposing direction. Because abiotic conditions dominate vegetation zonation, restoration of the altered hydrologic regime of this wetland to a natural hydrologic regime may be sufficient to re-establish many of the natural biodiversity functions provided by these wetlands. ?? 2008 The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  13. Predicting friction factor in herbaceous emergent wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynn-Thompson, T.; Hall, K.

    2012-12-01

    Over 53% of all wetlands in the US have been lost since the mid-1780s; to counteract wetland losses, wetland land area is being replaced through wetland restoration and mitigation. Development of the target wetland hydroperiod is critical to restoration success. For wetlands in which outflow is a component of the water budget, such as in riparian wetlands, surface water stage is controlled all or in part by the hydraulic resistance within the wetland, requiring accurate simulation of hydraulic resistance due to vegetation. Hydraulic models that consider vegetation rely on an accurate determination of a resistance parameter such as a friction factor or drag coefficient. At low Reynolds numbers typical of flows in wetlands, hydraulic resistance is orders of magnitude higher than fully turbulent flows and resistance parameters are functions of the flow regime as well as the vegetation density and structure. The exact relationship between hydraulic resistance, flow regime, and vegetation properties at the low-Reynolds number flows remains unclear. Prior research has typically involved laboratory studies of flow through idealized, individual stems. However, emergent wetland vegetation frequently grows as clumps. The goals of this research were to investigate the effect of clumping vegetation on flow resistance and to develop a prediction equation for use in wetland design. A 6-m by 1-m by 0.4-m recirculating flume was planted with mature common rush, Juncus effusus, a common emergent wetland plant. Three different flow rates (3, 4, and 5 L/s) and three different tailgate heights (0, 2.5, and 5 cm) were used to simulate a range of flow conditions. Plant spacing and clump diameter were varied (20 and 25 cm, 8 and 12 cm, respectively). Friction factors ranged from 9 to 40 and decreased with increasing plant density. Non-dimensional parameters determined through Buckingham Pi analysis were used in a regression analysis to develop a prediction model. Results of the regression analysis showed that the fraction of vegetated occupied area was most significant factor in determining friction factor.

  14. High and Mid-Latitude Wetlands, Climate Change, and Carbon Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peteet, Dorothy

    2000-01-01

    Pollen and macrofossil stratigraphy from wetlands associated with AMS chronology provides a vegetational and climatic history over thousands of years. From these records we establish a record of climate change which can be compared with independent records of carbon accumulation rates in these same wetlands. In this way, inferences can be made concerning carbon storage during different climatic regimes. One focus of our research has been high-latitude regions such as Alaskan and Siberian tundra, from which we have paleorecords which span the last 10,000 years. We will present records from the Malaspina Glacier region, Alaska and the Pur-Taz region of Western Siberia. A second focus of our research is in mid-latitude eastern North America. We will present paleorecords from wetlands in Vermont, New York, and Virginia showing the relationship between carbon accumulation rates and climatic changes since the late Pleistocene.

  15. Longitudinal dispersion in vegetated flow

    E-print Network

    Murphy, Enda

    2006-01-01

    Vegetation is ubiquitous in rivers, estuaries and wetlands, strongly influencing both water conveyance and mass transport. The plant canopy affects both mean and turbulent flow structure, and thus both advection and ...

  16. Restoring coastal wetlands that were ditched for mosquito control: a preliminary assessment of hydro-leveling as a restoration technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Thomas J., III; Tiling, Ginger; Leasure, Pamela S.

    2007-01-01

    The wetlands surrounding Tampa Bay, Florida were extensively ditched for mosquito control in the 1950s. Spoil from ditch construction was placed adjacent to the wetlands ditches creating mound-like features (spoil-mounds). These mounds represent a loss of 14% of the wetland area in Tampa Bay. Spoil mounds interfere with tidal flow and are locations for non-native plants to colonize (e.g., Schinus terebinthifolius). Removal of the spoil mounds to eliminate exotic plants, restore native vegetation, and re-establish natural hydrology is a restoration priority for environmental managers. Hydro-leveling, a new technique, was tested in a mangrove forest restoration project in 2004. Hydro-leveling uses a high pressure stream of water to wash sediment from the spoil mound into the adjacent wetland and ditch. To assess the effectiveness of this technique, we conducted vegetation surveys in areas that were hydro-leveled and in non-hydro-leveled areas 3 years post-project. Adult Schinus were reduced but not eliminated from hydro-leveled mounds. Schinus seedlings however were absent from hydro-leveled sites. Colonization by native species was sparse. Mangrove seedlings were essentially absent (?2 m?2) from the centers of hydro-leveled mounds and were in low density on their edges (17 m?2) in comparison to surrounding mangrove forests (105 m?2). Hydro-leveling resulted in mortality of mangroves adjacent to the mounds being leveled. This was probably caused by burial of pneumatophores during the hydro-leveling process. For hydro-leveling to be a useful and successful restoration technique several requirements must be met. Spoil mounds must be lowered to the level of the surrounding wetlands. Spoil must be distributed further into the adjacent wetland to prevent burial of nearby native vegetation. Finally, native species may need to be planted on hydro-leveled areas to speed up the re-vegetation process.

  17. ACUTE TOXICITY OF METHYL-PARATHION IN WETLAND MESOCOSMS: INFLUENCE OF AQUATIC PLANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The acute toxicity of methyl-parathion (MeP) introduced into constructed wetlands for the purpose of assessing the importance of emergent vegetation was tested using Hyalella azecta (Crustacea: Amphipoda). A vegetated (90% cover, mainly Juncus effuses) and a non-vegetated wetland (each with a water...

  18. Potential for using native plant species in stormwater wetlands.

    PubMed

    Bonilla-Warford, Cristina M; Zedler, Joy B

    2002-03-01

    Spartina pectinata (prairie cordgrass) was grown under five hydroperiods (wet-dry cycles) to determine its potential for use in stormwater wetlands, particularly as an alternative to the highly invasive Phalaris arundinacea (an exotic grass). Rhizomes planted in outdoor microcosms grew vigorously in all treatments, namely, weekly flooding in early summer, weekly flooding in late summer, flooding every three weeks throughout the summer, weekly flooding throughout the summer, and no flooding. Neither the timing nor frequency of 24-hour floods (10-20 cm deep) affected total stem length (grand mean 1003 +/- 188.8 cm per pot, n = 140) or above-ground biomass (46.5 +/- 8.3 g per pot, equivalent to approximately 360 g/m2). However, by late summer, fewer new tillers were found in unflooded microcosms, indicating that vegetative expansion is drought-sensitive. The growth of Spartina plants was further assessed with and without Glyceria striata (a native grass) and Phalaris arundinacea. Glyceria growth was not affected by hydrologic treatment. Glyceria reduced Spartina growth by approximately 11%, suggesting potential as a cover crop that might reduce establishment and growth of Phalaris seedlings. Seeds of Phalaris did not germinate, but branch fragments established where soil was moist from flooding, regardless of the presence of Glyceria. The ability of Spartina to establish vegetatively and grow well under variable water levels leads us to recommend further testing in stormwater wetlands, along with early planting of Glyceria to reduce weed invasions. PMID:11830768

  19. Application of EPA wetland research program approach to a floodplain wetland restoration assessment.

    SciTech Connect

    Kolka, R., K.; Trettin, C., C.; Nelson, E., A.; Barton, C., D.; Fletcher, D., E.

    2002-01-01

    Kolka, R.K., C.C. Trettin, E.A. Nelson, C.D. Barton, and D.E. Fletcher. 2002. Application of the EPA Wetland Research Program Approach to a floodplain wetland restoration assessment. J. Env. Monitoring & Restoration 1(1):37-51. Forested wetland restoration assessment is difficult because of the timeframe necessary for the development of a forest ecosystem. The development of a forested wetland ecosystem includes the recovery of hydrology, soils, vegetation, and faunal communities. To assess forested wetland restoration projects, measures need to be developed that are sensitive to early changes in community development and are predictive of future conditions. In this study we apply the EPS's Wetland Research Program's (WRP) approach to assess the recovery of two thermally altered riparian wetland systems in South Carolina. In one of the altered wetland systems, approximately 75% of the wetland was planted with bottomland tree seedlings in an effort to hasten recovery. Individual studies addressing hydrology, soils, vegetation, and faunal communities indicate variable recovery responses.

  20. Remote Sensing and Wetland Ecology: a South African Case Study

    PubMed Central

    De Roeck, Els R.; Verhoest, Niko E.C.; Miya, Mtemi H.; Lievens, Hans; Batelaan, Okke; Thomas, Abraham; Brendonck, Luc

    2008-01-01

    Remote sensing offers a cost efficient means for identifying and monitoring wetlands over a large area and at different moments in time. In this study, we aim at providing ecologically relevant information on characteristics of temporary and permanent isolated open water wetlands, obtained by standard techniques and relatively cheap imagery. The number, surface area, nearest distance, and dynamics of isolated temporary and permanent wetlands were determined for the Western Cape, South Africa. Open water bodies (wetlands) were mapped from seven Landsat images (acquired during 1987 – 2002) using supervised maximum likelihood classification. The number of wetlands fluctuated over time. Most wetlands were detected in the winter of 2000 and 2002, probably related to road constructions. Imagery acquired in summer contained fewer wetlands than in winter. Most wetlands identified from Landsat images were smaller than one hectare. The average distance to the nearest wetland was larger in summer. In comparison to temporary wetlands, fewer, but larger permanent wetlands were detected. In addition, classification of non-vegetated wetlands on an Envisat ASAR radar image (acquired in June 2005) was evaluated. The number of detected small wetlands was lower for radar imagery than optical imagery (acquired in June 2002), probably because of deterioration of the spatial information content due the extensive pre-processing requirements of the radar image. Both optical and radar classifications allow to assess wetland characteristics that potentially influence plant and animal metacommunity structure. Envisat imagery, however, was less suitable than Landsat imagery for the extraction of detailed ecological information, as only large wetlands can be detected. This study has indicated that ecologically relevant data can be generated for the larger wetlands through relatively cheap imagery and standard techniques, despite the relatively low resolution of Landsat and Envisat imagery. For the characterisation of very small wetlands, high spatial resolution optical or radar images are needed. This study exemplifies the benefits of integrating remote sensing and ecology and hence stimulates interdisciplinary research of isolated wetlands.

  1. Differences in Fish, Amphibian, and Reptile Communities Within Wetlands Created by an Agricultural Water Recycling System in Northwestern Ohio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Establishment of a water recycling system known as the wetland-reservoir subirrigation system (WRSIS) results in the creation of wetlands adjacent to agricultural fields. Each WRSIS consists of one wetland designed to process agricultural chemicals (WRSIS wetlands) and one wetland to store subirriga...

  2. Development of an Indicator to Monitor Mediterranean Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Antonio; Abdul Malak, Dania; Guelmami, Anis; Perennou, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Wetlands are sensitive ecosystems that are increasingly subjected to threats from anthropogenic factors. In the last decades, coastal Mediterranean wetlands have been suffering considerable pressures from land use change, intensification of urban growth, increasing tourism infrastructure and intensification of agricultural practices. Remote sensing (RS) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) techniques are efficient tools that can support monitoring Mediterranean coastal wetlands on large scales and over long periods of time. The study aims at developing a wetland indicator to support monitoring Mediterranean coastal wetlands using these techniques. The indicator makes use of multi-temporal Landsat images, land use reference layers, a 50m numerical model of the territory (NMT) and Corine Land Cover (CLC) for the identification and mapping of wetlands. The approach combines supervised image classification techniques making use of vegetation indices and decision tree analysis to identify the surface covered by wetlands at a given date. A validation process is put in place to compare outcomes with existing local wetland inventories to check the results reliability. The indicator´s results demonstrate an improvement in the level of precision of change detection methods achieved by traditional tools providing reliability up to 95% in main wetland areas. The results confirm that the use of RS techniques improves the precision of wetland detection compared to the use of CLC for wetland monitoring and stress the strong relation between the level of wetland detection and the nature of the wetland areas and the monitoring scale considered. PMID:25826210

  3. Development of an indicator to monitor mediterranean wetlands.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Antonio; Abdul Malak, Dania; Guelmami, Anis; Perennou, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Wetlands are sensitive ecosystems that are increasingly subjected to threats from anthropogenic factors. In the last decades, coastal Mediterranean wetlands have been suffering considerable pressures from land use change, intensification of urban growth, increasing tourism infrastructure and intensification of agricultural practices. Remote sensing (RS) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) techniques are efficient tools that can support monitoring Mediterranean coastal wetlands on large scales and over long periods of time. The study aims at developing a wetland indicator to support monitoring Mediterranean coastal wetlands using these techniques. The indicator makes use of multi-temporal Landsat images, land use reference layers, a 50m numerical model of the territory (NMT) and Corine Land Cover (CLC) for the identification and mapping of wetlands. The approach combines supervised image classification techniques making use of vegetation indices and decision tree analysis to identify the surface covered by wetlands at a given date. A validation process is put in place to compare outcomes with existing local wetland inventories to check the results reliability. The indicator´s results demonstrate an improvement in the level of precision of change detection methods achieved by traditional tools providing reliability up to 95% in main wetland areas. The results confirm that the use of RS techniques improves the precision of wetland detection compared to the use of CLC for wetland monitoring and stress the strong relation between the level of wetland detection and the nature of the wetland areas and the monitoring scale considered. PMID:25826210

  4. Hardwood re-sprout control in hydrologically restored Carolina Bay depression wetlands.

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, Lee, Justin

    2009-06-01

    Carolina bays are isolated depression wetlands located in the upper coastal plain region of the eastern Unites States. Disturbance of this wetland type has been widespread, and many sites contain one or more drainage ditches as a result of agricultural conversion. Restoration of bays is of interest because they are important habitats for rare flora and fauna species. Previous bay restoration projects have identified woody competitors in the seedbank and re-sprouting as impediments to the establishment of herbaceous wetland vegetation communities. Three bays were hydrologically restored on the Savannah River Site, SC, by plugging drainage ditches. Residual pine/hardwood stands within the bays were harvested and the vegetative response of the seedbank to the hydrologic change was monitored. A foliar herbicide approved for use in wetlands (Habitat® (Isopropylamine salt of Imazapyr)) was applied on one-half of each bay to control red maple (Acer rubrum L.), sweet gum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.), and water oak (Quercus nigra L.) sprouting. The effectiveness of the foliar herbicide was tested across a hydrologic gradient in an effort to better understand the relationship between depth and duration of flooding, the intensity of hardwood re-sprout pressure, and the need for hardwood management practices such as herbicide application.

  5. Slowing the rate of loss of mineral wetlands on human dominated landscapes - Diversification of farmers markets to include carbon (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creed, I. F.; Badiou, P.; Lobb, D.

    2013-12-01

    Canada is the fourth-largest exporter of agriculture and agri-food products in the world (exports valued at 28B), but instability of agriculture markets can make it difficult for farmers to cope with variability, and new mechanisms are needed for farmers to achieve economic stability. Capitalizing on carbon markets will help farmers achieve environmentally sustainable economic performance. In order to have a viable carbon market, governments and industries need to know what the carbon capital is and what potential there is for growth, and farmers need financial incentives that will not only allow them to conserve existing wetlands but that will also enable them to restore wetlands while making a living. In southern Ontario, farmers' needs to maximize the return on investment on marginal lands have resulted in loss of 70-90% of wetlands, making this region one of the most threatened region in terms of wetland degradation and loss in Canada. Our project establishes the role that mineral wetlands have in the net carbon balance by contributing insight into the potential benefits to carbon management provided by wetland restoration efforts in these highly degraded landscapes. The goal was to establish the magnitude of carbon offsets that could be achieved through wetland conservation (securing existing carbon stocks) and restoration (creating new carbon stocks). The experimental design was to focus on (1) small (0.2-2.0 ha) and (2) isolated (no inflow or outflow) mineral wetlands with the greatest restoration potential that included (3) a range of restoration ages (drained (0 yr), 3 yr, 6 yr, 12 yr, 20 yr, 35 yr, intact marshes) to capture potential changes in rates of carbon sequestration with restoration age of wetland. From each wetland, wetland soil carbon pools samples were collected at four positions: centre of wetland (open-water); emergent vegetation zone; wet meadow zone where flooding often occurs (i.e., high water mark); and upland where flooding rarely occurs (cores segmented into 5cm increments up to 45 cm, composited and analyzed for carbon pools using mass equivalent and carbon sequestration rates samples were taken at centre of wetland (open-water) (cores segmented into 1 cm increments up to 30 cm, composited and analyzed for Pb-210 and Cs-137 isotopes). The magnitude of wetland loss (?10 ha) is estimated to be over 1.5 million ha in southern Ontario since the time of European settlement. About 75% of converted wetlands (1.1 million ha) are now classified as 'undifferentiated agricultural lands.' We use our measured carbon sequestration rate Mg CO2 equivalents ha/yr under different scenarios of landowner uptake (5-50%) and prices for carbon offsets (2-50/MgCO2 equivalents) to estimate carbon sequestration and the value of this sequestration in restored wetlands. The project provides empirical evidence that restoring wetlands for carbon sequence could improve the livelihood of farmers and that policies should be established to incentivize farmers to adopt wetland restoration practices on marginal areas in order to improve the economic performance and environmental sustainability of agriculture in Ontario.

  6. The influence of papermill sludge application on the biogeochemistry and vegetation of young red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait. ) plantations established in recent clearcut forest ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Kraske, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    Combined primary and secondary papermill sludge was applied to three young red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) plantation (age < 8 years) in western Maine. Field studies were conducted to evaluate the influence of sludge application on forest soil chemical and physical properties, soil solution and streamwater chemistry, and conifer and competitive vegetation growth. Research sites were established in Letter E Township, Jim Pond Township, and Coplin Plantation. At Letter E, study plots were established in an adjacent uncut forest area, in order to examine the effects of clearcut harvesting on forest ecosystem biogeochemical processes. A seedling study was also established to examine the effect of sludge application on newly-planted tree species: japanese larch (Lariz leptolepis), red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.), and black spruce (Picea mariana(Mill.) B.S.P.). Sludge was operationally applied during the summer and fall of 1989. The target loading rate was 40 Mg ha[sup [minus]1]. Harvesting at the Letter E site appeared to increase concentrations of major nutrients in soil solution. In 1989, soil solution Ca[sup 2+], Mg[sup 2+], and NO[sub 3][sup [minus

  7. Wetlands ecology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. R. (principal investigator); Carter, V. L.; Mcginness, J. W., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The ERTS imagery analyzed provides approximately 2/3 coverage of the test site. Analysis was made using visual methods, density slicing, and multispectral analysis. Preliminary conclusions reached are that most, if not all, of the investigation objectives can be met. Saline and near-saline wetlands can be delineated from ERTS-1 images as the wetland-upland boundaries and land-water interface are clearly defined. Major plant species or communities such as Spartina alterniflora (high and low vigor forms), Spartina patens/Distichlis spicata, and Juncus roemarianus can be discriminated and spoil disposal areas identified.

  8. Global warming and prairie wetlands: potential consequences for waterfowl habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poiani, Karen A.; Johnson, W. Carter

    1991-01-01

    The accumulation of greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere is expected to warm the earth's climate at an unprecedented rate (Ramanathan 1988, Schneider 1989). If the climate models are correct, within 100 years the earth will not only be warmer than it has been during the past million years, but the change will have occurred more rapidly than any on record. Many profound changes in the earth's environment are expected, including rising sea level, increasing aridity in continental interiors, and melting permafrost. Ecosystems are expected to respond variously to a rapidly changing climate. Tree ranges in eastern North American are expected to shift northward, and seed dispersal may not be adequate to maintain current diversity (Cohn 1989, Johnson and Webb 1989). In coastal wetlands, rising sea level from melting icecaps and thermal expansion could flood salt-grass marshes and generally reduce the size and productivity of the intertidal zone (Peters and Darling 1985). As yet, little attention has been given to the possible effects of climatic warming on inland prairie wetland ecosystems. These wetlands, located in the glaciated portion of the North American Great Plains (Figure 1), constitute the single most important breeding area for waterfowl on this continent (Hubbard 1988). This region annually produces 50-80% of the continent's total duck production (Batt et al. 1989). These marshes also support a variety of other wildlife, including many species of nongame birds, muskrat, and mink (Kantrud et al. 1989a). Prairie wetlands are relatively shallow, water-holding depressions that vary in size, water permanence, and water chemistry. Permanence types include temporary ponds (typically holding water for a few weeks in the springs), seasonal ponds (holding water from spring until early summer), semipermanent ponds (holding water throughout the growing season during most years), and large permanent lakes (Stewart and Kantrud 1971). Refilling usually occurs in spring from precipitation and runoff from melting snow on frozen or saturated soils (Figure 2). Annual water levels fluctuate widely due to climate variability in the Great Plains (Borchert 1950, Kantrud et al. 1989b). Climate affects the quality of habitat for breeding waterfowl by controlling regional water conditions--water depth, areal extent, and length of wet/dry cycles (Cowardin et al. 1988)--and vegetation patterns such as the cover ration (the ratio of emergent plant cover to open water). With increased levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, climate models project warmer and, in some cases, drier conditions for the northern Great Plains (Karl et al. 1991, Manabe and Wetherald 1986, Mitchell 1983, Rind and Lebedeff 1984). In general, a warmer, drier climate could lower waterfowl production directly by increasing the frequency of dry basins and indirectly by producing less favorable cover rations (i.e., heavy emergent cover with few or no open-water areas). The possibility of diminished waterfowl production in a greenhouse climate comes at a time when waterfowl numbers have sharply declined for other reasons (Johnson and Shaffer 1987). Breeding habitat continues to be lost or altered by agriculture, grazing, burning, mowing, sedimentation, and drainage (Kantrud et al. 1989b). For example, it has been estimated that 60% of the wetland area in North Dakota has been drained (Tiner 1984). Pesticides entering wetlands from adjacent agricultural fields have been destructive to aquatic invertebrate populations and have significantly lowered duckling survival (Grue et al. 1988). In this article, we discuss current understanding and projections of global warming; review wetland vegetation dynamics to establish the strong relationship among climate, wetland hydrology, vegetation patterns, and waterflow habitat; discuss the potential effects of a greenhouse warming on these relationships; and illustrate the potential effects of climate change on wetland habitat by using a simulation model. The extent to which intensive management of the waterfowl resource will be needed in the f

  9. Geographically isolated wetlands: rethinking a misnomer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mushet, David M.; Calhoun, Aram J. K.; Alexander, Laurie C.; Cohen, Matthew J.; DeKeyser, Edward S.; Fowler, Laurie G.; Lane, Charles R.; Lang, Megan W.; Rains, Mark C.; Walls, Susan

    2015-01-01

    We explore the category “geographically isolated wetlands” (GIWs; i.e., wetlands completely surrounded by uplands at the local scale) as used in the wetland sciences. As currently used, the GIW category (1) hampers scientific efforts by obscuring important hydrological and ecological differences among multiple wetland functional types, (2) aggregates wetlands in a manner not reflective of regulatory and management information needs, (3) implies wetlands so described are in some way “isolated,” an often incorrect implication, (4) is inconsistent with more broadly used and accepted concepts of “geographic isolation,” and (5) has injected unnecessary confusion into scientific investigations and discussions. Instead, we suggest other wetland classification systems offer more informative alternatives. For example, hydrogeomorphic (HGM) classes based on well-established scientific definitions account for wetland functional diversity thereby facilitating explorations into questions of connectivity without an a priori designation of “isolation.” Additionally, an HGM-type approach could be used in combination with terms reflective of current regulatory or policymaking needs. For those rare cases in which the condition of being surrounded by uplands is the relevant distinguishing characteristic, use of terminology that does not unnecessarily imply isolation (e.g., “upland embedded wetlands”) would help alleviate much confusion caused by the “geographically isolated wetlands” misnomer.

  10. The Choptank Watershed Wetland Conservation Effects Assessment Project: Monitoring the Delivery of Wetland Ecosystem Services across the Landscape

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CEAP-Wetlands (NRCS) and the Choptank Benchmark Watershed CEAP (ARS) have established a partnership to assess and ultimately enhance the effect of conservation practices on ecosystem services provided by wetlands in the Choptank Watershed. The provision of these wetland services (e.g., pollutant red...

  11. Fate of viruses in artificial wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Gersberg, R.M.; Lyon, S.R.; Brenner, R.; Elkins, B.V.

    1987-04-01

    Little is known about the ability of wetlands to remove disease-causing viruses from municipal wastewater. In this study the authors examined the survival of several indicators of viral pollution applied in primary municipal wastewater to artificial wetland ecosystems. Only about 1% of the indigenous F-specific RNA bacteriophages survived flow through the vegetated wetland beds at a 5-cm-day/sup -1/ hydraulic application rate during the period from June through December 1985. The total number of indigenous F-specific bacteriophages was also reduced by about 99% by wetland treatment, with the mean inflow concentration over the period of an entire year reduced from 3129 to 33 PFU ml/sup -1/ in the outflow of an vegetated bed and to 174 PFU ml/sup -1/ in the outflow of an unvegetated bed. Such superior treatment by the vegetated bed demonstrates the significant role of higher aquatic plants in the removal process. Seeded MS2 bacteriophage and seeded poliovirus were removed more efficiently than were the indigenous bacteriophages, with less than 0.2% and MS2 and 0.1% of the poliovirus surviving flow at the same hydraulic application rate. The decay rate (k) of MS2 in a stagnant wetlands was lower than that for flowing systems, reflecting the enhanced capacity for filtration or adsorption of viruses by the root-substrate complex. Artificial wetlands may offer an attractive alternative to conventional land treatment systems for reducing the load disease-causing viruses to the aquatic environment.

  12. Saltwater Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Provides information about saltwater wetlands. Contains seven learning activities which deal with "making" a mud snail, plants and animals of mangroves, and the effects of tides on salt marshes. Included are reproducible handouts and worksheets for several of the activities. (TW)

  13. Inland Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Area Cooperative Educational Services, New Haven, CT. Environmental Education Center.

    This material includes student guide sheets, reference materials, and tape script for the audio-tutorial unit on Inland Wetlands. A set of 35mm slides and an audio tape are used with the material. The material is designed for use with Connecticut schools, but it can be adapted to other localities. The materials emphasize characteristics of inland…

  14. Coastal Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Area Cooperative Educational Services, New Haven, CT. Environmental Education Center.

    This material includes student guide sheets, reference materials, and tape script for the audio-tutorial unit on Inland Wetlands. A set of 35mm slides and an audio tape are used with the materials. The material is designed for use with Connecticut schools, but it can be adapted to other localities. The unit materials emphasize the structure,…

  15. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-print Network

    VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Fall 2004 Vol. 19, No. 3 VIMS The Virginia Wetlands Report is a quarterly publication of the Wetlands Program at the Virginia Institute of Ma written request to: Wetlands Program, Virginia Institute of Marine Science, P.O. Box 1346, Gloucester Pt

  16. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-print Network

    The Virginia Wetlands Report Fall 1997 Vol. 12, No. 3The Virginia Wetlands Report Almost everyone of Locally Important Wetlands Carl H. Hershner Editor's note: The Virginia Coastal Resources Management use. #12;The Virginia Wetlands Report is a quarterly publication of the Wetlands Program

  17. USDA PROGRAMS WETLAND RESTORATION

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    WETLAND VALUES A value is the result of the process determined beneficial in human terms FLOOD PROTECTION WETLAND FUNCTIONS Function ­ the natural physical, chemical and biological processes. FLOOD STORAGE FLOOD WETLAND FARMED WETLAND PASTURE LANDS SUBSTANTIALLY ALTERED BY FLOOD DRAINED WOODED WETLANDS ASSOCIATED

  18. Differences in Aquatic Communities Within Wetland Reservoir Subirrigation Systems in Northwestern Ohio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Establishment of an agricultural water recycling system known as the wetland-reservoir subirrigation system (WRSIS) results in the creation of wetlands adjacent to agricultural fields. Specifically, each WRSIS consists of one wetland designed to process agricultural chemicals (WRSIS wetlands) and on...

  19. TECHNICAL ARTICLES PLANTS USED IN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS AND THEIR

    E-print Network

    Brix, Hans

    TECHNICAL ARTICLES #12;2 PLANTS USED IN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS AND THEIR FUNCTIONS Hans Brix Department of Plant Ecology, Institute of Biological Sciences, University of Aarhus, Nordlandsvej 68, 8240 Risskov, Denmark ABSTRACT Vegetation plays an important role in wastewater treatment wetlands. Plants

  20. Quality assurance project plan: 1991 EMAP wetlands southeastern pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Swenson, E.M.; Lee, J.M.; Turner, R.E.

    1992-12-01

    The goal of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program - Wetlands (EMAP-Wetlands) Southeastern Pilot Study is to develop field indicators of salt marsh condition. These indicators are of four general types: (1) vegetation; (2) hydrology; (3) soil parameters; and (4) soil constituents. Field measurements and samples will be collected during late summer/early fall in 1991 and will be analyzed to identify which indicators and measurements best delineate salt marsh in good condition from that in impaired condition. Thus the project will involve field work, laboratory analysis, and data analysis. Results from this project will be used to establish criteria and parameters for long-term monitoring and assessment of salt marshes, particularly those parameters that may serve as indicators of healthy salt marsh and deteriorated salt marsh. Since EMAP-Wetlands-Southeastern is a pilot study, the measurement criteria will be evaluated as one of the project goals. Of concern will be how well the standardized sampling methods performed in actual field conditions, and which of these methods can be used to assess and characterize salt marshes.

  1. California Wetland and Riparian Protection Policy Technical Advisory Team

    E-print Network

    California Wetland and Riparian Protection Policy Technical Advisory Team Name Title Organization Department Southern California Coastal Water Research Project Aaron Allen Chief, North Coast Branch University Todd Keeler Wolf Senior Vegetation Ecologist Biogeographic Data Branch , California Department

  2. WETLAND DETECTION METHODS INVESTIGATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this investigation was to research and document the application of remote sensing technology for wetlands detection. arious sensors and platforms are evaluated for: suitability to monitor specific wetland systems; effectiveness of detailing wetland extent and capab...

  3. Riparian Wetlands: Mapping

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian wetlands are critical systems that perform functions and provide services disproportionate to their extent in the landscape. Mapping wetlands allows for better planning, management, and modeling, but riparian wetlands present several challenges to effective mapping due t...

  4. Our Valuable Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Juliana

    1988-01-01

    Defines wetlands and lists several types of wetland habitat. Describes explorations that can be done with secondary school students including the baby boom, a food pyramid, and microenvironments. Includes a classroom poster with text on the variety of wetlands. (CW)

  5. Application of Systems Model and Remote Sensing Images to Improve Wetland Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alminagorta, O.; Torres-Rua, A. F.

    2013-05-01

    Wetlands are complex ecosystem that involves interaction among hydrological, ecological and spatial-temporal considerations. Also, water shortages and invasive vegetation are common problems in wetlands. The present paper has the purpose to contribute with the solution of these problems: (i) Providing a tool to wetland managers to monitor changes in vegetation cover and wetland hydrology over time; (ii) Finding a relationship between vegetation response and key hydrological attributes in wetlands and (iii) Incorporating these relationship in an optimization model to recommend water allocation and invasive vegetation control to improve wetland management. This research is applied at the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge (the Refuge), located on the northeast side of Great Salt Lake, Utah. The Refuge constitutes one of the most important habitats for migratory birds for the Pacific Flyway of North America. Water measures and coverage vegetation collected in-situ at the Refuge has been used to calibrate and evaluate the effects on wetland plant communities to the process of flooding and drought in wetland units during different years. A MATLAB-based algorithm has been developed to process LandSat images to estimate the interaction between flooded areas and invasive vegetation cover. These interactions are embedded in a system optimization model to recommend water allocations and vegetation control actions among diked wetland units that improve wetland habitat for wildlife species. This modeling effort identify the interaction between invasive vegetation and flood wetland areas and embed those interactions in a systems model that wetland managers can use to make informed decisions about allocation of water and manage vegetation cover.

  6. 77 FR 63326 - Huron Wetland Management District, Madison Wetland Management District, and Sand Lake Wetland...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-16

    ...Madison Wetland Management District, and Sand Lake Wetland Management District, SD...EA) involving Huron, Madison, and Sand Lake Wetland Management Districts (Districts...Madison Wetland Management District, Sand Lake Wetland Management District...

  7. Hydrologic considerations in defining isolated wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winter, T.C.; LaBaugh, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Wetlands that are not connected by streams to other surface-water bodies are considered to be isolated. Although the definition is based on surface-water connections to other water bodies, isolated wetlands commonly are integral parts of extensive ground-water flow systems, and isolated wetlands can spill over their surface divides into adjacent surface-water bodies during periods of abundant precipitation and high water levels. Thus, characteristics of ground-water flow and atmospheric-water flow affect the isolation of wetlands. In general, the degree that isolated wetlands are connected through the ground-water system to other surface-water bodies depends to a large extent on the rate that ground water moves and the rate that hydrologic stresses can be transmitted through the ground-water system. Water that seeps from an isolated wetland into a gravel aquifer can travel many kilometers through the ground-water system in one year. In contrast, water that seeps from an isolated wetland into a clayey or silty substrate may travel less than one meter in one year. For wetlands that can spill over their surface watersheds during periods of wet climate conditions, their isolation is related to the height to a spill elevation above normal wetland water level and the recurrence interval of various magnitudes of precipitation. The concepts presented in this paper indicate that the entire hydrologic system needs to be considered in establishing a definition of hydrologic isolation.

  8. Geomorphic and hydrogeologic controls on wetland distribution in the New South Wales Southern Highlands, south east Australia: prioritising natural resource management investment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowood, Alie; Moore, Leah

    2014-05-01

    Strategic investment of public funds in wetland conservation on the New South Wales (NSW) Southern Tablelands, in south east Australia, is impeded by poor understanding of the distribution of wetlands and their geomorphic and hydrogeologic setting. Appropriate investment and management is also unclear in the face of climate change. This research detailed: the spatial configuration, the hydrogeological setting, and intrinsic ecological value of the wetlands. Using this modelling, potential impact of climate change on wetlands was examined. Previous work developed a draft typology for Southern Tablelands wetlands, expanded techniques for representing spatial variability in wetland biodiversity (using generalised dissimilarity models) and explored methods of modelling wetland location through integration of hydrology, terrain and geological features. This new work integrated the mapping of the spatial distribution of a range of wetland types with a hydrogeological landscape (HGL) framework in order to better understand the movement of water through wetland landscapes. The process of HGL determination relies on the integration of a number of factors including: geology, soils, slope, regolith thickness, vegetation and climate. If the distribution of regolith materials, fractured rock and barriers to flow are characterised, an understanding of surface and sub-surface fluid pathways can be established. Contextualising a study of wetlands in an HGL framework is useful because it provides information about the biophysical controls that influence why wetlands occur in some parts of the landscape and not others. Each HGL unit spatially defines areas with similar controls on movement of water and hence similar patterns of surface and groundwater connectivity. The NSW Southern Highland landscape was divided into 34 HGL units, based on derived spatial information and field observations. Each HGL unit had an associated conceptual model, identifying potential surface water and groundwater pathways. These models were then field tested by collating and interpreting the widest possible range of biophysical parameters, in order to enhance the rigour of the models. In parallel, wetland mapping identified 4 main wetland types: upland hanging swamps, upland bogs or fens, upland freshwater lakes and riverine wetlands. The wetland types were linked with their contemporary geomorphic setting and then integrated with the HGL framework enabling identification of the wetland 'plumbing' context. These integrated wetland HGL units were evaluated with respect to the NSW Climate Impact Profile for the south east NSW region (min. T increase 1-3°C; max T. increase 2-3°C; rainfall 20-50% summer increase, 20-50% winter decrease; 10-20% evaporation increase). This scenario-based modelling provides an accurate measure of sensitivity of the wetlands to change and allows evaluation of the capacity for a wetland to adapt to change. If landscape variation, the biophysical character of wetlands, the hydrogeological context, and hence the influences of surface and groundwater systems are understood, then we can identify NRM hazards and prioritise wetland management. The premise is that if we understand the natural processes that result in particular outcomes in a landscape, then strategic decisions about whether to intervene, how to intervene, or whether it is worth doing so, can be made.

