Sample records for wheat straw composition

  1. Preparation and characterization of wheat straw fibers for reinforcing application in injection molded thermoplastic composites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Panthapulakkal; A. Zereshkian; M. Sain

    2006-01-01

    The potential of wheat straw fibers prepared by mechanical and chemical processes as reinforcing additives for thermoplastics was investigated. Fibers prepared by mechanical and chemical processes were characterized with respect to their chemical composition, morphology, and physical, mechanical and thermal properties. Composites of polypropylene filled with 30% wheat straw fibers were prepared and their mechanical properties were also evaluated. The

  2. Preparation and properties of polypropylene composites reinforced with wheat and flax straw fibres: Part II Analysis of composite microstructure and mechanical properties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. R HORNSBY; E HINRICHSEN; K TARVERDI

    1997-01-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of polypropylene composites containing flax and wheat straw fibres are discussed.\\u000a Particular emphasis has been given to determining the nature and consequences of fibre damage induced during melt-processing\\u000a operations, fibre orientation occurring in mouldings, and possible interfacial adhesion between the matrix and fibres. Compared\\u000a to unfilled polypropylene, addition of flax and wheat straw caused a

  3. Thermal Degradation, Mechanical Properties and Morphology of Wheat Straw Flour Filled Recycled Thermoplastic Composites

    PubMed Central

    Mengeloglu, Fatih; Karakus, Kadir

    2008-01-01

    Thermal behaviors of wheat straw flour (WF) filled thermoplastic composites were measured applying the thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Morphology and mechanical properties were also studied using scanning electron microscope and universal testing machine, respectively. Presence of WF in thermoplastic matrix reduced the degradation temperature of the composites. One for WF and one for thermoplastics, two main decomposition peaks were observed. Morphological study showed that addition of coupling agent improved the compatibility between WFs and thermoplastic. WFs were embedded into the thermoplastic matrix indicating improved adhesion. However, the bonding was not perfect because some debonding can also be seen on the interface of WFs and thermoplastic matrix. In the case of mechanical properties of WF filled recycled thermoplastic, HDPE and PP based composites provided similar tensile and flexural properties. The addition of coupling agents improved the properties of thermoplastic composites. MAPE coupling agents performed better in HDPE while MAPP coupling agents were superior in PP based composites. The composites produced with the combination of 50-percent mixture of recycled HDPE and PP performed similar with the use of both coupling agents. All produced composites provided flexural properties required by the ASTM standard for polyolefin-based plastic lumber decking boards.

  4. Optimization of the dilute maleic acid pretreatment of wheat straw

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A Maarten J Kootstra; H.H. Beeftink; Elinor L Scott; Johan PM Sanders

    2009-01-01

    Background - In this study, the dilute maleic acid pretreatment of wheat straw is optimized, using pretreatment time, temperature and maleic acid concentration as design variables. A central composite design was applied to the experimental set up. The response factors used in this study are: (1) glucose benefits from improved enzymatic digestibility of wheat straw solids; (2) xylose benefits from

  5. Molecular composition and size distribution of sugars, sugar-alcohols and carboxylic acids in airborne particles during a severe urban haze event caused by wheat straw burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gehui; Chen, Chunlei; Li, Jianjun; Zhou, Bianhong; Xie, Mingjie; Hu, Shuyuan; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Chen, Yan

    2011-05-01

    Molecular compositions and size distributions of water-soluble organic compounds (WSOC, i.e., sugars, sugar-alcohols and carboxylic acids) in particles from urban air of Nanjing, China during a severe haze event caused by field burning of wheat straw were characterized and compared with those in the summer and autumn non-haze periods. During the haze event levoglucosan (4030 ng m -3) was the most abundant compound among the measured WSOC, followed by succinic acid, malic acid, glycerol, arabitol and glucose, being different from those in the non-haze samples, in which sucrose or azelaic acid showed a second highest concentration, although levoglucosan was the highest. The measured WSOC in the haze event were 2-20 times more than those in the non-hazy days. Size distribution results showed that there was no significant change in the compound peaks in coarse mode (>2.1 ?m) with respect to the haze and non-haze samples, but a large difference in the fine fraction (<2.1 ?m) was found with a sharp increase during the hazy days mostly due to the increased emissions of wheat straw burning. Molecular compositions of organic compounds in the fresh smoke particles from wheat straw burning demonstrate that sharply increased concentrations of glycerol and succinic and malic acids in the fine particles during the haze event were mainly derived from the field burning of wheat straw, although the sources of glucose and related sugar-alcohols whose concentrations significantly increased in the fine haze samples are unclear. Compared to that in the fresh smoke particles of wheat straw burning an increase in relative abundance of succinic acid to levoglucosan during the haze event suggests a significant production of secondary organic aerosols during transport of the smoke plumes.

  6. High solids simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of pretreated wheat straw to ethanol

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Mohagheghi; M. Tucker; K. Grohmann; C. Wyman

    1992-01-01

    Wheat straw was pretreated with dilute (0.5%) sulfuric acid at 140°C for 1 h. Pretreated straw solids were washed with deionized\\u000a water to neutrality and then stored frozen at –20°C. The approximate composition of the pretreated straw solids was 64% cellulose,\\u000a 33% lignin, and 2% xylan. The cellulose in the pretreated wheat straw solids was converted to ethanol in batch

  7. Biodegradation of wheat straw by Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Pandey, V K; Singh, M P

    2014-01-01

    Wheat straw pretreated with chemicals as well as hot water was subjected to degradation by edible mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus. Lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses component of both chemically as well as hot water treated wheat straw was degraded by the fungus and in turn the edible and nutritious fruiting body of the mushroom was produced. Biodegradation of wheat straw in terms of loss of lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose showed positive correlation with cellulases, xylanase, laccase and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity of the fungus. During vegetative growth of the fungus, lignin degradation was faster and during fructification, lignin degradation was slower than cellulose and hemicellulose. The carbon content of the wheat straw decreased while, nitrogen content increased during degradation of the waste. Hot water treated wheat straw supported better production of enzymatic activity and degraded more efficiently than chemically sterilized substrate. The cumulative yield and biological efficiency (BE) of the mushroom was maximum on the hot water treated substrate. Degradation of the hot water treated wheat straw was better and faster than chemically treated substrate. PMID:25535709

  8. Oyster mushroom cultivation with rice and wheat straw

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ruihong Zhang; Xiujin Li; J. G Fadel

    2002-01-01

    Cultivation of the oyster mushroom, Pleurotus sajor-caju, on rice and wheat straw without nutrient supplementation was investigated. The effects of straw size reduction method and particle size, spawn inoculation level, and type of substrate (rice straw versus wheat straw) on mushroom yield, biological efficiency, bioconversion efficiency, and substrate degradation were determined. Two size reduction methods, grinding and chopping, were compared.

  9. Bioconversion of lime pretreated wheat straw to fuel ethanol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lime pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification methods were evaluated for conversion of wheat straw cellulose and hemicellulose to fermentable sugars. The maximum yield of monomeric sugars from wheat straw (8.6%, w/v) by lime pretreatment (100 mg/g straw, 121 deg C, 1 h) and enzymatic hydrolysis ...

  10. Biorefining of wheat straw using an acetic and formic acid based organosolv fractionation process.

    PubMed

    Snelders, Jeroen; Dornez, Emmie; Benjelloun-Mlayah, Bouchra; Huijgen, Wouter J J; de Wild, Paul J; Gosselink, Richard J A; Gerritsma, Jort; Courtin, Christophe M

    2014-03-01

    To assess the potential of acetic and formic acid organosolv fractionation of wheat straw as basis of an integral biorefinery concept, detailed knowledge on yield, composition and purity of the obtained streams is needed. Therefore, the process was performed, all fractions extensively characterized and the mass balance studied. Cellulose pulp yield was 48% of straw dry matter, while it was 21% and 27% for the lignin and hemicellulose-rich fractions. Composition analysis showed that 67% of wheat straw xylan and 96% of lignin were solubilized during the process, resulting in cellulose pulp of 63% purity, containing 93% of wheat straw cellulose. The isolated lignin fraction contained 84% of initial lignin and had a purity of 78%. A good part of wheat straw xylan (58%) ended up in the hemicellulose-rich fraction, half of it as monomeric xylose, together with proteins (44%), minerals (69%) and noticeable amounts of acids used during processing. PMID:24508905

  11. Structure and morphology of cellulose in wheat straw

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ruigang Liu; Hui Yu; Yong Huang

    2005-01-01

    The structure and morphology of cellulose extracted from wheat were studied. It was found that the extraction process is effective and hemicelluloses and lignin can be extracted completely. Cellulose in wheat straw was identified as cellulose I allomorph with low crystallinity and the crystallinity of cellulose from different parts of the wheat straw has little difference. There was no metastable

  12. Oyster mushroom cultivation with rice and wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruihong; Li, Xiujin; Fadel, J G

    2002-05-01

    Cultivation of the oyster mushroom, Pleurotus sajor-caju, on rice and wheat straw without nutrient supplementation was investigated. The effects of straw size reduction method and particle size, spawn inoculation level, and type of substrate (rice straw versus wheat straw) on mushroom yield, biological efficiency, bioconversion efficiency, and substrate degradation were determined. Two size reduction methods, grinding and chopping, were compared. The ground straw yielded higher mushroom growth rate and yield than the chopped straw. The growth cycles of mushrooms with the ground substrate were five days shorter than with the chopped straw for a similar particle size. However, it was found that when the straw was ground into particles that were too small, the mushroom yield decreased. With the three spawn levels tested (12%, 16% and 18%), the 12% level resulted in significantly lower mushroom yield than the other two levels. Comparing rice straw with wheat straw, rice straw yielded about 10% more mushrooms than wheat straw under the same cultivation conditions. The dry matter loss of the substrate after mushroom growth varied from 30.1% to 44.3%. The straw fiber remaining after fungal utilization was not as degradable as the original straw fiber, indicating that the fungal fermentation did not improve the feed value of the straw. PMID:11991077

  13. Ethanol production from mixtures of wheat straw and wheat meal

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Bioethanol can be produced from sugar-rich, starch-rich (first generation; 1G) or lignocellulosic (second generation; 2G) raw materials. Integration of 2G ethanol with 1G could facilitate the introduction of the 2G technology. The capital cost per ton of fuel produced would be diminished and better utilization of the biomass can be achieved. It would, furthermore, decrease the energy demand of 2G ethanol production and also provide both 1G and 2G plants with heat and electricity. In the current study, steam-pretreated wheat straw (SPWS) was mixed with presaccharified wheat meal (PWM) and converted to ethanol in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). Results Both the ethanol concentration and the ethanol yield increased with increasing amounts of PWM in mixtures with SPWS. The maximum ethanol yield (99% of the theoretical yield, based on the available C6 sugars) was obtained with a mixture of SPWS containing 2.5% water-insoluble solids (WIS) and PWM containing 2.5% WIS, resulting in an ethanol concentration of 56.5 g/L. This yield was higher than those obtained with SSF of either SPWS (68%) or PWM alone (91%). Conclusions Mixing wheat straw with wheat meal would be beneficial for both 1G and 2G ethanol production. However, increasing the proportion of WIS as wheat straw and the possibility of consuming the xylose fraction with a pentose-fermenting yeast should be further investigated. PMID:20598120

  14. ETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM ALKALINE PEROXIDE PRETREATED ENZYMATICALLY SACCHARIFIED WHEAT STRAW

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat straw used in this study contained 44.24 ± 0.28% cellulose and 25.23 ± 0.11% hemicellulose. Alkaline H2O2 pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification were evaluated for conversion of wheat straw cellulose and hemicellulose to fermentable sugars. The maximum yield of monomeric sugars from whe...

  15. Distributed Physical and Molecular Separations for Selective Harvest of Higher Value Wheat Straw Components Project

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2004-09-30

    Wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.) is an abundant source of plant fiber. It is regenerated, in large quantities, every year. At present, this potentially valuable resource is greatly under-exploited. Most of the excess straw biomass (i.e., tonnage above that required for agronomic cropping system sustainability) is managed through expensive chopping/tillage operations and/or burnt in the field following harvest, resulting in air pollution and associated health problems. Potential applications for wheat straw investigated within this project include energy and composites manufacture. Other methods of straw utilization that will potentially benefit from the findings of this research project include housing and building, pulp and paper, thermal insulation, fuels, and chemicals. This project focused on components of the feedstock assembly system for supplying a higher value small grains straw residue for (1) gasification/combustion and (2) straw-thermoplastic composites. This project was an integrated effort to solve the technological, infrastructural, and economic challenges associated with using straw residue for these bioenergy and bioproducts applications. The objective of the research is to contribute to the development of a low-capital distributed harvesting and engineered storage system for upgrading wheat straw to more desirable feedstocks for combustion and for straw-plastic composites. They investigated two processes for upgrading wheat straw to a more desirable feedstock: (1) an efficient combine-based threshing system for separating the intermodal stems from the leaves, sheaths, nodes, and chaff. (2) An inexpensive biological process using white-rot fungi to improve the composition of the mechanically processed straw stems.

  16. Distributed Physical and Molecular Separations for Selective Harvest of Higher Value Wheat Straw Components Project

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, J.R

    2005-01-31

    Wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.) is an abundant source of plant fiber. It is regenerated, in large quantities, every year. At present, this potentially valuable resource is greatly under-exploited. Most of the excess straw biomass (i.e., tonnage above that required for agronomic cropping system sustainability) is managed through expensive chopping/tillage operations and/or burnt in the field following harvest, resulting in air pollution and associated health problems. Potential applications for wheat straw investigated within this project include energy and composites manufacture. Other methods of straw utilization that will potentially benefit from the findings of this research project include housing and building, pulp and paper, thermal insulation, fuels, and chemicals. This project focused on components of the feedstock assembly system for supplying a higher value small grains straw residue for (1) gasification/combustion and (2) straw-thermoplastic composites. This project was an integrated effort to solve the technological, infrastructural, and economic challenges associated with using straw residue for these bioenergy and bioproducts applications. The objective of the research is to contribute to the development of a low-capital distributed harvesting and engineered storage system for upgrading wheat straw to more desirable feedstocks for combustion and for straw-plastic composites. We investigated two processes for upgrading wheat straw to a more desirable feedstock: (1) An efficient combine-based threshing system for separating the internodal stems from the leaves, sheaths, nodes, and chaff. (2) An inexpensive biological process using white-rot fungi to improve the composition of the mechanically processed straw stems.

  17. Optimization of the dilute maleic acid pretreatment of wheat straw

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In this study, the dilute maleic acid pretreatment of wheat straw is optimized, using pretreatment time, temperature and maleic acid concentration as design variables. A central composite design was applied to the experimental set up. The response factors used in this study are: (1) glucose benefits from improved enzymatic digestibility of wheat straw solids; (2) xylose benefits from the solubilization of xylan to the liquid phase during the pretreatment; (3) maleic acid replenishment costs; (4) neutralization costs of pretreated material; (5) costs due to furfural production; and (6) heating costs of the input materials. For each response factor, experimental data were fitted mathematically. After data translation to €/Mg dry straw, determining the relative contribution of each response factor, an economic optimization was calculated within the limits of the design variables. Results When costs are disregarded, an almost complete glucan conversion to glucose can be reached (90% from solids, 7%-10% in liquid), after enzymatic hydrolysis. During the pretreatment, up to 90% of all xylan is converted to monomeric xylose. Taking cost factors into account, the optimal process conditions are: 50 min at 170°C, with 46 mM maleic acid, resulting in a yield of 65 €/Mg (megagram = metric ton) dry straw, consisting of 68 €/Mg glucose benefits (from solids: 85% of all glucan), 17 €/Mg xylose benefits (from liquid: 80% of all xylan), 17 €/Mg maleic acid costs, 2.0 €/Mg heating costs and 0.68 €/Mg NaOH costs. In all but the most severe of the studied conditions, furfural formation was so limited that associated costs are considered negligible. Conclusions After the dilute maleic acid pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis, almost complete conversion of wheat straw glucan and xylan is possible. Taking maleic acid replenishment, heating, neutralization and furfural formation into account, the optimum in the dilute maleic acid pretreatment of wheat straw in this study is 65 €/Mg dry feedstock. This is reached when process conditions are: 50 min at 170°C, with a maleic acid concentration of 46 mM. Maleic acid replenishment is the most important of the studied cost factors. PMID:20025730

  18. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Wheat Straw Paper

    E-print Network

    into Wheat Straw Paper Jamie Tang Jisun Jessica Kim Andrew Chow University of British Columbia APSC 262 March the current status of the subject matter of a project/report". #12;AN INVESTIGATION INTO WHEAT STRAW PAPER 29, 2012 Instructor: Dawn Mills #12;ii ABSTRACT "An Investigation into Wheat Straw Paper" Wheat paper

  19. Straw-reinforced polyester composites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. M. White; M. P. Ansell

    1983-01-01

    Annual crop fibres are rich in cellulose and they are a cheap and rapidly renewable source of fibres with potential for polymer reinforcement. Straw fibres have been incorporated in a polyester resin matrix and the properties of the fibre and composite determined. The fibres have a Young's modulus of approximately 8 GN m-2 and an effective density of 5.1 kN

  20. Cultivar variation and selection potential relevant to the production of cellulosic ethanol from wheat straw

    E-print Network

    California at Riverside, University of

    wheat straw J. Lindedam a, *, S.B. Andersen b , J. DeMartini c , S. Bruun b , H. Jørgensen a , C. Felby Sugar Wheat straw Variation Cultivar a b s t r a c t Optimizing cellulosic ethanol yield depends in capacity for producing fermentable sugars from straw of winter wheat cultivars with a high

  1. Growth of Pleurotus ostreatus on wheat straw and wheat-grain-based media: biochemical aspects and preparation of mushroom inoculum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Sainos; G. Díaz-Godínez; O. Loera; AM Montiel-González; C. Sánchez

    2006-01-01

    Mycelial growth, intracellular activity of proteases, laccases and ?-1,3-glucanases, and cytoplasmic protein were evaluated in the vegetative phase of Pleurotus ostreatus grown on wheat straw and in wheat-grain-based media in Petri dishes and in bottles. The productivity of the wheat straw and wheat-grain-based spawn in cylindrical polyethylene bags containing 5 kg of chopped straw was also determined. We observed high activity

  2. BUTANOL PRODUCTION FROM WHEAT STRAW HYDROLYSATE USING CLOSTRIDIUM BEIJERINCKII

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In these studies, butanol (acetone butanol ethanol or ABE) was produced from wheat straw hydrolysate (WSH) in batch cultures using Clostridium beijerinckii P260. In control fermentation, 48.9 gL**-1 glucose was used to produce 20.1 gL**-1 ABE with a productivity and yield of 0.28 gL**-1h**-1 and 0....

  3. The inorganic chemistry of the combustion of wheat straw

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Milton Blander; Arthur D. Pelton

    1997-01-01

    Equilibrium calculations of the combustion of wheat straw in an excess of air at 1 atm were carried out at temperatures ranging from 500–1200°C. A low melting molten silicate was present at all temperatures which, in addition to a large concentration of silica (76–83 mol%) and potassium (10–12 mol%) contained small concentrations (

  4. Fuel ethanol production from microwave pretreated wheat straw

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of temperature (160-240 deg C, 5 min) and duration (5-20 min at 200 deg C) of microwave pretreatment of wheat straw (8.6%, w/v, in water) on its enzymatic saccharification to fermentable sugars were evaluated. The yield of monomeric sugars from microwave (200 deg C, 10 min) pretreated w...

  5. Study of pozzolanic properties of wheat straw ash

    SciTech Connect

    Biricik, H.; Akoez, F.; Berktay, I.; Tulgar, A.N. [Yildiz Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Construction Materials] [Yildiz Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Construction Materials

    1999-05-01

    As an agricultural product, wheat straw contains considerable amounts of SiO{sub 2}. When burned it leaves an ash very rich in SiO{sub 2} that has a pozzolanic character. Wheat is an important agricultural product in Turkey. In this study, wheat straws are ground to 1--5-mm size and subjected to preburning treatment. The preburned material is later burned in controller conditions for 5 hours at 570 and 670 C. The ash is cooled suddenly and ground to 90--200 {micro} size. The standard test specimens are produced from ash and mechanically, chemically, and physically tested for determination of its pozzolanic properties. It is obtained that the ash has pozzolanic activity.

  6. Growth of Pleurotus ostreatus on wheat straw and wheat-grain-based media: Biochemical aspects and preparation of mushroom inoculum.

    PubMed

    Sainos, E; Díaz-Godínez, G; Loera, O; Montiel-González, A M; Sánchez, C

    2006-10-01

    Mycelial growth, intracellular activity of proteases, laccases and beta-1,3-glucanases, and cytoplasmic protein were evaluated in the vegetative phase of Pleurotus ostreatus grown on wheat straw and in wheat-grain-based media in Petri dishes and in bottles. The productivity of the wheat straw and wheat-grain-based spawn in cylindrical polyethylene bags containing 5 kg of chopped straw was also determined. We observed high activity of proteases and high content of intracellular protein in cultures grown on wheat straw. This suggests that the proteases are not secreted into the medium and that the protein is an important cellular reserve. On the contrary, cultures grown on wheat straw secreted laccases into the medium, which could be induced by this substrate. P. ostreatus grown on media prepared with a combination of wheat straw and wheat grain showed a high radial growth rate in Petri dishes and a high level of mycelial growth in bottles. The productivities of wheat straw and wheat-grain-based spawn were similar. Our results show that cheaper and more productive mushroom spawn can be prepared by developing the mycelium on wheat straw and wheat-grain-based substrates. PMID:16586105

  7. Cellulases and xylanase of an anaerobic rumen fungus grown on wheat straw, wheat straw holocellulose, cellulose, and xylan.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, S E; Theodorou, M K; Trinci, A P

    1987-01-01

    The activities of cellulolytic and xylanolytic enzymes produced by an anaerobic fungus (R1) which resembled Neocallimastix sp. were investigated. Carboxymethylcellulase (CMCase), cellobiase, and filter paper (FPase) activities had pH optima of 6.0, 5.5, and 6.0, respectively. CMCase and cellobiase activities both had a temperature optimum of 50 degrees C, whereas FPase had an optimum of 45 degrees C. The pH and temperature optima for xylanase activity were pH 6.0 and 50 degrees C, respectively. Growth of the fungus on wheat straw, wheat straw holocellulose, or cellulose resulted in substantial colonization, with at least 43 to 58% losses in substrate dry matter and accumulation of comparable amounts of formate. This end product was correlated to apparent loss of substrate dry weight and could be used as an indicator of fungal growth. Milling of wheat straw did not enhance the rate or extent of substrate degradation. Growth of the R1 isolate on the above substrates or xylan also resulted in accumulation of high levels of xylanase activity and lower cellulase activities. Of the cellulases, CMCase was the most active and was associated with either low or trace amounts of cellobiase and FPase activities. During growth on xylan, reducing sugars, including arabinose and xylose, rapidly accumulated in the medium. Xylose and other reducing sugars, but not arabinose, were subsequently used for growth. Reducing sugars also accumulated, but not as rapidly, when the fungus was grown on wheat straw, wheat straw holocellulose, or cellulose. Xylanase activities detected during growth of R1 on media containing glucose, xylose, or cellobiose suggested that enzyme production was constitutive.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:3606104

  8. Estimating Straw Production of Spring and Winter Wheat Richard Engel1

    E-print Network

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Estimating Straw Production of Spring and Winter Wheat Richard Engel1 , Dan Long2 , Gregg Carlson2 production for spring and winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) are important in Montana because crop residue that preserves a specified level of crop residue. Straw production levels for wheat frequently are estimated

  9. Enzyme affinity to cell types in wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.) before and after hydrothermal pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Wheat straw used for bioethanol production varies in enzymatic digestibility according to chemical structure and composition of cell walls and tissues. In this work, the two biologically different wheat straw organs, leaves and stems, are described together with the effects of hydrothermal pretreatment on chemical composition, tissue structure, enzyme adhesion and digestion. To highlight the importance of inherent cell wall characteristics and the diverse effects of mechanical disruption and biochemical degradation, separate leaves and stems were pretreated on lab-scale and their tissue structures maintained mostly intact for image analysis. Finally, samples were enzymatically hydrolysed to correlate digestibility to chemical composition, removal of polymers, tissue composition and disruption, particle size and enzyme adhesion as a result of pretreatment and wax removal. For comparison, industrially pretreated wheat straw from Inbicon A/S was included in all the experiments. Results Within the same range of pretreatment severities, industrial pretreatment resulted in most hemicellulose and epicuticular wax/cutin removal compared to lab-scale pretreated leaves and stems but also in most re-deposition of lignin on the surface. Tissues were furthermore degraded from tissues into individual cells while lab-scale pretreated samples were structurally almost intact. In both raw leaves and stems, endoglucanase and exoglucanase adhered most to parenchyma cells; after pretreatment, to epidermal cells in all the samples. Despite heavy tissue disruption, industrially pretreated samples were not as susceptible to enzymatic digestion as lab-scale pretreated leaves while lab-scale pretreated stems were the least digestible. Conclusions Despite preferential enzyme adhesion to epidermal cells after hydrothermal pretreatment, our results suggest that the single most important factor determining wheat straw digestibility is the fraction of parenchyma cells rather than effective tissue disruption. PMID:23590820

  10. Fermentation of wheat straw hemicelluloses to ethanol by Pachysolen tannophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Detroy, R.W.; Cunningham, R.L.; Herman, A.I.

    1982-01-01

    Wheat straw (WS) was subjected to autohydrolysis (165/sup 0/C) prior to acid hydrolysis of the xylans to yield liquor xylan solids. The crude xylan hydrolysates were tested as substrates for ethanol production by Pachysolen tannophilus. Ethanol fermentation of crude xylan hydrolysates by P. tannophilus was obtained with either ethanol- or ether-extracted material. Ethanol-extracted liquor solids yielded 10 g/L ethanol from 43 g/L xylose, whereas ether-extracted hydrolysates resulted in 4.3 g/L ethanol from 48 g/L xylose. Alkali pulping of wheat straw yielded a hemicellulose-rich fraction. Xylose was liberated by acid hydrolysis and fermentated by the yeast to produce 8.2 g/L ethanol from 47 g/L xylose in four days. 8 figures, 1 table.

  11. Enhanced saccharification of biologically pretreated wheat straw for ethanol production.

    PubMed

    López-Abelairas, M; Lu-Chau, T A; Lema, J M

    2013-02-01

    The biological pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass with white-rot fungi for the production of bioethanol is an alternative to the most used physico-chemical processes. After biological treatment, a solid composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin-this latter is with a composition lower than that found in the initial substrate-is obtained. On the contrary, after applying physico-chemical methods, most of the hemicellulose fraction is solubilized, while cellulose and lignin fractions remain in the solid. The optimization of the combination of cellulases and hemicellulases required to saccharify wheat straw pretreated with the white-rot fungus Irpex lacteus was carried out in this work. The application of the optimal dosage made possible the increase of the sugar yield from 33 to 54 %, and at the same time the reduction of the quantity of enzymatic mixture in 40 %, with respect to the initial dosage. The application of a pre-hydrolysis step with xylanases was also studied. PMID:23306886

  12. Nutritive value index of treated wheat straw with Pleurotus fungi

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Fazaeli

    2007-01-01

    Wheat straw was inoculated with spawns of two species of Pleurotus fungi (coded: PF and PO) and incubated in a fermentation room at 22±5ºC and 70±5, relative humidity. After 17 days of spawning, when the substrate was completely covered by fungal mycelia, half of the bags were removed from the fermentation room, sun dried and used for in vitro measurements

  13. Erythritol production on wheat straw using Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We overexpressed the err1 gene in the Trichoderma reesei wild-type and in the cellulase hyperproducing, carbon catabolite derepressed strain Rut-C30 in order to investigate the possibility of producing erythritol with T. reesei. Two different promoters were used for err1 overexpression in both strains, a constitutive (the native pyruvat kinase (pki) promoter) and an inducible one (the native ?-xylosidase (bxl1) promoter). The derived recombinant strains were precharacterized by analysis of err1 transcript formation on D-xylose and xylan. Based on this, one strain of each type was chosen for further investigation for erythritol production in shake flasks and in bioreactor experiments. For the latter, we used wheat straw pretreated by an alkaline organosolve process as lignocellulosic substrate. Shake flask experiments on D-xylose showed increased erythritol formation for both, the wild-type and the Rut-C30 overexpression strain compared to their respective parental strain. Bioreactor cultivations on wheat straw did not increase erythritol formation in the wild-type overexpression strain. However, err1 overexpression in Rut-C30 led to a clearly higher erythritol formation on wheat straw. PMID:24949268

  14. Comparison of sodium carbonate-oxygen and sodium hydroxide-oxygen pretreatments on the chemical composition and enzymatic saccharification of wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Geng, Wenhui; Huang, Ting; Jin, Yongcan; Song, Junlong; Chang, Hou-Min; Jameel, Hasan

    2014-06-01

    Pretreatment of wheat straw with a combination of sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) or sodium hydroxide (NaOH) with oxygen (O2) 0.5MPa was evaluated for its delignification ability at relatively low temperature 110°C and for its effect on enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency. In the pretreatment, the increase of alkali charge (as Na2O) up to 12% for Na2CO3 and 6% for NaOH, respectively, resulted in enhancement of lignin removal, but did not significantly degrade cellulose and hemicellulose. When the pretreated solid was hydrolyzed with a mixture of cellulases and hemicellulases, the sugar yield increased rapidly with the lignin removal during the pretreatment. A total sugar yield based on dry matter of raw material, 63.8% for Na2CO3-O2 and 71.9% for NaOH-O2 was achieved under a cellulase loading of 20FPU/g-cellulose. The delignification efficiency and total sugar yield from enzymatic hydrolysis were comparable to the previously reported results at much higher temperature without oxygen. PMID:24686372

  15. Pretreatment of wheat straw with potassium hydroxide for increasing enzymatic and microbial degradability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoying; Zicari, Steven M; Liu, Guangqing; Li, Yeqing; Zhang, Ruihong

    2015-06-01

    The pretreatment of wheat straw with potassium hydroxide (KOH) at ambient temperature (20°C) was investigated. The pretreatment effects on chemical composition and physical structures, and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis and anaerobic digestion were evaluated. Wheat straw at 10% total solids (TS) was treated with KOH solution for 24h at a wide range of KOH loadings from 2% to 50% (w/w dry basis). Higher KOH loading resulted in higher lignin reduction from the straw and chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the resulting black liquor. Maximum lignin reduction of 54.7% was observed at 50% KOH loading. In comparison to untreated straw, specific hydrolysis yields achieved 14.0-92.3% over the range of 2-50% KOH loading, and methane yields increased 16.7-77.5% for KOH loadings of 10-50%, respectively. Accounting for losses during pretreatment, 20% KOH loading resulted in maximum overall reducing sugar yield and methane yield and therefore is the recommended loading for pretreatment under these conditions. PMID:25768417

  16. Delignification of Wheat Straw by Pleurotus spp. under Mushroom-Growing Conditions †

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Linda J.; Reid, Ian D.; Coxworth, Ewen C.

    1987-01-01

    Pleurotus sajor-caju, P. sapidus, P. cornucopiae, and P. ostreatus mushrooms were produced on unsupplemented wheat straw. The yield of mushrooms averaged 3.6% (dry-weight basis), with an average 18% straw weight loss. Lignin losses (average, 11%) were lower than cellulose (20%) and hemicellulose (50%) losses. The cellulase digestibility of the residual straw after mushroom harvest was generally lower than that of the original straw. It does not appear feasible to simultaneously produce Pleurotus mushrooms and a highly delignified residue from wheat straw. PMID:16347363

  17. ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS AND FERMENTATION OF LIME PRETREATED WHEAT STRAW TO ETHANOL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat straw used in this study contained 44.24 +/- 0.28% cellulose and 25.23 +/- 0.11% hemicellulose. Lime pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification methods were evaluated for conversion of wheat straw cellulose and hemicellulose to fermentable sugars. The maximum yield of monomeric sugars from ...

  18. Scale-up of wheat straw conversion to fuel ethanol at 100 liter scale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat straw can serve as low cost feedstock for conversion to ethanol. Pretreatment is crucial prior to enzymatic hydrolysis. We have used dilute H2SO4 pretreatment at a high temperature for pretreatment of wheat straw. The pretreated hydrolyzate was bioabated using a novel fungal strain able to ...

  19. Use of ground wheat straw in container nursery substrates to overwinter daylily divisions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat (Triticum sp.) straw is being evaluated as a potential component in soilless container mixes either alone or combined with compost to replace a significant portion of the substrate currently supplied by pine bark and peat moss. The objective of this study was to evaluate wheat straw and horse...

  20. Microwave Pretreatment, Enzymatic Saccharification, and Fermentation of Wheat Straw to Ethanol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat straw used in this study contained 38.8±0.5% cellulose and 31.0±0.3% hemicellulose. The effects of temperature (160-240 deg C, 5 min) and duration (5-20 min at 200 deg C) of microwave pretreatment of wheat straw (8.6%, w/v, in water) on its enzymatic saccharification to fermentable sugars wer...

  1. Ammonia and urea treatment of wheat straw and corn stover JP Fontenot E Gallo Llorente, JM Obamahinti, VG Allen

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Ammonia and urea treatment of wheat straw and corn stover JP Fontenot E Gallo Llorente, JM Experiments were conducted to study the effect of treating two crop residues, wheat straw and corn stover treatment with black polyethylene for 93 days for wheat straw and 129 days for corn stover. Dry matter

  2. Degradation of wheat straw cell wall by white rot fungi Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jijiao

    The main aim of this dissertation research was to understand the natural microbial degradation process of lignocellulosic materials in order to develop a new, green and more effective pretreatment technology for bio-fuel production. The biodegradation of wheat straw by white rot fungi Phanerochaete chrysosporium was investigated. The addition of nutrients significantly improved the performance of P.chrysosporium on wheat straw degradation. The proteomic analysis indicated that this fungus produced various pepetides related to cellulose and lignin degradation while grown on the biomass. The structural analysis of lignin further showed that P.chrysosporium preferentially degraded hydroxycinnamtes in order to access cellulose. In details, the effects of carbon resource and metabolic pathway regulating compounds on manganeses peroxidase (MnP) were studied. The results indicated that MnP activity of 4.7 +/- 0.31 U mL-1 was obtained using mannose as a carbon source. The enzyme productivity further reached 7.36 +/- 0.05 U mL-1 and 8.77 +/- 0.23 U mL -1 when the mannose medium was supplemented with cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) respectively, revealing highest MnP productivity obtained by optimizing the carbon sources and supplementation with small molecules. In addition, the effects of nutrient additives for improving biological pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass were studied. The pretreatment of wheat straw supplemented with inorganic salts (salts group) and tween 80 was examined. The extra nutrient significantly improved the ligninase expression leading to improve digestibility of lignocellulosic biomass. Among the solid state fermentation groups, salts group resulted in a substantial degradation of wheat straw within one week, along with the highest lignin loss (25 %) and ˜ 250% higher efficiency for the total sugar release through enzymatic hydrolysis. The results were correlated with pyrolysis GC-MS (Py-GC-MS), thermogravimetric (TG) /differential thermogravimetric (DTG) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Finally, the fungal secretomes and composition, functional groups, and structural changes of the fungal spent wheat straw lignin were determined. Milled wood lignin (MWL) was extracted from biological treated and untreaed wheat straw. Detailed structural analysis through two dimentional heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonances (2D HMQC NMR) of the pretreated lignin (acetylated) revealed low abundances of the substructures dibenzodioxacin and cinnamyl alcohol. Further analysis of lignin by Fourier transmission infrared (FTIR) and pyrolysis gas chromatography/ mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) demonstrated the significant decrease of guaiacyl units. The results support previous findings on the biodegradation of wheat straw as analyzed by 13C cross polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS). Revealing the characteristic behavior of P. chrysosporium-mediated biomass degradation, the information presented in this paper offers new insight into the understanding of biological lignin degradation of wheat straw by P. chrysosporium.

  3. The influence of fertilizer nitrogen and season on the carbon-13 abundance of wheat straw

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. S. Jenkinson; K. Coleman; D. D. Harkness

    1995-01-01

    Carbon-13 abundance, expressed as ?13C in ‰, was measured in wheat straw grown between 1984 and 1989 on the Broadbalk Continuous Wheat Experiment at Rothamsted.\\u000a In all six years, straw grown without fertilizer N contained less carbon-13 (i.e.?13C was more negative) than straw grown with fertilizer, although the magnitude of this difference varied with year. In a dry\\u000a year, when

  4. Comparing the performance of Miscanthus x giganteus and wheat straw biomass in sulfuric acid based pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Kärcher, M A; Iqbal, Y; Lewandowski, I; Senn, T

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess and compare the suitability of Miscanthus x giganteus and wheat straw biomass in dilute acid catalyzed pretreatment. Miscanthus and wheat straw were treated in a dilute sulfuric acid/steam explosion pretreatment. As a result of combining dilute sulfuric acid- and steam explosion pretreatment the hemicellulose hydrolysis yields (96% in wheat straw and 90% in miscanthus) in both substrates were higher than reported in literature. The combined severity factor (=CSF) for optimal hemicellulose hydrolysis was 1.9 and 1.5 in for miscanthus and wheat straw respectively. Because of the higher CSF value more furfural, furfuryl alcohol, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and acetic acid was formed in miscanthus than in wheat straw pretreatment. PMID:25613555

  5. Biogeochemical Processes That Produce Dissolved Organic Matter From Wheat Straw

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, Robert L.; Rutherford, David W.; Leenheer, Jerry A.; Kennedy, Kay R.; Cox, Larry G.; Koci, Donald R.

    2003-01-01

    The chemical reactions that lead to the formation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in natural waters are poorly understood. Studies on the formation of DOM generally are complicated because almost all DOM isolates have been derived from mixtures of plant species composed of a wide variety of different types of precursor compounds for DOM formation. This report describes a study of DOM derived mainly from bales of wheat straw that had been left in a field for several years. During this period of time, black water from the decomposing wheat straw accumulated in pools in the field. The nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectra of the black water DOM indicate that it is composed almost entirely of lignin and carbohydrate polymeric units. Analysis by high-performance size-exclusion chromatography with multi-angle laser-light scattering detection indicates that the number average molecular weight of the DOM is 124,000 daltons. The results presented in this report indicate that the black water DOM is composed of hemicellulose chains cross-linked to lignin oligomers. These types of structures have been shown to exist in the hemicellulose matrix of plant cell walls. The cross-linked lignin-hemicellulose complexes apparently were released from partially degraded wheat-straw cell walls with little alteration. In solution in the black water, these lignin-hemicellulose polymers fold into compact globular particles in which the nonpolar parts of the polymer form the interiors of the particles and the polar groups are on the exterior surfaces of the particles. The tightly folded, compact conformation of these particles probably renders them relatively resistant to microbial degradation. This should be especially the case for the aromatic lignin structures that will be buried in the interiors of the particles.

  6. Flowability parameters for chopped switchgrass, wheat straw and corn stover

    SciTech Connect

    Chevanan, Nehru [University of Tennessee; Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Bitra, V.S.P. [University of Tennessee; Yoder, D.C. [University of Tennessee; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

    2009-02-01

    A direct shear cell to measure the shear strength and flow properties of chopped switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover was designed, fabricated, and tested. Yield loci (r2=0.99) determined at pre-consolidation pressures of 3.80 kPa and 5.02 kPa indicated that chopped biomass followed Mohr-Coulomb failure. Normal stress significantly affected the displacement required for shear failure, as well as the friction coefficient values for all three chopped biomass types. Displacement at shear failure ranged from 30 to 80 mm, and depended on pre-consolidation pressure, normal stress, and particle size. Friction coefficient was inversely related to normal stress, and was highest for chopped corn stover. Also, chopped corn stover exhibited the highest angle of internal friction, unconfined yield strength, major consolidation strength, and cohesive strength, all of which indicated increased challenges in handling chopped corn stover. The measured angle of internal friction and cohesive strength indicated that chopped biomass cannot be handled by gravity alone. The measured angle of internal friction and cohesive strength were 43 and 0.75 kPa for chopped switchgrass; 44 and 0.49 kPa for chopped wheat straw; and 48 and 0.82 kPa for chopped corn stover. Unconfined yield strength and major consolidation strength used for characterization of bulk flow materials and design of hopper dimensions were 3.4 and 10.4 kPa for chopped switchgrass; 2.3 and 9.6 kPa for chopped wheat straw and 4.2 and 11.8 kPa for chopped corn stover. These results are useful for development of efficient handling, storage, and transportation systems for biomass in biorefineries.

  7. Metataxonomic profiling and prediction of functional behaviour of wheat straw degrading microbial consortia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mixed microbial cultures, in which bacteria and fungi interact, have been proposed as an efficient way to deconstruct plant waste. The characterization of specific microbial consortia could be the starting point for novel biotechnological applications related to the efficient conversion of lignocellulose to cello-oligosaccharides, plastics and/or biofuels. Here, the diversity, composition and predicted functional profiles of novel bacterial-fungal consortia are reported, on the basis of replicated aerobic wheat straw enrichment cultures. Results In order to set up biodegradative microcosms, microbial communities were retrieved from a forest soil and introduced into a mineral salt medium containing 1% of (un)treated wheat straw. Following each incubation step, sequential transfers were carried out using 1 to 1,000 dilutions. The microbial source next to three sequential batch cultures (transfers 1, 3 and 10) were analyzed by bacterial 16S rRNA gene and fungal ITS1 pyrosequencing. Faith’s phylogenetic diversity values became progressively smaller from the inoculum to the sequential batch cultures. Moreover, increases in the relative abundances of Enterobacteriales, Pseudomonadales, Flavobacteriales and Sphingobacteriales were noted along the enrichment process. Operational taxonomic units affiliated with Acinetobacter johnsonii, Pseudomonas putida and Sphingobacterium faecium were abundant and the underlying strains were successfully isolated. Interestingly, Klebsiella variicola (OTU1062) was found to dominate in both consortia, whereas K. variicola-affiliated strains retrieved from untreated wheat straw consortia showed endoglucanase/xylanase activities. Among the fungal players with high biotechnological relevance, we recovered members of the genera Penicillium, Acremonium, Coniochaeta and Trichosporon. Remarkably, the presence of peroxidases, alpha-L-fucosidases, beta-xylosidases, beta-mannases and beta-glucosidases, involved in lignocellulose degradation, was indicated by predictive bacterial metagenome reconstruction. Reassuringly, tests for specific (hemi)cellulolytic enzymatic activities, performed on the consortial secretomes, confirmed the presence of such gene functions. Conclusion In an in-depth characterization of two wheat straw degrading microbial consortia, we revealed the enrichment and selection of specific bacterial and fungal taxa that were presumably involved in (hemi) cellulose degradation. Interestingly, the microbial community composition was strongly influenced by the wheat straw pretreatment. Finally, the functional bacterial-metagenome prediction and the evaluation of enzymatic activities (at the consortial secretomes) revealed the presence and enrichment of proteins involved in the deconstruction of plant biomass. PMID:24955113

  8. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sugarcane Bagasse Paper versus Wheat Straw Paper

    E-print Network

    versus Wheat Straw Paper Omar Omari, Marcus Cheung, Robert Chen, Hugo Chen University of British Columbia://kids-myshot.nationalgeographic.com/photos/view/60175/wheat-shot-by-paper-clip-girl http://bgbarman.bg/%D0%95%D0%BD%D1%86%D0%B8%D0%BA%D0%BB%D0%BE%D0%BF Bagasse Paper versus Wheat Straw Paper prepared by Omar Omari 54434105 Marcus Cheung 82207101 Robert Chen

  9. A solid state fungal fermentation-based strategy for the hydrolysis of wheat straw?

    PubMed Central

    Pensupa, Nattha; Jin, Meng; Kokolski, Matt; Archer, David B.; Du, Chenyu

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports a solid-state fungal fermentation-based pre-treatment strategy to convert wheat straw into a fermentable hydrolysate. Aspergillus niger was firstly cultured on wheat straw for production of cellulolytic enzymes and then the wheat straw was hydrolyzed by the enzyme solution into a fermentable hydrolysate. The optimum moisture content and three wheat straw modification methods were explored to improve cellulase production. At a moisture content of 89.5%, 10.2 ± 0.13 U/g cellulase activity was obtained using dilute acid modified wheat straw. The addition of yeast extract (0.5% w/v) and minerals significantly improved the cellulase production, to 24.0 ± 1.76 U/g. The hydrolysis of the fermented wheat straw using the fungal culture filtrate or commercial cellulase Ctec2 was performed, resulting in 4.34 and 3.13 g/L glucose respectively. It indicated that the fungal filtrate harvested from the fungal fermentation of wheat straw contained a more suitable enzyme mixture than the commercial cellulase. PMID:24121367

  10. A solid state fungal fermentation-based strategy for the hydrolysis of wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Pensupa, Nattha; Jin, Meng; Kokolski, Matt; Archer, David B; Du, Chenyu

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports a solid-state fungal fermentation-based pre-treatment strategy to convert wheat straw into a fermentable hydrolysate. Aspergillus niger was firstly cultured on wheat straw for production of cellulolytic enzymes and then the wheat straw was hydrolyzed by the enzyme solution into a fermentable hydrolysate. The optimum moisture content and three wheat straw modification methods were explored to improve cellulase production. At a moisture content of 89.5%, 10.2 ± 0.13 U/g cellulase activity was obtained using dilute acid modified wheat straw. The addition of yeast extract (0.5% w/v) and minerals significantly improved the cellulase production, to 24.0 ± 1.76 U/g. The hydrolysis of the fermented wheat straw using the fungal culture filtrate or commercial cellulase Ctec2 was performed, resulting in 4.34 and 3.13 g/L glucose respectively. It indicated that the fungal filtrate harvested from the fungal fermentation of wheat straw contained a more suitable enzyme mixture than the commercial cellulase. PMID:24121367

  11. Structure and enzymatic accessibility of leaf and stem from wheat straw before and after hydrothermal pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Biomass recalcitrance is affected by a number of chemical, physical and biological factors. In this study we looked into the differences in recalcitrance between two major anatomical fractions of wheat straw biomass, leaf and stem. A set of twenty-one wheat cultivars was fractionated and illustrated the substantial variation in leaf-to-stem ratio between cultivars. The two fractions were compared in terms of chemical composition, enzymatic convertibility, cellulose crystallinity and glucan accessibility. The use of water as a probe for assessing glucan accessibility was explored using low field nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy in combination with hydrogen-deuterium exchange. Results Leaves were clearly more degradable by lignocellulolytic enzymes than stems, and it was demonstrated that xylose removal was more linked to glucose yield for stems than for leaves. Comparing the locations of water in leaf and stem by low field NMR and FT-IR revealed that the glucan hydroxyl groups in leaves were more accessible to water than glucan hydroxyl groups in stems. No difference in crystallinity between leaf and stem was observed using wide angle x-ray diffraction. Hydrothermal pretreatment increased the accessibility towards water in stems but not in leaves. The results in this study indicate a correlation between the accessibility of glucan to water and to enzymes. Conclusions Enzymatic degradability of wheat straw anatomical fractions can be indicated by the accessibility of the hydroxyl groups to water. This suggests that water may be used to assess glucan accessibility in biomass samples. PMID:24860617

  12. Ensiling of wheat straw decreases the required temperature in hydrothermal pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ensiling is a well-known method for preserving green biomasses through anaerobic production of organic acids by lactic acid bacteria. In this study, wheat straw is subjected to ensiling in combination with hydrothermal treatment as a combined pretreatment method, taking advantage of the produced organic acids. Results Ensiling for 4 weeks was accomplished in a vacuum bag system after addition of an inoculum of Lactobacillus buchneri and 7% w/w xylose to wheat straw biomass at 35% final dry matter. Both glucan and xylan were preserved, and the DM loss after ensiling was less than 0.5%. When comparing hydrothermally treated wheat straw (170, 180 and 190°C) with hydrothermally treated ensiled wheat straw (same temperatures), several positive effects of ensiling were revealed. Glucan was up-concentrated in the solid fraction and the solubilisation of hemicellulose was significantly increased. Subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of the solid fractions showed that ensiling significantly improved the effect of pretreatment, especially at the lower temperatures of 170 and 180°C. The overall glucose yields after pretreatments of ensiled wheat straw were higher than for non-ensiled wheat straw hydrothermally treated at 190°C, namely 74-81% of the theoretical maximum glucose in the raw material, which was ~1.8 times better than the corresponding yields for the non-ensiled straw pretreated at 170 or 180°C. The highest overall conversion of combined glucose and xylose was achieved for ensiled wheat straw hydrothermally treated at 180°C, with overall glucose yield of 78% and overall conversion yield of xylose of 87%. Conclusions Ensiling of wheat straw is shown to be an effective pre-step to hydrothermal treatment, and can give rise to a welcomed decrease of process temperature in hydrothermal treatments, thereby potentially having a positive effect on large scale pretreatment costs. PMID:23945109

  13. Wet explosion of wheat straw and codigestion with swine manure: effect on the methane productivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, G; Gavala, H N; Skiadas, I V; Ahring, B K

    2009-11-01

    The continuously increasing demand for renewable energy sources renders anaerobic digestion to one of the most promising technologies for renewable energy production. Twenty-two (22) large-scale biogas plants are currently under operation in Denmark. Most of these plants use manure as the primary feedstock but their economical profitable operation relies on the addition of other biomass products with a high biogas yield. Wheat straw is the major crop residue in Europe and the second largest agricultural residue in the world. So far it has been used in several applications, i.e. pulp and paper making, production of regenerated cellulose fibers as an alternative to wood for cellulose-based materials and ethanol production. The advantage of exploiting wheat straw for various applications is that it is available in considerable quantity and at low-cost. In the present study, the codigestion of swine manure with wheat straw in a continuous operated system was investigated, as a method to increase the efficiency of biogas plants that are based on anaerobic digestion of swine manure. Also, the pretreatment of wheat straw with the wet explosion method was studied and the efficiency of the wet explosion process was evaluated based on (a) the sugars release and (b) the methane potential of the pretreated wheat straw compared to that of the raw biomass. It was found that, although a high release of soluble sugars was observed after wet explosion, the methane obtained from the wet-exploded wheat straw was slightly lower compared to that from the raw biomas s. On the other hand, the results from the codigestion of raw (non-pretreated) wheat straw with swine manure were very promising, suggesting that 4.6 kg of straw added to 1t of manure increase the methane production by 10%. Thus, wheat straw can be considered as a promising, low-cost biomass for increasing the methane productivity of biogas plants that are based mainly on swine manure. PMID:19666217

  14. Thermostable endoglucanases in the liquefaction of hydrothermally pretreated wheat straw

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Thermostable enzymes have several benefits in lignocellulose processing. In particular, they potentially allow the use of increased substrate concentrations (because the substrate viscosity decreases as the temperature increases), resulting in improved product yields and reduced capital and processing costs. A short pre-hydrolysis step at an elevated temperature using thermostable enzymes aimed at rapid liquefaction of the feedstock is seen as an attractive way to overcome the technical problems (such as poor mixing and mass transfer properties) connected with high initial solid loadings in the lignocellulose to ethanol process. Results The capability of novel thermostable enzymes to reduce the viscosity of high-solid biomass suspensions using a real-time viscometric measurement method was investigated. Heterologously expressed enzymes from various thermophilic organisms were compared for their ability to liquefy the lignocellulosic substrate, hydrothermally pretreated wheat straw. Once the best enzymes were identified, the optimal temperatures for these enzymes to decrease substrate viscosity were compared. The combined hydrolytic properties of the thermostable preparations were tested in hydrolysis experiments. The studied mixtures were primarily designed to have good liquefaction potential, and therefore contained an enhanced proportion of the key liquefying enzyme, EGII/Cel5A. Conclusions Endoglucanases were shown to have a superior ability to rapidly reduce the viscosity of the 15% (w/w; dry matter) hydrothermally pretreated wheat straw. Based on temperature profiling studies, Thermoascus aurantiacus EGII/Cel5A was the most promising enzyme for biomass liquefaction. Even though they were not optimized for saccharification, many of the thermostable enzyme mixtures had superior hydrolytic properties compared with the commercial reference enzymes at 55°C. PMID:21269447

  15. Effect of lignite humic acid treatment on the rate of decomposition of wheat straw

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Geoffrey M. Whiteley; Christine Pettit

    1994-01-01

    Comparisons were made between the rates of microbial respiration during the incubation of milled wheat straw in the presence or absence of a dispersal of lignite humic acids. Lignite treatment significantly reduced both the rate of O2 consumption and CO2 evolution from the straw substrate over a 4-week period. In view of this observed inhibitory effect, additions of exogenous humic

  16. On-combine Sensing Technique for Mapping Straw Yield within Wheat Fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Straw from production of wheat is available for conversion to bioenergy. However, not all of this straw is available for conversion because a certain amount must be returned to the soil for conservation. County and state-wide inventories do not account for variation within farm fields. In this st...

  17. Solid state NMR spectroscopy of specifically 13C-enriched lignin in wheat straw from coniferin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Noritsugu Terashima; Rajai H. Atalla; David L. Vanderhart

    1997-01-01

    Three coniferins, specifically 13C-enriched at side chain ?, ? and ? carbons, and natural abundance (unenriched) coniferin were administered to internode cavities of lignifying culms of dwarf wheat. Difference 13C CP\\/MAS spectra were obtained between the spectra of the coniferin-fed and the unfed wheat straws, or between the spectra of straws fed with enriched coniferin and unenriched coniferin. The difference

  18. Characterization of degradation products from alkaline wet oxidation of wheat straw

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Helene B Klinke; Birgitte K Ahring; Anette S Schmidt; Anne Belinda Thomsen

    2002-01-01

    Alkaline wet oxidation pre-treatment (water, sodium carbonate, oxygen, high temperature and pressure) of wheat straw was performed as a 24?1 fractional factorial design with the process parameters: temperature, reaction time, sodium carbonate and oxygen. Alkaline wet oxidation was an efficient pre-treatment of wheat straw that resulted in solid fractions with high cellulose recovery (96%) and high enzymatic convertibility to glucose

  19. Bioethanol, biohydrogen and biogas production from wheat straw in a biorefinery concept

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Prasad Kaparaju; María Serrano; Anne Belinda Thomsen; Prawit Kongjan; Irini Angelidaki

    2009-01-01

    The production of bioethanol, biohydrogen and biogas from wheat straw was investigated within a biorefinery framework. Initially, wheat straw was hydrothermally liberated to a cellulose rich fiber fraction and a hemicellulose rich liquid fraction (hydrolysate). Enzymatic hydrolysis and subsequent fermentation of cellulose yielded 0.41g-ethanol\\/g-glucose, while dark fermentation of hydrolysate produced 178.0ml-H2\\/g-sugars. The effluents from both bioethanol and biohydrogen processes were

  20. Hydrolysis of wheat straw hemicellulose with trifluoroacetic acid. Fermentation of xylose with Pachysolen tannophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Fanta, G.F.; Abbott, T.P.; Herman, A.I.; Burr, R.C.; Doane, W.M.

    1984-01-01

    Treatment of wheat straw 1N trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) for 7 h at reflux temperature yielded 23% xylose based upon initial straw weight. This corresponds to about an 80% xylose yield based on the xylan content of the hemicellulose. The cellulose component of wheat straw was largely unaffected, as evidenced by low glucose yields. Decomposition of xylose by prolonged refluxing (23h) was minimal in 1N TFA compared to 1N HCl. Treatment of wheat straw with refluxing 1N TFA converts about 10% of the lignin initially present in straw into water-soluble lignin fragments. Fermentation of the xylose-rich wheat straw hydrolyzate to ethanol with Pachysolen tannophilus was comparable to the fermentation of reagent grade xylose, indicating that furfural and toxic lignin by-products were not produced by 1N TFA in sufficient amounts to impair cell growth and ethanol production. Cellulase treatment of the wheat straw residue after TFA hydrolysis resulted in a 70-75% conversion of the cellulose into glucose.

  1. The effects of urine level, duration of treatment and moisture level on nutritive value of wheat straw

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    The effects of urine level, duration of treatment and moisture level on nutritive value of wheat the nutritive value of wheat straw was investigated. Two experiments arranged in a factorial design (3x3) with 3 replicates per treatment were performed using the same batch of wheat straw. In Experiment 1 moisture level

  2. An Alternative Application to the Portuguese Agro-Industrial Residue: Wheat Straw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzene, Denise S.; Silva, Daniel P.; Vicente, António A.; Gonçalves, Adilson R.; Teixeira, José A.

    The effects of alkaline treatments of the wheat straw with sodium hydroxide were investigated. The optimal condition for extraction of hemicelluloses was found to be with 0.50 mol/1 sodium hydroxide at 55 °C for 2 h. This resulted in the release of 17.3% of hemicellulose (% dry starting material), corresponding to the dissolution of 49.3% of the original hemicellulose. The yields were determined by gravimetric analysis and expressed as a proportion of the starting material. Chemical composition and physico-chemical properties of the samples of hemicelluloses were elucidated by a combination of sugar analyses, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and thermal analysis. The results showed that the treatments were very effective on the extraction of hemicelluloses from wheat straw and that the extraction intensity (expressed in terms of alkali concentration) had a great influence on the yield and chemical features of the hemicelluloses. The FTIR analysis revealed typical signal pattern for the hemicellulosic fraction in the 1,200-1,000 cm-1 region. Bands between 1,166 and 1,000 cm-1 are typical of xylans.

  3. Saccharification of wheat-straw cellulose by enzymatic hydrolysis following fermentative and chemical pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Detroy, R.W.; Lindenfelser, L.A.; St. Julian, G. Jr.; Orton, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    In our investigations, wheat straw fermentations were conducted using the edible, white-rot fungus commonly known as the oyster mushroom, Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq. ex Fr.) Kummer, as fermentation organism. Fermented substrates were evaluated for degree of lignin and cellulose degradation and saccharification. In addition, since our primary objective in the P. ostreatus fermentation was to increase the amount of availabile cellulose in straw for further fermentation, cellulose hydrolysis rates were determined. Cellulose conversion to fermentable sugar was also determined on chemically modified straws by subjecting them to enzymatic hydrolysis. Progress and extent of delignification was follwed also by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and structural changes were determined in treated-straw substrates.

  4. Fuel Ethanol Production from Wheat Straw: Demonstration of Technology at the 100 Liter Scale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat straw, a globally abundant byproduct of wheat production, contains about 70% carbohydrates that can serve as a low cost feedstock for conversion to fuel ethanol. It was pretreated at high solids loading with dilute acid at a high temperature for a short period of time. The pretreated hydrolyza...

  5. Modification of wheat straw in a high-shear mixer

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, M.E.; Doane, W.M.

    1984-01-01

    Wheat straw (WS) was treated in a pilot-scale continuous mixer to disrupt the lignin-hemicellulose-cellulose (LHC) complex. An efficient and practical method was desired to remove lignin and hemicellulose (pentosans) rapidly and efficiently from the lignocellulose complex and to make the cellulose accessible to enzymatic hydrolysis. Milled WS in the presence of various chemicals in aqueous solutions was extruded from the mixer under several processing conditions. Chemicals used were sodium hydroxide (NaOH), sodium sulfide (Na/sub 2/S), anthraquinone (AQ), anthrahydroquinone (AHQ), hexamethylenediamine (HMDA), hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA), hydrogen peroxide (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/), and ferrous ammonium sulfate (FAS), which were used alone and in selected combinations. Concomitantly, WS was treated in laboratory batches using similar reaction conditions, except for mixing shearing. In extrusion treatments of WS at 20% concentration at 97/sup 0/C for 5.5 min with NaOH (15.7%, dry WS basis), NaOH (15.7%) + AHQ (0.3%), and NaOH (12.7%) + Na/sub 2/S (5.0%), 64-72% of the WS lignin and 36-43% of the pentosans were removed from aqueously washed extrudates (residues). This compares with 46-56% and 23-27%, respectively, for batch treatments. AHQ and Na/sub 2/S enhanced delignification. Cellulase treatment of the residues, which contai

  6. Improving the nutritive value of wheat straw with urea and yeast culture for dry season feeding of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Kashongwe, Olivier Basole; Migwi, Preminius; Bebe, Bockline Omedo; Ooro, Patrick Auwor; Onyango, Tobias Atali; Osoo, John Odhiambo

    2014-08-01

    The study evaluated the effects of feeding urea treated/supplemented wheat straw-based diets with addition of yeast culture (YC) as a dry season feed for dairy cows. Wheat straw diets with 3.6% urea and 5.8% molasses were formulated to upgrade nonprotein nitrogen levels and fibre degradation in the rumen. Yeast culture was included at 0 and 10 g/cow/day in mixer with commercial dairy meal to improve on fibre degradation and milk yield. Two experiments were conducted. Firstly, an in sacco dry matter degradability (DMD) trial with three steers in a completely randomized design (CRD) with a 3?×?2 factorial arrangement to determine the effects on intake and rumen degradation parameters. Secondly, feeding trial with 18 lactating cows in a 3?×?2 factorial arrangement at two levels of yeast culture (0 and 10 g/cow/day) and three types of urea interventions: No intervention (WS); addition of urea to straw at the time of feeding (USWS); and 7 days incubation of straw with urea (UTWS). Yeast cultures addition had no effect on rumen pH and NH3-N, but urea intervention showed an effect on rumen pH with USWS being lowest (p??0.05) on dry matter intake, milk yield, and milk composition but they increased (p?

