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Sample records for wfs web feature

  1. Wolfram Syndrome in the Japanese Population; Molecular Analysis of WFS1 Gene and Characterization of Clinical Features

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Hiroshi; Okuya, Shigeru; Ohta, Yasuharu; Akiyama, Masaru; Taguchi, Akihiko; Kora, Yukari; Okayama, Naoko; Yamada, Yuichiro; Wada, Yasuhiko; Amemiya, Shin; Sugihara, Shigetaka; Nakao, Yuzo; Oka, Yoshitomo; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Background Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is a recessive neurologic and endocrinologic degenerative disorder, and is also known as DIDMOAD (Diabetes Insipidus, early-onset Diabetes Mellitus, progressive Optic Atrophy and Deafness) syndrome. Most affected individuals carry recessive mutations in the Wolfram syndrome 1 gene (WFS1). However, the phenotypic pleiomorphism, rarity and molecular complexity of this disease complicate our efforts to understand WFS. To address this limitation, we aimed to describe complications and to elucidate the contributions of WFS1 mutations to clinical manifestations in Japanese patients with WFS. Methodology The minimal ascertainment criterion for diagnosing WFS was having both early onset diabetes mellitus and bilateral optic atrophy. Genetic analysis for WFS1 was performed by direct sequencing. Principal Findings Sixty-seven patients were identified nationally for a prevalence of one per 710,000, with 33 patients (49%) having all 4 components of DIDMOAD. In 40 subjects who agreed to participate in this investigation from 30 unrelated families, the earliest manifestation was DM at a median age of 8.7 years, followed by OA at a median age of 15.8 years. However, either OA or DI was the first diagnosed feature in 6 subjects. In 10, features other than DM predated OA. Twenty-seven patients (67.5%) had a broad spectrum of recessive mutations in WFS1. Two patients had mutations in only one allele. Eleven patients (27.5%) had intact WFS1 alleles. Ages at onset of both DM and OA in patients with recessive WFS1 mutations were indistinguishable from those in patients without WFS1 mutations. In the patients with predicted complete loss-of-function mutations, ages at the onsets of both DM and OA were significantly earlier than those in patients with predicted partial-loss-of function mutations. Conclusion/Significance This study emphasizes the clinical and genetic heterogeneity in patients with WFS. Genotype-phenotype correlations may exist in patients with WFS1 mutations, as demonstrated by the disease onset. PMID:25211237

  2. Profiling the OGC Web Feature Service For Climate Science Datasets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, D.; Woolf, A.

    2009-04-01

    By describing climate datasets with feature types such as those defined by the Climate Science Modelling Language (CSML) and rendering those features in Geography Markup Language (GML), it becomes possible to deploy an OGC Web Feature Service (WFS) as a retrieval service for such data. The primary purpose of the WFS is to act as a filtering mechanism to allow for selection of features according to certain properties or constraints. However the latest version (2.0) of WFS, currently undergoing ISO standardization (ISO 19142), introduces a new concept of stored queries. The intention is that it can be used as a mechanism to define commonly used query filters, however the specification explicitly permits the use of executable code within stored queries. This provides a general flexible mechanism for defining and implementing operations on features or collections of features and hence makes it possible to perform useful tasks on climate features such as subsetting an atmospheric model on a particular pressure level or selecting a particular depth from a CTD profile. The very general nature of the mechanism however raises questions about the interoperable nature of such services. The burden of interoperability is pushed back from the WFS interface to the underlying data model. This talk reviews an implementation of the WFS with stored queries and considers the possible need for a Climate Science profile of WFS based on agreed feature models and operations.

  3. A spatial information crawler for OpenGIS WFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jun; Yang, Chong-jun; Ren, Ying-chao

    2008-10-01

    The growth of the internet makes it non-trivial to search for the accuracy information efficiently. Topical crawler, which is aiming at a certain area, attracts more and more intention now because it can help people to find out what they need. Furthermore, with the OpenGIS WFS (Web Feature Service) Specification developed by OGC (Open GIS Consortium), much more geospatial data providers adopt this protocol to publish their data on the internet. In this case, a crawler which is aiming at the WFS servers can help people to find the geospatial data from WFS servers. In this paper, we propose a prototype system of a WFS crawler based on the OpenGIS WFS Specification. The crawler architecture, working principles, and detailed function of each component are introduced. This crawler is capable of discovering WFS servers dynamically, saving and updating the service contents of the servers. The data collect by the crawler can be supported to a geospatial data search engine as its data source.

  4. Web Feature Service Semantic Mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobona, G.; Bermudez, L. E.; Brackin, R.; Percivall, G. S.

    2012-12-01

    Scientists from different organizations and disciplines need to work together to find the solutions to complex problems. Multi-disciplinary science typically involves users with specialized tools and their own preferred view of the data including unique characteristics of the user's information model and symbology. Even though organizations use web services to expose data, there are still semantic inconsistencies that need to be solved. Recent activities within the OGC Interoperability Program (IP) have helped advance semantic mediation solutions when using OGC services to help solve complex problems. The OGC standards development process is influenced by the feedback of activities within the Interoperability Program, which conducts international interoperability initiatives such as Testbeds, Pilot Projects, Interoperability Experiments, and Interoperability Support Services. These activities are designed to encourage rapid development, testing, validation, demonstration and adoption of open, consensus based standards and best practices. Two recent Testbeds, the OGC Web Services Phase 8 and Phase 9, have advanced the use of semantic mediation approaches to increase semantic interoperability among geospatial communities. The Cross-Community Interoperability (CCI) thread within these two testbeds, advanced semantic mediation approaches for data discovery, access and use of heterogeneous data models and heterogeneous metadata models. This presentation will provide an overview of the interoperability program, the CCI Thread and will explain the methodology to mediate heterogeneous GML Application Profiles served via WFS, including discovery of services via a catalog standard interface and mediating symbology applicable to each application profile.

  5. Respondent Web Site Features

    Cancer.gov

    The ASA24 Respondent Web site guides the participant through the completion of a 24-hour recall for the previous day, either from midnight to midnight or for the past 24-hours, using a dynamic user interface.

  6. Web Search Engines: (More) Features and Commands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hock, Randolph

    2000-01-01

    Provides a summary look at the features provided by nine major World Wide Web search engines. Examines size, Boolean operators, phrase searching capabilities, media searching, format options, and special features. (LRW)

  7. Web Search Engines: Search Syntax and Features.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojala, Marydee

    2002-01-01

    Presents a chart that explains the search syntax, features, and commands used by the 12 most widely used general Web search engines. Discusses Web standardization, expanded types of content searched, size of databases, and search engines that include both simple and advanced versions. (LRW)

  8. Marfanoid habitus, dysmorphic features, and web neck.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y C; Wilson, C J; Winship, I M; Veale, A G

    2000-12-01

    Bilateral pneumothoraces and aortic dilatation developed in a 25-year-old white man with marfanoid habitus, dysmorphic features, web neck, and intellectual impairment. He had physical features suggestive of Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome. We review the common characteristics of Marfan and Shprintzen-Goldberg syndromes and compare them with our case. Physicians should beware of potential cardiovascular abnormalities in patients with marfanoid habitus and dysmorphic features. PMID:11142456

  9. Web Search Engines: Features and Commands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hock, Randolph

    1999-01-01

    Presents a chart comparing Web search engines. Discusses features covered in the chart: size; Boolean Operators and Parentheses; phrase searching; proximity; truncation; title, date and URL fields; links to a URL; language; media searching; name; case sensitivity; searches all common words; directory attached; gives count for answer; gives term…

  10. WMS and WFS Standards Implementation of Weather Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, M.

    2005-12-01

    CustomWeather is private weather company that delivers global weather data products. CustomWeather has built a mapping platform according to OGC standards. Currently, both a Web Mapping Service (WMS) and Web Feature Service (WFS) are supported by CustomWeather. Supporting open geospatial standards has lead to number of positive changes internally to the processes of CustomWeather, along with those of the clients accessing the data. Quite a number of challenges surfaced during this process, particularly with respect to combining a wide variety of raw modeling and sensor data into a single delivery platform. Open standards have, however, made the delivery of very different data products rather seamless. The discussion will address the issues faced in building an OGC-based mapping platform along with the limitations encountered. While the availability of these data products through open standards is still very young, there have already been many adopters in the utility and navigation industries. The discussion will take a closer look at the different approach taken by these two industries as they utilize interoperability standards with existing data. Insight will be given in regards to applications already taking advantage of this new technology and how this is affecting decision-making processes. CustomWeather has observed considerable interest and potential benefit in this technology from developing countries. Weather data is a key element in disaster management. Interoperability is literally opening up a world of data and has the potential to quickly enable functionality that would otherwise take considerable time to implement. The discussion will briefly touch on our experience.

  11. Impairment of Visual Function and Retinal ER Stress Activation in Wfs1-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet Wersinger, Delphine; Benkafadar, Nesrine; Jagodzinska, Jolanta; Hamel, Christian; Tanizawa, Yukio; Lenaers, Guy; Delettre, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome is an early onset genetic disease (1/180,000) featuring diabetes mellitus and optic neuropathy, associated to mutations in the WFS1 gene. Wfs1?/? mouse model shows pancreatic beta cell atrophy, but its visual performance has not been investigated, prompting us to study its visual function and histopathology of the retina and optic nerve. Electroretinogram and visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were performed in Wfs1?/? and Wfs1+/+ mice at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of age. Fundi were pictured with Micron III apparatus. Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) abundance was determined from Brn3a immunolabeling of retinal sections. RGC axonal loss was quantified by electron microscopy in transversal optic nerve sections. Endoplasmic reticulum stress was assessed using immunoglobulin binding protein (BiP), protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and inositol-requiring enzyme 1 alpha (Ire1?) markers. Electroretinograms amplitudes were slightly reduced and latencies increased with time in Wfs1?/? mice. Similarly, VEPs showed decreased N+P amplitudes and increased N-wave latency. Analysis of unfolded protein response signaling revealed an activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress in Wfs1?/? mutant mouse retinas. Altogether, progressive VEPs alterations with minimal neuronal cell loss suggest functional alteration of the action potential in the Wfs1?/? optic pathways. PMID:24823368

  12. Impairment of visual function and retinal ER stress activation in Wfs1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Bonnet Wersinger, Delphine; Benkafadar, Nesrine; Jagodzinska, Jolanta; Hamel, Christian; Tanizawa, Yukio; Lenaers, Guy; Delettre, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome is an early onset genetic disease (1/180,000) featuring diabetes mellitus and optic neuropathy, associated to mutations in the WFS1 gene. Wfs1-/- mouse model shows pancreatic beta cell atrophy, but its visual performance has not been investigated, prompting us to study its visual function and histopathology of the retina and optic nerve. Electroretinogram and visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were performed in Wfs1-/- and Wfs1+/+ mice at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months of age. Fundi were pictured with Micron III apparatus. Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) abundance was determined from Brn3a immunolabeling of retinal sections. RGC axonal loss was quantified by electron microscopy in transversal optic nerve sections. Endoplasmic reticulum stress was assessed using immunoglobulin binding protein (BiP), protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and inositol-requiring enzyme 1 alpha (Ire1?) markers. Electroretinograms amplitudes were slightly reduced and latencies increased with time in Wfs1-/- mice. Similarly, VEPs showed decreased N+P amplitudes and increased N-wave latency. Analysis of unfolded protein response signaling revealed an activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress in Wfs1-/- mutant mouse retinas. Altogether, progressive VEPs alterations with minimal neuronal cell loss suggest functional alteration of the action potential in the Wfs1-/- optic pathways. PMID:24823368

  13. Tunisia WFS [World Fertility Survey].

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    Tunisia, the smallest North African country in size, has recently published the results of its part of the World Fertility Survey (WFS) taken in 1978. About 1/2 of this Missouri-sized country consists of arid and semiarid desert, with well-irrigated fertile areas in the north. The country, which has a population of about 7 million, must import large quantities of food each year and also suffers from widespread unemployment. In 1964, the government was among the earliest to announce a policy to reduce the rate of population growth and Tunisia now has 1 of the lowest birth rates of the African continent (33 births/1000 population) although it is still moderately high. Part of the reason for the birth rate decline has been a risking age at marriage; the legal minimum was fixed at 17 years for women and 20 for men by a 1964 law. The Tunisia WFS indicates that, of women 20-24 in 1978, 56% had not yet married, a large increase from the 27% of 1966. The mean age at 1st marriage for females was 24 in 1978, very high by less developed country standards. It may be that the fertility-lowering impetus from rising age at marriage has been spent (this measure cannot rise indefinitely): Tunisia's total fertility rate (TFR), the average number of children/woman, dropped from 7.1 children in 1966 to 5.7 in 1976, but the decrease has tapered off somewhat since. The TFR appears to have dropped to 5.2 as of 1981. When asked how many children they would like to have, the women surveyed gave 4.2 children, on average, as their "ideal" number. This number is, of course, considerably above that needed to ultimately stop population growth (about 2.1-2.5 children/woman). Contraceptive use in Tunisia is quite high by developing country standards; much of this is due to the efficient network of government-sponsored clinics. About 44% of the women exposed to pregnancy were practicing an efficient form of family planning with the pill or sterilization accounting for most of that number (22 and 20% respectively). Nonetheless, traditions which still favor 3-5 children and some possible loss of momentum from a rising age at marriage may cause future fertility declines to be slower than in the recent past. Tunisia does present an interesting case of a country maintaining a government program to reduce population growth as an overall part of the country's development efforts. PMID:12279827

  14. Adding a visualization feature to web search engines: it's time.

    PubMed

    Wong, Pak Chung

    2008-01-01

    It's widely recognized that all Web search engines today are almost identical in presentation layout and behavior. In fact, the same presentation approach has been applied to depicting search engine results pages (SERPs) since the first Web search engine launched in 1993. In this Visualization Viewpoints article, I propose to add a visualization feature to Web search engines and suggest that the new addition can improve search engines' performance and capabilities, which in turn lead to better Web search technology. PMID:19004680

  15. Toward Semantic Web Infrastructure for Spatial FEATURES' Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabsheibani, R.; Ariannamazi, S.; Hakimpour, F.

    2015-12-01

    The Web and its capabilities can be employed as a tool for data and information integration if comprehensive datasets and appropriate technologies and standards enable the web with interpretation and easy alignment of data and information. Semantic Web along with the spatial functionalities enable the web to deal with the huge amount of data and information. The present study investigate the advantages and limitations of the Spatial Semantic Web and compare its capabilities with relational models in order to build a spatial data infrastructure. An architecture is proposed and a set of criteria is defined for the efficiency evaluation. The result demonstrate that when using the data with special characteristics such as schema dynamicity, sparse data or available relations between the features, the spatial semantic web and graph databases with spatial operations are preferable.

  16. US National Geothermal Data System: Web feature services and system operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Stephen; Clark, Ryan; Allison, M. Lee; Anderson, Arlene

    2013-04-01

    The US National Geothermal Data System is being developed with support from the US Department of Energy to reduce risk in geothermal energy development by providing online access to the body of geothermal data available in the US. The system is being implemented using Open Geospatial Consortium web services for catalog search (CSW), map browsing (WMS), and data access (WFS). The catalog now includes 2427 registered resources, mostly individual documents accessible via URL. 173 WMS and WFS services are registered, hosted by 4 NGDS system nodes, as well as 6 other state geological surveys. Simple feature schema for interchange formats have been developed by an informal community process in which draft content models are developed based on the information actually available in most data provider's internal datasets. A template pattern is used for the content models so that commonly used content items have the same name and data type across models. Models are documented in Excel workbooks and posted for community review with a deadline for comment; at the end of the comment period a technical working group reviews and discusses comments and votes on adoption. When adopted, an XML schema is implemented for the content model. Our approach has been to keep the focus of each interchange schema narrow, such that simple-feature (flat file) XML schema are sufficient to implement the content model. Keeping individual interchange formats simple, and allowing flexibility to introduce new content models as needed have both assisted in adoption of the service architecture. One problem that remains to be solved is that off-the-shelf server packages (GeoServer, ArcGIS server) do not permit configuration of a normative schema location to be bound with XML namespaces in instance documents. Such configuration is possible with GeoServer using a more complex deployment process. XML interchange format schema versions are indicated by the namespace URI; because of the schema location problems, namespace URIs are redirected to the normative schema location. An additional issue that needs consideration is the expected lifetime of a service instance. A service contract should be accessible online and discoverable as part of the metadata for each service instance; this contract should specify the policy for service termination process--e.g. how notification will be made, if there is an expected end-of-life date. Application developers must be aware of these lifetime limitations to avoid unexpected failures. The evolution of the the service inventory to date has been driven primarily by data providers wishing to improve access to their data holdings. Focus is currently shifting towards improving tools for data consumer interaction--search, data inspection, and download. Long term viability of the system depends on business interdependence between the data providers and data consumers.

  17. Perceptions of Business Students' Feature Requirements in Educational Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazari, Sunil; Johnson, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    There is paucity of original research that explains phenomena related to content organization and site design of educational Web sites. Educational Web sites are often used to provide Web-based instruction, which itself is a relatively recent phenomenon for business schools, and additional research is needed in this area. Educational Web sites are…

  18. Perceptions of Business Students' Feature Requirements in Educational Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazari, Sunil; Johnson, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    There is paucity of original research that explains phenomena related to content organization and site design of educational Web sites. Educational Web sites are often used to provide Web-based instruction, which itself is a relatively recent phenomenon for business schools, and additional research is needed in this area. Educational Web sites are…

  19. Exemplary World Wide Web Resources. Pull-out Feature 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Ronald G.

    1997-01-01

    Offers an abundance of World Wide Web resources for K-12 educators. Briefly describes interesting web sites, including the "K-12 History on the Internet Resource Guide" and sites by National Geographic, the Smithsonian Institute, and Ben and Jerry's. Discusses personal web pages including the author's own. (MJP)

  20. Evaluating Web Sites Featuring Primary Sources on United States History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congleton, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    Most library Web sites offer lists of recommended Web sites for primary sources with only cursory summaries of the sites. While many of the resources listed are outstanding, too many are dubious in quality, often referring to dead URLs or sites containing no information on their sponsor, source of material, or other information needed to evaluate…

  1. Diffusion of Courses with World Wide Web Features: Perceptions of Journalism and Mass Communication Program Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Patrick J.

    2003-01-01

    Examines perceptions of top administrators concerning courses with Web features at Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication (ASJMC) programs. Studies the imperatives and pressures to implement courses with Web features as well as resistances to implementation. Suggests that administrators perceive an extensive set of needs and…

  2. Geospatial web services for limnological data: a case study of sensor observation service for ecological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias Muńoz, C.; Oggioni, A.; Brovelli, M. A.

    2014-04-01

    The present work aims at designing and implementing a spatial data infrastructure for storing and sharing ecological data through geospatial web services. As case study, we concentrated on limnological data coming from the drainage basin of Lake Maggiore in the Northern of Italy. In order to establish the infrastructure, we started with two basic questions: (1) What type of data is the ecological dataset? (2) Which are the geospatial web services standards most suitable to store and share ecological data? In this paper we describe the possibilities for sharing ecological data using geospatial web services and the difficulties that can be encountered in this task. In order to test actual technological solutions, we use real data of a limnological published study.We concluded that limnological data can be considered observational data, composed by biological (species) data and environmental data, and it can be modeled using Observation and Measurement (O&M) specification. With the actual web service implementation the geospatial web services that could potentially be used to publish limnological data are Sensor Observation Services (SOS) and Web Feature Services (WFS). SOS holds the essential components to represent time series observations, while WFS is a simple model that requires profiling. Both, SOS and WFS are not perfectly suitable to publish biological data, so other alternatives must be considered, as linked data.

  3. Key Features of Intertidal Food Webs That Support Migratory Shorebirds

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Béat, Blanche; Dupuy, Christine; Bocher, Pierrick; Chalumeau, Julien; De Crignis, Margot; Fontaine, Camille; Guizien, Katell; Lavaud, Johann; Lefebvre, Sébastien; Montanié, Hélène; Mouget, Jean-Luc; Orvain, Francis; Pascal, Pierre-Yves; Quaintenne, Gwenaël; Radenac, Gilles; Richard, Pierre; Robin, Frédéric; Vézina, Alain F.; Niquil, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    The migratory shorebirds of the East Atlantic flyway land in huge numbers during a migratory stopover or wintering on the French Atlantic coast. The Brouage bare mudflat (Marennes-Oléron Bay, NE Atlantic) is one of the major stopover sites in France. The particular structure and function of a food web affects the efficiency of carbon transfer. The structure and functioning of the Brouage food web is crucial for the conservation of species landing within this area because it provides sufficient food, which allows shorebirds to reach the north of Europe where they nest. The aim of this study was to describe and understand which food web characteristics support nutritional needs of birds. Two food-web models were constructed, based on in situ measurements that were made in February 2008 (the presence of birds) and July 2008 (absence of birds). To complete the models, allometric relationships and additional data from the literature were used. The missing flow values of the food web models were estimated by Monte Carlo Markov Chain – Linear Inverse Modelling. The flow solutions obtained were used to calculate the ecological network analysis indices, which estimate the emergent properties of the functioning of a food-web. The total activities of the Brouage ecosystem in February and July are significantly different. The specialisation of the trophic links within the ecosystem does not appear to differ between the two models. In spite of a large export of carbon from the primary producer and detritus in winter, the higher recycling leads to a similar retention of carbon for the two seasons. It can be concluded that in February, the higher activity of the ecosystem coupled with a higher cycling and a mean internal organization, ensure the sufficient feeding of the migratory shorebirds. PMID:24204666

  4. An ant colony optimization based feature selection for web page classification.

    PubMed

    Saraç, Esra; Özel, Selma Ayşe

    2014-01-01

    The increased popularity of the web has caused the inclusion of huge amount of information to the web, and as a result of this explosive information growth, automated web page classification systems are needed to improve search engines' performance. Web pages have a large number of features such as HTML/XML tags, URLs, hyperlinks, and text contents that should be considered during an automated classification process. The aim of this study is to reduce the number of features to be used to improve runtime and accuracy of the classification of web pages. In this study, we used an ant colony optimization (ACO) algorithm to select the best features, and then we applied the well-known C4.5, naive Bayes, and k nearest neighbor classifiers to assign class labels to web pages. We used the WebKB and Conference datasets in our experiments, and we showed that using the ACO for feature selection improves both accuracy and runtime performance of classification. We also showed that the proposed ACO based algorithm can select better features with respect to the well-known information gain and chi square feature selection methods. PMID:25136678

  5. An Ant Colony Optimization Based Feature Selection for Web Page Classification

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The increased popularity of the web has caused the inclusion of huge amount of information to the web, and as a result of this explosive information growth, automated web page classification systems are needed to improve search engines' performance. Web pages have a large number of features such as HTML/XML tags, URLs, hyperlinks, and text contents that should be considered during an automated classification process. The aim of this study is to reduce the number of features to be used to improve runtime and accuracy of the classification of web pages. In this study, we used an ant colony optimization (ACO) algorithm to select the best features, and then we applied the well-known C4.5, naive Bayes, and k nearest neighbor classifiers to assign class labels to web pages. We used the WebKB and Conference datasets in our experiments, and we showed that using the ACO for feature selection improves both accuracy and runtime performance of classification. We also showed that the proposed ACO based algorithm can select better features with respect to the well-known information gain and chi square feature selection methods. PMID:25136678

  6. Web Image Retrieval Using Self-Organizing Feature Map.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Qishi; Iyengar, S. Sitharama; Zhu, Mengxia

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of current image retrieval systems. Describes the architecture of the SOFM (Self Organizing Feature Maps) based image retrieval system, discussing the system architecture and features. Introduces the Kohonen model, and describes the implementation details of SOFM computation and its learning algorithm. Presents a test example…

  7. Underground storage tanks 200W-FS-34 and 200W-FS-35 excavated soil field sample plan

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, J.G.

    1994-09-07

    This plan outlines the process that will be used to collect samples from soil excavated during removal of underground storage tanks 200W-FS-34 and 200W-FS-35. The samples will be analyzed to determine if gasoline and diesel fuel are present in the soil at levels above action levels specified by the Washington State Department of Ecology. On April 15, 1992, the underground storage tanks were removed and soil samples were collected at each former tank location and from around the associated piping. Soil was excavated from the site until field instrumentation indicated that the former tank sites were clean in the judgment of the field team leader. Field monitoring consisted of using an organic vapor monitor to survey soil shaken in a plastic bag. Monitoring indicated that petroleum contamination ranged from 40 to 800 ppm.

  8. Randomized comparisons among health informatics students identify hypertutorial features as improving web-based instruction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Craig W; Xing, Yan; Yang, Lan

    2003-01-01

    Hypertutorials optimize five features - presentation, learner control, practice, feedback, and elaborative learning resources. Previous research showed graduate students significantly and overwhelmingly preferred Web-based hypertutorials to conventional "Book-on-the-Web" statistics or research design lessons. The current report shows that the source of hypertutorials' superiority in student evaluations of instruction lies in their hypertutorial features. Randomized comparisons between the two methodologies were conducted in two successive iterations of a graduate level health informatics research design and evaluation course. The two versions contained the same text and graphics, but differed in the presence or absence of hypertutorial features: Elaborative learning resources, practice, feedback, and amount of learner control. Students gave high evaluations to both Web-based methodologies, but consistently rated the hypertutorial lessons as superior. Significant differences localized in the hypertutorial subscale that measured student responses to hypertutorial features. PMID:14728188

  9. Randomized Comparisons among Health Informatics Students Identify Hypertutorial Features as Improving Web-Based Instruction

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Craig W.; Xing, Yan; Yang, Lan

    2003-01-01

    Hypertutorials optimize five features – presentation, learner control, practice, feedback, and elaborative learning resources. Previous research showed graduate students significantly and overwhelmingly preferred Web-based hypertutorials to conventional “Book-on-the-Web” statistics or research design lessons. The current report shows that the source of hypertutorials’ superiority in student evaluations of instruction lies in their hypertutorial features. Randomized comparisons between the two methodologies were conducted in two successive iterations of a graduate level health informatics research design and evaluation course. The two versions contained the same text and graphics, but differed in the presence or absence of hypertutorial features: Elaborative learning resources, practice, feedback, and amount of learner control. Students gave high evaluations to both Web-based methodologies, but consistently rated the hypertutorial lessons as superior. Significant differences localized in the hypertutorial subscale that measured student responses to hypertutorial features. PMID:14728188

  10. c.376G>A mutation in WFS1 gene causes Wolfram syndrome without deafness.

    PubMed

    Safarpour Lima, Behnam; Ghaedi, Hamid; Daftarian, Narsis; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Jamshidi, Javad; Khorrami, Mehdi; Noroozi, Rezvan; Sohrabifar, Nasim; Assarzadegan, Farhad; Hesami, Omid; Taghavi, Shaghayegh; Ahmadifard, Azadeh; Atakhorrami, Minoo; Rahimi-Aliabadi, Simin; Shahmohammadibeni, Neda; Alehabib, Elham; Andarva, Monavvar; Darvish, Hossein; Emamalizadeh, Babak

    2016-02-01

    Wolfram syndrome is one of the rare autosomal recessive, progressive, neurodegenerative disorders, characterized by diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. Several other features are observed in patients including deafness, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. A gene called WFS1 is identified on chromosome 4p, responsible for Wolfram syndrome. We investigated a family consisted of parents and 8 children, which 5 of them have been diagnosed for Wolfram syndrome. WFS1 gene in all family members was sequenced for causative mutations. A mutation (c.376G>A, p.A126T) was found in all affected members in homozygous state and in both parents in heterozygous state. The bioinformatics analysis showed the deleterious effects of this nucleotide change on the structure and function of the protein product. As all of the patients in the family showed the homozygote mutation, and parents were both heterozygote, this mutation is probably the cause of the disease. We identified this mutation in homozygous state for the first time as Wolfram syndrome causation. We also showed that this mutation probably doesn't cause deafness in affected individuals. PMID:26773575

  11. Analysis of metabolic effects of menthol on WFS1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Marite; Ivask, Marilin; Raasmaja, Atso; Kõks, Sulev

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the physiological regulation of energy metabolism in wild-type (WT) and WFS1-deficient (Wfs1KO) mice by measuring the effects of menthol treatment on the O2 consumption, CO2 production, rectal body temperature, and heat production. The basal metabolism and behavior was different between these genotypes as well as TRP family gene expressions. Wfs1KO mice had a shorter life span and weighed less than WT mice. The food and water intake of Wfs1KO mice was lower as well as the body temperature when compared to their WT littermates. Furthermore, Wfs1KO mice had higher basal O2 consumption, and CO2 and heat production than WT mice. In addition, Wfs1KO mice showed a higher response to menthol administration in comparison to WT mice. The strongest menthol effect was seen on different physiological measures 12 h after oral administration. The highest metabolic response of Wfs1KO mice was seen at the menthol dose of 10 mg/kg. Menthol increased O2 consumption, and CO2 and heat production in Wfs1KO mice when compared to their WT littermates. In addition, the expression of Trpm8 gene was increased. In conclusion, our results show that the Wfs1KO mice develop a metabolic phenotype characterized with several physiological dysfunctions. PMID:26733243

  12. Common variants in WFS1 confer risk of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Manjinder S; Weedon, Michael N; Fawcett, Katherine A; Wasson, Jon; Debenham, Sally L; Daly, Allan; Lango, Hana; Frayling, Timothy M; Neumann, Rosalind J; Sherva, Richard; Blech, Ilana; Pharoah, Paul D; Palmer, Colin N A; Kimber, Charlotte; Tavendale, Roger; Morris, Andrew D; McCarthy, Mark I; Walker, Mark; Hitman, Graham; Glaser, Benjamin; Permutt, M Alan; Hattersley, Andrew T; Wareham, Nicholas J; Barroso, InĂŞs

    2009-01-01

    We studied genes involved in pancreatic β cell function and survival, identifying associations between SNPs in WFS1 and diabetes risk in UK populations that we replicated in an Ashkenazi population and in additional UK studies. In a pooled analysis comprising 9,533 cases and 11,389 controls, SNPs in WFS1 were strongly associated with diabetes risk. Rare mutations in WFS1 cause Wolfram syndrome; using a gene-centric approach, we show that variation in WFS1 also predisposes to common type 2 diabetes. PMID:17603484

  13. Hydrogeomorphic features mediate the effects of land use/cover on reservoir productivity and food webs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bremigan, M.T.; Soranno, P.A.; Gonzalez, M.J.; Bunnell, D.B.; Arend, K.K.; Renwick, W.H.; Stein, R.A.; Vanni, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Although effects of land use/cover on nutrient concentrations in aquatic systems are well known, half or more of the variation in nutrient concentration remains unexplained by land use/cover alone. Hydrogeomorphic (HGM) landscape features can explain much remaining variation and influence food web interactions. To explore complex linkages among land use/cover, HGM features, reservoir productivity, and food webs, we sampled 11 Ohio reservoirs, ranging broadly in agricultural catchment land use/cover, for 3 years. We hypothesized that HGM features mediate the bottom-up effects of land use/cover on reservoir productivity, chlorophyll a, zooplankton, and recruitment of gizzard shad, an omnivorous fish species common throughout southeastern U.S. reservoirs and capable of exerting strong effects on food web and nutrient dynamics. We tested specific hypotheses using a model selection approach. Percent variation explained was highest for total nitrogen (R2 = 0.92), moderately high for total phosphorus, chlorophyll a, and rotifer biomass (R2 = 0.57 to 0.67), relatively low for crustacean zooplankton biomass and larval gizzard shad hatch abundance (R2 = 0.43 and 0.42), and high for larval gizzard shad survivor abundance (R2 = 0.79). The trophic status models included agricultural land use/cover and an HGM predictor, whereas the zooplankton models had few HGM predictors. The larval gizzard shad models had the highest complexity, including more than one HGM feature and food web components. We demonstrate the importance of integrating land use/cover, HGM features, and food web interactions to investigate critical interactions and feedbacks among physical, chemical, and biological components of linked land-water ecosystems.

  14. Persuasive Features in Web-Based Alcohol and Smoking Interventions: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the past decade, the use of technologies to persuade, motivate, and activate individuals’ health behavior change has been a quickly expanding field of research. The use of the Web for delivering interventions has been especially relevant. Current research tends to reveal little about the persuasive features and mechanisms embedded in Web-based interventions targeting health behavior change. Objectives The purpose of this systematic review was to extract and analyze persuasive system features in Web-based interventions for substance use by applying the persuasive systems design (PSD) model. In more detail, the main objective was to provide an overview of the persuasive features within current Web-based interventions for substance use. Methods We conducted electronic literature searches in various databases to identify randomized controlled trials of Web-based interventions for substance use published January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2009, in English. We extracted and analyzed persuasive system features of the included Web-based interventions using interpretive categorization. Results The primary task support components were utilized and reported relatively widely in the reviewed studies. Reduction, self-monitoring, simulation, and personalization seem to be the most used features to support accomplishing user’s primary task. This is an encouraging finding since reduction and self-monitoring can be considered key elements for supporting users to carry out their primary tasks. The utilization of tailoring was at a surprisingly low level. The lack of tailoring may imply that the interventions are targeted for too broad an audience. Leveraging reminders was the most common way to enhance the user-system dialogue. Credibility issues are crucial in website engagement as users will bind with sites they perceive credible and navigate away from those they do not find credible. Based on the textual descriptions of the interventions, we cautiously suggest that most of them were credible. The prevalence of social support in the reviewed interventions was encouraging. Conclusions Understanding the persuasive elements of systems supporting behavior change is important. This may help users to engage and keep motivated in their endeavors. Further research is needed to increase our understanding of how and under what conditions specific persuasive features (either in isolation or collectively) lead to positive health outcomes in Web-based health behavior change interventions across diverse health contexts and populations. PMID:21795238

  15. World Wide Web Based Image Search Engine Using Text and Image Content Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Bo; Wang, Xiaogang; Tang, Xiaoou

    2003-01-01

    Using both text and image content features, a hybrid image retrieval system for Word Wide Web is developed in this paper. We first use a text-based image meta-search engine to retrieve images from the Web based on the text information on the image host pages to provide an initial image set. Because of the high-speed and low cost nature of the text-based approach, we can easily retrieve a broad coverage of images with a high recall rate and a relatively low precision. An image content based ordering is then performed on the initial image set. All the images are clustered into different folders based on the image content features. In addition, the images can be re-ranked by the content features according to the user feedback. Such a design makes it truly practical to use both text and image content for image retrieval over the Internet. Experimental results confirm the efficiency of the system.

  16. Caching strategies for improving performance of web-based Geographic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Brodzik, M.; Collins, J. A.; Lewis, S.; Oldenburg, J.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Operation IceBridge mission collects airborne remote sensing measurements to bridge the gap between NASA's Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) mission and the upcoming ICESat-2 mission. The IceBridge Data Portal from the National Snow and Ice Data Center provides an intuitive web interface for accessing IceBridge mission observations and measurements. Scientists and users usually do not have knowledge about the individual campaigns but are interested in data collected in a specific place. We have developed a high-performance map interface to allow users to quickly zoom to an area of interest and see any Operation IceBridge overflights. The map interface consists of two layers: the user can pan and zoom on the base map layer; the flight line layer that overlays the base layer provides all the campaign missions that intersect with the current map view. The user can click on the flight campaigns and download the data as needed. The OpenGIS® Web Map Service Interface Standard (WMS) provides a simple HTTP interface for requesting geo-registered map images from one or more distributed geospatial databases. Web Feature Service (WFS) provides an interface allowing requests for geographical features across the web using platform-independent calls. OpenLayers provides vector support (points, polylines and polygons) to build a WMS/WFS client for displaying both layers on the screen. Map Server, an open source development environment for building spatially enabled internet applications, is serving the WMS and WFS spatial data to OpenLayers. Early releases of the portal displayed unacceptably poor load time performance for flight lines and the base map tiles. This issue was caused by long response times from the map server in generating all map tiles and flight line vectors. We resolved the issue by implementing various caching strategies on top of the WMS and WFS services, including the use of Squid (www.squid-cache.org) to cache frequently-used content. Our presentation includes the architectural design of the application, and how we use OpenLayers, WMS and WFS with Squid to build a responsive web application capable of efficiently displaying geospatial data to allow the user to quickly interact with the displayed information. We describe the design, implementation and performance improvement of our caching strategies, and the tools and techniques developed to assist our data caching strategies.

  17. Energy metabolism and thyroid function of mice with deleted wolframin (Wfs1) gene.

    PubMed

    Noormets, K; Kõks, S; Ivask, M; Aunapuu, M; Arend, A; Vasar, E; Tillmann, V

    2014-05-01

    There is no data about the energy metabolism of patients with Wolfram syndrome caused by mutations in the wolframin (Wfs1) gene. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Wfs1 in energy metabolism and thyroid function in Wfs1 deficient mice (Wfs1KO). 16 male (8 Wfs1KO, 8 wild type (wt)) and 16 female (8 Wfs1KO, 8wt) mice aged 11-13 weeks were studied alone in a specific metabolic cage for 48 h. Body weight, food, water and O2 consumption, motor activity, CO2 and heat production of mice were recorded. At the age of 14-20 weeks, plasma levels of thyroxine (T4), TSH and leptin were measured and histology of thyroid tissues examined. Mean CO2 and heat production was not different between the groups. Mean O2 consumption was higher in the Wfs1KO females compared to the Wfs1KO males (3 410.0±127.0 vs. 2 806.0±82.4 ml/kg/h; p<0.05), but not compared to the wt mice. The mean movement activity was not different between the groups except that the Wfs1KO females reared up more often than the wt females (199.8±63.46 vs. 39.26±24.71 cnts/48 h; p<0.05). Both male and female Wfs1KO mice had significantly lower body mass and food intake than wt mice. Male Wfs1KO mice also lost more weight in metabolic cage than wt males (20.43±0.41 vs. 16.07±0.86%; p<0.05) indicating more pronounced response to isolation. Male Wfs1KO mice had significantly lower levels of plasma leptin than wt male mice (3.37±0.40 vs. 5.82±0.71 ng/ml; p<0.01). Thyroid function measured by serum TSH and T4 levels was not different between Wfs1KO and wt groups, but both Wfs1KO and wt male mice had significantly higher mean T4 levels than female mice. The histology of thyroid tissue of Wfs1KO males showed a trend to a smaller mean number of epithelial cells per follicle than the wt male mice.Although Wfs1KO mice were smaller and lost more weight during the experiment, their energy metabolism was not different from wt mice except that the female Wfs1KO mice consumed more O2. As mice in this study were relatively young, longitudinal studies in older mice are necessary to clarify whether Wfs1 has a role in energy metabolism when the disease progresses further. PMID:24710642

  18. Automatic search of geospatial features for disaster and emergency management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuanrong; Zhao, Tian; Li, Weidong

    2010-12-01

    Although the fast development of OGC (Open Geospatial Consortium) WFS (Web Feature Service) technologies has undoubtedly improved the sharing and synchronization of feature-level geospatial information across diverse resources, literature shows that there are still apparent limitations in the current implementation of OGC WFSs. Currently, the implementation of OGC WFSs only emphasizes syntactic data interoperability via standard interfaces and cannot resolve semantic heterogeneity problems in geospatial data sharing. To help emergency responders and disaster managers find new ways of efficiently searching for needed geospatial information at the feature level, this paper aims to propose a framework for automatic search of geospatial features using Geospatial Semantic Web technologies and natural language interfaces. We focus on two major tasks: (1) intelligent geospatial feature retrieval using Geospatial Semantic Web technologies; (2) a natural language interface to a geospatial knowledge base and web feature services over the Semantic Web. Based on the proposed framework we implemented a prototype. Results show that it is practical to directly discover desirable geospatial features from multiple semantically heterogeneous sources using Geospatial Semantic Web technologies and natural language interfaces.

  19. Multi-Sensor Hurricane Web Site Featuring Ultra Hi-Res QuikSCAT Wind Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R.; Rodriguez, E.; Vazquez, J.; Rigor, E.; Poulsen, L.; Dunbar, S.; Long, D.; Kessling, M.; Callahan, P.; Liggett, P.

    2006-12-01

    Different spaceborne sensors enable different, potentially novel analyses of hurricanes. Scatterometer data augment traditional satellite images of clouds by providing direct measurements of surface winds to compare with observed cloud patterns, better determining a hurricane's location, direction, structure, and strength. Sea surface temperature data illuminate both the preconditions and the effects of hurricanes along their tracks. To further multi-sensor studies of hurricanes, PO.DAAC offers the web page http://podaac.jpl.nasa.gov/hurricanes, which features - easy access to hurricane-specific data for multiple sensors - near-real-time and historical hurricane data - visualized storm tracks with data hits located by time The primary sensor for this web page is QuikSCAT. In near-real-time, ultra-high resolution wind images (2.5 km/pixel speeds overlaid with 12.5 km directions) visualize the also available backscatter and merged geophysical data records. The web site also offers historical, more scientifically accurate images, backscatter, and wind vectors dating back to the beginning of the mission in 1999. Furthermore, the web page provides sea surface temperature data at 50km resolution from the AMSR-E instrument. Future plans include adding other radiometer data and sea surface height data from the Jason altimeter.

  20. Sex differences in the development of diabetes in mice with deleted wolframin (Wfs1) gene.

    PubMed

    Noormets, K; Kõks, S; Muldmaa, M; Mauring, L; Vasar, E; Tillmann, V

    2011-05-01

    Wolfram syndrome, caused by mutations in the wolframin (Wfs1) gene, is characterised by juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus, progressive optic atrophy, diabetes insipidus and deafness. Diabetes tend to start earlier in boys. This study investigated sex differences in longitudinal changes in blood glucose concentration (BGC) in wolframin-deficient mice (Wfs1KO) and compared their plasma proinsulin and insulin levels with those of wild-type (wt) mice. Non-fasting BGC was measured weekly in 42 (21 males) mice from both groups at nine weeks of age. An intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT) was conducted at the 30 (th) week and plasma insulin, c-peptide and proinsulin levels were measured at the 32 (nd) week. At the 32 (nd) week, Wfs1KO males had increased BGC compared to wt males (9.40±0.60 mmol/l vs. 7.91±0.20 mmol/l; p<0.05). The opposite tendency was seen in females. Both male and female Wfs1KO mice had impaired glucose tolerance on IPGTT. Wfs1KO males had significantly lower mean plasma insulin levels than wt males (57.78±1.80 ng/ml vs. 69.42±3.06 ng/ml; p<0.01) and Wfs1KO females (70.30±4.42 ng/ml; p<0.05). Wfs1KO males had a higher proinsulin/insulin ratio than wt males (0.09±0.02 vs. 0.05±0.01; p=0.05) and Wfs1KO females (0.04±0.01; p<0.05). Plasma c-peptide levels in males were lower in Wfs1KO males (mean 55.3±14.0 pg/ml vs. 112.7±21.9 pg/ml; p<0.05). Male Wfs1KO mice had a greater risk of developing diabetes than female Wfs1KO mice. Low plasma insulin concentration with an increased proinsulin/insulin ratio in Wfs1KO males indicates possible disturbances in converting proinsulin to insulin which in long-term may lead to insulin deficiency. Further investigation is needed to clarify the mechanism for the sex differences in the development of diabetes in Wolfram syndrome. PMID:21031341

  1. Prohormone convertase 2 activity is increased in the hippocampus of Wfs1 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Tein, Karin; Kasvandik, Sergo; Kõks, Sulev; Vasar, Eero; Terasmaa, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mutations in WFS1 gene cause Wolfram syndrome, which is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic nerve atrophy, and deafness. The WFS1 gene product wolframin is located in the endoplasmic reticulum. Mice lacking this gene exhibit disturbances in the processing and secretion of peptides, such as vasopressin and insulin. In the brain, high levels of the wolframin protein have been observed in the hippocampus, amygdala, and limbic structures. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Wfs1 knockout (KO) on peptide processing in mouse hippocampus. A peptidomic approach was used to characterize individual peptides in the hippocampus of wild-type and Wfs1 KO mice. Results: We identified 126 peptides in hippocampal extracts and the levels of 10 peptides differed between Wfs1 KO and wild-type mice at P < 0.05. The peptide with the largest alteration was little-LEN, which level was 25 times higher in the hippocampus of Wfs1 KO mice compared to wild-type mice. Processing (cleavage) of little-LEN from the Pcsk1n gene product proSAAS involves prohormone convertase 2 (PC2). Thus, PC2 activity was measured in extracts prepared from the hippocampus of Wfs1 KO mice. The activity of PC2 in Wfs1 mutant mice was significantly higher (149.9 ± 2.3%, p < 0.0001, n = 8) than in wild-type mice (100.0 ± 7.0%, n = 8). However, Western blot analysis showed that protein levels of 7B2, proPC2 and PC2 were same in both groups, and so were gene expression levels. Conclusion: Processing of proSAAS is altered in the hippocampus of Wfs1-KO mice, which is caused by increased activity of PC2. Increased activity of PC2 in Wfs1 KO mice is not caused by alteration in the levels of PC2 protein. Our results suggest a functional link between Wfs1 and PC2. Thus, the detailed molecular mechanism of the role of Wfs1 in the regulation of PC2 activity needs further investigation. PMID:26379490

  2. repRNA: a web server for generating various feature vectors of RNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Liu, Fule; Fang, Longyun; Wang, Xiaolong; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2016-02-01

    With the rapid growth of RNA sequences generated in the postgenomic age, it is highly desired to develop a flexible method that can generate various kinds of vectors to represent these sequences by focusing on their different features. This is because nearly all the existing machine-learning methods, such as SVM (support vector machine) and KNN (k-nearest neighbor), can only handle vectors but not sequences. To meet the increasing demands and speed up the genome analyses, we have developed a new web server, called "representations of RNA sequences" (repRNA). Compared with the existing methods, repRNA is much more comprehensive, flexible and powerful, as reflected by the following facts: (1) it can generate 11 different modes of feature vectors for users to choose according to their investigation purposes; (2) it allows users to select the features from 22 built-in physicochemical properties and even those defined by users' own; (3) the resultant feature vectors and the secondary structures of the corresponding RNA sequences can be visualized. The repRNA web server is freely accessible to the public at http://bioinformatics.hitsz.edu.cn/repRNA/ . PMID:26085220

  3. Male mice with deleted Wolframin (Wfs1) gene have reduced fertility

    PubMed Central

    Noormets, Klari; Kõks, Sulev; Kavak, Ants; Arend, Andres; Aunapuu, Marina; Keldrimaa, Aivi; Vasar, Eero; Tillmann, Vallo

    2009-01-01

    Background Wolfram Syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by non-autoimmune diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, cranial diabetes insipidus and sensorineural deafness. Some reports have described hypogonadism in male WS patients. The aim of our study was to find out whether Wfs1 deficient (Wfs1KO) male mice have reduced fertility and, if so, to examine possible causes. Methods Wfs1KO mice were generated by homologous recombination. Both Wfs1KO and wild type (wt) male mice were mated with wt female mice. The number of litters and the number of pups were counted and pregnancy rates calculated. The motility and morphology of the sperm and the histology of testes were analysed. Serum testosterone and FSH concentrations were also measured. Results The pregnancy rate in wt females mated with Wfs1KO males was significantly lower than in the control group (15% vs. 32%; p < 0.05), but there was no significant difference in litter size. Analysis of male fertility showed that, in the Wfs1KO group, eight males out of 13 had pups whereas in the control group all 13 males had at least one litter. Sperm motility was not affected in Wfs1KO mice, but Wfs1KO males had less proximal bent tails (14.4 +/- 1.2% vs. 21.5 +/- 1.3 p < 0.05) and less abnormal sperm heads (22.8 +/- 1.8 vs. 31.5 +/- 3.5, p < 0.05) than wt males. Testes histology revealed significantly reduced number of spermatogonia (23.9 +/- 4.9 vs. 38.1 +/- 2.8; p < 0.05) and Sertoli cells (6.4 +/- 0.5 vs. 9.2 +/- 1.0; p < 0.05) in Wfs1KO mice. Serum testosterone and FSH concentrations did not differ between the two groups. Conclusion The impaired fertility of Wfs1KO male mice is most likely due to changes in sperm morphology and reduced number of spermatogenic cells. The exact mechanism through which the Wfs1 gene influences sperm morphology needs to be clarified in further studies. PMID:19664290

  4. A flexible geospatial sensor observation service for diverse sensor data based on Web service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nengcheng; Di, Liping; Yu, Genong; Min, Min

    Achieving a flexible and efficient geospatial Sensor Observation Service (SOS) is difficult, given the diversity of sensor networks, the heterogeneity of sensor data storage, and the differing requirements of users. This paper describes development of a service-oriented multi-purpose SOS framework. The goal is to create a single method of access to the data by integrating the sensor observation service with other Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) services — Catalogue Service for the Web (CSW), Transactional Web Feature Service (WFS-T) and Transactional Web Coverage Service (WCS-T). The framework includes an extensible sensor data adapter, an OGC-compliant geospatial SOS, a geospatial catalogue service, a WFS-T, and a WCS-T for the SOS, and a geospatial sensor client. The extensible sensor data adapter finds, stores, and manages sensor data from live sensors, sensor models, and simulation systems. Abstract factory design patterns are used during design and implementation. A sensor observation service compatible with the SWE is designed, following the OGC "core" and "transaction" specifications. It is implemented using Java servlet technology. It can be easily deployed in any Java servlet container and automatically exposed for discovery using Web Service Description Language (WSDL). Interaction sequences between a Sensor Web data consumer and an SOS, between a producer and an SOS, and between an SOS and a CSW are described in detail. The framework has been successfully demonstrated in application scenarios for EO-1 observations, weather observations, and water height gauge observations.