  9. -TRANSITION FROM P-TO N-LIMITED PHYTOPLANKTON GROWTH IN AN ARTIFICIAL WETLAND -223 Applied Vegetation Science 9: 223-230, 2006

    E-print Network

    McCarthy, T.K.

    nitrogen limi- tation in the presence of moderate external phosphorus inputs. Keywords: Bog; Chlorophyte.higgins1@nuigalway.ie Introduction Oceanic raised bogs originally covered an area of 311 300 ha, or almost's raised bogs since the establishment of the Bord na Móna, the National Peat Board, in 1946. Vast expanses

  10. Quality-assurance project plan: Tampa, Florida wetlands study

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, A.D.; Gwin, S.E.; Kentula, M.E.; Brown, M.

    1991-12-01

    The project will compare characteristics of naturally occurring wetlands with wetlands created or restored as mitigation required under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act. It will also evaluate the utility of the Wetland Characterization Method developed by Corvallis Environmental Research Laboratory (ERL-C). The study includes field work and the associated data analysis. Data on vegetation, soils, and hydrology will be collected at each site. The study sites will be photographed and mapped, relative elevation measured, and general site descriptions compiled. Project results will be summarized for use by 404 personnel in making decisions concerning the use of creation and restoration as mitigation for proposed wetland destruction.

  11. Emissions of sulfur gases from wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    Data on the emissions of sulfur gases from marine and freshwater wetlands are summarized with respect to wetland vegetation type and possible formation mechanisms. The current data base is largest for salt marshes inhabited by Spartina alterniflora. Both dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) dominate emissions from salt marshes, with lesser quantities of methyl mercaptan (MeSH), carbonyl sulfide (COS), carbon disulfide (CS2) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) being emitted. High emission rates of DMS are associated with vegetation that produces the DMS precursor dimethylsulfonionpropionate (DMSP). Although large quantities of H2S are produced in marshes, only a small percentage escapes to the atmosphere. High latitude marshes emit less sulfur gases than temperate ones, but DMS still dominates. Mangrove-inhabited wetlands also emit less sulfur than temperate S. alterniflora marshes. Few data are available on sulfur gas emissions from freshwater wetlands. In most instances, sulfur emissions from temperate freshwater sites are low. However, some temperate and subtropical freshwater sites are similar in magnitude to those from marine wetlands which do not contain vegetation that produces DMSP. Emissions are low in Alaskan tundra but may be considerably higher in some bogs and fens.

  12. Eco-hydrological feedback mechanisms control ecological services in wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletti, J.; Hinz, C.; Vogwill, R.; Tareque, H.; Hipsey, M. R.

    2011-12-01

    Wetland ecosystems contain various feedback mechanisms between their abiotc and biotic components. The feedbacks are triggered by climate and propagate into patterns of environment partitioning based on distinct zones of hydrological function that vary in time and space. This partitioning co-evolves with vegetation, defines carbon metabolism and creates niches that govern patterns of flora and fauna abundance and distribution. Using a minimalistic model for wetland eco-hydrology, we explore vegetation adaptation to climate variability and the net metabolism of a wetland ecosystem given a range of climate conditions. We then apply the model to characterize the changes in niche habitat availability for a tortoise population endangered by a drying climate.

  13. Movements and wetland selection by brood-rearing black ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ringelman, J.K.; Longcore, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    Movements and wetland selection by brood-rearing black ducks (Anas rubripes) were studied in Maine during 1977-80. Eight radio-marked hens moved their broods an average of 1.2 km from the nest to rearing pond, but only 1 hen initiated secondary brood movements. Half of the 85 broods reared in the study area used only 3 wetlands, and most rearing ponds contained active beaver (Castor canadensis) colonies. Brood-rearing hens preferred Emergent ponds over lakes and Evergreen Scrub-Shrub wetlands, and did not occupy Dead Scrub-Shrub, Unconsolidated Bottom, or Aquatic Bed wetlands. Rearing ponds were large and possessed extensive areas of flooded mountain alder (Alnus incana), willow (Salix spp.), and herbaceous vegetation. Wetlands avoided by brood-rearing hens were those with large areas of open water, submergent aquatics, or ericaceous shrub vegetation.

  14. Aerobic methanotroph diversity in Sanjiang wetland, Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Yun, Juanli; Zhang, Hongxun; Deng, Yongcui; Wang, Yanfen

    2015-04-01

    Aerobic methanotrophs present in wetlands can serve as a methane filter and thereby significantly reduce methane emissions. Sanjiang wetland is a major methane source and the second largest wetland in China, yet little is known about the characteristics of aerobic methanotrophs in this region. In the present study, we investigated the diversity and abundance of methanotrophs in marsh soils from Sanjiang wetland with three different types of vegetation by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and pmoA gene analysis. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed the highest number of pmoA gene copies in marsh soils vegetated with Carex lasiocarpa (10(9) g(-1) dry soil), followed by Carex meyeriana, and the least with Deyeuxia angustifolia (10(8) g(-1) dry soil). Consistent results were obtained using Sanger sequencing and pyrosequencing techniques, both indicating the codominance of Methylobacter and Methylocystis species in Sanjiang wetland. Other less abundant methanotrophy, including cultivated Methylomonas and Methylosinus genus, and uncultured clusters such as LP20 and JR-1, were also detected in the wetland. Methanotroph diversity was almost the same in three different vegetation covered soils, suggesting that vegetation types had very little influence on the methanotroph diversity. Our study gives an in-depth insight into the community composition of aerobic methanotrophs in the Sanjiang wetland. PMID:25351140

  15. Remote sensing inland wetlands: a multispectral approach

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, J.R.; Hodgson, M.E.; Christensen, E.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Tinney, L.R.; Sharitz, R.

    1985-01-01

    Airborne Multispectral Scanner (MSS) data, large-scale aerial photography, and LANDSAT MSS and Thematic Mapper (TM) data were used to map a variety of wetland conditions along the Savannah River watershed in South Carolina. Predawn thermal infrared MSS imagery was analyzed to map the spatial distribution and migration of thermal effluent entering a portion of the Savannah River floodplain and the Savannah River below Augusta, Georgia. Daytime airborne MSS data were used to classify specific wetland vegetation types and associate them with their apparent (remotely sensed) temperature. Large scale, multiple data aerial photography were ideally suited to follow the growth of vegetational changes associated with the thermal discharges into the floodplain. LANDSAT MSS imagery obtained in the spring was used effectively to map the entire Savannah River watershed. LANDSAT TM imagery obtained in the summer was of limited use in regional wetland mapping. 21 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Estimating Carbon Stocks Along Depressional Wetlands Using Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) in the Disney Wilderness Preserve (Orlando, Florida)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClellan, M. D.; Comas, X.; Wright, W. J.; Mount, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    Peat soils store a large fraction of the global carbon (C) in soil. It is estimated that 95% of carbon in peatlands is stored in the peat soil, while less than 5% occurs in the vegetation. The majority of studies related to C stocks in peatlands have taken place in northern latitudes leaving the tropical and subtropical latitudes clearly understudied. In this study we use a combination of indirect non-invasive geophysical methods (mainly ground penetrating radar, GPR) as well as direct measurements (direct coring) to calculate total C stocks within subtropical depressional wetlands in the Disney Wilderness Preserve (DWP, Orlando, FL). A set of three-dimensional (3D) GPR surveys were used to detect variability of the peat layer thickness and the underlying peat-sand mix layer across several depressional wetlands. Direct samples collected at selected locations were used to confirm depth of each interface and to estimate C content in the laboratory. Layer thickness estimated from GPR and direct C content were used to estimate total peat volume and C content for the entire depressional wetland. Through the use of aerial photos a relationship between surface area along the depressional wetlands and total peat thickness (and thus C content) was established for the depressions surveyed and applied throughout the entire preserve. This work shows the importance of depressional wetlands as critical contributors of the C budget at the DWP.

  17. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-print Network

    VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Winter/Spring 2000 Vol. 15, No. 1 Virginia Debates Nontidal Wetlands Regulation Carl Hershner Wetland regulation is once again a topic of debate in Virginia's General Assembly. The Common- wealth has been committed to a policy of net

  18. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-print Network

    The Virginia Wetlands Report Summer 1997 Vol. 12, No. 2The Virginia Wetlands Report Wetlands tremendous appeal, particularly in rapidly developing areas such as Tide- water, Virginia. The goal of preserving and protecting tidal wetlands in Virginia has become both easier and more difficult over the past

  19. Exploring Microbial Iron Oxidation in Wetland Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Muyzer, G.; Bodelier, P. L. E.; den Oudsten, F.; Laanbroek, H. J.

    2009-04-01

    Iron is one of the most abundant elements on earth and is essential for life. Because of its importance, iron cycling and its interaction with other chemical and microbial processes has been the focus of many studies. Iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) have been detected in a wide variety of environments. Among those is the rhizosphere of wetland plants roots which release oxygen into the soil creating suboxic conditions required by these organisms. It has been reported that in these rhizosphere microbial iron oxidation proceeds up to four orders of magnitude faster than strictly abiotic oxidation. On the roots of these wetland plants iron plaques are formed by microbial iron oxidation which are involved in the sequestering of heavy metals as well organic pollutants, which of great environmental significance.Despite their important role being catalysts of iron-cycling in wetland environments, little is known about the diversity and distribution of iron-oxidizing bacteria in various environments. This study aimed at developing a PCR-DGGE assay enabling the detection of iron oxidizers in wetland habitats. Gradient tubes were used to enrich iron-oxidizing bacteria. From these enrichments, a clone library was established based on the almost complete 16s rRNA gene using the universal bacterial primers 27f and 1492r. This clone library consisted of mainly ?- and β-Proteobacteria, among which two major clusters were closely related to Gallionella spp. Specific probes and primers were developed on the basis of this 16S rRNA gene clone library. The newly designed Gallionella-specific 16S rRNA gene primer set 122f/998r was applied to community DNA obtained from three contrasting wetland environments, and the PCR products were used in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis. A second 16S rRNA gene clone library was constructed using the PCR products from one of our sampling sites amplified with the newly developed primer set 122f/998r. The cloned 16S rRNA gene sequences all represented novel culturable iron oxidizers most closely related to Gallionella spp. Based on their nucleotide sequences four groups could be identified, which were comparable to the DGGE banding pattern obtained before with the gradient tubes enrichments. The above mentioned nested PCR-DGGE method was used to study the distribution and community composition of Gallionella-like iron-oxidizing bacteria under the influence of plants species, soil depth, as well as season. Soil samples from Appels, Belgium, an intertidal, freshwater marsh known to hold intensive iron cycling, were taken from 5 different vegetation types in April, July and October 2007. Soil cores were sliced at 1-cm intervals and subjected to chemical and molecular analyses. The DGGE patterns showed that the community of iron-oxidizing bacteria differed with vegetation type, and sediment depth. Samples taken in autumn held lower diversity in Gallionella-related iron oxidizers than those sampled in spring and summer.

  20. Pipeline corridors through wetlands -- Impacts on plant communities: Norris Brook Crossing Peabody, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Shem, L.M.; Van Dyke, G.D.; Zimmerman, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipelines on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and right-of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents the results of a survey conducted August 17--19, 1992, at the Norris Brook crossing in the town of Peabody, Essex County, Massachusetts. The pipeline at this site was installed during September and October 1990. A backhoe was used to install the pipeline. The pipe was assembled on the adjacent upland and slid into the trench, after which the backhoe was used again to fill the trench and cover the pipeline. Within two years after pipeline construction, a dense vegetative community, composed predominantly of native perennial species, had become established on the ROW. Compared with adjacent natural areas undisturbed by pipeline installation, there was an increase in purple loosestrife and cattail within the ROW, while large woody species were excluded from the ROW. As a result of the ROW`s presence, habitat diversity, edge-type habitat, and species diversity increased within the site. Crooked-stem aster, Aster prenanthoides (a species on the Massasschusetts list of plants of special concern), occurred in low numbers in the adjacent natural areas and had reinvaded the ROW in low numbers.

  1. Urbanization interferes with the use of amphibians as indicators of ecological integrity of wetlands

    E-print Network

    Dorcas, Michael E.

    of wetlands by comparing anuran calling and subsequent tadpole development with an established index employing of wetlands can be substantially reduced, or eliminated, as a consequence of urbanization. We urge for careful

  2. Springs as Ecosystems: Clarifying Groundwater Dependence and Wetland Status (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, L.; Springer, A. E.; Ledbetter, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Springs ecosystems are among the most productive, biologically diverse and culturally important ecosystems on Earth. Net annual productivity of some springs exceeds 5 kg/m^2/yr. Springs support an estimated 19% of the endangered species and numerous rare taxa in the United States. Springs serve as keystone ecosystems in arid regions, and as cornerstones of indigenous cultural well-being, history, economics, and aesthetics. Despite their significance, the ecosystem ecology and stewardship of springs have received scant scientific and public attention, resulting in loss or impairment of 50-90% of the springs in many regions, both arid and temperate. Six reasons contribute to the lack of attention to springs. Springs are poorly mapped because: 1) their generally small size is less than the pixel area of most remote sensing analyses and they are overlooked; and 2) springs detection is often limited by emergence on cliff faces, beneath heavy vegetation cover, or under water. In addition, 3) high levels of ecosystem complexity at springs require multidisciplinary team approaches for inventory, assessment, and research, but collaboration between the fields of hydrogeology and ecology has been limited. 4) Protectionism by land owners and organizations that manage springs limits the availability information, preventing regional assessment of status. 5) Prior to recent efforts, the absence of a descriptive lexicon of springs types has limited discussion about variation in ecological characteristics and processes. 6) Neither regarded entirely as groundwater or as surface water, springs fall 'between jurisdictional cracks' and are not subject to clear legal and regulatory oversight. With regards to the latter point, two jurisdictional phrases have reduced scientific understanding and stewardship of springs ecosystems: 'jurisdictional wetlands' and 'groundwater-dependent ecosystems' (GDEs). Most springs have insufficient monitoring data to establish perenniality or the range of natural variation in flow, and many of the 12 springs types do not develop hydric soils or wetland vegetation. These factors and their normally small size preclude springs as jurisdictional wetlands by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Army Corps of Engineers criteria. Helocrenes (springfed wet meadows, cienegas, and some fens) are considered as wetlands, but the other 11 types of terrestrial springs often are not. The use of the phrase 'GDE' applies to any aquatic ecosystem supported by groundwater, and the utility of this phrase as a descriptor of springs is diluted by its application to all subterranean and surface aquatic habitats. The failure to recognize the importance of springs ecosystems has become a quiet but global crisis, in part due to inappropriate conceptual understanding and poor jurisdictional terminology. We clarify relationships between these concepts and terms to establish effective, consistent monitoring, assessment, restoration, management, and monitoring goals and protocols for improving springs stewardship.

  3. Losing function through wetland mitigation in central Pennsylvania, USA.

    PubMed

    Hoeltje, S M; Cole, C A

    2007-03-01

    In the United States, the Clean Water Act requires mitigation for wetlands that are negatively impacted by dredging and filling activities. During the mitigation process, there generally is little effort to assess function for mitigation sites and function is usually inferred based on vegetative cover and acreage. In our study, hydrogeomorphic (HGM) functional assessment models were used to compare predicted and potential levels of functional capacity in created and natural reference wetlands. HGM models assess potential function by measurement of a suite of structural variables and these modeled functions can then be compared to those in natural, reference wetlands. The created wetlands were built in a floodplain setting of a valley in central Pennsylvania to replace natural ridge-side slope wetlands. Functional assessment models indicated that the created sites differed significantly from natural wetlands that represented the impacted sites for seven of the ten functions assessed. This was expected because the created wetlands were located in a different geomorphic setting than the impacted sites, which would affect the type and degree of functions that occur. However, functional differences were still observed when the created sites were compared with a second set of reference wetlands that were located in a similar geomorphic setting (floodplain). Most of the differences observed in both comparisons were related to unnatural hydrologic regimes and to the characteristics of the surrounding landscape. As a result, the created wetlands are not fulfilling the criteria for successful wetland mitigation. PMID:17265110

  4. FORT BELKNAP WETLANDS MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The product activities include: 1) Conducting wetland inventories and wetland assessments in the Milk River Watershed. This will include wetland delineations, and the collection of vascular plants and plant identification. Currently there is no baseline data of wetland activite...

  5. Wetlands Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Ducks Unlimited, Inc. is dedicated to preservation of the world's waterfowl. Current inventories of wetland resources are crucial to effective waterfowl management. They contracted with NASA to use data from the LANDSAT satellites Thematic Mapper (TM), an advanced Earth scanning instrument that collects data in seven bands of the spectrum utilizing the Earth Resources Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS). The TM measures and records six values of light energy reflected from Earth and one value of heat energy as it scans the Earth below. On each orbital sweep, sensors produce a series of digital scenes representing features of Earth segments measuring about 100 by 110 miles, each scene covering about eight million acres, and each containing some 40 million bits of information called picture elements or pixels. They are computer processed and the resulting mosaic is projected on a digital display device.

  6. Forms of organic phosphorus in wetland soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheesman, A. W.; Turner, B. L.; Reddy, K. R.

    2014-06-01

    Phosphorus (P) cycling in freshwater wetlands is dominated by biological mechanisms, yet there has been no comprehensive examination of the forms of biogenic P (i.e. forms derived from biological activity) in wetland soils. We used solution 31P NMR spectroscopy to identify and quantify P forms in surface soils of 28 palustrine wetlands spanning a range of climatic, hydro-geomorphic and vegetation types. Total P concentrations ranged between 51 and 3516 ?g P gvegetation and hydrogeomorphic types, but only under acidic conditions. Conversely inorganic polyphosphates occurred in a broad range of wetland soils and their abundance appears to reflect more broadly that of a "substantial" and presumably active microbial community with a significant relationship between total inorganic polyphosphates and microbial biomass P. We conclude that soil P composition varies markedly among freshwater wetlands, but can be predicted by fundamental soil properties.

  7. Forms of organic phosphorus in wetland soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheesman, A. W.; Turner, B. L.; Reddy, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) cycling in freshwater wetlands is dominated by biological mechanisms, yet there has been no comprehensive examination of the forms of biogenic P (i.e., forms derived from biological activity) in wetland soils. We used solution 31P NMR spectroscopy to identify and quantify P forms in surface soils of 28 palustrine wetlands spanning a range of climatic, hydrogeomorphic, and vegetation types. Total P concentrations ranged between 51 and 3516 ?g P g-1, of which an average of 58% was extracted in a single-step NaOH-EDTA procedure. The extracts contained a broad range of P forms, including phosphomonoesters (averaging 24% of the total soil P), phosphodiesters (averaging 10% of total P), phosphonates (up to 4% of total P), and both pyrophosphate and long-chain polyphosphates (together averaging 6% of total P). Soil P composition was found to be dependant upon two key biogeochemical properties: organic matter content and pH. For example, stereoisomers of inositol hexakisphosphate were detected exclusively in acidic soils with high mineral content, while phosphonates were detected in soils from a broad range of vegetation and hydrogeomorphic types but only under acidic conditions. Conversely inorganic polyphosphates occurred in a broad range of wetland soils, and their abundance appears to reflect more broadly that of a "substantial" and presumably active microbial community with a significant relationship between total inorganic polyphosphates and microbial biomass P. We conclude that soil P composition varies markedly among freshwater wetlands but can be predicted by fundamental soil properties.

  8. Ecological effects of pipeline construction through deciduous forested wetlands, Midland County, Michigan. Topical report, October 1990--August 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rastorfer, J.R.; Van Dyke, G.D.; Zellmer, S.D.; Wilkey, P.L.

    1995-04-01

    This study is designed to record vegetational changes induced by the construction of a large-diameter gas pipeline through deciduous forested wetlands. Two second-growth wetland sites mapped Lenawee soils were selected in Midland County, Michigan: Site 1, a younger stand subjected to recent selective logging, and Site 2, a more mature stand. The collection of ecological data to analyze plant succession on the right-of-way (ROW) and the effects of the developing ROW plant communities on adjacent forest communities was initiated in 1989. Cover class estimates were made for understory and ROW plant species on the basis of 1 {times} 1{minus}m quadrats. Individual stem diameters and species counts were recorded for overstory plants in 10{minus}m quadrats. Although long-term studies have not been completed, firm baseline data were established for comparative analyses with future sampling. Current data indicate that vegetation became well-established on the ROW within one year and subsequently increased in coverage. About 65% of the species were wetland indicators, and the dominants included seeded and natural invading species; nevertheless, some elements of the original flora regenerated and persist. The plants of the ecotone understories of both sites changed from their original composition as a result of the installation of the gas pipeline. Although some forest species persist at both sites, the ecotone of Site I was influenced more by the seeded species, whereas the natural invaders were more important at Site 2.

  9. Conceptual hierarchical modeling to describe wetland plant community organization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Little, A.M.; Guntenspergen, G.R.; Allen, T.F.H.

    2010-01-01

    Using multivariate analysis, we created a hierarchical modeling process that describes how differently-scaled environmental factors interact to affect wetland-scale plant community organization in a system of small, isolated wetlands on Mount Desert Island, Maine. We followed the procedure: 1) delineate wetland groups using cluster analysis, 2) identify differently scaled environmental gradients using non-metric multidimensional scaling, 3) order gradient hierarchical levels according to spatiotem-poral scale of fluctuation, and 4) assemble hierarchical model using group relationships with ordination axes and post-hoc tests of environmental differences. Using this process, we determined 1) large wetland size and poor surface water chemistry led to the development of shrub fen wetland vegetation, 2) Sphagnum and water chemistry differences affected fen vs. marsh / sedge meadows status within small wetlands, and 3) small-scale hydrologic differences explained transitions between forested vs. non-forested and marsh vs. sedge meadow vegetation. This hierarchical modeling process can help explain how upper level contextual processes constrain biotic community response to lower-level environmental changes. It creates models with more nuanced spatiotemporal complexity than classification and regression tree procedures. Using this process, wetland scientists will be able to generate more generalizable theories of plant community organization, and useful management models. ?? Society of Wetland Scientists 2009.

  10. Impacts of water development on aquatic macroinvertebrates, amphibians, and plants in wetlands of a semi-arid landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Euliss, N.H., Jr.; Mushet, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    We compared the macroinvertebrate and amphibian communities of 12 excavated and 12 natural wetlands in western North Dakota, USA, to assess the effects of artificially lengthened hydroperiods on the biotic communities of wetlands in this semi-arid region. Excavated wetlands were largely unvegetated or contained submergent and deep-marsh plant species. The natural wetlands had two well-defined vegetative zones populated by plant species typical of wet meadows and shallow marshes. Excavated wetlands had a richer aquatic macroinvertebrate community that included several predatory taxa not found in natural wetlands. Taxa adapted to the short hydroperiods of seasonal wetlands were largely absent from excavated wetlands. The amphibian community of natural and excavated wetlands included the boreal chorus frog, northern leopard frog, plains spadefoot, Woodhouse's toad, and tiger salamander. The plains spadefoot occurred only in natural wetlands while tiger salamanders occurred in all 12 excavated wetlands and only one natural wetland. Boreal chorus frogs and northern leopard frogs were present in both wetland types; however, they successfully reproduced only in wetlands lacking tiger salamanders. Artificially extending the hydroperiod of wetlands by excavation has greatly influenced the composition of native biotic communities adapted to the naturally short hydroperiods of wetlands in this semi-arid region. The compositional change of the biotic communities can be related to hydrological changes and biotic interactions, especially predation, related to excavation.

  11. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-print Network

    that impact tidal wetlands, subaqueous bottom and coastal pri- mary sand dunes and beaches. Each project or conversion from one type of marine habitat to an- other. Permitted Impact Area Since 1993, the tidal wetland

  12. Wetland Characteristics and Denitrification

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation serves as an initial summary of our wetland field work's watershed characteristics hydrologic characteristics, water quality measurements, and denitrification assays. We present our measurement results in the context of wetland type (Estuarine, Freshwater Mars...

  13. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-print Network

    VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Winter/Spring 2003 Vol. 18, No Resources Management in Virginia, VIMS re- searchers Ratana Chuenpagdee, Kirk Havens, Tom Barnard, and Patty introduces the study. The Commonwealth of Virginia has enacted laws to regulate development in wetlands

  14. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-print Network

    The Virginia Wetlands Report Winter/Spring 1998 Vol. 13, No. 1The Virginia Wetlands Report N o net recently, the Chesapeake Bay Executive Council, which includes the Governor of Virginia, reaffirmed its and trends information. Determining the status of the wetlands inventory in Virginia involves measuring

  15. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-print Network

    VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Spring 2002 Vol. 17, No. 1 Update On Virginia's New and Improved Nontidal Wetlands Program By Ellen Gilinsky, Ph.D. PWS Virginia Water Protection Permit Program Manager Virginia Department of Environmental Quality October 1, 2001 has

  16. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-print Network

    VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Summer 2000 Vol. 15, No. 2 the development of a new regulatory program for nontidal wet- lands in Virginia. The Governor has signed the public benefits derived from wetlands in Virginia. The final bills passed by the legislature were

  17. Wetlands, Wildlife, and People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the problems created when wetlands are drained or altered by humans. Provides a brief case study of the Everglades as an example of the effects of human intervention. Presents four learning activities (along with reproducible worksheets) that deal with the benefits of wetlands, and some debated issues over wetlands. (TW)

  18. Education and training of future wetland scientists and managers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilcox, D.A.

    2008-01-01

    Wetland science emerged as a distinct discipline in the 1980s. In response, courses addressing various aspects of wetland science and management were developed by universities, government agencies, and private firms. Professional certification of wetland scientists began in the mid-1990s to provide confirmation of the quality of education and experience of persons involved in regulatory, management, restoration/construction, and research involving wetland resources. The education requirements for certification and the need for persons with specific wetland training to fill an increasing number of wetland-related positions identified a critical need to develop curriculum guidelines for an undergraduate wetland science and management major for potential accreditation by the Society of Wetland Scientists. That proposed major contains options directed toward either wetland science or management. Both options include required basic courses to meet the general education requirements of many universities, required upper-level specialized courses that address critical aspects of physical and biological sciences applicable to wetlands, and a minimum of four additional upper-level specialized courses that can be used to tailor a degree to students' interests. The program would be administered by an independent review board that would develop guidelines and evaluate university applications for accreditation. Students that complete the required coursework will fulfill the education requirements for professional wetland scientist certification and possess qualifications that make them attractive candidates for graduate school or entry-level positions in wetland science or management. Universities that offer this degree program could gain an advantage in recruiting highly qualified students with an interest in natural resources. Alternative means of educating established wetland scientists are likewise important, especially to provide specialized knowledge and experience or updates related to new management discoveries, policies, and regulations. ?? 2008 The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  19. Ecological outcomes and evaluation of success in passively restored southeastern depressional wetlands.

    SciTech Connect

    De Steven, Diane; Sharitz, Rebecca R.; Barton, Christopher, D.

    2010-11-01

    Abstract: Depressional wetlands may be restored passively by disrupting prior drainage to recover original hydrology and relying on natural revegetation. Restored hydrology selects for wetland vegetation; however, depression geomorphology constrains the achievable hydroperiod, and plant communities are influenced by hydroperiod and available species pools. Such constraints can complicate assessments of restoration success. Sixteen drained depressions in South Carolina, USA, were restored experimentally by forest clearing and ditch plugging for potential crediting to a mitigation bank. Depressions were assigned to alternate revegetation methods representing desired targets of herbaceous and wet-forest communities. After five years, restoration progress and revegetation methods were evaluated. Restored hydroperiods differed among wetlands, but all sites developed diverse vegetation of native wetland species. Vegetation traits were influenced by hydroperiod and the effects of early drought, rather than by revegetation method. For mitigation banking, individual wetlands were assessed for improvement from pre-restoration condition and similarity to assigned reference type. Most wetlands met goals to increase hydroperiod, herb-species dominance, and wetland-plant composition. Fewer wetlands achieved equivalence to reference types because some vegetation targets were incompatible with depression hydroperiods and improbable without intensive management. The results illustrated a paradox in judging success when vegetation goals may be unsuited to system constraints.

  20. 1997 Monitoring report for the Gunnison, Colorado Wetlands Mitigation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    Under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleaned up uranium mill tailings and other surface contamination near the town of Gunnison, Colorado. Remedial action resulted in the elimination of 4.3 acres (ac) (1.7 hectares [ha]) of wetlands. This loss is mitigated by the enhancement of six spring-fed areas on Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land (mitigation sites). Approximately 254 ac (1 03.3 ha) were fenced at the six sites to exclude grazing livestock. Of the 254 ac (103.3 ha), 17.8 ac (7.2 ha) are riparian plant communities; the rest are sagebrush communities. Baseline grazed conditions of the riparian plant communities at the mitigation sites were measured prior to fencing. This report discusses results of the fourth year of a monitoring program implemented to document the response of vegetation and wildlife to the exclusion of livestock. Three criteria for determining success of the mitigation were established: plant height, vegetation density (bare ground), and vegetation diversity. By 1996, Prospector Spring, Upper Long`s Gulch, and Camp Kettle met the criteria. The DOE requested transfer of these sites to BLM for long-term oversight. The 1997 evaluation of the three remaining sites, discussed in this report, showed two sites (Houston Gulch and Lower Long`s Gulch) meet the criteria. The DOE will request the transfer of these two sites to the BLM for long-term oversight. The last remaining site, Sage Hen Spring, has met only two of the criteria (percent bare ground and plant height). The third criterion, vegetation diversity, was not met. The vegetation appears to be changing from predominantly wet species to drier upland species, although the reason for this change is uncertain. It may be due to below-normal precipitation in recent years, diversion of water from the spring to the stock tank, or manipulation of the hydrology farther up gradient.

  1. -Spatio-temporal variation of salt marsh seedling establishment in relation to the environment -61 Journal of Vegetation Science 12: 61-74, 2001

    E-print Network

    - Spatio-temporal variation of salt marsh seedling establishment in relation to the environment Datum. Nomenclature: Hickman (1993). Spatio-temporal variation of salt marsh seedling establishment variation in plant establishment in the upper intertidal marsh of three southern California wet- lands

  2. Anacostia River fringe wetlands restoration project: final report for the five-year monitoring program (2003 through 2007)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krafft, Cairn C.; Hammerschlag, Richard S.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.

    2009-01-01

    The 6-hectare (ha) freshwater tidal Anacostia River Fringe Wetlands (Fringe Wetlands) were reconstructed along the mainstem of the Anacostia River in Washington, DC (Photograph 1, Figure 1) during the summer of 2003. The Fringe Wetlands consist of two separate planting cells. Fringe A, located adjacent to Lower Kingman Island, on the west bank of the Anacostia River, occupies 1.6 ha; Fringe B, located on the east bank of the Anacostia River, occupies 4.4 ha. This project is the third in a series of freshwater tidal wetland reconstructions on the Anacostia River designed and implemented by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Baltimore District and District Department of the Environment (DDOE) on lands managed by the National Park Service (NPS). The first was Kenilworth Marsh, reconstructed in 1993 (Syphax and Hammerschlag 2005); the second was Kingman Marsh, reconstructed in 2000 (Hammerschlag et al. 2006). Kenilworth and Kingman were both constructed in low-energy backwaters of the Anacostia. However, the Fringe Wetlands, which were constructed on two pre-existing benches along the high-energy mainstem, required sheet piling to provide protection from erosive impacts of increased flow and volume of water associated with storm events during the establishment phase (Photograph 2). All three projects required the placement of dredged sediment materials to increase elevations enough to support emergent vegetation (Photograph 3). The purpose of all three wetland reconstruction projects was to restore pieces of the once extensive tidal freshwater marsh habitat that bordered the Anacostia River historically, prior to the dredge and fill operations and sea wall installation that took place there in the early to mid-1900's (Photograph 4).

  3. Climate and site management as driving factors for the atmospheric greenhouse gas exchange of a restored wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, M.; Friborg, T.; Schelde, K.; Jensen, R.; Ringgaard, R.; Vasquez, V.; Thomsen, A. G.; Soegaard, H.

    2013-01-01

    The atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) budget of a restored wetland in western Denmark was established for the years 2009-2011 from eddy covariance measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) fluxes. The water table in the wetland, which was restored in 2002, was unregulated, and the vegetation height was limited through occasional grazing by cattle and grass cutting. The annual net CO2 uptake varied between 195 and 983 g m-2 and the annual net CH4 release varied between 11 and 17 g m-2. In all three years the wetland was a carbon sink and removed between 42 and 259 g C m-2 from the atmosphere. However, in terms of the full annual GHG budget (assuming that 1 g CH4 is equivalent to 25 g CO2 with respect to the greenhouse effect over a time horizon of 100 years) the wetland was a sink in 2009, a source in 2010 and neutral in 2011. Complementary observations of meteorological factors and management activities were used to explain the large inter-annual variations in the full atmospheric GHG budget of the wetland. The largest impact on the annual GHG fluxes, eventually defining their sign, came from site management through changes in grazing duration and animal stocking density. These changes accounted for half of the observed variability in the CO2 fluxes and about two thirds of the variability in CH4 fluxes. An unusually long period of snow cover in 2010 had the second largest effect on the annual CO2 flux, whose interannual variability was larger than that of the CH4 flux. Since integrated CO2 and CH4 flux data from restored wetlands are still very rare, it is concluded that more long-term flux measurements are needed to quantify the effects of ecosystem disturbance, in terms of management activities and exceptional weather patterns, on the atmospheric GHG budget more accurately.

  4. Exploring Policy Options to Stop the Loss of Wetlands on Prairie Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serran, J.; Creed, I. F.

    2013-12-01

    Wetlands from the prairie pothole region of North America have been disappearing at rapid rates over the past century. Within Canada, the issue of wetland loss is compounded by the lack of high resolution wetland inventories, the lack of information on rates of wetland loss, and the absence of wetland policies to further protect against loss. In Alberta, the situation is particularly problematic as increasing development pressures continue to place wetlands at risk. The 'no net loss' of wetlands policy established in 1993 has been ineffective, as wetland loss has continued, leaving Albertans searching for alternative policy options. An alternative policy option is to shift focus from wetland area to wetland function. We present a wetland function assessment system founded on ecological and hydrological processes for estimating wetland functions, including biodiversity, flood control, and pollution reduction, for a regional watershed in Alberta. First, we establish wetland loss rates using inventory time series from 1960 to present; wetland loss estimates can be derived from a break in slope in the area-frequency relationship. Second, we create a high-resolution wetland inventory using a novel approach that fuses LiDAR data (probability of wetland) with aerial photographs (to distinguish open water and the surrounding wet meadow zone). Third, using this wetland inventory, we identify indicators of wetland function using GIS and remote sensing data and technologies for application at regional watershed scales. Biodiversity indicators include a wetland's condition, ability to provide habitat, and potential for high ecological diversity. Flood control indicators include a wetland's ability to store water, connect to surface drainage network, and desynchronize flood waves throughout the landscape. Pollution control indicators include a wetland's contributing source area of nutrients, mechanisms that transport nutrients to the wetland, and mechanisms that retain nutrients once in the wetland. Finally, the function indicators are aggregated to provide an overall function score for each wetland. This overall value estimates a wetland's potential to provide ecosystem services compared to other wetlands on the landscape. The function indicators in combination with 'scarcity' as indicated by the historical wetland loss rates allows policy makers to adjust thresholds between wetland function scores and policy and management objectives. The wetland function assessment system offers a scientific foundation upon which wetland policy can be built. To exemplify its policy potential, we conduct quantitative ';future' scenarios to determine priority wetlands for protection under different development scenarios - this scenario analysis reveals the necessity of making tradeoffs among wetland functions, as wetlands with high ecological function may not be the same wetlands with high hydrological function. The project's resulting wetland function assessment system will improve conservation and restoration/remediation efforts by identifying high functioning wetlands, by revealing the necessity of tradeoffs, and by directing conservation towards preserving wetlands that provide important ecosystem services while allowing other wetlands to be developed.