  7. Acidic pretreatment of wheat straw in decanol for the production of surfactant, lignin and glucose.

    PubMed

    Marinkovic, Sinisa; Le Bras, Jean; Nardello-Rataj, Véronique; Agach, Mickaël; Estrine, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Wheat straw is an abundant residue of agriculture which is increasingly being considered as feedstock for the production of fuels, energy and chemicals. The acidic decanol-based pre-treatment of wheat straw has been investigated in this work. Wheat straw hemicellulose has been efficiently converted during a single step operation into decyl pentoside surfactants and the remaining material has been preserved keeping all its promises as potential feedstock for fuels or value added platform chemicals such as hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). The enzymatic digestibility of the cellulose contained in the straw residue has been evaluated and the lignin prepared from the material characterized. Wheat-based surfactants thus obtained have exhibited superior surface properties compared to fossil-based polyethoxylates decyl alcohol or alkyl oligoglucosides, some of which are largely used surfactants. In view of the growing importance of renewable resource-based molecules in the chemical industry, this approach may open a new avenue for the conversion of wheat straw into various chemicals. PMID:22312256

  8. The impact of glycerol organosolv pretreatment on the chemistry and enzymatic hydrolyzability of wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fubao Fuelbiol; Wang, Liang; Hong, Jiapeng; Ren, Junli; Du, Fengguang; Hu, Jinguang; Zhang, Zhenyu; Zhou, Bangwei

    2015-07-01

    Given that the glycerol organosolv pretreatment (GOP) can effectively improve the hydrolyzability of various lignocellulosic substrates, physicochemical changes of the substrate before and after the pretreatment was characterized to elucidate what is responsible for it. The effect of GOP on the main components and hydrolyzability of wheat straw was revisited. Results demonstrate that the GOP should be a promising candidate for the current pretreatment. Then the composition and structure of substrates was measured at multi-dimensional scales by using various analytic equipment such as TGA, SEM, AFM, CLSM, FT-IR, XRD and solid-state CP/MAS (13)C NMR. This paper reports some new insights on the mechanism behind that, which can be beneficial for further development, optimization, and scale-up of the GOP process. PMID:25863899

  9. Selenium uptake by edible oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus sp.) from selenium-hyperaccumulated wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Poonam; Prakash, Ranjana; Prakash, N Tejo

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to produce selenium (Se)-fortifying edible mushrooms, five species of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus sp.), were cultivated on Se-rich wheat straw collected from a seleniferous belt of Punjab, India. Total selenium was analyzed in the selenium hyperaccumulated wheat straw and the fruiting bodies. Significantly high levels (p<0.0001) of Se uptake were observed in fruiting bodies of all mushrooms grown on Se-rich wheat straw. To the best of our knowledge, accumulation and quantification of selenium in mushrooms has hitherto not been reported with substrates naturally enriched with selenium. The results demonstrate the potential of selenium-rich agricultural residues as substrates for production of Se-enriched mushrooms and the ability of different species of oyster mushrooms to absorb and fortify selenium. The study envisages potential use of selenium-rich agricultural residues towards cultivation of Se-enriched mushrooms for application in selenium supplementation or neutraceutical preparations. PMID:23535542

  10. Strong cellulase inhibitors from the hydrothermal pretreatment of wheat straw

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose with subsequent fermentation to ethanol provides a green alternative for the production of transportation fuels. Because of its recalcitrant nature, the lignocellulosic biomass must be pretreated before enzymatic hydrolysis. However, the pretreatment often results in the formation of compounds that are inhibitory for the enzymes or fermenting organism. Although well recognized, little quantitative information on the inhibition of individual cellulase components by identified inhibitors is available. Results Strong cellulase inhibitors were separated from the liquid fraction of the hydrothermal pretreatment of wheat straw. HPLC and mass-spectroscopy analyses confirmed that the inhibitors were oligosaccharides (inhibitory oligosaccharides, IOS) with a degree of polymerization from 7 to 16. The IOS are composed of a mixture of xylo- (XOS) and gluco-oligosaccharides (GOS). We propose that XOS and GOS are the fragments of the xylan backbone and mixed-linkage ?-glucans, respectively. The IOS were approximately 100 times stronger inhibitors for Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolases (CBHs) than cellobiose, which is one of the strongest inhibitors of these enzymes reported to date. Inhibition of endoglucanases (EGs) by IOS was weaker than that of CBHs. Most of the tested cellulases and hemicellulases were able to slowly degrade IOS and reduce the inhibitory power of the liquid fraction to some extent. The most efficient single enzyme component here was T. reesei EG TrCel7B. Although reduced by the enzyme treatment, the residual inhibitory power of IOS and the liquid fraction was strong enough to silence the major component of the T. reesei cellulase system, CBH TrCel7A. Conclusions The cellulase inhibitors described here may be responsible for the poor yields from the enzymatic conversion of the whole slurries from lignocellulose pretreatment under conditions that do not favor complete degradation of hemicellulose. Identification of the inhibitory compounds helps to design better enzyme mixtures for their degradation and to optimize the pretreatment regimes to minimize their formation. PMID:24053778

  11. Bioconversion of wheat straw to ethanol: chemical modification, enzymic hydrolysis, and fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Detroy, R.W.; Lindenfelser, L.A.; Sommer, S.; Orton W.L.

    1981-01-01

    Native wheat straw (WS) was pretreated with various concentrations of H2SO4 and NaOH followed by secondary treatments with ethylenediamine (EDA) and NH4OH prior to enzymic saccharification. Conversion of the cellulosic component to sugar varied with the chemical modification steps. Treatment solely with alkali yielded 51-75% conversion, depending on temperature. Acid treatment at elevated temperatures showed a substantial decrease in the hemicellulose component, whereas EDA-treated WS (acid pretreated) showed a 69-75% decrease in the lignin component. Acid-pretreated EDTA-treated straw yielded a 98% conversion rate, followed by 83% for alkali-NH4OH treated straws. In other experiments, WS was pretreated with varying concentrations of H2SO4 or HaOH followed by NH4OH treatment prior to enzymic hydrolysis. Pretreatment of straw with 2% NaOH for 4 h coupled to enzymic hydrolysis yielded a 76% conversion of the cellulosic component. Acid-base combination pretreatments yielded only 43% conversions. A reactor column was subsequently used to measure modification-saccharification-fermentation for wheat straw conversion on a larger scale. Thirty percent conversion of wheat straw cellulosics to sugar were observed with subsequent fermentation to ethanol. The crude cellulase preparation yielded considerable quantities of xylose in addition to the glucose. Saccharified materials were fermented directly with actively proliferating yeast cells without concentration of the sugars.

  12. Bulk density and compaction behavior of knife mill chopped switchgrass,wheat straw, and corn stover

    SciTech Connect

    Chevanan, Nehru [University of Tennessee; Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Bitra, V.S.P. [University of Tennessee; Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Yang, Y.T. [University of Tennessee; Miu, P.I [University of Tennessee; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

    2009-08-01

    Bulk density of comminuted biomass significantly increased by vibration during handling and transportation, and by normal pressure during storage. Compaction characteristics affecting the bulk density of switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover chopped in a knife mill at different operating conditions and using four different classifying screens were studied. Mean loose-filled bulk densities were 67.5 18.4 kg/m3 for switchgrass, 36.1 8.6 kg/m3 for wheat straw, and 52.1 10.8 kg/m3 for corn stover. Mean tapped bulk densities were 81.8 26.2 kg/m3 for switchgrass, 42.8 11.7 kg/m3 for wheat straw, and 58.9 13.4 kg/m3 for corn stover. Percentage changes in compressibility due to variation in particle size obtained from a knife mill ranged from 64.3 to 173.6 for chopped switchgrass, 22.2 51.5 for chopped wheat straw and 42.1 117.7 for chopped corn stover within the tested consolidation pressure range of 5 120 kPa. Pressure and volume relationship of chopped biomass during compression with application of normal pressure can be characterized by the Walker model and Kawakita and Ludde model. Parameter of Walker model was correlated to the compressibility with Pearson correlation coefficient greater than 0.9. Relationship between volume reduction in chopped biomass with respect to number of tappings studied using Sone s model indicated that infinite compressibility was highest for chopped switchgrass followed by chopped wheat straw and corn stover. Degree of difficulty in packing measured using the parameters of Sone s model indicated that the chopped wheat straw particles compacted very rapidly by tapping compared to chopped switchgrass and corn stover. These results are very useful for solving obstacles in handling bulk biomass supply logistics issues for a biorefinery.

  13. Bulk density and compaction behavior of knife mill chopped switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover.

    PubMed

    Chevanan, Nehru; Womac, Alvin R; Bitra, Venkata S P; Igathinathane, C; Yang, Yuechuan T; Miu, Petre I; Sokhansanj, Shahab

    2010-01-01

    Bulk density of comminuted biomass significantly increased by vibration during handling and transportation, and by normal pressure during storage. Compaction characteristics affecting the bulk density of switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover chopped in a knife mill at different operating conditions and using four different classifying screens were studied. Mean loose-filled bulk densities were 67.5+/-18.4 kg/m(3) for switchgrass, 36.1+/-8.6 kg/m(3) for wheat straw, and 52.1+/-10.8 kg/m(3) for corn stover. Mean tapped bulk densities were 81.8+/-26.2 kg/m(3) for switchgrass, 42.8+/-11.7 kg/m(3) for wheat straw, and 58.9+/-13.4 kg/m(3) for corn stover. Percentage changes in compressibility due to variation in particle size obtained from a knife mill ranged from 64.3 to 173.6 for chopped switchgrass, 22.2-51.5 for chopped wheat straw and 42.1-117.7 for chopped corn stover within the tested consolidation pressure range of 5-120 kPa. Pressure and volume relationship of chopped biomass during compression with application of normal pressure can be characterized by the Walker model and Kawakita and Ludde model. Parameter of Walker model was correlated to the compressibility with Pearson correlation coefficient greater than 0.9. Relationship between volume reduction in chopped biomass with respect to number of tappings studied using Sone's model indicated that infinite compressibility was highest for chopped switchgrass followed by chopped wheat straw and corn stover. Degree of difficulty in packing measured using the parameters of Sone's model indicated that the chopped wheat straw particles compacted very rapidly by tapping compared to chopped switchgrass and corn stover. These results are very useful for solving obstacles in handling bulk biomass supply logistics issues for a biorefinery. PMID:19699634

  14. Improvement of yield of the edible and medicinal mushroom Lentinula edodes on wheat straw by use of supplemented spawn.

    PubMed

    Gaitán-Hernández, Rigoberto; Cortés, Norberto; Mata, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    The research evaluated the interactions of two main factors (strain / types of spawn) on various parameters with the purpose to assess its effect on yield and biochemical composition of Lentinula edodes fruiting bodies cultivated on pasteurized wheat straw. The evaluation was made with four strains (IE-40, IE-105, IE-124 and IE-256). Different types of spawns were prepared: Control (C) (millet seed, 100%), F1 (millet seed, 88.5%; wheat bran, 8.8%; peat moss, 1.3%; and CaS04, 1.3%) and F2 (the same formula as F1, but substituting the wheat bran with powdered wheat straw). Wheat straw was pasteurized by soaking it for 1 h in water heated to 65 °C. After this the substrate (2 kg wet weight) was placed in polypropylene bags. The bags were inoculated with each spawn (5% w/w) and incubated in a dark room at 25 °C. A proximate analysis of mature fruiting bodies was conducted. The mean Biological Efficiency (BE) varied between 66.0% (C-IE-256) and 320.1% (F1-IE-124), with an average per strain of 125.6%. The highest mean BE was observed on spawn F1 (188.3%), significantly different from C and F2. The protein content of fruiting bodies was high, particularly in strain IE-40-F1 (17.7%). The amount of fat varied from 1.1 (F1-IE-40) to 2.1% (F2-IE-105) on dry matter. Carbohydrates ranged from 58.8% (F1-IE-40) to 66.1% (F1-IE-256). The energy value determined ranged from 302.9 kcal (F1-IE-40) to 332.0 kcal (F1-IE-256). The variability on BE observed in this study was significantly influenced by the spawn's formulation and genetic factors of the different strains. PMID:25242929

  15. Improvement of yield of the edible and medicinal mushroom Lentinula edodes on wheat straw by use of supplemented spawn

    PubMed Central

    Gaitán-Hernández, Rigoberto; Cortés, Norberto; Mata, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    The research evaluated the interactions of two main factors (strain / types of spawn) on various parameters with the purpose to assess its effect on yield and biochemical composition of Lentinula edodes fruiting bodies cultivated on pasteurized wheat straw. The evaluation was made with four strains (IE-40, IE-105, IE-124 and IE-256). Different types of spawns were prepared: Control (C) (millet seed, 100%), F1 (millet seed, 88.5%; wheat bran, 8.8%; peat moss, 1.3%; and CaS04, 1.3%) and F2 (the same formula as F1, but substituting the wheat bran with powdered wheat straw). Wheat straw was pasteurized by soaking it for 1 h in water heated to 65 °C. After this the substrate (2 kg wet weight) was placed in polypropylene bags. The bags were inoculated with each spawn (5% w/w) and incubated in a dark room at 25 °C. A proximate analysis of mature fruiting bodies was conducted. The mean Biological Efficiency (BE) varied between 66.0% (C-IE-256) and 320.1% (F1-IE-124), with an average per strain of 125.6%. The highest mean BE was observed on spawn F1 (188.3%), significantly different from C and F2. The protein content of fruiting bodies was high, particularly in strain IE-40-F1 (17.7%). The amount of fat varied from 1.1 (F1-IE-40) to 2.1% (F2-IE-105) on dry matter. Carbohydrates ranged from 58.8% (F1-IE-40) to 66.1% (F1-IE-256). The energy value determined ranged from 302.9 kcal (F1-IE-40) to 332.0 kcal (F1-IE-256). The variability on BE observed in this study was significantly influenced by the spawn’s formulation and genetic factors of the different strains. PMID:25242929

  16. BIOCONVERSION OF WHEAT STRAW TO BUTANOL (A SUPERIOR LIQUID FUEL): SIMULTANEOUS SACCHARIFICATION, FERMENTATION, AND PRODUCT RECOVERY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a result of the increasing price of transportation fuel, we have intensified our research on butanol production from agricultural residues using Clostridium beijerinckii. Butanol has superior fuel properties compared to ethanol. In this paper, wheat straw was evaluated as a feedstock for butano...

  17. Effect of enzymic treatment on nutritive value of leaf fraction of wheat straw

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Effect of enzymic treatment on nutritive value of leaf fraction of wheat straw FB Castro ER Ã?rskov was to determine the effect of enzymic treatment conditions, ie enzyme loading, incubation period and moisture 3) was completed to study the effect of enzyme loading (4, 8 and 16 IU AVICELase/g of substrate

  18. Xylitol production from wheat straw hemicellulosic hydrolysate: hydrolysate detoxification and carbon source used for inoculum preparation

    PubMed Central

    Canilha, Larissa; Carvalho, Walter; Felipe, Maria das Graças Almeida; de Almeida e Silva, João Batista

    2008-01-01

    Wheat straw hemicellulosic hydrolysate was used for xylitol bioproduction. The use of a xylose-containing medium to grow the inoculum did not favor the production of xylitol in the hydrolysate, which was submitted to a previous detoxification treatment with 2.5% activated charcoal for optimized removal of inhibitory compounds. PMID:24031226

  19. Simultaneous biological removal of endosulfan (?+?) and nitrates from drinking waters using wheat straw as substrate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ?ükrü Aslan; Ay?en Türkman

    2004-01-01

    Nitrate and endosulfan (?+?) removal was studied in an upflow biological denitrification reactor packed with wheat straw as carbon source and support particles for microorganisms. While almost complete nitrate elimination and between 65% and 70% endosulfan (?+?) elimination occurred when the temperature was higher than 20 °C; below that value, nitrate removal efficiency decreased to about 10%. Nitrate, dissolved organic

  20. Performance Monitoring: Evaluating a Wheat Straw PRB for Nitrate Removal at an Agricultural Operation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development?s National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) is conducting long-term monitoring of a wheat straw permeable reactive barrier (PRB) for remediation of ground water contaminated with nitrate from a now-closed swine concentrat...

  1. Screening of white-rot fungi for biological pretreatment of wheat straw for biogas production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. W. Miiller; W. Trfisch

    1986-01-01

    Twenty two basidiomycetes, mostly white rot fungi, were grown on wheat straw. Lignin-, cellulose-, and hemicellulose-degradation was recorded in order to find a species growing on lignin preferably. The “oyster-mushroom”Pleurotus sp. “florida” showed fastest delignification of all tested fungi.

  2. Influence of alkaline pre-treatments on the cell wall components of wheat straw

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Runcang Sun; J. Mark Lawther; W. B. Banks

    1995-01-01

    The effects of alkaline pre-treatments of wheat straw have been examined in detail. In particular, treatments with increasing amounts of sodium hydroxide at a range of temperatures and exposure times have been investigated. A number of other alkaline or oxidizing agents have also been utilized and briefly assessed. Optimal conditions for delignification and dissolution of hemicellulosic polysaccharides were found to

  3. Improved enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw by combined use of gamma ray and dilute acid for bioethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun Hong, Sung; Taek Lee, Jae; Lee, Sungbeom; Gon Wi, Seung; Ju Cho, Eun; Singh, Sudhir; Sik Lee, Seung; Yeoup Chung, Byung

    2014-01-01

    Pretreating wheat straw with a combination of dilute acid and gamma irradiation was performed in an attempt to enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis for bioethanol production. The glucose yield was significantly affected by combined pretreatment (3% sulfuric acid-gamma irradiation), compared with untreated wheat straw and individual pretreatment. The increasing enzymatic hydrolysis after combined pretreatment is resulting from decrease in crystallinity of cellulose, loss of hemicelluloses, and removal or modification of lignin. Therefore, combined pretreatment is one of the most effective methods for enhancing the enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw biomass.

  4. Bioconversion of wheat straw cellulose/hemicellulose to ethanol by Saccharomyces uvarum and Pachysolen tannophilus

    SciTech Connect

    Detroy, R.W.; Cunningham, R.L.; Bothast, R.J.; Bagby, M.O.; Herman, A.

    1982-05-01

    The information presented in this publication represents current research findings on the production of glucose and xylose from straw and subsequent direct fermentation of both sugars to ethanol. Agricultural straw was subjected to thermal or alkali pulping prior to enzymatic saccharification. When wheat straw (WS) was treated at 170 degrees C for 30-60 min at a water-to-solids ratio fo 7:1, the yield of cellulosic pulp was 70-82%. A sodium hydroxide extraction yielded a 60% cellulosic pulp and a hemicellulosic fraction available for fermentation to ethanol. The cellulosic pulps were subjected to cellulase hydrolysis at 55 degrees C for production of sugars to support a 6-C fermentation. Hemicellulose was recovered from the liquor filtrates by acid/alcohol precipitation followed by acid hydrolysis to xylose for fermentation. Subsequent experiments have involved the fermentation of cellulosic and hemicellulosic hydrolysates to ethanol. Apparently these fermentations were inhibited by substances introduced by thermal and alkali treatment of the straws, because ethanol efficiencies of only 40-60% were achieved. Xylose from hydrolysis of wheat straw pentosans supported an ethanol fermentation by Pachysolen tannophilus strain NRRL 2460. This unusual yeast is capable of producing ethanol from both glucose and xylose. Ethanol yields were not maximal due to deleterious substances in the WS hydrolysates. (Refs. 16).

  5. Straw Production and Grain Yield Relationships in Winter Wheat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edwin Donaldson; William F. Schillinger; Stephen M. Dofing

    2001-01-01

    use of traditional intensive tillage practices during fallow (Papendick, 1998). During most years, use of summer Winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) -fallow is the predominant fallow allows growers to sow winter wheat into adequate cropping system in low-precipitation regions (,250 mm annually) of the inland Pacific Northwest (PNW) in the USA. Wind erosion is a carryover soil water for seed

  6. Comparative analysis of the Trichoderma reesei transcriptome during growth on the cellulase inducing substrates wheat straw and lactose

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Renewable lignocellulosic biomass is an advantageous resource for the production of second generation biofuels and other biorefinery products. In Middle Europe, wheat straw is one of the most abundant low-cost sources of lignocellulosic biomass. For its efficient use, an efficient mix of cellulases and hemicellulases is required. In this paper, we investigated how cellulase production by T. reesei on wheat straw compares to that on lactose, the only soluble and also cheap inducing carbon source for enzyme production. Results We have examined and compared the transcriptome of T. reesei growing on wheat straw and lactose as carbon sources under otherwise similar conditions. Gene expression on wheat straw exceeded that on lactose, and 1619 genes were found to be only induced on wheat straw but not on lactose. They comprised 30% of the CAZome, but were also enriched in genes associated with phospholipid metabolism, DNA synthesis and repair, iron homeostatis and autophagy. Two thirds of the CAZome was expressed both on wheat straw as well as on lactose, but 60% of it at least >2-fold higher on the former. Major wheat straw specific genes comprised xylanases, chitinases and mannosidases. Interestingly, the latter two CAZyme families were significantly higher expressed in a strain in which xyr1 encoding the major regulator of cellulase and hemicellulase biosynthesis is non-functional. Conclusions Our data reveal several major differences in the transcriptome between wheat straw and lactose which may be related to the higher enzyme formation on the former and their further investigation could lead to the development of methods for increasing enzyme production on lactose. PMID:24016404

  7. Role of Bacillus spp. in antagonism between Pleurotus ostreatus and Trichoderma harzianum in heat-treated wheat-straw substrates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marnyye Velázquez-Cedeño; Anne Marie Farnet; Gerardo Mata; Jean-Michel Savoie

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to identify bacteria involved in Trichodermaharzianum inhibition while promoting Pleurotus ostreatus defences in order to favour cultivation-substrate selectivity for mushroom production. PCR-DGGE profiles of total DNA from wheat-straw substrate showed weak differences between bacterial communities from substrate inoculated with P. ostreatus with or without T. harzianum. The major cultivable bacteria were isolated from three batches of wheat-straw-based

  8. One step conversion of wheat straw to sugars by simultaneous ball milling, mild acid, and fungus Penicillium simplicissimum treatment.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Li; Chen, Zhenhua; Zhu, Yonghua; Liu, Xuanming; Liao, Hongdong; Chen, Ding

    2012-05-01

    Wheat straw is one of the major lignocellulosic plant residues in many countries including China. An attractive alternative is the utilization of wheat straw for bioethanol production. This article mainly studies a simple one-step wet milling with Penicillium simplicissimum and weak acid to hydrolysis of wheat straw. The optimal condition for hydrolysis was ball milling 48 h in citrate solvent (pH = 4) with P. simplicissimum H5 at the speed of 500 rpm and the yield of sugar increased with increased milling time. Corresponding structure transformations before and after milling analyzed by X-ray diffraction, transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and environmental scanning electron microscopy clearly indicated that this combined treatment could be attributed to the crystalline and chemical structure changes of cellulose in wheat straw during ball milling. This combined treatment of ball milling, mild acid, and fungus hydrolysis enabled the conversion of the wheat straw. Compared with traditional method of ball milling, this work showed a more simple, novel, and environmentally friendly way in mechanochemical treatment of wheat straw. PMID:22467431

  9. Sodium borohydrate (NaBH4) pretreatment for efficient enzymatic saccharification of wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Cöpür, Yalçin; Tozluoglu, Ayhan; Ozyürek, Omer

    2012-03-01

    In this study, the aim was to examine bioethanol production of wheat straw residues using an alternative chemical, sodium borohydrate (NaBH(4)) in chemical pretreatment step. The obtained results showed that sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and NaBH(4) treated straw resulted in 87.8% and 83.3% glucan conversion in enzymatic hydrolysis, but hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) (74.7%) and sulfuric acid (H(2)SO(4)) (71.7%) had lower glucan conversion. The highest ethanol yield from untreated straw (115 g/kg) was observed for 4% NaBH(4) pretreated sample (60 min) and the theoretical yield (86.9%) was also calculated to be highest for the sample. PMID:22244903

  10. Effect of modifying agents on the preparation and properties of the new adsorbents from wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xing; Gao, Baoyu; Wang, Wenyi; Yue, Qinyan; Wang, Yu; Ni, Shouqing

    2010-03-01

    Three different types of new adsorbents modified from wheat straw were synthesized after the reaction between epichlorohydrin and triethylamine by using ethylenediamine (EDA), diethylenetriamine (DETA) and triethylenetetramine (TETA) as modifying agents. The performance of the modified wheat straws (MWS) was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and elemental analysis. Results showed that the optimal dosages for the three modifying agent (EDA, DETA and TETA) were 3, 4 and 3 ml. The optimum synthesis temperature for the three MWS was 80, 85 and 95 degrees C, respectively. The IR spectra of the three MWS were analogical, and nitrogen contents of the MWS were found to be consistent with their adsorption capacity. The pseudo-second-order equation generated the best agreement with the experimental data for adsorption systems. In addition, the adsorption process of the three MWS reached equilibrium at 10-15 min. MWS (EDA) demonstrated the largest phosphate capacity than the other MWS. PMID:19632108

  11. Comparative culturing of Pleurotus spp. on coffee pulp and wheat straw: biomass production and substrate biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Salmones, Dulce; Mata, Gerardo; Waliszewski, Krzysztof N

    2005-03-01

    The results of the cultivation of six strains of Pleurotus (P. djamor (2), P. ostreatus (2) and P. pulmonarius (2)) on coffee pulp and wheat straw are presented. Metabolic activity associated with biomass of each strain was determined, as well as changes in lignin and polysaccharides (cellulose and hemicellulose), phenolic and caffeine contents in substrate samples colonized for a period of up to 36 days. Analysis were made of changes during the mycelium incubation period (16 days) and throughout different stages of fructification. Greater metabolic activity was observed in the wheat straw samples, with a significant increase between 4 and 12 days of incubation. The degradation of polysaccharide compounds was associated with the fruiting stage, while the reduction in phenolic contents was detected in both substrates samples during the first eight days of incubation. A decrease was observed in caffeine content of the coffee pulp samples during fruiting stage, which could mean that some caffeine accumulates in the fruiting bodies. PMID:15501659

  12. Effect of wheat straw ash on mechanical properties of autoclaved mortar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nabil M. Al-Akhras; Bilal A. Abu-Alfoul

    2002-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of wheat straw ash (WSA) on the mechanical strength of autoclaved mortar. The mechanical properties studied include compressive, tensile, and flexural strengths of mortar. Mortar mixes were prepared using natural silica, wadi (local sand), and crushed limestone fine aggregates at a w\\/c ratio of 0.6. Mortar specimens were exposed to autoclave for 2.5 h at

  13. Upgrading of urea formaldehyde-bonded reed and wheat straw particleboards using silane coupling agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guangping Han; Changwu Zhang; Dongmei Zhang; Kenji Umemura; Shuichi Kawai

    1998-01-01

    Reed and wheat straw particleboards bonded with urea formaldehyde (UF) resin were manufactured from two different material\\u000a configurations (i.e., fine and coarse particles). The board densities were in the range of 0.550–.90g\\/cm3. The effects of particle size and board density on the board properties were examined. The properties of particleboard produced\\u000a from fine particles were better than those made from

  14. Degradation of alkali-lignin residues from solid-state fermentation of wheat straw by streptomycetes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manuel Hernández; María J. Hernández-Coronado; Andrew S. Ball; María E. Arias

    2001-01-01

    The ability of three Streptomyces strains to degradealkali-lignin, produced from the treatment of wheat straw by the same organisms, was examined. Decolourisation and loss of alkali-lignin was only detected in cultures supplemented with ammonium as an inorganic N source. The pH of cultures supplemented with inorganic N reached lower pH than in those supplemented with yeast extract. From FT-IR spectra

  15. Novel bioconversion of wheat straw to bio-organic fertilizer in a solid-state bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongzhang; Sun, Fubao

    2007-03-01

    In order to increase the eco-efficiency and overall availability of naturally renewable resource, the novel bioconversion of steam-exploded wheat straw to bio-organic fertilizer containing N(2)-fixer, P and K solubilizers was investigated. The conversion was performed in solid-state fermentation (SSF) with periodic air-forced pressure oscillation (PAPO). The results showed that SSF-PAPO was competitive with the conventional solid-state fermentation (cSSF) in biomass accumulation and wheat straw digestion. With solid-liquid ratio 1:3, microbial biomass production at 72 h was high up to 2 x 10(11) cfu g(-1), nearly twice as that in cSSF. The degradation rate of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin after fermentation in SSF-PAPO reached 48.57 +/- 10.66, 84.77 +/- 2.75 and 2.15 +/- 10.11, respectively, which was greater than that of 29.30 +/- 10.28%, 33.47 +/- 4.85% and 0.53 +/- 9.07% in cSSF, correspondingly. The SSF-PAPO system displayed unique advantage, by a novel gas phase control strategy on gas concentration and heat gradient, on the bioconversion of wheat straw to the bio-organic fertilizer. PMID:17225993

  16. Optimization of ethanol production from microfluidized wheat straw by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Turhan, Ozge; Isci, Asli; Mert, Behic; Sakiyan, Ozge; Donmez, Sedat

    2015-11-17

    In this study, wheat straw was pretreated with a microfluidizer to improve its enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol yields. The pretreatment was performed at various pressures (500, 1000, and 1500 bar) and solid loadings (1, 2, and 3%). The microfluidized biomass was then subjected to hydrolysis and simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) experiments at different enzyme loadings (5, 10, and 15 FPU/g dry wheat straw) using a mutant yeast. The results indicated that the microfluidization method alters the structure of biomass and leads to a reduction in lignin content. The samples pretreated at 1% solid loading contained the minimum lignin concentration and provided the maximum sugar and ethanol yields. These results signified that the microfluidization method is more effective on biomass at low solid loadings. The process conditions were optimized for higher ethanol and sugar yields using response surface methodology (RSM). The optimum pressure and solid and enzyme loadings were found as 1500 bar, 1%, and 15 FPU/g dry wheat straw, respectively. The yields obtained at this condition were 82%, 94%, and 65% for glucose, xylose, and ethanol, respectively. High sugar yields implied that microfluidization is an effective pretreatment method for cellulosic ethanol production. On the other hand, low ethanol yield may indicate that the microorganism was sensitive to inhibitory compounds present in the fermentation medium. PMID:25181638

  17. A New and Environmentally Friendly Route for Preparation of Carbon Microspheres from Wheat Straw

    PubMed Central

    Leishan, Chen; Yu, Miao; Gairong, Chen

    2013-01-01

    The reactions were performed to synthesize carbon materials using wheat straw powder as raw material. The wheat straw powder was first hydrolyzed at the absence of a catalyst at 190°C for 1?h, then the hydrolyzate solution was used as carbon source to prepare carbon materials via hydrothermal carbonization at 180°C in the absence of a catalyst for 8?h. The influence of solid-liquid-ratio of wheat straw to water on the morphology of the product was investigated. The samples were examined by a scanning electron microscope and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results show that the product was carbon microspheres with a large number of O–H, CHO, and other functional groups, and the diameters of carbon microspheres noticeably depended on the solid-liquid ratio. When the solid-liquid ratio was 1?:?60, the diameters of carbon microspheres were in the range of 100 to 300?nm when the solid-liquid ratio was 1?:?40, carbon microspheres with larger and more uniform diameters mostly about 250?nm were obtained, and when the solid-liquid-ratio was 1?:?20, there were more larger carbon microspheres with diameters about 800?nm in the product and the surface of these carbon microspheres is smoother, whereas; the uniformity of the product deteriorates. PMID:24288457

  18. Fermentable hexose production from corn stalks and wheat straw with combined supercritical and subcritical hydrothermal technology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Lu, Wen-Jing; Wang, Hong-Tao; Yang, Jin-Long

    2009-12-01

    Lignocellulosic wastes, including corn stalks and wheat straw, were pretreated and hydrolyzed with combined supercritical and subcritical hydrothermal technology. Soluble sugars were collected by pre-washing the crushed materials before hydrolysis. The effects of solid-liquid ratio, temperature, and reaction time on oligosaccharide production were investigated and the optimum supercritical conditions were found to be 20 mg/2.5 ml water, 384 degrees C, 17 s for corn stalks and 20 mg/2.5 ml water, 384 degrees C, 19 s for wheat straw. Subsequent subcritical processing of the hydrolyzate (with or without the water extract) from supercritical treatment was guided by a previous analysis of cellulose hydrolysis kinetics. The highest yield of fermentable hexoses from corn stalks (27.4% of raw material) was obtained at 280 degrees C, 27 s, and from wheat straw (6.7% of raw material) at 280 degrees C, 54 s. This study provides novel key parameters for fermentable hexose production from lignocellulosic feedstocks using combined supercritical and subcritical hydrothermal treatment. PMID:19616938

  19. Bioprocessing of wheat straw into nutritionally rich and digested cattle feed

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Bhuvnesh; Jain, Kavish Kumar; Kalra, Anup; Kuhad, Ramesh Chander

    2014-01-01

    Wheat straw was fermented by Crinipellis sp. RCK-1, a lignin degrading fungus, under solid state fermentation conditions. The fungus degraded 18.38% lignin at the expense of 10.37% cellulose within 9 days. However, when wheat straw fermented for different duration was evaluated in vitro, the 5 day fungal fermented wheat straw called here “Biotech Feed” was found to possess 36.74% organic matter digestibility (OMD) and 5.38 (MJ/Kg Dry matter) metabolizable energy (ME). The Biotech Feed was also observed to be significantly enriched with essential amino acids and fungal protein by fungal fermentation, eventually increasing its nutritional value. The Biotech Feed upon in vitro analysis showed potential to replace 50% grain from concentrate mixture. Further, the calves fed on Biotech Feed based diets exhibited significantly higher (p<0.05) dry matter intake (DMI: 3.74?Kg/d), dry matter digestibility (DMD: 57.82%), total digestible nutrients (TDN: 54.76%) and comparatively gained 50?g more daily body weight. PMID:25269679

  20. Enzymatic hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose and pretreated wheat straw: a detailed comparison using convenient kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Monschein, Mareike; Reisinger, Christoph; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Marked slow-down of soluble sugar production at low degree of substrate conversion limits the space-time yield of enzymatic hydrolysis of ligno-cellulosic materials. A simple set of kinetic descriptors was developed to compare reducing sugar release from pure crystalline cellulose (Avicel) and pretreated wheat straw by Trichoderma reesei cellulase at 50 °C. The focus was on the rate-retarding effect of maximum hydrolysis rate at reaction start (r(max)), limiting hydrolysis rate (r(lim)) at extended reaction time (24h), and substrate conversion, marking the transition between the r(max) and r(lim) kinetic regimes (C(trans)). At apparent saturation of substrate (12.2g cellulose/L) with enzyme, r(max) for pretreated wheat straw (~9.6g/L/h) surpassed that for Avicel by about 1.7-fold whereas their r(lim) were almost identical (~0.15 g/L/h). C(trans) roughly doubled as enzyme/substrate loading was increased from 3.8 to 75FPU/g, suggesting C(trans) to be a complex manifestation of cellulase-cellulose interaction, not an intrinsic substrate property. A low-temperature adsorption step preceding hydrolysis at 50 °C resulted in enhanced cellulase binding at reaction start without increasing r(max). C(trans) was higher for pretreated wheat straw (~30%) than for Avicel (~20%) under these conditions. PMID:23220402

  1. Yield and size of oyster mushroom grown on rice/wheat straw basal substrate supplemented with cotton seed hull.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenjie; Guo, Fengling; Wan, Zhengjie

    2013-10-01

    Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) was cultivated on rice straw basal substrate, wheat straw basal substrate, cotton seed hull basal substrate, and wheat straw or rice straw supplemented with different proportions (15%, 30%, and 45% in rice straw substrate, 20%, 30%, and 40% in wheat straw substrate) of cotton seed hull to find a cost effective substrate. The effect of autoclaved sterilized and non-sterilized substrate on growth and yield of oyster mushroom was also examined. Results indicated that for both sterilized substrate and non-sterilized substrate, oyster mushroom on rice straw and wheat basal substrate have faster mycelial growth rate, comparatively poor surface mycelial density, shorter total colonization period and days from bag opening to primordia formation, lower yield and biological efficiency, lower mushroom weight, longer stipe length and smaller cap diameter than that on cotton seed hull basal substrate. The addition of cotton seed hull to rice straw and wheat straw substrate slowed spawn running, primordial development and fruit body formation. However, increasing the amount of cotton seed hull can increase the uniformity and white of mycelium, yield and biological efficiency, and increase mushroom weight, enlarge cap diameter and shorten stipe length. Compared to the sterilized substrate, the non-sterilized substrate had comparatively higher mycelial growth rate, shorter total colonization period and days from bag opening to primordia formation. However, the non-sterilized substrate did not gave significantly higher mushroom yield and biological efficiency than the sterilized substrate, but some undesirable characteristics, i.e. smaller mushroom cap diameter and relatively long stipe length. PMID:24235869

  2. Yield and size of oyster mushroom grown on rice/wheat straw basal substrate supplemented with cotton seed hull

    PubMed Central

    Yang, WenJie; Guo, FengLing; Wan, ZhengJie

    2013-01-01

    Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) was cultivated on rice straw basal substrate, wheat straw basal substrate, cotton seed hull basal substrate, and wheat straw or rice straw supplemented with different proportions (15%, 30%, and 45% in rice straw substrate, 20%, 30%, and 40% in wheat straw substrate) of cotton seed hull to find a cost effective substrate. The effect of autoclaved sterilized and non-sterilized substrate on growth and yield of oyster mushroom was also examined. Results indicated that for both sterilized substrate and non-sterilized substrate, oyster mushroom on rice straw and wheat basal substrate have faster mycelial growth rate, comparatively poor surface mycelial density, shorter total colonization period and days from bag opening to primordia formation, lower yield and biological efficiency, lower mushroom weight, longer stipe length and smaller cap diameter than that on cotton seed hull basal substrate. The addition of cotton seed hull to rice straw and wheat straw substrate slowed spawn running, primordial development and fruit body formation. However, increasing the amount of cotton seed hull can increase the uniformity and white of mycelium, yield and biological efficiency, and increase mushroom weight, enlarge cap diameter and shorten stipe length. Compared to the sterilized substrate, the non-sterilized substrate had comparatively higher mycelial growth rate, shorter total colonization period and days from bag opening to primordia formation. However, the non-sterilized substrate did not gave significantly higher mushroom yield and biological efficiency than the sterilized substrate, but some undesirable characteristics, i.e. smaller mushroom cap diameter and relatively long stipe length. PMID:24235869

  3. Effects of Different Tillage and Straw Return on Soil Organic Carbon in a Rice-Wheat Rotation System

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liqun; Hu, Naijuan; Yang, Minfang; Zhan, Xinhua; Zhang, Zhengwen

    2014-01-01

    Soil management practices, such as tillage method or straw return, could alter soil organic carbon (C) contents. However, the effects of tillage method or straw return on soil organic C (SOC) have showed inconsistent results in different soil/climate/cropping systems. The Yangtze River Delta of China is the main production region of rice and wheat, and rice-wheat rotation is the most important cropping system in this region. However, few studies in this region have been conducted to assess the effects of different tillage methods combined with straw return on soil labile C fractions in the rice-wheat rotation system. In this study, a field experiment was used to evaluate the effects of different tillage methods, straw return and their interaction on soil total organic C (TOC) and labile organic C fractions at three soil depths (0–7, 7–14 and 14–21 cm) for a rice-wheat rotation in Yangzhong of the Yangtze River Delta of China. Soil TOC, easily oxidizable C (EOC), dissolved organic C (DOC) and microbial biomass C (MBC) contents were measured in this study. Soil TOC and labile organic C fractions contents were significantly affected by straw returns, and were higher under straw return treatments than non-straw return at three depths. At 0–7 cm depth, soil MBC was significantly higher under plowing tillage than rotary tillage, but EOC was just opposite. Rotary tillage had significantly higher soil TOC than plowing tillage at 7–14 cm depth. However, at 14–21 cm depth, TOC, DOC and MBC were significantly higher under plowing tillage than rotary tillage except for EOC. Consequently, under short-term condition, rice and wheat straw both return in rice-wheat rotation system could increase SOC content and improve soil quality in the Yangtze River Delta. PMID:24586434

  4. Utilization of the water soluable fraction of wheat straw as a plant nutrient source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackowiak, C. L.; Garland, J. L.

    1990-01-01

    Recovery of water soluble, inorganic nutrients from the inedible portion of wheat was found to be an effective means of recycling nutrients within hydroponic systems. Through aqueous extraction (leaching), 60 percent of the total inorganic nutrient weight was removed from wheat straw and roots, although the recovery of individual nutrients varied. Leaching also removed about 20 percent of the total organic carbon from the biomass. In terms of dry weight, the leachate was comprised of approximately 60 percent organic and 40 percent inorganic compounds. Direct use of wheat straw leachate in static hydroponic systems had an inhibitory effect on wheat growth, both in the presence and absence of microorganisms. Biological treatment of leachate either with a mixed microbial community or the oyster mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus L., prior to use in hydroponic solutions, significantly reduced both the organic content and the inhibitory effects of the leachate. The inhibitory effects of unprocessed leachate appear to be a result of rapidly acting phytotoxic compounds that are detoxified by microbial activity. Leaching holds considerable promise as a method for nutrient recycling in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS).

  5. Wheat straw or alfalfa hay in diets with 30% neutral detergent fiber for lactating Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Poore, M H; Moore, J A; Swingle, R S; Eck, T P; Brown, W H

    1991-09-01

    Twenty-four Holstein cows near peak lactation were fed diets formulated to contain 30% NDF with forage NDF from chopped wheat straw or chopped alfalfa hay in proportions of 0:3, 1:2, 2:1, and 3:0 in an 8-wk trial to evaluate effects of fiber source on lactational performance. Concentrate was based on highly degradable carbohydrate in steam-flaked sorghum grain. Forage to concentrate ratio decreased from 49:51 to 28:72 when straw was substituted for alfalfa hay. Milk yield (38.4 kg/d) and DMI (23.1 kg/d) were not influenced by forage source. Milk fat percentage decreased and milk protein percentage increased linearly with increasing straw. Yields of 3.5% FCM and fat showed linear and quadratic responses, because they appeared to be reduced only on the 0:3 diet, and protein yield showed a quadratic response and was highest for the 1:2 diet. Digestibility of NDF averaged 43.5, 45.4, 40.7, and 31.2%, and acetate to propionate ratio was 3.0, 2.4, 2.2, and 1.9 with increasing dietary straw. Passage rates were not influenced by diet and averaged 9.3, 7.6, 6.1, and 4.7%/h for fluid, grain, alfalfa hay, and wheat straw, respectively. It is suggested that the ratio of forage NDF to ruminally degradable starch be maintained greater than or equal to 1:1 when diets based on low quality forage are fed to cows in early lactation. PMID:1663959

  6. Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) production by Clostridium beijerinckii from wheat straw hydrolysates: efficient use of penta and hexa carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Bellido, Carolina; Loureiro Pinto, Marina; Coca, Mónica; González-Benito, Gerardo; García-Cubero, María Teresa

    2014-09-01

    ABE fermentation by Clostridium beijerinckii of steam-exploded and ozonated wheat straw hydrolysates was investigated. In steam-exploded hydrolysates, highest yields of 0.40 g/g ABE yield and 127.71 g ABE/kg wheat straw were achieved when the whole slurry from the pretreatment was used. In ozonated hydrolysates, 0.32 g/g ABE yield and 79.65 g ABE/kg wheat straw were obtained from washed ozonated wheat straw. Diverse effects were observed in steam explosion and ozonolysis of wheat straw which resulted in hemicellulose removal and acid insoluble lignin solubilization, respectively. SEM analysis showed structural differences in untreated and pretreated biomass. Depending on the operational strategy, after pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis, the glucose recovery ranged between 65.73-66.49% and 63.22-65.23% and the xylose recovery ranged between 45.19-61.00% and 34.54-40.91% in steam-exploded and ozonated hydrolysates, respectively. The effect of the main inhibitory compounds found in hydrolysates (oxalic acid, acetic acid, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and furfural) was studied through ABE fermentation in model media. PMID:24983690

  7. Succinic acid production from orange peel and wheat straw by batch fermentations of Fibrobacter succinogenes S85.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Siles, Jose A; Thompson, Ian P

    2010-10-01

    Succinic acid is a platform molecule that has recently generated considerable interests. Production of succinate from waste orange peel and wheat straw by consolidated bioprocessing that combines cellulose hydrolysis and sugar fermentation, using a cellulolytic bacterium, Fibrobacter succinogenes S85, was studied. Orange peel contains D-limonene, which is a well-known antibacterial agent. Its effects on batch cultures of F. succinogenes S85 were examined. The minimal concentrations of limonene found to inhibit succinate and acetate generation and bacterial growth were 0.01%, 0.1%, and 0.06% (v/v), respectively. Both pre-treated orange peel by steam distillation to remove D: -limonene and intact wheat straw were used as feedstocks. Increasing the substrate concentrations of both feedstocks, from 5 to 60 g/L, elevated succinate concentration and productivity but lowered the yield. In addition, pre-treated orange peel generated greater succinate productivities than wheat straw but had similar resultant titres. The greatest succinate titres were 1.9 and 2.0 g/L for pre-treated orange peel and wheat straw, respectively. This work demonstrated that agricultural waste such as wheat straw and orange peel can be biotransformed to succinic acid by a one-step consolidated bioprocessing. Measures to increase fermentation efficiency are also discussed. PMID:20645087

  8. Development of geothermally assisted process for production of liquid fuels and chemicals from wheat straw

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, V.G.; Linden, J.C.; Moreira, A.R.; Lenz, T.G.

    1981-06-01

    The effects of variations in autohydrolysis conditions on the production of fermentable sugars from wheat straw are investigated. Both the direct production of sugar from the autohydrolysis of hemicellulose and the subsequent yield from the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose are considered. The principal parameters studied were time, temperature, and water/fiber weight ratio; however, the effects of adding minor amounts of phenol and aluminum sulfate to the autohydrolysis charge were also investigated. A brief study was made of the effects of two major parameters, substrate concentration and enzyme/substrate ratio, on the sugar yield from enzymatic hydrolysis of optimally pretreated straw. The efficiency with which these sugars could be fermented to ethanol was studied. In most cases experiments were carried out using distilled water; however, the effects of direct use of geothermal water were determined for each of the major steps in the process. An appendix to the body of the report describes the results of a preliminary economic evaluation of a plant designed to produce 25 x 10/sup 6/ gallons of ethanol per year from wheat straw using the best process conditions determined in the above work. Also appended are the results from a preliminary investigation of the applicability of autohydrolysis technology to the production of fermentable sugars from corn stover.

  9. Isotopic compositions of elemental carbon in smoke and ash derived from crop straw combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; Li, Jiuhai; Xu, Hui; Wu, Dan; Liu, Yan; Yang, Hui

    2014-08-01

    Six cultivars of straw for rice, maize and wheat, respectively, were burned under flaming and smoldering conditions, and carbon isotopic ratio values of elemental carbon (EC) in smoke and ash determined. The results showed that mean carbon isotopic fractionation (?13C) between EC in flaming and smoldering smoke from rice straw, and the starting material was -2.7‰ and -3.0‰, respectively. Moreover, the corresponding ?13C values for EC in flaming and smoldering smoke from wheat straw were -0.1‰ and +0.4‰, respectively. ?13C for EC in the two types of smoke from maize straw were -3.4‰ and +0.2‰, respectively. ?13C for EC in flaming and smoldering ash from rice straw were -1.8‰ and -1.6‰ in turn. ?13C for EC in flaming and smoldering ash from wheat straw were +0.9‰ and +2.4‰, respectively. Additionally, the ones for EC in the two types of ash from maize straw were -1.2‰ and -1.0‰, respectively. If ?13CEC values for pollutants, such as straw smoke, soot from coal and diesel-powered vehicles, and ambient PM2.5 in a region, are determined in summer and autumn, the contribution of straw burning to ambient EC is likely to be estimated with the approach of carbon isotopic mass balance.

  10. Pretreatment and fractionation of wheat straw for production of fuel ethanol and value-added co-products in a biorefinery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An integrated process has been developed for a wheat straw biorefinery. In this process wheat straw was pretreated by soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA), which extensively removed lignin but preserved high percentages of the carbohydrate fractions for subsequent bioconversion. The pretreatment condi...

  11. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation Into Wheat Straw Paper and Wood Pulp Paper Use at UBC

    E-print Network

    Into Wheat Straw Paper and Wood Pulp Paper Use at UBC Jack Yue Zhang Ryan LaMarche Weber Lin William Tung of a project/report". #12;1 AN INVESTIGATION INTO WHEAT STRAW PAPER AND WOOD PULP PAPER USE AT UBC Submitted to....................................................................................................................7 2.1 WOOD PULP PAPER

  12. Removal of Fermentation Inhibitors from Alkaline Peroxide Pretreated and Enzymatically Hydrolyzed Wheat Straw: Production of Butanol from Hydrolysate Using Clostridium beijerinckii in Batch Reactors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In these studies, alkaline peroxide pretreatment of wheat straw was investigated. Pretreated wheat straw was hydrolyzed using celluloytic and xylanolytic enzymes, and the hydrolysate was used to produce butanol using Clostridium beijerinckii P260. The culture produced less than 2.59 gL**-1 acetone...

  13. Post-Harvest Processing Methods for Reduction of Silica and Alkali Metals in Wheat Straw

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David Neal; Lacey, Jeffrey Alan; Shaw, Peter Gordon

    2002-04-01

    Silica and alkali metals in wheat straw limit its use for bioenergy and gasification. Slag deposits occur via the eutectic melting of SiO2 with K2O, trapping chlorides at surfaces and causing corrosion. A minimum melting point of 950°C is desirable, corresponding to SiO2:K2O of about 3:1. Mild chemical treatments were used to reduce Si, K, and Cl, while varying temperature, concentration, %-solids, and time. Dilute acid was more effective at removing K and Cl, while dilute alkali was more effective for Si. Reduction of minerals in this manner may prove economical for increasing utilization of the straw for combustion or gasification.

  14. Biomechanics of Wheat/Barley Straw and Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher T. Wright; Peter A. Pryfogle; Nathan A. Stevens; Eric D. Steffler; J. Richard Hess; Thomas H. Ulrich

    2005-03-01

    The lack of understanding of the mechanical characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks is a limiting factor in economically collecting and processing crop residues, primarily wheat and barley stems and corn stover. Several testing methods, including compression, tension, and bend have been investigated to increase our understanding of the biomechanical behavior of cellulosic feedstocks. Biomechanical data from these tests can provide required input to numerical models and help advance harvesting, handling, and processing techniques. In addition, integrating the models with the complete data set from this study can identify potential tools for manipulating the biomechanical properties of plant varieties in such a manner as to optimize their physical characteristics to produce higher value biomass and more energy efficient harvesting practices.

  15. Nitrogen availability effects on carbon mineralization, fungal and bacterial growth, and enzyme activities during decomposition of wheat straw in soil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. M Henriksen; T. A Breland

    1999-01-01

    Our objectives were (1) to investigate the response of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) straw decomposition to increasing nitrogen availability (0.5, 0.8, 1.2 and 1.9% N of straw dry matter) in a microcosm experiment at controlled temperature (15°C) and moisture (?10 kPa), (2) to elucidate underlying mechanisms at the microbial-community level, and (3) to develop a model according to the measurements.

  16. The analysis of handsheets from wheat straw following solid substrate fermentation by Streptomyces cyaneus and soda cooking treatment.

    PubMed

    Berrocal, M M; Rodríguez, J; Hernández, M; Pérez, M I; Roncero, M B; Vidal, T; Ball, A S; Arias, M E

    2004-08-01

    The recent interest in the utilisation of agricultural fibres has promoted research into their potential as raw materials for the pulp and paper industry. In the current study, we report on the effect of biological pretreatment of wheat straw by Streptomyces cyaneus on the performance of the handsheets produced from the treated pulps. The pre-treatment of wheat straw with S. cyaneus had a positive effect on both the burst and tear indexes of the pulps but had a negative impact on tensile index. No significant variation in permeability and in folding endurance was observed. Manipulation of handsheets from wheat straw through biological treatment may therefore result in improved quality traits. PMID:15081483

  17. Induction of laccase activity in the white rot fungus Pleurotus ostreatus using water polluted with wheat straw extracts.

    PubMed

    Parenti, Alejandra; Muguerza, Elaia; Iroz, Amaia Redin; Omarini, Alejandra; Conde, Enma; Alfaro, Manuel; Castanera, Raúl; Santoyo, Francisco; Ramírez, Lucía; Pisabarro, Antonio G

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore the use of polluted water effluents from wheat straw using industries as inducers of lignocellulolytic enzymatic activities in cultures of white rot basidiomycetes. For this purpose, we studied the effect of a wheat straw water extract on the evolution of the laccase activity recovered from submerged cultures of Pleurotus ostreatus made in different media and under various culture conditions. Our results demonstrated an accumulative induction effect in all the cultures and conditions tested. This induction is parallel to changes in the laccase electrophoretic profiles recovered from the culture supernatants. The isoenzyme that appeared to be mainly responsible for the laccase activity under these conditions was laccase 10, as confirmed by sequencing the induced protein. These results support the idea of using wheat straw effluents as inducers in liquid cultures of P. ostreatus mycelia for the production of ligninolytic enzymatic cocktails. PMID:23425584

  18. Digestibility, nitrogen utilization, and voluntary intake of ensiled crab waste-wheat straw mixtures fed to sheep.

    PubMed

    Abazinge, M D; Fontenot, J P; Allen, V G

    1994-03-01

    Crab waste and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) straw mixtures, ensiled with different additives, were evaluated in metabolism and palatability trials. Crab waste and straw were mixed in proportions of 1:1, wet basis, with 20% water and different additives, and ensiled in 210-L metal drums double-lined with polyethylene bags. Thirty crossbred wethers (40 kg initial BW) were fed a 1) basal diet consisting of 75% orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) hay and 25% concentrate, 2) ensiled crab waste-wheat straw, with 16% (vol/wt) added glacial acetic acid, 3) crab waste-wheat straw ensiled with 20% dry molasses, 4) crab waste-wheat straw ensiled with 20% dry molasses and a microbial inoculant, and 5) ensiled wheat straw supplemented with urea. Apparent digestibility of DM and CP was lower (P < .05) for acetic acid-treated silages than for silages containing molasses. Nitrogen retention was higher (P < .05) for molasses-inoculant-treated silage than for the molasses-treated silage (5.4 vs 3.9 g/d). Ruminal NH3 N and blood urea N were higher (P < .05) for lambs fed the molasses-treated silages than for those receiving the acetic acid-treated crab waste mixture. Among the wethers fed crab waste silages, intake was lower (P < .01) for wethers receiving the acetic acid-treated silage than for those fed the molasses-treated mixtures. Treatment of crab waste-straw mixtures with molasses produced a palatable silage that was efficiently utilized by wethers. PMID:8181970

  19. Pulp properties resulting from different pretreatments of wheat straw and their influence on enzymatic hydrolysis rate.

    PubMed

    Rossberg, Christine; Steffien, Doreen; Bremer, Martina; Koenig, Swetlana; Carvalheiro, Florbela; Duarte, Luís C; Moniz, Patrícia; Hoernicke, Max; Bertau, Martin; Fischer, Steffen

    2014-10-01

    Wheat straw was subjected to three different processes prior to saccharification, namely alkaline pulping, natural pulping and autohydrolysis, in order to study their effect on the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis. Parameters like medium concentration, temperature and time have been varied in order to optimize each method. Milling the raw material to a length of 4mm beforehand showed the best cost-value-ratio compared to other grinding methods studied. Before saccharification the pulp can be stored in dried form, leading to a high yield of glucose. Furthermore the relation of pulp properties (i.e. intrinsic viscosity, Klason-lignin and hemicelluloses content, crystallinity, morphology) to cellulose hydrolysis is discussed. PMID:25058295

  20. Bulk density of wet and dry wheat straw and switchgrass particles

    SciTech Connect

    Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Bi, X.T. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Naimi, L.J. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Hoque, M. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Narayan, S. [Lambton College, Sarnia, Ontario

    2008-05-01

    ABSTRACT. Bulk density is a major physical property in designing the logistic system for biomass handling. The size, shape, moisture content, individual particle density, and surface characteristics are few factors affecting the bulk density. This research investigates the effects of true particle lengths ranging from 6 to 50 mm and moisture contents ranging from 8% to 60% wet basis (wb) on the bulk density of wheat straw and switchgrass. Three types of particle densities of straw and switchgrass measured were: a hollow particle density assuming a hollow cylindrical geometry, a solid particle density assuming a solid cylindrical geometry, and a particle density measured using a gas pycnometer at a gas pressure of 40 kPa. The bulk density of both loose fill and packed fill biomass samples was examined. The calculated wet and dry bulk density ranged from 24 to 111 kg m 3 for straw and from 49 to 266 kg m 3 for switchgrass. The corresponding tapped bulk density ranged from 34 to 130 kg m 3 for straw and 68 to 323 kg m 3 for switchgrass. The increase in bulk density due to tapping the container was from 10% for short 6 mm particles to more than 50% for long 50 mm particles. An equation relating the bulk density of stems as a function of moisture content, dry bulk density, and particle size was developed. After the validation of this bulk density equation, the relationship would be highly useful in designing the logistics system for large scale transport of biomass to a biorefinery. The bulk density and particle density data of uniform particles would be important, if straw and switchgrass is used for pulping and paper making.

  1. Enzymic saccharification of pretreated wheat straw. [Trichoderma reesei

    SciTech Connect

    Vallander, L.; Eriksson, K.E.

    1985-01-01

    Studies of pretreatment of wheat and its subsequent saccharification by Trichoderma reesei cellulases are reported. Steam explosion was found to be the most effective of the pretreatment methods tested. Data are presented describing the effect of enzyme and substrate concentration on the rate and degree of hydrolysis. Significant inhibition of the cellulases was observed when sugar concentrations were 6% or higher. This inhibition increased when glucose and ethanol were present simultaneously. Adsorption of enzymes to the substrate was followed during a 24-h hydrolysis period. An initial rapid and extensive adsorption occurred, followed by a short desorption period that was followed in turn by a further increased adsorption peaking after 3 h. Intermediate removal of hydrolysate, particularly in combination with a second addition of enzyme, clearly improved the yield of saccharification compared to an uninterrupted hydrolysis over a 24-h period. Thus, a 74% yield of reducing sugars was obtained. Furthermore, an increase in the amount of recoverable enzymes was observed under these conditions. Evidence is presented that suggests that a countercurrent technique, whereby free enzymes in recovered hydrolysate are adsorbed onto new substrate, may provide a means of recirculating dissolved enzymes.

  2. Ozonation and alkaline-peroxide pretreatment of wheat straw for Cryptococcus curvatus fermentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwalt, C. J.; Hunter, J. B.; Lin, S.; McKenzie, S.; Denvir, A.

    2000-01-01

    Crop residues in an Advanced Life Support System (ALS) contain many valuable components that could be recovered and used. Wheat is 60% inedible, with approximately 90% of the total sugars in the residue cellulose and hemicellulose. To release these sugars requires pretreatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis. Cryptococcus curvatus, an oleaginous yeast, uses the sugars in cellulose and hemicellulose for growth and production of storage triglycerides. In this investigation, alkaline-peroxide and ozonation pretreatment methods were compared for their efficiency to release glucose and xylose to be used in the cultivation of C. curvatus. Leaching the biomass with water at 65 degrees C for 4 h prior to pretreatment facilitated saccharification. Alkaline-peroxide and ozone pretreatment were almost 100% and 80% saccharification efficient, respectively. The sugars derived from the hydrolysis of alkaline-peroxide-treated wheat straw supported the growth of C. curvatus and the production of edible single-cell oil.

  3. Grinding energy and physical properties of chopped and hammer-milled barley, wheat, oat, and canola straws

    SciTech Connect

    J.S. Tumuluru [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Biofuels and Renewable Energy Technologies Dept.; L.G. Tabil [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering; Y. Song [Shenyang Agricultural University (China). Coll. of Engineering; K.L. Iroba [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering; V. Meda [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, specific energy for grinding and physical properties of wheat, canola, oat and barley straw grinds were investigated. The initial moisture content of the straw was about 0.13–0.15 (fraction total mass basis). Particle size reduction experiments were conducted in two stages: (1) a chopper without a screen, and (2) a hammer mill using three screen sizes (19.05, 25.4, and 31.75 mm). The lowest grinding energy (1.96 and 2.91 kWh t-1) was recorded for canola straw using a chopper and hammer mill with 19.05-mm screen size, whereas the highest (3.15 and 8.05 kWh t-1) was recorded for barley and oat straws. The physical properties (geometric mean particle diameter, bulk, tapped and particle density, and porosity) of the chopped and hammer-milled wheat, barley, canola, and oat straw grinds measured were in the range of 0.98–4.22 mm, 36–80 kg m-3, 49–119 kg m-3, 600–1220 kg m-3, and 0.9–0.96, respectively. The average mean particle diameter was highest for the chopped wheat straw (4.22-mm) and lowest for the canola grind (0.98-mm). The canola grinds produced using the hammer mill (19.05-mm screen size) had the highest bulk and tapped density of about 80 and 119 kg m-3; whereas, the wheat and oat grinds had the lowest of about 58 and 88–90 kg m-3. The results indicate that the bulk and tapped densities are inversely proportional to the particle size of the grinds. The flow properties of the grinds calculated are better for chopped straws compared to hammer milled using smaller screen size (19.05 mm).