  5. Evidence for impaired function of dopaminergic system in Wfs1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Visnapuu, Tanel; Plaas, Mario; Reimets, Riin; Raud, Sirli; Terasmaa, Anton; Kõks, Sulev; Sütt, Silva; Luuk, Hendrik; Hundahl, Christian Ansgar; Eskla, Kattri-Liis; Altpere, Alina; Alttoa, Aet; Harro, Jaanus; Vasar, Eero

    2013-05-01

    Immunohistological studies suggest abundant expression of Wfs1 protein in neurons and nerve fibers that lie in the vicinity of dopaminergic (DA-ergic) fibers and neurons. Therefore, we sought to characterize the function of DA-ergic system in Wfs1-deficient mice. In wild-type mice, amphetamine, an indirect agonist of DA, caused significant hyperlocomotion and increase in tissue DA levels in the dorsal and ventral striatum. Both effects of amphetamine were significantly blunted in homozygous Wfs1-deficient mice. Motor stimulation caused by apomorphine, a direct DA receptor agonist, was somewhat stronger in Wfs1-deficient mice compared to their wild-type littermates. However, apomorphine caused a similar reduction in levels of DA metabolites (3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid) in the dorsal and ventral striatum in all genotypes. Behavioral sensitization to repeated treatment with amphetamine (2.5 mg/kg) was observed in wild-type, but not in Wfs1-deficient mice. The expression of DA transporter gene (Dat) mRNA was significantly lower in the midbrain of male and female homozygous mice compared to wild-type littermates. Altogether, the blunted effects of amphetamine and the reduced gene expression of DA transporter are probably indicative of an impaired functioning of the DA-ergic system in Wfs1-deficient mice. PMID:23396150

  6. Effect of Chronic Valproic Acid Treatment on Hepatic Gene Expression Profile in Wfs1 Knockout Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sütt, Silva; Kõks, Sulev; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.; Fernandes, Catherine; Vasar, Eero

    2014-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a widely used anticonvulsant and mood-stabilizing drug whose use is often associated with drug-induced weight gain. Treatment with VPA has been shown to upregulate Wfs1 expression in vitro. Aim of the present study was to compare the effect of chronic VPA treatment in wild type (WT) and Wfs1 knockout (KO) mice on hepatic gene expression profile. Wild type, Wfs1 heterozygous, and homozygous mice were treated with VPA for three months (300 mg/kg i.p. daily) and gene expression profiles in liver were evaluated using Affymetrix Mouse GeneChip 1.0 ST array. We identified 42 genes affected by Wfs1 genotype, 10 genes regulated by VPA treatment, and 9 genes whose regulation by VPA was dependent on genotype. Among the genes that were regulated differentially by VPA depending on genotype was peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (Ppard), whose expression was upregulated in response to VPA treatment in WT, but not in Wfs1 KO mice. Thus, regulation of Ppard by VPA is dependent on Wfs1 genotype. PMID:24799886

  7. Effect of chronic valproic Acid treatment on hepatic gene expression profile in wfs1 knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Punapart, Marite; Eltermaa, Mall; Oflijan, Julia; Sütt, Silva; Must, Anne; Kõks, Sulev; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Fernandes, Catherine; Vasar, Eero; Soomets, Ursel; Terasmaa, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a widely used anticonvulsant and mood-stabilizing drug whose use is often associated with drug-induced weight gain. Treatment with VPA has been shown to upregulate Wfs1 expression in vitro. Aim of the present study was to compare the effect of chronic VPA treatment in wild type (WT) and Wfs1 knockout (KO) mice on hepatic gene expression profile. Wild type, Wfs1 heterozygous, and homozygous mice were treated with VPA for three months (300 mg/kg i.p. daily) and gene expression profiles in liver were evaluated using Affymetrix Mouse GeneChip 1.0 ST array. We identified 42 genes affected by Wfs1 genotype, 10 genes regulated by VPA treatment, and 9 genes whose regulation by VPA was dependent on genotype. Among the genes that were regulated differentially by VPA depending on genotype was peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (Ppard), whose expression was upregulated in response to VPA treatment in WT, but not in Wfs1 KO mice. Thus, regulation of Ppard by VPA is dependent on Wfs1 genotype. PMID:24799886

  8. Phenotype Prediction of Pathogenic Nonsynonymous Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in WFS1

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xuli; Qin, Luyang; Xing, Guangqian; Cao, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a rare, progressive, neurodegenerative disorder that has an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. The gene for WS, wolfram syndrome 1 gene (WFS1), is located on human chromosome 4p16.1 and encodes a transmembrane protein. To date, approximately 230 mutations in WFS1 have been confirmed, in which nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) are the most common forms of genetic variation. Nonetheless, there is poor knowledge on the relationship between SNP genotype and phenotype in other nsSNPs of the WFS1 gene. Here, we analysed 395 nsSNPs associated with the WFS1 gene using different computational methods and identified 20 nsSNPs to be potentially pathogenic. Furthermore, to identify the amino acid distributions and significances of pathogenic nsSNPs in the protein of WFS1, its transmembrane domain was constructed by the TMHMM server, which suggested that mutations outside of the TMhelix could have more effects on protein function. The predicted pathogenic mutations for the nsSNPs of the WFS1 gene provide an excellent guide for screening pathogenic mutations. PMID:26435059

  9. Pragmatic service development and customisation with the CEDA OGC Web Services framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascoe, Stephen; Stephens, Ag; Lowe, Dominic

    2010-05-01

    The CEDA OGC Web Services framework (COWS) emphasises rapid service development by providing a lightweight layer of OGC web service logic on top of Pylons, a mature web application framework for the Python language. This approach gives developers a flexible web service development environment without compromising access to the full range of web application tools and patterns: Model-View-Controller paradigm, XML templating, Object-Relational-Mapper integration and authentication/authorization. We have found this approach useful for exploring evolving standards and implementing protocol extensions to meet the requirements of operational deployments. This paper outlines how COWS is being used to implement customised WMS, WCS, WFS and WPS services in a variety of web applications from experimental prototypes to load-balanced cluster deployments serving 10-100 simultaneous users. In particular we will cover 1) The use of Climate Science Modeling Language (CSML) in complex-feature aware WMS, WCS and WFS services, 2) Extending WMS to support applications with features specific to earth system science and 3) A cluster-enabled Web Processing Service (WPS) supporting asynchronous data processing. The COWS WPS underpins all backend services in the UK Climate Projections User Interface where users can extract, plot and further process outputs from a multi-dimensional probabilistic climate model dataset. The COWS WPS supports cluster job execution, result caching, execution time estimation and user management. The COWS WMS and WCS components drive the project-specific NCEO and QESDI portals developed by the British Atmospheric Data Centre. These portals use CSML as a backend description format and implement features such as multiple WMS layer dimensions and climatology axes that are beyond the scope of general purpose GIS tools and yet vital for atmospheric science applications.

  10. BPELPower—A BPEL execution engine for geospatial web services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Genong (Eugene); Zhao, Peisheng; Di, Liping; Chen, Aijun; Deng, Meixia; Bai, Yuqi

    2012-10-01

    The Business Process Execution Language (BPEL) has become a popular choice for orchestrating and executing workflows in the Web environment. As one special kind of scientific workflow, geospatial Web processing workflows are data-intensive, deal with complex structures in data and geographic features, and execute automatically with limited human intervention. To enable the proper execution and coordination of geospatial workflows, a specially enhanced BPEL execution engine is required. BPELPower was designed, developed, and implemented as a generic BPEL execution engine with enhancements for executing geospatial workflows. The enhancements are especially in its capabilities in handling Geography Markup Language (GML) and standard geospatial Web services, such as the Web Processing Service (WPS) and the Web Feature Service (WFS). BPELPower has been used in several demonstrations over the decade. Two scenarios were discussed in detail to demonstrate the capabilities of BPELPower. That study showed a standard-compliant, Web-based approach for properly supporting geospatial processing, with the only enhancement at the implementation level. Pattern-based evaluation and performance improvement of the engine are discussed: BPELPower directly supports 22 workflow control patterns and 17 workflow data patterns. In the future, the engine will be enhanced with high performance parallel processing and broad Web paradigms.

  11. Large scale near-duplicate celebrity web images retrieval using visual and textual features.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Fengcai; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Near-duplicate image retrieval is a classical research problem in computer vision toward many applications such as image annotation and content-based image retrieval. On the web, near-duplication is more prevalent in queries for celebrities and historical figures which are of particular interest to the end users. Existing methods such as bag-of-visual-words (BoVW) solve this problem mainly by exploiting purely visual features. To overcome this limitation, this paper proposes a novel text-based data-driven reranking framework, which utilizes textual features and is combined with state-of-art BoVW schemes. Under this framework, the input of the retrieval procedure is still only a query image. To verify the proposed approach, a dataset of 2 million images of 1089 different celebrities together with their accompanying texts is constructed. In addition, we comprehensively analyze the different categories of near duplication observed in our constructed dataset. Experimental results on this dataset show that the proposed framework can achieve higher mean average precision (mAP) with an improvement of 21% on average in comparison with the approaches based only on visual features, while does not notably prolong the retrieval time. PMID:24163631

  12. Large Scale Near-Duplicate Celebrity Web Images Retrieval Using Visual and Textual Features

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Near-duplicate image retrieval is a classical research problem in computer vision toward many applications such as image annotation and content-based image retrieval. On the web, near-duplication is more prevalent in queries for celebrities and historical figures which are of particular interest to the end users. Existing methods such as bag-of-visual-words (BoVW) solve this problem mainly by exploiting purely visual features. To overcome this limitation, this paper proposes a novel text-based data-driven reranking framework, which utilizes textual features and is combined with state-of-art BoVW schemes. Under this framework, the input of the retrieval procedure is still only a query image. To verify the proposed approach, a dataset of 2 million images of 1089 different celebrities together with their accompanying texts is constructed. In addition, we comprehensively analyze the different categories of near duplication observed in our constructed dataset. Experimental results on this dataset show that the proposed framework can achieve higher mean average precision (mAP) with an improvement of 21% on average in comparison with the approaches based only on visual features, while does not notably prolong the retrieval time. PMID:24163631

  13. WIP: A Web-based program for indexing planar features in quartz grains and its usage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losiak, Anna; Golebiowska, Izabela; FerrièRe, Ludovic; Wojciechowski, Jacek; Huber, Matthew S.; Koeberl, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Planar deformation features (PDFs) in quartz are the most important diagnostic features that allow the unambiguous identification of impact structures on Earth. In order to confirm that these features (that are characterized by planar character and form along specific crystallographic planes) are indeed PDFs, they need to be properly investigated and indexed. Following universal-stage measurements, the process of indexing is usually performed manually, using a Wulff stereonet and following a strict procedure, which is time consuming and error prone. In this article, we present WIP, a new Web-based program for indexing planar deformation features in quartz. The correctness of our program is shown by its application to measurements that had previously been indexed manually. The observed minor differences, especially in the absolute frequency percentage of PDFs, are negligible and not significant enough to influence the estimation of shock pressure that could be calculated from the indexed results. Usability of this program is shown using the spatial relationships between a statistically significant number of 278 quartz grains with 409 sets of PDFs analyzed within the area ( 35 mm2) of a single thin section of a meta-greywacke from the Bosumtwi impact structure. Our program is not only more accurate and faster than the manual (graphical) method but also removes the human error from the plotting process and allows control of several parameters, such as the value of estimated measurement error used in the indexing calculation or method of aggregated error handling. The program also provides information about the angles between the planes of the measured PDF sets present in a grain, which allows determination of the angles between (for example) indexed {10 1ÂŻ3} and {10 1ÂŻ1} sets.

  14. Wfs1-deficient mice display altered function of serotonergic system and increased behavioral response to antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Visnapuu, Tanel; Raud, Sirli; Loomets, Maarja; Reimets, Riin; Sütt, Silva; Luuk, Hendrik; Plaas, Mario; Kõks, Sulev; Volke, Vallo; Alttoa, Aet; Harro, Jaanus; Vasar, Eero

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown that mutations in the WFS1 gene make humans more susceptible to mood disorders. Besides that, mood disorders are associated with alterations in the activity of serotonergic and noradrenergic systems. Therefore, in this study, the effects of imipramine, an inhibitor of serotonin (5-HT) and noradrenaline (NA) reuptake, and paroxetine, a selective inhibitor of 5-HT reuptake, were studied in tests of behavioral despair. The tail suspension test (TST) and forced swimming test (FST) were performed in Wfs1-deficient mice. Simultaneously, gene expression and monoamine metabolism studies were conducted to evaluate changes in 5-HT- and NA-ergic systems of Wfs1-deficient mice. The basal immobility time of Wfs1-deficient mice in TST and FST did not differ from that of their wild-type littermates. However, a significant reduction of immobility time in response to lower doses of imipramine and paroxetine was observed in homozygous Wfs1-deficient mice, but not in their wild-type littermates. In gene expression studies, the levels of 5-HT transporter (SERT) were significantly reduced in the pons of homozygous animals. Monoamine metabolism was assayed separately in the dorsal and ventral striatum of naive mice and mice exposed for 30 min to brightly lit motility boxes. We found that this aversive challenge caused a significant increase in the levels of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), a metabolite of 5-HT, in the ventral and dorsal striatum of wild-type mice, but not in their homozygous littermates. Taken together, the blunted 5-HT metabolism and reduced levels of SERT are a likely reason for the elevated sensitivity of these mice to the action of imipramine and paroxetine. These changes in the pharmacological and neurochemical phenotype of Wfs1-deficient mice may help to explain the increased susceptibility of Wolfram syndrome patients to depressive states. PMID:23914152

  15. Wfs1-deficient mice display altered function of serotonergic system and increased behavioral response to antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Visnapuu, Tanel; Raud, Sirli; Loomets, Maarja; Reimets, Riin; Sütt, Silva; Luuk, Hendrik; Plaas, Mario; Kõks, Sulev; Volke, Vallo; Alttoa, Aet; Harro, Jaanus; Vasar, Eero

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown that mutations in the WFS1 gene make humans more susceptible to mood disorders. Besides that, mood disorders are associated with alterations in the activity of serotonergic and noradrenergic systems. Therefore, in this study, the effects of imipramine, an inhibitor of serotonin (5-HT) and noradrenaline (NA) reuptake, and paroxetine, a selective inhibitor of 5-HT reuptake, were studied in tests of behavioral despair. The tail suspension test (TST) and forced swimming test (FST) were performed in Wfs1-deficient mice. Simultaneously, gene expression and monoamine metabolism studies were conducted to evaluate changes in 5-HT- and NA-ergic systems of Wfs1-deficient mice. The basal immobility time of Wfs1-deficient mice in TST and FST did not differ from that of their wild-type littermates. However, a significant reduction of immobility time in response to lower doses of imipramine and paroxetine was observed in homozygous Wfs1-deficient mice, but not in their wild-type littermates. In gene expression studies, the levels of 5-HT transporter (SERT) were significantly reduced in the pons of homozygous animals. Monoamine metabolism was assayed separately in the dorsal and ventral striatum of naive mice and mice exposed for 30 min to brightly lit motility boxes. We found that this aversive challenge caused a significant increase in the levels of 5-HT and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), a metabolite of 5-HT, in the ventral and dorsal striatum of wild-type mice, but not in their homozygous littermates. Taken together, the blunted 5-HT metabolism and reduced levels of SERT are a likely reason for the elevated sensitivity of these mice to the action of imipramine and paroxetine. These changes in the pharmacological and neurochemical phenotype of Wfs1-deficient mice may help to explain the increased susceptibility of Wolfram syndrome patients to depressive states. PMID:23914152

  16. Familial Wolfram syndrome due to compound heterozygosity for two novel WFS1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz, Gabriela; PĂ©rez-Cano, Hector J.; Camargo, Mayra

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To describe the first instance of genotyping in a Latin American family with Wolfram syndrome (WS). Methods Four affected siblings and their healthy parents were studied. Ophthalmologic examination included best corrected visual acuity determination, funduscopy, fluorescein retinal angiography, and Goldmann kinetic perimetry. Molecular methods included linkage analysis using microsatellites markers located on the markers located on the Wofram syndrome 1 (WFS1) region at 4p16.1, PCR amplification and direct nucleotide sequencing analysis of the complete coding region and exon/intron junctions of WFS1. In addition, allele-specific cloning and sequencing techniques were used to characterize a heterozygous frameshift mutation. Results The four affected siblings presented with a homogeneous clinical picture characterized by early onset diabetes mellitus, severe optic atrophy, and progressive hearing loss. Linkage analysis indicated that all four sibs were heterozygous for markers linked to the WFS1 region and that each inherited the same allele from the mother and the same from the father, suggesting compound heterozygosity. Direct WFS1 analysis disclosed a paternally inherited novel missense R177P mutation whereas allele-specific cloning and sequencing revealed a novel WFS1 16 bp deletion that was inherited from the mother. Conclusions Our report of two novel WFS1 mutations expands the molecular spectrum of Wolfram syndrome. This is the first documented case of the molecular basis of the disease in a Latin American family. Analysis of more patients from this population will establish if compound heterozygosity is commonly found in affected individuals from this ethnic group. PMID:18660851

  17. A Web-Based Self-Testing System with Some Features of Web 2.0: Design and Primary Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiaolei; Liu, Haitao; Bao, Zhen; Ju, Bo; Wang, Zhenghong

    2010-01-01

    Self-testing is a means to check learning effect. Besides time-space restriction, there are many deficiencies in traditional offline self-testing. With the development of information technology, learners can have self-testing on the Internet. Self-testing on Internet, namely, web-based self-testing, overcomes time-space limitation of traditional…

  18. A Web-Based Self-Testing System with Some Features of Web 2.0: Design and Primary Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Xiaolei; Liu, Haitao; Bao, Zhen; Ju, Bo; Wang, Zhenghong

    2010-01-01

    Self-testing is a means to check learning effect. Besides time-space restriction, there are many deficiencies in traditional offline self-testing. With the development of information technology, learners can have self-testing on the Internet. Self-testing on Internet, namely, web-based self-testing, overcomes time-space limitation of traditional…

  19. Supporting Ease-of-Use and User Control: Desired Features and Structure of Web-Based Online IR Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xie, Hong

    2003-01-01

    Describes a study that investigated users' perceptions of ease of use versus user control in Web-based online information retrieval (IR) systems. Discusses desired features and functionalities as well as desired interface structures that support both ease of use and user control. (Author/LRW)

  20. The OGC Sensor Web Enablement framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, S. J.; Botts, M.

    2006-12-01

    Sensor observations are at the core of natural sciences. Improvements in data-sharing technologies offer the promise of much greater utilisation of observational data. A key to this is interoperable data standards. The Open Geospatial Consortium's (OGC) Sensor Web Enablement initiative (SWE) is developing open standards for web interfaces for the discovery, exchange and processing of sensor observations, and tasking of sensor systems. The goal is to support the construction of complex sensor applications through real-time composition of service chains from standard components. The framework is based around a suite of standard interfaces, and standard encodings for the message transferred between services. The SWE interfaces include: Sensor Observation Service (SOS)-parameterized observation requests (by observation time, feature of interest, property, sensor); Sensor Planning Service (SPS)-tasking a sensor- system to undertake future observations; Sensor Alert Service (SAS)-subscription to an alert, usually triggered by a sensor result exceeding some value. The interface design generally follows the pattern established in the OGC Web Map Service (WMS) and Web Feature Service (WFS) interfaces, where the interaction between a client and service follows a standard sequence of requests and responses. The first obtains a general description of the service capabilities, followed by obtaining detail required to formulate a data request, and finally a request for a data instance or stream. These may be implemented in a stateless "REST" idiom, or using conventional "web-services" (SOAP) messaging. In a deployed system, the SWE interfaces are supplemented by Catalogue, data (WFS) and portrayal (WMS) services, as well as authentication and rights management. The standard SWE data formats are Observations and Measurements (O&M) which encodes observation metadata and results, Sensor Model Language (SensorML) which describes sensor-systems, Transducer Model Language (TML) which covers low-level data streams, and domain-specific GML Application Schemas for definitions of the target feature types. The SWE framework has been demonstrated in several interoperability testbeds. These were based around emergency management, security, contamination and environmental monitoring scenarios.

  1. Full-Featured Geophysical Database Interface Launchable From a Web Browser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxby, W.; Carbotte, S.; Ryan, W. B.; O'Hara, S.

    2002-12-01

    In recent years, the volume of geophysical data that is accessible over the world-wide web has increased dramatically. This trend promises to continue, and accelerate, as new data are collected, and as existing data are incorporated into new databases. However, while these data are available in the technical sense, they are often only accessible through web sites that suffer from one or more of the following limitations: difficult and tedious to constrain searches; difficult or impossible to download large blocks of data; or impossible to evaluate data quality prior to downloading. Once downloaded, further analysis of the data may require specialized software. These are issues that database interfaces must address in order to make data truly accessible. MapApp, a Java(TM) applet (also a downloadable application), is a prototype geographical database browser/interface that demonstrates capabilities that future database interfaces must incorporate. Geographic searches are quickly accomplished through mouse clicks on a map. Database modules are initialized by loading data blocks onto the client, which may then be analyzed interactively without waiting for time-consuming server requests to be processed. Data displayed in tables and X-Y graphs are keyed to map locations, so that, for example, selecting a table entry automatically highlights its associated map symbol, and vice-versa. Data products, such as maps, graphs, grids and tables may be saved in a variety of formats. We will demonstrate recent enhancements to MapApp: the Ridge Petrology Database interface, and a prototype multi-channel seismic interface. With the Ridge PetDB module, tables listing stations, compiled sample chemistry and individual chemical analyses are automatically updated when the map is modified or when the user modifies the search parameters (e.g., rock type, chemical group). The data tables may then be saved to a file, or copied to the system clipboard and pasted into an application such as Excel. The MCS module features an image browser that loads full resolution seismic images; provides zoom, scroll, horizontal stretch/shrink, reverse direction, color modification, and digitizing functions; and offers download options for images, stacked seg-y and navigation files. All modules have been tested on economical, run-of-the-mill Unix workstations and Windows PCs, with satisfactory results.

  2. Silencing of the WFS1 gene in HEK cells induces pathways related to neurodegeneration and mitochondrial damage.

    PubMed

    Kõks, Sulev; Overall, Rupert W; Ivask, Marilin; Soomets, Ursel; Guha, Mithu; Vasar, Eero; Fernandes, Cathy; Schalkwyk, Leo C

    2013-03-01

    The gene WFS1 encodes a protein with unknown function although its functional deficiency causes different neuropsychiatric and neuroendocrine syndromes. In the present study, we aimed to find the functional networks influenced by the time-dependent silencing of WFS1 in HEK cells. We performed whole genome gene expression profiling (Human Gene 1.0 ST Arrays) in HEK cells 24, 48, 72, and 96 h after transfection with three different WFS1 siRNAs. To verify silencing we performed quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Analysis was conducted in two ways. First we analyzed the overall effect of the siRNA treatment on the gene expression profile. As a next step we performed time-course analysis separately for different siRNAs and combined for all siRNAs. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analysis confirmed clear silencing of the expression of WFS1 after 48 h. Significant (FDR value<10%) changes in the expression of 11 genes was identified with most of these genes being related to the mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. Time-course analysis confirmed significant correlations between WFS1 silencing and changes in the expression profiles of several genes. The pathways that were influenced significantly by WFS1 silencing were related to mitochondrial damage and neurodegenerative diseases. Our findings suggest a role of WFS1 gene in cell survival and its involvement in degenerative diseases. PMID:23321269

  3. Deletion of the Wolfram syndrome-related gene Wfs1 results in increased sensitivity to ethanol in female mice.

    PubMed

    Raud, Sirli; Reimets, Riin; Loomets, Maarja; SĂĽtt, Silva; Altpere, Alina; Visnapuu, Tanel; Innos, JĂĽrgen; Luuk, Hendrik; Plaas, Mario; Volke, Vallo; Vasar, Eero

    2015-08-01

    Wolfram syndrome, induced by mutation in WFS1 gene, increases risk of developing mood disorders in humans. In mice, Wfs1 deficiency cause higher anxiety-like behaviour and increased response to anxiolytic-like effect of diazepam, a GABAA receptor agonist. As GABAergic system is also target for ethanol, we analysed its anxiolytic-like and sedative properties in Wfs1-deficient mice using elevated plus-maze test and tests measuring locomotor activity and coordination, respectively. Additionally loss of righting reflex test was conducted to study sedative/hypnotic properties of ethanol, ketamine and pentobarbital. To evaluate pharmacokinetics of ethanol in mice enzymatic colour test was used. Finally, gene expression of alpha subunits of GABAA receptors following ethanol treatment was studied by real-time-PCR. Compared to wild-types, Wfs1-deficient mice were more sensitive to ethanol-induced anxiolytic-like effect, but less responsive to impairment of motor coordination. Ethanol and pentobarbital, but not ketamine, caused longer duration of hypnosis in Wfs1-deficient mice. The expression of Gabra2 subunit at 30 minutes after ethanol injection was significantly increased in the frontal cortex of Wfs1-deficient mice as compared to respective vehicle-treated mice. For the temporal lobe, similar change in Gabra2 mRNA occurred at 60 minutes after ethanol treatment in Wfs1-deficient mice. No changes were detected in Gabra1 and Gabra3 mRNA following ethanol treatment. Taken together, increased anxiolytic-like effect of ethanol in Wfs1-deficient mice is probably related to altered Gabra2 gene expression. Increased anti-anxiety effect of GABAA receptor agonists in the present work and earlier studies (Luuk et al., 2009) further suggests importance of Wfs1 gene in the regulation of emotional behaviour. PMID:25725334

  4. Design, Implementation and Applications of 3d Web-Services in DB4GEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, M.; Kuper, P. V.; Dittrich, A.; Wild, P.; Butwilowski, E.; Al-Doori, M.

    2013-09-01

    The object-oriented database architecture DB4GeO was originally designed to support sub-surface applications in the geo-sciences. This is reflected in DB4GeO's geometric data model as well as in its import and export functions. Initially, these functions were designed for communication with 3D geological modeling and visualization tools such as GOCAD or MeshLab. However, it soon became clear that DB4GeO was suitable for a much wider range of applications. Therefore it is natural to move away from a standalone solution and to open the access to DB4GeO data by standardized OGC web-services. Though REST and OGC services seem incompatible at first sight, the implementation in DB4GeO shows that OGC-based implementation of web-services may use parts of the DB4GeO-REST implementation. Starting with initial solutions in the history of DB4GeO, this paper will introduce the design, adaptation (i.e. model transformation), and first steps in the implementation of OGC Web Feature (WFS) and Web Processing Services (WPS), as new interfaces to DB4GeO data and operations. Among its capabilities, DB4GeO can provide data in different data formats like GML, GOCAD, or DB3D XML through a WFS, as well as its ability to run operations like a 3D-to-2D service, or mesh-simplification (Progressive Meshes) through a WPS. We then demonstrate, an Android-based mobile 3D augmented reality viewer for DB4GeO that uses the Web Feature Service to visualize 3D geo-database query results. Finally, we explore future research work considering DB4GeO in the framework of the research group "Computer-Aided Collaborative Subway Track Planning in Multi-Scale 3D City and Building Models".

  5. Web Services as Building Blocks for an Open Coastal Observing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitbach, G.; Krasemann, H.

    2012-04-01

    In coastal observing systems it is needed to integrate different observing methods like remote sensing, in-situ measurements, and models into a synoptic view of the state of the observed region. This integration can be based solely on web services combining data and metadata. Such an approach is pursued for COSYNA (Coastal Observing System for Northern and Artic seas). Data from satellite and radar remote sensing, measurements of buoys, stations and Ferryboxes are the observation part of COSYNA. These data are assimilated into models to create pre-operational forecasts. For discovering data an OGC Web Feature Service (WFS) is used by the COSYNA data portal. This Web Feature Service knows the necessary metadata not only for finding data, but in addition the URLs of web services to view and download the data. To make the data from different resources comparable a common vocabulary is needed. For COSYNA the standard names from CF-conventions are stored within the metadata whenever possible. For the metadata an INSPIRE and ISO19115 compatible data format is used. The WFS is fed from the metadata-system using database-views. Actual data are stored in two different formats, in NetCDF-files for gridded data and in an RDBMS for time-series-like data. The web service URLs are mostly standard based the standards are mainly OGC standards. Maps were created from netcdf files with the help of the ncWMS tool whereas a self-developed java servlet is used for maps of moving measurement platforms. In this case download of data is offered via OGC SOS. For NetCDF-files OPeNDAP is used for the data download. The OGC CSW is used for accessing extended metadata. The concept of data management in COSYNA will be presented which is independent of the special services used in COSYNA. This concept is parameter and data centric and might be useful for other observing systems.

  6. Wolfram gene (WFS1) mutation causes autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract in humans

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Vanita; Gregory-Evans, Cheryl; Emmett, Warren; Waseem, Naushin; Raby, Jacob; Prescott, DeQuincy; Moore, Anthony T; Bhattacharya, Shomi S

    2013-01-01

    Congenital cataracts are an important cause of bilateral visual impairment in infants. Through genome-wide linkage analysis in a four-generation family of Irish descent, the disease-associated gene causing autosomal-dominant congenital nuclear cataract was mapped to chromosome 4p16.1. The maximum logarithm of odds (LOD) score was 2.62 at a recombination fraction ?=0, obtained for marker D4S432 physically close to the Wolfram gene (WFS1). By sequencing the coding regions and intron–exon boundaries of WFS1, we identified a DNA substitution (c.1385A-to-G) in exon 8, causing a missense mutation at codon 462 (E462G) of the Wolframin protein. This is the first report of a mutation in this gene causing an isolated nuclear congenital cataract. These findings suggest that the membrane trafficking protein Wolframin may be important for supporting the developing lens. PMID:23531866

  7. Adding a Visualization Feature to Web Search Engines: It’s Time

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Pak C.

    2008-11-11

    Since the first world wide web (WWW) search engine quietly entered our lives in 1994, the “information need” behind web searching has rapidly grown into a multi-billion dollar business that dominates the internet landscape, drives e-commerce traffic, propels global economy, and affects the lives of the whole human race. Today’s search engines are faster, smarter, and more powerful than those released just a few years ago. With the vast investment pouring into research and development by leading web technology providers and the intense emotion behind corporate slogans such as “win the web” or “take back the web,” I can’t help but ask why are we still using the very same “text-only” interface that was used 13 years ago to browse our search engine results pages (SERPs)? Why has the SERP interface technology lagged so far behind in the web evolution when the corresponding search technology has advanced so rapidly? In this article I explore some current SERP interface issues, suggest a simple but practical visual-based interface design approach, and argue why a visual approach can be a strong candidate for tomorrow’s SERP interface.

  8. CuRe - A new wavefront reconstruction method for SH-WFS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obereder, Andreas; Ramlau, Ronny; Rosensteiner, Matthias; Zhariy, Mariya

    2011-09-01

    In order to fulfill the real-time requirements for AO on ELTs, one has to either invest in (very) high performance hardware or spend some effort on the development of highly efficient reconstruction algorithms for wavefront sensors. The AAO (Austrian Adaptive Optics) team is involved in deriving wavefront reconstructors for SH- and Pyramid-WFS measurements utilizing the mathematical properties of the forward operators for these wavefront sensors. At the moment, we focus mainly on direct reconstructors with complexity O(n) (where n denotes the number of subapertures of the WFS) to make the reconstruction scalable for large telescopes. In this talk we will introduce a new algorithm, the Cumulative Reconstructor (CuRe), present its properties, namely error propagation of the method and the numerical effort for the reconstruction of the incoming wavefront, as well as first results concerning the quality of the method (dependent on different noise sources). Further improvements of the algorithm, especially a domain decomposition method for enhancing reconstruction quality and improving the overall speed of the algorithm will be presented and analyzed. A speed comparison with different wavefront reconstruction algorithms will be presented to point out the enormous gain of the new CuReD (Cumulative Reconstructor with Domain Decomposition) algorithm concerning numerical performance and applicability for real life telescope adaptive optics applications. In the outlook of the talk we will present first XAO results utilizing a variant of the CuReD for the reconstruction of modulated Pyramid WFS measurements.

  9. Identification of novel mutations in WFS1 and genotype-phenotype correlation in Wolfram syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cano, A; Rouzier, C; Monnot, S; Chabrol, B; Conrath, J; Lecomte, P; Delobel, B; Boileau, P; Valero, R; Procaccio, V; Paquis-Flucklinger, V; Vialettes, B

    2007-07-15

    Mutations in the WFS1 gene have been reported in Wolfram syndrome (WS), an autosomal recessive disorder defined by early onset of diabetes mellitus (DM) and progressive optic atrophy. Because of the low prevalence of this syndrome and the recent identification of the WFS1 gene, few data are available concerning the relationships between clinical and molecular aspects of the disease. Here, we describe 12 patients from 11 families with WS. We report on eight novel (A214fsX285, L293fsX303, P346L, I427S, V503fsX517, R558C, S605fsX711, P838L) and seven previously reported mutations. We also looked for genotype-phenotype correlation both in patients included in this study and 19 additional WS patients that were previously reported. Subsequently, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of five published clinical and molecular studies of WFS1 for genotype-phenotype correlation, combined with our current French patient group for a total of 96 patients. The presence of two inactivating mutations was shown to predispose to an earlier age of onset of both DM and optic atrophy. Moreover, the clinical expression of WS was more complete and occurred earlier in patients harboring no missense mutation. PMID:17568405

  10. Mutation update and uncommon phenotypes in a French cohort of 96 patients with WFS1-related disorders.

    PubMed

    Chaussenot, A; Rouzier, C; Quere, M; Plutino, M; Ait-El-Mkadem, S; Bannwarth, S; Barth, M; Dollfus, H; Charles, P; Nicolino, M; Chabrol, B; Vialettes, B; Paquis-Flucklinger, V

    2015-05-01

    WFS1 mutations are responsible for Wolfram syndrome (WS) characterized by juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy, and for low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL). Our aim was to analyze the French cohort of 96 patients with WFS1-related disorders in order (i) to update clinical and molecular data with 37 novel affected individuals, (ii) to describe uncommon phenotypes and, (iii) to precise the frequency of large-scale rearrangements in WFS1. We performed quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 13 patients, carrying only one heterozygous variant, to identify large-scale rearrangements in WFS1. Among the 37 novel patients, 15 carried 15 novel deleterious putative mutations, including one large deletion of 17,444 base pairs. The analysis of the cohort revealed unexpected phenotypes including (i) late-onset symptoms in 13.8% of patients with a probable autosomal recessive transmission; (ii) two siblings with recessive optic atrophy without diabetes mellitus and, (iii) six patients from four families with dominantly-inherited deafness and optic atrophy. We highlight the expanding spectrum of WFS1-related disorders and we show that, even if large deletions are rare events, they have to be searched in patients with classical WS carrying only one WFS1 mutation after sequencing. PMID:24890733

  11. Web based geoprocessing tool for coverage data handling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, K.; Saran, S.

    2014-11-01

    With the advancements in GIS technologies and extensive use of OGC Web Services, geospatial resources and services are becoming progressively copious and convenient over the network. The application of OGC WCS (Web Coverage Service) and WFS (Web Feature Service) standards for geospatial raster and vector data has resulted in an opulent pool of interoperable geodata resources waiting to be used for analytical or modelling purposes. The issue of availing geospatial data processing with the aid of standardised web services was attended to by the OGC WPS (Web Processing Service) 1.0.0 specifications (Schut, 2007) which elucidate WPS as a standard interface which serves for the promulgation of geo-processes and consumption of those processes by the clients. This paper outlines the design and implementation of a geo-processing tool utilizing coverage data. The geo-process selected for application is the calculation of Normalized Difference Vegetative Index (NDVI), one of the globally used indices for vegetation cover monitoring. The system is realised using the Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL) and Python. The tool accesses the WCS server using the parameters defined in the XML request. The geo-process upon execution, performs the computations over the coverage data and generates the NDVI output. Since open source technology and standards are being used more often, especially in the field of scientific research, so our implementation is also built by using open source tools only.

  12. Trends in Culturally Relevant Interface Design Features for Latino Web Site Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachau, Lori L.; Hutchinson, Susan R.

    2012-01-01

    There is a lack of published research on designing Web-based instruction for the adult U.S. Latino population. Instructional designers need guidance on how to design culturally relevant learning environments for this audience, particularly for Latino people from Mexican heritage. The authors used content analysis to investigate the extent to which…

  13. Trends in Culturally Relevant Interface Design Features for Latino Web Site Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachau, Lori L.; Hutchinson, Susan R.

    2012-01-01

    There is a lack of published research on designing Web-based instruction for the adult U.S. Latino population. Instructional designers need guidance on how to design culturally relevant learning environments for this audience, particularly for Latino people from Mexican heritage. The authors used content analysis to investigate the extent to which…

  14. Diffusion of Courses with World Wide Web Features: Perceptions of Journalism and Mass Communication Program Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Patrick J.

    Research shows that educators at accredited journalism and mass communication programs in the United States agree that programs without a significant Web presence are ignoring the impact of technology on the field. A study utilized a cross-sectional survey design to assess the perceptions of college/university program top administrators concerning…

  15. OneGeology Web Services and Portal as a global geological SDI - latest standards and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, Tim; Tellez-Arenas, Agnes

    2014-05-01

    The global coverage of OneGeology Web Services (www.onegeology.org and portal.onegeology.org) achieved since 2007 from the 120 participating geological surveys will be reviewed and issues arising discussed. Recent enhancements to the OneGeology Web Services capabilities will be covered including new up to 5 star service accreditation scheme utilising the ISO/OGC Web Mapping Service standard version 1.3, core ISO 19115 metadata additions and Version 2.0 Web Feature Services (WFS) serving the new IUGS-CGI GeoSciML V3.2 geological web data exchange language standard (http://www.geosciml.org/) with its associated 30+ IUGS-CGI available vocabularies (http://resource.geosciml.org/ and http://srvgeosciml.brgm.fr/eXist2010/brgm/client.html). Use of the CGI simpelithology and timescale dictionaries now allow those who wish to do so to offer data harmonisation to query their GeoSciML 3.2 based Web Feature Services and their GeoSciML_Portrayal V2.0.1 (http://www.geosciml.org/) Web Map Services in the OneGeology portal (http://portal.onegeology.org). Contributing to OneGeology involves offering to serve ideally 1:1000,000 scale geological data (in practice any scale now is warmly welcomed) as an OGC (Open Geospatial Consortium) standard based WMS (Web Mapping Service) service from an available WWW server. This may either be hosted within the Geological Survey or a neighbouring, regional or elsewhere institution that offers to serve that data for them i.e. offers to help technically by providing the web serving IT infrastructure as a 'buddy'. OneGeology is a standards focussed Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI) and works to ensure that these standards work together and it is now possible for European Geological Surveys to register their INSPIRE web services within the OneGeology SDI (e.g. see http://www.geosciml.org/geosciml/3.2/documentation/cookbook/INSPIRE_GeoSciML_Cookbook%20_1.0.pdf). The Onegeology portal (http://portal.onegeology.org) is the first port of call for anyone wishing to discover the availability of global geological web services and has new functionality to view and use such services including multiple projection support. KEYWORDS : OneGeology; GeoSciML V 3.2; Data exchange; Portal; INSPIRE; Standards; OGC; Interoperability; GeoScience information; WMS; WFS; Cookbook.

  16. Fuzzy Logic-Supported Detection of Complex Geospatial Features in a Web Service Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, L. L.; Di, L. P.; Yue, P.; Zhang, M. D.

    2013-10-01

    Spatial relations among simple features can be used to characterize complex geospatial features. These spatial relations are often represented using linguistic terms such as near, which have inherent vagueness and imprecision. Fuzzy logic can be used to modeling fuzziness of the terms. Once simple features are extracted from remote sensing imagery, degree of satisfaction of spatial relations among these simple features can be derived to detect complex features. The derivation process can be performed in a distributed service environment, which benefits Earth science society in the last decade. Workflow-based service can provide ondemand uncertainty-aware discovery of complex features in a distributed environment. A use case on the complex facility detection illustrates the applicability of the fuzzy logic-supported service-oriented approach.

  17. OGC Web Services standards by example : the European Seismic Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frobert, L.; Kamb, L.; Trani, L.; Spinuso, A.; Bossu, R.; Van Eck, T.

    2011-12-01

    NERIES (2006-2010) was an Integrated Infrastructure Initiative (I3) project in the Sixth Framework Program (FP6) of the European Commission (EC), aiming at networking the European seismic networks, improving access to data, allowing access to specific seismic infrastructures and pursuing targeted research developing the next generation of tools for improved service and data analysis. During this project, a web portal was developed using web services to access data and a Visual Web Applications to display them. However these web services were not conform to any standard, making them difficult to consume by any new user interface. Therefore, for the NERA project, the follow-up of NERIES, we have proposed the use of web services standards to access our data. We have decided to use standards defined by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). The OGC defines standards for the Web service interfaces to access geo-tagged data. The events and seismic stations are also geo-tagged making these web services suitable for our purpose. Using standard web services gives us the opportunity to distribute our data across all conformant consumers to these standards through various programming languages and applications We have implemented a preliminary version of web services conforming to the Web Map Service (WMS) and Web Feature Service (WFS) standard to access our catalog of seismic events (nearly 200 000 events). To visualize them we have made four examples demo on our web site using different technologies (Adobe Flash, JavaScript, Java with Nasa World Wind and UDig a desktop GIS application). In the future we hope to implement other OGC Web services standard like : - Sensor Observation Service (SOS) to provide seismic waveform records; - Web Notification Service (WNS); - Catalog Service for the Web (CSW) to provide a search engine of all our web services; - Web Processing Service (WPS) to process data between different services. The power of the use of OGC standards is the easy integration into any software meeting those standards. For example, GIS compatible applications may display our map of seismic events with another layer of information as a geological map.

  18. Operational Use of OGC Web Services at the Met Office

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Bruce

    2010-05-01

    The Met Office has adopted the Service-Orientated Architecture paradigm to deliver services to a range of customers through Rich Internet Applications (RIAs). The approach uses standard Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) web services to provide information to web-based applications through a range of generic data services. "Invent", the Met Office beta site, is used to showcase Met Office future plans for presenting web-based weather forecasts, product and information to the public. This currently hosts a freely accessible Weather Map Viewer, written in JavaScript, which accesses a Web Map Service (WMS), to deliver innovative web-based visualizations of weather and its potential impacts to the public. The intention is to engage the public in the development of new web-based services that more accurately meet their needs. As the service is intended for public use within the UK, it has been designed to support a user base of 5 million, the analysed level of UK web traffic reaching the Met Office's public weather information site. The required scalability has been realised through the use of multi-tier tile caching: - WMS requests are made for 256x256 tiles for fixed areas and zoom levels; - a Tile Cache, developed in house, efficiently serves tiles on demand, managing WMS request for the new tiles; - Edge Servers, externally hosted by Akamai, provide a highly scalable (UK-centric) service for pre-cached tiles, passing new requests to the Tile Cache; - the Invent Weather Map Viewer uses the Google Maps API to request tiles from Edge Servers. (We would expect to make use of the Web Map Tiling Service, when it becomes an OGC standard.) The Met Office delivers specialist commercial products to market sectors such as transport, utilities and defence, which exploit a Web Feature Service (WFS) for data relating forecasts and observations to specific geographic features, and a Web Coverage Service (WCS) for sub-selections of gridded data. These are locally rendered as maps or graphs, and combined with the WMS pre-rendered images and text, in a FLEX application, to provide sophisticated, user impact-based view of the weather. The OGC web services supporting these applications have been developed in collaboration with commercial companies. Visual Weather was originally a desktop application for forecasters, but IBL have developed it to expose the full range of forecast and observation data through standard web services (WCS and WMS). Forecasts and observations relating to specific locations and geographic features are held in an Oracle Database, and exposed as a WFS using Snowflake Software's GO-Publisher application. The Met Office has worked closely with both IBL and Snowflake Software to ensure that the web services provided strike a balance between conformance to the standards and performance in an operational environment. This has proved challenging in areas where the standards are rapidly evolving (e.g. WCS) or do not allow adequate description of the Met-Ocean domain (e.g. multiple time coordinates and parametric vertical coordinates). It has also become clear that careful selection of the features to expose, based on the way in which you expect users to query those features, in necessary in order to deliver adequate performance. These experiences are providing useful 'real-world' input in to the recently launched OGC MetOcean Domain Working Group and World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) initiatives in this area.

  19. [Trends and differentials in fertility in Latin America: evidence from the WFS].

    PubMed

    Vlassoff, M

    1986-08-01

    This study presents a comprehensive comparative analysis of the data gathered in the World Fertility Survey (WFS) for the 13 participating countries of the Latin American and Caribbean region. The article begins by examining recent and cumulative fertility, and making an effort to include data other than that of the WFS for purposes of error estimation. The presentation takes the form of short descriptions of recent fertility trends in each country, e.g. Costa Rica experienced a marked decline in the past 20-25 years, although the trend slowed during the mid-1970s, possibly because of some legal problems associated with contraceptive distribution, among other factors. Several other factors are then analyzed, which bear upon the explanation of trends and differentials in fertility. Sections on infecundity and childlessness, infant and child mortality, and sex preferences for offspring are included to make available a wider range of WFS comparative results. Examples of data included in tables are, in Paraguay, of couples desiring boys only, 43% are actually using contraceptives, while 59% of couples desiring girls only are actually using contraceptives. In Haiti, Peru, and the Dominican Republic, where the infant mortality is highest, almost 34% of deaths were of children aged 1-4, while in Panama, Trinidad and Tobago and Jamaica, where mortality has diminished most, only 22% of the deaths are in this group. Socioeconomic determinants of cumulative fertility are probed using a log-linear model. 3 proximate determinants of fertility: age at 1st union; contraceptive use; and lactational infecundity are examined and their contributions to fertility differentials assessed. Finally, the role of socioeconomic factors in determining these intermediate variables is analyzed. PMID:12268025

  20. Features Predicting Weight Loss in Overweight or Obese Participants in a Web-Based Intervention: Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Freyne, Jill; Saunders, Ian; Berkovsky, Shlomo; Smith, Greg; Noakes, Manny

    2012-01-01

    Background Obesity remains a serious issue in many countries. Web-based programs offer good potential for delivery of weight loss programs. Yet, many Internet-delivered weight loss studies include support from medical or nutritional experts, and relatively little is known about purely web-based weight loss programs. Objective To determine whether supportive features and personalization in a 12-week web-based lifestyle intervention with no in-person professional contact affect retention and weight loss. Methods We assessed the effect of different features of a web-based weight loss intervention using a 12-week repeated-measures randomized parallel design. We developed 7 sites representing 3 functional groups. A national mass media promotion was used to attract overweight/obese Australian adults (based on body mass index [BMI] calculated from self-reported heights and weights). Eligible respondents (n = 8112) were randomly allocated to one of 3 functional groups: information-based (n = 183), supportive (n = 3994), or personalized-supportive (n = 3935). Both supportive sites included tools, such as a weight tracker, meal planner, and social networking platform. The personalized-supportive site included a meal planner that offered recommendations that were personalized using an algorithm based on a user’s preferences for certain foods. Dietary and activity information were constant across sites, based on an existing and tested 12-week weight loss program (the Total Wellbeing Diet). Before and/or after the intervention, participants completed demographic (including self-reported weight), behavioral, and evaluation questionnaires online. Usage of the website and features was objectively recorded. All screening and data collection procedures were performed online with no face-to-face contact. Results Across all 3 groups, attrition was high at around 40% in the first week and 20% of the remaining participants each week. Retention was higher for the supportive sites compared to the information-based site only at week 12 (P = .01). The average number of days that each site was used varied significantly (P = .02) and was higher for the supportive site at 5.96 (SD 11.36) and personalized-supportive site at 5.50 (SD 10.35), relative to the information-based site at 3.43 (SD 4.28). In total, 435 participants provided a valid final weight at the 12-week follow-up. Intention-to-treat analyses (using multiple imputations) revealed that there were no statistically significant differences in weight loss between sites (P = .42). On average, participants lost 2.76% (SE 0.32%) of their initial body weight, with 23.7% (SE 3.7%) losing 5% or more of their initial weight. Within supportive conditions, the level of use of the online weight tracker was predictive of weight loss (model estimate = 0.34, P < .001). Age (model estimate = 0.04, P < .001) and initial BMI (model estimate = -0.03, P < .002) were associated with frequency of use of the weight tracker. Conclusions Relative to a static control, inclusion of social networking features and personalized meal planning recommendations in a web-based weight loss program did not demonstrate additive effects for user weight loss or retention. These features did, however, increase the average number of days that a user engaged with the system. For users of the supportive websites, greater use of the weight tracker tool was associated with greater weight loss. PMID:23234759

  1. A Veterinary Comparative Counseling Elective Featuring Web-based, Student-created, Client Information Sheets.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jennifer C; Sehgal, Inder

    2016-02-25

    Objective. To design and implement a course in Companion Animal Comparative Counseling that would expose students (N=38) to essential elements of veterinary therapeutics and provide them with the opportunity to apply their knowledge by writing and posting client information sheets (CIS) on an open web site. Design. The elective course was limited to companion animals. Nine different topics were covered over the semester. Class sessions included a didactic component, trivia questions, and field trips. There were 4 major graded assessments: an examination on foundation knowledge, followed by two comparative counseling assessments and evaluation of group-composed CIS. Attendance and participation were also considered. Assessment. The class learned comparative disease states, how to counsel on common pet prescriptions, where to access informatics about specific veterinary drugs, and how to create their own CIS. Conclusion. As pharmacists, these students may have improved their training in veterinary comparative pharmacy. PMID:26941441

  2. A Veterinary Comparative Counseling Elective Featuring Web-based, Student-created, Client Information Sheets

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jennifer C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To design and implement a course in Companion Animal Comparative Counseling that would expose students (N=38) to essential elements of veterinary therapeutics and provide them with the opportunity to apply their knowledge by writing and posting client information sheets (CIS) on an open web site. Design. The elective course was limited to companion animals. Nine different topics were covered over the semester. Class sessions included a didactic component, trivia questions, and field trips. There were 4 major graded assessments: an examination on foundation knowledge, followed by two comparative counseling assessments and evaluation of group-composed CIS. Attendance and participation were also considered. Assessment. The class learned comparative disease states, how to counsel on common pet prescriptions, where to access informatics about specific veterinary drugs, and how to create their own CIS. Conclusion. As pharmacists, these students may have improved their training in veterinary comparative pharmacy. PMID:26941441

  3. Integrating Distributed Physical and Biological Marine data using OGC Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmell, A. L.; Blower, J. D.; Haines, K.; Price, M.; Millard, K.; Harpham, Q.