  5. Using Landsat MSS data with soils information to identify wetland habitats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ernst, C. L.; Hoffer, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    A previous study showed that certain fresh water wetland vegetation types can be spectrally separated when a maximum likelihood classification procedure is applied to Landsat spectral data. However, wetland and upland types which have similar vegetative life forms (e.g., upland hardwoods and hardwood swamps) are often confused because of spectral similarity. Therefore, the current investigation attempts to differentiate similar wetland and upland types by combining Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) data with soils information. The Pigeon River area in northern Indiana used in the earlier study was also employed in this investigation. A layered classification algorithm which combined soils and spectral data was used to generate a wetland classification. The results of the spectral/soils wetland classification are compared to the previous classification that had been based on spectral data alone. The results indicate wetland habitat mapping can be improved by combining soils and other ancillary data with Landsat spectral data.

  6. Annual monitoring report for the Gunnison, Colorado, wetlands mitigation plan

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) administers the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project to clean up uranium mill tailings and other surface contamination at 24 abandoned uranium mill sites in 10 states. One of these abandoned mill sites is near the town of Gunnison, Colorado; surface remediation and the environmental impacts of remedial action are described in the Gunnison environmental assessment (EA) (DOE, 1992). Remedial action resulted in the elimination of 4.3 acres (ac) 1.7 hectares (ha) of wetlands and mitigation of this loss of wetlands is being accomplished through the enhance of 18.4 ac (7.5 ha) of riparian plant communities in six spring feed areas on Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land. The description of the impacted and mitigation wetlands is provided in the Mitigation and Monitoring Plan for Impacted Wetlands at the Gunnison UMTRA Project Site, Gunnison, Colorado (DOE, 1994), which is attached to the US Army corps of Engineers (USACE) Section 404 Permit. As part of the wetlands mitigation plan, the six mitigation wetlands were fenced in the fall of 1993 to exclude livestock grazing. Baseline of grazed conditions of the wetlands vegetation was determined during the summer of 1993 (DOE, 1994). A 5-year monitoring program of these six sites has been implemented to document the response of vegetation and wildlife to the exclusion of livestock. This annual monitoring report provides the results of the first year of the 5-year monitoring period.

  7. A comparison of sampling techniques to estimate number of wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, R.R.; Higgins, K.F.; Naugle, D.E.; Jenks, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Service use annual estimates of the number of ponded wetlands to estimate duck production and establish duck hunting regulations. Sampling techniques that minimize bias may provide more reliable estimates of annual duck production. Using a wetland geographic information system (GIS), we estimated number of wetlands using standard counting protocol with belt transects and samples of square plots. Estimates were compared to the known number of wetlands in the GIS to determine bias. Bias in transect-derived estimates ranged from +67-87% of the known number of wetlands, compared to bias of +3-6% in estimates from samples of 10.24-km2 plots. We recommend using samples of 10.24-km2 plots stratified by wetland density to decrease bias.

  8. Assessing avian richness in remnant wetlands: Towards an improved methodology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krzys, Greg; Waite, Thomas A.; Stapanian, Martin; Vucetich, John A.

    2002-01-01

    Because the North American Breeding Bird Survey provides inadequate coverage of wetland habitat, the Wetland Breeding Bird Survey was recently established in Ohio, USA. This program relies on volunteers to conduct 3 counts at each monitored wetland. Currently, all counts are conducted during the morning. Under the premise that volunteer participation could be increased by allowing evening counts, we evaluated the potential for modifying the methodology. We evaluated the sampling efficiency of all 3-count combinations of morning and evening counts using data collected at 14 wetlands. Estimates of overall species richness decreased with increasing numbers of evening counts. However, this pattern did not hold when analyses were restricted to wetland-dependent species or those of conservation concern. Our findings suggest that it would be reasonable to permit evening counts, particularly if the data are to be used to monitor wetland dependent species and those of concern.

  9. Wetlands Assessment for site characterization, Advanced Neutron Source (ANS)

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, M.C.; Socolof, M.L.; Rosensteel, B.; Awl, D.

    1994-10-01

    This Wetlands Assessment has been prepared in accordance with the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 10 CFR 1022, Compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements, which established the policy and procedure for implementing Executive Order 11990, Protection of Wetlands. The proposed action is to conduct characterization activities in or near wetlands at the ANS site. The proposed action will covered under a Categorical Exclusion, therefore this assessment is being prepared as a separate document [10 CFR 1022.12(c)]. The purpose of this Wetlands Assessment is to fulfill the requirements of 10 CFR 1022.12(a) by describing the project, discussing the effects of the proposed action upon the wetlands, and considering alternatives to the proposed action.

  10. Wetlands in Changed Landscapes: The Influence of Habitat Transformation on the Physico-Chemistry of Temporary Depression Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Matthew S.; Day, Jenny A.

    2014-01-01

    Temporary wetlands dominate the wet season landscape of temperate, semi-arid and arid regions, yet, other than their direct loss to development and agriculture, little information exists on how remaining wetlands have been altered by anthropogenic conversion of surrounding landscapes. This study investigates relationships between the extent and type of habitat transformation around temporary wetlands and their water column physico-chemical characteristics. A set of 90 isolated depression wetlands (seasonally inundated) occurring on coastal plains of the south-western Cape mediterranean-climate region of South Africa was sampled during the winter/spring wet season of 2007. Wetlands were sampled across habitat transformation gradients according to the areal cover of agriculture, urban development and alien invasive vegetation within 100 and 500 m radii of each wetland edge. We hypothesized that the principal drivers of physico-chemical conditions in these wetlands (e.g. soil properties, basin morphology) are altered by habitat transformation. Multivariate multiple regression analyses (distance-based Redundancy Analysis) indicated significant associations between wetland physico-chemistry and habitat transformation (overall transformation within 100 and 500 m, alien vegetation cover within 100 and 500 m, urban cover within 100 m); although for significant regressions the amount of variation explained was very low (range: ?2 to ?5.5%), relative to that explained by purely spatio-temporal factors (range: ?35.5 to ?43%). The nature of the relationships between each type of transformation in the landscape and individual physico-chemical variables in wetlands were further explored with univariate multiple regressions. Results suggest that conservation of relatively narrow (?100 m) buffer strips around temporary wetlands is likely to be effective in the maintenance of natural conditions in terms of physico-chemical water quality. PMID:24533161

  11. Wetlands in changed landscapes: the influence of habitat transformation on the physico-chemistry of temporary depression wetlands.

    PubMed

    Bird, Matthew S; Day, Jenny A

    2014-01-01

    Temporary wetlands dominate the wet season landscape of temperate, semi-arid and arid regions, yet, other than their direct loss to development and agriculture, little information exists on how remaining wetlands have been altered by anthropogenic conversion of surrounding landscapes. This study investigates relationships between the extent and type of habitat transformation around temporary wetlands and their water column physico-chemical characteristics. A set of 90 isolated depression wetlands (seasonally inundated) occurring on coastal plains of the south-western Cape mediterranean-climate region of South Africa was sampled during the winter/spring wet season of 2007. Wetlands were sampled across habitat transformation gradients according to the areal cover of agriculture, urban development and alien invasive vegetation within 100 and 500 m radii of each wetland edge. We hypothesized that the principal drivers of physico-chemical conditions in these wetlands (e.g. soil properties, basin morphology) are altered by habitat transformation. Multivariate multiple regression analyses (distance-based Redundancy Analysis) indicated significant associations between wetland physico-chemistry and habitat transformation (overall transformation within 100 and 500 m, alien vegetation cover within 100 and 500 m, urban cover within 100 m); although for significant regressions the amount of variation explained was very low (range: ?2 to ?5.5%), relative to that explained by purely spatio-temporal factors (range: ?35.5 to ?43%). The nature of the relationships between each type of transformation in the landscape and individual physico-chemical variables in wetlands were further explored with univariate multiple regressions. Results suggest that conservation of relatively narrow (?100 m) buffer strips around temporary wetlands is likely to be effective in the maintenance of natural conditions in terms of physico-chemical water quality. PMID:24533161

  12. Removal of metals in constructed wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Crites, R.W.; Watson, R.C.; Williams, C.R.

    1996-12-31

    Trace metals are difficult to remove from municipal wastewater by conventional wastewater treatment methods. Constructed wetlands have the potential to trap and remove metals from the water column. Long term removal is expected to occur by accumulation and burial in the plant detritus in a manner similar to the removal of phosphorus. Few data are available in the literature on removal of metals by constructed wetlands. A free water surface constructed wetland at Sacramento Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant treating secondary municipal effluent has been operating since the spring of 1994. Removal data for 13 metals are presented for the period from August 1994 to May 1995. About 3,785 m{sup 3}/d (1 mgd) of pure oxygen activated sludge effluent, disinfected using UV light, is further treated through a 8 ha (20 acre) constructed wetlands Ten separate, parallel treatment cells are available to demonstrate the effects of detention time, vegetation management, and application frequency on the removal of metals, organics and ammonia. Detention time can be varied from 3 to 13 days by varying the flow and the water depth. The vegetation, primarily bulrush with some cattails, will be managed by different techniques to minimize mosquito production. Application frequency varies from continuous flow to batch flow (1 to 2 days of loading with 1 day of discharge).

  13. Using dual classifications in the development of avian wetland indices of biological integrity for wetlands in West Virginia, USA.

    PubMed

    Veselka, Walter; Anderson, James T; Kordek, Walter S

    2010-05-01

    Considerable resources are being used to develop and implement bioassessment methods for wetlands to ensure that "biological integrity" is maintained under the United States Clean Water Act. Previous research has demonstrated that avian composition is susceptible to human impairments at multiple spatial scales. Using a site-specific disturbance gradient, we built avian wetland indices of biological integrity (AW-IBI) specific to two wetland classification schemes, one based on vegetative structure and the other based on the wetland's position in the landscape and sources of water. The resulting class-specific AW-IBI was comprised of one to four metrics that varied in their sensitivity to the disturbance gradient. Some of these metrics were specific to only one of the classification schemes, whereas others could discriminate varying levels of disturbance regardless of classification scheme. Overall, all of the derived biological indices specific to the vegetative structure-based classes of wetlands had a significant relation with the disturbance gradient; however, the biological index derived for floodplain wetlands exhibited a more consistent response to a local disturbance gradient. We suspect that the consistency of this response is due to the inherent nature of the connectivity of available habitat in floodplain wetlands. PMID:19401811

  14. Ecological risk assessment of a wetland exposed to boron

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, R.L.; Kimerle, R.A.; Coyle, G.T.; Best, G.R.

    1997-11-01

    A wetland located in the southeastern portion of the United States was the site of an investigation to determine the potential ecological risk of elevated boron concentrations to the flora and fauna living in the wetland. The conceptual model identified the vegetation as the primary receptor of concern, and thus the vegetation is the focus of this article. Samples of surface water, sediments, and selected vegetation were collected from the study wetland and several nearby reference sites and were analyzed for boron. Concentrations of boron in all three media exceeded reference site concentrations. Boron concentrations were highest near the suspected source but decreased almost to reference-site concentrations near the outer perimeter of the wetland. Some plants appeared stressed with yellowing and necrotic leaves; however, a correlation between tissue boron concentrations and the plant`s visual appearance was not apparent for all species studied. Modeling of the fate of boron indicated that the wetland has likely been at a steady state for many years and that boron concentrations were not expected to increase. It was concluded that no observable adverse ecological impacts to the vegetation could be attributed to boron, nor is it likely that the boron poses an unacceptable risk to the surrounding areas.

  15. -Long-term assessment of seed provenance effect on the establishment of Bromus erectus -821 Journal of Vegetation Science 19: 821-830, 2008

    E-print Network

    Stampfli, Andreas

    - Long-term assessment of seed provenance effect on the establishment of Bromus erectus - 821 © IAVS; Opulus Press Uppsala. Long-term assessment of seed provenance effect on the establishment.stampfli@ips.unibe.ch *Corresponding author; E-mail michaela.zeiter@ips.unibe.ch Abstract Questions: Do short-term seed

  16. Experimental investigation of wave attenuation through model and live vegetation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hurricanes and tropical storms often cause severe damage and loss of life in coastal areas. It is widely recognized that wetlands along coastal fringes reduce storm surge and waves. Yet, the potential role and primary mechanisms of wave mitigation by wetland vegetation are not fully understood. K...

  17. Laboratory measurements of wave attenuation through model and live vegetation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surge and waves generated by hurricanes and tropical storms often cause severe damage and loss of life in coastal areas. It is widely recognized that wetlands along coastal fringes reduce storm surge and waves. Yet, the potential role and primary mechanisms of wave mitigation by wetland vegetation a...

  18. Vegetation at Dorman Slough, Lower Brule Indian Reservation, SD

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    View of wetland vegetation (right) and food plot (left) at Dorman Slough. A reconnaissance-level study of selected wetlands on and near the Lower Brule Indian Reservation in South Dakota was completed in 2012-13 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe using grou...

  19. Agricultural Encroachment: Implications for Carbon Sequestration in Tropical African Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. B.; Saunders, M.; Kansiime, F.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical wetlands have been shown to exhibit high rates of net primary productivity and may therefore play an important role in global climate change mitigation through carbon assimilation and sequestration. Many permanently flooded areas of tropical East Africa are dominated by the highly productive C4 emergent macrophyte sedge, Cyperus papyrus L. (papyrus). However, increasing population densities around wetland margins in East Africa are reducing the extent of papyrus coverage due to the planting of subsistence crops such as Cocoyam (Colocasia esculenta). We have assessed the impact of this land use change on the carbon cycle in theis wetland environment. Eddy covariance techniques were used, on a campaign basis, to measure fluxes of carbon dioxide over both papyrus and cocoyam dominated wetlands located on the Ugandan shore of Lake Victoria. The integration of flux data over the annual cycle shows that papyrus wetlands have the potential to act as a sink for significant amounts of carbon, in the region of 10 t C ha-1 yr-1. The cocoyam vegetation was found to assimilate ~7 t C ha-1 yr-1 but when carbon exports from crop biomass removal were taken into account these wetlands represent a significant net loss of carbon of similar magnitude. The development of sustainable wetland management strategies are therefore required in order to promote the dual wetland function of crop production and the mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions especially under future climate change scenarios.

  20. Classifying and mapping wetlands and peat resources using digital cartography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cameron, Cornelia C.; Emery, David A.

    1992-01-01

    Digital cartography allows the portrayal of spatial associations among diverse data types and is ideally suited for land use and resource analysis. We have developed methodology that uses digital cartography for the classification of wetlands and their associated peat resources and applied it to a 1:24 000 scale map area in New Hampshire. Classifying and mapping wetlands involves integrating the spatial distribution of wetlands types with depth variations in associated peat quality and character. A hierarchically structured classification that integrates the spatial distribution of variations in (1) vegetation, (2) soil type, (3) hydrology, (4) geologic aspects, and (5) peat characteristics has been developed and can be used to build digital cartographic files for resource and land use analysis. The first three parameters are the bases used by the National Wetlands Inventory to classify wetlands and deepwater habitats of the United States. The fourth parameter, geological aspects, includes slope, relief, depth of wetland (from surface to underlying rock or substrate), wetland stratigraphy, and the type and structure of solid and unconsolidated rock surrounding and underlying the wetland. The fifth parameter, peat characteristics, includes the subsurface variation in ash, acidity, moisture, heating value (Btu), sulfur content, and other chemical properties as shown in specimens obtained from core holes. These parameters can be shown as a series of map data overlays with tables that can be integrated for resource or land use analysis.

  1. Evidence is strong that all prairie wetlands provide services to society through runoff and

    E-print Network

    77 Evidence is strong that all prairie wetlands provide services to society through runoff science can clarify the magnitude of these benefits, economists cannot estimate the value of prairie of the densely vegetated prairie wetlands. We also are meas- uring effects of mowing on invertebrate pop

  2. Aquifers and Wetlands SUMMARY: This chapter begins with an overview of the hydrological cycle and

    E-print Network

    Cushman-Roisin, Benoit

    cycle and considers the flow of water in wetlands and undergraound. Special attention is paid to flow cycle of water, called the hydro- logical cycle. Approximately half of the solar energy striking through vegetated wetlands. 14.1 The Hydrological Cycle Rivers and streams are but a link in the global

  3. EFFECTS OF AGRICULTURAL ACTIVITIES AND BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES ON WATER QUALITY OF SEASONAL PRAIRIE POTHOLE WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Long-term effectsof within-basin tillage can constrain condition and function of prairie wetlands even after uplands are restored. Runoff was significantly greater to replicate wetlands within tilled basins with or without vegetated buffer strips as compared to ConsrvationReserve...

  4. Impact of Municipal Wastewater Effluent on Seed Bank Response and Soils Excavated from a Wetland Impoundment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intensive management of wetlands typically includes the manipulation of water depth, duration, and timing to promote desired vegetation communities. Increased demand for water may encourage the use of alternative sources such as wastewater effluents in managed wetlands. However, water quality is c...

  5. Evaluation of the nutrient removal efficiency of a constructed wetland system 

    E-print Network

    Hart, Kimberly Ann

    2006-10-30

    of the four cells was mostly the same. A comparison was conducted between the nutrient reduction efficiency and vegetation data of this wetland system with data from a pilotscale wetland system that was operated from 1992 to 2000. The findings of this study...

  6. Survey at West Brule Community wetlands, Lower Brule Indian Reservation, SD

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    USGS hydrologist surveying distinct vegetation bands in wetland area south of West Brule Community. A reconnaissance-level study of selected wetlands on and near the Lower Brule Indian Reservation in South Dakota was completed in 2012-13 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Lower Br...

  7. Reporting on ecological condition and ecosystem services for the 2011 National Wetland Condition Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The first-ever National Wetland Condition Assessment (NWCA) was conducted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in 2011. Vegetation, algae, soil, water chemistry, and hydrologic data were collected at ~900 wetland points across the contiguous United States. The NW...

  8. Coastwide Reference Monitoring System (CRMS) Vegetation Volume Index: An assessment tool for marsh habitat focused on the three-dimensional structure at CRMS vegetation monitoring stations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, William B.; Visser, Jenneke M.; Piazza, Sarai C.; Sharp, Leigh Anne; Hundy, Laura C.; McGinnis, Tommy E.

    2015-01-01

    The VV and VVI will be used to establish trends, to make comparisons, and to evaluate restoration projects. Assessments that rely on the VVI will be included in appropriate Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and Restoration Act (CWPPRA) project reports and analyses. Implementation of the VVI will give coastal managers a new tool to design, implement, and monitor coastal restoration projects. A yearly trajectory of site, project, basin, and coastwide VVI will be posted on the CRMS Web site as data are collected. The primary purpose of the tool is to assess CWPPRA restoration project effectiveness, but it will also be useful in identifying areas in need of restoration and in coastwide vegetation assessments.

  9. Restoration of a forested wetland ecosystem in a thermally impacted stream corridor

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.A.; McKee, W.H. Jr.; Dulohery, C.J.

    1995-09-01

    The Savannah River Swamp is a 3,020 Ha forested wetland on the floodplain of the Savannah River and is located on the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site (SRS). Major impacts to the swamp hydrology occurred with the completion of the production reactors and one coal-fired powerhouse at the SRS in the early 1950`s. Water was pumped from the Savannah River, through secondary heat exchangers of the reactors, and discharged into three of the tributary streams that flow into the swamp. This continued from 1954 to 1988 at various levels. The sustained increases in water volume resulted in overflow of the original stream banks and the creation of additional floodplains. Accompanying this was considerable erosion of the original stream corridor and deposition of a deep silt layer on the newly formed delta. Heated water was discharged directly into Pen Branch and water temperature in the stream often exceeded 50 C. The nearly continuous flood of the swamp, the thermal load of the water, and the heavy silting resulted in complete mortality of the original vegetation in large areas of the floodplain. Research has been ongoing to determine methods to reintroduce tree species characteristic of more mature forested wetlands. The goal of the restoration is to create structural and biological diversity in the forest canopy by establishing a mix of species typically present in riparian and wetland forests of the area.

  10. Assessment of Water Availability Impact on Wetland Management using Multi-temporal Landsat Images and Bayesian-based Learning Machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alminagorta, O.; Torres, A. F.

    2013-12-01

    Water availability has a direct impact on the wetland ecosystems. While wetland managers need better information to allocate scarce water to improve wetland services, most monitoring activities of flood areas and vegetation condition on wetlands relies on manual estimation of water depth and use of airboat with GPS devices. This process is costly and time-consuming. Remote sensing techniques have been previously used to characterize vegetation conditions along with hydrological characteristics of the wetlands with excellent results. Nevertheless, limited analysis has been done to relate the resulting wetland characterization with the historical water availability records. The present paper addresses the lack of adequate feedback on wetland conditions upon the available water for the wetland system by making use of multi-temporal Landsat images. These images are processed at wetland unit and system level to extract information about vegetation, soil and water conditions. This information is then correlated with historical water availability records for the wetland system by means of the Relevance Vector Machine, a Bayesian-based algorithm known for its robustness, efficiency, and sparseness. This research is applied at the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge (the Refuge), located on the northeast side of Great Salt Lake, Utah. The Refuge constitutes one of the most important habitats for migratory birds for the Pacific Flyway of North America. Water-discharge records and coverage vegetation collected at the Refuge has been used to calibrate and evaluate the effects on wetland services to the process of flooding and drought in wetland units during different years. The final product of this research is to provide a methodology that wetland managers can use to make informed decisions about water allocation to improve wetland services while avoiding wasting resources, effort, time and money.

  11. QUAKER RUN Stream and Wetland Restoration As-Built Completion Report

    E-print Network

    Kirby, Carl S.

    the floodplain. The site was found to be richly vegetated in wetlands and floodplains. The live willow stakes planted in spring 2006 exhibited a very high survival. The floodplains supported dozens of dove

  12. Draft Wetlands Rule Released

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2006-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers released on 28 March a draft of a new rule to guide compensatory mitigation for when wetlands are unavoidably lost due to development. However, whether the rule is successful in preventing a net loss in wetlands will depend largely on its implementation, according to two wetlands scientists who evaluated the issue for the U.S. National Research Council (NRC) in 2001. Under the federal Clean Water Act, developers who seek to build on wetlands must compensate for any wetlands loss if they are unable to avoid or minimize the loss. Such compensation is covered under the newly proposed compensatory mitigation rule. Benjamin Grumbles, EPA assistant administrator for water, called the rule an ``innovative new standard that will accelerate the pace of wetlands conservation and restoration.''

  13. Wetland Wildlife Ecology Spring 2014

    E-print Network

    Ma, Lena

    be able to identify and classify representatives of wetland wildlife groups (birds, amphibians, mammals to identity wetland wildlife including waterfowl, waterbirds and amphibians. A quiz will be given

  14. Anatomy and propagation dynamics of continuous-flux release bottom gravity currents through emergent aquatic vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testik, F. Y.; Yilmaz, N. A.

    2015-05-01

    The anatomy and propagation dynamics of non-Newtonian fluid mud gravity currents through emergent aquatic vegetation were investigated experimentally. The motivation of this study was related to the pipeline disposal of the dredged fluid mud into vegetated wetlands and near-shore areas, during which bottom gravity currents form. Our experimental observations showed that the presence of vegetation affects the propagation dynamics, hence the anatomy, of the gravity currents significantly. Vegetation-induced drag force dominated the resisting forces acting on the gravity current, forcing the current to transition into a drag-dominated propagation phase. During this transition, the gravity current profile evolved into a well-defined triangular/wedge shape. The onset of the fully established drag-dominated propagation phase was marked by the establishment of an equilibrium slope angle for the upper interface of the current with the ambient fluid. This equilibrium/terminal slope angle value remained constant throughout the rest of the drag-dominated propagation phase. Parameterizations for the required propagation distance for the onset of the fully established drag-dominated propagation phase, the array-averaged drag coefficient at the onset of this propagation phase, and the value of the terminal slope angle were proposed. Our experimental observations on the anatomy of gravity currents during the drag-dominated propagation phase were discussed in detail. This study documented significant effects of the vegetation in the propagation dynamics and anatomy of gravity currents, which warrants future detailed studies.

  15. STATUS OF RESTORATION SCIENCE: WETLANDS ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Information on wetland creation and restoration is increasing. ast fall the U.S.National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration published the next version of the status report on creation and restoration. n looking at projects, the reason they were established in a particular loc...

  16. Evaluation of a market in wetland credits: entrepreneurial wetland banking in Chicago.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Morgan; Hayden, Nicholas

    2008-06-01

    With the rise of market-led approaches to environmental policy, compensation for permitted discharge of dredge or fill material into wetlands under Section 404 of the U.S. Clean Water Act has been purchased increasingly from entrepreneurial third-party providers. The growth of this practice (i.e., entrepreneurial wetland banking) has resolved many challenges associated with wetland compensation. But it has also produced (1) quantifiable temporal loss of wetland ecological functions, (2) spatial redistribution of wetland area, and (3) a degree of regulatory instability that may pose a threat to entrepreneurial compensation as a sustainable component of wetland-compensation policy. We used achieved compensation ratios, lapse between bank credit sale and the attainment of performance standards, distance between impact and bank site, and changes in bank market area to examine these 3 factors. We analyzed data from a census of all such transactions in the Chicago District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, compiled from site visits, Corps databases, and contacts with consultants and Section 404 permittees. Entrepreneurial banking provided compensation at a lower overall ratio than nonbank forms of compensation. Approximately 60% of bank credits were sold after site-protection standards were met but before ecological performance standards were met at the bank site. The average distance between bank and impact site was approximately 26 km. The area of markets within which established banks can sell wetland credits has fluctuated considerably over the study period. Comparing these data with similar data for other compensation mechanisms will assist in evaluating banking as an element of conservation policy. Data characterizing the performance of entrepreneurial wetland banks in actual regulatory environments are scarce, even though it is the most established of similar markets that have become instrumental to federal policy in administering several major environmental protection laws. PMID:18577091

  17. Hydroperiod regime controls the organization of plant species in wetlands.

    PubMed

    Foti, Romano; del Jesus, Manuel; Rinaldo, Andrea; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2012-11-27

    With urban, agricultural, and industrial needs growing throughout the past decades, wetland ecosystems have experienced profound changes. Most critically, the biodiversity of wetlands is intimately linked to its hydrologic dynamics, which in turn are being drastically altered by ongoing climate changes. Hydroperiod regimes, e.g., percentage of time a site is inundated, exert critical control in the creation of niches for different plant species in wetlands. However, the spatial signatures of the organization of plant species in wetlands and how the different drivers interact to yield such signatures are unknown. Focusing on Everglades National Park (ENP) in Florida, we show here that cluster sizes of each species follow a power law probability distribution and that such clusters have well-defined fractal characteristics. Moreover, we individuate and model those signatures via the interplay between global forcings arising from the hydroperiod regime and local controls exerted by neighboring vegetation. With power law clustering often associated with systems near critical transitions, our findings are highly relevant for the management of wetland ecosystems. In addition, our results show that changes in climate and land management have a quantifiable predictable impact on the type of vegetation and its spatial organization in wetlands. PMID:23150589

  18. The Influence of Speckled Alder on Nitrogen Accumulation in Adirondack Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiernan, B. D.; Hurd, T. M.; Raynal, D. J.

    2001-05-01

    Shrub-dominated wetlands of the Adirondacks typically support vigorous populations of nitrogen-fixing speckled alder Alnus incana (L.) Moench var. americana Regel), and are the second most abundant wetland type in the Adirondack region. In symbiotic association with an actinomycete of the genus Frankia, this shrub fixes 37-43 kg N/ha/yr in monotypic stands. This study was undertaken to quantify the abundance of alder in wetlands typed as "Scrub-shrub 1" (SS1; known as alder/willow wetlands) in the National Wetlands Inventory, and to determine the accumulation of nitrate and ammonium in alder wetland substrates. Twenty wetlands from the Oswegatchie-Black (OB) and Upper Hudson (UH) watersheds were randomly selected using the Adirondack Park Agency's GIS data base which includes wetland cover types assigned using remotely sensed data. Wetlands designated as "SS1" (scrub-shrub vegetation) and "SS1/EM1" (scrub-shrub with emergent herbaceous vegetation) were included in the sample. Six wetlands varying in alder abundance were chosen to estimate N accumulation in the substrate, with measurement of dissolved inorganic N in groundwater and ion exchange resin extracts. In the OB watershed, A. incana averaged 30 % of total shrub density in SS1 wetlands and 36 % in SS1/EM1 wetlands. Alder accounted for 49 % of all stems in UH SS1 wetlands, 28 % in the SS1/EM1 wetlands and in total accounted for 35 % of all stems in this study. Nitrate in IER extracts and groundwater was significantly higher in high-density alder wetlands (p < 0.05). Eight of the 20 wetlands included in this study were estimated to have less than 3,000 alder stems/ha, and five were estimated to have greater than 10,000 stems/ha. The other seven wetlands averaged 6,000 stems/ha. At nine sites, foliar N equaled or exceeded estimated atmospheric deposition (~10 kg/ha/yr), and was likely derived from N fixation. We conclude that 50 % of the SS1/EM1 wetlands and at least 75 % of the SS1 wetlands in these watersheds are characterized by elevated nitrate due to the effect of alder on these systems.

  19. Wetland reclamation by accelerating succession

    SciTech Connect

    Rushton, B.T.

    1988-01-01

    This research analyzed mechanisms and processes for accelerating natural succession in order to restore soils and forests on clay setting areas left from phosphate mining in central Florida. Field measurements of succession on unreclaimed clay ponds showed wet sites dominated by dense stands of small shrubby willows even after 60 years with succession arrested because of a shortage of seeds for later stage trees. For drier sites an orderly procession of pioneer wetland trees colonized when wetland seed sources were within 20 meters. The first woody species were willows, myrtles, and baccharis followed in 5 to 10 years by red maple and elm. Oaks colonized slightly drier elevations. Hackberry, cherry, and sweetgum were also found. Experiments in which 3000 seedlings of 11 species were planted in six clay settling areas demonstrated succession can be accelerated. After the first growing season, results suggest that mixed swamp vegetation typical of floodplains may be the most suitable forested wetland community for settling pond reclamation. Percent survival was best for Carolina ash, American elm, and red maple. Some alluvial floodplain species were intermediate in success with 74% survival for baldcypress, 61% for sweetgum, and 61% for laurel oak. Trees from bayheads had the least survival with 52% for swampbay and 41% for loblolly bay. Poorest survival for all species planted (39%) was swamp tupelo. Floodplain species which required fairly dry conditions had poor survival, i.e., southern magnolia (53%) and cabbage palm (43%). Planted tree seedlings were more cost effective than placing seeds on the ground and covering them with litter. A simulation model with hydrologic regimes and outside seeding was used to summarize the operation of the successional system. Simulation that suggested trends for a longer time period than those observed in the field trials are yet to be confirmed.

  20. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-print Network

    The Virginia Wetlands Report Continued on page 2 Spring 1996 Vol. 11, No. 2The Virginia Wetlands Resources Management Program Grant, administered by Virginia's Department of Environmental Quality, and to vari- ous state agency personnel who interface with the shoreline permit program in Virginia

  1. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-print Network

    VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Summer 2003 Vol. 18, No. 2 Virginia Horseshoe Crab Management Up date. Tom Barnard and Lyle Varnell Vol.14,No.3 Dragonflies: Hawks Clamworm (Nereis succinea). Rebecca Jo Thomas Birds Vol.V,No.1 VirginiaRail. Vol.V(2) The Living Marsh

  2. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-print Network

    VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Fall 2002 Vol. 17, No. 3 Marina The Center for Coastal Resources Management at VIMS, with a NOAAgrant from the Virginia Coastal Program, has- ing ones. The tool is a series of maps of the Virginia coastline shown in seg- ments which are rated

  3. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-print Network

    VWR -- 1 The Virginia Wetlands Report The Virginia Wetlands Report Fall 2003 Vol. 18, No. 3 Most familiar with the Coastal Primary Sand Dune ProtectionAct in Virginia.You may have even heard of "secondary and recreational attractiveness that is coastal Virginia. Given these valuable natural functions, the Commonwealth

  4. WETLAND AND AGRICULTURE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The values of wetlands are commonly known among the general population. More importantly, ecological wetland functions such as nutrient cycling and mitigation of pollutants are becoming more recognized, especially in the agricultural community. Certain agricultural crops thrive in the moist, rich ...

  5. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-print Network

    Board is Excellent Learning Tool for Virginia Beach Students by Karla L. Schillinger The apple preserv- ing the wetland, strict zoning restric- tions, and selling the property to lo- cals. Local logger it as a preserve for everyone to visit and en- joy. At this time you may be thinking, "Not the usual Wetland Board

  6. Wetlands: Earth's Kidneys

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wetlands are unique, diverse, and productive habitats that emerge at the fringe of aquatic and upland land systems. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines wetlands as "areas that are regularly inundated by surface water or groundwater and characterized by a preva...

  7. Wetland debate still far from over

    SciTech Connect

    Grumbles, B.H.

    1994-01-01

    Section 404 of the Clean Water Act (CWA) establishes a comprehensive regulatory program administered by the Army Corps of Engineers and US EPA for the `discharge of dredged or fill material` into `waters of the United States`. The term wetlands is never defined and appears only three times in the statute. However, it`s reach is expansive. Regulations and the courts have defined the waters of the United States phrase to include certain wetlands. Developers, farmers and local governments have found something lacking in section 404 of the Clean Water Act and continue to seek reform that would more closely benefit their interests.

  8. Remote sensing of wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roller, N. E. G.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of using remote sensing to inventory wetlands and the related topics of proper inventory design and data collection are discussed. The material presented shows that aerial photography is the form of remote sensing from which the greatest amount of wetlands information can be derived. For extensive, general-purpose wetlands inventories, however, the use of LANDSAT data may be more cost-effective. Airborne multispectral scanners and radar are, in the main, too expensive to use - unless the information that these sensors alone can gather remotely is absolutely required. Multistage sampling employing space and high altitude remote sensing data in the initial stages appears to be an efficient survey strategy for gathering non-point specific wetlands inventory data over large areas. The operational role of remote sensing insupplying inventory data for application to several typical wetlands management problems is illustrated by summary descriptions of past ERIM projects.

  9. Findings of the wetland survey of the David Witherspoon, Inc., 1630 Site, South Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Rosensteel, B.A.

    1997-03-01

    In accordance with Department of Energy (DOE) Regulations surveys for wetland presence or absence were conducted in September 1996 on the DWI-1630 site (Witherspoon Landfill) located in South Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee. The DWI-1630 site includes a closed, capped landfill area, areas of past disturbance adjacent to the capped area, and patches of hardwood forest. Wetlands were identified on the landfill cap and in a small bottomland that was formerly used for a retention pond in the southwest corner of the DWI-1630 site. The wetlands identified on the cap are man-induced, atypical situation wetlands. These areas have hydrophytic vegetation and wetland hydrology, but the soils do not have hydric characteristics. Wetland development appears to be due to a combination of the grading or subsidence of the clay landfill cap, the low permeability of the clay fill soil, and the absence of surface drainage outlets from the depressions. These atypical situation wetland areas may not be considered by the US Army Corps of Engineers or the State of Tennessee to be jurisdictional wetlands. The wetland in the former retention pond area has hydrophytic vegetation, wetland hydrology, and hydric soils and is a jurisdictional wetland.

  10. HISTORIC WETLANDS OF PRUDENCE ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ten wetland sites around Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island have been selected for a multidisciplinary study. These wetland sites are being studied to develop indicators of "wetland health." The study includes assessing the ecological conditions of the wetlands in the past, and the c...