  4. Effects of Wheat Straw Incorporation on the Availability of Soil Nutrients and Enzyme Activities in Semiarid Areas

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ting; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Ke; Ding, Ruixia; Yang, Baoping; Nie, Junfeng; Jia, Zhikuan; Han, Qingfang

    2015-01-01

    Soil infertility is the main barrier to dryland agricultural production in China. To provide a basis for the establishment of a soil amelioration technical system for rainfed fields in the semiarid area of northwest China, we conducted a four—year (2007–2011) field experiment to determine the effects of wheat straw incorporation on the arid soil nutrient levels of cropland cultivated with winter wheat after different straw incorporation levels. Three wheat straw incorporation levels were tested (H: 9000 kg hm-2, M: 6000 kg hm-2, and L: 3000 kg hm-2) and no straw incorporation was used as the control (CK). The levels of soil nutrients, soil organic carbon (SOC), soil labile organic carbon (LOC), and enzyme activities were analyzed each year after the wheat harvest. After straw incorporation for four years, the results showed that variable straw amounts had different effects on the soil fertility indices, where treatment H had the greatest effect. Compared with CK, the average soil available N, available P, available K, SOC, and LOC levels were higher in the 0–40 cm soil layers after straw incorporation treatments, i.e., 9.1–30.5%, 9.8–69.5%, 10.3–27.3%, 0.7–23.4%, and 44.4–49.4% higher, respectively. On average, the urease, phosphatase, and invertase levels in the 0–40 cm soil layers were 24.4–31.3%, 9.9–36.4%, and 42.9–65.3% higher, respectively. Higher yields coupled with higher nutrient contents were achieved with H, M and L compared with CK, where these treatments increased the crop yields by 26.75%, 21.51%, and 7.15%, respectively. PMID:25880452

  5. Effect of Additions on Ensiling and Microbial Community of Senesced Wheat Straw

    SciTech Connect

    David N. Thompson; Joni M. Barnes; Tracy P. Houghton

    2005-04-01

    Crop residues collected during or after grain harvest are available once per year and must be stored for extended periods. The combination of air, high moisture, and high microbial loads leads to shrinkage during storage and risk of spontaneous ignition. Ensiling is a wet preservation method that could be used to store these residues stably. To economically adapt ensiling to biomass that is harvested after it has senesced, the need for nutrient, moisture, and microbial additions must be determined. We tested the ensiling of senesced wheat straw in sealed columns for 83 d. The straw was inoculated with Lactobacillus plantarum and amended with several levels of water and free sugars. The ability to stabilize the straw polysaccharides was strongly influenced by both moisture and free sugars. Without the addition of sugar, the pH increased from 5.2 to as much as 9.1, depending on moisture level, and losses of 22% of the cellulose and 21% of the hemicellulose were observed. By contrast, when sufficient sugars were added and interstitial water was maintained, a final pH of 4.0 was attainable, with correspondingly low (<5%) losses of cellulose and hemicellulose. The results show that ensiling should be considered a promising method for stable storage of wet biorefinery feedstocks.

  6. Rice straw–wood particle composite for sound absorbing wooden construction materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Han-Seung Yang; Dae-Jun Kim; Hyun-Joong Kim

    2003-01-01

    In this study, rice straw–wood particle composite boards were manufactured as insulation boards using the method used in the wood-based panel industry. The raw material, rice straw, was chosen because of its availability. The manufacturing parameters were: a specific gravity of 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8, and a rice straw content (10\\/90, 20\\/80, and 30\\/70 weight of rice straw\\/wood particle) of

  7. Bioethanol production from wheat straw via enzymatic route employing Penicillium janthinellum cellulases.

    PubMed

    Singhania, Reeta Rani; Saini, Jitendra Kumar; Saini, Reetu; Adsul, Mukund; Mathur, Anshu; Gupta, Ravi; Tuli, Deepak Kumar

    2014-10-01

    This study concerns in-house development of cellulases from a mutant Penicillium janthinellum EMS-UV-8 and its application in separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) processes for bioethanol production from pre-treated wheat straw. In a 5L fermentor, the above strain could produce cellulases having activity of 3.1 FPU/mL and a specific activity of 0.83 FPU/mg of protein. In-house developed cellulase worked more efficiently in case of SSF as ethanol concentration of 21.6g/L and yield of 54.4% were obtained which were higher in comparison to SHF (ethanol concentration 12 g/L and 30.2% yield). This enzyme preparation when compared with commercial cellulase for hydrolysis of pre-treated wheat straw was found competitive. This study demonstrates that P. janthinellum EMS-UV-8 is a potential fungus for future large-scale production of cellulases. PMID:25086433

  8. Characterization and swelling-deswelling properties of wheat straw cellulose based semi-IPNs hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Li, Qian; Su, Yuan; Yue, Qinyan; Gao, Baoyu

    2014-07-17

    A novel wheat straw cellulose-g-poly(potassium acrylate)/polyvinyl alcohol (WSC-g-PKA/PVA) semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (semi-IPNs) hydrogel was prepared by polymerizing wheat straw and an aqueous solution of acrylic acid (AA), and further semi-interpenetrating with PVA occurred during the chemosynthesis. The swelling and deswelling properties of WSC-g-PKA/PVA semi-IPNs hydrogel and WSC-g-PKA hydrogel were studied and compared in various pH solutions, salt solutions, temperatures, particle sizes and ionic strength. The results indicated that both hydrogels had the largest swelling capacity at pH=6, and the effect of ions on the swelling of hydrogels was in the order: Na(+)>K(+)>Mg(2+)>Ca(2+). The Schott's pseudo second order model can be effectively used to evaluate swelling kinetics of hydrogels. Moreover, the semi-IPNs hydrogel had improved swelling-deswelling properties compared with that of WSC-g-PKA hydrogel. PMID:24702940

  9. Influence of aeration on bioethanol production from ozonized wheat straw hydrolysates using Pichia stipitis.

    PubMed

    Bellido, Carolina; González-Benito, Gerardo; Coca, Mónica; Lucas, Susana; García-Cubero, María Teresa

    2013-04-01

    The influence of aeration on ethanol production by Pichia stipitis was studied in wheat straw hydrolysates subjected to ozone pretreatment for the first time. In a first stage, different aeration rates ranging from 0.03 to 0.50 L air/min, which corresponds to a volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient from 1.1 to 9.6 h(-1), were applied to model glucose/xylose substrates. The most promising value was found to be 3.3 h(-1) (0.1 L air/min) leading to better xylose utilization, an ethanol yield of 0.40 g ethanol/g sugars and complete depletion of sugars at 72 h. In a second stage, the effect of aeration was analyzed in ozonized wheat straw hydrolysates. Sugars were completely depleted at 96 h and ethanol yield reached a value of 0.41 g ethanol/g sugars. The addition of controlled oxygen (K(L)a=3.8 h(-1)) enhances the efficiency of the process causing an increase of 29.1% in ethanol production and a considerable reduction of 42.9% in fermentation time as compared to non-aerated hydrolysates. PMID:23422301

  10. Enzymatic hydrolysis optimization of microwave alkali pretreated wheat straw and ethanol production by yeast.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anita; Bishnoi, Narsi R

    2012-03-01

    Microwave alkali pretreated wheat straw was used for in-house enzyme production by Aspergillusflavus and Trichodermareesei. Produced enzymes were concentrated, pooled and assessed for the hydrolysis of pretreated wheat straw. Factors affecting hydrolysis were screened out by Placket-Burman design (PBD) and most significant factors were further optimized by Box-Behnken design (BBD). Under optimum conditions, 82% efficiency in hydrolysis yield was observed. After the optimization by response surface methodology (RSM), a model was proposed to predict the optimum value confirmed by the experimental results. The concentrated enzymatic hydrolyzate was fermented for ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia stipitis and co-culture of both. The yield of ethanol was found to be 0.48 g(p)/g(s), 0.43 g(p)/g(s) and 0.40 g(p)/g(s) by S. cerevisiae, P. stipitis and by co-culture, respectively, using concentrated enzymatic hydrolyzate. During anaerobic fermentation 42.31 ?mol/mL, 36.69 ?mol/mL, 43.35 ?mol/mL CO(2) was released by S. cerevisiae, P. stipitis and by co-culture, respectively. PMID:22261656

  11. Rapid Assessment of In Situ Wheat Straw Residue Via Remote Sensing Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, D. G.; Shaw, J. N.; Mask, P. L.; Rickman, D.; Luvall, J.; Wersinger, J. M.; Guertal, E. A.

    2003-01-01

    Crop residues influence near surface soil organic carbon content (SOC), impact our ability to remotely assess soil properties, and play a role in global carbon budgets. Methods that measure crop residues are laborious, and largely inappropriate for regional estimates. The objective of this study was to evaluate remote sensing (RS) data for rapid quantification of residue cover. In March 2000 and April 2001, residue plots (15 m x 15 m) were established in the Coastal Plain and Appalachian Plateau physiographic regions of Alabama. Treatments consisted of five wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) straw cover rates (0, 10, 20, 50, and 80%) replicated 3 times. Soil water content and residue decomposition were monitored. Spectral measurements were acquired via spectroradiometer (350 - 1050 nm), Airborne Terrestrial Applications Sensor (ATLAS) (400 - 12,500 nm), airborne color photography (400 - 600 nm), and IKONOS satellite (450 - 900 nm). Spectroradiometer data were acquired monthly, aircraft images yearly, and satellite per availability. Results showed all platforms successfully estimated residue cover variability using red, near infrared (NIR) and thermal infrared (TIR) regions of the spectrum. Airborne ATLAS imagery was best explaining as much as 98% of the variability in wheat straw cover. Spectroradiometer, color infrared photography, and IKONOS imagery accounted for 84, 56, and 24% of the variability, respectively.

  12. Methane production from wheat straw with anaerobic sludge by heme supplementation.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yonglan; Chang, Zhizhou; Ye, Xiaomei; Xu, Rong; Du, Jing; Chen, Guangyin

    2014-11-01

    Wheat straw particles were directly used as substrate for batch anaerobic digestion with anaerobic sludge under 35°C to evaluate the effects of adding heme on methane production. When 1mg/l heme was added to the fermentation process with no agitated speed, a maximum cumulative methane production of 12227.8ml was obtained with cumulative methane yield of wheat straw was 257.4ml/g-TS (total solid), which was increased by 20.6% compared with 213.5ml/g-TS of no heme was added in the reactor. Meanwhile, oxido-reduction potential (ORP) level was decreased, the activity of coenzyme F420 was significantly improved and NADH/NAD(+) ratio were the highest than other experimental groups. These results suggest that heme-supplemented anaerobic sludge with no agitated speed may be providing a more reductive environment, which is a cost-effective method of anaerobic digestion from biomass waste to produce methane with less energy consuming. PMID:25247248

  13. Pyrolysis products as markers in the chemical characterization of paperboards from waste paper and wheat straw pulps

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. C. Galletti; P. Bocchini; M. E. Guadalix; G. Almendros; S. Camarero; A. T. Martínez

    1997-01-01

    Analytical pyrolysis was used to characterize paperboard prepared with wheat straw subjected either to semichemical or biomechanical pulping (the latter including solid-state fermentation with the ligninolytic fungi Pleurotus ostreatus and P. floridanus) and variable proportions of waste paper. Pyrolysis products were also quantified and selected in attempt to match the industrial and laboratory parameters used in the assessment of pulp

  14. Comparison of separate hydrolysis and fermentation versus simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of pretreated wheat straw to ethanol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL Y- 2034 from wheat straw (WS) by separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) was studied. The yield of glucose from dilute acid pretreated WS (86 g L-1) after enzymatic saccharification was 2...

  15. Differential proteomic analysis of the secretome of Irpex lacteus and other white-rot fungi during wheat straw pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Identifying new high-performance enzymes or enzyme complexes to enhance biomass degradation is the key for the development of cost-effective processes for ethanol production. Irpex lacteus is an efficient microorganism for wheat straw pretreatment, yielding easily hydrolysable products with high sugar content. Thus, this fungus was selected to investigate the enzymatic system involved in lignocellulose decay, and its secretome was compared to those from Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Pleurotus ostreatus which produced different degradation patterns when growing on wheat straw. Extracellular enzymes were analyzed through 2D-PAGE, nanoLC/MS-MS, and homology searches against public databases. Results In wheat straw, I. lacteus secreted proteases, dye-decolorizing and manganese-oxidizing peroxidases, and H2O2 producing-enzymes but also a battery of cellulases and xylanases, excluding those implicated in cellulose and hemicellulose degradation to their monosaccharides, making these sugars poorly available for fungal consumption. In contrast, a significant increase of ?-glucosidase production was observed when I. lacteus grew in liquid cultures. P. chrysosporium secreted more enzymes implicated in the total hydrolysis of the polysaccharides and P. ostreatus produced, in proportion, more oxidoreductases. Conclusion The protein pattern secreted during I. lacteus growth in wheat straw plus the differences observed among the different secretomes, justify the fitness of I. lacteus for biopretreatment processes in 2G-ethanol production. Furthermore, all these data give insight into the biological degradation of lignocellulose and suggest new enzyme mixtures interesting for its efficient hydrolysis. PMID:23937687

  16. BUTANOL PRODUCTION FROM WHEAT STRAW BY SIMULTANEOUS SACCHARIFICATION AND FERMENTATION USING CLOSTRIDIUM BEIJERINCKII: PART II - FED-BATCH FERMENTATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In these studies, Clostridium beijerinckii P260 was used to produce butanol (acetone butanol ethanol, or ABE) from wheat straw (WS) hydrolyzate in a fed-batch reactor. It has been demonstrated that simultaneous hydrolysis of WS to achieve 100% hydrolysis to simple sugars (to the extent achievable u...

  17. BUTANOL PRODUCTION FROM WHEAT STRAW BY SIMULTANEOUS SACCHARIFICATION AND FERMENTATION USING CLOSTRIDIUM BEIJERINCKII: PART I-BATCH FERMENTATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five different processes were investigated to produce acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) from wheat straw (WS) by Clostridium beijerinckii. The five processes were fermentation of pretreated WS (Process I), separate hydrolysis and fermentation of WS to ABE without removing sediments (Process II), simult...

  18. Solid-state anaerobic co-digestion of spent mushroom substrate with yard trimmings and wheat straw for biogas production.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yunqin; Ge, Xumeng; Li, Yebo

    2014-10-01

    Spent mushroom substrate (SMS) is a biomass waste generated from mushroom production. About 5 kg of SMS is generated for every kg of mushroom produced. In this study, solid state anaerobic digestion (SS-AD) of SMS, wheat straw, yard trimmings, and their mixtures was investigated at different feedstock to effluent ratios. SMS was found to be highly degradable, which resulted in inhibition of SS-AD due to volatile fatty acid (VFA) accumulation and a decrease in pH. This issue was addressed by co-digestion of SMS with either yard trimmings or wheat straw. SS-AD of SMS/yard trimmings achieved a cumulative methane yield of 194 L/kg VS, which was 16 and 2 times higher than that from SMS and yard trimmings, respectively. SS-AD of SMS/wheat straw obtained a cumulative methane yield of 269 L/kg VS, which was 23 times as high as that from SMS and comparable to that from wheat straw. PMID:25084045

  19. Cultivation of Agaricus bisporus on wheat straw and waste tea leaves based composts using poplar leaves as activator material

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hilmi Toker; Ergun Baysal; Osman Nuri Yigitbasi; Mehmet Colak; Huseyin Peker; Hakan Simsek; Ferah Yilmaz

    This study was carried out to determine pin head formation time and mushroom yield of Agaricus bisporus on some casing materials. Composts were prepared basically from wheat straw and waste tea leaves using poplar leaves as activator material. In this study, moreover, in order to follow the evolution of the composting process, daily temperature measurements were taken. According to the

  20. Pretreatment of wheat straw using combined wet oxidation and alkaline hydrolysis resulting in convertible cellulose and hemicellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Bjerre, A.B.; Olesen, A.B.; Fernqvist, T.; Ploeger, A.; Schmidt, A.S. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark). Environmental Science and Technology Dept.] [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark). Environmental Science and Technology Dept.

    1996-03-05

    The wet oxidation process of wheat straw has been studied as a pretreatment method to attain the main goal: to break down cellulose to glucose enzymatic, and secondly, to dissolve hemicellulose (e.g., for fermentation) without producing microbial inhibitors. Wet oxidation combined with base addition readily oxidizes lignin from wheat straw facilitating the polysaccharides for enzymatic hydrolysis. By using a specially constructed autoclave system, the wet oxidation process was optimized with respect to both reaction time and temperature. The best conditions (20 g/L straw, 170 C, 5 to 10 min) gave about 85% w/w yield of converting cellulose to glucose. The process water, containing dissolved hemicellulose and carboxylic acids, has proven to be a direct nutrient source for the fungus Aspergillus niger producing exo-{beta}-xylosidase. Furfural and hydroxymethyl-furfural, known inhibitors of microbial growth when other pretreatment systems have been applied, were not observed following the wet oxidation treatment.

  1. Shiitake Medicinal Mushroom, Lentinus edodes (Higher Basidiomycetes) Productivity and Lignocellulolytic Enzyme Profiles during Wheat Straw and Tree Leaf Bioconversion.

    PubMed

    Elisashvili, Vladimir; Kachlishvili, Eva; Asatiani, Mikheil D

    2015-01-01

    Two commercial strains of Lentinus edodes have been comparatively evaluated for their productivity and lignocellulolytic enzyme profiles in mushroom cultivation using wheat straw or tree leaves as the growth substrates. Both substrates are profitable for recycling into shiitake fruit bodies. L. edodes 3715 gave the lowest yield of mushroom during tree leaves bioconversion with the biological efficiency (BE) 74.8% while the L. edodes 3721 BE achieved 83.4%. Cultivation of shiitake on wheat straw, especially in the presence of additional nitrogen source, increased the L. edodes 3721 BE to 92-95.3% owing to the high hydrolases activity and favorable conditions. Despite the quantitative variations, each strain of L. edodes had a similar pattern for secreting enzymes into the wheat straw and tree leaves. The mushrooms laccase and MnP activities were high during substrate colonization and declined rapidly during primordia appearance and fruit body development. While oxidase activity decreased, during the same period cellulases and xylanase activity raised sharply. Both cellulase and xylanase activity peaked at the mature fruit body stage. When mushrooms again shifted to the vegetative growth, oxidase activity gradually increased, whereas the hydrolases activity dropped rapidly. The MnP, CMCase, and FP activities of L. edodes 3721 during cultivation on wheat straw were higher than those during mushroom growth on tree leaves whereas the laccase activity was rather higher in fermentation of tree leaves. Enrichment of wheat straw with an additional nitrogen source rather favored to laccase, MnP, and FPA secretion during the vegetative stage of the L. edodes 3721 growth. PMID:25746408

  2. Characterization of cell wall components of wheat straw following hydrothermal pretreatment and fractionation.

    PubMed

    Merali, Zara; Ho, Justin D; Collins, Samuel R A; Le Gall, Gwénaëlle; Elliston, Adam; Käsper, Andres; Waldron, Keith W

    2013-03-01

    Thermophysical pretreatment enhances the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose. However, its impact on cell wall chemistry is still poorly understood. This paper reports the effects of hydrothermal pretreatment on the degradation and alkali-extractability of wheat straw cell wall polymers. Pretreatment resulted in loss and/or solubilization of arabinoxylans (by 53%), ferulic and diferulic acids which are important cross-linking agents accompanied by concomitant increases in cellulose (up to 43%) and lignin (29%). The remaining water-insoluble hemicelluloses were more readily extractable in alkali and were reduced in molecular weight indicating substantial thermochemical depolymerization. They were also associated with smaller but significant amounts of (cellulose-derived) glucose. The alkali-insoluble residues consisted predominantly of cellulosic glucose and lignin and contained p-coumaric acid. The depolymerization of hemicelluloses, reduction in cinnamic acids and partial degradation of cellulose is likely to contribute significantly to the accessibility of cellulases during subsequent enzymolysis. PMID:23347931

  3. Influence of high gravity process conditions on the environmental impact of ethanol production from wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Matty; Tillman, Anne-Marie; Cannella, David; Jørgensen, Henning

    2014-12-01

    Biofuel production processes at high gravity are currently under development. Most of these processes however use sugars or first generation feedstocks as substrate. This paper presents the results of a life cycle assessment (LCA) of the production of bio-ethanol at high gravity conditions from a second generation feedstock, namely, wheat straw. The LCA used lab results of a set of 36 process configurations in which dry matter content, enzyme preparation and loading, and process strategy were varied. The LCA results show that higher dry matter content leads to a higher environmental impact of the ethanol production, but this can be compensated by reducing the impact of enzyme production and use, and by polyethylene glycol addition at high dry matter content. The results also show that the renewable and non-renewable energy use resulting from the different process configurations ultimately determine their environmental impact. PMID:25299491

  4. Synthesis and characterization of a novel super-absorbent based on wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zuohao; Li, Qian; Yue, Qinyan; Gao, Baoyu; Xu, Xing; Zhong, Qianqian

    2011-02-01

    In order to develop an eco-friendly polymer, a novel super-absorbent polymer was prepared by graft copolymerization of acrylic acid (AA), acrylic amide (AM) and dimethyl diallyl ammonium chloride (DMDAAC) onto the pretreatment wheat straw (PTWS). The molecular structure of the super-absorbent was confirmed by FTIR. The factors that can influence absorbencies of the super-absorbent resin (SAR) were investigated, such as weight ratio between the monomers, the ratio of PTWS to monomers, the amount of initiator and cross-linker, temperature reaction time and neutralization degree of AA. The SAR has the water absorbency of 133.76 g/g in distilled water and 33.83 g/g in 0.9 wt.% NaCl solution. PMID:21074415

  5. Anaerobic digestion of wheat straw--performance of continuous solid-state digestion.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Marcel; Heeg, Kathrin; Mumme, Jan

    2013-10-01

    In this study the upflow anaerobic solid-state (UASS) reactor was operated at various conditions to optimize the process parameters for anaerobically digesting wheat straw in a continuous process. Additionally, particle size effects have been studied in the operation at 55 and 60°C. Moreover, the incremental effect of the organic loading rate (OLR) to the system was examined from 2.5 to 8 gVS L(-1) d(-1). It was found that the UASS operating at 60 °C with a small OLR yields highest methane production, but the advantage over thermophilic operation is negligible. The rise in OLR reduces the systems yields, as expected. From OLR=8 gVS L(-1) d(-1) a second stage is necessary to circumvent volatile fatty acids accumulation. PMID:23954246

  6. Dissecting the effect of chemical additives on the enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Monschein, Mareike; Reisinger, Christoph; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2014-10-01

    Chemical additives were examined for ability to increase the enzymatic hydrolysis of thermo-acidically pretreated wheat straw by Trichoderma reesei cellulase at 50 °C. Semi-empirical descriptors derived from the hydrolysis time courses were applied to compare influence of these additives on lignocellulose bioconversion on a kinetic level, presenting a novel view on their mechanism of action. Focus was on rate retardation during hydrolysis, substrate conversion and enzyme adsorption. PEG 8000 enabled a reduction of enzyme loading by 50% while retaining the same conversion of 67% after 24h. For the first time, a beneficial effect of urea is reported, increasing the final substrate conversion after 48 h by 16%. The cationic surfactant cetyl-trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) enhanced the hydrolysis rate at extended reaction time (rlim) by 34% and reduced reaction time by 28%. A combination of PEG 8000 and urea increased sugar release more than additives used individually. PMID:25108473

  7. Anaerobic codigestion of pretreated wheat straw with cattle manure and analysis of the microbial community.

    PubMed

    Song, Zilin; Zhang, Chao

    2015-06-01

    Wheat straw (WS) was pretreated with four concentrations of H2O2 (1%, 2%, 3%, and 4%) and was anaerobically codigested with dairy cattle manure (CM) at various ratios from 100:0 to 0:100. Wet-state H2O2 pretreatment effectively enhanced the biodegradability and methane yield of the WS. The optimal concentration of H2O2 for treating WS was 3%. The methane yield was higher with the codigestion of CM and H2O2-treated WS than with untreated WS and higher than with H2O2-treated WS alone or CM alone. A 40:60 ratio of H2O2-treated WS mixed with CM produced the highest yield of methane (320.8mLgvolatile solid (VS)(-1)). Results of high-throughput sequencing indicated that the methanogenic community shifted during the codigestion from the acetoclastic methanogens, Methanosarcina, to the hydrogenotrophic methanogens, Methanosphaera and Methanoculleus. PMID:25812816

  8. Oxidation of wheat straw lignin by fungal lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase and laccase: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Ingo, M.J.; Kurek, B. [Laboratorie de Chimie Biologique, Thiverval-Grignon (France)

    1996-10-01

    Lignin peroxidase (LiP), manganese peroxidase (MnP) from Phanerochaete chrysosporium and laccase from Pleurotus eryngii were separately used to degrade alkali wheat straw lignin (AL). In order to characterize the catalytic action of the different enzymes, the chemical structure and the hydrodynamic properties of the treated lignin were analyzed by thioacidolysis-gas chromatography and molecular size exclusion chromatography. The results confirmed that only LiP was able to degrade guiacyl (G) and syringyl (S) structures in non-phenolic methylated lignins. However, provided that some phenolic terminal structures are present, MnP and laccase were able to degrade the non-phenolic portion of the polymer linked by {beta}-O-4 alkyl aryl ether bonds. This suggested that the oxidative reactions catalyzed in alkali straw lignin could progress through bond cleavages generating phenoxy radicals. The molecular size distribution of both thioacidolysis products and the oxidized polymer showed that AL underwent condensation side-reactions regardless of the enzyme treatment, but only LiP oxidation led to the increase in the hydrodynamic volume of the recovered lignin. This indicated that modification of enzymes by bonding patterns in lignin is not always associated with alterations in the spatial network of the polymer.

  9. Photo-biohydrogen production potential of Rhodobacter capsulatus-PK from wheat straw

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biotechnological exploitation of lignocellulosic biomass is promising for sustainable and environmentally sound energy provision strategy because of the abundant availability of the renewable resources. Wheat straw (WS) comprising of 75-80% cellulose and hemicellulose is one of widely available, inexpensive and renewable lignocellulosic biomass types. The cellulosic and hemicellulose substrate can be hydrolyzed into monomeric sugars by chemical and/or biological methods. Results This study examined comparative potential of dilute acid and pre-ammonia pretreated and enzymatically hydrolyzed wheat straw (WS) for hydrogen production by purple non sulfur bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus-PK. Gas production became noticeable after 14 h of inoculation in WS pretreated with 4% H2SO4. The detoxified liquid hydrolyzate (DLH) after overliming attained a production level of 372 mL-H2/L after 16 h under illumination of 120-150 W/m2 at 30?±?2.0°C. Whereas the non-detoxified acid pretreated hydrolyzate (NDLH) of WS could produce only upto 254 mL-H2/L after 21 h post inoculation. Evolution of H2 became observable just after 10?±?2.0 h of inoculation by employing 48 h age inoculum on the WS pretreated with 30% ammonia, hydrolyzed with cellulase 80 FPU/g and ?-glucosidase 220 CbU/ml at 50°C. Upto 712 ml/L of culture was measured with continuous shaking for 24 h. The 47.5% and 64.2% higher hydrogen volume than the DLH and NDLH substrates, respectively appeared as a function of significantly higher monomeric sugar contents of the enzymatically hydrolyzed substrate and lesser/zero amounts of toxic derivatives including pH reducing agents. Conclusion Photofermentative hydrogen production from lignocellulosic waste is a feasible approach for eco-friendly sustainable supply of bioenergy in a cost-effective way. Results of this study provide new insight for addressing biotechnological exploitation of abundantly available and low-cost cellulosic substrates. PMID:24099439

  10. Patterns of ligninolytic enzymes in Trametes versicolor . Distribution of extra- and intracellular enzyme activities during cultivation on glucose, wheat straw and beech wood

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Schlosser; R. Grey; W. Fritsche

    1997-01-01

    Trametes versicolor was shown to produce extracellular laccase during surface cultivation on glucose, wheat straw and beech wood. Growth on both\\u000a wheat straw and beech wood led to an increase as high as 3.5-fold in extracellular laccase activity, in comparison with growth\\u000a on glucose. The corresponding yields in fungal biomass reached only about 20% of the value obtained on glucose.

  11. Effects of different heat pre-treatments of wheat straw on its microbial activity and colonization by different tropical and sub-tropical edible mushrooms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Maziero; F. Zadrazil

    1994-01-01

    Quantitative differentiation of microbial activity in wheat straw substrate is described after different heat pre-treatments and addition of water during solid-state fermentation. All the 28 tested strains of tropical and sub-tropical edible mushrooms colonized sterile wheat straw. Substrate pre-treated at 25°C was primarily colonized by Coprinus sp. and other competitive microorganisms, and had the highest pH values. With some exceptions,

  12. Possibility of using waste tire composites reinforced with rice straw as construction materials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Han-Seung Yang; Dae-Jun Kim; Young-Kyu Lee; Hyun-Joong Kim; Jin-Yong Jeon; Chun-Won Kang

    2004-01-01

    Agricultural lignocellulosic fiber (rice straw)-waste tire particle composite boards were manufactured for use as insulation boards in construction, using the same method as that used in the wood-based panel industry. The manufacturing parameters were: a specific gravity of 0.8 and a rice straw content (10\\/90, 20\\/80 and 30\\/70 by wt.% of rice straw\\/waste tire particle). A commercial polyurethane adhesive for

  13. Removal of dyes from a synthetic textile dye effluent by biosorption on apple pomace and wheat straw

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T Robinson; B Chandran; P Nigam

    2002-01-01

    This paper deals with two low-cost, locally available, renewable biosorbents; apple pomace and wheat straw for textile dye removal. Experiments at total dye concentrations of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 100, 150, and 200mg\\/l were carried out with a synthetic effluent consisting of an equal mixture of five textile dyes. The effect of initial dye concentration, biosorbent particle size, quantity

  14. Succinic acid production from orange peel and wheat straw by batch fermentations of Fibrobacter succinogenes S85

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qiang Li; Jose A. Siles; Ian P. Thompson

    2010-01-01

    Succinic acid is a platform molecule that has recently generated considerable interests. Production of succinate from waste\\u000a orange peel and wheat straw by consolidated bioprocessing that combines cellulose hydrolysis and sugar fermentation, using\\u000a a cellulolytic bacterium, Fibrobacter succinogenes S85, was studied. Orange peel contains d-limonene, which is a well-known antibacterial agent. Its effects on batch cultures of F. succinogenes S85

  15. VALIDATION OF FIRESIDE PERFORMANCE INDICES: FOULING/CORROSION EVALUATION OF MDF PARTICLEBOARD AND BLENDS WITH WHEAT STRAW BOARD

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Jay R. Gunderson; Donald P. McCollor

    1999-02-01

    Sauder Woodworking currently fires a large portion of all wood wastes in a boiler producing process steam. It is investigating using particleboard made from wheat straw in its manufacturing process and is concerned with the effects of the inorganics on its boiler. Wheat straw board contains higher ash contents and increased levels of potassium, creating concern over fouling characteristics in Sauder's tight boiler design. In addition, the wheat straw board contains high concentrations of chlorine, which may affect boiler tube corrosion when fired in combination with the particleboard wastes currently generated. Sauder has engaged the services of the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) at the University of North Dakota to investigate the potential detrimental effects of firing blends containing wheat straw on boiler tube fouling and corrosion. Additional funding for this project was provided through the U.S. Department of Energy Jointly Sponsored Research Program (DOE JSRP) project ''Validation of Fireside Performance Indices'' to validate, improve, and expand the PCQUEST (Predictive Coal Quality Effects Screening Tool) program. The PCQUEST fuel database is constantly expanding and adding new fuels, for which the algorithms may need refinement and additional verification in order to accurately predict index values. A key focus is on performing advanced and conventional fuel analyses and adding these analyses to the PCQUEST database. Such fuels include coals of all ranks and origins, upgraded coals, petroleum coke, biomass and biomass-coal blends, and waste materials blended with coal. Since there are differences in the chemical and mineral form of the inorganic content in biomass and substantial differences in organic matrix characteristics, analysis and characterization methods developed for coal fuels may not be applicable. The project was seen to provide an excellent opportunity to test and improve the ability of PCQUEST to handle nontypical soil and biomass minerals.

  16. Simultaneous biological removal of endosulfan (alpha+beta) and nitrates from drinking waters using wheat straw as substrate.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Sükrü; Türkman, Ay?en

    2004-06-01

    Nitrate and endosulfan (alpha+beta) removal was studied in an upflow biological denitrification reactor packed with wheat straw as carbon source and support particles for microorganisms. While almost complete nitrate elimination and between 65% and 70% endosulfan (alpha+beta) elimination occurred when the temperature was higher than 20 degrees C; below that value, nitrate removal efficiency decreased to about 10%. Nitrate, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and endosulfan (alpha+beta) removal efficiencies decreased considerably at 1500 microg/l endosulfan concentration in the batch experiments. Although a high removal efficiency was observed for endosulfan (alpha+beta) and nitrate in the biological denitrification continuous reactor, the effluent water could not be used for drinking purpose because of the unacceptable levels of endosulfan (alpha+beta), colour and dissolved organic content. During the continuous study, 23.4% of the initial weight of wheat straw was lost and 24 g was consumed per gram of nitrogen removed. The results of the continuous study showed that 21.3% of the endosulfan removal was achieved by adsorption onto the wheat straw and 68.2% of the endosulfan removal occurred by biological activity and the remaining portion was detected in the effluent water. PMID:15031003

  17. Relationship of deoxynivalenol content in grain, chaff, and straw with fusarium head blight severity in wheat varieties with various levels of resistance.

    PubMed

    Ji, Fang; Wu, Jirong; Zhao, Hongyan; Xu, Jianhong; Shi, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    A total of 122 wheat varieties obtained from the Nordic Genetic Resource Center were infected artificially with an aggressive Fusariumasiaticum strain in a field experiment. We calculated the severity of Fusarium head blight (FHB) and determined the deoxynivalenol (DON) content of wheat grain, straw and glumes. We found DON contamination levels to be highest in the glumes, intermediate in the straw, and lowest in the grain in most samples. The DON contamination levels did not increase consistently with increased FHB incidence. The DON levels in the wheat varieties with high FHB resistance were not necessarily low, and those in the wheat varieties with high FHB sensitivity were not necessarily high. We selected 50 wheat genotypes with reduced DON content for future research. This study will be helpful in breeding new wheat varieties with low levels of DON accumulation. PMID:25751146

  18. KNIFE MILL COMMINUTION ENERGY ANALYSIS OF SWITCHGRASS, WHEAT STRAW, AND CORN STOVER AND CHARACTERIZATION OF PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bitra, V.S.P. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Igathinathane, C. [North Dakota State University

    2010-01-01

    Biomass preprocessing and pretreatment technologies such as size reduction and chemical preconditioning are aimed at reducing the cost of ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. Size reduction is an energy-intensive biomass preprocessing unit operation. In this study, switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover were chopped in an instrumented knife mill to evaluate size reduction energy and corresponding particle size distribution as determined with a standard forage sieve analyzer. Direct mechanical power inputs were determined using a dedicated data acquisition system for knife mill screen openings from 12.7 to 50.8 mm, rotor speeds between 250 and 500 rpm, and mass feed rates from 1 to 11 kg/min. A speed of 250 rpm gave optimum performance of the mill. Optimum feed rates for 25.4 mm screen and 250 rpm were 7.6, 5.8, and 4.5 kg/min for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover, respectively. Total specific energy (MJ/Mg) was defined as the size reduction energy required to operate the knife mill plus that imparted to the biomass. Effective specific energy was defined as the energy imparted to the biomass. For these conditions, total specific energies were 27.3, 37.9, and 31.9 MJ/Mg and effective specific energies were 10.1, 15.5, and 3.2 MJ/Mg for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover, respectively. These results demonstrated that biomass selection affects the size reduction energy, even for biomass with similar features. Second-order polynomial equations for the total specific energy requirement fitted well (R2 > 0.95) as a function of knife mill screen size, mass feed rate, and speed for biomass materials tested. The Rosin-Rammler equation fitted the cumulative undersize mass of switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover chop passed through ASABE sieves with high R2 (>0.983). Knife mill chopping of switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover resulted in particle size distributions classified as 'well-graded strongly fine-skewed mesokurtic', 'well-graded fine-skewed mesokurtic', and 'well-graded fine-skewed mesokurtic', respectively, for small knife mill screen sizes (12.7 to 25.4 mm) and distributions classified as 'well-graded fine-skewed mesokurtic', 'well-graded strongly fine-skewed mesokurtic', and 'well-graded fine-skewed mesokurtic', respectively, for the large screen size (50.8 mm). Total and effective specific energy values per unit size reduction of wheat straw were greater compared to those for switchgrass. Corn stover resulted in reduced total and effective specific energy per unit size reduction compared to wheat straw for the same operating conditions, but higher total specific energy per unit size reduction and lesser effective specific energy per unit size reduction compared to switchgrass. Data on minimized total specific energy with corresponding particle spectra will be useful for preparing feed material with a knife mill for subsequent grinding with finer size reduction devices.

  19. Ash from Cereal and Rape Straw Used for Heat Production: Liming Effect and Contents of Plant Nutrients and Heavy Metals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marie-Louise Sander; Olof Andrén

    1997-01-01

    The composition of 79 samples of straw ash from seven heating plants in Sweden wasanalysed with the aim of evaluating straw ash as a fertilizer and liming agent. The variation in ashcomposition was explained mainly by ash fraction (bottom ash vs. fly ash) and straw type (wheat,barley, rye, rape) but also by heating plant. Compared with concentrations of Zn, Pb

  20. Synergic Effect of Wheat Straw Ash and Rice-Husk Ash on Strength Properties of Mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Ajay; Kunio, Hattori; Ogata, Hidehiko; Garg, Monika; Anwar, A. M.; Ashraf, M.; Mandula

    Pozzolan materials obtained from various sources; when used as partial replacement for Portland cement in cement based applications play an important role not only towards sustainable development but in reducing the construction costs as well. Present study was conducted to investigate the synergic effect of Rice-Husk Ash (RHA) and Wheat Straw Ash (WSA) on the strength properties of ash substituted mortar. Ash materials were obtained after burning the wastes at 600°C for 5 h at a control rate of 2°C min. Two binary blends of mortar substituting 15% cement with WSA and RHA and three combinations of ternary blend with (10+5)%, (5+10)% and (7.5+7.5)% mix ratios of WSA and RHA, together with a control specimen were subjected to destructive (compressive and flexural strength) as well as non-destructive (ultrasonic pulse velocity) tests till 180 days of curing. Ternary blend with (7.5 + 7.5)% combination of WSA and RHA showed better strength results than control and other blends and proved to be the optimum combination for achieving maximum synergic effect.

  1. Pilot scale conversion of wheat straw to ethanol via simultaneous saccharification and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Saha, Badal C; Nichols, Nancy N; Qureshi, Nasib; Kennedy, Gregory J; Iten, Loren B; Cotta, Michael A

    2014-10-18

    The production of ethanol from wheat straw (WS) by dilute acid pretreatment, bioabatement of fermentation inhibitors by a fungal strain, and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of the bio-abated WS to ethanol using an ethanologenic recombinant bacterium was studied at a pilot scale without sterilization. WS (124.2g/L) was pretreated with dilute H2SO4 in two parallel tube reactors at 160°C. The inhibitors were bio-abated by growing the fungus aerobically. The maximum ethanol produced by SSF of the bio-abated WS by the recombinant Escherichia coli FBR5 at pH 6.0 and 35°C was 36.0g/L in 83h with a productivity of 0.43gL(-1)h(-1). This value corresponds to an ethanol yield of 0.29g/g of WS which is 86% of the theoretical ethanol yield from WS. This is the first report on the production of ethanol by the recombinant bacterium from a lignocellulosic biomass at a pilot scale. PMID:25459799

  2. Two approaches for introduction of wheat straw lignin into rigid polyurethane foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshanitsa, A.; Paberza, A.; Vevere, L.; Cabulis, U.; Telysheva, G.

    2014-05-01

    In present work the BIOLIGNIN{trade mark, serif} obtained in the result of wheat straw organosolv processing in CIMV pilot plant (France) was investigated as a component of rigid polyurethanes (PUR) foam systems. Different separate approaches of lignin introduction into PUR foam system were studied: as filler without chemical preprocessing and as liquid lignopolyol obtained by lignin oxypropylation in alkali conditions. The incorporation of increasing amount of lignin as filler into reference PUR foam systems on the basis of mixture of commercial polyethers Lupranol 3300 and Lupranol 3422 steadily decreased the compression characteristics of foams, their dimensional stability and hydrophobicity. The complete substitution of Lupranol 3300 by lignopolyol increases its cell structure uniformity and dimensional stability and does not reduce the physical-mechanical properties of foam. In both cases the incorporation of lignin into PUR foam leads to the decreasing of maximum values of thermodegradation rates. The lignin filler can be introduced into lignopolyol based PUR foam in higher quantity than in the reference Lupranol based PUR without reduction of compression characteristics of material. In this work the optimal lignin content in the end product - PUR foam as both polyol and filler is 16%.

  3. Electrocoagulation treatment of black liquor from soda-AQ pulping of wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Rastegarfar, N; Behrooz, R; Bahramifar, N

    2015-02-01

    The effect of electrocoagulation treatment was investigated on black liquor from soda-anthraquinone (AQ) pulping of wheat straw. Removal of phenol, chemical oxygen demand (COD), color, total suspended solids (TSS), total dissolved solids (TDS), and total solids (TS) from black liquor was investigated at different current densities by using aluminum electrodes at various electrolysis times (10, 25, 40, 55, and 70 min) and pH levels (3, 5, 7, 9, and 10.5). It was observed that at 16 V, electrolysis time of 55 min and current density of 61.8 mA/cm(2) were sufficient for the removal of the pollutants. Energy consumption was evaluated as an important cost-relation parameter. Results showed that the electrocoagulation treatment reduced color intensity from the high initial value of 18,750 to 220 PCU. This was strongly influenced by the pH level of the wastewater. In addition, it was found that the removal efficiency increased with increasing of current density. The maximum efficiencies for removal were 98.8, 81, 80, 92, 61, and 68 % for color, phenol, COD, TSS, TDS, and TS, respectively. The lowest energy consumption values were obtained at neutral pH after 55 min. Electrocoagulation was found to be an effective, simple, and low-cost technique to treat black liquor. PMID:25637386

  4. Evaluation of pretreatment methods for enzymatic saccharification of wheat straw for bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Govumoni, Sai Prashanthi; Koti, Sravanthi; Kothagouni, Srilekha Yadav; Venkateshwar, S; Linga, Venkateswar Rao

    2013-01-16

    Pretreatment is an essential step in the enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass and subsequent production of bioethanol. The current study is focused on two different pretreatment methods of wheat straw using mild temperatures (100°C for 2h and RT for overnight). In one method, native substrate was treated with 1.5% (w/v) NaOH at two different above mentioned conditions followed by acid hydrolysis (0.75% (v/v) sulfuric acid at 100°C for 2h). In another method, the native substrate was initially treated with acid (0.75% (v/v) sulfuric acid at 100°C for 2h) followed by treatment with 1.5% (w/v) NaOH at two different above conditions. After the pretreatments, the residues were treated with Accellerase 1500 (26U/g) and maximum yield of glucose (65.2gL(-1)) were found with 0.75% sulfuric acid (100°C for 2h) followed by alkali (1.5% NaOH at 100°C for 2h). Fermentation of this hydrolyzate using Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain produced 24.4gL(-1) of ethanol with corresponding yield of 0.44g/g. PMID:23121959

  5. Production of cellulase in solid-state fermentation with Trichoderma reesei MCG 80 on wheat straw

    SciTech Connect

    Chahal, P.S.; Chahal, D.S. [Universite du Quebec, Laval (Canada); Le, G.B.B. [Ministry of Natural Resources, Charlesbourg, Quebec (Canada)

    1996-12-31

    It is an accepted fact that ethanol production from lignocellulosic materials is not economical as yet because of the high cost of cellulose production. To reduce the cost of cellulose production, lignocellulosic material (wheat straw [WS]), a comparatively much cheaper substrate, was used instead of costly substrates (pure cellulose or lactose). A pan bioreactor was developed for solid-state fermentation (SSF) that required a small capital investment. High yields of complete cellulose system were obtained compared to that in the liquid-state fermentation (LSF) from WS, when treated with 4.25% NaOH at 121{degrees}C for 1 h and mixed with Mandels` medium. A complete cellulose system is defined as one in which the ratio of {beta} glucosidase activity to filter paper activity in the enzyme solution is close to 1.0. The cellulose system derived from SSF using the pan bioreactor gave more than 85% hydrolysis of delignified WS. The prototype pan bioreactor requires further improvements so that optimum quantity of substrate can be fermented to obtain high yields of complete cellulose system per unit space. The SSF process provides a means for the production of complete cellulose system for the economical bioconversion of renewable biomass into ethanol. 18 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Strategies of xylanase supplementation for an efficient saccharification and cofermentation process from pretreated wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Alvira, Pablo; Tomás-Pejó, Elia; Negro, María José; Ballesteros, Mercedes

    2011-07-01

    Ethanol production from lignocellulosic raw materials includes a pretreatment step before enzymatic hydrolysis (EH). Pretreated substrates contain complex hemicelluloses in the solid fraction that can protect the cellulose from enzymatic attack. In addition, soluble xylooligomers are contained in the pretreated materials and may have an inhibitory effect on cellulase activity. In this context, several approaches for xylanase supplementation have been studied to increase EH yields. In this study, the whole slurry obtained after steam explosion pretreatment of wheat straw has been used as substrate. EH experiments were performed using commercial cellulase preparations supplemented with an endoxylanase (XlnC) from Aspergillus nidulans. Among different strategies of XlnC supplementation, the 24-h xylanase treatment before cellulase addition yielded an increase of 40.1 and 10.1% in glucose and xylose production, respectively. Different XlnC addition strategies were integrated in a simultaneous saccharification and cofermentation process (SSCF) using the xylose fermenting strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae F12. Ethanol production in SSCF was 28.4% higher when comparing to a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process. PMID:21567993

  7. Microbiota of Soil-Like Substrate Depending on Wheat Straw Processing Method in Experimental LSS Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirranen, Lyalya; Sysoeva, Olga

    In previous experiments conducted in the closed environmental system BIOS-3 plant waste and test persons' exometabolites were carried away from the life-support system (LSS). It is possible to create a new-generation LSS with a higher degree of matter cycle closure by adding to the soil-like substrate inedible plant waste used for cultivation of plants in the experimental LSS model. Using single-factor analysis of variance, we estimated the effect of the introduced inedible plant waste on the microbiota of the soil-like substrate (SLS). The plant waste was used: to increase the degree of matter cycle closure in the system; to replace the volume of soil-like substrate in the system; as a fertilizer for growing higher plants in the experimental LSS model. A statistically significant effect of wheat straw processing method on the number of all microorganism groups was observed in different variants of the experiment. The obtained results can be used in planning and carrying out of subsequent experiments with higher plants cultivated on SLS with waste in a closed environmental system including humans.

  8. Biorefinery valorization of autohydrolysis wheat straw hemicellulose to be applied in a polymer-blend film.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Héctor A; Cerqueira, Miguel A; Silva, Hélder D; Rodríguez-Jasso, Rosa M; Vicente, António A; Teixeira, José A

    2013-02-15

    The aims of this study were the extraction of hemicellulose from wheat straw (WS) and its utilization in the reinforcement of a ?-carrageenan/locust bean gum (?-car/LBG) polymeric blend films (PBFs). WS hemicellulose extraction was performed under autohydrolysis process and hemicellulose extracted (HE) under optimum condition was used in PBFs. PBFs were prepared varying different proportions of HE into the ?-car/LBG film-forming solutions. Barrier properties (water vapor permeability, WVP), mechanical properties (tensile-strength, TS and elongation-at-break, EB), moisture content, opacity and thermal properties of the resulting PBFs were determined and related with the incorporation of HE. The 2-3-2 proportion (in the high ratio) of PBF (?-car/LBG/HE) causes a slight decrease of WVP and an increase of the TS, thus resulting in an improvement of the physical properties of PBFs. HE showed to be a promising material in order to reinforce ?-car/LBG PBF and can be an alternative in the application of hemicellulose according to biorefinery concept. PMID:23399271

  9. Nutrient Composition of Spelt Wheat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. S. Ranhotra; J. A. Gelroth; B. K. Glaser; K. J. Lorenz

    1996-01-01

    Eight samples of spelt wheat from the 1994 crop year were analyzed for macrocomponents (proximates), selected vitamins and minerals, and the first limiting amino acid lysine. They were also immunoassayed for gluten. All spelt samples differed minimally in the content of various nutrients analyzed except lysine; lysine values differed widely and ranged between 1.96 and 3.96 g\\/100 g protein. All

  10. Steam explosion pretreatment of wheat straw to improve methane yields: Investigation of the degradation kinetics of structural compounds during anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Theuretzbacher, Franz; Lizasoain, Javier; Lefever, Christopher; Saylor, Molly K; Enguidanos, Ramon; Weran, Nikolaus; Gronauer, Andreas; Bauer, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    Wheat straw can serve as a low-cost substrate for energy production without competing with food or feed production. This study investigated the effect of steam explosion pretreatment on the biological methane potential and the degradation kinetics of wheat straw during anaerobic digestion. It was observed that the biological methane potential of the non steam exploded, ground wheat straw (276lNkgVS(-1)) did not significantly differ from the best steam explosion treated sample (286lNkgVS(-1)) which was achieved at a pretreatment temperature of 140°C and a retention time of 60min. Nevertheless degradation speed was improved by the pretreatment. Furthermore it was observed that compounds resulting from chemical reactions during the pretreatment and classified as pseudo-lignin were also degraded during the anaerobic batch experiments. Based on the rumen simulation technique, a model was developed to characterise the degradation process. PMID:25549903

  11. Hydrothermal and organosolv pretreatments of poplar wood and wheat straw for saccharification by a Trichoderma viride cellulase

    SciTech Connect

    Bonn, G.; Hoermeyer, H.F.; Bobleter, O.

    1987-01-01

    Two types of processes have been applied for the pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials in order to render them easily degradable by the cellulase of Trichoderma viride. They were compared at different temperatures, with regard both to the residual dry mass and the improvement in accessibility to the enzyme complex. The latter was measured in terms of glucose liberated, which was quantified by HPLC. Hydrothermolysis proved more effective than the organosolv process for the pretreatment of wheat straw, and vice versa for poplar wood. In terms of the percentage of glucan enzymatically converted to glucose, yields up to 90% could be achieved. 16 references.

  12. NO formation during agricultural straw combustion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qiangqiang Ren; Changsui Zhao; Lunbo Duan; Xiaoping Chen

    2011-01-01

    NO formation during combustion of four typical kinds of straw (wheat straw, rice straw, cotton stalk and corn stalk) which belong to soft straw and hard straw was studied in a tubular quartz fixed bed reactor under conditions relevant to grate boiler combustion. Regarding the real situation in biomass fired power plants in China, NO formation from blended straw combustion

  13. Biogas production from wheat straw and manure--impact of pretreatment and process operating parameters.

    PubMed

    Risberg, Kajsa; Sun, Li; Levén, Lotta; Horn, Svein Jarle; Schnürer, Anna

    2013-12-01

    Non-treated or steam-exploded straw in co-digestion with cattle manure was evaluated as a substrate for biogas production compared with manure as the sole substrate. All digestions were performed in laboratory-scale CSTR reactors (5L) operating with an organic loading late of approximately 2.8 g VS/L/day, independent of substrate mixture. The hydraulic retention was 25 days and an operating temperature of 37, 44 or 52°C. The co-digestion with steam exploded straw and manure was evaluated with two different mixtures, with different proportion. The results showed stable performance but low methane yields (0.13-0.21 N L CH4/kg VS) for both manure alone and in co-digestion with the straw. Straw appeared to give similar yield as manure and steam-explosion treatment of the straw did not increase gas yields. Furthermore, there were only slight differences at the different operating temperatures. PMID:24121239

  14. Feed intake, digestibility, nitrogen utilization, and body weight change of sheep consuming wheat straw supplemented with local agricultural and agro-industrial by-products.

    PubMed

    Nurfeta, Ajebu

    2010-06-01

    Effects of supplementing sheep consuming wheat straw with local agro-industrial by-products on feed intake, growth, digestibility and nitrogen utilization were determined. Thirty 1-year-old local wethers, with a mean (+/-SD) live weight of 19.8 (+/-1.06) kg, were assigned to five treatments: wheat straw + atella (T1), wheat straw + atella + poultry litter (T2), wheat straw + atella + coffee pulp (T3), wheat straw + atella + coffee pulp + poultry litter (T4), hay + concentrate (T5). A 7-day digestibility experiment and a 112-day growth trial were conducted. Total dry matter (DM) and organic matter (OM) intake as well as body weight gain was similar for all treatments. The highest (P < 0.05) nitrogen (N) intake was in sheep fed T1 and T4 diets, while the lowest was in those fed T2 and T5 diets. Sheep fed T1 and T2 diets had greater (P < 0.05) DM and OM digestibility than those fed T4 and T5 diets. The highest (P < 0.05) digestibility of N was for the T2, T4, and T5 diets, while the lowest was for the T1 diet. The highest N retention was in T4 diet, whereas the lowest was in T3 diet. In conclusion, in urban and peri-urban areas where atella, poultry litter, or coffee pulp are available, smallholder farmers could feed the mixtures as a supplement to straw with a good performance without using concentrate feeds. PMID:19882225

  15. Composting of poultry manure and wheat straw in a closed reactor: optimum mixture ratio and evolution of parameters.

    PubMed

    Petric, Ivan; Selimbasi?, Vahida

    2008-02-01

    The main objectives of this work were to investigate the evolution of some principal physico-chemical properties (temperature, carbon dioxide, oxygen, ammonia, pH, electrical conductivity, organic matter) and microbial population (mesophilic and thermophilic bacteria and fungi) during composting poultry manure with wheat straw in a reactor system, and to evaluate the optimum mixture ratio for organic substrate production. The experiments were carried out in four small laboratory reactors (1 l) and one large reactor (32 l) under adiabatic conditions over 14 days. During the process the highest temperature was 64.6 degrees C, pH varied between 7.40 and 8.85, electrical conductivity varied between 3.50 and 4.31 dS m(-1) and the highest value of organic matter (dry weight) degradation was 47.6%. Mesophilic bacteria and fungi predominated in the beginning, and started the degradation with generation of metabolic heat. By increasing the temperature in reactors, the number of thermophilic microorganisms also increased, which resulted in faster degradation of substrate. The application of a closed reactor showed a rapid degradation of manure/straw mixture as well as a good control of the emissions of air polluting gases into atmosphere. The results showed that the ratio of manure to straw 5.25:1 (dry weight) was better for composting process than the other mixture ratios. PMID:17387619

  16. [Studies on the changes in rice straw composition in relay treatment of chemical-microbial process by FTIR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong; Shen, Qi-rong; Zhong, Zeng-tao; Chen, Xiang-huai

    2004-09-01

    Direct burning of crop straw in the field has given or is giving rise to a serious pollution of atmosphere. The difficult decomposing of the crop straw by soil microorganisms is one of the reasons the crop straw is not popularly used in agriculture. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to study the changes in straw composition during the relay treatment of chemical-microbial process. The results showed that the method of FTIR spectra could indicate the changes in straw composition during the treatment processes. After the relay treatment of chemical-microbial process, the contents of cellulose, semi-cellulose, and silicon, and C/N ratio were decreased significantly, while the water soluble substances were increased, which was in accordance with the results of chemical analysis. The method to treat crop straw proposed in this paper could provide a practicable way in agricultural utilization of crop straw. PMID:15762520

  17. Ethanol production from wheat straw by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Scheffersomyces stipitis co-culture in batch and continuous system.

    PubMed

    Karagöz, P?nar; Özkan, Melek

    2014-04-01

    In this research, Scheffersomyces stipitis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in immobilized and suspended state were used to convert pentose and hexose sugars to ethanol. In batch and continuous systems, S. stipitis and S. cerevisiae co-culture performance was better than S. cerevisiae. Continuous ethanol production was performed in packed bed immobilized cell reactor (ICR). In ICR, S. stipitis cells were found to be more sensitive to oxygen concentration and other possible mass transfer limitations as compared to S. cerevisiae. Use of co-immobilized S. stipitis and S. cerevisiae resulted in maximum xylose consumption (73.92%) and 41.68 g/L day ethanol was produced at HRT (hydraulic retention time) of 6h with wheat straw hydrolysate. At HRT of 0.75 h, the highest amount of ethanol with the values of 356.21 and 235.43 g/L day was produced when synthetic medium and wheat straw hydrolysate were used as feeding medium in ICR, respectively. PMID:24614063

  18. Preparation of wheat straw based superabsorbent resins and their applications as adsorbents for ammonium and phosphate removal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Su, Yuan; Li, Qian; Yue, Qinyan; Gao, Baoyu

    2013-09-01

    A novel wheat straw cellulose-g-poly (potassium acrylate)/polyvinyl alcohol (WSC-g-PKA/PVA) semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (semi-IPNs) superabsorbent resin (SAR) was prepared by graft copolymerization. The structure and performance of the WSC-g-PKA/PVA semi-IPNs SAR was studied and compared with those of wheat straw cellulose-g-poly (potassium acrylate) (WSC-g-PKA) SAR. The effects of various experimental parameters such as solution pH, concentration, contact time and ion strength on NH4(+) and PO4(3-) removal from solutions were investigated. Equilibrium isotherm data of adsorption of both NH4(+) and PO4(3-) were well fitted to the Freundlich model. Kinetic analysis showed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model was more suitable for describing the whole adsorption process of NH4(+) and PO4(3-) on SARs. Overall, WSC-g-PKA/PVA semi-IPNs SAR showed better properties in comparison with WSC-g-PKA SAR and it could be considered as one efficient material for the removal and recovery of nitrogen and phosphorus with the agronomic reuse as a fertilizer. PMID:23786713

  19. Rice Straw Fiber Reinforced High Density Polyethylene Composite: Effect of Coupled Compatibilizating and

    E-print Network

    Rice Straw Fiber Reinforced High Density Polyethylene Composite: Effect of Coupled polyethylene (HDPE) composites were manufactured by extrusion and injection molding. Three compatibilizers compatibilizers, ma- leic anhydride grafted polyethylene and polypropylene (PE-g-MA and PP-g-MA) are considered

  20. Direct mechanical energy measures of hammer mill comminution of switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover and analysis of their particle size distributions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Venkata S. P. Bitra; Alvin R. Womac; Nehru Chevanan; Petre I. Miu; C. Igathinathane; Shahab Sokhansanj; David R. Smith

    2009-01-01

    Biomass particle size impacts handling, storage, conversion, and dust control systems. Size reduction mechanical energy was directly measured for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.), and corn stover (Zea mays L.) in an instrumented hammer mill. Direct energy inputs were determined for hammer mill operating speeds from 2000 to 3600 rpm for 3.2 mm integral classifying screen and mass

  1. The utilization of teff ( Eragrotis tef) straw by sheep fed supplementary forage legumes with or without either crushed maize grain or wheat bran

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. V Nsahlai; N. N Umunna; M. L. K Bonsi

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the interaction of high energy substrates (ES; crushed maize grain (MG) and wheat bran (WB)) with forage legumes (FLs), such as Lablab purpureus hay, sun dried leaves of Sesbania sesban and tagasaste (Chamaecytisus palmensis), on ruminal microbial activity (indexed by the degradability and digestibility of teff (Eragrotis tef) straw (TS), urinary excretion of purine derivatives (PD)) and

  2. Feasibility of using olive mill effluent (OME) as a wetting agent during the cultivation of oyster mushroom, Pleurotus ostreatus, on wheat straw

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erbil Kalm?s; Nuri Azbar; Hasan Y?ld?z; Fatih Kalyoncu

    2008-01-01

    In this study, cultivation of oyster mushroom, Pleurotus ostreatus, on wheat straw substrate containing tap water and olive mill effluent (OME) mixture containing varying volume of OME was studied in order to investigate the feasibility of using OME as an alternative wetting agent and OME’s impact on some fundamental food quality characteristics of mushrooms. Time period for mycelial colonization, primordium

  3. HYDROTHERMAL TREATMENT OF WHEAT STRAW ON PILOT PLANT SCALE Anders Thygesena

    E-print Network

    and Planning Højbakkegårds Allé 1, DK-2630 Tåstrup, Denmark c Elsam Biosystems A/S Nefovej 50, Postbox 101 of electricity. Today, Elsam uses co-combustion of coal and straw (up to 15%) in their electricity production

  4. An experimental study on shrinkage of earth plaster with natural fibres for straw bale buildings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Taha Ashour; Wei Wu

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a series of laboratory tests on shrinkage of plaster materials are presented. The plaster materials consist of cohesive soil, sand and different natural fibres. Three types of fibres, wheat straw, barley straw and wood shavings, were used as reinforcement in the tests. The shrinkage behaviour of earth plasters was studied by laboratory tests for different compositions and

  5. Cellulase stability, adsorption/desorption profiles and recycling during successive cycles of hydrolysis and fermentation of wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ana Cristina; Felby, Claus; Gama, Miguel

    2014-03-01

    The potential of enzymes recycling after hydrolysis and fermentation of wheat straw under a variety of conditions was investigated, monitoring the activity of the enzymes in the solid and liquid fractions, using low molecular weight substrates. A significant amount of active enzymes could be recovered by recycling the liquid phase. In the early stage of the process, enzyme adsorb to the substrate, then gradually returning to the solution as the saccharification proceeds. At 50°C, normally regarded as an acceptable operational temperature for saccharification, the enzymes (Celluclast) significantly undergo thermal deactivation. The hydrolysis yield and enzyme recycling efficiency in consecutive recycling rounds can be increased by using high enzyme loadings and moderate temperatures. Indeed, the amount of enzymes in the liquid phase increased with its thermostability and hydrolytic efficiency. This study contributes towards developing effective enzymes recycling strategies and helping to reduce the enzyme costs on bioethanol production. PMID:24502914

  6. Effect of endoxylanase and ?-L-arabinofuranosidase supplementation on the enzymatic hydrolysis of steam exploded wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Alvira, P; Negro, M J; Ballesteros, M

    2011-03-01

    The cost and hydrolytic efficiency of enzymes are major factors that restrict the commercialization of the bioethanol production process from lignocellulosic biomass. Hemicellulases and other accessory enzymes are becoming crucial to increase enzymatic hydrolysis (EH) yields at low cellulase dosages. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of two recombinant hemicellulolytic enzymes on the EH of steam pretreated wheat straw. Pretreatments at two severity conditions were performed and the whole slurry obtained after steam explosion pretreatment was employed as substrate. An endoxylanase (Xln C) from Aspergillus nidulans and an ?-L-arabinofuranosidase (AF) from Aspergillus niger, have been applied in combination with cellulase enzymes. A degree of synergism of 29.5% and increases up to 10% in the EH yields were obtained, showing the potential of accessory activities to improve the EH step and make the whole process more effective. PMID:21262567

  7. Hydrothermal pretreatment of several lignocellulosic mixtures containing wheat straw and two hardwood residues available in Southern Europe.