    2008-12-01

    Earth scientists use highly diverse sources of data, including in-situ measurements, remotely-sensed information and the results of numerical simulations. The ability to access, visualize, combine and compare these datasets is at the core of scientific investigation, but such tasks have hitherto been very difficult or impossible due to a fundamental lack of harmonization of data products. As a result, much valuable data remains underused. We present a web portal that visualizes and compares physical and biological marine data from both numerical models and in-situ observations. The model data are obtained via an Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC)-compatible Web Map Service (WMS), and the observed data are obtained via an OGC Web Feature Service (WFS). The physical model WMS, the biological model WMS and the WFS are located at three different institutes. This ability to display in-situ point observations alongside model data facilitates much valuable work on model validation. As models become increasingly complex, and sources of observed data become more numerous, it is important to be able to access and compare this growing amount of data efficiently, to ensure cross-checking and consistency between models and observations. The web portal is being applied in a large European operational oceanography project (ECOOP), where it is used to provide support to ecosystem modellers, and specifically to aid detection of potentially harmful algal blooms in coastal areas. The development of this system has been enabled by the conceptual framework of the Climate Science Modelling Language (CSML), which provides a common view onto all these datasets, independent of their storage format or physical location. CSML is based upon emerging international standards, enabling interoperability with other standards-based infrastructures. By creating a reusable Java library that embodies the CSML concepts we are able to apply these techniques to a number of other projects.

  4. A novel WFS technique for high-contrast imaging: Phase Sorting Interferometry (PSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codona, Johanan L.; Kenworthy, Matthew A.; Lloyd-Hart, Michael

    2008-07-01

    High-contrast adaptive optics (AO) observations near stars have to contend with the telescope's diffraction halo, a rapidly-changing cloud of residual atmospheric speckles, and a host of faint but persistent quasi-static speckles caused by various imperfections and aberrations. It is these quasi-static speckles that typically limit the detection sensitivity near stars as they are easily confused with faint stellar companions. Since they are coherent with the starlight, it is possible to suppress the quasi-static speckles and other residual diffraction halo over a search region by applying small offsets to the AO system's deformable mirror (DM). Computing the required offsets requires knowledge of the location, brightness, and phase of the speckle relative to the star's PSF core. We present a new wavefront sensing technique for measuring the static halo that uses the randomly-changing residual AO speckles as interferometric probes. Doing this requires simultaneous short-exposure frames from a mid-IR science camera and measurements of the residual closed-loop wavefront using the AO system's wavefront sensor (WFS). These data streams are combined to construct a map of the quasi-static halo's complex amplitude near the bright core of a star's PSF, permitting adaptive halo suppression. Implementing this new WFS and halo-suppression servo requires no new hardware, just new processing applied to the existing AO system. By suppressing the quasi-static speckles, we are left with only the fast speckle noise, which should average to a smooth background.

  5. Custom HL7 V3 message provider using web services security features.

    PubMed

    Voos, Javier; Riva, Guillermo; Zerbini, Carlos; Centeno, Carlos; Gonzalez, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Due the availability of new data transmission technologies and new standards for medical studies development, e-health systems have had a sustained adoption in recent years. In this scenario, the health systems are incorporating and increasing the health services offering in response to their needs. This paper presents a system able to transmit medical studies using different communication channels providing an effective use of the medical equipment, the data transmission networks and the human resources availability. This system is based on service oriented architecture (SOA) to propose different alternatives in terms of which data needs to be transmitted for the acquired medical study, in order to attend different medical diagnosis providing an efficient use of the available communication channels. About the security implemented for the data transmission, there are different configurations available for encryption and signing at message level, to ensure that messages cannot be changed without detection during the transmission. For message definition, the HL7 V3 standard is implemented and the medical studies are stored in a centralized database located in a web server accessible via Internet to enable second medical opinion from other specialists. PMID:21097078

  6. Hypothalamic gene expression profile indicates a reduction in G protein signaling in the Wfs1 mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Kõks, Sulev; Soomets, Ursel; Plaas, Mario; Terasmaa, Anton; Noormets, Klari; Tillmann, Vallo; Vasar, Eero; Fernandes, Cathy; Schalkwyk, Leonard C

    2011-12-16

    The Wfs1 gene codes for a protein with unknown function, but deficiency in this protein results in a range of neuropsychiatric and neuroendocrine syndromes. In the present study we aimed to find the functional networks influenced by Wfs1 in the hypothalamus. We performed gene expression profiling (Mouse Gene 1.0 ST Arrays) in Wfs1-deficient mice; 305 genes were differentially expressed with nominal P value<0.01. FDR (false discovery rate)-adjusted P values were significant (0.007) only for two genes: C4b (t=9.66) and Wfs1 (t=-9.03). However, several genes related to G protein signaling were very close to the FDR-adjusted significance level, such as Rgs4 (regulator of G protein signaling 4) that was downregulated (-0.34, t=-5.4) in Wfs1-deficient mice. Changes in Rgs4 and C4b expression were confirmed by QRT-PCR. In humans, Rgs4 is in the locus for bipolar disease (BPD), and its expression is downregulated in BPD. C4b is a gene related to the neurodegenerative diseases. Functional analysis including the entire data set revealed significant alterations in the canonical pathway "G protein-coupled receptor signaling." The gene expression profile in the hypothalami of the Wfs1 mutant mice was significantly similar to the profiles of following biological functions: psychological disorders, bipolar disorder, mood disorder. In conclusion, hypothalamic gene expression profile resembles with some molecular pathways functionally related to the clinical syndromes in the Wolfram syndrome patients. PMID:22028430

  7. Wellness Partners: Design and Evaluation of a Web-Based Physical Activity Diary with Social Gaming Features for Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Jordan-Marsh, Maryalice; Valente, Thomas William

    2013-01-01

    Background The United States is currently in an age of obesity and inactivity despite increasing public awareness and scientific knowledge of detrimental long-term health effects of this lifestyle. Behavior-tracking diaries offer an effective strategy for physical activity adherence and weight management. Furthermore, Web-based physical activity diaries can engage meaningful partners in people’s social networks through fun online gaming interactions and generate motivational mechanisms for effective behavioral change and positive health outcomes. Objective Wellness Partners (WP) is a Web-based intervention in the form of a physical activity diary with social networking and game features. Two versions were designed and developed for the purpose of this study—“Diary” only and “Diary+Game”. The objectives of this study included pilot testing the research process of this intervention design, implementation, evaluation, and exploring the effectiveness of social gaming features on adult participants’ physical activity and anthropometric measures. Methods We conducted a field experiment with randomized crossover design. Assessments occurred at baseline, first follow-up (FU, 5-8 weeks after using one version of WP), and second FU (5-8 weeks of using the other version of WP). In the control condition, participants started with the “Diary” version of WP while in the experimental condition, participants started with the “Diary+Game” version of WP. A total of 54 adults (egos) ages 44-88, and their family and friends (alters) ages 17-69 participated in the study in ego-network groups. Both egos and their alters completed online surveys about their exercise habits. In addition, egos completed anthropometric measurements of BMI, fat percentage, and fat mass by bioimpedance. Results From October 2009 to May 2010, flyers, emails, and Web advertisements yielded 335 volunteers who were screened. Rolling recruitment resulted in enrollment of 142 qualified participants in 54 ego-network groups, which were randomly assigned to a study condition. The final analytic sample included 87 individuals from 41 groups. Data were collected from December 2009 to August 2010, and data analysis was completed in 2011. Overall, the participants were given access to the intervention for 10-13 weeks. Statistical analysis suggested an increase in self-reported exercise frequency (mean days per week) from baseline (2.57, SD 1.92) to first FU (3.21, SD 1.74) in both conditions. Stronger effects were seen in the condition where Diary+Game was played first, especially in network groups with larger age variation between the alters and egos. Overall, the decrease in egos’ BMI was statistically significant from baseline to first FU, with greater decrease for those in the Diary+Game first condition (-0.26 vs -0.16 in the Diary first condition). Conclusions The Wellness Partners program increased physical activity among participants and resulted in health benefits among the egos. Web-based diary interventions designed with social gaming features hold potential to promote active lifestyles for middle-age adults and people in their social networks. PMID:23611986

  8. Wfs1 mutation makes mice sensitive to insulin-like effect of acute valproic acid and resistant to streptozocin.

    PubMed

    Terasmaa, Anton; Soomets, Ursel; Oflijan, Julia; Punapart, Marite; Hansen, Mats; Matto, Vallo; Ehrlich, Kersti; Must, Anne; Kõks, Sulev; Vasar, Eero

    2011-09-01

    Valproic acid (VLP) is a widely used anticonvulsant and mood-stabilizing drug that relieves the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, a pathogenetic process related to diabetes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether acute valproic acid is able to interfere with glucose intolerance in two different diabetes models: The first model was a Wfs1 mutant mouse with an elevated ER stress response and the second model a streptozocin-induced diabetic mouse. VLP (300 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered to Wfs1 knockout (KO) mice and glucose tolerance test was performed 15 min later. VLP did not have an effect on the course of the glucose tolerance test in wild-type mice, while it did normalize the glucose intolerance in Wfs1 knockout mice. Acute valproic acid also lowered the blood glucose levels in streptozocin-treated mice and potentiated the effect of insulin in these mice. Thus, acute valproic acid is effective in lowering blood glucose levels possibly by potentiating insulin action in both Wfs1 KO mice and in streptozocin-induced type 1 diabetic mice. PMID:21461749

  9. Micro-RNA Binding Site Polymorphisms in the WFS1 Gene Are Risk Factors of Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Elek, Zsuzsanna; Németh, Nóra; Nagy, Géza; Németh, Helga; Somogyi, Anikó; Hosszufalusi, Nóra; Sasvári-Székely, Mária; Rónai, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    The absolute or relative lack of insulin is the key factor in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus. Although the connection between loss of function mutations of the WFS1 gene and DIDMOAD-syndrome including diabetes mellitus underpins the significance of wolframin in the pathogenesis, exact role of WFS1 polymorphic variants in the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes has not been discovered yet. In this analysis, 787 patients with diabetes and 900 healthy people participated. Genotyping of the 7 WFS1 SNPs was carried out by TaqMan assays. Association study was performed by χ2-test in combination with correction for multiple testing. For functional analysis, the entire 3’ UTR of the WFS1 gene was subcloned in a pMIR-Report plasmid and relative luciferase activities were determined. Linkage disequilibrium analysis showed a generally high LD within the investigated region, however the rs1046322 locus was not in LD with the other SNPs. The two miR-SNPs, rs1046322 and rs9457 showed significant association with T1DM and T2DM, respectively. Haplotype analysis also confirmed the association between the 3’ UTR loci and both disease types. In vitro experiments showed that miR-185 reduces the amount of the resulting protein, and rs9457 miRSNP significantly influences the rate of reduction in a luciferase reporter assay. Genetic variants of the WFS1 gene might contribute to the genetic risk of T1DM and T2DM. Furthermore demonstrating the effect of rs9457 in binding of miR-185, we suggest that the optimal level of wolframin protein, potentially influenced by miR-regulation, is crucial in normal beta cell function. PMID:26426397

  10. A Geospatial Database that Supports Derivation of Climatological Features of Severe Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, M.; Ansari, S.; Del Greco, S.

    2007-12-01

    The Severe Weather Data Inventory (SWDI) at NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) provides user access to archives of several datasets critical to the detection and evaluation of severe weather. These datasets include archives of: · NEXRAD Level-III point features describing general storm structure, hail, mesocyclone and tornado signatures · National Weather Service Storm Events Database · National Weather Service Local Storm Reports collected from storm spotters · National Weather Service Warnings · Lightning strikes from Vaisala's National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) SWDI archives all of these datasets in a spatial database that allows for convenient searching and subsetting. These data are accessible via the NCDC web site, Web Feature Services (WFS) or automated web services. The results of interactive web page queries may be saved in a variety of formats, including plain text, XML, Google Earth's KMZ, standards-based NetCDF and Shapefile. NCDC's Storm Risk Assessment Project (SRAP) uses data from the SWDI database to derive gridded climatology products that show the spatial distributions of the frequency of various events. SRAP also can relate SWDI events to other spatial data such as roads, population, watersheds, and other geographic, sociological, or economic data to derive products that are useful in municipal planning, emergency management, the insurance industry, and other areas where there is a need to quantify and qualify how severe weather patterns affect people and property.

  11. Vacuolar-type H+-ATPase V1A subunit is a molecular partner of Wolfram syndrome 1 (WFS1) protein, which regulates its expression and stability.

    PubMed

    Gharanei, Seley; Zatyka, Malgorzata; Astuti, Dewi; Fenton, Janine; Sik, Attila; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Barrett, Timothy G

    2013-01-15

    Wolfram syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by neurodegeneration and diabetes mellitus. The gene responsible for the syndrome (WFS1) encodes an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident transmembrane protein that also localizes to secretory granules in pancreatic beta cells. Although its precise functions are unknown, WFS1 protein deficiency affects the unfolded protein response, intracellular ion homeostasis, cell cycle progression and granular acidification. In this study, immunofluorescent and electron-microscopy analyses confirmed that WFS1 also localizes to secretory granules in human neuroblastoma cells. We demonstrated a novel interaction between WFS1 and the V1A subunit of the H(+) V-ATPase (proton pump) by co-immunoprecipitation in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells and with endogenous proteins in human neuroblastoma cells. We mapped the interaction to the WFS1-N terminal, but not the C-terminal domain. V1A subunit expression was reduced in WFS1 stably and transiently depleted human neuroblastoma cells and depleted NT2 (human neuron-committed teratocarcinoma) cells. This reduced expression was not restored by adenoviral overexpression of BiP (immunoglobulin-binding protein) to correct the ER stress. Protein stability assays demonstrated that the V1A subunit was degraded more rapidly in WFS1 depleted neuroblastoma cells compared with wild-type; however, proteosomal inhibition did not restore the expression of the V1A subunit. Cell cycle assays measuring p21(cip) showed reduced levels in WFS1 depleted cells, and an inverse association between p21(cip) expression and apoptosis. We conclude that WFS1 has a specific interaction with the V1A subunit of H(+) ATPase; this interaction may be important both for pump assembly in the ER and for granular acidification. PMID:23035048

  12. Researcher Web Site Features

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content at the National Institutes of Health | www.cancer.gov Print Page E-mail Page Search: Please wait while this form is being loaded.... Home Browse by Resource Type Browse by Area of Research Research Networks Funding Information About

  13. Mutations in the Wolfram syndrome 1 gene (WFS1) are a common cause of low frequency sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Bespalova, I N; Van Camp, G; Bom, S J; Brown, D J; Cryns, K; DeWan, A T; Erson, A E; Flothmann, K; Kunst, H P; Kurnool, P; Sivakumaran, T A; Cremers, C W; Leal, S M; Burmeister, M; Lesperance, M M

    2001-10-15

    Non-syndromic low frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL) affecting only 2000 Hz and below is an unusual type of hearing loss that worsens over time without progressing to profound deafness. This type of LFSNHL may be associated with mild tinnitus but is not associated with vertigo. We have previously reported two families with autosomal dominant LFSNHL linked to adjacent but non-overlapping loci on 4p16, DFNA6 and DFNA14. However, further study revealed that an individual with LFSNHL in the DFNA6 family who had a recombination event that excluded the DFNA14 candidate region was actually a phenocopy, and consequently, DFNA6 and DFNA14 are allelic. LFSNHL appears to be genetically nearly homogeneous, as only one LFSNHL family is known to map to a different chromosome (DFNA1). The DFNA6/14 critical region includes WFS1, the gene responsible for Wolfram syndrome, an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy, and often, deafness. Herein we report five different heterozygous missense mutations (T699M, A716T, V779M, L829P, G831D) in the WFS1 gene found in six LFSNHL families. Mutations in WFS1 were identified in all LFSNHL families tested, with A716T arising independently in two families. None of the mutations was found in at least 220 control chromosomes with the exception of V779M, which was identified in 1/336 controls. This frequency is consistent with the prevalence of heterozygous carriers for Wolfram syndrome estimated at 0.3-1%. An increased risk of sensorineural hearing loss has been reported in such carriers. Therefore, we conclude that mutations in WFS1 are a common cause of LFSNHL. PMID:11709537

  14. Using Semantic Web Technologies to Streamline the Implementation of the OGC Web Service Interface Specifications for Coverage and Feature Data Within OPeNDAP.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, D.; Blumenthal, M.; Potter, N.; West, P.

    2008-12-01

    The OPeNDAP Data Access Protocol has seen widespread adoption within the science community. OPeNDAP servers are currently deployed by individual investigators, academic institutions, and at national and international data repositories to provide distributed data access for their respective user communities. Many of these data providers anticipate that there will be significant demand for data access by applications using the suite of OGC web service specifications. Supporting multiple data access protocols can be expensive, both in the initial acquisition and deployment cost for the software components as well as for the potentially redundant maintenance and security costs required when supporting multiple server implementations operationally. To provide a cost-effective solution for these data providers OPeNDAP is developing extensions to its data access protocol to enable the use of semantic web technologies for data and metadata transformations, and extensions to its server architecture to support request and response operations simultaneously for multiple data access protocols. The OGC Web Coverage Service Interface Specification is the initial data access protocol to be layered onto the OPeNDAP server for this multi-protocol support. Supporting data access through the OGC service interfaces comprises operations that are both mechanical and semantic. The OPeNDAP server architecture (Hyrax) uses a Lightweight Front-End Server (OLFS) that is responsible for interacting with the requesting client application. The OLFS is extensible and in this project has been extended to support the OGC web service interface specifications. Coupled with the OLFS the Hyrax architecture uses a Back-End Server (BES) to provide data access, processing, and response generation that are then returned through the OLFS to the requesting client. Similar to the OLFS, the BES is extensible and for this project has been extended to support various mechanical actions required in support of the OGC service's request and response interface specification. In addition to the simpler, mechanical aspects required to support these multiple protocols, semantic operations are required in order to interpret request elements and for constructing well-formed OGC responses. To support these semantic operations we"ve developed ontological representations of the OGC, OPeNDAP, and NetCDF/CF data models, and the relationships between those models. The OLFS has been extended to support XSLT operations transforming OPeNDAP's XML data descriptor (DDX) to a Resource Description Framework (RDF) representation. Modules executing within the BES operate on these RDF representations, using these ontologies to crosswalk the metadata elements between the protocols.

  15. Web Service

    MedlinePLUS

    ... www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/webservices.html MedlinePlus Web Service To use the sharing features on this ... please enable JavaScript. MedlinePlus offers a search-based Web service that provides access to MedlinePlus health topic ...

  16. Estimating natural mortality rates and simulating fishing scenarios for Gulf of Mexico red grouper (Epinephelus morio) using the ecosystem model OSMOSE-WFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GrĂĽss, Arnaud; Schirripa, Michael J.; Chagaris, David; Velez, Laure; Shin, Yunne-Jai; Verley, Philippe; Oliveros-Ramos, Ricardo; Ainsworth, Cameron H.

    2016-02-01

    The ecosystem model OSMOSE-WFS was employed to evaluate natural mortality rates and fishing scenarios for Gulf of Mexico (GOM) red grouper (Epinephelus morio). OSMOSE-WFS represents major high trophic level (HTL) groups of species of the West Florida Shelf, is forced by the biomass of plankton and benthos groups, and has a monthly time step. The present application of the model uses a recently developed 'stochastic mortality algorithm' to resolve the mortality processes of HTL groups. OSMOSE-WFS predictions suggest that the natural mortality rate of juveniles of GOM red grouper is high and essentially due to predation, while the bulk of the natural mortality of adult red grouper results from causes not represented in OSMOSE-WFS such as, presumably, red tides. These results were communicated to GOM red grouper stock assessments. Moreover, OSMOSE-WFS indicate that altering the fishing mortality of GOM red grouper may have no global impact on the biomass of the major prey of red grouper, due to the high complexity and high redundancy of the modeled system. By contrast, altering the fishing mortality of GOM red grouper may have a large impact on the biomass of its major competitors. Increasing the fishing mortality of red grouper would increase the biomass of major competitors, due to reduced competition for food. Conversely, decreasing the fishing mortality of red grouper would diminish the biomass of major competitors, due to increased predation pressure on the juveniles of the major competitors by red grouper. The fishing scenarios that we evaluated may have slightly different impacts in the real world, due to some discrepancies between the diets of red grouper and its major competitors predicted by OSMOSE-WFS and the observed ones. Modifications in OSMOSE-WFS are suggested to reduce these discrepancies.

  17. Learning a Language with Web 2.0: Exploring the Use of Social Networking Features of Foreign Language Learning Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Megan P.; Liu, Min

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an online survey and a usability test performed on three foreign language learning websites that use Web 2.0 technology. The online survey was conducted to gain an understanding of how current users of language learning websites use them for learning and social purposes. The usability test was conducted to gain…

  18. Molecular characterization of WFS1 in an Iranian family with Wolfram syndrome reveals a novel frameshift mutation associated with early symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sobhani, Maryam; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Rajab, Asadollah; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza

    2013-10-10

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder that represents a likely source of childhood diabetes especially among countries in the consanguinity belt. The main responsible gene is WFS1 for which over one hundred mutations have been reported from different ethnic groups. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular etiology of WS and to perform a possible genotype-phenotype correlation in Iranian kindred. An Iranian family with two patients was clinically studied and WS was suspected. Genetic linkage analysis via 5 STR markers was carried out. For identification of mutations, DNA sequencing of WFS1 including all the exons, exon-intron boundaries and the promoter was performed. Linkage analysis indicated linkage to the WFS1 region. After DNA sequencing of WFS1, one novel pathogenic mutation, which causes frameshift alteration c.2177_2178insTCTTC (or c.2173_2177dupTCTTC) in exon eight, was found. The genotype-phenotype correlation analysis suggests that the presence of the homozygous mutation may be associated with early onset of disease symptoms. This study stresses the necessity of considering the molecular analysis of WFS1 in childhood diabetes with some symptoms of WS. PMID:23845777

  19. The use of geospatial web services for exchanging utilities data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuczyńska, Joanna

    2013-04-01

    Geographic information technologies and related geo-information systems currently play an important role in the management of public administration in Poland. One of these tasks is to maintain and update Geodetic Evidence of Public Utilities (GESUT), part of the National Geodetic and Cartographic Resource, which contains an important for many institutions information of technical infrastructure. It requires an active exchange of data between the Geodesy and Cartography Documentation Centers and institutions, which administrate transmission lines. The administrator of public utilities, is legally obliged to provide information about utilities to GESUT. The aim of the research work was to develop a universal data exchange methodology, which can be implemented on a variety of hardware and software platforms. This methodology use Unified Modeling Language (UML), eXtensible Markup Language (XML), and Geography Markup Language (GML). The proposed methodology is based on the two different strategies: Model Driven Architecture (MDA) and Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). Used solutions are consistent with the INSPIRE Directive and ISO 19100 series standards for geographic information. On the basis of analysis of the input data structures, conceptual models were built for both databases. Models were written in the universal modeling language: UML. Combined model that defines a common data structure was also built. This model was transformed into developed for the exchange of geographic information GML standard. The structure of the document describing the data that may be exchanged is defined in the .xsd file. Network services were selected and implemented in the system designed for data exchange based on open source tools. Methodology was implemented and tested. Data in the agreed data structure and metadata were set up on the server. Data access was provided by geospatial network services: data searching possibilities by Catalog Service for the Web (CSW), data collection by Web Feature Service (WFS). WFS provides also operation for modification data, for example to update them by utility administrator. The proposed solution significantly increases the efficiency of data exchange and facilitates maintenance the National Geodetic and Cartographic Resource.

  20. Identification of p.A684V missense mutation in the WFS1 gene as a frequent cause of autosomal dominant optic atrophy and hearing impairment

    PubMed Central

    Rendtorff, Nanna D.; Lodahl, Marianne; Boulahbel, Houda; Johansen, Ida R.; Pandya, Arti; Welch, Katherine O.; Norris, Virginia W.; Arnos, Kathleen S.; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Emery, Sarah B.; Mets, Marilyn B.; Fagerheim, Toril; Eriksson, Kristina; Hansen, Lars; Bruhn, Helene; Möller, Claes; Lindholm, Sture; Ensgård, Stefan; Lesperance, Marci M.; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth

    2011-01-01

    Optic atrophy (OA) and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) are key abnormalities in several syndromes, including the recessively inherited Wolfram syndrome, caused by mutations in WFS1. In contrast, the association of autosomal dominant OA and SNHL without other phenotypic abnormalities is rare, and almost exclusively attributed to mutations in the Optic Atrophy-1 gene (OPA1), most commonly the p.R445H mutation. We present eight probands and their families from the US, Sweden, and UK with OA and SNHL, whom we analyzed for mutations in OPA1 and WFS1. Among these families, we found three heterozygous missense mutations in WFS1 segregating with OA and SNHL: p.A684V (six families), and two novel mutations, p.G780S and p.D797Y, all involving evolutionarily conserved amino acids and absent from 298 control chromosomes. Importantly, none of these families harbored the OPA1 p.R445H mutation. No mitochondrial DNA deletions were detected in muscle from one p.A684V patient analyzed. Finally, wolframin p.A684V mutant ectopically expressed in HEK cells showed reduced protein levels compared to wild-type wolframin, strongly indicating that the mutation is disease-causing. Our data support OA and SNHL as a phenotype caused by dominant mutations in WFS1 in these additional eight families. Importantly, our data provide the first evidence that a single, recurrent mutation in WFS1, p.A684V, may be a common cause of ADOA and SNHL, similar to the role played by the p.R445H mutation in OPA1. Our findings suggest that patients who are heterozygous for WFS1 missense mutations should be carefully clinically examined for OA and other manifestations of Wolfram syndrome. PMID:21538838

  1. Discover, Visualize, and Deliver Geospatial Data through OGC Standards-based WebGIS System

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Yaxing; SanthanaVannan, Suresh K; Cook, Robert B

    2009-01-01

    Geospatial data are important to understand the Earth - ecosystem dynamics, land cover changes, resource management, and human interactions with the Earth to name a few. One of the biggest difficulties users face is to discover, access, and assemble distributed, large volume, heterogeneous geospatial data to conduct geo-analysis. Traditional methods of geospatial data discovery, visualization, and delivery lack the capabilities of resource sharing and automation across systems or organizational boundaries. They require users to download the data ldquoas-isrdquo in their original file format, projection, and extent. Also, discovering data served by traditional methods requires prior knowledge of data location, and processing requires specialized expertise. These drawbacks of traditional methods create additional burden to users, introduce too much overhead to research, and also reduce the potential usage of the data. At the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), researchers working on NASA-sponsored projects: Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) and Modeling and Synthesis Thematic Data Center (MAST-DC) have tapped into the benefits of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards to overcome the drawbacks of traditional methods of geospatial data discovery, visualization, and delivery. The OGC standards-based approach facilitates data sharing and interoperability across network, organizational, and geopolitical boundaries. Tools and services based on OGC standards deliver the data in many user defined formats and allow users to visualize the data prior to download. This paper introduces an approach taken to visualize and deliver ORNL DAAC, MAST-DC, and other relevant geospatial data through OGC standards-based Web Services, including Web Map Service (WMS), Web Coverage Service (WCS), and Web Feature Service (WFS). It also introduces a WebGIS system built on top of OGC services that helps users discover, visualize, and access geospatial data.

  2. The prevalence of clinical features associated with primary ciliary dyskinesia in a heterotaxy population: results of a web-based survey.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Adam J; Tolleson-Rinehart, Sue; Zariwala, Maimoona A; Knowles, Michael R; Leigh, Margaret W

    2015-04-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia and heterotaxy are rare but not mutually exclusive disorders, which result from cilia dysfunction. Heterotaxy occurs in at least 12.1% of primary ciliary dyskinesia patients, but the prevalence of primary ciliary dyskinesia within the heterotaxy population is unknown. We designed and distributed a web-based survey to members of an international heterotaxy organisation to determine the prevalence of respiratory features that are common in primary ciliary dyskinesia and that might suggest the possibility of primary ciliary dyskinesia. A total of 49 members (25%) responded, and 37% of the respondents have features suggesting the possibility of primary ciliary dyskinesia, defined as (1) the presence of at least two chronic respiratory symptoms, or (2) bronchiectasis or history of respiratory pathogens suggesting primary ciliary dyskinesia. Of the respondents, four completed comprehensive, in-person evaluations, with definitive primary ciliary dyskinesia confirmed in one individual, and probable primary ciliary dyskinesia identified in two others. The high prevalence of respiratory features compatible with primary ciliary dyskinesia in this heterotaxy population suggests that a subset of heterotaxy patients have dysfunction of respiratory, as well as embryonic nodal cilia. To better assess the possibility of primary ciliary dyskinesia, heterotaxy patients with chronic oto-sino-respiratory symptoms should be referred for a primary ciliary dyskinesia evaluation. PMID:24905662

  3. Internet Telehealth for Pediatric Asthma Case Management: Integrating Computerized and Case Manager Features for Tailoring a Web-Based Asthma Education Program

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Meg; Gustafson, David H.; Sorkness, Christine A.; Molfenter, Todd; Staresinic, Anthony; Meis, Tracy; Hawkins, Robert P.; Shanovich, Kathleen Kelly; Walker, Nola P.

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on the development of a personalized, Web-based asthma-education program for parents whose 4- to 12-year-old children have moderate to severe asthma. Personalization includes computer-based tailored messages and a human coach to build asthma self-management skills. Computerized features include the Asthma Manager, My Calendar/Reminder, My Goals, and a tailored home page. These are integrated with monthly asthma-education phone calls from an asthmanurse case manager. The authors discuss the development process and issues and describe the current randomized evaluation study to test whether the yearlong integrated intervention can improve adherence to a daily asthma controller medication, asthma control, and parent quality of life to reduce asthma-related healthcare utilization. Implications for health education for chronic disease management are raised. PMID:16928987

  4. The use of Standard OGC Web Services in Integrating Distributed Model, Satellite and In-situ Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmell, A. L.; Blower, J.; Haines, K.; Price, M.; Millard, K.; Harpham, Q.

    2009-12-01

    Earth scientists use highly diverse sources of data, including in-situ measurements, remotely-sensed information and the results of numerical simulations. Thus there is often a large amount of data available to tackle a given problem. The challenge is how best to integrate these diverse data sources in a manner which will not only provide an effective solution to the problem at hand, but which will maximise both interoperability with other projects and reuseability for problems that still lie in the future. We present a web portal that visualizes and compares physical and biological marine data from numerical models, satellites, and in-situ observations. The model data are obtained via an Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC)-compatible Web Map Service (WMS), and the observed data are obtained via an OGC Web Feature Service (WFS). The physical model WMS, the biological model WMS and the WFS are located at three different institutes, and the actual data themselves are hosted at over 20 institutes around Europe and accessed via OPeNDAP and THREDDS. The use of CF-compliant NetCDF files, and Climate Science Modelling Language (CSML) increases the ease of data integration in this project. This ability to display in-situ point observations alongside model and satellite data facilitates much valuable work on model validation. As models become increasingly complex, and sources of observed data become more numerous, it is important to be able to access and compare this growing amount of data efficiently, to ensure cross-checking and consistency between models and observations. The web portal is being applied in a large European operational oceanography project (ECOOP), where it is used to provide support to modellers and in-situ data providers alike. A number of problems with model and in-situ datasets have been detected and corrected thanks to the ability to intercompare data sources and look for inconsistencies which might otherwise go undetected. The portal also serves as a technology demonstration towards a system for use by scientists and decision makers to detect and react to the prediction of potentially harmful algal blooms in coastal waters. In this scenario, the combining of multiple datasets gives greater confidence in the forecasting of algal blooms, as opposed to simply relying on numerical models alone.

  5. Breaking Open the Black Box: Isolating the Most Potent Features of a Web and Mobile Phone-Based Intervention for Depression, Anxiety, and Stress

    PubMed Central

    Proudfoot, Judith; Clarke, Janine; Birch, Mary-Rose; Parker, Gordon; Manicavasagar, Vijaya; Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan

    2015-01-01

    Background Internet-delivered mental health (eMental Health) interventions produce treatment effects similar to those observed in face-to-face treatment. However, there is a large degree of variation in treatment effects observed from program to program, and eMental Health interventions remain somewhat of a black box in terms of the mechanisms by which they exert their therapeutic benefit. Trials of eMental Health interventions typically use large sample sizes and therefore provide an ideal context within which to systematically investigate the therapeutic benefit of specific program features. Furthermore, the growth and impact of mobile phone technology within eMental Health interventions provides an opportunity to examine associations between symptom improvement and the use of program features delivered across computer and mobile phone platforms. Objective The objective of this study was to identify the patterns of program usage associated with treatment outcome in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of a fully automated, mobile phone- and Web-based self-help program, “myCompass”, for individuals with mild-to-moderate symptoms of depression, anxiety, and/or stress. The core features of the program include interactive psychotherapy modules, a symptom tracking feature, short motivational messages, symptom tracking reminders, and a diary, with many of these features accessible via both computer and mobile phone. Methods Patterns of program usage were recorded for 231 participants with mild-to-moderate depression, anxiety, and/or stress, and who were randomly allocated to receive access to myCompass for seven weeks during the RCT. Depression, anxiety, stress, and functional impairment were examined at baseline and at eight weeks. Results Log data indicated that the most commonly used components were the short motivational messages (used by 68.4%, 158/231 of participants) and the symptom tracking feature (used by 61.5%, 142/231 of participants). Further, after controlling for baseline symptom severity, increased use of these alert features was associated with significant improvements in anxiety and functional impairment. Associations between use of symptom tracking reminders and improved treatment outcome remained significant after controlling for frequency of symptom tracking. Although correlations were not statistically significant, reminders received via SMS (ie, text message) were more strongly associated with symptom reduction than were reminders received via email. Conclusions These findings indicate that alerts may be an especially potent component of eMental Health interventions, both via their association with enhanced program usage, as well as independently. Although there was evidence of a stronger association between symptom improvement and use of alerts via the mobile phone platform, the degree of overlap between use of email and SMS alerts may have precluded identification of alert delivery modalities that were most strongly associated with symptom reduction. Future research using random assignment to computer and mobile delivery is needed to fully determine the most ideal platform for delivery of this and other features of online interventions. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN): 12610000625077; http://www.anzctr.org.au/TrialSearch.aspx? (Archived by WebCite http://www.webcitation.org/6WPqHK0mQ). PMID:26543909

  6. The Effect of Social Support Features and Gamification on a Web-Based Intervention for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kostova, Zlatina; Nakamoto, Kent; Schulz, Peter Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is chronic systematic disease that affects people during the most productive period of their lives. Web-based health interventions have been effective in many studies; however, there is little evidence and few studies showing the effectiveness of online social support and especially gamification on patients’ behavioral and health outcomes. Objective The aim of this study was to look into the effects of a Web-based intervention that included online social support features and gamification on physical activity, health care utilization, medication overuse, empowerment, and RA knowledge of RA patients. The effect of gamification on website use was also investigated. Methods We conducted a 5-arm parallel randomized controlled trial for RA patients in Ticino (Italian-speaking part of Switzerland). A total of 157 patients were recruited through brochures left with physicians and were randomly allocated to 1 of 4 experimental conditions with different types of access to online social support and gamification features and a control group that had no access to the website. Data were collected at 3 time points through questionnaires at baseline, posttest 2 months later, and at follow-up after another 2 months. Primary outcomes were physical activity, health care utilization, and medication overuse; secondary outcomes included empowerment and RA knowledge. All outcomes were self-reported. Intention-to-treat analysis was followed and multilevel linear mixed models were used to study the change of outcomes over time. Results The best-fit multilevel models (growth curve models) that described the change in the primary outcomes over the course of the intervention included time and empowerment as time-variant predictors. The growth curve analyses of experimental conditions were compared to the control group. Physical activity increased over time for patients having access to social support sections plus gaming (unstandardized beta coefficient [B]=3.39, P=.02). Health care utilization showed a significant decrease for patients accessing social support features (B=–0.41, P=.01) and patients accessing both social support features and gaming (B=–0.33, P=.03). Patients who had access to either social support sections or the gaming experience of the website gained more empowerment (B=2.59, P=.03; B=2.29, P=.05; respectively). Patients who were offered a gamified experience used the website more often than the ones without gaming (t 91=–2.41, P=.02; U=812, P=.02). Conclusions The Web-based intervention had a positive impact (more desirable outcomes) on intervention groups compared to the control group. Social support sections on the website decreased health care utilization and medication overuse and increased empowerment. Gamification alone or with social support increased physical activity and empowerment and decreased health care utilization. This study provides evidence demonstrating the potential positive effect of gamification and online social support on health and behavioral outcomes. Trial Registration International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 57366516; http://www.controlled-trials. com/ISRCTN57366516 (Archived by webcite at http://www.webcitation.org/6PBvvAvvV). PMID:25574939

  7. Interactive Features of Web Surveys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Frederick G.

    2007-01-01

    Educational researchers and policy makers have come to rely on data from sample surveys. However, survey research on educational issues poses some special challenges. In many respects, the survey methodology issues in educational research are the same as those throughout the social and behavioral sciences. These issues concern obtaining the best…

  8. Web-GIS approach for integrated analysis of heterogeneous georeferenced data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okladnikov, Igor; Gordov, Evgeny; Titov, Alexander; Shulgina, Tamara

    2014-05-01

    Georeferenced datasets are currently actively used for modeling, interpretation and forecasting of climatic and ecosystem changes on different spatial and temporal scales [1]. Due to inherent heterogeneity of environmental datasets as well as their huge size (up to tens terabytes for a single dataset) a special software supporting studies in the climate and environmental change areas is required [2]. Dedicated information-computational system for integrated analysis of heterogeneous georeferenced climatological and meteorological data is presented. It is based on combination of Web and GIS technologies according to Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards, and involves many modern solutions such as object-oriented programming model, modular composition, and JavaScript libraries based on GeoExt library (http://www.geoext.org), ExtJS Framework (http://www.sencha.com/products/extjs) and OpenLayers software (http://openlayers.org). The main advantage of the system lies in it's capability to perform integrated analysis of time series of georeferenced data obtained from different sources (in-situ observations, model results, remote sensing data) and to combine the results in a single map [3, 4] as WMS and WFS layers in a web-GIS application. Also analysis results are available for downloading as binary files from the graphical user interface or can be directly accessed through web mapping (WMS) and web feature (WFS) services for a further processing by the user. Data processing is performed on geographically distributed computational cluster comprising data storage systems and corresponding computational nodes. Several geophysical datasets represented by NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis II, JMA/CRIEPI JRA-25 Reanalysis, ECMWF ERA-40 Reanalysis, ECMWF ERA Interim Reanalysis, MRI/JMA APHRODITE's Water Resources Project Reanalysis, DWD Global Precipitation Climatology Centre's data, GMAO Modern Era-Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications, reanalysis of Monitoring atmospheric composition and climate (MACC) Collaborated Project, NOAA-CIRES Twentieth Century Global Reanalysis Version II, NCEP Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR), meteorological observational data for the territory of the former USSR for the 20th century, results of modeling by global and regional climatological models, and others are available for processing by the system. The Web-GIS information-computational system for heterogeneous geophysical data analysis provides specialists involved into multidisciplinary research projects with reliable and practical instruments for integrated research of climate and ecosystems changes on global and regional scales. With its help even an unskilled in programming user is able to process and visualize multidimensional observational and model data through unified web-interface using a common graphical web-browser. This work is partially supported by SB RAS project VIII.80.2.1, RFBR grant #13-05-12034, grant #14-05-00502, and integrated project SB RAS #131. References 1. Gordov E.P., Lykosov V.N., Krupchatnikov V.N., Okladnikov I.G., Titov A.G., Shulgina T.M. Computational and information technologies for monitoring and modeling of climate changes and their consequences. - Novosibirsk: Nauka, Siberian branch, 2013. - 195 p. (in Russian) 2. Felice Frankel, Rosalind Reid. Big data: Distilling meaning from data // Nature. Vol. 455. N. 7209. P. 30. 3. T.M. Shulgina, E.P. Gordov, I.G. Okladnikov, A.G., Titov, E.Yu. Genina, N.P. Gorbatenko, I.V. Kuzhevskaya, A.S. Akhmetshina. Software complex for a regional climate change analysis. // Vestnik NGU. Series: Information technologies. 2013. Vol. 11. Issue 1. P. 124-131 (in Russian). 4. I.G. Okladnikov, A.G. Titov, T.M. Shulgina, E.P. Gordov, V.Yu. Bogomolov, Yu.V. Martynova, S.P. Suschenko, A.V. Skvortsov. Software for analysis and visualization of climate change monitoring and forecasting data // Numerical methods and programming, 2013. Vol. 14. P. 123-131 (in Russian).

  9. MedlinePlus Connect: Web Application

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/connect/application.html MedlinePlus Connect: Web Application To use the sharing features on this ... please see our guidelines and instructions on linking. Web Application Overview The API for the Web application ...

  10. MedlinePlus Connect: Web Service

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/connect/service.html MedlinePlus Connect: Web Service To use the sharing features on this ... if you implement MedlinePlus Connect by contacting us . Web Service Overview The parameters for the Web service ...

  11. Guide to Healthy Web Surfing

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gov/medlineplus/healthywebsurfing.html MedlinePlus Guide to Healthy Web Surfing To use the sharing features on this ... the site, use caution. Focus on quality--All Web sites are not created equal Does the site ...

  12. Decoding Technology: Web Browsers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Tim; Donohue, Chip

    2007-01-01

    More than ever, early childhood administrators are relying on the Internet for information. A key to becoming an exceptional Web "surfer" is getting to know the ins and outs of the Web browser being used. There are several options available, and almost all can be downloaded for free. However, many of the functions and features they offer are very…

  13. Decoding Technology: Web Browsers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Tim; Donohue, Chip

    2007-01-01

    More than ever, early childhood administrators are relying on the Internet for information. A key to becoming an exceptional Web "surfer" is getting to know the ins and outs of the Web browser being used. There are several options available, and almost all can be downloaded for free. However, many of the functions and features they offer are very…

  14. Web Design Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Brian

    2009-01-01

    The web site is a library's most important feature. Patrons use the web site for numerous functions, such as renewing materials, placing holds, requesting information, and accessing databases. The homepage is the place they turn to look up the hours, branch locations, policies, and events. Whether users are at work, at home, in a building, or on…

  15. Web Design Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Brian

    2009-01-01

    The web site is a library's most important feature. Patrons use the web site for numerous functions, such as renewing materials, placing holds, requesting information, and accessing databases. The homepage is the place they turn to look up the hours, branch locations, policies, and events. Whether users are at work, at home, in a building, or on…

  16. A web-based clinical record 'xl'Emofilia' for outpatients with haemophilia and allied disorders in the Region of Emilia-Romagna: features and pilot use.

    PubMed

    Pattacini, C; Rivolta, G F; Di Perna, C; Riccardi, F; Tagliaferri, A

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of haemophilia in developed countries is based on home self-infusion of concentrates. Improving communication between haemophilia centres (HC) and patients is very important. The Hub Centre (Parma) designed a new outpatient clinical record, 'xl'Emofilia', as part of a project 'Web Connections of the Region's HC' funded by Emilia-Romagna Health Authority. It is a web-based application suited to the needs of HC, which shares the databases of the region's HC, integrated with regional and national registries that can be accessed from anywhere. Data are managed with the 'https' protocol. Significant innovations are 'pathways' that help with the entry of data and 'problem list', which is a summary (updated automatically) of the patient's clinically significant data that can be consulted at a glance. With a 'web identity' (a personal USB key for secure web access), patients can record bleeds and home infusions, consult their own data and allow access to their general practitioners or in emergency departments anywhere in the world (also in English language). In December 2006, the HC started to use 'xl'Emofilia' and 673 clinical records are now active. Since April 2007, 50 pilot patients have been trained and are successfully using the system. A questionnaire administered to these patients on their level of satisfaction with the system and its ease of use gave excellent results. Our web-based system facilitates communication between patients and HC, improves the quality of care and enables patients to use these information at any time and from anywhere in the world. PMID:18976246

  17. Brandenburg 3D - a comprehensive 3D Subsurface Model, Conception of an Infrastructure Node and a Web Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerschke, Dorit; Schilling, Maik; Simon, Andreas; Wächter, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    The Energiewende and the increasing scarcity of raw materials will lead to an intensified utilization of the subsurface in Germany. Within this context, geological 3D modeling is a fundamental approach for integrated decision and planning processes. Initiated by the development of the European Geospatial Infrastructure INSPIRE, the German State Geological Offices started digitizing their predominantly analog archive inventory. Until now, a comprehensive 3D subsurface model of Brandenburg did not exist. Therefore the project B3D strived to develop a new 3D model as well as a subsequent infrastructure node to integrate all geological and spatial data within the Geodaten-Infrastruktur Brandenburg (Geospatial Infrastructure, GDI-BB) and provide it to the public through an interactive 2D/3D web application. The functionality of the web application is based on a client-server architecture. Server-sided, all available spatial data is published through GeoServer. GeoServer is designed for interoperability and acts as the reference implementation of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Feature Service (WFS) standard that provides the interface that allows requests for geographical features. In addition, GeoServer implements, among others, the high performance certified compliant Web Map Service (WMS) that serves geo-referenced map images. For publishing 3D data, the OGC Web 3D Service (W3DS), a portrayal service for three-dimensional geo-data, is used. The W3DS displays elements representing the geometry, appearance, and behavior of geographic objects. On the client side, the web application is solely based on Free and Open Source Software and leans on the JavaScript API WebGL that allows the interactive rendering of 2D and 3D graphics by means of GPU accelerated usage of physics and image processing as part of the web page canvas without the use of plug-ins. WebGL is supported by most web browsers (e.g., Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Safari, and Opera). The web application enables an intuitive navigation through all available information and allows the visualization of geological maps (2D), seismic transects (2D/3D), wells (2D/3D), and the 3D-model. These achievements will alleviate spatial and geological data management within the German State Geological Offices and foster the interoperability of heterogeneous systems. It will provide guidance to a systematic subsurface management across system, domain and administrative boundaries on the basis of a federated spatial data infrastructure, and include the public in the decision processes (e-Governance). Yet, the interoperability of the systems has to be strongly propelled forward through agreements on standards that need to be decided upon in responsible committees. The project B3D is funded with resources from the European Fund for Regional Development (EFRE).

  18. Properties of food webs

    SciTech Connect

    Pimm, S.L.

    1980-04-01

    On the assumption that systems of interacting species, when perturbed from equilibrium, should return to equilibrium quickly, one can predict four properties of food webs: (1) food chains should be short, (2) species feeding on more than one trophic level (omnivores) should be rare, (3) those species that do feed on more than one trophic level should do so by feeding on species in adjacent trophic levels, and (4) host-parasitoid systems are likely to be exceptions to (1)-(3) when interaction coefficients permit greater trophic complexity. By generating random, model food webs (with many features identical to webs described from a variety of marine, freshwater, and terrestrial systems), it is possible to generate expected values for the number of trophic levels and the degree of omnivory within webs. When compared with these random webs, real world webs are shown to have fewer trophic levels, less omnivory, and very few omnivores feeding on nonadjacent trophic levels. Insect webs are shown to have a greater degree of omnivory than other webs. The confirmation of all these predictions from stability analyses suggests that system stability places necessary, though not sufficient, limitations on the possible shapes of food webs.

  19. Preferred Features of Oral Treatments and Predictors of Non-Adherence: Two Web-Based Choice Experiments in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Brandes, David; Park, Jinhee; Liakhovitski, Dimitri; Koudinova, Tatiana; Sasane, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral disease modifying therapies (DMTs) for multiple sclerosis (MS) differ in efficacy, tolerability, and safety. Objective We sought to understand how these attributes impact patient preference and predicted DMT non-adherence among oral-naïve MS patients. Methods Adult MS patients from the “PatientsLikeMe” Web-based health data-sharing platform completed a discrete choice exercise where they were asked to express their preference for one of three hypothetical oral DMTs, each with a certain combination of levels of tested attributes. Another Web-based exercise tested a number of possible drivers of non-adherence, mainly side effects. Data from an MS clinic were used to adjust for sample bias. Respondents’ preferences were analyzed using Hierarchical Bayesian estimation. Results A total of 319 patients completed all questions. Most respondents were female (77.7%, 248/319) with mean age 48 years (SD 10). Liver toxicity was the attribute that emerged as the most important driver of patient preference (25.8%, relative importance out of 100%), followed by severe side effects (15.3%), delay to disability progression (10.7%), and common side effects (10.4%). The most important drivers of predicted non-adherence were frequency of daily dosing (17.4% out of 100%), hair thinning (14.8%), use during pregnancy (14.1%), severe side effects (13.8%), and diarrhea (13.0%). Conclusions Understanding the important concerns expressed by patients may help health care providers to understand and educate their patients more completely about these concerns. This knowledge may therefore improve both choices of appropriate therapy and adherence to therapy over time. PMID:25749630

  20. Web Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fürnkranz, Johannes

    The World-Wide Web provides every internet citizen with access to an abundance of information, but it becomes increasingly difficult to identify the relevant pieces of information. Research in web mining tries to address this problem by applying techniques from data mining and machine learning to Web data and documents. This chapter provides a brief overview of web mining techniques and research areas, most notably hypertext classification, wrapper induction, recommender systems and web usage mining.