  11. Wetland Restoration Response Analysis using MODIS and Groundwater Data

    PubMed Central

    Melesse, Assefa M.; Nangia, Vijay; Wang, Xixi; McClain, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Vegetation cover and groundwater level changes over the period of restoration are the two most important indicators of the level of success in wetland ecohydrological restoration. As a result of the regular presence of water and dense vegetation, the highest evapotranspiration (latent heat) rates usually occur within wetlands. Vegetation cover and evapotranspiration of large areas of restoration like that of Kissimmee River basin, South Florida will be best estimated using remote sensing technique than point measurements. Kissimmee River basin has been the area of ecological restoration for some years. The current ecohydrological restoration activities were evaluated through fractional vegetation cover (FVC) changes and latent heat flux using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. Groundwater level data were also analyzed for selected eight groundwater monitoring wells in the basin. Results have shown that the average fractional vegetation cover and latent heat along 10 km buffer of Kissimmee River between Lake Kissimmee and Lake Okeechobee was higher in 2004 than in 2000. It is evident that over the 5-year period of time, vegetated and areas covered with wetlands have increased significantly especially along the restoration corridor. Analysis of groundwater level data (2000-2004) from eight monitoring wells showed that, the average monthly level of groundwater was increased by 20 cm and 34 cm between 2000 and 2004, and 2000 and 2003, respectively. This change was more evident for wells along the river.

  12. Wetland Ecosystem Services Vary With Climate for Prairie Pothole Landscapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrology is the primary mechanism for the cyclic vegetation dynamics collectively known as the wetland cover cycle, which drives ecosystem services for the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR). These palustrine, depressional basin waters vacillate with regional drought and deluge, so surface water fluctuat...

  13. Building spectral libraries for wetlands land cover classification and hyperspectral remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Zomer, R J; Trabucco, A; Ustin, S L

    2009-05-01

    Recent advances in remote sensing provide opportunities to map plant species and vegetation within wetlands at management relevant scales and resolutions. Hyperspectral imagers, currently available on airborne platforms, provide increased spectral resolution over existing space-based sensors that can document detailed information on the distribution of vegetation community types, and sometimes species. Development of spectral libraries of wetland species is a key component needed to facilitate advanced analytical techniques to monitor wetlands. Canopy and leaf spectra at five sites in California, Texas, and Mississippi were sampled to create a common spectral library for mapping wetlands from remotely sensed data. An extensive library of spectra (n=1336) for coastal wetland communities, across a range of bioclimatic, edaphic, and disturbance conditions were measured. The wetland spectral libraries were used to classify and delineate vegetation at a separate location, the Pacheco Creek wetland in the Sacramento Delta, California, using a PROBE-1 airborne hyperspectral data set (5m pixel resolution, 128 bands). This study discusses sampling and collection methodologies for building libraries, and illustrates the potential of advanced sensors to map wetland composition. The importance of developing comprehensive wetland spectral libraries, across diverse ecosystems is highlighted. In tandem with improved analytical tools these libraries provide a physical basis for interpretation that is less subject to conditions of specific data sets. To facilitate a global approach to the application of hyperspectral imagers to mapping wetlands, we suggest that criteria for and compilation of wetland spectral libraries should proceed today in anticipation of the wider availability and eventual space-based deployment of advanced hyperspectral high spatial resolution sensors. PMID:18395960

  14. A remote sensing and GIS-based wetlands analysis in Canaan Valley, West Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yisha

    With the increasing influence in climate change and human activity, more and more people have begun to recognize the benefits of wetlands. However, there was a continuous annual net loss in the wetlands area since 1980s. Many programs have been implemented to monitor the status and trend of wetlands recently. In West Virginia, the wetlands area is a small portion of State's land but it plays a key role in the whole ecosystem. This research aimed to detect the land cover and vegetation changes focusing on Canaan Valley area, which represents the greatest wetlands area of West Virginia. Remote sensing datasets and GIS were used to analyze the trend change with the supervised maximum likelihood classification and Post-classification change detection methods. The potential causes of wetland loss were analyzed after the classification.

  15. State wetlands and riparian area protection programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Frederick; Pieart, Scott; Cook, Edward; Rich, Jacqueline; Coltman, Virginia

    1994-03-01

    The protection of wetlands and riparian areas has emerged as an important environmental planning issue. In the United States, several federal and state laws have been enacted to protect wetlands and riparian areas. Specifically, the federal Clean Water Act includes protection requirements in Sections 301 and 303 for state water quality standards, Section 401 for state certification of federal actions (projects, permits, and licenses), and Section 404 for dredge and fill permits. The Section 401 water quality state certification element has been called the “sleeping giant” of wetlands protection because it empowers state officials to veto or condition federally permitted or licensed activities that do not comply with state water quality standards. State officials have used this power infrequently. The purpose of this research was to analyze the effectiveness of state wetland and riparian programs. Contacts were established with officials in each state and in the national and regional offices of key federal agencies. Based on interviews and on a review of federal and state laws, state program effectiveness was analyzed. From this analysis, several problems and opportunities facing state wetland protection efforts are presented.

  16. The value of wetlands in protecting southeast louisiana from hurricane storm surges.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Edward B; Georgiou, Ioannis Y; Enchelmeyer, Brian; Reed, Denise J

    2013-01-01

    The Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004 and Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 have spurred global interest in the role of coastal wetlands and vegetation in reducing storm surge and flood damages. Evidence that coastal wetlands reduce storm surge and attenuate waves is often cited in support of restoring Gulf Coast wetlands to protect coastal communities and property from hurricane damage. Yet interdisciplinary studies combining hydrodynamic and economic analysis to explore this relationship for temperate marshes in the Gulf are lacking. By combining hydrodynamic analysis of simulated hurricane storm surges and economic valuation of expected property damages, we show that the presence of coastal marshes and their vegetation has a demonstrable effect on reducing storm surge levels, thus generating significant values in terms of protecting property in southeast Louisiana. Simulations for four storms along a sea to land transect show that surge levels decline with wetland continuity and vegetation roughness. Regressions confirm that wetland continuity and vegetation along the transect are effective in reducing storm surge levels. A 0.1 increase in wetland continuity per meter reduces property damages for the average affected area analyzed in southeast Louisiana, which includes New Orleans, by $99-$133, and a 0.001 increase in vegetation roughness decreases damages by $24-$43. These reduced damages are equivalent to saving 3 to 5 and 1 to 2 properties per storm for the average area, respectively. PMID:23536815

  17. The Value of Wetlands in Protecting Southeast Louisiana from Hurricane Storm Surges

    PubMed Central

    Barbier, Edward B.; Georgiou, Ioannis Y.; Enchelmeyer, Brian; Reed, Denise J.

    2013-01-01

    The Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004 and Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 have spurred global interest in the role of coastal wetlands and vegetation in reducing storm surge and flood damages. Evidence that coastal wetlands reduce storm surge and attenuate waves is often cited in support of restoring Gulf Coast wetlands to protect coastal communities and property from hurricane damage. Yet interdisciplinary studies combining hydrodynamic and economic analysis to explore this relationship for temperate marshes in the Gulf are lacking. By combining hydrodynamic analysis of simulated hurricane storm surges and economic valuation of expected property damages, we show that the presence of coastal marshes and their vegetation has a demonstrable effect on reducing storm surge levels, thus generating significant values in terms of protecting property in southeast Louisiana. Simulations for four storms along a sea to land transect show that surge levels decline with wetland continuity and vegetation roughness. Regressions confirm that wetland continuity and vegetation along the transect are effective in reducing storm surge levels. A 0.1 increase in wetland continuity per meter reduces property damages for the average affected area analyzed in southeast Louisiana, which includes New Orleans, by $99-$133, and a 0.001 increase in vegetation roughness decreases damages by $24-$43. These reduced damages are equivalent to saving 3 to 5 and 1 to 2 properties per storm for the average area, respectively. PMID:23536815

  18. Mapping of Geographically Isolated Wetlands of Western Siberia Using High Resolution Space Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyukarev, E.; Pologova, N.; Dyukarev, A.; Lane, C.; Autrey, B. C.

    2014-12-01

    Using the remote sensing data for integrated study of natural objects is actual for investigation of difficult to access areas of West Siberia. The research of this study focuses on determining the extent and spectral signatures of isolated wetlands within Ob-Tom Interfluve area using Landsat and Quickbird space images. High-resolution space images were carefully examined and wetlands were manually delineated. Wetlands have clear visible signs at the high resolution space images. 567 wetlands were recognized as isolated wetlands with the area about 10 000 ha (of 2.5% of the study area). Isolated wetlands with area less 2 ha are the most frequent. Half of the total amount of wetlands has area less than 6.4 ha. The largest isolated wetland occupies 797 ha, and only 5% have area more than 50 ha. The Landsat 7 ETM+ data were used for analysis of vegetation structure and spectral characteristics of wetlands. The masked isolated wetlands image was classified into 12 land cover classes using ISODATA unsupervised classification. The attribution of unsupervised classification results allowed us to clearly recognize 7 types of wetlands: tall, low and sparse ryams (Pine-Shrub-Sphagnum community), open wetlands with shrub, moss or sedge cover, and open water objects. Analysis of spectral profiles for all classes has shown that Landsat spectral bands 4 and 5 have higher variability. These bands allow to separate wetland classed definitely. Accuracy assessment of isolated wetland map shows a good agreement with expert field data. The work was supported by grants ISTC ? 4079.

  19. Dynamics in phosphorus retention in wetlands upstream of Delavan Lake, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robertson, Dale M.; Elder, John F.; Goddard, Gerald L.; James, William F.

    2009-01-01

    A phosphorus budget was constructed for Delavan Lake Inlet, a perennial riverine wetland with submersed and floating aquatic vegetation in southeastern Wisconsin, to better understand the phosphorus dynamics in natural wetlands and the role of wetlands in lake-rehabilitation efforts. During the growing season, the inlet served as a net source of phosphorus, primarily due to the release of phosphorus from the sediments. More phosphorus was released from the sediments of the inlet (600 kg) than was input from the upstream watershed (460 kg). This release was caused by high pH associated with high photosynthetic activity. During the remainder of the year, the inlet served as a net sink for phosphorus, retaining 6% of die phosphorus input from the watershed. Over the entire year, this wetland was a net source of over 500 kg of phosphorus to downstream Delavan Lake. A constructed riverine wetland upstream of Delavan Lake Inlet demonstrated a similar periodic release of phosphorus. However, in this case, the summer release of phosphorus was less than that trapped during the remainder of the year. The constructed wetland served as a net sink for approximately 20% of the input phosphorus on an annual time scale. The role of existing and constructed wetlands as phosphorus traps is complex. Wetlands can act as a source or a sink for phosphorus depending on the ambient conditions in die wetland. Howa wetland fits into a rehabilitation plan depends upon its net retention efficiency and the importance of the periodic releases of phosphorus to downstream waters.

  20. Pipeline corridors through wetlands - summary of seventeen plant-community studies at ten wetland crossings. Topical report, February 1990--August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyke, G.D. |; Shem, L.M.; Wilkey, P.L.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Alsum, S.K.

    1994-12-01

    As part of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program, Argonne National Laboratory conducted field studies on 10 wetland crossings located in six states to document impacts of natural gas pipeline rights-of-way (ROWS) on 15 wetland plant communities. This study is unique in the number, range, ages, and variety of wetland crossings surveyed and compared. Vegetation data and recorded observations were analyzed to reveal patterns associated with age, installation technology, maintenance practices, and wetland type. This report summarizes the findings of this study. Results revealed that ROWs of pipelines installed according to recent wetland regulations rapidly revegetated with dense and diverse plant communities. The ROW plant communities were similar to those in the adjacent natural areas in species richness, wetland indicator values, and percentages of native species. The ROW plant communities developed from naturally available propagules without fertilization, liming, or artificial seeding. ROWs contributed to increased habitat and plant species diversity in the wetland. There was little evidence that they degrade the wetland by providing avenues for the spread of invasive and normative plant species. Most impacts are temporal in nature, decreasing rapidly during the first several years and more slowly thereafter to the extent permitted by maintenance and other ROW activities.

  1. Pipeline corridors through wetlands - impacts on plant communities: Cassadaga Creek Tributary Crossing, Gerry Township, Chautauqua County, New York. Topical report, August 1992--November 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Shem, L.M.; Van Dyke, G.D.; Zimmerman, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipelines on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and right-of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents the results of a survey conducted over the period of August 3-4, 1992, at the Cassadaga wetlands crossing in Gerry Township, Chautauqua County, New York. The pipeline at this site was installed during February and March 1981. After completion of pipeline installation, the ROW was fertilized, mulched, and seeded with annual ryegrass. Two adjacent sites were surveyed in this study: a forested wetland and an emergent wetlands Eleven years after pipeline installation, the ROW at both sites supported diverse vegetative communities. Although devoid of large woody species, the ROW within the forested wetland had a dense vegetative cover. The ROW within the emergent wetland had a slightly less dense and more diverse vegetative community compared with that in the adjacent natural areas (NAs). The ROW within the emergent wetland also had a large number of introduced species that were not present in the adjacent NAs. The ROW, with its emergent marsh plant community, provided habitat diversity within the forested wetlands Because the ROW contained species not found within the adjacent NAs, overall species diversity was increased.

  2. Integrated wetland management: an analysis with group model building based on system dynamics model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin; Chang, Yang-Chi; Chen, Kung-Chen

    2014-12-15

    The wetland system possesses diverse functions such as preserving water sources, mediating flooding, providing habitats for wildlife and stabilizing coastlines. Nonetheless, rapid economic growth and the increasing population have significantly deteriorated the wetland environment. To secure the sustainability of the wetland, it is essential to introduce integrated and systematic management. This paper examines the resource management of the Jiading Wetland by applying group model building (GMB) and system dynamics (SD). We systematically identify local stakeholders' mental model regarding the impact brought by the yacht industry, and further establish a SD model to simulate the dynamic wetland environment. The GMB process improves the stakeholders' understanding about the interaction between the wetland environment and management policies. Differences between the stakeholders' perceptions and the behaviors shown by the SD model also suggest that our analysis would facilitate the stakeholders to broaden their horizons and achieve consensus on the wetland resource management. PMID:25194518

  3. EVALUATION OF WETLAND DEVELOPMENT AND WATERBIRD RESPONSE AT ELK CREEK WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA, LAKE MILLS, IOWA, 1961-1990

    EPA Science Inventory

    A waterfowl habitat development project involving 7.5 miles of stream was evaluated after 27 years. here was a modest 12% net increase in wetlands in impounded areas, but much of the wetland vegetation changed from seasonally flooded, nonpersistent and persistent emergents to sha...

  4. Assessing the diversity and composition of bacterial communities across a wetland, transition, upland gradient in Macon County Alabama

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wetlands provide essential functions to the ecosphere that range from water filtration to flood control. Current methods of evaluating the quality of wetlands include assessing vegetation, soil type, and period of inundation. With recent advances in molecular and bioinformatic techniques, measuremen...

  5. A multivariate assessment of changes in wetland habitat for waterbirds at Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge, Maine, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hierl, L.A.; Loftin, C.S.; Longcore, J.R.; McAuley, D.G.; Urban, D.L.

    2007-01-01

    We assessed changes in vegetative structure of 49 impoundments at Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge (MNWR), Maine, USA, between the periods 1984-1985 to 2002 with a multivariate, adaptive approach that may be useful in a variety of wetland and other habitat management situations. We used Mahalanobis Distance (MD) analysis to classify the refuge?s wetlands as poor or good waterbird habitat based on five variables: percent emergent vegetation, percent shrub, percent open water, relative richness of vegetative types, and an interspersion juxtaposition index that measures adjacency of vegetation patches. Mahalanobis Distance is a multivariate statistic that examines whether a particular data point is an outlier or a member of a data cluster while accounting for correlations among inputs. For each wetland, we used MD analysis to quantify a distance from a reference condition defined a priori by habitat conditions measured in MNWR wetlands used by waterbirds. Twenty-five wetlands declined in quality between the two periods, whereas 23 wetlands improved. We identified specific wetland characteristics that may be modified to improve habitat conditions for waterbirds. The MD analysis seems ideal for instituting an adaptive wetland management approach because metrics can be easily added or removed, ranges of target habitat conditions can be defined by field-collected data, and the analysis can identify priorities for single or multiple management objectives.

  6. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-print Network

    's new wetlands protection law instead con- tained a "grandfather clause" which declared that any project creation and restoration, as mitigation, had a very poor success record. Therefore the policy placed its

  7. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-print Network

    of mitigation for wetlands lost due to human distur- bance. Through much debate, the general con- sensus now- store a particular func- tion lost to a watershed by human disturbance. To that end, the place- ment Bay Managers Eye Recentl

  8. del Moral--Primary Successional Wetland--1 PREDICTABILITY OF PRIMARY SUCCESSIONAL WETLANDS ON PUMICE,

    E-print Network

    del Moral, Roger

    ON PUMICE, MOUNT ST. HELENS ROGER DEL MORAL Department of Botany, Box 355325, University of Washington. (1999) studied wetlands established after the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens on the Pumice Plain on pumice. Earlier studies on Mount St. Helens suggested that homogeneity increases as species expand from

  9. Channel, Floodplain, And Wetland Responses To Floods And Overbank Sedimentation, 1846-2006, Halfway Creek Marsh, Upper Mississippi Valley, Wisconsin

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conversion of upland forest and prairie vegetation to agricultural land uses, following Euro-American settlement in the Upper Mississippi River System, led to accelerated runoff and soil erosion that subsequently transformed channels, floodplains, and wetlands on bottomlands. Ha...

  10. Floodwaters Renew Zambia's Kafue Wetland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Not all floods are unwanted. Heavy rainfall in southern Africa between December 2003 and April 2004 provided central Zambia with floodwaters needed to support the diverse uses of water within the Kafue Flats area. The Kafue Flats are home to about one million people and provide a rich inland fishery, habitat for an array of unique wildlife, and the means for hydroelectricity production. The Flats falls between two dams: Upstream to the west (not visible here) is the Izhi-tezhi, and downstream (middle right of the images) is the Kafue Gorge dam. Since the construction of these dams, the flooded area has been reduced and the timing and intensity of the inundation has changed. During June 2004 an agreement was made with the hydroelectricity company to restore water releases from the dams according to a more natural flooding regime. These images from NASA's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) illustrate surface changes to the wetlands and other surfaces in central Zambia resulting from an unusually lengthy wet season. The Kafue Flats appear relatively dry on July 19, 2003 (upper images), with the Kafue River visible as a slender dark line that snakes from east to west on its way to join the Zambezi (visible in the lower right-hand corner). On July 21, 2004 (lower images), well into the dry season, much of the 6,500-square kilometer area of the Kafue Flats remains inundated. To the east of the Kafue Flats is Lusaka, the Zambian capital, visible as a pale area in the middle right of the picture, north of the river. In the upper portions of these images is the prominent roundish shape of the Lukanga Swamp, another important wetland.

    The images along the left are natural-color views from MISR's nadir camera, and the images along the right are angular composites in which red band data from MISR's 46o forward, nadir, and 46o backward viewing cameras is displayed as red, green and blue, respectively. In order to preserve brightness variations among the various cameras, the data from each camera were processed identically. Here, color changes indicate surface texture, and are influenced by terrain, vegetation structure, soil type and soil moisture content. Wet surfaces or areas with standing water appear blue in this display because sun glitter makes smooth, wet surfaces look brighter at the backward camera's view angle. Mostly the landscape appears somewhat purple, indicating that most of the surfaces scatter sunlight in both backward and forward directions. Areas that appear with a slight greenish hue can indicate sparce vegetation, since the nadir camera is more likely to sight the gaps between the trees or shrubs, and since vegetation is darker (in the red band) than the underlying soil surface. Areas which preferentially exhibit a red or pink hue correspond with wetland vegetation. The plateau of the Kafue National Park, to the west of Lukanga Swamp, appears brighter in 2004 compared with 2003, which indicates weaker absorption at the red band. Overall, the 2004 image exhibits a subtle blue hue (preference for forward-scattering) compared with 2003, which indicates overall surface changes that may be a result of enhanced surface wetness.

    The Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously and every 9 days views the entire globe between 82o north and 82o south latitude. These data products were generated from a portion of the imagery acquired during Terra orbits 19072 and 24421. The panels cover an area of 235 kilometers x 239 kilometers, and utilize data from blocks 100 to 103 within World Reference System-2 path 172.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  11. A method for detecting dewatering effects of underground mining activities on surface wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden-Wing, L.D.; Baldwin, J.R.; Webber, K.; Winstead, J.B.

    1999-07-01

    In 1996 US Energy/Kennecott Uranium Company initiated a large-scale, long-term monitoring program to document whether or not proposed uranium mining activities under Green Mountain in Central Wyoming would cause a groundwater draw-down resulting in changes in the existing riparian/wetland habitats. The monitoring program consisted of establishing 12 study drainages on Green Mountain and six control drainages on an adjacent but hydrologically isolated mountain not scheduled for mining. Baseline data were collected in 1996 and 1997 prior to the commencement of mining. For each drainage, breeding bird densities (birds/km) and richness (species/km), winter wild ungulate fecal pellet group densities (groups/km), small mammal densities (captures/trap night), and density and species composition of aquatic macro invertebrates were measured along permanent, marked transects within each riparian zone. In order to characterize the baseline vegetation and isolate the effects of livestock grazing, species composition, percent cover, production, and type boundary delineation of riparian vegetation were quantified within adjacent fenced and unfenced half-acre sample sites within each drainage. Baseline photographs were taken at permanent marked points from fixed angles at each of the sample sites. Piezometer holes were drilled at each monitoring site for measuring potential changes in ground water levels over time. If, during mining, water levels are found to drop significantly from baseline, a new study of wildlife and vegetative parameters would be conducted to determine whether or not significant decreases in wetland function or changes from baseline characteristics have occurred.

  12. Management practices and controls on methane emissions from sub-tropical wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLucia, Nicholas; Casa-Nova Gomez, Nuri; Bernacchi, Carl

    2015-04-01

    It is well documented that green house gas concentrations have risen at unequivocal rates since the industrial revolution but the disparity between anthropogenic sources and natural sources is uncertain. Wetlands are one example of a natural ecosystem that can be a substantial source or sink for methane (CH4) depending on any combination of climate conditions, natural and anthropogenic disturbances, or ecosystem perturbations. Due to strict anaerobic conditions required for CH4-generating microorganisms, natural wetlands are the main source for biogenic CH4. Although wetlands occupy less than 5% of total land surface area, they contribute approximately 20% of total CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. CH4 is one of the most damaging green house gases with current emission estimates ranging from 55 to 231 Tg CH4 yr-1. The processes regulating CH4 emissions are sensitive to land use and management practices of areas surrounding wetlands. Variation in adjacent vegetation or grazing intensity by livestock can, for example, alter CH4 fluxes from wetland soils by altering nutrient balance, carbon inputs and hydrology. Therefore, understanding how these changes will affect wetland source strength is essential to understand the impact of wetland management practices on the global climate system. In this study we quantify wetland methane fluxes from subtropical wetlands on a working cattle ranch in central Florida near Okeechobee Lake (27o10'52.04"N, 81o21'8.56"W). To determine differences in CH4 fluxes associated with land use and management, a replicated (n = 4) full factorial experiment was designed for wetlands where the surrounding vegetation was (1) grazed or un-grazed and (2) composed of native vegetation or improved pasture. Net exchange of CH4 and CO2 between the land surface and the atmosphere were sampled with a LICOR Li-7700 open path CH4 analyzer and Li-7500A open path CO2/H20 analyzer mounted in a 1-m3 static gas-exchange chamber. Our results showed and verified that CH4 emissions from subtropical wetlands were larger when high soil moisture was coupled with high temperatures. Grazing alone, does not appear to alter net ecosystem CH4 emissions from subtropical semi-native and improved wetlands. Pasture type is a stronger indicator of wetland methane potential. Wetlands embedded in improved pastures exhibited periods of increased methane emission that was particularly noticeable during the wet season (July- Nov). These results help quantify GHG emissions from subtropical wetlands under different management practices while demonstrating the differences in these fluxes based on the surrounding ecosystem.

  13. Coastal wetlands of Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldwin, Andrew H.; Kangas, Patrick J.; Megonigal, J. Patrick; Perry, Matthew C.; Whigham, Dennis F.; Batzer, Darold P., (Edited By)

    2012-01-01

    Wetlands are prominent landscapes throughout North America. The general characteristics of wetlands are controversial, thus there has not been a systematic assessment of different types of wetlands in different parts of North America, or a compendium of the threats to their conservation. Wetland Habitats of North America adopts a geographic and habitat approach, in which experts familiar with wetlands from across North America provide analyses and syntheses of their particular region of study. Addressing a broad audience of students, scientists, engineers, environmental managers, and policy makers, this book reviews recent, scientifically rigorous literature directly relevant to understanding, managing, protecting, and restoring wetland ecosystems of North America.

  14. Remote Sensing Monitoring of Tide Propagation Through Coastal Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wdowinski, S.; Hong, S.; Mulcan, A.; Brisco, B.

    2013-05-01

    Coastal wetlands including mangrove forests and saltwater marshes are considered among the most valuable ecosystems on earth, yet their existence is presently being threatened by climate change (sea-level rise) and human interference (e.g. infrastructure development). These fragile ecosystems depend on a continuous water and nutrient replenishment by ocean tidal flow. While ocean tides are well known and forecasted, tidal flow movements through coastal wetlands are poorly known due to the fact that vegetation resists the flow and delays both inland and seaward flow at rising and subsiding tide conditions, respectively. Thus far, most observations on tide propagation through coastal wetlands have been obtained from stage (water level) measurements within the vegetated tidal zone. These stage measurements possess high temporal resolution observations, but acquired at a limited number of measurement points. Wetland InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) observations provide a new complementary source of information for detecting tidal flow in coastal wetlands, by supplying high spatial resolution maps of water level changes between two SAR acquisition times. In this study, we use InSAR observations to detect surface water level changes in response to ocean tide propagation through the coastal Everglades' mangrove forests. Interferometric processing of the data show that the highest rate of water level changes occurs near channels, as the Shark Valley River (Fig 1., center of image). These high water level gradients reflect rapid horizontal flow into and from the channel during low and high tide conditions, respectively. The high spatial resolution wetland InSAR observations provide important constraints for detailed coastal wetland flow models. RADARSAT-2 interferogram of western south Florida showing tide-induced water level changes along the transition between the saltwater mangrove marsh in the southwest and freshwater swamp in the northeast.

  15. Sea Level Rise Modifies Biogeochemical Cycles in Winyah Bay, South Carolina Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, A. T.; Conner, W.; Rhew, R. C.; Suhre, D.; Wang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Rising sea level along the relatively flat southeastern US coastal plain significantly changes both vegetation composition and salinity of coastal wetlands, eventually modifying ecosystem functions and biogeochemical processes of these wetlands. We conducted a two-year study to evaluate the dynamics and relationships among aboveground productivity, greenhouse and halocarbon gas emissions, nutrients, and dissolved organic matter of a freshwater forested wetland, a salt-impacted and degraded forested wetland, and a salt marsh in Winyah Bay, South Carolina, representing the salinity gradient and the transition from freshwater forested wetland to salt marsh due to sea level rise. The degraded forested wetland had significantly lower above-ground productivity with annual stem growth of 102 g/m^2/yr and litterfall of 392 g/m^2/yr compared to the freshwater forested wetland (230 and 612 g/m^2/yr, respectively). High methane emission [> 50 mmol/m2/day, n = 4] was only observed in the freshwater-forested wetland but there was a strong smell of sulfide noticed in the salt marsh, suggesting that different redox processes control the decomposition of natural organic matter along the salinity gradient. In addition, the largest CHCl3 [209 × 183 nmol/m2/day, n = 4] emission was observed in the degraded forested wetland, but net CH3Cl [257 × 190 nmol/m2/day, n = 4] and CH3Br [28 × 20 nmol/m2/day, n = 4] emissions were only observed in the salt marsh, suggesting different mechanisms in response to salt intrusion at that sites. The highest DOC concentration (28 - 42 mg/L) in monthly water samples was found in degraded forest wetland, followed by the freshwater forested wetland (19 - 38 mg/L) and salt marsh (9 - 18 mg/L). Results demonstrate that the salt-impacted degraded wetland has unique biogeochemical cycles that differ from unaltered freshwater forested wetland and salt marsh.

  16. Wetland plant waxes from Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamalavage, A.; Magill, C. R.; Barboni, D.; Ashley, G. M.; Freeman, K. H.

    2013-12-01

    Olduvai Gorge, northern Tanzania, exposes a Plio-Pleistocene sedimentary record that includes lake and lake-margin sediments and fossil remains of ancient plants and early humans. There are rich paleontological and cultural records at Olduvai Gorge that include thousands of vertebrate fossils and stone tools. Previous studies of plant biomarkers in lake sediments from Olduvai Gorge reveal repeated, abrupt changes in landscape dominance by woodland or grassland vegetation during the early Pleistocene, about 1.8 million years ago. However, the reconstruction of wetland vegetation in the past is limited by a dearth of published lipid signatures for modern wetland species. Here, we present lipid and isotopic data for leaf tissues from eight modern plants (i.e., sedge and Typha species) living in wetlands near Olduvai Gorge. Trends in values for molecular and leaf ?13C and average chain length (ACL) of n-alkanes in plant tissues are similar to values for underlying soils. Compound-specific ?13C values for n-alkanes C25 to C33 range between -36.4 to -23.1‰ for C3 plants and -22.3 to -19.5‰ for C4 plants. Fractionation factors between leaf and lipids, ?29 and ?33, fall within the range reported in the literature, but they differ more widely within a single plant. For C3 plants, the average difference between ?29 and ?33 is 6.5 ‰, and the difference between ?29 and ?33 for C4 plants is less than 2‰. Both plant types show a parabolic relationship between chain length and ?13C values, in which C29 typically has the most depleted value, and typically shift by 3-5‰ between alkane homologs. This pattern has not been previously reported, and could be unique for sedge lipids. If so, these data help constrain the application of plant wax biomarkers from sedges for paleo-vegetation reconstruction in paleoclimate studies and at archaeological sites.

  17. Transfer of pesticides and copper in a stormwater wetland receiving contaminated runoff from a vineyard catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillard, E.; Babcsanyi, I.; Payraudeau, S.; Imfeld, G.

    2012-04-01

    Wetlands can collect contaminated runoff from urban and agricultural catchments, and have intrinsic physical, chemical and biological processes useful for mitigating pesticides. However, knowledge about the ability of wetlands to mitigate pesticide mixtures in runoff is currently very limited. Our results show that stormwater wetlands that primarily serve for flood protection can also be effective tools for reducing concentrations and loads of runoff-related pesticides. Concentrations and loads of 20 pesticides and degradation products, as well as copper were continuously recorded during the period of pesticide application (April to September 2009, 2010 and 2011) at the inlet, the outlet and in sediments of a stormwater wetland that collects runoff from a vineyard catchment. Removal rates of dissolved loads ranged from 39% (simazine) to 100% (cymoxanil, gluphosinate, kresoxim methyl and terbuthylazine). Dimethomorph, diuron, glyphosate and metalaxyl were more efficiently removed in spring than in summer. The calculation of sedimentation rates from discharge measurements and total suspended solids (TSS) values revealed that the wetland retained more than 77% of the input mass of suspended solids, underscoring the capability of the wetland to trap pesticide-laden particles. Only flufenoxuron was frequently detected in the wetland sediments. An inter-annual comparison showed that changes in the removal of aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA, a degradation product of glyphosate), isoxaben or simazine can be attributed mainly to the larger vegetation cover in 2010 compared to 2009. More than 80% of the copper load entering the wetland was retained in the sediments and the plants. Our results demonstrate that stormwater wetlands can efficiently remove pesticide mixtures and copper in agricultural runoff during critical periods of pesticide application. Nevertheless, fluctuations in the runoff regime, as well as the vegetation and hydrochemical characteristics affect the removal rate of individual pesticides and copper in stormwater wetlands. Therefore the use of stormwater wetlands as a management practice targeting pesticide and copper mitigation should not be conceived as a unique solution to treat pesticide runoff.

  18. Wetlands: crop freezes and land-use change in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marshall, C.H.; Pielke, R.A., Sr.; Steyaert, L.T.

    2003-01-01

    South Florida experienced a significant change in land usage during the twentieth century, including the conversion of natural wetlands into agricultural land for the cultivation of winter vegetable, sugar cane and citrus crops. This movement of agriculture from more northerly areas was intended partly to escape the risk of damaging winter freezes. Here we present evidence from a case study using a coupled atmosphere and land-surface computer-modelling system that suggests that the draining of wetlands may have inadvertently increased the frequency and severity of agriculturally damaging freezes in the south of Florida.  

  19. Association between wetland disturbance and biological attributes in floodplain wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chipps, S.R.; Hubbard, D.E.; Werlin, K.B.; Haugerud, N.J.; Powell, K.A.; Thompson, J.; Johnson, T.

    2006-01-01

    We quantified the influence of agricultural activities on environmental and biological conditions of floodplain wetlands in the upper Missouri River basin. Seasonally-flooded wetlands were characterized as low impact (non-disturbed) or high impact (disturbed) based on local land use. Biological data collected from these wetlands were used to develop a wetland condition index (WCI). Fourteen additional wetlands were sampled to evaluate the general condition of seasonally-flooded floodplain wetlands. Structural and functional attributes of macrophyte, algae, and macroinvertebrate communities were tested as candidate metrics for assessing biotic responses. The WCI we developed used six biological metrics to discriminate between disturbed and non-disturbed wetlands: 1) biomass of Culicidae larvae, 2) abundance of Chironomidae larvae, 3) macroinvertebrate diversity, 4) total number of plant species, 5) the proportion of exotic plant species, and 6) total number of sensitive diatom species. Disturbed wetlands had less taxa richness and species diversity and more exotic and nuisance (e.g., mosquitoes) species. Environmental differences between low and high impact wetlands included measures of total potassium, total phosphorus, total nitrogen, alkalinity, conductance, and sediment phosphorus concentration. Canonical analyses showed that WCI scores were weakly correlated (P = 0.057) with environmental variables in randomly selected wetlands. In addition, mean WCI score for random wetlands was higher than that for high impact wetlands, implying that floodplain wetlands were less impacted by the types of agricultural activities affecting high impact sites. Inter-year sampling of some wetlands revealed that WCI metrics were correlated in 2000 and 2001, implying that biological metrics provided useful indicators of disturbance in floodplain wetlands. ?? 2006, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  20. Microtopography enhances nitrogen cycling and removal in created mitigation wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolf, K.L.; Ahn, C.; Noe, G.B.

    2011-01-01

    Natural wetlands often have a heterogeneous soil surface topography, or microtopography (MT), that creates microsites of variable hydrology, vegetation, and soil biogeochemistry. Created mitigation wetlands are designed to mimic natural wetlands in structure and function, and recent mitigation projects have incorporated MT as one way to attain this goal. Microtopography may influence nitrogen (N) cycling in wetlands by providing adjacent areas of aerobic and anaerobic conditions and by increasing carbon storage, which together facilitate N cycling and removal. This study investigated three created wetlands in the Virginia Piedmont that incorporated disking-induced MT during construction. One site had paired disked and undisked plots, allowing an evaluation of the effects of this design feature on N flux rates. Microtopography was measured using conventional survey equipment along a 1-m circular transect and was described using two indices: tortuosity (T), describing soil surface roughness and relief, and limiting elevation difference (LD), describing soil surface relief. Ammonification, nitrification, and net N mineralization were determined with in situ incubation of modified ion-exchange resin cores and denitrification potential was determined using denitrification enzyme assay (DEA). Results demonstrated that disked plots had significantly greater LD than undisked plots one year after construction. Autogenic sources of MT (e.g. tussock-forming vegetation) in concert with variable hydrology and sedimentation maintained and in some cases enhanced MT in study wetlands. Tortuosity and LD values remained the same in one wetland when compared over a two-year period, suggesting a dynamic equilibrium of MT-forming and -eroding processes at play. Microtopography values also increased when comparing the original induced MT of a one-year old wetland with MT of older created wetlands (five and eight years old) with disking-induced MT, indicating that MT can increase by natural processes over time. When examined along a hydrologic gradient, LD increased with proximity to an overflow point as a result of differential sediment deposition and erosion during flood events. Nitrification increased with T and denitrification potential increased with LD, indicating that microtopographic heterogeneity enhances coupled N fluxes. The resulting N flux patterns may be explained by the increase in oxygen availability elicited by greater T (enhancing nitrification) and by the adjacent zones of aerobic and anaerobic conditions elicited by greater LD (enhancing coupled nitrification and denitrification potential). Findings of this study support the incorporation of MT into the design and regulatory evaluation of created wetlands in order to enhance N cycling and removal. ?? 2011.