    PubMed

    Silva-Fernandes, Talita; Duarte, Luís Chorão; Carvalheiro, Florbela; Loureiro-Dias, Maria Conceição; Fonseca, César; Gírio, Francisco

    2015-05-01

    This work studied the processing of biomass mixtures containing three lignocellulosic materials largely available in Southern Europe, eucalyptus residues (ER), wheat straw (WS) and olive tree pruning (OP). The mixtures were chemically characterized, and their pretreatment, by autohydrolysis, evaluated within a severity factor (logR0) ranging from 1.73 up to 4.24. A simple modeling strategy was used to optimize the autohydrolysis conditions based on the chemical characterization of the liquid fraction. The solid fraction was characterized to quantify the polysaccharide and lignin content. The pretreatment conditions for maximal saccharides recovery in the liquid fraction were at a severity range (logR0) of 3.65-3.72, independently of the mixture tested, which suggests that autohydrolysis can effectively process mixtures of lignocellulosic materials for further biochemical conversion processes. PMID:25742753

  8. The impact of particle size and initial solid loading on thermochemical pretreatment of wheat straw for improving sugar recovery.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Rejón, Oscar A; Sánchez, Arturo

    2014-07-01

    This work studies the effect of initial solid load (4-32 %; w/v, DS) and particle size (0.41-50 mm) on monosaccharide yield of wheat straw subjected to dilute H(2)SO(4) (0.75 %, v/v) pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification. Response surface methodology (RSM) based on a full factorial design (FFD) was used for the statistical analysis of pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. The highest xylose yield obtained during pretreatment (ca. 86 %; of theoretical) was achieved at 4 % (w/v, DS) and 25 mm. The solid fraction obtained from the first set of experiments was subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis at constant enzyme dosage (17 FPU/g); statistical analysis revealed that glucose yield was favored with solids pretreated at low initial solid loads and small particle sizes. Dynamic experiments showed that glucose yield did not increase after 48 h of enzymatic hydrolysis. Once established pretreatment conditions, experiments were carried out with several initial solid loading (4-24 %; w/v, DS) and enzyme dosages (5-50 FPU/g). Two straw sizes (0.41 and 50 mm) were used for verification purposes. The highest glucose yield (ca. 55 %; of theoretical) was achieved at 4 % (w/v, DS), 0.41 mm and 50 FPU/g. Statistical analysis of experiments showed that at low enzyme dosage, particle size had a remarkable effect over glucose yield and initial solid load was the main factor for glucose yield. PMID:24390576

  9. Impact of process conditions on the density and durability of wheat, oat, canola, and barley straw briquettes

    SciTech Connect

    J.S. Tumuluru; L.G. Tabil; Y. Song; L.L. Iroba; V. Meda

    2014-09-01

    The present study is to understand the impact of process conditions on the quality attributes of wheat oat, barley, and canola straw briquettes. Analysis of variance indicated that briquette moisture content and initial density immediately after compaction and final density after 2 weeks of storage are strong functions of feedstock moisture content and compression pressure, whereas durability rating is influenced by die temperature and feedstock moisture content. Briquettes produced at a low feedstock moisture content of 9 % (w.b.) yielded maximum densities >700 kg/m3 for wheat, oat, canola, and barley straws. Lower feedstock moisture content of <10 % (w.b.) and higher die temperatures >110 °C and compression pressure >10 MPa minimized the briquette moisture content and maximized densities and durability rating based on surface plots observations. Optimal process conditions indicated that a low feedstock moisture content of about 9 % (w.b.), high die temperature of 120–130 °C, medium-to-large hammer mill screen sizes of about 24 to 31.75 mm, and low to high compression pressures of 7.5 to 12.5 MPa minimized briquette moisture content to <8 % (w.b.) and maximized density to >700 kg/m3. Durability rating >90 % is achievable at higher die temperatures of >123 °C, lower to medium feedstock moisture contents of 9 to 12 % (w.b.), low to high compression pressures of 7.5 to 12.5 MPa, and large hammer mill screen size of 31.75 mm, except for canola where a lower compression pressure of 7.5 to 8.5 MPa and a smaller hammer mill screen size of 19 mm for oat maximized the durability rating values.

  10. Ash from cereal and rape straw used for heat production: Liming effect and contents of plant nutrients and heavy metals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marie-Louise Sander; Olof Andrén

    1997-01-01

    The composition of 79 samples of straw ash from seven heating plants in Sweden was analysed with the aim of evaluating straw\\u000a ash as a fertilizer and liming agent. The variation in ash composition was explained mainly by ash fraction (bottom ash vs.\\u000a fly ash) and straw type (wheat, barley, rye, rape) but also by heating plant. Compared with concentrations

  11. Kinetics of wheat straw solid-state fermentation with Trametes versicolor and Pleurotus ostreatus — lignin and polysaccharide alteration and production of related enzymatic activities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manuel Valmaseda; María Jesús Martínez; Angel T. Martínez

    1991-01-01

    The kinetics of straw solid-state fermentation (SSF) with Trametes versicolor and Pleurotus ostreatus was investigated to characterize the delignification processes by these white-rot fungi. Two successive phases could be defined during straw transformation, characterized by changes in respiratory activity, changes in lignin and polysaccharide content and composition, increase in in-vitro digestibility, and enzymatic activities produced by the fungi. Lignin composition

  12. Treatment of wheat straw using tannase and white-rot fungus to improve feed utilization by ruminants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Current research to enrich cattle feed has primarily focused on treatment using white rot fungi, while there are scarce reports using the enzyme tannase, which is discussed only in reviews or in the form of a hypothesis. In this context, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of tannase on wheat straw (WS) and also the effect of lyophilized tannase at concentrations of 0.1%, 0.2%, and 0.3% (w/w) on WS followed by fermentation with Ganoderma sp. for 10 d and compared in relation to biochemical parameters, crude protein (CP) content, and nutritional value by calculating the C/N ratio in order to improve the nutritional value of cattle feed. Results Penicillium charlesii, a tannase-producing microorganism, produced 61.4 IU/mL of tannase in 54 h when 2% (w/v) tannic acid (TA) was initially used as a substrate in medium containing (% w/v) sucrose (1.0), NaNO3 (1.0), and MgSO4 (0.08 pH, 5.0) in a 300-L fermentor (working volume 220 L), and concomitantly fed with 1.0% (w/v) TA after 24 h. The yield of partially purified and lyophilized tannase was 5.8 IU/mg. The tannin-free myco-straw at 0.1% (w/w) tannase showed 37.8% (w/w) lignin degradation with only a 20.4% (w/w) decrease in cellulose content and the in vitro feed digestibility was 32.2%. An increase in CP content (up to 1.28-fold) along with a lower C/N ratio of 25.0%, as compared to myco-straw, was obtained. Conclusions The use of tannin-free myco-straw has potential to improve the nutritional content of cattle feed. This biological treatment process was safe, eco-friendly, easy to perform, and was less expensive as compared to other treatment methods. PMID:24555694

  13. NO formation during agricultural straw combustion.

    PubMed

    Ren, Qiangqiang; Zhao, Changsui; Duan, Lunbo; Chen, Xiaoping

    2011-07-01

    NO formation during combustion of four typical kinds of straw (wheat straw, rice straw, cotton stalk and corn stalk) which belong to soft straw and hard straw was studied in a tubular quartz fixed bed reactor under conditions relevant to grate boiler combustion. Regarding the real situation in biomass fired power plants in China, NO formation from blended straw combustion was also investigated. Nitrogen transfer during blended straw pyrolysis was performed using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) coupled with a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. The results show that NO conversion for the four straws during combustion is distinctive. Over 70% fuel-N converts into NO for cotton stalk, while only 37% for wheat straw under the same condition. When wheat straw and cotton stalk were mixed, N-NO conversion increases. The limestone addition promotes NO emission during cotton stalk combustion. The presence of SO(2) in atmosphere suppresses NO formation from straw combustion. PMID:21592786

  14. Xylanase production using agro-residue in solid-state fermentation from Bacillus pumilus ASH for biodelignification of wheat straw pulp.

    PubMed

    Garg, Gaurav; Mahajan, Ritu; Kaur, Amanjot; Sharma, Jitender

    2011-11-01

    Two stage statistical design was used to optimize xylanase production from Bacillus pumilus ASH under solid-state fermentation. Initially, Plackett-Burman designing (PB) was used for the selection of crucial production parameters. Peptone, yeast extract, incubation time, moisture level and pH were found to be the crucial factors for the xylanase production. Crucial variables were further processed through central composite designing (CCD) of response surface methodology (RSM) to maximize the xylanase yield. Each significant factor was investigated at five different levels to study their influence on enzyme production. Statistical approach resulted in 2.19-fold increase in xylanase yield over conventional strategy. The determination coefficient (R (2)) as shown by analysis of variance (ANOVA) was 0.9992, which shows the adequate credibility of the model. Potential of cellulase-free xylanase was further investigated for biobleaching of wheat straw pulp. Xylanase aided bleaching through XCDED(1)D(2) sequence resulted in 20 and 17% reduction in chlorine and chlorine dioxide consumption as compared to control. Significant increase in pulp brightness (%ISO), whiteness and improvement in various pulp properties was also observed. PMID:21437760

  15. Microbial communities involved in biogas production from wheat straw as the sole substrate within a two-phase solid-state anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Heeg, Kathrin; Pohl, Marcel; Sontag, Mario; Mumme, Jan; Klocke, Michael; Nettmann, Edith

    2014-12-01

    Microbial communities involved in biogas production from wheat straw as the sole substrate were investigated. Anaerobic digestion was carried out within an up-flow anaerobic solid-state (UASS) reactor connected to an anaerobic filter (AF) by liquor recirculation. Two lab-scale reactor systems were operated simultaneously at 37 °C and 55 °C. The UASS reactors were fed at a fixed organic loading rate of 2.5 g L(-1) d(-1), based on volatile solids. Molecular genetic analyses of the bacterial and archaeal communities within the UASS reactors (digestate and effluent liquor) and the AFs (biofilm carrier and effluent liquor) were conducted under steady-state conditions. The thermophilic UASS reactor had a considerably higher biogas and methane yield in comparison to the mesophilic UASS, while the mesophilic AF was slightly more productive than the thermophilic AF. When the thermophilic and mesophilic community structures were compared, the thermophilic system was characterized by a higher Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio, as revealed by 16S rRNA gene (rrs) sequence analysis. The composition of the archaeal communities was phase-separated under thermophilic conditions, but rather stage-specific under mesophilic conditions. Family- and order-specific real-time PCR of methanogenic Archaea supported the taxonomic distribution obtained by rrs sequence analysis. The higher anaerobic digestion efficiency of the thermophilic compared to the mesophilic UASS reactor was accompanied by a high abundance of Firmicutes and Methanosarcina sp. in the thermophilic UASS biofilm. PMID:25467556

  16. Characterization of a cellulase-free, neutral xylanase from Thermomyces lanuginosus CBS 288.54 and its biobleaching effect on wheat straw pulp

    Microsoft Academic Search

    X. T. Li; Z. Q. Jiang; L. T. Li; S. Q. Yang; W. Y. Feng; J. Y. Fan; I. Kusakabe

    2005-01-01

    A xylanase purified from the thermophilic fungus Thermomyces lanuginosus CBS 288.54 was characterized and its potential application in wheat straw pulp biobleaching was evaluated. Xylanase was purified 33.6-fold to homogeneity with a recovery yield of 21.5%. It appeared as a single protein band on SDS-PAGE gel with a molecular mass of approx. 26.2kDa. The purified xylanase had a neutral optimum

  17. Low temperature lignocellulose pretreatment: effects and interactions of pretreatment pH are critical for maximizing enzymatic monosaccharide yields from wheat straw

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The recent development of improved enzymes and pentose-using yeast for cellulosic ethanol processes calls for new attention to the lignocellulose pretreatment step. This study assessed the influence of pretreatment pH, temperature, and time, and their interactions on the enzymatic glucose and xylose yields from mildly pretreated wheat straw in multivariate experimental designs of acid and alkaline pretreatments. Results The pretreatment pH was the most significant factor affecting both the enzymatic glucose and xylose yields after mild thermal pretreatments at maximum 140°C for 10 min. The maximal enzymatic glucose and xylose yields from the solid, pretreated wheat straw fraction were obtained after pretreatments at the most extreme pH values (pH 1 or pH 13) at the maximum pretreatment temperature of 140°C. Surface response models revealed significantly correlating interactions of the pretreatment pH and temperature on the enzymatic liberation of both glucose and xylose from pretreated, solid wheat straw. The influence of temperature was most pronounced with the acidic pretreatments, but the highest enzymatic monosaccharide yields were obtained after alkaline pretreatments. Alkaline pretreatments also solubilized most of the lignin. Conclusions Pretreatment pH exerted significant effects and factor interactions on the enzymatic glucose and xylose releases. Quite extreme pH values were necessary with mild thermal pretreatment strategies (T ? 140°C, time ? 10 min). Alkaline pretreatments generally induced higher enzymatic glucose and xylose release and did so at lower pretreatment temperatures than required with acidic pretreatments. PMID:21569460

  18. Role of anaerobic fungi in wheat straw degradation and effects of plant feed additives on rumen fermentation parameters in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dagar, S S; Singh, N; Goel, N; Kumar, S; Puniya, A K

    2014-11-12

    In the present study, rumen microbial groups, i.e. total rumen microbes (TRM), total anaerobic fungi (TAF), avicel enriched bacteria (AEB) and neutral detergent fibre enriched bacteria (NEB) were evaluated for wheat straw (WS) degradability and different fermentation parameters in vitro. Highest WS degradation was shown for TRM, followed by TAF, NEB and least by AEB. Similar patterns were observed with total gas production and short chain fatty acid profiles. Overall, TAF emerged as the most potent individual microbial group. In order to enhance the fibrolytic and rumen fermentation potential of TAF, we evaluated 18 plant feed additives in vitro. Among these, six plant additives namely Albizia lebbeck, Alstonia scholaris, Bacopa monnieri, Lawsonia inermis, Psidium guajava and Terminalia arjuna considerably improved WS degradation by TAF. Further evaluation showed A. lebbeck as best feed additive. The study revealed that TAF plays a significant role in WS degradation and their fibrolytic activities can be improved by inclusion of A. lebbeck in fermentation medium. Further studies are warranted to elucidate its active constituents, effect on fungal population and in vivo potential in animal system. PMID:25391347

  19. Biorefining strategy for maximal monosaccharide recovery from three different feedstocks: Eucalyptus residues, wheat straw and olive tree pruning.

    PubMed

    Silva-Fernandes, Talita; Duarte, Luís Chorão; Carvalheiro, Florbela; Marques, Susana; Loureiro-Dias, Maria Conceição; Fonseca, César; Gírio, Francisco

    2015-05-01

    This work proposes the biorefining of eucalyptus residues (ER), wheat straw (WS) and olive tree pruning (OP) combining hydrothermal pretreatment (autohydrolysis) with acid post-hydrolysis of the liquid fraction and enzymatic hydrolysis of the solid fraction towards maximal recovery of monosaccharides from those lignocellulose materials. Autohydrolysis of ER, WS and OP was performed under non-isothermal conditions (195-230°C) and the non-cellulosic saccharides were recovered in the liquid fraction while cellulose and lignin remained in the solid fraction. The acid post-hydrolysis of the soluble oligosaccharides was studied by optimizing sulfuric acid concentration (1-4%w/w) and reaction time (10-60min), employing a factorial (2(2)) experimental design. The solids resulting from pretreatment were submitted to enzymatic hydrolysis by applying commercial cellulolytic enzymes Celluclast® 1.5L and Novozyme® 188 (0.225 and 0.025g/g solid, respectively). This strategy provides high total monosaccharide recovery or high glucose recovery from lignocellulosic materials, depending on the autohydrolysis conditions applied. PMID:25742752

  20. Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of wheat straw: Influence of feedwater pH prepared by acetic acid and potassium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Reza, M Toufiq; Rottler, Erwin; Herklotz, Laureen; Wirth, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    In this study, influence of feedwater pH (2-12) was studied for hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of wheat straw at 200 and 260°C. Acetic acid and KOH were used as acidic and basic medium, respectively. Hydrochars were characterized by elemental and fiber analyses, SEM, surface area, pore volume and size, and ATR-FTIR, while HTC process liquids were analyzed by HPLC and GC. Both hydrochar and HTC process liquid qualities vary with feedwater pH. At acidic pH, cellulose and elemental carbon increase in hydrochar, while hemicellulose and pseudo-lignin decrease. Hydrochars produced at pH 2 feedwater has 2.7 times larger surface area than that produced at pH 12. It also has the largest pore volume (1.1×10(-1)mlg(-1)) and pore size (20.2nm). Organic acids were increasing, while sugars were decreasing in case of basic feedwater, however, phenolic compounds were present only at 260°C and their concentrations were increasing in basic feedwater. PMID:25710573

  1. Yield and nutritional content of Pleurotus sajor caju on wheat straw supplemented with raw and detoxified mahua cake.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditi; Sharma, Satyawati; Saha, Supradip; Walia, Suresh

    2013-12-15

    The effect of supplementation of wheat straw (WS) with raw/detoxified mahua cake (MC) on yield and nutritional quality of Pleurotus sajor caju was studied. Raw cake significantly enhanced the yield compared to control and could be tolerated up to a 10% addition. Detoxification further improved the mushroom yield giving a maximum of 1024.7 g kg(-1) from WS supplemented with 20% saponin free detoxified mahua cake. Chemical analysis of fruit bodies revealed that they are rich in proteins (27.4-34.8%), soluble sugars (28.6-32.2%) and minerals. Glucose, trehalose and glutamic acid, alanine were the major sugars and amino acids detected by HPLC analysis, respectively. HPLC studies further confirmed the absence of saponins (characteristic toxins present in MC) in both fruit bodies and spent. Degradation of complex molecules in spent was monitored via FTIR. The study proved beneficial for effective management of agricultural wastes along with production of nutrient rich and saponin free fruit bodies/spent. PMID:23993610

  2. Enzymatic Hydrolysis and Ethanol Fermentation of High Dry Matter Wet-Exploded Wheat Straw at Low Enzyme Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, Tania I.; Hou, Xiaoru; Hilstrøm, Troels; Ahring, Birgitte K.

    Wheat straw was pretreated by wet explosion using three different oxidizing agents (H2O2, O2, and air). The effect of the pretreatment was evaluated based on glucose and xylose liberated during enzymatic hydrolysis. The results showed that pretreatment with the use of O2 as oxidizing agent was the most efficient in enhancing overall convertibility of the raw material to sugars and minimizing generation of furfural as a by-product. For scale-up of the process, high dry matter (DM) concentrations of 15-20% will be necessary. However, high DM hydrolysis and fermentation are limited by high viscosity of the material, higher inhibition of the enzymes, and fermenting microorganism. The wet-explosion pretreatment method enabled relatively high yields from both enzymatic hydrolysis and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) to be obtained when performed on unwashed slurry with 14% DM and a low enzyme loading of 10 FPU/g cellulose in an industrial acceptable time frame of 96 h. Cellulose and hemicellulose conversion from enzymatic hydrolysis were 70 and 68%, respectively, and an overall ethanol yield from SSF was 68%.

  3. Impact of organic loading rate on the performance of psychrophilic dry anaerobic digestion of dairy manure and wheat straw: Long-term operation.

    PubMed

    Saady, Noori M Cata; Massé, Daniel I

    2015-04-01

    Development of efficient processes for valorising animal wastes would be a major advancement in cold-climate regions. This paper reports the results of long term (315days experiment) of novel psychrophilic (20°C) dry anaerobic digestion (PDAD) of cow feces and wheat straw in laboratory scale sequence batch reactor operated at increasing organic loading rate. The PDAD process fed with a mixture of feces and straw (TS of 27%) over a treatment cycle length of 21days at organic loading rate (OLR) 4.0, 5.0 and 6.0g TCODkg(-1) inoculum d(-1) (of 2.9±0.1, 3.7±0.1, and 4.4±0.1g VSkg(-1) inoculum d(-1), respectively) resulted in average specific methane yield (SMY) of 187.3±18.1, 163.6±39.5, 150.8±32.9NL CH4kg(-1)VS fed, respectively. PDAD of cow feces and wheat straw is possible with VS-based inoculum-to-substrate ratio of 1.4 at OLR of 6.0g TCODkg(-1) inoculum d(-1). Hydrolysis was the limiting step reaction. PMID:25681795

  4. Phytochemical composition and antioxidant capacity of whole wheat products.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-Y Oliver; Kamil, Alison; Blumberg, Jeffrey B

    2015-02-01

    Whole wheat contains an array of phytochemicals. We quantified alkylresorcinols (AR), phenolic acids, phytosterols, and tocols in six whole wheat products and characterized their antioxidant capacity and ability to induce quinone reductase activity (QR). Total AR content ranged from 136.8 to 233.9?µg/g and was correlated with whole wheat content (r?=?0.9248; p?=?0.0083). Ferulic acid (FerA) was the dominant phenolic at 99.9-316.0?µg/g and mostly bound tightly to the wheat matrix. AR-C21 and total FerA predicted the whole wheat content in each product (R(2?)=?0.9933). Total phytosterol content ranged from 562.6 to 1035.5?µg/g. Total tocol content ranged from 19.3 to 292.7?µg/g. Phytosterol and tocol contents were independent of whole wheat content. Whole wheat biscuits and pasta were the most potent products to induce QR in Hepa1c1c7 cells. This study provides a platform to characterize the relationship between the phytochemical composition of whole wheat and products formulated with this whole grain. PMID:25578763

  5. Effects of green liquor pretreatment on the chemical composition and enzymatic digestibility of rice straw.

    PubMed

    Gu, Feng; Wang, Wangxia; Jing, Lei; Jin, Yongcan

    2013-12-01

    Green liquor (Na2S+Na2CO3, GL) pretreatment is a proven pathway to improve the enzymatic saccharification for the production of bioethanol. In this work, the effects of GL pretreatment on the chemical composition and enzymatic digestibility of rice straw at various total titratable alkali (TTA) charge and temperature were investigated. The GL pretreatment showed excellent performance in high polysaccharides retention and delignification selectivity. Under the optimized GL pretreatment condition (4% TTA charge, 20% sulfidity and 140°C), 92.5% of glucan, 82.4% of xylan and 81.6% of arabinan in rice straw were recovered with a delignification of 39.4%. The maximum sugar yields of 83.9%, 69.6% and 78.0%, respectively for glucan, xylan and total sugar, were achieved at the same GL pretreatment condition with an enzyme loading of 40 FPU/g-substrate. The results suggested that GL pretreatment is a practicable method for rice straw to enhance enzymatic saccharification for bioethanol production. PMID:24128400

  6. Studies on the nutraceuticals composition of wheat derived oils wheat bran oil and wheat germ oil.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G Suresh; Krishna, A G Gopala

    2015-02-01

    Fat-soluble nutraceuticals of cereals are known for number of disease preventive activities. Hence wheat bran oil (WBO) and wheat germ oil (WGO) were extracted from wheat bran and germ which yielded 3.35 % and 7.35 % of oil, containing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) (64 %, 61.2 %) respectively. Both oils contained tocopherols and carotenoids, which were higher in wheat germ oil (273 mg/100 g, 12.23 mg/100 g) than wheat bran oil (190 mg/100 g, 2.21 mg/100 g). Steryl ferulates were also present in both the oils, but their content was eight-fold higher in WBO than in WGO. Three major steryl ferulates identified by HPLC were campesteryl ferulate and sitostenyl ferulate, campestanyl ferulate and ?-sitosteryl ferulate as in ?-oryzanol and another ferulate, viz., sitostanyl ferulate. A strong IC50 value of 7.5 mg/mL and 21.6 mg/mL DPPH free radicals scavenging for wheat germ oil for wheat bran oil was observed. NMR ((13)C and (1)H) profile explored the evidence of distribution of antioxidant molecules in the unsaponifiable matter of wheat derived oil. Since oils rich in PUFA and minor components are required for the normal physiological activities, blending such oils with other edible oils of the diet in wheat growing countries like India may be useful to provide health benefits. PMID:25694731

  7. Feed utilisation of Ethiopian Highland lambs on a basal diet of Eleucine coracana straw and supplemented with variously sourced protein mixed with wheat bran.

    PubMed

    Alem, Mulat; Tamir, Berhan; Kurtu, Mohammed Y

    2011-01-01

    The study investigated the effect of supplementation of a basal diet of Eleucine coracana (finger millet) straw with different protein sources mixed with wheat bran on feed utilisation in Ethiopian Highland lambs. Twenty yearling intact male lambs (14.9?±?0.30 kg; mean ± SD) were used in a randomised complete block design. Dietary treatments included a basal diet of E. coracana straw ad libitum (T1); basal diet supplemented with a mixture of 222 g noug seed (Guizotia abyssinica) cake (NSC) and 78 g wheat bran (WB) (T2); basal diet with a mixture of 234 g cotton seedcake (CSC) and 66 g WB (T3); and basal diet with a mixture of 5.4 g urea (U) and 294.6 g WB (T4). The supplements were offered at the daily rate of 300 g dry matter (DM) per lamb in two equal portions at 0800 and 1600 hours. Supplementation of Ethiopian Highland lambs on E. coracana straw basal diet with varied protein sources increased (P?straw with NSC, CSC and U mixed with WB improves feed utilisation, body weight gain and digestibility in Ethiopian Highland lambs. PMID:20661642

  8. Direct mechanical energy measures of hammer mill comminution of switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover and analysis of their particle size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Bitra, V.S.P [University of Tennessee; Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Chevanan, Nehru [University of Tennessee; Miu, P.I. [University of Tennessee; Smith, D.R. [University of Tennessee; Igathinathane, C. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

    2009-07-01

    Biomass particle size impacts handling, storage, conversion, and dust control systems. Size reduction mechanical energy was directly measured for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.), and corn stover (Zea mays L.) in an instrumented hammer mill. Direct energy inputs were determined for hammer mill operating speeds from 2000 to 3600 rpm for 3.2 mm integral classifying screen and mass input rate of 2.5 kg/min with 90 - and 30 -hammers. Overall accuracy of specific energy measurement was calculated as 0.072 MJ/Mg. Particle size distributions created by hammer mill were determined for mill operating factors using ISO sieve sizes from 4.75 to 0.02 mm in conjunction with Ro-Tap sieve analyzer. A wide range of analytical descriptors were examined to mathematically represent the range of particle sizes in the distributions. Total specific energy (MJ/Mg) was defined as size reduction energy to operate the hammer mill plus that imparted to biomass. Effective specific energy was defined as energy imparted to biomass. Total specific energy for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover grinding increased by 37, 30, and 45% from 114.4, 125.1, and 103.7 MJ/Mg, respectively, with an increase in hammer mill speed from 2000 to 3600 rpm for 90 -hammers. Corresponding total specific energy per unit size reduction was 14.9, 19.7, and 13.5 MJ/Mg mm, respectively. Effective specific energy of 90 -hammers decreased marginally for switchgrass and considerably for wheat straw and it increased for corn stover with an increase in speed from 2000 to 3600 rpm. However, effective specific energy increased with speed to a certain extent and then decreased for 30 -hammers. Rosin Rammler equation fitted the size distribution data with R2 > 0.995. Mass relative span was greater than 1, which indicated a wide distribution of particle sizes. Hammer milling of switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover with 3.2 mm screen resulted in well-graded fine-skewed mesokurtic particles. Uniformity coefficient was < 4.0 for wheat straw, which indicated uniform mix of particles, and it was about 4.0 for switchgrass and corn stover, which indicated a moderate assortment of particles. Size-related parameters, namely, geometric mean diameter, Rosin Rammler size parameter, median diameter, and effective size had strong correlation among themselves and good negative correlation with speed. Distribution-related parameters, namely, Rosin Rammler distribution parameter, mass relative span, inclusive graphic skewness, graphic kurtosis, uniformity index, uniformity coefficient, coefficient of gradation and distribution geometric standard deviation had strong correlation among themselves and a weak correlation with mill speed. Results of this extensive analysis of specific energy and particle sizes can be applied to selection of hammer mill operating factors to produce a particular size of switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover grind, and will serve as a guide for relations among the energy and various analytic descriptors of biomass particle distributions.

  9. Feasibility of filamentous fungi for biofuel production using hydrolysate from dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of wheat straw

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lipids produced from filamentous fungi show great promise for biofuel production, but a major limiting factor is the high production cost attributed to feedstock. Lignocellulosic biomass is a suitable feedstock for biofuel production due to its abundance and low value. However, very limited study has been performed on lipid production by culturing oleaginous fungi with lignocellulosic materials. Thus, identification of filamentous fungal strains capable of utilizing lignocellulosic hydrolysates for lipid accumulation is critical to improve the process and reduce the production cost. Results The growth performances of eleven filamentous fungi were investigated when cultured on glucose and xylose. Their dry cell weights, lipid contents and fatty acid profiles were determined. Six fungal strains with high lipid contents were selected to culture with the hydrolysate from dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of wheat straw. The results showed that all the selected fungal strains were able to grow on both detoxified liquid hydrolysate (DLH) and non-detoxified liquid hydrolysate (NDLH). The highest lipid content of 39.4% was obtained by Mortierella isabellina on NDLH. In addition, NDLH with some precipitate could help M. isabellina form pellets with an average diameter of 0.11?mm. Conclusion This study demonstrated the possibility of fungal lipid production from lignocellulosic biomass. M. isabellina was the best lipid producer grown on lignocellulosic hydrolysates among the tested filamentous fungi, because it could not only accumulate oils with a high content by directly utilizing NDLH to simplify the fermentation process, but also form proper pellets to benefit the downstream harvesting. Considering the yield and cost, fungal lipids from lignocellulosic biomass are promising alternative sources for biodiesel production. PMID:22824058

  10. Production of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) by Burkholderia sacchari using wheat straw hydrolysates and gamma-butyrolactone.

    PubMed

    Cesário, M Teresa; Raposo, Rodrigo S; M D de Almeida, M Catarina; van Keulen, Frederik; Ferreira, Bruno S; Telo, João P; R da Fonseca, M Manuela

    2014-11-01

    Burkholderia sacchari DSM 17165 is able to grow and produce poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) both on hexoses and pentoses. In a previous study, wheat straw lignocellulosic hydrolysates (WSH) containing high C6 and C5 sugar concentrations were shown to be excellent carbon sources for P(3HB) production. Using a similar feeding strategy developed for P(3HB) production based on WSH, fed-batch cultures were developed aiming at the production of the copolymer P(3HB-co-4HB) (poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate)) by B. sacchari. The ability of this strain to synthesize P(3HB-co-4HB) was first shown in shake flasks using gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) as precursor of the 4HB units. Fed-batch cultures using glucose as carbon source (control) and GBL were developed to achieve high copolymer productivities and 4HB incorporations. The attained P(3HB-co-4HB) productivity and 4HB molar% were 0.7g/(Lh) and 4.7molar%, respectively. The 4HB incorporation was improved to 6.3 and 11.8molar% by addition of 2g/L propionic and acetic acid, respectively. When WSH were used as carbon source under the same feeding conditions, the values achieved were 0.5g/(Lh) and 5.0molar%, respectively. Burkholderia sacchari, a strain able to produce biopolymers based on xylose-rich lignocellulosic hydrolysates, is for the first time reported to produce P(3HB-co-4HB) using gamma butyrolactone as precursor. PMID:24811901

  11. Physicochemical and thermal characterisation of residual hemicelluloses isolated by TAED activated peroxide from ultrasonic irradiated and alkali organosolv pre-treated wheat straw

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RunCang Sun; X. Y. Wang; X. F. Sun; J. X. Sun

    2002-01-01

    Eight white residual hemicellulosic preparations were obtained by post-treatment with TAED activated peroxide (2% H2O2–0.2% TAED at pH 11.8 for 12 h at 48 °C) from the ultrasonic irradiated and alkali organosolv pre-treated wheat straw. It was found that the post-treatment under the condition given released 44.5–53.5% of the original hemicelluloses and 14.8–30.8% of the original lignin. All the hemicelluloses extracted

  12. Fungicide Effects on Fungal Community Composition in the Wheat Phyllosphere

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Ida; Friberg, Hanna; Steinberg, Christian; Persson, Paula

    2014-01-01

    The fungicides used to control diseases in cereal production can have adverse effects on non-target fungi, with possible consequences for plant health and productivity. This study examined fungicide effects on fungal communities on winter wheat leaves in two areas of Sweden. High-throughput 454 sequencing of the fungal ITS2 region yielded 235 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) at the species level from the 18 fields studied. It was found that commonly used fungicides had moderate but significant effect on fungal community composition in the wheat phyllosphere. The relative abundance of several saprotrophs was altered by fungicide use, while the effect on common wheat pathogens was mixed. The fungal community on wheat leaves consisted mainly of basidiomycete yeasts, saprotrophic ascomycetes and plant pathogens. A core set of six fungal OTUs representing saprotrophic species was identified. These were present across all fields, although overall the difference in OTU richness was large between the two areas studied. PMID:25369054

  13. [Chemical compositions of n-alkanols in smoke from rice and maize straw combustion].

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Li, Jiu-Hai; Wu, Dan; Xu, Hui

    2014-03-01

    Six genotypes of rice straw and four genotypes of maize straw were burned under different conditions, and the smoke was collected and n-alkanol in it was measured by GC-MS. Results showed that, in the smoke from rice straw flaming combustion, n-alkanol was composed of individual compounds from C14 to C34, and total contents(sigma) changed in the range of 1 604.4 to 13 889.7 mg x kg(-1). The ratio values of amount for n-alkanol with lower carbon number to that for one with higher carbon number (L/H) were in the range of 0.02 to 0.09. The values for C24/C30, C32/C30, C30/sigma, CPI, and ACL varied from 3.3% to 19.6%, 8.4% to 19.9%, 53.9% to 72.6%, 8.7 to 21.5, and 29.0 to 30.1, respectively. The abundance distribution for the compounds was bimodal with the maximal and the second peaks at C30 and C24, respectively. In smoldering smoke of rice straw, individual n-alkanol from C14 to C34 were also analyzed, with sigma values varying in the range of 1 688.7 to 5 168.2 mg x kg(-1). The ratios for L/H, C24/C30, C32/ C30, and C30/sigma ranged from 0.08 to 0.14, 31.0% to 70.5%, 6.9% to 17.6%, 39.5% to 57.8%, respectively. In addition, the CPI and ACL values varied from 10.7 to 17. 5, and 27.2 to 28.5, respectively. Moreover, the distribution pattern was similar to that in flaming smoke. In flaming smoke of maize straw, n-alkanol from C12 to C34 were identified, with sigma values being in the range of 852.3 to 2 667.9 mg x kg(-1). The values for L/H, C24/C28, C32/C28, C28/sigma, CPI, and ACL varied from 0.2 to 1.0, 104.3% to 293.3%, 42.2% to 61.4%, 7.3% to 16.5%, 5.6 to 9.7, and 23.1 to 26.9, respectively. Besides, the abundance distribution pattern was mainly bimodal with a maximal peak at C30, C24 or C22. In the smoldering smoke for maize straw, the same individual n-alkanols were found, and the sigma values changed from 1493.0 to 8386.9 mg x kg(-1). The values for L/H, C24/C28, C32/C28, C28/sigma, CPI and ACL were in the range of 0.2 to 0.3, 53.6% to 217.6%, 21.7% to 75.9%, 8.8% to 27.3%, 4.2 to 6.5, and 26.3 to 27.2, respectively. Furthermore, the distribution pattern was bimodal as well with the highest peak mainly at C30 and the second one at C24. In brief, obvious discrimination exists among chemical compositions of n-alkanol in the straw and smoke. C24/C30, C32/C30, and C30/sigma are useful proxies in distinguishing between n-alkanol in airborne aerosol deriving from rice straw and one released in rice straw combustion process. L/H, C24/C28, C32/C28, and C28/sigma may have a potential in discriminating the compounds from maize straw and its burning. L/H is possibly used to makea distinction between the organic compounds from rice and maize straws, and/or from combustion of the straws. PMID:24881372

  14. Ethanol Production from Wet-Exploded Wheat Straw Hydrolysate by Thermophilic Anaerobic Bacterium Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1 in a Continuous Immobilized Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, Tania I.; Mikkelsen, Marie J.; Ahring, Birgitte K.

    Thermophilic ethanol fermentation of wet-exploded wheat straw hydrolysate was investigated in a continuous immobilized reactor system. The experiments were carried out in a lab-scale fluidized bed reactor (FBR) at 70°C. Undetoxified wheat straw hydrolysate was used (3-12% dry matter), corresponding to sugar mixtures of glucose and xylose ranging from 12 to 41 g/1. The organism, thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter BG1L1, exhibited significant resistance to high levels of acetic acid (up to 10 g/1) and other metabolic inhibitors present in the hydrolysate. Although the hydrolysate was not detoxified, ethanol yield in a range of 0.39-0.42 g/g was obtained. Overall, sugar efficiency to ethanol was 68-76%. The reactor was operated continuously for approximately 143 days, and no contamination was seen without the use of any agent for preventing bacterial infections. The tested microorganism has considerable potential to be a novel candidate for lignocellulose bioconversion into ethanol. The work reported here also demonstrates that the use of FBR configuration might be a viable approach for thermophilic anaerobic ethanol fermentation.

  15. Impact of steam explosion on the wheat straw lignin structure studied by solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance and density functional methods.

    PubMed

    Heikkinen, Harri; Elder, Thomas; Maaheimo, Hannu; Rovio, Stella; Rahikainen, Jenni; Kruus, Kristiina; Tamminen, Tarja

    2014-10-29

    Chemical changes of lignin induced by the steam explosion (SE) process were elucidated. Wheat straw was studied as the raw material, and lignins were isolated by the enzymatic mild acidolysis lignin (EMAL) procedure before and after the SE treatment for analyses mainly by two-dimensional (2D) [heteronuclear single-quantum coherence (HSQC) and heteronuclear multiple-bond correlation (HMBC)] and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The ?-O-4 structures were found to be homolytically cleaved, followed by recoupling to ?-5 linkages. The homolytic cleavage/recoupling reactions were also studied by computational methods, which verified their thermodynamic feasibility. The presence of the tricin bound to wheat straw lignin was confirmed, and it was shown to participate in lignin reactions during the SE treatment. The preferred homolytic ?-O-4 cleavage reaction was calculated to follow bond dissociation energies: G-O-G (guaiacyl) (69.7 kcal/mol) > G-O-S (syringyl) (68.4 kcal/mol) > G-O-T (tricin) (67.0 kcal/mol). PMID:25290760

  16. Characterization of a Novel Dye-Decolorizing Peroxidase (DyP)-Type Enzyme from Irpex lacteus and Its Application in Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Wheat Straw

    PubMed Central

    Salvachúa, Davinia; Prieto, Alicia

    2013-01-01

    Irpex lacteus is a white rot basidiomycete proposed for a wide spectrum of biotechnological applications which presents an interesting, but still scarcely known, enzymatic oxidative system. Among these enzymes, the production, purification, and identification of a new dye-decolorizing peroxidase (DyP)-type enzyme, as well as its physico-chemical, spectroscopic, and catalytic properties, are described in the current work. According to its N-terminal sequence and peptide mass fingerprinting analyses, I. lacteus DyP showed high homology (>95%) with the hypothetical (not isolated or characterized) protein cpop21 from an unidentified species of the family Polyporaceae. The enzyme had a low optimal pH, was very stable to acid pH and temperature, and showed improved activity and stability at high H2O2 concentrations compared to other peroxidases. Other attractive features of I. lacteus DyP were its high catalytic efficiency oxidizing the recalcitrant anthraquinone and azo dyes assayed (kcat/Km of 1.6 × 106 s-1 M-1) and its ability to oxidize nonphenolic aromatic compounds like veratryl alcohol. In addition, the effect of this DyP during the enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw was checked. The results suggest that I. lacteus DyP displayed a synergistic action with cellulases during the hydrolysis of wheat straw, increasing significantly the fermentable glucose recoveries from this substrate. These data show a promising biotechnological potential for this enzyme. PMID:23666335

  17. Sugarcane biomass for biorefineries: comparative composition of carbohydrate and non-carbohydrate components of bagasse and straw.

    PubMed

    Szczerbowski, Danielle; Pitarelo, Ana Paula; Zandoná Filho, Arion; Ramos, Luiz Pereira

    2014-12-19

    Two fractions of sugarcane, namely bagasse and straw (or trash), were characterized in relation to their chemical composition. Bagasse presented values of glucans, hemicelluloses, lignin and ash of 37.74, 27.23, 20.57 and 6.53%, respectively, while straw had 33.77, 27.38, 21.28 and 6.23% of these same components. Ash content was relatively high in both cane biomass fractions. Bagasse showed higher levels of contaminating oxides while straw had a higher content of alkaline and alkaline-earth oxides. A comparison between the polysaccharide chemical compositions of these lignocellulosic materials suggests that similar amounts of fermentable sugars are expected to arise from their optimal pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. Details about the chemical properties of cane biomass holocellulose, hemicelluloses A and B and ?-cellulose are provided, and these may offer a good opportunity for designing more efficient enzyme cocktails for substrate saccharification. PMID:25263869

  18. Genetic Diversity and Grain Protein Composition of Tetraploid Wheat

    E-print Network

    of origin, the highest Shannon- Weaver diversity index (H) was mainly due to plant height, a major agronomicGenetic Diversity and Grain Protein Composition of Tetraploid Wheat (Triticum durum Desf Department of Plant Breeding and Biotechnology Alnarp Doctoral Thesis Swedish University of Agricultural

  19. Effects of Wheat Bug (Eurygaster spp. and Aelia spp.) Infestation in Preharvest Period on Wheat Technological Quality and Gluten Composition

    PubMed Central

    Torbica, Aleksandra M.; Mastilovi?, Jasna S.; Poji?, Milica M.; Kevrešan, Žarko S.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of wheat bug infestation (Eurygaster spp. and Aelia spp.) on the composition of wheat gluten proteins and its influence on flour technological quality were investigated in the present study. Wheat samples of six wheat varieties, collected from two localities in northern Serbia, were characterized by significantly different level of wheat bug infestation. Composition of wheat gluten proteins was determined using sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE), while the selected parameters of technological quality were determined according to standard and modified empirical rheological methods (Farinograph, Extensograph, Alveograph, and Gluten Index). The surface morphology of the selected samples was viewed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Wheat from wheat bug-infested locality regardless of the variety had deteriorated technological quality expressed with higher Farinograph softening degree, lower or immeasurable Extensograph energy, and Alveograph deformation energy. The most important changes in the gluten proteins composition of bug-infested wheat were related to gliadin subunits with molecular weights below 75?kDa, which consequently caused deterioration of uniaxial and biaxial extensibility and dough softening during mixing. PMID:24550692

  20. Effects of wheat bug (Eurygaster spp. and Aelia spp.) infestation in preharvest period on wheat technological quality and gluten composition.

    PubMed

    Torbica, Aleksandra M; Mastilovi?, Jasna S; Poji?, Milica M; Kevrešan, Zarko S

    2014-01-01

    The effects of wheat bug infestation (Eurygaster spp. and Aelia spp.) on the composition of wheat gluten proteins and its influence on flour technological quality were investigated in the present study. Wheat samples of six wheat varieties, collected from two localities in northern Serbia, were characterized by significantly different level of wheat bug infestation. Composition of wheat gluten proteins was determined using sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE), while the selected parameters of technological quality were determined according to standard and modified empirical rheological methods (Farinograph, Extensograph, Alveograph, and Gluten Index). The surface morphology of the selected samples was viewed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Wheat from wheat bug-infested locality regardless of the variety had deteriorated technological quality expressed with higher Farinograph softening degree, lower or immeasurable Extensograph energy, and Alveograph deformation energy. The most important changes in the gluten proteins composition of bug-infested wheat were related to gliadin subunits with molecular weights below 75?kDa, which consequently caused deterioration of uniaxial and biaxial extensibility and dough softening during mixing. PMID:24550692

  1. Capacity for colonization and degradation of horse manure and wheat-straw-based compost by different strains of Agaricus subrufescens during the first two weeks of cultivation.

    PubMed

    Farnet, Anne-Marie; Qasemian, Leila; Peter-Valence, Frédérique; Ruaudel, Florence; Savoie, Jean Michel; Ferré, Elisée

    2013-03-01

    The potential of Agaricus subrufescens strains to colonize and transform horse manure and wheat-straw-based mushroom compost under the physico-chemical conditions typically used for Agaricus bisporus was assessed. Lignocellulolytic activities, H2O2 production and substrate transformation (assessed via CP/MAS NMR of (13)C) for certain A. subrufescens strains were similar or even greater than those obtained for an A. bisporus strain used as control. Moreover, the functional diversity of the microbial communities of the substrate was not altered by the growth of A. subrufescens after 2weeks. These findings obtained with mesocosms simulating the incubation phase of the mushroom production process hold promise for the improvement of cultivation of this tropical Agaricus species on European standard mushroom compost. PMID:23357087

  2. Compositional and Nutritional Characteristics of Spring Einkorn and Spelt Wheats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E.-S. M. ABDEL-AAL; P. HUCL; F. W. SOSULSKI

    Cereal Chem. 72(6):621-624 One einkorn and five spring spelt accessions were grown at five and tended to be high in riboflavin and pyridoxine compared with other four locations in 1992 and 1993, respectively, and evaluated for their wheats, whereas einkorn and spelt SK0263 and RL5407 were richer in compositional and nutritional properties compared to common hard red P-carotene and retinol

  3. Pilot-scale conversion of lime-treated wheat straw into bioethanol: quality assessment of bioethanol and valorization of side streams by anaerobic digestion and combustion

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Ronald HW; Bakker, Robert R; Boersma, Arjen R; Bisschops, Iemke; Pels, Jan R; de Jong, Ed; Weusthuis, Ruud A; Reith, Hans

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The limited availability of fossil fuel sources, worldwide rising energy demands and anticipated climate changes attributed to an increase of greenhouse gasses are important driving forces for finding alternative energy sources. One approach to meeting the increasing energy demands and reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is by large-scale substitution of petrochemically derived transport fuels by the use of carbon dioxide-neutral biofuels, such as ethanol derived from lignocellulosic material. Results This paper describes an integrated pilot-scale process where lime-treated wheat straw with a high dry-matter content (around 35% by weight) is converted to ethanol via simultaneous saccharification and fermentation by commercial hydrolytic enzymes and bakers' yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). After 53 hours of incubation, an ethanol concentration of 21.4 g/liter was detected, corresponding to a 48% glucan-to-ethanol conversion of the theoretical maximum. The xylan fraction remained mostly in the soluble oligomeric form (52%) in the fermentation broth, probably due to the inability of this yeast to convert pentoses. A preliminary assessment of the distilled ethanol quality showed that it meets transportation ethanol fuel specifications. The distillation residue, which contained non-hydrolysable and non-fermentable (in)organic compounds, was divided into a liquid and solid fraction. The liquid fraction served as substrate for the production of biogas (methane), whereas the solid fraction functioned as fuel for thermal conversion (combustion), yielding thermal energy, which can be used for heat and power generation. Conclusion Based on the achieved experimental values, 16.7 kg of pretreated wheat straw could be converted to 1.7 kg of ethanol, 1.1 kg of methane, 4.1 kg of carbon dioxide, around 3.4 kg of compost and 6.6 kg of lignin-rich residue. The higher heating value of the lignin-rich residue was 13.4 MJ thermal energy per kilogram (dry basis). PMID:18699996

  4. Differences in Cellulosic Supramolecular Structure of Compositionally Similar Rice Straw Affect Biomass Metabolism by Paddy Soil Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Tatsuki; Date, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Because they are strong and stable, lignocellulosic supramolecular structures in plant cell walls are resistant to decomposition. However, they can be degraded and recycled by soil microbiota. Little is known about the biomass degradation profiles of complex microbiota based on differences in cellulosic supramolecular structures without compositional variations. Here, we characterized and evaluated the cellulosic supramolecular structures and composition of rice straw biomass processed under different milling conditions. We used a range of techniques including solid- and solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy followed by thermodynamic and microbial degradability characterization using thermogravimetric analysis, solution-state NMR, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. These measured data were further analyzed using an “ECOMICS” web-based toolkit. From the results, we found that physical pretreatment of rice straw alters the lignocellulosic supramolecular structure by cleaving significant molecular lignocellulose bonds. The transformation from crystalline to amorphous cellulose shifted the thermal degradation profiles to lower temperatures. In addition, pretreated rice straw samples developed different microbiota profiles with different metabolic dynamics during the biomass degradation process. This is the first report to comprehensively characterize the structure, composition, and thermal degradation and microbiota profiles using the ECOMICS toolkit. By revealing differences between lignocellulosic supramolecular structures of biomass processed under different milling conditions, our analysis revealed how the characteristic compositions of microbiota profiles develop in addition to their metabolic profiles and dynamics during biomass degradation. PMID:23840554

  5. Chemical composition, functional and sensory characteristics of wheat-taro composite flours and biscuits.

    PubMed

    Himeda, Makhlouf; Njintang Yanou, Nicolas; Fombang, Edith; Facho, Balaam; Kitissou, Pierre; Mbofung, Carl M F; Scher, Joel

    2014-09-01

    The physicochemical, alveographic and sensory characteristics of precooked taro-wheat composite flours and their biscuits were investigated. A 2x7 factorial design consisting of two varieties of taro flour (Red Ibo Ngaoundere, RIN, and egg-like varieties) and 7 levels of wheat substitutions (0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 %) was used for this purpose. It was observed that water absorption capacity (range 95-152 g/100 g), water solubility index (range 18.8-29.5 g/100 g) and swelling capacity (range 125.4-204.6 mL/100 g) of composite flours significantly (p?wheat substitution. Up to 10 % substitution with RIN taro flour and 15 % with egg-like taro flour, the composite taro-wheat dough exhibited elasticity indices acceptable for the production of baking products, whereas at all levels of taro substitution, the composite biscuits samples were either acceptable as or better (5-10 % substitution with RIN flour) than 100 % wheat biscuit. PMID:25190844

  6. Organoleptic and glycemic properties of chickpea-wheat composite breads.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Tasleem A; Al-Hassawi, Fatima; Al-Khulaifi, Fatima; Al-Rayyes, Ghanima; Waslien, Carol; Huffman, Fatma G

    2015-04-01

    Prevalence of obesity and type-2-diabetes requires dietary manipulation. It was hypothesized that wheat-legume-composite breads will reduce the spike of blood glucose and increase satiety. Four pan bread samples were prepared: White bread (WB) as standard, Whole-wheat bread (WWB), WWB supplemented with chickpea flour at 25 % (25%ChB) and 35 % (35%ChB) levels. These breads were tested in healthy female subjects for acceptability and for effect on appetite, blood glucose, and physical discomfort in digestion. The breads were rated >5.6 on a 9-point hedonic scale with WB significantly higher than all other breads. No difference in area under the curve (AUC) for appetite was found, but blood glucose AUC was reduced as follows: 35%ChB < WB and WWB, WB >25%ChB = WWB or 35%ChB. We conclude that addition of chickpea flour at 35 % to whole wheat produces a bread that is acceptable to eat, causing no physical discomfort and lowers the glycemic response. PMID:25829607

  7. Impact of steam explosion on biogas production from rape straw in relation to changes in chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Vivekanand, Vivekanand; Ryden, Peter; Horn, Svein J; Tapp, Henri S; Wellner, Nikolaus; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Waldron, Keith W

    2012-11-01

    An 81day trial compared the cumulative production of methane from rape straw pre-treated by steam explosion at 15 levels of severity. The final methane yields were similar. The temporal variation in production rate exhibited two peaks: maximum production occurred in the first peak at around 21days with heights that increased with severity; the height of the second peak reduced with severity and peaked between 32 and 36days. Changes in the straw composition were investigated using mid-infrared spectroscopy. These were also strongly related to the degree of severity, allowing good predictive models to be built of severity and subsequently the rate of methane production. The main spectral changes showed the degradation of cellulose and xylose-containing hemicelluloses and production of furfural-like components commonly associated with biomass pre-treatments. Only small changes to lignin were associated with increased methane generation suggesting a structural rather than chemical role in this process. PMID:22947446

  8. The kinetics of inhibitor production resulting from hydrothermal deconstruction of wheat straw studied using a pressurised microwave reactor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of a microwave synthesis reactor has allowed kinetic data for the hydrothermal reactions of straw biomass to be established from short times, avoiding corrections required for slow heating in conventional reactors, or two-step heating. Access to realistic kinetic data is important for predictions of optimal reaction conditions for the pretreatment of biomass for bioethanol processes, which is required to minimise production of inhibitory compounds and to maximise sugar and ethanol yields. Results The gravimetric loss through solubilisation of straw provided a global measure of the extent of hydrothermal deconstruction. The kinetic profiles of furan and lignin-derived inhibitors were determined in the hydrothermal hydrolysates by UV analysis, with concentrations of formic and acetic acid determined by HPLC. Kinetic analyses were either carried out by direct fitting to simple first order equations or by numerical integration of sequential reactions. Conclusions A classical Arrhenius activation energy of 148 kJmol?1 has been determined for primary solubilisation, which is higher than the activation energy associated with historical measures of reaction severity. The gravimetric loss is primarily due to depolymerisation of the hemicellulose component of straw, but a minor proportion of lignin is solubilised at the same rate and hence may be associated with the more hydrophilic lignin-hemicellulose interface. Acetic acid is liberated primarily from hydrolysis of pendant acetate groups on hemicellulose, although this occurs at a rate that is too slow to provide catalytic enhancement to the primary solubilisation reactions. However, the increase in protons may enhance secondary reactions leading to the production of furans and formic acid. The work has suggested that formic acid may be formed under these hydrothermal conditions via direct reaction of sugar end groups rather than furan breakdown. However, furan degradation is found to be significant, which may limit ultimate quantities generated in hydrolysate liquors. PMID:24678822

  9. Fed-batch SSCF using steam-exploded wheat straw at high dry matter consistencies and a xylose-fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain: effect of laccase supplementation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lignocellulosic bioethanol is expected to play an important role in fossil fuel replacement in the short term. Process integration, improvements in water economy, and increased ethanol titers are key considerations for cost-effective large-scale production. The use of whole steam-pretreated slurries under high dry matter (DM) conditions and conversion of all fermentable sugars offer promising alternatives to achieve these goals. Results Wheat straw slurry obtained from steam explosion showed high concentrations of degradation compounds, hindering the fermentation performance of the evolved xylose-recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae KE6-12 strain. Fermentability tests using the liquid fraction showed a higher number of colony-forming units (CFU) and higher xylose consumption rates when treating the medium with laccase. During batch simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) processes, cell growth was totally inhibited at 12% DM (w/v) in untreated slurries. However, under these conditions laccase treatment prior to addition of yeast reduced the total phenolic content of the slurry and enabled the fermentation. During this process, an ethanol concentration of 19 g/L was obtained, corresponding to an ethanol yield of 39% of the theoretical yield. By changing the operation from batch mode to fed-batch mode, the concentration of inhibitors at the start of the process was reduced and 8 g/L of ethanol were obtained in untreated slurries with a final consistency of 16% DM (w/v). When fed-batch SSCF medium was supplemented with laccase 33 hours after yeast inoculation, no effect on ethanol yield or cell viability was found compared to untreated fermentations. However, if the laccase supplementation (21 hours after yeast inoculation) took place before the first addition of substrate (at 25 hours), improved cell viability and an increased ethanol titer of up to 32 g/L (51% of the theoretical) were found. Conclusions Laccase treatment in SSCF processes reduces the inhibitory effect that degradation compounds have on the fermenting microorganism. Furthermore, in combination with fed-batch operational mode, laccase supplementation allows the fermentation of wheat straw slurry at high DM consistencies, improving final ethanol concentrations and yields. PMID:24219973

  10. Comparison of separate hydrolysis and fermentation and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation processes for ethanol production from wheat straw by recombinant Escherichia coli strain FBR5.

    PubMed

    Saha, Badal C; Nichols, Nancy N; Qureshi, Nasib; Cotta, Michael A

    2011-11-01

    Ethanol production by recombinant Escherichia coli strain FBR5 from dilute acid pretreated wheat straw (WS) by separate hydrolysis and fermentation (SHF) and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) was studied. The yield of total sugars from dilute acid (0.5% H(2)SO(4)) pretreated (160 °C, 10 min) and enzymatically saccharified (pH 5.0, 45 °C, 72 h) WS (86 g/l) was 50.0 ± 1.4 g/l. The hydrolyzate contained 1,184 ± 19 mg furfural and 161 ± 1 mg hydroxymethyl furfural per liter. The recombinant E. coli FBR5 could not grow at all at pH controlled at 4.5 to 6.5 in the non-abated wheat straw hydrolyzate (WSH) at 35 °C. However, it produced 21.9 ± 0.3 g ethanol from non-abated WSH (total sugars, 44.1 ± 0.4 g/l) in 90 h including the lag time of 24 h at controlled pH 7.0 and 35 °C. The bioabatement of WS was performed by growing Coniochaeta ligniaria NRRL 30616 in the liquid portion of the pretreated WS aerobically at pH 6.5 and 30 °C for 15 h. The bacterium produced 21.6 ± 0.5 g ethanol per liter in 40 h from the bioabated enzymatically saccharified WSH (total sugars, 44.1 ± 0.4 g) at pH 6.0. It produced 24.9 ± 0.3 g ethanol in 96 h and 26.7 ± 0.0 g ethanol in 72 h per liter from bioabated WSH by batch SSF and fed-batch SSF, respectively. SSF offered a distinct advantage over SHF with respect to reducing total time required to produce ethanol from the bioabated WS. Also, fed-batch SSF performed better than the batch SSF with respect to shortening the time requirement and increase in ethanol yield. PMID:21968655

  11. List of publications 1. Sun, L., Mller, B. and Schnrer, A. (2013) Biogas production from wheat straw community

    E-print Network

    List of publications 1. Sun, L., Müller, B. and Schnürer, A. (2013) Biogas production from wheat biogas digesters. Biores. Technol. 132, 327­332 4. Manzoor, S., Müller, B., Niazi A., Bongcam-Rudloff E of syntrophic acetate- oxidising culture in biogas reactors exposed to increasing levels of ammonia. Applied

  12. Improving the fermentation performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by laccase during ethanol production from steam-exploded wheat straw at high-substrate loadings.

    PubMed

    Alvira, Pablo; Moreno, Antonio D; Ibarra, David; Sáez, Felicia; Ballesteros, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    Operating the saccharification and fermentation processes at high-substrate loadings is a key factor for making ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass economically viable. However, increasing the substrate loading presents some disadvantages, including a higher concentration of inhibitors (furan derivatives, weak acids, and phenolic compounds) in the media, which negatively affect the fermentation performance. One strategy to eliminate soluble inhibitors is filtering and washing the pretreated material. In this study, it was observed that even if the material was previously washed, inhibitory compounds were released during the enzymatic hydrolysis step. Laccase enzymatic treatment was evaluated as a method to reduce these inhibitory effects. The laccase efficiency was analyzed in a presaccharification and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process at high-substrate loadings. Water-insoluble solids fraction from steam-exploded wheat straw was used as substrate and Saccharomyces cerevisiae as fermenting microorganism. Laccase supplementation reduced strongly the phenolic content in the media, without affecting weak acids and furan derivatives. This strategy resulted in an improved yeast performance during simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process, increasing significantly ethanol productivity. PMID:23143932

  13. Straw Kazoo

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    WGBH Boston

    2002-01-01

    In this activity, learners make some music by constructing a kazoo out of a simple plastic drinking straw. Use this activity to explore sound, vibrations, and music. Learners can experiment with pitch by modifying the length of the straw.