  1. Teachers' Source Evaluation Self-Efficacy Predicts Their Use of Relevant Source Features When Evaluating the Trustworthiness of Web Sources on Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreassen, Rune; Brĺten, Ivar

    2013-01-01

    Building on prior research and theory concerning source evaluation and the role of self-efficacy in the context of online learning, this study investigated the relationship between teachers' beliefs about their capability to evaluate the trustworthiness of sources and their reliance on relevant source features when judging the trustworthiness…

  2. A Search Engine Features Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorndran, Gerald

    Until recently, the World Wide Web (WWW) public access search engines have not included many of the advanced commands, options, and features commonly available with the for-profit online database user interfaces, such as DIALOG. This study evaluates the features and characteristics common to both types of search interfaces, examines the Web search…

  3. Time Varying Feature Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echterhoff, J.; Simonis, I.; Atkinson, R.

    2012-04-01

    The infrastructure to gather, store and access information about our environment is improving and growing rapidly. The increasing amount of information allows us to get a better understanding of the current state of our environment, historical processes and to simulate and predict the future state of the environment. Finer grained spatial and temporal data and more reliable communications make it easier to model dynamic states and ephemeral features. The exchange of information within and across geospatial domains is facilitated through the use of harmonized information models. The Observations & Measurements (O&M) developed through OGC and standardised by ISO is an example of such a cross-domain information model. It is used in many domains, including meteorology, hydrology as well as the emergency management. O&M enables harmonized representation of common metadata that belong to the act of determining the state of a feature property, whether by sensors, simulations or humans. In addition to the resulting feature property value, information such as the result quality but especially the time that the result applies to the feature property can be represented. Temporal metadata is critical to modelling past and future states of a feature. The features, and the semantics of each property, are defined in domain specific Application Schema using the General Feature Model (GFM) from ISO 19109 and usually encoded following ISO 19136. However, at the moment these standards provide only limited support for the representation and handling of time varying feature data. Features like rivers, wildfires or gas plumes have a defined state - for example geographic extent - at any given point in time. To keep track of changes, a more complex model for example using time-series coverages is required. Furthermore, the representation and management of feature property value changes via the service interfaces defined by OGC and ISO - namely: WFS and WCS - would be rather complex. Keeping track of feature property value corrections or even feature (state change) cancellations for auditing purposes is also not easy to achieve. The aviation domain has strong requirements to represent and manage the state of aeronautical features through time. Being able to efficiently encode and manage feature state changes, keeping track of all changes for auditing purposes and being able to determine the future state of an aeronautical feature as currently known to the system are vital for aeronautical applications. In order to support these requirements, the Aeronautical Information Exchange Model (AIXM) which has been developed by the aviation domain is based on the so called AIXM Temporality Model (AIXM-TM). The AIXM-TM defines various rules for modeling, representing and handling the state of aeronautical features through time. This is a promising approach that can be incorporated into the GFM so that ultimately the modeling and management of time varying feature data is supported in an interoperable and harmonized way in all geospatial domains. This presentation gives an introduction to the main concepts of the AIXM-TM. It also shows how the GFM can be extended to support time varying feature data. Finally, the relationship of O&M and time varying features is discussed.

  4. APPRIS WebServer and WebServices

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Carro, Angel; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces the APPRIS WebServer (http://appris.bioinfo.cnio.es) and WebServices (http://apprisws.bioinfo.cnio.es). Both the web servers and the web services are based around the APPRIS Database, a database that presently houses annotations of splice isoforms for five different vertebrate genomes. The APPRIS WebServer and WebServices provide access to the computational methods implemented in the APPRIS Database, while the APPRIS WebServices also allows retrieval of the annotations. The APPRIS WebServer and WebServices annotate splice isoforms with protein structural and functional features, and with data from cross-species alignments. In addition they can use the annotations of structure, function and conservation to select a single reference isoform for each protein-coding gene (the principal protein isoform). APPRIS principal isoforms have been shown to agree overwhelmingly with the main protein isoform detected in proteomics experiments. The APPRIS WebServer allows for the annotation of splice isoforms for individual genes, and provides a range of visual representations and tools to allow researchers to identify the likely effect of splicing events. The APPRIS WebServices permit users to generate annotations automatically in high throughput mode and to interrogate the annotations in the APPRIS Database. The APPRIS WebServices have been implemented using REST architecture to be flexible, modular and automatic. PMID:25990727

  5. APPRIS WebServer and WebServices.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Carro, Angel; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L

    2015-07-01

    This paper introduces the APPRIS WebServer (http://appris.bioinfo.cnio.es) and WebServices (http://apprisws.bioinfo.cnio.es). Both the web servers and the web services are based around the APPRIS Database, a database that presently houses annotations of splice isoforms for five different vertebrate genomes. The APPRIS WebServer and WebServices provide access to the computational methods implemented in the APPRIS Database, while the APPRIS WebServices also allows retrieval of the annotations. The APPRIS WebServer and WebServices annotate splice isoforms with protein structural and functional features, and with data from cross-species alignments. In addition they can use the annotations of structure, function and conservation to select a single reference isoform for each protein-coding gene (the principal protein isoform). APPRIS principal isoforms have been shown to agree overwhelmingly with the main protein isoform detected in proteomics experiments. The APPRIS WebServer allows for the annotation of splice isoforms for individual genes, and provides a range of visual representations and tools to allow researchers to identify the likely effect of splicing events. The APPRIS WebServices permit users to generate annotations automatically in high throughput mode and to interrogate the annotations in the APPRIS Database. The APPRIS WebServices have been implemented using REST architecture to be flexible, modular and automatic. PMID:25990727

  6. Charting Our Path with a Web Literacy Map

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Bridget

    2015-01-01

    Being a literacy teacher today means being a teacher of Web literacies. This article features the "Web Literacy Map", an open source tool from Mozilla's Webmaker project. The map focuses on Exploring (Navigating the Web); Building (creating for the Web), and Connecting (Participating on the Web). Readers are invited to use resources,…

  7. Charting Our Path with a Web Literacy Map

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Bridget

    2015-01-01

    Being a literacy teacher today means being a teacher of Web literacies. This article features the "Web Literacy Map", an open source tool from Mozilla's Webmaker project. The map focuses on Exploring (Navigating the Web); Building (creating for the Web), and Connecting (Participating on the Web). Readers are invited to use resources,…

  8. WEBtop (Operating Systems on Web)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M. K.; Kumar, Rajeev

    2011-12-01

    WebOS (Web based operating system) is a new form of Operating Systems. You can use your desktop as a virtual desktop on the web, accessible via a browser, with multiple integrated built-in applications that allow the user to easily manage and organize her data from any location. Desktop on web can be named as WEBtop. This paper starts with a introduction of WebOS and its benefits. For this paper, We have reviewed some most interesting WebOS available nowadays and tried to provide a detailed description of their features. We have identified some parameters as comparison criteria among them. A technical review is given with research design and future goals to design better web based operating systems is a part of this study. Findings of the study conclude this paper.

  9. Significant expressivity of Wolfram syndrome: phenotypic assessment of two known and one novel mutation in the WFS1 gene in three Iranian families.

    PubMed

    Sobhani, Maryam; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Rajab, Asadollah; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza

    2014-11-01

    Wolfram syndrome also known as DIDMOAD (Diabetes Insipidus, Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy, and Deafness) is a rare neurodegenerative autosomal recessive disorder. There is evidence of variable expressivity both in patients and heterozygous carriers. In this study, we describe three Persian Wolfram syndrome families with differences in the age of onset, signs and symptoms of the disease. We clinically evaluated affected families for verifying WS clinical diagnosis. After linkage analysis via 5 STR markers, molecular analysis for WFS1 was performed by direct sequencing for patients and available family members. Three homozygous mutations were identified including c.1885 C>T, c.2205C>A both in exon 8 and c.460+1G>A in intron 4. The mutation c.2205C>A was found to be novel. We report interesting phenotype-genotype correlations: homozygous c.1885C>T and c.2205C>A variants were correlated with quite different disease severity and onset in the siblings. We report a rare case of WS with homozygous c.1885C>T who is married and has a healthy child. c.460+1G>A showed a possible partial dominant inheritance put forth by a heterozygous parent showing partial WS symptoms while her daughter displayed typical WS symptoms. Due to variable expressivity, detailed clinical examination and molecular diagnostics should be used to confirm WS and a more exact recurrence risk data. PMID:25173644

  10. Chapter 59: Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, M. J.

    Web services are a cornerstone of the distributed computing infrastructure that the VO is built upon yet to the newcomer, they can appear to be a black art. This perception is not helped by the miasma of technobabble that pervades the subject and the seemingly impenetrable high priesthood of actual users. In truth, however, there is nothing conceptually difficult about web services (unsurprisingly any complexities will lie in the implementation details) nor indeed anything particularly new. A web service is a piece of software available over a network with a formal description of how it is called and what it returns that a computer can understand. Note that entities such as web servers, ftp servers and database servers do not generally qualify as they lack the standardized description of their inputs and outputs. There are prior technologies, such as RMI, CORBA, and DCOM, that have employed a similar approach but the success of web services lies predominantly in its use of standardized XML to provide a language-neutral way for representing data. In fact, the standardization goes further as web services are traditionally (or as traditionally as five years will allow) tied to a specific set of technologies (WSDL and SOAP conveyed using HTTP with an XML serialization). Alternative implementations are becoming increasingly common and we will cover some of these here. One important thing to remember in all of this, though, is that web services are meant for use by computers and not humans (unlike web pages) and this is why so much of it seems incomprehensible gobbledegook. In this chapter, we will start with an overview of the web services current in the VO and present a short guide on how to use and deploy a web service. We will then review the different approaches to web services, particularly REST and SOAP, and alternatives to XML as a data format. We will consider how web services can be formally described and discuss how advanced features such as security, state and asynchrony can be provided. Note that much of this material is not yet used in the VO but features heavily in IVOA discussions on advanced services and capabilities.

  11. Prey interception drives web invasion and spider size determines successful web takeover in nocturnal orb-web spiders.

    PubMed

    Gan, Wenjin; Liu, Shengjie; Yang, Xiaodong; Li, Daiqin; Lei, Chaoliang

    2015-01-01

    A striking feature of web-building spiders is the use of silk to make webs, mainly for prey capture. However, building a web is energetically expensive and increases the risk of predation. To reduce such costs and still have access to abundant prey, some web-building spiders have evolved web invasion behaviour. In general, no consistent patterns of web invasion have emerged and the factors determining web invasion remain largely unexplored. Here we report web invasion among conspecifics in seven nocturnal species of orb-web spiders, and examined the factors determining the probability of webs that could be invaded and taken over by conspecifics. About 36% of webs were invaded by conspecifics, and 25% of invaded webs were taken over by the invaders. A web that was built higher and intercepted more prey was more likely to be invaded. Once a web was invaded, the smaller the size of the resident spider, the more likely its web would be taken over by the invader. This study suggests that web invasion, as a possible way of reducing costs, may be widespread in nocturnal orb-web spiders. PMID:26405048

  12. Prey interception drives web invasion and spider size determines successful web takeover in nocturnal orb-web spiders

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Wenjin; Liu, Shengjie; Yang, Xiaodong; Li, Daiqin; Lei, Chaoliang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A striking feature of web-building spiders is the use of silk to make webs, mainly for prey capture. However, building a web is energetically expensive and increases the risk of predation. To reduce such costs and still have access to abundant prey, some web-building spiders have evolved web invasion behaviour. In general, no consistent patterns of web invasion have emerged and the factors determining web invasion remain largely unexplored. Here we report web invasion among conspecifics in seven nocturnal species of orb-web spiders, and examined the factors determining the probability of webs that could be invaded and taken over by conspecifics. About 36% of webs were invaded by conspecifics, and 25% of invaded webs were taken over by the invaders. A web that was built higher and intercepted more prey was more likely to be invaded. Once a web was invaded, the smaller the size of the resident spider, the more likely its web would be taken over by the invader. This study suggests that web invasion, as a possible way of reducing costs, may be widespread in nocturnal orb-web spiders. PMID:26405048

  13. Caught on the Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isakson, Carol

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author presents several Web sites supporting electronic presentation skills. The sites featured here will help fine-tune one's skills in modeling effective presentations and provide suggestions for managing student presentations meeting National Educational Technology Standards (NETS). Most use PowerPoint, the current industry…

  14. WebWatch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesbeitt, Sarah

    1997-01-01

    Numerous Web-based phone and address directories provide advantages over the white and yellow pages. Although many share a common database, each has features that set it apart: maps, suggested driving directions, and phone dialing. This article examines eight (Bigfoot, BigBook, BigYellow, Switchboard, Infospace, Contractjobs, InterNIC)…

  15. WebWatch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesbeitt, Sarah

    1997-01-01

    Numerous Web-based phone and address directories provide advantages over the white and yellow pages. Although many share a common database, each has features that set it apart: maps, suggested driving directions, and phone dialing. This article examines eight (Bigfoot, BigBook, BigYellow, Switchboard, Infospace, Contractjobs, InterNIC)…

  16. Designing a Web Page.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackermann, Ernest; Hartman, Karen

    2000-01-01

    Presents technical issues, design considerations and resource sites to consider when designing a Web site. Discusses fonts; colors; screen resolutions; statement of purpose; audience; content; layout; size and number of images; spacing and emphasis; browser-supported features; grammar and spelling; revision/improvement; and testing. (AEF)

  17. Web Operational Status Boards

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-04-16

    Web Operational Status Boards (WebOSB)is a web-based application designed to acquire, display, and update highly dynamic status information between multiple users and jurisdictions. WebOSB is able to disseminate real-time status information—support the timely sharing of information—with constant, dynamic updates via personal computers and the Internet between emergency operations centers (EOCs), incident command centers, and to users outside the EOC who need to know the information (hospitals, shelters, schools). The WebOSB application far exceeds outdated information-sharingmore » methods used by emergency workers: whiteboards, Word and Excel documents, or even locality-specific Web sites. WebOSB’s capabilities include the following elements: - Secure access. Multiple users can access information on WebOSB from any personal computer with Internet access and a secure ID. Privileges are use to control access and distribution of status information and to identify users who are authorized to add or edit information. - Simultaneous update. WebOSB provides options for users to add, display, and update dynamic information simultaneously at all locations involved in the emergency management effort, A single status board can be updated from multiple locations enabling shelters and hospitals to post bed availability or list decontamination capability. - On-the-fly modification. Allowing the definition of an existing status board to be modified on-the-fly can be an asset during an emergency, where information requirements can change quickly. The status board designer feature allows an administrator to quickly define, modi,, add to, and implement new status boards in minutes without needing the help of Web designers and computer programmers. - Publisher/subscriber notification. As a subscriber, each user automatically receives notification of any new information relating to specific status boards. The publisher/subscriber feature automatically notified each user of any new information relating to specific status boards. WebOSB can be installed to fit the specific needs of an emergency management community. Because it was originally developed to concurrently support multiple EOCs at the local, county, and state level, it can also support multi-user environments for other types of projects.« less

  18. Web Operational Status Boards

    SciTech Connect

    2004-04-16

    Web Operational Status Boards (WebOSB)is a web-based application designed to acquire, display, and update highly dynamic status information between multiple users and jurisdictions. WebOSB is able to disseminate real-time status information?support the timely sharing of information?with constant, dynamic updates via personal computers and the Internet between emergency operations centers (EOCs), incident command centers, and to users outside the EOC who need to know the information (hospitals, shelters, schools). The WebOSB application far exceeds outdated information-sharing methods used by emergency workers: whiteboards, Word and Excel documents, or even locality-specific Web sites. WebOSB?s capabilities include the following elements: - Secure access. Multiple users can access information on WebOSB from any personal computer with Internet access and a secure ID. Privileges are use to control access and distribution of status information and to identify users who are authorized to add or edit information. - Simultaneous update. WebOSB provides options for users to add, display, and update dynamic information simultaneously at all locations involved in the emergency management effort, A single status board can be updated from multiple locations enabling shelters and hospitals to post bed availability or list decontamination capability. - On-the-fly modification. Allowing the definition of an existing status board to be modified on-the-fly can be an asset during an emergency, where information requirements can change quickly. The status board designer feature allows an administrator to quickly define, modi,, add to, and implement new status boards in minutes without needing the help of Web designers and computer programmers. - Publisher/subscriber notification. As a subscriber, each user automatically receives notification of any new information relating to specific status boards. The publisher/subscriber feature automatically notified each user of any new information relating to specific status boards. WebOSB can be installed to fit the specific needs of an emergency management community. Because it was originally developed to concurrently support multiple EOCs at the local, county, and state level, it can also support multi-user environments for other types of projects.

  19. Web Apollo: a web-based genomic annotation editing platform

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Web Apollo is the first instantaneous, collaborative genomic annotation editor available on the web. One of the natural consequences following from current advances in sequencing technology is that there are more and more researchers sequencing new genomes. These researchers require tools to describe the functional features of their newly sequenced genomes. With Web Apollo researchers can use any of the common browsers (for example, Chrome or Firefox) to jointly analyze and precisely describe the features of a genome in real time, whether they are in the same room or working from opposite sides of the world. PMID:24000942

  20. Web Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    White, Bebo

    2003-06-23

    Web Engineering is the application of systematic, disciplined and quantifiable approaches to development, operation, and maintenance of Web-based applications. It is both a pro-active approach and a growing collection of theoretical and empirical research in Web application development. This paper gives an overview of Web Engineering by addressing the questions: (a) why is it needed? (b) what is its domain of operation? (c) how does it help and what should it do to improve Web application development? and (d) how should it be incorporated in education and training? The paper discusses the significant differences that exist between Web applications and conventional software, the taxonomy of Web applications, the progress made so far and the research issues and experience of creating a specialization at the master's level. The paper reaches a conclusion that Web Engineering at this stage is a moving target since Web technologies are constantly evolving, making new types of applications possible, which in turn may require innovations in how they are built, deployed and maintained.

  1. Factsheets Web Application

    SciTech Connect

    VIGIL,FRANK; REEDER,ROXANA G.

    2000-10-30

    The Factsheets web application was conceived out of the requirement to create, update, publish, and maintain a web site with dynamic research and development (R and D) content. Before creating the site, a requirements discovery process was done in order to accurately capture the purpose and functionality of the site. One of the high priority requirements for the site would be that no specialized training in web page authoring would be necessary. All functions of uploading, creation, and editing of factsheets needed to be accomplished by entering data directly into web form screens generated by the application. Another important requirement of the site was to allow for access to the factsheet web pages and data via the internal Sandia Restricted Network and Sandia Open Network based on the status of the input data. Important to the owners of the web site would be to allow the published factsheets to be accessible to all personnel within the department whether or not the sheets had completed the formal Review and Approval (R and A) process. Once the factsheets had gone through the formal review and approval process, they could then be published both internally and externally based on their individual publication status. An extended requirement and feature of the site would be to provide a keyword search capability to search through the factsheets. Also, since the site currently resides on both the internal and external networks, it would need to be registered with the Sandia search engines in order to allow access to the content of the site by the search engines. To date, all of the above requirements and features have been created and implemented in the Factsheet web application. These have been accomplished by the use of flat text databases, which are discussed in greater detail later in this paper.

  2. SVG-Based Web Publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jerry Z.; Zhu, Eugene; Shim, Simon

    2003-01-01

    With the increasing applications of the Web in e-commerce, advertising, and publication, new technologies are needed to improve Web graphics technology due to the current limitation of technology. The SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) technology is a new revolutionary solution to overcome the existing problems in the current web technology. It provides precise and high-resolution web graphics using plain text format commands. It sets a new standard for web graphic format to allow us to present complicated graphics with rich test fonts and colors, high printing quality, and dynamic layout capabilities. This paper provides a tutorial overview about SVG technology and its essential features, capability, and advantages. The reports a comparison studies between SVG and other web graphics technologies.

  3. Sensor web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delin, Kevin A. (Inventor); Jackson, Shannon P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A Sensor Web formed of a number of different sensor pods. Each of the sensor pods include a clock which is synchronized with a master clock so that all of the sensor pods in the Web have a synchronized clock. The synchronization is carried out by first using a coarse synchronization which takes less power, and subsequently carrying out a fine synchronization to make a fine sync of all the pods on the Web. After the synchronization, the pods ping their neighbors to determine which pods are listening and responded, and then only listen during time slots corresponding to those pods which respond.

  4. Reservoir High's TE Site Wins Web Site of the Month

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article features "Mr. Rhine's Technology Education Web Site," a winner of the Web Site of the Month. This Web site was designed by Luke Rhine, a teacher at the Reservoir High School in Fulton, Maryland. Rhine's Web site offers course descriptions and syllabuses, class calendars, lectures and presentations, design briefs and other course…

  5. Reservoir High's TE Site Wins Web Site of the Month

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article features "Mr. Rhine's Technology Education Web Site," a winner of the Web Site of the Month. This Web site was designed by Luke Rhine, a teacher at the Reservoir High School in Fulton, Maryland. Rhine's Web site offers course descriptions and syllabuses, class calendars, lectures and presentations, design briefs and other course…

  6. Which Bundles of Features in a Web-Based Personally Controlled Health Management System Are Associated With Consumer Help-Seeking Behaviors for Physical and Emotional Well-Being?

    PubMed Central

    Proudfoot, Judith; Andrews, Annie; Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Crimmins, Jacinta; Arguel, Amaël; Coiera, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Background Personally controlled health management systems (PCHMS), which include a personal health record (PHR), health management tools, and consumer resources, represent the next stage in consumer eHealth systems. It is still unclear, however, what features contribute to an engaging and efficacious PCHMS. Objective To identify features in a Web-based PCHMS that are associated with consumer utilization of primary care and counselling services, and help-seeking rates for physical and emotional well-being concerns. Methods A one-group pre/posttest online prospective study was conducted on a university campus to measure use of a PCHMS for physical and emotional well-being needs during a university academic semester (July to November 2011). The PCHMS integrated an untethered personal health record (PHR) with well-being journeys, social forums, polls, diaries, and online messaging links with a health service provider, where journeys provide information for consumer participants to engage with clinicians and health services in an actionable way. 1985 students and staff aged 18 and above with access to the Internet were recruited online. Logistic regression, the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient, and chi-square analyses were used to associate participants’ help-seeking behaviors and health service utilization with PCHMS usage among the 709 participants eligible for analysis. Results A dose-response association was detected between the number of times a user logged into the PCHMS and the number of visits to a health care professional (P=.01), to the university counselling service (P=.03), and help-seeking rates (formal or informal) for emotional well-being matters (P=.03). No significant association was detected between participant pre-study characteristics or well-being ratings at different PCHMS login frequencies. Health service utilization was strongly correlated with use of a bundle of features including: online appointment booking (primary care: OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.01-3.00; counselling: OR 6.04, 95% CI 2.30-15.85), personal health record (health care professional: OR 2.82, 95% CI 1.63-4.89), the poll (health care professional: OR 1.47, 95% CI 1.02-2.12), and diary (counselling: OR 4.92, 95% CI 1.40-17.35). Help-seeking for physical well-being matters was only correlated with use of the personal health record (OR 1.73, 95% CI 1.18-2.53). Help-seeking for emotional well-being concerns (including visits to the university counselling service) was correlated with a bundle comprising the poll (formal or informal help-seeking: OR 1.03, 95% CI 1.00-1.05), diary (counselling: OR 4.92, 95% CI 1.40-17.35), and online appointment booking (counselling: OR 6.04, 95% CI 2.30-15.85). Conclusions Frequent usage of a PCHMS was significantly associated with increased consumer health service utilization and help-seeking rates for emotional health matters in a university sample. Different bundles of PCHMS features were associated with physical and emotional well-being matters. PCHMS appears to be a promising mechanism to engage consumers in help-seeking or health service utilization for physical and emotional well-being matters. PMID:23649790

  7. Elusive or Illuminating: Using the Web To Explore the Salem Witchcraft Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurter, Stephanie R.

    2003-01-01

    Presents Web sites useful for teaching about the Salem (Massachusetts) witchcraft trials. Includes Web sites that offer primary source material, collections of Web sites, teaching material, and sites that are interactive, including features, such as QuickTime movies. (CMK)

  8. Webbing It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandsberg, Jennifer

    1996-01-01

    Provides a quick look at some World Wide Web sites that contain current election year information. Recommends Project Vote Smart, a site with links to online news organizations, the home pages of all presidential candidates, and other political sites. Briefly notes several interactive CD-ROM resources. (MJP)

  9. Web Sitings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Erika

    2001-01-01

    Presents seven mathematics games, located on the World Wide Web, for elementary students, including: Absurd Math: Pre-Algebra from Another Dimension; The Little Animals Activity Centre; MathDork Game Room (classic video games focusing on algebra); Lemonade Stand (students practice math and business skills); Math Cats (teaches the artistic beauty…

  10. Webcam classification using simple features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramoun, Thitiporn; Choe, Jeehyun; Li, He; Chen, Qingshuang; Amornraksa, Thumrongrat; Lu, Yung-Hsiang; Delp, Edward J.

    2015-03-01

    Thousands of sensors are connected to the Internet and many of these sensors are cameras. The "Internet of Things" will contain many "things" that are image sensors. This vast network of distributed cameras (i.e. web cams) will continue to exponentially grow. In this paper we examine simple methods to classify an image from a web cam as "indoor/outdoor" and having "people/no people" based on simple features. We use four types of image features to classify an image as indoor/outdoor: color, edge, line, and text. To classify an image as having people/no people we use HOG and texture features. The features are weighted based on their significance and combined. A support vector machine is used for classification. Our system with feature weighting and feature combination yields 95.5% accuracy.

  11. Web processing service for landslide hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandric, I.; Ursaru, P.; Chitu, D.; Mihai, B.; Savulescu, I.

    2012-04-01

    Hazard analysis requires heavy computation and specialized software. Web processing services can offer complex solutions that can be accessed through a light client (web or desktop). This paper presents a web processing service (both WPS and Esri Geoprocessing Service) for landslides hazard assessment. The web processing service was build with Esri ArcGIS Server solution and Python, developed using ArcPy, GDAL Python and NumPy. A complex model for landslide hazard analysis using both predisposing and triggering factors combined into a Bayesian temporal network with uncertainty propagation was build and published as WPS and Geoprocessing service using ArcGIS Standard Enterprise 10.1. The model uses as predisposing factors the first and second derivatives from DEM, the effective precipitations, runoff, lithology and land use. All these parameters can be served by the client from other WFS services or by uploading and processing the data on the server. The user can select the option of creating the first and second derivatives from the DEM automatically on the server or to upload the data already calculated. One of the main dynamic factors from the landslide analysis model is leaf area index. The LAI offers the advantage of modelling not just the changes from different time periods expressed in years, but also the seasonal changes in land use throughout a year. The LAI index can be derived from various satellite images or downloaded as a product. The upload of such data (time series) is possible using a NetCDF file format. The model is run in a monthly time step and for each time step all the parameters values, a-priory, conditional and posterior probability are obtained and stored in a log file. The validation process uses landslides that have occurred during the period up to the active time step and checks the records of the probabilities and parameters values for those times steps with the values of the active time step. Each time a landslide has been positive identified new a-priory probabilities are recorded for each parameter. A complete log for the entire model is saved and used for statistical analysis and a NETCDF file is created and it can be downloaded from the server with the log file

  12. Personalization of Rule-based Web Services

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Okkyung; Han, SangYong

    2008-01-01

    Nowadays Web users have clearly expressed their wishes to receive personalized services directly. Personalization is the way to tailor services directly to the immediate requirements of the user. However, the current Web Services System does not provide any features supporting this such as consideration of personalization of services and intelligent matchmaking. In this research a flexible, personalized Rule-based Web Services System to address these problems and to enable efficient search, discovery and construction across general Web documents and Semantic Web documents in a Web Services System is proposed. This system utilizes matchmaking among service requesters', service providers' and users' preferences using a Rule-based Search Method, and subsequently ranks search results. A prototype of efficient Web Services search and construction for the suggested system is developed based on the current work.

  13. WebProtégé: A Collaborative Ontology Editor and Knowledge Acquisition Tool for the Web

    PubMed Central

    Tudorache, Tania; Nyulas, Csongor; Noy, Natalya F.; Musen, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present WebProtégé—a lightweight ontology editor and knowledge acquisition tool for the Web. With the wide adoption of Web 2.0 platforms and the gradual adoption of ontologies and Semantic Web technologies in the real world, we need ontology-development tools that are better suited for the novel ways of interacting, constructing and consuming knowledge. Users today take Web-based content creation and online collaboration for granted. WebProtégé integrates these features as part of the ontology development process itself. We tried to lower the entry barrier to ontology development by providing a tool that is accessible from any Web browser, has extensive support for collaboration, and a highly customizable and pluggable user interface that can be adapted to any level of user expertise. The declarative user interface enabled us to create custom knowledge-acquisition forms tailored for domain experts. We built WebProtégé using the existing Protégé infrastructure, which supports collaboration on the back end side, and the Google Web Toolkit for the front end. The generic and extensible infrastructure allowed us to easily deploy WebProtégé in production settings for several projects. We present the main features of WebProtégé and its architecture and describe briefly some of its uses for real-world projects. WebProtégé is free and open source. An online demo is available at http://webprotege.stanford.edu. PMID:23807872

  14. Designing a Web-based Reading Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefl-Mabry, Joette

    1998-01-01

    Describes a Web-based reading course for college developmental reading classes. Discusses course features, the first week of class, the benefits of Web-based instruction, old media versus new media, designing a successful site, and the benefits of patience. (SR)

  15. XML Content Finally Arrives on the Web!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funke, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Explains extensible markup language (XML) and how it differs from hypertext markup language (HTML) and standard generalized markup language (SGML). Highlights include features of XML, including better formatting of documents, better searching capabilities, multiple uses for hyperlinking, and an increase in Web applications; Web browsers; and what…

  16. WebQuests: Tools for Differentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweizer, Heidi; Kossow, Ben

    2007-01-01

    This article features the WebQuest, an inquiry-oriented activity in which some or all of the information that learners interact with comes from resources on the Internet. WebQuests, when properly constructed, are activities, usually authentic in nature, that require the student to use Internet-based resources to deepen their understanding and…

  17. Trends in Web-based Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Hong; Kinshuk; He, Xiaoqin; Patel, Ashok; Jesshope, Chris

    2001-01-01

    Discusses trends in Web-based learning environments. Highlights include common features of existing Web-based learning environments; challenges; the large amount of available online educational material; adaptation and dynamic interaction; real-time interaction; and monitoring online testing. (LRW)

  18. Web Page Authoring Tools: Comparison and Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craney, Linda

    Initially available from universities and individual enthusiasts, software tools to author World Wide Web pages are maturing into very feature-rich applications and are now offered by large corporations. These applications are enabling more companies to create and maintain pages themselves on the Web or on corporate Intranets. The market continues…

  19. Exemplary Web-Based Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milone, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Exemplary Web-based schools are as different as they are similar. The schools featured in this section have applied technology in unique ways to meet the needs of their students. Five examples are cited across the U.S.: Lemon Grove School District, Lemon Grove, California; Virginia Beach City Public Schools, Virginia Beach, Virginia; Carlsbad…

  20. Exemplary Web-Based Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milone, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Exemplary Web-based schools are as different as they are similar. The schools featured in this section have applied technology in unique ways to meet the needs of their students. Five examples are cited across the U.S.: Lemon Grove School District, Lemon Grove, California; Virginia Beach City Public Schools, Virginia Beach, Virginia; Carlsbad…

  1. Web 1.0 to Web 3.0 Evolution: Reviewing the Impacts on Tourism Development and Opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eftekhari, M. Hossein; Barzegar, Zeynab; Isaai, M. T.

    The most important event following the establishmenet of the Internet network was the Web introduced by Tim Berners-Lee. Websites give their owners features that allow sharing with which they can publish their content with users and visitors. In the last 5 years, we have seen some changes in the use of web. Users want to participate in content sharing and they like to interact with each other. This is known as Web 2.0. In the last year, Web 2.0 has reached maturity and now we need a smart web which will be accordingly be called Web 3.0. Web 3.0 is based on semantic web definition. Changing the way of using the web has had a clear impact on E-Tourism and its development and also on business models. In this paper, we review the definitions and describe the impacts of web evolution on E-Tourism.

  2. Vowel Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindau, Mona

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents an inventory of the features that are necessary to describe vowel systems in the languages of the world. The relationship between the features and then articulatory and acoustic correlates is explored. (Author/NCR)

  3. A Structural and Content-Based Analysis for Web Filtering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, P. Y.; Hui, S. C.; Fong, A. C. M.

    2003-01-01

    Presents an analysis of the distinguishing features of pornographic Web pages so that effective filtering techniques can be developed. Surveys the existing techniques for Web content filtering and describes the implementation of a Web content filtering system that uses an artificial neural network. (Author/LRW)

  4. Deep Web video

    SciTech Connect

    None Available

    2009-06-01

    To make the web work better for science, OSTI has developed state-of-the-art technologies and services including a deep web search capability. The deep web includes content in searchable databases available to web users but not accessible by popular search engines, such as Google. This video provides an introduction to the deep web search engine.

  5. Deep Web video

    ScienceCinema

    None Available

    2012-03-28

    To make the web work better for science, OSTI has developed state-of-the-art technologies and services including a deep web search capability. The deep web includes content in searchable databases available to web users but not accessible by popular search engines, such as Google. This video provides an introduction to the deep web search engine.

  6. Project Assessment Skills Web Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goff, Samuel J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to utilize Ruby on Rails to create a web application that will replace a spreadsheet keeping track of training courses and tasks. The goal is to create a fast and easy to use web application that will allow users to track progress on training courses. This application will allow users to update and keep track of all of the training required of them. The training courses will be organized by group and by user, making readability easier. This will also allow group leads and administrators to get a sense of how everyone is progressing in training. Currently, updating and finding information from this spreadsheet is a long and tedious task. By upgrading to a web application, finding and updating information will be easier than ever as well as adding new training courses and tasks. Accessing this data will be much easier in that users just have to go to a website and log in with NDC credentials rather than request the relevant spreadsheet from the holder. In addition to Ruby on Rails, I will be using JavaScript, CSS, and jQuery to help add functionality and ease of use to my web application. This web application will include a number of features that will help update and track progress on training. For example, one feature will be to track progress of a whole group of users to be able to see how the group as a whole is progressing. Another feature will be to assign tasks to either a user or a group of users. All of these together will create a user friendly and functional web application.

  7. Study & Analysis of various Protocols in popular Web Browsers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Bharat; Baghel, Harish Singh; Patil, Manoj; Singh, Pramod

    2012-08-01

    The web browsers are the application software that are used to access information from the World Wide Web. With the increasing popularity of the web browsers, the modern web browsers are designed to contain more features as compared to the existing web browsers. For the transferring of information through these browsers, various protocols have been implemented on these modern web browsers to make these browsers more efficient. Different protocols used in different layers have different functions and by increasing the efficiency of these protocols we can make the working of browsers more efficient.

  8. WebProtégé: a collaborative Web-based platform for editing biomedical ontologies

    PubMed Central

    Horridge, Matthew; Tudorache, Tania; Nuylas, Csongor; Vendetti, Jennifer; Noy, Natalya F.; Musen, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary: WebProtégé is an open-source Web application for editing OWL 2 ontologies. It contains several features to aid collaboration, including support for the discussion of issues, change notification and revision-based change tracking. WebProtégé also features a simple user interface, which is geared towards editing the kinds of class descriptions and annotations that are prevalent throughout biomedical ontologies. Moreover, it is possible to configure the user interface using views that are optimized for editing Open Biomedical Ontology (OBO) class descriptions and metadata. Some of these views are shown in the Supplementary Material and can be seen in WebProtégé itself by configuring the project as an OBO project. Availability and implementation: WebProtégé is freely available for use on the Web at http://webprotege.stanford.edu. It is implemented in Java and JavaScript using the OWL API and the Google Web Toolkit. All major browsers are supported. For users who do not wish to host their ontologies on the Stanford servers, WebProtégé is available as a Web app that can be run locally using a Servlet container such as Tomcat. Binaries, source code and documentation are available under an open-source license at http://protegewiki.stanford.edu/wiki/WebProtege. Contact: matthew.horridge@stanford.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24771560

  9. Refining the Use of the Web (and Web Search) as a Language Teaching and Learning Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Shaoqun; Franken, Margaret; Witten, Ian H.

    2009-01-01

    The web is a potentially useful corpus for language study because it provides examples of language that are contextualized and authentic, and is large and easily searchable. However, web contents are heterogeneous in the extreme, uncontrolled and hence "dirty," and exhibit features different from the written and spoken texts in other linguistic…

  10. Refining the Use of the Web (and Web Search) as a Language Teaching and Learning Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Shaoqun; Franken, Margaret; Witten, Ian H.

    2009-01-01

    The web is a potentially useful corpus for language study because it provides examples of language that are contextualized and authentic, and is large and easily searchable. However, web contents are heterogeneous in the extreme, uncontrolled and hence "dirty," and exhibit features different from the written and spoken texts in other linguistic…

  11. Web Mining for Web Image Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zheng; Wenyin, Liu; Zhang, Feng; Li, Mingjing; Zhang, Hongjiang

    2001-01-01

    Presents a prototype system for image retrieval from the Internet using Web mining. Discusses the architecture of the Web image retrieval prototype; document space modeling; user log mining; and image retrieval experiments to evaluate the proposed system. (AEF)

  12. Web Algebra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capani, Antonio; De Dominicis, Gabriel

    This paper proposes a model for a general interface between people and Computer Algebra Systems (CAS). The main features in the CAS interface are data navigation and the possibility of accessing powerful remote machines. This model is based on the idea of session management, in which the main engine of the tool enables interactions with the…

  13. Web Mining: Machine Learning for Web Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsinchun; Chau, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Presents an overview of machine learning research and reviews methods used for evaluating machine learning systems. Ways that machine-learning algorithms were used in traditional information retrieval systems in the "pre-Web" era are described, and the field of Web mining and how machine learning has been used in different Web mining applications…

  14. Web Mining: Machine Learning for Web Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsinchun; Chau, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Presents an overview of machine learning research and reviews methods used for evaluating machine learning systems. Ways that machine-learning algorithms were used in traditional information retrieval systems in the "pre-Web" era are described, and the field of Web mining and how machine learning has been used in different Web mining applications…

  15. Web Content Accessibility of Consumer Health Information Web Sites for People with Disabilities: A Cross Sectional Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Parmanto, Bambang

    2004-01-01

    Background The World Wide Web (WWW) has become an increasingly essential resource for health information consumers. The ability to obtain accurate medical information online quickly, conveniently and privately provides health consumers with the opportunity to make informed decisions and participate actively in their personal care. Little is known, however, about whether the content of this online health information is equally accessible to people with disabilities who must rely on special devices or technologies to process online information due to their visual, hearing, mobility, or cognitive limitations. Objective To construct a framework for an automated Web accessibility evaluation; to evaluate the state of accessibility of consumer health information Web sites; and to investigate the possible relationships between accessibility and other features of the Web sites, including function, popularity and importance. Methods We carried out a cross-sectional study of the state of accessibility of health information Web sites to people with disabilities. We selected 108 consumer health information Web sites from the directory service of a Web search engine. A measurement framework was constructed to automatically measure the level of Web Accessibility Barriers (WAB) of Web sites following Web accessibility specifications. We investigated whether there was a difference between WAB scores across various functional categories of the Web sites, and also evaluated the correlation between the WAB and Alexa traffic rank and Google Page Rank of the Web sites. Results We found that none of the Web sites we looked at are completely accessible to people with disabilities, i.e., there were no sites that had no violation of Web accessibility rules. However, governmental and educational health information Web sites do exhibit better Web accessibility than the other categories of Web sites (P < 0.001). We also found that the correlation between the WAB score and the popularity of a Web site is statistically significant (r = 0.28, P < 0.05), although there is no correlation between the WAB score and the importance of the Web sites (r = 0.15, P = 0.111). Conclusions Evaluation of health information Web sites shows that no Web site scrupulously abides by Web accessibility specifications, even for entities mandated under relevant laws and regulations. Government and education Web sites show better performance than Web sites among other categories. Accessibility of a Web site may have a positive impact on its popularity in general. However, the Web accessibility of a Web site may not have a significant relationship with its importance on the Web. PMID:15249268

  16. Children's Literature Web Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yokota, Junko; Cai, Mingshui

    2002-01-01

    Presents annotations of approximately 80 web sites that range in coverage from idiosyncratic and focused to diverse and comprehensive metasites. Notes categories of sites include: children's literature web guides; trade book publisher web sites; author/illustrator sites (metasites and individual); book review sources and teaching ideas; web sites…

  17. Web-Enabled?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiser, Kim

    2001-01-01

    Discusses problems that users with disabilities, particularly visual impairments, have with Web-based classes. Discusses efforts by the Texas Commission for the Blind to offer Web-based training to visually impaired staff members; and explains how to test a Web site for accessibility and how to make a Web site more accessible and effective. (LRW)

  18. Children's Literature Web Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yokota, Junko; Cai, Mingshui

    2002-01-01

    Presents annotations of approximately 80 web sites that range in coverage from idiosyncratic and focused to diverse and comprehensive metasites. Notes categories of sites include: children's literature web guides; trade book publisher web sites; author/illustrator sites (metasites and individual); book review sources and teaching ideas; web sites…

  19. Untangling Your Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombs, Norman

    2000-01-01

    Provides an overview of universal Web design and discusses guidelines developed by the Web access initiative (WAI) that focus on the access needs of Web users with disabilities. Highlights include barriers for people with print disabilities or motor impairments; the role of libraries; and resources to assist Web designers. (LRW)

  20. Web life: Hyperphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    So what is the site about? Hyperphysics is a network of cross-linked articles on topics from acceleration to the Zeeman effect – essentially an online physics encyclopedia. Unlike some sites featured in this column, Hyperphysics is far from new. In fact, by Web standards, it is positively ancient; when it was launched back in 1998 as a "hyperphysics exploration environment", the search engine Google was still based in a California garage. Today, Google's algorithms place Hyperphysics entries near the top of results pages for most physics-related search terms – it receives some three million hits per year – and some readers may already have stumbled across the site while searching for physics information on the Internet.

  1. WebCIS: large scale deployment of a Web-based clinical information system.

    PubMed

    Hripcsak, G; Cimino, J J; Sengupta, S

    1999-01-01

    WebCIS is a Web-based clinical information system. It sits atop the existing Columbia University clinical information system architecture, which includes a clinical repository, the Medical Entities Dictionary, an HL7 interface engine, and an Arden Syntax based clinical event monitor. WebCIS security features include authentication with secure tokens, authorization maintained in an LDAP server, SSL encryption, permanent audit logs, and application time outs. WebCIS is currently used by 810 physicians at the Columbia-Presbyterian center of New York Presbyterian Healthcare to review and enter data into the electronic medical record. Current deployment challenges include maintaining adequate database performance despite complex queries, replacing large numbers of computers that cannot run modern Web browsers, and training users that have never logged onto the Web. Although the raised expectations and higher goals have increased deployment costs, the end result is a far more functional, far more available system. PMID:10566471

  2. WebCIS: large scale deployment of a Web-based clinical information system.

    PubMed Central

    Hripcsak, G.; Cimino, J. J.; Sengupta, S.

    1999-01-01

    WebCIS is a Web-based clinical information system. It sits atop the existing Columbia University clinical information system architecture, which includes a clinical repository, the Medical Entities Dictionary, an HL7 interface engine, and an Arden Syntax based clinical event monitor. WebCIS security features include authentication with secure tokens, authorization maintained in an LDAP server, SSL encryption, permanent audit logs, and application time outs. WebCIS is currently used by 810 physicians at the Columbia-Presbyterian center of New York Presbyterian Healthcare to review and enter data into the electronic medical record. Current deployment challenges include maintaining adequate database performance despite complex queries, replacing large numbers of computers that cannot run modern Web browsers, and training users that have never logged onto the Web. Although the raised expectations and higher goals have increased deployment costs, the end result is a far more functional, far more available system. Images Figure 1 PMID:10566471

  3. Network coherence in the web graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Qingyan; Sun, Weigang; Chen, Fangyue

    2015-10-01

    Network coherence is used to characterize the consensus dynamics with additive stochastic disturbances and can be described by Laplacian spectrum. In this paper, we mainly obtain the scalings of network coherence in the web graphs with a special feature that its fractal dimension is infinite. We then investigate the relationship between the scalings and fractal dimension. Based on the structures of web graphs, we obtain the relationships for Laplacian matrix and Laplacian eigenvalues between web graphs and their corresponding equilateral polygons. We also obtain analytical expressions for the sum of the reciprocals and square reciprocals of all nonzero Laplacian eigenvalues. Finally we calculate first and second order coherence and see that the scalings of network coherence with network size N are N and N3 , which shows that the scalings are not related to the fractal dimension of web graphs. In addition, the scalings of network coherence in web graphs are larger than those performed on some fractal networks.

  4. An Autonomic Computing Architecture for Self-* Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chainbi, Walid; Mezni, Haithem; Ghedira, Khaled

    Adaptation in Web services has gained a significant attention and becomes a key feature of Web services. Indeed, in a dynamic environment such as the Web, it's imperative to design an effective system which can continuously adapt itself to the changes (service failure, changing of QoS offering, etc.). However, current Web service standards and technologies don't provide a suitable architecture in which all aspects of self-adaptability can be designed. Moreover, Web Services lack ability to adapt to the changing environment without human intervention. In this paper, we propose an autonomic computing approach for Web services' self-adaptation. More precisely, Web services are considered as autonomic systems, that is, systems that have self-* properties. An agent-based approach is also proposed to deal with the achievement of Web services self-adaptation.

  5. WIRM: An Open Source Toolkit for Building Biomedical Web Applications

    PubMed Central

    Jakobovits, Rex M.; Rosse, Cornelius; Brinkley, James F.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes an innovative software toolkit that allows the creation of web applications that facilitate the acquisition, integration, and dissemination of multimedia biomedical data over the web, thereby reducing the cost of knowledge sharing. There is a lack of high-level web application development tools suitable for use by researchers, clinicians, and educators who are not skilled programmers. Our Web Interfacing Repository Manager (WIRM) is a software toolkit that reduces the complexity of building custom biomedical web applications. WIRM’s visual modeling tools enable domain experts to describe the structure of their knowledge, from which WIRM automatically generates full-featured, customizable content management systems. PMID:12386108

  6. Evolving dynamic web pages using web mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Kartik; Dagli, Cihan H.

    2003-08-01

    The heterogeneity and the lack of structure that permeates much of the ever expanding information sources on the WWW makes it difficult for the user to properly and efficiently access different web pages. Different users have different needs from the same web page. It is necessary to train the system to understand the needs and demands of the users. In other words there is a need for efficient and proper web mining. In this paper issues and possible ways of training the system and providing high level of organization for semi structured data available on the web is discussed. Web pages can be evolved based on history of query searches, browsing, links traversed and observation of the user behavior like book marking and time spent on viewing. Fuzzy clustering techniques help in grouping natural users and groups, neural networks, association rules and web traversals patterns help in efficient sequential anaysis based on previous searches and queries by the user. In this paper we analyze web server logs using above mentioned techniques to know more about user interactions. Analyzing these web server logs help to closely understand the user behavior and his/her web access pattern.

  7. A general procedure to generate models for urban environmental-noise pollution using feature selection and machine learning methods.

    PubMed

    Torija, Antonio J; Ruiz, Diego P

    2015-02-01

    The prediction of environmental noise in urban environments requires the solution of a complex and non-linear problem, since there are complex relationships among the multitude of variables involved in the characterization and modelling of environmental noise and environmental-noise magnitudes. Moreover, the inclusion of the great spatial heterogeneity characteristic of urban environments seems to be essential in order to achieve an accurate environmental-noise prediction in cities. This problem is addressed in this paper, where a procedure based on feature-selection techniques and machine-learning regression methods is proposed and applied to this environmental problem. Three machine-learning regression methods, which are considered very robust in solving non-linear problems, are used to estimate the energy-equivalent sound-pressure level descriptor (LAeq). These three methods are: (i) multilayer perceptron (MLP), (ii) sequential minimal optimisation (SMO), and (iii) Gaussian processes for regression (GPR). In addition, because of the high number of input variables involved in environmental-noise modelling and estimation in urban environments, which make LAeq prediction models quite complex and costly in terms of time and resources for application to real situations, three different techniques are used to approach feature selection or data reduction. The feature-selection techniques used are: (i) correlation-based feature-subset selection (CFS), (ii) wrapper for feature-subset selection (WFS), and the data reduction technique is principal-component analysis (PCA). The subsequent analysis leads to a proposal of different schemes, depending on the needs regarding data collection and accuracy. The use of WFS as the feature-selection technique with the implementation of SMO or GPR as regression algorithm provides the best LAeq estimation (R(2)=0.94 and mean absolute error (MAE)=1.14-1.16 dB(A)). PMID:25461071

  8. WebMIRS: web-based medical information retrieval system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, L. Rodney; Pillemer, Stanley R.; Lawrence, Reva C.; Goh, Gin-Hua; Neve, Leif; Thoma, George R.