  1. The Amenity Value of Wetlands 

    E-print Network

    Gao, Shan

    2010-07-14

    Wetlands provide recreation and cultural values including scenic views, aesthetics, open-spaces, and leisure opportunities to surrounding residents. This study applies a hedonic approach to estimate the impact of wetland ...

  2. North Atlantic Coastal Tidal Wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    The book chapter provides college instructors, researchers, graduate and advanced undergraduate students, and environmental consultants interested in wetlands with foundation information on the ecology and conservation concerns of North Atlantic coastal wetlands. The book c...

  3. Trapping carbon in small ponds and wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinton, J. N.; Ockenden, M. C.; Deasy, C.; Favaretto, N.

    2012-04-01

    There is no doubt that carbon (C) is on the move. Recent estimates have suggested that the global sediment flux in agricultural landscapes due to water and tillage erosion is 35±10 Pg C y-1. Some of this C is oxidised and lost to the atmosphere, other material may be deposited and burried in colluvium and some may be delivered through both surface and subsurface flow paths to surface waters. In many agricultural landscapes these surface waters may take the form of small ponds and wetlands (field wetlands). In this paper we explore the potential of field wetlands to trap particulate C and influence the fate of dissolved organic carbon within the context of a small agricultural catchments in England. Since 2008 the mitigation options for phosphorus and sediment project (MOPS) has established ten monitored field wetlands across three catchments in the UK at Crake Trees, Cumbria (silt soils, rainfall 1500 mm y-1), Whinton Hill Cumbria (sandy soils, rainfall 1200 mm y-1), Newton Rigg, Cumbria (Silt soils, rainfall c1200 mm y-1) and Loddington, Leicestershire (Clay soils, rainfall 650 mm y-1). Although originally designed to capture sediment and phosphorus, their potential for influencing catchment scale C dynamics is becoming apparent. The C contents of sediments from the three catchments are typically in the range of 1.8 - 3.0% at Crake Trees Catchment, 2.5 to 9% at Whinton Hill and 2.0 to 3.1 % at Crake Trees. At the high rainfall sites the wetlands trap upwards of 20 t y-1 of sediment equating to several hundred kilograms of C. There is also some evidence that the ponds and wetlands may influence DOC, with DOC concentrations falling from approximately 35 mg l-1 to 15 mg l-1 at the Whinton Hill site as water passes through a series of field wetlands. In this paper we will present data from the last two years of monitoring and consider the wider implications for C sequestration by ponds and wetlands in agricultural landscapes.

  4. Wetland selection by breeding and foraging black terns in the Prairie Pothole Region of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steen, Valerie A.; Powell, Abby N.

    2012-01-01

    We examined wetland selection by the Black Tern (Chlidonias niger), a species that breeds primarily in the prairie pothole region, has experienced population declines, and is difficult to manage because of low site fidelity. To characterize its selection of wetlands in this region, we surveyed 589 wetlands throughout North and South Dakota. We documented breeding at 5% and foraging at 17% of wetlands. We created predictive habitat models with a machine-learning algorithm, Random Forests, to explore the relative role of local wetland characteristics and those of the surrounding landscape and to evaluate which characteristics were important to predicting breeding versus foraging. We also examined area-dependent wetland selection while addressing the passive sampling bias by replacing occurrence of terns in the models with an index of density. Local wetland variables were more important than landscape variables in predictions of occurrence of breeding and foraging. Wetland size was more important to prediction of foraging than of breeding locations, while floating matted vegetation was more important to prediction of breeding than of foraging locations. The amount of seasonal wetland in the landscape was the only landscape variable important to prediction of both foraging and breeding. Models based on a density index indicated that wetland selection by foraging terns may be more area dependent than that by breeding terns. Our study provides some of the first evidence for differential breeding and foraging wetland selection by Black Terns and for a more limited role of landscape effects and area sensitivity than has been previously shown.

  5. Characterization of change in the Harike wetland, a Ramsar site in India, using landsat satellite data.

    PubMed

    Mabwoga, Samson Okongo; Thukral, Ashwani Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The increasing population in the developing countries has rendered wetlands vulnerable to land use changes. Remote sensing offers a rapid and efficient means of data acquisition of ecosystems in time and space. The present study was undertaken to identify changes in the Harike wetland, a Ramsar site in the state of Punjab, India; and identify causal factors, as well as vulnerable areas threatened from the land cover changes. Unsupervised classification and post-classification change detection techniques were applied to Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) data of 16-10-1989, 22-10-2000 and 26-10-2010. Images were classified into five land cover classes (1) Waterbody, (2) Wetland I, (3) Wetland II, (4) Barren land and (5) Agricultural land. Land cover change is characterized mainly by a decrease in the wetland area, as indicated by decrease in wetland vegetation and an increase in non-wetland areas, characterized by increasing agricultural and barren land areas. Overall, the wetland shrunk by 13% from 1989 to 2010, with the north-eastern side experiencing maximum shrinkage. The wetland needs immediate reclamation to check it from further shrinkage so as to save its biodiversity. PMID:25332876

  6. Impact of municipal wastewater effluent on seed bank response and soils excavated from a wetland impoundment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finocchiaro, R.G.; Kremer, R.J.; Fredrickson, L.H.

    2009-01-01

    Intensive management of wetlands to improve wildlife habitat typically includes the manipulation of water depth, duration, and timing to promote desired vegetation communities. Increased societal, industrial, and agricultural demands for water may encourage the use of alternative sources such as wastewater effluents in managed wetlands. However, water quality is commonly overlooked as an influence on wetland soil seed banks and soils. In four separate greenhouse trials conducted over a 2-yr period, we examined the effects of municipal wastewater effluent (WWE) on vegetation of wetland seed banks and soils excavated from a wildlife management area in Missouri, USA. We used microcosms filled with one of two soil materials and irrigated with WWE, Missouri River water, or deionized water to simulate moist-soil conditions. Vegetation that germinated from the soil seed bank was allowed to grow in microcosms for approximately 100 d. Vegetative taxa richness, plant density, and biomass were significantly reduced in WWE-irrigated soil materials compared with other water sources. Salinity and sodicity rapidly increased in WWE-irrigated microcosms and probably was responsible for inhibiting germination or interfering with seedling development. Our results indicate that irrigation with WWE promoted saline-sodic soil conditions, which alters the vegetation community by inhibiting germination or seedling development. ?? 2009, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  7. NATIONAL WETLANDS INVENTORY (NWI) MAPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    National Wetland Inventory digital data files are records of wetlands location and classification as defined by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service. This data set is one of a series available in 7.5 minute by 7.5 minute blocks containing ground planimetric coordinates of wetlands p...

  8. Developing a New Wetland Habitat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard, Rosalie

    2006-01-01

    This article features a project at Ohio's Miami Valley Career Technology Center (MVCTC) which has made a real difference in the wetland environment on campus. The goals of the wetland project were to replace a poorly functioning tile system and develop two wetland areas for local and migratory wildlife. The environmental/natural resources students…

  9. Potential of constructed wetland systems for treating tannery industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kaseva, Mengiseny E; Mbuligwe, Stephen E

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on findings of a study on the performance of two units of a Horizontal Sub-Surface Flow Constructed Wetland (HSSFCW) units in treating wastewater effluent from a tannery industry. One of the HSSFCW units was planted with macrophytes, while the other was used as a control (without plants). Wastewater was fed into the wetland units at the mean flow rate of 0.045+/-0.005 m(3)/day. The studied parameters were chromium, turbidity, salinity, Total Dissolved Solids (TDS), Electric Conductivity (EC), pH and temperature. The mean Hydraulic Retention Time (HRT) was 1.60 days (in the control) and 1.80 days (in the vegetated) units, obtained as a ratio of the volume of the wastewater and the volumetric flow rate of wastewater through the units while taking into consideration the porosity of the media. The vegetated HSSFCW exhibited higher chromium removal efficiency (99.83%), than the control unit with the removal efficiency of 92.53%. High chromium removal was associated with both high temperature as well as high pH values in the HSSFCW units. The reduction in turbidity was found to be 71% in the vegetated wetland unit while the corresponding value for the control unit was 66%. Results obtained indicated low reduction efficiencies of both EC (0.3% in the vegetated unit and 1.6% in the control unit) and salinity (11% in the vegetated unit and 22% in the control unit) in the two mesocosms. Generally, however, the study demonstrated that constructed wetlands can be used as an option for improving the quality of tannery effluents especially in the removal of chromium. Chromium removal might have been effected by, among others, gravitational settling of solids and formation of co-precipitation with insoluble compounds as well as adsorption on the substrates and plant surfaces. PMID:20182085

  10. Amphipod densities and indices of wetland quality across the upper-Midwest, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anteau, M.J.; Afton, A.D.

    2008-01-01

    Nutritional, behavioral, and diet data for lesser scaup (Aythya affinis [Eyton, 1838]) indicates that there has been a decrease in amphipod (Gammarus lacustris [G. O. Sars, 1863] and Hyalella azteca [Saussure, 1858]) density and wetland quality throughout the upper-Midwest, USA. Accordingly, we estimated densities of Gammarus and Hyalella in six eco-physiographic regions of Iowa, Minnesota, and North Dakota; 356 randomly selected semipermanent and permanent wetlands were sampled during springs 2004 and 2005. We also examined indices of wetland quality (e.g., turbidity, fish communities, aquatic vegetation) among regions in a random subset of these wetlands (n = 267). Gammarus and Hyalella were present in 19% and 54% of wetlands sampled, respectively. Gammarus and Hyalella densities in North Dakota were higher than those in Iowa and Minnesota. Although historical data are limited, our regional mean (1 to 12 m-3) amphipod densities (Gammarus + Hyalella) were markedly lower than any of the historical density estimates. Fish, important predators of amphipods, occurred in 31%-45% of wetlands in North Dakota, 84% of wetlands in the Red River Valley, and 74%-84% of wetlands in Iowa and Minnesota. Turbidity in wetlands of Minnesota Morainal (4.0 NTU geometric mean) and Red River Valley (6.1 NTU) regions appeared low relative to that of the rest of the upper-Midwest (13.2-17.5 NTU). We conclude that observed estimates of amphipods, fish, and turbidity are consistent with low wetland quality, which has resulted in lower food availability for various wildlife species, especially lesser scaup, which use these wetlands in the upper-Midwest. ?? 2008, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  11. Estuarine Vegetation at Rush Ranch Open Space Preserve, San Francisco Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Rush Ranch Open Space Preserve (Rush Ranch) includes the largest remaining undiked tidal wetland within the Suisun Marsh region of the San Francisco Estuary. The brackish tidal wetlands grade into transitional vegetation and undeveloped grasslands of the Potrero Hills. We present analysis of ...

  12. Warmer temperature accelerates methane emissions from the Zoige wetland on the Tibetan Plateau without changing methanogenic community composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Mengmeng; Ma, Anzhou; Qi, Hongyan; Zhuang, Xuliang; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Zhao, Guohui

    2015-06-01

    Zoige wetland, locating on the Tibet Plateau, accounts for 6.2% of organic carbon storage in China. However, the fate of the organic carbon storage in the Zoige wetland remains poorly understood despite the Tibetan Plateau is very sensitive to global climate change. As methane is an important greenhouse gas and methanogenesis is the terminal step in the decomposition of organic matter, understanding how methane emissions from the Zoige wetland is fundamental to elucidate the carbon cycle in alpine wetlands responding to global warming. In this study, microcosms were performed to investigate the effects of temperature and vegetation on methane emissions and microbial processes in the Zoige wetland soil. A positive correlation was observed between temperature and methane emissions. However, temperature had no effect on the main methanogenic pathway—acetotrophic methanogenesis. Moreover, methanogenic community composition was not related to temperature, but was associated with vegetation, which was also involved in methane emissions. Taken together, these results indicate temperature increases methane emissions in alpine wetlands, while vegetation contributes significantly to methanogenic community composition and is associated with methane emissions. These findings suggest that in alpine wetlands temperature and vegetation act together to affect methane emissions, which furthers a global warming feedback loop.

  13. Warmer temperature accelerates methane emissions from the Zoige wetland on the Tibetan Plateau without changing methanogenic community composition.

    PubMed

    Cui, Mengmeng; Ma, Anzhou; Qi, Hongyan; Zhuang, Xuliang; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Zhao, Guohui

    2015-01-01

    Zoige wetland, locating on the Tibet Plateau, accounts for 6.2% of organic carbon storage in China. However, the fate of the organic carbon storage in the Zoige wetland remains poorly understood despite the Tibetan Plateau is very sensitive to global climate change. As methane is an important greenhouse gas and methanogenesis is the terminal step in the decomposition of organic matter, understanding how methane emissions from the Zoige wetland is fundamental to elucidate the carbon cycle in alpine wetlands responding to global warming. In this study, microcosms were performed to investigate the effects of temperature and vegetation on methane emissions and microbial processes in the Zoige wetland soil. A positive correlation was observed between temperature and methane emissions. However, temperature had no effect on the main methanogenic pathway--acetotrophic methanogenesis. Moreover, methanogenic community composition was not related to temperature, but was associated with vegetation, which was also involved in methane emissions. Taken together, these results indicate temperature increases methane emissions in alpine wetlands, while vegetation contributes significantly to methanogenic community composition and is associated with methane emissions. These findings suggest that in alpine wetlands temperature and vegetation act together to affect methane emissions, which furthers a global warming feedback loop. PMID:26109512

  14. Warmer temperature accelerates methane emissions from the Zoige wetland on the Tibetan Plateau without changing methanogenic community composition

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Mengmeng; Ma, Anzhou; Qi, Hongyan; Zhuang, Xuliang; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Zhao, Guohui

    2015-01-01

    Zoige wetland, locating on the Tibet Plateau, accounts for 6.2% of organic carbon storage in China. However, the fate of the organic carbon storage in the Zoige wetland remains poorly understood despite the Tibetan Plateau is very sensitive to global climate change. As methane is an important greenhouse gas and methanogenesis is the terminal step in the decomposition of organic matter, understanding how methane emissions from the Zoige wetland is fundamental to elucidate the carbon cycle in alpine wetlands responding to global warming. In this study, microcosms were performed to investigate the effects of temperature and vegetation on methane emissions and microbial processes in the Zoige wetland soil. A positive correlation was observed between temperature and methane emissions. However, temperature had no effect on the main methanogenic pathway—acetotrophic methanogenesis. Moreover, methanogenic community composition was not related to temperature, but was associated with vegetation, which was also involved in methane emissions. Taken together, these results indicate temperature increases methane emissions in alpine wetlands, while vegetation contributes significantly to methanogenic community composition and is associated with methane emissions. These findings suggest that in alpine wetlands temperature and vegetation act together to affect methane emissions, which furthers a global warming feedback loop. PMID:26109512

  15. Abrupt vegetation transitions characterise long-term Amazonian peatland development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roucoux, K. H.; Baker, T. R.; Gosling, W. D.; Honorio Coronado, E.; Jones, T. D.; Lahteenoja, O.; Lawson, I. T.

    2012-04-01

    Recent investigations of wetlands in western Amazonia have revealed the presence of extensive peatlands with peat deposits of up to 8 m-thick developing under a variety of vegetation types (Lähteenoja et al. 2012). Estimated to cover 150,000 km2 (Schulman et al. 1999), these peatlands make a valuable contribution to landscape and biological diversity and represent globally important carbon stores. In order to understand the processes leading to peat formation, and the sensitivity of these environments to future climatic change, it is necessary to understand their long-term history. The extent to which peatland vegetation changes over time, the stability of particular communities, the controls on transitions between vegetation types and how these factors relate to the accumulation of organic matter are not yet known. We report the first attempt to establish the long-term (millennial scale) vegetation history of a recently-described peatland site: Quistococha, a palm swamp, or aguajal, close to Iquitos in northern Peru. The vegetation is dominated by Mauritia flexuosa and Mauritiella armata and occupies a basin which is thought to be an abandoned channel of the River Amazon. We obtained a 4 m-long peat sequence from the deepest part of the basin. AMS-radiocarbon dating yielded a maximum age of 2,212 cal yr BP for the base of the peat, giving an average accumulation rate of 18 cm per century. Below the peat are 2 m of uniform, largely inorganic pale grey clays of lacustrine origin, which are underlain by an unknown thickness of inorganic sandy-silty clay of fluvial origin. Pollen analysis, carried out at c. 88-year intervals, shows the last 2,212 years to be characterised by the development of at least four distinct vegetation communities, with peat accumulating throughout. The main phases were: (1) Formation of Cyperaceae (sedge) fen coincident with peat initiation; (2) A short-lived phase of local Mauritia/Mauritiella development; (3) Development of mixed wet woodland with abundant Myrtaceae; (4) Expansion of Mauritia/Mauritiella palm swamp vegetation c. 1000 years ago representing establishment of the present day vegetation community. Our results show that the vegetation at this site has undergone continuous change throughout the period of peat formation. The sequence of vegetation development is not straightforward, being characterised by abrupt transitions between vegetation types and reversals in the apparent trajectory of change. Overall this suggests that the system is highly dynamic on centennial to millennial timescales. This complexity may reflect vegetation responses to a combination of external (physical) and internal (biological) drivers and the presence of thresholds in the system. Future investigations will work towards understanding the processes that drive these vegetation transitions and predicting peatland vegetation responses to future climatic change.

  16. Implications of hydrologic variability on the succession of plants in Great Lakes wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilcox, Douglas A.

    2004-01-01

    Primary succession of plant communities directed toward a climax is not a typical occurrence in wetlands because these ecological systems are inherently dependent on hydrology, and temporal hydrologic variability often causes reversals or setbacks in succession. Wetlands of the Great Lakes provide good examples for demonstrating the implications of hydrology in driving successional processes and for illustrating potential misinterpretations of apparent successional sequences. Most Great Lakes coastal wetlands follow cyclic patterns in which emergent communities are reduced in area or eliminated by high lake levels and then regenerated from the seed bank during low lake levels. Thus, succession never proceeds for long. Wetlands also develop in ridge and swale terrains in many large embayments of the Great Lakes. These formations contain sequences of wetlands of similar origin but different age that can be several thousand years old, with older wetlands always further from the lake. Analyses of plant communities across a sequence of wetlands at the south end of Lake Michigan showed an apparent successional pattern from submersed to floating to emergent plants as water depth decreased with wetland age. However, paleoecological analyses showed that the observed vegetation changes were driven largely by disturbances associated with increased human settlement in the area. Climate-induced hydrologic changes were also shown to have greater effects on plant-community change than autogenic processes. Other terms, such as zonation, maturation, fluctuations, continuum concept, functional guilds, centrifugal organization, pulse stability, and hump-back models provide additional means of describing organization and changes in vegetation; some of them overlap with succession in describing vegetation processes in Great Lakes wetlands, but each must be used in the proper context with regard to short- and long-term hydrologic variability.

  17. Constructed wetlands to control nonpoint-source pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Wengrzynek, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The use of land for agriculture, urban development, and recreational purposes results in pollution that has potential to contaminate groundwater, streams, lakes and oceans. Aquatic ecosystems can be damaged by even small amounts of pollutants in runoff during storms and by cumulative impacts of chronic, low levels of pollution. Nutrients, pesticides and sediments can have long term effects on the ecosystems. The instant invention using constructed wetlands has been particularly useful for purposes of protecting ecosystems from untoward effects of nonpoint source pollution. The construct, containing in hydraulic order a sediment basin, level-lip spreader, grassy filter, wetland, and deep pond can be used to remove pollutants from nonpoint source runoff. Wetlands are planted with vegetation that encourages growth of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, which are helpful in removing and detoxifying contaminants.

  18. Headwaters, Wetlands, and Wildfires: Utilizing Landsat imagery, GIS, and Statistical Models for Mapping Wetlands in Northern Colorado's Cache la Poudre Watershed in the aftermath of the June 2012 High Park Fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chignell, S.; Skach, S.; Kessenich, B.; Weimer, A.; Luizza, M.; Birtwistle, A.; Evangelista, P.; Laituri, M.; Young, N.

    2013-12-01

    The June 2012 High Park Fire burned over 87,000 acres of forest and 259 homes to the west of Fort Collins, CO. The fire has had dramatic impacts on forest ecosystems; of particular concern are its effects on the Cache la Poudre watershed, as the Poudre River is one of the most important headwaters of the Colorado Front Range, providing important ecosystem and economic services before flowing into the South Platte, which in turn flows into the Missouri River. Within a week of the fire, the area received several days of torrential rains. This precipitation--in conjunction with steep riverbanks and the loss of vegetation by fire--caused soil and ash runoff to be deposited into the Poudre's channel, resulting in a river of choking mud and black sludge. Monitoring the effects of such wildfires is critical and requires establishing immediate baseline data to assess impacts over time. Of particular concern is the region's wetlands, which not only provide habitat for a rich array of flora and fauna, but help regulate river discharge, improve water quality, and aid in carbon sequestration. However, the high expense of field work and the changing nature of wetlands have left many of the area's wetland maps incomplete and in need of updating. Utilizing Landsat 5 and Landsat 8 imagery, ancillary GIS layers, and boosted regression trees modeling, the NASA DEVELOP team based at the North Central Climate Science Center at Colorado State University developed a methodology for wetland modeling within the Cache la Poudre watershed. These efforts produced a preliminary model of predicted wetlands across the landscape that correctly classified 89% of the withheld validation points and had a kappa value of approximately 0.78. This initial model is currently being refined and validated using the USGS Software for Assisted Habitat Modeling (SAHM) to run multiple models within three elevation-based 'life zones.' The ultimate goal of this ongoing project is to provide important spatial data for land managers in the watershed, as well as an efficient, economical, and accurate wetland mapping methodology that can be reproduced throughout the intermountain west region.

  19. 488-D Ash Basin Vegetative Cover Treatibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Christopher; Marx, Don; Blake, John; Adriano, Domy; Koo, Bon-Jun; Czapka, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    The 488-D Ash Basin is an unlined containment basin that received ash and coal reject material from the operation of a powerhouse at the USDOE's Savannah River Site, SC. They pyretic nature of the coal rejects has resulted in the formation of acidic drainage (AD), which has contributed to groundwater deterioration and threatens biota in down gradient wetlands. Establishment of a vegetative cover was examined as a remedial alternative for reducing AD generation within this system by enhanced utilization of rainwater and subsequent non-point source water pollution control. The low nutrient content, high acidity, and high salinity of the basin material, however, was deleterious to plant survivability. As such, studies to identify suitable plant species and potential adaptations, and pretreatment techniques in the form of amendments, tilling, and/or chemical stabilization were needed. A randomized block design consisting of three subsurface treatments (blocks) and five duplicated surface amendments (treatments) was developed. One hundred inoculated pine trees were planted on each plot. Herbaceous species were also planted on half of the plots in duplicated 1-m2 beds. After two growing seasons, deep ripping, subsurface amendments and surface covers were shown to be essential for the successful establishment of vegetation on the basin. This is the final report of the study.

  20. 488-D Ash Basin Vegetative Cover Treatibility Study.

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Christopher; Marx, Don; Blake, John; Adriano, Domy; Koo, Bon-Jun; Czapka, Stephen.

    2003-01-01

    The 488-D Ash Basin is an unlined containment basin that received ash and coal reject material from the operation of a powerhouse at the USDOE's Savannah River Site, SC. They pyretic nature of the coal rejects has resulted in the formation of acidic drainage (AD), which has contributed to groundwater deterioration and threatens biota in down gradient wetlands. Establishment of a vegetative cover was examined as a remedial alternative for reducing AD generation within this system by enhanced utilization of rainwater and subsequent non-point source water pollution control. The low nutrient content, high acidity, and high salinity of the basin material, however, was deleterious to plant survivability. As such, studies to identify suitable plant species and potential adaptations, and pretreatment techniques in the form of amendments, tilling, and/or chemical stabilization were needed. A randomized block design consisting of three subsurface treatments (blocks) and five duplicated surface amendments (treatments) was developed. One hundred inoculated pine trees were planted on each plot. Herbaceous species were also planted on half of the plots in duplicated 1-m2 beds. After two growing seasons, deep ripping, subsurface amendments and surface covers were shown to be essential for the successful establishment of vegetation on the basin. This is the final report of the study.

  1. RIPARIAN BUFFER WIDTH, VEGETATIVE COVER, AND NITROGEN REMOVAL EFFECTIVENESS: A REVIEW OF CURRENT SCIENCE AND REGULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian zones, the vegetated region adjacent to streams and wetlands, are thought to be effective at intercepting and controlling nitrogen loads entering water bodies. Buffer width may be related to nitrogen removal efficiency by influencing nitrogen retention through plant seq...

  2. RIPARIAN BUFFER WIDTH, VEGETATIVE COVER, AND NITROGEN REMOVAL EFFECTIVENESS: A REVIEW OF CURRENT SCIENCE AND REGULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian zones, the vegetated region adjacent to streams and wetlands, are thought to be effective at intercepting and controlling nitrogen loads entering water bodies. Buffer width may be positively related to nitrogen removal efficiency by influencing nitrogen retention throug...

  3. Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu

    E-print Network

    Virginia Wetlands Report Center for Coastal Resources Management www.ccrm.vims.edu Volume 26, Issue 1 A Biannual Publication Focused on Virginia Wetland Issues and Training Spring 2011 The Center are established in the field. General Assembly Updates The Virginia GeneralAssembly passed a resolution during

  4. HYDROLOGIC REGIME CLASSIFICATION OF LAKE MICHIGAN COASTAL RIVERINE WETLANDS BASED ON WATERSHED CHARACTERISTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Classification of wetlands systems is needed not only to establish reference condition, but also to predict the relative sensitivity of different wetland classes. In the current study, we examined the potential for ecoregion- versus flow-based classification strategies to explain...

  5. IMPERVIOUS SURFACE AREA AND BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE RESPONSE AS INDEX OF IMPACT FROM URBANIZATION ON FRESHWATER WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of benthic macroinvertebrates to monitor water quality and ecological integrity is not as well established for wetlands as it is for rivers, streams and lakes where this form of biomonitoring is now a formalized procedure. he impact to wetlands from urbanization (as measu...

  6. Porewater chemistry in a treatment wetland: links to metal retention and release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadas, T. M.; Zhang, J.

    2011-12-01

    Constructed wetlands are gaining increased support for treatment of nonpoint source pollutants. A subsurface flow wetland treating runoff from an agricultural milkhouse floor and roof drainage has been monitored for metal removal. Influent dissolved concentrations from 5 to 30 ppb Cu and 60 to 800 ppb Zn were observed. Effluent concentrations of Zn were always lower from about 3 to 60 ppb Zn, however, Cu was typically around 10 ppb, and much larger at certain points in time, up to 95 ppb Cu. The results were similar in vegetated and non-vegetated wetlands, suggesting abiotic chemistry or microbial activity is controlling metal mobility. Porewater samples were taken using soil moisture lysimeters during both non-storm and storm events to examine metal and related chemistry with depth and distance in the wetland. Under non storm conditions, Cu and Zn average porewater concentrations were 64 and 250 ppb, respectively and did not vary much along the length of the wetland. During a storm event, Zn concentrations in the porewater initially increased near the inlet shortly after a storm, but typically decreased along the length and depth of the wetland to less than 60 ppb. Observed porewater Cu concentrations also increased near the inlet in some cases up to 700 ppb, but dropped rapidly with distance to less than 30 ppb near the middle of the wetland and increased again near the outlet. The dissolved Fe and Mn concentrations follow nearly opposite trends as Cu, increasing and then decreasing along the length of the wetland, suggesting possibly different roles in controlling Cu retention in each stage of the wetland, either co-precipitation with Cu initially, or reductive dissolution and release of Cu in later stages. An understanding of what controls metal retention and release is relevant to optimizing future design parameters of these wetlands.

  7. Estimating environmental conditions affecting protozoal pathogen removal in surface water wetland systems using a multi-scale, model-based approach.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Miles E; Hogan, Jennifer; Smith, Woutrina A; Oates, Stori C; Miller, Melissa A; Hardin, Dane; Shapiro, Karen; Los Huertos, Marc; Conrad, Patricia A; Dominik, Clare; Watson, Fred G R

    2014-09-15

    Cryptosporidium parvum, Giardia lamblia, and Toxoplasma gondii are waterborne protozoal pathogens distributed worldwide and empirical evidence suggests that wetlands reduce the concentrations of these pathogens under certain environmental conditions. The goal of this study was to evaluate how protozoal removal in surface water is affected by the water temperature, turbidity, salinity, and vegetation cover of wetlands in the Monterey Bay region of California. To examine how protozoal removal was affected by these environmental factors, we conducted observational experiments at three primary spatial scales: settling columns, recirculating wetland mesocosm tanks, and an experimental research wetland (Molera Wetland). Simultaneously, we developed a protozoal transport model for surface water to simulate the settling columns, the mesocosm tanks, and the Molera Wetland. With a high degree of uncertainty expected in the model predictions and field observations, we developed the model within a Bayesian statistical framework. We found protozoal removal increased when water flowed through vegetation, and with higher levels of turbidity, salinity, and temperature. Protozoal removal in surface water was maximized (~0.1 hour(-1)) when flowing through emergent vegetation at 2% cover, and with a vegetation contact time of ~30 minutes compared to the effects of temperature, salinity, and turbidity. Our studies revealed that an increase in vegetated wetland area, with water moving through vegetation, would likely improve regional water quality through the reduction of fecal protozoal pathogen loads. PMID:25016109

  8. Evidence for 20th century climate warming and wetland drying in the North American Prairie Pothole Region

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Brett A; Johnson, W Carter; Guntenspergen, Glenn R

    2013-01-01

    The Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of North America is a globally important resource that provides abundant and valuable ecosystem goods and services in the form of biodiversity, groundwater recharge, water purification, flood attenuation, and water and forage for agriculture. Numerous studies have found these wetlands, which number in the millions, to be highly sensitive to climate variability. Here, we compare wetland conditions between two 30-year periods (1946–1975; 1976–2005) using a hindcast simulation approach to determine if recent climate warming in the region has already resulted in changes in wetland condition. Simulations using the WETLANDSCAPE model show that 20th century climate change may have been sufficient to have a significant impact on wetland cover cycling. Modeled wetlands in the PPR's western Canadian prairies show the most dramatic effects: a recent trend toward shorter hydroperiods and less dynamic vegetation cycles, which already may have reduced the productivity of hundreds of wetland-dependent species. PMID:24223283

  9. Evidence for 20th century climate warming and wetland drying in the North American Prairie Pothole Region.

    PubMed

    Werner, Brett A; Johnson, W Carter; Guntenspergen, Glenn R

    2013-09-01

    The Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of North America is a globally important resource that provides abundant and valuable ecosystem goods and services in the form of biodiversity, groundwater recharge, water purification, flood attenuation, and water and forage for agriculture. Numerous studies have found these wetlands, which number in the millions, to be highly sensitive to climate variability. Here, we compare wetland conditions between two 30-year periods (1946-1975; 1976-2005) using a hindcast simulation approach to determine if recent climate warming in the region has already resulted in changes in wetland condition. Simulations using the WETLANDSCAPE model show that 20th century climate change may have been sufficient to have a significant impact on wetland cover cycling. Modeled wetlands in the PPR's western Canadian prairies show the most dramatic effects: a recent trend toward shorter hydroperiods and less dynamic vegetation cycles, which already may have reduced the productivity of hundreds of wetland-dependent species. PMID:24223283

  10. Evidence for 20th century climate warming and wetland drying in the North American Prairie Pothole Region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner, B.A.; Johnson, W. Carter; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.

    2013-01-01

    The Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of North America is a globally important resource that provides abundant and valuable ecosystem goods and services in the form of biodiversity, groundwater recharge, water purification, flood attenuation, and water and forage for agriculture. Numerous studies have found these wetlands, which number in the millions, to be highly sensitive to climate variability. Here, we compare wetland conditions between two 30-year periods (1946–1975; 1976–2005) using a hindcast simulation approach to determine if recent climate warming in the region has already resulted in changes in wetland condition. Simulations using the WETLANDSCAPE model show that 20th century climate change may have been sufficient to have a significant impact on wetland cover cycling. Modeled wetlands in the PPR's western Canadian prairies show the most dramatic effects: a recent trend toward shorter hydroperiods and less dynamic vegetation cycles, which already may have reduced the productivity of hundreds of wetland-dependent species.

  11. Estuarine wetland evolution including sea-level rise and infrastructure effects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Jose Fernando; Trivisonno, Franco; Rojas, Steven Sandi; Riccardi, Gerardo; Stenta, Hernan; Saco, Patricia Mabel

    2015-04-01

    Estuarine wetlands are an extremely valuable resource in terms of biotic diversity, flood attenuation, storm surge protection, groundwater recharge, filtering of surface flows and carbon sequestration. On a large scale the survival of these systems depends on the slope of the land and a balance between the rates of accretion and sea-level rise, but local man-made flow disturbances can have comparable effects. Climate change predictions for most of Australia include an accelerated sea level rise, which may challenge the survival of estuarine wetlands. Furthermore, coastal infrastructure poses an additional constraint on the adaptive capacity of these ecosystems. Numerical models are increasingly being used to assess wetland dynamics and to help manage some of these situations. We present results of a wetland evolution model that is based on computed values of hydroperiod and tidal range that drive vegetation preference. Our first application simulates the long term evolution of an Australian wetland heavily constricted by infrastructure that is undergoing the effects of predicted accelerated sea level rise. The wetland presents a vegetation zonation sequence mudflats - mangrove - saltmarsh from the seaward margin and up the topographic gradient but is also affected by compartmentalization due to internal road embankments and culverts that effectively attenuates tidal input to the upstream compartments. For this reason, the evolution model includes a 2D hydrodynamic module which is able to handle man-made flow controls and spatially varying roughness. It continually simulates tidal inputs into the wetland and computes annual values of hydroperiod and tidal range to update vegetation distribution based on preference to hydrodynamic conditions of the different vegetation types. It also computes soil accretion rates and updates roughness coefficient values according to evolving vegetation types. In order to explore in more detail the magnitude of flow attenuation due to roughness and its effects on the computation of tidal range and hydroperiod, we performed numerical experiments simulating floodplain flow on the side of a tidal creek using different roughness values. Even though the values of roughness that produce appreciable changes in hydroperiod and tidal range are relatively high, they are within the range expected for some of the wetland vegetation. Both applications of the model show that flow attenuation can play a major role in wetland hydrodynamics and that its effects must be considered when predicting wetland evolution under climate change scenarios, particularly in situations where existing infrastructure affects the flow.

  12. Tidal day organic and inorganic material flux of ponds in the Liberty Island freshwater tidal wetland.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Peggy W; Mayr, Shawn; Liu, Leji; Tang, Alison

    2015-01-01

    The loss of inorganic and organic material export and habitat produced by freshwater tidal wetlands is hypothesized to be an important contributing factor to the long-term decline in fishery production in San Francisco Estuary. However, due to the absence of freshwater tidal wetlands in the estuary, there is little information on the export of inorganic and organic carbon, nutrient or phytoplankton community biomass and the associated mechanisms. A single-day study was conducted to assess the potential contribution of two small vegetated ponds and one large open-water pond to the inorganic and organic material flux within the freshwater tidal wetland Liberty Island in San Francisco Estuary. The study consisted of an intensive tidal day (25.5 h) sampling program that measured the flux of inorganic and organic material at three ponds using continuous monitoring of flow, chlorophyll a, turbidity and salt combined with discrete measurements of phytoplankton community carbon, total and dissolved organic carbon and nutrient concentration at 1.5 h intervals. Vegetated ponds had greater material concentrations than the open water pond and, despite their small area, contributed up to 81% of the organic and 61% of the inorganic material flux of the wetland. Exchange between ponds was important to wetland flux. The small vegetated pond in the interior of the wetland contributed as much as 72-87% of the total organic carbon and chlorophyll a and 10% of the diatom flux of the wetland. Export of inorganic and organic material from the small vegetated ponds was facilitated by small-scale topography and tidal asymmetry that produced a 40% greater material export on ebb tide. The small vegetated ponds contrasted with the large open water pond, which imported 29-96% of the inorganic and 4-81% of the organic material into the wetland from the adjacent river. This study identified small vegetated ponds as an important source of inorganic and organic material to the wetland and the importance of small scale physical processes within ponds to material flux of the wetland. PMID:26090320

  13. REFINE WETLAND REGULATORY PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tribes will work toward refining a regulatory program by taking a draft wetland conservation code with permitting incorporated to TEB for review. Progress will then proceed in developing a permit tracking system that will track both Tribal and fee land sites within reservati...