  14. Sustainable Building Sourcebook: Straw Bale

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Sustainable Building Sourcebook is an online publication in partnership with the City of Austin, Texas, Green Building Program. This section of the Sourcebook provides information and resources on straw bale construction. The article begins with a definition of straw bale construction as a construction that uses "baled straw from wheat, oats, barley, rye, rice and others in walls covered by stucco...." and proceeds to address building considerations, commercial status, and implementation issues. The authors discuss some of the benefits of this "low cost alternative for building highly insulating walls" and consider some of the common concerns such as financing and public acceptance. A variety of resources for anyone interested in building with straw bales are provided and anyone who already has built one is invited to join the international Straw Bale Registry.

  15. Size-Resolved Anhydrosugar Composition in Smoke Aerosol from Controlled Field Burning of Rice Straw

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Guenter Engling; James J. Lee; Yi-Wen Tsai; Shih-Chun C. Lung; Charles C.-K. Chou; Chuen-Yu Chan

    2009-01-01

    A field study was conducted to determine the effects of ambient conditions and burning practices of rice fields in Taiwan on the chemical and physical characteristics of the smoke aerosol. Rice straw was burned on an actual rice field under typical conditions and smoke particles were collected immediately downwind of the field over the full particle size spectrum. Here we

  16. Production of manganese peroxidase and organic acids and mineralization of {sup 14}C-labelled lignin ({sup 14}C-DHP) during solid-state fermentation of wheat straw with the white rot fungus Nematoloma frowardii

    SciTech Connect

    Hofrichter, M.; Scheibner, K.; Fritsche, W. [Friedrich Schiller Univ., Jena (Germany). Inst. of Microbiology; Vares, T.; Kalsi, M.; Galkin, S.; Hatakka, A. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland). Dept. of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology

    1999-05-01

    The basidiomycetous fungus Nematoloma frowardii produced manganese peroxidase (MnP) as the predominant ligninolytic enzyme during solid-state fermentation (SSF) of wheat straw. The purified enzyme had a molecular mass of 50 kDa and an isoelectric point of 3.2. In addition to MnP, low levels of laccase and lignin peroxidase were detected. Synthetic {sup 14}C-ring-labelled lignin ({sup 14}C-DHP) was efficiently degraded during SSF. Approximately 75% of the initial radioactivity was released as {sup 14}CO{sub 2}, while only 6% was associated with the residual straw material, including the well-developed fungal biomass. On the basis of this finding the authors concluded that at least partial extracellular mineralization of lignin may have occurred. This conclusion was supported by the fact that they detected high levels of organic acids in the fermented straw, which rendered MnP effective and therefore made partial direct mineralization of lignin possible. Experiments performed in a cell-free system, which simulated the conditions in the straw cultures, revealed that MnP in fact converted part of the {sup 14}C-DHP to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and {sup 14}C-labelled water-soluble products in the presence of natural levels of organic acids.

  17. Effects of rice straw particle size on digesta particle size distribution, nitrogen metabolism, blood biochemical parameters, microbial amino acid composition and intestinal amino acid digestibility in goats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Zhao, Xiao Gang; Liao, Hai Yan; Tan, Zhi Liang; Tang, Shao Xun; Sun, Zhi Hong; Zhou, Chuan She; Han, Xue Feng

    2011-02-01

    Effects of rice straw particle size and physically effective neutral detergent fiber (peNDF) on particle size distribution of different digestive tract, nitrogen (N) metabolism, blood biochemical parameters, microbial amino acid (AA) composition and intestinal AA digestibility in goats were investigated. A 4 × 4 Latin square design was employed using four mature Liuyang black goats fitted with permanent ruminal, duodenal, and terminal ileal fistulae. During each of the four periods, goats were offered one of four diets that were similar in chemical composition, but varied in particle sizes and peNDF through alteration of the theoretical cut length of rice straw (10, 20, 40 and 80 mm, respectively). Dietary peNDF contents of four diets were 17.4, 20.9, 22.5 and 25.4%, respectively. Results showed that increasing particle size of rice straw and dietary peNDF significantly affected the particle size distributions of digesta in rumen, duodenum and ileum, except feces. However, increasing particle size of rice straw and peNDF did not affected N metabolism in goats, except the increased apparent N digestibility in rumen and large intestine, and the decreased apparent N digestibility in small intestine. Furthermore, increasing particle size of rice straw and peNDF showed little influence on the profile of blood biochemical parameters, microbial AA composition and intestinal AA digestibility in goats. PMID:21269364

  18. Classification of spelt cultivars based on differences in storage protein compositions from wheat.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Annette; Konitzer, Katharina; Wieser, Herbert; Koehler, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Wholemeal flours from 62 spelt and 13 wheat cultivars were studied. The quantitative protein compositions of the Osborne fractions determined by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, showed that the chromatograms of the reduced gliadin fractions were most suitable for the distinction of spelt from wheat and for the classification of spelt. The patterns of the reduced spelt gliadins showed one to three markers that were not present in wheat. Based on these markers, spelt cultivars were classified into three groups ranging from 'typical spelt' to 'similar to common wheat'. Marker 1 was identified as ?1,2-gliadin and markers 2, 3a and 3b were identified as ?-gliadins by means of N-terminal sequence analysis and determination of the relative molecular mass by mass spectrometry. As glutenin-bound ?-gliadins were present in wheat and absent in spelt, this protein type may be used to detect and quantitate small amounts of wheat in spelt products. PMID:25172697

  19. Natural variation in grain composition of wheat and related cereals.

    PubMed

    Shewry, Peter R; Hawkesford, Malcolm J; Piironen, Vieno; Lampi, Ann-Maija; Gebruers, Kurt; Boros, Danuta; Andersson, Annica A M; Åman, Per; Rakszegi, Mariann; Bedo, Zoltan; Ward, Jane L

    2013-09-01

    The wheat grain comprises three groups of major components, starch, protein, and cell wall polysaccharides (dietary fiber), and a range of minor components that may confer benefits to human health. Detailed analyses of dietary fiber and other bioactive components were carried out under the EU FP6 HEALTHGRAIN program on 150 bread wheat lines grown on a single site, 50 lines of other wheat species and other cereals grown on the same site, and 23-26 bread wheat lines grown in six environments. Principal component analysis allowed the 150 bread wheat lines to be classified on the basis of differences in their contents of bioactive components and wheat species (bread, durum, spelt, emmer, and einkorn wheats) to be clearly separated from related cereals (barley, rye, and oats). Such multivariate analyses could be used to define substantial equivalence when novel (including transgenic) cereals are considered. PMID:23414336

  20. Heterologous production of cellobiose dehydrogenases from the basidiomycete Coprinopsis cinerea and the ascomycete Podospora anserina and their effect on saccharification of wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Turbe-Doan, Annick; Arfi, Yonathan; Record, Eric; Estrada-Alvarado, Isabel; Levasseur, Anthony

    2013-06-01

    Cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs) are extracellular glycosylated haemoflavoenzymes produced by many different wood-degrading and phytopathogenic fungi. Putative cellobiose dehydrogenase genes are recurrently discovered by genome sequencing projects in various phylogenetically distinct fungi. The genomes from the basidiomycete Coprinopsis cinerea and the ascomycete Podospora anserina were screened for candidate cdh genes, and one and three putative gene models were evidenced, respectively. Two putative cdh genes were selected and successfully expressed for the first time in Aspergillus niger. CDH activity was measured for both constructions (CDHcc and CDHpa), and both recombinant CDHs were purified to homogeneity and subsequently characterised. Kinetic constants were determined for several carbohydrates including ?-1,4-linked di- and oligosaccharides. Optimal temperature and pH were 60 °C and 5 for CDHcc and 65-70 °C and 6 for CDHpa. Both CDHs showed a broad range of pH stability between 4 and 8. The effect of both CDHs on saccharification of micronized wheat straw by an industrial Trichoderma reesei secretome was determined. The addition of each CDH systematically decreased the release of total reducing sugars, but to different extents and according to the CDH concentration. Analytical methods were carried out to quantify the release of glucose, xylose and gluconic acid. An increase of glucose and xylose was measured at a low CDHcc concentration. At moderated and high CDHcc and CDHpa concentrations, glucose was severely reduced with a concomitant increase of gluconic acid. In conclusion, these results give new insights into the physical and chemical parameters and diversity of basidiomycetous and ascomycetous CDHs. These findings also demonstrated that CDH drastically influenced the saccharification on a natural substrate, and thus, CDH origin, concentration and potential enzymatic partners should be carefully considered in future artificial secretomes for biofuel applications. PMID:22940800

  1. Rapid determination of pH in solid-state fermentation of wheat straw by FT-NIR spectroscopy and efficient wavelengths selection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hui; Liu, Guohai; Mei, Congli; Yu, Shuang; Xiao, Xiahong; Ding, Yuhan

    2012-08-01

    In the work discussed in this paper we investigated the feasibility of determination of the pH of a fermented substrate in solid-state fermentation (SSF) of wheat straw. Fourier-transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy was combined with an appropriate multivariate method of analysis. A genetic algorithm and synergy interval partial least-squares (GA-siPLS) were used to select the efficient spectral subintervals and wavelengths by k-fold cross-validation during development of the model. The performance of the final model was evaluated by use of the root mean square error of cross-validation (RMSECV) and correlation coefficient (R (c)) for the calibration set, and verified by use of the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) and correlation coefficient (R (p)) for the validation set. The experimental results showed that the optimum GA-siPLS model was achieved by use of seven PLS factors, when four spectral subintervals were selected by siPLS and then 45 wavelength variables were chosen by use of the GA. The predicted precision of the best model obtained was: RMSECV = 0.0583, R (c) = 0.9878, RMSEP = 0.0779, and R (p) = 0.9779. Finally, the superior performance of the GA-siPLS model was demonstrated by comparison with four other PLS models. The overall results indicated that FT-NIR spectroscopy can be successfully used for measurement of pH in solid-state fermentation, and use of the GA-siPLS algorithm is the best means of calibration of the model. PMID:22688664

  2. Mechanical Properties of Green Composites with Poly(caprolactone) and Wheat Gluten

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat gluten (WG) was incorporated into poly(caprolactone) (PCL) up to 50% w/w as a filler to form a biodegradable polymer composite. Microscopic examination showed a well-dispersed particle-matrix system. The composite was evaluated for tensile properties. The tensile strength of the composite d...

  3. Comparison of TLUD and atmospherically-controlled retort methods of preparing biochar using corn stover and wheat straw feedstocks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biochar is a very versatile and useful material in many applications beyond carbon sequestration in soils. Rubber composite filler, sorptive media for toxic or other undesirable species in water, and peat moss replacement are just three examples of biochar applications we have studied at our laborat...

  4. Chemical composition, digestibility and energy content of leguminous grains and straws

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    is the most extensively used protein supplement ; however, under the low rainfall conditions prevailing, 164 soyabean meal, 50 wheat bran, 5 dicalcium phosphate, 10 limestone and 3 sodium chloride. A mineral-vitamin mixture was added to supply 6,000 I.U. vitamin A, 1,000 LU. vitamin D:,, 8.5 l.U. vitamin E, 25 mg Mn, 1

  5. Compression and tensile strength of low-density straw-protein particleboard

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaoqun Mo; Jie Hu; X. Susan Sun; Jo A Ratto

    2001-01-01

    Wheat straw can be used as a raw material for particleboard, and soybean protein can be used as an adhesive in particleboard fabrication. The objective of this research was to characterize the mechanical properties of low-density wheat straw-soy protein particleboard as affected by protein modification\\/denaturation, initial straw moisture content, and chemical treatment of the straw. Methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI), considered

  6. Elemental and isotopic fingerprint of Argentinean wheat. Matching soil, water, and crop composition to differentiate provenance.

    PubMed

    Podio, Natalia S; Baroni, María V; Badini, Raúl G; Inga, Marcela; Ostera, Héctor A; Cagnoni, Mariana; Gautier, Eduardo A; García, Pilar Peral; Hoogewerff, Jurian; Wunderlin, Daniel A

    2013-04-24

    The aim of this study was to investigate if elemental and isotopic signatures of Argentinean wheat can be used to develop a reliable fingerprint to assess its geographical provenance. For this pilot study we used wheat cultivated at three different regions (Buenos Aires, Córdoba, and Entre Ríos), together with matching soil and water. Elemental composition was determined by ICP-MS. ?(13)C and ?(15)N were measured by isotopic ratio mass spectrometry, while (87)Sr/(86)Sr ratio was determined using thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Wheat samples from three sampling sites were differentiated by the combination of 11 key variables (K/Rb, Ca/Sr, Ba, (87)Sr/(86)Sr, Co, Mo, Zn, Mn, Eu, ?(13)C, and Na), demonstrating differences among the three studied regions. The application of generalized Procrustes analysis showed 99.2% consensus between cultivation soil, irrigation water, and wheat samples, in addition to clear differences between studied areas. Furthermore, canonical correlation analysis showed significant correlation between the elemental and isotopic profiles of wheat and those corresponding to both soil and water (r(2) = 0.97, p < 0.001 and r(2) = 0.96, p < 0.001, respectively). To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the correspondence between soil, water, and wheat samples using different statistical methods, showing that wheat elemental and isotopic compositions are mainly related to soil and irrigation water characteristics of the site of growth. PMID:23531021

  7. [Composition of organic carbon/elemental carbon and water-soluble ions in rice straw burning].

    PubMed

    Hong, Lei; Liu, Gang; Yang, Meng; Xu, Hui; Li, Jiu-hai; Chen, Hui-yu; Huang, Ke; Yang, Wei-zong; Wu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Six types of rice straw were selected in China in this paper, the homemade biomass combustion devices were used to simulate the outdoor burning. The concentrations of organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (C) and water-soluble ions in particular matter produced by the flaming and smoldering were analyzed using Thermal Optical Carbon Analyzer (Model 2001A) and Ion Chromatography(ISC 2000/ISC 3000). The results showed that the mean value of OC (EFoc) and EC (EFEC) emission factors were (6.37 +/- 1.86) g x kg(-1) and (1.07 +/- 0.30) g x kg(-1) under the flaming conditions, respectively, while under the smoldering conditions the two mean values were (37.63 +/- 6.26) g x kg(-1) and (4.98 x 1.42) g x kg(-1). PM, OC and EC emitted from the same kind of rice straw had similar change trends. The average values of OC/EC under flaming and smoldering were 5.96 and 7.80, and the value of OC/PM was almost unchanged along with the combustion state. Nevertheless, the values of EC/PM under flaming and smoldering were 0.06-0.08 and 0.08-0.11, respectively. The trend of combustion state could be determined using the ratio of EC/PM and the RZ of emitted OC and EC through those two types of combustion reached 0. 97, which was significantly correlated at the 0. 01 level. Among the anions, Cl- showed the highest concentration, the results indicated that the average value of of Cl- emission factor was (0.246 +/- 0.150) g x kg(-1) under flaming, while it was (0.301 +/- 0.274) g x kg(-1) under smoldering. However, A big difference between flaming and smoldering was found in the average value of K+ emission factor, where (0.118 +/- 0.051) g x kg(-1) of the former was significantly higher than the latter (0.053 +/- 0.031) g x kg(-1). When it came to Na, the result of smoldering was significantly higher than that of flaming. The correlation between water-soluble ions in flaming was more significant than smoldering. Rice straw burning could be distinguished from fossil fuels and some other biomass burning by the OC/EC ratio, and it could also be distinguished from sort of trees burning by the ratio of K+ /Na+, Cl-/Na+ in water-soluble ions. PMID:25898643

  8. Phytochemical Composition, Anti-inflammatory, and Antiproliferative Activity of Whole Wheat Flour

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five wheat cultivars (Macon, Louise, WestBred 936, Alpowa, and Blanca Grande) were evaluated for phenolics composition, carotenoid, and tocopherol composition, anti-inflammatory activity, and antiproliferative activity against HT-29 cells. Total ferulic acid ranged from 451.7-731.3 µg/g , with the ...

  9. Potato Straw

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-07-12

    In this physics demonstration, learners are challenged to insert a straw the furthest into a potato. After learners explore different techniques, the demonstrator can show them how to hold the straw firmly about 2/3 of the way up and use a sharp thrusting movement. Use this activity to explore force and surface area. This activity guide includes a helpful video that demonstrates each step of the demonstration.

  10. Reinforcement Effect of Alkali-Hydrolyzed Wheat Gluten and Shear-Degraded Wheat Starch in Carboxylated Styrene-Butadiene Composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat gluten (WG) and wheat starch (WS) are the protein and carbohydrate obtained from wheat flours. Wheat gluten is not water soluble or dispersible due to its hydrophobic nature. To prepare wheat gluten dispersions, an alkali hydrolysis reaction was carried out to produce a stable aqueous disper...

  11. Short-term effects of pine straw raking on plant species richness and composition of longleaf pine communities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lisa A Kelly; Thomas R Wentworth; Cavell Brownie

    2000-01-01

    Pine straw is commonly used as landscaping material throughout the southeastern USA, but little is known regarding the effects of raking and removal of straw in natural longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) communities. In a 2–year experiment, we tested the effects of community type (scrub oak, dry savanna, and mesic savanna) and number of mechanized rakings (0–4 times over a 2-year

  12. Succession and phylogenetic composition of eubacterial communities in rice straw during decomposition on the surface of paddy field soil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naoko Asari; Rie Ishihara; Yasunori Nakajima; Makoto Kimura; Susumu Asakawa

    2007-01-01

    To estimate the bacterial communities in rice straw left on the soil surface of paddy fields, polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis was conducted. Rice straw samples were placed on the soil surface in a Japanese paddy field under drained conditions after harvest and under flooded conditions after the transplanting of rice. The residual samples on the soil

  13. Effects of prepartum controlled-energy wheat straw and grass hay diets supplemented with starch or sugar on periparturient dairy cow performance and lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Litherland, N B; da Silva, D N L; Hansen, W P; Davis, L; Emanuele, S; Blalock, H

    2013-05-01

    This study examined the effects of a forage source [wheat straw (WS) versus grass hay (GH)] prepartum and supplemental carbohydrate source [corn (dry feed; DF) versus molasses (liquid feed; LF)] on pre- and postpartum intake, digestibility, selective particle consumption, milk yield, and lipid metabolism. The objectives were to determine if forage or pre- and postpartum supplement alters periparturient intake, energy balance, and milk yield. Sixty (n=15) multiparous dairy cows were used in a randomized complete block design with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments to compare WS versus GH diets supplemented with either DF or LF. Dietary treatments were (1) WS prepartum + DF pre- and postpartum (WSDF), 2) WS prepartum + LF pre- and postpartum (WSLF), (3) GH prepartum + DF pre- and postpartum (GHDF), and (4) GH prepartum + LF pre- and postpartum (GHLF). Treatments began at dry-off, × before expected calving. During the prepartum phase, cows maintained dry matter intake (DMI) at 2.0% of body weight and prepartum energy balance remained positive for all treatments until calving. Prepartum GH diets had a more positive energy balance compared with WS diets. On week -5, energy balance was more positive for GHDF than for WSDF or GHLF. Energy balance for WSLF, however, was lower on week -3 and -1 than GHDF. Liquid feed decreased dry matter digestibility and increased prepartum liver triglyceride, serum nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), and tended to increase ?-hydroxybutyrate. After calving, LF decreased DMI and energy balance, but not yield of milk or 3.5% fat-corrected milk, resulting in greater feed efficiency compared with DF. Forage did not affect postpartum DMI, but milk yield tended to be higher for WS versus GH. The DMI expressed as percentage of body weight was not affected by supplement or prepartum forage type. Cows fed WS had lower serum NEFA, higher liver glycogen, and tended to have a lower triglyceride to glycogen ratio postpartum than GH. Serum NEFA peaked on d 14 for all treatments and then declined thereafter. In postpartum diets, more particles were retained on the top screen for LF (>19.0mm) of the Penn State Particle Separator, which also tended to have more particles in the second screen (particles 19.0-8.0mm). Supplement had minimal effect on postpartum selective particle consumption. In conclusion, feeding diets containing WS resulted in lower postpartum serum NEFA, higher liver glycogen, and a tendency for greater milk production and lower liver triglyceride to glycogen than those containing GH. Liquid feed reduced postpartum DMI but not yield of milk yield or 3.5% fat-corrected milk yield, resulting in an improvement in feed efficiency. Future research should continue to investigate the use of single dry cow diet feeding strategies as they affect pre- and postpartum animal responses. PMID:23498001

  14. Effects of Maturity Stages on the Nutritive Composition and Silage Quality of Whole Crop Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Z. L.; Zhang, T. F.; Chen, X. Z.; Li, G. D.; Zhang, J. G.

    2012-01-01

    The changes in yields and nutritive composition of whole crop wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) during maturation and effects of maturity stage and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) inoculants on the fermentation quality and aerobic stability were investigated under laboratory conditions. Whole crop wheat harvested at three maturation stages: flowering stage, milk stage and dough stage. Two strains of LAB (Lactobacillus plantarum: LAB1, Lactobacillus parafarraqinis: LAB2) were inoculated for wheat ensiling at 1.0×105 colony forming units per gram of fresh forage. The results indicated that wheat had higher dry matter yields at the milk and dough stages. The highest water-soluble carbohydrates content, crude protein yields and relative feed value of wheat were obtained at the milk stage, while contents of crude fiber, neutral detergent fiber and acid detergent fiber were the lowest, compared to the flowering and dough stages. Lactic acid contents of wheat silage significantly decreased with maturity. Inoculating homofermentative LAB1 markedly reduced pH values and ammonia-nitrogen (NH3-N) content (p<0.05) of silages at three maturity stages compared with their corresponding controls. Inoculating heterofermentative LAB2 did not significantly influence pH values, whereas it notably lowered lactic acid and NH3-N content (p<0.05) and effectively improved the aerobic stability of silages. In conclusion, considering both yields and nutritive value, whole crop wheat as forage should be harvested at the milk stage. Inoculating LAB1 improved the fermentation quality, while inoculating LAB2 enhanced the aerobic stability of wheat silages at different maturity stages. PMID:25049492

  15. Changes in weed composition of winter wheat crops due to long-term fertilization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lichu Yin; Zucong Cai; Wenhui Zhong

    2005-01-01

    The effects of various fertilization levels on weed species composition and aboveground biomass were investigated in experimental plots of winter wheat established 14 years ago in Fengqiu, China. The treatments examined influenced weeds growth, the effects differing much between weed species. Arenaria serpyllifolia, Chorispora tenella, Erysimum cheiranthoides, and Veronica persica were best adapted either to N-, P-, K-deficiency or balanced

  16. Mitochondrial polymorphism. IV. Phospholipid composition of mitochondria of a wheat hybrid and its parents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hari K. Srivastava; Igor V. Sarkissian

    1972-01-01

    Mitochondria of young seedlings of wheat genotypes 28, 31MS, and 31MS |MX 28 differed in total lipid and phospholipid. Hybrid mitochondria had more lipid and phospholipid than did the parents, and the three genotypes differed in fatty acid composition of the phospholipid fraction. Hybrid mitochondria exhibited heterosis in cytochrome oxidase activity. Although depletion of phospholipid greatly reduced cytochrome oxidase activity

  17. Composition and phylogenetic analysis of wheat cryptochrome gene family

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pei Xu; Hui Lan Zhu; Hai Bin Xu; Zheng Zhi Zhang; Cai Qin Zhang; Li Xia Zhang; Zheng Qiang Ma

    2010-01-01

    Cryptochrome (CRY) gene family encodes photoreceptors mediating developmental responses to blue light throughout the life\\u000a of plants. We report here the characterization of CRY gene family in hexaploid wheat. Degenerate PCR amplification of the regions encoding the conserved flavin-binding domain\\u000a of CRY proteins yielded seven bands, resulting from amplification of CRY1a, CRY1b and CRY2 homologous genes. Assignment of individual amplicons

  18. Straw Bridges

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago

    2012-01-01

    Learners design, build and test a model bridge out of straws. The bridge must span 25 cm across a gap between two tables or two chairs. To measure the load, the bridge must securely hold a small cup. Learners test the load by placing as many pennies in the cup as possible and counting how many the bridge can hold.

  19. Straw Bridges

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

    Working as engineering teams, students design and create model beam bridges using plastic drinking straws and tape as their construction materials. Their goal is to build the strongest bridge with a truss pattern of their own design, while meeting the design criteria and constraints. They experiment with different geometric shapes and determine how shapes affect the strength of materials. Let the competition begin!

  20. Study on allelopathic effects of Rice and Wheat Soil-Like Substrate on several plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Leyuan; Fu, Wenting; He, Wenting; Liu, Hong

    Rice and wheat are the traditional food of Chinese people, and therefore the main crop candidates for bio-regenerative life-support systems. Recycling rice and wheat straw is an important issue concerning the system. In order to decide if the mixed-substrate made of rice and wheat straw is suitable of plant cultivation, Rice and Wheat Soil-Like Substrate was tested in an aqueous extract germination experiment. The effects of different concentrations of aqueous extract on seed vigor, seedling growth and development situations and the physiological and biochemical characteristics of wheat, lettuce and pumpkin were studied, and the presence and degrees of allelopathic effects were analyzed. The test results showed that this type of SLS exerted different degrees of allelopathic effect on wheat and lettuce; this allelopathic effect was related to the concentration of SLS aqueous extract. The most significant phenomenon is that with the increase of aqueous extract concentration, the seed germination, root length and shoot fresh weight of wheat decreased; and every concentration of aqueous extract showed significant inhibition on the root length and root fresh weight of lettuce. However, this type of SLS showed little effect on the growth of pumpkin seedlings. Contents changes of chlorophyll and endogenous hormones in wheat and lettuce seedlings, and the chemical compositions of SLS were measured, and the mechanism of allelopathic effect was preliminarily analyzed.

  1. The Effects of Wheat Bran Composition on the Production of Biomass-Hydrolyzing Enzymes by Penicillium decumbens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xianyun; Liu, Ziyong; Qu, Yinbo; Li, Xuezhi

    The effects of the starch, protein, and soluble oligosaccharides contents in wheat bran on the extracellular biomass-hydrolyzing enzymes activities released by Penicillium decumbens mycelia grown in batch fermentations have been examined. The results showed increased starch content correlated directly with an increase in released amylase activity but inversely with the levels of secreted cellulase and xylanase. High amounts of protein in wheat bran also reduced the activities of cellulase, xylanase and protease in the culture medium. The effects of the soluble and insoluble components of wheat bran and cello-oligosaccharides supplements on production of extracellular cellulase and xylanase were compared. The soluble cello-oligosaccharides compositions in wheat bran were proved to be one of the most significant factors for cellulase production. According to the results of this research, determining and regulating the composition of wheat bran used as a fermentation supplement may allow for improved induction of cellulase and xylanase production.

  2. STRAW UTILIZATION IN REGION 10 STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    While agricultural burning has been going on for many years in Oregon, Idaho and Washington among grass seed and wheat growers as a means for reducing or eliminating straw wastes, over these years it has become more apparent that ag burning has adverse environmental and human hea...

  3. Inhibition of pitted morning glory ( Ipomoea lacunosa L.) and certain other weed species by phytotoxic components of wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) straw

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rex A. Liebl; A. Douglas Worsham

    1983-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine if well-known phytotoxic effects of plant residues on crop growth could also be responsible for observed reductions of certain weed species in no-till cropping systems. An aqueous extract of field-grown wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) reduced the germination and root length of pitted morning glory (Ipomoea lacunosa L.) and common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.). Phytotoxicity

  4. Co-cultivation of Trichoderma reesei RutC30 with three black Aspergillus strains facilitates efficient hydrolysis of pretreated wheat straw and shows promises for on-site enzyme production.

    PubMed

    Kolasa, Marta; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Lübeck, Peter Stephensen; Lübeck, Mette

    2014-10-01

    Co-cultivation of fungi may be an excellent system for on-site production of cellulolytic enzymes in a single bioreactor. Enzyme supernatants from mixed cultures of Trichoderma reesei RutC30, with either the novel Aspergillus saccharolyticus AP, Aspergillus carbonarius ITEM 5010 or Aspergillus niger CBS 554.65 cultivated in solid-state fermentation were tested for avicelase, FPase, endoglucanase and beta-glucosidase activity as well as in hydrolysis of pretreated wheat straw. Around 30% more avicelase activity was produced in co-cultivation of T. reesei and A. saccharolyticus than in T. reesei monoculture, suggesting synergistic interaction between those fungi. Fermentation broths of mixed cultures of T. reesei with different Aspergillus strains resulted in approx. 80% efficiency of hydrolysis which was comparable to results obtained using blended supernatants from parallel monocultures. This indicates that co-cultivation of T. reesei with A. saccharolyticus or A. carbonarius could be a competitive alternative for monoculture enzyme production and a cheaper alternative to commercial enzymes. PMID:25043347

  5. Mycological composition in the rhizosphere of winter wheat in different crop production systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frac, Magdalena; Lipiec, Jerzy; Usowicz, Boguslaw

    2010-05-01

    Fungi play an important role in the soil ecosystem as decomposers of plant residues, releasing nutrients that sustain and stimulate processes of plant growth. Some fungi possess antagonistic properties towards plant pathogens. The structure of plant and soil communities is influenced by the interactions among its component species and also by anthropogenic pressure. In the study of soil fungi, particular attention is given to the rhizosphere. Knowledge of the structure and diversity of the fungal community in the rhizosphere lead to the better understanding of pathogen-antagonist interactions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mycological composition of the winter wheat rhizosphere in two different crop production systems. The study was based on a field experiment established in 1994 year at the Experimental Station in South-East Poland. The experiment was conducted on grey-brown podzolic soil. In this experiment winter wheat were grown in two crop production systems: ecological and conventional - monoculture. The research of fungi composition was conducted in 15th year of experiment. Rhizosphere was collected two times during growing season, in different development stage: shooting phase and full ripeness phase. Martin medium and the dilutions 10-3 and 10-4 were used to calculate the total number cfu (colony forming units) of fungi occurring in the rhizosphere of winter wheat. The fungi were identified using Czapeka-Doxa medium for Penicillium, potato dextrose agar for all fungi and agar Nirenberga (SNA) for Fusarium. High number of antagonistic fungi (Penicillium sp., Trichoderma sp.) was recorded in the rhizosphere of wheat in ecological system. The presence of these fungi can testify to considerable biological activity, which contributes to the improvement of the phytosanitary condition of the soil. However, the decrease of the antagonistic microorganism number in the crop wheat in monoculture can be responsible for appearance higher number of the potentially phytopathogenic fungi (Fusarium sp., Alternaria sp.). Further research, using molecular technique, will help better understanding interactions between plant and microorganisms in the wheat rhizosphere under different soil management conditions.

  6. Inhibition of pitted morning glory (Ipomoea lacunosa L.) and certain other weed species by phytotoxic components of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) straw.

    PubMed

    Liebl, R A; Worsham, A D

    1983-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine if well-known phytotoxic effects of plant residues on crop growth could also be responsible for observed reductions of certain weed species in no-till cropping systems. An aqueous extract of field-grown wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) reduced the germination and root length of pitted morning glory (Ipomoea lacunosa L.) and common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.). Phytotoxicity was increased by about 70% when bioassays with the wheat extract on morning glory and ragweed were conducted in the presence of light. Phytotoxic substances were extracted from wheat with 2 N NaOH. The hydrolyzed extract was fractionated by thin-layer chromatography (TLC). The compound isolated by TLC having the greatest inhibitory effects on morning glory germination was identified using mass spectrometry and determined to be ferulic acid (4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid). Ferulic acid at 5 × 10(3) M inhibited the germination and root length of morning glory 23 and 82%, respectively, and prickly sida (Sida spinosa L.) with carpels 85 and 82%, respectively. Crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis L.) germination was inhibited 100%. Ferulic acid had no effect on ragweed or prickly sida without carpels. Morning glory root and shoot biomass were reduced 52 and 26%, respectively, when morning glory was grown in sand and watered with a 5 × 10(3) M solution of ferulic acid. Ferulic acid in the presence of prickly sida seed carpels was found to undergo decarboxylation, forming a styrene derivative, 2-methoxy-4-ethenylphenol. The more phytotoxic styrene compound was produced by a bacterium isolated from the carpels of prickly sida seed. The study showed that ferulic acid and other compounds may indeed play a role in reducing the growth of certain weeds in no-tillage cropping systems. PMID:24407798

  7. Fermentation of wheat: Effects of backslopping different proportions of pre-fermented wheat on the microbialand chemical composition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Colm A. Moran; Ronald H. J. Scholten; Juan M. Tricarico; Peter H. Brooks; Martin W. A. Verstegen

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine effect of backslop on the chemical and microbiological characteristics of fermented wheat (FW). Coarsely ground wheat was mixed with water (1:3 wt\\/wt) and inoculated with 6 log cfu ml each of an overnight culture of Lactobacillus plantarum and Pediococcus pentosaceus. Four fermentation treatments were conducted in 45 l, closed, PVC containers over 48 hours. Three

  8. FT-RAMAN SPECTRA OF UNSOAKED AND NAOH-SOAKED WHEAT KERNELS, BRAN AND FERULIC ACID

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sodium hydroxide (NaOH) test for determining wheat color class depends on the observation that upon soaking in NaOH, red wheat turns a darker red and white wheat turns straw yellow. To understand the mechanism of this test, Raman spectra of wheat bran, wheat starch, ferulic acid, and whole kern...

  9. Cell-wall architecture and lignin composition of wheat developed in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, L. H.; Heyenga, A. G.; Levine, H. G.; Choi, J.; Davin, L. B.; Krikorian, A. D.; Lewis, N. G.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The microgravity environment encountered during space-flight has long been considered to affect plant growth and developmental processes, including cell wall biopolymer composition and content. As a prelude to studying how microgravity is perceived - and acted upon - by plants, it was first instructive to investigate what gross effects on plant growth and development occurred in microgravity. Thus, wheat seedlings were exposed to microgravity on board the space shuttle Discovery (STS-51) for a 10 day duration, and these specimens were compared with their counterparts grown on Earth under the same conditions (e.g. controls). First, the primary roots of the wheat that developed under both microgravity and 1 g on Earth were examined to assess the role of gravity on cellulose microfibril (CMF) organization and secondary wall thickening patterns. Using a quick freeze/deep etch technique, this revealed that the cell wall CMFs of the space-grown wheat maintained the same organization as their 1 g-grown counterparts. That is, in all instances, CMFs were randomly interwoven with each other in the outermost layers (farthest removed from the plasma membrane), and parallel to each other within the individual strata immediately adjacent to the plasma membranes. The CMF angle in the innermost stratum relative to the immediately adjacent stratum was ca 80 degrees in both the space and Earth-grown plants. Second, all plants grown in microgravity had roots that grew downwards into the agar; they did not display "wandering" and upward growth as previously reported by others. Third, the space-grown wheat also developed normal protoxylem and metaxylem vessel elements with secondary thickening patterns ranging from spiral to regular pit to reticulate thickenings. Fourthly, both the space- and Earth-grown plants were essentially of the same size and height, and their lignin analyses revealed no substantial differences in their amounts and composition regardless of the gravitational field experienced, i.e. for the purposes of this study, all plants were essentially identical. These results suggest that the microgravity environment itself at best only slightly affected either cell wall biopolymer synthesis or the deposition of CMFs, in contrast to previous assertions.

  10. Mapping straw yield using on-combine light detection and ranging (LiDAR)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) straw is not only important for long-term soil productivity, but also as a raw material for biofuel, livestock feed, building, packing, and bedding. Inventory figures in the United States for potential straw availability are largely based on whole states and counties. ...

  11. Influence of Drought and Sowing Time on Protein Composition, Antinutrients, and Mineral Contents of Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sondeep; Gupta, Anil K.; Kaur, Narinder

    2012-01-01

    The present study in a two-year experiment investigated the influence of drought and sowing time on protein composition, antinutrients, and mineral contents of wheat whole meal of two genotypes differing in their water requirements. Different thermal conditions prevailing during the grain filling period under different sowing time generated a large effect on the amount of total soluble proteins. Late sown conditions offered higher protein content accompanied by increased albumin-globulin but decreased glutenin content. Fe content was increased to 20–23%; however, tannin decreased to 18–35% under early sown rain-fed conditions as compared to irrigated timely sown conditions in both the genotypes. Activity of trypsin inhibitor was decreased under rain-fed conditions in both genotypes. This study inferred that variable sowing times and irrigation practices can be used for inducing variation in different wheat whole meal quality characteristics. Lower temperature prevailing under early sown rain-fed conditions; resulted in higher protein content. Higher Fe and lower tannin contents were reported under early sown rain-fed conditions however, late sown conditions offered an increase in phytic acid accompanied by decreased micronutrients and glutenin contents. PMID:22629143

  12. Influence of drought and sowing time on protein composition, antinutrients, and mineral contents of wheat.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sondeep; Gupta, Anil K; Kaur, Narinder

    2012-01-01

    The present study in a two-year experiment investigated the influence of drought and sowing time on protein composition, antinutrients, and mineral contents of wheat whole meal of two genotypes differing in their water requirements. Different thermal conditions prevailing during the grain filling period under different sowing time generated a large effect on the amount of total soluble proteins. Late sown conditions offered higher protein content accompanied by increased albumin-globulin but decreased glutenin content. Fe content was increased to 20-23%; however, tannin decreased to 18-35% under early sown rain-fed conditions as compared to irrigated timely sown conditions in both the genotypes. Activity of trypsin inhibitor was decreased under rain-fed conditions in both genotypes. This study inferred that variable sowing times and irrigation practices can be used for inducing variation in different wheat whole meal quality characteristics. Lower temperature prevailing under early sown rain-fed conditions; resulted in higher protein content. Higher Fe and lower tannin contents were reported under early sown rain-fed conditions however, late sown conditions offered an increase in phytic acid accompanied by decreased micronutrients and glutenin contents. PMID:22629143

  13. Membrane fatty acid compositions and cold-induced responses in tetraploid and hexaploid wheats.

    PubMed

    Nejadsadeghi, Leila; Maali-Amiri, Reza; Zeinali, Hassan; Ramezanpour, Sanaz; Sadeghzade, Behzad

    2015-02-01

    Plant cells often increase cold tolerance by reprogramming their genes expression which results in adjusted metabolic alternations, a process enhanced under cold acclimation. In present study, we assessed the changes of membrane fatty acid compositions along with physio-biochemical indices like H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents and lipoxygenase (LOX) activity during cold stress (CS) phases in acclimated and non-acclimated durum (SRN and Gerdish) and bread (Norstar) wheat genotypes. During thermal treatments, MDA was an end product of lipid peroxidation via oxidative stress (H2O2 content) rather than LOX activity. LOX activity plays a double role in mechanism of cold tolerance in wheat, particularly at severe stress. With increase in severity of CS especially in non-acclimated plants, LOX activity decreased along with an increase in MDA and other responses helped increase or maintaine unsaturated fatty acids (FAs) whereas in acclimated plants (moderate CS), increasing of LOX activity along with a decrease in MDA indicates probably its role in secondary metabolites like jasmonic acid signaling pathway. Significant increase of total FAs and particularly unsaturated FAs showed distinct cell endeavor to protect against CS in Norstar and Gerdish compared to SRN genotype. Results showed that an increase in double bond index and LOX activity and low MDA under CS could be reasons for plant cold tolerance. PMID:25266238

  14. Dietary effects of barley fibre, wheat bran and rye bran on bile composition and gallstone formation in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J X; Lundin, E; Hallmans, G; Bergman, F; Westerlund, E; Petterson, P

    1992-06-01

    The effects of brewer's spent grain (BSG), wheat bran and rye bran on bile composition, gallstone formation and serum cholesterol were studied in Syrian golden hamsters. The frequency of gallstone formation in the animals fed diets supplemented with low (10%) and high (20%) concentrations of BSG or wheat bran was significantly lower than that of the animals fed a stone-provoking, fibre-free diet. The ratios of secondary to primary bile acids were lower in the animals fed the diets supplemented with a high dose of BSG, wheat bran and rye bran than in the controls. The ratio of LCA to DCA was reduced only in the animals fed the diet supplemented with rye bran as compared with controls. No significant changes in bile and serum cholesterol levels were observed in the experiment. PMID:1319177

  15. Effects of supplemental protein source and level of urea on intestinal amino acid supply and feedlot performance of lambs fed diets based on alkaline hydrogen peroxide-treated wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Willms, C L; Berger, L L; Merchen, N R; Fahey, G C

    1991-12-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of supplemental CP source and level of urea on intestinal amino acid (AA) supply and feedlot performance of lambs fed diets based on alkaline hydrogen peroxide-treated wheat straw (AHPWS). In Exp. 1, five cannulated (ruminal, duodenal, and ileal) crossbred wethers (61 kg) were used in a 5 x 5 Latin square design. Treatments consisted of different sources of CP and included soybean meal (SBM), a combination of urea, distillers dried grains (DDG), and fish meal, each provided an equal portion of supplemental CP (UDF), and three levels of urea (17, 33, and 50% of supplemental CP) fed in combination with DDG (U17, U33, and U50). Organic matter and N digestibilities decreased (P less than .05) when lambs were fed U17 compared with those fed SBM. There were no differences (P greater than .05) in bacterial N or AA flows to the duodenum due to CP source despite large differences in ruminal NH3 N concentrations and lower ruminal OM digestion when lambs were fed U17. Duodenal nonbacterial N and AA flows were highest (P less than .05) in lambs fed U17 and UDF and lowest when lambs were fed U50 and SBM. Lysine concentration in duodenal digesta decreased with incremental increases in DDG. In Exp. 2, 30 individually penned ram lambs (33 kg) were allotted to five CP treatments in a randomized complete block design. Treatments were similar to those of Exp. 1, with the exception that U17 was replaced by a 14% CP diet with SBM as the supplemental CP source; all other diets were formulated to contain 12% CP. Lambs fed U50 had decreased (P less than .08) ADG and gain/feed compared with all other treatments, and lambs fed UDF had greater (P less than .05) ADG and gain/feed than lambs fed U33. It was concluded that 17% of the supplemental CP from urea seems adequate to maximize bacterial protein synthesis and that no more than 33% of the supplemental CP should be provided by urea in diets based on AHPWS. Feeding a combination of ruminally resistant protein sources with complementary AA profiles of lysine and methionine (UDF) may enhance quality of protein entering the duodenum and feedlot performance. PMID:1808189

  16. Simultaneous determination of three herbicides in wheat, wheat straw, and soil using a quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe method with ultra high performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huanhuan; Xu, Jun; Dong, Fengshou; Liu, Xingang; Wu, Yanbing; Wu, Xiaohu; Zheng, Yongquan

    2015-04-01

    In this study, a sensitive and effective analytical method for the extraction and detection of three herbicide residues (florasulam, fluroxypyr, and halauxifen-methyl) in wheat and soil was developed. Samples were extracted with acetonitrile/water followed by salting out, dispersive solid-phase extraction cleanup, and detection using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. The target analytes were detected within a 5 min runtime using an ultra high performance liquid chromatography high-strength silica trifunctional column connected to an electrospray ionization source in positive mode. The method was validated in five replicates at three fortification concentrations in each matrix. Adequate pesticide quantification and identity confirmation were attained, even at the lowest concentration levels. The method showed very good accuracy and precision. Good recoveries were observed for the three herbicides and mostly ranged between 75.8 and 114.6%, with intraday relative standard deviations <6.01% and interday relative standard deviations <4.02%. The limits of quantification ranged between 0.14 and 7.68 ?g/kg for each herbicide. The method was successfully applied for the simultaneous analysis of the three herbicides in actual trial samples, and the results proved that the proposed method was effective in detecting these three herbicides. PMID:25620026

  17. Mineral Composition of Organically Grown Wheat Genotypes: Contribution to Daily Minerals Intake

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Abrar; Larsson, Hans; Kuktaite, Ramune; Johansson, Eva

    2010-01-01

    In this study, 321 winter and spring wheat genotypes were analysed for twelve nutritionally important minerals (B, Cu, Fe, Se, Mg, Zn, Ca, Mn, Mo, P, S and K). Some of the genotypes used were from multiple locations and years, resulting in a total number of 493 samples. Investigated genotypes were divided into six genotype groups i.e., selections, old landraces, primitive wheat, spelt, old cultivars and cultivars. For some of the investigated minerals higher concentrations were observed in selections, primitive wheat, and old cultivars as compared to more modern wheat material, e.g., cultivars and spelt wheat. Location was found to have a significant effect on mineral concentration for all genotype groups, although for primitive wheat, genotype had a higher impact than location. Spring wheat was observed to have significantly higher values for B, Cu, Fe, Zn, Ca, S and K as compared to winter wheat. Higher levels of several minerals were observed in the present study, as compared to previous studies carried out in inorganic systems, indicating that organic conditions with suitable genotypes may enhance mineral concentration in wheat grain. This study also showed that a very high mineral concentration, close to daily requirements, can be produced by growing specific primitive wheat genotypes in an organic farming system. Thus, by selecting genotypes for further breeding, nutritional value of the wheat flour for human consumption can be improved. PMID:20948934

  18. Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 Wheat croissants,

    E-print Network

    Liu, Taosheng

    Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 Wheat croissants, applesauce, straw- berry jam Fruit salad, celery 2 Fruit salad, cucum- bers 9 Blueberry muffins, applesauce Wheat crackers, cheese slices 10 11 12 White grape juice, cheerios, rice krispies Yogurt and pears 13 Wheat bagel, cream cheese, kiwi Sweet potatoes

  19. Association study of wheat grain protein composition reveals that gliadin and glutenin composition are trans-regulated by different chromosome regions

    PubMed Central

    Plessis, Anne; Ravel, Catherine; Martre, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Wheat grain storage protein (GSP) content and composition are the main determinants of the end-use value of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grain. The accumulation of glutenins and gliadins, the two main classes of GSP in wheat, is believed to be mainly controlled at the transcriptional level through a network of transcription factors. This regulation network could lead to stable cross-environment allometric scaling relationships between the quantity of GSP classes/subunits and the total quantity of nitrogen per grain. This work conducted a genetic mapping study of GSP content and composition and allometric scaling parameters of grain N allocation using a bread wheat worldwide core collection grown in three environments. The core collection was genotyped with 873 markers for genome-wide association and 167 single nucleotide polymorphism markers in 51 candidate genes for candidate association. The candidate genes included 35 transcription factors (TFs) expressed in grain. This work identified 74 loci associated with 38 variables, of which 19 were candidate genes or were tightly linked with candidate genes. Besides structural GSP genes, several loci putatively trans-regulating GSP accumulation were identified. Seven candidate TFs, including four wheat orthologues of barley TFs that control hordein gene expression, were associated or in strong linkage disequilibrium with markers associated with the composition or quantity of glutenin or gliadin, or allometric grain N allocation parameters, confirming the importance of the transcriptional control of GSP accumulation. Genome-wide association results suggest that the genes regulating glutenin and gliadin compositions are mostly distinct from each other and operate differently. PMID:23881399

  20. Influence of light on labelling of wheat stem lignins using [U14C] phenylalanine or [O14CH3] sinapic acid

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Influence of light on labelling of wheat stem lignins using [U14C] phenylalanine or [O14CH3 lignin in the dark or in the light. Batches of 5 wheat-straw upper internodes (flowery stage) were of wheat straw lignin with phe* or with sin* gives, especially in the dark, lignins either labelled

  1. Effect of Flour Extraction Rate on White and Red Winter Wheat Flour Compositions and Tortilla Texture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benjamín Ramírez-Wong; C. E. Walker; Ana I. Ledesma-Osuna; Patricia I. Torres; Concepción L. Medina-Rodríguez; Guadalupe A. López-Ahumada; María G. Salazar-García; Refugio Ortega-Ramírez; A. M. Johnson; Rolando A. Flores

    2007-01-01

    Cereal Chem. 84(3):207-213 Wheat flours commercially produced at 74, 80, and 100% extraction rates made from hard white winter wheat (WWF) and hard red winter wheat (WRF) were used to produce tortillas at a commercial-scale level. Flour characteristics for moisture, dry gluten, protein, ash, sedimentation volume, falling number, starch damage, and particle-size distribution were obtained. Farinograms and alveograms were also

  2. Wheat bran: its composition and benefits to health, a European perspective

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Wheat bran is a concentrated source of insoluble fibre. Fibre intakes are generally lower than recommendations. This paper reviews the physiological effects of wheat bran and the health benefits it may provide in terms of the prevention of diseases such as colon and breast cancers, cardiovascular disease, obesity and gastrointestinal diseases. In recognition of the weight of evidence, the European Food Safety Authority has recently approved two health claims for wheat bran and gastrointestinal health. PMID:22716911

  3. The manipulation of polar head group composition of phospholipids in the wheat Miranovskaja 808 affects frost tolerance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Horváth; L. Vigh; T. Farkas

    1981-01-01

    Caryopses of the frost-resistant cultivar of the wheat Triticum aestivum L., Miranovskaja 808, were germinated and grown in the presence of various concentrations of choline chloride. Changes in the composition of leaf total phospholipids and leaf total fatty acids at two extreme temperatures (25°C and 2°C) as well as changes in frost resistance were followed. A choline chloride concentration-dependent accumulation

  4. Straws and Airplanes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Science Museum of Minnesota

    1995-01-01

    Create airplanes from straws and geometric shapes. Test them out to see how far they can fly, or how accurately they can be aimed. All you need is a straw, two strips of paper, and some tape to make these strange-looking gliders!

  5. Phytochemical composition and anti-inflammatory activity of extracts from the whole-meal flour of Italian durum wheat cultivars.

    PubMed

    Laddomada, Barbara; Durante, Miriana; Minervini, Fiorenza; Garbetta, Antonella; Cardinali, Angela; D'Antuono, Isabella; Caretto, Sofia; Blanco, Antonio; Mita, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the quali-quantitative composition of hydrophilic (phenolic acids) and lipophilic (isoprenoids) extracts from whole-meal flour of five elite Italian durum wheat cultivars was determined. Significant differences in the content of bioactive compounds were observed among the wheat extracts, in particular concerning the content of bound phenolic acids, lutein and ?-tocotrienols. The cultivars Duilio and Svevo showed the highest amount of phenolic acids and isoprenoids, respectively. Extracts were evaluated for their anti-inflammatory activity on HT-29 human colon cells by measuring the levels of interleukin 8 (IL-8) and transforming growth factor ?1 (TGF-?1). Durum wheat extracts significantly inhibited the secretion of the pro-inflammatory IL-8 mediator at 66 µg/mL of phenolic acids and at 0.2 µg/mL of isoprenoids. Conversely, the secretion of the anti-inflammatory mediator TGF-?1 was not modified by neither hydrophilic nor lipophilic extracts. These results provide further insight into the potential of durum wheat on human health suggesting the significance of varieties with elevated contents of bioactive components. PMID:25658801

  6. Phytochemical Composition and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Extracts from the Whole-Meal Flour of Italian Durum Wheat Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Laddomada, Barbara; Durante, Miriana; Minervini, Fiorenza; Garbetta, Antonella; Cardinali, Angela; D’Antuono, Isabella; Caretto, Sofia; Blanco, Antonio; Mita, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the quali-quantitative composition of hydrophilic (phenolic acids) and lipophilic (isoprenoids) extracts from whole-meal flour of five elite Italian durum wheat cultivars was determined. Significant differences in the content of bioactive compounds were observed among the wheat extracts, in particular concerning the content of bound phenolic acids, lutein and ?-tocotrienols. The cultivars Duilio and Svevo showed the highest amount of phenolic acids and isoprenoids, respectively. Extracts were evaluated for their anti-inflammatory activity on HT-29 human colon cells by measuring the levels of interleukin 8 (IL-8) and transforming growth factor ?1 (TGF-?1). Durum wheat extracts significantly inhibited the secretion of the pro-inflammatory IL-8 mediator at 66 µg/mL of phenolic acids and at 0.2 µg/mL of isoprenoids. Conversely, the secretion of the anti-inflammatory mediator TGF-?1 was not modified by neither hydrophilic nor lipophilic extracts. These results provide further insight into the potential of durum wheat on human health suggesting the significance of varieties with elevated contents of bioactive components. PMID:25658801

  7. Estimating grain and straw nitrogen concentration in grain crops based on aboveground nitrogen concentration and harvest index

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Simulating grain (Ng) and straw (Ns) nitrogen concentration is important in cropping systems simulation models. In this paper we present a simple model to partition nitrogen between grain and straw at harvest for barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), maize (Zea mays L), and sorg...

  8. Heavy metals and trace elements in atmospheric fall-out: their relationship with topsoil and wheat element composition.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, Gonzalo M A; Jasan, Raquel; Plá, Rita; Pignata, María L

    2012-04-30

    The objectives of this study were to determine the average concentrations and deposition rates of 28 elements in atmospheric bulk deposition and to elucidate associations among topsoil, bulk deposition and wheat element composition. The fluxes of arsenic (As), copper (Cu), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) deposition in Córdoba were higher than in other agro-ecosystems, which reflects both natural (geochemistry and topsoil removal) and anthropogenic sources. High lanthanide, uranium (U) and thorium (Th) concentrations revealed the impact of an open cast uranium mine. The highest enrichment factors (EF) were those of Cu, Pb, Zn and nickel (Ni), with calcium (Ca) being the most prominent in the surroundings of a cement plant. Industries and the transport of airborne urban pollutants were the main anthropogenic sources for Ca, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, cadmium (Cd), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn) and antimony (Sb). The concentrations of metals in wheat grain were predicted using the topsoil and atmospheric fall-out composition with R(2)=0.90, with the latter being the best explanatory variable. The present study highlights the potential health hazards of wheat consumption (Environmental Protection Agency) by the assessment of heavy metals in bulk atmospheric deposition. PMID:22390956

  9. Organically vs conventionally grown winter wheat: effects on grain yield, technological quality, and on phenolic composition and antioxidant properties of bran and refined flour.

    PubMed

    Mazzoncini, Marco; Antichi, Daniele; Silvestri, Nicola; Ciantelli, Giulia; Sgherri, Cristina

    2015-05-15

    Since organic food is widely assumed to have a better nutritional quality than conventional food, our aim was to study the effects of organic vs conventional cropping systems on yield and the phenolic composition of winter wheat cv. 'Bologna'. Although organic wheat yielded less than conventional wheat, mainly due to the nitrogen shortage, and its bread-making quality was lower, the cultivation system did not affect the total amounts of phenolics and phenolic acids. Of the eight phenolic acids identified, only ferulic acid was influenced by the cultivation system. Phenolic composition and quantity were significantly affected by the milling fraction (bran or white flour): phenolics were more concentrated in the bran, which showed the highest antioxidant power. Under the conditions adopted in this study, an organic cropping system can maintain or even increase the health properties of the wheat milled products, provided a reduction in grain yield is accepted. PMID:25577104

  10. Bioethanol production from rice straw by popping pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rice straw has considerable potential as a raw material for bioethanol production. Popping pretreatment of rice straw prior to downstream enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation was found to increase cellulose to glucose conversion efficiency. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of popping pretreatment and determine the optimal enzyme loading using a surface response design. Results The optimal doses of cellulase and xylanase enzymes were 23 FPU and 62 IU/g biomass, respectively. Using the optimized enzyme condition and popping pretreatment of rice straw (15% substrate loading, w/v), a sugar recovery of 0.567 g/g biomass (glucose; 0.394 g/g) was obtained in 48 h, which was significantly higher than that from untreated rice straw (total sugar recovery; 0.270 g/g biomass). Fermentation of the hydrolyzates by Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in 0.172 g ethanol/g biomass after 24 h, equivalent to 80.9% of the maximum theoretical yield (based on the amount of glucose in raw material). Changes in the chemical composition and surface area of rice straw were also investigated before and after popping pretreatment. The results showed little or no difference in chemical composition between the pretreated rice straw and the control. However, the surface area of pretreated rice straw increased twofold compared to the control. Conclusion Popping pretreatment of rice straw can effectively improve downstream saccharification and fermentation, important for bioethanol production. PMID:24286244

  11. Whelmer #11: Straw Oboes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-01-01

    This activity introduces the concept of resonance and the relationship between pitch and the length and diameter of the straw. The Content section provides an explanation of Hertz which is equal to cycles per second.

  12. Solid-state fermentation of wheat bran by Trichoderma reesei QM9414: substrate composition changes, C balance, enzyme production, growth and kinetics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. Smits; A. Rinzema; J. Tramper; H. M. Van Sonsbeek; W. Knol

    1996-01-01

    A description is given of the solid-state fermentation of wheat bran by Trichoderma reesei QM9414 at constant temperature and relative humidity. Glucosamine, the oxygen consumption rate (OCR), the carbon dioxide\\u000a production rate (CPR), changes in wheat bran composition and the production of four enzymes were measured during 125?h of\\u000a fermentation. A C balance was set up between CO2 production, based

  13. Vertical distribution of dry mass in cereals straw and its loss during harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajaç, T.; Oleksy, A.; Stok?osa, A.; Klimek-Kopyra, A.; Macuda, J.

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed at evaluating the distribution of mass in the straw of cereal species and also at assessing the straw yield and its losses resulting from the amount of the stubble left in the field. It was found empirically that the wheat culms are composed of five internodes, and in barley, triticale and oats of six. The highest straw mass per 1 cm was found in the second internode in both forms of wheat and winter triticale, whereas barley and oats gathered the highest weight in the first internode. In the southern part of Silesia species and forms of cereals differed in the straw yield, which can be arranged as follows, from the highest: winter wheat > spring wheat, winter triticale, winter barley, and oats > spring barley. Due to the specific distribution of dry matter in each of internodes of both wheat forms - winter and spring, they loose less stubble mass (22 and 24%, respectively), comparing to other cereals, especially spring barley, which loose 31% yield of straw in the stubble of 15 cm height.

  14. Controlled composting of straw

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. M. Lynch; S. H. T. Harper; S. J. Chapman; D. A. Veal

    1984-01-01

    Production of composts on the farm from surplus straw might provide a low-cost biotechnological approach for increasing the\\u000a value of this lignocellulosic waste. Successful composting depends on the conversion of the polysaccharides (cellulose and\\u000a hemicelluloses) of straw by inoculated microorganisms to products that can promote plant growth when applied to the land.\\u000a None of the potentially useful products we have

  15. Drinking Straw Oboe

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Twin Cities Public Television, Inc.

    2006-01-01

    In this quick activity (page 1 of the PDF), learners will construct an oboe-like instrument from a plastic drinking straw by cutting the end to split it into two loose flaps, like reeds on an oboe. Blowing hard makes a sound. Cutting the straws to different lengths provides an opportunity for learners to predict how length will affect sound. Relates to the linked video, DragonflyTV GPS: Music and Sound.

  16. Cerebroside C Increases Tolerance to Chilling Injury and Alters Lipid Composition in Wheat Roots

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Xia; Xiao, Yu; Cao, Ling-Ling; Yan, Xu; Li, Cong; Shi, Hai-Yan; Wang, Jian-Wen; Ye, Yong-Hao

    2013-01-01

    Chilling tolerance was increased in seed germination and root growth of wheat seedlings grown in media containing 20 µg/mL cerebroside C (CC), isolated from the endophytic Phyllosticta sp. TG78. Seeds treated with 20 µg/mL CC at 4°C expressed the higher germination rate (77.78%), potential (23.46%), index (3.44) and the shorter germination time (6.19 d); root growth was also significantly improved by 13.76% in length, 13.44% in fresh weight and 6.88% in dry mass compared to controls. During the cultivation process at 4°C for three days and the followed 24 h at 25°C, lipid peroxidation, expressed by malondialdehyde (MDA) content and relative membrane permeability (RMP) was significantly reduced in CC-treated roots; activities of lipoxygenase (LOX), phospholipid C (PLC) and phospholipid D (PLD) were inhibited by 13.62–62.26%, 13.54–63.93% and 13.90–61.17%, respectively; unsaturation degree of fatty acids was enhanced through detecting the contents of CC-induced linoleic acid, linolenic acid, palmitic acid and stearic acid using GC-MS; capacities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were individually increased by 7.69–46.06%, 3.37–37.96%, and ?7.00–178.07%. These results suggest that increased chilling tolerance may be due, in part, to the reduction of lipid peroxidation and alternation of lipid composition of roots in the presence of CC. PMID:24058471

  17. Effects of gamma irradiation on chemical compositions of some agricultural residues

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. R. Al-Masri; M. Zarkawi

    1994-01-01

    An experiment was carried out to study the effects of different doses of gamma irradiation on the changes in the crude fibre contents of cottonwood, wheat straw, barley straw, lentils straw, maize straw and maize cobs. Ground samples of the 6 residues were irradiated by gamma irradiation at doses of 0, 10, 50 and 100 kilogray (kGy) under identical conditions

  18. Deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, and Fusarium graminearum contamination of cereal straw; field distribution; and sampling of big bales.