    1997-12-01

    At the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, a research and development division of the National Library of Medicine (NLM), we are developing a prototype multimedia database system to provide World Wide Web access to biomedical databases. WebMIRS (Web-based Medical Information Retrieval System) will allow access to databases containing text and images and will allow database query by standard SQL, by image content, or by a combination of the two. The system is being developed in the form of Java applets, which will communicate with the Informix DBMS on an NLM Sun workstation running the Solaris operating system. The system architecture will allow access from any hardware platform, which supports a Java-enabled Web browser, such as Netscape or Internet Explorer. Initial databases will include data from two national health surveys conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), and will include x-ray images from those surveys. In addition to describing in- house research in database access systems, this paper describes ongoing work toward querying by image content. Image content search capability will include capability to search for x-ray images similar to an input image with respect to vertebral morphometry used to characterize features such as fractures and disc space narrowing.

  9. WEB-WAP based telecare.

    PubMed Central

    DeLeo, Gianluca; Krishna, Santosh; Balas, E. Andrew; Maglaveras, Nicos; Boren, Suzanne Austin; Beltrame, Francesco; Fato, Marco

    2002-01-01

    We have developed two telecare applications based on mobile telephony (WAP) and WEB. The first can be used to request Basic Life Support (BLS) guidelines any time by using a WAP device and to teach people and non-professionals involved in health care emergency situations. The second is a WEB-WAP based tool for medical data retrieval and at-home health care monitoring of chronically ill patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) or diabetes. Medical education content related to these diseases is available on the WEB and on the WAP device. The WAP application uses the features found in the last generation of mobile phones such as better multimedia information presentations, better interactivity capabilities, and enhanced ease of use. Based on these two applications, a promising platform is offered for developing applications in health care, home care, medical monitoring and health education ensuring continuity of care. In the paper we present the preliminary results of a pilot test at Thessaloniki University (Greece) where the WEB-WAP based tool is used to monitor patients with diabetes or CHF. PMID:12463815

  10. Promoting Your Web Site.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raeder, Aggi

    1997-01-01

    Discussion of ways to promote sites on the World Wide Web focuses on how search engines work and how they retrieve and identify sites. Appropriate Web links for submitting new sites and for Internet marketing are included. (LRW)

  11. Presence of pro-tobacco messages on the Web.

    PubMed

    Hong, Traci; Cody, Michael J

    2002-01-01

    Ignored in the finalized Master Settlement Agreement (National Association of Attorneys General, 1998), the unmonitored, unregulated World Wide Web (Web) can operate as a major vehicle for delivering pro-tobacco messages, images, and products to millions of young consumers. A content analysis of 318 randomly sampled pro-tobacco Web sites revealed that tobacco has a pervasive presence on the Web, especially on e-commerce sites and sites featuring hobbies, recreation, and "fetishes." Products can be ordered online on nearly 50% of the sites, but only 23% of the sites included underage verification. Further, only 11% of these sites contain health warnings. Instead, pro-tobacco sites frequently associate smoking with "glamorous" and "alternative" lifestyles, and with images of young males and young (thin, attractive) females. Finally, many of the Web sites offered interactive site features that are potentially appealing to young Web users. Recommendations for future research and counterstrategies are discussed. PMID:12356288

  12. External Web Site Policy

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content Home Contact Us Search External Web Site Policy When you see this graphic notice ( ) next to a link on the Cancer Research Network Web site, it means that the link leads to another Web site that is not maintained by the federal

  13. Evaluating Web Usability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snider, Jean; Martin, Florence

    2012-01-01

    Web usability focuses on design elements and processes that make web pages easy to use. A website for college students was evaluated for underutilization. One-on-one testing, focus groups, web analytics, peer university review and marketing focus group and demographic data were utilized to conduct usability evaluation. The results indicated that…

  14. WWW: Neuroscience Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    The human brain contains an estimated 100 billion neurons, and browsing the Web, one might be led to believe that there's a Web site for every one of those cells. It's no surprise that there are lots of Web sites concerning the nervous system. After all, the human brain is toward the top of nearly everyone's list of favorite organs and of…

  15. Evaluating Web Usability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snider, Jean; Martin, Florence

    2012-01-01

    Web usability focuses on design elements and processes that make web pages easy to use. A website for college students was evaluated for underutilization. One-on-one testing, focus groups, web analytics, peer university review and marketing focus group and demographic data were utilized to conduct usability evaluation. The results indicated that…

  16. Multimedia Web Searching Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozmutlu, Seda; Spink, Amanda; Ozmutlu, H. Cenk

    2002-01-01

    Examines and compares multimedia Web searching by Excite and FAST search engine users in 2001. Highlights include audio and video queries; time spent on searches; terms per query; ranking of the most frequently used terms; and differences in Web search behaviors of U.S. and European Web users. (Author/LRW)

  17. Implementing Good Web Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plankis, Brian J.

    1998-01-01

    Provides an overview of Web-site design and discusses three steps in building a site: audience analysis, design, and evaluation. Includes an analysis of loading speeds with and without graphics; examples of no-style, low-bandwidth, and high-bandwidth Web sites; and addresses for related Web sites. (PEN)

  18. New Trends in Web Usage Patterns and Web Traffic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Jens F.

    As the Web is expanding, the Web traffic is changing, and so are the users. To get an adequate understanding of the Web as a medium, it is of paramount importance to know the users and the dominant usage patterns. The purpose of this paper is to map important aspects of Web usage patterns, Web traffic and Web search behavior. Issues dealt with…

  19. General features

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    The San Andreas fault system, a complex of faults that display predominantly large-scale strike slip, is part of an even more complex system of faults, isolated segments of the East Pacific Rise, and scraps of plates lying east of the East Pacific Rise that collectively separate the North American plate from the Pacific plate. This chapter briefly describes the San Andreas fault system, its setting along the Pacific Ocean margin of North America, its extent, and the patterns of faulting. Only selected characteristics are described, and many features are left for depictions on maps and figures.

  20. The RCSB Protein Data Bank: redesigned web site and web services

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Peter W.; Beran, Bojan; Bi, Chunxiao; Bluhm, Wolfgang F.; Dimitropoulos, Dimitris; Goodsell, David S.; Prli?, Andreas; Quesada, Martha; Quinn, Gregory B.; Westbrook, John D.; Young, Jasmine; Yukich, Benjamin; Zardecki, Christine; Berman, Helen M.; Bourne, Philip E.

    2011-01-01

    The RCSB Protein Data Bank (RCSB PDB) web site (http://www.pdb.org) has been redesigned to increase usability and to cater to a larger and more diverse user base. This article describes key enhancements and new features that fall into the following categories: (i) query and analysis tools for chemical structure searching, query refinement, tabulation and export of query results; (ii) web site customization and new structure alerts; (iii) pair-wise and representative protein structure alignments; (iv) visualization of large assemblies; (v) integration of structural data with the open access literature and binding affinity data; and (vi) web services and web widgets to facilitate integration of PDB data and tools with other resources. These improvements enable a range of new possibilities to analyze and understand structure data. The next generation of the RCSB PDB web site, as described here, provides a rich resource for research and education. PMID:21036868

  1. Ontology-based geospatial data query and integration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhao, T.; Zhang, C.; Wei, M.; Peng, Z.-R.

    2008-01-01

    Geospatial data sharing is an increasingly important subject as large amount of data is produced by a variety of sources, stored in incompatible formats, and accessible through different GIS applications. Past efforts to enable sharing have produced standardized data format such as GML and data access protocols such as Web Feature Service (WFS). While these standards help enabling client applications to gain access to heterogeneous data stored in different formats from diverse sources, the usability of the access is limited due to the lack of data semantics encoded in the WFS feature types. Past research has used ontology languages to describe the semantics of geospatial data but ontology-based queries cannot be applied directly to legacy data stored in databases or shapefiles, or to feature data in WFS services. This paper presents a method to enable ontology query on spatial data available from WFS services and on data stored in databases. We do not create ontology instances explicitly and thus avoid the problems of data replication. Instead, user queries are rewritten to WFS getFeature requests and SQL queries to database. The method also has the benefits of being able to utilize existing tools of databases, WFS, and GML while enabling query based on ontology semantics. ?? 2008 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  2. Enhancing UCSF Chimera through web services

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Conrad C.; Meng, Elaine C.; Morris, John H.; Pettersen, Eric F.; Ferrin, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Integrating access to web services with desktop applications allows for an expanded set of application features, including performing computationally intensive tasks and convenient searches of databases. We describe how we have enhanced UCSF Chimera (http://www.rbvi.ucsf.edu/chimera/), a program for the interactive visualization and analysis of molecular structures and related data, through the addition of several web services (http://www.rbvi.ucsf.edu/chimera/docs/webservices.html). By streamlining access to web services, including the entire job submission, monitoring and retrieval process, Chimera makes it simpler for users to focus on their science projects rather than data manipulation. Chimera uses Opal, a toolkit for wrapping scientific applications as web services, to provide scalable and transparent access to several popular software packages. We illustrate Chimera's use of web services with an example workflow that interleaves use of these services with interactive manipulation of molecular sequences and structures, and we provide an example Python program to demonstrate how easily Opal-based web services can be accessed from within an application. Web server availability: http://webservices.rbvi.ucsf.edu/opal2/dashboard?command=serviceList. PMID:24861624

  3. Enhancing UCSF Chimera through web services.

    PubMed

    Huang, Conrad C; Meng, Elaine C; Morris, John H; Pettersen, Eric F; Ferrin, Thomas E

    2014-07-01

    Integrating access to web services with desktop applications allows for an expanded set of application features, including performing computationally intensive tasks and convenient searches of databases. We describe how we have enhanced UCSF Chimera (http://www.rbvi.ucsf.edu/chimera/), a program for the interactive visualization and analysis of molecular structures and related data, through the addition of several web services (http://www.rbvi.ucsf.edu/chimera/docs/webservices.html). By streamlining access to web services, including the entire job submission, monitoring and retrieval process, Chimera makes it simpler for users to focus on their science projects rather than data manipulation. Chimera uses Opal, a toolkit for wrapping scientific applications as web services, to provide scalable and transparent access to several popular software packages. We illustrate Chimera's use of web services with an example workflow that interleaves use of these services with interactive manipulation of molecular sequences and structures, and we provide an example Python program to demonstrate how easily Opal-based web services can be accessed from within an application. Web server availability: http://webservices.rbvi.ucsf.edu/opal2/dashboard?command=serviceList. PMID:24861624

  4. Drying of fiber webs

    DOEpatents

    Warren, David W.

    1997-01-01

    A process and an apparatus for high-intensity drying of fiber webs or sheets, such as newsprint, printing and writing papers, packaging paper, and paperboard or linerboard, as they are formed on a paper machine. The invention uses direct contact between the wet fiber web or sheet and various molten heat transfer fluids, such as liquified eutectic metal alloys, to impart heat at high rates over prolonged durations, in order to achieve ambient boiling of moisture contained within the web. The molten fluid contact process causes steam vapor to emanate from the web surface, without dilution by ambient air; and it is differentiated from the evaporative drying techniques of the prior industrial art, which depend on the uses of steam-heated cylinders to supply heat to the paper web surface, and ambient air to carry away moisture, which is evaporated from the web surface. Contact between the wet fiber web and the molten fluid can be accomplished either by submersing the web within a molten bath or by coating the surface of the web with the molten media. Because of the high interfacial surface tension between the molten media and the cellulose fiber comprising the paper web, the molten media does not appreciately stick to the paper after it is dried. Steam generated from the paper web is collected and condensed without dilution by ambient air to allow heat recovery at significantly higher temperature levels than attainable in evaporative dryers.

  5. Drying of fiber webs

    DOEpatents

    Warren, D.W.

    1997-04-15

    A process and an apparatus are disclosed for high-intensity drying of fiber webs or sheets, such as newsprint, printing and writing papers, packaging paper, and paperboard or linerboard, as they are formed on a paper machine. The invention uses direct contact between the wet fiber web or sheet and various molten heat transfer fluids, such as liquefied eutectic metal alloys, to impart heat at high rates over prolonged durations, in order to achieve ambient boiling of moisture contained within the web. The molten fluid contact process causes steam vapor to emanate from the web surface, without dilution by ambient air; and it is differentiated from the evaporative drying techniques of the prior industrial art, which depend on the uses of steam-heated cylinders to supply heat to the paper web surface, and ambient air to carry away moisture, which is evaporated from the web surface. Contact between the wet fiber web and the molten fluid can be accomplished either by submersing the web within a molten bath or by coating the surface of the web with the molten media. Because of the high interfacial surface tension between the molten media and the cellulose fiber comprising the paper web, the molten media does not appreciatively stick to the paper after it is dried. Steam generated from the paper web is collected and condensed without dilution by ambient air to allow heat recovery at significantly higher temperature levels than attainable in evaporative dryers. 6 figs.

  6. WebBio, a web-based management and analysis system for patient data of biological products in hospital.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying-Hao; Kuo, Chen-Chun; Huang, Yaw-Bin

    2011-08-01

    We selected HTML, PHP and JavaScript as the programming languages to build "WebBio", a web-based system for patient data of biological products and used MySQL as database. WebBio is based on the PHP-MySQL suite and is run by Apache server on Linux machine. WebBio provides the functions of data management, searching function and data analysis for 20 kinds of biological products (plasma expanders, human immunoglobulin and hematological products). There are two particular features in WebBio: (1) pharmacists can rapidly find out whose patients used contaminated products for medication safety, and (2) the statistics charts for a specific product can be automatically generated to reduce pharmacist's work loading. WebBio has successfully turned traditional paper work into web-based data management. PMID:20703532

  7. Assistive Annotations: The Art of Recommending Web Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Judi

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how an experienced educator's Web site recommendations can help learners use the World Wide Web in ways bookmarks alone cannot. Highlights include browser-based and page-based annotations; examples; useful information to include (title or topic, operating instructions, description, special site features, cautions, and helpful…

  8. Problem-Based Learning in Web-Based Science Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Heeyoung; Chung, Ji-Sook; Kim, Younghoon

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss how general problem-based learning (PBL) models and social-constructivist perspectives are applied to the design and development of a Web-based science program, which emphasizes inquiry-based learning for fifth grade students. The paper also deals with the general features and learning process of a Web-based…

  9. Selecting a Web 2.0 Presentation Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Charles B.; Clark, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Web-based presentation tools are sometimes referred to as "next generation presentation tools" (EDUCAUSE, 2010). At the most basic level, these tools are simply online versions of traditional presentation software, such as Microsoft's PowerPoint or Apple's Keynote, but some services offer features like web-based collaboration, online presentation…

  10. Searching the Web: The Public and Their Queries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spink, Amanda; Wolfram, Dietmar; Jansen, Major B. J.; Saracevic, Tefko

    2001-01-01

    Reports findings from a study of searching behavior by over 200,000 users of the Excite search engine. Analysis of over one million queries revealed most people use few search terms, few modified queries, view few Web pages, and rarely use advanced search features. Concludes that Web searching by the public differs significantly from searching of…

  11. Finding and Managing Web Content with Copernic 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spalti, Michael W.

    1999-01-01

    Highlights features of Copernic 2000, a desktop application that helps manage information from the Web more efficiently. Explains search capabilities that execute simultaneous queries in multiple search engines and ranks them by relevance; refining search options on retrieved Web sites; browsing capabilities; managing results with bookmarks;…

  12. Selecting a Web 2.0 Presentation Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Charles B.; Clark, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Web-based presentation tools are sometimes referred to as "next generation presentation tools" (EDUCAUSE, 2010). At the most basic level, these tools are simply online versions of traditional presentation software, such as Microsoft's PowerPoint or Apple's Keynote, but some services offer features like web-based collaboration, online presentation…

  13. Robot-Generated Databases on the World Wide Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmel, Stacey

    1996-01-01

    Provides an overview of robots that retrieve World Wide Web documents and index data and then store it in a database. Nine robot-generated databases are described, including record content, services, search features, and sample search results; and sidebars discuss the controversy about Web robots and other resource discovery tools. (LRW)

  14. An Analysis of Academic Library Web Pages for Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Susan J.; Juricek, John Eric; Xu, F. Grace

    2008-01-01

    Web sites are increasingly used by academic libraries to promote key services and collections to teaching faculty. This study analyzes the content, location, language, and technological features of fifty-four academic library Web pages designed especially for faculty to expose patterns in the development of these pages.

  15. Examining Search Functions of EAD Finding Aids Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Xiaomu

    2006-01-01

    This article examined the search functions for all individual EAD Web sites listed on the Library of Congress Web site in 2003. In particular, the type of search engine, search modes, options for searching, search results display, search feedback, and other features of the search systems were studied. The data analysis suggests that there have…

  16. WebLogo: A Sequence Logo Generator

    PubMed Central

    Crooks, Gavin E.; Hon, Gary; Chandonia, John-Marc; Brenner, Steven E.

    2004-01-01

    WebLogo generates sequence logos, graphical representations of the patterns within a multiple sequence alignment. Sequence logos provide a richer and more precise description of sequence similarity than consensus sequences and can rapidly reveal significant features of the alignment otherwise difficult to perceive. Each logo consists of stacks of letters, one stack for each position in the sequence. The overall height of each stack indicates the sequence conservation at that position (measured in bits), whereas the height of symbols within the stack reflects the relative frequency of the corresponding amino or nucleic acid at that position. WebLogo has been enhanced recently with additional features and options, to provide a convenient and highly configurable sequence logo generator. A command line interface and the complete, open WebLogo source code are available for local installation and customization. PMID:15173120

  17. A French Vocabulary Tutor for the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labrie, Gilles

    2000-01-01

    Discusses a project to design and implement a small French vocabulary tutor for the World Wide Web. Highlights salient features and design of the tutor and focuses on two variants of a module on technology-related vocabulary that were created using very straightforward html code and JavaScript. (Author/VWL)

  18. Library Web OPACs in Pakistan: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahmood, Khalid

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to analyse features and functions of indigenously developed web-based catalogues of academic, special and national libraries of Pakistan. Design/methodology/approach: The assessment of 16 OPACs is based on a 91-item checklist developed with the help of previous studies conducted in other countries. Findings: The paper…

  19. School Web Site of the Month

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article features "Tech Directions" School Web Site of the Month. The website (http://satellite.stcharles.k12.la.us) was produced by technology education students at the Satellite Center of St. Charles Parish Public Schools in Luling, Louisiana. The Satellite Center focuses on the career paths projected to expand the most over the next decade.…

  20. Interactive Web Graphs for Economic Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Dennis A.; Kaufman, Rebecca S.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a Web site with animation and interactive activities containing graphs and basic economics concepts. Features changes in supply and market equilibrium, the construction of the long-run average cost curve, short-run profit maximization, long-run market equilibrium, and changes in aggregate demand and aggregate supply. States the…

  1. School Web Site of the Month

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article features "Tech Directions" School Web Site of the Month. The website (http://satellite.stcharles.k12.la.us) was produced by technology education students at the Satellite Center of St. Charles Parish Public Schools in Luling, Louisiana. The Satellite Center focuses on the career paths projected to expand the most over the next decade.…

  2. Online Reputation Systems in Web 2.0 Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weijun; Jin, Leigh

    Web 2.0 has transformed how reputation systems are designed and used by the Web. Based on a thorough review of the existing online reputation systems and their challenges in use, this paper studied a case of Amazon’s reputation system for the impacts of Web 2.0. Through our case study, several distinguished features of new generation reputation systems are noted including multimedia feedbacks, reviewer centered, folksonomy, community contribution, comprehensive reputation, dynamic and interactive system etc. These new developments move towards a relatively trustworthy and reliable online reputation system in the Web 2.0 era.

  3. Using Open Web APIs in Teaching Web Mining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsinchun; Li, Xin; Chau, M.; Ho, Yi-Jen; Tseng, Chunju

    2009-01-01

    With the advent of the World Wide Web, many business applications that utilize data mining and text mining techniques to extract useful business information on the Web have evolved from Web searching to Web mining. It is important for students to acquire knowledge and hands-on experience in Web mining during their education in information systems…

  4. Using Open Web APIs in Teaching Web Mining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hsinchun; Li, Xin; Chau, M.; Ho, Yi-Jen; Tseng, Chunju

    2009-01-01

    With the advent of the World Wide Web, many business applications that utilize data mining and text mining techniques to extract useful business information on the Web have evolved from Web searching to Web mining. It is important for students to acquire knowledge and hands-on experience in Web mining during their education in information systems…

  5. WebViz: A web browser based application for collaborative analysis of 3D data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruegg, C. S.

    2011-12-01

    In the age of high speed Internet where people can interact instantly, scientific tools have lacked technology which can incorporate this concept of communication using the web. To solve this issue a web application for geological studies has been created, tentatively titled WebViz. This web application utilizes tools provided by Google Web Toolkit to create an AJAX web application capable of features found in non web based software. Using these tools, a web application can be created to act as piece of software from anywhere in the globe with a reasonably speedy Internet connection. An application of this technology can be seen with data regarding the recent tsunami from the major japan earthquakes. After constructing the appropriate data to fit a computer render software called HVR, WebViz can request images of the tsunami data and display it to anyone who has access to the application. This convenience alone makes WebViz a viable solution, but the option to interact with this data with others around the world causes WebViz to be taken as a serious computational tool. WebViz also can be used on any javascript enabled browser such as those found on modern tablets and smart phones over a fast wireless connection. Due to the fact that WebViz's current state is built using Google Web Toolkit the portability of the application is in it's most efficient form. Though many developers have been involved with the project, each person has contributed to increase the usability and speed of the application. In the project's most recent form a dramatic speed increase has been designed as well as a more efficient user interface. The speed increase has been informally noticed in recent uses of the application in China and Australia with the hosting server being located at the University of Minnesota. The user interface has been improved to not only look better but the functionality has been improved. Major functions of the application are rotating the 3D object using buttons. These buttons have been replaced with a new layout that is easier to understand the function and is also easy to use with mobile devices. With these new changes, WebViz is easier to control and use for general use.

  6. The MCLIB library: New features

    SciTech Connect

    Seeger, P.A.

    1996-12-31

    This report describes the philosophy and structure of MCLIB, A Fortran library of Monte Carlo subroutines which has been developed to test designs of neutron scattering instruments. Emphasis is placed on new features added to the library since the previous presentation of MCLIB at ICANS-XIII in October, 1995. These new features include toroidal mirrors, writing and reading source files, splitting and banking of histories, and a Maxwellian probability distribution. The only change of a program structure has been to include charge and polarization vector in the description of a particle. The latest release of the source code and documentation may be obtained by anonymous ftp. Work is also continuing on a more friendly web-based user interface, and user input is requested for additional features to be added to the library.

  7. Silicon Web Process Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Hopkins, R. H.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hill, F. E.; Heimlich, M. E.; Driggers, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Progress in the development of techniques to grow silicon web at 25 wq cm/min output rate is reported. Feasibility of web growth with simultaneous melt replenishment is discussed. Other factors covered include: (1) tests of aftertrimmers to improve web width; (2) evaluation of growth lid designs to raise speed and output rate; (3) tests of melt replenishment hardware; and (4) investigation of directed gas flow systems to control unwanted oxide deposition in the system and to improve convective cooling of the web. Compatibility with sufficient solar cell performance is emphasized.

  8. An introduction to webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, C. D.

    2016-04-01

    Webs are sets of Feynman diagrams that contribute to the exponents of scattering amplitudes, in the kinematic limit in which emitted radiation is soft. As such, they have a number of phenomenological and formal applications, and offer tantalizing glimpses into the all-order structure of perturbative quantum field theory. This article is based on a series of lectures given to graduate students, and aims to provide a pedagogical introduction to webs. Topics covered include exponentiation in (non-)abelian gauge theories, the web mixing matrix formalism for non-abelian gauge theories, and recent progress on the calculation of web diagrams. Problems are included throughout the text, to aid understanding.

  9. Web 2.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Becky

    The Web is growing and changing from a paradigm of static publishing to one of participation and interaction. This change has implications for people with disabilities who rely on access to the Web for employment, information, entertainment, and increased independence. The interactive and collaborative nature of Web 2.0 can present access problems for some users. There are some best practices which can be put in place today to improve access. New specifications such as Accessible Rich Internet Applications (ARIA) and IAccessible2 are opening the doors to increasing the accessibility of Web 2.0 and beyond.

  10. Community food webs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    Community food webs describe the feeding relationships, or trophic interactions, between the species of an ecological community. Both the structure and dynamics of such webs are the focus of food web research. The topological structures of empirical food webs from many ecosystems have been published on the basis of field studies and they form the foundation for theory concerning the mean number of trophic levels, the mean number of trophic connections versus number of species, and other food web measures, which show consistency across different ecosystems. The dynamics of food webs are influenced by indirect interactions, in which changes in the level of a population in one part of the food web may have indirect effects throughout the web. The mechanisms of these interactions are typically studied microcosm experiments, or sometimes in-field experiments. The use of mathematical models is also a major approach to understanding the effects of indirect interactions. Both empirical and mathematical studies have revealed important properties of food webs, such as keystone predators and trophic cascades.

  11. The Effectiveness of Course Web Sites in Higher Education: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comunale, Christie L.; Sexton, Thomas R.; Voss, Diana J. Pedagano

    2002-01-01

    Describes an exploratory study of the educational effectiveness of course Web sites among undergraduate accounting students and graduate students in business statistics. Measured Web site visit frequency, usefulness of each site feature, and the impacts of Web sites on perceived learning and course performance. (Author/LRW)

  12. Making Web-Based Tables Accessible for Users of Screen Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amtmann, Dagmar; Johnson, Kurt; Cook, Debbie

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes results from a study of problems blind people using screen readers and Web browsers experienced when reading tables on the World Wide Web. Explains accessibility factors including complexity of layout, use of HTML programming, features of screen-reading software, and user variables; and makes recommendations for Web-based tables,…

  13. Collaborative Middle School Geometry through Blogs and Other Web 2.0 Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossain, Mokter; Wiest, Lynda R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the use of blogs, a simple application of Web 2.0 technologies, in middle school geometry instruction. Specifically, it provides an overview of the interactive features of Web 2.0 technologies and the feasibility of using Web 2.0 technologies in geometry teaching and learning, as well as a proposed model for creating a…

  14. Collaborative Middle School Geometry through Blogs and Other Web 2.0 Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hossain, Mokter; Wiest, Lynda R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the use of blogs, a simple application of Web 2.0 technologies, in middle school geometry instruction. Specifically, it provides an overview of the interactive features of Web 2.0 technologies and the feasibility of using Web 2.0 technologies in geometry teaching and learning, as well as a proposed model for creating a…

  15. Large-Scale Multiobjective Static Test Generation for Web-Based Testing with Integer Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, M. L.; Hui, Siu Cheung; Fong, A. C. M.

    2013-01-01

    Web-based testing has become a ubiquitous self-assessment method for online learning. One useful feature that is missing from today's web-based testing systems is the reliable capability to fulfill different assessment requirements of students based on a large-scale question data set. A promising approach for supporting large-scale web-based…

  16. Large-Scale Multiobjective Static Test Generation for Web-Based Testing with Integer Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, M. L.; Hui, Siu Cheung; Fong, A. C. M.

    2013-01-01

    Web-based testing has become a ubiquitous self-assessment method for online learning. One useful feature that is missing from today's web-based testing systems is the reliable capability to fulfill different assessment requirements of students based on a large-scale question data set. A promising approach for supporting large-scale web-based…

  17. WebQuests: a new instructional strategy for nursing education.

    PubMed

    Lahaie, Ulysses

    2007-01-01

    A WebQuest is a model or framework for designing effective Web-based instructional strategies featuring inquiry-oriented activities. It is an innovative approach to learning that is enhanced by the use of evolving instructional technology. WebQuests have invigorated the primary school (grades K through 12) educational sector around the globe, yet there is sparse evidence in the literature of WebQuests at the college and university levels. WebQuests are congruent with pedagogical approaches and cognitive activities commonly used in nursing education. They are simple to construct using a step-by-step approach, and nurse educators will find many related resources on the Internet to help them get started. Included in this article are a discussion of the critical attributes and main features of WebQuests, construction tips, recommended Web sites featuring essential resources, a discussion of WebQuest-related issues identified in the literature, and some suggestions for further research. PMID:17496479

  18. Making web annotations persistent over time

    SciTech Connect

    Sanderson, Robert; Van De Sompel, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    As Digital Libraries (DL) become more aligned with the web architecture, their functional components need to be fundamentally rethought in terms of URIs and HTTP. Annotation, a core scholarly activity enabled by many DL solutions, exhibits a clearly unacceptable characteristic when existing models are applied to the web: due to the representations of web resources changing over time, an annotation made about a web resource today may no longer be relevant to the representation that is served from that same resource tomorrow. We assume the existence of archived versions of resources, and combine the temporal features of the emerging Open Annotation data model with the capability offered by the Memento framework that allows seamless navigation from the URI of a resource to archived versions of that resource, and arrive at a solution that provides guarantees regarding the persistence of web annotations over time. More specifically, we provide theoretical solutions and proof-of-concept experimental evaluations for two problems: reconstructing an existing annotation so that the correct archived version is displayed for all resources involved in the annotation, and retrieving all annotations that involve a given archived version of a web resource.

  19. Endnote Web tutorial for BJCVS/RBCCV

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Marcos Aurélio Barboza; dos Santos, Carlos Alberto; Brandi, Antônio Carlos; Botelho, Paulo Henrique Husseini; Sciarra, Adília Maria Pires; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2015-01-01

    At present, many useful tools for reference management are available for use. They can be either off-line softwares or accessible Websites to all users in the internet. Their target is to facilitate the production of scientific text. But, to accomplish that, the featured bibliographic style should be effectively inserted, and the program has to be free. Here in this tutorial, we present Endnote Web®, a bibliographic reference management program comprising these two requirements: it contains the Brazilian Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery reference format and its use is free for charge after sign-in in IP registered terminal in Web of Science®. PMID:26107457

  20. ASGS: an alternative splicing graph web service

    PubMed Central

    Bollina, Durgaprasad; Lee, Bernett T. K.; Tan, Tin Wee; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2006-01-01

    Alternative transcript diversity manifests itself a prime cause of complexity in higher eukaryotes. The Alternative Splicing Graph Server (ASGS) is a web service facilitating the systematic study of alternatively spliced genes of higher eukaryotes by generating splicing graphs for the compact visual representation of transcript diversity from a single gene. Taking a set of transcripts in General Feature Format as input, ASGS identifies distinct reference and variable exons, generates a transcript splicing graph, an exon summary, splicing events classification and a single line graph to facilitate experimental analysis. This freely available web service can be accessed at . PMID:16845045

  1. Web 2 Nowhere?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Web 2.0 seems to be all the rage these days. One cannot go to a library conference and attend presentations or stroll down the halls without hearing some mention of it in magical tones reserved for some great discovery. The excitement surrounding Web 2.0 reminds the author of the frenzy that gripped the country between 1848 and 1855, when…

  2. Accessible Web Site Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters-Walters, Stacy

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the difficulties people with disabilities may encounter when accessing Web sites. Describes specific problems of those with visual disabilities, auditory disabilities, cognitive disabilities, attention deficit disorder, and physical disabilities. Information is provided on how Web sites can be designed to overcome disability barriers.…

  3. Web Page Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Lorin

    Designing a web home page involves many decisions that affect how the page will look, the kind of technology required to use the page, the links the page will provide, and kinds of patrons who can use the page. The theme of information literacy needs to be built into every web page; users need to be taught the skills of sorting and applying…

  4. Web Team Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, Jennifer; Felker, Kyle

    2005-01-01

    The dynamic world of the Web has provided libraries with a wealth of opportunities, including new approaches to the provision of information and varied internal staffing structures. The development of self-managed Web teams, endowed with authority and resources, can create an adaptable and responsive culture within libraries. This new working team…

  5. Making WEB Meaning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Jamie

    1996-01-01

    Poorly organized and dominated by amateurs, hucksters, and marketeers, the net requires efficient navigating devices. Students at Bellingham (Washington) Public Schools tackle information overload by contributing to virtual museums on school Web sites, using annotated Web curriculum lists, and conducting research in cooperative teams stressing…

  6. Rhizoctonia web blight

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia web blight, caused by several Rhizoctonia spp., is an important disease of evergreen azaleas and other ornamental plants in nurseries. The primary pathogens causing web blight are binucleate Rhizoctonia anastomosis groups (AG) (= Ceratobasidium D.P. Rogers, teleomorph). In southern AL an...

  7. The Social Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Will

    2006-01-01

    This article takes a look at tech guru Will Richardson's new book, "Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts, and Other Powerful Web Tools for Classrooms." Whether it's blogs or wikis or RSS, all roads now point to a Web where little is done in isolation. The biggest, most sweeping change in the people's relationship with the Internet may not be as much the ability…

  8. Sign Language Web Pages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fels, Deborah I.; Richards, Jan; Hardman, Jim; Lee, Daniel G.

    2006-01-01

    The World Wide Web has changed the way people interact. It has also become an important equalizer of information access for many social sectors. However, for many people, including some sign language users, Web accessing can be difficult. For some, it not only presents another barrier to overcome but has left them without cultural equality. The…

  9. Web (Dis)Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuyler, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Discusses winners of the National Information Infrastructure Awards and examines some of the current problems with World Wide Web pages for public libraries. Gophers are discussed, and the heavy use of graphics that prohibits the use of a non-graphical Web browser is considered. (LRW)

  10. Wetlands and Web Pages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tisone-Bartels, Dede

    1998-01-01

    Argues that the preservation of areas like the Shoreline Park (California) wetlands depends on educating students about the value of natural resources. Describes the creation of a Web page on the wetlands for third-grade students by seventh-grade art and ecology students. Outlines the technical process of developing a Web page. (DSK)

  11. Taming the Tangled Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2001-01-01

    Describes the Open Knowledge Initiative (OKI) and its use as a resource for higher education institutions interested in developing web-based learning capabilities. Highlights the OKI collaborative effort and its goal to ensure that the web tools it designs are installable and supportable on smaller campuses and by smaller institutions. (GR)

  12. Improving Web Site Usability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Chris

    2004-01-01

    Over the last 10 years the Internet has become an essential part of the way companies do business. These days, it is as important to have a Web site as it is to have a phone book listing. Unfortunately, many Web sites are riddled with perplexing navigation and unclear priorities that leave many users confused and frustrated. This article presents…

  13. Web 2 Nowhere?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Web 2.0 seems to be all the rage these days. One cannot go to a library conference and attend presentations or stroll down the halls without hearing some mention of it in magical tones reserved for some great discovery. The excitement surrounding Web 2.0 reminds the author of the frenzy that gripped the country between 1848 and 1855, when…

  14. SAWAN Web System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-04-21

    A web site designed to collect and distribute environmental data from various South Asia participants regarding the quality of water in the region. The web site provides transparency to water quality analysis parameters based on locations along South Asia rivers. It facilitates open communication among players in the region.

  15. Helping Students Make the Most of the Web. Spotlight Feature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dopke-Wilson, MariRae

    2006-01-01

    Better understanding the attitude and behaviors of students using the Internet for school work can provide valuable insight for today's school librarian. The Pew Internet & American Life Project conducted a qualitative study of Internet-using public middle and high school students drawn from across the country ranging from 12 to 17 years of age.…

  16. The Geoprocessing Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Peisheng; Foerster, Theodor; Yue, Peng

    2012-10-01

    As Web services technology has matured in recent years, an increasing amount of geospatial resources and processing functions are available in the form of online Web services. Consequently, effective and efficient data processing methods for geospatial information extraction and knowledge discovery over the Web are a major challenge for research and industry. The Geoprocessing Web, which consists of light-weight protocols, crowd-sourcing capability, and the capability to process real-time geospatial data sources provided by sensors, enables distributed, interoperable and collaborative processing of geospatial data for information and knowledge discovery. This paper provides a comprehensive overview about the state-of-the-art architecture and technologies, and the most recent developments in the Geoprocessing Web.

  17. An Educational System to Help Students Assess Website Features and Identify High-Risk Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kajiyama, Tomoko; Echizen, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to propose an effective educational system to help students assess Web site risk by providing an environment in which students can better understand a Web site's features and determine the risks of accessing the Web site for themselves. Design/methodology/approach: The authors have enhanced a prototype…

  18. An Educational System to Help Students Assess Website Features and Identify High-Risk Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kajiyama, Tomoko; Echizen, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to propose an effective educational system to help students assess Web site risk by providing an environment in which students can better understand a Web site's features and determine the risks of accessing the Web site for themselves. Design/methodology/approach: The authors have enhanced a prototype…

  19. Web-Based Online Public Access Catalogues of IIT Libraries in India: An Evaluative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madhusudhan, Margam; Aggarwal, Shalini

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to examine the various features and components of web-based online public access catalogues (OPACs) of IIT libraries in India with the help of a specially designed evaluation checklist. Design/methodology/approach: The various features of the web-based OPACs in six IIT libraries (IIT Delhi, IIT Bombay, IIT…

  20. Effectiveness of Learning Process Using "Web Technology" in the Distance Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killedar, Manoj

    2008-01-01

    Web is a globally distributed, still highly personalized media for cost-effective delivery of multimedia information and services. Web is expected to have a strong impact on almost every aspect of how we learn. "Total Quality" is the totality of features, as perceived by the customers of the product or service. Totality of features includes stated…

  1. Web-Based Online Public Access Catalogues of IIT Libraries in India: An Evaluative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madhusudhan, Margam; Aggarwal, Shalini

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to examine the various features and components of web-based online public access catalogues (OPACs) of IIT libraries in India with the help of a specially designed evaluation checklist. Design/methodology/approach: The various features of the web-based OPACs in six IIT libraries (IIT Delhi, IIT Bombay, IIT…

  2. A Collaborative Web-Based Architecture For Sharing ToxCast Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Collaborative Drug Discovery (CDD) has created a scalable platform that combines traditional drug discovery informatics with Web2.0 features. Traditional drug discovery capabilities include substructure, similarity searching and export to excel or sdf formats. Web2.0 features inc...

  3. Learning on the Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Fernando C. N.

    It is commonplace to say that theWeb has changed everything.Machine learning researchers often say that their projects and results respond to that change with better methods for finding and organizing Web information. However, not much of the theory, or even the current practice, of machine learning take the Web seriously. We continue to devote much effort to refining supervised learning, but the Web reality is that labeled data is hard to obtain, while unlabeled data is inexhaustible. We cling to the iid assumption, while all the Web data generation processes drift rapidly and involve many hidden correlations. Many of our theory and algorithms assume data representations of fixed dimension, while in fact the dimensionality of data, for example the number of distinct words in text, grows with data size. While there has been much work recently on learning with sparse representations, the actual patterns of sparsity on the Web are not paid much attention. Those patterns might be very relevant to the communication costs of distributed learning algorithms, which are necessary at Web scale, but little work has been done on this.

  4. Silicon web process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Skutch, M. E.; Driggers, J. M.; Hopkins, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The silicon web process takes advantage of natural crystallographic stabilizing forces to grow long, thin single crystal ribbons directly from liquid silicon. The ribbon, or web, is formed by the solidification of a liquid film supported by surface tension between two silicon filaments, called dendrites, which border the edges of the growing strip. The ribbon can be propagated indefinitely by replenishing the liquid silicon as it is transformed to crystal. The dendritic web process has several advantages for achieving low cost, high efficiency solar cells. These advantages are discussed.

  5. Chemistry WebBook

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 69 NIST Chemistry WebBook (Web, free access)   The NIST Chemistry WebBook contains: Thermochemical data for over 7000 organic and small inorganic compounds; thermochemistry data for over 8000 reactions; IR spectra for over 16,000 compounds; mass spectra for over 33,000 compounds; UV/Vis spectra for over 1600 compounds; electronic and vibrational spectra for over 5000 compounds; constants of diatomic molecules(spectroscopic data) for over 600 compounds; ion energetics data for over 16,000 compounds; thermophysical property data for 74 fluids.

  6. Enhanced Television Strategy Models: A Study of TV Web Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ha, Louisa

    2002-01-01

    Compares the use of enhanced television features and television commerce features on the Web sites of cable and broadcast television networks. Shows differences in strategies and site usability; proposes three enhanced television strategy models; and discusses implications on television revenue and viewership. (Author/LRW)

  7. Teaching Tectonics to Undergraduates with Web GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasio, D. J.; Bodzin, A.; Sahagian, D. L.; Rutzmoser, S.

    2013-12-01

    Geospatial reasoning skills provide a means for manipulating, interpreting, and explaining structured information and are involved in higher-order cognitive processes that include problem solving and decision-making. Appropriately designed tools, technologies, and curriculum can support spatial learning. We present Web-based visualization and analysis tools developed with Javascript APIs to enhance tectonic curricula while promoting geospatial thinking and scientific inquiry. The Web GIS interface integrates graphics, multimedia, and animations that allow users to explore and discover geospatial patterns that are not easily recognized. Features include a swipe tool that enables users to see underneath layers, query tools useful in exploration of earthquake and volcano data sets, a subduction and elevation profile tool which facilitates visualization between map and cross-sectional views, drafting tools, a location function, and interactive image dragging functionality on the Web GIS. The Web GIS platform is independent and can be implemented on tablets or computers. The GIS tool set enables learners to view, manipulate, and analyze rich data sets from local to global scales, including such data as geology, population, heat flow, land cover, seismic hazards, fault zones, continental boundaries, and elevation using two- and three- dimensional visualization and analytical software. Coverages which allow users to explore plate boundaries and global heat flow processes aided learning in a Lehigh University Earth and environmental science Structural Geology and Tectonics class and are freely available on the Web.

  8. External Web Site Policy

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content Home   |   Data   |   Statistics   |   Tools   |   Collaborations   |   Work with Us   |   Publications   |   About   |   Links External Web Site Policy When you see this graphic notice ( ) next to a link on the Breast Cancer Surveillance

  9. External Web Site Policy

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content Search International Cancer Screening Network Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Home | About ICSN | Collaborative Projects | Meetings | Cancer Sites | Publications | Contact Us External Web Site Policy When you see this

  10. Fun With Food Webs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Karl D.

    1977-01-01

    Explains an upper elementary game of tag that illustrates energy flow in food webs using candy bars as food sources. A follow-up field trip to a river and five language arts projects are also suggested. (CS)

  11. A Web Graphics Primer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Larry

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the basic technical concepts of using graphics in World Wide Web pages, including: color depth and dithering, dots-per-inch, image size, file types, Graphics Interchange Formats (GIFs), Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), format, and software recommendations. (AEF)

  12. A zooming Web browser

    SciTech Connect

    Bederson, B.B.; Hollan, J.D.; Stewart, J.; Rogers, D.; Vick, D.; Ring, L.; Grose, E.; Forsythe, C.

    1996-12-31

    We are developing a prototype zooming World-Wide Web browser within Pad++, a multiscale graphical environment. Instead of having a single page visible at a time, multiple pages and the links between them are depicted on a large zoomable information surface. Pages are scaled so that the page in focus is clearly readable with connected pages shown at smaller scales to provide context. We quantitatively compared performance with the Pad++ Web browser and Netscape in several different scenarios. We examined how quickly users could answer questions about a specific Web site designed for this test. Initially we found that subjects answered questions slightly slower with Pad++ than with Netscape. After analyzing the results of this study, we implemented several changes to the Pad++ Web browser, and repeated one Pad++ condition. After improvements were made to the Pad++ browser, subjects using Pad++ answered questions 23% faster than those using Netscape.

  13. Silicon web process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Blais, P. D.; Davis, J. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Thirty-five (35) furnace runs were carried out during this quarter, of which 25 produced a total of 120 web crystals. The two main thermal models for the dendritic growth process were completed and are being used to assist the design of the thermal geometry of the web growth apparatus. The first model, a finite element representation of the susceptor and crucible, was refined to give greater precision and resolution in the critical central region of the melt. The second thermal model, which describes the dissipation of the latent heat to generate thickness-velocity data, was completed. Dendritic web samples were fabricated into solar cells using a standard configuration and a standard process for a N(+) -P-P(+) configuration. The detailed engineering design was completed for a new dendritic web growth facility of greater width capability than previous facilities.

  14. Web document engineering

    SciTech Connect

    White, B.

    1996-05-01

    This tutorial provides an overview of several document engineering techniques which are applicable to the authoring of World Wide Web documents. It illustrates how pre-WWW hypertext research is applicable to the development of WWW information resources.

  15. Learning: The Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, David A., Ed.; DeVries, David J., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    Explores what can be learned--in particular, what can be learned about science--from the Web sites of four well-known science journals: Discover, Scientific American, Nature, and Science. (Author/ASK)

  16. Web service performance script

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2009-08-01

    This python script, available from ESRI and modified here, checks a server at specified intervals to ensure that web services remain up and running. If any are found to be off, they are automatically turned back on.

  17. Semantic Web for Manufacturing Web Services

    SciTech Connect

    Kulvatunyou, Boonserm; Ivezic, Nenad

    2002-06-01

    As markets become unexpectedly turbulent with a shortened product life cycle and a power shift towards buyers, the need for methods to rapidly and cost-effectively develop products, production facilities and supporting software is becoming urgent. The use of a virtual enterprise plays a vital role in surviving turbulent markets. However, its success requires reliable and large-scale interoperation among trading partners via a semantic web of trading partners' services whose properties, capabilities, and interfaces are encoded in an unambiguous as well as computer-understandable form. This paper demonstrates a promising approach to integration and interoperation between a design house and a manufacturer by developing semantic web services for business and engineering transactions. To this end, detailed activity and information flow diagrams are developed, in which the two trading partners exchange messages and documents. The properties and capabilities of the manufacturer sites are defined using DARPA Agent Markup Language (DAML) ontology definition language. The prototype development of semantic webs shows that enterprises can widely interoperate in an unambiguous and autonomous manner; hence, virtual enterprise is realizable at a low cost.

  18. The W's of Web Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finnegan, John; Griffin, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the pre-design questions that a Web site designer and client need to address. Discusses the why, who, what, where, and when phases of the Web site design process. Includes a Web Site Development Form to guide site designs through the first two stages of Web site development: specification and design. (AEF)

  19. Trophic coherence determines food-web stability.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Samuel; Domínguez-García, Virginia; Donetti, Luca; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2014-12-16

    Why are large, complex ecosystems stable? Both theory and simulations of current models predict the onset of instability with growing size and complexity, so for decades it has been conjectured that ecosystems must have some unidentified structural property exempting them from this outcome. We show that trophic coherence--a hitherto ignored feature of food webs that current structural models fail to reproduce--is a better statistical predictor of linear stability than size or complexity. Furthermore, we prove that a maximally coherent network with constant interaction strengths will always be linearly stable. We also propose a simple model that, by correctly capturing the trophic coherence of food webs, accurately reproduces their stability and other basic structural features. Most remarkably, our model shows that stability can increase with size and complexity. This suggests a key to May's paradox, and a range of opportunities and concerns for biodiversity conservation. PMID:25468963

  20. Trophic coherence determines food-web stability

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Samuel; Domínguez-García, Virginia; Donetti, Luca; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    Why are large, complex ecosystems stable? Both theory and simulations of current models predict the onset of instability with growing size and complexity, so for decades it has been conjectured that ecosystems must have some unidentified structural property exempting them from this outcome. We show that trophic coherence—a hitherto ignored feature of food webs that current structural models fail to reproduce—is a better statistical predictor of linear stability than size or complexity. Furthermore, we prove that a maximally coherent network with constant interaction strengths will always be linearly stable. We also propose a simple model that, by correctly capturing the trophic coherence of food webs, accurately reproduces their stability and other basic structural features. Most remarkably, our model shows that stability can increase with size and complexity. This suggests a key to May’s paradox, and a range of opportunities and concerns for biodiversity conservation. PMID:25468963

  1. Supporting Web Search with Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoeber, Orland; Yang, Xue Dong

    One of the fundamental goals of Web-based support systems is to promote and support human activities on the Web. The focus of this Chapter is on the specific activities associated with Web search, with special emphasis given to the use of visualization to enhance the cognitive abilities of Web searchers. An overview of information retrieval basics, along with a focus on Web search and the behaviour of Web searchers is provided. Information visualization is introduced as a means for supporting users as they perform their primary Web search tasks. Given the challenge of visualizing the primarily textual information present in Web search, a taxonomy of the information that is available to support these tasks is given. The specific challenges of representing search information are discussed, and a survey of the current state-of-the-art in visual Web search is introduced. This Chapter concludes with our vision for the future of Web search.

  2. Large-area sheet task advanced dendritic web growth development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hopkins, R. H.; Meier, D. L.; Schruben, J.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal models were developed that accurately predict the thermally generated stresses in the web crystal which, if too high, cause the crystal to degenerate. The application of the modeling results to the design of low-stress experimental growth configurations will allow the growth of wider web crystals at higher growth velocities. A new experimental web growth machine was constructed. This facility includes all the features necessary for carrying out growth experiments under steady thermal conditions. Programmed growth initiation was developed to give reproducible crystal starts. Width control permits the growth of long ribbons at constant width. Melt level is controlled to 0.1 mm or better. Thus, the capability exists to grow long web crystals of constant width and thickness with little operator intervention, and web growth experiments can now be performed with growth variables controlled to a degree not previously possible.