  14. Gulf Coast Wetlands

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Wetlands of the Gulf Coast     View Larger ... highlights coastal areas of four states along the Gulf of Mexico: Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and part of the Florida panhandle. The ... date:  Oct 15, 2001 Images:  Gulf Coast location:  United States Gulf of ...

  15. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-print Network

    and the Virginia Marine Resources Commission. Permit decisions made at the federal level by the USArmy Corps publication of the Wetlands Program at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science of the College of William Institute of Marine Science, P.O. Box 1346, Gloucester Pt,VA23062 USA. Address corrections requested

  16. Wading into Wetlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braus, Judy, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    Ranger Rick's NatureScope is a creative education series dedicated to inspiring in children an understanding and appreciation of the natural world while developing the skills they will need to make responsible decisions about the environment. The topic of this issue is "Wading into Wetlands." Contents are organized into the following sections: (1)…

  17. The Virginia Wetlands Report

    E-print Network

    by 6-8 feet of fill and construction de- bris from a bridge expansion project. Stormwater runoff from and tours. Design & Construction Dr. Bill Roberts and Walter Priest of the Center's Wetlands Program were at the VIMS Boat Basin and a stormwater outfall from the Coleman Bridge (US 17) determined the project

  18. 7 CFR 12.33 - Use of wetland and converted wetland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... to farm such wetlands under natural conditions or as they did prior to December 23, 1985. However, no... of food, forage, or fiber and as long as such actions do not alter the hydrology of nearby wetlands... wetlands under this section means any natural wetland, farmed wetland, farmed-wetland pasture, or...

  19. Uranium Immobilization in Wetland Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, Peter R.; Koster van Groos, Paul G.; Li, Dien; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Seaman, John C.; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Scheckel, Kirk

    2014-05-01

    In wetlands, which are a major feature at the groundwater-surface water interface, plants deliver oxygen to the subsurface to keep root tissue aerobic. Some of this oxygen leaches into the rhizosphere where it will oxidize iron that typically precipitates on or near roots. Furthermore, plans provide carbon via root exudates and turnover, which in the presence of the iron oxides drives the activity of heterotrophic iron reducers in wetland soils. Oxidized iron is an important electron acceptor for many microbially-driven transformations, which can affect the fate and transport of several pollutants. It has been shown that heterotrophic iron reducing organisms, such as Geobacter sp., can reduce water soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). The goal of this study was to determine if and how iron cycling in the wetland rhizosphere affects uranium dynamics. For this purpose, we operated a series of small-scale wetland mesocosms in a greenhouse to simulate the discharge of uranium-contaminated groundwater to surface waters. The mesocosms were operated with two different Fe(II) loading rates, two plant types, and unplanted controls. The mesocosms contained zones of root exclusion to differentiate between the direct presence and absence of roots in the planted mesocosms. The mesocosms were operated for several month to get fully established, after which a U(VI) solution was fed for 80 days. The mesocosms were then sacrificed and analyzed for solid-associated chemical species, microbiological characterization, micro-X-ray florescence (µ-XRF) mapping of Fe and U on the root surface, and U speciation via X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES). Results showed that bacterial numbers including Geobacter sp., Fe(III), as well as total uranium, were highest on roots, followed by sediments near roots, and lowest in zones without much root influence. Results from the µ-XRF mapping on root surfaces indicated a strong spatial correlation between Fe and U. This correlation was stronger for the mesocosms with the higher Fe(II) load. Analysis via XANES showed that a fraction (up to ~1/3) of uranium was reduced to U(IV), for mesocosms operated under low iron loading, indicating that iron cycling in the rhizosphere also results in uranium reduction and immobilization. For mesocosms operating under the higher iron loading, the fraction of uranium immobilized as U(IV) was much lower, indicating that uranium co-precipitation with iron might have been the dominant immobilization process. In parallel to these mesocosm experiments, dialysis samplers have been deployed at the Savannah River National Laboratory near a creek with uranium contamination, to determine dissolved species, including Fe(II) and U(VI) in these wetland soils and their seasonal variability. The results show that there is a strong seasonal variability in dissolved iron and uranium, indicating a strong immobilization during the growing season, which is consistent with the mesocosm experimental results that the rhizosphere iron and uranium cycling are closely linked.

  20. Mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) development within microhabitats of an Iowa wetland.

    PubMed

    Mercer, David R; Sheeley, Sara L; Brown, Edward J

    2005-07-01

    Although they provide a number of valuable ecological services, wetlands also may harbor mosquitoes that are vectors of human pathogens. During 2002 and 2003, we measured biological (i.e., abundances of mosquitoes, other insects, and total heterotrophic bacteria, vegetational cover, and dead organic material), chemical (i.e., pH, dissolved nitrate, dissolved nitrite, dissolved phosphate, total alkalinity, and electrical conductivity), and physical (i.e., water temperature, dissolved oxygen, depth, and turbidity) attributes at fixed survey sites in Beaver Valley Wetlands, a small reconstructed palustrine wetland in Black Hawk County, Iowa. The number of immature mosquitoes was significantly correlated with dissolved nitrate and dissolved phosphate concentrations in both years. During the second year of the study, the number of immature mosquitoes was significantly correlated with nonpredators and water turbidity, but not with other measured variables. Independent variables explained 87 and 70% of the variability in mosquito numbers per survey site for the 2 yr of the study, respectively. The most common species of mosquitoes developing in Beaver Valley Wetlands were Aedes vexans (Meigen) Culex territans Walker, Uranotaenia sapphirina (Osten Sacken), and Culex tarsalis Coquillet. We compared relative risks of disease transmission by the mosquitoes developing in wetland microhabitats based upon published species-specific infection rates and propensities to bite humans. The majority of mosquitoes and the greatest potential disease risks were associated with temporary pools, which represented a small proportion of the wetlands. Although relatively few mosquitoes developed in Beaver Valley Wetlands, targeted control efforts could dramatically reduce the numbers of mosquitoes produced with minimal impacts upon nontarget species. PMID:16119560

  1. High Arctic Hillslope-Wetland Linkages: Types, Patterns and Importance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, K. L.; Abnizova, A.

    2012-12-01

    High Arctic wetlands are lush areas in an otherwise barren landscape. They help to store and replenish water and they serve as significant resting and breeding grounds for migratory birds. In addition, they provide rich grazing grounds for arctic fauna such as muskox and caribou. Arctic wetlands can be small, patchy grounds of wet vegetation or they can encompass large zones characterized by lakes, ponds, wet meadows, and, often times, they are inter-mixed with areas of dry ground. While seasonal snowmelt continues to remain the most critical source of water for recharging ponds, lakes, and meadows in these environments, less is known about the role of lateral inputs of water into low-lying wetlands, namely water flowing into these wetland ecosystems from adjacent hillslopes, which often surround them. This paper will review the different modes of hillslope runoff into both patchy and regional-scale wetlands including late-lying snowbeds, snow-filled creeks, and both small and large (>1st order) streams. It will draw upon field results from four arctic islands (Ellesmere, Cornwallis, Somerset and Bathurst Island) and a research period which spans from the mid'90s until present. Our study will evaluate seasonal and inter-seasonal patterns of snowmelt driven discharge (initiation, duration), timing, and magnitude of peak flows, in addition to stream response to rainfall and dry episodes. The impacts of these lateral water sources for a range of wetlands (ponds, wet meadows) will include an analysis of water level fluctuations (frequency, duration), shrinkage/expansion rates, and water quality. Finally, this study will surmise how these types of lateral hillslope inflows might shift in the future and suggest the impact of these changes on the sustainability of High Arctic wetland terrain.

  2. Phosphorus Dynamic in Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, H. K.

    2010-12-01

    The projected greater warming at higher/northern latitudes in the coming decades due to global climatic changes can mineralize substantial amount of the organic matter and supply massive amount of phosphorus (P) to the water column, and cause the collapse of freshwater wetlands. Thus, the rates and duration of organic matter accumulations/decompositions under rising global temperatures are critical determinants of how a freshwater wetland functions as an ecological unit within a landscape. Phosphorus is a limiting nutrient and a primary controller of eutrophication. Once the external P loads are curtailed, internal P regeneration, resulting from decompositions of detritus and soil/sediment organic matter determine the productivity, as well as the water quality of a wetland. Thus, global rise in temperature not only causes hydro-climatic fluctuations but can also change the composition of aquatic/semi-aquatic communities, in turn, could lead to adverse effect on human food chain to collapse of the ecosystem. While P enrichment may lead to immediate algal blooms in wetlands/aquatic systems, decreased in P input from external sources may not be able to stop the blooms for a considerable period of time depending on the P loading from within. The extent of P mineralization under changing conditions, enzymatic hydrolysis, and estimation of different P pools using 31P NMR in sediments and the water columns showed that the stability and bioavailability of P can greatly be influenced by rise in temperature and fluctuations in water level, thus, are crucial in determining the fate of the freshwater wetlands.

  3. Par Pond vegetation status Summer 1995 -- Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Riley, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    The water level of Par Pond was lowered approximately 20 feet in mid-1991 in order to protect downstream residents from possible dam failure suggested by subsidence on the downstream slope of the dam and to repair the dam. This lowering exposed both emergent and nonemergent macrophyte beds to drying conditions resulting in extensive losses. A survey of the newly emergent, shoreline aquatic plant communities of Par Pond began in June 1995, three months after the refilling of Par Pond to approximately 200 feet above mean sea level. These surveys continued in July, September, and late October, 1995. Communities similar to the pre-drawdown, Par Pond aquatic plant communities are becoming re-established. Emergent beds of maidencane, lotus, waterlily, and watershield are extensive and well developed. Cattail occurrence continued to increase during the summer, but large beds common to Par Pond prior to the drawdown have not formed. Estimates from SPOT HRV, remote sensing satellite data indicated that as much as 120 hectares of emergent wetlands vegetation may have been present along the Par Pond shoreline by early October, 1995. To track the continued development of macrophytes in Par Pond, future surveys throughout 1996 and 1997, along with the continued evaluation of satellite data to map the areal extent of the macrophyte beds of Par Pond, are planned.

  4. Heavy metal pollution in aquatic ecosystems and its phytoremediation using wetland plants: An ecosustainable approach

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, P.K.

    2008-07-01

    This review addresses the global problem of heavy metal pollution originating from increased industrialization and urbanization and its amelioration by using wetland plants both in a microcosm as well as natural/field condition. This review mentions salient features of wetland ecosystems, their vegetation component, and the pros and cons involved in heavy metal removal. Wetland plants are preferred over other bio-agents due to their low cost, frequent abundance in aquatic ecosystems, and easy handling. Constructed wetlands proved to be effective for the abatement of heavy metal pollution from acid mine drainage; landfill leachate; thermal power; and municipal, agricultural, refinery, and chlor-alkali effluent. the physicochemical properties of wetlands provide many positive attributes for remediating heavy metals. Typha, Phragmites, Eichhornia, Azolla, Lemna, and other aquatic macrophytes are some of the potent wetland plants for heavy metal removal. Biomass disposal problem and seasonal growth of aquatic macrophytes are some limitations in the transfer of phytoremediation technology from the laboratory to the field. However, the disposed biomass of macrophytes may be used for various fruitful applications. An ecosustainable model has been developed through the author's various works, which may ameliorate some of the limitations. The creation of more areas for phytoremediation may also aid in wetlands conservation. Genetic engineering and biodiversity prospecting of endangered wetland plants are important future prospects in this regard.

  5. Methane emission from natural wetlands: Global distribution, area, and environmental characteristics of sources

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, E.; Fung, I. )

    1987-03-01

    A global data base of wetlands at 1 degree resolution was developed from the integration of three independent global, digital sources: (1) vegetation, (2) soil properties and (3) fractional inundation in each 1 degree cell. The integration yielded a global distribution of wetland sites identified with in situ ecological and environmental characteristics. The wetland sites were classified into five major groups on the basis of environmental characteristics governing methane emissions. The global wetland area derived in this study is 5.3 trillion sq m, approximately twice the wetland area previously used in methane emission studies. Methane emission was calculated using methane fluxes for the major wetland groups, and simple assumptions about the duration of the methane production season. The annual methane emission from wetlands is about 110 Tg, well within the range of previous estimates. Tropical/subtropical peat-poor swamps from 20 degrees N to 30 degrees S account from 30% of the global wetland area and 25% of the total methane emission. About 60% of the total emission comes from peat-rich bogs concentrated from 50-70 degrees N, suggesting that the highly seasonal emission from these ecosystems is the major contributor to the large annual oscillations observed in atmospheric methane concentrations at these latitudes. 78 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Improved coastal wetland mapping using very-high 2-meter spatial resolution imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Matthew J.; Merton, Elizabeth J.; Muller-Karger, Frank E.

    2015-08-01

    Accurate wetland maps are a fundamental requirement for land use management and for wetland restoration planning. Several wetland map products are available today; most of them based on remote sensing images, but their different data sources and mapping methods lead to substantially different estimations of wetland location and extent. We used two very high-resolution (2 m) WorldView-2 satellite images and one (30 m) Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) image to assess wetland coverage in two coastal areas of Tampa Bay (Florida): Fort De Soto State Park and Weedon Island Preserve. An initial unsupervised classification derived from WorldView-2 was more accurate at identifying wetlands based on ground truth data collected in the field than the classification derived from Landsat 8 OLI (82% vs. 46% accuracy). The WorldView-2 data was then used to define the parameters of a simple and efficient decision tree with four nodes for a more exacting classification. The criteria for the decision tree were derived by extracting radiance spectra at 1500 separate pixels from the WorldView-2 data within field-validated regions. Results for both study areas showed high accuracy in both wetland (82% at Fort De Soto State Park, and 94% at Weedon Island Preserve) and non-wetland vegetation classes (90% and 83%, respectively). Historical, published land-use maps overestimate wetland surface cover by factors of 2-10 in the study areas. The proposed methods improve speed and efficiency of wetland map production, allow semi-annual monitoring through repeat satellite passes, and improve the accuracy and precision with which wetlands are identified.

  7. Nitrate fate and transport through current and former depressional wetlands in an agricultural landscape, Choptank Watershed, Maryland, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Denver, J.M.; Ator, S.W.; Lang, M.W.; Fisher, T.R.; Gustafson, A.B.; Fox, R.; Clune, J.W.; McCarty, G.W.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding local groundwater hydrology and geochemistry is critical for evaluating the effectiveness of wetlands at mitigating agricultural impacts on surface waters. The effectiveness of depressional wetlands at mitigating nitrate (NO3) transport from fertilized row crops, through groundwater, to local streams was examined in the watershed of the upper Choptank River, a tributary of Chesapeake Bay on the Atlantic Coastal Plain. Hydrologic, geochemical, and water quality data were collected from January of 2008 through December of 2009 from surface waters and networks of piezometers installed in and around current or former depressional wetlands of three major types along a gradient of anthropogenic alteration: (1) natural wetlands with native vegetation (i.e., forested); (2) prior-converted croplands, which are former wetlands located in cultivated fields; and (3) hydrologically restored wetlands, including one wetland restoration and one shallow water management area. These data were collected to estimate the orientation of groundwater flow paths and likely interactions of groundwater containing NO3 from agricultural sources with reducing conditions associated with wetlands of different types. Natural wetlands were found to have longer periods of soil saturation and reducing conditions conducive to denitrification compared to the other wetland types studied. Because natural wetlands are typically located in groundwater recharge areas along watershed divides, nitrogen (N) from nearby agriculture was not intercepted. However, these wetlands likely improve water quality in adjacent streams via dilution. Soil and geochemical conditions conducive to denitrification were also present in restored wetlands and prior-converted croplands, and substantial losses of agricultural NO3 were observed in groundwater flowing through these wetland sediments. However, delivery of NO3 from agricultural areas through groundwater to these wetlands resulting in opportunities for denitrification were limited, particularly where reducing conditions did not extend throughout the entire thickness of the surficial aquifer allowing NO3 to pass conservatively beneath a wetland along deeper groundwater flow paths. The complexity of N fate and transport associated with depressional wetlands complicates the understanding of their importance to water quality in adjacent streams. Although depressional wetlands often contribute low NO3 water to local streams, their effectiveness as landscape sinks, for N from adjacent agriculture varies with natural conditions, such as the thickness of the aquifer and the extent of reducing conditions. Measurement of such natural geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical conditions are therefore fundamental to understanding N mitigation in individual wetlands.

  8. Wetland survey of the X-10 Bethel Valley and Melton Valley groundwater operable units at Oak Ridge National Labortory Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Rosensteel, B.A.

    1996-03-01

    Executive Order 11990, Protection of Wetlands, (May 24, 1977) requires that federal agencies avoid, to the extent possible, adverse impacts associated with the destruction and modification of wetlands and that they avoid direct and indirect support of wetlands development when there is a practicable alternative. In accordance with Department of Energy (DOE) Regulations for Compliance with Floodplains and Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements (Subpart B, 10 CFR 1022.11), surveys for wetland presence or absence were conducted in both the Melton Valley and the Bethel Valley Groundwater Operable Units (GWOU) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) from October 1994 through September 1995. As required by the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act of 1992, wetlands were identified using the criteria and methods set forth in the Wetlands Delineation Manual (Army Corps of Engineers, 1987). Wetlands were identified during field surveys that examined and documented vegetation, soils, and hydrologic evidence. Most of the wetland boundary locations and wetland sizes are approximate. Boundaries of wetlands in Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 and on the former proposed site of the Advanced Neutron Source in the upper Melton Branch watershed were located by civil survey during previous wetland surveys; thus, the boundary locations and areal sizes in these areas are accurate. The wetlands were classified according to the system developed by Cowardin et al. (1979) for wetland and deepwater habitats of the United States. A total of 215 individual wetland areas ranging in size from 0.002 ha to 9.97 ha were identified in the Bethel Valley and Melton Valley GWOUs. The wetlands are classified as palustrine forested broad-leaved deciduous (PFO1), palustrine scrub-shrub broad-leaved deciduous (PSS1), and palustrine persistent emergent (PEM1).

  9. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Constructed Wetlands 

    E-print Network

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23

    A constructed wetland system for domestic wastewater treatment is designed to mimic the natural wetland treatment process of Mother Nature. This publication explains the treatment, design, operation and maintenance of constructed wetlands....

  10. 7 CFR 920.20 - Establishment and membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Body § 920.20 Establishment and membership. There is hereby established a Kiwifruit...

  11. 7 CFR 920.20 - Establishment and membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Body § 920.20 Establishment and membership. There is hereby established a Kiwifruit...

  12. 7 CFR 920.20 - Establishment and membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Body § 920.20 Establishment and membership. There is hereby established a Kiwifruit...

  13. 7 CFR 920.20 - Establishment and membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Body § 920.20 Establishment and membership. There is hereby established a Kiwifruit...

  14. 7 CFR 920.20 - Establishment and membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Body § 920.20 Establishment and membership. There is hereby established a Kiwifruit...

  15. 7 CFR 920.20 - Establishment and membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Body § 920...Establishment and membership. There is hereby established a Kiwifruit Administrative Committee consisting of...

  16. 7 CFR 920.20 - Establishment and membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Body § 920...Establishment and membership. There is hereby established a Kiwifruit Administrative Committee consisting of...

  17. 7 CFR 920.20 - Establishment and membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Body § 920...Establishment and membership. There is hereby established a Kiwifruit Administrative Committee consisting of 12...

  18. 7 CFR 920.20 - Establishment and membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Body § 920...Establishment and membership. There is hereby established a Kiwifruit Administrative Committee consisting of...

  19. 7 CFR 920.20 - Establishment and membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Administrative Body § 920...Establishment and membership. There is hereby established a Kiwifruit Administrative Committee consisting of...

  20. Role of wetlands in attenuation of storm surges using coastal circulation model (ADCIRC), Chesapeake Bay region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, Mithun; Ferreira, Celso; Lawler, Seth

    2014-05-01

    The Chesapeake Bay, Virginia is subject to storm surge from extreme weather events nearly year-round; from tropical storms and hurricanes during the summer and fall, (e.g., hurricanes Isabel [2003] and Sandy [2012]), and from nor'easters during the winter (e.g., winter storms Nemo and Saturn [2013]). Coastal wetlands can deliver acute fortification against incoming hurricane storm surges. Coastal wetlands and vegetation shape the hydrodynamics of storm surge events by retaining water and slowing the propagation of storm surge, acting as a natural barrier to flooding. Consequently, a precise scheme to quantify the effect of wetlands on coastal surge levels was also prerequisite. Two wetland sites were chosen in the Chesapeake Bay region for detailed cataloging of vegetation characteristics, including: height, stem diameter, and density. A framework was developed combining these wetlands characterizations with numerical simulations. Storms surges were calculated using Coastal circulation model (ADCIRC) coupled to a wave model (SWAN) forced by an asymmetric hurricane vortex model using an unstructured mesh (comprised of 1.8 million nodes) under a High Performance Computing environment. The Hurricane Boundary Layer (HBL) model was used to compute wind and pressure fields for historical tropical storms and for all of the synthetic storms. Wetlands were characterized in the coupled numerical models by bathymetric and frictional resistance. Multiple model simulations were performed using historical hurricane data and hypothetical storms to compare the predicted storm surge inundation resulting from various levels of wetlands expansion or reduction. The results of these simulations demonstrate the efficacy of wetlands in storm surge attenuation and also the outcome will scientifically support planning of wetlands restoration projects with multi-objective benefits for society.

  1. A synthesis of methane emissions from 71 northern, temperate, and subtropical wetlands.

    PubMed

    Turetsky, Merritt R; Kotowska, Agnieszka; Bubier, Jill; Dise, Nancy B; Crill, Patrick; Hornibrook, Ed R C; Minkkinen, Kari; Moore, Tim R; Myers-Smith, Isla H; Nykänen, Hannu; Olefeldt, David; Rinne, Janne; Saarnio, Sanna; Shurpali, Narasinha; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina; Waddington, J Michael; White, Jeffrey R; Wickland, Kimberly P; Wilmking, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Wetlands are the largest natural source of atmospheric methane. Here, we assess controls on methane flux using a database of approximately 19 000 instantaneous measurements from 71 wetland sites located across subtropical, temperate, and northern high latitude regions. Our analyses confirm general controls on wetland methane emissions from soil temperature, water table, and vegetation, but also show that these relationships are modified depending on wetland type (bog, fen, or swamp), region (subarctic to temperate), and disturbance. Fen methane flux was more sensitive to vegetation and less sensitive to temperature than bog or swamp fluxes. The optimal water table for methane flux was consistently below the peat surface in bogs, close to the peat surface in poor fens, and above the peat surface in rich fens. However, the largest flux in bogs occurred when dry 30-day averaged antecedent conditions were followed by wet conditions, while in fens and swamps, the largest flux occurred when both 30-day averaged antecedent and current conditions were wet. Drained wetlands exhibited distinct characteristics, e.g. the absence of large flux following wet and warm conditions, suggesting that the same functional relationships between methane flux and environmental conditions cannot be used across pristine and disturbed wetlands. Together, our results suggest that water table and temperature are dominant controls on methane flux in pristine bogs and swamps, while other processes, such as vascular transport in pristine fens, have the potential to partially override the effect of these controls in other wetland types. Because wetland types vary in methane emissions and have distinct controls, these ecosystems need to be considered separately to yield reliable estimates of global wetland methane release. PMID:24777536

  2. Connecting carbon and nitrogen storage in rural wetland soil to groundwater abstraction for urban water supply.

    PubMed

    Lewis, David Bruce; Feit, Sharon J

    2015-04-01

    We investigated whether groundwater abstraction for urban water supply diminishes the storage of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and organic matter in the soil of rural wetlands. Wetland soil organic matter (SOM) benefits air and water quality by sequestering large masses of C and N. Yet, the accumulation of wetland SOM depends on soil inundation, so we hypothesized that groundwater abstraction would diminish stocks of SOM, C, and N in wetland soils. Predictions of this hypothesis were tested in two types of subtropical, depressional-basin wetland: forested swamps and herbaceous-vegetation marshes. In west-central Florida, >650 ML groundwater day(-1) are abstracted for use primarily in the Tampa Bay metropolis. At higher abstraction volumes, water tables were lower and wetlands had shorter hydroperiods (less time inundated). In turn, wetlands with shorter hydroperiods had 50-60% less SOM, C, and N per kg soil. In swamps, SOM loss caused soil bulk density to double, so areal soil C and N storage per m(2) through 30.5 cm depth was diminished by 25-30% in short-hydroperiod swamps. In herbaceous-vegetation marshes, short hydroperiods caused a sharper decline in N than in C. Soil organic matter, C, and N pools were not correlated with soil texture or with wetland draining-reflooding frequency. Many years of shortened hydroperiod were probably required to diminish soil organic matter, C, and N pools by the magnitudes we observed. This diminution might have occurred decades ago, but could be maintained contemporarily by the failure each year of chronically drained soils to retain new organic matter inputs. In sum, our study attributes the contraction of hydroperiod and loss of soil organic matter, C, and N from rural wetlands to groundwater abstraction performed largely for urban water supply, revealing teleconnections between rural ecosystem change and urban resource demand. PMID:25394332

  3. Modeling spatial-temporal dynamics of global wetlands: comprehensive evaluation of a new sub-grid TOPMODEL parameterization and uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Zimmermann, N. E.; Poulter, B.

    2015-11-01

    Simulations of the spatial-temporal dynamics of wetlands are key to understanding the role of wetland biogeochemistry under past and future climate variability. Hydrologic inundation models, such as TOPMODEL, are based on a fundamental parameter known as the compound topographic index (CTI) and provide a computationally cost-efficient approach to simulate wetland dynamics at global scales. However, there remains large discrepancy in the implementations of TOPMODEL in land-surface models (LSMs) and thus their performance against observations. This study describes new improvements to TOPMODEL implementation and estimates of global wetland dynamics using the LPJ-wsl dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM), and quantifies uncertainties by comparing three digital elevation model products (HYDRO1k, GMTED, and HydroSHEDS) at different spatial resolution and accuracy on simulated inundation dynamics. In addition, we found that calibrating TOPMODEL with a benchmark wetland dataset can help to successfully delineate the seasonal and interannual variations of wetlands, as well as improve the spatial distribution of wetlands to be consistent with inventories. The HydroSHEDS DEM, using a river-basin scheme for aggregating the CTI, shows best accuracy for capturing the spatio-temporal dynamics of wetlands among the three DEM products. The estimate of global wetland potential/maximum is ∼ 10.3 Mkm2 (106 km2), with a mean annual maximum of ∼ 5.17 Mkm2 for 1980-2010. This study demonstrates the feasibility to capture spatial heterogeneity of inundation and to estimate seasonal and interannual variations in wetland by coupling a hydrological module in LSMs with appropriate benchmark datasets. It additionally highlights the importance of an adequate investigation of topographic indices for simulating global wetlands and shows the opportunity to converge wetland estimates across LSMs by identifying the uncertainty associated with existing wetland products.

  4. World's wetlands. [Ecology and productivity

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, R.

    1981-02-01

    The 70 million acres of wetlands represent a valuable US resource, providing spawning and nursery grounds for animals, productive areas for photosynthesis, cleansing water, and absorbing floods. Wetlands perform a valuable function in species diversification by nurturing vulnerable plants and animals. The formation of peat affects the carbon dioxide cycle by slowing the recycling of carbon dioxide. Research is needed to determine what will happen as development in the Arctic zones destroys peat and wetlands. (DCK)

  5. Restoration of Ailing Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Oswald J.

    2012-01-01

    It is widely held that humankind's destructive tendencies when exploiting natural resources leads to irreparable harm to the environment. Yet, this thinking runs counter to evidence that many ecological systems damaged by severe natural environmental disturbances (e.g., hurricanes) can restore themselves via processes of natural recovery. The emerging field of restoration ecology is capitalizing on the natural restorative tendencies of ecological systems to build a science of repairing the harm inflicted by humans on natural environment. Evidence for this, for example, comes from a new meta-analysis of 124 studies that synthesizes recovery of impacted wetlands worldwide. While it may take up to two human generations to see full recovery, there is promise, given human will, to restore many damaged wetlands worldwide. PMID:22291573

  6. Mud On the Move: Measuring Suspended Sediment Concentrations within Tidal Wetlands in the San Francisco Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callaway, J.; Ferner, M.; Lacy, J. R.; Schile, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    Supply of suspended sediment is critical for the development and sustainability of tidal wetlands. Suspended sediment concentration (SSC) is also a key parameter used in calibrating wetland accretion models, which aid in understanding restoration dynamics and projecting resilience to sea-level rise. Despite the importance of suspended sediment, few field studies have directly measured SSC within tidal wetlands, relying instead on measurements in adjacent waters or focusing on long-term rates of sediment accretion. We refined and tested a simple method for collecting SSC samples within wetlands on an incoming high tide, using siphon collectors. Bottles were positioned during low tide at set locations along transects extending away from either channels or the lower boundary of the vegetated wetland. This sampling protocol was developed collaboratively, with substantial input from local wetland managers and other stakeholders within the San Francisco Bay area and beyond. Simultaneously, we measured time series of SSC, water level, and tidal currents in the subtidal shallows, on the intertidal mudflats, and in two channels within the wetland. We observed significant sediment export during king tides in the wetland channels. Cumulative suspended sediment flux (SSF) over four days during the January 2014 king tides was approximately 10 tons/m of channel width, towards the bay. During neap tides SSF in the channels was directed landward but was lower in magnitude. Elevated velocities in the channels during ebb king tides suggest that resuspension within the channels, rather than erosion of the wetland, accounts for much of the bayward SSF. Within the wetland, SSC from the siphon samplers was highest at the bayward end of the cross-shore transects, indicating landward sediment flux. Taken together with long term accretion data which indicates sediment accumulation within the wetland, our results suggest that sediment is primarily supplied across the wetland-Bay interface, and exported from the wetland through tidal channels. These findings are relevant to the design and monitoring of restored wetlands, which frequently rely on transport through breaches for sediment supply. They also indicate the importance of accounting for sediment export as well as import in modeling the response of wetlands to sea-level rise.

  7. Managing Restored Wetlands in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to Reduce Methane Emissions and Increase Carbon Uptake Laurie Koteen, Sara Knox, Cove Sturtevant, Joseph Verfaillie, Jaclyn Hatala, Dennis Baldocchi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koteen, L. E.; Knox, S. H.; Sturtevant, C. S.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Matthes, J. H.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2013-12-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta of California is a region transformed by more than a century of agricultural practices. Beginning in the 19th century, substantial regions were first drained of water and then converted to cropland in order to take advantage of the area's rich peatland soils. In the intervening time period, soil oxidation and subsidence have led to huge peat losses of up to 10 m in some places, and river water now threatens to topple the levees that were erected to keep fields from flooding. Within this region, we have been monitoring greenhouse gas exchange of several agricultural sites, a degraded pasture, and two restored wetlands. Of these land use types, restoration of wetlands is of particular interest to Delta managers as these sites attain many of the region's most pressing ecological goals, including improved water quality, increased wildlife habitat, and soil accretion. In our current investigation, we hope to assess if wetland management activities can be implemented to achieve greenhouse gas management goals as well. While we find that the restored wetlands are able to take up and store a substantial amount of carbon via rapid growth rates, they also emit methane; a greenhouse gas 25 times more potent than CO¬2. We are currently in the process of implementing two management activities with the goals of reducing methane emissions and increasing carbon uptake. Evidence from the wetland literature indicates that periodic lowering of the water table below the soil surface can reduce wetland methane emissions by: 1. Reintroducing oxygen into the soil column. This both supports growth of the methanotrophic bacteria that consume methane produced in the anaerobic zones of the soil column, and suppresses the methanogens that produce it. 2. Re-oxidization of formerly reduced compounds in the soil, (i.e. NO3-, SO42-) which can serve as alternative terminal electron acceptors of the decomposition byproducts (i.e. H2 and acetate) that lead to methane formation. Under these conditions, it becomes more energetically favorable for alternative chemical transformations to occur in which CO2 and not CH4¬ is released. A second management activity would be implemented to see if wetland carbon uptake could be increased. As wetlands mature, perennial wetland vegetation often develops a significant thatch layer which can reduce photosynthesis of growing shoots by blocking radiation from leaf surfaces. Here we propose to remove the stalks of established vegetation. This would serve two goals: 1. Decomposing vegetation would be incorporated into the soil, leading to soil accretion, and 2. Thatch removal would liberate fledgling shoots, potentially increasing carbon uptake through subsequent seasons. A third investigation would compare CO2 and CH4 fluxes at an existing tower atop low salinity sediments with a new tower where site salinity is relatively high. This effort would inform new site selection efforts for wetland restoration projects. Sites located closer to the San Francisco Bay Area are tidally-influenced, and therefore have higher salinity than the impounded freshwater systems of our current study within the Delta region.

  8. An object-based approach to delineate wetlands across landscapes of varied disturbance with high spatial resolution satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mui, Amy; He, Yuhong; Weng, Qihao

    2015-11-01

    Mapping wetlands across both natural and human-altered landscapes is important for the management of these ecosystems. Though they are considered important landscape elements providing both ecological and socioeconomic benefits, accurate wetland inventories do not exist in many areas. In this study, a multi-scale geographic object-based image analysis (GEOBIA) approach was employed to segment three high spatial resolution images acquired over landscapes of varying heterogeneity due to human-disturbance to determine the robustness of this method to changing scene variability. Multispectral layers, a digital elevation layer, normalized-difference vegetation index (NDVI) layer, and a first-order texture layer were used to segment images across three segmentation scales with a focus on accurate delineation of wetland boundaries and wetland components. Each ancillary input layer contributed to improving segmentation at different scales. Wetlands were classified using a nearest neighbor approach across a relatively undisturbed park site and an agricultural site using GeoEye1 imagery, and an urban site using WorldView2 data. Successful wetland classification was achieved across all study sites with an accuracy above 80%, though results suggest that overall a higher degree of landscape heterogeneity may negatively affect both segmentation and classification. The agricultural site suffered from the greatest amount of over and under segmentation, and lowest map accuracy (kappa: 0.78) which was partially attributed to confusion among a greater proportion of mixed vegetated classes from both wetlands and uplands. Accuracy of individual wetland classes based on the Canadian Wetland Classification system varied between each site, with kappa values ranging from 0.64 for the swamp class and 0.89 for the marsh class. This research developed a unique approach to mapping wetlands of various degrees of disturbance using GEOBIA, which can be applied to study other wetlands of similar settings.

  9. Application of wetland valuation techniques: Examples from Great Lakes Coastal wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Amacher, G.S.; Brazee, R.J.; Bulkley, J.W.; Moll, R.A.

    1989-04-01

    Proper wetland valuation procedures have not been applied in the past to Michigan's coastal wetlands. Previous valuation studies fail to value individual wetland ecological functions and use improper techniques to derive wetland values. The results of previous studies hence undervalue Michigan wetlands. This report uses existing Michigan wetland data and proper economic methods to illustrate the utilization of proper economic methods to value recreational fishing, commercial, fishing, and real-estate benefits for Lake St. Clair and Saginaw Bay wetlands.

  10. Using Bayesian Belief Networks to Explore the Effects of Nitrogen Inputs on Wetland Ecosystem Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, P. L.; Jordan, S. J.