    PubMed

    Häggblom, P; Nordkvist, E

    2015-05-01

    Sampling of straw bales from wheat, barley, and oats was carried out after harvest showing large variations in deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone (ZEN) levels. In the wheat field, DON was detected in all straw samples with an average DON concentration of 976 ?g/kg and a median of 525 ?g/kg, while in four bales, the concentrations were above 3000 ?g/kg. For ZEN, the concentrations were more uniform with an average concentration of 11 ?g/kg. The barley straw bales were all positive for DON with an average concentration of 449 ?g/kg and three bales above 800 ?g/kg. In oat straw, the average DON concentration was 6719 ?g/kg with the lowest concentration at 2614 ?g/kg and eight samples above 8000 ?g/kg. ZEN contamination was detected in all bales with an average concentration of 53 ?g/kg with the highest concentration at 219 ?g/kg. Oat bales from another field showed an average concentration of 16,382 ?g/kg. ZEN concentrations in the oat bales were on average 153 ?g/kg with a maximum at 284 ?g/kg. Levels of Fusarium graminearum DNA were higher in oat straw (max 6444 pg DNA/mg straw) compared to straw from wheat or barley. The significance of mycotoxin exposure from straw should not be neglected particularly in years when high levels of DON and ZEN are also detected in the feed grain. With a limited number of samples preferably using a sampling probe, it is possible to distinguish lots of straw that should not be used as bedding material for pigs. PMID:25665688

  19. Barriers and incentives to the production of bioethanol from cereal straw: A farm business perspective

    PubMed Central

    Glithero, N.J.; Ramsden, S.J.; Wilson, P.

    2013-01-01

    The EU renewable energy directive stipulates a requirement for 10% of transport fuels to be derived from renewable sources by 2020. Second generation biofuels offer potential to contribute towards this target with cereal straw representing a potentially large feedstock source. From an on-farm survey of 240 arable farmers, timeliness of crop establishment and benefits of nutrient retention from straw incorporation were cited as reasons for straw incorporation. However, two-thirds (one-third) of farmers would supply wheat (barley) straw for bioenergy. The most popular contract length and continuous length of straw supply was either 1 or 3 years. Contracts stipulating a fixed area of straw supply for a fixed price were the most frequently cited preferences, with £50 t?1 the most frequently cited minimum contract price that farmers would find acceptable. Arable farmers in England would be willing to sell 2.52 Mt of cereal straw for bioenergy purposes nationally and 1.65 Mt in the main cereal growing areas of Eastern England. Cereal straw would be diverted from current markets or on-farm uses and from straw currently incorporated into soil. Policy interventions may be required to incentivise farmers to engage in this market, but food and fuel policies must increasingly be integrated to meet societal goals. PMID:24926116

  20. Barriers and incentives to the production of bioethanol from cereal straw: A farm business perspective.

    PubMed

    Glithero, N J; Ramsden, S J; Wilson, P

    2013-08-01

    The EU renewable energy directive stipulates a requirement for 10% of transport fuels to be derived from renewable sources by 2020. Second generation biofuels offer potential to contribute towards this target with cereal straw representing a potentially large feedstock source. From an on-farm survey of 240 arable farmers, timeliness of crop establishment and benefits of nutrient retention from straw incorporation were cited as reasons for straw incorporation. However, two-thirds (one-third) of farmers would supply wheat (barley) straw for bioenergy. The most popular contract length and continuous length of straw supply was either 1 or 3 years. Contracts stipulating a fixed area of straw supply for a fixed price were the most frequently cited preferences, with £50 t(-1) the most frequently cited minimum contract price that farmers would find acceptable. Arable farmers in England would be willing to sell 2.52 Mt of cereal straw for bioenergy purposes nationally and 1.65 Mt in the main cereal growing areas of Eastern England. Cereal straw would be diverted from current markets or on-farm uses and from straw currently incorporated into soil. Policy interventions may be required to incentivise farmers to engage in this market, but food and fuel policies must increasingly be integrated to meet societal goals. PMID:24926116

  1. Adsorption of anionic dyes from aqueous solutions using chemically modified straw.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenxuan; Li, Haijiang; Kan, Xiaowei; Dong, Lei; Yan, Han; Jiang, Ziwen; Yang, Hu; Li, Aimin; Cheng, Rongshi

    2012-08-01

    The effective disposal of redundant straw is a significant work for environmental protection and full utilization of resource. In this work, the wheat straw has been modified by etherification to prepare a kind of quaternary ammonium straw adsorbents. The adsorption behaviors of the modified straw for methyl orange (MO) and acid green 25(AG25) were studied in both batch and column systems. The adsorption capacity of the straw for both dyes improved evidently after modification. The maximal MO and AG25 uptakes were more than 300 and 950 mg g(-1), respectively. Furthermore, the adsorption equilibrium, kinetics and column studies all indicated that the adsorption behavior was a monolayer chemical adsorption with an ion-exchange process. In addition, after adsorption of anionic dyes, the used adsorbents were successfully applied to adsorb a cationic dye directly at suitable conditions in the secondary adsorption. This was due to the altered surface structures of the used adsorbents. PMID:22609712

  2. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation Into Wheat Paper at UBC

    E-print Network

    Into Wheat Paper at UBC Jobin Ansari-Gilani Donald Harris Siavash Jalali Youtai Xue University of British SUSTAINABILITY REPORT An Investigation Into Wheat Paper at UBC Prepared for Dr. Dawn Mills March 29, 2012 Jobin Ansari-Gilani Donald Harris Siavash Jalali Youtai Xue #12;2 Abstract Wheat straw is an agricultural waste

  3. Wheat Variety Descriptions and Comments for Varieties Planted in Panhandle and South Plains Variety Trials

    E-print Network

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Wheat Variety Descriptions and Comments for Varieties Planted in Panhandle and South Plains Variety@ag.tamu.edu Jackie Rudd, AgriLife Research Wheat Breeder AP06T3519 AgriPro experimental. First year in trial. AP06T. Questionable straw strength under irrigation. Russian wheat aphid tolerant. Leaf rust resistant with moderate

  4. Nutrient Composition of Retail Samples of Sorghum, Millet, and Whole Wheat Flour

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than 2 million people in the United States have celiac disease, or about 1 in 133 individuals. People who have this disease cannot tolerate gluten, a protein in wheat, rye, and barley. The only treatment for celiac disease is a gluten-free diet. Nutrient profiles were lacking in the USDA Nat...

  5. Variation in polar lipid composition within near-isogenic wheat lines containing different puroindoline haplotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An extensive amount of research has investigated kernel hardness. However, the exact mechanism underlying this phenomenon is unknown. Puroindoline-A and puroindoline-B proteins must be present in their wild-type form to create soft textured wheat. Similar to puroindoline proteins, polar lipids are...

  6. Effect of high molecular weight glutenin subunit allelic composition on wheat flour tortilla quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat cultivars possessing quality attributes needed to produce optimum quality tortillas have not been identified. This study investigated the effect of variations in high molecular weight glutenin subunits encoded at the Glu-1 loci (Glu-A1, Glu-B1, Glu-D1) on dough properties and tortilla quality....

  7. Winter Wheat Seedling Emergence from Deep Sowing Depths

    Microsoft Academic Search

    William F. Schillinger; Edwin Donaldson; Robert E. Allan; Stephen S. Jones

    1998-01-01

    sity (Rohde, 1966). By today's standards, it has poor disease resistance, modest yield potential, and inferior Growers in low-precipitation (,300 mm annual) dryland wheat- grain quality; it is also difficult to thresh, and has weak fallow areas of the inland Pacific Northwest need winter wheat (Triti- cum aestivum L.) cultivars that emerge from deep sowing depths in straw that causes

  8. Protein composition of wheat gluten polymer fractions determined by quantitative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Certain wheat gluten proteins form large protein polymers that are extractable in 0.5% SDS only after sonication. Although there is a strong relationship between the amounts of these polymers in the flour and bread-making quality, the protein components of these polymers have not been thoroughly investigated. Results Flour proteins from the US bread wheat Butte 86 were extracted in 0.5% SDS using a two-step procedure with and without sonication. Proteins were further separated by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) into monomeric and polymeric fractions and analyzed by quantitative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). When proteins in select 2-DE spots were identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), overlapping spots from the different protein fractions often yielded different identifications. Most high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) and low-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (LMW-GS) partitioned into the polymer fractions, while most gliadins were found in the monomer fractions. The exceptions were alpha, gamma and omega gliadins containing odd numbers of cysteine residues. These proteins were detected in all fractions, but comprised the largest proportion of the SDS-extractable polymer fraction. Several types of non-gluten proteins also were found in the polymer fractions, including serpins, triticins and globulins. All three types were found in the largest proportions in the SDS-extractable polymer fraction. Conclusions This is the first study to report the accumulation of gliadins containing odd numbers of cysteine residues in the SDS-extractable glutenin polymer fraction, supporting the hypothesis that these gliadins serve as chain terminators of the polymer chains. These data make it possible to formulate hypotheses about how protein composition influences polymer size and structure and provide a foundation for future experiments aimed at determining how environment affects glutenin polymer distribution. In addition, the analysis revealed additional layers of complexity to the wheat flour proteome that should be considered when evaluating quantitative 2-DE data. PMID:24517725

  9. Effect of lactic acid fermentation of wheat and barley whole meal flour on carbohydrate composition and digestibility in mink ( Mustela vison)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G Skrede; S Sahlstrøm; A Skrede; A Holck; E Slinde

    2001-01-01

    Wheat and barley whole meal flours (WMFs) were subjected to treatment by fermentation, autoclaving, and fermentation followed by autoclaving. The WMFs were analysed for chemical composition, formulated into wet diets (282gkg?1) and fed to adult mink (Mustela vison) for determination of total tract digestibility of total starch, total carbohydrate, crude protein and fat. Fermentation of WMF\\/water mixtures inoculated with a

  10. [Emission factors and PM chemical composition study of biomass burning in the Yangtze River Delta region].

    PubMed

    Tang, Xi-Bin; Huang, Cheng; Lou, Sheng-Rong; Qiao, Li-Ping; Wang, Hong-Li; Zhou, Min; Chen, Ming-hua; Chen, Chang-Hong; Wang, Qian; Li, Gui-Ling; Li, Li; Huang, Hai-Ying; Zhang, Gang-Feng

    2014-05-01

    The emission characteristics of five typical crops, including wheat straw, rice straw, oil rape straw, soybean straw and fuel wood, were investigated to explore the gas and particulates emission of typical biomass burning in Yangzi-River-Delta area. The straws were tested both by burning in stove and by burning in the farm with a self-developed measurement system as open burning sources. Both gas and fine particle pollutants were measured in this study as well as the chemical composition of fine particles. The results showed that the average emission factors of CO, NO, and PM2,5 in open farm burning were 28.7 g.kg -1, 1.2 g.kg-1 and 2.65 g kg-1 , respectively. Due to insufficient burning in the low oxygen level environment, the emission factors of stove burning were higher than those of open farm burning, which were 81.9 g kg-1, 2. 1 g.kg -1 and 8.5 gkg -1 , respectively. Oil rape straw had the highest emission factors in all tested straws samples. Carbonaceous matter, including organic carbon(OC) and element carbon(EC) , was the foremost component of PM2, 5from biomass burning. The average mass fractions of OC and EC were (38.92 +/- 13.93)% and (5.66 +/-1.54)% by open farm burning and (26.37 +/- 10. 14)% and (18.97 +/- 10.76)% by stove burning. Water soluble ions such as Cl-and K+ had a large contribution. The average mass fractions of CI- and K+ were (13.27 +/-6. 82)% and (12.41 +/- 3.02)% by open farm burning, and were (16.25 +/- 9.34)% and (13.62 +/- 7.91)% by stove burning. The K +/OC values of particles from wheat straw, rice straw, oil rape straw and soybean straw by open farm burning were 0. 30, 0. 52, 0. 49 and 0. 15, respectively, which can be used to evaluate the influence on the regional air quality in YRD area from biomass burning and provide direct evidence for source apportionment. PMID:25055647

  11. Seasonal Changes in the Composition and Content of Dehydrins in Winter Wheat Plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. V. Stupnikova; G. B. Borovskii; V. K. Voinikov

    2004-01-01

    Seasonal changes in the pattern and content of dehydrins in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) plants grown under field and laboratory conditions were studied by one-dimensional PAGE and immunochemical methods. During hardening, plants accumulated dehydrin-like polypeptides with mol wts of 209, 196, 66, 50, and 41 kD. In winter, low-molecular-weight dehydrins with mol wts of 24, 22, 17, 15, and 12

  12. Protein Allelic Composition, Dough Rheology, and Baking Characteristics of Flour Mill Streams from Wheat Cultivars with Known and Varied Baking Qualities 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Menkovska; D. Knezevic; M. Ivanoski

    2002-01-01

    Cereal Chem. 79(5):720-725 Flour mill streams obtained by milling grain of 10 bread wheat cultivars grown in the Skopje region of Macedonia were analyzed for rheological and breadmaking quality characteristics and for composition of gliadins and HMW-GS. The objective of this study was to examine the relationships between the composition of gluten proteins and bread- making quality, as well as

  13. Increasing the value of straw by fermentation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1979-01-01

    Actual and potential uses for straw, currently a major source of waste cellulose, are reviewed. The study covers five principal aspects: (1) problems associated with straw use; (2) direct uses for straw; (3) mechanical conversion; (4) mechanical, chemical, and biological treatments; and (5) chemicals from straw. Investigation reveals that straw is technically suitable as a raw material in the manufacture

  14. Characteristics of dough and tortillas prepared with composite wheat-sorghum flours

    E-print Network

    Torres, Patricia Isabel

    1988-01-01

    puncture test with tne puncn and die test cel1 with tne Inst ron Uni ver sal Machine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3U particle size di str ibution obtaineo by dry ano wet sieving of flour C. . . . . . . . . Particl e size di stribution of sorgnum fl ours A..., B, and C, determined by' wet sieving 3B Linear regression plot of the tortilla sensory and instrumental measure of I I rmness 4i Types of farinograpn curves obtained wite wheat-sor gnum dou ghs Stress-strain curves for tortilla dough...

  15. Nanostructural morphology of plasticized wheat gluten and modified potato starch composites: relationship to mechanical and barrier properties.

    PubMed

    Muneer, Faraz; Andersson, Mariette; Koch, Kristine; Menzel, Carolin; Hedenqvist, Mikael S; Gällstedt, Mikael; Plivelic, Tomás S; Kuktaite, Ramune

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, we were able to produce composites of wheat gluten (WG) protein and a novel genetically modified potato starch (MPS) with attractive mechanical and gas barrier properties using extrusion. Characterization of the MPS revealed an altered chain length distribution of the amylopectin fraction and slightly increased amylose content compared to wild type potato starch. WG and MPS of different ratios plasticized with either glycerol or glycerol and water were extruded at 110 and 130 °C. The nanomorphology of the composites showed the MPS having semicrystalline structure of a characteristic lamellar arrangement with an approximately 100 Å period observed by small-angle X-ray scattering and a B-type crystal structure observed by wide-angle X-ray scattering analysis. WG has a structure resembling the hexagonal macromolecular arrangement as reported previously in WG films. A larger amount of ?-sheets was observed in the samples 70/30 and 30/70 WG-MPS processed at 130 °C with 45% glycerol. Highly polymerized WG protein was found in the samples processed at 130 °C versus 110 °C. Also, greater amounts of WG protein in the blend resulted in greater extensibility (110 °C) and a decrease in both E-modulus and maximum stress at 110 and 130 °C, respectively. Under ambient conditions the WG-MPS composite (70/30) with 45% glycerol showed excellent gas barrier properties to be further explored in multilayer film packaging applications. PMID:25629918

  16. Enhanced biological straw saccharification through coculturing of lignocellulose-degrading microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Taha, Mohamed; Shahsavari, Esmaeil; Al-Hothaly, Khalid; Mouradov, Aidyn; Smith, Andrew T; Ball, Andrew S; Adetutu, Eric M

    2015-04-01

    Lignocellulosic waste (LCW) is an abundant, low-cost, and inedible substrate for the induction of lignocellulolytic enzymes for cellulosic bioethanol production using an efficient, environmentally friendly, and economical biological approach. In this study, 30 different lignocellulose-degrading bacterial and 18 fungal isolates were quantitatively screened individually for the saccharification of four different ball-milled straw substrates: wheat, rice, sugarcane, and pea straw. Rice and sugarcane straws which had similar Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy profiles were more degradable, and resulted in more hydrolytic enzyme production than wheat and pea straws. Crude enzyme produced on native straws performed better than those on artificial substrates (such as cellulose and xylan). Four fungal and five bacterial isolates were selected (based on their high strawase activities) for constructing dual and triple microbial combinations to investigate microbial synergistic effects on saccharification. Combinations such as FUNG16-FUNG17 (Neosartorya fischeri-Myceliophthora thermophila) and RMIT10-RMIT11 (Aeromonas hydrophila-Pseudomonas poae) enhanced saccharification (3- and 6.6-folds, respectively) compared with their monocultures indicating the beneficial effects of synergism between those isolates. Dual isolate combinations were more efficient at straw saccharification than triple combinations in both bacterial and fungal assays. Overall, co-culturing can result in significant increases in saccharification which may offer significant commercial potential for the use of microbial consortia. PMID:25724976

  17. Two-step straw processing a new concept of silica problem solution Jan Pekarovic

    E-print Network

    Fleming, Paul D. "Dan"

    . INTRODUCTION Most of the non-wood fibers are derived from annual plants. The advantage of annual plants, which could be used for pulp and paper production. Wheat straw and corn stalks represent the most Pekarovicova Paul Daniel Fleming III. Department of Paper Engineering, Chemical Engineering, and Imaging

  18. Study of chemical pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification for producing fermentable sugars from rice straw.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Hsing; Chen, Yi-Chun; Lin, Jih-Gaw

    2014-07-01

    This study evaluated a cost-effective approach for the conversion of rice straw into fermentable sugars. The composition of rice straw pretreated with 1 % sulfuric acid or 1 % sodium hydroxide solution was compared to rice straw with no chemical pretreatment. Enzymatic saccharification experiments on non-pretreated rice straw (NPRS), pretreated rice straw (PRS), and pretreated rice straw with acid hydrolysate (PRSAH) were conducted in a series of batch reactors. The results indicated that pretreating the rice straw with dilute acid and base increased the cellulose content from 38 % to over 50 %. During enzymatic saccharification, straight aliphatic cellulose was hydrolyzed before branched hemicellulose, and glucose was the major hydrolysis product. The glucose yield was 0.52 g glucose/g for NPRS and was comparable to the yields of 0.50 g glucose/g for PRS and 0.58 g glucose/g for PRSAH. The hydrolysis of rice straw to produce glucose can be described by a first-order reaction with a rate constant of 0.0550 d(-1) for NPRS, 0.0653 d(-1) for PRSAH, and 0.0654 d(-1) for PRS. Overall, the production of fermentable sugars from ground rice straw will be more cost effective if the straw is not pretreated with chemicals. PMID:24346765

  19. Using isotopic tracers to assess the impact of tillage and straw management on the microbial metabolic network in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Groenigen, K.; Forristal, D.; Jones, M. B.; Schwartz, E.; Hungate, B. A.; Dijkstra, P.

    2013-12-01

    By decomposing soil organic matter, microbes gain energy and building blocks for biosynthesis and release CO2 to the atmosphere. Therefore, insight into the effect of management practices on microbial metabolic pathways and C use efficiency (CUE; microbial C produced per substrate C utilized) may help to predict long term changes in soil C stocks. We studied the effects of reduced (RT) and conventional tillage (CT) on the microbial central C metabolic network, using soil samples from a 12-year-old field experiment in an Irish winter wheat cropping system. Each year after harvest, straw was removed from half of the RT and CT plots or incorporated into the soil in the other half, resulting in four treatment combinations. We added 1-13C and 2,3-13C pyruvate and 1-13C and U-13C glucose as metabolic tracer isotopomers to composite soil samples taken at two depths (0-15 cm and 15-30 cm) from each treatment and used the rate of position-specific respired 13CO2 to parameterize a metabolic model. Model outcomes were then used to calculate CUE of the microbial community. We found that the composite samples differed in CUE, but the changes were small, with values ranging between 0.757-0.783 across treatments and soil depth. Increases in CUE were associated with a decrease in tricarboxylic acid cycle and reductive pentose phosphate pathway activity and increased consumption of metabolic intermediates for biosynthesis. Our results indicate that RT and straw incorporation promote soil C storage without substantially changing CUE or any of the microbial metabolic pathways. This suggests that at our site, RT and straw incorporation promote soil C storage mostly through direct effects such as increased soil C input and physical protection from decomposition, rather than by feedback responses of the microbial community.

  20. [Effect of straw-returning on the storage and distribution of different active fractions of soil organic carbon].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hul; Wang, Xu-dong; Tian, Xiao-hong

    2014-12-01

    The impacts of straw mulching and returning on the storage of soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC) and mineral associated organic carbon (MOC), and their proportions to the total organic carbon (TOC) were studied based on a field experiment. The results showed that compared to the treatment of wheat straw soil-returning (WR), the storage of TOC and MOC decreased by 4.1% and 9.7% respectively in 0-20 cm soil in the treatment with wheat straw mulching (WM), but the storage of DOC and POC increased by 207.7% and 11.9%, and TOC and POC increased significantly in 20-40 cm soil. Compared to the treatment with maize straw soil-returning (MR), the storage of TOC and MOC in the plough pan soil of the treatment with maize straw mulching (MM) increased by 13.6% and 14.6% , respectively. Compared to the WR-MR treatment, the storage of TOC and MOC in top soil (0-20 icm) significantly decreased by 8.5% and 10.3% respectively in WM-MM treatment. The storage of TOC, and POC in top soil was significantly higher in the treatments with maize straw soil-returning or mulching than that with wheat straw. Compared to the treatment without straw (CK), the storage of TOC in top soil increased by 5.2% to 18.0% in the treatments with straw returning or mulching in the six modes (WM, WR, MM, MR, WM-MM,WR-MR) (P<0.05), but the storage of TOC in the plough pan soil decreased by 8.0% to 11.5% (P<0.05) except for the treatments of WM and MM. The storage of DOC and DOC/TOC ratio decreased significantly in top soil in the treatments with straw mulching or returning in six modes. The storage of POC and POC/TOC ratio in WM and WM-MM treatments, MOC and MOC/TOC ratio in WR treatment, increased significantly in top soil. In the other three treatments with straw mulching and returning (MM, MR, WR-MR), the storage of POC and MOC increased significantly in top soil. These results suggested that straw mulching had the potential to accumulate active organic carbon fraction in soil, straw soil-returning had the potential to accumulate stable organic carbon fraction. Considering organic carbon sequestration in cropland in the region of Guanzhong plain, maize straw mulching or soil-returning was better than wheat straw, and wheat straw and maize straw soil-returning (WR-MR) were better than wheat and maize straw mulching (WM-MM). PMID:25876399

  1. Species Composition and Diversity of Parasitoids and Hyper-Parasitoids in Different Wheat Agro-Farming Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zi-hua; Liu, Jun-He; He, Da-Han; Guan, Xiao-qin; Liu, Wen-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Insect communities depend on both their local environment and features of the surrounding habitats. Diverse plant communities may enhance the abundance and species diversity of local natural enemies, which is possible due to a higher abundance and species diversity in complex landscapes. This hypothesis was tested using cereal aphid parasitoids and hyper-parasitoids by comparing 18 spring wheat fields, Triticum aestivum L. (Poales: Poaceae), in structurally-complex landscapes (dominated by semi-natural habitat, > 50%, n = 9) and structurally-simple landscapes dominated by arable landscape (dominated by crop land, > 80%, n = 9). The agricultural landscape structure had significant effects on the number of parasitoid and hyper-parasitoid species, as 26 species (17 parasitoids and 9 hyper-parasitoids) were found in the complex landscapes and 21 were found in the simple landscapes (14 parasitoids and 7 hyper-parasitoids). Twenty-one species occurred in both landscape types, including 14 parasitoids and 7 hyper-parasitoids species. The species diversity of parasitoids and hyper-parasitoids were significantly different between the complex and simple landscapes. In addition, arable fields in structurally-simple agricultural landscapes with little semi-natural habitats could support a lower diversity of cereal aphid parasitoids and hyper-parasitoids than structurally-complex landscapes. These findings suggest that cereal aphid parasitoids and hyper-parasitoids need to find necessary resources in structurally-complex landscapes, and generalizations are made concerning the relationship between landscape composition and biodiversity in agricultural landscapes. Overall, abundance, species richness, and species diversity increased with increasing plant diversity and landscape complexity in spring wheat fields and increasing amounts of semi-natural habitats in the surrounding landscape. PMID:24773471

  2. The Biodiversity of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Greek Traditional Wheat Sourdoughs Is Reflected in Both Composition and Metabolite Formation

    PubMed Central

    De Vuyst, Luc; Schrijvers, Vincent; Paramithiotis, Spiros; Hoste, Bart; Vancanneyt, Marc; Swings, Jean; Kalantzopoulos, George; Tsakalidou, Effie; Messens, Winy

    2002-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from Greek traditional wheat sourdoughs manufactured without the addition of baker's yeast. Application of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of total cell protein, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR, DNA-DNA hybridization, and 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis, in combination with physiological traits such as fructose fermentation and mannitol production, allowed us to classify the isolated bacteria into the species Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus paralimentarius, and Weissella cibaria. This consortium seems to be unique for the Greek traditional wheat sourdoughs studied. Strains of the species W. cibaria have not been isolated from sourdoughs previously. No Lactobacillus pontis or Lactobacillus panis strains were found. An L. brevis-like isolate (ACA-DC 3411 t1) could not be identified properly and might be a new sourdough LAB species. In addition, fermentation capabilities associated with the LAB detected have been studied. During laboratory fermentations, all heterofermentative sourdough LAB strains produced lactic acid, acetic acid, and ethanol. Mannitol was produced from fructose that served as an additional electron acceptor. In addition to glucose, almost all of the LAB isolates fermented maltose, while fructose as the sole carbohydrate source was fermented by all sourdough LAB tested except L. sanfranciscensis. Two of the L. paralimentarius isolates tested did not ferment maltose; all strains were homofermentative. In the presence of both maltose and fructose in the medium, induction of hexokinase activity occurred in all sourdough LAB species mentioned above, explaining why no glucose accumulation was found extracellularly. No maltose phosphorylase activity was found either. These data produced a variable fermentation coefficient and a unique sourdough metabolite composition. PMID:12450829

  3. First Survey of the Wheat Chromosome 5A Composition through a Next Generation Sequencing Approach

    PubMed Central

    Vitulo, Nicola; Albiero, Alessandro; Forcato, Claudio; Campagna, Davide; Dal Pero, Francesca; Bagnaresi, Paolo; Colaiacovo, Moreno; Faccioli, Primetta; Lamontanara, Antonella; Šimková, Hana; Kubaláková, Marie; Perrotta, Gaetano; Facella, Paolo; Lopez, Loredana; Pietrella, Marco; Gianese, Giulio; Doležel, Jaroslav; Giuliano, Giovanni; Cattivelli, Luigi; Valle, Giorgio; Stanca, A. Michele

    2011-01-01

    Wheat is one of the world's most important crops and is characterized by a large polyploid genome. One way to reduce genome complexity is to isolate single chromosomes using flow cytometry. Low coverage DNA sequencing can provide a snapshot of individual chromosomes, allowing a fast characterization of their main features and comparison with other genomes. We used massively parallel 454 pyrosequencing to obtain a 2x coverage of wheat chromosome 5A. The resulting sequence assembly was used to identify TEs, genes and miRNAs, as well as to infer a virtual gene order based on the synteny with other grass genomes. Repetitive elements account for more than 75% of the genome. Gene content was estimated considering non-redundant reads showing at least one match to ESTs or proteins. The results indicate that the coding fraction represents 1.08% and 1.3% of the short and long arm respectively, projecting the number of genes of the whole chromosome to approximately 5,000. 195 candidate miRNA precursors belonging to 16 miRNA families were identified. The 5A genes were used to search for syntenic relationships between grass genomes. The short arm is closely related to Brachypodium chromosome 4, sorghum chromosome 8 and rice chromosome 12; the long arm to regions of Brachypodium chromosomes 4 and 1, sorghum chromosomes 1 and 2 and rice chromosomes 9 and 3. From these similarities it was possible to infer the virtual gene order of 392 (5AS) and 1,480 (5AL) genes of chromosome 5A, which was compared to, and found to be largely congruent with the available physical map of this chromosome. PMID:22028874

  4. Wheat gluten amino acid composition analysis by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with integrated pulsed amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Rombouts, Ine; Lamberts, Lieve; Celus, Inge; Lagrain, Bert; Brijs, Kristof; Delcour, Jan A

    2009-07-17

    A simple accurate method for determining amino acid composition of wheat gluten proteins and their gliadin and glutenin fractions using high-performance anion-exchange chromatography with integrated pulsed amperometric detection is described. In contrast to most conventional methods, the analysis requires neither pre- or post-column derivatization, nor oxidation of the sample. It consists of hydrolysis (6.0M hydrochloric acid solution at 110 degrees C for 24h), evaporation of hydrolyzates (110 degrees C), and chromatographic separation of the liberated amino acids. Correction factors (f) accounted for incomplete cleavage of peptide bonds involving Val (f=1.07) and Ile (f=1.13) after hydrolysis for 24h and for Ser (f=1.32) losses during evaporation. Gradient conditions including an extra eluent (0.1M acetic acid solution) allowed multiple sequential sample analyses without risk of Glu contamination on the anion-exchange column. While gluten amino acid compositions by the present method were mostly comparable to those obtained by a conventional method involving oxidation, acid hydrolysis and post-column ninhydrin derivatization, the latter method underestimated Tyr, Val and Ile levels. Results for the other amino acids obtained by the different methods were linearly correlated (r>0.99, slope=1.03). PMID:19523641

  5. Effect of processing on phenolic composition of dough and bread fractions made from refined and whole wheat flour of three wheat varieties.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yingjian; Luthria, Devanand; Fuerst, E Patrick; Kiszonas, Alecia M; Yu, Liangli; Morris, Craig F

    2014-10-29

    This study investigated the effect of breadmaking on the assay of phenolic acids from flour, dough, and bread fractions of three whole and refined wheat varieties. Comparison of the efficacy of two commonly used methods for hydrolysis and extraction of phenoilc acids showed that yields of total phenolic acids (TPA) were 5-17% higher among all varieties and flour types when samples were directly hydrolyzed in the presence of ascorbate and EDTA as compared to the method separating free, soluble conjugates and bound, insoluble phenolic acids. Ferulic acid (FA) was the predominant phenolic acid, accounting for means of 59 and 81% of TPA among all refined and whole wheat fractions, respectively. All phenolic acids measured were more abundant in whole wheat than in refined samples. Results indicated that the total quantified phenolic acids did not change significantly when breads were prepared from refined and whole wheat flour. Thus, the potential phytochemical health benefits of total phenolic acids appear to be preserved during bread baking. PMID:25286188

  6. Customized optimization of cellulase mixtures for differently pretreated rice straw.

    PubMed

    Kim, In Jung; Jung, Ju Yeon; Lee, Hee Jin; Park, Hyong Seok; Jung, Young Hoon; Park, Kyungmoon; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2015-05-01

    Lignocellulose contains a large amount of cellulose but is recalcitrant to enzymatic hydrolysis, which yields sugars for fuels or chemicals. Various pretreatment methods are used to improve the enzymatic digestibility of cellulose in lignocellulose. Depending on the lignocellulose types and pretreatment methods, biomass compositions and physical properties significantly vary. Therefore, customized enzyme mixtures have to be employed for the efficient hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulose. Here, using three recombinant model enzymes consisting of endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, and xylanase with a fixed amount of ?-glucosidase, the optimal formulation of enzyme mixtures was designed for two differently pretreated rice straws (acid-pretreated or alkali-pretreated rice straw) by the mixture design methodology. As a result, different optimal compositions for the enzyme mixtures were employed depending on the type of pretreatment of rice straw. These results suggest that customized enzyme mixtures for pretreated lignocellulosic biomass are necessary to obtain increased sugar yields and should be considered in the industrial utilization of lignocellulose. PMID:25547288

  7. Changes in lipid composition of Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici conidia produced on wheat leaves treated with heptanoyl salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Muchembled, Jérôme; Sahraoui, Anissa Lounès-Hadj; Grandmougin-Ferjani, Anne; Sancholle, Michel

    2006-06-01

    Treatment of wheat leaves with heptanoyl salicylic acid (HS) and trehalose at concentrations of 0.1 and 15 g l(-1), prior to fungal inoculation, resulted in 40% and 60% protection, respectively, against powdery mildew. The total lipid composition of Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici (Bgt) conidia, the causal agent of wheat powdery mildew, was compared when produced on wheat leaves, respectively, untreated and treated with the two elicitors, HS and trehalose. An obvious effect was observed on lipid composition (sterol and fatty acid (FA)) of Bgt conidia produced on wheat leaves treated with HS. A total of 16 FA (C12-C24 saturated and unsaturated) as well as unusual methoxylated Fatty Acids (mFA) (3-methoxydocosanoic and 3-methoxytetracosanoic acids) were detected in the conidia. Medium chain FA were predominant in HS treated conidia (64.65%) while long chain fatty acids constituted the major compounds in untreated conidia (62%). The long chain/medium chain FA ratio decreased from 1.8 in the conidia produced on untreated leaves to 0.5 in the conidia obtained from HS treated leaves. When comparing the sterol composition of Bgt conidia produced on leaves treated with HS versus conidia obtained from untreated ones, very important changes within the two major classes can be seen. In particular, 24-methylsterols, e.g., 24-methylenecholesterol and 24-methylcholesta-7,24-dien were reduced by about 82% whereas 24-ethylsterols, e.g., 24-ethylcholesterol and 24-ethylcholesta-5,22-dienol were increased by about 85%. The 24-methylsterols/24-ethylsterols ratio was reduced by ninefold in the conidia produced from HS treated leaves. PMID:16647727

  8. Effect of fermentation conditions on L-lactic Acid production from soybean straw hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Wang, Qunhui; Xu, Zhong; Zhang, Wenyu; Xiang, Juan

    2015-01-28

    Four types of straw, namely, soybean, wheat, corn, and rice, were investigated for use in lactic acid production. These straws were mainly composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. After pretreatment with ammonia, the cellulose content increased, whereas the hemicellulose and lignin contents decreased. Analytical results also showed that the liquid enzymatic hydrolysates were primarily composed of glucose, xylose, and cellobiose. Preliminary experiments showed that a higher lactic acid concentration could be obtained from the wheat and soybean straw. However, soybean straw was chosen as the substrate for lactic acid production owing to its high protein content. The maximum lactic acid yield (0.8 g/g) and lactic acid productivity (0.61 g/(l/h)) were obtained with an initial reducing sugar concentration of 35 g/l at 30°C when using Lactobacillus casei (10% inoculum) for a 42 h fermentation period. Thus, the experimental results demonstrated the feasibility of using a soybean straw enzymatic hydrolysate as a substrate for lactic acid production. PMID:25152056

  9. Wheat Improvement Programs WHEAT PROGRAM

    E-print Network

    Wheat Improvement Programs WHEAT PROGRAM The small grains improvement effort at Texas Agri techniques. The College Station center focuses on wheat and oats for the South Texas and Blacklands regions of Texas, while the Amarillo center develops wheat and triticale lines for the Texas High Plains

  10. Novel insights into the composition, variation, organization, and expression of the low-molecular-weight glutenin subunit gene family in common wheat

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Liu, Dongcheng; Zhang, Aimin

    2013-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (LMW-GS), encoded by a complex multigene family, play an important role in the processing quality of wheat flour. Although members of this gene family have been identified in several wheat varieties, the allelic variation and composition of LMW-GS genes in common wheat are not well understood. In the present study, using the LMW-GS gene molecular marker system and the full-length gene cloning method, a comprehensive molecular analysis of LMW-GS genes was conducted in a representative population, the micro-core collections (MCC) of Chinese wheat germplasm. Generally, >15 LMW-GS genes were identified from individual MCC accessions, of which 4–6 were located at the Glu-A3 locus, 3–5 at the Glu-B3 locus, and eight at the Glu-D3 locus. LMW-GS genes at the Glu-A3 locus showed the highest allelic diversity, followed by the Glu-B3 genes, while the Glu-D3 genes were extremely conserved among MCC accessions. Expression and sequence analysis showed that 9–13 active LMW-GS genes were present in each accession. Sequence identity analysis showed that all i-type genes present at the Glu-A3 locus formed a single group, the s-type genes located at Glu-B3 and Glu-D3 loci comprised a unique group, while high-diversity m-type genes were classified into four groups and detected in all Glu-3 loci. These results contribute to the functional analysis of LMW-GS genes and facilitate improvement of bread-making quality by wheat molecular breeding programmes. PMID:23536608

  11. Characterization of agronomic and quality traits and HSW-G5 compositions from the progenies of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) with different protein content.

    PubMed

    Bian, M; Sun, D K; Sun, D F; Sun, G L

    2015-01-01

    High molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) play an essential role in wheat processing quality. In this study, we evaluated the genetic pattern with HMW-GS composition between generations and examined whether agronomic and quality traits were correlated with each other. A wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivar with high protein content and 2 cultivars with low protein content were subjected to a reciprocal cross. Sixteen agronomic and 4 quality characteristics were investigated. A total of 216 seeds from each F2 generation were chosen randomly and analyzed for HMW-GS composition using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Agronomic and quality characteristics were not significantly different between reciprocal crosses, indicating no cytoplasmic effect on the characteristics studied. The separation ratio of 2 HMW-GS loci was 9:3:3:1, indicating no linkage between any 2 loci. The novel HMW-GS N was detected in cultivar R145, which did not follow the Mendelian segregation ratio. A Glu-A1a(1) band was not detected in 1 individual from Tian8901xR145. Average grain weight per spike was significantly correlated with quality characteristics and may be a suitable criterion for selecting high protein content in wheat breeding programs. PMID:25867343

  12. Depolymerisation and Re-polymerisation of Wheat Glutenin During Dough Processing. II. Changes in Composition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. L. Weegels; R. J. Hamer; J. D. Schofield

    1997-01-01

    tbIn view of the importance of the glutenin macropolymer (GMP) for dough properties and bread-making quality, the changes of composition of glutenin subunits in GMP were investigated for flours and doughs from three cultivars (Rektor, Camp Remy, Obelisk) and from a blend of two of those cultivars (Camp Remy\\/Obelisk). After mixing, the content of GMP, and the contents of highMrand

  13. Chemical composition of teff (Eragrostis tef) compared with that of wheat, barley and grain sorghum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Melak H. Mengesha

    1966-01-01

    The chemical composition of teff, analyzed from uncontaminated seeds, revealed the superiority of the species in mineral nutritive\\u000a value. Teff’s exceedingly high iron and calcium content was confirmed. The high iron content of teff reported by the Ethiopia\\u000a Nutrition Survey must have been due to certain inherent factors of the species, not only a result of contamination. The magnitude\\u000a of

  14. Nutrient Digestibility, Ruminal Fermentation Activities, Serum Parameters and Milk Production and Composition of Lactating Goats Fed Diets Containing Rice Straw Treated with Pleurotus ostreatus

    PubMed Central

    Kholif, A. E.; Khattab, H. M.; El-Shewy, A. A.; Salem, A. Z. M.; Kholif, A. M.; El-Sayed, M. M.; Gado, H. M.; Mariezcurrena, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    The study evaluated replacement of Egyptian berseem clover (BC, Trifolium alexandrinum) with spent rice straw (SRS) of Pleurotus ostreatus basidiomycete in diets of lactating Baladi goats. Nine lactating homo-parity Baladi goats (average BW 23.8±0.4 kg) at 7 d postpartum were used in a triplicate 3×3 Latin square design with 30 d experimental periods. Goats were fed a basal diet containing 0 (Control), 0.25 (SRS25) and 0.45 (SRS45) (w/w, DM basis) of SRS. The Control diet was berseem clover and concentrate mixture (1:1 DM basis). The SRS45 had lowered total feed intake and forages intake compared to Control. The SRS25 and SRS45 rations had the highest digestibilities of DM (p = 0.0241) and hemicellulose (p = 0.0021) compared to Control which had higher (p<0.01) digestibilities of OM (p = 0.0002) and CP (p = 0.0005) than SRS25 and SRS45. Ruminal pH and microbial protein synthesis were higher (p<0.0001) for SRS25 and SRS45 than Control, which also had the highest (p<0.0001) concentration of TVFA, total proteins, non-protein N, and ammonia-N. All values of serum constituents were within normal ranges. The Control ration had higher serum globulin (p = 0.0148), creatinine (p = 0.0150), glucose (p = 0.0002) and cholesterol (p = 0.0016). Both Control and SRS25 groups had the highest (p<0.05) milk (p = 0.0330) and energy corrected milk (p = 0.0290) yields. Fat content was higher (p = 0.0373) with SRS45 and SRS25 groups compared with Control. Replacement of BC with SRS in goat rations increased milk levels of conjugated linoleic acid and unsaturated fatty acids compared with Control. It was concluded that replacing 50% of Egyptian berseem clover with SRS in goat rations improved their productive performance without marked effects on metabolic indicators health. PMID:25049962

  15. Nutrient Digestibility, Ruminal Fermentation Activities, Serum Parameters and Milk Production and Composition of Lactating Goats Fed Diets Containing Rice Straw Treated with Pleurotus ostreatus.

    PubMed

    Kholif, A E; Khattab, H M; El-Shewy, A A; Salem, A Z M; Kholif, A M; El-Sayed, M M; Gado, H M; Mariezcurrena, M D

    2014-03-01

    The study evaluated replacement of Egyptian berseem clover (BC, Trifolium alexandrinum) with spent rice straw (SRS) of Pleurotus ostreatus basidiomycete in diets of lactating Baladi goats. Nine lactating homo-parity Baladi goats (average BW 23.8±0.4 kg) at 7 d postpartum were used in a triplicate 3×3 Latin square design with 30 d experimental periods. Goats were fed a basal diet containing 0 (Control), 0.25 (SRS25) and 0.45 (SRS45) (w/w, DM basis) of SRS. The Control diet was berseem clover and concentrate mixture (1:1 DM basis). The SRS45 had lowered total feed intake and forages intake compared to Control. The SRS25 and SRS45 rations had the highest digestibilities of DM (p = 0.0241) and hemicellulose (p = 0.0021) compared to Control which had higher (p<0.01) digestibilities of OM (p = 0.0002) and CP (p = 0.0005) than SRS25 and SRS45. Ruminal pH and microbial protein synthesis were higher (p<0.0001) for SRS25 and SRS45 than Control, which also had the highest (p<0.0001) concentration of TVFA, total proteins, non-protein N, and ammonia-N. All values of serum constituents were within normal ranges. The Control ration had higher serum globulin (p = 0.0148), creatinine (p = 0.0150), glucose (p = 0.0002) and cholesterol (p = 0.0016). Both Control and SRS25 groups had the highest (p<0.05) milk (p = 0.0330) and energy corrected milk (p = 0.0290) yields. Fat content was higher (p = 0.0373) with SRS45 and SRS25 groups compared with Control. Replacement of BC with SRS in goat rations increased milk levels of conjugated linoleic acid and unsaturated fatty acids compared with Control. It was concluded that replacing 50% of Egyptian berseem clover with SRS in goat rations improved their productive performance without marked effects on metabolic indicators health. PMID:25049962

  16. Effects of lactic acid fermentation on wheat and barley carbohydrate composition and production performance in the chicken

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G Skrede; O Herstad; S Sahlstrøm; A Holck; E Slinde; A Skrede

    2003-01-01

    Effects of dietary inclusion of dried lactic acid fermented wheat or barley whole meal flours (WMF) on chicken performance were studied. WMFs were fermented for 16h at 30°C by a Lactobacillus strain isolated from a Norwegian rye sourdough. Four diets containing 600g wheat WMF kg?1 (0, 200, 400 and 600g fermented kg?1) and three diets containing 600g barley WMF kg?1

  17. Simultaneous bioconversion of barley straw to butanol and product recovery: use of concentrated sugar solution and process integration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a result of increased gasoline prices, we focused on the production of butanol which contains more energy than ethanol on per gallon (or kg) basis from cellulosic agricultural biomass such as wheat straw using two different systems: i) separate hydrolysis, fermentation, and recovery (SHFR), and ...

  18. Wheat Allergy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Wheat Soy Fish Shellfish Other Symptoms Diagnosis & Testing Proven Methods Skin Prick Tests Blood Tests Oral Food ... Wheat Soy Fish Shellfish Other Symptoms Diagnosis & Testing Proven Methods Skin Prick Tests Blood Tests Oral Food ...

  19. Solid-state production of lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP) by Phanerochaete chrysosporium using steam-exploded straw as substrate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xu Fujian; Chen Hongzhang; Li Zuohu

    2001-01-01

    In the used media mainly consisting of steam-exploded wheat straw, the straw, which could replace expensive veratryl alcohol, might act not only as nutrient, but also as inducer of lignin enzymes. The activities of the enzymes lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP) in solid-state fermentation (SSF) were far higher than in submerged fermentation (SmF). Under optimal conditions of SSF,

  20. Microbial community responsible for the decomposition of rice straw in a paddy field: estimation by phospholipid fatty acid analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Asumi Nakamura; ChoCho Tun; Susumu Asakawa; Makoto Kimura

    2003-01-01

    To estimate the microbial communities responsible for rice straw decomposition in paddy field, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) composition of leaf sheaths and blades was analyzed during the decomposition of both residues under upland conditions after harvest and under flooded conditions at the time of transplanting of rice plants. In addition, rice straw that had been placed in the field under

  1. Nutrient utilization by sheep and performance and carcass characteristics of steers fed crab waste-straw silage.

    PubMed

    Ayangbile, O A; Fontenot, J P; Graham, P P; Kirk, D J; Allen, V G

    1998-03-01

    Crab waste preserved with .2% NaOCl was mixed with wheat straw, liquid molasses, and water (32:32:16:20, wet basis) and ensiled for a minimum of 8 wk with microbial inoculant. A reduction in pH and water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC) and a higher concentration of lactic acid (4.9%, DM basis) were achieved. The trimethylamine (TMA) concentration in the silage was 11.2 mg N/100 g. In a digestion trial, 18 crossbred wethers (43 kg) were fed three diets: 1) basal, 2) a 50:50 mixture, DM basis, of basal and crab waste-straw silage, and 3) 100% crab waste-straw silage. Apparent digestibility of DM, OM, CP, energy, NDF, ADF, cellulose, and hemicellulose decreased linearly (P < .01) with increased levels of crab waste-straw silage. Nitrogen retention increased linearly (P < .05) with level of crab waste-straw silage. Apparent absorption was higher (P < .01) and retention was positive (P < .05) for Ca, Mg, Na, K, Cu, and Fe for sheep fed the highest level of crab waste-straw silage. In a 108-d trial, 30 yearling steers were fed diets in which crab waste-straw silage was included in the diet at 0, 15, and 26%, DM basis. Average daily gain tended to be highest (linear effect, P < .15) and carcass weights were highest (linear effect, P < .05) for steers fed 26% crab waste-straw silage. Average carcass quality grade was low Choice, and yield grade averaged 2.3, with no significant differences among treatments. Consumption of crab waste-straw silage did not adversely affect the taste of the meat. Results indicate that feeding crab waste-straw silage did not adversely affect nutrient utilization or performance of ruminants. PMID:9535324

  2. The effect of drying temperature on the composition of biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Houghton, T.P.; Stevens, D.N.; Wright, C.T.; Radtke, C.W.

    2008-05-01

    The compositional quality of different lignocellulosic feedstocks influences their performance and potential demand at a biorefinery. Many analytical protocols for determining the composition or performance characteristics of biomass involve a drying step, where the drying temperature can vary depending on the specific protocol. To get reliable data, it is important to determine the correct drying temperature to vaporize the water without negatively impacting the compositional quality of the biomass. A comparison of drying temperature between 45 degrees C and 100 degrees C was performed using wheat straw and corn stover. Near-infrared (NIR) spectra were taken of the dried samples and compared using principal component analysis (PCA). Carbohydrates were analyzed using quantitative saccharification to determine sugar degradation. Analysis of variance was used to determine if there was a significant difference between drying at different temperatures. PCA showed an obvious separation in samples dried at different temperatures due to sample water content. However, quantitative saccharification data shows, within a 95% confidence interval, that there is no significant difference in sugar content for drying temperatures up to 100 degrees C for wheat straw and corn stover.

  3. The effect of additions of nitrogen, phosphoric acid and potash on the yield and composition of seabreeze wheat and sweet sudan grass grown on Austin clay soil in the greenhouse

    E-print Network

    Fisher, Flake Leroy

    1950-01-01

    THE EFFECT OF ADDITIONS OF NITROGEN, PHOSPHCRIC ACID kND POTASH ON THE IIELD kND COMPOSITION OF SEABRFXZK WHEAT kND SWEET SUDAN GRASS GUNN ON AUSTIN CLAX SOIL IN THE GREENHOUSE k Thesis Flake Leroy Fisher Approved as to style and content hy... Chairean o ttee Head Department of Agronomy January, 1950 THE EFFECT OF ADDITIONS OF NITROGEN& PHOSPHORIC ACID AND POTASH ON THE YIELD AND COMPOSITION OF SEABREE2Z WHEAT AND SHEET SUDAN GRASS GROMN ON AUSTIN CLAY SOIL IN THE GREENHOUSE Flake Leroy...

  4. Effect of Organic Source and Nitrogen Levels on Soil Microbial Biomass Nitrogen in Rice under Rice-wheat Cropping System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hrusikesh Patro; Lingaraj Patro; S. C. Swain; R. K. Tarai; B. S. Mohapatra; Ajay Kumar; R. Udayagiri

    2009-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted at Govind Ballav Pant Univerisity of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar during 2000-01 and 2001-02 to evaluate the effect of four organic sources viz. Sesbania aculeata, Crotalaria juncea, Vigna unguiculata and wheat straw along with 4 levels of N to rice (Oryza sativa L.) and 3 levels of N to wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Enerd. Fiori

  5. Registration of ‘Bearpaw’ wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Bearpaw’ (Reg. No. CV-1083, PI 665228) hard red winter (HRW) wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was developed and released by the Montana Agricultural Experiment Station in September 2011. Bearpaw is of unknown pedigree, derived from a composite of five crosses made to the same F1 male sterile parent in ...

  6. Protein composition of wheat gluten polymer fractions determined by quantitative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flour proteins from the US bread wheat Butte 86 were extracted in 0.5% SDS using a two-step procedure with and without sonication and further separated by size exclusion chromatography into monomeric and polymeric fractions. Proteins in each fraction were analyzed by quantitative two-dimensional gel...

  7. Oilseed rape straw for cultivation of oyster mushroom

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ahmad Norouzi; Gholamali Peyvast; Jamalali Olfati

    Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus var. sajor caju (Fr.) Singer) was grown on five substrates: rice straw, rice straw + oilseed rape straw (75:25, 50:50, and 25:75 dw\\/dw), and oilseed rape straw alone. Rice straw + oilseed rape straw (25:75) and oilseed rape straw were best for fruit body production of P. ostreatus. The time to fruiting for P. ostreatus was

  8. Increased Yield Surplus of Vetch-Wheat Rotations under Drought in a Mediterranean Environment

    PubMed Central

    Dalias, Panagiotis

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents results of a plot-scale field experiment aiming at the comparative evaluation of agricultural practices and agricultural systems as far as their performance in very-low-rainfall conditions is concerned. Wheat was seeded after common vetch, treated in three different ways, after fallow or after the incorporation of dried sewage sludge or straw. Grain and straw yields and grain characteristics were always compared with conventional wheat monoculture without any additional organic inputs. Results showed a clear positive effect of vetch on next year's wheat yield and an increase in grain protein. Not only did the exceptionally dry season mask this effect, but also vetch-wheat systems were proved to be more effective in restraining wheat yield reductions, which are unavoidable under drought, marking these systems the most promising for improving sustainability and stability of rainfed agriculture. PMID:22649304

  9. Comparison of Seven Chemical Pretreatments of Corn Straw for Improving Methane Yield by Anaerobic Digestion

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zilin; GaiheYang; Liu, Xiaofeng; Yan, Zhiying; Yuan, Yuexiang; Liao, Yinzhang

    2014-01-01

    Agriculture straw is considered a renewable resource that has the potential to contribute greatly to bioenergy supplies. Chemical pretreatment prior to anaerobic digestion can increase the anaerobic digestibility of agriculture straw. The present study investigated the effects of seven chemical pretreatments on the composition and methane yield of corn straw to assess their effectiveness of digestibility. Four acid reagents (H2SO4, HCl, H2O2, and CH3COOH) at concentrations of 1%, 2%, 3%, and 4% (w/w) and three alkaline reagents (NaOH, Ca(OH)2, and NH3·H2O) at concentrations of 4%, 6%, 8%, and 10% (w/w) were used for the pretreatments. All pretreatments were effective in the biodegradation of the lignocellulosic straw structure. The straw, pretreated with 3% H2O2 and 8% Ca(OH)2, acquired the highest methane yield of 216.7 and 206.6 mL CH4 g VS ?1 in the acid and alkaline pretreatments, which are 115.4% and 105.3% greater than the untreated straw. H2O2 and Ca(OH)2 can be considered as the most favorable pretreatment methods for improving the methane yield of straw because of their effectiveness and low cost. PMID:24695485

  10. Changes in the Material Characteristics of Maize Straw during the Pretreatment Process of Methanation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yongzhong; Zhao, Xiaoling; Guo, Yan; Yang, Gaihe; Xi, Jianchao; Ren, Guangxin

    2012-01-01

    Pretreatment technology is important to the direct methanation of straw. This study used fresh water, four bacterium agents (stem rot agent, “result” microbe decomposition agent, straw pretreatment composite bacterium agent, and complex microorganism agent), biogas slurry, and two chemical reagents (sodium hydroxide and urea) as pretreatment promoters. Different treatments were performed, and the changes in the straw pH value, temperature, total solid (TS), volatile solid (VS), and carbon-nitrogen ratio (C/N ratio) under different pretreatment conditions were analyzed. The results showed that chemical promoters were more efficient than biological promoters in straw maturity. Pretreatment using sodium hydroxide induced the highest degree of straw maturity. However, its C/N ratio had to be reduced during fermentation. In contrast, the C/N ratio of the urea-pretreated straw was low and was easy to regulate when used as anaerobic digestion material. The biogas slurry pretreatment was followed by pretreatments using four different bacterium agents, among which the effect of the complex microorganism agent (BA4) was more efficient than the others. The current study is significant to the direct and efficient methanation of straw. PMID:23118505

  11. Comparison of different pretreatment methods for separation hemicellulose from straw during the lignocellulosic bioethanol production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhuber, Katharina; Krennhuber, Klaus; Steinmüller, Viktoria; Kahr, Heike; Jäger, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    The combustion of fossil fuels is responsible for 73% of carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere and consequently contributes to global warming. This fact has enormously increased the interest in the development of methods to reduce greenhouse gases. Therefore, the focus is on the production of biofuels from lignocellulosic agricultural residues. The feedstocks used for 2nd generation bioethanol production are lignocellulosic raw materials like different straw types or energy crops like miscanthus sinensis or arundo donax. Lignocellulose consists of hemicellulose (xylose and arabinose), which is bonded to cellulose (glucose) and lignin. Prior to an enzymatic hydrolysis of the polysaccharides and fermentation of the resulting sugars, the lignocelluloses must be pretreated to make the sugar polymers accessible to enzymes. A variety of pretreatment methods are described in the literature: thermophysical, acid-based and alkaline methods.In this study, we examined and compared the most important pretreatment methods: Steam explosion versus acid and alkaline pretreatment. Specific attention was paid to the mass balance, the recovery of C 5 sugars and consumption of chemicals needed for pretreatment. In lab scale experiments, wheat straw was either directly pretreated by steam explosion or by two different protocols. The straw was either soaked in sulfuric acid or in sodium hydroxide solution at different concentrations. For both methods, wheat straw was pretreated at 100°C for 30 minutes. Afterwards, the remaining straw was separated by vacuum filtration from the liquid fraction.The pretreated straw was neutralized, dried and enzymatically hydrolyzed. Finally, the sugar concentrations (glucose, xylose and arabinose) from filtrate and from hydrolysate were determined by HPLC. The recovery of xylose from hemicellulose was about 50% using the sulfuric acid pretreatment and less than 2% using the sodium hydroxide pretreatment. Increasing concentrations of sulfuric acid lead to increasing conversion of hemicellulose to xylose. In contrast, increasing sodium hydroxide concentrations degrade the hemicellulose to unknown derivates. Consequently, almost no sugars from hemicellulose remain for fermentation. The hydrolysis of sulfuric acid pretreated straw results in a maximum glucose concentration of 100 g/kg straw and a xylose concentration of nearly 30 g/kg. Sodium hydroxide pretreated and hydrolyzed straw leads to a maximum glucose concentration of 90 g/kg straw and a xylose concentration of nearly 20 g/kg. In comparison to the two chemical pretreatment methods (sodium hydroxide and sulfuric acid pretreatment), the steam explosion pretreatment (conditions: temperature 190°C, time 20 minutes) results in a higher glucose concentration of about 190 g/kg straw and a xylose concentration of nearly 75 g/kg straw after enzymatic hydrolysis of the dried straw. Because of the small effect the sodium hydroxide pretreatment has on xylose recovery, this method won't be used for separation and conversion of hemicellulose into xylose and arabinose. Although pretreatment with sulfuric acid achieved promising results, further research and economical considerations have to be performed. In conclusion, the steam explosion method is still the state of the art pretreatment method for the production of lignocellulosic biofuels. Alkaline methods destroy most of the xylose part of the sugar fraction and a loss of up to 25 % of the fermentable sugars is not acceptable for a sustainable biofuel production. The acid pretreatment yields high amounts of accessible hemicellulose and cellulose, but the consumption of chemicals for acid pretreatment and neutralization has to be taken into account when considering technical implementation.

  12. The Biodiversity of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Greek Traditional Wheat Sourdoughs Is Reflected in Both Composition and Metabolite Formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luc De Vuyst; Vincent Schrijvers; Spiros Paramithiotis; Bart Hoste; Marc Vancanneyt; Jean Swings; George Kalantzopoulos; Effie Tsakalidou; Winy Messens

    2002-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were isolated from Greek traditional wheat sourdoughs manufactured without the addition of baker's yeast. Application of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of total cell protein, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR, DNA-DNA hybridization, and 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis, in combination with physiological traits such as fructose fermentation and mannitol production, allowed us to classify the isolated bacteria

  13. Thermostable endoglucanases in the liquefaction of hydrothermally pretreated wheat straw

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nóra Szijártó; Emma Horan; Junhua Zhang; Terhi Puranen; Matti Siika-aho; Liisa Viikari

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thermostable enzymes have several benefits in lignocellulose processing. In particular, they potentially allow the use of increased substrate concentrations (because the substrate viscosity decreases as the temperature increases), resulting in improved product yields and reduced capital and processing costs. A short pre-hydrolysis step at an elevated temperature using thermostable enzymes aimed at rapid liquefaction of the feedstock is seen

  14. Flocculation of high purity wheat straw soda lignin.

    PubMed

    Piazza, G J; Lora, J H; Garcia, R A

    2014-01-01

    In industrial process, acidification causes non-sulfonated lignin insolubility. The flocculants poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (pDADMAC) and bovine blood (BB) also caused lignin insolubility while cationic polyacrylamide, chitosan, and soy protein PF 974 were ineffective. Turbidity determined optimal flocculant, but turbidity magnitude with BB was greater than expected. pDADMAC caused negative lignin Zeta potential to became positive, but BB-lignin Zeta potential was always negative. Insoluble lignin did not gravity sediment, and flocculant-lignin mixtures were centrifuged. Pellet and supernatant dry mass and corrected spectroscopic results were in good agreement for optimal pDADMAC and BB. Spectroscopy showed 87-92% loss of supernatant lignin. Nitrogen analysis showed BB concentrated in the pellet until the pellet became saturated with BB. Subtracting ash and BB mass from pellet and supernatant mass confirmed optimal BB. Low levels of alum caused increased lignin flocculation at lower levels of pDADMAC and BB, but alum did not affect optimal flocculant. PMID:24326211

  15. A novel method for determination of the (15) N isotopic composition of Rubisco in wheat plants exposed to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Aranjuelo, Iker; Molero, Gemma; Avice, Jean Christophe; Bourguignon, Jacques

    2015-02-01

    Although ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is mostly known as a key enzyme involved in CO2 assimilation during the Calvin cycle, comparatively little is known about its role as a pool of nitrogen storage in leaves. For this purpose, we developed a protocol to purify Rubisco that enables later analysis of its (15) N isotope composition (?(15) N) at the natural abundance and (15) N-labeled plants. In order to test the utility of this protocol, durum wheat (Triticum durum var. Sula) exposed to an elevated CO2 concentration (700 vs 400 µmol mol(-1) ) was labeled with K(15) NO3 (enriched at 2 atom %) during the ear development period. The developed protocol proves to be selective, simple, cost effective and reproducible. The study reveals that (15) N labeling was different in total organic matter, total soluble protein and the Rubisco fraction. The obtained data suggest that photosynthetic acclimation in wheat is caused by Rubisco depletion. This depletion may be linked to preferential nitrogen remobilization from Rubisco toward grain filling. PMID:25272325

  16. Stereoselective transformation of triadimefon to metabolite triadimenol in wheat and soil under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hongwu; Li, Li; Qiu, Jing; Li, Wei; Yang, Shuming; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Qiu, Lihong

    2013-09-15

    Racemic triadimefon (TF) was applied to wheat and soil at three sites (Beijing, Huaibei, and Zhengzhou in China) under open field conditions. Its enantioselective degradation and stereoselective transformation to the major metabolite, triadimenol (TN), in wheat straw, grain and soil were investigated. At all sites, the degradation of TF enantiomers in straw and soil followed first-order kinetics. In soil from Beijing and Zhengzhou R-(-)-TF was preferentially degraded; however, preferential enantioselective degradations were not recorded in soil from Huaibei or in the straw from all sites. There were noticeable differences in the stereoselective formation of TN stereoisomers in all straw and soil samples. TN diastereomer A with high animal toxicity was preferentially produced via a reductive reaction in straw. In contrast, diastereomer B, was preferential in soil across the experimental period. Different TN concentrations were found in the order of SR-(-)-TN>RR-(+)-TN>RS-(+)-TN>SS-(-)-TN in straw, and RR-(+)-TN>SS-(-)-TN>SR-(-)-TN>RS-(+)-TN in soil. Neither TF nor TN was found in wheat grain at harvest. Because of differences in degradation, formation, and toxicity, the characterization of enantiomers and stereoisomers in this study contributes toward comprehensively assessing the fate and risk of chiral agrochemicals in the environment and food. PMID:23876258

  17. Eat Wheat!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho Wheat Commission, Boise.

    This pamphlet contains puzzles, games, and a recipe designed to teach elementary school pupils about wheat. It includes word games based on the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Guide Pyramid and on foods made from wheat. The Food Guide Pyramid can be cut out of the pamphlet and assembled as a three-dimensional information source and food guide.…

  18. Wheat Newsletter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review was written for readers of the Annual Wheat Newsletter, Volume 53. It summarizes activities on wheat research during 2006 at the U.S. Grain Marketing Research Laboratory (USGMRL). The article includes technical abstracts of research accomplishments from the Grain Quality and Structure ...