  3. Image and video search engine for the World Wide Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, John R.; Chang, Shih-Fu

    1997-01-01

    We describe a visual information system prototype for searching for images and videos on the World-Wide Web. New visual information in the form of images, graphics, animations and videos is being published on the Web at an incredible rate. However, cataloging this visual data is beyond the capabilities of current text-based Web search engines. In this paper, we describe a complete system by which visual information on the Web is (1) collected by automated agents, (2) processed in both text and visual feature domains, (3) catalogued and (4) indexed for fast search and retrieval. We introduce an image and video search engine which utilizes both text-based navigation and content-based technology for searching visually through the catalogued images and videos. Finally, we provide an initial evaluation based upon the cataloging of over one half million images and videos collected from the Web.

  4. Specification Patent Management for Web Application Platform Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukami, Yoshiaki; Isshiki, Masao; Takeda, Hideaki; Ohmukai, Ikki; Kokuryo, Jiro

    Diversified usage of web applications has encouraged disintegration of web platform into management of identification and applications. Users make use of various kinds of data linked to their identity with multiple applications on certain social web platforms such as Facebook or MySpace. There has emerged competition among web application platforms. Platformers can design relationship with developers by controlling patent of their own specification and adopt open technologies developed external organizations. Platformers choose a way to open according to feature of the specification and their position. Patent management of specification come to be a key success factor to build competitive web application platforms. Each way to attract external developers such as standardization, open source has not discussed and analyzed all together.

  5. Web Scraping for Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derriere, S.; Boch, T.

    2012-09-01

    Astronomical web sites and portals are used daily by astronomers, and are increasingly interactive and customizable, mainly through the use of JavaScript. In addition, information often arises from the linking of remotely distributed data and contents. All these potential links can not always be defined in advance and stored in a web document for at least two reasons: they could potentially increase the size of the document source by a large fraction; and sometimes only the user (and not the document creator) knows where relevant links should be provided. Web scraping is the process of automatically collecting Web information. In this context, we started developing a method allowing retrieval of remote information, and display of this information (including links to remote websites) in the current document, triggered by a very simple action from the user: the selection of a portion of text in the web document. Our first prototype deals with astronomical object names. It is written in JavaScript, and can easily be implemented in a web document, or used as a bookmarklet. Whenever the user selects a portion of text in a web document, a request to the Sesame name resolver is made to test if this is a valid object identifier. On success, information retrieved in JSON allows to display a tooltip with additional information on this object such as its coordinates, links to various CDS services, image thumbnails, etc. We present the current status of this work, and discuss how it could be extended in the future to other applications.

  6. CMS offline web tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metson, S.; Belforte, S.; Bockelman, B.; Dziedziniewicz, K.; Egeland, R.; Elmer, P.; Eulisse, G.; Evans, D.; Fanfani, A.; Feichtinger, D.; Kavka, C.; Kuznetsov, V.; van Lingen, F.; Newbold, D.; Tuura, L.; Wakefield, S.

    2008-07-01

    We describe a relatively new effort within CMS to converge on a set of web based tools, using state of the art industry techniques, to engage with the CMS offline computing system. CMS collaborators require tools to monitor various components of the computing system and interact with the system itself. The current state of the various CMS web tools is described along side current planned developments. The CMS collaboration comprises of nearly 3000 people from all over the world. As well as its collaborators, its computing resources are spread all over globe and are accessed via the LHC grid to run analysis, large scale production and data transfer tasks. Due to the distributed nature of collaborators effective provision of collaborative tools is essential to maximise physics exploitation of the CMS experiment, especially when the size of the CMS data set is considered. CMS has chosen to provide such tools over the world wide web as a top level service, enabling all members of the collaboration to interact with the various offline computing components. Traditionally web interfaces have been added in HEP experiments as an afterthought. In the CMS offline we have decided to put web interfaces, and the development of a common CMS web framework, on an equal footing with the rest of the offline development. Tools exist within CMS to transfer and catalogue data (PhEDEx and DBS/DLS), run Monte Carlo production (ProdAgent) and submit analysis (CRAB). Effective human interfaces to these systems are required for users with different agendas and practical knowledge of the systems to effectively use the CMS computing system. The CMS web tools project aims to provide a consistent interface to all these tools.

  7. Personality in cyberspace: personal Web sites as media for personality expressions and impressions.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Bernd; Machilek, Franz; SchĂĽtz, Astrid

    2006-06-01

    This research examined the personality of owners of personal Web sites based on self-reports, visitors' ratings, and the content of the Web sites. The authors compared a large sample of Web site owners with population-wide samples on the Big Five dimensions of personality. Controlling for demographic differences, the average Web site owner reported being slightly less extraverted and more open to experience. Compared with various other samples, Web site owners did not generally differ on narcissism, self-monitoring, or self-esteem, but gender differences on these traits were often smaller in Web site owners. Self-other agreement was highest with Openness to Experience, but valid judgments of all Big Five dimensions were derived from Web sites providing rich information. Visitors made use of quantifiable features of the Web site to infer personality, and the cues they utilized partly corresponded to self-reported traits. PMID:16784349

  8. Scalable web services for the PSIPRED Protein Analysis Workbench

    PubMed Central

    Buchan, Daniel W. A.; Minneci, Federico; Nugent, Tim C. O.; Bryson, Kevin; Jones, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present the new UCL Bioinformatics Group’s PSIPRED Protein Analysis Workbench. The Workbench unites all of our previously available analysis methods into a single web-based framework. The new web portal provides a greatly streamlined user interface with a number of new features to allow users to better explore their results. We offer a number of additional services to enable computationally scalable execution of our prediction methods; these include SOAP and XML-RPC web server access and new HADOOP packages. All software and services are available via the UCL Bioinformatics Group website at http://bioinf.cs.ucl.ac.uk/. PMID:23748958

  9. Scalable web services for the PSIPRED Protein Analysis Workbench.

    PubMed

    Buchan, Daniel W A; Minneci, Federico; Nugent, Tim C O; Bryson, Kevin; Jones, David T

    2013-07-01

    Here, we present the new UCL Bioinformatics Group's PSIPRED Protein Analysis Workbench. The Workbench unites all of our previously available analysis methods into a single web-based framework. The new web portal provides a greatly streamlined user interface with a number of new features to allow users to better explore their results. We offer a number of additional services to enable computationally scalable execution of our prediction methods; these include SOAP and XML-RPC web server access and new HADOOP packages. All software and services are available via the UCL Bioinformatics Group website at http://bioinf.cs.ucl.ac.uk/. PMID:23748958

  10. F-OWL: An Inference Engine for Semantic Web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zou, Youyong; Finin, Tim; Chen, Harry

    2004-01-01

    Understanding and using the data and knowledge encoded in semantic web documents requires an inference engine. F-OWL is an inference engine for the semantic web language OWL language based on F-logic, an approach to defining frame-based systems in logic. F-OWL is implemented using XSB and Flora-2 and takes full advantage of their features. We describe how F-OWL computes ontology entailment and compare it with other description logic based approaches. We also describe TAGA, a trading agent environment that we have used as a test bed for F-OWL and to explore how multiagent systems can use semantic web concepts and technology.

  11. Detecting image purpose in World Wide Web documents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paek, Seungyup; Smith, John R.

    1998-04-01

    The number of WWW documents available to users of the Internet is growing at an incredible rate. Therefore, it is becoming increasingly important to develop systems that aid users in searching, filtering, and retrieving information from the Internet. Currently, only a few prototype systems catalog and index images in Web documents. To greatly improve the cataloging and indexing of images on the Web, we have developed a prototype rule-based systems that detects the content images in Web documents. Content images are images that are associated with the main content of Web documents, as opposed to a multitude of other images that exist in Web documents for different purposes, such as decorative, advertisement and logo images. We present a system that uses decision tree learning for automated rule induction for the content images detection system. The system uses visual features, text-related features and the document context of images in concert for fast and effective content image detection in Web documents. We have evaluated the system by collecting more than 1200 images from 4 different Web sites and we have achieved an overall classification accuracy of 84 percent.

  12. Recognition of pornographic web pages by classifying texts and images.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weiming; Wu, Ou; Chen, Zhouyao; Fu, Zhouyu; Maybank, Steve

    2007-06-01

    With the rapid development of the World Wide Web, people benefit more and more from the sharing of information. However, Web pages with obscene, harmful, or illegal content can be easily accessed. It is important to recognize such unsuitable, offensive, or pornographic Web pages. In this paper, a novel framework for recognizing pornographic Web pages is described. A C4.5 decision tree is used to divide Web pages, according to content representations, into continuous text pages, discrete text pages, and image pages. These three categories of Web pages are handled, respectively, by a continuous text classifier, a discrete text classifier, and an algorithm that fuses the results from the image classifier and the discrete text classifier. In the continuous text classifier, statistical and semantic features are used to recognize pornographic texts. In the discrete text classifier, the naive Bayes rule is used to calculate the probability that a discrete text is pornographic. In the image classifier, the object's contour-based features are extracted to recognize pornographic images. In the text and image fusion algorithm, the Bayes theory is used to combine the recognition results from images and texts. Experimental results demonstrate that the continuous text classifier outperforms the traditional keyword-statistics-based classifier, the contour-based image classifier outperforms the traditional skin-region-based image classifier, the results obtained by our fusion algorithm outperform those by either of the individual classifiers, and our framework can be adapted to different categories of Web pages. PMID:17431300

  13. Wired to the web

    SciTech Connect

    Stoddard, B.C.

    1995-11-01

    Once the domain of engineering techies and university computer gurus, the Internet has taken a popular route into business and homes. With the breakthrough of the World Wide Web (the Web), use of the Internet has grown astonishingly, doubling each year for the last couple of years. Many think that Internet usage is shallow and short term, but other companies are becoming less skeptical. Marketing and communications are two reasons why utilities, businesses, and organizations of all sorts are setting up shop on the Web. Corporation and associations have established home pages where a company can disseminate information about itself. the number of Web sites doubles every 53 days. Electric utilities have taken note of the number of users and about 40 had developed home pages as of Labor Day. This article examines some of these utilities and how they are using their Web sites to provide not only standard corporate information, press releases, and financial information, but also to personalize their contact with their customer base.

  14. Food and Beverage Brands that Market to Children and Adolescents on the Internet: A Content Analysis of Branded Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Anna E.; Story, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To identify food and beverage brand Web sites featuring designated children's areas, assess marketing techniques present on those industry Web sites, and determine nutritional quality of branded food items marketed to children. Design: Systematic content analysis of food and beverage brand Web sites and nutrient analysis of food and…

  15. Food and Beverage Brands that Market to Children and Adolescents on the Internet: A Content Analysis of Branded Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Anna E.; Story, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To identify food and beverage brand Web sites featuring designated children's areas, assess marketing techniques present on those industry Web sites, and determine nutritional quality of branded food items marketed to children. Design: Systematic content analysis of food and beverage brand Web sites and nutrient analysis of food and…

  16. Development of Kevlar parachute webbings

    SciTech Connect

    Ericksen, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the development of Kevlar webbings for parachute applications. Evaluation of existing webbings and a study of the effects of filling yarn denier and pick count on tensile and joint strength provided data for fabric design. Measurements of warp crimp as a function of filling denier and pick count demonstrated the relationship between warp crimp and strength. One newly developed webbing had higher strength efficiency and another had higher joint efficiency than comparable existing webbings. Both new webbings had overall efficiencies over 5% higher than values for existing webbings. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Renaissance of the Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarty, M.

    2009-09-01

    The renaissance of the web has driven development of many new technologies that have forever changed the way we write software. The resulting tools have been applied to both solve problems and creat new ones in a wide range of domains ranging from monitor and control user interfaces to information distribution. This discussion covers which of and how these technologies are being used in the astronomical computing community. Topics include JavaScript, Cascading Style Sheets, HTML, XML, JSON, RSS, iCalendar, Java, PHP, Python, Ruby on Rails, database technologies, and web frameworks/design patterns.

  18. Semantic Sensor Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, A.; Henson, C.; Thirunarayan, K.

    2008-12-01

    Sensors are distributed across the globe leading to an avalanche of data about our environment. It is possible today to utilize networks of sensors to detect and identify a multitude of observations, from simple phenomena to complex events and situations. The lack of integration and communication between these networks, however, often isolates important data streams and intensifies the existing problem of too much data and not enough knowledge. With a view to addressing this problem, the Semantic Sensor Web (SSW) [1] proposes that sensor data be annotated with semantic metadata that will both increase interoperability and provide contextual information essential for situational knowledge. Kno.e.sis Center's approach to SSW is an evolutionary one. It adds semantic annotations to the existing standard sensor languages of the Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) defined by OGC. These annotations enhance primarily syntactic XML-based descriptions in OGC's SWE languages with microformats, and W3C's Semantic Web languages- RDF and OWL. In association with semantic annotation and semantic web capabilities including ontologies and rules, SSW supports interoperability, analysis and reasoning over heterogeneous multi-modal sensor data. In this presentation, we will also demonstrate a mashup with support for complex spatio-temporal-thematic queries [2] and semantic analysis that utilize semantic annotations, multiple ontologies and rules. It uses existing services (e.g., GoogleMap) and semantics enhanced SWE's Sensor Observation Service (SOS) over weather and road condition data from various sensors that are part of Ohio's transportation network. Our upcoming plans are to demonstrate end to end (heterogeneous sensor to application) semantics support and study scalability of SSW involving thousands of sensors to about a billion triples. Keywords: Semantic Sensor Web, Spatiotemporal thematic queries, Semantic Web Enablement, Sensor Observation Service [1] Amit Sheth, Cory Henson, Satya S. Sahoo, "Semantic Sensor Web," IEEE Internet Computing, 12 (4), July-August 2008, pp. 78-83. http://knoesis.wright.edu/research/semsci/application_domain/sem_sensor/ [2] Amit Sheth and Matthew Perry, "Traveling the Semantic Web through Space, Time and Theme," IEEE Internet Computing, 12 (2), February-March 2008. http://knoesis.org/research/semweb/projects/stt/

  19. WebTheme: Understanding Web Information through Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Whiting, Mark A.; Cramer, Nicholas O.

    2002-06-09

    WebTheme combines the power of software agent-based information retrieval with visual analytics to provide users with a new tool for understanding web information. WebTheme allows users to both quickly comprehend large collections of information from the Web and drill down into interesting portions of a collection. Software agents work for users to perform controlled harvesting of web material of interest. Visualization and analysis tools allow exploration of the resulting document space. Information spaces are organized and presented according to their topical context. Tools that display how documents were collected by the agents, where they were gathered, and how they are linked further enhance users? understanding of information and its context. WebTheme is a significant tool in the pursuit of the Semantic Web. In particular, it supports enhanced user insight into semantics of large, pre-structured or ad-hoc, web information collections.

  20. Using ESO Reflex with Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järveläinen, P.; Savolainen, V.; Oittinen, T.; Maisala, S.; Ullgrén, M. Hook, R.

    2008-08-01

    ESO Reflex is a prototype graphical workflow system, based on Taverna, and primarily intended to be a flexible way of running ESO data reduction recipes along with other legacy applications and user-written tools. ESO Reflex can also readily use the Taverna Web Services features that are based on the Apache Axis SOAP implementation. Taverna is a general purpose Web Service client, and requires no programming to use such services. However, Taverna also has some restrictions: for example, no numerical types such integers. In addition the preferred binding style is document/literal wrapped, but most astronomical services publish the Axis default WSDL using RPC/encoded style. Despite these minor limitations we have created simple but very promising test VO workflow using the Sesame name resolver service at CDS Strasbourg, the Hubble SIAP server at the Multi-Mission Archive at Space Telescope (MAST) and the WESIX image cataloging and catalogue cross-referencing service at the University of Pittsburgh. ESO Reflex can also pass files and URIs via the PLASTIC protocol to visualisation tools and has its own viewer for VOTables. We picked these three Web Services to try to set up a realistic and useful ESO Reflex workflow. They also demonstrate ESO Reflex abilities to use many kind of Web Services because each of them requires a different interface. We describe each of these services in turn and comment on how it was used

  1. Modeling Traffic on the Web Graph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiss, Mark R.; Gonçalves, Bruno; Ramasco, José J.; Flammini, Alessandro; Menczer, Filippo

    Analysis of aggregate and individual Web requests shows that PageRank is a poor predictor of traffic. We use empirical data to characterize properties of Web traffic not reproduced by Markovian models, including both aggregate statistics such as page and link traffic, and individual statistics such as entropy and session size. As no current model reconciles all of these observations, we present an agent-based model that explains them through realistic browsing behaviors: (1) revisiting bookmarked pages; (2) backtracking; and (3) seeking out novel pages of topical interest. The resulting model can reproduce the behaviors we observe in empirical data, especially heterogeneous session lengths, reconciling the narrowly focused browsing patterns of individual users with the extreme variance in aggregate traffic measurements. We can thereby identify a few salient features that are necessary and sufficient to interpret Web traffic data. Beyond the descriptive and explanatory power of our model, these results may lead to improvements in Web applications such as search and crawling.

  2. Dynamic Web Pages: Performance Impact on Web Servers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kothari, Bhupesh; Claypool, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of Web servers and requests for dynamic pages focuses on experimentally measuring and analyzing the performance of the three dynamic Web page generation technologies: CGI, FastCGI, and Servlets. Develops a multivariate linear regression model and predicts Web server performance under some typical dynamic requests. (Author/LRW)

  3. Restructuring Web Site Design: An Alternative to WebTeams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Marc; Boyer, Janice

    In July 1997, the University Library at the University of Nebraska at Omaha adopted a new structural model for Web site development--the publishing metaphor. Rather than relying on an individual expert (the Webmaster) or a WebTeam comprised of a few individuals, the model permits everyone in the organization, regardless of position or Web

  4. Designing Effective Web Forms for Older Web Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hui; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick; Fujimura, Kaori; Gao, Qin; Wang, Lin

    2012-01-01

    This research aims to provide insight for web form design for older users. The effects of task complexity and information structure of web forms on older users' performance were examined. Forty-eight older participants with abundant computer and web experience were recruited. The results showed significant differences in task time and error rate…

  5. Designing Effective Web Forms for Older Web Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hui; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick; Fujimura, Kaori; Gao, Qin; Wang, Lin

    2012-01-01

    This research aims to provide insight for web form design for older users. The effects of task complexity and information structure of web forms on older users' performance were examined. Forty-eight older participants with abundant computer and web experience were recruited. The results showed significant differences in task time and error rate…

  6. Elementary Classroom Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Elizabeth A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how elementary classroom Web sites support children's literacy. From a sociocultural perspective of literacy and a transformative stance toward the integration of literacy and technology, and building on explorations of new literacies, I discuss opportunities provided by the Internet that can support…

  7. School Violence. Web Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constitutional Rights Foundation, Los Angeles, CA.

    In answer to the concerns about school violence in the United States (especially since the tragedy in 1999 at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado), this Internet curriculum offers lessons and resources that address the topic of school violence and its causes, as well as the search for solutions. The curriculum presents four world wide web

  8. Silicon web process development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hill, F. E.; Skutch, M. E.; Driggers, J. M.; Hopkins, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    A barrier crucible design which consistently maintains melt stability over long periods of time was successfully tested and used in long growth runs. The pellet feeder for melt replenishment was operated continuously for growth runs of up to 17 hours. The liquid level sensor comprising a laser/sensor system was operated, performed well, and meets the requirements for maintaining liquid level height during growth and melt replenishment. An automated feedback loop connecting the feed mechanism and the liquid level sensing system was designed and constructed and operated successfully for 3.5 hours demonstrating the feasibility of semi-automated dendritic web growth. The sensitivity of the cost of sheet, to variations in capital equipment cost and recycling dendrites was calculated and it was shown that these factors have relatively little impact on sheet cost. Dendrites from web which had gone all the way through the solar cell fabrication process, when melted and grown into web, produce crystals which show no degradation in cell efficiency. Material quality remains high and cells made from web grown at the start, during, and the end of a run from a replenished melt show comparable efficiencies.

  9. Underwater Web Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wighting, Mervyn J.; Lucking, Robert A.; Christmann, Edwin P.

    2004-01-01

    Teachers search for ways to enhance oceanography units in the classroom. There are many online resources available to help one explore the mysteries of the deep. This article describes a collection of Web sites on this topic appropriate for middle level classrooms.

  10. Caught on the Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isakson, Carol

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author presents Web sites about teen use of online social networks and age-appropriate resources. These resources can be used for teaching students ways in which to use these networks safely and ethically. Among other things, "Social Network Service" entry in Wikipedia, offers a description and a "List of Social Networking…

  11. Library Web Site Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Howard

    1999-01-01

    Reports on some of the new ways public library sites are presenting themselves to their patrons and to the broader World Wide Web audience. Discusses library virtual tours; calendar display; audio-visual materials; resource listings; book clubs; money-raising activities; fugitive fact files; hot item advisors; periodicals; FAQs (frequently asked…

  12. Spider Webs and Silks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollrath, Fritz

    1992-01-01

    Compares the attributes of the silk from spiders with those of the commercially harvested silk from silkworms. Discusses the evolution, design, and effectiveness of spider webs; the functional mechanics of the varieties of silk that can be produced by the same spider; and the composite, as well as molecular, structure of spider silk thread. (JJK)

  13. Web Development Simplified

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Bernd W.

    2010-01-01

    The author has discussed the Multimedia Educational Resource for Teaching and Online Learning site, MERLOT, in a recent Electronic Roundup column. In this article, he discusses an entirely new Web page development tool that MERLOT has added for its members. The new tool is called the MERLOT Content Builder and is directly integrated into the…

  14. Spider Web Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    A delicate pattern, like that of a spider web, appears on top of the Mars residual polar cap, after the seasonal carbon-dioxide ice slab has disappeared. Next spring, these will likely mark the sites of vents when the carbon-dioxide ice cap returns. This Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Orbiter Camera image is about 3-kilometers wide (2-miles).

  15. Spinning a Web Search.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lager, Mark A.

    This paper focuses on techniques for retrieval used in information sciences and in World Wide Web search engines. The purpose of reference service and information science is to provide useful information in response to a query. The two metrics of recall and precision serve to express information retrieval performance. There are two major…

  16. Spelling and the Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varnhagen, Connie K.; McFall, G. Peggy; Figueredo, Lauren; Takach, Bonnie Sadler; Daniels, Jason; Cuthbertson, Heather

    2008-01-01

    Correct spelling is increasingly important in our technological world. We examined children's and adults' Web search behavior for easy and more difficult to spell target keywords. Grade 4 children and university students searched for the life cycle of the lemming (easy to spell target keyword) or the ptarmigan (difficult to spell target keyword).…

  17. Caught on the Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isakson, Carol

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a listing of Web resources which showcases sites created by school districts to support staff use of available technologies. These include Online Technology Tutorials from the Kent School District, Tips and Tutorials from the Kenton County (Kentucky) Schools Office of Instructional Technology, and Teacher…

  18. Spinning the Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggins, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    Skills in communication and collaboration can be just as important as content knowledge and technical skills in the workplace. So what are schools doing to foster these skills? English language arts teacher Alexis Wiggins adapted the Socratic seminar model to make it student-led and collaborative. Under her new approach, the Spider Web

  19. WebWatch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcombe, Pat

    2002-01-01

    Reviews ten Web sites that are designed to answer basic legal questions for the layperson. They provide resources on a broad range of legal topics, such as divorce, real estate, and criminal justice, as well as legal forms and information on finding a lawyer. (LRW)

  20. Criminal Justice Web Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Timothy

    1998-01-01

    Evaluates 15 criminal justice Web sites that have been selected according to the following criteria: authority, currency, purpose, objectivity, and potential usefulness to researchers. The sites provide narrative and statistical information concerning crime, law enforcement, the judicial system, and corrections. Searching techniques are also…

  1. Building Web Literacy Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinhardt, Jonathon; Isbell, Katherine

    2002-01-01

    Describes web literacy instruction developed and implemented in response to students' needs as part of an English-as-a-Foreign-Language academic skills preparation curriculum. The goals of the instruction are to introduce critical reading strategies and develop computer literacy skills. (Author/VWL)

  2. Warbling on the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Steven

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of Web technology to create a repository for American bird songs at Northeastern Sate University (Oklahoma). Explains the use of software to translated bird songs into a sonogram, or picture, of what the sounds look like for ornithology students to better learn bird vocalizations. (LRW)

  3. Spinning a Web Search.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lager, Mark A.

    This paper focuses on techniques for retrieval used in information sciences and in World Wide Web search engines. The purpose of reference service and information science is to provide useful information in response to a query. The two metrics of recall and precision serve to express information retrieval performance. There are two major…

  4. Elementary Classroom Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Elizabeth A.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how elementary classroom Web sites support children's literacy. From a sociocultural perspective of literacy and a transformative stance toward the integration of literacy and technology, and building on explorations of new literacies, I discuss opportunities provided by the Internet that can support…

  5. Web Development Simplified

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Bernd W.

    2010-01-01

    The author has discussed the Multimedia Educational Resource for Teaching and Online Learning site, MERLOT, in a recent Electronic Roundup column. In this article, he discusses an entirely new Web page development tool that MERLOT has added for its members. The new tool is called the MERLOT Content Builder and is directly integrated into the…

  6. Experiments in Web Storytelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Recognized as one of our oldest yet still vital forms of communication, storytelling offers new opportunity when it takes place on the web. Even our every day activities of writing email, creating presentations, or participating in social media can become more dynamic when considered stories. A digital storyteller from outside the museum field…

  7. Web-dendritic ribbon growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilborn, R. B., Jr.; Faust, J. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A web furnace was constructed for pulling dendritic-web samples. The effect of changes in the furnace thermal geometry on the growth of dendritic-web was studied. Several attempts were made to grow primitive dendrites for use as the dendritic seed crystals for web growth and to determine the optimum twin spacing in the dendritic seed crystal for web growth. Mathematical models and computer programs were used to determine the thermal geometries in the susceptor, crucible melt, meniscus, and web. Several geometries were determined for particular furnace geometries and growth conditions. The information obtained was used in conjunction with results from the experimental growth investigations in order to achieve proper conditions for sustained pulling of two dendrite web ribbons. In addition, the facilities for obtaining the following data were constructed: twin spacing, dislocation density, web geometry, resistivity, majority charge carrier type, and minority carrier lifetime.

  8. Web Browser Security Update Effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duebendorfer, Thomas; Frei, Stefan

    We analyze the effectiveness of different Web browser update mechanisms on various operating systems; from Google Chrome's silent update mechanism to Opera's update requiring a full re-installation. We use anonymized logs from Google's world wide distributed Web servers. An analysis of the logged HTTP user-agent strings that Web browsers report when requesting any Web page is used to measure the daily browser version shares in active use. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first global scale measurement of Web browser update effectiveness comparing four different Web browser update strategies including Google Chrome. Our measurements prove that silent updates and little dependency on the underlying operating system are most effective to get users of Web browsers to surf the Web with the latest browser version.

  9. Code AI Personal Web Pages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Joseph A.; Smith, Charles A. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The document consists of a publicly available web site (george.arc.nasa.gov) for Joseph A. Garcia's personal web pages in the AI division. Only general information will be posted and no technical material. All the information is unclassified.

  10. The Evolution of Web Searching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, David

    2000-01-01

    Explores the interrelation between Web publishing and information retrieval technologies and lists new approaches to Web indexing and searching. Highlights include Web directories; search engines; portalisation; Internet service providers; browser providers; meta search engines; popularity based analysis; natural language searching; links-based…

  11. Web Browser Trends and Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin-Jones, Bob

    2000-01-01

    Discusses Web browsers and how their capabilities have been expanded, support for Web browsing on different devices (cell phones, palmtop computers, TV sets), and browser support for the next-generation Web authoring language, XML ("extensible markup language"). (Author/VWL)

  12. The Web Resource Collaboration Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Joanna C.

    2004-01-01

    The Web Resource Collaboration Center (WRCC) is a web-based tool developed to help software engineers build their own web-based learning and performance support systems. Designed using various online communication and collaboration technologies, the WRCC enables people to: (1) build a learning and professional development resource that provides…

  13. Sensor system for web inspection

    DOEpatents

    Sleefe, Gerard E.; Rudnick, Thomas J.; Novak, James L.

    2002-01-01

    A system for electrically measuring variations over a flexible web has a capacitive sensor including spaced electrically conductive, transmit and receive electrodes mounted on a flexible substrate. The sensor is held against a flexible web with sufficient force to deflect the path of the web, which moves relative to the sensor.

  14. Information Diversity in Web Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jiahui

    2009-01-01

    The web is a rich and diverse information source with incredible amounts of information about all kinds of subjects in various forms. This information source affords great opportunity to build systems that support users in their work and everyday lives. To help users explore information on the web, web search systems should find information that…

  15. The Art of Web Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longe, Heather

    2008-01-01

    The essential components to building a successful Web site are many times overlooked. There is a misconception that if an individual knows HTML or is a Web developer, an effective Web site can easily be created. In reality, a variety of other factors are needed before technical skills ever come into play. When instructing students in the art of…

  16. Designing a WebQuest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salsovic, Annette R.

    2009-01-01

    A WebQuest is an inquiry-based lesson plan that uses the Internet. This article explains what a WebQuest is, shows how to create one, and provides an example. When engaged in a WebQuest, students use technology to experience cooperative learning and discovery learning while honing their research, writing, and presentation skills. It has been found…

  17. The Art of Web Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longe, Heather

    2008-01-01

    The essential components to building a successful Web site are many times overlooked. There is a misconception that if an individual knows HTML or is a Web developer, an effective Web site can easily be created. In reality, a variety of other factors are needed before technical skills ever come into play. When instructing students in the art of…

  18. Web-based collaboration tools.

    PubMed

    Wink, Diane M

    2009-01-01

    In this bimonthly series, the author examines how nurse educators can use Internet and Web-based computer technologies such as search, communication, and collaborative writing tools; social networking and social bookmarking sites; virtual worlds; and Web-based teaching and learning programs. This article describes Web-based collaboration tools and techniques to increase their effectiveness. PMID:19901730

  19. The Semantic Web in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohler, Jason

    2008-01-01

    The semantic web or Web 3.0 makes information more meaningful to people by making it more understandable to machines. In this article, the author examines the implications of Web 3.0 for education. The author considers three areas of impact: knowledge construction, personal learning network maintenance, and personal educational administration.…

  20. Interactive Web Sites for Teens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haycock, Ken

    2005-01-01

    Eighty-three percent of teenagers are online. The average teen spends 5 to 10 hours a week on the Web. When using Web sites, teenagers are easily bored. Teenagers are also not nearly as skilled as adults at navigating the Web and do not really care for glitzy graphics. Insufficient reading skills, immature research strategies, and unwillingness to…

  1. The Semantic Web in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohler, Jason

    2008-01-01

    The semantic web or Web 3.0 makes information more meaningful to people by making it more understandable to machines. In this article, the author examines the implications of Web 3.0 for education. The author considers three areas of impact: knowledge construction, personal learning network maintenance, and personal educational administration.…

  2. Designing using manufacturing features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szecsi, T.; Hoque, A. S. M.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a design system that enables the composition of a part using manufacturing features. Features are selected from feature libraries. Upon insertion, the system ensures that the feature does not contradict the design-for-manufacture rules. This helps eliminating costly manufacturing problems. The system is developed as an extension to a commercial CAD/CAM system Pro/Engineer.

  3. Web Usage, Advertising, and Shopping: Relationship Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korgaonkar, Pradeep; Wolin, Lori D.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses Web sales and explores the differences between heavy, medium, and light Web users in terms of their beliefs about Web advertising, attitudes toward Web advertising, purchasing patterns, and demographics. Suggests marketers need to target Web advertising to particular Web users. (Author/LRW)

  4. Food-Web Structure of Seagrass Communities across Different Spatial Scales and Human Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Coll, Marta; Schmidt, Allison; Romanuk, Tamara; Lotze, Heike K.

    2011-01-01

    Seagrass beds provide important habitat for a wide range of marine species but are threatened by multiple human impacts in coastal waters. Although seagrass communities have been well-studied in the field, a quantification of their food-web structure and functioning, and how these change across space and human impacts has been lacking. Motivated by extensive field surveys and literature information, we analyzed the structural features of food webs associated with Zostera marina across 16 study sites in 3 provinces in Atlantic Canada. Our goals were to (i) quantify differences in food-web structure across local and regional scales and human impacts, (ii) assess the robustness of seagrass webs to simulated species loss, and (iii) compare food-web structure in temperate Atlantic seagrass beds with those of other aquatic ecosystems. We constructed individual food webs for each study site and cumulative webs for each province and the entire region based on presence/absence of species, and calculated 16 structural properties for each web. Our results indicate that food-web structure was similar among low impact sites across regions. With increasing human impacts associated with eutrophication, however, food-web structure show evidence of degradation as indicated by fewer trophic groups, lower maximum trophic level of the highest top predator, fewer trophic links connecting top to basal species, higher fractions of herbivores and intermediate consumers, and higher number of prey per species. These structural changes translate into functional changes with impacted sites being less robust to simulated species loss. Temperate Atlantic seagrass webs are similar to a tropical seagrass web, yet differed from other aquatic webs, suggesting consistent food-web characteristics across seagrass ecosystems in different regions. Our study illustrates that food-web structure and functioning of seagrass habitats change with human impacts and that the spatial scale of food-web analysis is critical for determining results. PMID:21811637

  5. THE NSF National Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education Digital Library (NSDL) Program; Software for Building a Full-Featured Discipline-Based Web Portal; A Metadata Framework Developed at the Tsinghua University Library To Aid in the Preservation of Digital Resources; A Scalable Architecture for Harvest-Based Digital Libraries; The Design and Evaluation of Interactivities in a Digital Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zia, Lee L.; Almasy, Edward; Sleasman, David; Bower, Rachael; Niu, Jingfang; Liu, Xiaoming; Maly, Kurt; Zubair, Mohammad; Nelson, Michael L.; Brody, Tim; Harnard, Stevan; Carr, Les; Budhu, Muniram; Coleman, Anita

    2002-01-01

    Includes five articles that discuss digital library programs related to the National Science Foundation; software for building Web portals; metadata developed at Tsinghua University Library (China) for preserving digital resources; the Open Archives Initiative for metadata and the need for a common infrastructure; and interactivity in a digital…

  6. THE NSF National Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education Digital Library (NSDL) Program; Software for Building a Full-Featured Discipline-Based Web Portal; A Metadata Framework Developed at the Tsinghua University Library To Aid in the Preservation of Digital Resources; A Scalable Architecture for Harvest-Based Digital Libraries; The Design and Evaluation of Interactivities in a Digital Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zia, Lee L.; Almasy, Edward; Sleasman, David; Bower, Rachael; Niu, Jingfang; Liu, Xiaoming; Maly, Kurt; Zubair, Mohammad; Nelson, Michael L.; Brody, Tim; Harnard, Stevan; Carr, Les; Budhu, Muniram; Coleman, Anita

    2002-01-01

    Includes five articles that discuss digital library programs related to the National Science Foundation; software for building Web portals; metadata developed at Tsinghua University Library (China) for preserving digital resources; the Open Archives Initiative for metadata and the need for a common infrastructure; and interactivity in a digital…

  7. Processing biological literature with customizable Web services supporting interoperable formats.

    PubMed

    Rak, Rafal; Batista-Navarro, Riza Theresa; Carter, Jacob; Rowley, Andrew; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    Web services have become a popular means of interconnecting solutions for processing a body of scientific literature. This has fuelled research on high-level data exchange formats suitable for a given domain and ensuring the interoperability of Web services. In this article, we focus on the biological domain and consider four interoperability formats, BioC, BioNLP, XMI and RDF, that represent domain-specific and generic representations and include well-established as well as emerging specifications. We use the formats in the context of customizable Web services created in our Web-based, text-mining workbench Argo that features an ever-growing library of elementary analytics and capabilities to build and deploy Web services straight from a convenient graphical user interface. We demonstrate a 2-fold customization of Web services: by building task-specific processing pipelines from a repository of available analytics, and by configuring services to accept and produce a combination of input and output data interchange formats. We provide qualitative evaluation of the formats as well as quantitative evaluation of automatic analytics. The latter was carried out as part of our participation in the fourth edition of the BioCreative challenge. Our analytics built into Web services for recognizing biochemical concepts in BioC collections achieved the highest combined scores out of 10 participating teams. Database URL: http://argo.nactem.ac.uk. PMID:25006225

  8. Easy Web Interfaces to IDL Code for NSTX Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    W.M. Davis

    2011-08-16

    Reusing code is a well-known Software Engineering practice to substantially increase the efficiency of code production, as well as to reduce errors and debugging time. A variety of "Web Tools" for the analysis and display of raw and analyzed physics data are in use on NSTX [1], and new ones can be produced quickly from existing IDL [2] code. A Web Tool with only a few inputs, and which calls an IDL routine written in the proper style, can be created in less than an hour; more typical Web Tools with dozens of inputs, and the need for some adaptation of existing IDL code, can be working in a day or so. Efficiency is also increased for users of Web Tools because o f the familiar interface of the web browser, and not needing X-windows, accounts, passwords, etc. Web Tools were adapted for use by PPPL physicists accessing EAST data stored in MDSplus with only a few man-weeks of effort; adapting to additional sites should now be even easier. An overview of Web Tools in use on NSTX, and a list of the most useful features, is also presented.

  9. Processing biological literature with customizable Web services supporting interoperable formats

    PubMed Central

    Rak, Rafal; Batista-Navarro, Riza Theresa; Carter, Jacob; Rowley, Andrew; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    Web services have become a popular means of interconnecting solutions for processing a body of scientific literature. This has fuelled research on high-level data exchange formats suitable for a given domain and ensuring the interoperability of Web services. In this article, we focus on the biological domain and consider four interoperability formats, BioC, BioNLP, XMI and RDF, that represent domain-specific and generic representations and include well-established as well as emerging specifications. We use the formats in the context of customizable Web services created in our Web-based, text-mining workbench Argo that features an ever-growing library of elementary analytics and capabilities to build and deploy Web services straight from a convenient graphical user interface. We demonstrate a 2-fold customization of Web services: by building task-specific processing pipelines from a repository of available analytics, and by configuring services to accept and produce a combination of input and output data interchange formats. We provide qualitative evaluation of the formats as well as quantitative evaluation of automatic analytics. The latter was carried out as part of our participation in the fourth edition of the BioCreative challenge. Our analytics built into Web services for recognizing biochemical concepts in BioC collections achieved the highest combined scores out of 10 participating teams. Database URL: http://argo.nactem.ac.uk. PMID:25006225

  10. COEUS: “semantic web in a box” for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background As the “omics” revolution unfolds, the growth in data quantity and diversity is bringing about the need for pioneering bioinformatics software, capable of significantly improving the research workflow. To cope with these computer science demands, biomedical software engineers are adopting emerging semantic web technologies that better suit the life sciences domain. The latter’s complex relationships are easily mapped into semantic web graphs, enabling a superior understanding of collected knowledge. Despite increased awareness of semantic web technologies in bioinformatics, their use is still limited. Results COEUS is a new semantic web framework, aiming at a streamlined application development cycle and following a “semantic web in a box” approach. The framework provides a single package including advanced data integration and triplification tools, base ontologies, a web-oriented engine and a flexible exploration API. Resources can be integrated from heterogeneous sources, including CSV and XML files or SQL and SPARQL query results, and mapped directly to one or more ontologies. Advanced interoperability features include REST services, a SPARQL endpoint and LinkedData publication. These enable the creation of multiple applications for web, desktop or mobile environments, and empower a new knowledge federation layer. Conclusions The platform, targeted at biomedical application developers, provides a complete skeleton ready for rapid application deployment, enhancing the creation of new semantic information systems. COEUS is available as open source at http://bioinformatics.ua.pt/coeus/. PMID:23244467

  11. Contextual and Conceptual Information Retrieval and Navigation on the Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Grand, Bénédicte; Aufaure, Marie-Aude; Soto, Michel

    The goal of this chapter is to propose a methodology and tools to enhance information retrieval and navigation on the Web through contextual and conceptual help. This methodology provides users with an extended navigation space by adding a conceptual and a semantic layer above Web data. The conceptual layer is made of Galois lattices which cluster Web pages into concepts according to their common features (in particular their textual content). These lattices represent the Global Conceptual Context of Web pages. An additional navigation layer is provided by ontologies which are connected to the conceptual level through specific concepts of the lattices. Users may navigate transparently within each of these three layers and go from one to another very easily.

  12. Silicon dendritic web material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D. L.; Campbell, R. B.; Sienkiewicz, L. J.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a low cost and reliable contact system for solar cells and the fabrication of several solar cell modules using ultrasonic bonding for the interconnection of cells and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material for module encapsulation are examined. The cells in the modules were made from dendritic web silicon. To reduce cost, the electroplated layer of silver was replaced with an electroplated layer of copper. The modules that were fabricated used the evaporated Ti, Pd, Ag and electroplated Cu (TiPdAg/Cu) system. Adherence of Ni to Si is improved if a nickel silicide can be formed by heat treatment. The effectiveness of Ni as a diffusion barrier to Cu and the ease with which nickel silicide is formed is discussed. The fabrication of three modules using dendritic web silicon and employing ultrasonic bonding for interconnecting calls and ethylene vinyl acetate as the potting material is examined.

  13. WebLogo

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2003-01-08

    WebLogo is a web based application designed to make the generation of sequence logos as easy and painless as possible. Sequesnce logos are a graphical representation of an amino acid or nucleic acid multiple sequence alignment developed by Tom Schneider and Mike Stephens. Each logo consists of stacks of symbols, one stack for each position in the sequence. The overall height of the stack indicates the sequence conservation at that position, while the height ofmore »symbols within the stack indicates the relative frequency of each amino or nucleic acid at that position. In general, a sequence logo provides a richer and more precise description of, for example, a binding site, than would a consensus sequence.« less

  14. Quantum computational webs

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, D.; Eisert, J.

    2010-10-15

    We discuss the notion of quantum computational webs: These are quantum states universal for measurement-based computation, which can be built up from a collection of simple primitives. The primitive elements--reminiscent of building blocks in a construction kit--are (i) one-dimensional states (computational quantum wires) with the power to process one logical qubit and (ii) suitable couplings, which connect the wires to a computationally universal web. All elements are preparable by nearest-neighbor interactions in a single pass, of the kind accessible in a number of physical architectures. We provide a complete classification of qubit wires, a physically well-motivated class of universal resources that can be fully understood. Finally, we sketch possible realizations in superlattices and explore the power of coupling mechanisms based on Ising or exchange interactions.

  15. NHANES Analysis Web Tutorials

    Cancer.gov

    Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) have provided unique opportunities to study major nutrition, infection, environmental, and chronic health conditions in the US. The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) makes NHANES datasets publicly available on its Web site. However, all NHANES users face similar challenges because of the complexity of NHANES' survey design and vast amount of information available in NHANES data.

  16. From webs to polylogarithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardi, Einan

    2014-04-01

    We compute a class of diagrams contributing to the multi-leg soft anomalous dimension through three loops, by renormalizing a product of semi-infinite non-lightlike Wilson lines in dimensional regularization. Using non-Abelian exponentiation we directly compute contributions to the exponent in terms of webs. We develop a general strategy to compute webs with multiple gluon exchanges between Wilson lines in configuration space, and explore their analytic structure in terms of ? ij , the exponential of the Minkowski cusp angle formed between the lines i and j. We show that beyond the obvious inversion symmetry ? ij ? 1 /? ij , at the level of the symbol the result also admits a crossing symmetry ? ij ? - ? ij , relating spacelike and timelike kinematics, and hence argue that in this class of webs the symbol alphabet is restricted to ? ij and . We carry out the calculation up to three gluons connecting four Wilson lines, finding that the contributions to the soft anomalous dimension are remarkably simple: they involve pure functions of uniform weight, which are written as a sum of products of polylogarithms, each depending on a single cusp angle. We conjecture that this type of factorization extends to all multiple-gluon-exchange contributions to the anomalous dimension.

  17. Users' Perceptions of the Web As Revealed by Transaction Log Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moukdad, Haidar; Large, Andrew

    2001-01-01

    Describes the results of a transaction log analysis of a Web search engine, WebCrawler, to analyze user's queries for information retrieval. Results suggest most users do not employ advanced search features, and the linguistic structure often resembles a human-human communication model that is not always successful in human-computer communication.…

  18. Users' Perceptions of the Web As Revealed by Transaction Log Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moukdad, Haidar; Large, Andrew

    2001-01-01

    Describes the results of a transaction log analysis of a Web search engine, WebCrawler, to analyze user's queries for information retrieval. Results suggest most users do not employ advanced search features, and the linguistic structure often resembles a human-human communication model that is not always successful in human-computer communication.…

  19. GIF versus JPEG: Choosing a Graphics Compression Format for Web Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, Scott

    1998-01-01

    Explains GIF and JPEG formats for computer graphics to help Web page creators make an informed decision when selecting a format for each graphic in a Web publication. Highlights include compressing and decompressing computer images; image quality, including color; special features, including animation; and file size. (Author/LRW)

  20. Text Categorization Based on K-Nearest Neighbor Approach for Web Site Classification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Oh-Woog; Lee, Jong-Hyeok

    2003-01-01

    Discusses text categorization and Web site classification and proposes a three-step classification system that includes the use of Web pages linked with the home page. Highlights include the k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) approach; improving performance with a feature selection method and a term weighting scheme using HTML tags; and similarity…

  1. Testing the Competition: Usability of Commercial Information Sites Compared to Academic Library Web Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, Tiffini Anne; Norlin, Elaina

    2002-01-01

    This usability study examines how students use electronic research libraries such as Questia, which has been designed to replace traditional libraries, and compares it with large university library Web sites. Suggests that design features incorporated by Web site designers can drastically affect the success of students doing research. (Author/LRW)

  2. Synchronous Distance Education: Using Web-Conferencing in an MBA Accounting Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellingson, Dee Ann; Notbohm, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Online distance education can take many forms, from a correspondence course with materials online to fully synchronous, live instruction. This paper describes a fully synchronous, live format using web-conferencing. Some useful features of web-conferencing and the way they are employed in this course are described. Instructor observations and…

  3. ProBiS-2012: web server and web services for detection of structurally similar binding sites in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Konc, Janez; Janeži?, Dušanka

    2012-01-01

    The ProBiS web server is a web server for detection of structurally similar binding sites in the PDB and for local pairwise alignment of protein structures. In this article, we present a new version of the ProBiS web server that is 10 times faster than earlier versions, due to the efficient parallelization of the ProBiS algorithm, which now allows significantly faster comparison of a protein query against the PDB and reduces the calculation time for scanning the entire PDB from hours to minutes. It also features new web services, and an improved user interface. In addition, the new web server is united with the ProBiS-Database and thus provides instant access to pre-calculated protein similarity profiles for over 29?000 non-redundant protein structures. The ProBiS web server is particularly adept at detection of secondary binding sites in proteins. It is freely available at http://probis.cmm.ki.si/old-version, and the new ProBiS web server is at http://probis.cmm.ki.si. PMID:22600737

  4. ProBiS-2012: web server and web services for detection of structurally similar binding sites in proteins.

    PubMed

    Konc, Janez; Janezic, Dusanka

    2012-07-01

    The ProBiS web server is a web server for detection of structurally similar binding sites in the PDB and for local pairwise alignment of protein structures. In this article, we present a new version of the ProBiS web server that is 10 times faster than earlier versions, due to the efficient parallelization of the ProBiS algorithm, which now allows significantly faster comparison of a protein query against the PDB and reduces the calculation time for scanning the entire PDB from hours to minutes. It also features new web services, and an improved user interface. In addition, the new web server is united with the ProBiS-Database and thus provides instant access to pre-calculated protein similarity profiles for over 29?000 non-redundant protein structures. The ProBiS web server is particularly adept at detection of secondary binding sites in proteins. It is freely available at http://probis.cmm.ki.si/old-version, and the new ProBiS web server is at http://probis.cmm.ki.si. PMID:22600737

  5. Environmental controls on food web regimes: A fluvial perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Mary E.

    2006-02-01

    Because food web regimes control the biomass of primary producers (e.g., plants or algae), intermediate consumers (e.g., invertebrates), and large top predators (tuna, killer whales), they are of societal as well as academic interest. Some controls over food web regimes may be internal, but many are mediated by conditions or fluxes over large spatial scales. To understand locally observed changes in food webs, we must learn more about how environmental gradients and boundaries affect the fluxes of energy, materials, or organisms through landscapes or seascapes that influence local species interactions. Marine biologists and oceanographers have overcome formidable challenges of fieldwork on the high seas to make remarkable progress towards this goal. In river drainage networks, we have opportunities to address similar questions at smaller spatial scales, in ecosystems with clear physical structure and organization. Despite these advantages, we still have much to learn about linkages between fluxes from watershed landscapes and local food webs in river networks. Longitudinal (downstream) gradients in productivity, disturbance regimes, and habitat structure exert strong effects on the organisms and energy sources of river food webs, but their effects on species interactions are just beginning to be explored. In fluid ecosystems with less obvious physical structure, like the open ocean, discerning features that control the movement of organisms and affect food web dynamics is even more challenging. In both habitats, new sensing, tracing and mapping technologies have revealed how landscape or seascape features (e.g., watershed divides, ocean fronts or circulation cells) channel, contain or concentrate organisms, energy and materials. Field experiments and direct in situ observations of basic natural history, however, remain as vital as ever in interpreting the responses of biota to these features. We need field data that quantify the many spatial and temporal scales of functional relationships that link environments, fluxes and food web interactions to understand how they will respond to intensifying anthropogenic forcing over the coming decades.