    2011-12-01

    Increased reactive nitrogen (Nr) inputs to freshwater wetlands resulting from infrastructure development due to population growth along with intensive agricultural practices associated with food production can threaten regulating (i.e. climate change, water purification, and waste treatment) and supporting (i.e. nutrient cycling) ecosystem services. Wetlands generally respond both by sequestering Nr (i.e. soil accumulation and biomass assimilation) and converting Nr into inert gaseous forms via biogeochemical processes. It is important for wetlands to be efficient in removing excessive Nr inputs from polluted waters to reduce eutrophication in downstream receiving water bodies while producing negligible amounts of nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas, which results from incomplete denitrification. Wetlands receiving excessive Nr lose their ability to provide a constant balance between regulating water quality and mitigating climate change. The purpose of this study is to explore the effects of Nr inputs on ecosystem services provided by wetlands using a Bayesian Belief Network (BBN). The network was developed from established relationships between a variety of wetland function indicators and biogeochemical process associated with Nr removal. Empirical data for 34 freshwater wetlands were gathered from a comprehensive review of published peer-reviewed and gray literature. The BBN was trained using 30 wetlands (88% of the freshwater wetland case file) and tested using 4 wetlands (12% of the freshwater wetland case file). Sensitivity analysis suggested that Nr removal, water quality, soil Nr accumulation and N2O emissions had the greatest influence on ecosystem service tradeoffs. The magnitude of Nr inputs did not affect ecosystem services. The network implies that Nr removal efficiency has a greater influence on final ecosystem services associated with water quality impairment and atmospheric pollution. A very low error rate, which was based on 4 wetland cases, indicated that a larger dataset is required to provide robust predictions. These findings are considered preliminary and could change as the model is updated.

  11. [Diversity of plant in Jiaxing Shijiuyang ecological wetland for drinking water during operation].

    PubMed

    Shen, Ya-Qiang; Wei, Hong-Bin; Cheng, Wang-Da; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Wang, Wei-Dong; Yin, Cheng-Qing

    2011-10-01

    The Shijiuyang ecological wetland for drinking water of Jiaxing City, Zhejiang Province is one of the biggest constructed wetlands for water resource protection in China. To ensure a deep understanding of the present status of the wetland vegetation of Shijiuyang ecological wetland which has been run for 2.5 years and provide support for the vegetation management of ecological wetland, systematic investigation was carried out by using plot method and quadrat method in October to November, 2010. The species composition, dynamics of plant diversity and the biomass production during operation were analyzed. Altogether 70 species belonging to 28 families and 62 genera were recorded. Among them, there were 26 wetland plants, 20 mesophytes, 14 emergent, 4 submerged, 6 floating ones. Compared with the preliminary stage, the species numbers of wetland plants increased significantly from 15 species to 70 species. The spatial pattern of riparian species diversity was examined by adopting the Simpson index and Shannon-Wiener index as species diversity indices. The results showed that the riparian species diversity was higher in the west of the Beijiaohe river (Simpson index = 0.468 3, Shannon-Wiener index = 0.835 2) than that in the south of the Dongsheng Road (Simpson index = 0.357 6, Shannon-Wiener index = 0.660 4). The analyses of quantitative characteristics of wetland vegetation showed that the plants in the root-channel purification zone in the south of the Dongsheng Road grew better than those in the west of the Beijiaohe river. With regard to the riparian vegetation, the riparian plants in the west of the Beijiaohe river were more abundant. The mean biomass production (dry weight) in the root-channel purification zone was 1.73 kg x m(-2) and the total area was 9.12 x 10(4) m2, so the total biomass production was estimated to be 157.8 t. In the same way, the mean riparian vegetation biomass production(dry weight) was 0.83 kg x m(-2) and the total vegetation area was 3.75 x 10(4) m2, so the total riparian vegetation biomass production(dry weight) was estimated as 31.1 t. PMID:22279896

  12. WETLAND AND COASTAL HABITAT CONSERVATION AND RESTORATION MX 6475307

    EPA Science Inventory

    From the date of the project award to March 2009, the project team will coordinate the Wetland and Coastal Habitat Conservation and Restoration committee established by the Governors’ Action Plan of the Gulf of Mexico Alliance. A series of workshops will be held in the Gulf Stat...

  13. Temporal changes in wetland landscapes of a section of the St. Lawrence River, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, Martin; Bouchard, André

    1991-03-01

    Historical aerial photographs (from 1946 through 1983) were used to study and describe the nature and extent of changes in wetland vegetation of a section of the St. Lawrence River and to evaluate the relative importance of water level, fire, and vegetational development as causal factors of these historical changes. Data were encoded and analyzed using a geographical information system, autocorrelation, and Mantel tests. Results show three temporal patterns in wetland dynamics. First, some wetland zones have been reduced by human activities (urbanization, landfilling, canal dredging). The second group consists of wetland areas that remain stable and do not change over time. They are generally protected sites artificially maintained by water-level control. A third situation has occurred in the Lake Saint-François National Wildlife Area, where no significant wetland losses were detected, but where landscape structure has changed greatly. Modeling with Mantel tests suggests that, in the latter case, these changes in wetland landscape are related to the suppression of burning (fires set deliberately by Indians) since the purchase of the territory by the Canadian federal government. This situation has caused rapid replacement of wet meadows by Alnus rugosa scrub and a possible decline in habitat diversity.

  14. Alteration of soil microbial communities and water quality in restored wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bossio, D.A.; Fleck, J.A.; Scow, K.M.; Fujii, R.

    2006-01-01

    Land usage is a strong determinant of soil microbial community composition and activity, which in turn determine organic matter decomposition rates and decomposition products in soils. Microbial communities in permanently flooded wetlands, such as those created by wetland restoration on Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta islands in California, function under restricted aeration conditions that result in increasing anaerobiosis with depth. It was hypothesized that the change from agricultural management to permanently flooded wetland would alter microbial community composition, increase the amount and reactivity of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) compounds in Delta waters; and have a predominant impact on microbial communities as compared with the effects of other environmental factors including soil type and agricultural management. Based on phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, active microbial communities of the restored wetlands were changed significantly from those of the agricultural fields, and wetland microbial communities varied widely with soil depth. The relative abundance of monounsaturated fatty acids decreased with increasing soil depth in both wetland and agricultural profiles, whereas branched fatty acids were relatively more abundant at all soil depths in wetlands as compared to agricultural fields. Decomposition conditions were linked to DOC quantity and quality using fatty acid functional groups to conclude that restricted aeration conditions found in the wetlands were strongly related to production of reactive carbon compounds. But current vegetation may have had an equally important role in determining DOC quality in restored wetlands. In a larger scale analysis, that included data from wetland and agricultural sites on Delta islands and data from two previous studies from the Sacramento Valley, an aeration gradient was defined as the predominant determinant of active microbial communities across soil types and land usage. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Estimated ultraviolet radiation doses in wetlands in six national parks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diamond, S.A.; Trenham, P.C.; Adams, Michael J.; Hossack, B.R.; Knapp, R.A.; Stark, L.; Bradford, D.; Corn, P.S.; Czarnowski, K.; Brooks, P.D.; Fagre, D.B.; Breen, B.; Dentenbeck, N.E.; Tonnessen, K.

    2005-01-01

    Ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B, 280–320-nm wavelengths) doses were estimated for 1024 wetlands in six national parks: Acadia (Acadia), Glacier (Glacier), Great Smoky Mountains (Smoky), Olympic (Olympic), Rocky Mountain (Rocky), and Sequoia/Kings Canyon (Sequoia). Estimates were made using ground-based UV-B data (Brewer spectrophotometers), solar radiation models, GIS tools, field characterization of vegetative features, and quantification of DOC concentration and spectral absorbance. UV-B dose estimates were made for the summer solstice, at a depth of 1 cm in each wetland. The mean dose across all wetlands and parks was 19.3 W-h m?2 (range of 3.4–32.1 W-h m?2). The mean dose was lowest in Acadia (13.7 W-h m?2) and highest in Rocky (24.4 W-h m?2). Doses were significantly different among all parks. These wetland doses correspond to UV-B flux of 125.0 ?W cm?2 (range 21.4–194.7 ?W cm?2) based on a day length, averaged among all parks, of 15.5 h. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a key determinant of water-column UV-B flux, ranged from 0.6 (analytical detection limit) to 36.7 mg C L?1 over all wetlands and parks, and reduced potential maximal UV-B doses at 1-cm depth by 1%–87 %. DOC concentration, as well as its effect on dose, was lowest in Sequoia and highest in Acadia (DOC was equivalent in Acadia, Glacier, and Rocky). Landscape reduction of potential maximal UV-B doses ranged from zero to 77% and was lowest in Sequoia. These regional differences in UV-B wetland dose illustrate the importance of considering all aspects of exposure in evaluating the potential impact of UV-B on aquatic organisms.

  16. Ecological effects of pipeline construction through deciduous forested wetlands, Midland County, Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Zellmer, S.D. ); Rastorfer, J.R. . Dept. of Biological Sciences ANL Van Dyke, G.D. . Dept. of Biology)

    1991-07-01

    Implementation of recent federal and state regulations promulgated to protect wetlands makes information on effects of gas pipeline rights-of-way (ROWs) in wetlands essential to the gas pipeline industry. This study is designed to record vegetational changes induced by the construction of a large-diameter gas pipeline through deciduous forested wetlands. Two second-growth forested wetland sites mapped as Lenawee soils, one mature and one subjected to recent selective logging, were selected in Midland County, Michigan. Changes in the adjacent forest and successional development on the ROW are being documented. Cover-class estimates are being made for understory and ROW plant species using 1 {times}1-m quadrats. Counts are also being made for all woody species with stems < 2 cm in diameter at breast height (dbh) in the same plots used for cover-class estimates. Individual stem diameters and species counts are being recorded for all woody understory and overstory plants with stems {ge}2 cm dbh in 10 {times} 10-m plots. Although analyses of the data have not been completed, preliminary analyses indicate that some destruction of vegetation at the ROW forest edge may have been avoidable during pipeline construction. Rapid regrowth of many native wetland plant species on the ROW occurred because remnants of native vegetation and soil-bearing propagules of existing species survived on the ROW after pipeline construction and seeding operations. 91 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Critical Questions in Wetland Science

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wetlands are transitional between terrestrial and aquatic environments. As such, they perform important ecological functions (e.g., nutrient cycling, flood abatement) providing a variety of ecosystem services on which humans rely. Wetlands are also one of the world’s most e...

  18. Burned Wetland Near Tebicuary River

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In the rangelands of southern Paraguay, wetlands are burned to encourage new growth for cattle grazing. The burned wetland grasses are in the Family Poaceae (Gramineae), and may be in one of these genera: Panicum, Paspalum, Pennisetum, Tripogon. The Ñeembucú Region is typified by exten...

  19. INDIAN RIVER LAGOON WETLANDS INITIATIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Indian River Wetlands Initiative is a broad research effort to compare the effects of various restoration and management strategies on a variety of wetland functions, flora, and fauna. It involves managing a selected group of impoundments under various management strategies ...

  20. Recognizing Wetlands An Informational Pamphlet

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    that are covered by water or have waterlogged soils for long periods during the growing season. Plants growing in wetlands are capable of living in saturated soil conditions for at least part of the growing season of the growing season for an area to be a wetland. Each characteristic is discussed below. However

  1. PERFORMANCE CRITERIA FOR WETLAND RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new publication from EPA Wetland Research Program called An Approach to Improving Decision Making in Wetland Restoration and Creation is a synthesis of five years of research done under the program. ach book chapter takes an aspect of the approach and develops it. undamentally,...

  2. WASTEWATER TREATMENT BY ARTIFICIAL WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies of artificial wetlands at Santee, California demonstrated the capacity of wetlands systems for integrated secondary and advanced treatment of municipal wastewaters. When receiving a blend of primary and secondary wastewaters at a blend ratio of 1:2 (6 cm per day: 12 cm pe...

  3. Wetland Losses and Human Impacts

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    Losses 53% in Lower US Most % Loss: See Handout! ·Arkansas = 91% ·California = 91% ·Iowa = 89% ·Ohio = 90 on Wetlands Levees and Channelization Flood Control­Ironic! Navigation & Transportation ·Prevent Overbank Flow ·Drain Adjacent Landscape Quickly Flood Control Acts 1928­68 Effects? Human Influences on Wetlands

  4. Wetland Losses and Human Impacts

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    State Legislation State Wetland Losses 53% in Lower US Most % Loss: See Handout! ·Arkansas = 91 on Wetlands Levees and Channelization Flood Control­Ironic! Navigation & Transportation ·Prevent Overbank Flow ·Drain Adjacent Landscape Quickly Flood Control Acts 1928­68 Effects? MS River Levee 5X or 80

  5. Evaluation of the biotic potential of microorganisms and higher plants to enhance the quality of constructed wetlands. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mays, D.A.; Floyd, M.; Taylor, R.W.; Sistani, K.

    1998-09-30

    A project was carried out from October 1, 1991 through September 30, 1998 to evaluate the growth of several species of wetland plants in constructed cells using mine spoil as a growth medium, to evaluate microbial diversity and finally, to demonstrate the concept on an actual strip-mined site. In order to gain background information for evaluation of constructed wetlands, several wetlands on both undisturbed and strip-mined areas were evaluated to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of the substrates as well as the vegetation characteristics. The research phase of this projects consisted of 10 wetland cells each 7x16 m in size with the water depth varying from 0 to 40 cm. The substrates were allowed to stabilize over winter and each cell was planted in the spring of 1993 with 18 plants each of cattail, maidencance, soft stem bulrush and pickerel weed. All cells were thickly vegetated by the end of the first growing season.

  6. Evaluation of Surface Hydrological Connectivity Between a Forested Coastal Wetland and Regulated Waters of the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, D. D.; Wilcox, B. P.; Jacob, J. S.; Sipocz, A.; Munster, C.

    2008-12-01

    Rapid urbanization, industry, and agriculture have put enormous developmental pressure on coastal forested wetlands along the Texas coast. At least 97,000 acres of freshwater forested wetlands on the Texas coast have been lost since 1955, amid much larger losses of other coastal wetland types (TPWD-Texas Wetlands Conservation Plan, 1996). Some coastal wetlands are protected by federal regulations under the Clean Water Act in an effort to maintain wetland hydrological and ecological services, such as water quality improvement and flood control. However, federal protection of many important coastal wetlands is dependent upon documented proof of a hydrologic connection to federally protected Waters of the United States and reasonable influence on the quality of those waters. This study focuses on a 13 acre catchment of coastal flatwoods wetland with an ambiguous legal status because of a possible , but undocumented, hydrologic connection to regulated Waters of the United States. Documentation of the hydrologic connectivity of this type of wetland is critical because of the geographic extent of similar wetlands and their contributions to water quality. The objective of the study was to determine if a hydrologic connection exists, and if so, to quantify the strength of the connection. A surface connection was established based on runoff and rainfall data collected since April of 2005, with the wetland discharging surface water directly into an adjacent protected wetland. The connection was weak during dry years, but in years with average rainfall, surface runoff accounted for a much more significant portion of the water budget. These results suggest that runoff water from similar wetlands contributes directly to protected wetland waters, and may influence water quality downstream.

  7. Hydrology and hydraulics of treatment wetlands constructed on drained peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postila, Heini; Ronkanen, Anna-Kaisa; Kløve, Bjørn

    2013-04-01

    Treatment wetlands are globally used for wastewater purification purposes. In Finland, these wetlands are commonly peatland-based and are used to treat runoff from peat extraction sites and peatland forestry. Wetlands are also used for polishing municipal wastewaters and mining waters. In peat extraction the structures are usually called overland flow areas (OFAs), which are traditionally established on pristine peatlands. However, nowadays establishing of new peat extraction sites is guided to drained peatland areas due to the Finnish Peat Use Strategy, which leads difficulties to find undisturbed peatland area for OFA. Therefore treatment wetlands have had to construct also on drained peatland areas. In drained areas peat physical properties have changed due to oxidation and subsidence and the water flow pathways differs from OFAs flow patterns, which maybe have effect on purification results. Thus in the present study we aim to clarify the hydrology and hydraulic properties of treatment wetlands constructed on drained peatland areas. For this purposes, 20 treatment wetlands on drained peatland areas across Finland were detailed measured for peat hydraulic conductivity. In selected areas, runoff was continuously monitored, flow distribution at treatment areas was studied and water residence times measured with tracer tests using potassium iodide (KI). Generally, in the study areas, the ditches had been completely blocked, partly blocked e.g with peat dams or not blocked at all. The ditches were located partly parallel to the flow direction and partly perpendicular to it. The distribution of water to the wetlands has been implemented in many different ways e.g. by distribution ditch or by perforated pipes. Based on the results, in majority of the wetlands, the peat drainage has clearly affected the hydraulic properties of wetlands, but not on all sites. In more than half of the wetlands (12), the median hydraulic conductivity of peat drastically decreased at the depth below 20 cm (or 10 cm). Two site it decreased at the depth of 40 cm, and at five sites, it was high at all depth investigated (down to 60-70 cm). The outflow proportion to inflow varied from 20 % to 97 %, which means that the part of the water infiltrated into the groundwater. Evaporation can explain part of the observed reduced water flow especially in dense tree stands. More than half of the wetlands contained also dry areas, meaning that treatment wetlands constructed on drained area have problems with even water distribution to the wetland. Ditches are also potential preferential flow paths and the shortest observed residence time was less than one day, but a much longer residence time was also recorded. The water flow in these treatment wetlands consequently occur only at the surface layer (0-20 cm) of peat, not deeper, or in the ditches, which may have impact on water purification results.

  8. Climatic and hydrologic processes leading to wetland losses in Yellowstone National Park, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schook, Derek M.; Cooper, David J.

    2014-03-01

    Wetlands are vital habitats and can be used as landscape indicators because they integrate catchment-scale processes. Wetland drying during the recent decades in Yellowstone National Park's Northern Range has incited concern among National Park managers and the public at large. Our research was focused on developing an understanding of the processes controlling wetland water levels and the changes contributing to wetland decline in the Northern Range. We integrated analyses of hydrology, climate, soils, and vegetation. In 2009, 24 study wetlands were instrumented each with an average of five shallow groundwater monitoring well and piezometer nests. We mapped hydric soils, analyzed aerial photographs, and identified geomorphic indicators of higher water to quantify historic wetland area. The Trumpeter Lake study site was intensively studied to resolve watershed processes driving water table changes through time, and it was used to identify the timescale on which a regionally critical wetland varies. Climate data indicated that warming and drying occurred during the last century, but that this pattern was within the natural range of variation for the study region over the past 800 years, as determined from tree ring data. Hydrologic data revealed that study sites included locations of groundwater discharge, recharge, and flow-through as well as water perched above the regional water table. Hydrologic regimes were classified using a shape-magnitude framework and seven wetland classes were characterized, and the robustness of this classification is assessed using longer-term datasets. Aerial photographs and hydric soil delineation both confirmed formerly greater wetland abundance. Changes varied by wetland class and the presence or absence of surface water outlets. Wetland plant species inhabited distinct habitats of water table depth and variation, and can be used to infer subsurface hydrologic regime in the absence of extensive monitoring well networks. A subset of long-term monitoring wells has been instrumented with groundwater pressure transducers, enabling further understanding of wetland hydrologic processes, promoting additional assessment of the wetland classification, and aiding in identification of wetlands especially vulnerable to climate change.

  9. Biogeochemical factors which regulate the formation and fate of sulfide in wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Mark E.; Lyons, W. Berry; Gaudette, H. E.

    1992-01-01

    Coastal wetland areas occupy a small percentage of the terrestrial environment yet are extremely productive regions which support rapid rates of belowground bacterial activity. Wetlands appear to be significant as biogenic sources of gaseous sulfur, carbon, and nitrogen. These gases are important as tracers of man's activities, and they influence atmospheric chemistry. The interactions among wetland biogeochemical processes regulate the anaerobic production of reduced gases and influence the fate of these volatiles. Therefore, spatial and temporal variations in hydrology, salinity, temperature and specification, and growth of vegetation affect the type and magnitude of gas emissions thus hindering predictive estimates of gas flux. Our research is divided into two major components, the first is the biogeochemical characterization of a selected tidal wetland area in terms of factors likely to regulate sulfide flux; the second is a direct measurement of gaseous sulfur flux as related to changes in these biogeochemical conditions. Presently, we are near completion of phase one.

  10. Correlation between aircraft MSS and LIDAR remotely sensed data on a forested wetland in South Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, John R.; Hodgson, Michael E.; Mackey, Halkard E., Jr.; Krabill, William

    1987-01-01

    Wetlands in a portion of the Savannah River swamp forest, the Steel Creek Delta, were mapped using April 26, 1985 high-resolution aircraft multispectral scanner (MSS) data. Due to the complex spectral characteristics of the wetland vegetation, it was necessary to implement several techniques in the classification of the MSS imagery of the Steel Creek Delta. In particular, when performing unsupervised classification, an iterative cluster busting technique was used which simplified the cluster labeling process. In addition to the MSS data, light detecting and ranging (LIDAR) data were acquired by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) personnel along two flightlines over the Steel Creek Delta. These data were registered with the wetland classification map and correlated. Statistical analyses demonstrated that the laser derived canopy height information was significantly correlated with the Steel Creek Delta wetland classes encountered along the profiling transect of the LIDAR data.

  11. Louisiana wetland water level monitoring using retracked TOPEX/POSEIDON altimetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, H.; Shum, C.K.; Yi, Y.; Ibaraki, M.; Kim, J.-W.; Braun, Andreas; Kuo, C.-Y.; Lu, Zhiming

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies using satellite radar altimetry to observe inland river and wetland water level changes usually spatially average high-rate (10-Hz for TOPEX, 18-Hz for Envisat) measurements. Here we develop a technique to apply retracking of TOPEX waveforms by optimizing the estimated retracked gate positions using the Offset Center of Gravity retracker. This study, for the first time, utilizes stacking of retracked TOPEX data over Louisiana wetland and concludes that the water level observed by each of 10-Hz data with along-track sampling of ~660 m exhibit variations, indicating detection of wetland dynamics. After further validations using nearby river gauges, we conclude that TOPEX is capable of measuring accurate water level changes beneath heavy-vegetation canopy region (swamp forest), and that it revealed wetland dynamic flow characteristics along track with spatial scale of 660 m or longer. ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  12. Correlation between aircraft MSS and LIDAR remotely sensed data on a forested wetland in South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, J.R.; Hodgson, M.E.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.; Krabill, W.

    1987-01-01

    Wetlands in a portion of the Savannah River swamp forest, the Steel Creek Delta, were mapped using April 26, 1985 high-resolution aircraft multispectral scanner (MSS) data. Due to the complex spectral characteristics of the wetland vegetation, it was necessary to implement several techniques in the classification of the MSS imagery of the Steel Creek Delta. In particular, when performing unsupervised classification, an iterative ''cluster busting'' technique was used which simplified the cluster labeling process. In addition to the MSS data, light detecting and ranging (LIDAR) data were acquired by National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) personnel along two flightlines over the Steel Creek Delta. These data were registered with the wetland classification map and correlated. Statistical analyses demonstrated that the laser derived canopy height information was significantly correlated with the Steel Creek Delta wetland classes encountered along the profiling transect of the LIDAR data.

  13. 7 CFR 12.33 - Use of wetland and converted wetland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... continue to farm such wetlands under natural conditions or as they did prior to December 23, 1985. However... production of food, forage, or fiber and as long as such actions do not alter the hydrology of nearby... wetlands under this section means any natural wetland, farmed wetland, farmed-wetland pasture, or...

  14. Soil recovery across a chronosequence of restored wetlands in the Florida Everglades

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qibing; Li, Yuncong; Zhang, Min

    2015-01-01

    The restoration project in the Hole-in-the-Donut of Everglades National Park in Florida, USA is to reestablish native wetlands by complete removal of the invasive plants and the associated soil. However, there is little information available about changes in properties of the newly formed Marl soils in restored wetlands. In this study, we measured soil physicochemical properties, soil enzymatic activities, and stable isotopes of carbon (?13C) in plants and soil organic carbon (SOC) in an undisturbed natural wetland (UNW) and three wetlands restored respectively in 1989, 1996 and 1999 (WR89, WR96 and WR99). The older restored wetlands (WR89 and WR96) are characterized by greater SOC and mineral nitrogen. The values of soil dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities in the four wetlands follow the order: UNW?>?WR89?>?WR96?>?WR99, and are consistent with changes in vegetation coverage. The principal component analysis shows that dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities are the vital variables contributing to the soil of UNW. The similar ?13C values of SOC and plants in the restored wetlands suggest the formation of SOC during restoration is mainly derived from the associated plants. These results indicate that the newly restored soils develop toward the soil in the UNW with time since restoration. PMID:26621209

  15. Rapid assessment indicator of wetland integrity as an unintended predictor of avian diversity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stapanian, Martin A.; Waite, Thomas A.; Krzys, Gregory; Mack, John J.; Micacchion, Mick

    2004-01-01

    Rapid assessment of aquatic ecosystems has been widely implemented, sometimes without thorough evaluation of the robustness of rapid assessment metrics as indicators of ecological integrity. Here, we evaluate whether the Ohio Rapid Assessment Method (ORAM) for Wetlands Version 5.0 is a useful indicator of ecological integrity beyond its intended purpose. ORAM was developed to categorize natural wetlands for regulatory purposes and to contribute to the development of indicators of biotic integrity. It was never intended for use as an index of the quality of habitat for wetland birds. Nonetheless, it is conceivable that ORAM scores could serve as adequate predictors of avian diversity. We evaluated whether avian species richness in wetlands could be reliably predicted from each of the following variables: (1) total ORAM score, (2) total score minus the score for one metric that did not apply to all wetlands, and (3) sum of scores for the four ORAM components (of 16 scored) with the highest potential point total. These four components corresponded to aquatic vegetation communities, microtopography, modifications to natural hydrologic regime, and sources of water. All three variables were significant predictors of both total species richness and mean species richness of birds of conservation concern. Variable (3) was a significant predictor of mean species richness of wetland-dependent birds. Variable (2) was a weak predictor of both total and mean species richness of all birds combined. These results extend the robustness of ORAM as an indicator of the ecological integrity of wetlands.

  16. Soil recovery across a chronosequence of restored wetlands in the Florida Everglades.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qibing; Li, Yuncong; Zhang, Min

    2015-01-01

    The restoration project in the Hole-in-the-Donut of Everglades National Park in Florida, USA is to reestablish native wetlands by complete removal of the invasive plants and the associated soil. However, there is little information available about changes in properties of the newly formed Marl soils in restored wetlands. In this study, we measured soil physicochemical properties, soil enzymatic activities, and stable isotopes of carbon (?(13)C) in plants and soil organic carbon (SOC) in an undisturbed natural wetland (UNW) and three wetlands restored respectively in 1989, 1996 and 1999 (WR89, WR96 and WR99). The older restored wetlands (WR89 and WR96) are characterized by greater SOC and mineral nitrogen. The values of soil dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities in the four wetlands follow the order: UNW?>?WR89?>?WR96?>?WR99, and are consistent with changes in vegetation coverage. The principal component analysis shows that dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities are the vital variables contributing to the soil of UNW. The similar ?(13)C values of SOC and plants in the restored wetlands suggest the formation of SOC during restoration is mainly derived from the associated plants. These results indicate that the newly restored soils develop toward the soil in the UNW with time since restoration. PMID:26621209

  17. Study of natural wetlands associated with acid mine drainage. Final research report Jul 87-Dec 90

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, L.R.

    1990-12-01

    Thirty-five natural wetlands impacted by acid mine drainage (mostly in western PA) were surveyed for abiotic and biotic parameters in relation to water quality. Using treatment efficiency and area-adjusted mass retention as wetland performance indices, correlation analyses and multiple regression techniques were employed to evaluate the influence of the wetland parameters on the mitigation of pH, Fe, Mn, and Al. Elevation of pH was correlated with large, broad, low-flow wetlands with shallow, non-channelized surface water, inlet alkalinity, and dense populations of vascular plants and bryophytes. Moderate and high iron concentrations interfered with the mitigation of pH. High Fe treatment efficiencies were correlated to low flows, large areas, broad shapes, non-channelized flows, exposed locations, a diverse and dense vegetative cover, and inlet alkalinity. Large wetlands having lush vascular plant cover and receiving alkaline waters low in total iron concentrations were implicated in significant Mn treatment. Outlet Fe concentrations were usually in compliance in wetlands that significantly lowered Mn concentrations. Algae tolerate manganese but probably do not play an active role in its elimination. Reliable indices of wetland performance include area-adjusted mass retention (for pH) and treatment efficiency (for metals).

  18. A preliminary survey of the National Wetlands Inventory as mapped for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hampton, N.L.; Rope, R.C.; Glennon, J.M.; Moor, K.S.

    1995-02-01

    Approximately 135 areas within the boundaries of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) have been mapped as wetland habitat as part of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). A preliminary survey of these wetlands was conducted to examine their general characteristics and status, to provide an estimation of relative ecological importance, to identify additional information needed to complete ecological characterization of important INEL wetlands, and to identify high priority wetland areas on the INEL. The purpose of the survey was to provide information to support the preparation of the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER&WM) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Information characterizing general vegetation, hydrology, wildlife use, and archaeology was collected at 105 sample sites on the INEL. Sites representing NWI palustrine, lacustrine, and riverine wetlands (including manmade), and areas unmapped or unclassified by the NWI were included in the sample. The field information was used to develop a preliminary ranking of relative ecological importance for each wetland visited during this survey. Survey limitations are identified.

  19. Wetlands of Argonne National Laboratory-East DuPage County, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Van Lonkhuyzen, R.A.; LaGory, K.E.

    1994-03-01

    Jurisdictional wetlands of the Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) site in DuPage County, Illinois, were delineated in the summer and autumn of 1993 in accordance with the 1987 US Army Corps of Engineers methodology. Potential wetland sites with an area greater than 500 m{sup 2} (0.05 ha [0.124 acre]) were identified for delineation on the basis of aerial photographs, the DuPage County soil survey, and reconnaissance-level field studies. To qualify as a jurisdictional wetland, an area had to support a predominance of hydrophytic vegetation as well as have hydric soil and wetland hydrology. Thirty-five individual jurisdictional wetlands were delineated at ANL-E, totaling 180,604 m{sup 2} (18.1 ha [44.6 acres]). These wetlands were digitized onto the ANL-E site map for use in project planning. Characteristics of each wetland are presented -- including size, dominant plant species and their indicator status, hydrologic characteristics (including water source), and soil characteristics.

  20. South Florida wetlands ecosystem; biogeochemical processes in peat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orem, William; U.S. Geological Survey

    1996-01-01

    The South Florida wetlands ecosystem is an environment of great size and ecological diversity (figs. 1 and 2). The landscape diversity and subtropical setting of this ecosystem provide a habitat for an abundance of plants and wildlife, some of which are unique to South Florida. South Florida wetlands are currently in crisis, however, due to the combined effects of agriculture, urbanization, and nearly 100 years of water management. Serious problems facing this ecosystem include (1) phosphorus contamination producing nutrient enrichment, which is causing changes in the native vegetation, (2) methylmercury contamination of fish and other wildlife, which poses a potential threat to human health, (3) changes in the natural flow of water in the region, resulting in more frequent drying of wetlands, loss of organic soils, and a reduction in freshwater flow to Florida Bay, (4) hypersalinity, massive algal blooms, and seagrass loss in parts of Florida Bay, and (5) a decrease in wildlife populations, especially those of wading birds. This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) project focuses on the role of organic-rich sediments (peat) of South Florida wetlands in regulating the concentrations and impact of important chemical species in the environment. The cycling of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur in peat is an important factor in the regulation of water quality in the South Florida wetlands ecosystem. These elements are central to many of the contamination issues facing South Florida wetlands, such as nutrient enrichment, mercury toxicity, and loss of peat. Many important chemical and biological reactions occur in peat and control the fate of chemical species in wetlands. Wetland scientists often refer to these reactions as biogeochemical processes, because they are chemical reactions usually mediated by microorganisms in a geological environment. An understanding of the biogeochemical processes in peat of South Florida wetlands will provide a basis for evaluating the effects on water quality of (1) constructing buffer wetlands to alleviate nutrient contamination and (2) replumbing the ecosystem to restore natural water flow. The results may also suggest new approaches for solving problems of contamination and water quality in these wetlands. A second focus of this project will be on the geochemical history of the South Florida ecosystem. Peat is a repository of the history of past environmental conditions in the wetland. Before effective action can be taken to correct many of the problems facing these wetlands, we must first study the biogeochemistry of the peat at depth in order to understand whether current problems are the result of recent human activity or are part of a long-term natural cycle. Coordination with other (USGS) projects for South Florida is ongoing. These projects are studying the biological history of the ecosystem by using pollen and shells buried in the peat, together with procedures for dating the peat at various depths, to develop an overall ecosystem history model, with emphasis on the last 100 years.

  1. Groundwater dynamics in wetland soils control the production and transfer mechanisms of dissolved reactive phosphorus in an agricultural landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupas, Rémi; Gu, Sen; Gruau, Gérard; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal

    2015-04-01

    Because of its high sorption affinity on soils solid phase, mitigation options to reduce diffuse P transfer usually focus on trapping particulate P forms delivered via surface flowpaths. Therefore, vegetated buffer zones placed between croplands and watercourses have been promoted worldwide, sometimes in wetland areas. To investigate the risk of such P trapping riparian wetlands (RWs) releasing dissolved P to rivers, we monitored molybdate reactive P (MRP) in the free soil solution of two RWs in an intensively farmed catchment. Two main mechanisms causing MRP release were identified in light of the geochemical and hydrological conditions in the RWs, controlled by groundwater dynamics. First, soil rewetting after the dry summer was associated with the presence of a pool of mobile P, limited in size. Its mobilization started under conditions of water saturation caused by groundwater uprise in RW organo-mineral soil horizons. Second, the establishment of anoxic conditions in the end of the winter caused reductive solubilization of Fe oxide-hydroxide, along with release of P. Comparison between sites revealed that the first MRP release occurred only in a RW with P enriched soils, whereas the second was recorded even in a RW with a low soil P status. Seasonal variations in MRP concentrations in the stream were synchronized with those in RW soils. Hence, enriched and/or periodically anoxic RWs can act as a key component of the P transfer continuum in agricultural landscapes by converting particulate P from croplands into MRP released to rivers.

  2. Coastal wetlands analysis from ERTS MSS digital data and field spectral measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, V.; Schubert, J.

    1974-01-01

    Classification, delineation and evaluation of coastal wetlands can be made on the basis of major vegetative associations. To produce wetland maps, two vegetation-analysis look-up tables were developed for use in the ERTS ANALYSIS System. These look-up tables are based on Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS) digital values in Multispectral Scanner (MSS) bands 4, 5, and 7 and were developed using seasonal spectral reflectance measurements from field observations. Computer-generated maps at an approximate scale of 1:20,000 were produced for the primary test site, Chincoteague Marsh, Virginia. There is a high degree of accuracy in the identification of wetland features and plant associations. The classification was also tested on other Atlantic coast salt marshes and a brackish marsh in the Chesapeake Bay.

  3. Investigations on classification categories for wetlands of Chesapeake Bay using remotely sensed data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, F. S. L.

    1974-01-01

    The use of remote sensors to determine the characteristics of the wetlands of the Chesapeake Bay and surrounding areas is discussed. The objectives of the program are stated as follows: (1) to use data and remote sensing techniques developed from studies of Rhode River, West River, and South River salt marshes to develop a wetland classification scheme useful in other regions of the Chesapeake Bay and to evaluate the classification system with respect to vegetation types, marsh physiography, man-induced perturbation, and salinity; and (2) to develop a program using remote sensing techniques, for the extension of the classification to Chesapeake Bay salt marshes and to coordinate this program with the goals of the Chesapeake Research Consortium and the states of Maryland and Virginia. Maps of the Chesapeake Bay areas are developed from aerial photographs to display the wetland structure and vegetation.

  4. Carbon and nitrogen biogeochemistry of a Prairie Pothole Wetland, Stutsman County, North Dakota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holloway, JoAnn M.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; Mills, Christopher T.