  19. Effects of application of corn straw on soil microbial community structure during the maize growing season.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Lin, Yin-Hua; Yang, Zhong-Qi; Xu, Yan-Peng; Tan, Fei; Jia, Xu-Dong; Wang, Miao; Xu, De-Rong; Wang, Xi-Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of corn straw application on soil microbial communities and the relationship between such communities and soil properties in black soil. The crop used in this study was maize (Zea mays L.). The five treatments consisted of applying a gradient (50, 100, 150, and 200%) of shattered corn straw residue to the soil. Soil samples were taken from May through September during the 2012 maize growing season. The microbial community structure was determined using phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis. Our results revealed that the application of corn straw influenced the soil properties and increased the soil organic carbon and total nitrogen. Applying corn straw to fields also influenced the variation in soil microbial biomass and community composition, which is consistent with the variations found in soil total nitrogen (TN) and soil respiration (SR). However, the soil carbon-to-nitrogen ratio had no effect on soil microbial communities. The abundance of PLFAs, TN, and SR was higher in C1.5 than those in other treatments, suggesting that the soil properties and soil microbial community composition were affected positively by the application of corn straw to black soil. A Principal Component Analysis indicated that soil microbial communities were different in the straw decomposition processes. Moreover, the soil microbial communities from C1.5 were significantly different from those of CK (p?straw treatments that correlated with SR (p?straw positively influences soil properties and soil microbial communities and that these properties affect these communities. The individual PLFA signatures were sensitive indicators that reflected the changes in the soil environment condition. PMID:24652702

  20. PCDD/F emissions from burning wheat and rice field residue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gullett, Brian; Touati, Abderrahmane

    This paper presents the first known values for emissions of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDDs/Fs) from combustion of agricultural field biomass. Wheat and rice straw stubble collected from two western US states were tested in a field burn simulation to determine emission factors. The resulting emission factor was approximately 0.5 ng toxic equivalency (TEQ)/kg burned for both sources. When coupled with published agricultural data on crop residue burning, about 1 g TEQ/year can be expected from wheat and rice straw residue burning, making this an apparently minor source of PCDDs/Fs in the United States.

  1. Chemical composition in relation with biomass ash structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holubcik, Michal; Jandacka, Jozef

    2014-08-01

    Biomass combustion can be more complicated like combustion of fossil fuels because it is necessary to solve problems with lower ash melting temperature. It can cause a lot of problems during combustion process. Chemical composition of biomass ash has great impact on sinters and slags creation in ash because it affects structure of heated ash. In this paper was solved relation between chemical composition and structure of heated ash from three types of biomass (spruce wood, miscanthus giganteus and wheat straw). Amount of SiO2, CaO, MgO, Al2O3 and K2O was determined. Structure of heated ash was optically determined after heating to 1000 °C or 1200 °C. Results demonstrated that chemical composition has strong effect on structure and color of heated ash.

  2. EFFECT OF STARCH SWELLING ON THE COMPOSITE MODULUS OF LOW- AND HIGH-GLUTEN WHEAT FLOURS AND CARBOXYLATED STYRENE-BUTADIENE LATEX

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat flour is a plentiful renewable resource. The dry flour is rigid and can be used as a potential reinforcement material for soft rubber matrices. Wheat flours with two different gluten contents were investigated and the initial cook temperature of the aqueous wheat flour dispersions was varied...

  3. Bioethanol production from rice straw residues

    PubMed Central

    Belal, Elsayed B.

    2013-01-01

    A rice straw - cellulose utilizing mold was isolated from rotted rice straw residues. The efficient rice straw degrading microorganism was identified as Trichoderma reesei. The results showed that different carbon sources in liquid culture such as rice straw, carboxymethyl cellulose, filter paper, sugar cane bagasse, cotton stalk and banana stalk induced T. reesei cellulase production whereas glucose or Potato Dextrose repressed the synthesis of cellulase. T. reesei cellulase was produced by the solid state culture on rice straw medium. The optimal pH and temperature for T. reesei cellulase production were 6 and 25 °C, respectively. Rice straw exhibited different susceptibilities towards cellulase to their conversion to reducing sugars. The present study showed also that, the general trend of rice straw bioconversion with cellulase was more than the general trend by T. reesei. This enzyme effectively led to enzymatic conversion of acid, alkali and ultrasonic pretreated cellulose from rice straw into glucose, followed by fermentation into ethanol. The combined method of acid pretreatment with ultrasound and subsequent enzyme treatment resulted the highest conversion of lignocellulose in rice straw to sugar and consequently, highest ethanol concentration after 7 days fermentation with S. cerevisae yeast. The ethanol yield in this study was about 10 and 11 g.L?1. PMID:24159309

  4. Bioethanol production from rice straw residues.

    PubMed

    Belal, Elsayed B

    2013-01-01

    A rice straw - cellulose utilizing mold was isolated from rotted rice straw residues. The efficient rice straw degrading microorganism was identified as Trichoderma reesei. The results showed that different carbon sources in liquid culture such as rice straw, carboxymethyl cellulose, filter paper, sugar cane bagasse, cotton stalk and banana stalk induced T. reesei cellulase production whereas glucose or Potato Dextrose repressed the synthesis of cellulase. T. reesei cellulase was produced by the solid state culture on rice straw medium. The optimal pH and temperature for T. reesei cellulase production were 6 and 25 °C, respectively. Rice straw exhibited different susceptibilities towards cellulase to their conversion to reducing sugars. The present study showed also that, the general trend of rice straw bioconversion with cellulase was more than the general trend by T. reesei. This enzyme effectively led to enzymatic conversion of acid, alkali and ultrasonic pretreated cellulose from rice straw into glucose, followed by fermentation into ethanol. The combined method of acid pretreatment with ultrasound and subsequent enzyme treatment resulted the highest conversion of lignocellulose in rice straw to sugar and consequently, highest ethanol concentration after 7 days fermentation with S. cerevisae yeast. The ethanol yield in this study was about 10 and 11 g.L(-1). PMID:24159309

  5. Effect of Leucaena and Sesbania supplementation on body growth and scrotal circumference of Ethiopian highland sheep and goats fed teff straw basal diet

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. Kaitho; A. Tegegne; N. N. Umunna; I. V. Nsahlai; S. Tamminga; J Van Bruchem; J. M. Arts

    1998-01-01

    The long term effect of supplementation of Leucaena pallida and Sesbania sesban on growth and reproduction performance was determined on 30 male Ethiopian highland sheep and 25 East African goats. Unchopped teff straw (Eragrostis tef) was given ad libitum and supplemented with either wheat bran (150 g), Leucaena (200 or 400 g) or Sesbania (200 or 400 g). The animals

  6. Impact of UV-B on drought- or cadmium-induced changes in the fatty acid composition of membrane lipid fractions in wheat.

    PubMed

    Gondor, Orsolya Kinga; Szalai, Gabriella; Kovács, Viktória; Janda, Tibor; Pál, Magda

    2014-10-01

    UV-B radiation may have either a positive or negative impact under the same conditions in wheat, depending on the type of secondary abiotic stressor: Cd or drought. Supplemental UV-B prevented the wilting and leaf rolling induced by PEG treatment. In contrast, combined UV-B and Cd treatment resulted in pronounced oxidative stress. The opposite effect of UV-B radiation in the case of drought or cadmium stress may be related to the alteration induced in the fatty acid composition. UV-B caused changes in the unsaturation of leaf phosphatidylglycerol fractions, and the accumulation of flavonoid in the leaves may prevent the stress induced by subsequent drought treatment. However it resulted in pronounced injury despite the increased flavonoid content in roots exposed to Cd. This was manifested in a drastic decrease in the unsaturation of the leaf monogalactosyldiacylglycerol and the root phosphatidylglycerol and digalactosyldiacylglycerol fractions. Data on the flavonoid content and fatty acid composition showed that oxidative stress was induced by drought in the leaves, by Cd in the roots, and interestingly, by UV-B radiation in both the leaves and roots. The additive effect of the combined stresses was also detected in the roots. The results presented here suggest a relationship between the capacity of the plant to remodel the fatty acid composition and its resistance to various stress factors. PMID:25062444

  7. Shifts of functional gene representation in wheat rhizosphere microbial communities under elevated ozone

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinyu; Deng, Ye; Li, Qi; Lu, Caiyan; Wang, Jingjing; Zhang, Huiwen; Zhu, Jianguo; Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili

    2013-01-01

    Although the influence of ozone (O3) on plants has been well studied in agroecosystems, little is known about the effect of elevated O3 (eO3) on soil microbial functional communities. Here, we used a comprehensive functional gene array (GeoChip 3.0) to investigate the functional composition, and structure of rhizosphere microbial communities of Yannong 19 (O3-sensitive) and Yangmai 16 (O3-relatively sensitive) wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars under eO3. Compared with ambient O3 (aO3), eO3 led to an increase in soil pH and total carbon (C) percentages in grain and straw of wheat plants, and reduced grain weight and soil dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Based on GeoChip hybridization signal intensities, although the overall functional structure of rhizosphere microbial communities did not significantly change by eO3 or cultivars, the results showed that the abundance of specific functional genes involved in C fixation and degradation, nitrogen (N) fixation, and sulfite reduction did significantly (P<0.05) alter in response to eO3 and/or wheat cultivars. Also, Yannong 19 appeared to harbor microbial functional communities in the rhizosphere more sensitive in response to eO3 than Yangmai 16. Additionally, canonical correspondence analysis suggested that the functional structure of microbial community involved in C cycling was largely shaped by soil and plant properties including pH, DOC, microbial biomass C, C/N ratio and grain weight. This study provides new insight into our understanding of the influence of eO3 and wheat cultivars on soil microbial communities. PMID:23151639

  8. Dissipation kinetics and residues of florasulam and tribenuron-methyl in wheat ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bizhang; Qian, Wei; Hu, Jiye

    2015-02-01

    The dissipation kinetics and residual levels of florasulam and tribenuron-methyl in wheat field ecosystem were determined using a quick, easy, cheap, efficient, rugged and safe method (QuEChERS) with rapid resolution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (RRLC-MS/MS). The average recoveries of florasulam and tribenuron-methyl at three spiking levels in wheat plant, soil, wheat straw and wheat grain ranged from 72.8% to 99.2% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) were less than 10.1% and 82.5% to 103.8% with RSDs were less than 9.4%, respectively. The limits of quantification (LOQs) of florasulam and tribenuron-methyl for wheat plant, wheat straw, wheat grain and soil were 0.01, 0.01, 0.005, 0.005 mg kg(-1), respectively. The field trials results showed that the half-lives of florasulam were 2.76-10.83 d. Half-lives for tribenuron-methyl were found to be 1.27-5.37 d. The terminal residues in wheat grain were much lower than maximum residue limits (MRLs) set by China (0.01 mg kg(-1) for florasulam and 0.05 mg kg(-1) for tribenuron-methyl), which considered to be safe for human beings. These results will contribute to establishing the scientific basis of the dosage of florasulam and tribenuron-methyl for use in wheat field ecosystems. PMID:25268470

  9. Wheat: The Whole Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    This publication presents information on wheat. Wheat was originally a wild grass and not native to the United States. Wheat was not planted there until 1777 (and then only as a hobby crop). Wheat is grown on more acres than any other grain in this country. Soft wheats are grown east of the Mississippi River, and hard wheats are grown west of the…

  10. Moisture in a straw bale wall

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.Z.; Fremouw, S.; Kline, J.; Northcutt, D.; Wang, Z.; Weiser, R.

    1999-07-01

    The objective of this project was to see if there was sufficient moisture to promote fungus growth within a straw bale wall. To determine the level of moisture, the walls in a straw bale building were instrumented to monitor relative humidity. The year-long monitoring began in August, 1997. During the monitoring period the building's interior relative humidity ranged from 22 to 71% and the exterior relative humidity ranged from 10 to 94%. The maximum straw bale relative humidity recorded was 85%, which occurred on February 21 on the south side of the building in a lower bale on the exterior side. The minimum straw bale relative humidity occurred on August 13 on the east side of the building in a lower bale on the exterior side and was 27%. In the 23 studies of mold growth in straw bales the authors reviewed, mold growth occurred between 70 and 91% relative humidity.

  11. Vital wheat gluten as a filler for rubber compounds: effects of pH and homogenization on the reinforcement properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vital wheat gluten was evaluated as a reinforcement filler in rubber composites. Previous studies of wheat flours that contained different concentrations of wheat gluten suggested that rubber composite reinforcement was directly proportional to wheat gluten concentration, although this effect may h...

  12. Assessment of Straw Biomass Feedstock Resources in the Pacific Northwest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Straw is produced as a coproduct of cereal grain and grass seed production on 6.2 million acres in the Pacific Northwest of the U.S. Some of this straw residue is returned to the soil for conservation purposes, but markets for excess straw are limited. As a consequence, much of this straw was burne...

  13. Alkylresorcinols in wheat varieties in the HEALTHGRAIN Diversity Screen.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Annica A M; Kamal-Eldin, Afaf; Fra?, Anna; Boros, Danuta; Aman, Per

    2008-11-12

    The contents of alkylresorcinols (AR) were analyzed in 131 winter wheats, 20 spring wheats, 10 durum wheats, 5 spelt wheats, and 10 early cultivated forms of wheat (5 diploid einkorn and 5 tetraploid emmer), which are part of the HEALTHGRAIN diversity screen. AR were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC), which provides both total contents and relative homologue compositions, as well as with a Fast Blue colorimetric method that provides only total contents but which is fast and easily screens a large number of samples. There was considerable variation in the total AR content analyzed with GC: winter wheat (220-652 microg/g of dm), spring wheat (254-537 microg/g of dm), durum wheat (194-531 microg/g of dm), spelt (490-741 microg/g of dm), einkorn (545-654 microg/g of dm), and emmer wheat (531-714 microg/g of dm). The relative AR homologue composition was different for different types of wheat, with a C17:0 to C21:0 ratio of 0.1 for winter, spring, and spelt wheats, 0.04 for einkorn and emmer wheat, and 0.01 for durum wheat. The total AR content analyzed with the Fast Blue method was lower than that analyzed with GC but there was a good correlation between the two methods (R(2) = 0.76). PMID:18921971

  14. Effects of straw incorporation along with microbial inoculant on methane and nitrous oxide emissions from rice fields.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Yu, Haiyang; Ma, Jing; Xu, Hua; Wu, Qinyan; Yang, Jinghui; Zhuang, Yiqing

    2015-06-15

    Incorporation of straw together with microbial inoculant (a microorganism agent, accelerating straw decomposition) is being increasingly adopted in rice cultivation, thus its effect on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions merits serious attention. A 3-year field experiment was conducted from 2010 to 2012 to investigate combined effect of straw and microbial inoculant on methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) in a rice field in Jurong, Jiangsu Province, China. The experiment was designed to have treatment NPK (N, P and K fertilizers only), treatment NPKS (NPK plus wheat straw), treatment NPKSR (NPKS plus Ruilaite microbial inoculant) and treatment NPKSJ (NPKS plus Jinkuizi microbial inoculant). Results show that compared to NPK, NPKS increased seasonal CH4 emission by 280-1370%, while decreasing N2O emission by 7-13%. When compared with NPKS, NPKSR and NPKSJ increased seasonal CH4 emission by 7-13% and 6-12%, respectively, whereas reduced N2O emission by 10-27% and 9-24%, respectively. The higher CH4 emission could be attributed to the higher soil CH4 production potential triggered by the combined application of straw and microbial inoculant, and the lower N2O emission to the decreased inorganic N content. As a whole, the benefit of lower N2O emission was completely offset by increased CH4 emission, resulting in a higher GWP for NPKSR (5-12%) and NPKSJ (5-11%) relative to NPKS. Due to NPKSR and NPKSJ increased rice grain yield by 3-6% and 2-4% compared to NPKS, the GHGI values for NPKS, NPKSR and NPKSJ were comparable. These findings suggest that incorporating straw together with microbial inoculant would not influence the radiative forcing of rice production in the terms of per unit of rice grain yield relative to the incorporation of straw alone. PMID:25756676

  15. Study of wheat protein based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Peng

    Wheat gluten is a naturally occurring protein polymer. It is produced in abundance by the agricultural industry, is biodegradable and very inexpensive (less than $0.50/lb). It has unique viscoelastic properties, which makes it a promising alternative to synthetic plastics. The unplasticized wheat gluten is, however, brittle. Plasticizers such as glycerol are commonly used to give flexibility to the articles made of wheat gluten but with the penalty of greatly reduced stiffness. Former work showed that the brittleness of wheat gluten can also be improved by modifying it with a tri-thiol additive with no penalty of reduced stiffness. However, the cost of the customer designed tri-thiol additive was very high and it was unlikely to make a cost effective material from such an expensive additive. Here we designed a new, inexpensive thiol additive called SHPVA. It was synthesized from polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) through a simple esterification reaction. The mechanical data of the molded wheat gluten/SHPVA material indicated that wheat gluten was toughened by SHPVA. As a control, the wheat gluten/PVA material showed no improvement compared with wheat gluten itself. Several techniques have been used to characterize this novel protein/polymer blend. Differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) study showed two phases in both wheat gluten/PVA and wheat gluten/SHPVA material. However, scanning electron microscope (SEM) pictures indicated that PVA was macroscopically separated from wheat gluten, while wheat gluten/SHPVA had a homogeneous look. The phase image from the atomic force microscope (AFM) gave interesting contrast based on the difference in the mechanical properties of these two phases. The biodegradation behavior of these protein/polymer blends was examined in soil. SHPVA was not degraded in the time period of the experiment. Wheat gluten/SHPVA degraded slower than wheat gluten. We also developed some other interesting material systems based on wheat gluten, including the wheat gluten/basalt composite and wheat gluten/clay composite materials. Their mechanical properties and biodegradation behaviors were determined.

  16. Changes in composition and structure of wheat bran resulting from the action of human faecal bacteria in vitro.

    PubMed

    Stevens, B J; Selvendran, R R

    1988-12-01

    Cell-wall material of wheat bran was incubated with human faecal bacteria for 24-72 h and the resulting structural changes were studied by methylation analysis. Of the carbohydrate content, approximately 39% was degraded after 24 h, increasing to only 44% after 72 h. Arabinoxylans and mixed-linkage beta-D-glucans from the aleurone layer were degraded preferentially. After treatment of the bran with alkali, the extent of degradation was increased three-fold as a result of saponification of ester cross-links which facilitated increased degradation of the polymers from both the aleurone and outer, lignified, layers. There was evidence that ester linkages between the glucuronosyl residues, attached to O-2 of the (1----4)-linked xylosyl residues, and phenolic groups of lignin were also saponified. The treatment with alkali also rendered the cellulose more susceptible to bacterial attack. The alkali-soluble acidic arabinoxylan fractions of the bran were degraded readily by bacterial action, but the xyloglucans cross-linked to arabinoxylans by phenolics were relatively resistant. PMID:2850867

  17. Original article Effect of white-rot basidiomycetes-treated wheat

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -mutant (PO-M) and Trametes gibbosa (TG) were incubated on wheat straw for 30 days at 28 °C. Neutral detergent-PO-M) and Trametes gibbosa (TWS-TG) together with barley (80:20%) were used as the experimental diets froment dans le rumen. Pleurotus ostreatus (PO), Pleurotus ostreatus-mutant (PO-M), Trametes gibbosa (TG

  18. INTERNATIONAL WHEAT QUALITY CONFERENCE Session VII. Advancements in Processing Technology Novel Uses of Wheat By-products

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ROGER M. ROWELL; HENRY SPELTER

    Wheat straw is renewable, widely distributed, available locally, moldable, anisotropic, hydroscopic, recyclable, versatile, non-abrasive, porous, viscoelastic, easily available in many forms, biodegradable, combustible, compostible, and reactive. It also has a high aspect ratio, high strength-to-weight ratio, and has good insulation properties (sound, electrical, and thermal). The fiber structure is hollow and laminated, with molecular layers and an integrated matrix. Some

  19. Genetic variability in anthocyanin composition and nutritional properties of blue, purple, and red bread (Triticum aestivum L.) and durum (Triticum turgidum L. ssp. turgidum convar. durum) wheats.

    PubMed

    Ficco, Donatella B M; De Simone, Vanessa; Colecchia, Salvatore A; Pecorella, Ivano; Platani, Cristiano; Nigro, Franca; Finocchiaro, Franca; Papa, Roberto; De Vita, Pasquale

    2014-08-27

    Renewed interest in breeding for high anthocyanins in wheat (Triticum ssp.) is due to their antioxidant potential. A collection of different pigmented wheats was used to investigate the stability of anthocyanins over three crop years. The data show higher anthocyanins in blue-aleurone bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), followed by purple- and red-pericarp durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. ssp. turgidum convar. durum), using cyanidin 3-O-glucoside as standard. HPLC of the anthocyanin components shows five to eight major anthocyanins for blue wheat extracts, compared to three anthocyanins for purple and red wheats. Delphinidin 3-O-rutinoside, delphinidin 3-O-glucoside, and malvidin 3-O-glucoside are predominant in blue wheat, with cyanidin 3-O-glucoside, peonidin 3-O-galactoside, and malvidin 3-O-glucoside in purple wheat. Of the total anthocyanins, 40-70% remain to be structurally identified. The findings confirm the high heritability for anthocyanins, with small genotype × year effects, which will be useful for breeding purposes, to improve the antioxidant potential of cereal-based foods. PMID:25130676

  20. Fast pyrolysis of rice straw, sugarcane bagasse and coconut shell in an induction-heating reactor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. T. Tsai; M. K. Lee; Y. M. Chang

    2006-01-01

    With the application of induction heating, a fast pyrolysis was used for producing valuable products from rice straw, sugarcane bagasse and coconut shell in an externally heated fixed-bed reactor. The effect of process parameters such as pyrolysis temperature, heating rate and holding time on the yields of pyrolysis products and their chemical compositions were investigated. The maximum yield of ca.

  1. Biomethane production and physicochemical characterization of anaerobically digested teff (Eragrostis tef) straw pretreated by sodium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Chufo, Akiber; Yuan, Hairong; Zou, Dexun; Pang, Yunzhi; Li, Xiujin

    2015-04-01

    The biogas production potential and biomethane content of teff straw through pretreatment by NaOH was investigated. Different NaOH concentrations (1%, 2%, 4% and 6%) were used for each four solid loadings (50, 65, 80 and 95g/L). The effects of NaOH as pretreatment factor on the biodegradability of teff straw, changes in main compositions and enhancement of anaerobic digestion were analyzed. The result showed that, using 4% NaOH for pretreatment in 80g/L solid loading produced 40.0% higher total biogas production and 48.1% higher biomethane content than the untreated sample of teff straw. Investigation of changes in chemical compositions and physical microstructure indicated that there was 4.3-22.1% total lignocellulosic compositions removal after three days pretreatment with NaOH. The results further revealed that NaOH pretreatment changed the structural compositions and lignin network, and improved biogas production from teff straw. PMID:25656865

  2. Winter and Specialty Wheat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Baenziger; R. Graybosch; D. Van Sanford; W. Berzonsky

    Wheat is the most widely grown crop in the world. Winter wheat is primarily common wheat (2n = 6x = 42) which has extensive germplasm resources that are used in breeding, often for disease and insect resistance. Though\\u000a wheat can be used as a forage crop and its grain for animal feed, the primary uses of common wheat are to

  3. Morphological features and physicochemical properties of waxy wheat starch.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huanxin; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Chunzhong; Zhou, Xing

    2013-11-01

    Morphological features, granule composition, and physicochemical properties of waxy wheat starch were compared with those of normal wheat starch. The morphologies and granule populations were found to be similar for the two starches. However, waxy wheat starch contained a smaller proportion of B-type granules, had a larger average granule diameter, and a higher degree of crystallinity than normal wheat starch, as measured by particle size analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. These differences resulted in a higher gelatinization temperature, transition enthalpy, peak viscosity, breakdown, swelling power, lower peak viscosity temperature and final viscosity in waxy wheat starch. These points suggest that waxy wheat starch should have greater resistance to retrogradation during cooling and higher water-holding capacity under dry conditions. Highlighting the differences in physicochemical properties of waxy and normal wheat starches should help point toward effective applications of waxy wheat starch in the food industry. PMID:24076202

  4. Soil organic carbon dynamics in wheat-maize cropping systems of north China: application of isotope approach to long-term experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Xu, M.; Zhang, W.

    2013-12-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) in agro-ecosystem is largely influencedby agricultural practices such as croppingand fertilization. However, quantifying the contributions of various crops has been lacking. Here, we applied isotopic approachto study SOC dynamics under wheat-maize rotation with variousfertilization treatments atthree long-term experiment sites innorth China. Three treatments were chosen: no fertilizer (control), chemical nitrogen-phosphorus-potassium (NPK) and NPK plus straw (NPKS).Soil samples were collected from0-20, 20-40, 40-60, 60-80 and 80-100cm after 13 and 20 years of treatment, and SOC and its stable 13C compositions were determined. Generally, SOC content significantly decreased with depths, from 8.2 ×1.4 g kg-1 (in 0-20 cm) to 3.3×1.0 g kg-1 (in 80-100 cm) across all treatments and sites. Soil ?13C values at all depths, treatments and sites ranged from -24.2‰ to -21.6‰, averaged -22.8‰, indicating that ~70% of SOC was derived from wheat and previous C3 plant, and ~30% from maize and previous C4 plant.Both SOC and soil ?13C were significantly affected by fertilization managements, especiallyin 0-40 cm where linear relationship occurred between SOC and estimated C input. Overall, the slop of the linear equation, i.e., conversion efficiency, was four times greater for wheat-derived C relative to that for maize residue C. Our study indicated that maize-derived C contributed less to C sequestration in wheat-maize rotation system of north China. Figure 1. Relationships between SOC stock (0-40 cm) and accumulated C input for wheat (C3), maize (C4) and total. Significance is marked with one (P < 0.05), two (P < 0.01) and three (P < 0.001) asterisks.

  5. The Impact of Post-Pretreatment Conditioning on Enzyme Accessibility and Water Interactions in Alkali Pretreated Rice Straw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karuna, Nardrapee

    Rice straw, a high-abundance lignocellulosic residue from rice production has tremendous potential as a feedstock for biofuel production in California. In this study, the impact of post-alkali pretreatment conditioning schemes on enzyme saccharification efficiency was examined, particularly focusing on understanding resulting biomass compositional impacts on water interactions with the biomass and enzyme accessibility to the cellulose fraction. Rice straw was pretreated with sodium hydroxide and subsequently washed by two different conditions: 1) by extensive washing with distilled water to reduce the pH to the optimum for cellulases which is pH 5--6, and 2) immediate pH adjustment to pH 5--6 with hydrochloric acid before extensive washing with distilled water. The two post-pretreatment conditions gave significant differences in ash, acid-insoluble lignin, glucan and xylan compositions. Alkali pretreatment improved cellulase digestibility of rice straw, and water washing improved enzymatic digestibility more than neutralization. Hydrolysis reactions with a purified Trichoderma reesei Cel7A, a reducing-end specific cellulase, demonstrated that the differences in saccharification are likely due to differences in the accessibility of the cellulose fraction to the cellulolytic enzymes. Further analyses were conducted to study the mobility of the water associated with the rice straw samples by measuring T2 relaxation times of the water protons by 1H-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxometry. Results showed significant changes in water association with the rice straw due to the pretreatment and due to the two different post-pretreatment conditions. Pretreatment increased the amount of water at the surface of the rice straw samples as indicated by increased amplitude of the shortest T2 time peaks in the relaxation spectra. Moreover, the amount of water in the first T2 pool in the water washed sample was significantly greater than in the neutralized sample. These results suggest that the specific surface area of rice straw accessible to water protons was increased by the alkali pretreatment, likely due to solubilization of alkali-soluble components of the cell walls. Post-pretreatment processes resulted in differences in the specific surface area likely due to re-precipitation of alkali solubilized components during neutralization. The T2 relaxation times of the surface water pool in washed and raw rice straw were not significantly different, at 4.4 and 4.5 ms, respectively, but both T2 times were significantly shorter than that of the neutralized and then washed sample, at 5.5 ms. The expectation was that the T2 times of the surface water peaks would reflect differences in surface composition of the rice straw samples. Further analysis of surface composition is necessary to further interpret the shortest T2 times observed in the samples. The T2 spectra of the rice straw samples contained longer T2 time peaks that were interpreted as differences in porosity of the rice straw due to the treatments. Pretreatment caused physical changes to rice straw that impacted water organization (3 peaks to 4 peaks), but the amount of water in the peaks were greater in the washed rice straw than the neutralized rice straw suggesting that water-washed rice straw had more of the larger pores than the neutralized and then washed rice straw. One possible explanation is that the neutralization caused precipitation of alkali solubilized components that filled the volumes of the pores.

  6. Bioaugmentation with an acetate-type fermentation bacterium Acetobacteroides hydrogenigenes improves methane production from corn straw.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Guo, Rong-Bo; Qiu, Yan-Ling; Qiao, Jiang-Tao; Yuan, Xian-Zheng; Shi, Xiao-Shuang; Wang, Chuan-Shui

    2015-03-01

    The effect of bioaugmentation with an acetate-type fermentation bacterium in the phylum Bacteroidetes on the anaerobic digestion of corn straw was evaluated by batch experiments. Acetobacteroides hydrogenigenes is a promising strain for bioaugmentation with relatively high growth rate, hydrogen yields and acetate tolerance, which ferments a broad spectrum of pentoses, hexoses and polyoses mainly into acetate and hydrogen. During corn straw digestion, bioaugmentation with A. hydrogenigenes led to 19-23% increase of the methane yield, with maximum of 258.1 mL/g-corn straw achieved by 10% inoculation (control, 209.3 mL/g-corn straw). Analysis of lignocellulosic composition indicated that A. hydrogenigenes could increase removal rates of cellulose and hemicelluloses in corn straw residue by 12% and 5%, respectively. Further experiment verified that the addition of A. hydrogenigenes could improve the methane yields of methyl cellulose and xylan (models for cellulose and hemicelluloses, respectively) by 16.8% and 7.0%. PMID:25549904

  7. Mutation of Cellulose Synthase Gene Improves the Nutritive Value of Rice Straw

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yanjing; Zhao, Guoqi; Wei, Zhenwu; Yan, Changjie; Liu, Sujiao

    2012-01-01

    Rice straw is an important roughage resource for ruminants in many rice-producing countries. In this study, a rice brittle mutant (BM, mutation in OsCesA4, encoding cellulose synthase) and its wild type (WT) were employed to investigate the effects of a cellulose synthase gene mutation on rice straw morphological fractions, chemical composition, stem histological structure and in situ digestibility. The morphological fractions investigation showed that BM had a higher leaf sheath proportion (43.70% vs 38.21%, p<0.01) and a lower leaf blade proportion (25.21% vs 32.14%, p<0.01) than WT. Chemical composition analysis showed that BM rice straw was significantly (p<0.01) higher in CP (crude protein), hemicellulose and acid insoluble ash (AIA) contents, but lower in dry matter (DM), acid detergent fiber (ADFom) and cellulose contents when compared to WT. No significant difference (p>0.05) was detected in neutral detergent fiber (NDFom) and ADL contents for both strains. Histological structure observation indicated that BM stems had fewer sclerenchyma cells and a thinner sclerenchyma cell wall than WT. The results of in situ digestion showed that BM had higher DM, NDFom, cellulose and hemicellulose disappearance at 24 or 48 h of incubation (p<0.05). The effective digestibility of BM rice straw DM and NDFom was greater than that of WT (31.4% vs 26.7% for DM, 29.1% vs 24.3% for NDFom, p<0.05), but the rate of digestion of the slowly digested fraction of BM rice straw DM and NDF was decreased. These results indicated that the mutation in the cellulose synthase gene could improve the nutritive value of rice straw for ruminants. PMID:25049629

  8. On-farm conversion of straw to bioenergy – A value added solution to grass seed straw

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of the geospatial distribution of straw from grass seed and cereal production in the PNW is vital to the accuracy and reliability of feasibility studies comparing scales of operation of proposed bioenergy conversion plants. The first step in identifying optimum locations for straw-based bi...

  9. Long-term changes in yield and soil fertility in a twenty-year rice-wheat experiment in Nepal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Gami; J. Ladha; H. Pathak; M. Shah; E. Pasuquin; S. Pandey; P. Hobbs; D. Joshy; R. Mishra

    2001-01-01

    A long-term rice-wheat experiment was conducted at Parwanipur, Nepal, to study the effects of organic and mineral sources of nutrients on yield and nutrient status of the soil. Twelve treatments comprising different combinations of inorganic N, P, and K; farmyard manure (FYM); and wheat chopped straw (WCS) were included. On average during a 20-year period, the control plot with an

  10. A straw-soil co-composting and evaluation for plant substrate in BLSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Quanyong; Guo, Shuangsheng; Ai, Weidang; Tang, Yongkang; Qin, Lifeng

    2013-02-01

    Material closure is important for the establishment of Bioregenerative Life Support System, and many studies have focused on transforming candidate plant residues into plant culture medium. For the limitations of using wheat straw compost as substrate for plant cultivation, a straw-soil co-composting technique was studied. The changes of pH, C/N value, germination index, cellulose, lignin and so on were monitored during the co-composting process. The maturity was evaluated by the C/N value and the germination index. The result showed that after 45 days' fermentation, the straw-soil final co-compost with inoculation (T1) became mature, while the co-compost without inoculation (T0) was not mature. In the plant culture test, the T1 substrate could satisfy the needs for lettuce's growth, and the edible biomass yield of lettuce averaged 74.42 g pot-1 at harvest. But the lettuces in T0 substrate showed stress symptoms and have not completed the growth cycle. Moreover, the results of nitrogen (N) transformation experiment showed that about 10.0% and 3.1% N were lost during the T1 co-composting and plant cultivation, respectively, 23.5% N was absorbed by lettuce, and 63.4% N remained in the T1 substrate after cultivation.

  11. Dissipation of clodinafop-propargyl and its metabolite in wheat field ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Guan, Wenbi; Ma, Yongqiang; Zhang, Hongyan

    2013-06-01

    The dissipation and residues of clodinafop-propargyl and clodinafop in wheat and soil were investigated by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Clodinafop-propargyl rapidly degraded to the acid derivative-clodinafop as major metabolite in plant and soil. The half-lives of clodinafop-propargyl were 2.35-11.20 days in soil and 6.00 days in wheat plant. The half-lives of clodinafop were 7.04-11.22 days in soil and 0.67-1.24 days in wheat plant. The residues of clodinafop-propargyl and clodinafop in wheat grain, wheat straw and soil were below the detection limit. PMID:23612716

  12. Seismic load-resisting capacity of plastered straw bale walls

    E-print Network

    Hsiaw, Jennifer S. (Jennifer Sing-Yee)

    2010-01-01

    Straw bales have been incorporated into buildings for centuries, but only recently have they been explored in academic settings for their structural potential. Straw bale building is encountering a growing audience due to ...

  13. Evolutionary Genomics of Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat is the world’s largest and most important food crop for direct human consumption, therefore, continued wheat improvement is paramount for feeding an ever-increasing human population. Wheat improvement is tightly associated with the characterization and understanding of wheat evolution and gene...

  14. Effect of Partial Replacement of Wheat Flour with High Quality Cassava Flour on the Chemical Composition, Antioxidant Activity, Sensory Quality, and Microbial Quality of Bread

    PubMed Central

    Eleazu, Chinedum; Eleazu, Kate; Aniedu, Chinyere; Amajor, John; Ikpeama, Ahamefula; Ebenzer, Ike

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, wheat flour was mixed with high quality cassava flour (HQCF) in several ratios: 90:10, 80:20, 70:30, and 60:40, and used to prepare 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% National Root Crops Research Institute (NRCRI) cassava bread, respectively. 100% wheat bread was prepared as a control (100% wheat bread). Five bread samples were prepared per group. Antioxidant assays [i.e., 2,2-diphenyl- 1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) scavenging assay, reducing power assay] revealed that the bread samples had considerable antioxidant capacities. Substitution of wheat flour with HQCF at various concentrations resulted in dose dependent decreases in the mineral and protein contents of the resulting bread samples. The crude fiber content of the bread samples was minimal, while the carbohydrate content of the bread samples ranged from 43.86% to 48.64%. A 20% substitution of wheat flour with HQCF yielded bread samples with a general acceptability that was comparable to that of 100% wheat bread. The mean bacteria counts of the bread samples ranged from 2.0×103 CFU/mL to 1.4×104 CFU/mL, while the fungal counts ranged from 0 CFU/mL to 3×103 CFU/mL. There was a positive correlation between the DPPH antioxidant activities and the reducing powers of the bread samples (R2=0.871) and a positive correlation between the DPPH antioxidant activities and the flavonoid contents of the bread samples (R2=0.487). The higher microbial load of the NRCRI cassava bread samples indicates that these bread samples may have a shorter shelf life than the 100% wheat bread. The significant positive correlation between total flavonoid content and reducing power (R2=0.750) suggests that the flavonoids present in the lipophilic fractions of the bread samples could be responsible for the reductive capacities of the bread samples. PMID:25054110

  15. Utilization of straw in biomass energy in China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xianyang Zeng; Yitai Ma; Lirong Ma

    2007-01-01

    China is a big agricultural country and one of the most abundant straw resources in the world, producing more than 620million tons of straw in 2002, and representing about 33–45% of energy consumption for livelihood in rural areas. Utilization of straw as energy with high efficiency and rationality not only meets the demands for energy as the economy grows, but

  16. Bioconversion of rice straw into a soil-like substrate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chengying Yu; Hong Liu; Yidong Xing; N. S. Manukovsky; V. S. Kovalev; Yu. L. Gurevich

    2008-01-01

    To increase the closure of bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS), the bioconversion of rice straw into a soil-like substrate (SLS) by mushrooms and worms has been studied. The results showed that rice straw could be treated better by aerobic fermentation and succeeding growth of mushrooms Pleurotus ostreatus. In this process the total content of lignocellulose in the straw was removed

  17. Quanah Wheat.

    E-print Network

    Atkins, Irvin Milburn

    1951-01-01

    is sufficiently winter-hardy for the recommended area of the Roll- ing Plains and Central Texas, but should not be grown outsick these areas. Quanah is similar to Comanche in milling and baking charac- t eristics. Tests by commercial and institutional... in other states. Development Quanah wheat was developed from a complex cross in which the first generations of two hybrids were crossed. The parentage was (Comanche x Honor-Forward, Cornell 501e-1-28, F,) x (Med- iterranean-Hope, 41-33-1-513 x Comanche...

  18. Producing Pine Straw in East Texas Forests

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2004-01-09

    that all fallen needles can be harvested. However, the health and productivity of the tree crop for producing wood fiber must be considered. Although great quantities of straw might be produced from denser stands, overly dense stands slow individual tree... System than other organic mulches, from $1.60 to $4.60 less per 10- by 10-foot bed. Value to the Landowner Pine straw is a renewable resource that can be harvested each year in Texas, and you don?t have to cut down the trees to collect it. Landowners who...

  19. Pine Straw as a Ground Cover Mulch

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Eric; Tate, Jay

    2004-01-09

    you would need: 8.33 bags of pine bark mulch or 5.56 bags of cypress mulch or 5.56 bags of cedar mulch or 8.33 bags of pine nuggets or 8.33 bags of red mulch Prices will vary, but pine straw is often the least expensive of mulches. Cost savings from... that pine trees naturally drop make an excellent mulch and an attractive landscaping ground cover. Pine straw has recently seen rising popularity in East Texas as a ground cover mulch for landscaping around trees and in flower beds. Although this gain...

  20. Net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity in a double-cropping cereal rotation as affected by nitrogen and straw management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, T.; Gao, B.; Christie, P.; Ju, X.

    2013-12-01

    The effects of nitrogen and straw management on global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) in a winter wheat-summer maize double-cropping system on the North China Plain were investigated. We measured nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions and studied net GWP (NGWP) and GHGI by calculating the net exchange of CO2 equivalent (CO2-eq) from greenhouse gas emissions, agricultural inputs and management practices, as well as changes in soil organic carbon (SOC), based on a long-term field experiment established in 2006. The field experiment includes six treatments with three fertilizer N levels (zero N (control), optimum and conventional N) and straw removal (i.e. N0, Nopt and Ncon) or return (i.e. SN0, SNopt and SNcon). Optimum N management (Nopt, SNopt) saved roughly half of the fertilizer N compared to conventional agricultural practice (Ncon, SNcon), with no significant effect on grain yields. Annual mean N2O emissions reached 3.90 kg N2O-N ha-1 in Ncon and SNcon, and N2O emissions were reduced by 46.9% by optimizing N management of Nopt and SNopt. Straw return increased annual mean N2O emissions by 27.9%. Annual SOC sequestration was 0.40-1.44 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 in plots with N application and/or straw return. Compared to the conventional N treatments the optimum N treatments reduced NGWP by 51%, comprising 25% from decreasing N2O emissions and 75% from reducing N fertilizer application rates. Straw return treatments reduced NGWP by 30% compared to no straw return because the GWP from increments of SOC offset the GWP from higher emissions of N2O, N fertilizer and fuel after straw return. The GHGI trends from the different nitrogen and straw management practices were similar to the NGWP. In conclusion, optimum N and straw return significantly reduced NGWP and GHGI and concomitantly achieved relatively high grain yields in this important winter wheat-summer maize double-cropping system.

  1. Straw Rockets Are out of This World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillman, Joan

    2013-01-01

    To capture students' excitement and engage their interest in rocketships and visiting planets in the solar system, the author designed lessons that give students the opportunity to experience the joys and challenges of developing straw rockets, and then observing which design can travel the longest distance. The lessons are appropriate for…

  2. Ethanol/water pulps from sugar cane straw and their biobleaching with xylanase from Bacillus pumilus.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Regina Y; Gonçalves, Adilson R; Duarte, Marta C T

    2007-04-01

    The influence of independent variables (temperature and time) on the cooking of sugar cane straw with ethanol/water mixtures was studied to determine operating conditions that obtain pulp with high cellulose contents and a low lignin content. An experimental 2(2) design was applied for temperatures of 185 and 215 degrees C, and time of 1 and 2.5 h with the ethanol/water mixture concentration and constant straw-to-solvent ratio. The system was scaled-up at 200 degrees C cooking temperature for 2 h with 50% ethanol-water concentration, and 1:10 (w/v) straw-to-solvent ratio to obtain a pulp with 3.14 cP viscosity, 58.09 kappa-number, and the chemical composition of the pulps were 3.2% pentosan and 31.5% lignin. Xylanase from Bacillus pumilus was then applied at a loading of 5-150 IU/g dry pulp in the sugar cane straw ethanol/water pulp at 50 degrees C for 2 and 20 h. To ethanol/water pulps, the best enzyme dosage was found to be 20 IU/g dry pulp at 20 h, and a high enzyme dosage of 150 IU/g dry pulp did not decrease the kappa-number of the pulp. PMID:18478412

  3. Structural insights into rice straw pretreated by hot-compressed water in relation to enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guoce; Yano, Shinichi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Seiichi; Wang, Jianlong; Endo, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    Pretreatment-induced structural alteration is critical in influencing the rate and extent of enzymatic saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass. The present work has investigated structural features of rice straw pretreated by hot-compressed water (HCW) from 140 to 240 °C for 10 or 30 min and enzymatic hydrolysis profiles of pretreated rice straw. Compositional profiles of pretreated rice straw were examined to offer the basis for structural changes. The wide-angle X-ray diffraction analysis revealed possible modification in crystalline microstructure of cellulose and the severity-dependent variation of crystallinity. The specific surface area (SSA) of pretreated samples was able to achieve more than 10-fold of that of the raw material and was in linear relationship with the removal of acetyl groups and xylan. The glucose yield by enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated materials correlated linearly with the SSA increase and the dissolution of acetyl and xylan. A quantitatively intrinsic relationship was suggested to exist between enzymatic hydrolysis and the extraction of hemicellulose components in hydrothermally treated rice straw, and SSA was considered one important structural parameter signaling the efficiency of enzymatic digestibility in HCW-treated materials in which hemicellulose removal and lignin redistribution happened. PMID:25178420

  4. Ethanol/Water Pulps From Sugar Cane Straw and Their Biobleaching With Xylanase from Bacillus pumilus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriya, Regina Y.; Gonçalves, Adilson R.; Duarte, Marta C. T.

    The influence of independent variables (temperature and time) on the cooking of sugar cane straw with ethanol/water mixtures was studied to determine operating conditions that obtain pulp with high cellulose contents and a low lignin content. An experimental 22 design was applied for temperatures of 185 and 215°C, and time of 1 and 2.5 h with the ethanol/water mixture concentration and constant straw-to-solvent ratio. The system was scaled-up at 200°C cooking temperature for 2 h with 50% ethanol-water concentration, and 1?10 (w/v) straw-to-solvent ratio to obtain a pulp with 3.14 cP viscosity, 58.09 kappa-number, and the chemical composition of the pulps were 3.2% pentosan and 31.5% lignin. Xylanase from Bacillus pumilus was then applied at a loading of 5-150 IU/g dry pulp in the sugar cane straw ethanol/water pulp at 50°C for 2 and 20 h. To ethanol/water pulps, the best enzyme dosage was found to be 20 IU/g dry pulp at 20 h, and a high enzyme dosage of 150 IU/g dry pulp did not decrease the kappa-number of the pulp.

  5. Utilization of extruded linseed to modify fatty composition of intensively-reared lamb meat: Effect of associated cereals (wheat vs. corn) and linoleic acid content of the diet

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. Berthelot; P. Bas; P. Schmidely

    2010-01-01

    Sixty male lambs were used in two trials to study the efficiency of transfer and elongation of linolenic acid (ALA) in muscle and caudal adipose tissue and to assess factors affecting this process and related changes in fatty acid (FA) profile. In experiment 1, lambs were fed a control diet or extruded linseed (L) diet either with wheat (W, rapid

  6. Regional differences in species composition and toxigenic potential among Fusarium head blight isolates from Uruguay indicate a risk of nivalenol contamination in new wheat production areas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Members of the Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC) are the primary cause of Fusarium head blight (FHB) of wheat, and frequently contaminate grain with trichothecene mycotoxins that pose a serious threat to food safety and animal health. The species identity and trichothecene toxin potential...

  7. [Effects of wheat planted adjacent to rape on the major pests and their natural enemies in wheat field].

    PubMed

    Li, Chuan; Wu, Wen-Qing; Zhu, Liang; Zhang, Qing-Wen; Liu, Xiao-Xia

    2011-12-01

    Based on the dynamic analysis of insect community structure characteristics, an investigation was conducted on the composition, abundance, and stability of wheat aphids and their major natural enemies in the wheat field adjacent to rape field in Handan City, Hebei Province in 2008-2009. The wheat and rape fields had the similar composition of insect communities. The main pests were aphids, their predatory natural enemies included ladybirds, green lacewings, spiders, and hover flies, and their parasitic natural enemies were wasps. In 2008-2009, the composition of insect communities in the wheat and rape fields had definite changes, but the common features were the lowest abundance of aphids and the highest abundance of predatory and parasitic natural enemies in wheat field adjacent to rape field. The insect community, aphid sub-community, and predatory natural enemy' s sub-community had a high stability in the wheat field adjacent to rape field and a low stability far from the rape field, suggesting that planting wheat adjacent to rape could effectively protect and make use of the natural enemies and promote their control ability on wheat aphids in wheat field. PMID:22384611

  8. Vernonia amygdalina as a supplement to teff straw ( Eragrostis tef ) fed to Ethiopian Menz sheep

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. L. K. Bonsi; P. O. Osuji; A. K. Tuah; N. N. Umunna

    1995-01-01

    Sixteen rumen fistulated Ethiopian Menz type sheep were used in a completely randomized block design (CRBD) in experiment 1. Unchopped teff straw was fed alone or supplemented with either 100, 150 or 200 g\\/d of sun-dried vernonia leaves. The chemical compositions of fresh, boiled, water-soaked and sun-dried vernonia and soluble carbohydrate (SC) loss by boiling were determined. In experiment 2,25

  9. A traditional technique as an alternative to plastic sheet for covering urea-treated straw : digestibility and growth trials

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ). A digestibility and nitrogen retention trial was carried out on 8 «Queue fine de l'Ouest,, sheep arranged,5% minerals and vitamins). Chemical composition of concentrate expressed in percent DM was, 94.6, 13.8 and 9 of the experiment. Ammonia and urea treatments increase nitrogen content of straws. Sheep consumed more ammonia

  10. Wheat grass selection

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Richard Wang (USDA; ARS)

    2006-09-25

    The wheat grass on the right is not tolerant of high salinity, or high salt conditions. The wheat grass on the left is a hybrid that has a high salt tolerance. It grows well in high salinity environments.

  11. Wheat Diseases Atlas.

    E-print Network

    McCoy, Norman L.; Berry, Robert W.

    1982-01-01

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I4 OTHER WHEAT PROBLEMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I4 Frost and Winter Injury . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I4 Cold Wind Scorch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I5 Color Banding... to wheat producers over the state on whose farms demonstrations have been conducted and pic tures for this publication were made. WhEAT DisEASES ATLAs Norman L. McCoy and Robert W Berry* INTRODUCTION Wheat diseases have caused untold human suffer ing...

  12. Processing Wheat for Food

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Teachers' Domain presents this interactive lesson on wheat processing, including an introduction to the five kinds of wheat grown in the US and the anatomy of wheat. The module then moves through the six steps in wheat processing: cleaning, conditioning, blending, breaking, sieving, and reducing. Each step is animated to help students visualize the process. On the site, visitors will also find a supplemental background essay, discussion questions, and standards alignment from Teachers' Domain.

  13. Wheat Stripe Rust

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is a chapter on wheat stripe rust in a book entitled “Wheat: Science and Trade”. The chapter provides an overview on various aspects of wheat stripe rust and control, including distribution and epidemiology; origin and historical importance; taxonomy, lifecycle, and host range; genetic variati...

  14. The enrichment of wheat cookies with high-oleic sunflower seed and hull-less barley flour: Impact on nutritional composition, content of heavy elements and physical properties

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Biljana Škrbi?; Jelena Cvejanov

    2011-01-01

    Cookies prepared with white or wholegrain wheat flours and substituted with high-oleic sunflower seed (10g\\/100g and 30g\\/100g supplementation levels) and hull-less barley flour (30g\\/100g and 50g\\/100g levels) were evaluated for nutritional properties, physical and sensory attributes. Sunflower seed significantly increased the contents of Se, Zn, Mg, and Ca, as well as the contents of ?-tocopherol and fat in cookies. The

  15. Effects of Mixing Conditions and Wheat Flour Dough Composition on Lipid Hydrolysis and Oxidation Levels in the Presence of Exogenous Lipase

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philippe Castello; Jacques Potus; Jean-Luc Baret; Jacques Nicolas

    1999-01-01

    Cereal Chem. 76(4):476-482 The lipid profiles of wheat flour doughs containing exogenous lipase were studied under different mixing conditions using a microscale mixer. An experimental design comparing the effects of dough water content (52-68%), the speed of mixing (50-100 rpm), and the mixer temperature (18-32°C) showed that the hydrolysis levels were pos itively influenced by temperature and speed of mixing

  16. Effects of Combination of Rice Straw with Alfalfa Pellet on Milk Productivity and Chewing Activity in Lactating Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Na, Y. J.; Lee, I. H.; Park, S. S.; Lee, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of diets containing coarse-texture rice straw and small particle size alfalfa pellets as a part of total mixed ration (TMR) on milk productivity and chewing activity in lactating dairy cows. Sixteen multiparous Holstein dairy cows (670±21 kg body weight) in mid-lactation (194.1±13.6 days in milk) were randomly assigned to TMR containing 50% of timothy hay (TH) or TMR containing 20% of rice straw and 30% of alfalfa pellet mixture (RSAP). Geometric mean lengths of TH and RSAP were found to be 5.8 and 3.6, respectively. Dry matter intake, milk yield and milk composition were measured. Moreover, eating and ruminating times were recorded continuously using infrared digital camcorders. Milk yield and milk composition were not detected to have significant differences between TH and RSAP. Dry matter intake (DMI) did not significantly differ for cows fed with TH or RSAP. Although particle size of TH was larger than RSAP, eating, ruminating and total chewing time (min/d or min/kg of DMI) on TH and RSAP were similar. Taken together, our results suggest that using a proper amount of coarse-texture rice straw with high value nutritive alfalfa pellets may stimulate chewing activity in dairy cows without decreasing milk yield and composition even though the quantity of rice straw was 40% of TH. PMID:25050037

  17. The relative sensitivity of algae to decomposing barley straw

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Derek Martin; Irene Ridge

    1999-01-01

    Decomposing barley straw has previously been shown to inhibit the growth of a limited number of algae under both laboratory\\u000a and field conditions. Bioassays were conducted on a range of algae to evaluate their relative sensitivities to straw-derived\\u000a inhibitor(s). A range of sensitivities was found, including some species that were resistant to the straw-derived inhibitor(s).\\u000a A microcystin-producing strain of Microcystis

  18. Enhanced saccharification of rice straw using hypochlorite-hydrogen peroxide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hee-Kyoung Kang; Nahyun M. Kim; Ghahyun J. Kim; Eun-Seong Seo; Hwa-Ja Ryu; Sang-Il Yun; Hyun-Chul Choi; Donal F. Day; Jongho Kim; Dong-Lyun Cho; Doman Kim

    2011-01-01

    Rice straw is a lignocellulosic biomass, and has been recognized as a renewable organic substance and alternative energy source.\\u000a In this study, rice straw was pretreated with hypochlorite-hydrogen peroxide (Ox-B) solution. The optimal pretreatment conditions\\u000a were determined via response surface methodology, and the pretreated rice straw was hydrolyzed with exo-glucanase, endoglucanase,\\u000a hemicellulase, and ?-glucosidase Accellerase 1000™ (endo-glucanase equivalent activity of

  19. Fungal biodegradation and biotransformation of soluble lignocarbohydrate complexes from straw. [Aspergillus japonicus, Polyporus versicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Milstein, O.A.; Vared, Y.; Sharma, A.; Gressel, J.; Flowers, H.M.

    1983-08-01

    Aspergillus japonicus is an efficient degrader of phenolics and carbohydrates present in a mixture of soluble lignocarbohydrate complexes extracted from wheat straw. Trichoderma species attacked part of the carbohydrate but hardly affected the aromatic portion of this solution. Polyporus versicolor had a complex effect; polymerization of low-molecular-size phenolics accompanied the degradation of aromatic and carbohydrate polymers. The addition of xylose to the medium facilitated depolymerization of lignin by the fungi tested and prevented the polymerization of low-molecular-size fractions of lignocarbohydrate complexes by P. versicolor. P. versicolor, in contrast to A. japonicus and Trichoderma species, also excreted into the medium considerable amounts of laccase, but only in the absence of endogenous or exogenous carbohydrates. Apparently, laccase is involved in polymerization rather than degradation of lignin in this organism. A number of extracellular glycanases were also secreted by these fungi. 19 references

  20. Physical Separation of Straw Stem Components to Reduce Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, John Richard; Thompson, David Neal; Hoskinson, Reed Louis; Shaw, Peter Gordon; Grant, D.R.

    2002-04-01

    In this paper, we describe ongoing efforts to solve challenges to using straw for bioenergy and bioproducts. Among these, silica in straw forms a low-melting eutectic with potassium, causing slag deposits, and chlorides cause corrosion beneath the deposits. Straw consists principally of stems, leaves, sheaths, nodes, awns, and chaff. Leaves and sheaths are higher in silica, while chaff, leaves and nodes are the primary source of fines. Our approach to reducing silica is to selectively harvest the straw stems using an in-field physical separation, leaving the remaining components in the field to build soil organic matter and contribute soil nutrients.

  1. Biosorption of heavy metal ions using wheat based biosorbents--a review of the recent literature.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Umar; Kozinski, Janusz A; Khan, Misbahul Ain; Athar, Makshoof

    2010-07-01

    Conventional technologies for the removal/remediation of toxic metal ions from wastewaters are proving expensive due to non-regenerable materials used and high costs. Biosorption is emerging as a technique offering the use of economical alternate biological materials for the purpose. Functional groups like carboxyl, hydroxyl, sulphydryl and amido present in these biomaterials, make it possible for them to attach metal ions from waters. Every year, large amounts of straw and bran from Triticum aestivum (wheat), a major food crop of the world, are produced as by-products/waste materials. The purpose of this article is to review rather scattered information on the utilization of straw and bran for the removal/minimization of metal ions from waters. High efficiency, high biosorption capacity, cost-effectiveness and renewability are the important parameters making these materials as economical alternatives for metal removal and waste remediation. Applications of available adsorption and kinetic models as well as influences of change in temperature and pH of medium on metal biosorption by wheat straw and wheat bran are reviewed. The biosorption mechanism has been found to be quite complex. It comprises a number of phenomena including adsorption, surface precipitation, ion-exchange and complexation. PMID:20223652

  2. Effect of different mulch materials on winter wheat production in desalinized soil in Heilonggang region of North China*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan-min; Liu, Xiao-jing; Li, Wei-qiang; Li, Cun-zhen

    2006-01-01

    Freshwater shortage is the main problem in Heilonggang lower-lying plain, while a considerable amount of underground saline water is available. We wanted to find an effective way to use the brackish water in winter wheat production. Surface mulch has significant effect in reducing evaporation and decreasing soil salinity level. This research was aimed at comparing the effect of different mulch materials on winter wheat production. The experiment was conducted during 2002~2003 and 2003~2004. Four treatments were setup: (1) no mulch, (2) mulch with plastic film, (3) mulch with corn straw, (4) mulch with concrete slab between the rows. The result indicated that concrete mulch and straw mulch was effective in conserving soil water compared to plastic film mulch which increased soil temperature. Concrete mulch decreases surface soil salinity better in comparison to other mulches used. Straw mulch conserved more soil water but decreased wheat grain yield probably due to low temperature. Concrete mulch had similar effect with plastic film mulch on promoting winter wheat development and growth. PMID:17048298

  3. Cash Wheat in a Wheat-Ryegrass Grazing System.

    E-print Network

    Nelson, L.R.; Rouquette, F.M. Jr.; Randel, R.D.

    1983-01-01

    ~-~ash Wheat ? Ina B~1452 November 1983 t Wheat--Ryegrass Grazing System ~ THE TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION / Neville P. Clarke, Director / The Texas A&M University System / College Station, 'l"exas SUMMARY Wheat is an important...