  6. Matching Alternative Addresses: a Semantic Web Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariannamazi, S.; Karimipour, F.; Hakimpour, F.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid development of crowd-sourcing or volunteered geographic information (VGI) provides opportunities for authoritatives that deal with geospatial information. Heterogeneity of multiple data sources and inconsistency of data types is a key characteristics of VGI datasets. The expansion of cities resulted in the growing number of POIs in the OpenStreetMap, a well-known VGI source, which causes the datasets to outdate in short periods of time. These changes made to spatial and aspatial attributes of features such as names and addresses might cause confusion or ambiguity in the processes that require feature's literal information like addressing and geocoding. VGI sources neither will conform specific vocabularies nor will remain in a specific schema for a long period of time. As a result, the integration of VGI sources is crucial and inevitable in order to avoid duplication and the waste of resources. Information integration can be used to match features and qualify different annotation alternatives for disambiguation. This study enhances the search capabilities of geospatial tools with applications able to understand user terminology to pursuit an efficient way for finding desired results. Semantic web is a capable tool for developing technologies that deal with lexical and numerical calculations and estimations. There are a vast amount of literal-spatial data representing the capability of linguistic information in knowledge modeling, but these resources need to be harmonized based on Semantic Web standards. The process of making addresses homogenous generates a helpful tool based on spatial data integration and lexical annotation matching and disambiguating.

  7. Real-time medical collaboration services over the web.

    PubMed

    Andrikos, Christos; Rassias, Georgios; Tsanakas, Panayiotis; Maglogiannis, Ilias

    2015-08-01

    The gradual shift in modern medical practice, from working alone clinical doctors to MDTs (Multi-Disciplinary Teams), raises the need of online real-time collaboration among geographically distributed medical personnel. The paper presents a Web-based platform, featuring an efficient medical data management and exchange, for hosting real-time collaborative services. The presented work leverages state-of-the-art features of the web (technologies and APIs) to support client-side medical data processing. Moreover, to address the typical bandwidth bottleneck and known scalability issues of centralized data sharing, an indirect RPC (Remote Process Call) scheme is introduced through object synchronization over the WebRTC paradigm. PMID:26736529

  8. Promoting Teachers' Positive Attitude towards Web Use: A Study in Web Site Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akpinar, Yavuz; Bayramoglu, Yusuf

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine effects of a compact training for developing web sites on teachers' web attitude, as composed of: web self efficacy, perceived web enjoyment, perceived web usefulness and behavioral intention to use the web. To measure the related constructs, the Web Attitude Scale was adapted into Turkish and tested with a…

  9. Efficient Web Services Policy Combination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatan, Farrokh; Harman, Joseph G.

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale Web security systems usually involve cooperation between domains with non-identical policies. The network management and Web communication software used by the different organizations presents a stumbling block. Many of the tools used by the various divisions do not have the ability to communicate network management data with each other. At best, this means that manual human intervention into the communication protocols used at various network routers and endpoints is required. Developing practical, sound, and automated ways to compose policies to bridge these differences is a long-standing problem. One of the key subtleties is the need to deal with inconsistencies and defaults where one organization proposes a rule on a particular feature, and another has a different rule or expresses no rule. A general approach is to assign priorities to rules and observe the rules with the highest priorities when there are conflicts. The present methods have inherent inefficiency, which heavily restrict their practical applications. A new, efficient algorithm combines policies utilized for Web services. The method is based on an algorithm that allows an automatic and scalable composition of security policies between multiple organizations. It is based on defeasible policy composition, a promising approach for finding conflicts and resolving priorities between rules. In the general case, policy negotiation is an intractable problem. A promising method, suggested in the literature, is when policies are represented in defeasible logic, and composition is based on rules for non-monotonic inference. In this system, policy writers construct metapolicies describing both the policy that they wish to enforce and annotations describing their composition preferences. These annotations can indicate whether certain policy assertions are required by the policy writer or, if not, under what circumstances the policy writer is willing to compromise and allow other assertions to take precedence. Meta-policies are specified in defeasible logic, a computationally efficient non-monotonic logic developed to model human reasoning. One drawback of this method is that at one point the algorithm starts an exhaustive search of all subsets of the set of conclusions of a defeasible theory. Although the propositional defeasible logic has linear complexity, the set of conclusions here may be large, especially in real-life practical cases. This phenomenon leads to an inefficient exponential explosion of complexity. The current process of getting a Web security policy from combination of two meta-policies consists of two steps. The first is generating a new meta-policy that is a composition of the input meta-policies, and the second is mapping the meta-policy onto a security policy. The new algorithm avoids the exhaustive search in the current algorithm, and provides a security policy that matches all requirements of the involved metapolicies.

  10. A Web-based Multi-user Interactive Visualization System For Large-Scale Computing Using Google Web Toolkit Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, R. M.; McLane, J. C.; Yuen, D. A.; Wang, S.

    2009-12-01

    We have created a web-based, interactive system for multi-user collaborative visualization of large data sets (on the order of terabytes) that allows users in geographically disparate locations to simultaneous and collectively visualize large data sets over the Internet. By leveraging asynchronous java and XML (AJAX) web development paradigms via the Google Web Toolkit (http://code.google.com/webtoolkit/), we are able to provide remote, web-based users a web portal to LCSE's (http://www.lcse.umn.edu) large-scale interactive visualization system already in place at the University of Minnesota that provides high resolution visualizations to the order of 15 million pixels by Megan Damon. In the current version of our software, we have implemented a new, highly extensible back-end framework built around HTTP "server push" technology to provide a rich collaborative environment and a smooth end-user experience. Furthermore, the web application is accessible via a variety of devices including netbooks, iPhones, and other web- and javascript-enabled cell phones. New features in the current version include: the ability for (1) users to launch multiple visualizations, (2) a user to invite one or more other users to view their visualization in real-time (multiple observers), (3) users to delegate control aspects of the visualization to others (multiple controllers) , and (4) engage in collaborative chat and instant messaging with other users within the user interface of the web application. We will explain choices made regarding implementation, overall system architecture and method of operation, and the benefits of an extensible, modular design. We will also discuss future goals, features, and our plans for increasing scalability of the system which includes a discussion of the benefits potentially afforded us by a migration of server-side components to the Google Application Engine (http://code.google.com/appengine/).

  11. GCLR Web Seminars as a Venue for Transformative Educational Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angay-Crowder, Tuba; Albers, Peggy; Pace, Christi L.; Jung, Jin Kyeong Frances; Hwang, Ju A.; Pang, Myoung Eun

    2014-01-01

    This article features a discussion about the significance of global perspectives in shaping critical literacy through a web seminar project, Global Conversations in Literacy Research (GCLR). Ubiquitous media and worldwide communication via Internet change the perceptions about literacy and language, urging critical discussions around literacy…

  12. Colleges Get Free Web Pages but with a Catch: Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenstyk, Goldie

    1999-01-01

    Striving to streamline student services and improve electronic communication, colleges and universities are signing on with companies that offer sophisticated World Wide Web sites through which students can accomplish basic administrative functions and receive information. The sites are often free of charge but also feature advertising messages…

  13. GCLR Web Seminars as a Venue for Transformative Educational Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angay-Crowder, Tuba; Albers, Peggy; Pace, Christi L.; Jung, Jin Kyeong Frances; Hwang, Ju A.; Pang, Myoung Eun

    2014-01-01

    This article features a discussion about the significance of global perspectives in shaping critical literacy through a web seminar project, Global Conversations in Literacy Research (GCLR). Ubiquitous media and worldwide communication via Internet change the perceptions about literacy and language, urging critical discussions around literacy…

  14. "Just the Answers, Please": Choosing a Web Search Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Presents guidelines for selecting World Wide Web search engines. Real-life questions were used to test six search engines. Queries sought company information, product reviews, medical information, foreign information, technical reports, and current events. Compares performance and features of AltaVista, Excite, HotBot, Infoseek, Lycos, and Open…

  15. Colleges Get Free Web Pages but with a Catch: Advertising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenstyk, Goldie

    1999-01-01

    Striving to streamline student services and improve electronic communication, colleges and universities are signing on with companies that offer sophisticated World Wide Web sites through which students can accomplish basic administrative functions and receive information. The sites are often free of charge but also feature advertising messages…

  16. Large-area sheet task advanced dendritic web growth development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    Modeling in the development of low stress configurations for wide web growth is presented. Parametric sensitivity to identify design features which can be used for dynamic trimming of the furnace element was studied. Temperature measurements of experimental growth behavior led to modification in the growth system to improve lateral temperature distributions.

  17. "Just the Answers, Please": Choosing a Web Search Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Presents guidelines for selecting World Wide Web search engines. Real-life questions were used to test six search engines. Queries sought company information, product reviews, medical information, foreign information, technical reports, and current events. Compares performance and features of AltaVista, Excite, HotBot, Infoseek, Lycos, and Open…

  18. An Efficient Web Page Ranking for Semantic Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chahal, P.; Singh, M.; Kumar, S.

    2014-01-01

    With the enormous amount of information presented on the web, the retrieval of relevant information has become a serious problem and is also the topic of research for last few years. The most common tools to retrieve information from web are search engines like Google. The Search engines are usually based on keyword searching and indexing of web pages. This approach is not very efficient as the result-set of web pages obtained include large irrelevant pages. Sometimes even the entire result-set may contain lot of irrelevant pages for the user. The next generation of search engines must address this problem. Recently, many semantic web search engines have been developed like Ontolook, Swoogle, which help in searching meaningful documents presented on semantic web. In this process the ranking of the retrieved web pages is very crucial. Some attempts have been made in ranking of semantic web pages but still the ranking of these semantic web documents is neither satisfactory and nor up to the user's expectations. In this paper we have proposed a semantic web based document ranking scheme that relies not only on the keywords but also on the conceptual instances present between the keywords. As a result only the relevant page will be on the top of the result-set of searched web pages. We explore all relevant relations between the keywords exploring the user's intention and then calculate the fraction of these relations on each web page to determine their relevance. We have found that this ranking technique gives better results than those by the prevailing methods.

  19. Multimedia indexing over the Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnew, Brent; Faloutsos, Christos; Wang, Zhenyu; Welch, Donald J.; Xue, Xiaogang

    1997-01-01

    There has been work on database systems that can retrieve multimedia objects by their content. We are extending this work by using the World Wide Web as source and storage for multimedia objects much like current text search engines do for textual information. A system that can access all types of multimedia objects by their content is a formidable task and improvements are constantly being made to indexing techniques. We have taken an important first step in demonstrating the viability of this technique while laying the groundwork for a larger, more capable system. We have implemented a simple indexing scheme while concentrating on building the infrastructure to support this system. Our system can retrieve references to images on the WWW, index those images, and store those images using spatial access methods. We then use query by example to find a set of images on the WWW that resemble our query image. Due to its design, it is easy to include additional context features, to substitute different indexing schemes, and add other types of multimedia to our system like time sequences, voice and video.

  20. Goal-Directed Planning for Sensor Webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, R.; Dungan, J. L.; Khatib, L.; Votava, P.

    2007-12-01

    An Earth-observing sensor web is an organization of space, airborne, or in situ sensing devices for collecting measurements of the Earth's processes. Sensor web coordination involves formulating Earth science goals and transforming them into sensor web workflows, i.e., sequences of data acquisition and processing tasks that satisfy the specified goals. Automating parts of this process using recent advances in intelligent control software technology will offer improved sensor web effectiveness. Our approach to the coordination problem applies architectural concepts of workflow management systems by identifying two phases in workflow generation. In the first phase, users formulate high-level campaign goals that are automatically transformed into abstract workflow plans. An abstract workflow plan represents the organization of data acquisition and processing actions that fulfills the goals specified by the user, but leaves out details such as how requests for access to a data resource are formatted. Abstracting away these details improves the usability of sensor web resources by scientists. To implement the first phase, we utilize the Labeled Transition System Analyzer (LTSA), a model-checking software tool. LTSA contains a concise process-based language, FSP (Finite State Processes) for designing and modeling software programs. We will use LTSA and FSP to automate the process of building executable plans for accessing resources on a sensor web. FSP has the constructs for representing conditional dependencies, iterations, and parallel actions, all of which are common features in Earth science campaigns. The second phase of the process consists of the automatic transformation of an abstract plan into a concrete plan, i.e., a sequence of actions that can be autonomously executed on a sensor web. The transformation in phase two might require further decomposition of actions in the abstract plan into a sequence of lower-level data acquisition requests. It may also involve the selection of resources to accomplish a given action and the representation of data acquisition tasks in a format that is recognized by the targeted resource (e.g. a sensor control command or a data archive query). The second phase relies on a service-layer information infrastructure for accessing sensor web resources. Standardizing requirements for such a service layer through the Open Geospatial Consortium Sensor Web Enablement (OGC/SWE) effort should allow access to numerous and diverse sensor web resources. For the purpose of demonstrating a prototype of our workflow management concepts, our system currently utilizes a simpler information infrastructure layer for servicing requests. This layer controls access to TOPS (Terrestrial Observation and Prediction System), a modeling software system that brings together technologies in information technology, weather/climate forecasting, ecosystem modeling, and satellite remote sensing to enhance management decisions related to floods, droughts, forest fires, human health, and crop, range, and forest production. We provide examples of concrete plans for accessing TOPS data and modeling resources and how they are generated from abstract plans.

  1. On the Nets. Comparing Web Browsers: Mosaic, Cello, Netscape, WinWeb and InternetWorks Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notess, Greg R.

    1995-01-01

    World Wide Web browsers are compared by speed, setup, hypertext transport protocol (HTTP) handling, management of file transfer protocol (FTP), telnet, gopher, and wide area information server (WAIS); bookmark options; and communication functions. Netscape has the most features, the fastest retrieval, sophisticated bookmark capabilities. (JMV)

  2. Collaborative Writing Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yong Mei Fung

    2010-01-01

    As part of a research study on collaborative writing, this paper discusses defining and facilitating features that occur during face-to-face collaboration, based on the literature and research. The defining features are mutual interaction, negotiations, conflict, and shared expertise. Facilitating features include affective factors, use of L1,…

  3. Genetic toxicology: web resources.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert R

    2002-04-25

    Genetic toxicology is the scientific discipline dealing with the effects of chemical, physical and biological agents on the heredity of living organisms. The Internet offers a wide range of online digital resources for the field of Genetic Toxicology. The history of genetic toxicology and electronic data collections are reviewed. Web-based resources at US National Library of Medicine (NLM), including MEDLINE, PUBMED, Gateway, Entrez, and TOXNET, are discussed. Search strategies and Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) are reviewed in the context of genetic toxicology. The TOXNET group of databases are discussed with emphasis on those databases with genetic toxicology content including GENE-TOX, TOXLINE, Hazardous Substances Data Bank, Integrated Risk Information System, and Chemical Carcinogenesis Research Information System. Location of chemical information including chemical structure and linkage to health and regulatory information using CHEMIDPLUS at NLM and other databases is reviewed. Various government agencies have active genetic toxicology research programs or use genetic toxicology data to assist fulfilling the agency's mission. Online resources at the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences, and the National Toxicology Program (NTP) are outlined. Much of the genetic toxicology for pharmaceuticals, industrial chemicals and pesticides that is performed in the world is regulatory-driven. Regulatory web resources are presented for the laws mandating testing, guidelines on study design, Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations, and requirements for electronic data collection and reporting. The Internet provides a range of other supporting resources to the field of genetic toxicology. The web links for key professional societies and journals in genetic toxicology are listed. Distance education, educational media resources, and job placement services are also available online in the field of genetic toxicology. As molecular biology and computational tools improve, new areas within genetic toxicology such as structural activity relationship analysis, mutational spectra databases and toxicogenomics, now have resources online as well. PMID:11955688

  4. Location-based Web Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlers, Dirk; Boll, Susanne

    In recent years, the relation of Web information to a physical location has gained much attention. However, Web content today often carries only an implicit relation to a location. In this chapter, we present a novel location-based search engine that automatically derives spatial context from unstructured Web resources and allows for location-based search: our focused crawler applies heuristics to crawl and analyze Web pages that have a high probability of carrying a spatial relation to a certain region or place; the location extractor identifies the actual location information from the pages; our indexer assigns a geo-context to the pages and makes them available for a later spatial Web search. We illustrate the usage of our spatial Web search for location-based applications that provide information not only right-in-time but also right-on-the-spot.

  5. Vocal characteristics of congenital anterior glottic webs in children: A case report.

    PubMed

    Shah, Jay; White, Katherine; Dohar, Joseph

    2015-06-01

    This case report describes a 5-year-old girl with chronic dysphonia and high-pitched voice since birth. Vocal quality was noted to be harsh. Videostroboscopy revealed significant hyperfunction and a Type II congenital anterior glottic web. Endoscopic division of the anterior glottic web was performed with significant improvement in vocal quality and quality of life. This paper describes methods of analyzing, diagnosing, and treating anterior glottic web with a focus on quality of life. Also, unique acoustic and aerodynamic voice features are identified. No other descriptions of a voice characteristic for anterior glottic web currently exist in the literature. PMID:25912682

  6. Web services in the U.S. geological survey streamstats web application

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guthrie, J.D.; Dartiguenave, C.; Ries, Kernell G., III

    2009-01-01

    StreamStats is a U.S. Geological Survey Web-based GIS application developed as a tool for waterresources planning and management, engineering design, and other applications. StreamStats' primary functionality allows users to obtain drainage-basin boundaries, basin characteristics, and streamflow statistics for gaged and ungaged sites. Recently, Web services have been developed that provide the capability to remote users and applications to access comprehensive GIS tools that are available in StreamStats, including delineating drainage-basin boundaries, computing basin characteristics, estimating streamflow statistics for user-selected locations, and determining point features that coincide with a National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) reach address. For the state of Kentucky, a web service also has been developed that provides users the ability to estimate daily time series of drainage-basin average values of daily precipitation and temperature. The use of web services allows the user to take full advantage of the datasets and processes behind the Stream Stats application without having to develop and maintain them. ?? 2009 IEEE.

  7. IDL Grid Web Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massimino, P.; Costa, A.

    2008-08-01

    Image Data Language is a software for data analysis, visualization and cross-platform application development. The potentiality of IDL is well-known in the academic scientific world, especially in the astronomical environment where thousands of procedures are developed by using IDL. The typical use of IDL is the interactive mode but it is also possible to run IDL programs that do not require any interaction with the user, submitting them in batch or background modality. Through the interactive mode the user immediately receives images or other data produced in the running phase of the program; in batch or background mode, the user will have to wait for the end of the program, sometime for many hours or days to obtain images or data that IDL produced as output: in fact in Grid environment it is possible to access to or retrieve data only after completion of the program. The work that we present gives flexibility to IDL procedures submitted to the Grid computer infrastructure. For this purpose we have developed an IDL Grid Web Portal to allow the user to access the Grid and to submit IDL programs granting a full job control and the access to images and data generated during the running phase, without waiting for their completion. We have used the PHP technology and we have given the same level of security that Grid normally offers to its users. In this way, when the user notices that the intermediate program results are not those expected, he can stop the job, change the parameters to better satisfy the computational algorithm and resubmit the program, without consuming the CPU time and other Grid resources. The IDL Grid Web Portal allows you to obtain IDL generated images, graphics and data tables by using a normal browser. All conversations from the user and the Grid resources occur via Web, as well as authentication phases. The IDL user has not to change the program source much because the Portal will automatically introduce the appropriate modification before submitting the IDL program to the Grid. When the user wishes, he will be able to check the status of his program and outputs, if any, because the Portal will assign the users a specific and univocal session identification number. This Web portal runs in the Trinacria Grid Virtual Laboratory and fully exploits the power of this grid in terms of CPU and data storage.

  8. Inflation in a web

    SciTech Connect

    Li Sheng; Piao Yunsong; Liu Yang

    2009-12-15

    In a given path with multiple branches, in principle, it can be expected that there are some fork points, where one branch is bifurcated into different branches, or various branches converge into one or several branches. In this paper, it is shown that if there is a web formed by such branches in a given field space, in which each branch can be responsible for a period of slow roll inflation, a multiverse separated by a domain wall network will come into being, some of which might correspond to our observable universe. We discuss this scenario and show possible observations of a given observer at late time.

  9. Brane webs and random processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Amer; Qureshi, Babar A.; Shabbir, Khurram; Shehper, Muhammad A.

    2015-11-01

    We study (p, q) 5-brane webs dual to certain N M5-brane configurations and show that the partition function of these brane webs gives rise to cylindric Schur process with period N. This generalizes the previously studied case of period 1. We also show that open string amplitudes corresponding to these brane webs are captured by the generating function of cylindric plane partitions with profile determined by the boundary conditions imposed on the open string amplitudes.

  10. Enhancing Data Interoperability with Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, S. R.; Zimble, D. A.; Wang, W.; Herring, D.; Halpert, M.

    2014-12-01

    In an effort to improve data access and interoperability of climate and weather data, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Climate.gov and Climate Prediction Center (CPC) are exploring various platform solutions to enhance a user's ability to locate, preview, and acquire the data. The Climate.gov and CPC data team faces multiple challenges including the various kinds of data and formats, inconsistency of metadata records, variety of data service implementations, very large volumes of data and geographically distributed locations. We have created the Data Access and Interoperability project to design a web-based platform, where interoperability between systems can be leveraged to allow greater data discovery, access, visualization and delivery. In the interoperable data platform, systems can integrate with each other to support the synthesis of climate and weather data. Interoperability is the ability for users to discover the available climate and weather data, preview and interact with the data, and acquire the data in common digital formats through a simple web-based interface. The goal of the interoperable data platform is to leverage existing web services, implement the established standards and integrate with existing solutions across the earth sciences domain instead of creating new technologies. Towards this effort to improve the interoperability of the platform, we are collaborating with ESRI Inc. to provide climate and weather data via web services. In this presentation, we will discuss and demonstrate how to use ArcGIS to author RESTful based scientific web services using open standards. These web services are able to encapsulate the logic required to handle and describe scientific data through a variety of service types including, image, map, feature, geoprocessing, and their respective service methods. Combining these types of services and leveraging well-documented APIs, including the ArcGIS JavaScript API, we can afford to focus our attention on the design and development of user-friendly maps and apps. As a use case scenario, we will demonstrate the maps and apps that we developed as prototypes for CPC Climate Forecast System (CFSv2) products including Total Monthly Sea Ice Concentration that were built to improve the user's overall experience.

  11. Mobyle: a new full web bioinformatics framework

    PubMed Central

    Néron, Bertrand; Ménager, Hervé; Maufrais, Corinne; Joly, Nicolas; Maupetit, Julien; Letort, Sébastien; Carrere, Sébastien; Tuffery, Pierre; Letondal, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: For the biologist, running bioinformatics analyses involves a time-consuming management of data and tools. Users need support to organize their work, retrieve parameters and reproduce their analyses. They also need to be able to combine their analytic tools using a safe data flow software mechanism. Finally, given that scientific tools can be difficult to install, it is particularly helpful for biologists to be able to use these tools through a web user interface. However, providing a web interface for a set of tools raises the problem that a single web portal cannot offer all the existing and possible services: it is the user, again, who has to cope with data copy among a number of different services. A framework enabling portal administrators to build a network of cooperating services would therefore clearly be beneficial. Results: We have designed a system, Mobyle, to provide a flexible and usable Web environment for defining and running bioinformatics analyses. It embeds simple yet powerful data management features that allow the user to reproduce analyses and to combine tools using a hierarchical typing system. Mobyle offers invocation of services distributed over remote Mobyle servers, thus enabling a federated network of curated bioinformatics portals without the user having to learn complex concepts or to install sophisticated software. While being focused on the end user, the Mobyle system also addresses the need, for the bioinfomatician, to automate remote services execution: PlayMOBY is a companion tool that automates the publication of BioMOBY web services, using Mobyle program definitions. Availability: The Mobyle system is distributed under the terms of the GNU GPLv2 on the project web site (http://bioweb2.pasteur.fr/projects/mobyle/). It is already deployed on three servers: http://mobyle.pasteur.fr, http://mobyle.rpbs.univ-paris-diderot.fr and http://lipm-bioinfo.toulouse.inra.fr/Mobyle. The PlayMOBY companion is distributed under the terms of the CeCILL license, and is available at http://lipm-bioinfo.toulouse.inra.fr/biomoby/PlayMOBY/. Contact: mobyle-support@pasteur.fr; mobyle-support@rpbs.univ-paris-diderot.fr; letondal@pasteur.fr Supplementary information:Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19689959

  12. The Noonan Syndrome--A Review of the Clinical and Genetic Features of 27 Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Edith; Turner, Gillian

    1973-01-01

    Reviewed were clinical and genetic features of 27 cases of the Noonan Syndrome, a condition with characteristics such as webbing of the neck, short stature, frequent congential heart lesions, and chromosomal irregularities. (DB)

  13. Tele diagnostic by web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Shigeki

    2006-03-01

    Because of the development of multimedia technologies like Web and Internet, it now becomes possible to think about Tele Medicine and Tele Diagnostic for a distant place where no doctors and no nurses are situated at or are available. And also some kind of intelligence can be added onto them, which makes possible to give certain kind of medical treatment assistance or suggestions for a patient from a computer diagnostic base through the Internetworking. For doing this, here considers about a basic system of "Tele Diagnostic for a remote place" where it dose not have a doctor and a medical assistance. In order to implement the system, JAVA, VRML, HTML, and CORTONA are used as a basic language and a viewer. And also in order to add a kind of intelligence, Augmented Knowledge In Agent (AKIA) by using Back Propagation Neural Networks (BPNN) is used. And by this study, here can introduce the system that has the following basic mechanisms; By inputting physical data like temperature or blood pressure, the system would show a diagnostic assistance by TEXT. And also the bad place of body would be shown graphically if there were any. The system can be put onto Web, so that anybody could have this assistance at any place ubiquitously only if a person has Internetworking access.

  14. FPA Depot - Web Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avila, Edwin M. Martinez; Muniz, Ricardo; Szafran, Jamie; Dalton, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Lines of code (LOC) analysis is one of the methods used to measure programmer productivity and estimate schedules of programming projects. The Launch Control System (LCS) had previously used this method to estimate the amount of work and to plan development efforts. The disadvantage of using LOC as a measure of effort is that one can only measure 30% to 35% of the total effort of software projects involves coding [8]. In the application, instead of using the LOC we are using function point for a better estimation of hours in each software to develop. Because of these disadvantages, Jamie Szafran of the System Software Branch of Control And Data Systems (NE-C3) at Kennedy Space Canter developed a web application called Function Point Analysis (FPA) Depot. The objective of this web application is that the LCS software architecture team can use the data to more accurately estimate the effort required to implement customer requirements. This paper describes the evolution of the domain model used for function point analysis as project managers continually strive to generate more accurate estimates.

  15. Web Accessibility--Does Your Web Site Make the Grade?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Melanie O.

    2004-01-01

    Web sites today should meet Web accessibility guidelines to comply with a host of regulations and guidelines for people with disabilities. Recent estimates state that 20% of the U.S. population has a disability and that 10% of the on-line population is disabled. Our aging population also experiences similar issues. This session will help you…

  16. Work of the Web Weavers: Web Development in Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundza, Maira; Vander Meer, Patricia Fravel; Perez-Stable, Maria A.

    2009-01-01

    Although the library's Web site has become a standard tool for seeking information and conducting research in academic institutions, there are a variety of ways libraries approach the often challenging--and sometimes daunting--process of Web site development and maintenance. Three librarians at Western Michigan University explored issues related…

  17. Bringing Web 2.0 to Web Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketterl, Markus; Mertens, Robert; Vornberger, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: At many universities, web lectures have become an integral part of the e-learning portfolio over the last few years. While many aspects of the technology involved, like automatic recording techniques or innovative interfaces for replay, have evolved at a rapid pace, web lecturing has remained independent of other important developments…

  18. Science on the Web: Web Activities Using Scientific Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poppe, Barbara; McAlister, Deborah; Richardson, Lisa

    This guide is intended to help teachers learn about using special software tools for the World Wide Web. It makes use of the scientific data produced by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and other government agencies. Activities in this booklet include: (1) "Finding People in Cyberspace"; (2) "Finding Science on the Web";…

  19. Endoscopic Web Localization for Laparoscopic Duodenal Web Excision.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Nicholas E; Gibbons, Alexander T; Wyneski, Matthew J; Ponsky, Todd A

    2015-12-01

    When performing an open duodenal web excision, it is helpful to identify the web using a nasogastric tube because it is often difficult to determine where the web origin is located when looking at the serosal side of the bowel. However, it may be challenging to navigate the nasogastric tube to the web during laparoscopy. We present a novel technique that utilizes intraoperative endoscopy to precisely identify the location of the duodenal web, facilitating laparoscopic excision. Intraoperative endoscopy was implemented in the case of a 3-month-old boy undergoing laparoscopic excision of a duodenal web. With endoscopic visualization and transillumination, the duodenal web was precisely identified and excised laparoscopically. A supplemental video of the case presentation and technique is provided in the online version of this manuscript (Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/SLE/A134). The procedure was completed successfully and the patient did well postoperatively. Flexible endoscopy is a useful adjunct for duodenal web localization during laparoscopy, improving on the previous method of estimating the location based on a change in duodenal caliber. PMID:26551236

  20. Bringing Web 2.0 to Web Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketterl, Markus; Mertens, Robert; Vornberger, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: At many universities, web lectures have become an integral part of the e-learning portfolio over the last few years. While many aspects of the technology involved, like automatic recording techniques or innovative interfaces for replay, have evolved at a rapid pace, web lecturing has remained independent of other important developments…

  1. Work of the Web Weavers: Web Development in Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundza, Maira; Vander Meer, Patricia Fravel; Perez-Stable, Maria A.

    2009-01-01

    Although the library's Web site has become a standard tool for seeking information and conducting research in academic institutions, there are a variety of ways libraries approach the often challenging--and sometimes daunting--process of Web site development and maintenance. Three librarians at Western Michigan University explored issues related…

  2. Metadata for Web Resources: How Metadata Works on the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Martin

    This paper discusses bibliographic control of knowledge resources on the World Wide Web. The first section sets the context of the inquiry. The second section covers the following topics related to metadata: (1) definitions of metadata, including metadata as tags and as descriptors; (2) metadata on the Web, including general metadata systems,…

  3. Gauging the Success of Your Web Site

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsborough, Reid

    2005-01-01

    Web analytics is a way to measure and optimize Web site performance, says Jason Burby, director of Web analytics for ZAAZ Inc., a Web design and development firm in Seattle with a countrywide client base. He compares it to using Evite, which is a useful, free web service that makes it easy to send out party and other invitations and,…

  4. Methodologies for Crawler Based Web Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thelwall, Mike

    2002-01-01

    Describes Web survey methodologies used to study the content of the Web, and discusses search engines and the concept of crawling the Web. Highlights include Web page selection methodologies; obstacles to reliable automatic indexing of Web sites; publicly indexable pages; crawling parameters; and tests for file duplication. (Contains 62…

  5. Gauging the Success of Your Web Site

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsborough, Reid

    2005-01-01

    Web analytics is a way to measure and optimize Web site performance, says Jason Burby, director of Web analytics for ZAAZ Inc., a Web design and development firm in Seattle with a countrywide client base. He compares it to using Evite, which is a useful, free web service that makes it easy to send out party and other invitations and,…

  6. WebGLORE: a Web service for Grid LOgistic REgression

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wenchao; Li, Pinghao; Wang, Shuang; Wu, Yuan; Xue, Meng; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Jiang, Xiaoqian

    2013-01-01

    WebGLORE is a free web service that enables privacy-preserving construction of a global logistic regression model from distributed datasets that are sensitive. It only transfers aggregated local statistics (from participants) through Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure to a trusted server, where the global model is synthesized. WebGLORE seamlessly integrates AJAX, JAVA Applet/Servlet and PHP technologies to provide an easy-to-use web service for biomedical researchers to break down policy barriers during information exchange. Availability and implementation: http://dbmi-engine.ucsd.edu/webglore3/. WebGLORE can be used under the terms of GNU general public license as published by the Free Software Foundation. Contact: x1jiang@ucsd.edu PMID:24072732

  7. Web Search Studies: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Web Search Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, Michael

    Perhaps the most significant tool of our internet age is the web search engine, providing a powerful interface for accessing the vast amount of information available on the world wide web and beyond. While still in its infancy compared to the knowledge tools that precede it - such as the dictionary or encyclopedia - the impact of web search engines on society and culture has already received considerable attention from a variety of academic disciplines and perspectives. This article aims to organize a meta-discipline of “web search studies,” centered around a nucleus of major research on web search engines from five key perspectives: technical foundations and evaluations; transaction log analyses; user studies; political, ethical, and cultural critiques; and legal and policy analyses.

  8. What medical educators need to know about "Web 2.0".

    PubMed

    McGee, James B; Begg, Michael

    2008-01-01

    "Web 2.0" describes a collection of web-based technologies which share a user-focused approach to design and functionality, where users actively participate in content creation and editing through open collaboration between members of communities of practice. The current generation of students in medical school made Web 2.0 websites such as Facebook and MySpace some of the most popular on the Internet. Medical educators and designers of educational software applications can benefit from understanding and applying Web 2.0 concepts to the curriculum and related websites. Health science schools have begun experimenting with wikis, blogs and other Web 2.0 applications and have identified both advantages and potential problems with these relatively open, student-focused communication tools. This paper reviews the unique features of Web 2.0 technologies, addresses questions regarding potential pitfalls and suggests valuable applications in health science education. PMID:18464141

  9. Secure Web-Site Access with Tickets and Message-Dependent Digests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donato, David I.

    2008-01-01

    Although there are various methods for restricting access to documents stored on a World Wide Web (WWW) site (a Web site), none of the widely used methods is completely suitable for restricting access to Web applications hosted on an otherwise publicly accessible Web site. A new technique, however, provides a mix of features well suited for restricting Web-site or Web-application access to authorized users, including the following: secure user authentication, tamper-resistant sessions, simple access to user state variables by server-side applications, and clean session terminations. This technique, called message-dependent digests with tickets, or MDDT, maintains secure user sessions by passing single-use nonces (tickets) and message-dependent digests of user credentials back and forth between client and server. Appendix 2 provides a working implementation of MDDT with PHP server-side code and JavaScript client-side code.

  10. An open source Java web application to build self-contained Web GIS sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala Romero, O.; Ahmed, A.; Chassignet, E.; Zavala-Hidalgo, J.

    2014-12-01

    This work describes OWGIS, an open source Java web application that creates Web GIS sites by automatically writing HTML and JavaScript code. OWGIS is configured by XML files that define which layers (geographic datasets) will be displayed on the websites. This project uses several Open Geospatial Consortium standards to request data from typical map servers, such as GeoServer, and is also able to request data from ncWMS servers. The latter allows for the displaying of 4D data stored using the NetCDF file format (widely used for storing environmental model datasets). Some of the features available on the sites built with OWGIS are: multiple languages, animations, vertical profiles and vertical transects, color palettes, color ranges, and the ability to download data. OWGIS main users are scientists, such as oceanographers or climate scientists, who store their data in NetCDF files and want to analyze, visualize, share, or compare their data using a website.

  11. MAPI: towards the integrated exploitation of bioinformatics Web Services

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bioinformatics is commonly featured as a well assorted list of available web resources. Although diversity of services is positive in general, the proliferation of tools, their dispersion and heterogeneity complicate the integrated exploitation of such data processing capacity. Results To facilitate the construction of software clients and make integrated use of this variety of tools, we present a modular programmatic application interface (MAPI) that provides the necessary functionality for uniform representation of Web Services metadata descriptors including their management and invocation protocols of the services which they represent. This document describes the main functionality of the framework and how it can be used to facilitate the deployment of new software under a unified structure of bioinformatics Web Services. A notable feature of MAPI is the modular organization of the functionality into different modules associated with specific tasks. This means that only the modules needed for the client have to be installed, and that the module functionality can be extended without the need for re-writing the software client. Conclusions The potential utility and versatility of the software library has been demonstrated by the implementation of several currently available clients that cover different aspects of integrated data processing, ranging from service discovery to service invocation with advanced features such as workflows composition and asynchronous services calls to multiple types of Web Services including those registered in repositories (e.g. GRID-based, SOAP, BioMOBY, R-bioconductor, and others). PMID:22032807

  12. BrainBrowser: distributed, web-based neurological data visualization

    PubMed Central

    Sherif, Tarek; Kassis, Nicolas; Rousseau, Marc-Étienne; Adalat, Reza; Evans, Alan C.

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen massive, distributed datasets become the norm in neuroimaging research, and the methodologies used to analyze them have, in response, become more collaborative and exploratory. Tools and infrastructure are continuously being developed and deployed to facilitate research in this context: grid computation platforms to process the data, distributed data stores to house and share them, high-speed networks to move them around and collaborative, often web-based, platforms to provide access to and sometimes manage the entire system. BrainBrowser is a lightweight, high-performance JavaScript visualization library built to provide easy-to-use, powerful, on-demand visualization of remote datasets in this new research environment. BrainBrowser leverages modern web technologies, such as WebGL, HTML5 and Web Workers, to visualize 3D surface and volumetric neuroimaging data in any modern web browser without requiring any browser plugins. It is thus trivial to integrate BrainBrowser into any web-based platform. BrainBrowser is simple enough to produce a basic web-based visualization in a few lines of code, while at the same time being robust enough to create full-featured visualization applications. BrainBrowser can dynamically load the data required for a given visualization, so no network bandwidth needs to be waisted on data that will not be used. BrainBrowser's integration into the standardized web platform also allows users to consider using 3D data visualization in novel ways, such as for data distribution, data sharing and dynamic online publications. BrainBrowser is already being used in two major online platforms, CBRAIN and LORIS, and has been used to make the 1TB MACACC dataset openly accessible. PMID:25628562

  13. BrainBrowser: distributed, web-based neurological data visualization.

    PubMed

    Sherif, Tarek; Kassis, Nicolas; Rousseau, Marc-Étienne; Adalat, Reza; Evans, Alan C

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have seen massive, distributed datasets become the norm in neuroimaging research, and the methodologies used to analyze them have, in response, become more collaborative and exploratory. Tools and infrastructure are continuously being developed and deployed to facilitate research in this context: grid computation platforms to process the data, distributed data stores to house and share them, high-speed networks to move them around and collaborative, often web-based, platforms to provide access to and sometimes manage the entire system. BrainBrowser is a lightweight, high-performance JavaScript visualization library built to provide easy-to-use, powerful, on-demand visualization of remote datasets in this new research environment. BrainBrowser leverages modern web technologies, such as WebGL, HTML5 and Web Workers, to visualize 3D surface and volumetric neuroimaging data in any modern web browser without requiring any browser plugins. It is thus trivial to integrate BrainBrowser into any web-based platform. BrainBrowser is simple enough to produce a basic web-based visualization in a few lines of code, while at the same time being robust enough to create full-featured visualization applications. BrainBrowser can dynamically load the data required for a given visualization, so no network bandwidth needs to be waisted on data that will not be used. BrainBrowser's integration into the standardized web platform also allows users to consider using 3D data visualization in novel ways, such as for data distribution, data sharing and dynamic online publications. BrainBrowser is already being used in two major online platforms, CBRAIN and LORIS, and has been used to make the 1TB MACACC dataset openly accessible. PMID:25628562

  14. InterMine: extensive web services for modern biology.

    PubMed

    Kalderimis, Alex; Lyne, Rachel; Butano, Daniela; Contrino, Sergio; Lyne, Mike; Heimbach, Joshua; Hu, Fengyuan; Smith, Richard; St?pán, Radek; Sullivan, Julie; Micklem, Gos

    2014-07-01

    InterMine (www.intermine.org) is a biological data warehousing system providing extensive automatically generated and configurable RESTful web services that underpin the web interface and can be re-used in many other applications: to find and filter data; export it in a flexible and structured way; to upload, use, manipulate and analyze lists; to provide services for flexible retrieval of sequence segments, and for other statistical and analysis tools. Here we describe these features and discuss how they can be used separately or in combinations to support integrative and comparative analysis. PMID:24753429

  15. InterMine: extensive web services for modern biology

    PubMed Central

    Kalderimis, Alex; Lyne, Rachel; Butano, Daniela; Contrino, Sergio; Lyne, Mike; Heimbach, Joshua; Hu, Fengyuan; Smith, Richard; Štěpán, Radek; Sullivan, Julie; Micklem, Gos

    2014-01-01

    InterMine (www.intermine.org) is a biological data warehousing system providing extensive automatically generated and configurable RESTful web services that underpin the web interface and can be re-used in many other applications: to find and filter data; export it in a flexible and structured way; to upload, use, manipulate and analyze lists; to provide services for flexible retrieval of sequence segments, and for other statistical and analysis tools. Here we describe these features and discuss how they can be used separately or in combinations to support integrative and comparative analysis. PMID:24753429

  16. GlycoPattern: a web platform for glycan array mining

    PubMed Central

    Agravat, Sanjay B.; Saltz, Joel H.; Cummings, Richard D.; Smith, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary: GlycoPattern is Web-based bioinformatics resource to support the analysis of glycan array data for the Consortium for Functional Glycomics. This resource includes algorithms and tools to discover structural motifs, a heatmap visualization to compare multiple experiments, hierarchical clustering of Glycan Binding Proteins with respect to their binding motifs and a structural search feature on the experimental data. Availability and implementation: GlycoPattern is freely available on the Web at http://glycopattern.emory.edu with all major browsers supported. Contact: sanjay.agravat@emory.edu PMID:25143288

  17. SynchWeb: a modern interface for ISPyB

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, S. J.; Levik, K. E.; Williams, M. A.; Ashton, A. W.; McAuley, K. E.

    2015-01-01

    SynchWeb is a modern interface to the ISPyB database. It significantly simplifies sample registration and is targeted towards live data collection monitoring and remote access for macromolecular crystallography. It adds a variety of new features including project management, an integrated diffraction image viewer, and a map and model viewer, as well as displaying results from automated analysis pipelines. Virtually all aspects of an experiment can be monitored through the web browser and the success of each experiment can be evaluated. PMID:26089766

  18. Line feature matching algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Taisong; Li, Cuihua

    2007-11-01

    This paper presents a line feature matching algorithm. Firstly, it extracts the set of line features in the image, and represents an object using attributed relational graph (ARG). By defining relation vectors between the adjacent features, the graph can describe the structural information of an object. Secondly, the one-to-one correspondences between model features and image features is established by two processes - coarse match and refined match through the analysis of matching ordering and matching number of relation vectors. Finally, the object examples in the image are extracted. Test showed that the proposed algorithm had superior performance to the present line feature matching algorithms, which is robust to shape deformation, or input noise, and decreased the computational cost.

  19. Adaptive feature extraction expert

    SciTech Connect

    Yuschik, M.

    1983-01-01

    The identification of discriminatory features places an upper bound on the recognition rate of any automatic speech recognition (ASR) system. One way to structure the extraction of features is to construct an expert system which applies a set of rules to identify particular properties of the speech patterns. However, these patterns vary for an individual speaker and from speaker to speaker so that another expert is actually needed to learn the new variations. The author investigates the problem by using sets of discriminatory features that are suggested by a feature generation expert, improves the selectivity of these features with a training expert, and finally develops a minimally spanning feature set with a statistical selection expert. 12 references.

  20. Web Accessibility and Accessibility Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ravonne A.; Huprich, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Section 508 of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that programs and services be accessible to people with disabilities. While schools of library and information science (SLIS*) and university libraries should model accessible Web sites, this may not be the case. This article examines previous studies about the Web accessibility of…

  1. Web Accessibility and Accessibility Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Ravonne A.; Huprich, Julia

    2009-01-01

    Section 508 of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) mandates that programs and services be accessible to people with disabilities. While schools of library and information science (SLIS*) and university libraries should model accessible Web sites, this may not be the case. This article examines previous studies about the Web accessibility of…

  2. The Great Lakes Food Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Marjane L.

    1997-01-01

    Presents a play for students in grades four to nine that incorporates the scientific names, physical characteristics, feeding habits, interactions, and interdependence of the plants and animals that make up the Great Lakes food web to facilitate the learning of this complex system. Includes a Great Lakes food web chart. (AIM)

  3. Culturally Responsive Educational Web Sites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillani, Bijan B.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the shortcomings of multicultural education; presents Vygotsky's sociocognitive theory as a model for multicultural education for the World Wide Web; and discusses the process of Web design as an appropriate technological tool to apply Vygotsky's theory to create culturally responsive educational environments. (Contains 9 references.)…

  4. Distance Education Clearinghouse Web Site.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Kate; Martin, Sara

    A World Wide Web site, developed by University of Nebraska-Lincoln Information Services staff and funded by a NEB*SAT (Nebraska's multiple channel satellite and optical fiber educational telecommunications network) grant, provides a clearinghouse of distance education, Internet, and Web page development information that is useful to librarians and…

  5. Acerca de este sitio web

    Cancer.gov

    Página de guía que permite al lector entender la forma en que está organizado el sitio web del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer (NCI), las categorías de información disponibles y las políticas que rigen este sitio web.

  6. Critical Reading of the Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Teresa; Cohen, Deb

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquity and familiarity of the world wide web means that students regularly turn to it as a source of information. In doing so, they "are said to rely heavily on simple search engines, such as Google to find what they want." Researchers have also investigated how students use search engines, concluding that "the young web users tended to…

  7. Digging Deeper: The Deep Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Laura

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on the Deep Web, defined as Web content in searchable databases of the type that can be found only by direct query. Discusses the problems of indexing; inability to find information not indexed in the search engine's database; and metasearch engines. Describes 10 sites created to access online databases or directly search them. Lists ways…

  8. NASA: Data on the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galica, Carol

    1997-01-01

    Provides an annotated bibliography of selected NASA Web sites for K-12 math and science teachers: the NASA Lewis Research Center Learning Technologies K-12 Home Page, Spacelink, NASA Quest, Basic Aircraft Design Page, International Space Station, NASA Shuttle Web Site, LIFTOFF to Space Education, Telescopes in Education, and Space Educator's…

  9. NASA: Data on the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galica, Carol

    1997-01-01

    Provides an annotated bibliography of selected NASA Web sites for K-12 math and science teachers: the NASA Lewis Research Center Learning Technologies K-12 Home Page, Spacelink, NASA Quest, Basic Aircraft Design Page, International Space Station, NASA Shuttle Web Site, LIFTOFF to Space Education, Telescopes in Education, and Space Educator's…

  10. New Generation Sensor Web Enablement

    PubMed Central

    Bröring, Arne; Echterhoff, Johannes; Jirka, Simon; Simonis, Ingo; Everding, Thomas; Stasch, Christoph; Liang, Steve; Lemmens, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Many sensor networks have been deployed to monitor Earth’s environment, and more will follow in the future. Environmental sensors have improved continuously by becoming smaller, cheaper, and more intelligent. Due to the large number of sensor manufacturers and differing accompanying protocols, integrating diverse sensors into observation systems is not straightforward. A coherent infrastructure is needed to treat sensors in an interoperable, platform-independent and uniform way. The concept of the Sensor Web reflects such a kind of infrastructure for sharing, finding, and accessing sensors and their data across different applications. It hides the heterogeneous sensor hardware and communication protocols from the applications built on top of it. The Sensor Web Enablement initiative of the Open Geospatial Consortium standardizes web service interfaces and data encodings which can be used as building blocks for a Sensor Web. This article illustrates and analyzes the recent developments of the new generation of the Sensor Web Enablement specification framework. Further, we relate the Sensor Web to other emerging concepts such as the Web of Things and point out challenges and resulting future work topics for research on Sensor Web Enablement. PMID:22163760

  11. Designing Web-Based Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Ann

    1998-01-01

    Outlines Web-based training (WBT) options (page-, frame-, and screen-based), provides general guidelines for designing Web-delivered instruction. Discusses case studies of a teacher's guide to the Holocaust and sales training for a telecommunications company. Provides addresses of sample WBT sites. Includes reader reactions and author responses to…

  12. The World Wide Web Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owston, Ron

    2007-01-01

    Nearly a decade ago the author wrote in one of the first widely-cited academic articles, Educational Researcher, about the educational role of the web. He argued that educators must be able to demonstrate that the web (1) can increase access to learning, (2) must not result in higher costs for learning, and (3) can lead to improved learning. These…

  13. Staleness Among Web Search Engines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehler, Wallace

    1998-01-01

    Describes a study of four major Web search engines that tested for staleness, a condition when a significant number of the hits it returns point to Web pages or server-level domains (SLD) that are no longer viable. Results of tests of URLs with AltaVista, HotBot, InfoSeek, and Open Text are discussed. (Author/LRW)

  14. Web Tools: The Second Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascopella, Angela

    2008-01-01

    Web 2.0 tools and technologies, or second generation tools, help districts to save time and money, and eliminate the need to transfer or move files back and forth across computers. Many Web 2.0 tools help students think critically and solve problems, which falls under the 21st-century skills. The second-generation tools are growing in popularity…

  15. Research on Web Search Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh-Yee, Ingrid

    2001-01-01

    Reviews studies, conducted between 1995 and 2000, on Web search behavior, of children and adults. Most studies on children describe their interaction with the Web; research on adults focused on describing search patterns, effects of selected factors on search behavior, and the use of multiple data-gathering methods. Many studies lack external…

  16. Digging Deeper: The Deep Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Laura

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on the Deep Web, defined as Web content in searchable databases of the type that can be found only by direct query. Discusses the problems of indexing; inability to find information not indexed in the search engine's database; and metasearch engines. Describes 10 sites created to access online databases or directly search them. Lists ways…

  17. Critical Reading of the Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Teresa; Cohen, Deb

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquity and familiarity of the world wide web means that students regularly turn to it as a source of information. In doing so, they "are said to rely heavily on simple search engines, such as Google to find what they want." Researchers have also investigated how students use search engines, concluding that "the young web users tended to…

  18. Reference Resources on the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Chris

    2000-01-01

    Compares three Web-based online reference services that are described as a cross between a traditional database service and a Web search engine: Ask Jeeves (http://www.ask.com), The Electric Library (http://www.elibrary.com), and Information Please (http://www.infoplease.com). Concludes that each has strengths and weaknesses and aren't directly…

  19. Retrieval Effectiveness on the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savoy, Jacques; Picard, Justin

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the role of search engines in Web usability and analyzes and evaluates the retrieval effectiveness of various indexing and searching strategies on a new Web text collection. Highlights include preprocessing techniques that might improve retrieval effectiveness; and hyperlinks as useful sources of evidence in improving retrieval…

  20. Group Learning on the Web

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alant, E.; Dada, S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the issues of syndicate learning in a web-based environment. The multi-professional Master's degree in Early Childhood Intervention is described and discussed in terms of its philosophy of multi-professional small group learning. A description of the processes involved in facilitating web-based learning in small groups is…

  1. Image Searching across the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pack, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how to find digital images on the Web. Considers images and copyright; provides an overview of the search capabilities of six search engines, including AltaVista, Google, AllTheWeb.com, Ditto.com, Picsearch, and Lycos; and describes specialized image search engines. (LRW)

  2. Web services interface for Space Weather: NeQuick 2 web and experimental TEC Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migoya Orue, Yenca O.; Nava, Bruno; Radicella, Sandro M.; Alazo Cuartas, Katy; Luigi, Ciraolo

    2013-04-01

    A web front-end has been recently developed and released to allow retrieving and plotting ionospheric parameters computed by the latest version of the model, NeQuick 2. NeQuick is a quick-run ionospheric electron density model particularly designed for trans-ionospheric propagation applications. It has been developed at the Aeronomy and Radiopropagation Laboratory (now T/ICT4D Laboratory) of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) - Trieste, Italy with the collaboration of the Institute for Geophysics, Astrophysics and Meteorology (IGAM) of the University of Graz, Austria. To describe the electron density of the ionosphere up to the peak of the F2 layer, NeQuick uses a profile formulation which includes five semi-Epstein layers with modelled thickness parameters. Through a simple web interface users can exploit all the model features including the possibility of computing the electron density and visualizing the corresponding Total Electron Content (TEC) along any ground-to-satellite straight line ray-path. Indeed, the TEC is the ionospheric parameter retrieved from the GPS measurements. It complements the experimental data obtained with diverse kinds of sensors and can be considered a major source of ionospheric information. Since the TEC is not a direct measurement, a "de-biasing" procedure or calibration has to be applied to obtain the relevant values from the raw GPS observables. Using the observation and navigation RINEX files corresponding to a single receiver as input data, the web application allows the user to compute the slant and/or vertical TEC following the concept of the "arc-by-arc" offsets estimation. The combined use of both tools, freely available from the T/ICT4D Web site, will allow the comparison of experimentally derived slant and vertical TEC with modelled values. An online demonstration of the capabilities of the mentioned web services will be illustrated.