    2011-01-01

    The concentration and form of dissolved organic C (DOC) and N species (NH4+ and NO3-) were investigated as part of a larger hydrogeochemical study of the Cottonwood Lake Study Area within the Prairie Potholes region. Groundwater, pore water and surface wetland water data were used to help characterize the relationships between surface and groundwater with respect to nutrient dynamics. Photosynthesis and subsequent decomposition of vegetation in these hydrologically dynamic wetlands generates a large amount of dissolved C and N, although the subsurface till, derived in part from organic matter rich Pierre Shale, is a likely secondary source of nutrients in deeper groundwater. While surface water DOC concentrations ranged from 2.2 to 4.6 mM, groundwater values were 0.15 mM to 3.7 mM. Greater specific UV absorbance (SUVA254) in the wetland water column and in soil pore waters relative to groundwater indicate more reactive DOC in the surface to near-surface waters. Circumneutral wetlands had greater SUVA254, possibly because of variations in vegetation communities. The dominant inorganic nitrogen species was NH4+ in both wetland water and most ground water samples. The exceptions were 3 wells with NO3- ranging from 38 to 115 ?M. Shallow groundwater wells (Well 28 and Well 13S) with greater connection to wetland surface water had greater NH4+ concentrations (1.1 mM and 120 ?M) than other well samples (3–90 ?M). Pore water nutrient chemistry was more similar to surface water than ground water. Nitrogen results suggest reducing conditions in both groundwater and surface water, possibly due to the microbial uptake of O2 by decaying vegetation in the wetland water column, labile organic C available in shallow groundwater, or the oxidation of pyrite associated with the subsurface.

  5. Community metabolism during early development of a restored wetland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKenna, J.E., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Productivity is an important ecological function of any natural system and may be quite high in wetlands. Restoration of productive wetlands may play a key role in re-establishing ecological function to portions of the vast areas of wetlands (roughly 86%) drained and otherwise altered in the United States over the past two centuries. A restored wetland at the Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge (upstate New York, USA) was examined to determine if ecological function (i.e., productivity), as well as biotic structure, was restored. Physicochemical conditions and both aquatic and terrestrial productivity were measured at the restoration site and compared with rates and conditions in a reference wetland. Gross aquatic community production rates (based on diurnal oxygen curves) were similar at each site (1,679 and 2,311 g O2 ?? m-2 ?? yr-1) and within the range expected for the habitat. Terrestrial Net Aboveground Primary Production rates (measured by monthly biomass changes) (2,400 and 2,500 g dry wt. ?? m-2 ?? yr-1) were also similar between sites when tree and herb production were combined. Aquatic respiration rates (3,704 and 4,552 g O2 ?? m-2 ?? yr-1) were also similar but high, typically more than twice as large as gross aquatic production. As a result, net aquatic production rates at both sites were usually negative, indicating that these small wetlands are organic matter sinks that satisfy aquatic respiration by consumption of both autochthonous aquatic production and imported terrestrial production. They enhance diversity of the local landscape by producing populations of aquatic consumers that cannot be supported by aquatic production alone. Typical wetland conditions and processes developed quickly after restoration, but differences in biotic community structure indicate that observed rates of production and respiration at both sites were maintained by flow through different foodweb pathways. Despite the relatively high process rates, any successional progress of the restoration site is expected to be slow.

  6. North Dakota Wetlands Discovery Guide. Photocopy Booklet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietz, Nancy J., Ed.; And Others

    This booklet contains games and activities that can be photocopied for classroom use. Activities include Wetland Terminology, Putting on the Map, Erosional Forces, Water in...Water out, Who Lives Here?, Wetlands in Disguise, Dichotomous Plant Game, Algae Survey, Conducting an Algal Survey, Water Quality Indicators Guide, Farming Wetlands, Wetlands

  7. Hydrology of Mid-Atlantic Freshwater Wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrology is a key variable in the structure and function of a wetland; it is a primary determinant of wetland type, and it drives many of the functions a wetland performs and in turn the services it provides. However, wetland hydrology has been understudied. Efforts by Riparia s...

  8. Effects of Habitat Management Treatments on Plant Community Composition and Biomass in a Montane Wetland

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated the vegetative response of wetlands and adjacent upland grasslands to four treatment regimes (continuous idle, fall prescribed burning followed by idle, annual fall cattle grazing, and rotation of summer grazing and idle) commonly used by the USGS. . . Our results il...

  9. The effects of merging TM and A/C radar on wetland classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsby, J. P.; Mulligan, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    While radar does not provide detailed begetation discrimination, it provide the means to separate areas of different moisture conditions. Thus, the use of LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) in conjunction with the microwave data was attempted. If successful, information on shoreline cover, emergent wetland vegetation and extent, and submerged grassbeds would provide much needed data for planning and maintenance of wetlands. Originally, the goal was to determine the accuracy with which one could categorize various types of vegetation and land use within an inland wetland using LANDSAT TM data. First, a Level 1/2 supervised classification was performed. Following a more detailed ground trust survey, a Level 3 classification was done. Aircraft L-band radar data were received and the decision was made to merge the TM and L-band data and assess whether vegetation catagories within the wetland areas could be better defined. Preliminary results indicate vegetation delineation is improved for open agricultural areas and water, but other features are more confused.

  10. Remote sensing of wetland conditions in West Coast salt marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustin, Susan L.; Lay, Mui C.; Li, Lin

    2004-11-01

    The objective of the PEEIR (Pacific Estuarine Ecosystem Indicator Research Consortium) program is to develop new indicators for assessing wetland health or condition. As part of PEEIR program we are investigating the use of imaging spectrometry to map and characterize marsh vegetation of several estuarine systems in California. We obtained airborne Advanced Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data, an instrument which measures a detailed reflectance spectrum (400-2500nm) for each pixel, over paired tidal marshes, having either a history of exposure to pollution or no known exposure. AVIRIS image data was analyzed based on comparison to field measurements and reflectance changes measured in hydroponic experiments. We report leaf and canopy reflectance measurements of several common plant species of Pacific coast salt marshes exposed to different concentrations of heavy metals (Cd, V) and crude oil contaminants. Species exhibited differential sensitivities to specific contaminants, however in general, Salicornia virginica, the most salt tolerant species and the dominant species in these wetlands (70-90% cover) was most sensitive to metal and petroleum contaminants. Field measurements of canopy reflectance, biomass and vegetation structure were acquired across GPS-located transects at each field site. The AVIRIS data were calibrated to surface reflectance using the FLAASH radiative transfer code and geometrically registered to coordinates using the 1m USGS digital orthophoto quads. AVIRIS results show spatial patterns of plant stress indicators (e.g., reduced chlorophyll and water contents) are consistent with known patterns of contamination in these tidal wetlands.

  11. Vegetable production after heavy rains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is not clear if extraordinary precipitation stored in the soil was able to support vegetable crops planted after rains events returned to normal levels. Cucumber and sweet corn were established from seed and non-pungent jalapeno peppers were established from 8-week old transplants on beds. Half...

  12. Applications of ERTS data to coastal wetland ecology with special reference to plant community mapping and typing and impact of man. [Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, South Carolina, and Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. R.; Carter, V. P.; Mcginness, J.

    1974-01-01

    Complete seasonal ERTS-1 coverage of Atlantic coastal wetlands from Delaware Bay to Georgia provides a basis for assessment of temporal data for wetland mapping, evaluation, and monitoring. Both MSS imagery and digital data have proved useful for gross wetland species delineation and determination of the upper wetland boundary. Tidal effects and (band to band or seasonal) spectral reflectance differences make it possible to type vegetatively coastal wetlands in salinity related categories. Management areas, spoil disposal sites, drainage ditches, lagoon-type developments and highway construction can be detected indicating a monitoring potential for the future. A northern test site (Maryland-Virginia) and a southern test site (Georgia-South Carolina), representing a range of coastal marshes from saline to fresh, were chosen for intensive study. Wetland maps were produced at various scales using both ERTS imagery (bands 5 and 7) and digital data (bands 4, 5 and 7).

  13. Global data bases on distribution, characteristics and methane emission of natural wetlands: Documentation of archived data tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Elaine

    1989-01-01

    Global digital data bases on the distribution and environmental characteristics of natural wetlands, compiled by Matthews and Fung (1987), were archived for public use. These data bases were developed to evaluate the role of wetlands in the annual emission of methane from terrestrial sources. Five global 1 deg latitude by 1 deg longitude arrays are included on the archived tape. The arrays are: (1) wetland data source, (2) wetland type, (3) fractional inundation, (4) vegetation type, and (5) soil type. The first three data bases on wetland locations were published by Matthews and Fung (1987). The last two arrays contain ancillary information about these wetland locations: vegetation type is from the data of Matthews (1983) and soil type from the data of Zobler (1986). Users should consult original publications for complete discussion of the data bases. This short paper is designed only to document the tape, and briefly explain the data sets and their initial application to estimating the annual emission of methane from natural wetlands. Included is information about array characteristics such as dimensions, read formats, record lengths, blocksizes and value ranges, and descriptions and translation tables for the individual data bases.

  14. Effects of Water Level on Three Wetlands Soil Seed Banks on the Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Miaojun; Ma, Zhen; Du, Guozhen

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the effect of water level on germination in soil seed banks has been documented in many ecosystems, the mechanism is not fully understood, and to date no empirical studies on this subject exist. Further, no work has been done on the effect of water level on seed banks of drying and saline-alkaline wetlands in alpine areas on the Tibetan Plateau. Methodology We examined the effects of water level (0 cm, 5 cm and 10 cm) on seed germination and seedling establishment from soil seed banks at 0–5 cm and 5–10 cm depths in typical, drying, and saline-alkaline wetlands. We also explore the potential role of soil seed bank in restoration of drying and saline-alkaline wetlands. Principal Findings Species richness decreased with increase in water level, but there almost no change in seed density. A huge difference exists in species composition of the seed bank among different water levels in all three wetlands, especially between 0 cm and 5 cm and 0 cm and 10 cm. Similarity of species composition between seed bank and plant community was higher in 0 cm water level in drying wetland than in the other two wetlands. The similarity was much higher in 0 cm water level than in 5 cm and 10 cm water levels in all three wetlands. Species composition of the alpine wetland plant community changed significantly after drying and salinization, however, species composition of the seed bank was unchanged regardless of the environment change. Conclusions/Significance Water level greatly affects seed bank recruitment and plant community establishment. Further, different water levels in restored habitats are likely to determine its species composition of the plant community. The seed bank is important in restoration of degraded wetlands. Successful restoration of drying and salinization wetlands could depend on the seed bank. PMID:24984070

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A WETLAND INVENTORY DATABASE AND WETLAND PROTECTION & MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR EL PASO COUNTY, COLORADO

    EPA Science Inventory

    1) Develop a Wetland Inventory Database ( including the specific goals of assessing wetland status and condition, creating a digitized database of wetland resources using a Geographic Information System, and ensuring compatibility with existing County databases and ensuring tran...

  16. CRMS vegetation analytical team framework: Methods for collection, development, and use of vegetation response variables

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cretini, Kari F.; Visser, Jenneke M.; Krauss, Ken W.; Steyer, Gregory D.

    2011-01-01

    This document identifies the main objectives of the Coastwide Reference Monitoring System (CRMS) vegetation analytical team, which are to provide (1) collection and development methods for vegetation response variables and (2) the ways in which these response variables will be used to evaluate restoration project effectiveness. The vegetation parameters (that is, response variables) collected in CRMS and other coastal restoration projects funded under the Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and Restoration Act (CWPPRA) are identified, and the field collection methods for these parameters are summarized. Existing knowledge on community and plant responses to changes in environmental drivers (for example, flooding and salinity) from published literature and from the CRMS and CWPPRA monitoring dataset are used to develop a suite of indices to assess wetland condition in coastal Louisiana. Two indices, the floristic quality index (FQI) and a productivity index, are described for herbaceous and forested vegetation. The FQI for herbaceous vegetation is tested with a long-term dataset from a CWPPRA marsh creation project. Example graphics for this index are provided and discussed. The other indices, an FQI for forest vegetation (that is, trees and shrubs) and productivity indices for herbaceous and forest vegetation, are proposed but not tested. New response variables may be added or current response variables removed as data become available and as our understanding of restoration success indicators develops. Once indices are fully developed, each will be used by the vegetation analytical team to assess and evaluate CRMS/CWPPRA project and program effectiveness. The vegetation analytical teams plan to summarize their results in the form of written reports and/or graphics and present these items to CRMS Federal and State sponsors, restoration project managers, landowners, and other data users for their input.

  17. The influence of urbanisation on macroinvertebrate biodiversity in constructed stormwater wetlands.

    PubMed

    Mackintosh, Teresa J; Davis, Jenny A; Thompson, Ross M

    2015-12-01

    The construction of wetlands in urban environments is primarily carried out to assist in the removal of contaminants from wastewaters; however, these wetlands have the added benefit of providing habitat for aquatic invertebrates, fish and waterbirds. Stormwater quantity and quality is directly related to impervious area (roads, sealed areas, roofs) in the catchment. As a consequence, it would be expected that impervious area would be related to contaminant load and biodiversity in receiving waters such as urban wetlands. This study aimed to establish whether the degree of urbanisation and its associated changes to stormwater runoff affected macroinvertebrate richness and abundance within constructed wetlands. Urban wetlands in Melbourne's west and south east were sampled along a gradient of urbanisation. There was a significant negative relationship between total imperviousness (TI) and the abundance of aquatic invertebrates detected for sites in the west, but not in the south east. However macroinvertebrate communities were relatively homogenous both within and between all study wetlands. Chironomidae (non-biting midges) was the most abundant family recorded at the majority of sites. Chironomids are able to tolerate a wide array of environmental conditions, including eutrophic and anoxic conditions. Their prevalence suggests that water quality is impaired in these systems, regardless of degree of urbanisation, although the causal mechanism is unclear. These results show some dependency between receiving wetland condition and the degree of urbanisation of the catchment, but suggest that other factors may be as important in determining the value of urban wetlands as habitat for wildlife. PMID:26245534

  18. Emission of greenhouse gases from geographically isolated wetlands of Western Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovatskaya, E.; Dyukarev, E.; Veretennikova, E.

    2014-12-01

    Wetlands are integral components of landscapes with specific nutrient dynamics and carbon sequestration potentials, which frequently differ, based on hydroperiod and seasonal hydropattern, as well as the constituent concentration of inputs, site-specific storages and vegetation structures. Human modifications have the potential to significantly alter controls on carbon dynamics. This study focused on determining carbon emissions (CO2 and CH4) from geographically isolated peatlands within the Ob-Tom River Interfluve area of Western Siberia affected by water diversion for municipal use by the city of Tomsk, Russia. Two oligotrophic wetlands within the study area were selected for site-specific CO2 studies, the Timiryazevskoe (16 ha) and Kirsanovskoe wetlands (29 ha), both affected by the Tomsk water intake (177 water wells 250 000 m3 water daily). Measurements of ??2 and CH4 emissions from peat surfaces were carried out bi-monthly in growing periods from 2008-2013 in two dominate vegetation zones, pine- shrub-sphagnum phytocenosis (ryam) and sedge-sphagnum fens. ??2 emissions were measured using OPTOGAS-500.4 infrared gas analyzer and dark chamber. Methane emissions were measured using static chamber method. Air samples were collected by syringes and analyzed at gas chromatograph Shimadzu-GC14B. Observations were accompanied by measurement of air temperature and humidity, surface temperature, peat temperature at various depths and the water table level. C?2 emission over the vegetative growing period had clearly pronounced seasonal dynamics with maximum values in the middle of the growing season (mid-July) and minimum values in spring and autumn. The average total flux over the studied period is 123±55 g?/m2 at sedge-sphagnum fen of Kirsanovskoe wetland and 323±66 g?/m2 at fen of Timiryazevskoe wetland. Total ??2 flux for the snow-free period at ryam sites of Timiryazevskoe and Kirsanovskoe wetlands is 238±84 and 260±47 g?/m2 accordingly. Methane emission from the surface of isolated wetlands for the snow-free period varies from 0.3±1.1 to 2.9±2.3 gC/m2 on ryam sites of Kirsanovskoe and Timiryazevskoe wetlands respectively. The total CH4 flux on sedge-sphagnum fen varies from 2.5±3.0 at Kirsanovskoe wetlands to 31.6±26.3 gC/m2 at Timiryazevskoe wetland.

  19. Case study: purification efficiency of a treatment wetland used at a peat extraction area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskelinen, Riku; Ronkanen, Anna-Kaisa; Marttila, Hannu; Kløve, Bjørn

    2014-05-01

    The inflow and outflow of a treatment wetland was intensively monitored between March 2012 and October 2012. Sampling was done with automated sampling equipment bidaily during the snowmelt period and daily for the rest of the study period. The treatment wetland is located downstream of a peat extraction area with a surface area of 208 ha. Drainage network at the peat extraction area has been fitted with peak flow control structures and a sedimentation basin from which the water is pumped to the treatment wetland. The treatment wetland has a surface area of 11 ha of peatland soil and is covered by grassy vegetation during the summer season. After flowing through the wetland water is discharging to a small stream through a v-notch weir. All samples were analysed for electric conductivity (EC), suspended solids (SS), Colour, Turbidity and pH. Additional analyses for various elements and nutrients were done for samples selected on the basis of hydrology. Results of the additional analyses represent the dissolved fraction of analysed elements as the samples were first filtrated with 0.45 µm filter for SS. Our results show that the purification efficiency varies during the measurement period. For example, to SS the overall purification efficiency was 62 %. However during the spring flood the purification efficiency is negative which can be caused by snowmelt water flushing previous year's dead vegetation or particulate matter accumulated during the winter period. After midsummer we can observe drastic increase in the retention of SS. Similar pattern can be seen in the retention of phosphorous with overall retention of 11 % of the total phosphorous. In the case of nitrogen the overall performance for the wetland is poor. Some of this can be explained by poor retention of NO2-3-N due to cold weather during spring melt season. However during the summer time denitrification process seems to be working as the retention of N improves. Retention of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is poor until midsummer, and during fall, the wetland acts as a source of DOC. The collected data set has given us a good insight for dominating processes in a treatment wetland during the spring, summer and autumn. However more research is needed for linking the water quality data we have collected with physical changes in the wetland (e.g. growth of vegetation, development of preferential flow paths) for better understanding of treatment wetland as a whole.

  20. Hydrologic response of northern wetlands to silvicultural water management systems

    SciTech Connect

    Trettin, C.C.

    1994-09-01

    Two types of water management systems are used to ameliorate saturated soil conditions which limit silvicultural operations and site productivity in northern wetlands. The pattern ditch system is an intensive drainage network designed to regulate water table depth in peat soils. The prescription drainage system is a low-intensity drainage system that is used to develop apparent drainage patterns in mineral and histic-mineral soils. These water management systems may either increase or decrease peak flow, base flow, and the duration of peak flow events, depending on drainage system design, climate, season, site characteristics, and land use. The most common hydrologic response to drainage is an increase in peak flow and base flow, and an increase in annual runoff. The effect of wetland drainage on watershed hydrology depends on the proportion of the watershed drained. Drainage may also affect water quality, nutrient cycling, vegetation composition and structure.

  1. Using Mesocosms to Test the Effect of Land Management Practices on Monomethylmercury Production in Freshwater Seasonal Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, W. A.; Negrey, J.; Martenuk, S.; Bonnema, A.; Byington, A.; Masek, J.; Newman, A.; Stephenson, M.; Coale, K. H.

    2013-12-01

    Managed seasonal freshwater wetlands are an ideal habitat for the production of monomethylmercury (MMHg). Wetting and drying cycles created by water management promote growth of wetland vegetation for waterfowl food during the summer growing season. After fall floodup of the fields this vegetation decomposes creating anoxic conditions and an abundant carbon source utilized by MMHg producing microbes. This results in hot moments of MMHg production after floodup and increased MMHg loads from seasonal wetlands. In this work, we determine the effect land management practices have on MMHg production. A manipulative study was conducted during the fall (October-November) of 2012 in a 20 hectacre seasonally flooded wetland located in Yolo Wildlife Area, CA. Polycarbonate cylindrical mesocosms (0.75 m diameter, 0.6 m tall), were placed over 6 differing land management treatment types: disc, simulated cattle grazed, mowed with vegetation removed, mowed with vegetation left in place, scraped with all vegetation removed, and natural undisturbed. Each treatment had n = 5 replicates. Samples were collected for determination of mercury speciation and ancillary measurements. Sampling occurred bi-weekly or weekly over a period of thirty days. Dissolved MMHg concentrations peaked in all treatments by day 16 of the experiment. Comparison of treatments was done on a mass dissolved MMHg basis. Natural and mowed treatments were similar (2.2 and 2.1 ?g MMHg respectively). Simulated grazing treatments (1.4 ?g MMHg ) resulted in 36% reduction in MMHg relative to the natural treatment. Cleared (0.36 ?g MMHg), disced (0.51 ?g MMHg), and mowed with vegetation removed (0.88 ?g MMHg) produced significantly less MMHg than the natural undisturbed treatment. Our results indicate specific management practices of seasonally flooded wetlands can reduce the net production of MMHg and potentially reduce loads to surrounding water. Net mass MMHg (ug) produced by treatment type within mesocosms in a freshwater seasonal wetland.

  2. Landscape context mediates influence of local food abundance on wetland use by wintering shorebirds in an agricultural valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taft, Oriane W.; Haig, Susan M.

    2006-01-01

    While it is widely understood that local abundance of benthic invertebrates can greatly influence the distribution and abundance of wetland birds, no studies have examined if wetland landscape context can mediate this relationship. We studied the influence of wetland food abundance and landscape context on use of agricultural wetlands by wintering dunlin (Calidris alpina) and killdeer (Charadrius vociferus) in the Willamette Valley of Oregon, USA, over two winters (1999a??2000, 2000a??2001) of differing rainfall and subsequent habitat distribution. We monitored bird use (frequency of occurrence and abundance) at a sample of wetlands differing in local food abundance (density and biomass) and landscape context [adjacent shorebird habitat (defined as ha of wet habitat with less than 50% vegetative cover and within a 2-km radius) and nearest neighbor distance]. We evaluated predictive models for bird use using linear regression and the Cp criterion to select the most parsimonious model. During the dry winter (2000a??2001), dunlin exhibited greater use of sites with higher invertebrate density and biomass but also with more adjacent shorebird habitat and closest to a wetland neighbor. However, neither landscape context nor food abundance were important predictors of dunlin use during the wet winter (1999a??2000). Use of sites by killdeer was unrelated to either local food abundance or landscape context measures during both winters. Our findings contribute to a growing recognition of the importance of landscape structure to wetland birds and highlight a number of implications for the spatial planning and enhancement of wetlands using a landscape approach.

  3. Spatial and temporal variations in shallow wetland groundwater quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schot, Paul P.; Pieber, Simone M.

    2012-02-01

    SummaryWetlands worldwide are threatened by environmental change. Differences in groundwater composition is one of the factors affecting wetland terrestrial floristic biodiversity. However, few studies discuss variations in wetland groundwater composition. This study presents an analysis of local-scale spatial and short-term temporal variations in 15 groundwater composition parameters of the 7 km2 Naardermeer wetland nature reserve in The Netherlands. Data is available from a network of 35 groundwater wells with 2-4 filters each, at depths between 50 and 800 cm, which were sampled about monthly over a 1-year period, totalling 1042 chemical analysis from 103 filter screens. Relative standard deviations indicate large differences in variation between parameters. Largest spatial and temporal variations were found for nutrients (NO3-, PO43-, NH4+) and redox sensitive parameters (Fe, Mn), and lowest variations for macroions and SiO2. A horizontal zonation in groundwater concentrations has been found related to soil type and soil wetness, with largest horizontal decrease in NO3- and SO42-, and largest increase in Fe and SiO2, going in the groundwater flow direction from dry sandy soils to wet peat/clay soils. No clear horizontal patterns have been found for the macroions. Spatial zonations in the north-south direction and with depth are absent for all parameters. Spatial and temporal variations were found to be related. 3D-maps indicate highest temporal fluctuations at filter screens with lowest median concentrations for NO3-, SO42- and Fe, but the reverse pattern for SiO2. High temporal variations of nutrients and redox sensitive parameters could not be traced back to a seasonal trend. The spatial and temporal variability of groundwater quality parameters as presented in this study, together with their reported effects on different vegetation types, may be used to design efficient monitoring schemes by nature managers having set specific vegetation development targets for different spatial locations.

  4. Amazon River carbon dioxide outgassing fuelled by wetlands.

    PubMed

    Abril, Gwenaël; Martinez, Jean-Michel; Artigas, L Felipe; Moreira-Turcq, Patricia; Benedetti, Marc F; Vidal, Luciana; Meziane, Tarik; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Bernardes, Marcelo C; Savoye, Nicolas; Deborde, Jonathan; Souza, Edivaldo Lima; Albéric, Patrick; Landim de Souza, Marcelo F; Roland, Fabio

    2014-01-16

    River systems connect the terrestrial biosphere, the atmosphere and the ocean in the global carbon cycle. A recent estimate suggests that up to 3 petagrams of carbon per year could be emitted as carbon dioxide (CO2) from global inland waters, offsetting the carbon uptake by terrestrial ecosystems. It is generally assumed that inland waters emit carbon that has been previously fixed upstream by land plant photosynthesis, then transferred to soils, and subsequently transported downstream in run-off. But at the scale of entire drainage basins, the lateral carbon fluxes carried by small rivers upstream do not account for all of the CO2 emitted from inundated areas downstream. Three-quarters of the world's flooded land consists of temporary wetlands, but the contribution of these productive ecosystems to the inland water carbon budget has been largely overlooked. Here we show that wetlands pump large amounts of atmospheric CO2 into river waters in the floodplains of the central Amazon. Flooded forests and floating vegetation export large amounts of carbon to river waters and the dissolved CO2 can be transported dozens to hundreds of kilometres downstream before being emitted. We estimate that Amazonian wetlands export half of their gross primary production to river waters as dissolved CO2 and organic carbon, compared with only a few per cent of gross primary production exported in upland (not flooded) ecosystems. Moreover, we suggest that wetland carbon export is potentially large enough to account for at least the 0.21 petagrams of carbon emitted per year as CO2 from the central Amazon River and its floodplains. Global carbon budgets should explicitly address temporary or vegetated flooded areas, because these ecosystems combine high aerial primary production with large, fast carbon export, potentially supporting a substantial fraction of CO2 evasion from inland waters. PMID:24336199

  5. Ammonia and nitric acid emissions from wetlands and boreal forest fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebel, Peter J.; Vay, Stephanie A.; Roberts, Patricia D.

    1991-01-01

    Tests conducted during three (one boreal and two wetland) ecosystem fires have established the NH3- and HNO3-determination effectiveness of the 'tungsten oxide denuder' technique, using a low-flying helicopter to fly through biomass-burn smoke plumes. Both species were found to be present in the smoke plumes at levels much higher than background. Despite the differences between boreal and wetland ecosystems, HNO3 emissions were comparable; NH3 emissions, by contrast, were 5-8 times greater in the boreal fire than in the wetland fires. Biomass burning is found to make a significant role in the tropospheric ammonia budget.

  6. 7 CFR 1467.9 - Wetlands Reserve Enhancement Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wetlands Reserve Enhancement Program. 1467.9 Section 1467...PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS WETLANDS RESERVE PROGRAM § 1467.9 Wetlands Reserve Enhancement Program. (a) Wetlands...

  7. 7 CFR 1467.9 - Wetlands Reserve Enhancement Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Wetlands Reserve Enhancement Program. 1467.9 Section 1467...PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS WETLANDS RESERVE PROGRAM § 1467.9 Wetlands Reserve Enhancement Program. (a) Wetlands...

  8. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Constructed wetlands have been demonstrated effective in removing organic, metal, and nutrient elements including nitrogen and phosphorus from municipal wastewaters, mine drainage, industrial effluents, and agricultural runoff. The technology is waste stream-specific, requiring...

  9. REMOTE SENSING AND GIS WETLANDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Learn how photographs and computer sensor generated images can illustrate conditions of hydrology, extent, change over time, and impact of events such as hurricanes and tornados. Other topics include: information storage and modeling, and evaluation of wetlands for managing reso...

  10. 76 FR 22785 - Wetland Conservation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ... 7 CFR Part 12 RIN 0578-AA58 Wetland Conservation AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, United States... concerning the Natural Resources Conservation Service's (NRCS) coordination responsibilities. DATES..., Director, Ecological Sciences Division, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources...

  11. Hydrocarbon removal with constructed wetlands 

    E-print Network

    Eke, Paul Emeka

    2008-01-01

    Wetlands have long played a significant role as natural purification systems, and have been effectively used to treat domestic, agricultural and industrial wastewater. However, very little is known about the biochemical ...

  12. Are all intertidal wetlands naturally created equal? Bottlenecks, thresholds and knowledge gaps to mangrove and saltmarsh ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friess, Daniel A.; Krauss, Ken W.; Horstman, Erik M.; Balke, Thorsten; Bouma, Tjeerd J.; Galli, Demis; Webb, Edward L.

    2011-01-01

    Intertidal wetlands such as saltmarshes and mangroves provide numerous important ecological functions, though they are in rapid and global decline. To better conserve and restore these wetland ecosystems, we need an understanding of the fundamental natural bottlenecks and thresholds to their establishment and long-term ecological maintenance. Despite inhabiting similar intertidal positions, the biological traits of these systems differ markedly in structure, phenology, life history, phylogeny and dispersal, suggesting large differences in biophysical interactions. By providing the first systematic comparison between saltmarshes and mangroves, we unravel how the interplay between species-specific life-history traits, biophysical interactions and biogeomorphological feedback processes determine where, when and what wetland can establish, the thresholds to long-term ecosystem stability, and constraints to genetic connectivity between intertidal wetland populations at the landscape level. To understand these process interactions, research into the constraints to wetland development, and biological adaptations to overcome these critical bottlenecks and thresholds requires a truly interdisciplinary approach.

  13. Effect of Estuarine Wetland Degradation on Transport of Toxoplasma gondii Surrogates from Land to Sea? †

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Karen; Conrad, Patricia A.; Mazet, Jonna A. K.; Wallender, Wesley W.; Miller, Woutrina A.; Largier, John L.

    2010-01-01

    The flux of terrestrially derived pathogens to coastal waters presents a significant health risk to marine wildlife, as well as to humans who utilize the nearshore for recreation and seafood harvest. Anthropogenic changes in natural habitats may result in increased transmission of zoonotic pathogens to coastal waters. The objective of our work was to evaluate how human-caused alterations of coastal landscapes in California affect the transport of Toxoplasma gondii to estuarine waters. Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan parasite that is excreted in the feces of infected felids and is thought to reach coastal waters in contaminated runoff. This zoonotic pathogen causes waterborne toxoplasmosis in humans and is a significant cause of death in threatened California sea otters. Surrogate particles that mimic the behavior of T. gondii oocysts in water were released in transport studies to evaluate if the loss of estuarine wetlands is contributing to an increased flux of oocysts into coastal waters. Compared to vegetated sites, more surrogates were recovered from unvegetated mudflat habitats, which represent degraded wetlands. Specifically, in Elkhorn Slough, where a large proportion of otters are infected with T. gondii, erosion of 36% of vegetated wetlands to mudflats may increase the flux of oocysts by more than 2 orders of magnitude. Total degradation of wetlands may result in increased Toxoplasma transport of 6 orders of magnitude or more. Destruction of wetland habitats along central coastal California may thus facilitate pathogen pollution in coastal waters with detrimental health impacts to wildlife and humans. PMID:20802072

  14. Selected pesticides adsorption and desorption in substrates from artificial wetland and forest buffer.

    PubMed

    Passeport, Elodie; Benoit, Pierre; Bergheaud, Valérie; Coquet, Yves; Tournebize, Julien

    2011-07-01

    Buffer zones such as artificial wetlands and forest buffers may help decrease non-point-source pesticide pollution from agricultural catchments. The present study focuses on understanding the role of the substrates mainly found in such buffer zones for pesticide adsorption and desorption. Radiolabeled [(14)C]isoproturon, [(14)C]metazachlor, and [(14)C]epoxiconazole were used to measure adsorption and desorption isotherms on wetland sediments and plants and forest soil and litter from two sites in France. Wetland sediments and forest soil exhibited the most important potential for pesticide adsorption. Wetland plants and forest litter also showed high adsorption coefficients and were associated with highly hysteretic desorption, particularly for the moderately mobile isoproturon and metazachlor. Adsorption of the highly hydrophobic epoxiconazole was strong and associated with weak desorption from all substrates. Calculated sorption coefficients were larger than those classically measured on soils. Isoproturon, metazachlor, and epoxiconazole K(OC) sorption coefficients ranged from 84 to 372, 131 to 255, and 1,356 to 3,939 L/kg, respectively. Therefore, specifically collecting buffer zone substrate sorption data is needed for modeling purposes. Results showed that forests and wetlands present potential for pesticide retention. This may be enhanced by planting vegetation and leaving dead vegetal material in buffer zone design. PMID:21509808

  15. Effect of estuarine wetland degradation on transport of Toxoplasma gondii surrogates from land to sea.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Karen; Conrad, Patricia A; Mazet, Jonna A K; Wallender, Wesley W; Miller, Woutrina A; Largier, John L

    2010-10-01

    The flux of terrestrially derived pathogens to coastal waters presents a significant health risk to marine wildlife, as well as to humans who utilize the nearshore for recreation and seafood harvest. Anthropogenic changes in natural habitats may result in increased transmission of zoonotic pathogens to coastal waters. The objective of our work was to evaluate how human-caused alterations of coastal landscapes in California affect the transport of Toxoplasma gondii to estuarine waters. Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan parasite that is excreted in the feces of infected felids and is thought to reach coastal waters in contaminated runoff. This zoonotic pathogen causes waterborne toxoplasmosis in humans and is a significant cause of death in threatened California sea otters. Surrogate particles that mimic the behavior of T. gondii oocysts in water were released in transport studies to evaluate if the loss of estuarine wetlands is contributing to an increased flux of oocysts into coastal waters. Compared to vegetated sites, more surrogates were recovered from unvegetated mudflat habitats, which represent degraded wetlands. Specifically, in Elkhorn Slough, where a large proportion of otters are infected with T. gondii, erosion of 36% of vegetated wetlands to mudflats may increase the flux of oocysts by more than 2 orders of magnitude. Total degradation of wetlands may result in increased Toxoplasma transport of 6 orders of magnitude or more. Destruction of wetland habitats along central coastal California may thus facilitate pathogen pollution in coastal waters with detrimental health impacts to wildlife and humans. PMID:20802072

  16. Coma / Vegetative State

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Vegetative State Email Print Share Coma / Vegetative State Articles Facts About the Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States After Severe Brain Injury Brain Trauma, Concussion, and Coma What Is ...

  17. Airport expansion requires major wetlands mitigation project

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, B.M.

    1994-01-01

    This article describes the steps taken to mitigate the impact to existing wetlands by creating new wetlands in an airport expansion project. The project addressed maintaining suitable amounts of wetlands to accommodate peak waterfowl populations, moving of high voltage power transmission towers, and maintaining agricultural and hunting interests. This project involved recreating of open water areas, marsh habitat, mud flat habitat, saline meadow habitat, maintaining two existing wetlands in the area of the new wetlands without disturbing them, and improving upland habitat surrounding the new wetlands.

  18. Current vegetation characteristics within tree-kill zones of F- and H-Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.A.; Irwin, J.E.

    1994-04-01

    Vegetation of two wetland areas previously adversely affected by outcropping groundwater was characterized to evaluate the type and extent of revegetation. When the damage first became evident in the late 1970s and early 1980s the areas were examined and described to try to establish the cause of the extensive tree mortality. The F- and H-Area seepage basins above the wetland areas received waste products from the separation areas beginning in 1955. The operation, estimated loading, and current status of the basins were summarized by Killian et al. Analysis of soil and water at the affected seeplines where the tree-kill was occurring confirmed that the surface water was strongly influenced by constituents of the F- and H-Area seepage basins. While no single cause of the forest mortality was defined, alterations in the hydrology and siltation patterns, pH changes, increased conductivity, and increased levels of sodium, nitrogen compounds, and aluminum were believed to be interacting to cause the mortality.

  19. Introducing a boreal wetland model within the Earth System model framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getzieh, R. J.; Brovkin, V.; Reick, C.; Kleinen, T.; Raddatz, T.; Raivonen, M.; Sevanto, S.

    2009-04-01