  4. Bioconversion of Straw Into Improved Fodder: Mycoprotein Production and Cellulolytic Acivity of Rice Straw Decomposing Fungi

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Sixty two out of the sixty four species of fungal isolates tested could produce both exo-?1,4-gluconase (C1) and endo-?1,4-gluconase (Cx) on pure cellulose and rice straw as carbon source in Czapek's medium. Fifty-eight and fifteen species were able to grow at 25? and at 45?, respectively. Eleven species could grow at both 25? and 45? while, four species appeared only at 45?. The most cellulolytic species at 25? was Trichoderma koningii producing 1.164 C1 (mg glucose/1 ml culture filtrate/1 hr) and 2.690 Cx on pure cellulose, and 0.889 C1 and 1.810 Cx on rice straw, respectively. At 45?, the most active thermotolerant species were Aspergillus terreus, followed by A. fumigatus. Talaromyces thermophilus was the highest active thermophilic species followed by Malbranchea sulfurea. Most of these species were also active in fermentation of rice straw at 25 and 45? (P<0.05). The most active ones were T. koningii, A. ochraceus and A. terreus, which produced 201.5, 193.1 and 188.1 mg crude protein/g dry straw, respectively. PMID:24049480

  5. The effect of long or chopped straw on pig behaviour.

    PubMed

    Lahrmann, H P; Oxholm, L C; Steinmetz, H; Nielsen, M B F; D'Eath, R B

    2015-05-01

    In the EU, pigs must have permanent access to manipulable materials such as straw, rope, wood, etc. Long straw can fulfil this function, but can increase labour requirements for cleaning pens, and result in problems with blocked slatted floors and slurry systems. Chopped straw might be more practical, but what is the effect on pigs' behaviour of using chopped straw instead of long straw? Commercial pigs in 1/3 slatted, 2/3 solid pens of 15 pigs were provided with either 100 g/pig per day of long straw (20 pens) or of chopped straw (19 pens). Behavioural observations were made of three focal pigs per pen (one from each of small, medium and large weight tertiles) for one full day between 0600 and 2300 h at each of ~40 and ~80 kg. The time spent rooting/investigating overall (709 s/pig per hour at 40 kg to 533 s/pig per hour at 80 kg), or directed to the straw/solid floor (497 s/pig per hour at 40 kg to 343 s/pig per hour at 80 kg), was not affected by straw length but reduced with age. Time spent investigating other pigs (83 s/pig per hour at 40 kg), the slatted floor (57 s/pig per hour) or pen fixtures (21 s/pig per hour) was not affected by age or straw length. Aggressive behaviour was infrequent, but lasted about twice as long in pens with chopped straw (2.3 s/pig per hour at 40 kg) compared with pens with long straw (1.0 s/pig per hour at 40 kg, P=0.060). There were no significant effects of straw length on tail or ear lesions, but shoulders were significantly more likely to have minor scratches with chopped straw (P=0.031), which may reflect the higher levels of aggression. Smaller pigs showed more rooting/investigatory behaviour, and in particular directed towards the straw/solid floor and the slatted floor than their larger pen-mates. Females exhibited more straw and pen fixture-directed behaviour than males. There were no effects of pig size or sex on behaviour directed towards other pigs. In summary, pigs spent similar amounts of time interacting with straw/solid floor when long and chopped straw were provided, and most aspects of pig-directed behaviour and injuries were not affected by straw length. There was an increase in pigs with minor shoulder lesions with chopped straw, perhaps because of increased aggression. The use of chopped straw as an enrichment material for pigs warrants further investigation in larger and more detailed studies. PMID:25496522

  6. Response of Soil CO2 Emission and Summer Maize Yield to Plant Density and Straw Mulching in the North China Plain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Quanru; Liu, Xinhui; Bian, Chengyue; Ma, Changjian; Lang, Kun; Han, Huifang; Li, Quanqi

    2014-01-01

    Demand for food security and the current global warming situation make high and strict demands on the North China Plain for both food production and the inhibition of agricultural carbon emissions. To explore the most effective way to decrease soil CO2 emissions and maintain high grain yield, studies were conducted during the 2012 and 2013 summer maize growing seasons to assess the effects of wheat straw mulching on the soil CO2 emissions and grain yield of summer maize by adding 0 and 0.6?kg?m?2 to fields with plant densities of 100?000, 75?000, and 55?000 plants ha?1. The study indicated that straw mulching had some positive effects on summer maize grain yield by improving the 1000-kernel weight. Meanwhile, straw mulching effectively controlled the soil respiration rate and cumulative CO2 emission flux, particularly in fields planted at a density of 75?000 plants ha?1, which achieved maximum grain yield and minimum carbon emission per unit yield. In addition, soil microbial biomass and microbial activity were significantly higher in mulching treatments than in nonmulching treatments. Consequently, summer maize with straw mulching at 75?000 plants ha?1 is an environmentally friendly option in the North China Plain. PMID:25147835

  7. Feed intake, digestibility, body weight and carcass parameters of Afar rams fed tef (Eragrostis tef) straw supplemented with graded levels of concentrate mix.

    PubMed

    Hagos, Tesfay; Melaku, Solomon

    2009-04-01

    The experiment was conducted at Alamata Agricultural Research Center, Ethiopia using 20 Afar rams with an initial body weight (BW) of 18.2 +/- 1.76 (mean +/- SD) kg. The objectives were to study the effect of supplementation with concentrate mix consisting of wheat bran (WB), noug seed cake (NSC) and sesame seed cake (SSC) at the ratio of 2:1:1 on dry matter (DM) basis, respectively on feed intake, digestibility, BW gain and carcass parameters of Afar rams fed tef (Eragrostis tef) straw basal diet. The experiment was arranged with four treatments and five replications in a randomized complete block design. The treatments included feeding sole tef straw (T1, control), and daily supplementation with the concentrate mix offered at 150 (T2, low), 250 (T3, medium) and 350 (T4, high) g DM per head. Total DM intake, crude protein (CP) digestibility, daily BW gain (P < 0.001), DM and organic matter (OM) digestibility, and carcass parameters (P < 0.05) were higher in the supplemented than in the control treatment. Intake of tef straw reduced as the level of supplementation increased, whereas the contrary was true for CP intake. Performance in carcass parameters was better for the medium compared to the low level of concentrate mix supplementation. Moreover, the medium level of supplementation did not substitute tef straw intake. Therefore, it is concluded that the medium level of concentrate mix supplement maintained the utilization of the roughage feed and resulted in better carcass parameters. PMID:18777140

  8. Coffee Stirrers and Drinking Straws as Disposable Spatulas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turano, Morgan A.; Lobuono, Cinzia; Kirschenbaum, Louis J.

    2015-01-01

    Although metal spatulas are damaged through everyday use and become discolored and corroded by chemical exposure, plastic drinking straws are inexpensive, sterile, and disposable, reducing the risk of cross-contamination during laboratory procedures. Drinking straws are also useful because they come in a variety of sizes; narrow sample containers…

  9. Temporal Changes in Tall Fescue Straw Residue Degradation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In grass seed agriculture, straw residue is a byproduct. Traditionally it has been thought of as a “waste” product yielding little additional net income to the grower. Straw residue can be baled and sold to Asian or local markets, open field burned, or flailed and left on the soil surface or incorpo...

  10. Effects of rice straw and water management on riceland mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Lawler, Sharon P; Dritz, Deborah A

    2006-09-01

    Rice fields are important sources of mosquitoes in many regions, and rice (Oryza spp.) growing practices can affect mosquito populations. Rice straw incorporation and winter flooding have become common methods to prepare seedbeds, largely replacing burning of straw. These methods increase nutrients during the growing season. We sampled mosquito larvae during 1999-2001 in 16 0.72-ha plots where straw was either burned or incorporated into soil after the previous growing season; these treatments were crossed with either winter flooding or no winter flooding. In 2000, all fields were drained mid-season for an application of herbicide, and then they were reflooded. Mosquitoes responded positively to straw incorporation and winter flooding, especially in combination. The mid-season reflood in year 2 was associated with an order of magnitude increase in Culex tarsalis Coquillett larvae. Results confirm that rice straw and water management can strongly influence mosquito populations. PMID:17017215

  11. Straw pellets as fuel in biomass combustion units

    SciTech Connect

    Andreasen, P.; Larsen, M.G. [Danish Technological Inst., Aarhus (Denmark)

    1996-12-31

    In order to estimate the suitability of straw pellets as fuel in small combustion units, the Danish Technological Institute accomplished a project including a number of combustion tests in the energy laboratory. The project was part of the effort to reduce the use of fuel oil. The aim of the project was primarily to test straw pellets in small combustion units, including the following: ash/slag conditions when burning straw pellets; emission conditions; other operational consequences; and necessary work performance when using straw pellets. Five types of straw and wood pellets made with different binders and antislag agents were tested as fuel in five different types of boilers in test firings at 50% and 100% nominal boiler output.

  12. Wheat Evolution: Dough Washing

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

    2012-01-01

    In this activity (page 5), learners investigate the evolution of wheat by washing different types of dough with water and comparing the results. The evolution of wheat from wild grasses demonstrates the dramatic effect of both natural and directed evolution on the structure of a crop plant and the chemical makeup of the product harvested from it. These activities illustrate the changes to both the structure and the chemistry of the wheat plant.

  13. Gaseous and particulate emission profiles during controlled rice straw burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchis, E.; Ferrer, M.; Calvet, S.; Coscollà, C.; Yusà, V.; Cambra-López, M.

    2014-12-01

    Burning of rice straw can emit considerable amounts of atmospheric pollutants. We evaluated the effect of rice straw moisture content (5%, 10%, and 20%) on the emission of carbon dioxide (CO2) and on the organic and inorganic constituents of released particulate matter (PM): dioxins, heavy metals, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Four burning tests were conducted per moisture treatment using the open chamber method. Additionally, combustion characteristics, including burning stages, durations, temperature, and relative humidity, were recorded. Burning tests showed flaming and smoldering stages were significantly longer in 20% moisture treatment (P < 0.05) compared with the rest. The amount of burned straw and ashes decreased with increasing straw moisture content (P < 0.001). Carbon dioxide was the main product obtained during combustion with emission values ranging from 692 g CO2 kg dry straw-1 (10% moisture content) to 835 g CO2 kg dry straw-1 (20% moisture content). Emission factors for PM were the highest in 20% moisture treatment (P < 0.005). Fine PM (PM2.5) accounted for more than 60% of total PM mass. Emission factors for dioxins increased with straw moisture content, being the highest in 20% moisture treatment, although showing a wide variability among burning tests (P > 0.05). Emissions factors for heavy metals were low and similar among moisture treatments (P > 0.05). Emission factors for individual PAHs were generally higher in 20% moisture treatment. Overall, emission factors of atmospheric pollutants measured in our study were higher in the 20% moisture content. This difference could be attributed to the incomplete combustion at higher levels of rice straw moisture content. According to our results, rice straw burning should be done after straw drying and under minimal moisture conditions to lower pollutant emission levels.

  14. Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus

    E-print Network

    Morgan, Gaylon

    2005-01-26

    Figure 1. Leaves infected with Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus. Picture from KSU Department of Plant Pathology web-site. Figure 2. Wheat plant infected with Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus and High Plains Virus. Picture was provided by Dr. Charlie Rush, Plant....edu/Agriculture/Entomology/entfacts/fldcrops/ef117. htm ? Compendium of Wheat Diseases, Wiese. American Phy- topathological Society. 1987. Produced by AgriLife Communications and Marketing, Texas A&M System Extension publications can be found on the Web at: http://AgriLifebookstore.org Visit...

  15. Slow pyrolysis of rice straw: analysis of products properties, carbon and energy yields.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinje; Lee, Yongwoon; Ryu, Changkook; Park, Young-Kwon

    2014-03-01

    Among many uses of rice straw, application of its biochar from pyrolysis to the soil is receiving greater interest for increased crop productivity and sequestration of CO2. This study investigated slow pyrolysis of rice straw at 300-700°C to characterize the yields and detailed composition of the biochar, bio-oil and non-condensable gases. Biochar was analyzed for pH, microscopic surface area and pore volume distribution. Although the mass yield for the organic fraction was only about 25% above 500°C, biochar was the primary product of pyrolysis containing 40% of energy and 45% of carbon from the straw. The utilization of by-products (bio-oil and gases) as energy resources was essential, since the sum of energy yield was about 60%. The gases could be burned to produce the heat for an auto-thermal pyrolysis process, but the heat balance was significantly influenced by the moisture content of the raw material. PMID:24423650

  16. Genetic dissection of yield and its component traits using high-density composite map of wheat chromosome 3A: bridging gaps between QTLs and underlying genes.

    PubMed

    Rustgi, Sachin; Shafqat, Mustafa N; Kumar, Neeraj; Baenziger, P Stephen; Ali, M Liakat; Dweikat, Ismail; Campbell, B Todd; Gill, Kulvinder Singh

    2013-01-01

    Earlier we identified wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) chromosome 3A as a major determinant of grain yield and its component traits. In the present study, a high-density genetic linkage map of 81 chromosome 3A-specific markers was developed to increase the precision of previously identified yield component QTLs, and to map QTLs for biomass-related traits. Many of the previously identified QTLs for yield and its component traits were confirmed and were localized to narrower intervals. Four novel QTLs one each for shoot biomass (Xcfa2262-Xbcd366), total biomass (wPt2740-Xcfa2076), kernels/spike (KPS) (Xwmc664-Xbarc67), and Pseudocercosporella induced lodging (PsIL) were also detected. The major QTLs identified for grain yield (GY), KPS, grain volume weight (GVWT) and spikes per square meter (SPSM) respectively explained 23.2%, 24.2%, 20.5% and 20.2% of the phenotypic variation. Comparison of the genetic map with the integrated physical map allowed estimation of recombination frequency in the regions of interest and suggested that QTLs for grain yield detected in the marker intervals Xcdo549-Xbarc310 and Xpsp3047-Xbarc356 reside in the high-recombination regions, thus should be amenable to map-based cloning. On the other hand, QTLs for KPS and SPSM flanked by markers Xwmc664 and Xwmc489 mapped in the low-recombination region thus are not suitable for map-based cloning. Comparisons with the rice (Oryza sativa L.) genomic DNA sequence identified 11 candidate genes (CGs) for yield and yield related QTLs of which chromosomal location of two (CKX2 and GID2-like) was confirmed using wheat aneuploids. This study provides necessary information to perform high-resolution mapping for map-based cloning and for CG-based cloning of yield QTLs. PMID:23894667

  17. Genetic Dissection of Yield and Its Component Traits Using High-Density Composite Map of Wheat Chromosome 3A: Bridging Gaps between QTLs and Underlying Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rustgi, Sachin; Shafqat, Mustafa N.; Kumar, Neeraj; Baenziger, P. Stephen; Ali, M. Liakat; Dweikat, Ismail; Campbell, B. Todd; Gill, Kulvinder Singh

    2013-01-01

    Earlier we identified wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) chromosome 3A as a major determinant of grain yield and its component traits. In the present study, a high-density genetic linkage map of 81 chromosome 3A-specific markers was developed to increase the precision of previously identified yield component QTLs, and to map QTLs for biomass-related traits. Many of the previously identified QTLs for yield and its component traits were confirmed and were localized to narrower intervals. Four novel QTLs one each for shoot biomass (Xcfa2262-Xbcd366), total biomass (wPt2740-Xcfa2076), kernels/spike (KPS) (Xwmc664-Xbarc67), and Pseudocercosporella induced lodging (PsIL) were also detected. The major QTLs identified for grain yield (GY), KPS, grain volume weight (GVWT) and spikes per square meter (SPSM) respectively explained 23.2%, 24.2%, 20.5% and 20.2% of the phenotypic variation. Comparison of the genetic map with the integrated physical map allowed estimation of recombination frequency in the regions of interest and suggested that QTLs for grain yield detected in the marker intervals Xcdo549-Xbarc310 and Xpsp3047-Xbarc356 reside in the high-recombination regions, thus should be amenable to map-based cloning. On the other hand, QTLs for KPS and SPSM flanked by markers Xwmc664 and Xwmc489 mapped in the low-recombination region thus are not suitable for map-based cloning. Comparisons with the rice (Oryza sativa L.) genomic DNA sequence identified 11 candidate genes (CGs) for yield and yield related QTLs of which chromosomal location of two (CKX2 and GID2-like) was confirmed using wheat aneuploids. This study provides necessary information to perform high-resolution mapping for map-based cloning and for CG-based cloning of yield QTLs. PMID:23894667

  18. POTENTIAL FOR ON-FARM CONVERSION OF STRAW TO BIOENERGY IN SEED PRODUCING OPERATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous efforts to convert straw to energy have been limited by the cost of transporting straw to a conversion facility, and by lack of technology to handle straw. A new dual stage gasifier design is being evaluated for potential on-farm conversion of straw to electrical power and liquid fuels. A...

  19. Residues and dissipation kinetics of triazole fungicides difenoconazole and propiconazole in wheat and soil in Chinese fields.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Jiang, Wayne; Jian, Qiu; Song, Wencheng; Zheng, Zuntao; Wang, Donglan; Liu, Xianjin

    2015-02-01

    An analytical method for simultaneously determining the residues of difenoconazole and propiconazole in wheat straw, wheat grain and soil was developed. Mean recoveries and relative standard deviations in all samples ranged 86.2-101.3% and 3.1-12.1% for propiconazole and difenoconazole. The half-lives of difenoconazole and propiconazole were 3.6-5.5days and 5.1-6.9days in wheat straws, and 4.9-5.8days and 6.1-8.4days in soil, respectively. The residues in wheat grain were found to be <0.01mg/kg, based on the application rate (135g a.i./ha) and the pre-harvest interval (PHI=28days) recommended by the manufacturer. The results suggest that the use of difenoconazole and propiconazole on wheat is considered to be safe under the Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) in the Chinese fields, and the main factors for pesticide residue in crops are application times, rates and pre-harvest intervals. PMID:25172726

  20. Composites

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Cornell Center for Materials Research

    2003-01-01

    In this activity, learners explore how composites work by creating and testing their own composite for an imaginary company. This activity shows learners that composites are simply materials that are made up of two or more visibly distinct substances. Use this activity to talk about how composites are everywhere in our lives.

  1. Registration of "Brick" Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) [caused by Fusarium graminearum Schwabe; telomorph Gibberella zeae (Schwein.) Petch, is a major constraint to spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) production. The objective of this research was to release a hard red spring wheat (HRSW) cultivar with enhanced FHB resistance....

  2. Registration of "Select" Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium head blight (FHB), caused by Fusarium graminearum, Schwabe [telomorph Gibberella zeae (Schwein.) Petch]), is a major constraint on the production of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The objective of this research was to release a hard red spring wheat (HRSW) cultivar with enhanced level...

  3. REGISTRATION OF 'TRIBUTE' WHEAT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Tribute’ (Reg. no. CV-958, PI 632689) is a soft red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) developed and released May 2002 by the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station. Tribute is broadly adapted and has performed well over most of the soft red winter wheat production regions in the U.S.A. and Can...

  4. Registration of 'Snowmass' wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Snowmass’ (Reg. No. CV-1050, PI 658597) hard white winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was developed by the Colorado Agricultural Experiment Station and released in July 2009 through a marketing agreement with the Colorado Wheat Research Foundation. In addition to researchers at Colorado State Uni...

  5. Registration of ‘Ripper’ Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Ripper’ (Reg. No. CV-1016, PI 644222) hard red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was developed by the Colorado Agricultural Experiment Station and released in August 2006 through an exclusive marketing agreement with the Colorado Wheat Research Foundation. In addition to researchers at Colorado S...

  6. Registration of ‘Kelse’ wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hard red spring (HRS) wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grain must have high grain protein concentration (GPC) to maximize market value. The objective of this research was to develop a HRS wheat cultivar with high GPC and durable resistance to stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis Westend f. sp. tritici), a ...

  7. Registration of 'Antero' Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ’Antero’ (Reg. No. CV-XXXX, PI 667743) hard white winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was developed by the Colorado Agricultural Experiment Station and released in August 2012 through a marketing agreement with the Colorado Wheat Research Foundation. In addition to researchers at Colorado State Univ...

  8. Wheat: Science and Trade

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Up-to-date textbooks are needed to educate the agricultural scientists of tomorrow. This manuscript comprises one chapter in such a textbook, “Wheat: Science and Trade”, and covers the subject of wheat genetic engineering. The chapter begins with a summary of key discussion elements and ends with a...

  9. REGISTRATION OF 'MCCORMICK' WHEAT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘McCormick’ (Reg. no. CV-959, PI 632691) is a soft red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) developed and released May 2002 by the Virginia Agricultural Experiment Station. McCormick wheat was named in tribute of Robert Hall of Walnut Grove in Rockbridge County, VA, and his sons, including Cyrus Hal...

  10. REGISTRATION OF 'HALLAM' WHEAT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Hallam’ (PI 638790) is a hard red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivar developed cooperatively by the Nebraska Agricultural Experiment Station and the USDA-ARS and released in 2005 by the developing institutions. Hallam was released primarily for its superior adaptation to rainfed wheat pr...

  11. Dynamics of Potassium Release and Adsorption on Rice Straw Residue

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jifu; Lu, Jianwei; Li, Xiaokun; Ren, Tao; Cong, Rihuan; Zhou, Li

    2014-01-01

    Straw application can not only increase crop yields, improve soil structure and enrich soil fertility, but can also enhance water and nutrient retention. The aim of this study was to ascertain the relationships between straw decomposition and the release-adsorption processes of K+. This study increases the understanding of the roles played by agricultural crop residues in the soil environment, informs more effective straw recycling and provides a method for reducing potassium loss. The influence of straw decomposition on the K+ release rate in paddy soil under flooded condition was studied using incubation experiments, which indicated the decomposition process of rice straw could be divided into two main stages: (a) a rapid decomposition stage from 0 to 60 d and (b) a slow decomposition stage from 60 to 110 d. However, the characteristics of the straw potassium release were different from those of the overall straw decomposition, as 90% of total K was released by the third day of the study. The batches of the K sorption experiments showed that crop residues could adsorb K+ from the ambient environment, which was subject to decomposition periods and extra K+ concentration. In addition, a number of materials or binding sites were observed on straw residues using IR analysis, indicating possible coupling sites for K+ ions. The aqueous solution experiments indicated that raw straw could absorb water at 3.88 g g?1, and this rate rose to its maximum 15 d after incubation. All of the experiments demonstrated that crop residues could absorb large amount of aqueous solution to preserve K+ indirectly during the initial decomposition period. These crop residues could also directly adsorb K+ via physical and chemical adsorption in the later period, allowing part of this K+ to be absorbed by plants for the next growing season. PMID:24587364

  12. Structural and molecular basis of starch viscosity in hexaploid wheat.

    PubMed

    Ral, J-P; Cavanagh, C R; Larroque, O; Regina, A; Morell, M K

    2008-06-11

    Wheat starch is considered to have a low paste viscosity relative to other starches. Consequently, wheat starch is not preferred for many applications as compared to other high paste viscosity starches. Increasing the viscosity of wheat starch is expected to increase the functionality of a range of wheat flour-based products in which the texture is an important aspect of consumer acceptance (e.g., pasta, and instant and yellow alkaline noodles). To understand the molecular basis of starch viscosity, we have undertaken a comprehensive structural and rheological analysis of starches from a genetically diverse set of wheat genotypes, which revealed significant variation in starch traits including starch granule protein content, starch-associated lipid content and composition, phosphate content, and the structures of the amylose and amylopectin fractions. Statistical analysis highlighted the association between amylopectin chains of 18-25 glucose residues and starch pasting properties. Principal component analysis also identified an association between monoesterified phosphate and starch pasting properties in wheat despite the low starch-phosphate level in wheat as compared to tuber starches. We also found a strong negative correlation between the phosphate ester content and the starch content in flour. Previously observed associations between internal starch granule fatty acids and the swelling peak time and pasting temperature have been confirmed. This study has highlighted a range of parameters associated with increased starch viscosity that could be used in prebreeding/breeding programs to modify wheat starch pasting properties. PMID:18459791

  13. Nitrogen and residue management effects on agronomic productivity and nitrogen use efficiency in rice–wheat system in Indian Punjab

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. K. Gupta; Gurpreet-Singh; Jagmohan-Singh; H. S. Sidhu

    2009-01-01

    Development of a sustainable and environment friendly crop production system depends on identifying effective strategies for\\u000a the management of tillage and postharvest crop residues. Three-year (2004–2007) field study was initiated on two soil types\\u000a to evaluate the effect of straw management (burning, incorporation and surface mulch) and tillage (conventional tillage and\\u000a zero tillage) before sowing wheat and four nitrogen rates

  14. Whole Wheat Pizza Dough Ingredients

    E-print Network

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Whole Wheat Pizza Dough Ingredients: 1 cup flour, white, for breads 1 cup whole wheat flour 1. Blend yeast with flour mixture. Add hot water; stir to form dough. 3. Add enough whole wheat flour whole wheat flour on the kneading surface; turn out dough onto floured surface; knead to form stiff

  15. Lipase inactivation in wheat germ by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Pankaj Kumar; Kudachikar, V. B.; Kumar, Sourav

    2013-05-01

    An attempt was made to improve the shelf life of wheat germ by optimizing processing conditions involving ?-irradiation. Studies were carried out to investigate the effect of ?-irradiation (0-30 kGy doses) on the chemical composition of wheat germ with respect to variation in moisture, total ash, crude fat, free fatty acid, protein and lipase activity. The results demonstrate that shelf stability of wheat germ was achieved by inactivation of lipase at doses of ?-irradiation greater than 12 kGy.

  16. Coral Reefs & Climate Change: Last Straw for a Threatened Ecosystem

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Glick, Patricia.

    1999-01-01

    Patricia Glick of the National Wildlife Federation's Climate Change & Wildlife Program authored this October 1999 report entitled "Coral Reefs and Climate Change: Last Straw for a Threatened Ecosystem." The resource (.pdf format) is accompanied by color photographs.

  17. Investigating Atmospheric Pressure with a Cup, Straw and Water

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This activity is a reinforcement lab activity where students experiment with ways to get water to flow out of a cup and up a straw causing an imbalance in the atmospheric pressure surrounding the water.

  18. Mutagenicity of the ash of rice straws by Ames' test.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, N; Ohta, T; Sakai, H; Endoh, K; Yamamoto, M

    1988-05-01

    Mutagenicity of fly ashes and bottom ashes of rice straw and rice husk was assayed by Ames' test. With respect to rice-straw ash, the extract from the fly ash was found to be more mutagenic than that from the bottom ash. In the case of rice husk, the mutagenicity of extract from the bottom ash was stronger than that from the fly ash. The extract from rice-husk bottom ash showed the strongest mutagenic activity among the four. PMID:3046058

  19. The anaerobic digestion of rice straw: A review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wendy Mussoline; Giovanni Esposito; Andrea Giordano; Piet Lens

    2012-01-01

    The anaerobic digestion of rice straw has been studied for the past century, but the renewable energy potential is barely utilized. Greenhouse gas emissions from rice fields can be substantially reduced if straw is removed. Methane yields ranging from 92 to 404 litres per kilogram of volatile solids have been achieved. Optimal digestion conditions such as pH (6.5 to 8.0),

  20. Modelling and experiments of straw combustion in a grate furnace

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. P van der Lans; L. T Pedersen; A Jensen; P Glarborg; K Dam-Johansen

    2000-01-01

    A two-dimensional mathematical model for the combustion of straw in a cross-current, moving bed was developed as part of a tool for optimizing operating conditions and design parameters. To verify the model and to increase the understanding of straw bed combustion, laboratory fixed-bed experiments were performed in a 15cm diameter and 137cm long vertical reactor. Air was introduced through the

  1. Effect of particle size on rate and extent of degradation of alfalfa hay, barley straw and ammonia-treated barley straw

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Effect of particle size on rate and extent of degradation of alfalfa hay, barley straw and ammonia experiment alfalfa hay (A, 57.4 % DOM), barley straw (S, 40.2 % DOM) and ammonia-treated barley straw (TS, 51 characteristics were also studied for alfalfa hay. Average dry matter (DM) intakes were 74.5, 29.2 and 45.9 g

  2. Wheat Evolution: Sedimentation Testing

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

    2012-01-01

    In this activity (p.8-9 of PDF), learners investigate the evolution of wheat by conducting sedimentation tests on different flours. The evolution of wheat from wild grasses demonstrates the dramatic effect of both natural and directed evolution on the structure of a crop plant and the chemical makeup of the product harvested from it. These activities illustrate the changes to both the structure and the chemistry of the wheat plant. Note: Sedimentation test can also be done using SDS detergent and lactic acid instead of soap and vinegar.

  3. Wheat Evolution: Dough Rising

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council

    2012-01-01

    In this activity (p.6-7 of PDF), learners investigate the evolution of wheat by creating dough from different flours, observing the samples of dough as they rise, and then baking the dough. The evolution of wheat from wild grasses demonstrates the dramatic effect of both natural and directed evolution on the structure of a crop plant and the chemical makeup of the product harvested from it. These activities illustrate the changes to both the structure and the chemistry of the wheat plant.

  4. Genetic relationships and diversity among Tibetan wheat, common wheat and European spelt wheat revealed by RAPD markers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qixin Sun; Zhongfu Ni; Zhiyong Liu; Jianwei Gao; Tiecheng Huang

    1998-01-01

    An endemic hexaploid wheat found in Tibet, China was taxonomically classified as a subspecies in common wheat, i.e. Triticum\\u000a aestivum ssp. tibetanum. Seven accessions of the Tibetan wheat, 22 cultivars of common wheat and 17 lines of spelt wheat were\\u000a used for RAPD analysis to study the genetic relationships of the Tibetan wheat with common wheat and spelt wheat, and

  5. Bed agglomeration characteristics of rice straw combustion in a vortexing fluidized-bed combustor.

    PubMed

    Duan, Feng; Chyang, Chien-Song; Zhang, Li-Hui; Yin, Siang-Fong

    2015-05-01

    To investigate bed agglomeration characteristics, the combustion of pelletized rice straw was conducted in a bench-scale vortexing fluidized bed. Effects of bed temperature, superficial velocity, secondary gas velocities, and mass blended ratio of coal on the defluidization time were investigated. The alkali concentrations in different sections of the bed zone were also studied. The bed materials and agglomerates were analyzed using SEM/EDX to obtain the surface morphology and the compositions. The results revealed that the defluidization time is increased with superficial gas velocity and is decreased with bed temperature. Eutectic composition with low melting point materials promote defluidization at high temperatures. Effect of the secondary gas velocity on the defluidization time indicates different trends at different bed temperatures. The highest value of alkali concentration appears at upper bubbling zone. Coal ash can avoid the existence of a certain eutectic composition, and increases its melting point. PMID:25742751

  6. Changes in protein composition and Mn abundance in photosystem II particles on photoactivation of the latent O/sub 2/-evolving system in flash-grown wheat leaves. [Triticum aestivum L

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, T.A.; Kajikawa, H.; Inoue, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Protein composition and Mn abundance were compared between the two photosystem II (PSII) particle preparations obtained before and after photoactivation of the latent O/sub 2/-evolving system in intermittently flashed wheat leaves. The following results have been obtained: (a) nonphotoactivated PSII particles were devoid of two extrinsic proteins which corresponded to the 24 and 16 kilodalton proteins in spinach particles, although the particles contained all the intrinsic proteins and the 33 kilodalton extrinsic protein. (b) The two extrinsic proteins absent in nonphotoactivated PSII particles were present in nonphotoactivated thylakoids, but were easily removed by a hypotonic shock followed by brief sonication. Such removal of the proteins did not occur in photoactivated thylakoids. (c) Nonphotoactivated PSII particles contained 1.5 Mn/400 chlorophyll, while photoactivated particles contained 8 Mn/400 chlorophyll. (d) Nonphotoactivated thylakoids contained 6 Mn/400 chlorophyll, but most of them were removed from thylakoids by a hypotonic shock in the presence of ethylenediaminetetraacetate. Such removal of Mn did not occur in photoactivated thylakoids.

  7. Supplementary Materials for Reckoning wheat yield trends

    E-print Network

    Huybers, Peter

    Supplementary Materials for Reckoning wheat yield trends Marena Lin and Peter Huybers Department decomposition of wheat yields 5 4.1 U.S. county-level wheat yields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 4.2 French departmental wheat yields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 5

  8. Substituting Normal and Waxy-Type Whole Wheat Flour on Dough and Baking Properties

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Induck; Kang, Chun-Sik; Cheong, Young-Keun; Hyun, Jong-Nae; Kim, Kee-Jong

    2012-01-01

    Normal (cv. Keumkang, KK) and waxy-type (cv. Shinmichal, SMC) whole wheat flour was substituted at 20 and 40% for white wheat flour (WF) during bread dough formulation. The flour blends were subjected to dough and baking property measurement in terms of particle size distribution, dough mixing, bread loaf volume and crumb firmness. The particle size of white wheat flour was the finest, with increasing coarseness as the level of whole wheat flour increased. Substitution of whole wheat flour decreased pasting viscosity, showing all RVA parameters were the lowest in SMC40 composite flour. Water absorption was slightly higher with 40% whole wheat flour regardless of whether the wheat was normal or waxy. An increased mixing time was observed when higher levels of KK flour were substituted, but the opposite reaction occurred when SMC flour was substituted at the same levels. Bread loaf volume was lower in breads containing a whole wheat flour substitution compared to bread containing only white wheat flour. No significant difference in bread loaf volume was observed between normal and waxy whole flour, but the bread crumb firmness was significantly lower in breads containing waxy flour. The results of these studies indicate that up to 40% whole wheat flour substitution could be considered a practical option with respect to functional qualities. Also, replacing waxy whole flour has a positive effect on bread formulation over normal whole wheat flour in terms of improving softness and glutinous texture. PMID:24471084

  9. Citric Acid Production from Hydrolysate of Pretreated Straw Cellulose by Yarrowia lipolytica SWJ-1b Using Batch and Fed-Batch Cultivation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Lv, Jinshun; Zhang, Tong; Deng, Yuanfang

    2015-11-17

    In this study, crude cellulase produced by Trichoderma reesei Rut-30 was used to hydrolyze pretreated straw. After the compositions of the hydrolysate of pretreated straw were optimized, the study showed that natural components of pretreated straw without addition of any other components such as (NH4)2SO4, KH2PO4, or Mg(2+) were suitable for citric acid production by Yarrowia lipolytica SWJ-1b, and the optimal ventilatory capacity was 10.0 L/min/L medium. Batch and fed-batch production of citric acid from the hydrolysate of pretreated straw by Yarrowia lipolytica SWJ-1b has been investigated. In the batch cultivation, 25.4 g/L and 26.7 g/L citric acid were yields from glucose and hydrolysate of straw cellulose, respectively, while the cultivation time was 120 hr. In the three-cycle fed-batch cultivation, citric acid (CA) production was increased to 42.4 g/L and the cultivation time was extended to 240 hr. However, iso-citric acid (ICA) yield in fed-batch cultivation (4.0 g/L) was similar to that during the batch cultivation (3.9 g/L), and only 1.6 g/L of reducing sugar was left in the medium at the end of fed-batch cultivation, suggesting that most of the added carbon was used in the cultivation. PMID:25356914

  10. The impact of alkali pretreatment and post-pretreatment conditioning on the surface properties of rice straw affecting cellulose accessibility to cellulases.

    PubMed

    Karuna, Nardrapee; Zhang, Lu; Walton, Jeffrey H; Couturier, Marie; Oztop, Mecit H; Master, Emma R; McCarthy, Michael J; Jeoh, Tina

    2014-09-01

    Rice straw was pretreated with sodium hydroxide and subsequently conditioned to reduce the pH to 5-6 by either: (1) extensive water washing or (2) acidification with hydrochloric acid then water washing. Alkali pretreatment improved the enzymatic digestibility of rice straw by increasing the cellulose accessibility to cellulases. However, acidification after pretreatment reversed the gains in cellulose accessibility to cellulases and enzymatic digestibility due to precipitation of solubilized compounds. Surface composition analyses by ToF-SIMS confirmed a reduction in surface lignin by pretreatment and water washing, and suggested that acidification precipitated a chemically modified form of lignin on the surfaces of rice straw. The spin-spin relaxation times (T2) of the samples indicated increased porosity in alkali pretreated rice straw. The acidified pretreated rice straw had reduced amounts of water in the longer T2 proton pools associated with water in the pores of the biomass likely due to back-filling by the precipitated components. PMID:24983695

  11. Wheat Pasture Poisoning.

    E-print Network

    Crookshank, H. R.; Sims, Frank H.

    1956-01-01

    the time the first symptoms develop until the animal passes into the comatose condi- ;ion. If treatment is not begun before coma, there ir little chance of recovery. While wheat pasture poisoning has been re- yrted in dry cows, heifers and sheep, we... used gave definite positive tests. It is felt, however, that further work of this nature might be of value. TREATMENT OF CASES During the period covered by these studies, the basic treatment for wheat pasture poisoning has been the intravenous...

  12. Wheat for Kids! [and] Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho Wheat Commission, Boise.

    "Wheat for Kids" contains information at the elementary school level about: the structure of the wheat kernel; varieties of wheat and their uses; growing wheat; making wheat dough; the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Guide Pyramid and nutrition; Idaho's part of the international wheat market; recipes; and word games based on the information…

  13. 9 CFR 72.19 - Interstate shipments and use of pine straw, grass, litter from quarantined area; prohibited until...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...shipments and use of pine straw, grass, litter from quarantined area; prohibited until...shipments and use of pine straw, grass, litter from quarantined area; prohibited until...disinfected. Pine straw, grass, or similar litter collected from tick-infested...

  14. Composition of organic matter in earthworm casts depending on litter quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellerbrock, R. H.; Gerke, H. H.; Schrader, S.; Leue, M.

    2009-04-01

    Earthworms contribute to decomposition and stabilization of organic matter (OM) in soil. The digestion during intestinal passage inside worms may lead to a change in the composition of OM. It is largely unknown if and how the type of litter the earthworm is feeding on is affecting the OM composition in the casts. Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) is used to determine the hydrophobic CH- (A) and the hydrophilic CO- (B) functional groups in OM. The objective was to compare the A/B- ratios of litter samples with that of (i) the corresponding casts of the primary decomposer Lumbricus terrestris and (ii) the water contact angles of ground cast samples and at intact cast surfaces. Litter from 10 different plant species including leaves of birch, beech, oak, spruce, pear, mustard and wheat straw (3 replicates) was offered separately to L. terrestris in microcosms containing a Luvisol soil. The OM composition of litter and that of casts, collected from the soil surface after 4-weeks was analyzed with FTIR (DRIFT technique). The A/B ratio of casts was generally increased as compared to that of the soil. For most litter types, the A/B ratio of cast was relatively similar except for casts from birch (Betula pendula) and pear (Pyrus communis) where the OM show a 3-times higher A/B ratio as compared to wheat (Triticum aestivum) or beech (Fagus sylvatica) casts. The higher A/B ratios seem to be related to the relative higher C/N ratios in the casts from Betula pendula and Pyrus communis feeding experiments. The results indicate that digestion of litter by the worm may change OM composition. The assumption that earthworm casts may enrich hydrophobic OM components could be verified only partly. However particulate and soluble OM fractions in the earthworm casts could have contributed to such differentiation.

  15. FOAMED ARTICLES BASED ON POTATO STARCH, CORN AND WHEAT FIBRE, AND POLY(VINYL ALCOHOL)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continued research cooperation between USDA Laboratories (USA) and the University of Pisa, Italy, has yielded several composites based on blends of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and either corn or wheat fibres, co-product of the corn-wheat wet-milling process. Foam trays were prepared by baking the blen...

  16. Persistence of herbicide fenoxaprop ethyl and its acid metabolite in soil and wheat crop under Indian tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shashi B; Das, Tapas K; Kulshrestha, Gita

    2013-01-01

    The persistence of fenoxaprop ethyl {Ethyl (RS)-2-[4-(6-chloro-1,3-benzoxazol-2-yloxy) phenoxy] propionate} herbicide and its active metabolite fenoxaprop acid was investigated in soil and wheat crop. Fenoxaprop acid was prepared by alkaline hydrolysis of fenoxaprop ethyl. A HPLC method was developed in which fenoxaprop ethyl herbicide and its acid metabolite showed sharp single peak at 6.44 and 2.61 min respectively. The sensitivity of the method for ester and acid was 2 and 1 ng respectively with limit of detection of 0.1 and 0.05 ?g mL(-1). The recovery of fenoxaprop ethyl and fenoxaprop acid from soil, wheat straw and grain ranged between 73.8-80.2%. In a field experiment fenoxaprop ethyl (Puma super® 10 EC) when applied to wheat crop at the rate of 120 g and 240 g a.i. ha(-1) as post emergence spray, fenoxaprop ethyl converted to fenoxaprop acid. Residues of fenoxaprop ethyl and acid dissipated in soil with a half-life of 0.5 and 7.3 days, respectively. At harvest no detectable residues of fenoxaprop ethyl or acid were observed in soil, wheat grain and straw samples. PMID:23431970

  17. Dissipation of sulfosulfuron in soil and wheat plant under predominant cropping conditions and in a simulated model ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Atmakuru; Maheswari, Sinthalapadi Thulasiramaraja

    2003-05-21

    Environmental fate and dissipation of the sulfonylurea herbicide sulfosulfuron was investigated in soil (inceptisol) and wheat plant under predominant cropping conditions. Studies were conducted in natural field conditions and in a simulated model ecosystem. Thirty days after the wheat seeds had been sown, sulfosulfuron [N-[[(4,6-dimethoxy-2-pyrimidinyl)amino]carbonyl]-2-(ethylsulfonyl)imidazo[1,2-a]pyridine-3-sulfonamide] 75% w/w WG formulation was applied once in the field. The dosages were 25 and 50 g of active ingredient (ai)/ha. Studies were conducted in significantly separated individual plots to avoid contamination. In a predetermined interval, soil samples were collected and analyzed for the residues of sulfosulfuron. At harvest, wheat grain, straw, and soil samples were analyzed for the residues. Similar experiments were conducted in a model ecosystem. Apart from this, after harvest, the succeeding crops coriander (Coriandrum sativum) and edible amaranth (Amaranthus mangostanus L.) were raised in the model ecosystem and studied for the residues. No residues were detected in wheat grain, straw, and soil samples collected at harvest from both experiments or in the succeeding crops coriander and edible amaranth in the model ecosystem when tested at the minimum detection level of 0.001 microg/g. The dissipation of sulfosulfuron was found to have first-order kinetics in soil and plant in both studies. The dissipation data of sulfosulfuron in the model ecosystem were compared with those from the natural field conditions. PMID:12744673

  18. New Uses for Wheat and Modified Wheat Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hard wheat from the Great Plains historically has been used as a source of flour for the production of leavened bakery products. However, potentially applications of wheat in both new markets and new products has necessitated the need to develop wheats with novel processing attributes. The most lo...

  19. Insects which challenge global wheat production: Russian wheat aphid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The book chapter on Russian wheat aphid, (Diuraphis noxia (Mord.)), is one of several that addresses significant pests in the book entitled, Wheat Science and Trade. The chapter gives a detailed account of the history of the Russian wheat aphid as global pest, and its biology, ecology and managemen...

  20. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation Into the Wheat Straw Paper

    E-print Network

    . The papers sold at UBC are typically created from wood fibres and 30% consumer recycled content from pulp for wood pulp paper, many trees from forests have to be cut down every year. The paper industry has a large fiber to reinforce the pulp mixture, adjusting to this paper would significantly reduce the ecological

  1. Recovery of wheat straw soda lignin using flocculation by proteins, synthetic flocculants, and a metal coagulant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-sulfonated lignin, a byproduct of biomass conversion to fuel ethanol, is finding increasing applications and can be converted to chemical substances which replace those obtained from petrochemicals. To date, most studies of flocculant function on non-sulfonated lignin have used mixtures of lign...

  2. Fuel Ethanol Production from Pretreated Wheat Straw Using a Recombinant Bacterium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2008, about 9 billion gallons of ethanol were produced from corn starch in the U.S. The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 requires that 36 billion gallons of renewable fuel be produced in 2022 of which cellulosic biofuel is to contribute 16 billion gallons. Currently, there is no com...

  3. Butanol productivity enhancers in wheat straw hydrolyzate: employing potential of enhanced reaction rate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Butanol production by fermentation is gaining momentum due to increased prices of fossil fuels. This biofuel is a major product of acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation that can be produced from hydrolyzed agricultural residues and/or corn. A control glucose (60 g/L) based batch fermentation us...

  4. Cultivation of oyster mushrooms on wheat straw and bagasse substrate amendedwith distillery effluent

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Deepak Pant; U. Gangi Reddy; Alok Adholeya

    2006-01-01

    Summary  Molasses-based distilleries produce large quantities of dark coloured effluent, which is a major cause of environmental pollution.\\u000a An experiment was conducted to investigate the efficacy of distillery effluent amendment for edible mushroom production. Three\\u000a species of oyster mushroom, namely Pleurotus florida Eger (EM 1303), Pleurotus pulmonarius (Fries) Quelet (EM 1302) and Pleurotus sajor-caju (Fries) Singer (EM 1304) were grown on

  5. Cultivation of two Pleurotus species on wheat straw substrates containing olive mill waste water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erbil Kalm??; Sayit Sarg?n

    2004-01-01

    Olive oil extraction produces large amounts of waste water, known as olive mill waste water (OMWW). This has a high chemical oxygen demand and contains high levels of phenolic compounds, and is therefore a cause of environmental pollution. The major aim of this study was to investigate the use of OMWW as a moisture source for mushroom cultivation. Pleurotus sajor-caju

  6. [Effects of ground cover and water-retaining agent on winter wheat growth and precipitation utilization].

    PubMed

    Wu, Ji-Cheng; Guan, Xiu-Juan; Yang, Yong-Hui

    2011-01-01

    An investigation was made at a hilly upland in western Henan Province to understand the effects of water-retaining agent (0, 45, and 60 kg x hm(-2)), straw mulching (3000 and 6000 kg x hm(-2)), and plastic mulching (thickness < 0.005 mm) on winter wheat growth, soil moisture and nutrition conditions, and precipitation use. All the three measures promoted winter wheat growth, enhanced grain yield and precipitation use efficiency, and improved soil moisture and nutritional regimes. These positive effects were more obvious when the straw- or plastic mulching was combined with the use of water-retaining agent. Comparing with the control, all the measures increased the soil moisture content at different growth stages by 0.1%-6.5%. Plastic film mulching had the best water-retention effect before jointing stage, whereas water-retaining agent showed its best effect after jointing stage. Soil moisture content was the lowest at flowering and grain-filling stages. Land cover increased the grain yield by 2.6%-20.1%. The yield increment was the greatest (14.2%-20.1%) by the combined use of straw mulching and water-retaining agent, followed by plastic mulching combined with water-retaining agent (11.9% on average). Land cover also improved the precipitation use efficiency (0.4-3.2 kg x mm(-1) x hm(-2)) in a similar trend as the grain yield. This study showed that land cover and water-retaining agent improved soil moisture and nutrition conditions and precipitation utilization, which in turn, promoted the tillering of winter wheat, and increased the grain number per ear and the 1000-grain mass. PMID:21548293

  7. Bioconversion of rice straw into a soil-like substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chengying; Liu, Hong; Xing, Yidong; Manukovsky, N. S.; Kovalev, V. S.; Gurevich, Yu. L.

    To increase the closure of bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS), the bioconversion of rice straw into a soil-like substrate (SLS) by mushrooms and worms has been studied. The results showed that rice straw could be treated better by aerobic fermentation and succeeding growth of mushrooms Pleurotus ostreatus. In this process the total content of lignocellulose in the straw was removed by 37.74%. Furthermore, 46.68 g (fresh weight) of mushrooms could be produced from 100.0 g (dry weight) of rice straw. During the conversion of rice straw into a starting SLS by mushrooms and worms, the matter loss was 77.31%. The lettuce has been planted in the SLS and the yield when lettuce was cultivated on the SLS (8.77gm-2day-1) was comparable to the yield obtained on the nutrient solution. In addition, the silicon in the SLS ash can reach upto 32% and the circulation of it is expected during the growth of rice.

  8. Pressure variation assisted fiber extraction and development of high performance natural fiber composites and nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markevicius, Gediminas

    It is believed, that due to the large surface areas provided by the nano scale materials, various composite properties could be enhanced when such particles are incorporated into a polymer matrix. There is also a trend of utilizing natural resources or reusing and recycling materials that are already available for the fabrication of the new composite materials. Cellulose is the most abundant natural polymer on the planet, and therefore it is not surprising to be of interest for composite fabrication. Basic structures of cellulose, comprised of long polysaccharide chains, are the building blocks of cellulose nano fibers. Nano fibers are further bound into micro fibrils and macro fibers. Theoretically pure cellulose nano fibers have tremendous strengths, and therefore are some of the most sought after nano particles. The fiber extraction however is a complex task. The ultrasound, which creates pressure variation in the medium, was employed to extract nano-size cellulose particles from microcrystalline cellulose (MCC). The length and the intensity of the cavitations were evaluated. Electron microscopy studies revealed that cellulose nanoparticles were successfully obtained from the MCC after ultrasound treatment of just 30 minutes. Structure of the fractionated cellulose was also analyzed with the help of X-ray diffraction, and its thermal properties were evaluated with the help of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Ultrasound treatment performed on the wheat straw, kenaf, and miscanthus particles altered fiber structure as a result of the cavitation. The micro fibers were generated from these materials after they were subjected to NaOH treatment followed by the ultrasound processing. The potential of larger than nano-sized natural fibers to be used for composite fabrication was also explored. The agricultural byproducts, such as wheat or rice straw, as well as other fast growing crops as miscanthus or kenaf, are comprised of three basic polymers. Just like in wood the polymers are: cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin. When subjected to elevated pressures and temperatures, we are able to get access to some of these natural polymers and use them as a matrix material for composite fabrication. Therefore, fabrication of composite materials without addition of synthetic polymers is possible. Thermal and mechanical properties of such composites are evaluated with the help of electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and flexural strength measurements. The chemical changes in the composites are also probed with the help of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis. Various additives introduced into composite materials provide different properties. The addition of small amounts of synthetic polymers further enhances the properties of natural fiber composites and do not require high fabrication pressures. Calcium sulfite crystals, which are one of the coal combustion products, were combined with the natural fibers and recycled HDPE polymer to form wood substitute composites. The introduction of these additives resulted in composites with the properties similar to those of the natural wood. Coal combustion products, often used in composite material fabrication, contain mercury which may be rereleased during composite fabrication. Mercury behavior under composite fabrication conditions, such as elevated pressures and temperatures were evaluated. Sulfite rich scrubber material, generated during the flue gas desulphurization process was the main target of the study. It was observed that the release of the mercury is highly dependent on the composite fabrication pressure as well as the temperature.

  9. Whole Wheat Strawberry Muffins Ingredients

    E-print Network

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Whole Wheat Strawberry Muffins Ingredients: Non stick cooking spray 1 cup strawberries, chopped 2 wheat flour 1/2 cup brown sugar, packed 1 1/2 teaspoons baking soda Directions 1. Heat oven to 400º bowl mix together whole wheat flour, brown sugar and baking soda. Mix well. 5. Add strawberry mixture

  10. A Microsatellite Map of Wheat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marion S. Roder; Victor Korzun; Katja Wendehake; Jens Plaschke; Marie-Helene Tixier; Philippe Leroy; Martin W. Ganal

    Hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L. em. Thell) is one of the world's most important crop plants and displays a very low level of intraspecific polymorphism. We report the development of highly polymorphic microsatellite markers using procedures optimized for the large wheat genome. The isolation of microsatellite-containing clones from hypomethylated regions of the wheat genome increased the proportion of useful

  11. Pseudomonas punonensis sp. nov., isolated from straw.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Elena; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha-Helena; Valverde, Angel; Velázquez, Encarna; Zúñiga, Doris; Velezmoro, Carmen; Peix, Alvaro

    2013-05-01

    During a study of the 'tunta' (frozen-dry potato) production process in Peru, a bacterial strain, LMT03(T), was isolated from the straw grass in which the potatoes are dried. This strain was classified into the genus Pseudomonas on the basis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, and is most closely related to Pseudomonas argentinensis CH01(T) with 99.3?% identity in this gene and 96?%, 92?% and 86?% identities in rpoB, rpoD and gyrB genes, respectively. Strain LMT03(T) has a single polar flagellum, like other related yellow-pigment-producing pseudomonads. The major quinone is Q-9. The major fatty acids are C18?:?1?7c in summed feature 8 (40.82?%), C16?:?1?6c/C16?:?1?6c in summed feature 3 (23.72?%) and C16?:?0 (15.20?%). The strain produces oxidase but it does not produce gelatinase, indole, urease, arginine dihydrolase or ?-galactosidase. Catalase production was very weak after 28 and 48 h incubation on nutrient agar medium. Nitrate reduction is negative. It does not hydrolyse aesculin. The DNA G+C content is 57.8 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization results showed lower than 52?% relatedness with respect to the type strain of P. argentinensis, CH01(T). These results, together with other phenotypic characteristics, support the definition of a novel species within the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas punonensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is LMT03(T) (?=?LMG 26839(T)?=?CECT 8089(T)). PMID:23002045

  12. Effects of expeller pressed camelina meal and/or canola meal on digestibility, performance and fatty acid composition of broiler chickens fed wheat-soybean meal-based diets.

    PubMed

    Thacker, Philip; Widyaratne, Gemunu

    2012-10-01

    This experiment was conducted to compare the effects of graded levels of camelina meal and/or canola meal on digestibility, performance and fatty acid composition of broiler chickens. A total of 180-day-old male broiler chicks were randomly assigned to one of the six treatments. The control diet was based on wheat and soybean meal and contained 15% canola meal. The experimental diets contained 3%, 6%, 9%, 12% or 15% camelina meal added at the expense of canola meal. Chromic oxide (0.35%) was added to all diets as a digestibility marker. On the morning of day 22, birds were killed by cervical dislocation and their abdominal fat pad was obtained. The apparent total tract digestibility of dry matter and energy as well as nitrogen retention all declined linearly (p < 0.01) with increasing levels of dietary camelina meal. Weight gain (p < 0.01) and feed intake (p = 0.08) were linearly reduced as the level of camelina meal in the diet increased. Feed conversion ratio was also negatively affected by camelina meal (p < 0.01). Birds fed diets containing 15% camelina meal had significantly higher (p < 0.01) levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids, total n-3 fatty acids, total n-6 fatty acids and a significantly lower ratio of n-6 to n-3 fatty acids (p < 0.01) than birds fed canola meal. In conclusion, the inclusion of camelina meal in their diet significantly reduced the growth and feed conversion ratio of broilers compared with canola meal. However, the potential to incorporate n-3 fatty acids into carcass tissues may provide some justification for including camelina meal in poultry rations. PMID:22881197

  13. The Straw Tube Trackers of the PANDA Experiment

    E-print Network

    Gianotti, P; Pace, E; Boca, G L; Costanza, S; Genova, P; Lavezzi, L; Montanga, P; Rotondi, A; Bragadireanu, M; Vasile, M E; Pietreanu, D; Biernat, J; Jowzaee, S; Korcyl, G; Palka, M; Salabura, P; Smyrski, J; Fiutowski, T; Idzik, M; Przyborowski, D; Korcyl, K; Kulessa, P; Pysz, K; Dobbs, S; Tomaradze, A; Bettoni, D; Fioravanti, E; Garzia, I; Savrie, M; Kozlov, V; Mertens, M; Ohm, H; Orfanitski, S; Ritman, J; Serdyuk, V; Wintz, P; Spataro, S

    2013-01-01

    The PANDA experiment will be built at the FAIR facility at Darmstadt (Germany) to perform accurate tests of the strong interaction through bar pp and bar pA annihilation's studies. To track charged particles, two systems consisting of a set of planar, closed-packed, self-supporting straw tube layers are under construction. The PANDA straw tubes will have also unique characteristics in term of material budget and performance. They consist of very thin mylar-aluminized cathodes which are made self-supporting by means of the operation gas-mixture over-pressure. This solution allows to reduce at maximum the weight of the mechanical support frame and hence the detector material budget. The PANDA straw tube central tracker will not only reconstruct charged particle trajectories, but also will help in low momentum (PANDA tracking group has first tested with detailed Monte Carlo simulations, and then with experimental tests ...

  14. Enhanced malachite green removal from aqueous solution by citric acid modified rice straw

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Renmin Gong; Youbin Jin; Fayang Chen; Jian Chen; Zhili Liu

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, rice straw was thermochemically modified with citric acid (CA) as esterifying agent. Two introduced free carboxyl groups of esterified rice straw were further loaded with sodium ion to yield potentially biodegradable cationic sorbent. In order to investigate the effect of chemical modification on the cationic dye sorption of rice straw, the removal capacities of native and modified

  15. Dustiness of chopped straw as affected by lignosulfonate as a dust suppressant.

    PubMed

    Breum, N O; Nielsen, B H; Lyngbye, M; Midtgård, U

    1999-01-01

    Many sources add to the concentration of bioaerosols in livestock buildings, and source control is the number one priority for keeping a low concentration. Straw is a common but dusty bedding material in livestock buildings and the present study is focused on the dustiness of chopped straw (barley) as affected by lignosulfonate (LS) as a dust suppressant. A LS-solution was aerosolized in a spray chamber fitted to an existing bedding chopper to allow the chopped straw to adsorb the LS-solution. The dustiness of straw treated with LS was compared to non-treated straw. As storage conditions may affect dustiness, the study included treated straw kept for 4 weeks in sealed plastic bags. Dustiness of the chopped straw was measured in terms of the potential of the straw to emit bioaerosols in a rotating drum. The LS-treated straw proved low in dustiness compared to the non-treated straw. The dustiness with respect to the mass of dust was reduced by at least a factor of 6, and for fungi and endotoxin the factors of reduction were 4 and 3, respectively. Dustiness of LS-treated straw kept in plastic bags was reduced by a factor of 2 for mass of dust and by a factor of 4 for endotoxin, but dustiness for fungi was increased by a factor of 3. It is concluded that lignosulfonate has potential as a dust suppressant for chopped straw. PMID:10607994

  16. Characterizing pathways of invasive plant spread to Alaska: II. propagules from imported hay and straw

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine the extent and nature of spread of exotic plant species to and within Alaska by shipment of hay and straw we conducted a study to determine the amounts of hay and straw imported into Alaska and the amounts and types of seed contained in hay/straw. Vendors were contacted to determine the...

  17. A diploid wheat TILLING resource for wheat functional genomics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Triticum monococcum L., an A genome diploid einkorn wheat, was the first domesticated crop. As a diploid, it is attractive genetic model for the study of gene structure and function of wheat-specific traits. Diploid wheat is currently not amenable to reverse genetics approaches such as insertion mutagenesis and post-transcriptional gene silencing strategies. However, TILLING offers a powerful functional genetics approach for wheat gene analysis. Results We developed a TILLING population of 1,532 M2 families using EMS as a mutagen. A total of 67 mutants were obtained for the four genes studied. Waxy gene mutation frequencies are known to be 1/17.6 - 34.4 kb DNA in polyploid wheat TILLING populations. The T. monococcum diploid wheat TILLING population had a mutation frequency of 1/90 kb for the same gene. Lignin biosynthesis pathway genes- COMT1, HCT2, and 4CL1 had mutation frequencies of 1/86 kb, 1/92 kb and 1/100 kb, respectively. The overall mutation frequency of the diploid wheat TILLING population was 1/92 kb. Conclusion The mutation frequency of a diploid wheat TILLING population was found to be higher than that reported for other diploid grasses. The rate, however, is lower than tetraploid and hexaploid wheat TILLING populations because of the higher tolerance of polyploids to mutations. Unlike polyploid wheat, most mutants in diploid wheat have a phenotype amenable to forward and reverse genetic analysis and establish diploid wheat as an attractive model to study gene function in wheat. We estimate that a TILLING population of 5, 520 will be needed to get a non-sense mutation for every wheat gene of interest with 95% probability. PMID:23134614

  18. Drinking-Straw Microbalance and Seesaw: Stability and Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Peter; Glasser, Leslie

    2015-03-01

    The mechanics of a beam balance are little appreciated and seldom understood. We here consider the conditions that result in a stable balance, with center of gravity below the fulcrum (pivot point), while an unstable balance results when the center of gravity is above the fulcrum. The highly sensitive drinking-straw microbalance, which uses a plastic drinking straw as a rigid beam, is briefly described with some slight convenient modifications. Different placements of the center of gravity are considered analytically to explain the equilibrium neutrality, stability, and instability of such beam balances as the microbalance, the playground "seesaw" or "teeter-totter," the "dipping bird," and other toys and magic tricks.

  19. Environmentally friendly education: A passive solar, straw-bale school

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, L.; Dickinson, J.

    1999-07-01

    The Waldorf students in the Roaring Fork Valley of western Colorado are learning their reading, writing and arithmetic in the cozy confines of a solar heated, naturally lit, straw-bale school. The Waldorf education system, founded in 1919 by Austrian Rudolph Steiner, stresses what's appropriate for the kids, not what's easiest to teach. In constructing a new school, the Waldorf community wanted a building that would reflect their philosophy. There was a long list of requirements: natural, energy efficient, light, warm, alive, and earthy. Passive solar straw-bale construction brought together all those qualities.

  20. Thermal processing of black liquor from alkaline straw pulping

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, J.L.; Garcia, L.; Gea, G.; Bilbao, R.; Arauzo, J. [Univ. of Zaragoza (Spain)

    1996-12-31

    Black liquor is the wastewater from the cooking of wood or straw in the production of pulp and paper. Nowadays new processes are being investigated as alternatives to the traditional recovery boiler used for black liquor treatment. One of the processes which appears to be more promising is gasification, for which further research is needed for its full industrial implementation. There is not much data about the behavior of soda black liquors from straw cooking in the literature. Therefore the thermal decomposition of one of these liquors has been studied in a thermobalance, in inert (N{sub 2}) atmosphere. The kinetic constants from isothermal experiments have been obtained.