  3. Web2Quests: Updating a Popular Web-Based Inquiry-Oriented Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurt, Serhat

    2009-01-01

    WebQuest is a popular inquiry-oriented activity in which learners use Web resources. Since the creation of the innovation, almost 15 years ago, the Web has changed significantly, while the WebQuest technique has changed little. This article examines possible applications of new Web trends on WebQuest instructional strategy. Some possible…

  4. Web2Quests: Updating a Popular Web-Based Inquiry-Oriented Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurt, Serhat

    2009-01-01

    WebQuest is a popular inquiry-oriented activity in which learners use Web resources. Since the creation of the innovation, almost 15 years ago, the Web has changed significantly, while the WebQuest technique has changed little. This article examines possible applications of new Web trends on WebQuest instructional strategy. Some possible…

  5. DECADE web portal: toward the integration of MaGa, EarthChem and VOTW data systems to further the knowledge on Earth degassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardellini, Carlo; Frigeri, Alessandro; Lehnert, Kerstin; Ash, Jason; McCormick, Brendan; Chiodini, Giovanni; Fischer, Tobias; Cottrell, Elizabeth

    2015-04-01

    The release of volatiles from the Earth's interior takes place in both volcanic and non-volcanic areas of the planet. The comprehension of such complex process and the improvement of the current estimates of global carbon emissions, will greatly benefit from the integration of geochemical, petrological and volcanological data. At present, major online data repositories relevant to studies of degassing are not linked and interoperable. In the framework of the Deep Earth Carbon Degassing (DECADE) initiative of the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO), we are developing interoperability between three data systems that will make their data accessible via the DECADE portal: (1) the Smithsonian Institutionian's Global Volcanism Program database (VOTW) of volcanic activity data, (2) EarthChem databases for geochemical and geochronological data of rocks and melt inclusions, and (3) the MaGa database (Mapping Gas emissions) which contains compositional and flux data of gases released at volcanic and non-volcanic degassing sites. The DECADE web portal will create a powerful search engine of these databases from a single entry point and will return comprehensive multi-component datasets. A user will be able, for example, to obtain data relating to compositions of emitted gases, compositions and age of the erupted products and coincident activity, of a specific volcano. This level of capability requires a complete synergy between the databases, including availability of standard-based web services (WMS, WFS) at all data systems. Data and metadata can thus be extracted from each system without interfering with each database's local schema or being replicated to achieve integration at the DECADE web portal. The DECADE portal will enable new synoptic perspectives on the Earth degassing process allowing to explore Earth degassing related datasets over previously unexplored spatial or temporal ranges.

  6. Enabling Web-Based GIS Tools for Internet and Mobile Devices To Improve and Expand NASA Data Accessibility and Analysis Functionality for the Renewable Energy and Agricultural Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, A.; Stackhouse, P. W.; Tisdale, B.; Tisdale, M.; Chandler, W.; Hoell, J. M., Jr.; Kusterer, J.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center Science Directorate and Atmospheric Science Data Center have initiated a pilot program to utilize Geographic Information System (GIS) tools that enable, generate and store climatological averages using spatial queries and calculations in a spatial database resulting in greater accessibility of data for government agencies, industry and private sector individuals. The major objectives of this effort include the 1) Processing and reformulation of current data to be consistent with ESRI and openGIS tools, 2) Develop functions to improve capability and analysis that produce "on-the-fly" data products, extending these past the single location to regional and global scales. 3) Update the current web sites to enable both web-based and mobile application displays for optimization on mobile platforms, 4) Interact with user communities in government and industry to test formats and usage of optimization, and 5) develop a series of metrics that allow for monitoring of progressive performance. Significant project results will include the the development of Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) compliant web services (WMS, WCS, WFS, WPS) that serve renewable energy and agricultural application products to users using GIS software and tools. Each data product and OGC service will be registered within ECHO, the Common Metadata Repository, the Geospatial Platform, and Data.gov to ensure the data are easily discoverable and provide data users with enhanced access to SSE data, parameters, services, and applications. This effort supports cross agency, cross organization, and interoperability of SSE data products and services by collaborating with DOI, NRCan, NREL, NCAR, and HOMER for requirements vetting and test bed users before making available to the wider public.

  7. Critical Path Web Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Judith L.; Charles, John B.; Rummel, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Approximately three years ago, the Agency's lead center for the human elements of spaceflight (the Johnson Space Center), along with the National Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) (which has the lead role in developing countermeasures) initiated an activity to identify the most critical risks confronting extended human spaceflight. Two salient factors influenced this activity: first, what information is needed to enable a "go/no go" decision to embark on extended human spaceflight missions; and second, what knowledge and capabilities are needed to address known and potential health, safety and performance risks associated with such missions. A unique approach was used to first define and assess those risks, and then to prioritize them. This activity was called the Critical Path Roadmap (CPR) and it represents an opportunity to develop and implement a focused and evolving program of research and technology designed from a "risk reduction" perspective to prevent or minimize the risks to humans exposed to the space environment. The Critical Path Roadmap provides the foundation needed to ensure that human spaceflight, now and in the future, is as safe, productive and healthy as possible (within the constraints imposed on any particular mission) regardless of mission duration or destination. As a tool, the Critical Path Roadmap enables the decision maker to select from among the demonstrated or potential risks those that are to be mitigated, and the completeness of that mitigation. The primary audience for the CPR Web Site is the members of the scientific community who are interested in the research and technology efforts required for ensuring safe and productive human spaceflight. They may already be informed about the various space life sciences research programs or they may be newcomers. Providing the CPR content to potential investigators increases the probability of their delivering effective risk mitigations. Others who will use the CPR Web Site and its content include program managers and administrators who track the program and are involved in decisions regarding resource allocation and program evaluation.

  8. Critical Path Web Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Judith L.; Charles, John B.; Rummel, John A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Approximately three years ago, the Agency's lead center for the human elements of spaceflight (the Johnson Space Center), along with the National Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) (which has the lead role in developing countermeasures) initiated an activity to identify the most critical risks confronting extended human spaceflight. Two salient factors influenced this activity: first, what information is needed to enable a "go/no go" decision to embark on extended human spaceflight missions; and second, what knowledge and capabilities are needed to address known and potential health, safety and performance risks associated with such missions. A unique approach was used to first define and assess those risks, and then to prioritize them. This activity was called the Critical Path Roadmap (CPR) and it represents an opportunity to develop and implement a focused and evolving program of research and technology designed from a "risk reduction" perspective to prevent or minimize the risks to humans exposed to the space environment. The Critical Path Roadmap provides the foundation needed to ensure that human spaceflight, now and in the future, is as safe, productive and healthy as possible (within the constraints imposed on any particular mission) regardless of mission duration or destination. As a tool, the Critical Path Roadmap enables the decisionmaker to select from among the demonstrated or potential risks those that are to be mitigated, and the completeness of that mitigation. The primary audience for the CPR Web Site is the members of the scientific community who are interested in the research and technology efforts required for ensuring safe and productive human spaceflight. They may already be informed about the various space life sciences research programs or they may be newcomers. Providing the CPR content to potential investigators increases the probability of their delivering effective risk mitigations. Others who will use the CPR Web Site and its content include program managers and administrators who track the program and are involved in decisions regarding resource allocation and program evaluation.

  9. Thin film-coated polymer webs

    DOEpatents

    Wenz, Robert P.; Weber, Michael F.; Arudi, Ravindra L.

    1992-02-04

    The present invention relates to thin film-coated polymer webs, and more particularly to thin film electronic devices supported upon a polymer web, wherein the polymer web is treated with a purifying amount of electron beam radiation.

  10. Course Development on the World Wide Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kathleen P.

    1998-01-01

    Guidelines for developing Web-based course materials include considerations of available resources, how technology aids in meeting curricular goals and objectives, Web-site design and construction, and Web-course evaluation. (SK)

  11. WebViz:A Web-based Collaborative Interactive Visualization System for large-Scale Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, D. A.; McArthur, E.; Weiss, R. M.; Zhou, J.; Yao, B.

    2010-12-01

    WebViz is a web-based application designed to conduct collaborative, interactive visualizations of large data sets for multiple users, allowing researchers situated all over the world to utilize the visualization services offered by the University of Minnesota’s Laboratory for Computational Sciences and Engineering (LCSE). This ongoing project has been built upon over the last 3 1/2 years .The motivation behind WebViz lies primarily with the need to parse through an increasing amount of data produced by the scientific community as a result of larger and faster multicore and massively parallel computers coming to the market, including the use of general purpose GPU computing. WebViz allows these large data sets to be visualized online by anyone with an account. The application allows users to save time and resources by visualizing data ‘on the fly’, wherever he or she may be located. By leveraging AJAX via the Google Web Toolkit (http://code.google.com/webtoolkit/), we are able to provide users with a remote, web portal to LCSE's (http://www.lcse.umn.edu) large-scale interactive visualization system already in place at the University of Minnesota. LCSE’s custom hierarchical volume rendering software provides high resolution visualizations on the order of 15 million pixels and has been employed for visualizing data primarily from simulations in astrophysics to geophysical fluid dynamics . In the current version of WebViz, we have implemented a highly extensible back-end framework built around HTTP "server push" technology. The web application is accessible via a variety of devices including netbooks, iPhones, and other web and javascript-enabled cell phones. Features in the current version include the ability for users to (1) securely login (2) launch multiple visualizations (3) conduct collaborative visualization sessions (4) delegate control aspects of a visualization to others and (5) engage in collaborative chats with other users within the user interface of the web application. These features are all in addition to a full range of essential visualization functions including 3-D camera and object orientation, position manipulation, time-stepping control, and custom color/alpha mapping.

  12. Utilization of a Web-Based vs Integrated Phone/Web Cessation Program Among 140,000 Tobacco Users: An Evaluation Across 10 Free State Quitlines

    PubMed Central

    Vickerman, Katrina A; Kellogg, Elizabeth S; Zbikowski, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Background Phone-based tobacco cessation program effectiveness has been established and randomized controlled trials have provided some support for Web-based services. Relatively little is known about who selects different treatment modalities and how they engage with treatments in a real-world setting. Objective This paper describes the characteristics, Web utilization patterns, and return rates of tobacco users who self-selected into a Web-based (Web-Only) versus integrated phone/Web (Phone/Web) cessation program. Methods We examined the demographics, baseline tobacco use, Web utilization patterns, and return rates of 141,429 adult tobacco users who self-selected into a Web-Only or integrated Phone/Web cessation program through 1 of 10 state quitlines from August 2012 through July 2013. For each state, registrants were only included from the timeframe in which both programs were offered to all enrollees. Utilization data were limited to site interactions occurring within 6 months after registration. Results Most participants selected the Phone/Web program (113,019/141,429, 79.91%). After enrollment in Web services, Web-Only were more likely to log in compared to Phone/Web (21,832/28,410, 76.85% vs 23,920/56,892, 42.04%; P<.001), but less likely to return after their initial log-in (8766/21,832, 40.15% vs 13,966/23,920, 58.39%; P<.001). In bivariate and multivariable analyses, those who chose Web-Only were younger, healthier, more highly educated, more likely to be uninsured or commercially insured, more likely to be white non-Hispanic and less likely to be black non-Hispanic, less likely to be highly nicotine-addicted, and more likely to have started their program enrollment online (all P<.001). Among both program populations, participants were more likely to return to Web services if they were women, older, more highly educated, or were sent nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) through their quitline (all P<.001). Phone/Web were also more likely to return if they had completed a coaching call, identified as white non-Hispanic or “other” race, or were commercially insured (all P<.001). Web-Only were less likely to return if they started their enrollment online versus via phone. The interactive Tobacco Tracker, Cost Savings Calculator, and Quitting Plan were the most widely used features overall. Web-Only were more likely than Phone/Web to use most key features (all P<.001), most notably the 5 Quitting Plan behaviors. Among quitlines that offered NRT to both Phone/Web and Web-Only, Web-Only were less likely to have received quitline NRT. Conclusions This paper adds to our understanding of who selects different cessation treatment modalities and how they engage with the program in a real-world setting. Web-Only were younger, healthier smokers of higher socioeconomic status who interacted more intensely with services in a single session, but were less likely to re-engage or access NRT benefits. Further research should examine the efficacy of different engagement techniques and services with different subpopulations of tobacco users. PMID:25673013

  13. Stability in Real Food Webs: Weak Links in Long Loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neutel, Anje-Margriet; Heesterbeek, Johan A. P.; de Ruiter, Peter C.

    2002-05-01

    Increasing evidence that the strengths of interactions among populations in biological communities form patterns that are crucial for system stability requires clarification of the precise form of these patterns, how they come about, and why they influence stability. We show that in real food webs, interaction strengths are organized in trophic loops in such a way that long loops contain relatively many weak links. We show and explain mathematically that this patterning enhances stability, because it reduces maximum ``loop weight'' and thus reduces the amount of intraspecific interaction needed for matrix stability. The patterns are brought about by biomass pyramids, a feature common to most ecosystems. Incorporation of biomass pyramids in 104 food-web descriptions reveals that the low weight of the long loops stabilizes complex food webs. Loop-weight analysis could be a useful tool for exploring the structure and organization of complex communities.

  14. A Method of EC Model Implementation Using Web Service Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, Jun; Koizumi, Hisao; Ishikawa, Toshiyuki; Dasai, Takashi

    In recent years, advances in computer and communication technology and the associated rapid increase in the number of Internet users are encouraging advances in Electronic Commerce (EC). Business models of EC are being actively developed by many different enterprises and engineers, and implemented in many kinds of fields. Meanwhile Web services that reuse remote components over the Internet are drawing attention. Web services are based on SOAP/WSDL/UDDI and are given an important position as the infrastructure of the EC systems. The article analyzes the functions and structures of various business models, establishing the patterns of their distinctive and common features, and proposes a method of determining the implementation specifications of business models utilizing these patterns and Web service functions. This method has been applied to a parts purchasing system, which is a typical pattern of the B to B (Business to Business) EC applications. The article also discusses the results of evaluating this prototype system.

  15. Large area sheet task: Advanced dendritic web growth development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, C. S.; Seidensticker, R. G.; Mchugh, J. P.; Hopkins, R. H.; Meier, D.; Schruben, J.

    1981-01-01

    The growth of silicon dendritic web for photovoltaic applications was investigated. The application of a thermal model for calculating buckling stresses as a function of temperature profile in the web is discussed. Lid and shield concepts were evaluated to provide the data base for enhancing growth velocity. An experimental web growth machine which embodies in one unit the mechanical and electronic features developed in previous work was developed. In addition, evaluation of a melt level control system was begun, along with preliminary tests of an elongated crucible design. The economic analysis was also updated to incorporate some minor cost changes. The initial applications of the thermal model to a specific configuration gave results consistent with experimental observation in terms of the initiation of buckling vs. width for a given crystal thickness.

  16. Web-based healthcare hand drawing management system.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Sheau-Ling; Weng, Yung-Ching; Chen, Chi-Huang; Hsu, Kai-Ping; Lin, Jeng-Wei; Lai, Feipei

    2010-01-01

    The paper addresses Medical Hand Drawing Management System architecture and implementation. In the system, we developed four modules: hand drawing management module; patient medical records query module; hand drawing editing and upload module; hand drawing query module. The system adapts windows-based applications and encompasses web pages by ASP.NET hosting mechanism under web services platforms. The hand drawings implemented as files are stored in a FTP server. The file names with associated data, e.g. patient identification, drawing physician, access rights, etc. are reposited in a database. The modules can be conveniently embedded, integrated into any system. Therefore, the system possesses the hand drawing features to support daily medical operations, effectively improve healthcare qualities as well. Moreover, the system includes the printing capability to achieve a complete, computerized medical document process. In summary, the system allows web-based applications to facilitate the graphic processes for healthcare operations. PMID:21097079

  17. Semantic Features for Classifying Referring Search Terms

    SciTech Connect

    May, Chandler J.; Henry, Michael J.; McGrath, Liam R.; Bell, Eric B.; Marshall, Eric J.; Gregory, Michelle L.

    2012-05-11

    When an internet user clicks on a result in a search engine, a request is submitted to the destination web server that includes a referrer field containing the search terms given by the user. Using this information, website owners can analyze the search terms leading to their websites to better understand their visitors needs. This work explores some of the features that can be used for classification-based analysis of such referring search terms. We present initial results for the example task of classifying HTTP requests countries of origin. A system that can accurately predict the country of origin from query text may be a valuable complement to IP lookup methods which are susceptible to the obfuscation of dereferrers or proxies. We suggest that the addition of semantic features improves classifier performance in this example application. We begin by looking at related work and presenting our approach. After describing initial experiments and results, we discuss paths forward for this work.

  18. Featured Molecules: Ascorbic Acid and Methylene Blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, William F.; Wildman, Randall J.

    2003-05-01

    The WebWare molecules of the month for May are featured in several articles in this issue. "Arsenic: Not So Evil After All?" discusses the pharmaceutical uses of methylene blue and its development as the first synthetic drug used against a specific disease. The JCE Classroom Activity "Out of the Blue" and the article "Greening the Blue Bottle" feature methylene blue and ascorbic acid as two key ingredients in the formulation of the blue bottle. You can also see a colorful example of these two molecules in action on the cover. "Sailing on the 'C': A Vitamin Titration with a Twist" describes an experiment to determine the vitamin C (ascorbic acid) content of citrus fruits and challenges students, as eighteenth-century sea captains, to decide the best fruit to take on a long voyage. Fully manipulable (Chime) versions of these and other molecules are available at Only@JCE Online.

  19. Web 2.0 Applications in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Dongsheng; Liu, Chen

    Since 2005, the term Web 2.0 has gradually become a hot topic on the Internet. Web 2.0 lets users create web contents as distinct from webmasters or web coders. Web 2.0 has come to our work, our life and even has become an indispensable part of our web-life. Its applications have already been widespread in many fields on the Internet. So far, China has about 137 million netizens [1], therefore its Web 2.0 market is so attractive that many sources of venture capital flow into the Chinese Web 2.0 market and there are also a lot of new Web 2.0 companies in China. However, the development of Web 2.0 in China is accompanied by some problems and obstacles. In this paper, we will mainly discuss Web 2.0 applications in China, with their current problems and future development trends.

  20. Management reporting on the Web.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, G; McHolm, G; Jones, D T

    2000-01-01

    Driven by easy-to-use World Wide Web technology and new information integration concepts that have proven their worth in business and industry, online management reporting is now becoming an important strategy for improving operational performance in health care organizations. In this article, we provide an overview of these new information management concepts and describe our experience in planning and executing an enterprise-wide Web-enabled management reporting initiative. We also offer an inventory of the key organizational capacities that we found essential for developing and sustaining Web-enabled reporting services for health care managers. PMID:11079955

  1. RESTful Web Services at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Casella, R.

    2011-06-14

    RESTful (REpresentational State Transfer) web services are an alternative implementation to SOAP/RPC web services in a client/server model. BNLs IT Division has started deploying RESTful Web Services for enterprise data retrieval and manipulation. Data is currently used by system administrators for tracking configuration information and as it is expanded will be used by Cyber Security for vulnerability management and as an aid to cyber investigations. This talk will describe the implementation and outstanding issues as well as some of the reasons for choosing RESTful over SOAP/RPC and future directions.

  2. Interstellar Initiative Web Page Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Alkesh

    1999-01-01

    This summer at NASA/MSFC, I have contributed to two projects: Interstellar Initiative Web Page Design and Lenz's Law Relative Motion Demonstration. In the Web Design Project, I worked on an Outline. The Web Design Outline was developed to provide a foundation for a Hierarchy Tree Structure. The Outline would help design a Website information base for future and near-term missions. The Website would give in-depth information on Propulsion Systems and Interstellar Travel. The Lenz's Law Relative Motion Demonstrator is discussed in this volume by Russell Lee.

  3. The Web as an API.

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, J. H.

    2001-01-01

    As programmers we have worked with many Application Development Interface API development kits. They are well suited for interaction with a particular system. A vast source of information can be made accessible by using the http protocol through the web as an API. This setup has many advantages including the vast knowledge available on setting web servers and services. Also, these tools are available on most hardware and operating system combinations. In this paper I will cover the various types of systems that can be developed this way, their advantages and some drawbacks of this approach. Index Terms--Application Programmer Interface, Distributed applications, Hyper Text Transfer Protocol, Web.

  4. Incorporating Web 2.0 Technologies from an Organizational Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, R.

    2009-12-01

    The Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS) provides support for the organization, facilitation, and dissemination of online educational and scientific materials and information to a wide range of stakeholders. ARCUS is currently weaving the fabric of Web 2.0 technologies—web development featuring interactive information sharing and user-centered design—into its structure, both as a tool for information management and for educational outreach. The importance of planning, developing, and maintaining a cohesive online platform in order to integrate data storage and dissemination will be discussed in this presentation, as well as some specific open source technologies and tools currently available, including: ? Content Management: Any system set up to manage the content of web sites and services. Drupal is a content management system, built in a modular fashion allowing for a powerful set of features including, but not limited to weblogs, forums, event calendars, polling, and more. ? Faceted Search: Combined with full text indexing, faceted searching allows site visitors to locate information quickly and then provides a set of 'filters' with which to narrow the search results. Apache Solr is a search server with a web-services like API (Application programming interface) that has built in support for faceted searching. ? Semantic Web: The semantic web refers to the ongoing evolution of the World Wide Web as it begins to incorporate semantic components, which aid in processing requests. OpenCalais is a web service that uses natural language processing, along with other methods, in order to extract meaningful 'tags' from your content. This metadata can then be used to connect people, places, and things throughout your website, enriching the surfing experience for the end user. ? Web Widgets: A web widget is a portable 'piece of code' that can be embedded easily into web pages by an end user. Timeline is a widget developed as part of the SIMILE project at MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) for displaying time-based events in a clean, horizontal timeline display. Numerous standards, applications, and 3rd party integration services are also available for use in today's Web 2.0 environment. In addition to a cohesive online platform, the following tools can improve networking, information sharing, and increased scientific and educational collaboration: ? Facebook (Fan pages, social networking, etc) ? Twitter/Twitterfeed (Automatic updates in 3 steps) ? Mobify.me (Mobile web) ? Wimba, Adobe Connect, etc (real time conferencing) Increasingly, the scientific community is being asked to share data and information within and outside disciplines, with K-12 students, and with members of the public and policy-makers. Web 2.0 technologies can easily be set up and utilized to share data and other information to specific audiences in real time, and their simplicity ensures their increasing use by the science community in years to come.

  5. New features in MEDM.

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, K., Jr.

    1999-04-13

    MEDM, which is derived from Motif Editor and Display Manager, is the primary graphical interface to the EPICS control system. This paper describes new features that have been added to MEDM in the last two years. These features include new editing capabilities, a PV Info dialog box, a means of specifying limits and precision, a new implementation of the Cartesian Plot, new features for several objects, new capability for the Related Display, help, a user-configurable Execute Menu, reconfigured start-up options, and availability for Windows 95/98/NT. Over one hundred bugs have been fixed, and the program is quite stable and in extensive use.

  6. Importance of the spatial data and the sensor web in the ubiquitous computing area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akçit, Nuhcan; Tomur, Emrah; Karslıoǧlu, Mahmut O.

    2014-08-01

    Spatial data has become a critical issue in recent years. In the past years, nearly more than three quarters of databases, were related directly or indirectly to locations referring to physical features, which constitute the relevant aspects. Spatial data is necessary to identify or calculate the relationships between spatial objects when using spatial operators in programs or portals. Originally, calculations were conducted using Geographic Information System (GIS) programs on local computers. Subsequently, through the Internet, they formed a geospatial web, which is integrated into a discoverable collection of geographically related web standards and key features, and constitutes a global network of geospatial data that employs the World Wide Web to process textual data. In addition, the geospatial web is used to gather spatial data producers, resources, and users. Standards also constitute a critical dimension in further globalizing the idea of the geospatial web. The sensor web is an example of the real time service that the geospatial web can provide. Sensors around the world collect numerous types of data. The sensor web is a type of sensor network that is used for visualizing, calculating, and analyzing collected sensor data. Today, people use smart devices and systems more frequently because of the evolution of technology and have more than one mobile device. The considerable number of sensors and different types of data that are positioned around the world have driven the production of interoperable and platform-independent sensor web portals. The focus of such production has been on further developing the idea of an interoperable and interdependent sensor web of all devices that share and collect information. The other pivotal idea consists of encouraging people to use and send data voluntarily for numerous purposes with the some level of credibility. The principal goal is to connect mobile and non-mobile device in the sensor web platform together to operate for serving and collecting information from people.

  7. A web implementation: the good and the not-so-good.

    PubMed

    Bergsneider, C; Piraino, D; Fuerst, M

    2001-06-01

    E-commerce, e-mail, e-greeting, e-this, and e-that everywhere you turn there is a new "e" word for an internet or Web application. We, at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, have been "e-nlightened" and will discuss in this report the implementation of a web-based radiology information system (RIS) in our radiology division or "e-radiology" division. The application, IDXRad Version 10.0 from IDX Corp, Burlington, VT, is in use at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation and has both intranet (for use in Radiology) and internet (referring physician viewing) modules. We will concentrate on the features of using a web browser for the application's front-end, including easy prototyping for screen review, easier mock-ups of demonstrations by vendors and developers, and easier training as more people become web-addicted. Project communication can be facilitated with an internal project web page, and use of the web browser can accommodate quicker turnaround of software upgrades as the software code is centrally located. Compared with other technologies, including client/server, there is a smaller roll out cost when using a standard web browser. However, the new technology requires a change and changes are never implemented without challenges. A seasoned technologist using a legacy system can enter data quicker using function keys than using a graphical user interface and pointing and clicking through a series of pop-up windows. Also, effective use of a web browser depends on intuitive design for it to be easily implemented and accepted by the user. Some software packages will not work on both of the popular web browsers and then are tailored to specific release levels. As computer-based patient records become a standard, patient confidentiality must be enforced. The technical design and application security features that support the web-based software package will be discussed. Also web technologies have their own implementation issues. PMID:11442081

  8. Feature selection in bioinformatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lipo

    2012-06-01

    In bioinformatics, there are often a large number of input features. For example, there are millions of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are genetic variations which determine the dierence between any two unrelated individuals. In microarrays, thousands of genes can be proled in each test. It is important to nd out which input features (e.g., SNPs or genes) are useful in classication of a certain group of people or diagnosis of a given disease. In this paper, we investigate some powerful feature selection techniques and apply them to problems in bioinformatics. We are able to identify a very small number of input features sucient for tasks at hand and we demonstrate this with some real-world data.

  9. DCTD — Featured Trials

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Content Click here to view the Site Map Home | Sitemap | Contact DCTD Search this site Featured Trials Funding Opportunities Partnerships DCTD Programs Cancer Diagnosis Program Cancer Imaging Program Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program Developmental

  10. Volcanic features of Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.; Masursky, H.; Strom, R.G.; Terrile, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Volcanic activity is apparently higher on Io than on any other body in the Solar System. Its volcanic landforms can be compared with features on Earth to indicate the type of volcanism present on Io. ?? 1979 Nature Publishing Group.

  11. Feature Characterization Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2006-08-03

    FCLib is a data analysis toolkit constructed to meet the needs of data discovery in large-scale, spatio-temporal data such as finite element simulation data. FCLib is a C library toolkit of building blocks that can be assembled into complex analyses. Important features of FCLib include the following: (1) Support of feature-based analysis, (2) minimization of low-oevel processing, (3) ease of use, and (4) applicable to the wide variety of science domains.

  12. Features in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Larry W.; Harris, Craig C.; Simmons, Karen E.

    1987-03-01

    A systematic, uniform search of Voyage 2 photopolarimeter system (PSS) data set for all significant features of Saturn's rings is described. On August 25, 1981, the PSS observed the occultation of the star Delta Scorpii by the rings of Saturn, and the timing of the data taking was rapid enough that the spatial resolution in the radial direction in the ring plane was better than 100 m. Tabular information and figures for 216 significant features that were found are presented.

  13. Magallanes: a web services discovery and automatic workflow composition tool

    PubMed Central

    Ríos, Javier; Karlsson, Johan; Trelles, Oswaldo

    2009-01-01

    Background To aid in bioinformatics data processing and analysis, an increasing number of web-based applications are being deployed. Although this is a positive circumstance in general, the proliferation of tools makes it difficult to find the right tool, or more importantly, the right set of tools that can work together to solve real complex problems. Results Magallanes (Magellan) is a versatile, platform-independent Java library of algorithms aimed at discovering bioinformatics web services and associated data types. A second important feature of Magallanes is its ability to connect available and compatible web services into workflows that can process data sequentially to reach a desired output given a particular input. Magallanes' capabilities can be exploited both as an API or directly accessed through a graphic user interface. The Magallanes' API is freely available for academic use, and together with Magallanes application has been tested in MS-Windows™ XP and Unix-like operating systems. Detailed implementation information, including user manuals and tutorials, is available at . Conclusion Different implementations of the same client (web page, desktop applications, web services, etc.) have been deployed and are currently in use in real installations such as the National Institute of Bioinformatics (Spain) and the ACGT-EU project. This shows the potential utility and versatility of the software library, including the integration of novel tools in the domain and with strong evidences in the line of facilitate the automatic discovering and composition of workflows. PMID:19832968

  14. Sensor Web Dynamic Measurement Techniques and Adaptive Observing Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talabac, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    Sensor Web observing systems may have the potential to significantly improve our ability to monitor, understand, and predict the evolution of rapidly evolving, transient, or variable environmental features and events. This improvement will come about by integrating novel data collection techniques, new or improved instruments, emerging communications technologies and protocols, sensor mark-up languages, and interoperable planning and scheduling systems. In contrast to today's observing systems, "event-driven" sensor webs will synthesize real- or near-real time measurements and information from other platforms and then react by reconfiguring the platforms and instruments to invoke new measurement modes and adaptive observation strategies. Similarly, "model-driven" sensor webs will utilize environmental prediction models to initiate targeted sensor measurements or to use a new observing strategy. The sensor web concept contrasts with today's data collection techniques and observing system operations concepts where independent measurements are made by remote sensing and in situ platforms that do not share, and therefore cannot act upon, potentially useful complementary sensor measurement data and platform state information. This presentation describes NASA's view of event-driven and model-driven Sensor Webs and highlights several research and development activities at the Goddard Space Flight Center.

  15. Specification and Verification of Web Applications in Rewriting Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpuente, María; Ballis, Demis; Romero, Daniel

    This paper presents a Rewriting Logic framework that formalizes the interactions between Web servers and Web browsers through a communicating protocol abstracting HTTP. The proposed framework includes a scripting language that is powerful enough to model the dynamics of complex Web applications by encompassing the main features of the most popular Web scripting languages (e.g. PHP, ASP, Java Servlets). We also provide a detailed characterization of browser actions (e.g. forward/backward navigation, page refresh, and new window/tab openings) via rewrite rules, and show how our models can be naturally model-checked by using the Linear Temporal Logic of Rewriting (LTLR), which is a Linear Temporal Logic specifically designed for model-checking rewrite theories. Our formalization is particularly suitable for verification purposes, since it allows one to perform in-depth analyses of many subtle aspects related to Web interaction. Finally, the framework has been completely implemented in Maude, and we report on some successful experiments that we conducted by using the Maude LTLR model-checker.

  16. Filtergraph: An interactive web application for visualization of astronomy datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Dan; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua; Siverd, Robert J.; Paegert, Martin; De Lee, Nathan M.; Robinson, William H.

    2013-08-01

    Filtergraph is a web application being developed and maintained by the Vanderbilt Initiative in Data-intensive Astrophysics (VIDA) to flexibly and rapidly visualize a large variety of astronomy datasets of various formats and sizes. The user loads a flat-file dataset into Filtergraph which automatically generates an interactive data portal that can be easily shared with others. From this portal, the user can immediately generate scatter plots of up to five dimensions as well as histograms and tables based on the dataset. Key features of the portal include intuitive controls with auto-completed variable names, the ability to filter the data in real time through user-specified criteria, the ability to select data by dragging on the screen, and the ability to perform arithmetic operations on the data in real time. To enable seamless data visualization and exploration, changes are quickly rendered on screen and visualizations can be exported as high quality graphics files. The application is optimized for speed in the context of large datasets: for instance, a plot generated from a stellar database of 3.1 million entries renders in less than 2 s on a standard web server platform. This web application has been created using the Web2py web framework based on the Python programming language. Filtergraph is free to use at http://filtergraph.vanderbilt.edu/.

  17. Building the Service-Based Library Web Site: A Step-by-Step Guide to Design and Options.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garlock, Kristen L.; Piontek, Sherry

    The World Wide Web, with its captivating multimedia features and hypertext capabilities, has brought millions of new users to the Internet. Library staff who could create a home page on the Web could present basic information about the library and its services, showcase its resources, create links to quality material inside and outside the…

  18. Building the Service-Based Library Web Site: A Step-by-Step Guide to Design and Options.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garlock, Kristen L.; Piontek, Sherry

    The World Wide Web, with its captivating multimedia features and hypertext capabilities, has brought millions of new users to the Internet. Library staff who could create a home page on the Web could present basic information about the library and its services, showcase its resources, create links to quality material inside and outside the…

  19. New web technologies for astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprimont, P.-G.; Ricci, D.; Nicastro, L.

    2014-12-01

    Thanks to the new HTML5 capabilities and the huge improvements of the JavaScript language, it is now possible to design very complex and interactive web user interfaces. On top of that, the once monolithic and file-server oriented web servers are evolving into easily programmable server applications capable to cope with the complex interactions made possible by the new generation of browsers. We believe that the whole community of amateur and professionals astronomers can benefit from the potential of these new technologies. New web interfaces can be designed to provide the user with a large deal of much more intuitive and interactive tools. Accessing astronomical data archives, schedule, control and monitor observatories, and in particular robotic telescopes, supervising data reduction pipelines, all are capabilities that can now be implemented in a JavaScript web application. In this paper we describe the Sadira package we are implementing exactly to this aim.

  20. Publishing Daily on the Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, George

    1997-01-01

    Relates how a 16,000 circulation daily newspaper publishes on the Web. Discusses lessons learned about audience, content, design, interactivity, and making money. Muses about the effect new media will have on print. (PA)

  1. Social Web and Knowledge Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolog, Peter; Krötzsch, Markus; Schaffert, Sebastian; Vrandečić, Denny

    Knowledge Management is the study and practice of representing, communicating, organizing, and applying knowledge in organizations. Moreover, being used by organizations, it is inherently social. The Web, as a medium, enables new forms of communications and interactions and requires new ways to represent knowledge assets. It is therefore obvious that the Web will influence and change Knowledge Management, but it is very unclear what the impact of these changes will be. This chapter raises questions and discusses visions in the area that connects the Social Web and Knowledge Management - an area of research that is only just emerging. The World Wide Web conference 2008 in Beijing hosted a workshop on that question, bringing together researchers and practitioners to gain first insights toward answering questions of that area.

  2. NASA and The Semantic Web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashish, Naveen

    2005-01-01

    We provide an overview of several ongoing NASA endeavors based on concepts, systems, and technology from the Semantic Web arena. Indeed NASA has been one of the early adopters of Semantic Web Technology and we describe ongoing and completed R&D efforts for several applications ranging from collaborative systems to airspace information management to enterprise search to scientific information gathering and discovery systems at NASA.

  3. Mashups over the Deep Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornung, Thomas; Simon, Kai; Lausen, Georg

    Combining information from different Web sources often results in a tedious and repetitive process, e.g. even simple information requests might require to iterate over a result list of one Web query and use each single result as input for a subsequent query. One approach for this chained queries are data-centric mashups, which allow to visually model the data flow as a graph, where the nodes represent the data source and the edges the data flow.

  4. Synthetic seismogram web service and Python tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimann, Sebastian; Cesca, Simone; Kriegerowski, Marius; Dahm, Torsten

    2014-05-01

    Many geophysical methods require knowledge of Green's functions (GF) or synthetic seismograms in dependence of ranges of source and receiver coordinates. Examples include synthetic seismogram generation, moment tensor inversion, the modeling of depth phases for regional and teleseismic earthquakes, or the modeling of pressure diffusion induced static displacement and strain. Calculation of Green's functions is a computationally expensive operation and it can be of advantage to calculate them in advance: the same Green's function traces can then be reused several or many times as required in a typical application. Regarding Green's function computation as an independent step in a use-case's processing chain encourages to store these in an application independent form. They can then be shared between different applications and they can also be passed to other researchers, e.g. via a web service. Starting now, we provide such a web service to the seismological community (http://kinherd.org/), where a researcher can share Green's function stores and retrieve synthetic seismograms for various point and extended earthquake source models for many different earth models at local, regional and global scale. This web service is part of a rich new toolset for the creation and handling of Green's functions and synthetic seismograms (http://emolch.github.com/pyrocko/gf). It can be used off-line or in client mode. Its core features are: greatly simplified generation of Green's function stores supports various codes for Green's function computation extensible Green's function storage format flexible spacial indexing of Green's functions integrated travel time computation support for other types of Green's functions; e.g. poro-elastic GFs written in Python

  5. AIRSAR Web-Based Data Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Anhua; Van Zyl, Jakob; Kim, Yunjin; Hensley, Scott; Lou, Yunling; Madsen, Soren; Chapman, Bruce; Imel, David; Durden, Stephen; Tung, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    The AIRSAR automated, Web-based data processing and distribution system is an integrated, end-to-end synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processing system. Designed to function under limited resources and rigorous demands, AIRSAR eliminates operational errors and provides for paperless archiving. Also, it provides a yearly tune-up of the processor on flight missions, as well as quality assurance with new radar modes and anomalous data compensation. The software fully integrates a Web-based SAR data-user request subsystem, a data processing system to automatically generate co-registered multi-frequency images from both polarimetric and interferometric data collection modes in 80/40/20 MHz bandwidth, an automated verification quality assurance subsystem, and an automatic data distribution system for use in the remote-sensor community. Features include Survey Automation Processing in which the software can automatically generate a quick-look image from an entire 90-GB SAR raw data 32-MB/s tape overnight without operator intervention. Also, the software allows product ordering and distribution via a Web-based user request system. To make AIRSAR more user friendly, it has been designed to let users search by entering the desired mission flight line (Missions Searching), or to search for any mission flight line by entering the desired latitude and longitude (Map Searching). For precision image automation processing, the software generates the products according to each data processing request stored in the database via a Queue management system. Users are able to have automatic generation of coregistered multi-frequency images as the software generates polarimetric and/or interferometric SAR data processing in ground and/or slant projection according to user processing requests for one of the 12 radar modes.

  6. Designing Web Sites for the Blind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lescher, John

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on making Web sites accessible for blind and visually impaired people. Discusses the possibility of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) becoming applicable to Web sites; tools that allow the visually impaired to use computers and the Web; 18 guidelines for designing an effective, accessible, and maintainable Web site; and testing for…

  7. Challenges of Web-Based Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luecht, Richard M.

    This paper discusses six challenges relevant to Web-based testing. Some of these challenges are not specific to Web-based testing, but generalize to all computer-based testing. The challenges are: (1) security and using test centers for Web-based testing; (2) measuring complex skills and problem-solving tasks on the Web; (3) integrating modern…

  8. Results from a Web Impact Factor Crawler.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thelwall, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Discusses Web impact factors (WIFs), Web versions of the impact factors for journals, and how they can be calculated by using search engines. Highlights include HTML and document indexing; Web page links; a Web crawler designed for calculating WIFs; and WIFs for United Kingdom universities that measured research profiles or capability. (Author/LRW)

  9. Improving Web Accessibility in a University Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olive, Geoffrey C.

    2010-01-01

    Improving Web accessibility for disabled users visiting a university's Web site is explored following the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) guidelines and Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act rules for Web page designers to ensure accessibility. The literature supports the view that accessibility is sorely lacking, not only in the USA, but also…

  10. Roadmap for a Departmental Web Site

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Guo-Qiang; White, Lee; Hesse, Christopher; Buchner, Marc; Mehregany, Mehran

    2005-01-01

    Virtually every academic department in an institute of higher education requires Web presence as a critical component of its information technology strategy. The problem of how to leverage the World Wide Web and build effective and useful departmental Web sites seems to have long been solved. Yet browsing academic Web sites from around the world…

  11. Evaluating Web Resources with Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Ruth V.; Arnone, Marilyn

    1999-01-01

    Describes WebMAC Junior, a tool developed to provide elementary students in grades one through four with hands-on experience in evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of Web sites. Discusses Web evaluation criteria and includes ideas for incorporating Web evaluation into the curriculum that promote information literacy. (LRW)

  12. The Semantic Web in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czerkawski, BetĂĽl Ă–zkan

    2014-01-01

    The Semantic Web enables increased collaboration among computers and people by organizing unstructured data on the World Wide Web. Rather than a separate body, the Semantic Web is a functional extension of the current Web made possible by defining relationships among websites and other online content. When explicitly defined, these relationships…

  13. Corporate Web Sites in Traditional Print Advertisements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardun, Carol J.; Lamb, Larry

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Web presence in print advertisements to determine how marketers are creating bridges between traditional advertising and the Internet. Content analysis showed Web addresses in print ads; categories of advertisers most likely to link print ads with Web sites; and whether the Web site attempts to develop a database of potential…

  14. Technical Services and the World Wide Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheschy, Virginia M.

    The World Wide Web and browsers such as Netscape and Mosaic have simplified access to electronic resources. Today, technical services librarians can share in the wealth of information available on the Web. One of the premier Web sites for acquisitions librarians is AcqWeb, a cousin of the AcqNet listserv. In addition to interesting news items,…

  15. On the topology of the world exchange arrangements web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Jin, Yu Ying; Chen, Guanrong

    2004-11-01

    Exchange arrangements among different countries over the world are foundations of the world economy, which generally stand behind the daily economic evolution. As the first study of the world exchange arrangements web (WEAW), we built a bipartite network with countries as one type of nodes and currencies as the other, and found it to have a prominent scale-free feature with a power-law degree distribution. In a further empirical study of the currency section of the WEAW, we calculated the clustering coefficients, average nearest-neighbors degree, and average shortest distance. As an essential economic network, the WEAW is found to be a correlated disassortative network with a hierarchical structure, possessing a more prominent scale-free feature than the world trade web (WTW).

  16. A specialized framework for data retrieval Web applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jerzy Nogiec; Kelley Trombly-Freytag; Dana Walbridge

    2004-07-12

    Although many general-purpose frameworks have been developed to aid in web application development, they typically tend to be both comprehensive and complex. To address this problem, a specialized server-side Java framework designed specifically for data retrieval and visualization has been developed. The framework's focus is on maintainability and data security. The functionality is rich with features necessary for simplifying data display design, deployment, user management and application debugging, yet the scope is deliberately kept limited to allow for easy comprehension and rapid application development. The system clearly decouples the application processing and visualization, which in turn allows for clean separation of layout and processing development. Duplication of standard web page features such as toolbars and navigational aids is therefore eliminated. The framework employs the popular Model-View-Controller (MVC) architecture, but it also uses the filter mechanism for several of its base functionalities, which permits easy extension of the provided core functionality of the system.

  17. Past, Present, and Future of Web Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Yasuhiko

    World Wide Web was born as a means to provide information through the Internet. As a number of e-shopping sites are developed on the Internet, the Web provides not only information but also services with which users can interact to buy products. This paper describes the basic standards used in Web service; XML, SOAP, and WSDL, and how Web services are implemented on the Java-based platform Axis. It also mentions the REST-based Web service which gains more attention recently. Finally it forecasts the future of Web service from a viewpoint of Semantic Web.

  18. AnnotateGenomicRegions: a web application

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Modern genomic technologies produce large amounts of data that can be mapped to specific regions in the genome. Among the first steps in interpreting the results is annotation of genomic regions with known features such as genes, promoters, CpG islands etc. Several tools have been published to perform this task. However, using these tools often requires a significant amount of bioinformatics skills and/or downloading and installing dedicated software. Results Here we present AnnotateGenomicRegions, a web application that accepts genomic regions as input and outputs a selection of overlapping and/or neighboring genome annotations. Supported organisms include human (hg18, hg19), mouse (mm8, mm9, mm10), zebrafish (danRer7), and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (sacCer2, sacCer3). AnnotateGenomicRegions is accessible online on a public server or can be installed locally. Some frequently used annotations and genomes are embedded in the application while custom annotations may be added by the user. Conclusions The increasing spread of genomic technologies generates the need for a simple-to-use annotation tool for genomic regions that can be used by biologists and bioinformaticians alike. AnnotateGenomicRegions meets this demand. AnnotateGenomicRegions is an open-source web application that can be installed on any personal computer or institute server. AnnotateGenomicRegions is available at: http://cru.genomics.iit.it/AnnotateGenomicRegions. PMID:24564446

  19. Access to Space Interactive Design Web Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, John; Cutlip, William; Hametz, Mark

    2000-01-01

    The Access To Space (ATS) Group at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) supports the science and technology community at GSFC by facilitating frequent and affordable opportunities for access to space. Through partnerships established with access mode suppliers, the ATS Group has developed an interactive Mission Design web site. The ATS web site provides both the information and the tools necessary to assist mission planners in selecting and planning their ride to space. This includes the evaluation of single payloads vs. ride-sharing opportunities to reduce the cost of access to space. Features of this site include the following: (1) Mission Database. Our mission database contains a listing of missions ranging from proposed missions to manifested. Missions can be entered by our user community through data input tools. Data is then accessed by users through various search engines: orbit parameters, ride-share opportunities, spacecraft parameters, other mission notes, launch vehicle, and contact information. (2) Launch Vehicle Toolboxes. The launch vehicle toolboxes provide the user a full range of information on vehicle classes and individual configurations. Topics include: general information, environments, performance, payload interface, available volume, and launch sites.

  20. Semantic Web meets Integrative Biology: a survey.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huajun; Yu, Tong; Chen, Jake Y

    2013-01-01

    Integrative Biology (IB) uses experimental or computational quantitative technologies to characterize biological systems at the molecular, cellular, tissue and population levels. IB typically involves the integration of the data, knowledge and capabilities across disciplinary boundaries in order to solve complex problems. We identify a series of bioinformatics problems posed by interdisciplinary integration: (i) data integration that interconnects structured data across related biomedical domains; (ii) ontology integration that brings jargons, terminologies and taxonomies from various disciplines into a unified network of ontologies; (iii) knowledge integration that integrates disparate knowledge elements from multiple sources; (iv) service integration that build applications out of services provided by different vendors. We argue that IB can benefit significantly from the integration solutions enabled by Semantic Web (SW) technologies. The SW enables scientists to share content beyond the boundaries of applications and websites, resulting into a web of data that is meaningful and understandable to any computers. In this review, we provide insight into how SW technologies can be used to build open, standardized and interoperable solutions for interdisciplinary integration on a global basis. We present a rich set of case studies in system biology, integrative neuroscience, bio-pharmaceutics and translational medicine, to highlight the technical features and benefits of SW applications in IB. PMID:22492191